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  1. ELENA antiproton facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartmann, Wolfgang; Belochitskii, Pavel; Breuker, Horst; Butin, François Carli, Christian; Eriksson, Tommy; Maury, Stephen; Oelert, Walter; Pasinelli, Sergio; Tranquille, Gerard

    The following sections are included: * Motivation to build ELENA * From initial ideas to machine project * Choice of ELENA extraction energy * ELENA layout and optics * ELENA cycle * Beam extraction and main machine parameters * Beam instrumentation * ELENA transfer lines * ELENA experimental areas * Conclusion * References

  2. Deporting Elena's Father

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tempel, Melissa Bollow

    2010-01-01

    As a bilingual teacher in Milwaukee Public Schools, this author has seen many students deal with deportation. In this article, she shares a story of Elena, whose father was deported, that casts light on a growing crisis. She is using Elena as an example because this is "not" a unique story. It has many similarities to the experiences of…

  3. Deporting Elena's Father

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tempel, Melissa Bollow

    2010-01-01

    As a bilingual teacher in Milwaukee Public Schools, this author has seen many students deal with deportation. In this article, she shares a story of Elena, whose father was deported, that casts light on a growing crisis. She is using Elena as an example because this is "not" a unique story. It has many similarities to the experiences of…

  4. CERN ELENA project progress report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartmann, Wolfgang; Belochitskii, Pavel; Breuker, Horst; Butin, François; Carli, C.; Eriksson, Tommy; Oelert, Walter; Maury, Stephan; Pasinelli, Sergio; Tranquille, Gerard

    2015-05-01

    The Extra Low Energy Antiproton ring (ELENA) is a CERN project aiming at constructing a 30 m circumference synchrotron to further decelerate antiprotons from the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) from 5.3 MeV to 100 keV. The additional deceleration complemented by an electron cooler to reduce emittances will allow the existing AD experiments to increase substantially their antiproton capture efficiencies and render new experiments possible. The ELENA design is now well advanced and the project has entered the construction stage, in particular for what concerns the infrastructure. Installation of the machine components is foreseen during the second half of 2015 and beginning of 2016 followed by ring commissioning until the end of 2016. New electrostatic transfer lines to the experiments will be installed and commissioned during the first half of 2017 followed by the first physics operation with AD/ELENA end of 2017. Main ELENA related infrastructure progresses as well as the status of the project are reported.

  5. The ELENA Project at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oelert, W.

    CERN has a longstanding tradition of pursuing fundamental physics on extreme low and high energy scales. The present physics knowledge is successfully described by the Standard Model and the General Relativity. In the anti-matter regime many predictions of this established theory still remain experimentally unverified and one of the most fundamental open problems in physics concerns the question of asymmetry between particles: why is the observable and visible universe apparently composed almost entirely of matter and not of anti-matter? There is a huge interest in the very compelling scientiic case for anti-hydrogen and low energy anti-proton physics, here to name especially the Workshop on New Opportunities in the Physics Landscape at CERN which was convened in May 2009 by the CERN Directorate and culminated in the decision for the final approval of the construction of the Extra Low ENergy Antiproton (ELENA) ring by the Research Board in June 2011. ELENA is a CERN project aiming to construct a small 30 m circumference synchrotron to further decelerate anti-protons from the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) from 5.3 MeV down to 100 keV.

  6. 3. View of Santa Elena, looking from water level (Note: ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. View of Santa Elena, looking from water level (Note: The lighthouse of Del Morro is just visible in the background) - Murallas del Viejo San Juan, Baluarte de Santa Elena, San Juan, San Juan Municipio, PR

  7. Ecotourism: The Santa Elena Rainforest Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wearing, Stephen

    1993-01-01

    Describes an ecotourism project in which the community of Santa Elena, Costa Rica, are developing a rainforest reserve on government land leased permanently to the local high school. Discusses the impact of the project on the community's economy and environment. (Contains 30 references.) (MDH)

  8. Significant Silence in Elena Garro's "Los Perros"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Jessica

    2010-01-01

    Elena Garro's one-act play "Los perros" (1958) confronts the difficult issue of sexual violence in rural Mexico, a problem that persists today. The characters struggle with the social reality of rape, alluding to the threat of sexual violence while avoiding addressing it directly. While words are granted an almost magical power in…

  9. Significant Silence in Elena Garro's "Los Perros"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Jessica

    2010-01-01

    Elena Garro's one-act play "Los perros" (1958) confronts the difficult issue of sexual violence in rural Mexico, a problem that persists today. The characters struggle with the social reality of rape, alluding to the threat of sexual violence while avoiding addressing it directly. While words are granted an almost magical power in…

  10. Ecotourism: The Santa Elena Rainforest Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wearing, Stephen

    1993-01-01

    Describes an ecotourism project in which the community of Santa Elena, Costa Rica, are developing a rainforest reserve on government land leased permanently to the local high school. Discusses the impact of the project on the community's economy and environment. (Contains 30 references.) (MDH)

  11. Population identification of red-fin pargo, Parargyrops edita Tanaka, in Taiwan strait and Beibu Gulf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qiyong; Cai, Zeping; Xu, Xucai

    1985-06-01

    This paper deals with population identification of Parargyrops edita Tanaka. Samples of spawning stocks were collected from Niushan-Penghu, Minnan-Taiwan shoal (Southern Fujian-Taiwan shoal) and Beibu Gulf during the spawning period 1981 1982. Morphological characters, both meristic and morphometric, are counted and measured respectively. The stock concept and intraspecific categories have been discussed. Some meristic characters as the number of left or right ventral fin spine, right ventral fin rays and abdominal vertebrae of this fish may be constant, others as the numbers of left or right pectoral fin rays and gill-rakers may have obvious geographical variation. Morphological characters have not attained the level of subspecific distinctness, no sub-species could be found among these stocks by means of coefficient of difference (C.D.). Basing upon the comparative analysis of M diff, the authors consider that stocks of Minnan-Taiwan shoal and Niushan-Penghu belong to the same local population, Taiwan Strait local population. By means of the discriminant function analysis and linear relationship analysis, statistical differences will be found to exist in meristic characters between the stock of Minnan-Taiwan shoal and that of Niushan-Penghu, so that the two are virtually different stocks or subpopulations. The stock of Beibu Gulf belongs to another called the Beibu Gulf local population. These two local populations are of allopatric distribution and show statistically significant difference between themselves. Among these stocks, the Minnan-Taiwan shoal stock is strongly influenced by the much more complicated environmental conditions of the mixed boundary region of the subtropical Sino-Japanese Subregion in the north and the tropical Indo-Malayan Subregion in the south. Thus its coefficient of variability (C.V.) is greater than those of the other two in the mean values of various meristic characters.

  12. AD performance and its extension towards ELENA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oelert, Walter; Eriksson, Tommy; Belochitskii, Pavel; Tranquille, Gerard

    The CERN's Antiproton Decelerator (AD) is devoted to special experiments with low energy antiprotons. A main topic is the antihydrogen production with the present aim to produce these antimatter atoms with such low energy that they can be trapped in a magnetic gradient field. First very convincing results have been published recently by ALPHA. Still, it appears to be cumbersome, time consuming and ineffective when collecting the needed large numbers and high densities of antiproton clouds with the present AD. Both the effectiveness and the availability for additional experiments at this unique facility would drastically increase, if the antiproton beam of presently 5 MeV kinetic energy would be reduced by an additional decelerator to something like 100 keV. Such a facility "ELENA", as an abbreviation for Extra Low ENergy Antiproton Ring and first discussed in 1982 for LEAR, was freshly proposed with a substantial new design and revised layout and is presently under consideration. ELENA will increase the number of useful antiprotons by up to two orders of magnitude and will allow to serve up to four experiments in parallel.

  13. AD performance and its extension towards ELENA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oelert, Walter; Eriksson, Tommy; Belochitskii, Pavel; Tranquille, Gerard

    2012-12-01

    The CERN's Antiproton Decelerator (AD) is devoted to special experiments with low energy antiprotons. A main topic is the antihydrogen production with the present aim to produce these antimatter atoms with such low energy that they can be trapped in a magnetic gradient field. First very convincing results have been published recently by ALPHA. Still, it appears to be cumbersome, time consuming and ineffective when collecting the needed large numbers and high densities of antiproton clouds with the present AD. Both the effectiveness and the availability for additional experiments at this unique facility would drastically increase, if the antiproton beam of presently 5 MeV kinetic energy would be reduced by an additional decelerator to something like 100 keV. Such a facility "ELENA", as an abbreviation for Extra Low ENergy Antiproton Ring and first discussed in 1982 for LEAR, was freshly proposed with a substantial new design and revised layout and is presently under consideration. ELENA will increase the number of useful antiprotons by up to two orders of magnitude and will allow to serve up to four experiments in parallel.

  14. The AD and ELENA orbit, trajectory and intensity measurement systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marco-Hernández, R.; Alves, D.; Angoletta, M. E.; Marqversen, O.; Molendijk, J.; Oponowicz, E.; Ruffieux, R.; Sánchez-Quesada, J.; SØby, L.

    2017-07-01

    This paper describes the new Antiproton Decelerator (AD) orbit measurement system and the Extra Low ENergy Antiproton ring (ELENA) orbit, trajectory and intensity measurement system. The AD machine at European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) is presently being used to decelerate antiprotons from 3.57 GeV/c to 100 MeV/c for matter vs anti-matter comparative studies. The ELENA machine, presently under commissioning, has been designed to provide an extra deceleration stage down to 13.7 MeV/c. The AD orbit system is based on 32 horizontal and 27 vertical electrostatic Beam Position Monitor (BPM) fitted with existing low noise front-end amplifiers while the ELENA system consists of 24 \\gls{BPM}s equipped with new low-noise head amplifiers. In both systems the front-end amplifiers generate a difference (delta) and a sum (sigma) signal which are sent to the digital acquisition system, placed tens of meters away from the AD or ELENA rings, where they are digitized and further processed. The beam position is calculated by dividing the difference signal by the sum signal either using directly the raw digitized data for measuring the turn-by-turn trajectory in the ELENA system or after down-mixing the signals to baseband for the orbit measurement in both machines. The digitized sigma signal will be used in the ELENA system to calculate the bunched beam intensity and the Schottky parameters with coasting beam after passing through different signal processing chain. The digital acquisition arrangement for both systems is based on the same hardware, also used in the ELENA Low Level Radio Frequency (LLRF) system, which follows the VME Switched Serial (VXS) enhancement of the Versa Module Eurocard 64x extension (VME64x) standard and includes VITA 57 standard Field Programmable Gate Array Mezzanine Card (FMC). The digital acquisition Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) and Digital Signal Processor (DSP) firmware shares many common functionalities with the LLRF system but

  15. 77 FR 25013 - Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel MARIE ELENA; Invitation for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Maritime Administration Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel MARIE ELENA... the vessel MARIE ELENA is: Intended Commercial Use of Vessel: ``Sailboat passenger charter...

  16. Enhancement of the Gelation Properties of Surimi from Yellowtail Seabream (Parargyrops edita, Sparidae) with Chinese Oak Silkworm Pupa, Antheraea pernyi.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jialin; Fan, Daming; Zhao, Jianxin; Zhang, Hao; Huang, Jianlian; Zhou, Wenguo; Zhang, Wenhai; Chen, Wei

    2016-02-01

    In this study, the textural properties and micromechanism of yellowtail seabream (Parargyrops edita, Sparidae) surimi, with and without Chinese oak silkworm pupa homogenate (SPH), were investigated at different levels. The fresh, freeze-dried, and oven-dried SPH all showed a gel-enhancing ability in suwari (40/90 °C) and modori (67/90 °C) gels, in a concentration-dependent manner. Though the drying treatments can improve the storability of SPH, compared with fresh, the effect of the active substance was weakened. Suwari and modori gels added with 5%(w/w, whole product) fresh SPH had the increase in breaking force and deformation by 37.39% and 47.98%, and 85.14% and 78.49%, respectively, compared with the control gel (without SPH addition). The major myofibrillar protein, especially myosin heavy chain (MHC), was better retained by the addition of SPH. Compared the control group, a finer, denser, and more ordered 3-dimensional gel network microstructure was obtained, and different Df (Fractal dimension) was analyzed by using the box count method. This was found in all samples from 2.838 to 2.864 for suwari gels and 2.795 to 2.857 for modori gels, respectively. Therefore, the modori of yellowtail seabream surimi, linked with endogenous proteases, could be retarded in the presence of SPH, leading to an increase in gel strength.

  17. STS-84 M.S. Elena Kondakova suits up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    STS-84 Mission Specialist Elena V. Kondakova gives a 'thumbs up' as she dons her launch and entry suit during final prelaunch preparations in the Operations and Checkout Building. Kondakova is a cosmonaut with the Russian Space Agency. This is her second trip into space, but her first on the Space Shuttle. She spent 169 days in space as flight engineer of the 17th main mission on the Russian Space Station Mir from Oct. 4, 1994, to March 9, 1995. STS-84 aboard Atlantis will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Mir.

  18. STS-84 Post Landing - Valery Ryumin greets wife Elena Kondakova

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FL - Veteran cosmonaut Valery Ryumin greets his wife, STS-84 Mission Specialist Elena V. Kondakova, with some flowers after the Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis lands on KSC's Runway 33. STS-84 was the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. The nine-day STS-84 mission was Kondakova's second space flight, but her first on the Space Shuttle. She spent 169 days in space as flight engineer of the 17th main mission on Mir from October 1994 to March 1995. Her husband is now director of the Mir-Shuttle program for Russia.

  19. STS-84 M.S. Elena Kondakova suits up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    STS-84 Mission Specialist Elena V. Kondakova gives a 'thumbs up' as she dons her launch and entry suit during final prelaunch preparations in the Operations and Checkout Building. Kondakova is a cosmonaut with the Russian Space Agency. This is her second trip into space, but her first on the Space Shuttle. She spent 169 days in space as flight engineer of the 17th main mission on the Russian Space Station Mir from Oct. 4, 1994, to March 9, 1995. STS-84 aboard Atlantis will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Mir.

  20. STS-84 Post Landing - Valery Ryumin greets wife Elena Kondakova

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FL - Veteran cosmonaut Valery Ryumin greets his wife, STS-84 Mission Specialist Elena V. Kondakova, with some flowers after the Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis lands on KSC's Runway 33. STS-84 was the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. The nine-day STS-84 mission was Kondakova's second space flight, but her first on the Space Shuttle. She spent 169 days in space as flight engineer of the 17th main mission on Mir from October 1994 to March 1995. Her husband is now director of the Mir-Shuttle program for Russia.

  1. Elena: A case of dissociative identity disorder from the 1920s.

    PubMed

    Schimmenti, Adriano

    2017-01-01

    In 1930, Italian psychiatrist Giovanni Enrico Morselli described the history, diagnosis, and treatment of his patient Elena. The case of Elena has been considered in literature as one of the most remarkable cases of multiple personality ever published. In fact, before treatment, Elena showed alternating French- and Italian-speaking personalities, with the Italian personality knowing nothing of her French counterparts. After a difficult treatment involving recovered memories of incestuous attacks by her father, which were proven to be true, Elena fully recovered from her symptoms. In this article, the author presents details of the case that were not available in the international literature before. He also discusses Elena's psychological and somatoform symptoms according to a contemporary perspective on the relationally traumatic origins of dissociation and dissociative identity disorder.

  2. STS-84 Mission Specialist Elena V. Kondakova in white room

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-84 Mission Specialist Elena V. Kondakova prepares to enter the Space Shuttle Atlantis at Launch Pad 39A with help from white room closeout crew members. The fourth Shuttle mission of 1997 will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. The commander is Charles J. Precourt. The pilot is Eileen Marie Collins. The five mission specialists are C. Michael Foale, Carlos I. Noriega, Edward Tsang Lu, Jean-Francois Clervoy of the European Space Agency and Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency. The planned nine-day mission will include the exchange of Foale for U.S. astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger, who has been on Mir since Jan. 15. Linenger transferred to Mir during the last docking mission, STS-81; he will return to Earth on Atlantis. Foale is slated to remain on Mir for about four months until he is replaced in September by STS-86 Mission Specialist Wendy B. Lawrence. During the five days Atlantis is scheduled to be docked with the Mir, the STS-84 crew and the Mir 23 crew, including two Russian cosmonauts, Commander Vasily Tsibliev and Flight Engineer Alexander Lazutkin, will participate in joint experiments. The STS-84 mission also will involve the transfer of more than 7,300 pounds of water, logistics and science equipment to and from the Mir. Atlantis is carrying a nearly 300-pound oxygen generator to replace one of two Mir units which have experienced malfunctions. The oxygen it generates is used for breathing by the Mir crew.

  3. STS-84 Mission Specialist Elena V. Kondakova in white room

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-84 Mission Specialist Elena V. Kondakova prepares to enter the Space Shuttle Atlantis at Launch Pad 39A with help from white room closeout crew members. The fourth Shuttle mission of 1997 will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. The commander is Charles J. Precourt. The pilot is Eileen Marie Collins. The five mission specialists are C. Michael Foale, Carlos I. Noriega, Edward Tsang Lu, Jean-Francois Clervoy of the European Space Agency and Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency. The planned nine-day mission will include the exchange of Foale for U.S. astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger, who has been on Mir since Jan. 15. Linenger transferred to Mir during the last docking mission, STS-81; he will return to Earth on Atlantis. Foale is slated to remain on Mir for about four months until he is replaced in September by STS-86 Mission Specialist Wendy B. Lawrence. During the five days Atlantis is scheduled to be docked with the Mir, the STS-84 crew and the Mir 23 crew, including two Russian cosmonauts, Commander Vasily Tsibliev and Flight Engineer Alexander Lazutkin, will participate in joint experiments. The STS-84 mission also will involve the transfer of more than 7,300 pounds of water, logistics and science equipment to and from the Mir. Atlantis is carrying a nearly 300-pound oxygen generator to replace one of two Mir units which have experienced malfunctions. The oxygen it generates is used for breathing by the Mir crew.

  4. Elena Guardincerri: Tracking muons to reduce nuclear threats and help preserve architectural treasures

    SciTech Connect

    Del Mauro, Diana; Guardincerri, Elena

    2016-02-29

    When Elena Guardincerri was a physics PhD student at the University of Genova, she considered muons a nuisance. She built muon detectors to snare these secondary cosmic rays, which were interfering with her experiments to study elusive neutrinos.

  5. The future of the cern ad infrastructures in the context of elena machine design and integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartmann, W.; Belochitskii, P.; Butin, F.; Carli, C.; Choisnet, O.; Eriksson, T.; Kersevan, R.; Maridor, S.; Maury, S.; Tranquille, G.

    2014-06-01

    ELENA will lower the energy of AD antiprotons from 5MeV to 100keV, thus increasing by a factor of up to 100 the number of antiprotons usable by the experiments (Oelert et al. 2014). The AD infrastructures must be adapted to cope with another 20 years of low energy antiproton physics. To fit the ELENA ring in the already crowded AD hall, old kicker generators must be relocated to a new technical building, existing and new services and racks must be re-arranged also at height, preserving access and maintenance capabilities. The ELENA beam will be delivered to existing experiments via new transfer lines without compromising the possibility to maintain a visitors path to this very popular place at CERN.

  6. The BepiColombo Serena/ELENA instrument: performances and testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orsini, Stefano; De Angelis, Elisabetta; Selci, Stefano; Di Lellis, Andrea; Leoni, Roberto; Rispoli, Rosanna; Colasanti, Luca; Vertolli, Nello; Mura, Alessandro; Milillo, Anna; D'Alessandro, Marco; Mattioli, Francesco; Maschietti, Daniele; Brienza, Daniele; Scheer, Juergen; Wurz, Peter

    2013-04-01

    The neutral sensor ELENA (Emitted Low-Energy Neutral Atoms) for the ESA cornerstone BepiColombo mission to Mercury (in the SERENA instrument package) is a new kind of low energetic neutral atoms instrument, mostly devoted to sputtering emission from planetary surfaces, from E ~20 eV up to E~5 keV, within 1-D (4.5°x76°). ELENA is a Time of Flight instrument, based on the novel concept of ultra-sonic oscillating shutter as Start section and MCP detector with 32 discrete anodes as a direct Stop section. ELENA will monitor the emission of neutral atoms from the whole surface of Mercury allowing to investigate the interaction between the environment and the planet, the global particle loss-rate and the remote sensing of the surface properties. In particular, surface release processes are investigated by identifying particles release from the surface via solar wind-induced ion sputtering (<1eV - >100 eV) as well as Hydrogen back-scattered at hundreds eV. The results of ELENA performance test, will be presented: the innovative Shutter system (Start section) operating at requested frequencies (around 43kHz), the ion rejection capability of double deflection system, the Stop detector, the electronic boards, the validation test.

  7. The BepiColombo SERENA/ELENA sensor. Approaching final delivery: sensor description and recent results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orsini, S.; Selci, S.; Di Lellis, A. M.; Mura, A.; De Angelis, E.; Milillo, A.; Leoni, R.; Dandouras, I.; Scheer, J.; Wurz, P.

    2012-04-01

    The neutral sensor ELENA (Emitted Low-Energy Neutral Atoms) for the ESA cornerstone BepiColombo mission to Mercury (in the SERENA instrument package) is a new kind of low energetic neutral atoms instrument, mostly devoted to sputtering emission from planetary surfaces, from E ~20 eV up to E~5 keV, within 1-D (4.5°x76°). ELENA is a Time-of-Flight (TOF) system, based on oscillating shutter (operated at frequencies up to 50 kHz) and mechanical gratings: the incoming neutral particles directly impinge upon the entrance with a definite timing (START) and arrive to a STOP detector after a flight path. In this way the low-energy neutral particles are directly detected, without using elements of interaction. The new results of the development of the BepiColombo SERENA/ELENA instrument are presented in the frame of the scientific items (instrument simulations, laboratory testing, etc.). In particular, the actual status of the ELENA TOF sections (shuttering system and MCPs) are reported in the light of recent testing results. The sensor performances are investigated, as well as their capability to accomplish the scientific requirements (new deflector system, shuttering functionality test, MCP efficiency, piezo driver and proximity boards, etc.).

  8. ELENA MCP detector: absolute detection efficiency for low-energy neutral atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rispoli, R.; De Angelis, E.; Colasanti, L.; Vertolli, N.; Orsini, S.; Scheer, J. A.; Mura, A.; Milillo, A.; Wurz, P.; Selci, S.; Di Lellis, A. M.; Leoni, R.; D'Alessandro, M.; Mattioli, F.; Cibella, S.

    2012-09-01

    Microchannel Plates (MCP) detectors are frequently used in space instrumentation for detecting a wide range of radiation and particles. In particular, the capability to detect non-thermal low energy neutral species is crucial for the sensor ELENA (Emitted Low-Energy Neutral Atoms), part of the package SERENA (Search for Exospheric Refilling and Emitted Natural Abundances) on board the BepiColombo mission of ESA to Mercury to be launched in 2015. ELENA is a Time of Flight (TOF) sensor, based on a novel concept using an ultra-sonic oscillating shutter (Start section), which is operated at frequencies up to 50 kHz; a MCP detector is used as a Stop detector. The scientific objective of ELENA is to detect energetic neutral atoms in the range 10 eV - 5 keV, within 76° FOV, perpendicular to the S/C orbital plane. ELENA will monitor the emission of neutral atoms from the whole surface of Mercury thanks to the spacecraft motion. The major scientific objectives are the interaction between the plasma environment and the planet’s surface, the global particle loss-rate and the remote sensing of the surface properties. In particular, surface release processes are investigated by identifying particles released from the surface, via solar wind-induced ion sputtering (< 1eV - < 100 eV) as well as Hydrogen back-scattered at hundreds eV. MCP absolute detection efficiency for very low energy neutral atoms (E < 30 eV) is a crucial point for this investigation. At the MEFISTO facility of the Physical Institute of the University of Bern (CH), measurements on three different types of MCP (with and without coating) have been performed providing the detection efficiencies in the energy range 10eV - 1keV. Outcomes from such measurements are discussed here.

  9. ELENA: the extra low energy anti-proton facility at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maury, Stephan; Oelert, Walter; Bartmann, Wolfgang; Belochitskii, Pavel; Breuker, Horst; Butin, Francois; Carli, Christian; Eriksson, Tommy; Pasinelli, Sergio; Tranquille, Gerard

    2014-04-01

    At the last LEAP conference in Vancouver 2011 the authors stated that a project "ELENA", as an abbreviation for Extra Low ENergy Antiproton ring and as first discussed in 1982 for LEAR by H. Herr et al., was freshly proposed with a substantial new design and revised layout and that it was under consideration to be built at CERN. ELENA is an upgrade of the Anti-proton Decelerator (AD) at CERN and is devoted to special experiments with physics using low energy anti-protons. The main topics are the anti-hydrogen production and consecutive studies of the features of this anti-matter atom as well as the anti-proton nucleon interaction by testing the QED to high precision. During the last years the project underwent several steps in presentations at different committees at CERN and was finally approved such that the construction has started. ELENA will increase the number of useful anti-protons by about two orders of magnitude and will allow to serve up to four experiments simultaneously. Very first and convincing results from the experiments at the AD have been published recently. For high precision physics, however, it appears to be cumbersome, time consuming and ineffective when collecting the needed large numbers and high densities of anti-proton clouds with the present AD. Both the effectiveness and the availability for additional experiments at this unique facility will drastically increase, when the anti-proton beam of presently 5 MeV kinetic energy is reduced by the additional decelerator ELENA to 100 keV.

  10. BepiColombo Serena/ELENA instrument:development and testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orsini, S.; De Angelis, E.; Selci, S.; Di Lellis, A. M.:; Leoni, R.; Rispoli, R.; Colasanti, L.; Vertolli, N.; Scheer, J.; Mura, A.; Milillo, A.; Wurz, P.; D'Alessandro, M.; Maschietti, D.; Mattioli, F.; Cibella, S.; Brienza, D.; lo Spazio, Compagnia Generale per

    2012-04-01

    ELENA is a TOF sensor, based on a novel concept ultra-sonic oscillating shutter (Start section) which is operated at frequencies up to 50 kHz; a MCP detector is used as a Stop section. It is aimed to detect neutral atoms in the range 10 eV - 5 keV, within 70° FOV, perpendicular to the S/C orbital plane. ELENA will monitor the emission of neutral atoms from the whole surface of Mercury thanks to the spacecraft motion. The major scientific objectives are the interaction between the environment and the planet, the global particle loss-rate and the remote sensing of the surface properties. In particular, surface release processes are investigated by identifying particles release from the surface, via solar wind-induced ion sputtering (<1eV - >100 eV) as well as Hydrogen back-scattered at hundreds eV. In particular, the capability to detect non-thermal low energy neutral species is crucial for the sensor ELENA (Emitted Low-Energy Neutral Atoms), part of the package SERENA (Search for Exospheric Refilling and Emitted Natural Abundances) on board the BepiColombo mission to Mercury to be launched in 2014. The instrument is now validated and tested to reach its performances: the up-graded shutter system (Start section) has been operated for the first time with neutral atom beam and tested at high frequency, the Stop section has been calibrated investigating the region of very low energy detection efficiency, the electronics boards and the entire acquisition chain has been appointed and tested with ion beam. The first results of all the ELENA capability will be presented.

  11. ELENA MCP detector: absolute efficiency measurement for low energy neutral atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rispoli, R.; De Angelis, E.; Colasanti, L.; Vertolli, N.; Orsini, S.; Scheer, J.; Mura, A.; Milillo, A.; Wurz, P.; Selci, S.; Di Lellis, A. M.; Leoni, R.; D'Alessandro, M.; Mattioli, F.; Cibella, S.

    2012-04-01

    MicroChannel plates (MCP) detectors are frequently used in space instrumentation for detecting a wide range of radiation and particles. In particular, the capability to detect non-thermal low energy neutral species is crucial for the sensor ELENA (Emitted Low-Energy Neutral Atoms), part of the package SERENA (Search for Exospheric Refilling and Emitted Natural Abundances) on board the BepiColombo mission to Mercury to be launched in 2014. ELENA is a TOF sensor, based on a novel concept ultra-sonic oscillating shutter (Start section)which is operated at frequencies up to 50 kHz; a MCP detector is used as a Stop section. It is aimed to detect neutral atoms in the range 10 eV - 5 keV, within 70° FOV, perpendicular to the S/C orbital plane. ELENA will monitor the emission of neutral atoms from the whole surface of Mercury thanks to the spacecraft motion. The major scientific objectives are the interaction between the environment and the planet, the global particle loss-rate and the remote sensing of the surface properties. In particular, surface release processes are investigated by identifying particles release from the surface, via solar wind-induced ion sputtering (<1eV and >100 eV) as well as Hydrogen back-scattered at hundreds eV. MCP absolute detection efficiency for very low energy neutral atoms (E< 30eV) is a crucial point not yet investigated. At the MEFISTO facility of the Physical Institute of University of Bern (CH), measurements on three different type of MCPs coating have been performed providing the behaviors of MCP detection efficiency in the range 10eV-1keV. Outcomes from such measurements are here discussed.

  12. [Elena de Cespedes: The eventful life of a XVI century surgeon].

    PubMed

    Carrillo Esper, Raúl; Carrillo Córdova, Jorge Raúl; Carrillo Córdova, Luis Daniel; Carrillo Córdova, Dulce María; Carrillo Córdova, Carlos Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Throughout the history of surgery there have been exceptional cases of surgeons around the world. One of them is Elena/o of Cespedes. Born as a girl, this hermaphrodite dedicated all his life to acting as a man, doing jobs that were only for men such as a soldier, peasant, and surgeon. She was the first licensed surgeon in Spain and maybe in all Europe. She married a woman and then was tried for sodomy by the Spanish Inquisition commanded by inquisitor Lope de Mendoza. She was founded guilty and punished with 200 lashes and a 10-year service at a hospital, dressed as a woman.

  13. New findings of Pleistocene fossil turtles (Geoemydidae, Kinosternidae and Chelydridae) from Santa Elena Province, Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    Abella, Juan; Gregori, Maria D.

    2017-01-01

    New Pleistocene fossilized turtle remains from five localities of western Ecuador (Santa Elena Province) are described here. All these shell (carapace and plastron) fossil remains come from the Tablazo Formation and belong to three different lineages of cryptodires (“hidden-necked” turtles). The most abundant remains belong to geoemydids, attributed here to the genus Rhinoclemmys (indeterminate species). Less abundant in occurrence are the kinosternidids, attributed to Kinosternon (indeterminate species), and the first fossil record of chelydrids, Chelydra(indeterminate species), in the entirety of Central and South America. PMID:28439472

  14. New findings of Pleistocene fossil turtles (Geoemydidae, Kinosternidae and Chelydridae) from Santa Elena Province, Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Cadena, Edwin A; Abella, Juan; Gregori, Maria D

    2017-01-01

    New Pleistocene fossilized turtle remains from five localities of western Ecuador (Santa Elena Province) are described here. All these shell (carapace and plastron) fossil remains come from the Tablazo Formation and belong to three different lineages of cryptodires ("hidden-necked" turtles). The most abundant remains belong to geoemydids, attributed here to the genus Rhinoclemmys (indeterminate species). Less abundant in occurrence are the kinosternidids, attributed to Kinosternon (indeterminate species), and the first fossil record of chelydrids, Chelydra(indeterminate species), in the entirety of Central and South America.

  15. Hurricane Elena and Pinellas County, Florida: Some Lessons Learned from the Largest Evacuation of Nursing Home Patients in History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangum, Wiley P.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Studied prior planning for and problems associated with evacuation of 1,860 nursing home patients in Pinellas County, Florida, due to Hurricane Elena in 1985 through questionnaires administered to nursing home administrators and public documents. Found most serious problems to be transporting patients to shelters in timely fashion, delayed passage…

  16. Hurricane Elena and Pinellas County, Florida: Some Lessons Learned from the Largest Evacuation of Nursing Home Patients in History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangum, Wiley P.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Studied prior planning for and problems associated with evacuation of 1,860 nursing home patients in Pinellas County, Florida, due to Hurricane Elena in 1985 through questionnaires administered to nursing home administrators and public documents. Found most serious problems to be transporting patients to shelters in timely fashion, delayed passage…

  17. STS-84 M.S. Elena Kondakova at TCDT Press Briefing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    STS-84 Mission Specialist Elena V. Kondakova, a cosmonaut with the Russian Space Agency, talks to news media representatives and other onlookers during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities at Launch Pad 39A. Kondakova will be one of seven crew members on the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Another of the crew members, C. Michael Foale, will transfer to the space station and become a member of the Mir 23 crew, replacing U.S. astronaut Jerry M. Linenger, who will return to Earth aboard Atlantis. Foale will live and work on Mir until mid-September when his replacement is expected to arrive on the STS-86 mission. Kondakova previously lived on the Russian space station as the flight engineer of the 17th main mission on Mir from Oct. 4, 1994, to March 9, 1995. STS-84 is targeted for a May 15 liftoff.

  18. STS-84 M.S. Elena Kondakova on M-113 carrier at TCDT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    STS-84 Mission Specialist Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency rides in an M-113 armored personnel carrier as part of the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. Her nickname on this mission is Betty Sue. STS-84 aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. After docking, STS-84 Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale will transfer to the space station and become a member of the Mir 23 crew, replacing U.S. astronaut Jerry M. Linenger, who will return to Earth aboard Atlantis. Foale will live and work on Mir until mid-September when his replacement is expected to arrive on the STS-86 mission. STS-84 is targeted for a May 15 liftoff.

  19. STS-84 M.S. Elena Kondakova on M-113 carrier at TCDT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    STS-84 Mission Specialist Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency rides in an M-113 armored personnel carrier as part of the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. Her nickname on this mission is Betty Sue. STS-84 aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. After docking, STS-84 Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale will transfer to the space station and become a member of the Mir 23 crew, replacing U.S. astronaut Jerry M. Linenger, who will return to Earth aboard Atlantis. Foale will live and work on Mir until mid-September when his replacement is expected to arrive on the STS-86 mission. STS-84 is targeted for a May 15 liftoff.

  20. STS-84 M.S. Elena Kondakova at TCDT Press Briefing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    STS-84 Mission Specialist Elena V. Kondakova, a cosmonaut with the Russian Space Agency, talks to news media representatives and other onlookers during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities at Launch Pad 39A. Kondakova will be one of seven crew members on the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Another of the crew members, C. Michael Foale, will transfer to the space station and become a member of the Mir 23 crew, replacing U.S. astronaut Jerry M. Linenger, who will return to Earth aboard Atlantis. Foale will live and work on Mir until mid-September when his replacement is expected to arrive on the STS-86 mission. Kondakova previously lived on the Russian space station as the flight engineer of the 17th main mission on Mir from Oct. 4, 1994, to March 9, 1995. STS-84 is targeted for a May 15 liftoff.

  1. Geology of the Santa Elena Peninsula, Costa Rica and its implications for the tectonic evolution of the Central America-Caribbean region

    SciTech Connect

    Lew, L.R.

    1985-01-01

    The Santa Elena Peninsula of Costa Rice represents an Aptian to Middle Eocene intraoceanic volcanic arc formed on a basement of serpentinized periodotite. This peridotite was probably part of the oceanic lithosphere formed at a spreading ridge which began to separate South America from North America in pre-Jurassic time. The arc resulted from northward subduction of oceanic crust along one ENE-trending trench about 70 km south of Santa Elena. The first phase of tectonism, arc volcanism, and sedimentation occurred in the area from Aptian to Campanian time. Carbonate bank limestone were deposited on the peridotite, which had been tilted and uplifted along E-W-trending high angle faults. A second volcanic arc developed above the limestone and was active until the Middle Eocene. From the Campanian to the Middle Eocene a forearc basin evolved south of the arc and a backarc basin north of it. A major Middle Eocene tectonic episode was associated with termination of activity of the Santa Elena subduction zone. This involved both thin-skinned deformation and reactivation of the steep basement faults to juxtapose peridotite and Campanian to Middle Eocene sediments. Existing models of the early plate tectonic evolution of the region, postulating initiation of spreading in the Jurassic, and development of a major transform in the Santa Elena area in the Cretaceous, are incompatible with the geology of the Santa Elena area. New models have been formulated genetically relating the structures in the Santa Elena tectonic province to northward subduction.

  2. Simulation studies of the beam cooling process in presence of heating effects in the Extra Low ENergy Antiproton ring (ELENA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resta-López, J.; Hunt, J. R.; Karamyshev, O.; Welsch, C. P.

    2015-05-01

    The Extra Low ENergy Antiproton ring (ELENA) is a small synchrotron equipped with an electron cooler, which is currently being constructed at CERN to further decelerate antiprotons from the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) from 5.3 MeV to energies as low as 100 keV. At such low energies it is very important to carefully take contributions from electron cooling and beam heating mechanisms (e.g. on the residual gas and intrabeam scattering) into account. Detailed investigations into the ion kinetics under consideration of effects from electron cooling and heating sources have been carried out, and the equilibrium phase space dimensions of the beam have been computed, based on numerical simulations using the code BETACOOL. The goal is to provide a consistent explanation of the different physical effects acting on the beam in ELENA.

  3. DESIGN AND SHIELDING OF A BEAM LINE FROM ELENA TO ATRAP USING ELECTROSTATIC QUADRUPOLE LENSES AND BENDS

    SciTech Connect

    Yuri, Yosuke; Lee, Edward P.

    2010-09-01

    The construction of the Extra Low ENergy Antiprotons (ELENA) upgrade to the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) ring has been proposed at CERN to produce a greatly increased current of low-energy antiprotons for various experiments including anti-hydrogen studies. This upgrade involves the addition of a small storage ring and electrostatic beam lines. The 5.3-MeV antiproton beams from AD are decelerated down to 100 keV in the compact ring and transported to each experimental apparatus. In this paper, we describe an electrostatic beam line from the ELENA ring to the ATRAP experimental apparatus and magnetic shielding of the low-energy beam line against the ATRAP superconducting solenoid magnet. A possible rough conceptual design of this system is displayed.

  4. A melt-focusing zone in the lithospheric mantle preserved in the Santa Elena Ophiolite, Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madrigal, Pilar; Gazel, Esteban; Denyer, Percy; Smith, Ian; Jicha, Brian; Flores, Kennet E.; Coleman, Drew; Snow, Jonathan

    2015-08-01

    The Santa Elena Ophiolite in Costa Rica is composed of a well-preserved fragment of the lithospheric mantle that formed along a paleo-spreading center. Within its exposed architecture, this ophiolite records a deep section of the melt transport system of a slow/ultra-slow spreading environment, featuring a well-developed melt-focusing system of coalescent diabase dikes that intrude the peridotite in a sub-vertical and sub-parallel arrangement. Here we present an integrated analysis of new structural data, 40Ar/39Ar geochronology, major and trace element geochemistry and radiogenic isotope data from the diabase dikes in order to elucidate the tectonic setting of the Santa Elena Ophiolite. The dikes are basaltic and tholeiitic in composition. Petrological models of fractional crystallization suggest deep pressures of crystallization of > 0.4 GPa for most of the samples, which is in good agreement with similar calculations from slow/ultra-slow spreading ridges and require a relatively hydrated ( 0.5 wt.% H2O) MORB-like source composition. The diabase dikes share geochemical and isotope signatures with both slow/ultra-slow spreading ridges and back-arc basins and indicate mixing of a DMM source and an enriched mantle end-member like EMII. The 40Ar/39Ar geochronology yielded an age of 131 Ma for a previous pegmatitic gabbroic magmatic event that intruded the peridotite when it was hot and plastic and an age of 121 Ma for the diabase intrusions, constraining the cooling from near asthenospheric conditions to lithospheric mantle conditions to 10 Ma. Our findings suggest a complex interplay between oceanic basin and back-arc extension environments during the Santa Elena Ophiolite formation. We propose an alternative hypothesis for the origin of Santa Elena as an obducted fragment of an oceanic core complex (OCC).

  5. Origin of plagiogranites in oceanic complexes: A case study of the Nicoya and Santa Elena terranes, Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whattam, Scott A.; Gazel, Esteban; Yi, Keewook; Denyer, Percy

    2016-10-01

    The origin of minor leucocratic intrusions known as ;plagiogranites; in oceanic complexes dominated by basaltic compositions have been debated in the literature. Here we use well preserved plagiogranites within the contrasting Santa Elena Ophiolite and the Nicoya Complex, NW Costa Rica, to investigate the origin and age of these leucocratic intrusions. Magmatic zircons of plagiogranites of the Santa Elena ophiolite and the Nicoya Complex, yield weighted mean SHRIMP 206Pb/238U ages of 125.3 ± 2.0 Ma and 90.9 ± 2.0 Ma to 88.5 ± 2.0 Ma (n = 5), respectively. These ages record the main magmatic phases of formation of these intrusions preserved in each complex. Relatively flat, unfractionated chondrite-normalized REE patterns of plagiogranites from both complexes mimic signatures of related mafic rocks, which is consistent with formation via fractional crystallization from a mafic source as opposed to partial melting of a mafic (basalt, amphibolite) protolith. In the case of the Nicoya Complex, modelling suggests that the Nicoya plagiogranites are consistent as 10-15% residual liquids after fractional crystallization from its mafic parental source. Trace element systematics of the plagiogranites are consistent with an oceanic arc origin for Santa Elena and a mostly mid-ocean ridge to oceanic-plateau origin for Nicoya.

  6. STS-84 M.S. Michael Foale and Elena Kondakova at TCDT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    STS-84 Mission Specialists C. Michael Foale, at left, and Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency find a moment to communicate one-on-one -- perhaps about upcoming and past experiences living on the Russian Space Station Mir? -- during a busy training session at Launch Pad 39A. They and the other five crew members are participating in the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT), a dress rehearsal for launch. STS-84 aboard Atlantis will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Mir. Kondakova spent 169 days in space as the cosmonaut flight engineer of the 17th main mission to Mir from Oct. 4, 1994 to March 9, 1995. After Atlantis docks with Mir on STS-84, Foale will transfer to the space station and become a member of the Mir 23 crew, replacing U.S. astronaut Jerry M. Linenger, who will return to Earth aboard Atlantis. Foale will live and work on Mir until mid-September when his replacement is expected to arrive on the STS-86 mission. STS-84 is targeted for a May 15 liftoff.

  7. STS-84 M.S. Michael Foale and Elena Kondakova at TCDT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    STS-84 Mission Specialists C. Michael Foale, at left, and Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency find a moment to communicate one-on-one -- perhaps about upcoming and past experiences living on the Russian Space Station Mir? -- during a busy training session at Launch Pad 39A. They and the other five crew members are participating in the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT), a dress rehearsal for launch. STS-84 aboard Atlantis will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Mir. Kondakova spent 169 days in space as the cosmonaut flight engineer of the 17th main mission to Mir from Oct. 4, 1994 to March 9, 1995. After Atlantis docks with Mir on STS-84, Foale will transfer to the space station and become a member of the Mir 23 crew, replacing U.S. astronaut Jerry M. Linenger, who will return to Earth aboard Atlantis. Foale will live and work on Mir until mid-September when his replacement is expected to arrive on the STS-86 mission. STS-84 is targeted for a May 15 liftoff.

  8. [Implementation of a French cohort of children or adolescents with autism spectrum disorders: ELENA cohort].

    PubMed

    Baghdadli, A; Loubersac, J; Soussana, M; Rattaz, C; Michelon, C

    2014-10-01

    Multidisciplinary cohort studies of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) followed from childhood to adulthood exist abroad but not in France. The objective of the ELENA French cohort is to study the developmental trajectories of children and adolescents with ASD and their risk or protective associated factors. This is an open, prospective and multicenter cohort study, including children and adolescents under 16 years of age with ASD recruited from services specialized in the assessment of developmental disorders. The patients will be monitored every 18 months for at least 36 months and during a maximum of 10 years. Clinical, social, environmental, and genetic data, as well as data relating to the parental quality of life will be collected. The primary endpoint will be the adaptive level in three domains of the Vineland II (communication, socialization and daily living skills). The secondary endpoints will be parental quality of life, comorbidities, interventions and severity of ASD. The inclusion of 1600 patients over a 10-year period is expected. This cohort should contribute to a better knowledge of the child developing an ASD, taking into account the physical, social and familial environment, the type of interventions and some genetic components. It should also lay the foundations for a national network of professionals working in the field of autism research by offering them a common tool for promoting translational studies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. The Regina Elena National Cancer Institute process of accreditation according to the standards of the Organisation of European Cancer Institutes.

    PubMed

    Canitano, Stefano; Di Turi, Annunziata; Caolo, Giuseppina; Pignatelli, Adriana C; Papa, Elena; Branca, Marta; Cerimele, Marina; De Maria, Ruggero

    2015-01-01

    The accreditation process is, on the one hand, a tool used to homogenize procedures, rendering comparable and standardized processes of care, and on the other, a methodology employed to develop a culture of quality improvement. Although not yet proven by evidence-based studies that health outcomes improve as a result of an accreditation to excellence, it is undeniable that better control of healthcare processes results in better quality and safety of diagnostic and therapeutic pathways. The Regina Elena National Cancer Institute underwent the accreditation process in accordance with the standards criteria set by the Organisation of European Cancer Institutes (OECI), and it has recently completed the process, acquiring its designation as a Comprehensive Cancer Center (CCC). This was an invaluable opportunity for the Regina Elena Institute to create a more cohesive environment, to widely establish a culture of quality, to implement an institutional information system, and to accelerate the process of patient involvement in strategic decisions. The steps of the process allowed us to evaluate the performance and the organization of the institute and put amendments in place designed to be adopted through 26 improvement actions. These actions regarded several aspects of the institute, including quality culture, information communication technology system, care, clinical trials unit, disease management team, nursing, and patient empowerment and involvement. Each area has a timeline. We chose to present the following 3 improvement actions: clinical trial center, computerized ambulatory medical record, and centrality of patient and humanization of clinical pathway.

  10. Methane Dynamics in a Tropical Serpentinizing Environment: The Santa Elena Ophiolite, Costa Rica

    PubMed Central

    Crespo-Medina, Melitza; Twing, Katrina I.; Sánchez-Murillo, Ricardo; Brazelton, William J.; McCollom, Thomas M.; Schrenk, Matthew O.

    2017-01-01

    Uplifted ultramafic rocks represent an important vector for the transfer of carbon and reducing power from the deep subsurface into the biosphere and potentially support microbial life through serpentinization. This process has a strong influence upon the production of hydrogen and methane, which can be subsequently consumed by microbial communities. The Santa Elena Ophiolite (SEO) on the northwestern Pacific coast of Costa Rica comprises ~250 km2 of ultramafic rocks and mafic associations. The climatic conditions, consisting of strongly contrasting wet and dry seasons, make the SEO a unique hydrogeological setting, where water-rock reactions are enhanced by large storm events (up to 200 mm in a single storm). Previous work on hyperalkaline spring fluids collected within the SEO has identified the presence of microorganisms potentially involved in hydrogen, methane, and methanol oxidation (such as Hydrogenophaga, Methylobacterium, and Methylibium spp., respectively), as well as the presence of methanogenic Archaea (such as Methanobacterium). Similar organisms have also been documented at other serpentinizing sites, however their functions have not been confirmed. SEO's hyperalkaline springs have elevated methane concentrations, ranging from 145 to 900 μM, in comparison to the background concentrations (<0.3 μM). The presence and potential activity of microorganisms involved in methane cycling in serpentinization-influenced fluids from different sites within the SEO were investigated using molecular, geochemical, and modeling approaches. These results were combined to elucidate the bioenergetically favorable methane production and/or oxidation reactions in this tropical serpentinizing environment. The hyperalkaline springs at SEO contain a greater proportion of Archaea and methanogens than has been detected in any terrestrial serpentinizing system. Archaea involved in methanogenesis and anaerobic methane oxidation accounted from 40 to 90% of total archaeal

  11. Methane Dynamics in a Tropical Serpentinizing Environment: The Santa Elena Ophiolite, Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Crespo-Medina, Melitza; Twing, Katrina I; Sánchez-Murillo, Ricardo; Brazelton, William J; McCollom, Thomas M; Schrenk, Matthew O

    2017-01-01

    Uplifted ultramafic rocks represent an important vector for the transfer of carbon and reducing power from the deep subsurface into the biosphere and potentially support microbial life through serpentinization. This process has a strong influence upon the production of hydrogen and methane, which can be subsequently consumed by microbial communities. The Santa Elena Ophiolite (SEO) on the northwestern Pacific coast of Costa Rica comprises ~250 km(2) of ultramafic rocks and mafic associations. The climatic conditions, consisting of strongly contrasting wet and dry seasons, make the SEO a unique hydrogeological setting, where water-rock reactions are enhanced by large storm events (up to 200 mm in a single storm). Previous work on hyperalkaline spring fluids collected within the SEO has identified the presence of microorganisms potentially involved in hydrogen, methane, and methanol oxidation (such as Hydrogenophaga, Methylobacterium, and Methylibium spp., respectively), as well as the presence of methanogenic Archaea (such as Methanobacterium). Similar organisms have also been documented at other serpentinizing sites, however their functions have not been confirmed. SEO's hyperalkaline springs have elevated methane concentrations, ranging from 145 to 900 μM, in comparison to the background concentrations (<0.3 μM). The presence and potential activity of microorganisms involved in methane cycling in serpentinization-influenced fluids from different sites within the SEO were investigated using molecular, geochemical, and modeling approaches. These results were combined to elucidate the bioenergetically favorable methane production and/or oxidation reactions in this tropical serpentinizing environment. The hyperalkaline springs at SEO contain a greater proportion of Archaea and methanogens than has been detected in any terrestrial serpentinizing system. Archaea involved in methanogenesis and anaerobic methane oxidation accounted from 40 to 90% of total archaeal

  12. Geochemical evidence for active tropical serpentinization in the Santa Elena Ophiolite, Costa Rica: An analog of a humid early Earth?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Murillo, Ricardo; Gazel, Esteban; Schwarzenbach, Esther M.; Crespo-Medina, Melitza; Schrenk, Matthew O.; Boll, Jan; Gill, Ben C.

    2014-05-01

    Serpentinization is a planetary process that has important consequences on geochemical cycles, supporting microbial activity through the formation of H2 and CH4 and having the potential to sequester atmospheric CO2. We present geochemical evidence of active serpentinization in the Santa Elena Ophiolite, Costa Rica which is sustained by peridotites with a degree of serpentinization less than 50% with no evidence of an internal heat source. Average spring water temperatures are 29.1°C. Two hyperalkaline spring systems were discovered, with a spring fluid pH up to 11.18. The fluids are characterized by low Mg (1.0-5.9 mg/L) and K (1.0-5.5 mg/L) and relative high Ca (29-167 mg/L), Na (16-27 mg/L), Cl (26-29 mg/L), hydroxide (41-63 mg/L), and carbonate (31-49 mg/L). Active CH4 (24.3% v/v) vents coupled with carbonate deposits (δ13CCO2 =-27 to -14‰; δ18OCO2 =-17 to - 6‰) also provide evidence for active serpentinization and carbonation. Isotope ratios of the alkaline fluids (δ18O = -7.9‰, δ2H = -51.4‰) and groundwater (δ18O = -7.6‰; δ2H = -48.0‰) suggests that, during base flow recession, springs are fed by groundwater circulation. Methanogenic Archaea, which comprises a relatively high percentage of the 16S rRNA gene tag sequences, suggests that biological methanogenesis may play a significant role in the system. Santa Elena's extreme varying weather results in a scenario that could be of significant importance for (a) improving the knowledge of conditions on a humid early Earth or Mars that had periodic changes in water supply, (b) revealing new insights on serpentinizing solute transport, and (c) modeling hydrogeochemical responses as a function of recharge.

  13. Major Element Geochemistry of Peridotites from Santa Elena Ophiolite Complex, NW Costa Rica and Their Tectonic Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, S.; Snow, J. E.; Gazel, E.; Sisson, V.

    2010-12-01

    The Santa Elena Ophiolite Complex (SEOC) is located on the west coast of Northern Costa Rica, near the Nicaraguan border. It consists primarily of preserved oceanic crustal rocks and underlying upper mantle thrust onto an accretionary complex. The petrogenesis and tectonic origin of this complex have widely been interpreted to be either a preserved mantle portion of the Caribbean Large Igneous Province (CLIP) as it drifted between North and South America from the Galapagos hotpot into the present day Caribbean Ocean around 80 Ma or as the mantle section to the nearby Nicoya complex. Previous structural work suggests that SEOC is a supra-subduction complex, not related to the CLIP or Nicoya. Our preliminary results agree. Mantle peridotites collected from the Santa Elena Ophiolite Complex consist primarily of spinel lherzolite (61 %) with minor amounts of harzburgite and dunite (22 % and 16 % respectively). Spinel Cr# [molar Cr / (Cr+Al)*100] is widely accepted to constrain mantle partial melting and lithospheric melt stagnation. Cr# of spinels within Santa Elena lherzolites fall between 12 and 35, suggesting an extent of 3 % to 13 % partial melting. Cr# of harzburgites range from 35 to 39, suggesting 13 % to 14 % partial melting. This range of partial melting suggests only modest depletion of this exposed portion of the ancient uppermost mantle. TiO2 concentrations of the lherzolite and harzburgite range from 0.004% to 0.128%, with the exception of one sample, SE10 - 17 (0.258%), and fall within the normal melting trend for mantle peridotites. The presence of dunite indicates that melt flow and associated melt - rock reaction with the surrounding peridotite took place within this portion of the mantle. A Cr# of 84.5 from one of these dunite samples indicate that significant melt rock reaction with refractory melts took place. Such results are rarely found in mid-ocean ridge abyssal peridotite settings, and are currently found primarily in forearc tectonic settings

  14. Is There any Relationship Between the Santa Elena Depression and Chicxulub Impact Crater, Northwestern Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefticariu, L.

    2005-05-01

    The Terminal Cretaceous Chicxulub Impact Crater had a strong control on the depositional and diagenetic history of the northern Yucatan Platform during most of the Cenozoic Era. The Chicxulub Sedimentary Basin (henceforth Basin), which approximately coincides with the impact crater, is circumscribed by a concentration of karstic sinkholes known as the Ring of Cenotes. Santa Elena Depression (henceforth Depression) is the name proposed for the bowl-shaped buried feature, first contoured by geophysical studies, immediately south of the Basin, in the area where the Ticul 1 and UNAM 5 wells were drilled. Lithologic, petrographic, and biostratigraphic data on PEMEX, UNAM, and ICDP cores show that: 1) Cenozoic deposits are much thicker inside the Basin than inside the Depression, 2) in general, the Cenozoic formations from inside the Depression are the thickest among those outside the Basin, 3) variably dolomitized pelagic or outer-platform wackestone or mudstone occur both inside the Basin and Depression, 4) the age of the deeper-water sedimentary carbonate rocks is Paleocene-Eocene inside the Basin and Paleocene?-Early Eocene inside the Depression, 5) the oldest formations that crop out are of Middle Eocene age at the edge of the Basin and Early-Middle Eocene age inside the Depression, 6) saline lake deposits, that consist chiefly of anhydrite, gypsum, and fine carbonate, and also contain quartz, chert, clay, zeolite, potassium feldspar, pyrite, and fragments of wood, are present in the Cenozoic section of the UNAM 5 core between 282 and 198 m below the present land surface, 7) the dolomite, subaerial exposure features (subaerial crusts, vugs, karst, dedolomite), and vug-filling cement from the Eocene formations are more abundant inside the Depression than inside the Basin. The depositional environments that are proposed for explaining the Cenozoic facies succession within the Santa Elena Depression are: 1) deeper marine water (Paleocene?-Early Eocene), 2) relatively

  15. Platinum group and chalcophile element systematics of serpentinized peridotites from the St. Elena ophiolite in Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holm, J.; Bizimis, M.; Schwarzenbach, E. M.; Foustoukos, D.; Frisby, C. P.; Brandon, A. D.; Gazel, E.

    2015-12-01

    We present in situ LA-ICPMS data on platinum group element (PGE) and chalcophile element (namely Cu, Ag, Te, Au, Pb) systematics in sulfides from partially serpentinized peridotites of the St. Elena ophiolite, Costa Rica. PGE are strong indicators of primary mantle processes, though their behavior during low temperature alteration processes such as serpentinization is not well understood. St. Elena sulfides are dominantly pentlandites that coexist with Fe-Ni alloys and native Cu. This indicates extremely low fO2 and fS2 conditions likely established during the early stages of serpentinization. We observe extremely variable PGE-Re concentrations in the sulfides, (e.g. [Os] = 2 - 100,000 times primitive mantle, PM). Low [Os] sulfides have high Pd/Os, which in turn correlates positively with Cu concentrations, suggesting Pd enrichment through Cu-rich fluids (e.g. Schwarzenbach et al., 2014, CMP) as opposed to melt-rock reaction. Sulfide PM-normalized PGE-Re patterns are dominated by strong Pt depletions (e.g., Pt/Pd = 0.80-0.0009). Occasional Pt enrichments over Pd and Ru (or Rh) in a PM-normalized pattern (~5% of the sulfide population) often correlate with Te and/or Au enrichments. Pt enrichment was also observed in a composite pentlandite-awaruite, suggesting possible exsolution of Pt from sulfides under extremely low fS2 conditions. Pb concentrations do not correlate with other chalcophiles or PGE. Pb ranges from 0.01-31.64 ppm with the majority of sulfides <5 ppm, and an average concentration of 2.77 ppm (n=64). Assuming that this Pb concentration is representative of mantle sulfides, this implies that Pb is not dominantly held in sulfides in the upper mantle. Combination of in situ and bulk rock PGE analyses will be used to distinguish the effects of primary magmatic signatures (e.g., melt depletion, melt-rock interaction) and secondary processes such as serpentinization on the PGE-Re and chalcophile element systematics of these sulfides.

  16. Erratum: Simulation studies of the beam cooling process in presence of heating effects in the Extra Low ENergy Antiproton ring (ELENA) Erratum: Simulation studies of the beam cooling process in presence of heating effects in the Extra Low ENergy Antiproton ring (ELENA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resta-López, J.; Hunt, J. R.; Karamyshev, O.; Welsch, C. P.

    2015-08-01

    The Extra Low ENergy Antiproton ring (ELENA) is a small synchrotron equipped with an electron cooler, which is currently being constructed at CERN to further decelerate antiprotons from the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) from 5.3 MeV to energies as low as 100 keV . At such low energies it is very important to carefully take contributions from electron cooling and beam heating mechanisms (e.g. on the residual gas and intrabeam scattering) into account. Detailed investigations into the ion kinetics under consideration of effects from electron cooling and heating sources have been carried out, and the equilibrium phase space dimensions of the beam have been computed, based on numerical simulations using the code BETACOOL. The goal is to provide a consistent explanation of the different physical effects acting on the beam in ELENA.

  17. The hELENa project - I. Stellar populations of early-type galaxies linked with local environment and galaxy mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sybilska, A.; Lisker, T.; Kuntschner, H.; Vazdekis, A.; van de Ven, G.; Peletier, R.; Falcón-Barroso, J.; Vijayaraghavan, R.; Janz, J.

    2017-09-01

    We present the first in a series of papers in The role of Environment in shaping Low-mass Early-type Nearby galaxies (hELENa) project. In this paper, we combine our sample of 20 low-mass early types (dEs) with 258 massive early types (ETGs) from the ATLAS3D survey - all observed with the SAURON integral field unit - to investigate early-type galaxies' stellar population scaling relations and the dependence of the population properties on local environment, extended to the low-σ regime of dEs. The ages in our sample show more scatter at lower σ values, indicative of less massive galaxies being affected by the environment to a higher degree. The shape of the age-σ relations for cluster versus non-cluster galaxies suggests that cluster environment speeds up the placing of galaxies on the red sequence. While the scaling relations are tighter for cluster than for the field/group objects, we find no evidence for a difference in average population characteristics of the two samples. We investigate the properties of our sample in the Virgo cluster as a function of number density (rather than simple clustrocentric distance) and find that dE ages correlate with the local density such that galaxies in regions of lower density are younger, likely because they are later arrivals to the cluster or have experienced less pre-processing in groups, and consequently used up their gas reservoir more recently. Overall, dE properties correlate more strongly with density than those of massive ETGs, which was expected as less massive galaxies are more susceptible to external influences.

  18. Sulfur and carbon geochemistry of the Santa Elena peridotites: Comparing oceanic and continental processes during peridotite alteration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarzenbach, Esther M.; Gill, Benjamin C.; Gazel, Esteban; Madrigal, Pilar

    2016-05-01

    Ultramafic rocks exposed on the continent serve as a window into oceanic and continental processes of water-peridotite interaction, so called serpentinization. In both environments there are active carbon and sulfur cycles that contain abiogenic and biogenic processes, which are eventually imprinted in the geochemical signatures of the basement rocks and the calcite and magnesite deposits associated with fluids that issue from these systems. Here, we present the carbon and sulfur geochemistry of ultramafic rocks and carbonate deposits from the Santa Elena ophiolite in Costa Rica. The aim of this study is to leverage the geochemistry of the ultramafic sequence and associated deposits to distinguish between processes that were dominant during ocean floor alteration and those dominant during low-temperature, continental water-peridotite interaction. The peridotites are variably serpentinized with total sulfur concentrations up to 877 ppm that is typically dominated by sulfide over sulfate. With the exception of one sample the ultramafic rocks are characterized by positive δ34Ssulfide (up to + 23.1‰) and δ34Ssulfate values (up to + 35.0‰). Carbon contents in the peridotites are low and are isotopically distinct from typical oceanic serpentinites. In particular, δ13C of the inorganic carbon suggests that the carbon is not derived from seawater, but rather the product of the interaction of meteoric water with the ultramafic rocks. In contrast, the sulfur isotope data from sulfide minerals in the peridotites preserve evidence for interaction with a hydrothermal fluid. Specifically, they indicate closed system abiogenic sulfate reduction suggesting that oceanic serpentinization occurred with limited input of seawater. Overall, the geochemical signatures preserve evidence for both oceanic and continental water-rock interaction with the majority of carbon (and possibly sulfate) being incorporated during continental water-rock interaction. Furthermore, there is

  19. Groundwork begins for ELENA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Michael

    2013-08-01

    CERN boss Rolf-Dieter Heuer was literally in the driving seat in June as construction begun on an extension to CERN’s antimatter facility, which will allow researchers to trap more antiprotons for antihydrogen research.

  20. SERENA: a suite of four instruments (ELENA, STROFIO, PICAM and MIPA) on board BepiColombo-MPO for particle detection in the Hermean Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milillo, Anna; Livi, Stefano; Orsini, Stefano; Torkar, Klaus; Barabash, Stas; Milillo, Anna; Wurz, Peter; di Lellis, Andrea Maria; Kallio, Esa

    SERENA (‘Search for Exospheric Refilling and Emitted Natural Abundances') is an instrument package that will fly on board the BepiColombo/Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO); it will investigate the Mercury's complex particle environment that surrounds the planet. Such an environment is composed by thermal and directional neutral atoms (exosphere) originating via surface release and charge-exchange processes, and by ionized particles originated through photo-ionization and again by surface release processes. In order to accomplish the scientific goals, in-situ analysis of the environmental elements is necessary, and for such a purpose the SERENA instrument shall include four units: two Neutral Particle Analyzers (ELENA and STROFIO) and two Ion Spectrometers (MIPA and PICAM). The scientific merit of SERENA is presented, and the basic characteristics of the four units are described, with a focus on novel technological aspects.

  1. Structural evolution and deformation kinematics of a subduction-related serpentinite-matrix mélange, Santa Elena peninsula, northwest Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escuder-Viruete, Javier; Baumgartner, Peter O.

    2014-09-01

    Detailed structural analysis of the Isla Pelada serpentinite-matrix mélange on Santa Elena Peninsula, Pacific coast of northwest Costa Rica, elucidates for the spatial distribution and temporal progression of a décollement-related deformation. This décollement zone constitutes the fault rock of a plate boundary in a subduction to collision setting. The décollement zone is defined by a thick tectonic mélange that includes blocks and belts of polymictic breccia, turbiditic greywacke, argillite, radiolarite, basalt, gabbro and serpentinized peridotite in a variably foliated serpentinite matrix. The chemical-mineral data of the peridotite blocks in the mélange indicate that they are fragments of abyssal mantle, different of the very depleted forearc mantle peridotites of the overlying Santa Elena ultramafic nappe. The structural evolution of the mélange can be divided into four main events. Early D1 deformation took place during underthrusting in the footwall of the décollement and is characterized by subhorizontal layer-parallel extension and subsequent by heterogeneous shearing of trench-fill deposits, oceanic volcanic rocks and variably serpentinized peridotites, resulting asymmetric boudinage, mesoscopic porphyroclasts and pervasive (S1) S-C fabrics. D1 is followed by layer-parallel contraction with early D2 folding and local development of an S2 pressure-solution cleavage, and late-D2 thrusting and large-scale duplexing. Therefore, D2 deformation evolves from pervasive coaxial subhorizontal contraction to a more localized non-coaxial strain (along relatively narrow thrust surfaces, in the mélange). D2 deformation mainly occurred in the hanging-wall of the décollement and was related to the downward migration of the subduction thrust. The result is the incorporation of slices of the subducted sequence by underplating into the overriding plate, typical of accretionary prisms. Kinematic indicators in the mélange are consistent with a general eastward

  2. SERENA: A suite of four instruments (ELENA, STROFIO, PICAM and MIPA) on board BepiColombo-MPO for particle detection in the Hermean environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orsini, S.; Livi, S.; Torkar, K.; Barabash, S.; Milillo, A.; Wurz, P.; di Lellis, A. M.; Kallio, E.; The Serena Team

    2010-01-01

    'Search for Exospheric Refilling and Emitted Natural Abundances' (SERENA) is an instrument package that will fly on board the BepiColombo/Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO). It will investigate Mercury's complex particle environment that is composed of thermal and directional neutral atoms (exosphere) caused by surface release and charge-exchange processes, and of ionized particles caused by photo-ionization of neutrals as well by charge exchange and surface release processes. In order to investigate the structure and dynamics of the environment, an in-situ analysis of the key neutral and charged components is necessary, and for this purpose the SERENA instrument shall include four units: two neutral particle analyzers (Emitted Low Energy Neutral Atoms (ELENA) sensor and Start from a Rotating FIeld mass spectrometer (STROFIO)) and two ion spectrometers (Miniature Ion Precipitation Analyzer (MIPA) and Planetary Ion Camera (PICAM)). The scientific merits of SERENA are presented, and the basic characteristics of the four units are described, with a focus on novel technological aspects.

  3. Compositional diversity in peridotites as result of a multi-process history: The Pacific-derived Santa Elena ophiolite, northwest Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escuder-Viruete, Javier; Baumgartner, Peter O.; Castillo-Carrión, Mercedes

    2015-08-01

    The Santa Elena ophiolite (SEO) is an ultramafic nappe of more than 270 km2 overlying a tectonic serpentinite-matrix mélange in northwest Costa Rica. It is mainly composed of Cpx-rich and Cpx-poor harzburgites (~ 2.5 km-thick), with minor lherzolite, dunite and chromitite, as well as intrusive mafic sills and subvertical dikes, which coalesce into an upper Isla Negritos gabbroic sill complex. Minerals and whole-rock features of the Cpx-rich and Cpx-poor harzburgites share features of the abyssal and supra-subduction zone (SSZ) peridotites, respectively. To explain these characteristics two-stages of melting and refertilization processes are required. By means of trace element modeling, the composition of Cpx-rich harzburgites may be reproduced by up to ~ 5-10% melting of a primitive mantle source, and the composition of Cpx-poor harzburgites and dunites by ~ 15-18% melting of an already depleted mantle. Therefore, the Cpx-rich harzburgites can be interpreted as product of first-stage melting and low-degrees of melt-rock interaction in a mid-ocean ridge environment, and the Cpx-poor harzburgites and dunites as the product of second-stage melting and refertilization in a SSZ setting. The mafic sills and the Isla Negrito gabbros are genetically related and can be explained as crystallization from the liquids that were extracted from the lower SSZ mantle levels and emplaced at shallow conditions. The Murciélagos Island basalts are not directly related to the ultramafic and mafic rocks of the SEO. Their E-MORB-like composition is similar to most of the CLIP mafic lavas and suggests a common Caribbean plume-related source. The SEO represents a fragment of Pacific-derived, SSZ oceanic lithosphere emplaced onto the southern North America margin during the late Cretaceous. Because of the predominance of rollback-induced extension during its history, only a limited amount of crustal rocks were formed and preserved in the SEO.

  4. 1985 Hurricanes: JUAN, DANNY, ELENA.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-05-01

    Station, the 40 Arpent levee (west) and Claudet levee at Lockport, the Mobly/Serigny levee below Golden Meadow, the levee west of Pie -Theriot...in the vicinity of Pecan Island in Vermilion Parish. Shortly after Danny made landfall, it was downgraded to a tropical storm. Danny was a Category 1

  5. [The intervention of Dr Francisco Díaz in the inquisitorial process against Elena/o de Cespedes, a transsexual surgeon found guilty by the Inquistion in Toledo in 1587].

    PubMed

    Maganto Pavón, Emilio

    2007-10-01

    To make known, comprehensively, an almost unknown episode in the life of Dr. Francisco Diaz (1527-1590), surgeon of the king Philip II, and author of the first urology treaty in the history of medicine. To our knowledge, to date there were few references about the participation that, as an expert, Francisco Diaz had to have in the inquisitorial process against Elena de Cespedes, a presumed hermaphrodite accused by the Inquisition because being a woman married another one pretending to be a man. The trial was carried out in Toledo in 1587 and had great impact in that time, because the accused, dressing with male clothes and usurping the prerogatives of a man, had gotten by fraud titles and favours which were forbidden for women, the title of surgeon among them. Except for the reference by Folch Jou and Burshatin, both short and incomplete, no other author or biographer of the famous surgeon had cited this episode of his life, which to our judgment could mean a great damage to his reputation. We reviewed the works by the two aforementioned authors, all the works and biographies about Dr. Francisco Diaz that we could found, and microfilmed and transcript the whole bundle 234, expedient 24, from the section Inquisition at the National Historical Archive in Madrid, corresponding to Elena de Cespedes (alias Eleno) (> 500 pages) to obtain the greatest amount of data about the accused and the performance of Dr. Francisco Diaz. Francisco Diaz was requested, as an expert, by the Vicar of Madrid to perform the examination of the genitourinary organs to give or not marriage license to that woman saying she was a man. In his report in the year 1586, surprisingly the urologist declared that the petitioner was a man. As it would be demonstrated during the trial, the accused, who alleged being hermaphrodite in her defense, had been able to deceive the expert with her tricks altering her genital morphology. Thanks to her surgical knowledge she had mutilated herself surgically

  6. Interpreting Bodies. Elena Castellani (ed.) Interpreting Bodies: Classical and Quantum Objects in Modern Physics (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1998), viii+329 pp., ISBN 0-691-01725-5, paperback, 19.95 US, ISBN 0-691-01724-7, cloth, 65.00 US.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruetsche, Laura

    The objects of the empirical science known as particle physics are not like objects ordinarily conceived. Physicists' particles can enter states strangely entangled with those of other particles; they can obey statistics which suggest that they lack genidentity; their properties (some think) are created in measurement, or (others think) can only be limned from the symmetries of the theory describing them. 'The implications of contemporary physical theories for the debate on the nature of objects' provides 'the central theme' (p. 4) of Interpreting Bodies, editor Elena Castellani's new collection of essays. Contributions to the volume vary dramatically in vintage (Born's and Reichenbach's are well into middle age; others appear here for the first time); in approach (the collection includes Giuliano Toraldo diFrancia's nine-page history of the object concept from Democritus to d'Espagnat, Peter Mittelstaedt's discussion of the Kantian constitution of quantum objects, and Giulo Peruzzi's explication of the scattering cross section and its role in experimental particle physics); and in intended audience. Lacking the space to treat each contribution in turn, I will focus on those dealing with the problem of the One and the Many.

  7. Nipple reconstruction using a star flap enhanced by scar tissue: the Regina Elena Cancer Institute experience.

    PubMed

    Gullo, Pierpaolo; Buccheri, Ernesto Maria; Pozzi, Marcello; De Vita, Roy

    2011-10-01

    We propose a new, simple, and reliable method of nipple reconstruction using a star flap and a free graft of a linear fragment of scar tissue. The harvested fragment is deepithelialized and fixed under the flap to give the reconstruction consistency and make it steady. The study included 218 nipple reconstructions performed between 2002 and 2008. In an attempt to estimate their satisfaction, patients were then asked to complete a 1-year postoperative questionnaire. Patients were directed to use a numerical scale of 1-10, with 1 as the worst outcome and 10 as the best possible outcome. The average projection of the nipple in the immediate postoperative period was 7.08 ± 0.5 mm (mean ± standard deviation). After 1 year, the average projection of the reconstructed nipple was 6.08 ± 0.5 mm. The average diameter of the reconstructed nipple in the immediate postoperative period was 14.9 ± 3 mm. After 1 year, the average diameter of the reconstructed nipple was 14.2 ± 4 mm. The average patient satisfaction with nipple projection was 7.28, sensation of the nipple, 4.11; color of the nipple, 6.36; position of the reconstructed nipple, 7.34; and symmetry compared with the opposite nipple-areola complex, 7.97. Overall patient satisfaction was 6.61. We maintain that the technique presented here is safe, easy to perform, and reproducible and improves the long-term projection of the reconstructed nipple.

  8. The Dona Elena Project, A Better-Living Program in an Isolated Rural Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Lydia J.

    In 1958 a project was begun in a small, isolated, rural farm community in Puerto Rico to provide nutrition education and improve other conditions of home and community living. Preliminary meetings, interviews, and examinations revealed the interest and great need of the 100 families. Progress reports were made after 1 year, 2 years, and 5 years.…

  9. Pedagogia de la Participacion: Entering Elena Garro's "Un hogar solido" through the Body. Enacting Death and Politics in Mexico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Misemer, Sarah M.

    2009-01-01

    Garro's one-act play offers an unusual combination of corpses and animate actors on stage thus combining life and death in the same body. Garro's piece presents students with an approach to "embodying" Mexican culture and its notions of death. The fusion of death and cultural practices in Mexico is a crucial part of the ongoing project for…

  10. Pedagogia de la Participacion: Entering Elena Garro's "Un hogar solido" through the Body. Enacting Death and Politics in Mexico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Misemer, Sarah M.

    2009-01-01

    Garro's one-act play offers an unusual combination of corpses and animate actors on stage thus combining life and death in the same body. Garro's piece presents students with an approach to "embodying" Mexican culture and its notions of death. The fusion of death and cultural practices in Mexico is a crucial part of the ongoing project for…

  11. 78 FR 9927 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; State Program Report

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-12

    .... ADDRESSES: Submit electronic comments on the collection of information to: Elena.Fazio@acl.hhs.gov Submit...: Administration for Community Living, Washington, DC 20201, Attention: Elena Fazio. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Elena Fazio by telephone: (202)357- 3583 or by email: Elena.Fazio@acl.hhs.gov ....

  12. A new species of poeciliid fish, Poeciliopsis santaelena, from Peninsula Santa Elena, Area De Conservación Guanacaste, Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Bussing, William A

    2008-06-01

    An undescribed freshwater fish was recently discovered during a biological inventory of Area de Conservaci6n Guanacaste, northwestern Costa Rica. This new species of Poeciliopsis is closely related to a group of widespread species of small spotted fishes designated as the Poeciliopsis gracilis complex in this study. The complex extends on both versants from southern Mexico to Nicaragua, and with this new finding, extends into Costa Rica. The new species is distinguished from its Central American relatives by its lack of lateral and ventral markings, higher pectoral and caudal-fin counts and more posterior placement of the dorsal fin. Poeciliopsis santaelena is endemic to the Rio Potrero Grande, a river whose flow is reduced to just a few pools during the long dry season and flows fully only during very rainy weather. It is just another in a growing list of threatened or endangered species found in this unique peninsular environment.

  13. 38. View of niche in center bay of N room ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    38. View of niche in center bay of N room in mill ruins in which a painting or tapestry of Santa Elena was hung. - Hacienda Azurarera Santa Elena, Sugar Mill Ruins, 1.44 miles North of PR Route 2 Bridge Over Rio De La Plata, Toa Baja, Toa Baja Municipio, PR

  14. Coming to Terms with Conceptual Knowledge: One Teacher's Journal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ebert, Christine L.

    This study describes the emerging mathematical understanding of one student enrolled in an elementary mathematics content course. Through the medium of her journal entries, a portrait of Elena's struggle to overcome her difficulty with mathematics and construct conceptual knowledge emerges. Though these struggles are not unique, Elena's story is…

  15. Language experience narratives and the role of autobiographical reasoning in becoming an urban science teacher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera Maulucci, Maria S.

    2011-06-01

    One of the central challenges globalization and immigration present to education is how to construct school language policies, procedures, and curricula to support academic success of immigrant youth. This case-study compares and contrasts language experience narratives along Elena's developmental trajectory of becoming an urban science teacher. Elena reflects upon her early language experiences and her more recent experiences as a preservice science teacher in elementary dual language classrooms. The findings from Elena's early schooling experiences provide an analysis of the linkages between Elena's developing English proficiency, her Spanish proficiency, and her autobiographical reasoning. Elena's experiences as a preservice teacher in two elementary dual language classrooms indicates ways in which those experiences helped to reframe her views about the intersections between language learning and science learning. I propose the language experience narrative, as a subset of the life story, as a way to understand how preservice teachers reconstruct past language experiences, connect to the present, and anticipate future language practices.

  16. Evaluation of Attractive Toxic Sugar Bait (ATSB) - Barrier for Control of Vector and Nuisance Mosquitoes and Its Effect on Non-target Organisms in Sub-tropical Environments in Florida

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    target organisms in sub-tropical environments in Florida Whitney A. Quallsa,∗, Günter C. Müllerb, Edita E. Revayc, Sandra A. Alland...sub-tropical environments in Florida 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK...control of anopheline mosquitoes using ATSB has not yet been demonstrated in more tropical, sub-tropical environments like Latin America or Florida , US

  17. Cataract Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stories Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Cataracts Sections What Are Cataracts? Cataract Symptoms Who Is ... Pictures and Videos: What Do Cataracts Look Like? Cataract Surgery Written by: Kierstan Boyd Reviewed by: Elena ...

  18. Cataracts

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stories Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Cataracts Sections What Are Cataracts? Cataract Symptoms Who Is ... Videos: What Do Cataracts Look Like? What Are Cataracts? Written by: Kierstan Boyd Reviewed by: Elena M ...

  19. Making the 'wonder material'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolyarov, Daniel

    2012-08-01

    Graphene is taking the world of physics by storm, with new applications cropping up almost weekly. Daniel Stolyarov describes how he and his wife, Elena Polyakova, turned the graphene boom into a business.

  20. An Integrated Research Program for the Modeling, Analysis and Control of Aerospace Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-03-03

    Fabiano, Jr. - Brown University Mitchell Feigenbaum - Rockefeller University Elena Fernandez - Institudo de Desarrollo Techologico, para la Industria ...Minnesota James Sochacki - ISC, LaRamie, Wyoming Felippe de Souza - Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica Jason L. Speyer - University of Texas Eitan Tadmor

  1. An Integrated Research Program for the Modeling, Analysis and Control of Aerospace Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-03-03

    Mitchell Feigenbaum - Rockefeller University Elena Fernandez - Institudo de Desarrollo Techologico, para la Industria Quimica Wilfred M. Greenlee...Wyoming Felippe de Souza - Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica Jason L. Speyer - University of Texas Eitan Tadmor - Tel Aviv University Roberto

  2. 22. Detail view of arched passageway as in preceeding photo. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. Detail view of arched passageway as in preceeding photo. - Hacienda Azurarera Santa Elena, Sugar Mill Ruins, 1.44 miles North of PR Route 2 Bridge Over Rio De La Plata, Toa Baja, Toa Baja Municipio, PR

  3. 16. View of middle bay of N (rear) elevation looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. View of middle bay of N (rear) elevation looking SE. - Hacienda Azurarera Santa Elena, Sugar Mill Ruins, 1.44 miles North of PR Route 2 Bridge Over Rio De La Plata, Toa Baja, Toa Baja Municipio, PR

  4. 29. Detail view of small triangular openings from opposite side ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. Detail view of small triangular openings from opposite side of wall. - Hacienda Azurarera Santa Elena, Sugar Mill Ruins, 1.44 miles North of PR Route 2 Bridge Over Rio De La Plata, Toa Baja, Toa Baja Municipio, PR

  5. 2. Skewed view of E elevation of sugar mill looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Skewed view of E elevation of sugar mill looking NW. - Hacienda Azurarera Santa Elena, Sugar Mill Ruins, 1.44 miles North of PR Route 2 Bridge Over Rio De La Plata, Toa Baja, Toa Baja Municipio, PR

  6. 23. Detail view of brickwork in same arched passageway. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. Detail view of brickwork in same arched passageway. - Hacienda Azurarera Santa Elena, Sugar Mill Ruins, 1.44 miles North of PR Route 2 Bridge Over Rio De La Plata, Toa Baja, Toa Baja Municipio, PR

  7. Ana's Story: How She and Her Family Learned about Sports Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... tory How she and her family learned about sports injuries. This booklet is not copyrighted. You can ... tory How she and her family learned about sports injuries. Juan Néstor Elena Isabel Carlos 1 2 ...

  8. National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... to provide full opportunities and accommodations for its citizens with disabilities Explore our site, especially NIDILRR Items ... of Margaret Campbell, PhD, NIDILRR Office of Research Sciences, and Elena Fazio, Ph.D., Office of Performance ...

  9. Richard B. Russell Dam and Lake, Savannah River, Georgia and South Carolina Final Foundation Report, Concrete Dam, Embankments and Powerhouse. Volume 1. Text and Plates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-10-03

    abuae of iron- and magnesiun.-rich minerals) rock, generally of fine to edita grain size. It is a metamorphosed diabase or basalt, and is referred to on...nata-diabsoe ad four repcesentative samples of mota-decite. The avierage value of the neta- diabase samples s 20,150 psi ad of the aeta-dacite samples...TABLE 6 SONIC VELOCITIES AND AVERAGE SCHMIDT REBOUND NUMBERS Hole no. Elev. Rock type Rebound no. Velocity C-127 315 Meta- diabase 51 19,600 C-129 292

  10. [The quality of a scientific publication is the product of a sum of efforts and attributes].

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Larrañaga, Francisco

    2017-01-01

    Todo editor de una publicación médica científica busca que la revista que edita tenga o se reconozca con calidad. La calidad se logra mediante la participación de un conjunto de profesionales (editores, autores, revisores, impresores, diseñadores e incluso lectores) y los resultados de su participación profesional agregan, durante el proceso, propiedades con la finalidad de que el producto, una publicación médica científica, sea valorada por su calidad.

  11. Intersections between immigration, language, identity, and emotions: a science teacher candidate's journey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera Maulucci, Maria S.

    2008-04-01

    This study reports a subset of findings from a larger, ongoing study aimed at exploring interactions between teacher identity, learning, and classroom practices in a social justice teacher education program at a selective liberal arts college in New York. This case-study explores the journey of Elena, as an immigrant, a student, and a pre-service teacher candidate towards becoming a social justice educator. Elena reflects upon her school language experiences as an immigrant youth, her learning in a social justice teacher education program, and her field experiences in an international high school. The analysis spans macro-, meso-, and microlevels to explore the ways globalization, particularly immigration, as well as schooling policies for English language learners interact with aspects of Elena's core identity, particularly in school settings. The findings show some of the ways language and literacy verified and/or denied aspects of Elena's core identity; specific instances where second language proficiency was cast as power and privilege versus disadvantage according to ethnic, language, and class categorizations; and the struggles Elena, and other immigrant youth may face given the focus on English language acquisition and high stakes accountability in schools, at the expense of students' primary language proficiency and affirmation of core identity markers.

  12. ISS Expedition 42 Crew Profile, Version 2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-11-26

    Narrated production with biographical information about ISS Expedition 42 crewmembers Barry "Butch" Wilmore, Alexander Samokutyaev, Elena Serova, Terry Virts, Anton Shkaplerov and Samantha Cristoforetti. The program covers the crewmember's career including childhood photographs, previous space missions and interview sound bites with the crewmembers.

  13. A Theory of Collective Induction. Final Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-07-03

    Associates 8616 Weetwood Center Drive Dan of the Acadni Dept. MlL VA 22180 U. S. Naval Academy Annapolis, MD 21402-018 Dr. Michael Lasky Office of the...South Elena Avenue 1801 N. Beauregard Street Fourth Floor Alexandria, VA 22311 Redondo Beach, CA 90277 Lt. Dennis McBride, USN Dr. Harold P. Van Cott

  14. Posttranscriptional Regulation of the Neurofibromatosis 2 Gene

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-01

    Promoter in Transgenic Mice. Pediatric Academic Societies’ Annual Meeting, Washington, D.C. Our senior research associate Dr. Elena M. Akhmametyeva...presented this research abstract to the Annual International Pediatric Research Meeting. The findings presented in this abstract were similar to those...tumors with osteosarcomas at a high frequency, and fibrosarcoma and hepatocellular carcinoma at an increased, but lower frequency (152). Almost

  15. Unique Challenges for Women of Color in STEM Transferring from Community Colleges to Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reyes, Marie-Elena

    2011-01-01

    In this article, Marie-Elena Reyes presents the issues faced by women of color in the fields of science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) as they transfer from community colleges to universities. Community colleges offer a great potential for diversifying and increasing participation of underrepresented groups in STEM. Many women of color…

  16. Language Experience Narratives and the Role of Autobiographical Reasoning in Becoming an Urban Science Teacher

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivera Maulucci, Maria S.

    2011-01-01

    One of the central challenges globalization and immigration present to education is how to construct school language policies, procedures, and curricula to support academic success of immigrant youth. This case-study compares and contrasts language experience narratives along Elena's developmental trajectory of becoming an urban science teacher.…

  17. Discourse Analysis Today.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheu, Dagmar, Ed.; Lopez-Maestre, M. D., Ed.

    2003-01-01

    This collection of articles includes: "Introduction: Discourse Analysis Today" (Dagmar Schue and M.D. Lopez-Maestre); "The Metaphorical and Metonymic Understanding of the Trinitarian Dogma" (Antonio Barcelona); "Symmetry as Conceptual Metaphor in Walker's The Color Purple" (Elena Tapia); "And She's Like it's…

  18. Platinum Highlight Abstract - November 2013 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Characterization and Favorable In Vivo Properties of Heterodimeric Soluble IL-15?IL-15R? Cytokine Compared to IL-15 Monomer Elena Chertova, Cristina Bergamaschi, Oleg Chertov, Raymond Sowder, Jenifer Bear, James D. Roser, Rachel K. Beach, Jeffrey D. Lifson, Barbara K. Felber, and George N. PavlakisJ Biol Chem 288(25):18093-18103, 2013

  19. Breakthrough: Fighting Cancer with Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Rozhkova, Elena

    2012-01-01

    Argonne nanoscientist Elena Rozhkova is studying ways to enlist nanoparticles to treat brain cancer. This nano-bio technology may eventually provide an alternative form of therapy that targets only cancer cells and does not affect normal living tissue. Read more at http://1.usa.gov/JAXh7Q.

  20. 46. View of end bay of NW corner of mill ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    46. View of end bay of NW corner of mill ruins showing where flue emerged from area of Jamaican Train. - Hacienda Azurarera Santa Elena, Sugar Mill Ruins, 1.44 miles North of PR Route 2 Bridge Over Rio De La Plata, Toa Baja, Toa Baja Municipio, PR

  1. ES Review: Selections from 2009 and 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smiles, Robin, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    This fourth edition of the "ES Review" brings together, in one setting, some of the best work from 2009-10. It features: (1) Teacher Quality (Teachers at Work: Improving Teacher Quality Through School Design (Elena Silva); Understanding Teachers Contracts (Andrew J. Rotherham); How Teachers Unions Lost the Media (Richard Whitmire and…

  2. ES Review: Selections from 2008 & 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smiles, Robin, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    This third edition of the "ES Review" brings together, in one setting, some of the best work from 2008-09. It features: (1) K-12 Accountability (Measuring Skills for the 21st Century (Elena Silva); Beyond the Bubble: Technology and the Future of Student Assessment (Bill Tucker); Testing the Limits (Bill Tucker); Changing the Game: The…

  3. Breakthrough: Fighting Cancer with Nanoparticles

    ScienceCinema

    Rozhkova, Elena

    2016-07-12

    Argonne nanoscientist Elena Rozhkova is studying ways to enlist nanoparticles to treat brain cancer. This nano-bio technology may eventually provide an alternative form of therapy that targets only cancer cells and does not affect normal living tissue. Read more at http://1.usa.gov/JAXh7Q.

  4. Enhancing trappable antiproton populations through deceleration and frictional cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Zolotorev, M.; Sessler, A.; Penn, G.; Wurtele, J. S.; Charman, A. E.

    2012-03-01

    CERN currently delivers antiprotons for trapping experiments with the Antiproton Decelerator (AD), which slows the antiprotons down to about 5 MeV.This energy is currently too high for direct trapping, and thick foils are used to slow down the beam to energies which can be trapped.To allow further deceleration to $\\sim 100 \\;\\mbox{keV}$, CERN is initiating the construction of ELENA,consisting of a ring which will combine RF deceleration and electron cooling capabilities. We describe a simple frictionalcooling scheme that can serve to provide significantly improved trapping efficiency, either directly from the AD or first usinga standard deceleration mechanism (induction linac or RFQ). This scheme could be implemented in a short time.The device itself is short in length, uses accessible voltages, and at reasonable cost could serve in the interim beforeELENA becomes operational, or possibly in lieu of ELENA for some experiments. Simple theory and simulations provide a preliminary assessment of theconcept and its strengths and limitations, and highlight important areas for experimental studies, in particular to pin down the level of multiplescattering for low-energy antiprotons. We show that the frictional cooling scheme can provide a similar energy spectrum to that of ELENA,but with higher transverse emittances.

  5. JPRS Report East Europe.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Radio Broadcasts for Baltic, Ukrainian Polonia Begin [TRYBUNA 8 May] .................................... 2 YUGOSLAVIA Reasons for Tudjman’s...for Baltic, Ukrainian Polonia Elena Lagadinova, deputy chairman; Begin Khristina Pepeldzhiyska, deputy chairman; 90P20027A Warsaw TR YBUNA in Polish 8...Commission for [Text] On 7 May, Polish Radio began broadcasting Socioeconomic Development; special programs for Poles [ Polonia ] residing in the East. 2

  6. U.S. Elementary and Secondary Schools: Equalizing Opportunity or Replicating the Status Quo?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rouse, Cecilia Elena; Barrow, Lisa

    2006-01-01

    Although education pays off handsomely in the United States, children from low-income families attain less education than children from more advantaged families. In this article, Cecilia Elena Rouse and Lisa Barrow investigate why family background is so strongly linked to education. The authors show that family socioeconomic status affects such…

  7. K-12 Implications Seen in Some Cases before High Court

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Arizona's variation on government vouchers for religious schools and California's prohibition on the sale of violent video games to minors present the top two cases with implications for education in the U.S. Supreme Court term that formally begins Oct. 4. New Justice Elena Kagan brings to the court extensive education policy experience as a…

  8. Unique Challenges for Women of Color in STEM Transferring from Community Colleges to Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reyes, Marie-Elena

    2011-01-01

    In this article, Marie-Elena Reyes presents the issues faced by women of color in the fields of science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) as they transfer from community colleges to universities. Community colleges offer a great potential for diversifying and increasing participation of underrepresented groups in STEM. Many women of color…

  9. ES Review: Selections from 2009 and 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smiles, Robin, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    This fourth edition of the "ES Review" brings together, in one setting, some of the best work from 2009-10. It features: (1) Teacher Quality (Teachers at Work: Improving Teacher Quality Through School Design (Elena Silva); Understanding Teachers Contracts (Andrew J. Rotherham); How Teachers Unions Lost the Media (Richard Whitmire and…

  10. The GBAR experiment: gravitational behaviour of antihydrogen at rest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, P.; Sacquin, Y.

    2012-09-01

    The recently recommended experiment GBAR is foreseen to run at CERN at the AD/ELENA antiproton source. It aims at performing the first measurement of the Earth's gravitational acceleration on antimatter by observing the free-fall of antihydrogen atoms. This requires creating anti-atoms at an unprecedented low energy. The different steps of the experiment and their present status are reviewed.

  11. Language Experience Narratives and the Role of Autobiographical Reasoning in Becoming an Urban Science Teacher

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivera Maulucci, Maria S.

    2011-01-01

    One of the central challenges globalization and immigration present to education is how to construct school language policies, procedures, and curricula to support academic success of immigrant youth. This case-study compares and contrasts language experience narratives along Elena's developmental trajectory of becoming an urban science teacher.…

  12. "If It Fits into Their Culture, Then They Will Have a Connection": Experiences of Two Latina Students in a Select High School Choir

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palkki, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    In the United States, Latino/a students are underrepresented in secondary school music programs (Elpus & Abril, 2011). By understanding the needs of Latino/a students, music educators can create programs that will better serve this student population. This intrinsic case study chronicles the experiences of Cassandra and Elena, two students…

  13. An Outline of the Romanian Special Education Approach. New Attitudes for a New Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buica, Cristian B.

    2004-01-01

    Romanian special education finds its beginnings in the second half of the nineteenth century at the same time as the constitution of the modern state and the efforts of gradual opening to new European reforming ideas. For this period it is worth mentioning the Shelter for children and old people set up by Elena Cuza (1862), the wife of Ruler…

  14. Supreme Court Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Charles F.; Hawke, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    Of the three branches of government, the Supreme Court usually receives the least national attention. Not so this year. In addition to another changing of the guard with the retirement of Justice Stevens and the nomination of Elena Kagan, the 2009-2010 term generated a great deal of controversy. And in a number of instances, the public's keen…

  15. Promoting the Contributions of Willing and Able States: Australia’s Response to Transnational Extremism

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-15

    Institute (US Army War College, November 2005): 21. See also Robert Kagan, Of Paradise and Power: America and Europe in the New World Order (New York...Connection: International Terrorism, Organized Crime and the Coming Apocalypse (United States: Prometheus Books, 2005), 53-54. 72 Barry Desker and Elena

  16. Lie Group Techniques for Neural Learning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-03

    Lie group techniques for Neural Learning Edinburgh June 2004 Elena Celledoni SINTEF Applied Mathematics, IMF-NTNU Lie group techniques for Neural...ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) SINTEF Applied Mathematics, IMF-NTNU 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND

  17. Platinum Highlight Abstract - November 2013 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Characterization and Favorable In Vivo Properties of Heterodimeric Soluble IL-15?IL-15R? Cytokine Compared to IL-15 Monomer Elena Chertova, Cristina Bergamaschi, Oleg Chertov, Raymond Sowder, Jenifer Bear, James D. Roser, Rachel K. Beach, Jeffrey D. Lifson, Barbara K. Felber, and George N. PavlakisJ Biol Chem 288(25):18093-18103, 2013

  18. Expedition 42 Crew Arrives in Kazakhstan

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-03-13

    Video File of ISS Expedition 42 crewmembers Barry "Butch" Wilmore, Alexander Samokutyaev and Elena Serova as they arrive in Kazakhstan. Includes footage of the crew as they are greeted in a traditional ceremony at the airport in Karaganda, Kazamhstan where the crew are given presents; dressed in robes and hats and offer short statements. Wilmore is not present.

  19. Serova works with test samples from Kaskad Cell Cultivation Experiment

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-09-29

    ISS041-E-037551 (29 Sept. 2014) --- Russian cosmonaut Elena Serova, Expedition 41 flight engineer, works with test samples from the Kaskad cell cultivation experiment in a glovebox in the Poisk Mini-Research Module 2 (MRM2) of the International Space Station.

  20. Department of Defense: Further Actions Needed to Institutionalize Key Business System Modernization Management Controls

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    reported that the pace of DOD’s efforts in defining and implementing key institutional modernization management controls had slowed compared with...Carl Barden, Shaun Byrnes, Debra Conner, Elena Epps, Rebecca Eyler, Nancy Glover, Neelaxi Lakhmani (Assistant Director), Anh Le, Lori Martinez

  1. 37. Detail view of center of castiron arch in N ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    37. Detail view of center of cast-iron arch in N room of mill. - Hacienda Azurarera Santa Elena, Sugar Mill Ruins, 1.44 miles North of PR Route 2 Bridge Over Rio De La Plata, Toa Baja, Toa Baja Municipio, PR

  2. 31. Closerin interior view of N room of mill, looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. Closer-in interior view of N room of mill, looking NW, showing cast-iron columns and arches. - Hacienda Azurarera Santa Elena, Sugar Mill Ruins, 1.44 miles North of PR Route 2 Bridge Over Rio De La Plata, Toa Baja, Toa Baja Municipio, PR

  3. 48. Detail of top of wall in S room showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    48. Detail of top of wall in S room showing strap-iron beam tie-back anchored in wall with severely deteriorated beam in place. - Hacienda Azurarera Santa Elena, Sugar Mill Ruins, 1.44 miles North of PR Route 2 Bridge Over Rio De La Plata, Toa Baja, Toa Baja Municipio, PR

  4. 21. View of N room of mill looking NW through ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. View of N room of mill looking NW through arched passageway in wall separating N and S rooms. - Hacienda Azurarera Santa Elena, Sugar Mill Ruins, 1.44 miles North of PR Route 2 Bridge Over Rio De La Plata, Toa Baja, Toa Baja Municipio, PR

  5. 3. Detail view of third bay in E elevation of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Detail view of third bay in E elevation of sugar mill looking W. - Hacienda Azurarera Santa Elena, Sugar Mill Ruins, 1.44 miles North of PR Route 2 Bridge Over Rio De La Plata, Toa Baja, Toa Baja Municipio, PR

  6. 28. Detail view of small triangular openings (perhaps for ventilation) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. Detail view of small triangular openings (perhaps for ventilation) in top of S wall in center bay of N room of mill. - Hacienda Azurarera Santa Elena, Sugar Mill Ruins, 1.44 miles North of PR Route 2 Bridge Over Rio De La Plata, Toa Baja, Toa Baja Municipio, PR

  7. 17. Detail view of corner of middle bay of N ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. Detail view of corner of middle bay of N (rear) elevation looking SE. - Hacienda Azurarera Santa Elena, Sugar Mill Ruins, 1.44 miles North of PR Route 2 Bridge Over Rio De La Plata, Toa Baja, Toa Baja Municipio, PR

  8. 27. View of interior S wall of N room of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. View of interior S wall of N room of mill showing rows of cast-iron columns and arches. - Hacienda Azurarera Santa Elena, Sugar Mill Ruins, 1.44 miles North of PR Route 2 Bridge Over Rio De La Plata, Toa Baja, Toa Baja Municipio, PR

  9. 5. Detail view of fifth bay in E elevation of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Detail view of fifth bay in E elevation of sugar mill looking W. - Hacienda Azurarera Santa Elena, Sugar Mill Ruins, 1.44 miles North of PR Route 2 Bridge Over Rio De La Plata, Toa Baja, Toa Baja Municipio, PR

  10. 30. Interior view of N room of mill, looking NW, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. Interior view of N room of mill, looking NW, showing cast-iron columns and arches. - Hacienda Azurarera Santa Elena, Sugar Mill Ruins, 1.44 miles North of PR Route 2 Bridge Over Rio De La Plata, Toa Baja, Toa Baja Municipio, PR

  11. 45. View of end bay of W elevation showing openings ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    45. View of end bay of W elevation showing openings in wall associated with sugar making process. - Hacienda Azurarera Santa Elena, Sugar Mill Ruins, 1.44 miles North of PR Route 2 Bridge Over Rio De La Plata, Toa Baja, Toa Baja Municipio, PR

  12. 32. Symmetrical view of castiron columns and arches, looking W, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. Symmetrical view of cast-iron columns and arches, looking W, in interior of N room of mill. - Hacienda Azurarera Santa Elena, Sugar Mill Ruins, 1.44 miles North of PR Route 2 Bridge Over Rio De La Plata, Toa Baja, Toa Baja Municipio, PR

  13. 19. View of W elevation of mill looking NE showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. View of W elevation of mill looking NE showing two bays and wall buttress. - Hacienda Azurarera Santa Elena, Sugar Mill Ruins, 1.44 miles North of PR Route 2 Bridge Over Rio De La Plata, Toa Baja, Toa Baja Municipio, PR

  14. 26. Sharply angled view looking N at E wall of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. Sharply angled view looking N at E wall of N room of mill. - Hacienda Azurarera Santa Elena, Sugar Mill Ruins, 1.44 miles North of PR Route 2 Bridge Over Rio De La Plata, Toa Baja, Toa Baja Municipio, PR

  15. An Outline of the Romanian Special Education Approach. New Attitudes for a New Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buica, Cristian B.

    2004-01-01

    Romanian special education finds its beginnings in the second half of the nineteenth century at the same time as the constitution of the modern state and the efforts of gradual opening to new European reforming ideas. For this period it is worth mentioning the Shelter for children and old people set up by Elena Cuza (1862), the wife of Ruler…

  16. 43. Detail view of connection between column top and arch ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    43. Detail view of connection between column top and arch in S room. - Hacienda Azurarera Santa Elena, Sugar Mill Ruins, 1.44 miles North of PR Route 2 Bridge Over Rio De La Plata, Toa Baja, Toa Baja Municipio, PR

  17. 14. Detail view of molding at first floor level on ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Detail view of molding at first floor level on SE corner of mill. - Hacienda Azurarera Santa Elena, Sugar Mill Ruins, 1.44 miles North of PR Route 2 Bridge Over Rio De La Plata, Toa Baja, Toa Baja Municipio, PR

  18. 33. Interior view of N room of mill, looking NW, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    33. Interior view of N room of mill, looking NW, showing interior of W wall and cast-iron columns and arches. - Hacienda Azurarera Santa Elena, Sugar Mill Ruins, 1.44 miles North of PR Route 2 Bridge Over Rio De La Plata, Toa Baja, Toa Baja Municipio, PR

  19. 6. Detail view of eighth bay in E elevation of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Detail view of eighth bay in E elevation of sugar mill looking W. - Hacienda Azurarera Santa Elena, Sugar Mill Ruins, 1.44 miles North of PR Route 2 Bridge Over Rio De La Plata, Toa Baja, Toa Baja Municipio, PR

  20. 4. Detail view of fourth bay in E elevation of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Detail view of fourth bay in E elevation of sugar mill looking W. - Hacienda Azurarera Santa Elena, Sugar Mill Ruins, 1.44 miles North of PR Route 2 Bridge Over Rio De La Plata, Toa Baja, Toa Baja Municipio, PR

  1. 18. View of W elevation of ramp looking NE showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. View of W elevation of ramp looking NE showing entrances and openings to storage spaces below. - Hacienda Azurarera Santa Elena, Sugar Mill Ruins, 1.44 miles North of PR Route 2 Bridge Over Rio De La Plata, Toa Baja, Toa Baja Municipio, PR

  2. 24. View of N room of mill looking NE through ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. View of N room of mill looking NE through arched opening in W elevation. - Hacienda Azurarera Santa Elena, Sugar Mill Ruins, 1.44 miles North of PR Route 2 Bridge Over Rio De La Plata, Toa Baja, Toa Baja Municipio, PR

  3. 49. Detail of top wall in S room showing two ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    49. Detail of top wall in S room showing two beam tie-backs. - Hacienda Azurarera Santa Elena, Sugar Mill Ruins, 1.44 miles North of PR Route 2 Bridge Over Rio De La Plata, Toa Baja, Toa Baja Municipio, PR

  4. Pretend Play in the Early Childhood Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McEntire, Nancy

    2009-01-01

    This article presents and summarizes recent resources related to pretend play in the early childhood classroom. These include "Contemporary Perspectives on Play in Early Childhood Education" by Olivia N. Sarachoe and Bernard Spodek; "Dramatic Play: Bring It Back" by Tammy Benson; and "The Importance of Being Playful" by Elena Bodrova and Deborah…

  5. Far-Away Wisdom: Three Nominees for the 1992 Andersen Prize.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrett, Jeffrey

    1993-01-01

    Reports on the work of three nominees for the 1992 Andersen medal, awarded to recognize a body of work that has made a lasting contribution to children's literature. Discusses the work of Finnish author Hannu Makela; Argentinian writer, poet, and singer Maria Elena Walsh; and the Iranian author Hooshang Moradi Kermani. (RS)

  6. 7. 3/4 view of sugar mill looking NW showing entry ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. 3/4 view of sugar mill looking NW showing entry ramp, S and E elevations. - Hacienda Azurarera Santa Elena, Sugar Mill Ruins, 1.44 miles North of PR Route 2 Bridge Over Rio De La Plata, Toa Baja, Toa Baja Municipio, PR

  7. 35. Detail view of castiron column capitol showing bearing point ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    35. Detail view of cast-iron column capitol showing bearing point of arches. - Hacienda Azurarera Santa Elena, Sugar Mill Ruins, 1.44 miles North of PR Route 2 Bridge Over Rio De La Plata, Toa Baja, Toa Baja Municipio, PR

  8. 12. Detail view of molding at second floor level on ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Detail view of molding at second floor level on SE corner of mill. - Hacienda Azurarera Santa Elena, Sugar Mill Ruins, 1.44 miles North of PR Route 2 Bridge Over Rio De La Plata, Toa Baja, Toa Baja Municipio, PR

  9. Supreme Court Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Charles F.; Hawke, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    Of the three branches of government, the Supreme Court usually receives the least national attention. Not so this year. In addition to another changing of the guard with the retirement of Justice Stevens and the nomination of Elena Kagan, the 2009-2010 term generated a great deal of controversy. And in a number of instances, the public's keen…

  10. K-12 Implications Seen in Some Cases before High Court

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Arizona's variation on government vouchers for religious schools and California's prohibition on the sale of violent video games to minors present the top two cases with implications for education in the U.S. Supreme Court term that formally begins Oct. 4. New Justice Elena Kagan brings to the court extensive education policy experience as a…

  11. Chemical ecology of Xyleborus glabratus and implications for monitoring and management

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Abstract Chemical ecology of Xyleborus glabratus and implications for monitoring and management Paul E. Kendra, Wayne S. Montgomery, Jerome Niogret, Elena Q. Schnell, and Nancy D. Epsky USDA-ARS, Subtropical Horticulture Research Station, 13601 Old Cutler Rd., Miami, FL 33158 The redbay ambrosia b...

  12. ES Review: Selections from 2008 & 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smiles, Robin, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    This third edition of the "ES Review" brings together, in one setting, some of the best work from 2008-09. It features: (1) K-12 Accountability (Measuring Skills for the 21st Century (Elena Silva); Beyond the Bubble: Technology and the Future of Student Assessment (Bill Tucker); Testing the Limits (Bill Tucker); Changing the Game: The…

  13. Identification of a new species of Aphis (Hemiptera: Aphididae) based on distinct morphology

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Aphis elena Lagos-Kutz and Voegtlin, sp. nov. (Hemiptera: Aphididae), is described from specimens collected in Illinois, USA, on the North American native plant, Pycnanthemum virginianum (L.) T. Dur. & B.D. Jacks. ex B.L. Rob. & Fernald (Family: Lamiaceae). Both apterous and alate viviparae are desc...

  14. Leadership Coaching That Transforms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aguilar, Elena

    2017-01-01

    Leading a school can be a lonely, challenging job, Elena Aguilar has found in her years coaching principals. Aguilar describes how coaching approach she's developed--transformational coaching--helps principals get three things most of them need: a neutral person they can talk with confidentially, job-embedded professional development, and a safe…

  15. Education and Thinking: The Role of Knowledge

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-21

    Middlefield Road, Suite 140 "Menlo Park, CA 94025 • 1 Dr. Douglas Towne Univ. of So. California Behavioral Technology Labs 1845 S. Elena Ave. Redondo Beach, CA...90277 1 Dr. Kurt Van Lehn Zerox PARC 3333 Coyote Hill Road Palo Alto, CA 94304 1 Dr. Keith T. Wescourt Perceptronics, Inc. 545 Middlefield Road

  16. Phytolith analysis of archeological soils: evidence for maize cultivation in formative ecuador.

    PubMed

    Pearsall, D M

    1978-01-13

    Soil samples from the archeological sites of Real Alto and OGCh-20, Santa Elena Peninsula, Ecuador, show the presence of cross-shaped silica bodies identifiable as maize (Zea mays L.) phytoliths by size comparison with known wild grass and maize phytoliths. These results support arguments for the cultivation of maize at 2450 B.C. in coastal Ecuador.

  17. Pretend Play in the Early Childhood Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McEntire, Nancy

    2009-01-01

    This article presents and summarizes recent resources related to pretend play in the early childhood classroom. These include "Contemporary Perspectives on Play in Early Childhood Education" by Olivia N. Sarachoe and Bernard Spodek; "Dramatic Play: Bring It Back" by Tammy Benson; and "The Importance of Being Playful" by Elena Bodrova and Deborah…

  18. Fields of Toil: A Migrant Family's Journey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valle, Isabel

    Journalist Isabel Valle lived and traveled for 1 year with the family of Raul and Maria Elena Martinez, migrant farmworkers who make their permanent home in south Texas. Her reports appeared every Sunday in the Walla Walla Union-Bulletin's award-winning series "Fields of Toil." This book compiles those weekly reports, which reveal the…

  19. Boundary Layer Dust Occurrence. 4. Atmospheric Dust over Selected Geographical Areas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-06-01

    s) San Marcos, Colombia 4 San Salvador/Ilopango, El Savador 4 Santa Elena, Venezuela 4 Santa Rosa de Copan, Honduras 4 Sariwon, North Korea 4...Ueckermunde, East Germany 4 Ulan Bator, Mongolia 4 Unqg, North Korea 4 Varna, Bulgaria 4 Venezia/San wicolo, Italy 4 Vienna, Austria 4 Villa Cisneros

  20. Fields of Toil: A Migrant Family's Journey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valle, Isabel

    Journalist Isabel Valle lived and traveled for 1 year with the family of Raul and Maria Elena Martinez, migrant farmworkers who make their permanent home in south Texas. Her reports appeared every Sunday in the Walla Walla Union-Bulletin's award-winning series "Fields of Toil." This book compiles those weekly reports, which reveal the…

  1. The Roots of Higher Education for Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bullard, Melissa Meriam

    1979-01-01

    Presented is a history of higher education for women that explores the changing circumstances that made it possible for a woman, Elena Lucrezia Cornaro Psicopia, to earn a university degree. Topics include the education of women in ancient society, Christianity's influence, the rise of universities, and changes caused by the humanists. (JMD)

  2. A Framework for Supporting Postsecondary Learners with Psychiatric Disabilities in Online Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grabinger, Scott

    2010-01-01

    Elena has a psychiatric disability: bipolar (manic/depressive) disorder. Daniele suffers from depression. Both are serious cognitive disorders that have significant effects on learning, especially learning online. One of the problems students with psychiatric disabilities encounter is finding support in online environments, especially when 10, 50,…

  3. The last glacial termination on the eastern flank of the central Patagonian Andes (47 ° S)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henríquez, William I.; Villa-Martínez, Rodrigo; Vilanova, Isabel; De Pol-Holz, Ricardo; Moreno, Patricio I.

    2017-07-01

    Few studies have examined in detail the sequence of events during the last glacial termination (T1) in the core sector of the Patagonian Ice Sheet (PIS), the largest ice mass in the Southern Hemisphere outside of Antarctica. Here we report results from Lago Edita (47°8' S, 72°25' W, 570 m a.s.l.), a small closed-basin lake located in a valley overridden by eastward-flowing Andean glaciers during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). The Lago Edita record shows glaciolacustrine sedimentation until 19 400 yr BP, followed by organic sedimentation in a closed-basin lake and a mosaic of cold-resistant hygrophilous conifers and rainforest trees, along with alpine herbs between 19 400 and 11 000 yr BP. Our data suggest that the PIS retreated at least ˜ 90 km from its LGM limit between ˜ 21 000 and 19 400 yr BP and that scattered, low-density populations of cold-resistant hygrophilous conifers, rainforest trees, high-Andean and steppe herbs thrived east of the Andes during the LGM and T1, implying high precipitation levels and southern westerly wind (SWW) influence at 47° S. The conifer Podocarpus nubigena increased between 14 500 and 13 000 yr BP, suggesting even stronger SWW influence during the Antarctic Cold Reversal, after which it declined and persisted until 11 000 yr BP. Large increases in arboreal pollen at ˜ 13 000 and ˜ 11 000 yr BP led to the establishment of forests near Lago Edita between 10 000 and 9000 yr BP, suggesting a rise in the regional tree line along the eastern Andean slopes driven by warming pulses at ˜ 13 000 and ˜ 11 000 yr BP and a subsequent decline in SWW influence at ˜ 11 000 yr BP. We propose that the PIS imposed a regional cooling signal along its eastern, downwind margin through T1 that lasted until the separation of the northern and southern Patagonian ice fields along the Andes during the Younger Dryas period. We posit that the withdrawal of glacial and associated glaciolacustrine environments through T1 provided a route for the

  4. A survey of scale insects in soil samples from Europe (Hemiptera, Coccomorpha).

    PubMed

    Kaydan, Mehmet Bora; Benedicty, Zsuzsanna Konczné; Kiss, Balázs; Szita, Éva

    2016-01-01

    In the last decades, several expeditions were organized in Europe by the researchers of the Hungarian Natural History Museum to collect snails, aquatic insects and soil animals (mites, springtails, nematodes, and earthworms). In this study, scale insect (Hemiptera: Coccomorpha) specimens extracted from Hungarian Natural History Museum soil samples (2970 samples in total), all of which were collected using soil and litter sampling devices, and extracted by Berlese funnel, were examined. From these samples, 43 scale insect species (Acanthococcidae 4, Coccidae 2, Micrococcidae 1, Ortheziidae 7, Pseudococcidae 21, Putoidae 1 and Rhizoecidae 7) were found in 16 European countries. In addition, a new species belonging to the family Pseudococcidae, Brevennia larvalis Kaydan, sp. n. and a new species of Ortheziidae, Ortheziola editae Szita & Konczné Benedicty, sp. n. are described and illustrated based on the adult female stage. Revised keys to the adult females of Brevennia and Ortheziola are presented.

  5. A survey of scale insects in soil samples from Europe (Hemiptera, Coccomorpha)

    PubMed Central

    Kaydan, Mehmet Bora; Benedicty, Zsuzsanna Konczné; Kiss, Balázs; Szita, Éva

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In the last decades, several expeditions were organized in Europe by the researchers of the Hungarian Natural History Museum to collect snails, aquatic insects and soil animals (mites, springtails, nematodes, and earthworms). In this study, scale insect (Hemiptera: Coccomorpha) specimens extracted from Hungarian Natural History Museum soil samples (2970 samples in total), all of which were collected using soil and litter sampling devices, and extracted by Berlese funnel, were examined. From these samples, 43 scale insect species (Acanthococcidae 4, Coccidae 2, Micrococcidae 1, Ortheziidae 7, Pseudococcidae 21, Putoidae 1 and Rhizoecidae 7) were found in 16 European countries. In addition, a new species belonging to the family Pseudococcidae, Brevennia larvalis Kaydan, sp. n. and a new species of Ortheziidae, Ortheziola editae Szita & Konczné Benedicty, sp. n. are described and illustrated based on the adult female stage. Revised keys to the adult females of Brevennia and Ortheziola are presented. PMID:27081335

  6. Status of fish communities in the Rio Grande, Big Bend National Park, Texas - comparison before and after Spring 2003 period of low flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moring, J. Bruce

    2005-01-01

    During 2003–04 the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the National Park Service, re-evaluated the status of fish communities in three reaches of the Rio Grande in Big Bend National Park that originally were evaluated when the three reaches were established for study in 1999. The objective was to determine whether there were measurable differences between 1999 and 2003–04 (referred to as 2004) fish community status that likely are attributable to a rare 58-day period of low flow (less than 1 cubic meter per second) in spring 2003 at the Johnson Ranch gaging station on the Rio Grande in Big Bend National Park. The total number of fish species collected at all three sites (Boquillas, Johnson Ranch, and Santa Elena) in 1999 was greater than in 2004. The number of fish species collected at the Boquillas site in 1999 (10) was twice that collected in 2004; the number of species collected at the Johnson Ranch site in 1999 (nine) was almost twice that collected in 2004 (five). In contrast, the numbers at the Santa Elena site were nearly the same, 15 species in 1999, 14 in 2004. Percent community similarity for the Boquillas site is 8.04, for the Johnson Ranch site, 6.65, and for the Santa Elena site, 47.6, which indicates considerably more similarity between the 1999 and 2004 fish communities at the Santa Elena site than for the Boquillas and Johnson Ranch sites. At the Boquillas and Johnson Ranch sites, the fish communities shifted from small minnow (Cyprinidae) dominated in 1999 to largely gar (Lepisosteidae) and catfish (Ictaluridae) dominated in 2004. In contrast, no such shift occurred at the Santa Elena site between 1999 and 2004. Differences in flow conditions between the two downstream sites and the Santa Elena site might account for the dissimilar findings. The findings of the study provide some evidence that the spring 2003 period of low flow affected fish communities, but the findings are not definitive as other factors such as increased salinity

  7. A model for the Holocene extinction of the mammal megafauna in Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ficcarelli, G.; Coltorti, M.; Moreno-Espinosa, M.; Pieruccini, P. L.; Rook, L.; Torre, D.

    2003-03-01

    This paper presents the results of multidisciplinary research in the Ecuadorian coastal regions, with particular emphasis on the Santa Elena Peninsula. The new evidence, together with previous data gathered on the Ecuadorian cordillera during the last 12 years, allows us to formulate a model that accounts for most of the mammal megafauna extinction at the Pleistocene/Holocene transition. After the illustration of geomorphological and paleontological evidences of the area of the Santa Elena Peninsula (and other sites), and of a summary of the paleoclimatic data, the main results and conclusions of this work are: (1) Late Pleistocene mammal assemblages survived in the Ecuadorian coast until the Early Holocene sea level rise; (2) Prior to the extinction of most of the megafauna elements (mastodons, ground sloths, equids, sabre-tooth felids), the mammal communities at Santa Elena Peninsula comprise elements with differing habitat requirements, attesting conditions of high biological pressure; (3) At the El Cautivo site (Santa Elena Peninsula), we have discovered Holocene sediments containing the first known occurrences in Ecuador of lithic artifacts that are associated with mammal megafauna remains; (4) During the last 10,000 years, the coastal region of Ecuador underwent significant changes in vegetation cover. At the Pleistocene/Holocene transition the climate changed from very arid conditions to humid conditions. Our data indicates that the megafauna definitively abandoned the Cordillera areas around 12,000 yr BP due to t he increasing aridity, and subsequently migrated to coastal areas where ecological conditions still were suitable, Santa Elena Peninsula and mainly Amazonian areas being typical. We conclude that the unusual high faunal concentrations and the change to dense vegetation cover (due to a rapid increase in precipitation in the lower Holocene) at 8000-6000 yr BP, caused the final collapse and extinction of most elements of the mammal megafauna

  8. Bernardino Ramazzini rests in Padua.

    PubMed

    Zanchin, Giorgio; Capitanio, Mariatonia; Panetto, Monica; Visentin, Guido; Marin, Vito Terrbile Wiel

    2005-06-01

    The founder of occupational medicine, Bernardino Ramazzini (1633-1714) was buried, according to contemporary sources, in the church of Beata Elena Enselmini in Padua. In 1914 Arnaldo Maggiora, Professor of Public Health, examined the remains buried in that tomb, but failed to confirm the presence of the corpse of Ramazzini. THe current study aims to clarify the issue. Our investigations included an anthropological examination and radiocarbon dating of the exhumed remains, along with a careful review of written sources. The discrepancies between the identification of 1914 and our own findings; the historical research, the burial site within a convent of nuns, for whom we know Ramazzini to have been the doctor; the age of the bones and the rarity of the octogenarian at that time and the radiocarbon results, confirm the traditional belief that the mortal remains of the great physician from Carpi reset "sine titulo" in the ancient setting of Beata Elena Enselmini.

  9. Recognize sex work as legitimate work.

    PubMed

    Reynaga, Elena

    2008-12-01

    It is not sex work per se that makes sex workers vulnerable to HIV, but rather the policies that repress them. In this article, based on her presentation at a plenary session at the conference, Elena Reynaga, who is a sex worker, describes how these policies deprive sex workers of their rights and subject them to physical and sexual violence. The author concludes that at the heart of the problem lies the fact that sex work is not recognized as legitimate work.

  10. Antenna Development for Multifunctional Armor Applications Using Embedded Spin-Torque Nano-Oscillator (STNO) as a Microwave Detector

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-09

    MULTIFUNCTIONAL ARMOR APPLICATIONS USING EMBEDDED SPIN-TORQUE NANO -OSCILLATOR (STNO) AS A MICROWAVE DETECTOR Elena Bankowski, PhD Thomas Meitzler, PhD...Rochester, MI ABSTRACT Recent advances in spintronics resulted in the development of a new class of radiation-resistant nano -sized microwave devices...spin-torque nano -oscillators (STNO). To use these novel nano -scale devices in wireless communications system as either microwave sources or detectors

  11. Decentralized Riemannian Particle Filtering with Applications to Multi-Agent Localization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-14

    Electrical Engineer- ing, 1999. 34. Berlinet, A. and I. Vajda. “About the Asymptotic Accuracy of Barron Density Esti- mates”. IEEE Transactions on...to Make Sense of Numbers”. Comments in: Science, 286:1460–1466, November 1999. 80. Deza, Elena and Michel Marie Deza. Dictionary of Distances...Stats., 6:1189–1242, 1975. 175 96. Émery, Michel . Stochastic Calculus in Manifolds. Springer-Verlag, Berlin, 1989. With an appendix by P. -A. Meyer

  12. Four new species of Aphelinidae (Hymenoptera: Chalcidoidea) from Mexico.

    PubMed

    Myartseva, Svetlana Nikolaevna; Ruíz-Cancino, Enrique; Coronado-Blanco, Juana María

    2013-01-01

    Four new species of Encarsia Förster (Hymenoptera: Aphelinidae) from Mexico are described--E. albata Myartseva sp. n. (State of Nuevo León), E. barracas Myartseva sp. n. (State of Baja California Sur), E. chichenitza Myartseva sp. n. (State of Yucatán) and E. elenae Myartseva sp. n. (State of Tamaulipas). A key to the species of Encarsia in Mexico published in 2012 is modified to include the newly described species.

  13. Expedition 41 Preflight

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-09-23

    Expedition 41 Flight Engineer Barry Wilmore gets his hair cut at the Cosmonaut Hotel, on Tuesday, Sept. 23, 2014, at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. Launch of the Soyuz is scheduled for Sept. 26 and will send Barry Wilmore of NASA, Soyuz Commander Alexander Samokutyaev of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos), and Flight Engineer Elena Serova of Roscosmos to the International Space Station for a five and a half month stay. Photo Credit: (NASA/Dr. Peter Bauer)

  14. Crewmember activity in the Spacehab module

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-05-29

    STS084-301-014 (15-24 May 1997) --- Zero-gravity adds a flavor of confusion to this 35mm frame, photographed onboard the Spacehab Double Module during a break in transfer operations of supplies for the STS-84 mission. For orientation purposes, the picture should be held with the glovebox positioned vertically on the right side of the frame. The crew members pictured, from top to bottom, are Elena V. Kondakova, Jean-Francois Clervoy and Edward T. Lu.

  15. Expedition 41 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-09-24

    Expedition 41 Soyuz Commander Alexander Samokutyaev of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) and Flight Engineer Elena Serova of Roscosmos hold up tiger toys that will be carried with them to the International Space Station to commemorate International Tiger Day at a press conference held at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan on Wednesday, Sept. 24, 2014. The mission is set to launch Sept. 26 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  16. Preparation of Optically Transparent Films of Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and Montmorillonite

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-11-01

    methacrylate] [PMMA] and Montmorillonite DISTRIBUTION: Approved for public release, distribution unlimited This paper is part of the following report...Society V6.4 Preparation of Optically Transparent Films of Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and Montmorillonite Elena Vasiliul, Chyi-Shan Wang"’ 2...exchanged with 1.40 meq/g of dimethyl dehydrogenated tallow ammonium from a sodium montmorillonite , Cloisite Na+ (CNa). Since the cation-exchange

  17. 76 FR 29257 - Accreditation and Approval of Inspectorate America Corporation, as a Commercial Gauger and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-20

    ...Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to 19 CFR 151.12 and 19 CFR 151.13, Inspectorate America Corporation, 4717 Santa Elena, Corpus Christi, TX 78405, has been approved to gauge and accredited to test petroleum and petroleum products for customs purposes, in accordance with the provisions of 19 CFR 151.12 and 19 CFR 151.13. Anyone wishing to employ this entity to conduct laboratory analyses......

  18. Expedition 41 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-09-24

    NASA Expedition 41 backup crew member Flight Engineer Scott Kelly of NASA answers a question during a press conference Wednesday, Sept. 24, 2014 at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Expedition 41 Flight Engineer Barry Wilmore of NASA, Soyuz Commander Alexander Samokutyaev of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos), and Flight Engineer Elena Serova of Roscosmos are set to launch Sept. 26 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  19. Expedition 41 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-09-24

    Expedition 41 Flight Engineer Barry Wilmore of NASA answers a question during a press conference on Wednesday, Sept. 24, 2014, at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Launch of the Soyuz rocket is scheduled for Sept. 26 and will carry Wilmore, Elena Serova of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos), and Alexander Samokutyaev of Roscosmos into orbit to begin their five and a half month mission on the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  20. The Road to Remarkable: Directed by Vision, Driven by Strength--2010 Five-Year Report of the Policy and Planning Board

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The 2010 Policy and Planning Board of the American Psychological Association (APA) was chaired by Elena J. Eisman, EdD. Other members of the board included Gwyneth M. Boodoo, PhD; G. Rita Dudley-Grant, PhD; Beverly Greene, PhD; Christopher W. Loftis, PhD; Michael J. Murphy, PhD; Paul D. Nelson, PhD; Kurt Salzinger, PhD; and Michael Wertheimer,…

  1. The Road to Remarkable: Directed by Vision, Driven by Strength--2010 Five-Year Report of the Policy and Planning Board

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The 2010 Policy and Planning Board of the American Psychological Association (APA) was chaired by Elena J. Eisman, EdD. Other members of the board included Gwyneth M. Boodoo, PhD; G. Rita Dudley-Grant, PhD; Beverly Greene, PhD; Christopher W. Loftis, PhD; Michael J. Murphy, PhD; Paul D. Nelson, PhD; Kurt Salzinger, PhD; and Michael Wertheimer,…

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Hubble Tarantula Treasury Project (HTTP). III. (Sabbi+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabbi, E.; Lennon, D. J.; Anderson, J.; Cignoni, M.; van der Marel, R. P.; Zaritsky, D.; de Marchi, G.; Panagia, N.; Gouliermis, D. A.; Grebel, E. K.; Gallagher, J. S., III; Smith, L. J.; Sana, H.; Aloisi, A.; Tosi, M.; Evans, C. J.; Arab, H.; Boyer, M.; de Mink, S. E.; Gordon, K.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Larsen, S. S.; Ryon, J. E.; Zeidler, P.

    2016-02-01

    Hubble Tarantula Treasury Project (HTTP; HST 12939, PI Elena Sabbi + HST 12499, PI Danny Lennon) was awarded 60 orbits of HST time in cycle 20 to survey the entire Tarantula Nebula (30 Doradus), using both the UVIS and the IR channels of the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3), and, in parallel, the Wide Field Channel (WFC) of the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS). See log of the observations (from 2011 Oct 03 to 2013 Sep 17) in table 1. (2 data files).

  3. Chechnya and Russia: Conflict and Self-Determination

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-12-01

    both sides on 25 August 1996. An unofficially translated english text version is available in Diane Curran, Fiona Hill, and Elena...Lieven, 306. 79 Hugh Seton- Watson , The Russian Empire: 1801-1917 (Oxford: The Clarendon Press, 1967), 183. 80 Seely, 32. 29 2...81 Ibid., 39. 82 Ibid., 32. 83 Seton- Watson , 292-293. 84 Gall and de Waal, 48. 30 a reserve army, regulated prices for

  4. Expedition 41 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-09-24

    Expedition 41 prime crew members, Flight Engineer Barry Wilmore of NASA, left, Soyuz Commander Alexander Samokutyaev of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos), center, and Flight Engineer Elena Serova of Roscosmos, right, pose for a photo at the conclusion of the press conference held at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan on Wednesday, Sept. 24, 2014. Their mission to the International Space Station is set to launch Sept. 26 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  5. Expedition 41 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-09-24

    Expedition 41 Flight Engineer Barry Wilmore of NASA, left, Soyuz Commander Alexander Samokutyaev of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos), center, and Flight Engineer Elena Serova of Roscosmos, right, wave to the crowd at the conclusion of the press conference, Wednesday, Sept. 24, 2014, at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. The mission to the International Space Station is set to launch Sept. 26 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  6. Expedition 41 Crew Wave

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-09-25

    Expedition 41 Soyuz Commander Alexander Samokutyaev of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos), bottom, Flight Engineer Barry Wilmore of NASA, middle, and Elena Serova of Roscosmos, top, wave farewell prior to boarding the Soyuz TMA-14M spacecraft for launch, Thursday, Sept. 25, 2014 at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. Samokutyaev, Wilmore, and Serova will spend the next five and a half months aboard the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  7. The Retention of Female Unrestricted Line Officers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    PS y• s’TANTIA PER SCIENTIAM NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA THESIS THE RETENTION OF FEMALE UNRESTRICTED LINE OFFICERS by Elena G...Title (Mix case letters) 5. FUNDING NUMBERS The Retention of Female Unrestricted Line Officers 6. AUTHOR(S) 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND...public release; distribution is unlimited. 13. ABSTRACT (maximum 200 words) This thesis analyzes the retention of female Naval officers, focusing on the

  8. An unusually rich scuttle fly fauna (Diptera, Phoridae) from north of the Arctic Circle in the Kola Peninsula, N. W. Russia.

    PubMed

    Disney, R H L

    2013-01-01

    64 species of Phoridae, in 6 genera, are reported from the Kola Peninsula, north of the Arctic Circle. The new species Megaselia elenae and Megaselia kozlovi are described. 33 species of Megaselia, only known from females, are given code numbers. Keys to the species of all the females of Megaselia and Phora are provided; and also a key to the males European Megaselia species with a notopleural cleft.

  9. An experiment in hurricane track prediction using parallel computing methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, Chang G.; Jwo, Jung-Sing; Lakshmivarahan, S.; Dhall, S. K.; Lewis, John M.; Velden, Christopher S.

    1994-01-01

    The barotropic model is used to explore the advantages of parallel processing in deterministic forecasting. We apply this model to the track forecasting of hurricane Elena (1985). In this particular application, solutions to systems of elliptic equations are the essence of the computational mechanics. One set of equations is associated with the decomposition of the wind into irrotational and nondivergent components - this determines the initial nondivergent state. Another set is associated with recovery of the streamfunction from the forecasted vorticity. We demonstrate that direct parallel methods based on accelerated block cyclic reduction (BCR) significantly reduce the computational time required to solve the elliptic equations germane to this decomposition and forecast problem. A 72-h track prediction was made using incremental time steps of 16 min on a network of 3000 grid points nominally separated by 100 km. The prediction took 30 sec on the 8-processor Alliant FX/8 computer. This was a speed-up of 3.7 when compared to the one-processor version. The 72-h prediction of Elena's track was made as the storm moved toward Florida's west coast. Approximately 200 km west of Tampa Bay, Elena executed a dramatic recurvature that ultimately changed its course toward the northwest. Although the barotropic track forecast was unable to capture the hurricane's tight cycloidal looping maneuver, the subsequent northwesterly movement was accurately forecasted as was the location and timing of landfall near Mobile Bay.

  10. Population parameters and dynamic pool models of commercial fishes in the Beibu Gulf, northern South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xuehui; Qiu, Yongsong; Du, Feiyan; Lin, Zhaojin; Sun, Dianrong; Huang, Shuolin

    2012-01-01

    Length-frequency data of eight commercial fish species in the Beibu Gulf (Golf of Tonkin), northern South China Sea, were collected during 2006-2007. Length-weight relationships and growth and mortality parameters were analyzed using FiSAT II software. Five species had isometric growth, two species had negative allometric growth, and one species had positive allometric growth. Overall, the exploitation rates of the eight species were lower in 2006-2007 than in 1997-1999: for four species ( Saurida tumbil, Saurida undosquamis, Argyrosomus macrocephalus, and Nemipterus virgatus) it was lower in 2006-2007 than in 1997-1999, for two species ( Parargyrops edita and Trichiurus haumela) it remained the same, and for the other two species ( Trachurus japonicus and Decapterus maruadsi) it was higher in 2006-2007 than in 1997-1999. The exploitation rates might have declined because of the decline in fishing intensity caused by high crude oil prices. The optimum exploitation rate, estimated using Beverton-Holt dynamic pool models, indicated that although fishes in the Beibu Gulf could sustain high exploitation rates, the under-size fishes at first capture resulted in low yields. To increase the yield per recruitment, it is more effective to increase the size at first capture than to control fishing effort.

  11. Petroleum geology of Pacific margin of Central America and northern South America, from Guatemala to Ecuador

    SciTech Connect

    Scrutton, M.E.; Escalante, G.F.

    1986-07-01

    Exploration for hydrocarbons along the Pacific margin of Central America and northern South America has been limited and spasmodic. Less than 100 exploration wells have been drilled, with nearly 50 of these being in the Santa Elena, Progreso, and Guayas basins in Ecuador. Shows have been reported in some wells, and a few oil seeps are known. The only commercial production established to date has been from the Santa Elena Peninsula in Ecuador in the extreme south of the study area. Understanding of the geology in this part of the continental margin is incomplete at best. This paper reviews present-day knowledge in an attempt to define the sedimentary basins better, to characterize their structure and stratigraphy, and to assess their petroleum prospects. The area of continental margin reviewed is to the north, located northwest of the trench system where oceanic crust of the Cocos plate subducts under the Caribbean plate, and to the south, where the northern part of the Nazca plate collides with the South American plate. This plate tectonic setting forms the framework on which local structural and sedimentary events have created a series of relatively small trench-slope and forearc basins in what is now the coastal plain and adjacent offshore area of Central and South America, south or west of a line of mountain ranges with active volcanism. Sedimentary fill is generally of Tertiary age. The basins and subbasins recognized and described include: in Ecuador - Guayas, Santa Elena, Progreso, Valdivia, Bajo Grande, Manta, Muisne-Esmeraldas, and Borbon; in Colombia - Choco-Pacific; in Panama - Gulf of Panama basin complex (Santiago, Tonosi, Sambu), and Burica-Chiriqui; in Costa Rica - Terraba and Coronado/Tempisque; in Nicaragua - San Juan del Sur; and in the Honduras, El Salvador, and Guatemala - the Pacific coastal basin.

  12. Extremely low prevalence of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis in frog populations from neotropical dry forest of Costa Rica supports the existence of a climatic refuge from disease.

    PubMed

    Zumbado-Ulate, Héctor; Bolaños, Federico; Gutiérrez-Espeleta, Gustavo; Puschendorf, Robert

    2014-12-01

    Population declines and extinctions of numerous species of amphibians, especially stream-breeding frogs, have been linked to the emerging infectious disease chytridiomycosis, caused by the chytrid fungus, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis. In Central America, most of the 34 species of the Craugastor punctariolus species group have disappeared in recent years in high- and low-elevation rainforests. Distribution models for B. dendrobatidis and the continuous presence of the extirpated stream-dwelling species, Craugastor ranoides, in the driest site of Costa Rica (Santa Elena Peninsula), suggest that environmental conditions might restrict the growth and development of B. dendrobatidis, existing as a refuge from chytridiomycosis-driven extinction. We conducted field surveys to detect and quantify the pathogen using Real-time PCR in samples from 15 species of frogs in two locations of tropical dry forest. In Santa Elena Peninsula, we swabbed 310 frogs, and only one sample of the species, C. ranoides, tested positive for B. dendrobatidis (prevalence <0.1%). In Santa Rosa Station, we swabbed 100 frogs, and nine samples from three species tested positive (prevalence = 9.0%). We failed to detect signs of chytridiomycosis in any of the 410 sampled frogs, and low quantities of genetic equivalents (between 0 and 1073) were obtained from the ten positive samples. The difference in the prevalence between locations might be due not only to the hotter and drier conditions of Santa Elena Peninsula but also to the different compositions of species in both locations. Our results suggest that B. dendrobatidis is at the edge of its distribution in these dry and hot environments of tropical dry forest. This study supports the existence of climatic refuges from chytridiomycosis and highlights the importance of tropical dry forest conservation for amphibians in the face of epidemic disease.

  13. The Progreso Basin Province of Northwestern Peru and Southwestern Ecuador: Neogene and Cretaceous-Paleogene Total Petroleum Systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Higley, Debra K.

    2004-01-01

    The Progreso Basin province (6083) in northwestern Peru and southwestern Ecuador consists of the Paleogene Santa Elena block and Peru Bank, and the Neogene Tumbes-Progreso subbasin. The Santa Elena block and Peru Bank are part of the Cretaceous-Paleogene Total Petroleum System (TPS)(608302), which contains the Cretaceous-Paleogene Santa Elena Block Assessment Unit (60830201). The Tumbes- Progreso subbasin includes the Neogene TPS (608301) and associated Neogene Pull-Apart Basin Assessment Unit (60830101). The complex tectonic history of the Progreso Basin province influenced depositional and erosional patterns across the region, and also the location, timing, and types of seals, traps, possible source and reservoir rocks, and hydrocarbon generation and migration. Marine shales that are interbedded with and overlie reservoir intervals are the probable hydrocarbon source rocks. Timing of hydrocarbon generation and migration was probably Miocene and younger, following creation of the Tumbes-Progreso subbasin by movement along the Dolores-Guayaquil megashear. More than 220 million barrels of oil (MMBO) and 255 billion cubic feet of gas (BCFG) have been produced from the Progreso Basin province. The means of estimated recoverable oil, gas, and natural gas liquids (NGL) resources from undiscovered fields in the province are 237 MMBO, 695 BCFG, and 32 MMB NGL, respectively. The means of estimated recoverable oil, gas, and NGL resources from undiscovered onshore fields are 45 MMBO, 113 BCFG, and 5 MMBNGL, and from undiscovered offshore fields are 192 BBO, 582 BCFG, and 27 MMBNGL. These are USGS grown undiscovered resources that were determined by using a minimum field size of 1 million barrels of oil equivalent.

  14. Ecuador rural electrification. Project impact evaluation report 21

    SciTech Connect

    Kessler, J.L.; Ballantyne, J.; Maushammer, R.; Simancas, N.R.

    1981-01-01

    The direct and indirect benefits of rural electrification in Ecuador warrant A.I.D.'s continued sponsorship of such programs. This assessment of A.I.D.'s 1964-75 sponsorship of four electrification projects in Ecuador concludes that, although implemented along with other development projects such as road construction, the program was a key factor in upgrading the towns of Santa Elena, Santo Domingo de los Colorados, Daule, and Ambato into regional market and service centers. The main benefits of this program, which was not originally designed to benefit the poor, were job creation, access to agricultural product processing facilities, and increased opportunities for small commercial enterprises.

  15. jsc2014e081385

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-09-21

    2014-09-21-13-30-24 At the Korolev Museum in the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan, Expedition 41/42 Flight Engineer Barry Wilmore of NASA signs a wall mural bearing a picture of a Soyuz rocket launch Sept. 21 during ceremonial pre-flight activities. Wilmore, Soyuz Commander Alexander Samokutyaev of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) and Flight Engineer Elena Serova of Roscosmos will launch on Sept. 26, Kazakh time, in the Soyuz to begin a 5 ½ month mission on the International Space Station. Serova will become the fourth Russian woman to fly in space and the first to live and work on the station. NASA/Victor Zelentsov

  16. Commission 20: Position and Motion of Minor Planets, Comets and Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valsecchi, Giovanni B.; Fernandez, Julio; Bowell, Edward L. G.; Arlot, Jean-Eudes; Bowell, Edward L. G.; Chernetenko, Yulia A.; Chesley, Steven R.; Lazzaro, Daniela; Lemaitre, Anne; Marsden, Brian G.; Muinonen, Karri; Rickman, Hans; Tholen, David J.; Yoshikawa, Makoto

    2007-12-01

    A total of 16 among the new IAU members have asked to join Commission 20; they are: Jerome Berthier, Nicholas J. Cooper, Marco Delbò, Romina P. Di Sisto, Michael W. Evans, Tetsuharu Fuse, Ludmila Hudkova, Yurij N. Krugly, Elena N. Polyakhova, Zhanna Pozhalova, Alessandro Rossi, Qi Rui, Jonathan D. Shanklin, Slawomira E. Szutowicz, Gino Tuccari and Hong-Suh Yim. Moreover, two requests to join the Commission have been received by astronomers that are already IAU members: Peter De Cat and Ricardo A. Gil-Hutton.

  17. New Approach for Producing and Purifying IL-15 Heterodimers That Have Potent Immune Effect | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Nancy Parrish, Staff Writer Cytokines are proteins that play a crucial role in the human immune system by delivering messages that trigger the activation of immune cells to fight off attacks from viruses or other invaders. Cristina Bergamaschi, Ph.D., NCI Center for Cancer Research, has been studying the mechanism of expression and function of a cytokine known as interleukin-15 (IL-15) for the last five years, in collaboration with Elena Chertova, Ph.D., and other researchers in the Retroviral Protein Chemistry Core (RPCC) of the AIDS and Cancer Virus Program (ACVP), Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research.

  18. jsc2014e079818

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-09-05

    2596: At the Kremlin Wall in Moscow’s Red Square, Expedition 41/42 Soyuz Commander Alexander Samokutyaev of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) lays flowers where Russian space icons are interred in a traditional ceremony Sept. 5. Samokutyaev, Flight Engineer Barry Wilmore of NASA and Elena Serova of Roscosmos will launch from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on Sept. 26, Kazakh time, in their Soyuz TMA-14M spacecraft for a 5 ½ month mission on the International Space Station. Serova will become the fourth Russian woman to fly in space and the first Russian woman to conduct a long duration mission on the station. NASA/Stephanie Stoll

  19. jsc2014e079817

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-09-05

    2580: At the Kremlin Wall in Moscow’s Red Square, Expedition 41/42 Flight Engineer Barry Wilmore of NASA lays flowers where Russian space icons are interred in a traditional ceremony Sept. 5. Wilmore, Soyuz Commander Alexander Samokutyaev of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) and Elena Serova of Roscosmos will launch from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on Sept. 26, Kazakh time, in their Soyuz TMA-14M spacecraft for a 5 ½ month mission on the International Space Station. Serova will become the fourth Russian woman to fly in space and the first Russian woman to conduct a long duration mission on the station. NASA/Stephanie Stoll

  20. jsc2014e079814

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-09-05

    2550: Expedition 41/42 Flight Engineer Elena Serova of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) lays flowers at the Kremlin Wall in Moscow’s Red Square where Russian space icons are interred in a traditional ceremony Sept. 5. Serova, Soyuz Commander Alexander Samokutyaev of Roscosmos and NASA Flight Engineer Barry Wilmore will launch from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on Sept. 26, Kazakh time, in their Soyuz TMA-14M spacecraft for a 5 ½ month mission on the International Space Station. Serova will become the fourth Russian woman to fly in space and the first Russian woman to conduct a long duration mission on the station. NASA/Stephanie Stoll

  1. Expedition 41 Crew Door Signing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-09-25

    Expedition 41 Flight Engineer Barry Wilmore of NASA performs the traditional door signing at the Cosmonaut Hotel prior to departing the hotel for launch in a Soyuz rocket with fellow crew mates, Soyuz Commander Alexander Samokutyaev and Flight Engineer Elena Serova of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos), Thursday, Sept. 25, 2014 in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Launch of the Soyuz rocket is scheduled for the early hours of Sept. 26 Kazakhstan time and will carry Wilmore, Samokutyaev, and Serova into orbit to begin their five and a half month mission on the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  2. Paleocene-Eocene Paleoclimatic Event Records in the Chicxulub Crater (Yucatan, Gulf of Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Cruz, L. L.; Fucugauchi, J. U.

    2013-05-01

    Chicxulub crater was formed by an asteroid impact on the Yucatan carbonate platform about 65.5 Ma ago at the Cretaceous/Paleogene (K/Pg) boundary. After crater formation, carbonate deposition gradually covered the structure, preserving a largely undisturbed sedimentary record for the Paleogene. As part of the studies, drilling programs with continuous core recovery have been conducted over the past years. The cores preserve a record of post-impact processes, life recovery in target area, platform evolution and emergence, sea-level changes and the paleoceanographic and paleoclimatic conditions in the region. To contribute to the knowledge of the Paleocene-Eocene warming and changes in oceanic hydrography, we carried out x-ray fluorescence and stable oxygen and carbon isotope studies of the carbonate sections on top of the impact breccias sampled in the Santa Elena and Yaxcopoil-1 boreholes. The Santa Elena borehole is located 110 km radial distance from crater center, outside the crater rim. Yaxcopoil-1 borehole is located 62 km away from crater center in the terrace zone inside the crater rim. The Cenozoic sequence is about 332 m and 796 m thick in the Santa Elena and Yaxcopoil-1 boreholes. The stable isotope records are correlated to data on marine sediment cores from the ocean drilling projects for the Paleocene and Eocene, which permit inferences on the paleoceanographic and paleoclimatic reconstruction as well as additional stratigraphic constraints for the sections. The positive bulk carbon isotope (δ13C) values in the basal Paleocene sediments reflect a return or enhancement of ocean productivity following plankton extinctions following the K/Pg impact. The Paleocene represents a time of global warmth temperatures with low vertical and latitudinal gradients in the oceans, likely resulting from elevated CO2 levels. δ13C values in the Santa Elena borehole show increases between 3 and 4 % by the late Paleocene that decrease to levels prevailing before the K

  3. Advances in Disordered Systems, Random Processes and Some Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contucci, Pierluigi; Giardinà, Cristian

    2016-12-01

    Preface; 1. Topological field theory of data: mining data beyond complex networks? Mario Rasetti and Emanuela Merelli; 2. A random walk in diffusion phenomena and statistical mechanics Elena Agliari; 3. Legendre structures in statistical mechanics for ordered and disordered systems Francesco Guerra; 4. Extrema of log-correlated random variables: principles and examples Louis-Pierre Arguin; 5. Scaling limits, Brownian loops and conformal fields Federico Camia; 6. The Brownian web, the Brownian net, and their universality Emmanuel Schertzer, Rongfeng Sun and Jan M. Swart; Index.

  4. Beam preparation for studying the gravitational behavior of antimatter at rest (GBAR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunney, D.; Dupré, P.; Grandemange, P.; Manea, V.; Mortensen, T.; Cabaret, S.; Pitrel, S.; Comini, P.; Debu, P.; Liszkay, L.; Lotrus, P.; Pérez, P.; Rey, J.-M.; Reymond, J.-M.; Ruiz, N.; Sacquin, Y.; Vallage, B.; Brook-Roberge, D.; Hardy, Ph.

    2014-03-01

    The specific antiproton- and positron-beam requirements of the CERN AD-7 experiment, GBAR (Gravitational Behavior of Antimatter at Rest) are presented. GBAR will synthesize antihydrogen ions which will be sympathetically cooled before performing a free-fall experiment on the atom. Antiprotons delivered by CERN's ELENA facility in 100-keV, 300-ns pulses will be electrostatically decelerated and transformed to keV energies using a pulsed drift tube. Positrons are created using a linear electron accelerator and collected into a Penning-Malmberg trap. Descriptions of these ion optical systems are given along with the status.

  5. New Crew Launches to the ISS on This Week @NASA - September 26, 2014

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-09-26

    On September 25, Eastern time, NASA astronaut Barry Wilmore and his Expedition 41/42 crewmates, Alexander Samokutyaev and Elena Serova of the Russian Federal Space Agency, launched to the International Space Station aboard a Russian Soyuz spacecraft, from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. They arrived six hours later and were welcomed by the crew onboard the station, including NASA’s Reid Wiseman. Expedition 41/42 will spend about five-and-a-half months on the ISS. Also, Clinton Global Initiative, SpaceX Dragon arrives at ISS, MAVEN’s first Mars images, Curiosity drills at Mt. Sharp, New aeronautics technologies and more!

  6. Expedition 41 Pressure Check

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-09-25

    Expedition 41 Flight Engineer Barry Wilmore of NASA, right, waits to have his Russian Sokol suit pressure checked while Soyuz Commander Alexander Samokutyaev of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) has his suit checked on Thursday, Sept. 25, 2014, at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Launch of the Soyuz rocket is scheduled for the early hours of Sept. 26 (Kazakhstan time) and will carry Samokutyaev, Wilmore, and Flight Engineer Elena Serova of Roscosmos into orbit to begin their five and a half month mission on the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  7. ISS Expedition 43 Crew Departure from Russia

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-03-16

    NASA video file of ISS Expedition 43 crew departure from Russia on March 16, 2015 with crewmembers Scott Kelly, Gennady Padalka, and Mikhail Kornienko; and backupcrew Jeff Williams, Sergei Volkov and Alexie Ovchinin. Includes footage of crew and backup crew as the meet outside the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center (GCTC); ISS Expedition 42 crewmembers Elena Serova and Alexander Samokutyaev as they exits the GCTC; crew and backup crew with family, friends and officials as they walk to park, pose for photographs and offers short remarks; and finally the crew as they are leaving by bus.

  8. Expedition 42 Soyuz TMA-14M Landing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-03-11

    A Russian MI-8 Helicopter is seen through the airport bus decal a day before the Soyuz TMA-14M spacecraft landing with Expedition 42 commander Barry Wilmore of NASA, Alexander Samokutyaev of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) and Elena Serova of Roscosmos Wednesday, March 11, 2015 in Karaganda, Kazakhstan. NASA Astronaut Wilmore, Russian Cosmonauts Samokutyaev and Serova are returning after almost six months onboard the International Space Station where they served as members of the Expedition 41 and 42 crews. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  9. Expedition 42 Soyuz TMA-14M Landing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-03-12

    Russian ground support personnel assemble a portable medical tent at the Soyuz TMA-14M spacecraft landing site shortly after the capsule landed with Expedition 42 commander Barry Wilmore of NASA, Alexander Samokutyaev of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) and Elena Serova of Roscosmos near the town of Zhezkazgan, Kazakhstan on Thursday, March 12, 2015. NASA Astronaut Wilmore, Russian Cosmonauts Samokutyaev and Serova are returning after almost six months onboard the International Space Station where they served as members of the Expedition 41 and 42 crews. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  10. The Perseids Aug 11-12, 1996 in Bulgaria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bojurova, E.; Trukchev, I.

    As every year Astroclub "Canopus" organized an extended Perseid observing campaign. Members of the club took part in expedition to Avren village near Varna, at the National Astronomical Observatory (Rojen) and at the National Yought Astronomical Camp in Belite Brezi (South Bulgaria). Here we present some results derived on the basis of data obtained by Biliana Ognianova, Diana Tisheva, Diliana Antonova, Eva Bojurova, Elena Surbinska, Irena Stavreva, Katia Koleva, Lilia Porojanova, Anton Antonov, Denis Mechmedov, Doichin Docinski, Galin Genchev, Ivan Trukhchev, Valentin Velkov. More than 2000 Perseids were recorded. Some other showers were also observed.

  11. New crew launches to ISS on This Week @NASA - November 28, 2014

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-11-28

    NASA’s Terry Virts and Expedition 42/43 crewmates, Anton Shkaplerov of the Russian Federal Space Agency and the European Space Agency’s Samantha Cristoforetti, launched Nov. 23 at 4:01 p.m. Eastern Standard Time, from Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Almost six hours later, their Soyuz spacecraft docked to the International Space Station – where they joined Expedition 42 Commander Barry Wilmore of NASA, and Flight Engineers Alexander Samokutyaev and Elena Serova of Roscosmos – returning the station crew to its full complement of six people. Also, First 3-D printed object in space, Orion flight test update, New airborne Earth Science missions and Happy Thanksgiving from space!

  12. Designing Medical Facilities to Care for Patients with Highly Hazardous Communicable Diseases

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-07-14

    Schieffelin JS, Rubinson L, O’Dempsey T , Donovan SM, Bausch DG, Fowler RA, Fletcher TE. Being ready to treat Ebola virus disease patients. Am J Trop Med...Healthcare Facilities MARK G KORTEPETER MD, MPH1,2 ELENA H KWON, DO, MPH3 THEODORE J CIESLAK, MD1 1Department of Epidemiology University of...the Ebola outbreak.30,31,32 [REFs: Lowe - Am J Infect Control x 2] [REF - Jelden AmJInfectControl] In the old “slammer” model, this was not an issue

  13. New Approach for Producing and Purifying IL-15 Heterodimers That Have Potent Immune Effect | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Nancy Parrish, Staff Writer Cytokines are proteins that play a crucial role in the human immune system by delivering messages that trigger the activation of immune cells to fight off attacks from viruses or other invaders. Cristina Bergamaschi, Ph.D., NCI Center for Cancer Research, has been studying the mechanism of expression and function of a cytokine known as interleukin-15 (IL-15) for the last five years, in collaboration with Elena Chertova, Ph.D., and other researchers in the Retroviral Protein Chemistry Core (RPCC) of the AIDS and Cancer Virus Program (ACVP), Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research.

  14. STS-84 and Mir 23 crewmembers exchange gifts during meal after docking

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-05-17

    STS084-377-026 (15-24 May 1997) --- Cosmonaut Elena V. Kondakova opens a gift box and a number of tiny chocolate Space Shuttles free-float in Russia's Mir Space Station's Base Block. The STS-84 mission specialist and her crew mates had earlier presented the gift to the Mir-23 crew members, including Vasili Tsibliyev (right), mission commander. In the background are astronauts Eileen M. Collins, STS-84 pilot, and Jerry M. Linenger, mission specialist. Linenger was in his last days aboard Mir prior to returning to Earth with the STS-84 crew aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis.

  15. Expedition 41 Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-09-24

    Expedition 41 prime crew members, Flight Engineer Barry Wilmore of NASA, right, Soyuz Commander Alexander Samokutyaev of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos), center, and Flight Engineer Elena Serova of Roscosmos, left, pose for a photo with items they will take with them to the International Space Station at the conclusion of the press conference held at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan on Wednesday, Sept. 24, 2014. The mission is set to launch Sept. 26 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Photo Credit: (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  16. Classification of Murine Pulmonary Tumors —

    Cancer.gov

    This WEB site contains a digital atlas of virtual histological slides with representative mouse and human pulmonary proliferative lesions. It complements the paper "Classification of Proliferative Pulmonary Lesions of the Mouse: Recommendations of the Mouse Models of Human Cancers Consortium" by Alexander Yu. Nikitin, Ana Alcaraz, Miriam R. Anver, Roderick T. Bronson, Robert D. Cardiff, Darlene Dixon, Armando E. Fraire, Edward W. Gabrielson, William T. Gunning, Diana C. Haines, Matthew H. Kaufman, R. Ilona Linnoila, Robert R. Maronpot, Alan S. Rabson, Robert L. Reddick, Sabine Rehm, Nora Rozengurt, Hildegard M. Schuller, Elena N. Shmidt, William D. Travis, Jerrold M. Ward and Tyler Jacks published in Cancer Research 64: 2307-2316, 2004

  17. Tumor Suppressor Activity of the EphB2 Receptor in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-01

    Receptor in Prostate Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-06-1-0077 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6 . AUTHOR(S) Elena B. Pasquale...5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7 . PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER The Burnham...4 Body…………………………………………………………………………………….4 Key Research Accomplishments………………………………………….……… 7 Reportable Outcomes

  18. Timeline: iPSCs--The First Decade.

    PubMed

    Chari, Sheila; Mao, Steve

    2016-02-04

    Research into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) has expanded at a remarkable pace in the decade since Shinya Yamanaka and Kazutoshi Takahashi first reported their groundbreaking discovery in 2006. This Timeline highlights the key events in the development of this field, including basic insights into the production of iPSCs and how they have been applied to improve our understanding and treatment of human disease. To view this Timeline, open or download the PDF. You can also listen to the associated interview with Debbie Sweet, Editor of Cell Stem Cell, and Elena Porro, Editor of Cell. PAPERCLIP.

  19. jsc2014e079808

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-09-05

    2381: At the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center in Star City, Russia, Expedition 41/42 Flight Engineer Barry Wilmore of NASA signs a welcome book at the Gagarin Museum Sept. 5 in a traditional ceremony. Wilmore, Elena Serova of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) and Soyuz Commander Alexander Samokutyaev of Roscosmos (right) will launch from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on Sept. 26, Kazakh time, in their Soyuz TMA-14M spacecraft for a 5 ½ month mission on the International Space Station. Serova will become the fourth Russian woman to fly in space and the first Russian woman to conduct a long duration mission on the station. NASA/Stephanie Stoll

  20. Trace element fluxes and natural potential risks from 210Pb-dated sediment cores in lacustrine environments at the Central Mexican Plateau.

    PubMed

    Ontiveros-Cuadras, J F; Ruiz-Fernández, A C; Sanchez-Cabeza, J A; Pérez-Bernal, L H; Sericano, J L; Preda, M; Wee Kwong, L Liong; Páez-Osuna, F

    2014-01-15

    The accumulation, enrichment and provenance of selected trace metals (Ag, As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb, V and Zn) were studied in sediment cores collected from three lakes located in the Central Mexican Plateau, selected on the basis of their contrasting degree of urbanization: Santa Elena Lake, in a rural and remote area; El Tule Lake, in a rural and slightly urbanized area; and Chapala Lake, in a highly urbanized area. Grain size, magnetic susceptibility and sedimentary constituents such as organic carbon, calcium carbonate, as well as major (Al, Fe, Mn) and minor (Ca, Li, Rb, Sr, Th) elements were analyzed to explain the concentration trends of trace metals. Factor analysis (FA) was used to assess the provenance of the trace elements. The highest metal enrichment factor (EF) above natural concentration levels was found at Chapala Lake for Ag (EF = 3.9), although other trace element EF in all lakes was <2.0, indicating slight contamination. However, the concentration levels of Cr and Ni in all lakes, Hg and Zn in Chapala Lake, Cu in El Tule Lake and As in Santa Elena Lake were above international benchmarks for which adverse effects are expected to occur frequently, even for those metals only slightly enriched (e.g. As, Cr). Through FA, the terrigenous contribution was identified as the most important source of trace metals to the three lakes, most likely related to deforestation and erosion of the surrounding areas, followed by atmospheric transport of volcanic ashes, rather than to direct sources.

  1. The geomorphology of the Chandeleur Island Wetlands

    SciTech Connect

    Debusschere, K.; Penland, S.; Westphal, K. ); Handley, L. ); Michot, T. ); Reed, D.; Seal, R.

    1990-09-01

    The Chandeleur Islands represent the largest and oldest transgressive barrier island arc in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Generated by the transgressive submergence of the St. Bernard delta complex, the Chandeleur Islands form the protective geologic framework for one of the richest areas of salt marsh and seagrass flats in Louisiana. The Chandeleur barrier island arc is 60 km long and consists of five individual islands backed by a linear, multiple bar system enclosing a shallow basin floored by extensive seagrass flats. The northern part of the Chandeleur chain is the highest in relief, elevation, width, and habitat diversity. Nonstorm morphology is predominantly a combination of continuous dunes and dune terraces. Numerous washover channels and large washover fans extend into the backbarrier environment. Further south, the island width decreases and washover flats and terraces dominate the shoreline morphology In the southernmost section, the island arc is fragmented into a series of small islands and shoals separated by tidal inlets. Between 1984 and 1989, aerial videotape, aerial photographic, and bathymetric surveys were used to map and monitor the geomorphic changes occurring along the shoreline and in backbarrier areas. The aerial videotape mapping surveys focused on the impacts of hurricanes Danny, Elena, and Juan on the geomorphology of the islands. Videotape imagery was acquired in July 1984 and in July (prestorm), August (post-Danny), September (post-Elena), and November (post-Juan) 1985. A coastal geomorphic classification was developed to map the spatial and temporal landscape changes between surveys.

  2. Physics Climate as Experienced by LGBT+ Physicists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Elena

    2012-02-01

    In 2009, Elena Long created the LGBT+ Physicists website (http://lgbtphysicists.x10hosting.com) as a warehouse for resources useful for sexual and gender minorities working in physics. This resource has grown to include networking resources, lists of LGBT-friendly universities and localities, recommendations for enacting positive change in physics communities, and out-reach to other STEM-oriented LGBT organizations. This has been possible in large part by the dynamic community of LGBT+ physicists and allies looking to make physics more welcoming towards our community. In 2011, Elena used hir position as Member at Large on the executive committee of the Forum of Graduate Student Affairs (FGSA) to conduct a climate survey that included, among other things, the first serious look at LGBT+ demographics in physics. The survey focused particularly on issues of language heard and harassment experienced by physicists and was broken down into categories based on race, physical and mental ability, gender, and sexuality. Furthermore, it examined the outcomes of experienced harassment and the reasons for when harassment was not reported. Due to the nature of the study, overlapping demographics, especially ``multiple minorities,'' were also explored. This talk will give a brief history of the LGBT+ Physicists resource as well as an overview of the FGSA study.

  3. PREFACE: Workshop on Oxide Materials 2014: Novel Multifunctional Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, M. E.; Lopera, W.

    2015-07-01

    The 2014 Workshop on Oxide Materials: Novel Multifunctional Properties was held in Cali, Colombia, from September 15 to September 19 on the campus of Universidad del Valle. It was a great privilege to have had this workshop in Cali after the first workshop on oxide materials commemorating the first centennial of the discovery of the superconductivity in 2011. The meeting gathered an audience of 80 participants, 10 invited speakers with two or three plenary talks each, 20 short oral contributions, two poster sessions with 20 presentations each. This proceedings volume contains papers reported at the conference. The Proceedings of the 2014 Workshop on Oxide Materials: Novel Multifunctional Properties were edited by Maria Elena Gomez and Wilson Lopera with the assistance of Carlos William Sanchez and Albert Ortiz as copy editor. We are grateful for the financial support from COLCIENCIAS through research project COLCIENCIAS-UNIVALLE contract 002/2013; Universidad de Valle through Professor Ivan Ramos, Rector; the Faculty of Science with Professor Jaime Cantera, Dean; the Center of Excellence on Novel Materials with Professor Pedro Prieto, Director; ICETEX, and INTECO Ltda. Further details about the conference, including details of the invited speakers and plenary sessions are available in the PDF. Maria Elena Gómez, Editor Wilson Lopera, Editor

  4. The Neutral Atoms Detector Technologies Developed for the SERENA Package for BepiColombo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Lellis, A. M.; Orsini, S.; Livi, S.; Wurz, P.; Milillo, A.

    2004-04-01

    A comprehensive suite for the particle detection in the Mercury environment, the SERENA instrument, is going to be proposed for the ESA cornerstone BepiColombo mission. The SERENA package consists of the sensors STROFIO and ELENA, which identify the neutral particles and measure their energies in the range from fractions of eV to a few keVs, and the sensors PICAM and MIPA for measuring and analyzing ionized particles from some eV to tens of keV. The proposed neutral sensor STROFIO will observe and analyze the bulk of the thermal / supra-thermal (0-50 eV) exospheric gas along the ram direction, while ELENA will be devoted to detect the sputtering emission (E min < 100eV; E max > 1 keV) within 1-D (2 deg x 60 deg) nadir cross track slices from the planet surface. The paper describes the new design techniques approached for the neutral particles identification and the related miniaturized datahandling unit. Such design technologies could be fruitfully exported to different applications for planetary exploration.

  5. Recent glacial recession and its impact on alpine riverflow in the Rwenzori Mountains of Uganda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Richard G.; Mileham, Lucinda; Tindimugaya, Callist; Mwebembezi, Leo

    2009-10-01

    The limited number and duration of hydrological measurements in the East African Highlands inhibit current understanding of the impact of glacial recession on alpine riverflow. From historical records and surveys conducted in the dry season of 2005 and wet season of 2007, we report (1) recent changes in the terminal positions of large valley glaciers (Speke, Elena) and (2) spot measurements of alpine riverflow along altitudinal transects of the principal river (River Mubuku) draining alpine icefields in order to assess the relative contribution of icefields and underlying ecotones to river discharge. Observed acceleration in the rates of termini retreat of the Speke and Elena glaciers since the late 1960s is attributed, in part, to the convex-concave slope profile in which these valley glaciers reside. We show that current glacial recession has a negligible impact on alpine riverflow. Spot measurements of meltwater discharges indicate that icefields contribute considerably less than 2% of the river discharge at the base of the Rwenzori Mountains during both dry and wet seasons. An anomalously high specific discharge of the River Mubuku (1730 mm a -1) arises from high rates of precipitation exceeding 2000 mm a -1 below alpine icefields within Heath-moss and Montane forest ecotones that occupy more than half of the river's gauged catchment area. For other tropical alpine icefields representing a tiny fraction (<1%) of alpine river catchment areas (e.g. Irian Jaya, Kilimanjaro, Mount Kenya), glacial meltwater discharges are similarly expected to contribute a negligible proportion of alpine riverflow.

  6. Cathodoluminescence of natural, plastically deformed pink diamonds.

    PubMed

    Gaillou, E; Post, J E; Rose, T; Butler, J E

    2012-12-01

    The 49 type I natural pink diamonds examined exhibit color restricted to lamellae or bands oriented along {111} that are created by plastic deformation. Pink diamonds fall into two groups: (1) diamonds from Argyle in Australia and Santa Elena in Venezuela are heavily strained throughout and exhibit pink bands alternating with colorless areas, and (2) diamonds from other localities have strain localized near the discrete pink lamellae. Growth zones are highlighted by a blue cathodoluminescence (CL) and crosscut by the pink lamellae that emit yellowish-green CL that originates from the H3 center. This center probably forms by the recombination of nitrogen-related centers (A-aggregates) and vacancies mobilized by natural annealing in the Earth's mantle. Twinning is the most likely mechanism through which plastic deformation is accommodated for the two groups of diamonds. The plastic deformation creates new centers visible through spectroscopic methods, including the one responsible for the pink color, which remains unidentified. The differences in the plastic deformation features, and resulting CL properties, for the two groups might correlate to the particular geologic conditions under which the diamonds formed; those from Argyle and Santa Elena are deposits located within Proterozoic cratons, whereas most diamonds originate from Archean cratons.

  7. Thermal and impact histories of reheated group IVA, IVB, and ungrouped iron meteorites and their parent asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J.; Goldstein, J. I.; Scott, E. R. D.; Michael, J. R.; Kotula, P. G.; Pham, T.; McCoy, T. J.

    2011-09-01

    Abstract- The microstructures of six reheated iron meteorites—two IVA irons, Maria Elena (1935), Fuzzy Creek; one IVB iron, Ternera; and three ungrouped irons, Hammond, Babb’s Mill (Blake’s Iron), and Babb’s Mill (Troost’s Iron)—were characterized using scanning and transmission electron microscopy, electron-probe microanalysis, and electron backscatter diffraction techniques to determine their thermal and shock history and that of their parent asteroids. Maria Elena and Hammond were heated below approximately 700-750 °C, so that kamacite was recrystallized and taenite was exsolved in kamacite and was spheroidized in plessite. Both meteorites retained a record of the original Widmanstätten pattern. The other four, which show no trace of their original microstructure, were heated above 600-700 °C and recrystallized to form 10-20 μm wide homogeneous taenite grains. On cooling, kamacite formed on taenite grain boundaries with their close-packed planes aligned. Formation of homogeneous 20 μm wide taenite grains with diverse orientations would have required as long as approximately 800 yr at 600 °C or approximately 1 h at 1300 °C. All six irons contain approximately 5-10 μm wide taenite grains with internal microprecipitates of kamacite and nanometer-scale M-shaped Ni profiles that reach approximately 40% Ni indicating cooling over 100-10,000 yr. Un-decomposed high-Ni martensite (α2) in taenite—the first occurrence in irons—appears to be a characteristic of strongly reheated irons. From our studies and published work, we identified four progressive stages of shock and reheating in IVA irons using these criteria: cloudy taenite, M-shaped Ni profiles in taenite, Neumann twin lamellae, martensite, shock-hatched kamacite, recrystallization, microprecipitates of taenite, and shock-melted troilite. Maria Elena and Fuzzy Creek represent stages 3 and 4, respectively. Although not all reheated irons contain evidence for shock, it was probably the main

  8. Paleocene Turbidite Deposition in the Central American Seaway (NW Costa Rica): Geochemical Analysis and Provenance of Detrital Spinel and Clinopyroxene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giblin, A. C.

    2015-12-01

    The Central American Land Bridge is the crucial connection between North and South America, and the Miocene closure of the Panama seaway led to a change in global oceanic circulation patterns. Modern Costa Rica is part of the island arc that formed over the western Caribbean subduction zone, and the Santa Elena peninsula is on the northwest coast of Costa Rica next to the Sandino forearc basin. This study focuses on the origin and provenance of the Paleocene deep-water Rivas and Descartes turbidites that crop out on the northern part of the Santa Elena peninsula in northwestern Costa Rica. Understanding the sedimentary fill of the Sandino Basin that contributed to the closing of the seaway may lead to a better understanding of the Late Cretaceous-Paleogene arcs. Provenance studies of the Santa Elena Peninsula turbidite sandstone bodies constrain the history of the paleogeography and tectonics of the region. Petrographic analyses of rock thin sections constrain source areas; geochemical analysis of individual detrital heavy minerals from rock samples give indications of sediment sources and tectonic setting during deposition. This study is a provenance analysis based on (i) semi-quantitative energy-dispersive spectrometry analysis of heavy minerals, (ii) quantitative wavelength-dispersive spectrometry for major elements of detrital clinopyroxene and spinel grains, (iii) trace element analysis through laser ablation of single detrital clinopyroxene grains, and (iv) comparative analysis of the different potential source rocks to clearly identify the most likely sediment sources. The detrital spinel and clinopyroxene are possibly sourced from: mantle ophiolites, mid-ocean ridge gabbros, or volcanic arc tholeiitic basalts or calc-alkaline andesites. Spinel and clinopyroxne geochemistry suggests a possible peridotitic source, linked to mantle rocks that are now covered by Tertiary volcanics or have completely eroded. The character of the crustal minerals indicates

  9. Geochemical signatures of the oceanic complexes in southern Central America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazel, E.; Herzberg, C. T.; Carr, M. J.; Denyer, P.

    2006-12-01

    The Pacific coast of Costa Rica and western Panama is famous for wide occurrence of oceanic crust that represent fragmentary and disrupted Jurassic to Miocene sequences with a very complicated geological and geotectonic histories. In Northern Costa Rica, the Santa Elena Nappe of ultramafic and mafic associations overthrusts the Santa Rosa Accretionary Complex. The Nicoya Complex represents pre-Campanian Caribbean Large Igneous Province (CLIP) segments that crop out in the Nicoya Peninsula and the basement of the Herradura Block. The Tortugal Komatiitic-like Suite represents an accreted seamount section. The Tulin Formation (Maastrichtian to Lower Eocene) forms the main edifice of an accreted oceanic island of the Herradura Block. The Quepos Block was formed by the accretion of a late Cretaceous-Paleocene seamount. In the Osa and Burica peninsulas, Caño Island and Golfito area, a series of Upper Cretaceous to Eocene accreted CLIP and seamount blocks crop out. In western Panama, the oceanic rocks range from Upper Cretaceous to Miocene and their geochemistry show ocean island and CLIP signatures. These oceanic complexes are result of accretionary processes rather than tectonic erosion, even though this last process is currently active in the Middle American Trench. The mafic and ultramafic associations of Santa Elena Nappe and Murcielago Islands represent a supra-subduction complex with a subduction modified NMORB source. The Nicoya Complex, Herradura Basement, and CLIP rocks from Osa, Golfito, Burica and W Panamá were probably formed from high-degree melts of a NMORB source modified by the Galapagos hot-spot plume. The presence of rocks with an ocean island signature from Upper Cretaceous to Lower Miocene suggests the continuous arrivals of Galapagos hot-spot seamount tracks. Mantle reservoirs of the CLIP rocks and ocean islands trend to HIMU (high U/Pb), while Santa Elena rocks trend toward depleted reservoirs (DM). CLIP signature is characterized by high 206Pb

  10. Local NASA Scientists Discover New Species of Organism in Mars-Like Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Microbiologist Dr. Elena V. Pikuta, and Astrobiologist Richard Hoover culture extremophiles, microorganisms that can live in extreme environments, in the astrobiology laboratory at the National Space Science and Technology Center (NSSTC) in Huntsville, Alabama. The scientists recently discovered a new species of extremophiles, Spirochaeta Americana. The species was found in Northern California's Mono Lake, an alkaline, briny oxygen-limited lake in a closed volcanic crater that Hoover believes may offer new clues to help identify sites to research for potential life on Mars. Hoover is an astrobiologist at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), and Pikuta is a microbiologist with the Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomy Research Laboratory at the University of Alabama in Huntsville. The NSSTC is a partnership with MSFC, Alabama universities, industry, research institutes, and federal agencies.

  11. STS-84 Day 03 Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    On this third day of the STS-84 mission, the flight crew, Cmdr. Charles J. Precourt, Pilot Eileen M. Collins, Payload Cmdr, Jean-Francois Clervoy (ESA), Mission Specialists Edward T. Lu, Carlos I. Noriega, Elena V. Kondakova, Jerry M. Linenger (download), and C. Michael Foale (upload) guide Atlantis to its docking with the Mir to cap off a 42-hour chase. Precourt greets Mir 23 Commander Vasily Tsibliev and, after embraces and handshakes, the crew members make their way into the Mir Core Module for a brief welcoming ceremony. During the ceremony, the Shuttle crew give Tsibliev and Flight Engineer Alexander Lazutkin baseball caps emblazoned with the STS-84 crew insignia as well as the traditional Russian offering of bread, tea and salt. Then, the ten astronauts and cosmonauts get down to business, first conducting a joint safety briefing to familiarize themselves with each other's craft.

  12. Professor Monastyrski N.D. (1847–1888): One of the Forgotten Pioneers of Biliary Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Gachabayov, Mahir; Kubachev, Kubach

    2017-01-01

    Today, the ingenious and untimely deceased surgeon Monastyrski’s name is almost lost in the history of medicine and means little, if anything, to young surgeons. Monastyrski Nestor Dmitrievich was born in 1847 in Czerniowce and graduated from the medical faculty of the University of Vienna. Deeply inspired by the stars of European medicine and surgery: Billroth, Kaposi, Mikulicz, he became a brilliant surgeon and teacher. Monastyrski performed the first gastroenterostomy in Russia and was one of the pioneers of the aseptic method in Russia. In May 1887 he performed the historical first cholecystojejunostomy in the world. In 1888, exhausted by a tumor of the right kidney, Monastyrski insisted on surgery which resulted in his death several hours later. The department of surgery which was founded by Monastyrski N.D. in the Clinical Institute of Grand Duchess Elena Pavlovna (today – North-Western State Medical Academy named after I.I. Mechnikov) was named after him. PMID:28373287

  13. Easy-Going On-Spectrometer Optimisation of Phase Modulated Homonuclear Decoupling Sequences in Solid-State NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimminck, Dennis L. A. G.; Vasa, Suresh K.; Meerts, W. Leo; Kentgens, P. M.

    2011-06-01

    A global optimisation scheme for phase modulated proton homonuclear decoupling sequences in solid-state NMR is presented. Phase modulations, parameterised by DUMBO Fourier coefficients, were optimized using a Covariance Matrix Adaptation Evolution Strategies algorithm. Our method, denoted EASY-GOING homonuclear decoupling, starts with featureless spectra and optimises proton-proton decoupling, during either proton or carbon signal detection. On the one hand, our solutions closely resemble (e)DUMBO for moderate sample spinning frequencies and medium radio-frequency (rf) field strengths. On the other hand, the EASY-GOING approach resulted in a superior solution, achieving significantly better resolved proton spectra at very high 680 kHz rf field strength. N. Hansen, and A. Ostermeier. Evol. Comput. 9 (2001) 159-195 B. Elena, G. de Paepe, L. Emsley. Chem. Phys. Lett. 398 (2004) 532-538

  14. jsc2014e080991

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-09-17

    17-14-26-12-2: (17 Sept. 2014) --- Expedition 41 Flight Engineer Barry Wilmore of NASA flashes a smile Sept. 17 as he plants a tree at a plot bearing his name behind the Cosmonaut Hotel crew quarters in Baikonur, Kazakhstan during traditional ceremonies. Alongside Wilmore is Flight Engineer Elena Serova of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos). Wilmore, Serova and Soyuz Commander Alexander Samokutyaev of Roscosmos are scheduled to launch from the Baikonur Cosmodrome Sept. 26, Kazakh time, in the Soyuz TMA-14M spacecraft for a 5 ½ month mission on the International Space Station. Serova will become the fourth Russian woman to fly in space and the first Russian woman to live and work on the station. Photo credit: NASA/Victor Zelentsov

  15. jsc2014e081387

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-09-21

    2014-09-21-14-00-27-2 Outside the Korolev Museum at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan, the Expedition 41/42 prime and backup crews participate in the raising of the flag bearing their crew insignia Sept. 21 during ceremonial pre-flight activities. From left to right are prime crewmembers Alexander Samokutyaev of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos), Elena Serova of Roscosmos and Barry Wilmore of NASA and backup crewmembers Gennady Padalka of Roscosmos, Scott Kelly of NASA and Mikhail Kornienko of Roscosmos. Wilmore, Samokutyaev and Serova will launch on Sept. 26, Kazakh time, in the Soyuz to begin a 5 ½ month mission on the International Space Station. Serova will become the fourth Russian woman to fly in space and the first to live and work on the station. Kelly and Kornienko will launch in March 2015 to spend a full year on the station. NASA/Victor Zelentsov

  16. jsc2014e080990

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-09-17

    17-14-22-37-4: (17 Sept. 2014) --- Assisted by NASA Flight Engineer Barry Wilmore (center) and Soyuz Commander Alexander Samokutyaev of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos), right, Expedition 41/42 Flight Engineer Elena Serova of Roscosmos (left) plants a tree at a plot bearing her name behind the Cosmonaut Hotel crew quarters in Baikonur, Kazakhstan Sept. 17 during traditional ceremonies. Wilmore, Serova and Samokutyaev are scheduled to launch from the Baikonur Cosmodrome Sept. 26, Kazakh time, in the Soyuz TMA-14M spacecraft for a 5 ½ month mission on the International Space Station. Serova will become the fourth Russian woman to fly in space and the first Russian woman to live and work on the station. Photo credit: NASA/Victor Zelentsov

  17. jsc2014e080983

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-09-17

    17-12-00-2: (17 Sept. 2014) --- At the Cosmonaut Hotel crew quarters in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, Expedition 41 Flight Engineer Barry Wilmore of NASA tries his hand at a game of table tennis Sept. 17 as he and his crewmates prepare for their upcoming launch. Wilmore, Soyuz Commander Alexander Samokutyaev of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) and Flight Engineer Elena Serova of Roscosmos will launch from the Baikonur Cosmodrome Sept. 26, Kazakh time, in the Soyuz TMA-14M spacecraft for a 5 ½ month mission on the International Space Station. Serova will become the fourth Russian woman to fly in space and the first Russian woman to live and work on the station. Photo credit: NASA/Victor Zelentsov

  18. jsc2014e079813

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-09-05

    2529a: Expedition 41/42 Flight Engineer Elena Serova of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos, left), Soyuz Commander Alexander Samokutyaev of Roscosmos (center) and NASA Flight Engineer Barry Wilmore (right) walk along the Kremlin Wall at Moscow’s Red Square Sept. 5 where they laid flowers at the sites where Russian space icons are interred in a traditional ceremony. The trio will launch from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on Sept. 26, Kazakh time, in their Soyuz TMA-14M spacecraft for a 5 ½ month mission on the International Space Station. Serova will become the fourth Russian woman to fly in space and the first Russian woman to conduct a long duration mission on the station. NASA/Stephanie Stoll

  19. jsc2014e079819

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-09-05

    2612: Expedition 41/42 Flight Engineer Barry Wilmore of NASA (left), Soyuz Commander Alexander Samokutyaev of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos, center) and Elena Serova of Roscosmos (right) pose for pictures at the Kremlin Wall in Moscow’s Red Square Sept. 5 where they laid flowers at the sites where Russian space icons are interred in a traditional ceremony. The trio will launch from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on Sept. 26, Kazakh time, in their Soyuz TMA-14M spacecraft for a 5 ½ month mission on the International Space Station. Serova will become the fourth Russian woman to fly in space and the first Russian woman to conduct a long duration mission on the station. NASA/Stephanie Stoll

  20. jsc2014e079815

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-09-05

    2562a: At the Kremlin Wall in Moscow’s Red Square, Expedition 41/42 Flight Engineer Barry Wilmore of NASA raises his arm to salute after laying flowers where Russian space icons are interred in a traditional ceremony Sept. 5. Wilmore, Soyuz Commander Alexander Samokutyaev of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) and Elena Serova of Roscosmos will launch from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on Sept. 26, Kazakh time, in their Soyuz TMA-14M spacecraft for a 5 ½ month mission on the International Space Station. Serova will become the fourth Russian woman to fly in space and the first Russian woman to conduct a long duration mission on the station. NASA/Stephanie Stoll

  1. Secondary recovery development in Ecuador

    SciTech Connect

    Arteaga, L.; Endara, J.; Alduja, F.

    1981-03-01

    The oil activity in Ecuador goes back to 1920 when the oil-bearing structures were discovered in the Peninsula of Santa Elena in the Ecuatorian coast. Since that time 2,700 oil wells have been drilled; at the present time, only 650 wells are still producing. Oil production has been decreasing in spite of artificial producing systems (sucker rod pumping, and gas lift). During the period of 1966 to 1969 a total of 8 pilot projects was performed to evaluate the possibility of using secondary recovery methods (waterflooding) in 3 different oil-bearing formations from 5 areas, and utilizing different injection patterns. The results from numerical simulation and pilot projects showed the convenience and easibility of the implmentation of secondary recovery systems (waterflooding) in the Shushufindi-Aguarico field. A detailed description is presented of the development of the secondary recovery methods in Ecuador - antecedents, pilot projects, results, etc.

  2. jsc2014e079812

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-09-05

    JSC2014-E-079812 (5 Sept. 2014) --- Accompanied by his wife and daughters at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center in Star City, Russia, Expedition 41 Flight Engineer Barry Wilmore of NASA takes a walk through the Gagarin Museum Sept. 5. Wilmore, Alexander Samokutyaev of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) and Elena Serova of Roscosmos are scheduled to launch from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on Sept. 26, Kazakh time, in their Soyuz TMA-14M spacecraft for a 5 ? month mission on the International Space Station. Serova will become the fourth Russian woman to fly in space and the first Russian woman to conduct a long duration mission on the station. Photo credit: NASA/Stephanie Stoll

  3. Violent Star Formation in NGC 2363: Erratum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Delgado, Rosa M.; Perez, Enrique; Tenorio-Tagle, Guillermo; Vilchez, Jose M.; Terlevich, Elena; Terlevich, Roberto; Telles, Eduardo; Rodríguez Espinosa, Jose M.; Mas-Hesse, Miguel; Garcia-Vargas, Maria Luisa; Diaz, Angeles I.; Cepa, Jordi; Castaneda, Hector

    1996-12-01

    In the paper "Violent Star Formation in NGC 2363" by Rosa M. Gonzalez- Delgado, Enrique Perez, Guillermo Tenorio-Tagle, Jose M. Vilchez, Elena Terlevich, Roberto Terlevich, Eduardo Telles, Jose M. Rodriguez-Espinosa, Miguel Mas-Hesse, Maria Luisa Garcia-Vargas, Angeles I. Diaz, Jordi Cepa, and Hector Castaneda (ApJ, 437,239 [1994)), there are three errors in Section 5.4. The Paschen discontinuity in knot A is (0.82 +/- 0.19) x 10^-16^ ergs s^-1^ cm^-2^ A^-1^, the coefficient in the formula in page 258 is 2.445 x 10^11^, and the units in the ordinate axis of Figure 16 are 10^-15^ ergs cm^-2^ s^-1^ A^-1^. These are typographical errors, and they do not affect the determination of the electron temperature using the Paschen jump and the discussion and conclusions in this paper.

  4. STS-84 Crew speaking at TCDT Press Briefing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    STS-84 crew members listen intently to Commander Charles J. Precourt, at far right, as he talks to news media representatives and other onlookers at Launch Pad 39A during the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT). Other crew members, from left, are Mission Specialist Edward Tsang Lu, Pilot Eileen Marie Collins, and Mission Specialists Carlos I. Noriega, Jean-Francois Clervoy of the European Space Agency, C. Michael Foale, and Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency. STS-84 will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. After docking, Foale will transfer to the space station and become a member of the Mir 23 crew, replacing U.S. astronaut Jerry M. Linenger, who will return to Earth aboard Atlantis. Foale will live and work on Mir until mid-September when his replacement is expected to arrive on the STS-86 mission. STS-84 is targeted for a May 15 liftoff.

  5. Expedition 41 Crew Door Signing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-09-25

    Expedition 41 Flight Engineer Elena Serova of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos), performs the traditional door signing at the Cosmonaut Hotel prior to departing the hotel for launch in a Soyuz rocket with fellow crew mates, Soyuz Commander Alexander Samokutyaev of Roscosmos and Flight Engineer Barry Wilmore of NASA, Thursday, Sept. 25, 2014 in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Launch of the Soyuz rocket is scheduled for the early hours of Sept. 26 Kazakhstan time and will carry Serova, Wilmore, and Samokutyaev into orbit to begin their five and a half month mission on the International Space Station. Serova will become the fourth Russian woman to fly in space and the first Russian woman to live and work on the station. Photo Credit (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)

  6. Non-Gaussian beam dynamics in low energy antiproton storage rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resta-López, J.; Hunt, J. R.; Welsch, C. P.

    2016-10-01

    In low energy antiproton facilities, where electron cooling is fundamental, the cooling forces together with heating phenomena causing emittance blow-up, such as Intra Beam Scattering (IBS), result in highly non-Gaussian beam distributions. In these cases, a precise simulation of IBS effects is essential to realistically evaluate the long term beam evolution, taking into account the non-Gaussian characteristics of the beam. Here, we analyse the beam dynamics in the Extra Low ENergy Antiproton ring (ELENA), which is a new small synchrotron currently being constructed at CERN to decelerate antiprotons to energies as low as 100 keV. Simulations are performed using the code BETACOOL, comparing different models of IBS.

  7. AGN STORM: A Leap Forward In Reverberation Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalla Bontà, Elena; AGN STORM Team

    2016-10-01

    Reverberation mapping is a tomographic technique that can be used to determine the structure and kinematics of the broad- line emitting region at the center of active galactic nuclei. By-products of these investigations are the masses of the central black holes and information about the structure of the accretion disk. I will show some of the most recent results from the AGN Space Telescope and Optical Reverberation Mapping (AGN STORM) project, which was built around 180 daily observations of the bright Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 5548 with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph on Hubble Space Telescope. AGN STORM included observations made with Swift, XMM, and several ground-based telescopes, including the 1.22-m telescope at Asiago Observatory. Elena Dalla Bonta` on behalf of the AGN STORM Team.

  8. Case study of a magnetic system for low-energy machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoerling, Daniel

    2016-08-01

    The extra low-energy antiproton ring (ELENA) is a CERN particle decelerator with the purpose to deliver antiprotons at lowest energies aiming to enhance the study of antimatter. The hexagonal shaped ring with a circumference of about 30 m will decelerate antiprotons from momenta of 100 to 13.7 MeV /c . In this paper, the design approach for a magnet system for such a machine is presented. Due to the extra-low beam rigidity, the design of the magnet system is especially challenging because even small fields, arising for example from residual magnetization and hysteresis, have a major impact on beam dynamics. In total, seven prototype magnets of three different magnet types have been built and tested. This paper outlines challenges, describes solutions for the design of the magnet system and discusses the results of the prototypes.

  9. Division B Commission 6: Astronomical Telegrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaoka, H.; Green, D. W. E.; Samus, N. N.; Aksnes, K.; Gilmore, A. C.; Nakano, S.; Sphar, T.; Tichá, J.; Williams, G. V.

    2016-04-01

    IAU Commission 6 ``Astronomical Telegrams'' had a single business meeting during Honolulu General Assembly of the IAU. It took place on Tuesday, 11 August 2015. The meeting was attended by Hitoshi Yamaoka (President), Daniel Green (Director of the Central Bureau for Astronomical Telegrams, CBAT, via Skype), Steven Chesley (JPL), Paul Chodas (JPL), Alan Gilmore (Canterbury University), Shinjiro Kouzuma (Chukyo University), Paolo Mazzali (Co-Chair of the Supernova Working Group), Elena Pian (Scuola Normale Superiore di Pisa), Marion Schmitz (chair IAU Working Group Designations + NED), David Tholen (University of Hawaii), Jana Ticha (Klet Observatory), Milos Tichy (Klet Observatory), Giovanni Valsecchi (INAF\\slash Italy), Gareth Williams (Minor Planet Center). Apologies: Nikolai Samus (General Catalogue of Variable Stars, GCVS).

  10. Past, present and future low energy antiproton facilities at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartmann, W.; Belochitskii, P.; Breuker, H.; Butin, F.; Carli, C.; Eriksson, T.; Maury, S.; Oelert, W.; Pasinelli, S.; Tranquille, G.

    2014-05-01

    Low energy antiprotons are available for physics experiments at CERN since the 1980s and have been used by a large variety of experiments. The Low Energy Antiproton Ring LEAR has been constructed as a complementary use of antiprotons available at that time for high energy physics and delivered beam to experiments mainly using slow extraction. After completion of LEAR exploitation, the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) was constructed (adaptation of the existing Antiproton Collector, AC) to allow for a simpler low energy antiproton scheme (only one accelerator operated with Antiprotons) with fast extraction well suited for trap experiments. The Extra Low ENergy Antiproton ring ELENA is a small synchrotron presently constructed to further decelerate antiprotons from the AD in a controlled manner, and to reduce emittances with the help of an electron cooler to improve the capture efficiencies of existing experiments and allow for additional ones.

  11. Programming for High School Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-08-01

    All portions of the High School Program will take place Sunday, August 16, and Monday, August 17, in the Grand Hyatt Washington Hotel, 1000 H Street, NW, Washington, DC. All attendees must register for the meeting to participate in the technical sessions and programs. Registration provides full access to the special High School Chemistry Day program, the entire ACS meeting (Sunday-Thursday), and the Exposition (Sunday evening-Wednesday). Attendees can track professional development (based on clock hours) for sessions attended at the ACS National Meeting. On completion and submission of ACS forms, participants will be mailed a certificate documenting their participation in the conference. The Organizer for the High School Program is Elena Pisciotta, who teaches at Damascus High School, Damascus, MD.

  12. Research on the impacts of past and future hurricanes on the endangered Florida manatee: Chapter 6J in Science and the storms-the USGS response to the hurricanes of 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langtimm, Catherine A.; Krohn, M. Dennis; Stith, Bradley M.; Reid, James P.; Beck, C.A.; Butler, Susan M.

    2007-01-01

    U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) research on Florida manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris) from 1982 through 1998 identified lower apparent survival rates for adult manatees during years when Hurricane Elena (1985), the March "Storm of the Century"(1993), and Hurricane Opal (1995) hit the northern coast of the Gulf of Mexico. Although our analysis showed that a significant number of our monitored individual manatees failed to return to their winter homes after these storms, their actual fate remains unknown. With the aid of new satellite technology to track manatees during storms and new statistical techniques to determine survival and emigration rates, researchers are working to understand how hurricanes impact the endangered species by studying manatees caught in the path of the destructive hurricanes of 2004 and 2005.

  13. Professor Monastyrski N.D. (1847-1888): One of the Forgotten Pioneers of Biliary Surgery.

    PubMed

    Gachabayov, Mahir; Kubachev, Kubach

    2017-06-01

    Today, the ingenious and untimely deceased surgeon Monastyrski's name is almost lost in the history of medicine and means little, if anything, to young surgeons. Monastyrski Nestor Dmitrievich was born in 1847 in Czerniowce and graduated from the medical faculty of the University of Vienna. Deeply inspired by the stars of European medicine and surgery: Billroth, Kaposi, Mikulicz, he became a brilliant surgeon and teacher. Monastyrski performed the first gastroenterostomy in Russia and was one of the pioneers of the aseptic method in Russia. In May 1887 he performed the historical first cholecystojejunostomy in the world. In 1888, exhausted by a tumor of the right kidney, Monastyrski insisted on surgery which resulted in his death several hours later. The department of surgery which was founded by Monastyrski N.D. in the Clinical Institute of Grand Duchess Elena Pavlovna (today - North-Western State Medical Academy named after I.I. Mechnikov) was named after him. © 2017 Marshfield Clinic.

  14. jsc2014e080536

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-09-14

    14-11-06-13: (14 Sept. 2014) --- At their Cosmonaut Hotel crew quarters in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, the Expedition 41/42 prime crew members participate in ceremonies after raising the flags of Russia, the U.S. and Kazakhstan during traditional ceremonies Sept. 14. From left to right are Barry Wilmore of NASA, Alexander Samokutyaev of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) and Elena Serova of Roscosmos. Wilmore, Samokutyaev and Serova will launch on Sept. 26, Kazakh time, in the Soyuz TMA-14M spacecraft to begin a 5 ½ month mission on the International Space Station. Serova will become the fourth Russian woman to fly in space. Photo credit: NASA/Victor Zelentsov

  15. 201503120104hq

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-03-12

    201503120104hq (03/12/2015) --- Expedition 42 Cosmonaut Elena Serova of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos, left, Alexander Samokutyaev of Roscosmos, center, and NASA Astronaut Barry Wilmore sit in chairs outside the Soyuz TMA-14M spacecraft just minutes after they landed in a remote area near the town of Zhezkazgan, Kazakhstan on Thursday, Mar. 12, 2015. The three crew members returned to Earth after a 167-day mission on the International Space Station (ISS) that included hundreds of scientific experiments and several spacewalks to prepare the orbiting laboratory for future arrivals by U.S. commercial crew spacecraft. They served as members of the Expedition 41 and 42 crews. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  16. Geology and geomorphology of the Roraima group, southeastern Venezuela

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanezpintado, G.

    A moderately detailed, accurate geologic geomorphologic map of the Roraima region at a 1:250,000 scale was prepared. This provides a suitable base for future, more detailed studies. It is recommended that the Roraima Formation be raised to Group status and include three apparently conformable but lithogically separable Formations from the base upwards, these are the Canaima, Gualaquinima, and Auyantepui formation. Two composite stratigraphic sections are established and formational thicknesses determined near Santa Elena de U. and Canaima. Radar imagery and aerial photo interpretation allows improved mapping of regional and local structures. Broad, gentle, postdepositional folding of the Roraima into anteclises and syneclises apparently was followed by intrusion of basic dikes and sills; the principal host is the Canaima Formation. Diamond bearing places in the present alluvial valleys are the result of continuous deposition, reworking and redeposition of older, more geographically disjunct floodplain and deltaic sediments.

  17. Recollections of a translator (Russian title: Vstrecha v verhah ili vospominania perevodchika)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaina, Alex

    The article includes recollections of the author-translator from few meetings in Moscow during 70-th years of the XX-th century. The recollections includes a visit to Moscow of a Romanian delegation of trade-unions, a visit of Nicolae Ceausescu and Elena Ceausescu to Moscow in november 1977 in view of the 60-th years of the Revolution of October celebration. A visit by Nicu Ceausescu, physicist and the leader of the Union of Communist Youth of Romania, to Central Comitee of the All Union Communist Youth Organization of the USSR (Komsomol) in Moscow during a transit fly to Beijing (China) is reported also. The recollections reffers also the following persons: Andrey Gromyko- minister of the foreign office of the USSR, Geidar Aliev - 1-st secretary of the Central Commitee of the Azerbaijan S.S.R. Communist party, Grigor'ev- a secretary of the Soviet Komsomol (All Union Organization of Communist Youth) and other.

  18. Local NASA Scientists Discover New Species of Organism in Mars-Like Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Microbiologist Dr. Elena V. Pikuta, and Astrobiologist Richard Hoover culture extremophiles, microorganisms that can live in extreme environments, in the astrobiology laboratory at the National Space Science and Technology Center (NSSTC) in Huntsville, Alabama. The scientists recently discovered a new species of extremophiles, Spirochaeta Americana. The species was found in Northern California's Mono Lake, an alkaline, briny oxygen-limited lake in a closed volcanic crater that Hoover believes may offer new clues to help identify sites to research for potential life on Mars. Hoover is an astrobiologist at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), and Pikuta is a microbiologist with the Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomy Research Laboratory at the University of Alabama in Huntsville. The NSSTC is a partnership with MSFC, Alabama universities, industry, research institutes, and federal agencies.

  19. jsc2014e080542

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-09-14

    14-12-59-00: (14 Sept. 2014) --- Wearing native Kazakh clothing, Expedition 41/42 backup crewmembers Scott Kelly of NASA (second from left), Gennady Padalka of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos, second from right) and Mikhail Kornienko of Roscosmos (far right) enjoy the ambiance of a traditional Kazakh lunch in a “yurt”, or tent, during a tour of Baikonur, Kazakhstan Sept. 14. Kelly and Kornienko will launch from Baikonur in March 2015 to spend a full year on the International Space Station. They are backups to Barry Wilmore of NASA, Alexander Samokutyaev of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) and Elena Serova of Roscosmos. Wilmore, Samokutyaev and Serova will launch on Sept. 26, Kazakh time, in the Soyuz TMA-14M spacecraft to begin a 5 ½ month mission on the station. Serova will become the fourth Russian woman to fly in space. NASA/Victor Zelentsov

  20. STS-84 crew participates in TCDT activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Proudly wearing red KSC Fire/Rescue hats, members of the STS-84 crew pause for a moment for a group photograph while participating in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. From left, are Mission Specialists C. Michael Foale, Carlos I. Noriega, Jean-Francois Clervoy of the European Space Agency and Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency; and Pilot Eileen Marie Collins, Mission Specialist Edward Tsang Lu and Commander Charles J. Precourt. STS-84 aboard Atlantis will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. After docking, Foale will transfer to the space station and become a member of the Mir 23 crew, replacing U.S. astronaut Jerry M. Linenger, who will return to Earth aboard Atlantis. Foale will live and work on Mir until mid-September when his replacement is expected to arrive on the STS-86 mission. STS-84 is targeted for a May 15 liftoff.

  1. The BepiColombo/SERENA Integrated Test Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orsini, Stefano; De Angelis, Elisabetta; Livi, Stefano; Lichtenegger, Herbert; Barabash, Stas; Milillo, Anna; Wurz, Peter; Olivieri, Angelo; D'Arcio, Luigi; Phillips, Mark; Laky, Gunter; Wieser, Martin; Camozzi, Fabio; Di Lellis, Andrea M.; Mura, Alessandro; Lazzarotto, Francesco; Aronica, Alessandro; Rispoli, Rosanna; Verolli, Nello; Piazza, Daniele

    2017-04-01

    The activities related to the BepiColombo/MPO/SERENA Integrated Test (SIT, held in February 2017 by the vacuum facility at the University of Bern, CH) are presented. This campaign is a unique opportunity to test the experiment performances, with all the four flight-spare instruments of SERENA (ELENA, STROFIO, PICAM, AND MIPA, simultaneously operated by the System Control Unit (SCU), in a fully operational configuration. The test is focused on the On-Board Commanding Procedure and on the Science Operation Basic Procedure, with the goal of providing a comprehensive picture of the on-board S/W facility both in nominal and more resource demanding conditions. Such a test is a powerful tool for allowing SERENA to perform the best possible observation of the particle populations surrounding Mercury.

  2. SERENA: a Novel Instrument Package on board BepiColombo-MPO to study Neutral and Ionized Particles in the Hermean Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orsini, S.; Livi, S.; Torkar, K.; Barabash, S.; Milillo, A.; Wurz, P.; di Lellis, A. M.; Kallio, E.

    2009-06-01

    SERENA (`Search for Exospheric Refilling and Emitted Natural Abundances') is an instrument package that will fly on board the BepiColombo Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO) it will investigate the Mercury's complex particle environment that surrounds the planet. Such an environment is composed by thermal and directional neutral atoms (exosphere) originating via surface release and charge-exchange processes, and by ionized particles originated through photo-ionization and again by surface release processes. In order to accomplish the scientific goals, in-situ analysis of the environmental elements is necessary, and for such a purpose the SERENA instrument shall include four units: two Neutral Particle Analyzers (ELENA and STROFIO) and two Ion Spectrometers (MIPA and PICAM). The scientific merit of SERENA is presented, and the basic characteristics of the four units are described, with a focus on novel technological aspects.

  3. Space Science

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-07-30

    Microbiologist Dr. Elena V. Pikuta, and Astrobiologist Richard Hoover culture extremophiles, microorganisms that can live in extreme environments, in the astrobiology laboratory at the National Space Science and Technology Center (NSSTC) in Huntsville, Alabama. The scientists recently discovered a new species of extremophiles, Spirochaeta Americana. The species was found in Northern California's Mono Lake, an alkaline, briny oxygen-limited lake in a closed volcanic crater that Hoover believes may offer new clues to help identify sites to research for potential life on Mars. Hoover is an astrobiologist at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), and Pikuta is a microbiologist with the Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomy Research Laboratory at the University of Alabama in Huntsville. The NSSTC is a partnership with MSFC, Alabama universities, industry, research institutes, and federal agencies.

  4. jsc2014e080528

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-09-13

    13-13-33-41-3: (13 Sept. 2014) --- At the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan and clad in his Russian Sokol launch and entry suit, Expedition 41/42 Flight Engineer Barry Wilmore of NASA runs through practice procedures in the Soyuz TMA-14M spacecraft Sept. 13 during the first of two “fit check” dress rehearsal activities. Wilmore, Soyuz Commander Alexander Samokutyaev of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) and Flight Engineer Elena Serova of Roscosmos will launch on Sept. 26, Kazakh time, in the Soyuz to begin a 5 ½ month mission on the International Space Station. Serova will become the fourth Russian woman to fly in space. Photo credit: ASA/Victor Zelentsov

  5. jsc2014e079822

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-09-05

    2741: Expedition 41/42 Flight Engineer Barry Wilmore of NASA (left), Soyuz Commander Alexander Samokutyaev of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos, center) and Elena Serova of Roscosmos (right) hoist arms in a display of unity in front of St. Basil’s Cathedral in Moscow’s Red Square Sept. 5 where they laid flowers at the site where Russian space icons are interred in a traditional ceremony. The trio will launch from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on Sept. 26, Kazakh time, in their Soyuz TMA-14M spacecraft for a 5 ½ month mission on the International Space Station. Serova will become the fourth Russian woman to fly in space and the first Russian woman to conduct a long duration mission on the station. NASA/Stephanie Stoll

  6. jsc2014e079821

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-09-05

    2734: Expedition 41/42 Flight Engineer Barry Wilmore of NASA (left), Soyuz Commander Alexander Samokutyaev of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos, center) and Elena Serova of Roscosmos (right) hoist arms in a display of unity in front of St. Basil’s Cathedral in Moscow’s Red Square Sept. 5 where they laid flowers at the site where Russian space icons are interred in a traditional ceremony. The trio will launch from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on Sept. 26, Kazakh time, in their Soyuz TMA-14M spacecraft for a 5 ½ month mission on the International Space Station. Serova will become the fourth Russian woman to fly in space and the first Russian woman to conduct a long duration mission on the station. NASA/Stephanie Stoll

  7. STS-84 Crew speaking at TCDT Press Briefing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    STS-84 crew members listen intently to Commander Charles J. Precourt, at far right, as he talks to news media representatives and other onlookers at Launch Pad 39A during the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT). Other crew members, from left, are Mission Specialist Edward Tsang Lu, Pilot Eileen Marie Collins, and Mission Specialists Carlos I. Noriega, Jean-Francois Clervoy of the European Space Agency, C. Michael Foale, and Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency. STS-84 will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. After docking, Foale will transfer to the space station and become a member of the Mir 23 crew, replacing U.S. astronaut Jerry M. Linenger, who will return to Earth aboard Atlantis. Foale will live and work on Mir until mid-September when his replacement is expected to arrive on the STS-86 mission. STS-84 is targeted for a May 15 liftoff.

  8. Tabanidae (Diptera) of Amazônia XX. description of Tabanus pseudonebulosus n.sp.

    PubMed

    Gorayeb, Inocêncio de Sousa; de Barros, Antonio Thadeu Medeiros

    2006-03-01

    Tabanus pseudonebulosus, new species, is described based on 217 female specimens and 5 males collected in Venezuela (Guarico, Aguaio, Santa Elena, and Palmarito) and in Brazil (Parcí: Santana do Araguaia, Serra das Andorinhas in São Geraldo do Araguaia, Serra Norte Carajás and Gorotire; Amazonas: Canutama; Mato Grosso do Sul: Corumbá), mostly in open vegetation, scrub forest and in rocky environments. Observed intraspecific variation in the specimens is presented and related to collection localities, and morphological differences are diagnosed in relation to the similar species Tabanus nebulosus DeGeer 1776 and T. importunus Wiedemann 1828. Morphometrical data and indices for specimens in different localities are provided. Drawings and photo of the new species are presented.

  9. Testing the Pairs-Reflection Model with X-Ray Spectral Variability and X-Ray Properties of Complete Samples of Radio-Selected BL Lacertae Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urry, C. Megan

    1997-01-01

    This grant was awarded to Dr. C. Megan Urry of the Space Telescope Science Institute in response to two successful ADP proposals to use archival Ginga and Rosat X-ray data for 'Testing the Pairs-Reflection model with X-Ray Spectral Variability' (in collaboration with Paola Grandi, now at the University of Rome) and 'X-Ray Properties of Complete Samples of Radio-Selected BL Lacertae Objects' (in collaboration with then-graduate student Rita Sambruna, now a post-doc at Goddard Space Flight Center). In addition, post-docs Joseph Pesce and Elena Pian, and graduate student Matthew O'Dowd, have worked on several aspects of these projects. The grant was originally awarded on 3/01/94; this report covers the full period, through May 1997. We have completed our project on the X-ray properties of radio-selected BL Lacs.

  10. Community structure of helminth parasites of the "Cururu" toad, Rhinella icterica (Anura: Bufonidae) from southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Viviane Gularte Tavares; Amato, Suzana B; Borges-Martins, Márcio

    2013-03-01

    Sixty specimens of the "cururu" toad, Rhinella icterica (Spix 1824) (Bufonidae), were collected in Campo Belo do Sul, State of Santa Catarina, Brazil, between May 2009 and January 2011, and were examined for the presence of helminth parasites. Nine species of adult helminths were found: Catadiscus cohni, Rudolphitrema rudolphii, Cylindrotaenia sp., Rhabdias fuelleborni, Strongyloides sp., Cosmocerca rara, Cosmocerca brasiliensis, Aplectana elenae, and Oxyascaris sp., in addition to an unidentified adult nematode species. Females of cosmocercid nematodes, proteocephalan plerocercoid, and acanthocephalan cystacanth were found but not identified for lack absolute of taxonomic characters. The sex of the anurans had no influence on prevalence, abundance, and richness of helminth species. Length and body mass of hosts did not influence the prevalence and richness of helminths, while the abundance of R. fuelleborni was significantly correlated with both parameters.

  11. The Costa Rican Jurassic to Miocene oceanic complexes: Origin, tectonics and relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denyer, Percy; Gazel, Esteban

    2009-12-01

    The occurrences of oceanic assemblages on the Pacific shore of Costa Rica are part of an intricate group of complexes with different tectonic origins. Although they are dismembered and disrupted, they are the only available inland source of information to decipher the evolution of this active margin. Six main regions are described in this paper: (1) Santa Elena Peninsula, constituted by a supra-subduction zone (Santa Elena Nappe), that is overthrusting an igneous-sedimentary Aptian-Cenomanian sequence (Santa Rosa Accretionary Complex), which includes OIB (Ocean Island Basalts) portions, (2) the Nicoya Complex, which is a Jurassic-Cretaceous chert sediment pile disrupted and detached from its original basement by multiple magmatic events that occurred during the formation of the CLIP (Caribbean Large Igneous Province), (3) the Tortugal area formed by the Tortugal Suite with OIB signature and surrounded by Nicoya Complex outcrops, (4) the Herradura Block composed of the Tulín Formation to Maastrichtian to Lower Eocene OIB accreted oceanic island and the Nicoya Complex as basement, (5) Quepos Block correlated with the Tulín Formation, (6) the Osa-Burica Block composed of the Golfito and Burica Terranes (geochemically and chronologically correlated to the Nicoya Complex), Rincón Block (Early Paleocene to Early Eocene accreted seamounts), and the Miocene Osa-Caño Accretionary Complex. The Santa Rosa Accretionary Complex together with the Tortugal Suite have OIB signatures and possibly without Galapagos hotspot geochemical affinity. These coincidences would be explained by the hypothetical existence of an "autochthonous" Cretaceous basement formed by these two regions together with the rest of the Caribbean. Costa Rican basement is constituted by several CLIP portions and seamounts accreted from the end of Cretaceous in the northwest to the Miocene in the southeast, forming the diverse oceanic occurrences of the Pacific, which are mainly connected to the Galapagos

  12. Hydrothermal processes in partially serpentinized peridotites from Costa Rica: evidence from native copper and complex sulfide assemblages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarzenbach, Esther M.; Gazel, Esteban; Caddick, Mark J.

    2014-11-01

    Native metals and metal alloys are common in serpentinized ultramafic rocks, generally representing the redox and sulfur conditions during serpentinization. Variably serpentinized peridotites from the Santa Elena Ophiolite in Costa Rica contain an unusual assemblage of Cu-bearing sulfides and native copper. The opaque mineral assemblage consists of pentlandite, magnetite, awaruite, pyrrhotite, heazlewoodite, violarite, smythite and copper-bearing sulfides (Cu-pentlandite, sugakiite [Cu(Fe,Ni)8S8], samaniite [Cu2(Fe,Ni)7S8], chalcopyrite, chalcocite, bornite and cubanite), native copper and copper-iron-nickel alloys. Using detailed mineralogical examination, electron microprobe analyses, bulk rock major and trace element geochemistry, and thermodynamic calculations, we discuss two models to explain the formation of the Cu-bearing mineral assemblages: (1) they formed through desulfurization of primary sulfides due to highly reducing and sulfur-depleted conditions during serpentinization or (2) they formed through interaction with a Cu-bearing, higher temperature fluid (350-400 °C) postdating serpentinization, similar to processes in active high-temperature peridotite-hosted hydrothermal systems such as Rainbow and Logatchev. As mass balance calculations cannot entirely explain the extent of the native copper by desulfurization of primary sulfides, we propose that the native copper and Cu sulfides formed by local addition of a hydrothermal fluid that likely interacted with adjacent mafic sequences. We suggest that the peridotites today exposed on Santa Elena preserve the lower section of an ancient hydrothermal system, where conditions were highly reducing and water-rock ratios very low. Thus, the preserved mineral textures and assemblages give a unique insight into hydrothermal processes occurring at depth in peridotite-hosted hydrothermal systems.

  13. PREFACE 16 ISCMP: Progress in Solid State and Molecular Electronics, Ionics and Photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimova-Malinovska, Doriana; Nesheva, Diana; Petrov, Alexander G.; Primatarowa, Marina T.

    2010-11-01

    We are pleased to introduce the Proceedings of the 16 ISCMP, organized by the Institute of Solid State Physics of the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences. The Chairman of the School was Professor Alexander G Petrov. The School was dedicated to the late Professor Joe Marshall, who served for a long time as Chairman and Honorary Chairman and left us just after having completed the proceedings of the previous School. Like previous events, the School took place in the beautiful Black Sea resort of Saint Constantine and Elena near Varna, going back to the renewed facilities of the Panorama hotel. Participants from 19 different countries delivered 34 invited lecturers and 75 posters, contributing to three sessions of poster presentations. Papers submitted to the Proceedings were refereed according to the high standards of the Journal of Physics: Conference Series and the articles published in this volume illustrate the diversity and the high level of the contributions. Not the least significant factor in the success of the 16 ISCMP was the social program, both the organized events (Welcome and Farewell Parties) and the variety of pleasant local restaurants and beaches. These Proceedings are published for the first time in Journal of Physics: Conference Series. We are grateful to the Journal's staff for encouraging this idea. The Scientific Committee of the ISCMP dedicates this volume of the Proceedings to the living memory of Professor Joe Marshall, Honorary Chairman of the ISCMP. The Committee decided that the next event will take place again in Saint Constantine and Elena, in September 2012. It will be entitled: Open Problems in Condensed Matter Physics, Biomedical Physics and their Applications. Doriana Dimova-Malinovska, Diana Nesheva, Alexander G Petrov and Marina T Primatarowa

  14. Vein Formation and Element Mobility During Serpentinization of Peridotites: Mineralogy and Thermodynamic Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarzenbach, E. M.; Caddick, M. J.; Beard, J. S.

    2014-12-01

    Serpentinization is a common mineralogical process that occurs in ultramafic rocks when water interacts with the primary minerals olivine and pyroxene to form a rock dominated by serpentine. Temperature of hydration and the primary mineralogy of the peridotite strongly influence the alteration products. We studied peridotites with low to extremely low degrees of serpentinization from two settings, the Santa Elena ophiolite in Costa Rica and the Gakkel Ridge, to test how temperature and primary mineralogy control reactions, reaction sequences, and subsequent vein textures during peridotite hydration. Serpentinization of a harzburgite from Costa Rica occurred at around 250°C, resulting in olivine-hosted veins that are a mixture of brucite and serpentine - with a bulk composition approximately equivalent to hydrated host olivine - and later stage veins that also contain magnetite. Serpentinite that formed by hydration of orthopyroxene is accompanied by talc, with a bulk composition (serp + tlc) that is depleted in silica relative to the orthopyroxene host. In contrast, veins in orthopyroxene in an almost un-serpentinized peridotite (degree of serpentinization ~ 5 %) from the ultra-slow spreading Gakkel Ridge have an average composition very similar to the host orthopyroxene, whilst veins in olivine suggest slight enrichment in silica compared to the host olivine. Replacement of orthopyroxene here results in the formation of serpentine, talc and amphibole. The presence of amphibole in orthopyroxene and the higher degree of orthopyroxene replacement compared to olivine suggests that serpentinization occurred at higher temperatures than in the Santa Elena peridotites, resulting in the mobilization of more silica through the system. Thermodynamic models of the hydration of olivine and orthopyroxene agree with the mineralogical observations and show that hydration of olivine first results in the simple formation of serpentine and brucite. Increasing water-rock ratios then

  15. Quaternary sedimentation and active faulting along the Ecuadorian shelf: preliminary results of the ATACAMES Cruise (2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaud, F.; Proust, J. N.; Collot, J. Y.; Lebrun, J. F.; Witt, C.; Ratzov, G.; Pouderoux, H.; Martillo, C.; Hernández, M. J.; Loayza, G.; Penafiel, L.; Schenini, L.; Dano, A.; Gonzalez, M.; Barba, D.; De Min, L.; Ponce, G.; Urresta, A.; Calderon, M.

    2015-03-01

    Selected high-resolution seismic-reflection profiles and multibeam bathymetry acquired along the convergent Ecuador margin during the ATACAMES cruise on onboard the R/V L'Atalante (Jan.15-Feb.18, 2012) allow a preliminary evaluation of the neotectonic development and stratigraphic evolution of the margin based on the sismo-stratigraphic analysis of Quaternary sediment preserved on the margin shelf and upper slope. We present three major preliminary results. (1) The evolution of the Esmeraldas, Guayaquil and Santa Elena canyons. The head of the Esmeraldas canyon is the location of a continuous significant sediment transport. The Guayaquil canyon shows several episodes of deposition and incision. Aggrading sedimentation pattern in the canyon records several changes in relative sea-level. The subsidence of the Gulf of Guayaquil probably contributes to the good preservation of the canyon filling stages. The Santa Elena canyon is controlled by a SW-NE trending normal fault. (2) Variations of sediment accumulation and relative vertical motions are shown along-strike the shelf edge. Offshore the uplifted Manta peninsula, a pronounced subsidence of the shelf edge is documented by sedimentary clinoforms that have deposited in a morphological reentrant, and have migrated upslope testifying of a local subsidence meanwhile the adjacent La Plata Island area underwent uplift. In the Esmeraldas canyon area, a local uplift of the shelf is documented. (3) Two neotectonic fault systems with a possible transcurrent component are imaged across the shelf edge and upper margin slope offshore Jama, and Cape Galera. This possible transcurrent motion could be related to the reactivation of ancient faults of the upper plate by the subduction. These preliminary results indicate that the ATACAMES data set has a strong potential to evaluate the spatial and temporal contribution of tectonic and climate changes on the structural development and stratigraphic evolution of the Ecuador continental

  16. Women in landscape architecture and heritage conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostenaru-Dan, Maria; Theodoridou, Magda; Hayashi, Mikiko; Anghelache, Mirela Adriana

    2017-04-01

    This contribution present research done by Marie Curie fellows in Italy. The first author investigated early landscape architecture in Italy, by Italian and by mobile Romanian landscape planers. The very first one was princess Jeanne Ghyca, who did the parterre d'eau at villa Gamberaia by Florence. This villa influenced the landscape architecture of Italy such as Piero Porcinai or Marie Teresa Parpagliolo. Maria Teresa Parpagliolo is the next name to deal as, since she designed the landscape of the EUR (Esposizione Universale Roma), in a time when Mussolini denied the contribution of women. Water characterises also this planning, with an aquarium being built currently under the lake. Maria Teresa Parpagliolo also worked with Elena Luzzatto, the first women architect in Italy, at the design of the military cemetery in Rome. This work will also be presented. Elena Luzzatto contributed to other Roman cemeteries as well, designing funerary stones for Verano and the cemetery at Prima Porta which will be presented. The work on cemeteries will be put in context of Rome (acatholic cemetery for example) and Italy (Carlo Scarpa, Aldo Rossi contributions). The investigation on the role of women will be compared to other programmes dealing with, for example the COST network genderSTE dealing with cities and climate change which are relevant for landscape, and MOMOWO, a European culture project on early woman planers. The next two authors did research on conservation issues, through the network EPISCON, and this is resulting in role models for the GEMS booklet and the Romanian role models booklet. The fourth author also was a Marie Curie fellow in Italy, at the ROSE school in Pavia, doing research on earthquake mitigation along with the first author's Marie Curie stay. The story will also be promoted in the Marie Curie Alumni chapter Romania.

  17. KSC-97PC812

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-05-15

    STS-84 Mission Specialist Elena V. Kondakova prepares to enter the Space Shuttle Atlantis at Launch Pad 39A with help from white room closeout crew members. The fourth Shuttle mission of 1997 will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. The commander is Charles J. Precourt. The pilot is Eileen Marie Collins. The five mission specialists are C. Michael Foale, Carlos I. Noriega, Edward Tsang Lu, Jean-Francois Clervoy of the European Space Agency and Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency. The planned nine-day mission will include the exchange of Foale for U.S. astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger, who has been on Mir since Jan. 15. Linenger transferred to Mir during the last docking mission, STS-81; he will return to Earth on Atlantis. Foale is slated to remain on Mir for about four months until he is replaced in September by STS-86 Mission Specialist Wendy B. Lawrence. During the five days Atlantis is scheduled to be docked with the Mir, the STS-84 crew and the Mir 23 crew, including two Russian cosmonauts, Commander Vasily Tsibliev and Flight Engineer Alexander Lazutkin, will participate in joint experiments. The STS-84 mission also will involve the transfer of more than 7,300 pounds of water, logistics and science equipment to and from the Mir. Atlantis is carrying a nearly 300-pound oxygen generator to replace one of two Mir units which have experienced malfunctions. The oxygen it generates is used for breathing by the Mir crew

  18. Baseline assessment of instream and riparian-zone biological resources on the Rio Grande in and near Big Bend National Park, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moring, James Bruce

    2002-01-01

    Five study sites, and a sampling reach within each site, were established on the Rio Grande in and near Big Bend National Park in 1999 to provide the National Park Service with data and information on the status of stream habitat, fish communities, and benthic macroinvertebrates. Differences in stream-habitat conditions and riparian vegetation reflect differences in surface geology among the five sampling reaches. In the most upstream reach, Colorado Canyon, where igneous rock predominates, streambed material is larger; and riparian vegetation is less diverse and not as dense as in the four other, mostly limestone reaches. Eighteen species of fish and a total of 474 individuals were collected among the five reaches; 348 of the 474 were minnows. The most fish species (15) were collected at the Santa Elena reach and the fewest species (9) at the Colorado Canyon and Johnson Ranch reaches. The fish community at Colorado Canyon was least like the fish communities at the four other reaches. Fish trophic structure reflected fish-community structure among the five reaches. Invertivores made up at least 60 percent of the trophic structure at all reaches except Colorado Canyon. Piscivores dominated the trophic structure at Colorado Canyon. At the four other reaches, piscivores were the smallest trophic group. Eighty percent of the benthic macroinvertebrate taxa collected were aquatic insects. Two species of blackfly were the most frequently collected invertebrate taxon. Net-spinning caddisflies were common at all reaches except Santa Elena. The aquatic-insect community at the Boquillas reach was least similar to the aquatic-insect community at the other reaches.

  19. Advanced Accelerator Concepts Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Wurtele, Jonathan S.

    2014-05-13

    physics motivation for our experiment, one that requires only a few dozen researchers but must effectively integrate plasma, accelerator, atomic, and fundamental physics, as well as combine numerous technologies in the control, manipulation, and measurement of neutral and non-neutral particles. The ELENA ring (to which we hope to contribute, should funding be provided) is expect, when completed, to significantly enhance the performance of antihydrogen trapping by increasing by a factor of 100 the number of antiprotons that can be successfully trapped and cooled. ELENA operation is scheduled to commence in 2017. In collaboration with LBNL scientists, we proposed a frictional cooling scheme. This is an alternative cooling method to that used by ELENA. It is less complicated, experimentally unproven, and produces a lower yield of cold antiprotons. Students and postdoctoral researchers work on the trapping, cooling, transport, and nonlinear dynamics of antiprotons bunches that are provided by the AD to ALPHA; they contribute to the operation of the experiment, to software development, and to the design and operation of experiments. Students are expected to spend at summers at CERN while taking courses; after completion of courses they typically reside at CERN for most of the half-year run. The Antiproton Decelerator [AD] at CERN, along with its experiments, is the only facility in the world where antiprotons can be trapped and cooled and combined with positrons to form cold antihydrogen, with the ultimate goal of studying CPT violation and, subsequently, gravitational interactions of antimatter. Beyond the ALPHA experiment, the group worked on beam physics problems including limits on the average current in a time-dependent period cathode and new methods to create longitudinally coherent high repetition rate soft x-ray sources and wide bandwidth mode locked x-ray lasers. We completed a detailed study of quantum mechanical effects in the transit time cooling of muons.

  20. Biological soil crusts in Chile along the precipitation gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samolov, Elena; Glaser, Karin; Baumann, Karen; Leinweber, Peter; Jung, Patrick; Büdel, Burkhard; Mikhailyuk, Tatiana; Karsten, Ulf

    2017-04-01

    Biological soil crusts in Chile along a precipitation gradient Elena Samolov* (1), Karin Glaser (1), Karen Baumann (2), Peter Leinweber (2), Patrick Jung (3), Burkhard Büdel (3), Tatiana Mikhailyuk (4) and Ulf Karsten (1) (1) Institute of Biological Sciences - Applied Ecology and Phycology, University of Rostock, Rostock, Germany, (2) Faculty of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences - Soil Sciences, University of Rostock, Rostock, Germany (3) University of Kaiserslautern, Kaiserslautern, Germany (4) M.H. Kholodny Institute of Botany, National Academy of Science of Ukraine, Kyiv, Ukraine * elena.samolov@uni-rostock.de Biological soil crusts (BSCs) are an association of different microorganisms and soil particles in the top millimeters of the soil. They are formed by algae, cyanobacteria, microfungi, bacteria, bryophytes and lichens in various compositions; together with their by-products they create a micro-ecosystem that performs important ecological functions, e.g. primary production, nitrogen fixation, mineralization and stabilization of soils. These top-soil assemblages are almost unstudied in South America (Büdel et al. 2016). Therefore, our aim is to investigate for the first time biodiversity of the key photosynthetic organisms, green algae and cyanobacteria following a precipitation gradient along the west coast of Chile. We are applying polyphasic approach - a combination of microscopy, culture dependent (16S and 18S rRNA, ITS) and culture independent molecular techniques (NGS). First results, based on culturing and light microscopy, showed high diversity of eukaryotic algae in biocrusts from humid regions, followed by semi-arid regions. Lichen dominated biocrusts from arid regions were characterized by a high diversity of green algae, while cyanobacteria were scarcely present. The functional role of the BSCs in the biogeochemical cycle of phosphorous (P) was evaluated using state of the art analytical methods including 31P-NMR (nuclear magnetic

  1. Archaeointensity Determination of the Earth's Magnetic Field in Coastal Ecuador During the last six Millennia: New data from Ecuadorian Potsherds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrero-Bervera, E.; Tema, E.; Athens, J. S.

    2015-12-01

    We present new absolute archaeointensity data from five archaeological sites in coastal area of Ecuador (South America). Potsherd fragments come from the archaeological excavations of Guayas Province (ca. 535-1535 AD, Manteño Period), Nido de Las Lechusas (ca. 55-755 AD, Guangala Period, and ca. 470-1470 AD, Panzaleo Period), Santa Elena (ca. 4530-2030 BC, Valdivia Period) and Valdivia (ca. 4530-2030 BC, Valdivia Period) respectively, based on available radiocarbon dating. Successful archaeointensity data have been obtained from thirty seven potsherds using the Thellier-Coe protocol. Rock magnetic experiments including low-field magnetic susceptibility versus temperature (k-T) plots, Isothermal Remanent Magnetization (IRM) acquisition curves, as well as hysteresis loops and back-fields, have been performed in order to characterize the magnetic behavior of the samples and determine their main magnetic carriers. The Curie temperatures indicate the presence of at least two magnetic mineral phases (i.e. 560-5750C and 610-6200C), with predominant Curie temperatures typical of magnetite. The results of the magnetic grain size analyses suggest the presence of particles in the Pseudo-Single Domain (PSD) range, according to the distribution on the modified Day plots (Dunlop 2002 a and b) for magnetite. The successful absolute paleointensity determinations yielded archaeointensity values of 17.3 ± 0.5 μT for Guayas (Manteno Period), 29.13 ± 0.61 μT for Nido de Las Lechusas (Guangala Period), 35.45 ± 1.6 μT for Nido de Las Lechusas ((Panzaleo Period), 27.3 ± 1.0 μT for Santa Elena (Valdivia Period) and 25.82 ± 1.82 μT for Valdivia (Valdivia Period). The new results are in good correlation with archaeomagnetic data from the earlier published data from the coastal Valdiva in Ecuador. These new archaeointensity data from Ecuador for the last 4530-2030 BC years aim to enrich our knowledge of the geomagnetic field intensity variations in the south hemisphere, together

  2. A new tropical active serpentinization end-member discovered in Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Murillo, R.; Gazel, E.; Boll, J.; Schwarzenbach, E. M.

    2013-12-01

    Serpentinization is a planetary process where ultramafic rocks react with fluids with important consequences on global biogeochemical cycles through formation of H2 and CH4. Exposed sections of upper-mantle rocks on continents, where meteoric water interacts with the ultramafic rocks, provide natural laboratories to study present-day serpentinization. Here, we present geochemical evidence of active serpentinization and methane vents in the Santa Elena Ophiolite (comprising 250 km2 of ultramafic rocks) in Costa Rica. The system is sustained by peridotites with a 50% degree of serpentinization. Two alkaline spring systems were discovered. The alkaline fluids pH ranged from 11.01 to 11.18. Mean hydroxide and carbonate concentrations were 52 mg/L and 38 mg/L. Mean dissolved calcium was 104 mg/L with a maximum of 167 mg/L. These springs are also characterized by low Mg (< 1 mg/L) and K (2.35 mg/L) and relatively high Na (21.4 mg/L) and chloride (27.1 mg/L) concentrations. Average spring temperature was 29.1°C. Active CH4 vents (24.3% volume) coupled with extensive carbonate deposits (magnesite and calcite with isotopic compositions within the range of similar ultramafic hosted systems) also provide strong evidence of active serpentinization. Groundwater and alkaline spring's hydrological connectivity was explored using stable isotope as natural tracers. Isotope composition of the alkaline fluids (d18O = -7.9‰, d2H = -51.4‰) was remarkably similar to the groundwater signature from 10 deep wells (30-70 m) (d18O = -7.6‰; dD = -48.0‰) sampled in local watersheds. These results support the hypothesis that during prolonged dry periods these alkaline springs are fed by deep subsurface storage. Mean electrical conductivity of the alkaline fluids (622 uS/cm) was considerably higher than of surface waters (470 uS/cm); this significant difference may be additional evidence of active serpentinization in the area. Overall, Santa Elena's varying weather conditions between

  3. Analysis of epistatic interactions and fitness landscapes using a new geometric approach

    PubMed Central

    Beerenwinkel, Niko; Pachter, Lior; Sturmfels, Bernd; Elena, Santiago F; Lenski, Richard E

    2007-01-01

    Background Understanding interactions between mutations and how they affect fitness is a central problem in evolutionary biology that bears on such fundamental issues as the structure of fitness landscapes and the evolution of sex. To date, analyses of fitness landscapes have focused either on the overall directional curvature of the fitness landscape or on the distribution of pairwise interactions. In this paper, we propose and employ a new mathematical approach that allows a more complete description of multi-way interactions and provides new insights into the structure of fitness landscapes. Results We apply the mathematical theory of gene interactions developed by Beerenwinkel et al. to a fitness landscape for Escherichia coli obtained by Elena and Lenski. The genotypes were constructed by introducing nine mutations into a wild-type strain and constructing a restricted set of 27 double mutants. Despite the absence of mutants higher than second order, our analysis of this genotypic space points to previously unappreciated gene interactions, in addition to the standard pairwise epistasis. Our analysis confirms Elena and Lenski's inference that the fitness landscape is complex, so that an overall measure of curvature obscures a diversity of interaction types. We also demonstrate that some mutations contribute disproportionately to this complexity. In particular, some mutations are systematically better than others at mixing with other mutations. We also find a strong correlation between epistasis and the average fitness loss caused by deleterious mutations. In particular, the epistatic deviations from multiplicative expectations tend toward more positive values in the context of more deleterious mutations, emphasizing that pairwise epistasis is a local property of the fitness landscape. Finally, we determine the geometry of the fitness landscape, which reflects many of these biologically interesting features. Conclusion A full description of complex fitness

  4. Chicxulub Post-Impact Sedimentary Sequence: Integrated Borehole Paleogene Carbonate Stratigraphy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fucugauchi, J. U.; Perez-Cruz, L. L.; Escobar-Sanchez, E.; Ortega-Nieto, A.; Velasco-Villarreal, M.

    2014-12-01

    The Chicxulub crater was formed by a bolide impact on the southern Gulf of Mexico at ~66 Ma ago that marked the Cretaceous/Paleogene (K/Pg) boundary, represented worldwide by the ejecta layer. The K/Pg boundary layer with its global distribution provides a high resolution marker, allowing high precision stratigraphic analyses in marine and continental sequences. Following crater formation, sedimentation re-established in the carbonate platform, filling the basin. Crater is located half on-land and half offshore, with the crater floor covered by sediments with variable thickness up to about 1 km. The target, impact and post-impact sequences have been drilled and cored, providing samples for stratigraphic, petrographic and physical-chemical laboratory studies. The post-impact stratigraphy has been analyzed in several studies at proximal, intermediate and distal outcrops and in the crater boreholes, using e.g., radiometric dating, micropaleontology, paleomagnetism, and strontium and stable isotope geochemistry. Emphasis has been given on the impact breccias-carbonates contact and the basal Paleocene sequence. Here we re-analyze the available data, revisiting the stratigraphy for the Santa Elena, Tekax, Peto and Yaxcopoil-1 boreholes using newly constructed detailed lithostratigraphic columns in the continuously cored boreholes. Additionally we extend the study to the Paleogene sequence in the Santa Elena and Yaxcopoil-1 boreholes using bulk carbon and oxygen isotopes, magnetic polarity, XRF core geochemistry and magnetic susceptibility stratigraphy. Results spanning chrons c29 to c24 constrain the K/Pg boundary, c29r-c29n polarity reversal and the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum, providing high resolution records. The basal Paleocene gap and age differences in an integrated stratigraphy are discussed and correlated to the GPTS scale and IODP marine isotope records. The extent and characteristics of crater structure and target/cover sediments have been imaged with

  5. Epistasis and its relationship to canalization in the RNA virus phi 6.

    PubMed Central

    Burch, Christina L; Chao, Lin

    2004-01-01

    Although deleterious mutations are believed to play a critical role in evolution, assessing their realized effect has been difficult. A key parameter governing the effect of deleterious mutations is the nature of epistasis, the interaction between the mutations. RNA viruses should provide one of the best systems for investigating the nature of epistasis because the high mutation rate allows a thorough investigation of mutational effects and interactions. Nonetheless, previous investigations of RNA viruses by S. Crotty and co-workers and by S. F. Elena have been unable to detect a significant effect of epistasis. Here we provide evidence that positive epistasis is characteristic of deleterious mutations in the RNA bacteriophage phi 6. We estimated the effects of deleterious mutations by performing mutation-accumulation experiments on five viral genotypes of decreasing fitness. We inferred positive epistasis because viral genotypes with low fitness were found to be less sensitive to deleterious mutations. We further examined environmental sensitivity in these genotypes and found that low-fitness genotypes were also less sensitive to environmental perturbations. Our results suggest that even random mutations impact the degree of canalization, the buffering of a phenotype against genetic and environmental perturbations. In addition, our results suggest that genetic and environmental canalization have the same developmental basis and finally that an understanding of the nature of epistasis may first require an understanding of the nature of canalization. PMID:15238511

  6. Begomovirus diversity in tomato crops and weeds in Ecuador and the detection of a recombinant isolate of rhynchosia golden mosaic Yucatan virus infecting tomato.

    PubMed

    Paz-Carrasco, Lenin C; Castillo-Urquiza, Gloria P; Lima, Alison T M; Xavier, Cesar A D; Vivas-Vivas, Leticia M; Mizubuti, Eduardo S G; Zerbini, F Murilo

    2014-08-01

    Viral diseases caused by begomoviruses are of economic importance due to their adverse effects on the production of tropical and subtropical crops. In Ecuador, despite reports of significant infestations of Bemisia tabaci in the late 1990s, only very recently has a begomovirus, tomato leaf deformation virus (ToLDeV, also present in Peru), been reported in tomato. ToLDeV is the first monopartite begomovirus discovered that originated in the Americas, and its presence in Ecuador highlights the need for a wider survey of tomato-infecting begomoviruses in this country. Tomato and weed samples were collected in 2010 and 2011 in six provinces of Ecuador, and begomovirus genomes were cloned and sequenced using a rolling-circle-amplification-based approach. Most tomato samples from the provinces of Guayas, Loja, Manabi and Santa Elena were infected with tomato leaf deformation virus (ToLDeV). One sample from Manabi had a triple infection with ToLDeV, rhynchosia golden mosaic Yucatan virus (RhGMYuV) and an isolate that was a recombinant between the two. A new begomovirus was detected in another tomato sample from Manabi. Samples of Rhynchosia sp. from the provinces of Guayas and Manabi were infected by RhGMYuV. These results indicate not only the prevalence of ToLDeV in tomato in Ecuador but also the presence of other viruses, albeit at a much lower frequency.

  7. Impact of two policy interventions on dietary diversity in Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Ponce, Juan; Ramos-Martin, Jesus

    2017-06-01

    To differentiate the effects of food vouchers and training in health and nutrition on consumption and dietary diversity in Ecuador by using an experimental design. Interventions involved enrolling three groups of approximately 200 randomly selected households per group in three provinces in Ecuador. Power estimates and sample size were computed using the Optimal Design software, with a power of 80 %, at 5 % of significance and with a minimum detectable effect of 0·25 (sd). The first group was assigned to receive a monthly food voucher of $US 40. The second group was assigned to receive the same $US 40 voucher, plus training on health and nutrition issues. The third group served as the control. Weekly household values of food consumption were converted into energy intake per person per day. A simple proxy indicator was constructed for dietary diversity, based on the Food Consumption Score. Finally, an econometric model with three specifications was used for analysing the differential effect of the interventions. Three provinces in Ecuador, two from the Sierra region (Carchi and Chimborazo) and one from the Coastal region (Santa Elena). Members of 773 households randomly selected (n 4343). No significant impact on consumption for any of the interventions was found. However, there was evidence that voucher systems had a positive impact on dietary diversity. No differentiated effects were found for the training intervention. The most cost-effective intervention to improve dietary diversity in Ecuador is the use of vouchers to support family choice in food options.

  8. KSC-98pc662

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-05-30

    STS-91 Mission Commander Charles Precourt (left) talks to Elena V. Kondakova and her husband, Valery Ryumin, a cosmonaut with the Russian Space Agency (RSA) and STS-91 mission specialist, at Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF). The STS-91 crew had just arrived at the SLF aboard T-38 jets in preparation for launch. Kondakova, also a cosmonaut with the RSA, flew with Commander Precourt as a mission specialist on STS-84 which launched on May 15, 1997. STS-91 is scheduled to be launched on June 2 on Space Shuttle Discovery with a launch window opening around 6:10 p.m. EDT. The mission will feature the ninth Shuttle docking with the Russian Space Station Mir, the first Mir docking for Discovery, the conclusion of Phase I of the joint U.S.-Russian International Space Station Program, and the first flight of the new Space Shuttle super lightweight external tank. The STS-91 flight crew also includes Pilot Dominic Gorie and Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence; Franklin Chang-Diaz, Ph.D.; and Janet Kavandi, Ph.D. Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., will be returning to Earth with the crew after living more than four months aboard Mir

  9. Disability Life Writing and the Problem of Dependency in The Autobiography of Gaby Brimmer.

    PubMed

    Adams, Rachel

    2017-03-01

    Independence was a core value of the movement for disability rights. People with disabilities did not have to be dependent, advocates claimed; they were robbed of autonomy by poverty, social prejudice, and architectural barriers. Recently, critics have noted that the emphasis on independence equates personhood with autonomy, reason, and self-awareness, thereby excluding those who are incapable of self-determination. The stigma of dependency is communicated to caregivers whose work is devalued and undercompensated. These values are echoed in the life writing of people with disabilities, which tends to present a singular narrative voice, even when the author requires assistance in the physical or intellectual work of composition. The 1979 Mexican memoir-testimonio Gaby Brimmer, collaboratively authored by the acclaimed journalist Elena Poniatowska, Brimmer, her mother, and her paid caregiver is a notable exception. Consisting of interwoven dialogue among its three informants, Gaby Brimmer enacts dependency at the level of form, while exploring the challenges and opportunities of interdependence in societies that devalue the giving and receiving of care.

  10. Astronomy. Inspiration. Art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanic, N.

    2008-10-01

    This paper speculates how poetry and other kind of arts are tightly related to astronomy. Hence the connection between art and natural sciences in general will be discussed in the frame of ongoing multidisciplinary project `Astronomy. Inspiration. Art' at Public Observatory in Belgrade (started in 2004). This project tends to inspire (better to say `infect') artist with a cosmic themes and fantastic sceneries of the Universe. At the very beginning of the project, Serbian poet and philosopher Laza Lazić (who published 49 books of poetry, stories and novels), as well as writer Gordana Maletić (with 25 published novels for children) were interested to work on The Inspiration by Astronomical Phenomena in Serbian Literature. Five young artists and scientists include their new ideas and new approach to multidisciplinary studies too (Srdjan Djukić, Nenad Jeremić, Olivera Obradović, Romana Vujasinović, Elena Dimoski). Two books that will be presented in details in the frame of this Project, "STARRY CITIES" (http://zavod.co.yu) and "ASTROLIES", don't offer only interesting illustrations, images from the latest astronomical observations and currently accepted cosmological theories -- those books induces, provoking curiosity in a specific and witty way, an adventure and challenge to explore and create.

  11. Single-access laparoscopic approach in the surgical treatment of endometrial cancer: A single-institution experience and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Corrado, Giacomo; Cutillo, Giuseppe; Pomati, Giulia; Mancini, Emanuela; Baiocco, Ermelinda; Patrizi, Lodovico; Saltari, Maria; Barletta, Francesco; Patani, Fabiola; Vizza, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to assess the surgical and oncological outcome for the management of endometrial cancer (EC) by laparoendoscopic single-site surgery (LESS). PATIENTS AND METHODS: We performed a retrospective chart review of patients who underwent a LESS for EC. All the patients were treated by the same surgical team between July 2009 and June 2013 at the Gynaecologic Oncologic Unit, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome, Italy. RESULTS: A total of 50 women were included, with a median age of 45 years (range, 39-84 years) and a median body mass index (BMI) of 21.8 kg/m2 (range, 19-48 kg/m2). Median operative time was 100 min (range, 50-240 min), median blood loss was 90 mL (range, 10-300 mL) and median hospital stay was 3 days (range, 2-9 days). The median number of pelvic lymph nodes retrieved was 14 (range, 5-20). No intraoperative complications occurred, but there were 4 postoperative complications. Two patients required a laparoscopic conversion. The median follow-up was 36 months (range, 16-62 months) and no recurrence occurred. CONCLUSION: Our report showed that the LESS approach in the treatment of early EC can be a safe and reliable technique in terms of surgical and oncological outcomes. PMID:27609329

  12. An occurence records database of Irregular Echinoids (Echinodermata: Echinoidea) in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Melo, Alejandra; Solís-Marín, Francisco Alonso; Buitrón-Sánchez, Blanca Estela; Laguarda-Figueras, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Research on echinoderms in Mexico began in the late nineteenth century. We present a dataset that includes the taxonomic and geographic information of irregular echinoids from Mexico, housed in four collections: 1) Colección Nacional de Equinodermos "Ma. Elena Caso Muñoz" from the Instituto de Ciencias del Mar y Limnología (ICML), Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM); 2) Invertebrate Zoology Collection, Smithsonian Museum of Natural History, Washington, D.C., United States of America (USA); 3) Invertebrate Collection, Museum of Comparative Zoology, University of Harvard, Boston, Massachusetts, USA and 4) Invertebrate Zoology, Peabody Museum, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut, USA. A total of six orders, 17 families, 35 genera and 68 species are reported, 37 distributed in the Pacific coast and 31 in the Atlantic coast, none of them was found in both coasts. The most diverse region is the Gulf of California (S=32); the most diverse order is Spatangoida with 31 species reported in mexican waters.

  13. STS-84 crew gets instruction in LC 39A's emergency egress system from Clark during TCDT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The STS-84 crew, with Commander Charles J. Precourt in front, gets instruction in Launch Pad 39A's emergency egress system from Ken Clark, at right, a training instructor with United Space Alliance (USA). The seven- member crew is participating in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. From left, are Pilot Eileen Marie Collins, and Mission Specialists Carlos I. Noriega, Edward Tsang Lu, Jean-Francois Clervoy of the European Space Agency, C. Michael Foale and Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency. NASA astronaut Mario Runco Jr., next to Kondakova in a blue flight suit, is assisting the crew during TCDT. STS-84 will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. After docking, Foale will transfer to the space station and become a member of the Mir 23 crew, replacing U.S. astronaut Jerry M. Linenger, who will return to Earth aboard Atlantis. Foale will live and work on Mir until mid- September when his replacement is expected to arrive on the STS- 86 mission. STS-84 is targeted for a May 15 liftoff.

  14. Taxonomic revision of the Neotropical genus Pityocera Giglio-Tos, 1896 (Diptera: Tabanidae: Scionini).

    PubMed

    Krolow, Tiago Kütter; Henriques, Augusto Loureiro; Gorayeb, Inocêncio De Sousa; Limeira-de-Oliveira, Francisco; Buestán, Jaime

    2015-01-07

    The genus Pityocera Giglio-Tos is revised based on examination of external morphology and genitalia of type material and specimens from Brazilian and foreign institutions. Five currently valid species in three subgenera are recognized: P. (Elaphella) cervus (Wiedemann, 1828); P. (Pityocera) festai Giglio-Tos, 1896; P. (Pseudelaphella) nana (Walker, 1850); P. (Pseudelaphella) nigribasis Fairchild, 1964; P. (Pseudelaphella) patellicornis (Kröber, 1930). Five new species are described: P. (Pseudelaphella) barrosi Gorayeb & Krolow sp. nov. (Brazil: Mato Grosso do Sul); P. (Pseudelaphella) gorayebi Limeira-de-Oliveira & Krolow sp. nov. (Brazil: Maranhão, Tocantins and Bahia); P. (Pseudelaphella) pernaquila Gorayeb & Krolow sp. nov. (Brazil: Pará and Rondônia); P. (Pseudelaphella) rhinolissa Krolow & Henriques sp. nov. (Brazil: Pará, Maranhão, Tocantins, Rondônia, Mato Grosso, Goiás and Mato Grosso do Sul; Bolivia: Santa Cruz); P. (Pseudelaphella) ecuadorensis Buestán & Krolow sp. nov. (Ecuador: Manabí, Guayas, Santa Elena and Loja). We provide diagnosis, descriptions, redescriptions, distribution records, illustrations and discussion for all species, as well as a key for identification of species. 

  15. STS-84 crew boards Astrovan for trip to LC 39A during TCDT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The crew of Space Shuttle Mission STS-84 leaves the Operations and Checkout Building en route to Launch Pad 39A via the astronaut van, at right. The crew is participating in the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT), a dress rehearsal for launch. Leading the seven-member crew, from left, are Pilot Eileen Marie Collins and Commander Charles J. Precourt. Mission Specialist Elena V. Kondakova from the Russian Space Agency is directly behind them. In the next row, from left, are Mission Specialists C. Michael Foale and Carlos I. Noriega. In the last row, from left, are Mission Specialists Jean-Francois Clervoy of the European Space Agency and Edward Tsang Lu. STS-84 will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. After docking, Foale will transfer to the space station and become a member of the Mir 23 crew, replacing U.S. astronaut Jerry M. Linenger, who will return to Earth aboard Atlantis. Foale will live and work on Mir until mid-September when his replacement is expected to arrive on the STS-86 mission. STS-84 is targeted for a May 15 liftoff.

  16. Investigations into beam monitors at the AE bar {g}IS experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sosa, A.; Bravin, E.; Harasimowicz, J.; Jeff, A.; Welsch, C. P.

    2014-02-01

    Detailed diagnostic of antiproton beams at low energies is required for essentially all experiments at the Antiproton Decelerator (AD), but will be particularly important for the future Extra Low ENergy Antiproton ring (ELENA) and its keV beam lines to the different experiments. Many monitors have been successfully developed and operated at the AD, but in particular beam profile monitoring remains a challenge. A dedicated beam instrumentation and detector test stand has recently been setup at the AE bar {g}IS experiment (Antimatter Experiment: Gravity, Interferometry, Spectroscopy). Located behind the actual experiment, it allows for parasitic use of the antiproton beam at different energies for testing and calibration. With the aim to explore and validate different candidate technologies for future low energy beam lines, as well as the downstream antihydrogen detector in AE bar {g}IS, measurements have been carried out using Silicon strip and pixel detectors, a purpose-built secondary emission monitor and emulsions. Here, results from measurements and characterization of the different detector types with regard to their future use at the AD complex are presented.

  17. Negative ion source development at the cooler synchrotron COSY/Jülich

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felden, O.; Gebel, R.; Maier, R.; Prasuhn, D.

    2013-02-01

    The Nuclear Physics Institute at the Forschungszentrum Jülich, a member of the Helmholtz Association, conducts experimental and theoretical basic research in the field of hadron, particle, and nuclear physics. It operates the cooler synchrotron COSY, an accelerator and storage ring, which provides unpolarized and polarized proton and deuteron beams with beam momenta of up to 3.7 GeV/c. Main activities of the accelerator division are the design and construction of the high energy storage ring HESR, a synchrotron and part of the international FAIR project, and the operation and development of COSY with injector cyclotron and ion sources. Filament driven volume sources and a charge exchange colliding beams source, based on a nuclear polarized atomic beam source, provide unpolarized and polarized H- or D- routinely for more than 6500 hours/year. Within the Helmholtz Association's initiative Accelerator Research and Development, ARD, the existing sources at COSY, as well as new sources for future programs, are investigated and developed. The paper reports about these plans, improved pulsed beams from the volume sources and the preparation of a source for the ELENA project at CERN.

  18. Linac-based positron source and generation of a high density positronium cloud for the GBAR experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liszkay, L.; Comini, P.; Corbel, C.; Debu, P.; Dupré, P.; Grandemange, P.; Pérez, P.; Rey, J.-M.; Ruiz, N.; Sacquin, Y.

    2013-06-01

    The aim of the recently approved GBAR (Gravitational Behaviour of Antihydrogen at Rest) experiment is to measure the acceleration of neutral antihydrogen atoms in the gravitational field of the Earth. The experimental scheme requires a high density positronium cloud as a target for antiprotons, provided by the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) - Extra Low Energy Antiproton Ring (ELENA) facility at CERN. We introduce briefly the experimental scheme and present the ongoing efforts at IRFU CEA Saclay to develop the positron source and the positron-positronium converter, which are key parts of the experiment. We have constructed a slow positron source in Saclay, based on a low energy (4.3 MeV) linear electron accelerator (linac). By using an electron target made of tungsten and a stack of thin W meshes as positron moderator, we reached a slow positron intensity that is comparable with that of 22Na-based sources using a solid neon moderator. The source feeds positrons into a high field (5 T) Penning-Malmberg trap. Intense positron pulses from the trap will be converted to slow ortho-positronium (o-Ps) by a converter structure. Mesoporous silica films appear to date to be the best candidates as converter material. We discuss our studies to find the optimal pore configuration for the positron-positronium converter.

  19. Physics with antihydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertsche, W. A.; Butler, E.; Charlton, M.; Madsen, N.

    2014-12-01

    Performing measurements of the properties of antihydrogen, the bound state of an antiproton and a positron, and comparing the results with those for ordinary hydrogen, has long been seen as a route to test some of the fundamental principles of physics. There has been much experimental progress in this direction in recent years, and antihydrogen is now routinely created and trapped and a range of exciting measurements probing the foundations of modern physics are planned or underway. In this contribution we review the techniques developed to facilitate the capture and manipulation of positrons and antiprotons, along with procedures to bring them together to create antihydrogen. Once formed, the antihydrogen has been detected by its destruction via annihilation or field ionization, and aspects of the methodologies involved are summarized. Magnetic minimum neutral atom traps have been employed to allow some of the antihydrogen created to be held for considerable periods. We describe such devices, and their implementation, along with the cusp magnetic trap used to produce the first evidence for a low-energy beam of antihydrogen. The experiments performed to date on antihydrogen are discussed, including the first observation of a resonant quantum transition and the analyses that have yielded a limit on the electrical neutrality of the anti-atom and placed crude bounds on its gravitational behaviour. Our review concludes with an outlook, including the new ELENA extension to the antiproton decelerator facility at CERN, together with summaries of how we envisage the major threads of antihydrogen physics will progress in the coming years.

  20. GBAR. Gravitational behavior of antihydrogen at rest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debu, Pascal

    2012-12-01

    The GBAR project aims to perform the first test of the Equivalence Principle with antimatter by measuring the free fall of ultra-cold antihydrogen atoms. The objective is to measure the gravitational acceleration to better than a percent in a first stage, with a long term perspective to reach a much higher precision using gravitational quantum states of antihydrogen. The production of 20 μK atoms proceeds via sympathetic cooling of overline{H^+} ions by Be + ions. overline{H^+} ions are produced via a two-step process, involving the interaction of bursts of 107 slow antiprotons from the AD (or ELENA upgrade) at CERN with a dense positronium cloud. In order to produce enough positronium, it is necessary to realize an intense source of slow positrons, a few 108 per second. This is done with a small electron linear accelerator. A few 1010 positrons are accumulated every cycle in a Penning-Malmberg trap before they are ejected onto a positron-to-positronium converter. The overall scheme of the experiment is described and the status of the installation of the prototype positron source at Saclay is shown. The accumulation scheme of positrons is given, and positronium formation results are presented. The estimated performance and efficiency of the various steps of the experiment are given.

  1. Gbar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debu, Pascal

    The GBAR project aims to perform the first test of the Equivalence Principle with antimatter by measuring the free fall of ultra-cold antihydrogen atoms. The objective is to measure the gravitational acceleration to better than a percent in a first stage, with a long term perspective to reach a much higher precision using gravitational quantum states of antihydrogen. The production of 20 μK atoms proceeds via sympathetic cooling of overline{H^+} ions by Be + ions. overline{H^+} ions are produced via a two-step process, involving the interaction of bursts of 107 slow antiprotons from the AD (or ELENA upgrade) at CERN with a dense positronium cloud. In order to produce enough positronium, it is necessary to realize an intense source of slow positrons, a few 108 per second. This is done with a small electron linear accelerator. A few 1010 positrons are accumulated every cycle in a Penning-Malmberg trap before they are ejected onto a positron-to-positronium converter. The overall scheme of the experiment is described and the status of the installation of the prototype positron source at Saclay is shown. The accumulation scheme of positrons is given, and positronium formation results are presented. The estimated performance and efficiency of the various steps of the experiment are given.

  2. Tsunami mapping in the Gulf of Guayaquil, Ecuador, due to local seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioualalen, M.; Monfret, T.; Béthoux, N.; Chlieh, M.; Ponce Adams, G.; Collot, J.-Y.; Martillo Bustamante, C.; Chunga, K.; Navarrete, E.; Montenegro, G.; Solis Gordillo, G.

    2014-12-01

    The North-Andean subduction zone generates recurrent tsunamigenic earthquakes. The seismicity is usually considered to be segmented because of different specific morphological features of the Nazca Plate driving the subduction motion. Most of the recent powerful earthquakes in the margin were located in its northern part. To the south, the region of the Gulf of Guayaquil, only (undocumented) three events in 1901, 1933 and 1953 were possibly powerful and tsunamigenic. Here we are interested in the tsunami signature due to local seismicity. Two realistic earthquake scenarios (Mw = 7 and Mw = 7.5) taking into account the hypothesized segmentation of the area are proposed. Their return period is supposed to be intra-centenary. Then, a larger magnitude unsegmented Mw = 8 scenario is computed (half-millennium return period). The interior of the Gulf of Guayaquil as well as the Santa Elena Peninsula are sheltered areas including numerous coastal infrastructures and the city of Guayaquil. It is predicted that potential flooding would occur at high tide only for both segmented and unsegmented scenarios in (1) south of Playas with however only a few centimeters of wave height and (2) Chanduy (a few meters). Both are important zones of coastal farms.

  3. A new scheme to accumulate positrons in a Penning-Malmberg trap with a linac-based positron pulsed source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupré, P.

    2013-03-01

    The Gravitational Behaviour of Antimatter at Rest experiment (GBAR) is designed to perform a direct measurement of the weak equivalence principle on antimatter by measuring the acceleration of anti-hydrogen atoms in the gravitational field of the Earth. The experimental scheme requires a high density positronium (Ps) cloud as a target for antiprotons, provided by the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) - Extra Low Energy Antiproton Ring (ELENA) facility at CERN. The Ps target will be produced by a pulse of few 1010 positrons injected onto a positron-positronium converter. For this purpose, a slow positron source using an electron Linac has been constructed at Saclay. The present flux is comparable with that of 22Na-based sources using solid neon moderator. A new positron accumulation scheme with a Penning-Malmberg trap has been proposed taking advantage of the pulsed time structure of the beam. In the trap, the positrons are cooled by interaction with a dense electron plasma. The overall trapping efficiency has been estimated to be ˜70% by numerical simulations.

  4. Morphodynamic signature of the 1985 hurricane impacts on the northern Gulf of Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Penland, Shea; Suter, John R.; Sallenger, Ashbury H.; Williams, S. Jeffress; McBride, Randolph A.; Westphal, Karen E.; Reimer, P. Douglas; Jaffe, Bruce E.

    1989-01-01

    Three hurricanes hit Lousiana (LA), Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), and the Florida (FL) panhandle in 1985, producing dramatic geomorphic changes in a wide variety of coastal environments. The impact zone for hurricanes Danny, Elena, and Juan stretched 1000 km between the Sabine River in LA to the Apalachicola River in FL. Barrier shorelines experienced repeated intense overwash events, producing beach and dune erosion exceeding 30 m, as well as producing classic examples of storm surge deposits. Pre- and post-storm airborne videotape surveys, sequential vertical mapping photography, and field surveys provide the data base for this regional hurricane impact assessment on the northern Gulf of Mexico. Hurricane impacts on the low-profile and high-profile barrier shorelines, as well as on the marine terrace cliffs were systematic and predictable. Controlling the direction of overwash flow and the impact distribution pattern is the relationship among shoreline orientation, hurricane storm track, and regional wind field. The relationship between shore-zone geomorphology and storm surge overwash controls the impact response.

  5. CPT tests with antihydrogen and antiprotonic helium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayano, Ryugo

    2014-09-01

    Recent progress of the CPT tests with antihydrogen and antiprotonic helium atoms by the ASACUSA collaboration at CERN's antiproton decelerator will be presented. The antiprotonic helium atom (antiproton+electron+helium nucleus) is a serendipitously discovered metastable three-body system, whose energy levels can now be studied by laser spectroscopy techniques to a relative precision of ~10-9. By comparing these precise experimental results with the result of three-body QED calculation, the antiproton-to-electron mass ratio was determined to a relative precision of 1 . 2 ×10-9 . While this can be used as a precise test of the CPT symmetry, CODATA instead assumed the CPT, and combined our results with the proton-to-electron mass ratio measured by the Penning trap method in their adjustment of the fundamental physical constants. In addition to the laser spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium, ASACUSA collaboration also aims at measuring the ground-state hyperfine splitting of antihydrogen using the (anti)-atomic beam method. Extraction of antihydrogen atoms from a ``cusp'' trap has so far been demonstrated. Both of these experiments will benefit from the completing of a new antiproton decelerator-cooler ring called ELENA, which is under construction at CERN.

  6. PREFACE: 1st Tensor Polarized Solid Target Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-10-01

    These are the proceedings of the first Tensor Spin Observables Workshop that was held in March 2014 at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility in Newport News, Virginia. The conference was convened to study the physics that can be done with the recently approved E12-13-011 polarized target. A tensor polarized target holds the potential of initiating a new generation of tensor spin physics at Jefferson Lab. Experiments which utilize tensor polarized targets can help clarify how nuclear properties arise from partonic degrees of freedom, provide unique insight into short-range correlations and quark angular momentum, and also help pin down the polarization of the quark sea with a future Electron Ion Collider. This three day workshop was focused on tensor spin observables and the associated tensor target development. The workshop goals were to stimulate progress in the theoretical treatment of polarized spin-1 systems, foster the development of new proposals, and to reach a consensus on the optimal polarized target configuration for the tensor spin program. The workshop was sponsored by the University of New Hampshire, the Jefferson Science Associates, Florida International University, and Jefferson Lab. It was organized by Karl Slifer (chair), Patricia Solvignon, and Elena Long of the University of New Hampshire, Douglas Higinbotham and Christopher Keith of Jefferson Lab, and Misak Sargsian of the Florida International University. These proceedings represent the effort put forth by the community to begin exploring the possibilities that a high-luminosity, high-tensor polarized solid target can offer.

  7. bar H and bar H+ production cross sections for the GBAR experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comini, P.; Hervieux, P.-A.

    2013-06-01

    The production and cooling of the bar H+ ion is the key point of the GBAR experiment (Gravitational Behaviour of Antihydrogen at Rest), which aims at performing the free fall of antihydrogen atoms to measure bar g, the acceleration of antimatter on Earth. bar H+ ions will be obtained from collisions between a positronium cloud and antiprotons delivered by the AD/ELENA facility at CERN, with intermediate formation of antihydrogen atoms. In order to optimise the experimental production of bar H+ ions, we computed the total cross sections of the two corresponding reactions, within the same theoretical framework of the Continuum Distorted Wave - Final State (CDW-FS) model. The different contributions of the bar H excited states have been systematically investigated for different states of Ps. The results exhibit an increase of the bar H production toward low kinetic energies, in agreement with experimental data and previous calculations, whereas the largest bar H+ production is obtained with low energy ground-state antihydrogen atoms. These theoretical predictions suggest that the overall production of bar H+ could be optimal for 2 keV antiproton impact energy, using positronium atoms prepared in the 2p state.

  8. Preauricular skin tags and difficult tracheal intubation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Moschini, V; Collini, R

    2009-10-01

    Despite the large variety of equipment available for pediatric intubations, difficult tracheal intubation is still a main factor in deaths associated with anesthesia, especially in children with congenital anomalies of the airways or with rare diseases and syndromes. The aim of this study was to focus attention on the possibility of difficult intubation in children with preauricular tags. This condition is reported as both isolated and associated with more complex syndromes, including nephrourological anomalies and multiple craniofacial dysmorphysms. We retrospectively analyzed the anesthesia procedures for seven children (aged between 3 and 18 months) who underwent surgical ablation of preauricular tags between October 2006 and April 2008 at the Fondazione Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Mangiagalli and Regina Elena of Milan. Two of these children, both native residents of Sri Lanka, presented with a problematic airway and difficult tracheal intubation, which was suspected in one case but totally unexpected in the other. Considering the International Guidelines for difficult intubation in pediatrics and the data of other authors, our conclusions for how to approach a child with preauricular tags are: 1) to verify whether the defect is isolated or associated with other malformations; 2) to analyze the medical history and to perform an accurate physical examination to identify a possibly difficult airway; and 3) to not exceed three attempts to intubate and, if possible, to choose an alternative strategy.

  9. An occurence records database of Irregular Echinoids (Echinodermata: Echinoidea) in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Solís-Marín, Francisco Alonso; Buitrón-Sánchez, Blanca Estela; Laguarda-Figueras, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Research on echinoderms in Mexico began in the late nineteenth century. We present a dataset that includes the taxonomic and geographic information of irregular echinoids from Mexico, housed in four collections: 1) Colección Nacional de Equinodermos “Ma. Elena Caso Muñoz” from the Instituto de Ciencias del Mar y Limnología (ICML), Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM); 2) Invertebrate Zoology Collection, Smithsonian Museum of Natural History, Washington, D.C., United States of America (USA); 3) Invertebrate Collection, Museum of Comparative Zoology, University of Harvard, Boston, Massachusetts, USA and 4) Invertebrate Zoology, Peabody Museum, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut, USA. New information A total of six orders, 17 families, 35 genera and 68 species are reported, 37 distributed in the Pacific coast and 31 in the Atlantic coast, none of them was found in both coasts. The most diverse region is the Gulf of California (S=32); the most diverse order is Spatangoida with 31 species reported in mexican waters. PMID:27660526

  10. Andrei Sakharov Prize Talk: Guerrilla Tactics for Human Rights: the Paradigm of Scientists for Sakharov, Orlov and Sharansky (SOS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pripstein, Morris

    2010-02-01

    In response to the seriously deteriorating plight of dissident scientist colleagues in the former Soviet Union in the late 1970s, a small group of physicists at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) came together to plot out a new course of action on behalf of their beleaguered colleagues. A guiding principle was to engage individual scientists to act collectively in unorthodox efforts to publicly ``encourage'' the Soviet authorities to cease their human rights violations. While the focus was to be on the three scientists in the eventual name of the group, ``Scientists for Sakharov, Orlov and Sharansky (SOS),'' it was also meant to be a lightning rod for the more general concern of the plight of all dissident scientists. Examples of such actions included an unprecedented moratorium on scientific cooperation with the Soviet Union, a ``Hostages for Elena Bonner'' initiative where Western scientists volunteered to serve as good-faith witnesses in the Soviet Union for the temporary release of Sakharov's wife for medical treatment in the West, and picketing of embassies and of selected scientists at scientific conferences. Within two years from this small beginning in Berkeley and with no staff whatsoever, the effort grew into an international movement to promote the human rights of scientists, comprising more than 8,000 scientists from 44 countries. As co-founder and chairperson of SOS, I will discuss the evolution of the group's operational principles and actions as well as various reactions to its initiatives, and some possible lessons learned. )

  11. Honors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-10-01

    More than a dozen AGU members are among 94 researchers announced by U.S. president Barack Obama on 26 September as recipients of the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers. The award, which is coordinated by the Office of Science and Technology Policy within the Executive Office of the President, is considered the highest honor bestowed by the U.S. government on science and engineering professionals in the early stages of their independent research careers. This year's recipients include Jeffrey Book, Naval Research Laboratory; Jonathan Cirtain, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center; Fotini Katopodes Chow, University of California, Berkeley; Elizabeth Cochran, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS); Ian Howat, Ohio State University; Christiane Jablonowski, University of Michigan; Justin Kasper, Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory; Elena Litchman, Michigan State University; James A. Morris Jr., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA); Erin M. Oleson, NOAA; Victoria Orphan, California Institute of Technology; Sasha Reed, USGS; David Shelly, USGS; and Feng Wang, University of California, Berkeley. Five AGU members are among 10 U.S. representatives recently selected for International Arctic Science Committee working groups. The AGU members, chosen as representatives through the U.S. National Academies review process, are Atmosphere Working Group member James Overland, Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, NOAA; Cryosphere Working Group members Walter Meier, University of Colorado at Boulder, and Elizabeth Hunke, Los Alamos National Laboratory; Marine Working Group member Mary-Louise Timmermans, Yale University; and Terrestrial Working Group member Vanessa Lougheed, University of Texas at El Paso.

  12. Discovery and microbial content of the driest site of the hyperarid Atacama Desert, Chile.

    PubMed

    Azua-Bustos, Armando; Caro-Lara, Luis; Vicuña, Rafael

    2015-06-01

    The Atacama Desert is the driest and oldest desert on Earth. Eleven years ago, the Yungay region was established as the driest site of this hyperarid desert and also close to the dry limit for life on Earth. Since then, much has been published about the extraordinary characteristics of this site and its pertinence as a Mars analogue model. However, as a result of a more systematic search in the Atacama here, we describe a new site, María Elena South (MES), which is much drier than Yungay. The mean atmospheric relative humidity (RH) at MES was 17.3%, with the RH of its soils remaining at a constant 14% at the depth of 1 m, a value that matches the lowest RH measurements taken by the Mars Science Laboratory at Gale Crater. Remarkably, we found a number of viable bacterial species in the soil profile at MES using a combination of molecular dependent and independent methods, unveiling the presence of life in the driest place on the Atacama Desert reported to date.

  13. Smallpox vaccination in the early 19th century using live carriers: the travels of Francisco Xavier de Balmis.

    PubMed

    Aldrete, J Antonio

    2004-04-01

    Realizing that the Spanish colonies were being devastated by epidemics of smallpox resulting in thousands of deaths, Charles IV, King of Spain, sent one of his court's physicians to apply the recently discovered vaccine. Without refrigeration, the vaccine was passed from one child to another (boys taken out of orphanages). Francisco Xavier de Balmis and a team that included three assistants, two surgeons, and three nurses sailed from Spain on November 30. 1803. They vaccinated more than 100,000 people from the Caribbean Islands and South, Central, and North America, reaching up to San Antonio, Texas, and then traveled to the Philippines, Macao, Canton, and Santa Elena Island, landing back in Cadiz on September 7, 1806. During his journey, Balmis instructed local physicians on how to prepare, preserve, and apply the vaccine, while collecting rare biologic specimens. On the 200th anniversary of their sailing, recognition is given to this group for conducting what was the first global vaccination campaign that reached Texas and California.

  14. STS-84 Day 08 Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    On this eighth day of the STS-84 mission, the flight crew, Cmdr. Charles J. Precourt, Pilot Eileen M. Collins, Payload Cmdr, Jean-Francois Clervoy (ESA), Mission Specialists Edward T. Lu, Carlos I. Noriega, Elena V. Kondakova, Jerry M. Linenger (download), and C. Michael Foale (upload) sing 'The Cosmonauts' Song' to Mir-23 crew members Vasily Tsibliev, Alexander Lazutkin and astronaut Mike Foale, who is beginning his four-month research mission on Mir. Foale and his new crewmates played music as Atlantis departed following the joint phase of the flight. Atlantis' undocking from Mir was modified from previous joint missions in that a flyaround of the station for photographic purposes was not conducted. Instead, Pilot Eileen Collins guided Atlantis below the Mir after the two spacecraft completed their physical separation, stopping three times at distances of 90, 300 and 1,500 feet to collect data from a European sensor device designed to assist future rendezvous of a proposed European Space Agency resupply vehicle with the International Space Station. Once the data collection was completed, the shuttle took advantage of natural orbital mechanics to drift beneath and out in front of Mir.

  15. Long-range atmospheric transport of persistent organic pollutants to remote lacustrine environments.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Fernández, Ana Carolina; Ontiveros-Cuadras, Jorge Feliciano; Sericano, José L; Sanchez-Cabeza, Joan-Albert; Liong Wee Kwong, Laval; Dunbar, Robert B; Mucciarone, David A; Pérez-Bernal, Libia Hascibe; Páez-Osuna, Federico

    2014-09-15

    Concentrations, temporal trends and fluxes of persistent organic pollutants (POPs: PAHs, PCBs and PBDEs) were determined in soil and (210)Pb-dated sediment cores from remote lacustrine environments (El Tule and Santa Elena lakes) in rural areas of Central Mexico. In both areas, the concentrations of target analytes in soil and sediment samples were comparable and indicative of slightly contaminated environments. The prevalence of low-molecular-weight PAHs in soils suggested their mainly atmospheric origin, in contrast to the aquatic sediments where runoff contribution was also significant. Increasing contamination trends of PCBs and PBDEs were evident, showing maximum fluxes of 4.8 ± 2.1 and 0.3 ± 0.1 ng cm(-2) a(-1) for PCBs and PBDEs, respectively. The predominance of lower-brominated PBDEs and lower-chlorinated PCBs in soils and sediments indicated that their presence is mostly due to long-range atmospheric transport. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. KSC-97pc782

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-05-11

    STS-84 Mission Specialist Elena V. Kondakova, a cosmonaut with the Russian Space Agency, and her husband, Valery Ryumin, greet press represenatives and other well wishers after her arrival at KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility. Ryumin is director of the Mir-Shuttle program for RSC Energia in Russia. This will be Kondakova’s first flight on a U.S. Space Shuttle, but her second trip into space. She spent 169 days in space as flight engineer of the 17th main mission on Mir from October 1994 to March 1995. STS-84 will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. During the docking, STS-84 Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale will transfer to the Russian space station to become a member of the Mir 23 crew, replacing U.S. astronaut Jerry M. Linenger, who will return to Earth on Atlantis. Foale is scheduled to remain on Mir about four months until his replacement arrives on STS-86 in September

  17. Onboard data processing and compression for a four-sensor suite: the SERENA experiment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mura, A.; Orsini, S.; Di Lellis, A.; Lazzarotto, F.; Barabash, S.; Livi, S.; Torkar, K.; Milillo, A.; De Angelis, E.

    2013-09-01

    SERENA (Search for Exospheric Refilling and Emitted Natural Abundances) is an instrument package that will fly on board the BepiColombo/Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO). SERENA instrument includes four units: ELENA (Emitted Low Energy Neutral Atoms), a neutral particle analyzer/imager to detect ion sputtering and backscattering from Mercury's surface; STROFIO (Start from a Rotating FIeld mass spectrometer), a mass spectrometer to identify atomic masses released from the surface; MIPA (Miniature Ion Precipitation Analyzer) and PICAM (Planetary Ion Camera), two ion spectrometers to monitor the precipitating solar wind and measure the plasma environment around Mercury. The System Control Unit architecture is such that all four sensors are connected to a high resolution FPGA, which dialogs with a dedicated high-performance data processing unit. The unpredictability of the data rate, due to the peculiarities of these investigations, leads to several possible scenarios for the data compression and handling. In this study we first discuss about the predicted data volume that comes from the optimized operation strategy, and then we report on the instrument data processing and compression.

  18. Physics with antihydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertsche, W. A.; Butler, E.; Charlton, M.; Madsen, N.

    2015-12-01

    Performing measurements of the properties of antihydrogen, the bound state of an antiproton and a positron, and comparing the results with those for ordinary hydrogen, has long been seen as a route to test some of the fundamental principles of physics. There has been much experimental progress in this direction in recent years, and antihydrogen is now routinely created and trapped and a range of exciting measurements probing the foundations of modern physics are planned or underway. In this contribution we review the techniques developed to facilitate the capture and manipulation of positrons and antiprotons, along with procedures to bring them together to create antihydrogen. Once formed, the antihydrogen has been detected by its destruction via annihilation or field ionization, and aspects of the methodologies involved are summarized. Magnetic minimum neutral atom traps have been employed to allow some of the antihydrogen created to be held for considerable periods. We describe such devices, and their implementation, along with the cusp magnetic trap used to produce the first evidence for a low-energy beam of antihydrogen. The experiments performed to date on antihydrogen are discussed, including the first observation of a resonant quantum transition and the analyses that have yielded a limit on the electrical neutrality of the anti-atom and placed crude bounds on its gravitational behaviour. Our review concludes with an outlook, including the new ELENA extension to the antiproton decelerator facility at CERN, together with summaries of how we envisage the major threads of antihydrogen physics will progress in the coming years.

  19. Singular effective slip length for longitudinal flow over a dense bubble mattress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnitzer, Ory

    2016-11-01

    We derive accurate asymptotic expansions in the small-solid-fraction limit ɛ << 1 for the effective slip length characterising unidirectional liquid flow over a 'bubble mattress' - a periodically grooved surface, with trapped bubbles protruding between solid ridges. The slip length diverges in this limit: inversely with √{ ɛ} for contact angles θ near π / 2 , and logarithmically for 0 <= θ < π / 2 . The analysis of the velocity field entails matching 'inner' expansions valid close to the solid segments with 'outer' expansions valid on the scale of the periodicity, where the protruding bubbles appear to touch. For θ close to π / 2 , the inner-region geometry is narrow and the analysis there resembles lubrication theory; for smaller contact angles the inner region is resolved using a Schwarz-Christoffel mapping. In both cases the outer problem is solved using a mapping from a degenerate curvilinear triangle to an auxiliary half plane. The asymptotic analysis explicitly illustrates the logarithmic-to-algebraic transition, and yields a uniformly valid approximation for the slip length for arbitrary contact angles 0 <= θ <= π / 2 . We demonstrate good agreement with a numerical solution (courtesy of Ms Elena Luca).

  20. Impact of 1985 hurricanes on Isles Dernieres, Louisiana: Temporal and spatial analysis of coastal geomorphic changes

    SciTech Connect

    Debusshere, K.; Westphal, K.; Penland, S.; McBride, R. )

    1989-09-01

    Catastrophic geomorphic changes occurred in the Isles Dernieres barrier island arc as a result of the direct impact of three hurricanes in 1985. The severity of the impact of hurricanes Danny, Elena, and Juan had not been equaled since the landfall of hurricanes Betsy and Camille in the late 1960s. The Isles Dernieres had not been subjected to a direct hurricane landfall since hurricane Bob in 1979. The recent hurricane impacts provided the USGS/LGS Louisiana Cooperative Barrier Island and Land Loss Study the opportunity to examine the process-response characteristics of this low-profile transgressive barrier island arc to multiple hurricane impacts in a single hurricane season. The geomorphic changes along the Isles Dernieres were determined using four sequential airborne videotape surveys acquired in July 1984, July 1985 (pre-storm), August 1985 (post-Danny) and November 1985 (post-Juan) and mapped on 1:24,000 base maps produced from concurrent vertical aerial photography. A coastal geomorphic classification was developed to describe, quantify, and map the alongshore geomorphic, sedimentologic , and vegetative character of this barrier shoreline. The classification consists of three levels of descriptors: (1) primary morphology to define the predominant longshore morphology, (2) modifiers to depict the small-scale longshore features, and (3) variants to locate and quantify important coastal features, not mappable at the scale used.

  1. STS-84 Crew Breakfast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    STS-84 crew members pose for a photograph during the traditional prelaunch meal together -- in this case, lunch -- in the Operations and Checkout Building. From left, are Mission Specialist Jean-Francois Clervoy of the European Space Agency, Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale, Mission Specialist Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency, Commander Charles J. Precourt, Pilot Eileen Marie Collins, Mission Specialist Carlos I. Noriega and Mission Specialist Edward Tsang Lu. After a weather briefing, they will don their orange launch and entry suits and proceed to Launch Pad 39A for liftoff of the Space Shuttle Atlantis. STS-84 will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. The planned nine-day mission also will include the exchange of Foale for U.S. astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger, who has been on Mir since Jan. 15. Linenger transferred to Mir during the last docking mission, STS-81. He will return to Earth on Atlantis. Foale is scheduled to remain on Mir for about four months until he is replaced by STS-86 Mission Specialist Wendy B. Lawrence.

  2. The role of CMEs in the refilling of Mercury's exosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lichtenegger, H. I. M.; Lammer, H.; Kallio, E.; Mura, A.; Wurz, P.; Millio, A.; Torka, K.; Livi, S.; Barabash, S.; Orsini, S.

    A better understanding of the connection between the solar plasma environment and surface particle release processes from Mercury is needed for planned exospheric and remote surface geochemical studies by the Neutral Particle Analyzer Ion Spectrometer sensors ELENA, STROFIO, MIPA and PICAM of the SERENA instrument on board of ESA's BepiColombo planetary orbiter MPO. We study the exosphere refilling of various elements caused by sputtering during the exposure of CMEs from Mercury's surface by applying a quasi-neutral hybrid model and by using a survey of potential surface analogues, which are based on laboratory studied Lunar surface regolith and hypothetical analogue materials as derived form experimental studies. The formation and refilling of Mercury's exosphere during CME exposure is compared with usual solar wind cases by considering various parameters, such as regolith porosity, binding energies and elemental fractionation of the surface minerals. For studying the influence of these parameters we use the derived geochemical surface composition and the exposed surface are as an input for a 3-D exospheric model for studying whether the measurements of exospheric particles by the particle detectors is feasible along the MPO spacecraft orbit. Finally we find a denser exosphere environment distributed over a larger planetary area during collisions of CMEs or magnetic clouds with Mercury.

  3. STS-84 M.S. Kondakova with husband Ryumin at SLF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    STS-84 Mission Specialist Elena V. Kondakova, a cosmonaut with the Russian Space Agency, and her husband, Valery Ryumin, greet press represenatives and other well wishers after her arrival at KSCs Shuttle Landing Facility. Ryumin is director of the Mir- Shuttle program for RSC Energia in Russia. This will be Kondakovas first flight on a U.S. Space Shuttle, but her second trip into space. She spent 169 days in space as flight engineer of the 17th main mission on Mir from October 1994 to March 1995. STS-84 will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. During the docking, STS-84 Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale will transfer to the Russian space station to become a member of the Mir 23 crew, replacing U.S. astronaut Jerry M. Linenger, who will return to Earth on Atlantis. Foale is scheduled to remain on Mir about four months until his replacement arrives on STS-86 in September.

  4. Expanding the Link between Out-Group Threats and In-Group Behavior: (A Reply to Kavaliers and Choleris).

    PubMed

    Radford, Andrew N; Bruintjes, Rick

    2017-04-01

    In social species, groups and their members face a variety of threats from conspecific outsiders. Such out-group conflict is predicted to influence within-group behavior, with empirical work demonstrating this link in humans, primates, and birds. In our note "Out-Group Threat Promotes Within-Group Affiliation in a Cooperative Fish," appearing in The American Naturalist in February 2016, we provided experimental evidence that simulated territorial intrusions result in subsequent increases in affiliation among groupmates in a cichlid fish (Neolamprologus pulcher). Martin Kavaliers and Elena Choleris, in their comment "Out-Group Threat Responses, In-Group Bias, and Nonapeptide Involvement Are Conserved Across Vertebrates," appearing in this issue, commented on our cichlid-fish article; they consider the conserved nature of the link between out-group threat and in-group behavior and bias in vertebrates, the influence of pathogens in the process, and the potential underpinning hormonal mechanisms. Here, we provide clarification and expansion of some of the core points that are discussed in the comment by Kavaliers and Choleris.

  5. A new genus and species of the trypanorhynch family Otobothriidae Dollfus, 1942 from the slender weasel shark Paragaleus randalli Compagno, Krupp & Carpenter (Hemigaleidae) in the Persian Gulf.

    PubMed

    Haseli, Mohammad; Malekpour Fard, Zahra

    2017-07-03

    A survey on the cestode fauna of Paragaleus randalli Compagno, Krupp & Carpenter in the Persian Gulf resulted in the discovery of a new trypanorhynch species of the family Otobothriidae Dollfus, 1942, the second otobothrioid species hosted by the family Hemigaleidae Hasse. The new species exhibits the closest morphological similarity to Pristiorhynchus palmi Schaeffner & Beveridge, 2013, the type- and only species of its genus. However, the new species differs from P. palmi in the position of the bothrial pits, the morphology and oncotaxy of the basal armature, the commencement of the hook files on the internal surface, a wider scolex peduncle in the pars bulbosa than in the pars vaginalis, a long neck and the presence of a lateral bothrial groove connecting the two bothrial pits to each other. The latter character is a unique trait within the Otobothrioidea Dollfus, 1942. Considering such differences, a new genus, Olgaella n. g., was erected to accommodate O. elenae n. g., n. sp. within the Otobothriidae. The evolutionary relatedness of the bothrial pits of the Otobothrioidea and the bothrial grooves of the Lacistorhynchoidea Guiart, 1927 is discussed.

  6. ESO Helps Antofagasta Region after the Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-11-01

    On November 14 at 12:41 local time, a major earthquake with magnitude 7.7 on the Richter scale affected the north of Chile. The epicentre was located 35 km from the city of Tocopilla and 170 km of Antofagasta. Two persons died and tens were injured, while buildings were damaged in several cities. In the Maria Elena-Tocopilla area, several thousand homes were destroyed or damaged. In an act of solidarity with the local community and its authorities, ESO immediately announced a donation of 30 millions Chilean pesos (around 40,000 euros) to Antofagasta's Regional Government to support reconstruction in the Region II. ESO and its staff have been shocked by the earthquake and its impact on local communities, especially on the people of Tocopilla. The ESO Representation in Chile formally contacted the regional authorities to explore with them possible ways to collaborate in this difficult moment. In addition, many of ESO staff are personally cooperating with the victims, under the coordination of Cruz Roja, the organisation currently in charge of implementing individual efforts.

  7. Intradomiciliary and peridomiciliary captures of sand flies (Diptera: Psychodidae) in the leishmaniasis endemic area of Chapare province, tropic of Cochabamba, Bolivia.

    PubMed

    Ballart, C; Vidal, G; Picado, A; Cortez, M R; Torrico, F; Torrico, M C; Godoy, R E; Lozano, D; Gállego, M

    2016-02-01

    In South America, cutaneous leishmaniasis is the most frequent clinical form of leishmaniasis. Bolivia is one of the countries with higher incidence, with 33 cases per 100,000 individuals, and the disease is endemic in 70% of the territory. In the last decade, the number of cases has increased, the age range has expanded, affecting children under 5 years old, and a similar frequency between men and women is found. An entomological study with CDC light traps was conducted in three localities (Chipiriri, Santa Elena and Pedro Domingo Murillo) of the municipality of Villa Tunari, one of the main towns in the Chapare province (Department of Cochabamba, Bolivia). A total of 16 specimens belonging to 6 species of the genus Lutzomyia were captured: Lu. aragaoi, Lu. andersoni, Lu. antunesi, Lu. shawi, Lu. yuilli yuilli and Lu. auraensis. Our results showed the presence of two incriminated vectors of leishmaniasis in an urbanized area and in the intradomicile. More entomological studies are required in the Chapare province to confirm the role of vector sand flies, the intradomiciliary transmission of the disease and the presence of autochthonous cases of cutaneous leishmaniasis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. KSC-97PC863

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-05-25

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Members of the STS-84 crew pause at Patrick Air force Base just prior to their departure for Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. They are (from left) Mission Specialist Jean-Francois Clervoy; returning astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger; Mission Commander Charles J. Precourt; Mission Specialist Edward Tsang Lu; and Mission Specialist Elena V. Kondakova. The seven-member crew returned aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis May 24 on KSC's Runway 33 after the completion of a successful nine-day mission. STS-84 was the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station MIr. Atlantis was docked with the Mir for five days. STS-84 Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale replaced Linenger, who had been on the Russian space station since Jan. 15. Besides the docking and crew exchange, STS-84 included the transfer of more than 7,300 pounds of water, logistics and science experiments and hardware to and from the Mir. Scientific experiments conducted during the STS-84 mission, and scheduled for Foale's stay on the Mir, are in the fields of advanced technology, Earth sciences, fundamental biology, human life sciences, International Space Station risk mitigation, microgravity sciences and space sciences.

  9. Latest climate changes in Romania :tornadoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pop, Elena

    2014-05-01

    " that eat and spit out roofs, animals, trucks and concrete road poles. I have minutely searched with my students all the data of that tornado, the direction of wind gusts, we have calculated the force of the impact by studying the photos taken on that occasion. I have also done some research on other tornadoes that have taken place In Movilita and Brezoaele the past years. I have studied the increase of the centrifugal force and that of Coriolis in the context of repetition of such dangerous atmospheric phenomena that showed their apparition as ten per year in Romania. Therefore the average Coriolis parameter is 10-4 s-1, for a typical atmospheric speed of 10 m/s (22 mph) the radius is 100 km (62 mi), with a period of about 17 hours. The lowering of the air pressure occurring on such occasions has been one of my concerns as well the the speed of the cloud column rotation. All these phenomena are the effect of the climate change occurring all over our Planet due to pollution. As you can see the devastation produced by such extreme climate lead to spontaneous floods and later desertification on the south-eastern part of our country. References : 1. Craciun, Cristina, Bala, Bogdan, Tornadele din Romania, http://dezechilibrenaturale.blogspot.ro/2013/02/tornadele-din-romania.html 2. Bell, Aurora, Tornadele in Romania, http://vremea.meteoromania.ro/node/33 3. Lemon, R. Leslie, Stan-Sion, Aurora, Soci , Cornel, Corduneanu, Elena, A strong, long -track, Romanian tornado, http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0169809503000632 Author : Mrs. Elena Pop, Science teacher at "Lucian Blaga" Secondary School, Ocna Mures, Romania

  10. A One Health overview, facilitating advances in comparative medicine and translational research.

    PubMed

    Stroud, Cheryl; Dmitriev, Igor; Kashentseva, Elena; Bryan, Jeffrey N; Curiel, David T; Rindt, Hans; Reinero, Carol; Henry, Carolyn J; Bergman, Philip J; Mason, Nicola J; Gnanandarajah, Josephine S; Engiles, Julie B; Gray, Falon; Laughlin, Danielle; Gaurnier-Hausser, Anita; Wallecha, Anu; Huebner, Margie; Paterson, Yvonne; O'Connor, Daniel; Treml, Laura S; Stannard, James P; Cook, James L; Jacobs, Marc; Wyckoff, Gerald J; Likins, Lee; Sabbagh, Ubadah; Skaff, Andrew; Guloy, Amado S; Hays, Harlen D; LeBlanc, Amy K; Coates, Joan R; Katz, Martin L; Lyons, Leslie A; Johnson, Gayle C; Johnson, Gary S; O'Brien, Dennis P; Duan, Dongsheng; Calvet, James P; Gandolfi, Barbara; Baron, David A; Weiss, Mark L; Webster, Debra A; Karanu, Francis N; Robb, Edward J; Harman, Robert J

    2016-08-01

    A1 One health advances and successes in comparative medicine and translational researchCheryl StroudA2 Dendritic cell-targeted gorilla adenoviral vector for cancer vaccination for canine melanomaIgor Dmitriev, Elena Kashentseva, Jeffrey N. Bryan, David T. CurielA3 Viroimmunotherapy for malignant melanoma in the companion dog modelJeffrey N. Bryan, David Curiel, Igor Dmitriev, Elena Kashentseva, Hans Rindt, Carol Reinero, Carolyn J. HenryA4 Of mice and men (and dogs!): development of a commercially licensed xenogeneic DNA vaccine for companion animals with malignant melanomaPhilip J. BergmanA5 Successful immunotherapy with a recombinant HER2-expressing Listeria monocytogenes in dogs with spontaneous osteosarcoma paves the way for advances in pediatric osteosarcomaNicola J. Mason, Josephine S. Gnanandarajah, Julie B. Engiles, Falon Gray, Danielle Laughlin, Anita Gaurnier-Hausser, Anu Wallecha, Margie Huebner, Yvonne PatersonA6 Human clinical development of ADXS-HER2Daniel O'ConnorA7 Leveraging use of data for both human and veterinary benefitLaura S. TremlA8 Biologic replacement of the knee: innovations and early clinical resultsJames P. StannardA9 Mizzou BioJoint Center: a translational success storyJames L. CookA10 University and industry translational partnership: from the lab to commercializationMarc JacobsA11 Beyond docking: an evolutionarily guided OneHealth approach to drug discoveryGerald J. Wyckoff, Lee Likins, Ubadah Sabbagh, Andrew SkaffA12 Challenges and opportunities for data applications in animal health: from precision medicine to precision husbandryAmado S. GuloyA13 A cloud-based programmable platform for healthHarlen D. HaysA14 Comparative oncology: One Health in actionAmy K. LeBlancA15 Companion animal diseases bridge the translational gap for human neurodegenerative diseaseJoan R. Coates, Martin L. Katz, Leslie A. Lyons, Gayle C. Johnson, Gary S. Johnson, Dennis P. O'BrienA16 Duchenne muscular dystrophy gene therapyDongsheng DuanA17 Polycystic

  11. Galileo's Medicean Moons (IAU S269)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbieri, Cesare; Chakrabarti, Supriya; Coradini, Marcello; Lazzarin, Monica

    2010-11-01

    Preface; 1. Galileo's telescopic observations: the marvel and meaning of discovery George V. Coyne, S. J.; 2. Popular perceptions of Galileo Dava Sobel; 3. The slow growth of humility Tobias Owen and Scott Bolton; 4. A new physics to support the Copernican system. Gleanings from Galileo's works Giulio Peruzzi; 5. The telescope in the making, the Galileo first telescopic observations Alberto Righini; 6. The appearance of the Medicean Moons in 17th century charts and books. How long did it take? Michael Mendillo; 7. Navigation, world mapping and astrometry with Galileo's moons Kaare Aksnes; 8. Modern exploration of Galileo's new worlds Torrence V. Johnson; 9. Medicean Moons sailing through plasma seas: challenges in establishing magnetic properties Margaret G. Kivelson, Xianzhe Jia and Krishan K. Khurana; 10. Aurora on Jupiter: a magnetic connection with the Sun and the Medicean Moons Supriya Chakrabarti and Marina Galand; 11. Io's escaping atmosphere: continuing the legacy of surprise Nicholas M. Schneider; 12. The Jovian Rings Wing-Huen Ip; 13. The Juno mission Scott J. Bolton and the Juno Science Team; 14. Seeking Europa's ocean Robert T. Pappalardo; 15. Europa lander mission: a challenge to find traces of alien life Lev Zelenyi, Oleg Korablev, Elena Vorobyova, Maxim Martynov, Efraim L. Akim and Alexander Zakahrov; 16. Atmospheric moons Galileo would have loved Sushil K. Atreya; 17. The study of Mercury Louise M. Prockter and Peter D. Bedini; 18. Jupiter and the other giants: a comparative study Thérèse Encrenaz; 19. Spectroscopic and spectrometric differentiation between abiotic and biogenic material on icy worlds Kevin P. Hand, Chris McKay and Carl Pilcher; 20. Other worlds, other civilizations? Guy Consolmagno, S. J.; 21. Concluding remarks Roger M. Bonnet; Posters; Author index; Object index.

  12. Human Papilloma Virus prevalence and type-specific relative contribution in invasive cervical cancer specimens from Italy

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Cervical cancer represents an important global public health problem. It is the 2nd most common cancer among women worldwide. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) infection is now well-established as a necessary cause of invasive cervical cancer (ICC) development. Only a few studies on HPV prevalence and type-specific distribution in ICC have been conducted in Italy. Aim To describe the prevalence of HPV and the HPV type-specific distribution in ICC cases identified in Rome, Italy. Methods 140 paraffin embedded tissue blocks of primary ICC diagnosed between 2001 and 2006 were identified at the Regina Elena Cancer Institute in Rome (Italy). HPV was detected through amplification of HPV DNA using SPF-10 HPV broad-spectrum primers followed by DEIA and then genotyping by LiPA25 (version 1). Results 134 cases were considered suitable for HPV DNA detection after histological evaluation; and overall, 90.3% (121/134) HPV prevalence was detected. 111 cases had a single HPV type, 4 cases had an uncharacterized type (HPVX) and 6 cases had multiple HPV infections. The five most common single HPV types among positive cases were: HPV16 (71/121; 58.7%), HPV18 (12/121; 9.9%), HPV31, HPV45 and HPV58 (5/121; 4.1% each). 2 (1.5%) of the single infections and 2 (1.5%) of the multiple infections contained low risk types. Statistically significant differences in the relative contribution of HPV18 were found when comparing squamous cell carcinomas with adenocarcinomas. Conclusions HPV16 and HPV18 accounted for almost 70% of all the HPV positive ICC cases. The study provides baseline information for further evaluation on the impact of recently introduced HPV vaccines in Italy. PMID:20525370

  13. Usefulness of conventional transbronchial needle aspiration in the diagnosis, staging and molecular characterization of pulmonary neoplasias by thin-prep based cytology: experience of a single oncological institute

    PubMed Central

    Ramieri, Maria Teresa; Marandino, Ferdinando; Visca, Paolo; Salvitti, Tommaso; Gallo, Enzo; Casini, Beatrice; Giordano, Francesca Romana; Frigieri, Claudia; Caterino, Mauro; Carlini, Sandro; Rinaldi, Massimo; Ceribelli, Anna; Pennetti, Annarita; Alò, Pier Luigi; Pescarmona, Edoardo; Filippetti, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Background Conventional transbronchial needle aspiration (c-TBNA) contributed to improve the bronchoscopic examination, allowing to sample lesions located even outside the tracheo-bronchial tree and in the hilo-mediastinal district, both for diagnostic and staging purposes. Methods We have evaluated the sensitivity, accuracy, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of the c-TBNA performed during the 2005–2015 period for suspicious lung neoplasia and/or hilar and mediastinal lymphadenopathy at the Thoracic endoscopy of the Thoracic Surgery Department of the Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome. Data from 273 consecutive patients (205 males and 68 females) were analyzed. Results Among 158 (58%) adequate specimens, 112 (41%) were neoplastic or contained atypical cells, 46 (17%) were negative or not diagnostic. We considered in the analysis first the overall period; then we compared the findings of the first [2005–2011] and second period [2012–2015] and, finally, only those of adequate specimens. During the overall period, sensibility and accuracy values were respectively of 53% and 63%, in the first period they reached 41% and 53% respectively; in the second period sensibility and accuracy reached 60% and 68%. Considering only the adequate specimens, sensibility and accuracy during the overall period were respectively of 80% and 82%; the values obtained for the first period were 68% and 72%. Finally, in the second period, sensibility reached 86% and accuracy 89%. Carcinoma-subtyping was possible in 112 cases, adenocarcinomas being diagnosed in 50 cases; further, in 30 cases molecular predictive data could be obtained. Conclusions The c-TBNA proved to be an efficient method for the diagnosis/staging of lung neoplasms and for the diagnosis of mediastinal lymphadenopathy. Endoscopist’s skill and technical development, associated to thin-prep cytology and to a rapid on site examination (ROSE), were able to provide by c-TBNA a

  14. Where on earth to publish? A sample survey comparing traditional and open access publishing in the oncological field

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The paper intends to help scientific authors to make the best choice of journals in which to publish, by describing and comparing journal features in the area of oncology. For this purpose, the authors identified impact factor (IF) ranking, cost options and copyright conditions offered to authors wishing to publish in full open access (OA), subscription-based or hybrid journals. Methods Data referring to articles published in 2010 by three Italian research institutions (National Institute of Health – Rome (ISS), Regina Elena National Cancer Institute – Rome (IRE), National Cancer Institute – Milan (INT) in journals (78) managed according to different business models, all listed in the Journal Citation Reports, subject category Oncology, were collected and analysed. The journals surveyed were ranked according to IF, position in quartiles, publication charges, usage rights in published articles, self-archiving conditions in OAI-compliant repositories digital archives. Results Almost half (34) the journals surveyed were included in the first quartile, thus revealing authors’ preference for journals with a high IF. The prevalent journal business model was the hybrid formula (based on subscriptions but also offering a paid OA option) with 51 journals, followed by subscription-based only journals accounting for 22, while just 5 full OA journals were identified. In general, no relationship was found between IF and article publication charges, in terms of correspondence between more expensive fees and higher IF. Conclusions The issue of OA journals as compared with traditional subscription-based journals is highly debated among stakeholders: library administrators facing financial restrictions, authors seeking to locate the best outlet for their research, publishers wishing to increase their revenues by offering journals with wider appeal. Against this background, factors such as the quest for alternatives to high-cost business models, investments in

  15. Association of Urinary Activity of MMP-2 with Microalbuminuria in an Isolated Sample of Subjects Living in High Altitude Rural Locations in México.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Hernández, Magda Elena; Morales-Romero, Jaime; Sampieri, Clara Luz; Luna Lozano, Diego Jesús; Valencia Lezama, Isidra Del Carmen; Muñoz Contreras, Mónica Janett; Rodríguez Hernández, Arturo

    2017-09-01

    Hernández-Hernández, Magda Elena, Jaime Morales-Romero, Clara Luz Sampieri, Diego Jesús Luna Lozano, Isidra del Carmen Valencia Lezama, Mónica Janett Muñoz Contreras, and Arturo Rodríguez Hernández. Association of urinary activity of MMP-2 with microalbuminuria in an isolated sample of subjects living in high altitude rural locations in México. High Alt Med Biol. 18:209-218, 2017.-Matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) are implicated in remodeling of the renal extracellular matrix. In a cross-sectional study we evaluated renal impairment in general population of high-altitude rural locations in México. Multivariable analysis was performed to identify the association between MMP-2 and MMP-9 and microalbuminuria. Twenty-eight (20.9%) subjects with renal impairment (WRI) and 106 (79.1%) without renal impairment were included. No differences were found relating to sex, location, marital status, current habits, weight, height, body mass index, waist size in males, creatinine in males, and uric acid. In contrast, differences were found among age, level of education, waist size in general and in females, creatinine in general and in females, urinary albumin, urea, glucose, total cholesterol, and triglycerides. Proportions of hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus, central abdominal obesity, hypertriglyceridemia, and hypercholesterolemia were greater in the group WRI. Presence of urinary MMP-2 or of both urinary gelatinases and arbitrary unit (AU) values ≥P90 were associated with microalbuminuria. We conclude that AU values ≥P90 of urinary MMP-2 (OR = 20.1, p = 0.002) is associated with microalbuminuria.

  16. Serpentinization, element transfer, and the progressive development of zoning in veins: evidence from a partially serpentinized harzburgite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarzenbach, Esther M.; Caddick, Mark J.; Beard, James S.; Bodnar, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Serpentinization is an important geochemical process that affects the chemistry and petrophysical properties of the oceanic lithosphere and supports life through abiogenic formation of hydrogen. Here, we document through detailed mineralogical evidence and equilibrium thermodynamic models the importance of water (H2O) and silica (SiO2) activities on mineral assemblages produced during progressive serpentinization of a harzburgite. We describe a harzburgite from the Santa Elena Ophiolite in Costa Rica that is ~30 % serpentinized. Serpentine + brucite ± magnetite veins occur in olivine, Al-rich serpentine + talc veins occur in orthopyroxene, and Al-rich serpentine ± talc ± brucite veins occur at the boundary of orthopyroxene and olivine. Bulk vein chemistry and element distribution maps demonstrate distinct chemical zonations within veins and chemical gradients between orthopyroxene- and olivine-dominated areas. Specifically, the sample records (1) varying brucite composition depending on whether or not it is associated with magnetite, (2) formation of magnetite from Fe-rich brucite (±Fe-rich serpentine) during olivine hydration, where magnetite coexists with brucite Mg#96 and serpentine Mg#99, (3) chemical gradients in Si, Al, Cr, and Ca within and between orthopyroxene- and olivine-hosted veins, and 4) local (different) equilibrium assemblages within different zones of veins. The studied sample preserves rarely observed textures documenting continuous replacement of olivine, rather than individual vein generations and overprinting that is typically observed in more intensely serpentinized peridotites. Furthermore, the presence of a discrete sequence of vein textures and mineralogy allows direct comparison between mineral textures and equilibrium thermodynamic models and permits new insights into mineral reactions during serpentinization.

  17. KSC-97PC801

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-05-15

    The Space Shuttle Atlantis turns night into day for a few moments as it lifts off on May 15 at 4:07:48 a.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A on the STS-84 mission. The fourth Shuttle mission of 1997 will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. The commander is Charles J. Precourt. The pilot is Eileen Marie Collins. The five mission specialists are C. Michael Foale, Carlos I. Noriega, Edward Tsang Lu, Jean-Francois Clervoy of the European Space Agency and Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency. The planned nine-day mission will include the exchange of Foale for U.S. astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger, who has been on Mir since Jan. 15. Linenger transferred to Mir during the last docking mission, STS-81; he will return to Earth on Atlantis. Foale is slated to remain on Mir for about four months until he is replaced in September by STS-86 Mission Specialist Wendy B. Lawrence. During the five days Atlantis is scheduled to be docked with the Mir, the STS-84 crew and the Mir 23 crew, including two Russian cosmonauts, Commander Vasily Tsibliev and Flight Engineer Alexander Lazutkin, will participate in joint experiments. The STS-84 mission also will involve the transfer of more than 7,300 pounds of water, logistics and science equipment to and from the Mir. Atlantis is carrying a nearly 300-pound oxygen generator to replace one of two Mir units which have experienced malfunctions. The oxygen it generates is used for breathing by the Mir crew

  18. KSC-97PC809

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-05-15

    STS-84 Mission Specialist Edward T. Lu prepares to enter the Space Shuttle Atlantis at Launch Pad 39A with help from white room closeout crew members. The fourth Shuttle mission of 1997 will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. The commander is Charles J. Precourt. The pilot is Eileen Marie Collins. The five mission specialists are C. Michael Foale, Carlos I. Noriega, Edward Tsang Lu, Jean-Francois Clervoy of the European Space Agency and Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency. The planned nine-day mission will include the exchange of Foale for U.S. astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger, who has been on Mir since Jan. 15. Linenger transferred to Mir during the last docking mission, STS-81; he will return to Earth on Atlantis. Foale is slated to remain on Mir for about four months until he is replaced in September by STS-86 Mission Specialist Wendy B. Lawrence. During the five days Atlantis is scheduled to be docked with the Mir, the STS-84 crew and the Mir 23 crew, including two Russian cosmonauts, Commander Vasily Tsibliev and Flight Engineer Alexander Lazutkin, will participate in joint experiments. The STS-84 mission also will involve the transfer of more than 7,300 pounds of water, logistics and science equipment to and from the Mir. Atlantis is carrying a nearly 300-pound oxygen generator to replace one of two Mir units which have experienced malfunctions. The oxygen it generates is used for breathing by the Mir crew

  19. KSC-97PC799

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-05-15

    The Space Shuttle Atlantis turns night into day for a few moments as it lifts off on May 15 at 4:07:48 a.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A on the STS-84 mission. The fourth Shuttle mission of 1997 will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. The commander is Charles J. Precourt. The pilot is Eileen Marie Collins. The five mission specialists are C. Michael Foale, Carlos I. Noriega, Edward Tsang Lu, Jean-Francois Clervoy of the European Space Agency and Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency. The planned nine-day mission will include the exchange of Foale for U.S. astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger, who has been on Mir since Jan. 15. Linenger transferred to Mir during the last docking mission, STS-81; he will return to Earth on Atlantis. Foale is slated to remain on Mir for about four months until he is replaced in September by STS-86 Mission Specialist Wendy B. Lawrence. During the five days Atlantis is scheduled to be docked with the Mir, the STS-84 crew and the Mir 23 crew, including two Russian cosmonauts, Commander Vasily Tsibliev and Flight Engineer Alexander Lazutkin, will participate in joint experiments. The STS-84 mission also will involve the transfer of more than 7,300 pounds of water, logistics and science equipment to and from the Mir. Atlantis is carrying a nearly 300-pound oxygen generator to replace one of two Mir units which have experienced malfunctions. The oxygen it generates is used for breathing by the Mir crew

  20. KSC-97PC808

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-05-15

    STS-84 Pilot Eileen M. Collins prepares to enter the Space Shuttle Atlantis at Launch Pad 39A with help from white room closeout crew members. The fourth Shuttle mission of 1997 will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. The commander is Charles J. Precourt. The pilot is Eileen Marie Collins. The five mission specialists are C. Michael Foale, Carlos I. Noriega, Edward Tsang Lu, Jean-Francois Clervoy of the European Space Agency and Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency. The planned nine-day mission will include the exchange of Foale for U.S. astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger, who has been on Mir since Jan. 15. Linenger transferred to Mir during the last docking mission, STS-81; he will return to Earth on Atlantis. Foale is slated to remain on Mir for about four months until he is replaced in September by STS-86 Mission Specialist Wendy B. Lawrence. During the five days Atlantis is scheduled to be docked with the Mir, the STS-84 crew and the Mir 23 crew, including two Russian cosmonauts, Commander Vasily Tsibliev and Flight Engineer Alexander Lazutkin, will participate in joint experiments. The STS-84 mission also will involve the transfer of more than 7,300 pounds of water, logistics and science equipment to and from the Mir. Atlantis is carrying a nearly 300-pound oxygen generator to replace one of two Mir units which have experienced malfunctions. The oxygen it generates is used for breathing by the Mir crew

  1. KSC-97PC810

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-05-15

    STS-84 Mission Specialist Carlos I. Noriega prepares to enter the Space Shuttle Atlantis at Launch Pad 39A with help from white room closeout crew members. The fourth Shuttle mission of 1997 will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. The commander is Charles J. Precourt. The pilot is Eileen Marie Collins. The five mission specialists are C. Michael Foale, Carlos I. Noriega, Edward Tsang Lu, Jean-Francois Clervoy of the European Space Agency and Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency. The planned nine-day mission will include the exchange of Foale for U.S. astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger, who has been on Mir since Jan. 15. Linenger transferred to Mir during the last docking mission, STS-81; he will return to Earth on Atlantis. Foale is slated to remain on Mir for about four months until he is replaced in September by STS-86 Mission Specialist Wendy B. Lawrence. During the five days Atlantis is scheduled to be docked with the Mir, the STS-84 crew and the Mir 23 crew, including two Russian cosmonauts, Commander Vasily Tsibliev and Flight Engineer Alexander Lazutkin, will participate in joint experiments. The STS-84 mission also will involve the transfer of more than 7,300 pounds of water, logistics and science equipment to and from the Mir. Atlantis is carrying a nearly 300-pound oxygen generator to replace one of two Mir units which have experienced malfunctions. The oxygen it generates is used for breathing by the Mir crew

  2. KSC-97PC802

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-05-15

    The Space Shuttle Atlantis turns night into day for a few moments as it lifts off on May 15 at 4:07:48 a.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A on the STS-84 mission. The fourth Shuttle mission of 1997 will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. The commander is Charles J. Precourt. The pilot is Eileen Marie Collins. The five mission specialists are C. Michael Foale, Carlos I. Noriega, Edward Tsang Lu, Jean-Francois Clervoy of the European Space Agency and Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency. The planned nine-day mission will include the exchange of Foale for U.S. astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger, who has been on Mir since Jan. 15. Linenger transferred to Mir during the last docking mission, STS-81; he will return to Earth on Atlantis. Foale is slated to remain on Mir for about four months until he is replaced in September by STS-86 Mission Specialist Wendy B. Lawrence. During the five days Atlantis is scheduled to be docked with the Mir, the STS-84 crew and the Mir 23 crew, including two Russian cosmonauts, Commander Vasily Tsibliev and Flight Engineer Alexander Lazutkin, will participate in joint experiments. The STS-84 mission also will involve the transfer of more than 7,300 pounds of water, logistics and science equipment to and from the Mir. Atlantis is carrying a nearly 300-pound oxygen generator to replace one of two Mir units which have experienced malfunctions. The oxygen it generates is used for breathing by the Mir crew

  3. KSC-97PC804

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-05-15

    The Space Shuttle Atlantis turns night into day for a few moments as it lifts off on May 15 at 4:07:48 a.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A on the STS-84 mission. The fourth Shuttle mission of 1997 will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. The commander is Charles J. Precourt. The pilot is Eileen Marie Collins. The five mission specialists are C. Michael Foale, Carlos I. Noriega, Edward Tsang Lu, Jean-Francois Clervoy of the European Space Agency and Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency. The planned nine-day mission will include the exchange of Foale for U.S. astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger, who has been on Mir since Jan. 15. Linenger transferred to Mir during the last docking mission, STS-81; he will return to Earth on Atlantis. Foale is slated to remain on Mir for about four months until he is replaced in September by STS-86 Mission Specialist Wendy B. Lawrence. During the five days Atlantis is scheduled to be docked with the Mir, the STS-84 crew and the Mir 23 crew, including two Russian cosmonauts, Commander Vasily Tsibliev and Flight Engineer Alexander Lazutkin, will participate in joint experiments. The STS-84 mission also will involve the transfer of more than 7,300 pounds of water, logistics and science equipment to and from the Mir. Atlantis is carrying a nearly 300-pound oxygen generator to replace one of two Mir units which have experienced malfunctions. The oxygen it generates is used for breathing by the Mir crew

  4. KSC-97PC811

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-05-15

    STS-84 Mission Specialist Jean-Francois Clervoy prepares to enter the Space Shuttle Atlantis at Launch Pad 39A with help from white room closeout crew members. The fourth Shuttle mission of 1997 will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. The commander is Charles J. Precourt. The pilot is Eileen Marie Collins. The five mission specialists are C. Michael Foale, Carlos I. Noriega, Edward Tsang Lu, Jean-Francois Clervoy of the European Space Agency and Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency. The planned nine-day mission will include the exchange of Foale for U.S. astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger, who has been on Mir since Jan. 15. Linenger transferred to Mir during the last docking mission, STS-81; he will return to Earth on Atlantis. Foale is slated to remain on Mir for about four months until he is replaced in September by STS-86 Mission Specialist Wendy B. Lawrence. During the five days Atlantis is scheduled to be docked with the Mir, the STS-84 crew and the Mir 23 crew, including two Russian cosmonauts, Commander Vasily Tsibliev and Flight Engineer Alexander Lazutkin, will participate in joint experiments. The STS-84 mission also will involve the transfer of more than 7,300 pounds of water, logistics and science equipment to and from the Mir. Atlantis is carrying a nearly 300-pound oxygen generator to replace one of two Mir units which have experienced malfunctions. The oxygen it generates is used for breathing by the Mir crew

  5. KSC-97PC803

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-05-15

    The Space Shuttle Atlantis turns night into day for a few moments as it lifts off on May 15 at 4:07:48 a.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A on the STS-84 mission. The fourth Shuttle mission of 1997 will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. The commander is Charles J. Precourt. The pilot is Eileen Marie Collins. The five mission specialists are C. Michael Foale, Carlos I. Noriega, Edward Tsang Lu, Jean-Francois Clervoy of the European Space Agency and Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency. The planned nine-day mission will include the exchange of Foale for U.S. astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger, who has been on Mir since Jan. 15. Linenger transferred to Mir during the last docking mission, STS-81; he will return to Earth on Atlantis. Foale is slated to remain on Mir for about four months until he is replaced in September by STS-86 Mission Specialist Wendy B. Lawrence. During the five days Atlantis is scheduled to be docked with the Mir, the STS-84 crew and the Mir 23 crew, including two Russian cosmonauts, Commander Vasily Tsibliev and Flight Engineer Alexander Lazutkin, will participate in joint experiments. The STS-84 mission also will involve the transfer of more than 7,300 pounds of water, logistics and science equipment to and from the Mir. Atlantis is carrying a nearly 300-pound oxygen generator to replace one of two Mir units which have experienced malfunctions. The oxygen it generates is used for breathing by the Mir crew

  6. KSC-97PC805

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-05-15

    The Space Shuttle Atlantis turns night into day for a few moments as it lifts off on May 15 at 4:07:48 a.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A on the STS-84 mission. The fourth Shuttle mission of 1997 will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. The commander is Charles J. Precourt. The pilot is Eileen Marie Collins. The five mission specialists are C. Michael Foale, Carlos I. Noriega, Edward Tsang Lu, Jean-Francois Clervoy of the European Space Agency and Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency. The planned nine-day mission will include the exchange of Foale for U.S. astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger, who has been on Mir since Jan. 15. Linenger transferred to Mir during the last docking mission, STS-81; he will return to Earth on Atlantis. Foale is slated to remain on Mir for about four months until he is replaced in September by STS-86 Mission Specialist Wendy B. Lawrence. During the five days Atlantis is scheduled to be docked with the Mir, the STS-84 crew and the Mir 23 crew, including two Russian cosmonauts, Commander Vasily Tsibliev and Flight Engineer Alexander Lazutkin, will participate in joint experiments. The STS-84 mission also will involve the transfer of more than 7,300 pounds of water, logistics and science equipment to and from the Mir. Atlantis is carrying a nearly 300-pound oxygen generator to replace one of two Mir units which have experienced malfunctions. The oxygen it generates is used for breathing by the Mir crew

  7. KSC-97PC798

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-05-15

    The Space Shuttle Atlantis turns night into day for a few moments as it lifts off on May 15 at 4:07:48 a.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A on the STS-84 mission. The fourth Shuttle mission of 1997 will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. The commander is Charles J. Precourt. The pilot is Eileen Marie Collins. The five mission specialists are C. Michael Foale, Carlos I. Noriega, Edward Tsang Lu, Jean-Francois Clervoy of the European Space Agency and Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency. The planned nine-day mission will include the exchange of Foale for U.S. astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger, who has been on Mir since Jan. 15. Linenger transferred to Mir during the last docking mission, STS-81; he will return to Earth on Atlantis. Foale is slated to remain on Mir for about four months until he is replaced in September by STS-86 Mission Specialist Wendy B. Lawrence. During the five days Atlantis is scheduled to be docked with the Mir, the STS-84 crew and the Mir 23 crew, including two Russian cosmonauts, Commander Vasily Tsibliev and Flight Engineer Alexander Lazutkin, will participate in joint experiments. The STS-84 mission also will involve the transfer of more than 7,300 pounds of water, logistics and science equipment to and from the Mir. Atlantis is carrying a nearly 300-pound oxygen generator to replace one of two Mir units which have experienced malfunctions. The oxygen it generates is used for breathing by the Mir crew

  8. KSC-97PC806

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-05-15

    STS-84 Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale prepares to enter the Space Shuttle Atlantis at Launch Pad 39A with help from white room closeout crew members. The fourth Shuttle mission of 1997 will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. The commander is Charles J. Precourt. The pilot is Eileen Marie Collins. The five mission specialists are C. Michael Foale, Carlos I. Noriega, Edward Tsang Lu, Jean-Francois Clervoy of the European Space Agency and Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency. The planned nine-day mission will include the exchange of Foale for U.S. astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger, who has been on Mir since Jan. 15. Linenger transferred to Mir during the last docking mission, STS-81; he will return to Earth on Atlantis. Foale is slated to remain on Mir for about four months until he is replaced in September by STS-86 Mission Specialist Wendy B. Lawrence. During the five days Atlantis is scheduled to be docked with the Mir, the STS-84 crew and the Mir 23 crew, including two Russian cosmonauts, Commander Vasily Tsibliev and Flight Engineer Alexander Lazutkin, will participate in joint experiments. The STS-84 mission also will involve the transfer of more than 7,300 pounds of water, logistics and science equipment to and from the Mir. Atlantis is carrying a nearly 300-pound oxygen generator to replace one of two Mir units which have experienced malfunctions. The oxygen it generates is used for breathing by the Mir crew

  9. KSC-97PC807

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-05-15

    STS-84 Commander Charles J. Precourt prepares to enter the Space Shuttle Atlantis at Launch Pad 39A with help from white room closeout crew members. The fourth Shuttle mission of 1997 will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. The commander is Charles J. Precourt. The pilot is Eileen Marie Collins. The five mission specialists are C. Michael Foale, Carlos I. Noriega, Edward Tsang Lu, Jean-Francois Clervoy of the European Space Agency and Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency. The planned nine-day mission will include the exchange of Foale for U.S. astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger, who has been on Mir since Jan. 15. Linenger transferred to Mir during the last docking mission, STS-81; he will return to Earth on Atlantis. Foale is slated to remain on Mir for about four months until he is replaced in September by STS-86 Mission Specialist Wendy B. Lawrence. During the five days Atlantis is scheduled to be docked with the Mir, the STS-84 crew and the Mir 23 crew, including two Russian cosmonauts, Commander Vasily Tsibliev and Flight Engineer Alexander Lazutkin, will participate in joint experiments. The STS-84 mission also will involve the transfer of more than 7,300 pounds of water, logistics and science equipment to and from the Mir. Atlantis is carrying a nearly 300-pound oxygen generator to replace one of two Mir units which have experienced malfunctions. The oxygen it generates is used for breathing by the Mir crew

  10. KSC-97PC800

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-05-15

    The Space Shuttle Atlantis turns night into day for a few moments as it lifts off on May 15 at 4:07:48 a.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A on the STS-84 mission. The fourth Shuttle mission of 1997 will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. The commander is Charles J. Precourt. The pilot is Eileen Marie Collins. The five mission specialists are C. Michael Foale, Carlos I. Noriega, Edward Tsang Lu, Jean-Francois Clervoy of the European Space Agency and Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency. The planned nine-day mission will include the exchange of Foale for U.S. astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger, who has been on Mir since Jan. 15. Linenger transferred to Mir during the last docking mission, STS-81; he will return to Earth on Atlantis. Foale is slated to remain on Mir for about four months until he is replaced in September by STS-86 Mission Specialist Wendy B. Lawrence. During the five days Atlantis is scheduled to be docked with the Mir, the STS-84 crew and the Mir 23 crew, including two Russian cosmonauts, Commander Vasily Tsibliev and Flight Engineer Alexander Lazutkin, will participate in joint experiments. The STS-84 mission also will involve the transfer of more than 7,300 pounds of water, logistics and science equipment to and from the Mir. Atlantis is carrying a nearly 300-pound oxygen generator to replace one of two Mir units which have experienced malfunctions. The oxygen it generates is used for breathing by the Mir crew

  11. A Review on Forearc Ophiolite Obduction, Adakite-Like Generation, and Slab Window Development at the Chile Triple Junction Area: Uniformitarian Framework for Spreading-Ridge Subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourgois, Jacques; Lagabrielle, Yves; Martin, Hervé; Dyment, Jérôme; Frutos, Jose; Cisternas, Maria Eugenia

    2016-10-01

    This paper aggregates the main basic data acquired along the Chile Triple Junction (CTJ) area (45°-48°S), where an active spreading center is presently subducting beneath the Andean continental margin. Updated sea-floor kinematics associated with a comprehensive review of geologic, geochemical, and geophysical data provide new constraints on the geodynamics of this puzzling area. We discuss: (1) the emplacement mode for the Pleistocene Taitao Ridge and the Pliocene Taitao Peninsula ophiolite bodies. (2) The occurrence of these ophiolitic complexes in association with five adakite-like plutonic and volcanic centers of similar ages at the same restricted locations. (3) The inferences from the co-occurrence of these sub-coeval rocks originating from the same subducting oceanic lithosphere evolving through drastically different temperature-pressure ( P- T) path: low-grade greenschist facies overprint and amphibolite-eclogite transition, respectively. (4) The evidences that document ridge-jump events and associated microplate individualization during subduction of the SCR1 and SCR-1 segments: the Chonos and Cabo Elena microplates, respectively. The ridge-jump process associated with the occurrence of several closely spaced transform faults entering subduction is controlling slab fragmentation, ophiolite emplacement, and adakite-like production and location in the CTJ area. Kinematic inconsistencies in the development of the Patagonia slab window document an 11- km westward jump for the SCR-1 spreading segment at ~6.5-to-6.8 Ma. The SCR-1 spreading center is relocated beneath the North Patagonia Icefield (NPI). We argue that the deep-seated difference in the dynamically sustained origin of the high reliefs of the North and South Patagonia Icefield (NPI and SPI) is asthenospheric convection and slab melting, respectively. The Chile Triple Junction area provides the basic constraints to define the basic signatures for spreading-ridge subduction beneath an Andean

  12. List of Participants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-07-01

    Alba Paolo (Università di Torino) Becattini Francesco (Università di Firenze) Bombaci Ignazio (Università di Pisa) Bonaccorso Angela (INFN Pisa) Colonna Maria (INFN-LNS Catania) Coraggio Luigi (INFN Napoli) Covello Aldo (Università di Napoli) Di Toro Massimo (Università di Catania) De Angelis Giacomo (INFN-LNL Legnaro) Gargano Angela (INFN Napoli) Gattobigio Mario (INLN, Université de Nice-Sophia Antipolis, CNRS, France) Gensini Paolo (INFN Lecce) Giannini Mauro (Università di Genova) Girlanda Luca (Università del Salento) Giusti Carlotta (Università di Pavia) Greco Vincenzo (Università di Catania) Grossi Eduardo (Università di Firenze) Itaco Nunzio (Università di Napoli) Kievsky Alejandro (INFN Pisa) Lanza Edoardo (INFN Catania) Lavagno Andrea (Politecnico di Torino) Logoteta Domenico (Universidade de Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal) Lo Iudice Nicola (Università di Napoli) Lombardo Maria Paola (INFN-LNF Frascati) Lo Meo Sergio (ENEA Bologna) Mannarelli Massimo (INFN-LNGS Assergi) Marcucci Laura Elisa (Università di Pisa) Matera Francesco (Università di Firenze) Orlandini Giuseppina (Università di Trento) Pacati Franco (Università di Pavia) Pederiva Francesco (Università di Trento) Pirrone Sara (INFN Catania) Puglisi Armando (Università di Catania) Radici Marco (INFN Pavia) Rinaldi Matteo (Università di Perugia) Roggero Alessandro (Università di Trento) Rolando Valentina (Università di Ferrara) Rosati Sergio (Università di Pisa) Ruggieri Marco (Università di Catania) Salmè Gianni (INFN Roma) Santopinto Elena (INFN Genova) Scopetta Sergio (Università di Perugia) Taiuti Mauro (Università di Genova) Vigezzi Enrico (INFN Milano) Viviani Michele (INFN Pisa) Vorabbi Matteo (Università di Pavia)

  13. Dose-dependent influence of commercial garlic (Allium sativum) on rats fed cholesterol-containing diet.

    PubMed

    Gorinstein, Shela; Leontowicz, Maria; Leontowicz, Hanna; Jastrzebski, Zenon; Drzewiecki, Jerzy; Namiesnik, Jacek; Zachwieja, Zofia; Barton, Henryk; Tashma, Zev; Katrich, Elena; Trakhtenberg, Simon

    2006-05-31

    The aim of this investigation was to evaluate the dose-dependent influence of commercial garlic on rats fed cholesterol-containing diets. It was found that commercial garlic contains high concentrations of dietary fibers, microelements, and total polyphenols, and its total antioxidant capacity as determined by two independent assays [1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS)] was similar to that of the original garlic samples. Wistar rats (35) were randomly divided into five diet groups, named control, Chol, Garlic500, Garlic750, and Garlic1000. Control rats were fed basal diet (BD), which included wheat starch, casein, soybean oil, and vitamin and mineral mixtures. To the BD of the Chol group was added 1% of cholesterol. To the BD of the other three groups (Garlic500, Garlic750, and Garlic1000) were added 1% of cholesterol and commercial garlic equal to 500, 750, and 1000 mg of raw garlic per kilogram of animal weight. After 4 weeks of the experiment only in rats from the Garlic500 group were a significant hindering in the rise in plasma lipids and also a significant hindering in a decrease of plasma antioxidant activity registered. A significant decrease in plasma circulating fibrinogen and an increase in the clotting time were found in the same group of rats (P < 0.05 in both cases). The fibrinogenolytic effect of garlic diets was visualized by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. In the fibrinogen fraction of Garlic500 the 66, 24, and 14 kDa protein bands were detected with weaker protein intensity than in the corresponding ones in the Garlic750 and Garlic1000 diet groups. In conclusion, the positive influences of commercial garlic on plasma lipids, proteins, antioxidant activity, and some indices of blood coagulation are dose-dependent. Therefore, commercial garlic (Elena, Zelazków, Poland) could be a valuable component of atherosclerosis-preventing diets only in optimal doses.

  14. Where on earth to publish? A sample survey comparing traditional and open access publishing in the oncological field.

    PubMed

    Poltronieri, Elisabetta; Bravo, Elena; Camerini, Tiziana; Ferri, Maurizio; Rizzo, Roberto; Solimini, Renata; Cognetti, Gaetana

    2013-01-22

    The paper intends to help scientific authors to make the best choice of journals in which to publish, by describing and comparing journal features in the area of oncology. For this purpose, the authors identified impact factor (IF) ranking, cost options and copyright conditions offered to authors wishing to publish in full open access (OA), subscription-based or hybrid journals. Data referring to articles published in 2010 by three Italian research institutions (National Institute of Health - Rome (ISS), Regina Elena National Cancer Institute - Rome (IRE), National Cancer Institute - Milan (INT) in journals (78) managed according to different business models, all listed in the Journal Citation Reports, subject category Oncology, were collected and analysed. The journals surveyed were ranked according to IF, position in quartiles, publication charges, usage rights in published articles, self-archiving conditions in OAI-compliant repositories digital archives. Almost half (34) the journals surveyed were included in the first quartile, thus revealing authors' preference for journals with a high IF. The prevalent journal business model was the hybrid formula (based on subscriptions but also offering a paid OA option) with 51 journals, followed by subscription-based only journals accounting for 22, while just 5 full OA journals were identified. In general, no relationship was found between IF and article publication charges, in terms of correspondence between more expensive fees and higher IF. The issue of OA journals as compared with traditional subscription-based journals is highly debated among stakeholders: library administrators facing financial restrictions, authors seeking to locate the best outlet for their research, publishers wishing to increase their revenues by offering journals with wider appeal. Against this background, factors such as the quest for alternatives to high-cost business models, investments in setting up institutional repositories hosting the

  15. Pharmacokinetics, phenotype and product choice in haemophilia B: how to strike a balance?

    PubMed

    Berntorp, E; Dolan, G; Hermans, C; Laffan, M; Santagostino, E; Tiede, A

    2014-11-01

    At the 7th Annual Congress of the European Association for Haemophilia and Allied Disorders (EAHAD) held in Brussels, Belgium, in February 2014, Pfizer sponsored a satellite symposium entitled: "Pharmacokinetics, phenotype and product choice in haemophilia B: How to strike a balance?" Co-chaired by Cedric Hermans (Cliniques Universitaires Saint Luc, Brussels, Belgium) and Mike Laffan (Imperial College, London, UK), the symposium provided an opportunity to debate whether pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters are good surrogates for clinical efficacy for haemophilia B in clinical practice, consider the perceptions and evidence of disease severity, and examine how these considerations can inform approaches to balancing the potential risks and benefits of the currently available treatment options for haemophilia B. PK parameters are routinely measured in clinical practice and are a requirement of regulatory bodies to demonstrate the clinical efficacy of products; however, the relationship between measured PK parameters and clinical efficacy is yet to be determined, an issue that was debated by Gerry Dolan (University Hospital, Queen's Medical Centre, Nottingham, UK) and Erik Berntorp (Lund University, Malmö Centre for Thrombosis and Haemostasis, Malmö, Sweden). Elena Santagostino (Universita degli Studi di Milano, Milano, Italy) reviewed how differing perceptions on the severity of haemophilia B compared with haemophilia A may have an impact on clinical decision-making. Finally, Andreas Tiede (Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany), examined the considerations for balancing the potential risks and benefits of the currently available treatment options for haemophilia B. Although the pathophysiology of haemophilia B has been widely studied and is largely understood, continued investigation and discussion around the optimal management course and appropriate therapeutic choice is warranted.

  16. Laparoscopic Debulking Surgery in the Management of Advanced Ovarian Cancer After Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Corrado, Giacomo; Mancini, Emanuela; Cutillo, Giuseppe; Baiocco, Ermelinda; Vici, Patrizia; Sergi, Domenico; Patrizi, Lodovico; Saltari, Maria; Baffa, Alberto; Vizza, Enrico

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and morbidity of total laparoscopic debulking surgery in the treatment of advanced ovarian cancer after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. We performed a retrospective review of laparoscopic approach in patients with histologically confirmed epithelial ovarian cancer (International Federation of GynaecologyObstetrics stages IIIC-IV) who received 3 courses of neoadjuvant chemotherapy, from January 2010 to December 2014, at the Gynaecologic Oncologic Unit, "Regina Elena" National Cancer Institute, Rome, Italy. A total of 30 patients were included. The median age was 50 years (range, 26-73 years), median body mass index was 24.5 kg/m (range, 19-39 kg/m). All patients had good clinical response to 3 cycles of neoadjuvant chemotherapy. All women underwent a complete debulking surgery with no residual disease. The median operating time was 152 minutes (range, 70-335 minutes), the median blood loss was 70 mL (range, 50-200 mL). The median number of removed pelvic lymph nodes was 15 (range, 13-25). There was 1 (3.3%) intraoperative complication and 2 (6.6%) postoperative short-term complications. The median length of hospital stay was 4 days (range, 3-13 days). The median follow-up was 15 months (range, 2-54 months). Twenty-six patients are free from recurrence at the time of this report. Laparoscopic cytoreduction in patients with advanced ovarian cancer after neoadjuvant chemotherapy, when performed by skilled surgeons, seems feasible and may decrease the impact of aggressive surgery on high-morbidity patients, such as on women after chemotherapy.

  17. STS-84 Mission Specialist Jean-Francois Clervoy in white room

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-84 Mission Specialist Jean- Francois Clervoy prepares to enter the Space Shuttle Atlantis at Launch Pad 39A with help from white room closeout crew members. The fourth Shuttle mission of 1997 will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. The commander is Charles J. Precourt. The pilot is Eileen Marie Collins. The five mission specialists are C. Michael Foale, Carlos I. Noriega, Edward Tsang Lu, Jean-Francois Clervoy of the European Space Agency and Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency. The planned nine-day mission will include the exchange of Foale for U.S. astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger, who has been on Mir since Jan. 15. Linenger transferred to Mir during the last docking mission, STS-81; he will return to Earth on Atlantis. Foale is slated to remain on Mir for about four months until he is replaced in September by STS-86 Mission Specialist Wendy B. Lawrence. During the five days Atlantis is scheduled to be docked with the Mir, the STS-84 crew and the Mir 23 crew, including two Russian cosmonauts, Commander Vasily Tsibliev and Flight Engineer Alexander Lazutkin, will participate in joint experiments. The STS-84 mission also will involve the transfer of more than 7,300 pounds of water, logistics and science equipment to and from the Mir. Atlantis is carrying a nearly 300-pound oxygen generator to replace one of two Mir units which have experienced malfunctions. The oxygen it generates is used for breathing by the Mir crew.

  18. STS-84 Commander Charles J. Precourt in white room

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-84 Commander Charles J. Precourt prepares to enter the Space Shuttle Atlantis at Launch Pad 39A with help from white room closeout crew members. The fourth Shuttle mission of 1997 will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. The commander is Charles J. Precourt. The pilot is Eileen Marie Collins. The five mission specialists are C. Michael Foale, Carlos I. Noriega, Edward Tsang Lu, Jean-Francois Clervoy of the European Space Agency and Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency. The planned nine-day mission will include the exchange of Foale for U.S. astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger, who has been on Mir since Jan. 15. Linenger transferred to Mir during the last docking mission, STS-81; he will return to Earth on Atlantis. Foale is slated to remain on Mir for about four months until he is replaced in September by STS-86 Mission Specialist Wendy B. Lawrence. During the five days Atlantis is scheduled to be docked with the Mir, the STS-84 crew and the Mir 23 crew, including two Russian cosmonauts, Commander Vasily Tsibliev and Flight Engineer Alexander Lazutkin, will participate in joint experiments. The STS-84 mission also will involve the transfer of more than 7,300 pounds of water, logistics and science equipment to and from the Mir. Atlantis is carrying a nearly 300-pound oxygen generator to replace one of two Mir units which have experienced malfunctions. The oxygen it generates is used for breathing by the Mir crew.

  19. Diet and resource partitioning among anurans in irrigated rice fields in Pantanal, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Piatti, L; Souza, F L

    2011-08-01

    Artificial ponds or irrigated systems scattered throughout farmlands can offer important habitats for anurans and can be interesting sites for research on species resources use in a changing landscape. This study describes the diet and resource partitioning among anurans inhabiting irrigated rice fields in the Pantanal region. Twenty categories of prey were found in the stomachs of Leptodactylus chaquensis, L. elenae, L. podicipinus and Rhinella bergi, the most frequent being Coleoptera, Hymenoptera, larvae of Hexapoda, Hemiptera, Diptera and Orthoptera. The great differences found in the diet of these species in rice fields compared to other locations, according to available records in the literature, was the increased importance of Hemipitera and Orthoptera and the decrease in importance of Hymenoptera in the diet of leptodactylids. These differences might be attributed to changes in the availability of resources in response to habitat modification. Although diet composition was very similar among species, niche overlap was larger than expected by chance, suggesting that the competition for food resources is not, or has not been, a significant force in determining the structure of this frog community. Two non-exclusive hypotheses could be considered as a justification for this result: 1) the high niche overlap could result from resource availability, which is sufficient to satisfy all species without any strong competition; 2) or the high values of niche overlap could be a selective force driving species to compete, but there has not been enough time to express a significant divergence in the species diet because the study area is characterised as a dynamic habitat influenced by frequent and cyclical changes.

  20. STS-84 Mission Specialist Carlos I. Noriega in white room

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-84 Mission Specialist Carlos I. Noriega prepares to enter the Space Shuttle Atlantis at Launch Pad 39A with help from white room closeout crew members. The fourth Shuttle mission of 1997 will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. The commander is Charles J. Precourt. The pilot is Eileen Marie Collins. The five mission specialists are C. Michael Foale, Carlos I. Noriega, Edward Tsang Lu, Jean-Francois Clervoy of the European Space Agency and Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency. The planned nine-day mission will include the exchange of Foale for U.S. astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger, who has been on Mir since Jan. 15. Linenger transferred to Mir during the last docking mission, STS-81; he will return to Earth on Atlantis. Foale is slated to remain on Mir for about four months until he is replaced in September by STS-86 Mission Specialist Wendy B. Lawrence. During the five days Atlantis is scheduled to be docked with the Mir, the STS-84 crew and the Mir 23 crew, including two Russian cosmonauts, Commander Vasily Tsibliev and Flight Engineer Alexander Lazutkin, will participate in joint experiments. The STS-84 mission also will involve the transfer of more than 7,300 pounds of water, logistics and science equipment to and from the Mir. Atlantis is carrying a nearly 300-pound oxygen generator to replace one of two Mir units which have experienced malfunctions. The oxygen it generates is used for breathing by the Mir crew.

  1. HUBBLE STAYS ON TRAIL OF FADING GAMMA-RAY BURST FIREBALL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A Hubble Space Telescope image of the fading fireball from one of the universe's most mysterious phenomena, a gamma-ray burst. Though the visible component has faded to 1/500th its brightness (27.7 magnitude) from the time it was first discovered by ground- based telescopes last March (the actual gamma-ray burst took place on February 28), Hubble continues to clearly see the fireball and discriminated a surrounding nebulosity (at 25th magnitude) which is considered a host galaxy. The continued visibility of the burst, and the rate of its fading, support theories that the light from a gamma-ray burst is an expanding relativistic (moving near the speed of light) fireball, possibly produced by the collision of two dense objects, such as an orbiting pair of neutron stars. If the burst happened nearby, within our own galaxy, the resulting fireball should have had only enough energy to propel it into space for a month. The fact that this fireball is still visible after six months means the explosion was truly titanic and, to match the observed brightness, must have happened at the vast distances of galaxies. The energy released in a burst, which can last from a fraction of a second to a few hundred seconds, is equal to all of the Sun's energy generated over its 10 billion year lifetime. The false-color image was taken Sept. 5, 1997 with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph. Credit: Andrew Fruchter (STScI), Elena Pian (ITSRE-CNR), and NASA

  2. Bioelectrical impedance vector analysis detects low body cell mass and dehydration in patients with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Buffa, R; Mereu, R M; Putzu, P F; Floris, G; Marini, E

    2010-12-01

    This paper evaluates the nutritional status in patients with mild-moderate and severe Alzheimer's disease (AD) by bioelectrical impedance vector analysis (BIVA). Cross-sectional study. Alzheimer Center, SS. Trinita Hospital, Cagliari, and "Monsignor Angioni" Nursing Home, Quartu Sant'Elena (Cagliari, Italy). 83 free-living patients with mild-moderate Alzheimer's disease (29 men, 54 women), 9 institutionalized women in the severe stage; 468 age-matched controls (202 men, 266 women). Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA), anthropometric (height, weight, BMI), bioelectrical (R, Xc) and biochemical variables (serum albumin) were assessed. Bioelectrical characteristics were significantly different in the patients with mild-moderate AD with respect to controls, indicating low body cell mass (men, T2= 12.8; women, T2=34.9; p < 0.01). Women with severe AD showed low body cell mass and dehydration with respect to patients with mild-moderate AD (T2=17.1; p < 0.01). The phase angle, R/H and Z/H were significantly correlated (p < 0.05) with MNA (phase: r = 0.31; R/H: r =-0.37; Z/H: r =-0.37) and albumin (phase: r=0.47; R/H: r=-0.36; Z/H: r=-0.36). Alzheimer's disease is characterized by a tendency to malnutrition, present even in the mild-moderate stages, and a tendency to dehydration that appears in the severe stage. The BIVA technique is a promising tool for the screening and monitoring of nutrition and hydration status in Alzheimer's disease.

  3. Plio-Quaternary uplift of the Manta Peninsula and La Plata Island and the subduction of the Carnegie Ridge, central coast of Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedoja, K.; Dumont, J. F.; Lamothe, M.; Ortlieb, L.; Collot, J.-Y.; Ghaleb, B.; Auclair, M.; Alvarez, V.; Labrousse, B.

    2006-11-01

    This paper quantifies the uplift of the Manta Peninsula and La Plata Island (Ecuador) using marine terraces. These marine terraces are part of a more extensive segment of uplifting coast extending all along the Talara arc, from 6.5°S to 1°N. Along this arc, the highest terraces are observed on the Manta Peninsula with five marine terraces up to 360 ± 10 m. On La Plata Island, four marine terraces are raised up to 170 ± 10 m. The terraces are dated using infrared-stimulated luminescence (IRSL) and U-Th methods. The calculated uplifts range from 0.3 to 0.5 mm yr -1 for the past 300 ka. The oldest terraces show a transition to the synsedimentary uplifted Plio-Pleistocene deposits of the Canoa Formation. In comparison with the lower uplift rates documented in the Santa Elena Peninsula to the south and the Esmeraldas area to the north, the uplift of the Manta Peninsula gives an account of the effect of the subduction of the Carnegie Ridge since the late Pliocene. The coastal uplift ends to the north outside the projection point of the border of the Carnegie Ridge but extends southward along the northern margin of the Gulf of Guayaquil, outside of the effect of the Carnegie Ridge, which suggests that other elements must be considered for uplift in this area. A weak scan pattern of the Carnegie Ridge along the coast is observed, but instead of a true scan motion, the context suggests the possibility of a segmented ridge and the head-on introduction in the trench of a new segment with a beveled front trending parallel to the Grijalva fracture zone. The onset of subduction of the Carnegie Ridge seems correlated with a change in the tectonic deformation of the coast, from compression conditions before the middle-late Pliocene to extension conditions during the subduction of the ridge.

  4. Nature of the Yucatan Block Basement as Derived From Study of Granitic Clasts in the Impact Breccias of Chicxulub Crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vera-Sanchez, P.; Rebolledo-Vieyra, M.; Perez-Cruz, L.; Urrutia-Fucugauchi, J.

    2008-05-01

    The tectonic and petrologic nature of the basement of the Yucatan Block is studied from analyses of basement clasts present in the impact suevitic breccias of Chicxulub crater. The impact breccias have been sampled as part of the drilling projects conducted in the Yucatan peninsula by Petroleos Mexicanos, the National University of Mexico and the Chicxulub Scientific Drilling Project. Samples analyzed come mainly from the Yaxcopoil-1, Tekax, and Santa Elena boreholes, and partly from Pemex boreholes. In this study we concentrate on clasts of the granites, granodiorites and quartzmonzonites in the impact breccias. We report major and trace element geochemical and petrological data, which are compared with data from the granitic and volcanic rocks from the Maya Mountains in Belize and from the Swannee terrane in Florida. Basement granitic clasts analyzed present intermediate to acidic sub-alkaline compositions. Plots of major oxides (e.g., Al2O3, Fe2O3, TiO2 and CaO) and trace elements (e.g., Th, Y, Hf, Nb and Zr) versus silica allow separation of samples into two major groups, which can be compared to units in the Maya Mountains and in Florida basement. The impact suevitic breccia samples have been affected by alteration likely related to the hydrothermal processes associated with the crater melt sheet. Cloritization, seritization and fenitization alterations are recognized, due to the long term hydrothermalism. Krogh et al. (1993) reported U-Pb dates on zircons from the suevitic breccias, which gave dates of 545 +/- 5 Ma and 418 +/- 6 Ma, which were interpreted in terms of the deep granitic metamorphic Yucatan basement. The younger date correlates with the age for the Osceola Granite and the St. Lucie metamorphic complex of the Swannee terrane in the Florida peninsula. The intrusive rocks in the Yucatan basement may be related to approx. 418 Ma ago collisional event in the Late Silurian.

  5. HUBBLE STAYS ON TRAIL OF FADING GAMMA-RAY BURST FIREBALL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A Hubble Space Telescope image of the fading fireball from one of the universe's most mysterious phenomena, a gamma-ray burst. Though the visible component has faded to 1/500th its brightness (27.7 magnitude) from the time it was first discovered by ground- based telescopes last March (the actual gamma-ray burst took place on February 28), Hubble continues to clearly see the fireball and discriminated a surrounding nebulosity (at 25th magnitude) which is considered a host galaxy. The continued visibility of the burst, and the rate of its fading, support theories that the light from a gamma-ray burst is an expanding relativistic (moving near the speed of light) fireball, possibly produced by the collision of two dense objects, such as an orbiting pair of neutron stars. If the burst happened nearby, within our own galaxy, the resulting fireball should have had only enough energy to propel it into space for a month. The fact that this fireball is still visible after six months means the explosion was truly titanic and, to match the observed brightness, must have happened at the vast distances of galaxies. The energy released in a burst, which can last from a fraction of a second to a few hundred seconds, is equal to all of the Sun's energy generated over its 10 billion year lifetime. The false-color image was taken Sept. 5, 1997 with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph. Credit: Andrew Fruchter (STScI), Elena Pian (ITSRE-CNR), and NASA

  6. The Mw 7.7 Tocopilla, Chile, Earthquake of 14 November 2007: A Comprehensive Study Using Teleseismic, Local and InSAR data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos, J.; Peyrat, S.; Bejar, M.; Socquet, A.; Meneses, G.; Perez, A.; Madariaga, R.; Favreau, P.; Bernard, P.; Barrientos, S.; Armijo, R.; Asch, G.; Sobesiak, M.; Vilotte, J.

    2008-05-01

    A large Mw 7.7 earthquake took place in the Northern Chile subduction zone severely affecting the cities of Tocopilla, Maria Elena, Quillagua and Mejillones . The earthquake was very well recorded by many broadband stations at teleseismic distances and by more than 10 three-component accelerographs in the near field, four of them right above the rupture region. These data plus InSAR interferograms spanning the date of the earthquake were independently analysed and inverted to determine the characteristics of this event. Two main patches of energy release, located along the plate interface, close to the Chilean coast were clearly identified from the waveform inversion. These patches, separated by 60 to 65 km, ruptured from north to south with a velocity between 2.8 to 3.0 km/s. This rupture scenario is consistent with the modelling of InSAR interferograms by Bejar et al (2008) and the kinematic inversion of near field data by Peyrat et al (2008). Most of the early aftershocks, which took place during the two weeks following the main event, occurred near the Southern end of the rupture zone, just North of the Mejillones Peninsula. The majority of them were thrust events with focal mechanisms similar to that of the mainshock, except for the largest aftershock that took place on 16 December at the southern end of the rupture zone. The latter is a compressional event at 40 km depth, with compression along the slab ("slab push" mechanism). This complex pattern of seismicity, in addition to the lack of co-seismic displacement along the plate interface beneath the Mejillones Peninsula, indicates that structures under the peninsula play a significant role in the subduction process. Bejar et al (2008), Rupture geometry and slip associated with the 2007 November 14 Mw = 7.7 Tocopilla (Chile) earthquake, as preliminary determined by InSAR and GPS observations, this meeting Peyrat et al. (2008). Detailed source process of the 2007 Tocopilla earthquake, this meeting.

  7. KSC-97PC841

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-05-24

    The orbiter drag chute deploys after Atlantis touches down on Runway 33 of KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility at the conclusion of the nine-day STS-84 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 9:27:44 EDT on May 24, 1997. The first landing opportunity was waved off because of low cloud cover. It was the 37th landing at KSC since the Shuttle program began in 1981, and the eighth consecutive landing at KSC. STS-84 was the sixth of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Atlantis was docked with the Mir for five days. STS-84 Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale replaced astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger, who has been on the Russian space station since Jan. 15. Linenger returned to Earth on Atlantis with the rest of the STS-84 crew, Mission Commander Charles J. Precourt, Pilot Eileen Marie Collins, and Mission Specialists Carlos I. Noriega, Edward Tsang Lu, Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency and JeanFrancois Clervoy of the European Space Agency. Foale is scheduled to remain on the Mir for approximately four months, until he is replaced by STS-86 crew member Wendy B. Lawrence in September. Besides the docking and crew exchange, STS-84 included the transfer of more than 7,300 pounds of water, logistics and science experiments and hardware to and from the Mir. Scientific experiments conducted during the STS-84 mission, and scheduled for Foale’s stay on the Mir, are in the fields of advanced technology, Earth sciences, fundamental biology, human life sciences, International Space Station risk mitigation, microgravity sciences and space sciences

  8. KSC-97PC839

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-05-24

    The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touches down on Runway 33 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility, bringing to an end the nine-day STS-84 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 9:27:44 EDT on May 24, 1997. The first landing opportunity was waved off because of low cloud cover. It was the 37th landing at KSC since the Shuttle program began in 1981, and the eighth consecutive landing at KSC. STS-84 was the sixth of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Atlantis was docked with the Mir for five days. STS-84 Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale replaced astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger, who has been on the Russian space station since Jan. 15. Linenger returned to Earth on Atlantis with the rest of the STS-84 crew, Mission Commander Charles J. Precourt, Pilot Eileen Marie Collins, and Mission Specialists Carlos I. Noriega, Edward Tsang Lu, Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency and JeanFrancois Clervoy of the European Space Agency. Foale is scheduled to remain on the Mir for approximately four months, until he is replaced by STS-86 crew member Wendy B. Lawrence in September. Besides the docking and crew exchange, STS-84 included the transfer of more than 7,300 pounds of water, logistics and science experiments and hardware to and from the Mir. Scientific experiments conducted during the STS-84 mission, and scheduled for Foale’s stay on the Mir, are in the fields of advanced technology, Earth sciences, fundamental biology, human life sciences, International Space Station risk mitigation, microgravity sciences and space sciences

  9. KSC-97PC838

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-05-24

    The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touches down on Runway 33 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility, bringing to an end the nine-day STS-84 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 9:27:44 EDT on May 24, 1997. The first landing opportunity was waved off because of low cloud cover. It was the 37th landing at KSC since the Shuttle program began in 1981, and the eighth consecutive landing at KSC. STS-84 was the sixth of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Atlantis was docked with the Mir for five days. STS-84 Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale replaced astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger, who has been on the Russian space station since Jan. 15. Linenger returned to Earth on Atlantis with the rest of the STS-84 crew, Mission Commander Charles J. Precourt, Pilot Eileen Marie Collins, and Mission Specialists Carlos I. Noriega, Edward Tsang Lu, Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency and JeanFrancois Clervoy of the European Space Agency. Foale is scheduled to remain on the Mir for approximately four months, until he is replaced by STS-86 crew member Wendy B. Lawrence in September. Besides the docking and crew exchange, STS-84 included the transfer of more than 7,300 pounds of water, logistics and science experiments and hardware to and from the Mir. Scientific experiments conducted during the STS-84 mission, and scheduled for Foale’s stay on the Mir, are in the fields of advanced technology, Earth sciences, fundamental biology, human life sciences, International Space Station risk mitigation, microgravity sciences and space sciences

  10. KSC-97PC844

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-05-24

    Framed by the Vehicle Assembly Building in the distance, at left, and the Mate-Demate Device, the Space Shuttle Atlantis with its drag chute deployed touches down on KSC’s Runway 33 at the conclusion of the STS-84 mission. The Shuttle Training Aircraft with astronaut Kenneth D. Cockrell at the controls is flying in front of Atlantis. Cockrell is acting deputy chief of the Astronaut Office. Main gear touchdown was at 9:27:44 EDT on May 24, 1997. The first landing opportunity was waved off because of low cloud cover. It was the 37th landing at KSC since the Shuttle program began in 1981, and the eighth consecutive landing at KSC. STS-84 was the sixth of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Atlantis was docked with the Mir for five days. STS-84 Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale replaced astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger, who has been on the Russian space station since Jan. 15. Linenger returned to Earth on Atlantis with the rest of the STS-84 crew, Mission Commander Charles J. Precourt, Pilot Eileen Marie Collins, and Mission Specialists Carlos I. Noriega, Edward Tsang Lu, Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency and Jean-Francois Clervoy of the European Space Agency. Foale is scheduled to remain on the Mir for approximately four months, until he is replaced by STS-86 crew member Wendy B. Lawrence in September. Besides the docking and crew exchange, STS-84 included the transfer of more than 7,300 pounds of water, logistics and science experiments and hardware to and from the Mir. Scientific experiments conducted during the STS-84 mission, and scheduled for Foale’s stay on the Mir, are in the fields of advanced technology, Earth sciences, fundamental biology, human life sciences, International Space Station risk mitigation, microgravity sciences and space sciences

  11. KSC-97PC852

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-05-24

    The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touches down on Runway 33 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility, bringing to an end the nine-day STS-84 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 9:27:44 EDT on May 24, 1997. The first landing opportunity was waved off because of low cloud cover. It was the 37th landing at KSC since the Shuttle program began in 1981, and the eighth consecutive landing at KSC. STS-84 was the sixth of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Atlantis was docked with the Mir for five days. STS-84 Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale replaced astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger, who has been on the Russian space station since Jan. 15. Linenger returned to Earth on Atlantis with the rest of the STS-84 crew, Mission Commander Charles J. Precourt, Pilot Eileen Marie Collins, and Mission Specialists Carlos I. Noriega, Edward Tsang Lu, Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency and JeanFrancois Clervoy of the European Space Agency. Foale is scheduled to remain on the Mir for approximately four months, until he is replaced by STS-86 crew member Wendy B. Lawrence in September. Besides the docking and crew exchange, STS-84 included the transfer of more than 7,300 pounds of water, logistics and science experiments and hardware to and from the Mir. Scientific experiments conducted during the STS-84 mission, and scheduled for Foale’s stay on the Mir, are in the fields of advanced technology, Earth sciences, fundamental biology, human life sciences, International Space Station risk mitigation, microgravity sciences and space sciences

  12. KSC-97PC850

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-05-24

    The orbiter drag chute deploys after Atlantis touches down on Runway 33 of KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility at the conclusion of the nine-day STS-84 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 9:27:44 EDT on May 24, 1997. The first landing opportunity was waved off because of low cloud cover. It was the 37th landing at KSC since the Shuttle program began in 1981, and the eighth consecutive landing at KSC. STS-84 was the sixth of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Atlantis was docked with the Mir for five days. STS-84 Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale replaced astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger, who has been on the Russian space station since Jan. 15. Linenger returned to Earth on Atlantis with the rest of the STS-84 crew, Mission Commander Charles J. Precourt, Pilot Eileen Marie Collins, and Mission Specialists Carlos I. Noriega, Edward Tsang Lu, Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency and JeanFrancois Clervoy of the European Space Agency. Foale is scheduled to remain on the Mir for approximately four months, until he is replaced by STS-86 crew member Wendy B. Lawrence in September. Besides the docking and crew exchange, STS-84 included the transfer of more than 7,300 pounds of water, logistics and science experiments and hardware to and from the Mir. Scientific experiments conducted during the STS-84 mission, and scheduled for Foale’s stay on the Mir, are in the fields of advanced technology, Earth sciences, fundamental biology, human life sciences, International Space Station risk mitigation, microgravity sciences and space sciences

  13. KSC-97PC843

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-05-24

    The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis touches down on Runway 33 of the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility, bringing to an end the nine-day STS-84 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 9:27:44 EDT on May 24, 1997. The first landing opportunity was waved off because of low cloud cover. It was the 37th landing at KSC since the Shuttle program began in 1981, and the eighth consecutive landing at KSC. STS-84 was the sixth of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Atlantis was docked with the Mir for five days. STS-84 Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale replaced astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger, who has been on the Russian space station since Jan. 15. Linenger returned to Earth on Atlantis with the rest of the STS-84 crew, Mission Commander Charles J. Precourt, Pilot Eileen Marie Collins, and Mission Specialists Carlos I. Noriega, Edward Tsang Lu, Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency and JeanFrancois Clervoy of the European Space Agency. Foale is scheduled to remain on the Mir for approximately four months, until he is replaced by STS-86 crew member Wendy B. Lawrence in September. Besides the docking and crew exchange, STS-84 included the transfer of more than 7,300 pounds of water, logistics and science experiments and hardware to and from the Mir. Scientific experiments conducted during the STS-84 mission, and scheduled for Foale’s stay on the Mir, are in the fields of advanced technology, Earth sciences, fundamental biology, human life sciences, International Space Station risk mitigation, microgravity sciences and space sciences

  14. KSC-97PC842

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-05-24

    The orbiter drag chute deploys after Atlantis touches down on Runway 33 of KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility at the conclusion of the nine-day STS-84 mission. Main gear touchdown was at 9:27:44 EDT on May 24, 1997. The first landing opportunity was waved off because of low cloud cover. It was the 37th landing at KSC since the Shuttle program began in 1981, and the eighth consecutive landing at KSC. STS-84 was the sixth of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Atlantis was docked with the Mir for five days. STS-84 Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale replaced astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger, who has been on the Russian space station since Jan. 15. Linenger returned to Earth on Atlantis with the rest of the STS-84 crew, Mission Commander Charles J. Precourt, Pilot Eileen Marie Collins, and Mission Specialists Carlos I. Noriega, Edward Tsang Lu, Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency and JeanFrancois Clervoy of the European Space Agency. Foale is scheduled to remain on the Mir for approximately four months, until he is replaced by STS-86 crew member Wendy B. Lawrence in September. Besides the docking and crew exchange, STS-84 included the transfer of more than 7,300 pounds of water, logistics and science experiments and hardware to and from the Mir. Scientific experiments conducted during the STS-84 mission, and scheduled for Foale’s stay on the Mir, are in the fields of advanced technology, Earth sciences, fundamental biology, human life sciences, International Space Station risk mitigation, microgravity sciences and space sciences

  15. KSC-97PC845

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-05-24

    The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis, with its drag chute deployed, rolls out on Runway 33 of KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility at the conclusion of the nine-day STS-84 mission. The Shuttle Training Aircraft piloted by astronaut Kenneth D. Cockrell, acting deputy chief of the Astronaut Office, is flying above Atlantis. Main gear touchdown was at 9:27:44 EDT on May 24, 1997. The first landing opportunity was waved off because of low cloud cover. It was the 37th landing at KSC since the Shuttle program began in 1981, and the eighth consecutive landing at KSC. STS-84 was the sixth of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Atlantis was docked with the Mir for five days. STS-84 Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale replaced astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger, who has been on the Russian space station since Jan. 15. Linenger returned to Earth on Atlantis with the rest of the STS-84 crew, Mission Commander Charles J. Precourt, Pilot Eileen Marie Collins, and Mission Specialists Carlos I. Noriega, Edward Tsang Lu, Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency and JeanFrancois Clervoy of the European Space Agency. Foale is scheduled to remain on the Mir for approximately four months, until he is replaced by STS-86 crew member Wendy B. Lawrence in September. Besides the docking and crew exchange, STS-84 included the transfer of more than 7,300 pounds of water, logistics and science experiments and hardware to and from the Mir. Scientific experiments conducted during the STS-84 mission, and scheduled for Foale’s stay on the Mir, are in the fields of advanced technology, Earth sciences, fundamental biology, human life sciences, International Space Station risk mitigation, microgravity sciences and space sciences

  16. KSC-97PC840

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-05-24

    The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis glides in for a landing on Runway 33 at KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility at the conclusion of the nine-day STS-84 mission. It will be the 37th landing at KSC since the Shuttle program began in 1981, and the eighth consecutive landing at KSC. STS-84 was the sixth of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Atlantis was docked with the Mir for five days. STS-84 Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale replaced astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger, who has been on the Russian space station since Jan. 15. Linenger returned to Earth on Atlantis with the rest of the STS-84 crew, Mission Commander Charles J. Precourt, Pilot Eileen Marie Collins, and Mission Specialists Carlos I. Noriega, Edward Tsang Lu, Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency and Jean-Francois Clervoy of the European Space Agency. Foale is scheduled to remain on the Mir for approximately four months, until he is replaced by STS-86 crew member Wendy B. Lawrence in September. Besides the docking and crew exchange, STS-84 included the transfer of more than 7,300 pounds of water, logistics and science experiments and hardware to and from the Mir. Scientific experiments conducted during the STS-84 mission, and scheduled for Foale’s stay on the Mir, are in the fields of advanced technology, Earth sciences, fundamental biology, human life sciences, International Space Station risk mitigation, microgravity sciences and space sciences

  17. KSC-97PC855

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-05-24

    This unusual view of the underside of the Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis shortly before landing was taken by a fish-eye camera lens from KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility. The Vehicle Assembly Building is in the background at left. The Shuttle Training Aircraft can be seen in the distance, at center. Atlantis is wrapping up its nine-day STS-84 mission, which was the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Atlantis was docked with the Mir for five days. STS-84 Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale replaced astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger, who has been on the Russian space station since Jan. 15. Linenger is returning to Earth on Atlantis with the rest of the STS-84 crew, Mission Commander Charles J. Precourt, Pilot Eileen Marie Collins, and Mission Specialists Carlos I. Noriega, Edward Tsang Lu, Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency and Jean-Francois Clervoy of the European Space Agency. Foale is scheduled to remain on the Mir for approximately four months, until he is replaced by STS-86 crew member Wendy B. Lawrence in September. Besides the docking and crew exchange, STS-84 included the transfer of more than 7,300 pounds of water, logistics and science experiments and hardware to and from the Mir. Scientific experiments conducted during the STS-84 mission, and scheduled for Foale’s stay on the Mir, are in the fields of advanced technology, Earth sciences, fundamental biology, human life sciences, International Space Station risk mitigation, microgravity sciences and space sciences

  18. KSC-97PC851

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-05-24

    The Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis rolls out on Runway 33 of KSC’s Shuttle Landing Facility at the conclusion of the nine-day STS-84 mission. The Shuttle Training Aircraft piloted by astronaut Kenneth D. Cockrell, acting deputy chief of the Astronaut Office, is flying above Atlantis. The Vehicle Assembly Building is at left. Main gear touchdown was at 9:27:44 EDT on May 24, 1997. The first landing opportunity was waved off because of low cloud cover. It was the 37th landing at KSC since the Shuttle program began in 1981, and the eighth consecutive landing at KSC. STS-84 was the sixth of nine planned dockings of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. Atlantis was docked with the Mir for five days. STS-84 Mission Specialist C. Michael Foale replaced astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger, who has been on the Russian space station since Jan. 15. Linenger returned to Earth on Atlantis with the rest of the STS-84 crew, Mission Commander Charles J. Precourt, Pilot Eileen Marie Collins, and Mission Specialists Carlos I. Noriega, Edward Tsang Lu, Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency and JeanFrancois Clervoy of the European Space Agency. Foale is scheduled to remain on the Mir for approximately four months, until he is replaced by STS-86 crew member Wendy B. Lawrence in September. Besides the docking and crew exchange, STS-84 included the transfer of more than 7,300 pounds of water, logistics and science experiments and hardware to and from the Mir. Scientific experiments conducted during the STS-84 mission, and scheduled for Foale’s stay on the Mir, are in the fields of advanced technology, Earth sciences, fundamental biology, human life sciences, International Space Station risk mitigation, microgravity sciences and space sciences

  19. U.S. elementary and secondary schools: equalizing opportunity or replicating the status quo?

    PubMed

    Rouse, Cecilia Elena; Barrow, Lisa

    2006-01-01

    Although education pays off handsomely in the United States, children from low-income families attain less education than children from more advantaged families. In this article, Cecilia Elena Rouse and Lisa Barrow investigate why family background is so strongly linked to education. The authors show that family socioeconomic status affects such educational outcomes as test scores, grade retention, and high school graduation, and that educational attainment strongly affects adult earnings. They then go on to ask why children from more advantaged families get more or better schooling than those from less advantaged families. For low-income students, greater psychological costs, the cost of forgone income (continuing in school instead of getting a job), and borrowing costs all help to explain why these students attain less education than more privileged children. And these income-related differences in costs may themselves be driven by differences in access to quality schools. As a result, U.S. public schools tend to reinforce the transmission of low socioeconomic status from parents to children. Policy interventions aimed at improving school quality for children from disadvantaged families thus have the potential to increase social mobility. Despite the considerable political attention paid to increasing school accountability, as in the No Child Left Behind Act, along with charter schools and vouchers to help the children of poor families attend private school, to date the best evidence suggests that such programs will improve student achievement only modestly. Based on the best research evidence, smaller class sizes seem to be one promising avenue for improving school quality for disadvantaged students. High teacher quality is also likely to be important. However, advantaged families, by spending more money on education outside school, can and will partly undo policy attempts to equalize school quality for poor and nonpoor children.

  20. PREFACE: XX International School on Nuclear Physics, Neutron Physics and Applications (Varna2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoyanov, Chavdar; Dimitrova, Sevdalina

    2014-09-01

    nuclear waste treatment. Nuclear methods for applications. A special session in honor of the late Mario Stoitsov, was also part of the program. Many colleagues of Mario from all over the world came to Varna to pay tribute to this prominent scientist and loyal friend. Several colleagues contributed to the organization of the School. We would like to thank them and especially the Scientific Secretary of the School Dr Elena Stefanova and the members of the Organizing Committee Dr Dimitar Tarpanov and Peter Zivkov for their cordiality and high level assistance. We are also grateful to Dr Jacek Dobaczewski, who reached out to the collaborators of Mario Stoitsov on behalf of the conference. Sofia, 20 March 2014 Co-chair persons of the Organizing Committee Prof Dr Sc Ch Stoyanov Prof Dr Sc S Dimitrova Details of the committees are available in the PDF.

  1. PREFACE: XIX International School on Nuclear Physics, Neutron Physics and Applications (VARNA 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoyanov, Chavdar; Dimitrova, Sevdalina; Voronov, Victor

    2012-05-01

    to give our thanks to them, especially to the Scientific Secretary of the School, Dr Elena Stefanova, and to Dr Dimitar Tarpanov and the members of the Organizing Committee for their cordiality and high level assistance. Sofia, 12 March 2012 Co-chairpersons of the Organizing Committee Professor Dr Sc Ch Stoyanov Professor Dr Sc S Dimitrova Conference photograph The PDF also contains details of the Conference Organizers and Committees.

  2. Specificity of Cs-137 redistribution in toposequence of arable soils cultivated after the Chernobyl accident

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korobova, Elena; Romanov, Sergey; Baranchukov, Vladimir; Berezkin, Victor; Moiseenko, Fedor; Kirov, Sergey

    2017-04-01

    structure of geochemical fields and modeling of the geochemical field //Chemometrics and Intelligent Laboratory Systems, 99, 1-8. Korobova, E., Romanov S., 2011. Experience of mapping spatial structure of Cs-137 in natural landscape and patterns of its distribution in soil toposequence // Journal of Geochemical Exploration, 109, 1-3, 139-145. Korobova Elena, Sergey Romanov, Vladimir Samsonov, Fedor Moiseenko, 2008. Peculiarities of spatial structure of 137Cs contamination field in landscape toposequence: regularities in geo-field structure. Proceedings of the International Conference on Radioecology and Environmental Radioactivity, 15-20 June 2008, Bergen, Norway, Part 2, 182-186.

  3. Chicxulub Impact, Yucatan Carbonate Platform, Cretaceous-Paleogene Boundary and Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fucugauchi, J. U.; Perez-Cruz, L. L.

    2015-12-01

    Chicxulub formed 66 Ma ago by an asteroid impact on the Yucatan carbonate platform, southern Gulf of Mexico. Impact produced a 200 km diameter crater, platform fracturing, deformation and ejecta emplacement. Carbonate sedimentation restarted and crater was covered by up to 1 km of sediments. Drilling programs have sampled the Paleogene sediments, which record the changing sedimentation processes in the impact basin and platform. Here, results of a study of the Paleocene-Eocene sediments cored in the Santa Elena borehole are used to characterize the K/Pg and PETM. The borehole reached a depth of 504 m and was continuously cored, sampling the post-impact sediments and impact breccias, with contact at 332 m. For this study, we analyzed the section from ~230 to ~340 m, corresponding to the upper breccias and Paleocene-Eocene sediments. The lithological column, constructed from macroscopic and thin-section petrographic analyses, is composed of limestones and dolomitized limestones with several thin clay layers. Breccias are melt and basement clast rich, described as a suevitic unit. Section is further investigated using paleomagnetic, rock magnetic, X-ray fluorescence geochemical and stable isotope analyses. Magnetic polarities define a sequence of reverse to normal, which correlate to the geomagnetic polarity time scale from chrons 29r to 26r. The d13 C values in the first 20 m interval range from 1.2 to 3.5 %0 and d18 O values range from -1.4 to -4.8 %0. Isotope values show variation trends that correlate with the marine carbon and oxygen isotope patterns for the K-Pg boundary and early Paleocene. Positive carbon isotopes suggest relatively high productivity, with apparent recovery following the K-Pg extinction event. Geochemical data define characteristic trends, with Si decreasing gradually from high values in the suevites, low contents in Paleocene sediments with intervals of higher variability and then increased values likely marking the PETM. Variation trends are

  4. List of Participants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bombaci, I.; Covello, A.; Marcucci, L. E.; Rosati, S.

    2009-07-01

    Armani Paolo (Università di Trento) Benhar Omar (INFN Roma) Bombaci Ignazio (Università di Pisa) Bonanno Luca (Università di Ferrara) Catara Francesco (Università di Catania) Cò Giampaolo (Università di Lecce) Colonna Maria (Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, INFN Catania) Colonna Nicola (INFN Bari) Conti Francesco (Università di Pavia) Coraggio Luigi (INFN Napoli) Covello Aldo (Università di Napoli) Cristoforetti Marco (Technische Universität München, Germania) Cuofano Carmine (Università di Ferrara) Di Toro Massimo (Università di Catania) Drago Alessandro (Università di Ferrara) Faccioli Pietro (Università di Trento) Farina Nicola (INFN Roma) Finelli Paolo (Università di Bologna) Fiorentini Giovanni (Università di Ferrara) Fortunato Lorenzo (Università di Padova) Gambacurta Danilo (Università di Catania) Gandolfi Stefano (Università di Trento) Gargano Angela (INFN Napoli) Giannini Mauro (Università di Genova) Girlanda Luca (INFN Pisa) Giusti Carlotta (INFN Pavia) Illarionov Alexei (SISSA Trieste) Itaco Nunzio (Università di Napoli) Kievsky Alejandro (INFN Pisa) Lanza Edoardo (INFN Catania) Leidemann Winfried (Università di Trento) Lenzi Silvia (Università di Padova) Lipparini Enrico (Università di Trento) Lissia Marcello (Università di Cagliari) Lo Iudice Nicola (Università di Napoli) Maieron Chiara (Università di Lecce) Marcucci Laura Elisa (Università di Pisa) Matera Francesco (Università di Firenze) Millo Raffaele (Università di Trento) Orlandini Giuseppina (Università di Trento) Pacati Franco (Università di Pavia) Pastore Alessandro (Univeristy of Jyväskylä, Finlandia) Pederiva Francesco (Università di Trento) Pisent Gualtiero (Università di Padova) Prete Gianfranco (INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro) Quarati Piero (Politecnico di Torino) Rosati Sergio (Università di Pisa) Salmè Giovanni (INFN Roma) Santopinto Elena (INFN Genova) Traini Marco (Università di Trento) Vigezzi Enrico (INFN Milano) Vitturi Andrea (Universit

  5. PREFACE: 12th Conference on ''Theoretical Nuclear Physics in Italy''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bombaci, I.; Covello, A.; Marcucci, L. E.; Rosati, S.

    2009-07-01

    These Proceedings contain the invited and contributed papers presented at the 12th Conference on Theoretical Nuclear Physics in Italy held in Cortona, Italy, from 8-10 October 2008. As usual, the meeting was held at il Palazzone, a 16th century castle owned by the Scuola Normale Superiore di Pisa. The aim of this biennal conference is to bring together Italian theorists working in various fields of Nuclear Physics to discuss their latest results and confront their points of view in a lively and informal way. This offers the opportunity to promote collaborations between different groups. There were about 50 participants at the conference, coming from 14 Italian Universities (Cagliari, Catania, Ferrara, Firenze, Genova, Lecce, Milano, Napoli, Padova, Pavia, Pisa, Roma, Trento, Trieste). The program of the conference, prepared by the Organizing Committee (Ignazio Bombaci, Aldo Covello, Laura Elisa Marcucci and Sergio Rosati) focused on six main topics: Few-Nucleon Systems, Nuclear Matter and Nuclear Dynamics, Nuclear Astrophysics, Structure of Hadrons and Hadronic Matter, Nuclear Structure, Nuclear Physics with Electroweak Probes. Winfried Leidemann, Maria Colonna, Marcello Lissia, Elena Santopinto, Silvia Lenzi and Omar Benhar took the burden of giving general talks on these topics and reviewing the research activities of the various Italian groups. In addition, 19 contributed papers were presented, most of them by young participants. In the last session of the Conference there were two invited talks related to experimental activities of great current interest. Gianfranco Prete from the Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro spoke about the Italian radioactive ion beam facility SPES and the status of the European project EURISOL, while Nicola Colonna from the INFN, Bari, gave an overview of the perspectives of development of fourth-generation nuclear reactors. We would like to thank the authors of the general reports for their hard work in reviewing the main achievements in

  6. Water Management for Competing Uses: Environmental Flows in the Transboundary Rio Grande/Rio Bravo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandoval Solis, S.; McKinney, D. C.

    2011-12-01

    Introduction Due to high water demand, the scarcity of water, and the complexity of water allocation, environmental flows have not been considered as an integral part of the water management in the Rio Grande/Rio Bravo transboundary basin. The Big Bend reach is located between the cities of Presidio/Ojinaga to Amistad international reservoir, along the main stream (Fig. 1). Important environmental habitats such as the Big Bend National and State Park in the U.S., the Maderas del Carmen, Cañon de Santa Elena and Ocampo natural reserved areas in Mexico are ecologically threatened because of the lack of environmental water management policies. Several efforts have been undertaken by scientists, government agencies and NGOs to determine the environmental flows for this reach and water management policies that can provide these flows. Objective The objective of this research is to describe a water management policy that can conciliate environmental and human water uses in the Big Bend region. In other words, define a policy that can provide environmental flows without harming water supply for stakeholders or increasing flood risk, within legal and physical constraints of the system. Methodology First, the system was characterized identifying water users, hydraulic infrastructure, and water allocation according to state, federal and international regulations. Second, a hydrograph for environmental flows was proposed that mimics the hydrologic characteristics of the prior dam alteration. Third, a water planning model was constructed to evaluate alternative policies. Fourth, the water management is proposed to provide environmental restoration flows from Luis L. Leon reservoir. This policy considers mechanisms that reduce flooding and drought risks, while meting national and international water regulations. Results Three types of natural flow regimes are considered: (1) median flows aimed to provide the base flow in the region, (2) high flows to provide transversal

  7. Learning from Expert Elicitation in Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, M. G.

    2009-12-01

    Since the early 1990's the author has been involved in the design and execution of six detailed expert elicitations that, among other things, have obtained subjective judgments from experts that reflect their best judgment in the form of subjective probability density functions, about the value of key climate variables, climate impacts and a technology for mitigation (Morgan and Keith, 1995; Morgan Pitelka and Shevliakova, 2001; Morgan, Adams and Keith, 2006; Zickfeld et al, 2007; Curtright, Morgan and Keith, 2008; Zickfeld, Morgan Keith and Frame, in review). This paper builds on that experience to draw insights about the design and use of expert elicitation in the assessment and analysis of climate change and its impacts. Several trends in responses will be noted. Methodological pitfalls will be discussed. Comparisons will be drawn with the consensus-based methods employed by IPCC, which appear to have produced tighter uncertainty bounds than individual elicitation. The paper will close with thoughts on the possible use of expert elicitation in future IPCC assessments. Support for this work is from the Climate Decision Making Center through a cooperative agreement between the National Science Foundation (SES-0345798) and Carnegie Mellon University. References: M. Granger Morgan and David Keith, "Subjective Judgments by Climate Experts," Environmental Science & Technology, 29(10), 468A-476A, October 1995. M. Granger Morgan, Louis F. Pitelka and Elena Shevliakova, "Elicitation of Expert Judgments of Climate Change Impacts on Forest Ecosystems," Climatic Change, 49, 279-307, 2001. M. Granger Morgan, Peter Adams, and David W. Keith, "Elicitation of Expert Judgments of Aerosol Forcing," Climatic Change, 75, 195-214, 2006. Kirsten Zickfeld, Anders Levermann, Till Kuhlbrodt. Stefan Rahmstorf, M. Granger Morgan and David Keith, "Expert Judgements on the Response on the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation to Climate Change," Climatic Change, 82, 235-265, 2007

  8. Geochemical Constraints on the pre-Cenozoic Subduction History of two Margins of the Chortis Block (Northern Central America)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geldmacher, J.; Martens, U.; Hoernle, K.; Hauff, F.; Bogaard, P.; Kluegel, A.

    2007-12-01

    The igneous forearc basement along the Pacific coast of northern Central America (between southern Mexico and Costa Rica) comprises a highly tectonized accretionary assemblage of igneous and ultramafic rocks. Volcanic and gabbroic rocks with primitive arc geochemical signatures formed between ~100 and ~180 Ma and are interpreted to have originated by arc magmatism resulting from subduction of the Pacific/Farallon plate. Additionally, the forearc contains geochemically enriched ocean island basalt (OIB)-like units that are interpreted as accreted seamounts and islands of a 100 to ~220 Ma old hotspot track, which most likely originated from a long-extinct hotspot located in the Pacific. Based on their combined Pb, Nd, Hf isotopic compositions an affiliation of these isotopically strongly enriched rocks with the Caribbean Large Igneous Province or the Galápagos hotspot appears unlikely. Rocks of similar age and geochemistry are exposed in the Santa Elena Peninsula of Costa Rica, suggesting that the same type of forearc basement is accreted to the continental Chortis block all the way from southern Mexico to Costa Rica. In contrast, gabbroic rocks of the Motagua suture zone in central Guatemala (El Tambor accretionary complex) show depleted MORB signatures and have igneous ages of ~130Ma. These MOR Gabbros were accreted on the current northern margin of the Chortis block during subduction of proto-Caribbean crust. In contrast, geochemistry of gabbros and diorites of the Sierra de Santa Cruz (SSC) indicate medium to high K-series arc affinity and their Ar/Ar ages range from ~75 to 130 Ma. The SSC is interpreted as the western extension of the early Cuban arc that collided with the Maya block in the latest Cretaceous. Arc-derived volcanic clasts were subsequently shed into the Paleocene Sepur Formation of the Maya block. No evidence of accretion of OIB-like material was found in the Motagua suture or the SSC so far. These new data suggest that proto-Caribbean crust

  9. SUPPORT FOR THE CONFERENCE ''WOCE & BEYOND'' TO BE HELD NOVEMBER 2002

    SciTech Connect

    Nowlin, Worth, D., Jr., Distinguished Professor, Department of Oceanography, Texas A&M University

    2003-02-05

    OAK B188 We are proud to report that the WOCE and Beyond meeting was a tremendous success, garnering praise for its content and execution from federal agency representatives, international sponsors, the speakers, and the audience. The conference attracted 379 registered participants (total attendance was 401) from 22 countries; 319 posters were presented; and 30 oral presentations by distinguished researchers touched on all aspects of WOCE science.Particularly gratifying to the organizers was the active participation of 43 students from around the world. In addition to helping underwrite infrastructure costs related to the poster sessions, DOE's grant supported the travel and subsistence of 12 students and funded the awards for outstanding student posters (31 student posters were judged for three prizes of $500 each). Thus a strategic goal of the meeting-entraining young scientists into the WOCE research stream-was achieved with the help of DOE funding.Post-conference, the meeting' s website (http://www.woce2002.tamu.edu) was revamped to link to the plenary session presentations and poster abstracts. This website will be maintained until June of 2003. A copy of the meeting document, combining the program and poster abstracts will be sent to Dr. Anna Palmisano, DOE Scientific Officer.Recipients of travel support were: Mr Marcelo Barreiro, Texas A&M University Ms Elena Brambilla, Scripps Institution of Oceanography Ms Shuimin Chen, University of Hawaii Ms Meyre da Silva, Texas A&M University Ms Elizabeth Douglass, Scripps Institution of Oceanography Mr Shane Elipot, Scripps Institution of Oceanography Mr Joong-Tae Kim, Texas A&M University Mr Yueng-Djern Lenn, Scripps Institution of Oceanography's Nadja Lonnroth, Texas A&M University Mr Alvaro Montenegro, Florida State University Ms Sarah Zedler, Scripps Institution of Oceanography's Li Zhang, Texas A&M University Recipients of $500 Prizes for Outstanding Student Posters: Mr Geoffrey Gebbie, Massachusetts Institute

  10. PREFACE: IX International Conference on Modern Techniques of Plasma Diagnostics and their Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savjolov, A. S.; Dodulad, E. I.

    2016-01-01

    Ministry of Education and Science contract 02.•03.21.0005 of August 27th 2013). Papers selected by the Program Committee for publishing were reviewed under control of invited editors Prof. Andrey Kukushkin, Dr. Sci. Alexander Kukushkin, Dr. Sci. Elena Baronova, Dr. Emil Dodulad. We would like to thank heartily all of the speakers, participants and organizing committee members for their contribution to the conference

  11. Chemical gradients and progressive veining in a partly serpentinized harzburgite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarzenbach, Esther; Caddick, Mark; Beard, James; Bodnar, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Serpentinized ultramafic rocks constitute a major part of the oceanic lithosphere. They form when water interacts with olivine and pyroxene to produce a dense network of veins comprised of secondary minerals: Serpentine + brucite ± magnetite veins occur in olivine, Al-rich serpentine + talc veins occur in orthopyroxene, and Al-rich serpentine ± talc ± brucite veins occur at the boundary between orthopyroxene and olivine. Here, we present a detailed study on a harzburgite from the Santa Elena Ophiolite in Costa Rica that is ~30% serpentinized in order to provide new constraints on the effect of variable water (H2O) and silica (SiO2) activities on vein formation in peridotites. The studied sample records 1) mineralogical and chemical zonations in olivine-hosted veins that show a distinct pattern with increasing width of the veins (consumption of olivine), 2) varying brucite composition depending on whether or not it is associated with magnetite, and 3) chemical gradients in Si, Al, Cr, and Ca at the boundary between orthopyroxene- and olivine-hosted veins. These observed chemical variations suggest fluid mediated mass transport within and between orthopyroxene- and olivine-hosted veins. We use thermodynamic models to show that an increase in vein width and progressive evolution of olivine-hosted veins is accompanied by an increase in water-rock ratios. This is associated with the development of chemical gradients (e.g. gradients in water and silica activity) between the fluid-rich center of serpentine veins and the olivine grain boundaries as typically expressed by the abundance of brucite in the vein center and a dominance of serpentine at the boundary with olivine. The increase in water-rock ratios within the vein center also leads to the formation of magnetite from Fe-rich brucite ± Fe-rich serpentine. Mass transfer between vein core and vein rim may exist on the submicron-scale along grain boundaries of the finely intergrown serpentine-brucite mixture. We

  12. Element transport in veins during serpentinization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarzenbach, E. M.; Beard, J. S.; Caddick, M. J.

    2013-12-01

    Serpentinization of ultramafic rocks has wide ranging implications for the petrology, rheology, and petrophysical properties of the oceanic lithosphere. During hydration of the peridotite, fluid-rock ratios and temperature control mineral formation in the veins. We studied a partly serpentinized peridotite from the Santa Elena ophiolite complex in Costa Rica and tracked element mobility during water-rock interaction. Serpentinization of the studied harzburgite is around 30 to 40%, with serpentinization of olivine being more advanced than serpentinization of orthopyroxene. Element mapping and point analyses show that the veins preserve characteristic element distributions within orthopyroxene and olivine, and with distance to orthopyroxene-hosted serpentine veins. With increasing distance from the orthopyroxene the following vein assemblages were observed in olivine: pure serpentine veins, serpentine + brucite veins, serpentine + brucite + magnetite veins. Veins are enriched in SiO2 in the proximity of orthopyroxene suggesting that a net transfer of SiO2 takes place from serpentinizing orthopyroxene to olivine. The magnetite-bearing serpentine veins mostly consist of Mg-rich serpentine (Mg# = 90 - 95) and Fe-rich brucite (Mg# = 70 - 75) finely intergrown. In contrast, the center of these veins contains a thin zone of high-Mg serpentine (Mg# 97), and high-Mg brucite (Mg# 92 - 94) next to magnetite. We infer from thermodynamic calculations that these mineral assemblages are controlled by H2O activity and low SiO2 activities. Within orthopyroxene, serpentine (Mg# = 84 - 89) with an elevated Al2O3 content (< 4.14wt.%) was detected, but talc was absent, indicating net loss of SiO2 from orthopyroxene during serpentinization. CaO and Al2O3 migrate from orthopyroxene, but occur only as trace components in serpentine at > 100 μm and > 200 μm, respectively, from the orthopyroxene. We infer that brucite is not stable in close proximity to orthopyroxene due to elevated SiO2

  13. Nano-discs Destroy Cancer Cells

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-01

    magnetic-vortex microdiscs for targeted cancer-cell destruction, by Dong-Hyun Kim, Elena A. Rozhkova, Ilya V. Ulasov, Samuel D. Bader, Tijana Rajh, Maciej S. Lesniak & Valentyn Novosad. Nature Materials (cover story), vol. 9, pp. 165 171, February 2010. http://www.nature.com/nmat/journal/v9/n2/index.html

  14. Chordoma: clinical characteristics, management and prognosis of a case series of 25 patients

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Adequate surgery still remains the only curative treatment of chordoma. Interesting clinical data on advanced disease with molecularly targeted therapies were reported. Methods We described the clinical outcome of a series of chordoma patients followed at Regina Elena National Cancer Centre of Rome from 2004 to 2008. Results Twenty-five consecutive patients with sacral (11 patients), spine (13 patients), and skull base (1 patient) chordoma went to our observation. Six patients (24%) had primary disease, 14(56%) a recurrent disease, and 5(20%) a metastatic spreading. Surgery was the primary option for treatment in 22 out of 25 patients. Surgical margins were wide in 5 (23%) and intralesional in 17(77%) patients; 3 out of 4 in-house treated patients obtained wide margins. After first surgery, radiotherapy (protons or high-energy photons) were delivered to 3 patients. One out of the 5 patients with wide margins is still without evidence of disease at 20 months from surgery; 2 patients died without evidence of disease after 3 and 36 months from surgery. Sixteen out of 17 (94%) patients with intralesional margins underwent local progression at a median time of 18 months with a 2-year local progression-free survival of 47%. The 5-year metastasis-free survival rate was 78.3%. Seventeen patients with locally advanced and/or metastatic disease expressing platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) β were treated with imatinib mesylate. A RECIST stabilization of the disease was the best response observed in all treated cases. Pain relief with reduction in analgesics use was obtained in 6 out of 11 (54%) symptomatic patients. The 5- and 10-year survival rates of the entire series of patients were 76.7 and 59.7%, respectively. Conclusions Despite progress of surgical techniques and the results obtained with targeted therapy, more effort is needed for better disease control. Specific experience of the multidisciplinar therapeutic team is, however, essential to

  15. PREFACE: 8th Asian International Seminar on Atomic and Molecular Physics (AISAMP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Jim F.; Buckman, Steve; Bieske, Evan J.

    2009-09-01

    the Institute of Physics. The support from the IOPCS staff made this publication possible. The 8th AISAMP was sponsored primarily by the University of Western Australia and Curtin University of Technology, both in Perth, Western Australia, and by Journal of Physics: Conference Series. Support was also received from the International Council of Science, ICSU. Guidance and active participation from colleagues, particularly from the University of Western Australia, and Curtin University, and from the Australian National University and Melbourne University were sources of strength for the actual organization of the conference. Dr Elena Semidelova receives special thanks for her organizing abilities. We hope that this issue of Journal of Physics: Conference Series will be referenced widely and that it will strengthen ties between all scientists and their countries. Evan Bieske, Stephen Buckman and Jim F Williams Guest Editors

  16. Evolved massive stars in W33 and in GMC 23.3-0.3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messineo, Maria; Clark, J. Simon; Figer, Donald F.; Menten, Karl M.; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Najarro, Francisco; Rich, Michael; Ivanov, Valentin D.; Valenti, Elena; Trombley, Christine; Chen, Rosie; Davies, Ben; MacKenty, John W.

    2015-08-01

    We have conducted an infrared spectroscopic survey for massive evolved stars and/or clusters in the Galactic giant molecular clouds G23.3-0.3 and W33. A large number of extraordinary sub-clumps/clusters of massive stars were detected. The spatial and temporal distribution of these massive stars yields information on the star formation history of the clouds.In G23.3-0.3, we discovered a dozen massive O-type stars, one candidate luminous blue variable, and several red supergiants. The O-type stars have masses from 25 to 50 Msun and ages of 5-8 Myr, while the RSGs belong to a burst that occurred 20-30 Myr ago. Therefore, GMC G23.3-0.3 has had one of the longest known histories of star formation (20-30 Myr). GMC G23.3-0.3 is rich in HII regions and supernova remnants; we detected massive stars in the cores of SNR W41 and of SNR G22.7-0.2.In W33, we detected a few evolved O-type stars and one Wolf-Rayet star, but none of the late-type objects has the luminosity of a red supergiant. W33 is characterized by discrete sources and has had at least 3-5 Myr of star formation history, which is now propagating from west to east. While our detections of massive evolved stars in W33 are made on the west side of the cloud, several dense molecular cores that may harbor proto clusters have recently been detected on the east side of the cloud by Immer et al. (2014).Messineo, Maria; Menten, Karl M.; Figer, Donald F.; Davies, Ben; Clark, J. Simon; Ivanov, Valentin D.Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Rich, R. Michael; MacKenty, John W.; Trombley, Christine 2014A&A...569A..20MMessineo, Maria; Clark, J. Simon; Figer, Donald F.; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Francisco, Najarro; Rich, R. Michael; Menten, Karl M.; Ivanov, Valentin D.; Valenti, Elena; Trombley, Christine; Chen, C.H. Rosie; Davies, Ben; submitted to ApJ.

  17. The dependence of the discharge of nitrous oxide by ordinary chernozem steppe of the Central-Chernozem Region of Russia from the content of humus, nitrogen and enzymatic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avksentev, Alexey; Negrobova, Elena; Kramareva, Tatiana; Moiseeva, Evgenya

    2016-04-01

    The dependence of the discharge of nitrous oxide by ordinary chernozem steppe of the Central-Chernozem Region of Russia from the content of humus, nitrogen and enzymatic activity Alexey Avksentev, Elena Negrobova, Tatiana Kramareva, Evgenya Moiseeva 394000 Voronezh, Universitetskaya square, 1 Voronezh State University Nitrous oxide is emitted by soil as a result of microbiological processes, ranks third in the list of aggressive greenhouse gas after carbon dioxide and methane. Nitrous oxide is formed during nitrification and denitrification of ammonia that enters the soil during microbial decomposition of complex organic compounds. Denitrification can be direct and indirect. In the microbiological process of recovery of nitrates involved of the organic substance. In aerobic conditions microorganisms denitrificator behave like normal saprotrophs and oxidize organic matter in the act of breathing oxygen. Thus, they operate at different times two enzyme systems: the electron transport chain with an oxygen acceptor in aerobic and restoration of nitrates under anaerobic conditions. Investigation of the emission of nitrous oxide by ordinary Chernozem steppe of the Central-Chernozem Region showed that it depends on the type of cenosis and the content of available forms of nitrogen. Natural ecosystems emit nitrous oxide more than the soil of arable land. The dependence of the emission of nitrous oxide from the humus content shows positive trend, but the aggregation of data, significant differences are not detected. Research shows that nitrous oxide emissions are seasonal. So the autumn season is characterized by nitrous oxide emissions than spring. Enzymatic processes are an important link in the biological cycle of elements and, consequently, participate in the process of decomposition of organic matter, nitrification and other processes. Analysis of the data on enzyme activity of ordinary Chernozem and the intensity of emission of N20 shows a clear relationship between

  18. PREFACE: INERA Workshop: Transition Metal Oxide Thin Films-functional Layers in "Smart windows" and Water Splitting Devices. Parallel session of the 18th International School on Condensed Matter Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-11-01

    The Special issue presents the papers for the INERA Workshop entitled "Transition Metal Oxides as Functional Layers in Smart windows and Water Splitting Devices", which was held in Varna, St. Konstantin and Elena, Bulgaria, from the 4th-6th September 2014. The Workshop is organized within the context of the INERA "Research and Innovation Capacity Strengthening of ISSP-BAS in Multifunctional Nanostructures", FP7 Project REGPOT 316309 program, European project of the Institute of Solid State Physics at the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences. There were 42 participants at the workshop, 16 from Sweden, Germany, Romania and Hungary, 11 invited lecturers, and 28 young participants. There were researchers present from prestigious European laboratories which are leaders in the field of transition metal oxide thin film technologies. The event contributed to training young researchers in innovative thin film technologies, as well as thin films characterization techniques. The topics of the Workshop cover the field of technology and investigation of thin oxide films as functional layers in "Smart windows" and "Water splitting" devices. The topics are related to the application of novel technologies for the preparation of transition metal oxide films and the modification of chromogenic properties towards the improvement of electrochromic and termochromic device parameters for possible industrial deployment. The Workshop addressed the following topics: Metal oxide films-functional layers in energy efficient devices; Photocatalysts and chemical sensing; Novel thin film technologies and applications; Methods of thin films characterizations; From the 37 abstracts sent, 21 manuscripts were written and later refereed. We appreciate the comments from all the referees, and we are grateful for their valuable contributions. Guest Editors: Assoc. Prof. Dr.Tatyana Ivanova Prof. DSc Kostadinka Gesheva Prof. DSc Hassan Chamatti Assoc. Prof. Dr. Georgi Popkirov Workshop Organizing Committee Prof

  19. Lower survival probabilities for adult Florida manatees in years with intense coastal storms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langtimm, C.A.; Beck, C.A.

    2003-01-01

    The endangered Florida manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris) inhabits the subtropical waters of the southeastern United States, where hurricanes are a regular occurrence. Using mark-resighting statistical models, we analyzed 19 years of photo-identification data and detected significant annual variation in adult survival for a subpopulation in northwest Florida where human impact is low. That variation coincided with years when intense hurricanes (Category 3 or greater on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale) and a major winter storm occurred in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Mean survival probability during years with no or low intensity storms was 0.972 (approximate 95% confidence interval = 0.961-0.980) but dropped to 0.936 (0.864-0.971) in 1985 with Hurricanes Elena, Kate, and Juan; to 0.909 (0.837-0.951) in 1993 with the March "Storm of the Century"; and to 0.817 (0.735-0.878) in 1995 with Hurricanes Opal, Erin, and Allison. These drops in survival probability were not catastrophic in magnitude and were detected because of the use of state-of-the-art statistical techniques and the quality of the data. Because individuals of this small population range extensively along the north Gulf coast of Florida, it was possible to resolve storm effects on a regional scale rather than the site-specific local scale common to studies of more sedentary species. This is the first empirical evidence in support of storm effects on manatee survival and suggests a cause-effect relationship. The decreases in survival could be due to direct mortality, indirect mortality, and/or emigration from the region as a consequence of storms. Future impacts to the population by a single catastrophic hurricane, or series of smaller hurricanes, could increase the probability of extinction. With the advent in 1995 of a new 25- to 50-yr cycle of greater hurricane activity, and longer term change possible with global climate change, it becomes all the more important to reduce mortality and injury

  20. Hazards in determination and extrapolation of depositional rates of recent sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Isphording, W.C. . Dept. of Geology-Geography); Jackson, R.B. )

    1992-01-01

    Calculation of depositional rates for the past 250 years in estuarine sediments at sites in the Gulf of Mexico have been carried out by measuring changes that have taken place on bathymetric charts. Depositional rates during the past 50 to 100 years can similarly be estimated by this method and may be often confirmed by relatively abrupt changes at depth in the content of certain heavy metals in core samples. Analysis of bathymetric charts of Mobile Bay, Alabama, dating back to 1858, disclosed an essentially constant sedimentation rate of 3.9 mm/year. Apalachicola Bay, Florida, similarly, was found to have a rate of 5.4 mm/year. Though, in theory, these rates should provide reliable estimates of the influx of sediment into the estuaries, considerable caution must be used in attempting to extrapolate them to any depth in core samples. The passage of hurricanes in the Gulf of Mexico is a common event and can rapidly, and markedly, alter the bathymetry of an estuary. The passage of Hurricane Elena near Apalachicola Bay in 1985, for example, removed over 84 million tons of sediment from the bay and caused an average deepening of nearly 50 cm. The impact of Hurricane Frederick on Mobile Bay in 1979 was more dramatic. During the approximate 7 hour period when winds from this storm impacted the estuary, nearly 290 million tons of sediment was driven out of the bay and an average deepening of 46 cm was observed. With such weather events common in the Gulf Coast, it is not surprising that when radioactive age dating methods were used to obtain dates of approximately 7,500 years for organic remains in cores from Apalachicola Bay, that the depths at which the dated materials were obtained in the cores corresponded to depositional rates of only 0.4 mm/year, or one-tenth that obtained from historic bathymetric data. Because storm scour effects are a common occurrence in the Gulf, no attempt should be made to extrapolate bathymetric-derived rates to beyond the age of the charts.

  1. Evolution of Fractal Parameters through Development Stage of Soil Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ospina, Abelardo; Florentino, Adriana; Tarquis, Ana Maria

    2016-04-01

    ). REFERENCES Karperien, A. (2013). FracLac for ImageJ. Méndoza, B., Florentino, A., Hernández-Hernández, R.M., Aciego, J., Torres, D. and Vera, Elena. (2013). Biological attributes of two Quibor soils with addition of organic fertilizer and salt solutions. Revista Mexicana de Ciencias Agrícolas, 4(3), 409-421. Ospina, Abelardo, Adriana Florentino and Ana M. Tarquis (2015) Spatial Pattern of Biological Soil Crust with Fractal Geometry. Geophysical Research Abstracts, 17, EGU2015-15415-1 Toledo, V. and Florentino, A. (2009). The Microbiotic Crust On Soil. Revista de Investigación N° 68(33), 199-216.

  2. Nitrogen washout/washin, helium dilution and computed tomography in the assessment of end expiratory lung volume

    PubMed Central

    Chiumello, Davide; Cressoni, Massimo; Chierichetti, Monica; Tallarini, Federica; Botticelli, Marco; Berto, Virna; Mietto, Cristina; Gattinoni, Luciano

    2008-01-01

    Introduction End expiratory lung volume (EELV) measurement in the clinical setting is routinely performed using the helium dilution technique. A ventilator that implements a simplified version of the nitrogen washout/washin technique is now available. We compared the EELV measured by spiral computed tomography (CT) taken as gold standard with the lung volume measured with the modified nitrogen washout/washin and with the helium dilution technique. Methods Patients admitted to the general intensive care unit of Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico Mangiagalli Regina Elena requiring ventilatory support and, for clinical reasons, thoracic CT scanning were enrolled in this study. We performed two EELV measurements with the modified nitrogen washout/washin technique (increasing and decreasing inspired oxygen fraction (FiO2) by 10%), one EELV measurement with the helium dilution technique and a CT scan. All measurements were taken at 5 cmH2O airway pressure. Each CT scan slice was manually delineated and gas volume was computed with custom-made software. Results Thirty patients were enrolled (age = 66 +/- 10 years, body mass index = 26 +/- 18 Kg/m2, male/female ratio = 21/9, partial arterial pressure of carbon dioxide (PaO2)/FiO2 = 190 +/- 71). The EELV measured with the modified nitrogen washout/washin technique showed a very good correlation (r2 = 0.89) with the data computed from the CT with a bias of 94 +/- 143 ml (15 +/- 18%, p = 0.001), within the limits of accuracy declared by the manufacturer (20%). The bias was shown to be highly reproducible, either decreasing or increasing the FiO2 being 117+/-170 and 70+/-160 ml (p = 0.27), respectively. The EELV measured with the helium dilution method showed a good correlation with the CT scan data (r2 = 0.91) with a negative bias of 136 +/- 133 ml, and appeared to be more correct at low lung volumes. Conclusions The EELV measurement with the helium dilution technique (at low volumes) and modified nitrogen washout/washin technique

  3. Teen theaters grapple with issues.

    PubMed

    Pugni, J L

    1984-01-01

    ). It grew out of the belief that improvisational drama, by permitting teens to portray their conflicts, is a more creative educational tool than a lecture series by adult professionals. YET productions deal with teen pregnancy, parenting, sexual responsibility, and decision making, alcohol and drug abuse, birth control, homosexuality, divorce, abortion, suicide, and sex-role stereotyping. In Dallas, Texas, Elena Love and Jim Roderick established the Teen Perspective Theater (TPT) as an arm of the Planned Parenthood of Greater Dalls education program. An acting company of 11 students aged 13-18 was drawn from public and private schools. Rehearsals began the end of July and included educational sessions as well as performance skill workshops. The presentation follows the format established by other Planned Parenthood theater groups: brief improvisational skits, in-character exchange with the audience, and personal exchange with the audience.

  4. Land sliding in the area of the town of Ocna Mures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pop, Elena

    2013-04-01

    order to urgently stop the landslide phenomena. Mrs. Elena Pop, Science teacher at"Lucian Blaga" Secondary School, from Ocna Mures,Romania

  5. Structure of Suasselkä Postglacial Fault in northern Finland obtained by analysis of ambient seismic noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afonin, Nikita; Kozlovskaya, Elena

    2016-04-01

    the SPGF corresponds to a narrow region of low S-wave velocities surrounded by rocks with high S-wave velocities. We interpret this low velocity region as a non-healed mechanically weak fault damage zone (FDZ) remained after the last major earthquake that occurred after the last glaciation. Seismic instruments for the DAFNE/FINLAND experiment were provided by the institute of Seismology of the University of Helsinki and by the Sodankylä Geophysical Observatory. The study was partly funded by Posiva Oy and Geological Survey of Finland. DAFNE/FINLAND Working Group: Ilmo Kukkonen Pekka Heikkinen Kari Komminaho Elena Kozlovskaya Riitta Hurskainen Tero Raita Hanna Silvennoinen

  6. PREFACE: XIV Mexican School on Particles and Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashir, Adnan; Contreras, Guillermo; Raya, Alfredo; Tejeda-Yeomans, Maria Elena

    2011-03-01

    de Física de Altas Energías. At a personal level, we are very grateful to Dr Juan Carlos D'Olivo (President of the Red Nacional de Física de Altas Energías), Dr Pedro Mata Vázquez (Director of COECyT), Dr Ricardo Becerril Bárcenas (Director of the Institute of Physics and Mathematics, UMSNH), Dr Rigoberto Vera Mendoza (Director of the Faculty of Science, UMSNH) and Dr José Napoleón Guzmán Ávila (Coordinator of Scientific Research, UMSNH) for their invaluable support in all organizational matters, which enabled the school to become a reality. We gratefully acknowledge the help of our colleagues in the organizing committee: Alexis Aguilar, Alejandro Ayala, Wolfgang Bietenholz, Alberto Güijosa, Gabriela Murguía, Sarira Sahu (UNAM), Eduard de la Cruz Burelo, Abdel Pérez-Lorenzana (CINVESTAV), Elena Cáceres (UCOL), David Delepine (UG), Mariana Kirchbach (UASLP), Ildefonso León (UAS), Juan Carlos Arteaga-Velázquez (for his impeccable work in managing the web page of the school) and Víctor Villanueva (UMSNH). Most of them contributed to the extra work involved in refereeing the contributions submitted for this publication. Many thanks also go to all the student volunteers for the efficiency and dedication with which they carried out their duties. At the registration desk, we relied on the hard work of Xiomara Gutiérrez, Enif Gutiérrez (UMSNH) and Mara Diaz Pancardo. Several post docs and PhD students provided invaluable support in all organizational matters: Adolfo Huet, Cliffor Compeán, Rocío Bermúdez, Saúl Sánchez, Anabel Trejo, Iraís Rubalcava, Khépani Raya, José Juan González, Saúl Hernández Ortiz (UMSNH), Alfredo Galaviz, and Alan Aganza (USON). Their help in carrying out the organization of the school was essential and without their collaboration, this school would not have been the same. We also acknowledge the help of the administrative secretary Maria Esperanza Jaramillo of IFM (UMSNH). We would like to take this opportunity to thank

  7. The Chicxulub Multiring Impact Crater and the Cretaceous/Paleogene Boundary: Results From Geophysical Surveys and Drilling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urrutia-Fucugauchi, J.; Perez-Cruz, Ligia

    2010-03-01

    different geophysical aerial, land and marine methods including gravity, magnetics, electromagnetics and seismic refraction and reflection. The impact lithologies and carbonate sequence have been cored as part of several drilling projects. Here we analyze the stratigraphy of Chicxulub from borehole logging data and core analyses, with particular reference to studies on CSDP Yaxcopoil-1 and UNAM Santa Elena boreholes. Analyses of core samples have examined the stratigraphy of the cover carbonate sequence, impact breccia contact and implications for impact age, K/Pg global correlations and paleoenvironmental conditions following impact. The K/Pg age for Chicxulub has been supported from different studies, including Ar/Ar dating, magnetic polarity stratigraphy, geochemistry and biostratigraphy. A Late Maastrichtian age has also been proposed for Chicxulub from studies in Yaxcopoil-1 basal Paleocene carbonates, with impact occurring 300 ka earlier predating the K/Pg boundary. This proposal calls attention to the temporal resolution of stratigraphic and chronological methods, and the need for further detailed analyses of the basal carbonate sections in existing boreholes and new drilling/coring projects. Stratigraphy of impact ejecta and basal sediments in Yaxcopoil-1 and UNAM boreholes indicates a hiatus in the basal sequence. Modeling of post- impact processes suggest erosion effects due to seawater back surge, block slumping and partial rim collapse of post-impact crater modification. Analyses of stable isotopes and magnetostratigraphic data for the Paleocene carbonate sequences in Yaxcopoil-1 and Santa Elena boreholes permit to investigate the post- impact processes, depositional conditions and age of basal sediments. Correlation of stable isotopes with the global pattern for marine carbonate sediments provides a stratigraphic framework for the basal Paleocene carbonates. The analyses confirm a K/Pg boundary age for the Chicxulub impact. References: Collins et al, 2008

  8. Long-lasting but Dim Brethren of Cosmic Flashes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-08-01

    Astronomers, using ESO's Very Large Telescope, have for the first time made the link between an X-ray flash and a supernova. Such flashes are the little siblings of gamma-ray bursts (GRB) and this discovery suggests the existence of a population of events less luminous than 'classical' GRBs, but possibly much more numerous. "This extends the GRB-supernova connection to X-ray flashes and fainter supernovae, implying a common origin," said Elena Pian, (INAF, Italy), lead-author of one of the four papers related to this event appearing in the 31 August issue of Nature. The event began on 18 February 2006: the NASA/PPARC/ASI Swift satellite detected an unusual gamma-ray burst, about 25 times closer and 100 times longer than the typical gamma-ray burst. GRBs release in a few seconds more energy than that of the Sun during its entire lifetime of more than 10,000 million years. The GRBs are thus the most powerful events since the Big Bang known in the Universe. ESO PR Photo 33/06 ESO PR Photo 33/06 The Field around SN2006aj The explosion, called GRB 060218 after the date it was discovered, originated in a star-forming galaxy about 440 million light-years away toward the constellation Aries. This is the second-closest gamma-ray burst ever detected. Moreover, the burst of gamma rays lasted for nearly 2,000 seconds; most bursts last a few milliseconds to tens of seconds. The explosion was surprisingly dim, however. A team of astronomers has found hints of a budding supernova. Using, among others, ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) in Chile, the scientists have watched the afterglow of this burst grow brighter in optical light. This brightening, along with other telltale spectral characteristics in the light, strongly suggests that a supernova was unfolding. Within days, the supernova became apparent. The observations with the VLT started on 21 February 2006, just three days after the discovery. Spectroscopy was then performed nearly daily for seventeen days, providing the

  9. Tanque Loma, a new late-Pleistocene megafaunal tar seep locality from southwest Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsey, Emily L.; Lopez R., Eric X.

    2015-01-01

    Fossil deposits in the petroleum-rich sediments of the Santa Elena Peninsula in southwestern Ecuador contain some of the largest and best-preserved assemblages of Pleistocene megafaunal remains known from the neotropics, and thus represent an opportunity to greatly expand our knowledge of Pleistocene paleoecology and the extinction of Quaternary megafauna in this region. This paper reports data from excavations at Tanque Loma, a late-Pleistocene locality on the Santa Elena Peninsula that preserves a dense assemblage of megafaunal remains in hydrocarbon-saturated sediments along with microfaunal and paleobotanical material. The megafauna bones are concentrated in and just above a ˜0.5 m thick asphaltic layer, but occur sparsely and with poorer preservation up to 1 m above this deposit. Several meters of presumed-Holocene sediments overlying the megafauna-bearing strata are rich in bones of microvertebrates including birds, squamates, and rodents. These are interpreted as raptor assemblages. While over 1000 megafaunal bones have been identified from the Pleistocene strata at Tanque Loma, more than 85% of these remains pertain to a single species, the giant ground sloth Eremotherium laurillardi. Only five other megafauna taxa have been identified from this site, including Glossotherium cf. tropicorum, Holmesina occidentalis, cf. Notiomastodon platensis, Equus (Amerhippus) c.f. santaeelenae, and a cervid tentatively assigned to cf. Odocoileus salinae based on body size and geography. No carnivores have yet been identified from Tanque Loma, and microvertebrate remains are extremely rare in the Pleistocene deposits, although terrestrial snail shells and fragmented remains of marine invertebrates are occasionally encountered. Accelerator Mass Spectrometry radiocarbon dates on Eremotherium and cf. Notiomaston bones from within and just above the asphaltic layer yielded dates of ˜17,000 - 23,500 radiocarbon years BP. Taken together, the taxonomic composition, taphonomy

  10. PREFACE: Eclipse on the Coral Sea: Cycle 24 Ascending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cally, Paul; Erdélyi, Robert; Norton

    2013-06-01

    Cycle 24 thus far from Sarbani Basu. Other invited papers presented here include an appreciation of Hinode's view of solar activity as the cycle rises by Toshifumi Shimizu; a first taxonomy of magnetic tornadoes and chromospheric swirls by Sven Wedemeyer {\\it et al}; an analysis of Hinode/EIS observations of transient heating events; a timely re-examination of solar dynamo theory by Paul Charbonneau; an exciting teaser for the solar potential of the Murchison Widefield Array now operating in Western Australia by Steven Tingay {\\it et al}; an overview and critique of the state of nonlinear force-free magnetic field extrapolation theory and practice by Mike Wheatland and Stuart Gilchrist; and a masterful review of atmospheric MHD wave coupling to the Sun's internal p-mode oscillations by Elena Khomenko and Irantzu Calvo Santamaria. The many contributed papers published here are no less exciting. All papers have been refereed to a high standard. The editors thank all the referees, drawn both from conference attendees and the wider community, who have taken their tasks very seriously and provided very detailed and helpful reports. Nearly all contributions have been substantially improved by the process. We must also thank our financial sponsors. Both the Global Oscillations Network Group (GONG) and LWS/SDO were generous in their support, as were the School of Mathematical Sciences and the Monash Centre for Astrophysics (MoCA) at Monash University, Melbourne, and the Centre for Astronomy at James Cook University, Townsville. The Local Organizing Committee and the many students who assisted before and during the conference also deserve high praise for facilitating such a memorable meeting. Paul Cally, Robert Erdélyi and Aimee Norton Conference photograph

  11. Marine biodiversity baseline for Área de Conservación Guanacaste, Costa Rica: published records

    PubMed Central

    Cortés, Jorge

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The diversity of tropical marine organisms has not been studied as intensively as the terrestrial biota worldwide. Additionally, marine biodiversity research in the tropics lags behind other regions. The 43,000 ha Sector Marino of Área de Conservación Guanacaste (ACG, Marine Sector of Guanacaste Conservation Area), on the North Pacific coast of Costa Rica is no exception. For more than four decades, the terrestrial flora and fauna has been studied continuously. The ACG marine biodiversity was studied in the 1930’s by expeditions that passed through the area, but not much until the 1990’s, except for the marine turtles. In the mid 1990’s the Center for Research in Marine Science and Limnology (CIMAR) of the Universidad de Costa Rica (UCR) initiated the exploration of the marine environments and organisms of ACG. In 2015, ACG, in collaboration with CIMAR, started the BioMar project whose goal is to inventory the species of the marine sector of ACG (BioMar ACG project). As a baseline, here I have compiled the published records of marine ACG species, and found that 594 marine species have been reported, representing 15.5% of the known species of the Pacific coast of Costa Rica. The most diverse groups were the crustaceans, mollusks and cnidarians comprising 71.7% of the ACG species. Some taxa, such as mangroves and fish parasites are well represented in ACG when compared to the rest of the Costa Rican coast but others appear to be greatly underrepresented, for example, red algae, polychaetes, copepods, equinoderms, and marine fishes and birds, which could be due to sampling bias. Thirty species have been originally described with specimens from ACG, and 89 species are not known from other localities on the Pacific coast of Costa Rica except ACG. Most of the sampling has been concentrated in a few localities in Sector Marino, Playa Blanca and Islas Murciélago, and in the nearby waters of Bahía Santa Elena. In an effort to fill this gap, CIMAR is

  12. Cytomegalovirus reactivation after autologous stem cell transplantation in myeloma and lymphoma patients: A single-center study

    PubMed Central

    Marchesi, Francesco; Pimpinelli, Fulvia; Gumenyuk, Svitlana; Renzi, Daniela; Palombi, Francesca; Pisani, Francesco; Romano, Atelda; Spadea, Antonio; Papa, Elena; Canfora, Marco; Ensoli, Fabrizio; Mengarelli, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine the incidence of and the risk factors for cytomegalovirus (CMV) symptomatic infection and end-organ disease after autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT). METHODS: A total of 327 consecutive non CD34+ selected autografts performed from the Hematology and Stem Cell Transplantation Unit of Regina Elena National Cancer Institute of Rome (Italy) in the period comprised between January 2003 to January 2015, were reviewed. Over the 327 autografts, 201 were performed in patients with multiple myeloma, whereas the remaining 126 in patients affected by non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma and Hodgkin’s lymphoma. The patients who underwent an ASCT for an acute leukemia (n = 20) in the same period were excluded from this analysis. CMV DNA load in the blood has been determined by polymerase-chain reaction in the case of a clinical suspicion of reactivation, therefore, no routine monitoring strategy was adopted. In the presence of signs and symptoms of CMV reactivation an antiviral treatment was performed. RESULTS: Overall, 36 patients (11%) required a specific antiviral treatment for a symptomatic CMV reactivation (n = 32) or an end-organ disease (n = 4). We observed 20 and 16 cases of CMV reactivation among lymphoma (16%) and myeloma patients (8%), respectively. Among cases of end-organ disease, 3 were diagnosed as interstitial pneumonia and one remaining case as hemorrhagic enteritis. All cases of CMV reactivation were observed in IgG seropositive patients, with no documented cases of primary CMV infection. All patients were treated with a specific antiviral therapy, with a global rate of hospitalization of 55%; four patients received intravenous immunoglobulins. Transplant-related mortality was significantly higher in patients who experienced a CMV reactivation (8.4% ± 4.7% vs 1.7% ± 0.8%; P = 0.047). In univariate analysis, a pre-transplant HBcIgG seropositivity, a diagnosis of T-cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma and higher median age at transplant were

  13. PREFACE: International Conference on Image Optimisation in Nuclear Medicine (OptiNM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christofides, Stelios; Parpottas, Yiannis

    2011-09-01

    research and results to more than 150 participants from 14 countries. During the conference, exhibitors presented medical equipment used in nuclear medicine. We gratefully acknowledge the financial support of the Cyprus Research Promotion Foundation, the European Regional Development Fund and the Cyprus Biomedical Research Foundation. Also, we appreciate the support of the various local sponsors listed in the conference programme. We would like to express our sincere thanks and gratitude to the organising committee, the scientific committee and the supporting professional organizations for the success of the conference. We also thank all of speakers for their excellent contributions, all the participants for their input, and the exhibitors for their valuable presentations. Special thanks go to Demetris Kaolis, Maria Christofidou, Isabelle Chrysanthou, Charalambos Yiannakkaras, Ourania Demetriadou, and Elena Christofidou for their invaluable contribution to the conference. The conference volume consists of 26 selected proceedings papers. We would like to thank all of the authors for their time and genuine efforts and the reviewers for their fruitful comments. The Conference Chairpersons Stelios Christofides and Yiannis Parpottas

  14. Low-Metallicity Star Formation: From the First Stars to Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Leslie K.; Madden, Suzanne C.; Schneider, Raffaella

    2008-12-01

    'Shea and Michael L. Norman; 16. Damped Lyα systems as probes of chemical evolution over cosmological timescales Miroslava Dessauges-Zavadsky; 17. Connecting high-redshift galaxy populations through observations of local damped Lyman alpha dwarf galaxies Regina E. Schulte-Ladbeck; 18. Chemical enrichment and feedback in low metallicity environments: constraints on galaxy formation Francesca Matteucci; 19. Effects of reionization on dwarf galaxy formation Massimo Ricotti; 20. The importance of following the evolution of the dust in galaxies on their SEDs A. Schurer, F. Calura, L. Silva, A. Pipino, G. L. Granato, F. Matteucci and R. Maiolino; 21. About the chemical evolution of dSphs (and the peculiar globular cluster ωCen) Andrea Marcolini and Annibale D'Ercole; 22. Young star clusters in the small Magellanic cloud: impact of local and global conditions on star formation Elena Sabbi, Linda J. Smith, Lynn R. Carlson, Antonella Nota, Monca Tosi, Michele Cignoni, Jay S. Gallagher III, Marco Sirianni and Margaret Meixner; 23. Modeling the ISM properties of metal-poor galaxies and gamma-ray burst hosts Emily M. Levesque, Lisa J. Kewley, Kirsten Larson and Leonie Snijders; 24. Dwarf galaxies and the magnetisation of the IGM Uli Klein; Session III. Explosive Events in Low-Metallicity Environments: 25. Supernovae and their evolution in a low metallicity ISM Roger A. Chevalier; 26. First stars - type Ib supernovae connection Ken'ichi Nomoto, Masaomi Tanaka, Yasuomi Kamiya, Nozomu Tominaga and Keiichi Maeda; 27. Supernova nucleosynthesis in the early universe Nozomu Tominaga, Hideyuki Umeda, Keiichi Maeda, Ken'ichi Nomoto and Nobuyuki Iwamoto; 28. Powerful explosions at Z = 0? Sylvia Ekström, Georges Meynet, Raphael Hirschi and André Maeder; 29. Wind anisotropy and stellar evolution Cyril Georgy, Georges Meynet and André Maeder; 30. Low-mass and metal-poor gamma-ray burst

  15. Low-metallicity Star Formation (IAU S255)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Leslie K.; Madden, Suzanne C.; Schneider, Raffaella

    2009-01-01

    'Shea and Michael L. Norman; 16. Damped Lyα systems as probes of chemical evolution over cosmological timescales Miroslava Dessauges-Zavadsky; 17. Connecting high-redshift galaxy populations through observations of local damped Lyman alpha dwarf galaxies Regina E. Schulte-Ladbeck; 18. Chemical enrichment and feedback in low metallicity environments: constraints on galaxy formation Francesca Matteucci; 19. Effects of reionization on dwarf galaxy formation Massimo Ricotti; 20. The importance of following the evolution of the dust in galaxies on their SEDs A. Schurer, F. Calura, L. Silva, A. Pipino, G. L. Granato, F. Matteucci and R. Maiolino; 21. About the chemical evolution of dSphs (and the peculiar globular cluster ωCen) Andrea Marcolini and Annibale D'Ercole; 22. Young star clusters in the small Magellanic cloud: impact of local and global conditions on star formation Elena Sabbi, Linda J. Smith, Lynn R. Carlson, Antonella Nota, Monca Tosi, Michele Cignoni, Jay S. Gallagher III, Marco Sirianni and Margaret Meixner; 23. Modeling the ISM properties of metal-poor galaxies and gamma-ray burst hosts Emily M. Levesque, Lisa J. Kewley, Kirsten Larson and Leonie Snijders; 24. Dwarf galaxies and the magnetisation of the IGM Uli Klein; Session III. Explosive Events in Low-Metallicity Environments: 25. Supernovae and their evolution in a low metallicity ISM Roger A. Chevalier; 26. First stars - type Ib supernovae connection Ken'ichi Nomoto, Masaomi Tanaka, Yasuomi Kamiya, Nozomu Tominaga and Keiichi Maeda; 27. Supernova nucleosynthesis in the early universe Nozomu Tominaga, Hideyuki Umeda, Keiichi Maeda, Ken'ichi Nomoto and Nobuyuki Iwamoto; 28. Powerful explosions at Z = 0? Sylvia Ekström, Georges Meynet, Raphael Hirschi and André Maeder; 29. Wind anisotropy and stellar evolution Cyril Georgy, Georges Meynet and André Maeder; 30. Low-mass and metal-poor gamma-ray burst

  16. Middle Cretaceous to Oligocene rise of the Middle American landbridge - documented by south-eastwards younging shallow water carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgartner-Mora, Claudia; Baumgartner, Peter O.; Barat, Flore

    2013-04-01

    Basements of Southern Central America are oceanic in origin, including the southern half of the classical "Chortis Block" formed by subduction/accretion mélanges named Mesquito Composite Oceanic Terrane (MCOT). The rise of these oceanic basements into the photic zone and eventual emergence was controlled by convergent, collision tectonics, and/or arc development. In this context, shallow carbonate palaeo-environments were short-lived and formed not only on uplifted basements and arcs, but also on (now accreted) volcanic edifices of Pacific oceanic seamounts. From Northern Nicaragua (NW) to Eastern Panama (SE) we observe a systematic younging of the first shallow water carbonate facies encroaching on basements and/or older deep-water formations: In the Siuna area (NE-Nicaragua) Aptian-Albian shallow water limestones dated by rudists and Orbitolina texana rest unconformably on the Jurassic/Early Cretaceous Siuna Serpentinite Mélange, part of the MCOT. In N-Costa Rica, the assembly of several terranes (Santa Elena Ultramafic Unit, Nicoya Complex s. s., Matambu and Manzanillo Terranes) is overlapped by Late Campanian-Maastrichtian shallow water facies dated by rudists and Larger Foraminifera, such as Pseudorbitoides rutteni, Pseudorbitoides israelski, Sulcoperculina sp. and Sulcoperculina globosa. Reworked Campanian-Maastrichtian shallow water material including Larger Foraminifera was found in the Herradura Promontory (central Pacific coast of Costa Rica). It could be derived from an accreted seamount. No shallow carbonates are known so far from the early Palaeocene. The Tempisque Basin (N-Costa Rica) hosts the Barra Honda carbonate Platform (originally >900 km2) dated as late Palaeocene (Thanetian) by planktonic Foraminifera, 87Sr / 86Sr ratios and Ranikothalia spp. Other late Palaeocene shallow carbonates documented in S-Costa Rica/W-Panama (Quepos, Burica) are interpreted as insular carbonate shoals (atolls?) on now accreted seamounts. To the SE of the S

  17. Environmental Studies in the Boreal Forest Zone: Summer IPY Institute at Central Boreal Forest Reserve, Fedorovskoe, Tver area, Russia (14-28 August, 2007)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparrow, E. B.; Kurbatova, Y.; Groisman, P.; Alexeev, V.

    2007-12-01

    Reserve were arranged to highlight various aspects of wetland studies and management in the European taiga environment. As part of the GLOBE (Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment) IPY "Seasons and Biomes" project led by Dr. Elena Sparrow, the K-12 teachers were instructed in and practiced existing GLOBE protocols as well as new protocols created specifically for the Seasons and Biomes project to study interannual variability of seasons in their own biomes. These teachers will in turn engage their students in Earth System scientific research as a way of teaching and learning science as well as involving them in the IPY. Support for the Summer Institute was provided by many institutions and organizations from the United States (IARC, NASA, NSF, University of Maryland, GLOBE USA, and Hydrology Science and Services Corporation), Russia (Central Biosphere Forest Reserve, A.N. Severtsov Institute for Ecology and Evolution of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Southern Federal University, Russian Foundation for Basic Research, GLOBE Russia, and non-profit organization "Transparent World"), Japan (National Institute for Environmental Studies), China (Beijing Normal University), Germany (Friedrich-Schiller-University) and the Circumpolar North (University of the Arctic).

  18. YRMR Organizing Committee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-02-01

    Elena Cannuccia graduated in physics at the University of Rome Tor Vergata in the Condensed Matter Theory Group (1http://www.fisica.uniroma2.it/?cmtheo-group/). She is currently finishing her PhD in the same research group. Her research project focused on the investigation of the role played by electron-phonon coupling on the electronic properties of polymers. Through completing her research she made a contribution to the development of YAMBO (http://www.yambo-code.org/), a FORTRAN/C code for Many-Body calculations in solid state and molecular physics. Luca Mazzaferro is a PhD student at the University of Rome "Tor Vergata". He works on the ATLAS experiment and is a member of the ATLAS Calibration group. He gratuated from the University of Rome "La Sapienza" in May 2010, and worked with the local ATLAS group, developing the LCDS routines for the calibration of the ATLAS MDT Chambers. This software is now a standard for managing the calibration analysis of ATLAS chambers. He also works in the administrative group of "Tor Vergata" grid-computing farm. Marina Migliaccio graduated in Universe Science at the University of Rome "Tor Vergata", and she is now a PhD student in Astronomy. During her PhD she has spent eight months as a visiting scholar at the Kavli Institute for Cosmology in Cambridge (UK). The focus of her research is precision cosmology. In this context, her work so far has been devoted to the study of Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation in order to constrain cosmological models and early universe physics. She has analyzed the BOOMERanG balloon-borne experiment data, searching for a primordial non-Gaussian signature. Since 2008, she has been involved in the Planck mission Core Cosmology program, where her major contribution deals with measuring the statistical properties of CMB intensity and polarization fields in view of realistic (both instrumental and astrophysical) effects. Davide Pietrobon graduated in Astronomy, sharing the PhD between the

  19. Environmental Challenges Related to the Acquisition of the Trans Carpathian Wide Angle Reflection and Refraction Line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragut, Dorina-Alina; Schultz, Gehrig; Mocanu, Victor; Stephenson, Randell; Janik, Tomasz; Starostenko, Vitaly

    2015-04-01

    technological targets while managing to obey all legal rules and regulations imposed by the decision makers. We finally demonstrate that there is no danger for the environment by this classic form of seismic wave generation if all restrictions, health and safety rules are strictly complied with and are continuously monitored. This project could not be carried out successfully without significant support from: Mark Sturgess and Mark Wigley of Hunt Oil of Romania; Alex Stefan and Radita Bandrabur of Prospectiuni; Vasile Ionel Catana and Albert Ion Ranete of Maxam Romania; Alissa Ionescu of Lukoil Romania; Gheorghe Dutu, Claudia Raileanu and Elena Caramalau of the National Agency of Mineral Resources of Romania; Laszlo Klarick of the Romanian Senate. This work has been supported from the strategic grant POSDRU/159/1.5/S/133391, Project "Doctoral and Post-doctoral programs of excellence for highly qualified human resources training for research in the field of Life sciences, Environment and Earth Science" cofinanced by the European Social Fund within the Sectorial Operational Program Human Resources Development 2007 - 2013.

  20. Marine biodiversity baseline for Área de Conservación Guanacaste, Costa Rica: published records.

    PubMed

    Cortés, Jorge

    2017-01-01

    The diversity of tropical marine organisms has not been studied as intensively as the terrestrial biota worldwide. Additionally, marine biodiversity research in the tropics lags behind other regions. The 43,000 ha Sector Marino of Área de Conservación Guanacaste (ACG, Marine Sector of Guanacaste Conservation Area), on the North Pacific coast of Costa Rica is no exception. For more than four decades, the terrestrial flora and fauna has been studied continuously. The ACG marine biodiversity was studied in the 1930's by expeditions that passed through the area, but not much until the 1990's, except for the marine turtles. In the mid 1990's the Center for Research in Marine Science and Limnology (CIMAR) of the Universidad de Costa Rica (UCR) initiated the exploration of the marine environments and organisms of ACG. In 2015, ACG, in collaboration with CIMAR, started the BioMar project whose goal is to inventory the species of the marine sector of ACG (BioMar ACG project). As a baseline, here I have compiled the published records of marine ACG species, and found that 594 marine species have been reported, representing 15.5% of the known species of the Pacific coast of Costa Rica. The most diverse groups were the crustaceans, mollusks and cnidarians comprising 71.7% of the ACG species. Some taxa, such as mangroves and fish parasites are well represented in ACG when compared to the rest of the Costa Rican coast but others appear to be greatly underrepresented, for example, red algae, polychaetes, copepods, equinoderms, and marine fishes and birds, which could be due to sampling bias. Thirty species have been originally described with specimens from ACG, and 89 species are not known from other localities on the Pacific coast of Costa Rica except ACG. Most of the sampling has been concentrated in a few localities in Sector Marino, Playa Blanca and Islas Murciélago, and in the nearby waters of Bahía Santa Elena. In an effort to fill this gap, CIMAR is collaborating with

  1. Multi-criteria indexes to evaluate the effects of repeated organic amendment applications on soil quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obriot, Fiona; Stauffer, Marie; Goubard, Yolaine; Vieuble-Gonod, Laure; Revallier, Agathe; Houot, Sabine

    2015-04-01

    value of data set permits to normalized the data set, a principal component analysis was used for each data in order to explain the variability and at the end, the combination of all indicators selected and weighted by anterior steps defined SQI. Results The repeated applications of organic amendments increased soil fertility and microbial activity compared to control treatments as revealed by the corresponding indices. The largest improvements were observed in treatments that increased more the soil organic matter content (GWS, FYM and BIO) compared to MSW. The regular application of OWP did not significantly modify the SQI dedicated to biodiversity. A recent additional application did not lead to significant supplementary effect on the SQI. Physical properties, productivity and pollution index need more time to be explained. Conclusion The use of SQI allows the aggregation of different indicators to evaluate specific ecosystem services (soil fertility, soil biodiversity, vegetal productivity…) and disservices (heavy metal contamination) of the introduction of OWP in soil. Separate indices made possible to assess different aspects of soil quality separately. Other field results on the effect of OWP application would make possible to relate more precisely the observed effects to the SQIs. References [a] Velasquez, Elena, Patrick Lavelle, et Mercedes Andrade. « GISQ, a Multifunctional Indicator of Soil Quality ». Soil Biology & Biochemistry 39, no 12 (décembre 2007): 3066 80. doi:10.1016/j.soilbio.2007.06.013.

  2. Oceanic terranes of S-Central America - 200 Million years of accretion history recorded on the W-edge of the Caribbean Plate.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgartner, P. O.; Flores, K.; Bandini, A.; Buchs, D.; Andjic, G.; Baumgartner-Mora, C.

    2012-04-01

    The W-edge of the Caribbean Plate is characterized by two major basement domains, separated today by a SW-NE trending diffuse fault zone located SE of the Nicoya Peninsula (Costa Rica) and possibly connecting with the Hess Escarpment. To the NW, in the area originally called "Chortis Block", oceanic island/arc basements range in age from Late Triassic to Early Cretaceous and form a complicated puzzle of geodynamic units. To the SE of this fault line, no age older than Turonian-Santonian (90-85 Ma) is known. This area only represents the trailing edge of the Caribbean Large Igensous Procince (CLIP). The Mesquito Composite Oceanic Terrane (MCOT) comprises the southern half of the "Chortis Block", classically considered as a continental fragment of N-America. The MCOT is defined by isolated outcrops of ultramafic, mafic oceanic/arc rocks, and radiolarites of Late Triassic, Jurassic and Early Cretaceous age: Rhaetian (latest Triassic) radiolarites found in the El Castillo Mélange (S-MCOT: S-Nicaragua/N- Costa Rica). They are associated with blocks of OIB-metabasalts. These rocks document the presence of a Late Triassic oceanic basement that must have been the substrate of the 174 -177 Ma old (Early/Middle Jurassic) Petit-Spot-like alkaline volcanics that intruded Early Jurassic radiolarites. These rocks form tectonic slivers in the middle Cretaceous Santa Rosa Accretionary Complex (relative autochthonous of the Santa Elena ultramafic unit, N-Costa Rica). The oldest rocks of the Nicoya Complex s. str. (NW-Nicoya Peninsula, Costa Rica) are Bajocian (Middle Jurassic) radiolarites, that occur as blocks magmatically engulfed in plateau-type basalts and intrusives that range in age thoughout the pre-Campanian Cretaceous (130-83 Ma). Middle and Late Jurassic metaradiolarites occur as blocks in the Siuna Serpentinite Médange (NE-Nicaragua), along with High-p, arc-related mafics. We envision an oceanic arc that collided in the latest Jurassic with the Agua Fria arc system

  3. Petrography and Geochemistry of the Zamora Batholith in the south of the sub-Andean zone (Ecuador)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villares, F. M.

    2013-05-01

    The Zamora Batholith is an intrusive complex that is located in the extreme south-east of Ecuador. It has dimensions of 200 x 50 km approximately. It is mainly located in the Zamora Chinchipe province from which it takes its name. This study consisted in the petrographic and geochemical characterization of the Zamora Batholith in the area covered by 1: 50,000 geological maps of Centro Shaime, Guayzimi, Paquisha, Los Encuentros and El Pangui. Fieldwork was done by the "Proyecto Mapeo Geológico escala 1:50.000 (zonas prospectivas mineras)" of the Instituto Nacional de Investigación Geológico, Minero, Metalúrgico of Ecuador. This research was performed with 59 thin sections and 10 whole - rock chemical analysis done in the C.I.C of the Granada University. The Zamora Batholith intrudes Triassic to Jurassic volcanic rocks. It is overlaid by sandstones of the Hollin Formation of the Upper Aptian age and shale and limestone from the Napo Formation. Post-cretaceous deposits of ash and lava flows of andesitic to rhyolitic compositions cover the batholith. The petrography of the Zamora Batholith ranges from tonalite to monzogranite with the same qualitative mineralogy. The rocks are composed by different proportions of plagioclase, amphibole, feldspar K, quartz, biotite, opaque, pyroxene and epidote, as accessory minerals has zircon, sphene and apatite. To the south of the Conguime and Guayzimi towns, the dominant petrography is medium to coarse grained amphibole granodiorite with tonalitic and monzogranitic subordinates. To the north monzogranites are dominant rocks and subordinate granodiorites. To the East of Santa Elena the sienogranites are associated with El Hito porphyritic granite that intrudes to Zamora Batholith. Frequently the batholith has propylitic alteration; which produces a primary association of chlorite, epidote, calcite and pyrite. The granitoids have dioritic to granitic compositions (60.09 to 73.6 wt.% SiO2) and are I - type, medium to high-K calc

  4. Are population dynamics of shorebirds affected by El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) while on their non-breeding grounds in Ecuador?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Hara, Patrick D.; Haase, Ben J. M.; Elner, Robert W.; Smith, Barry D.; Kenyon, Jamie K.

    2007-08-01

    Declines in avian populations are a global concern, particularly for species that migrate between Arctic-temperate and tropical locations. Long-term population studies offer opportunities to detect and document ecological effects attributable to long-term climatic cycles such as the El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO). In this study, we report possible population-level effects of such climatic cycles on shorebird species that use two non-breeding season sites in Ecuador (Santa Elena peninsula area, near La Libertad). During our 9-year study period (1991/1992-1999/2000), there was a particularly strong ENSO warm phase event during 1997/1998. Population trend data for three species of shorebird, Western Sandpipers ( Calidris mauri), Semipalmated Sandpipers ( C. pusilla), and Least Sandpipers ( C. minutilla), indicated abundances generally declined during the 1990s, but there was an increase in the proportion of first-year birds and their abundance in the years following the 1997/1998 ENSO warm phase. There was some support for variation in apparent survivorship associated with the onset of the ENSO warm phase event in our population models, based on capture-mark-recapture data. Following the 1997/1998 ENSO event onset, individuals for all three species were significantly lighter during the non-breeding season ( F1,3789 = 6.6, p = 0.01). Least-squares mean mass (controlling for size, sex and day of capture) for first-year birds dropped significantly more than for adults following ENSO (first-year mass loss = 0.69 ± 0.12 g; adult mass loss = 0.34 ± 0.11 g, F1,3789 = 5.31, p = 0.021), and least-squares mean mass dropped most during the period when sandpipers prepare for northward migration by gaining mass and moulting into breeding plumage. Least Sandpipers may have declined the most in mean mass following ENSO (0.76 ± 0.19 g), whereas Semipalmated Sandpipers were 0.52 ± 0.12 g lighter, and Western Sandpipers 0.40 ± 0.13 g lighter, but overall variation among

  5. PREFACE: International Conference on Many Particle Spectroscopy of Atoms, Molecules, Clusters and Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowek, Danielle; Bennani, Azzedine; Lablanquie, Pascal; Maquet, Alfred

    2008-12-01

    ) - Université Paris-Sud 11, Orsay Danielle DOWEK (co-Chair) - Université Paris-Sud 11, Orsay Bernadette ROME (Secretary) - Université Paris-Sud 11, Orsay Elena Magdalena STAICU CASAGRANDE - Université Paris-Sud 11, Orsay Alain HUETZ - Université Paris-Sud 11, Orsay Laurence MALEGAT - Université Paris-Sud 11, Orsay Michael MEYER - Université Paris-Sud 11, Orsay Adnan NAJA - Université Paris-Sud 11, Orsay Yan PICARD - Université Paris-Sud 11, Orsay Lidija ANDRIC - Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris Alain DUBOIS - Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris Pascal LABLANQUIE - Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris Alfred MAQUET - Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris Francis PENENT - Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris Patricia SELLES - Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris Marc SIMON - Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris Conference photograph

  6. Late Cretaceous - Paleogene forearc sedimentation and accretion of oceanic plateaus and seamounts along the Middle American convergent margin (Costa Rica)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgartner, Peter O.; Baumgartner-Mora, Claudia; Andjic, Goran

    2016-04-01

    The Late Cretaceous-Paleogene sedimentation pattern in space and time along the Middle American convergent margin was controlled by the accretion of Pacific plateaus and seamounts. The accretion of more voluminous plateaus must have caused the temporary extinction of the arc and tectonic uplift, resulting in short lived episodes of both pelagic and neritic biogenic sedimentation. By the Late Eocene, shallow carbonate environments became widespread on a supposed mature arc edifice, that is so far only documented in arc-derived sediments. In northern Costa Rica forearc sedimentation started during the Coniacian-Santonian on the Aptian-Turonian basement of the Manzanillo Terrane. The arrival and collision of the Nicoya Terrane (a CLIP-like, 139-83 Ma Pacific plateau) and the Santa Elena Terrane caused the extinction of the arc during late Campanian- Early Maastrichtian times, indicated by the change to pelagic limestone sedimentation (Piedras Blancas Formation) in deeper areas and shallow-water rudistid - Larger Benthic Foraminfera limestone on tectonically uplifted areas of all terranes. Arc-derived turbidite sedimentation resumed in the Late Maastrichtian and was again interrupted during the Late Paleocene - Early Eocene, perhaps due to the underplating of a yet unknown large seamount. The extinction of the arc resulted in the deposition of the siliceous pelagic Buenavista Formation, as well as the principally Thanetian Barra Honda carbonate platform on a deeply eroded structural high in the Tempisque area. In southern Costa Rica the basement is thought to be the western edge of the CLIP. It is Santonian-Campanian in age and is only exposed in the southwestern corner of Herradura. Cretaceous arc-forearc sequences are unknown, except for the Maastrichtian-Paleocene Golfito Terrane in southeastern Costa Rica. The distribution and age of shallow/pelagic carbonates vs. arc-derived detrital sediments is controlled by the history of accretion of Galápagos hot spot

  7. Assessment of chemical element migration in soil-plant complex of Urov endemic localities of East Transbaikalia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vadim V., Ermakov; Valentina, Danilova; Sabsbakhor, Khushvakhtova; Aklexander, Degtyarev; Sergey, Tyutikov; Victor, Berezkin; Elena, Karpova

    2014-05-01

    - Salicaceae) and selenium (needles of larch - Larix sibirica L.) were found among the plants. References 1. Ermakov V., Jovanovic L. Characteristics of selenium migration in soil-plant system of East Meshchera and Transbaikalia// J. Geochem. Explor., 2010. Vol. 107, 200-205. 2. Ermakov Vadim, Jovanovic Larisa, Berezkin Victor, Tyutikov Sergey, Danilogorskaya Anastasiya, Danilova Valentina, Krechetova Elena, Degtyarev Alexander, Khushvakhtova Sabsbakhor. Chemical assessment of soil and water of Urov biogeochemical provinces of Eastern Transbaikalia// Ecologica, 2012. Vol. 19, 69, 5-9. 3. Ermakov V.V., Tuytikov S.F. Khushvakhtova S.D., Danilova V.N. Boev V.A., Barabanschikova R.N., Chudinova E.A. Peculiarities of quantitative determination of selenium in biological materials// Bulletin of the Tyumen State University Press, 2010, 3, 206-214. Supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research, grant number 12-05-00141a.

  8. A numerical and observational study of the genesis of concentric eyewall hurricanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nong, Shangyao

    This work attempts to understand the dynamics of the genesis of concentric eyewall hurricanes. More specifically, we focus on the effects of external eddy forcing associated with upper-level wave asymmetries in the environment of tropical cyclones, and through what processes these effects can be achieved. Our approach is a combination of numerical modeling and observational case studies. We have made use of two numerical models, namely a simple two-layer model and a two-dimensional cloud resolving non-hydrostatic model. The latter is called the full physics model for short. Owing to the lack of direct measurements of upper-level atmospheric conditions, we choose to use reanalysis data from National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) and National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) and European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF). A somewhat lengthy evaluation suggests that both datasets are marginally suitable for case studies of tropical, cyclones. Our major conclusions are as follows: (1)Numerical simulations from the simple and full physics models suggest that the genesis of concentric eyewall hurricane results from finite-amplitude wind-induced surface heat exchange (WISHE) instability of the tropical atmosphere. (2)The results from the full physics model suggest that the role of the eddy forcing is like the catalyst in a chemical reaction. The forcing helps manifest internal finite-amplitude instabilities which themselves are driven by surface enthalpy fluxes. (3)The results from our extensive case studies suggest that a causal relationship does not always exist between environmental forcing and genesis of a secondary eyewall. Some cases, for example, Hurricane Allen of 1980, Hurricane Elena of 1985 and Hurricane Opal of 1995, show a good and clear relationship between their eyewall replacement cycles and their external forcings. Some cases, for example, Hurricane Gilbert of 1998 and Hurricane Andrew of 1992, show some degree of

  9. Quality of water and sediment in streams affected by historical mining, and quality of Mine Tailings, in the Rio Grande/Rio Bravo Basin, Big Bend Area of the United States and Mexico, August 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lambert, Rebecca B.; Kolbe, Christine M.; Belzer, Wayne

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the International Boundary and Water Commission - U.S. and Mexican Sections, the National Park Service, the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, the Secretaria de Medio Ambiente y Recursos Naturales in Mexico, the Area de Proteccion de Flora y Fauna Canon de Santa Elena in Mexico, and the Area de Proteccion de Flora y Fauna Maderas del Carmen in Mexico, collected samples of stream water, streambed sediment, and mine tailings during August 2002 for a study to determine whether trace elements from abandoned mines in the area in and around Big Bend National Park have affected the water and sediment quality in the Rio Grande/Rio Bravo Basin of the United States and Mexico. Samples were collected from eight sites on the main stem of the Rio Grande/Rio Bravo, four Rio Grande/Rio Bravo tributary sites downstream from abandoned mines or mine-tailing sites, and 11 mine-tailing sites. Mines in the area were operated to produce fluorite, germanium, iron, lead, mercury, silver, and zinc during the late 1800s through at least the late 1970s. Moderate (relatively neutral) pHs in stream-water samples collected at the 12 Rio Grande/Rio Bravo main-stem and tributary sites indicate that water is well mixed, diluted, and buffered with respect to the solubility of trace elements. The highest sulfate concentrations were in water samples from tributaries draining the Terlingua mining district. Only the sample from the Rough Run Draw site exceeded the Texas Surface Water Quality Standards general-use protection criterion for sulfate. All chloride and dissolved solids concentrations in water samples were less than the general-use protection criteria. Aluminum, copper, mercury, nickel, selenium, and zinc were detected in all water samples for which each element was analyzed. Cadmium, chromium, and lead were detected in samples less frequently, and silver was not detected in any of the samples. None of the sample concentrations of

  10. European Plate Observing System - the Arctic dimension and the Nordic collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atakan, K.; Heikkinen, P.; Juhlin, C.; Thybo, H.; Vogfjord, K.

    2012-04-01

    Dehls (NGU), Øystein Nordgulen (NGU), Roland Roberts (UU), Reynir Bødvarsson (UU), Ólafur Guðmundsson (UU), Steinunn Jacobsdottir (IMO), Freysteinn Sigmundsson (IES), Benedikt Halldórsson (EERC), Gudmundur Valsson (LMI), Irina Artemieva (KU), Peter Voss (GEUS), Trine Dahl-Jensen (GEUS), Tine B. Larsen (GEUS), Jens Jørgen Møller (GEUS), Martin Hansen (GEUS), Jørgen Tulstrup (GEUS), Johnny Fredericia (GEUS), Niels Andersen (DTU-Space), Jurgen Matzka (DTU-Space), Shfaqat Abbas Khan (DTU-Space), Niels Balling (AU), Markku Poutanen (FGI), Elena Kozlovskaya (SGO).

  11. Verochka Zingan or recollections from the Physics Department of the Moscow University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaina, Alex; Gaina, Danielle A.

    The author recollects his studentship during 70-th years at the Physics Department of the Moscow University. He was graduated from the theoretical Physics Department in 1977. The Rectors of the University that times were I.G. Petrovskii, R.V. Khokhlov and A.A. Logunov. The dean of the Physics Department was V.S. Fursov. As a particular event a meet with the former prime-minister of the USSR A.N. Kosygin is reported. Between professors mentioned throughout the recollections are A.I.Kitaigorodskii, Ya. B. Zel'dovich, D.D. Ivanenko, A.A. Sokolov, A.A. Vlasov, V.B. Braginsky, I.M. Ternov, L.A. Artsimovich, E.P. Velikhov and other, including that which became University professors later. A great number of colleagues from the Physics, Chemistry, Phylological and Historical Departments of the Moscow University are mentioned. Particularly, the students which entered the group 113 in 1971 and finished the group 601 in 1977 are listed. The recollections include 5 parts. Persons cited throughout the paper: A.N. Kosygin, A.S. Golovin, V. Kostyukevich, I.M. Ternov, E.G. Pozdnyak, A. N. Matveev, V.P. Elyutin, V.V. Kerzhentsev, 113 academic group (1971), V. Topala, E.A. Marinchuk, P.Paduraru, A.I. Kitaygorodski, A. Leahu, S. Berzan, B. Ursu, I. Coanda (Koade), M. Stefanovici, O. Bulgaru, A. Iurie-Apostol, A.S. Davydov, M.I. Kaganov, I.M. Lifshitz, Ya. B. Zel'dovich, A.Zhukov, A.I. Buzdin, N.S. Perov, V. Dolgov, P. Vabishchevich, A.A. Samarskii, V. Makarov, Irina Kamenskih, A.A. Arsen'ev, L.A. Artsimovich, A.A. Tyapkin, B.M. Pontecorvo, D.I. Blokhintsev, I.G. Petrovskii, R.V. Khokhlov, V.N. Rudenko, A.A. Sokolov, D.D. Ivanenko (Iwanenko), A.A. Vlasov, V.N. Ponomarev, N.N. Bogolyubov, N.N. Bogolyubov (Jr), V.Ch. Zhukovskii, Tamara Tarasova, Zarina Radzhabova (Malovekova), V.Malovekov, Tatiana Shmeleva, Alexandra C.Nicolescu, Tatiana Nicolescu, Rano Mahkamova, Miriam Yandieva, Natalia Germaniuk (Grigor'eva), E. Grigor'ev, A. Putro, Elena Nikiforova, B. Kostrykin, Galia Laufer, K

  12. Detailed chronology of a giant Pleistocene rock-avalanche sequence in the hyperarid southern Peru revealed by jointly applied 10Be and 3He cosmic ray exposure dating : The Study case of the Cerro Caquilluco landslide complex.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swann, Zerathe; Laurence, Audin; Carlos, Benavente; Régis, Braucher; Pierre-Henri, Blard; Didier, Bourlès; Julien, Carcaillet; Fabrizio, Delgado; Pascal, Lacroix; Valderrama Patricio, Murillo; Aster Team

    2015-04-01

    suggesting sequential failures, this object appeared as a good target to bring additional knowledge on the previously exposed issues. Our goal was to use TCN and to sample a maximum of individual lobes to be able to discuss: (i) the time of recurrence of successive extreme events, (ii) the respective roles of past climate variations versus earthquake forcing on the landslide trigger, and (iii) the impact of these mass remobilizations on local erosion rates compared to fluvial erosion rates and tectonic uplift rates (both known in this region). On average, three samples were extracted from individual meter-scale boulders sampled on seven different lobes of debris (~20 samples). Due to the lack of quartz in that volcanic lithology, 10Be was extracted from feldspaths for all samples. Half were additionally processed for 3He measurements on pyroxene, allowing to reduce the uncertainty on the derived exposure ages and to solve the production equation for both time and erosion variables. The obtained ages show a perfect consistency with the pattern of erosion, geomorphic surfaces and relative position of each lobes (i.e. younger from the toe to the top). These results highlight sequential failures staggered at the Pleistocene timescale, with some surprising time of recurrence ranging from 30 to 100 ka that may correspond to the main last climate variations in that region. Crosta, G.B., Hermanns, R.L., Frattini, P., Valbuzzi, E., Valagussa, A., 2014a. Large slope instabilities in Northern Chile: Inventory, Characterisation and Possible Triggers. In: Proceedings of the 3rd world landslide Forum, 2-6 June 2014, Bejing, p 6. DOI: 10.1007/978/-3-319-04996-0_28. Crosta, G.B., Paolo, F., Elena, V., Hermanns, R.L., 2014b. The Cerro Caquilluco-Cerrillos Negros Giant Rock Avalanches (Tacna, Peru). IAEG - Torino 2014, N°159. McPhillips, D., Bierman, P.R., Rood, D.H., 2014. Millennial-scale record of landslides in the Andes consistent with earthquake trigger. Nature Geoscience, DOI: 10

  13. PREFACE: Workshop Photograph and Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-07-01

    Workshop photograph Workshop Program Sunday 28 March 201019:00-21:00 Reception at Okura Frontier Hotel Tsukuba(Buffet style dinner with drink) Monday 29 March 2010Introduction (Chair: André Rubbia (ETH Zurich))09:00 Welcome address (05') Atsuto Suzuki (KEK)09:05 Message from CERN on neutrino physics (10') Sergio Bertolucci (CERN)09:15 Message from FNAL on neutrino physics (10') Young Kee Kim (FNAL)09:25 Message from KEK on neutrino physics (10') Koichiro Nishikawa (KEK)09:35 Introductory remark on GLA2010 (10') Takuya Hasegawa (KEK) Special session (Chair: Koichiro Nishikawa (KEK))09:45 The ICARUS Liquid Argon TPC (45') Carlo Rubbia (CERN)10:30-11:00 Coffee break Main goals of Giant Liquid Argon Charge Imaging Experiments I (Chair: Takashi Kobayashi (KEK))11:00 Results from massive underground detectors (non accelerator) (30') Takaaki Kajita (ICRR, U. of Tokyo)11:30 Present long baseline neutrino experiments (30') Chang Kee Jung (SUNY Stony Brook)12:00-12:10 Workshop picture12:10-14:00 Lunch break Main goals of Giant Liquid Argon Charge Imaging Experiments II (Chair: Takashi Kobayashi (KEK))14:00 Physics goals of the next generation massive underground experiments (30') David Wark (Imperial College London)14:30 Near detectors for long baseline neutrino experiments (20') Tsuyoshi Nakaya (Kyoto U.) Lessons on Liquid Argon Charge Imaging technology from ongoing developments (Chair: Chang Kee Jung (SUNY Stony Brook))14:50 WARP (30') Claudio Montanari (U. of Pavia)15:20 ArDM (30') Alberto Marchionni (ETH Zurich)15:50 From ArgoNeuT to MicroBooNE (30') Bonnie Fleming (Yale U.)16:20 250L (30') Takasumi Maruyama (KEK)16:50 The DEAP/CLEAN project (20') Mark Boulay (Queen's U.)17:10-17:40 Coffee break Lessons from Xe based Liquids Imaging detectors (Chair: Flavio Cavanna (U. of L'Aquilla))17:30 MEG (20') Satoshi Mihara (KEK)17:50 The XENON project (20') Elena Aprile (Columbia U.)18:10 XMASS (20') Hiroyuki Sekiya (ICRR, U. of Tokyo) Studies on physics performance (Chair

  14. Obituary: Ralph Robert Robbins, Jr., 1938-2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemenway, Mary Kay; Jefferys, William H.; Lambert, David L.

    2007-12-01

    Ralph Robert Robbins, Jr., died on 2 December 2005, in Kyle, Texas. His wife, Maria Elena Robbins, his daughters Julia Robbins Kelso and Stephanie Juarez Balles, his son Matthew Juarez, and five grandchildren survive him. Bob was on the faculty at the University of Texas from 1968 until his retirement in 2003. Bob was born in Wichita, Kansas, on 2 September 1938, the only son of Mildred and Ralph Robert Robbins, Sr. Guided by his high school's policy to provide a practical education to children of working-class parents, Bob began high school with a heavy dose of vocational courses until the results of a test indicated his special talent in mathematics. He was awarded a full scholarship to Yale University, graduating magna cum laude in mathematics in 1960. He won the Warner Prize in Mathematics at Yale that year. He received his Ph.D. in 1966 with a dissertation entitled "The Triplet Spectrum of Neutral Helium in Expanding Nebulae" from the University of California at Berkeley. His interest in college teaching was ignited at this time through summer teaching positions at San Mateo California Junior College and the Ohio State University. Following a year at Texas as a McDonald Observatory Post-doctoral Fellow, Bob taught for a year in the physics department of the University of Houston before returning to the University of Texas at Austin as an Assistant Professor of Astronomy in 1968. He was promoted to Associate Professor in 1972. Bob's research in the early 1970s on theoretical studies of helium was of vital importance to astronomers for over three decades. These pioneering calculations became vital to observational astronomers in the mid-1990s as interest grew in the primordial helium produced by the Big Bang. Bob's interest and influence in education was international in scope. In the summers 1968-1970, he was a government consultant in Mathematics in East Pakistan (now Bangladesh). He consulted with the government that was preparing a master plan for technical

  15. PREFACE: Semiconducting oxides Semiconducting oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catlow, Richard; Walsh, Aron

    2011-08-01

    their help in producing this special section. We hope that it conveys some of the excitement and significance of the field. Semiconducting oxides contents Chemical bonding in copper-based transparent conducting oxides: CuMO2 (M = In, Ga, Sc) K G Godinho, B J Morgan, J P Allen, D O Scanlon and G W Watson Electrical properties of (Ba, Sr)TiO3 thin films with Pt and ITO electrodes: dielectric and rectifying behaviourShunyi Li, Cosmina Ghinea, Thorsten J M Bayer, Markus Motzko, Robert Schafranek and Andreas Klein Orientation dependent ionization potential of In2O3: a natural source for inhomogeneous barrier formation at electrode interfaces in organic electronicsMareike V Hohmann, Péter Ágoston, André Wachau, Thorsten J M Bayer, Joachim Brötz, Karsten Albe and Andreas Klein Cathodoluminescence studies of electron irradiation effects in n-type ZnOCasey Schwarz, Yuqing Lin, Max Shathkin, Elena Flitsiyan and Leonid Chernyak Resonant Raman scattering in ZnO:Mn and ZnO:Mn:Al thin films grown by RF sputteringM F Cerqueira, M I Vasilevskiy, F Oliveira, A G Rolo, T Viseu, J Ayres de Campos, E Alves and R Correia Structure and electrical properties of nanoparticulate tungsten oxide prepared by microwave plasma synthesisM Sagmeister, M Postl, U Brossmann, E J W List, A Klug, I Letofsky-Papst, D V Szabó and R Würschum Charge compensation in trivalent cation doped bulk rutile TiO2Anna Iwaszuk and Michael Nolan Deep level transient spectroscopy studies of n-type ZnO single crystals grown by different techniquesL Scheffler, Vl Kolkovsky, E V Lavrov and J Weber Microstructural and conductivity changes induced by annealing of ZnO:B thin films deposited by chemical vapour depositionC David, T Girardeau, F Paumier, D Eyidi, B Lacroix, N Papathanasiou, B P Tinkham, P Guérin and M Marteau Multi-component transparent conducting oxides: progress in materials modellingAron Walsh, Juarez L F Da Silva and Su-Huai Wei Thickness dependence of the strain, band gap and transport properties of

  16. Crushed aggregates for roads and their properties for frost protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsova, Elena; Willy Danielsen, Svein

    2015-04-01

    Crushed aggregates for roads and their properties for frost protection Elena Kuznetsova, NTNU and Svein Willy Danielsen, SINTEF With natural (fluvial, glaciofluvial) sand/gravel resources being rapidly depleted in many countries, the last decade has seen a significant trend towards using more alternative materials for construction purpose. In Norway the development and implementation of crushed aggregate technology has been the most important way to get around the problem with increased resource scarcity. Today Norway is one the European countries with the highest percentage of crushed/manufactured aggregates. A crushed product will reveal a different particle size distribution, a sharper, more angular particle shape, and not least - a significantly different mineral composition. The latter may often be characterised by more polymineral composition, and it will also much more depend on the local bedrock. When handled with care and knowledge, these differences can give the user a lot of new opportunities relating to materials design. Norwegian road construction practice has changed significantly during the last 40 years due to the replacement of gravel by crushed rock materials in the granular layers of the pavements. The use of non-processed rock materials from blasting was allowed in the subbase layer until 2012. This was a reason for a lot of problems with frost heaving due to inhomogeneity of this material, and in practice it was difficult to control the size of large stones. Since 2012 there is a requirement that rock materials for use in the subbase layer shall be crushed (Handbook N200, 2014). During the spring 2014 The Norwegian Public Roads Administration introduced a new handbook with requirements for roads construction in Norway, including new specifications for the frost protection layer. When pavements are constructed over moist and/or frost susceptible soils in cold and humid environments, the frost protection layer also becomes a very important part

  17. List of Posters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    List of Posters: Dark matter annihilation in the Galactic galo, by Dokuchaev Vyacheslav, et al. NEMO developments towards km3 telescope in the Mediterranean Sea. The NEMO project. Neutrino Mediterranean Observatory By Antonio Capone, NEMO Collaboration. Alignment as a result from QCD jet production or new still unknown physics at LHC? By Alexander Snigirev. Small-scale fluctuations of extensive air showers: systematics in energy and muon density estimation By Grigory Rubtsov. SHINIE: Simulation of High-Energy Neutrino Interacting with the Earth By Lin Guey-Lin, et al.. Thermodynamics of rotating solutions in n+1 dimensional Einstein - Maxwell -dilation gravity By Ahmad Sheykhi, et al.. Supernova neutrino physics with future large Cherenkov detectors By Daniele Montanino. Crossing of the Cosmological Constant Barrier in the string Inspired Dark Energy Model By S. Yu. Vernov. Calculations of radio signals produced by ultra-high and extremely high energy neutrino induced cascades in Antarctic ice By D. Besson, et al.. Inflation, Cosmic Acceleration and string Gravity By Ischwaree Neupane. Neutrino Physics: Charm and J/Psi production in the atmosphere By Liudmila Volkova. Three generation flavor transitions and decays of supernova relic neutrinos By Daniele Montanino. Lattice calculations & computational quantum field theory: Sonification of Quark and Baryon Spectra By Markum Harald, et al.. Generalized Kramers-Wannier Duality for spin systems with non-commutative symmetry By V. M. Buchstaber, et al.. Heavy ion collisions & quark matter: Nuclear matter jets and multifragmentation By Danut Argintaru, et al.. QCD hard interactions: The qT-spectrum of the Higgs and Slepton-pairs at the LHC By Guiseppe Bozzi. QCD soft interactions: Nonperturbative effects in Single-Spin Asymmetries: Instantons and TMD-parton distributions By Igor Cherednikov, et al.. Gluon dominance model and high multiplicity By Elena Kokoulina. Resonances in eta pi- pi- pi+ system By Dmitry Ryabchikov

  18. PREFACE New developments in nanopore research—from fundamentals to applications New developments in nanopore research—from fundamentals to applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, Tim; Edel, Joshua B.; Winterhalter, Mathias

    2010-11-01

    , Di Cao and Stuart Lindsay Probing DNA with micro- and nanocapillaries and optical tweezers L J Steinbock, O Otto, D R Skarstam, S Jahn, C Chimerel, J L Gornall and U F Keyser Fabrication of nanopores with embedded annular electrodes and transverse carbon nanotube electrodes Zhijun Jiang, Mirna Mihovilovic, Jason Chan and Derek Stein Fabrication and electrical characterization of a pore-cavity-pore device D Pedone, M Langecker, A M Münzer, R Wei, R D Nagel and U Rant Use of tunable nanopore blockade rates to investigate colloidal dispersions G R Willmott, R Vogel, S S C Yu, L G Groenewegen, G S Roberts, D Kozak, W Anderson and M Trau Facilitated translocation of polypeptides through a single nanopore Robert Bikwemu, Aaron J Wolfe, Xiangjun Xing and Liviu Movileanu Mechanistic insight into gramicidin-based detection of protein-ligand interactions via sensitized photoinactivation Tatyana I Rokitskaya, Michael X Macrae, Steven Blake, Natalya S Egorova, Elena A Kotova, Jerry Yang and Yuri N Antonenko Sequence-dependent unfolding kinetics of DNA hairpins studied by nanopore force spectroscopy Stephan Renner, Andrey Bessonov, Ulrich Gerland and Friedrich C Simmel Hydration properties of mechanosensitive channel pores define the energetics of gating A Anishkin, B Akitake, K Kamaraju, C-S Chiang and S Sukharev Dynamic translocation of ligand-complexed DNA through solid-state nanopores with optical tweezers Andy Sischka, Andre Spiering, Maryam Khaksar, Miriam Laxa, Janine König, Karl-Josef Dietz and Dario Anselmetti Force fluctuations assist nanopore unzipping of DNA V Viasnoff, N Chiaruttini, J Muzard and U Bockelmann Control and reversal of the electrophoretic force on DNA in a charged nanopore Binquan Luan and Aleksei Aksimentiev The properties of the outer membrane localized Lipid A transporter LptD Raimund Haarmann, Mohamed Ibrahim, Mara Stevanovic, Rolf Bredemeier and Enrico Schleiff Structural and dynamical properties of the porins OmpF and OmpC: insights from

  19. Cosmic "Dig" Reveals Vestiges of the Milky Way's Building Blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-11-01

    means of a computer-controlled deformable mirror that counteracts the image distortion introduced by atmospheric turbulence. It is based on real-time optical corrections computed at very high speed (many hundreds of times each second) from image data obtained by a wavefront sensor (a special camera) that monitors light from a reference star, Present AO systems can only correct the effect of atmospheric turbulence in a very small region of the sky - typically 15 arcseconds or less - the correction degrading very quickly when moving away from the reference star. Engineers have therefore developed new techniques to overcome this limitation, one of which is multi-conjugate adaptive optics. MAD uses up to three guide stars instead of one as references to remove the blur caused by atmospheric turbulence over a field of view thirty times larger than existing techniques (eso0719). More information This research was presented in a paper that appears in the 26 November 2009 issue of Nature , "The cluster Terzan 5 as a remnant of a primordial building block of the Galactic bulge", by F. R. Ferraro et al.. The team is composed of Francesco Ferraro, Emanuele Dalessandro, Alessio Mucciarelli and Barbara Lanzoni (Department of Astronomy, University of Bologna, Italy), Giacomo Beccari (ESA, Space Science Department, Noordwijk, Netherlands), Mike Rich (Department of Physics and Astronomy, UCLA, Los Angeles, USA), Livia Origlia, Michele Bellazzini and Gabriele Cocozza (INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, Italy), Robert T. Rood (Astronomy Department, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, USA), Elena Valenti (ESO and Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Departamento de Astronomia, Santiago, Chile) and Scott Ransom (National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, USA). ESO, the European Southern Observatory, is the foremost intergovernmental astronomy organisation in Europe and the world's most productive astronomical observatory. It is supported by 14 countries

  20. a Passage to the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1995-11-01

    a concluding Press Conference , during which the outcome of this unique event will be summarized by the participants and the organisers: Monday, November 20, 1995, 15:30 pm, at the ESO Headquarters, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 2, D-85748 Garching, Germany List of National First-Prize Winners Belgium: Mr. Freddy Allemeersch (Teacher), Mr. Pieter De Ceuninck, Mr. Jeroen Staelens (Onze-Lieve-Vrouwecollege, Brugge) Denmark: Mr. Joern C. Olsen, Mr. Henrik Struckmann, Mr. Uffe A. Hansen, Mr. Mogens Winther (Teacher) (Soenderborg Amtsgymnasium) Finland: Mr. Reima Eresmaa, Ms. Laura Elina Nykyri, Ms. Reetamaija Janhonen (Cygnaeues-Lukeo, Jyvaeskylae and Jyvaeskylaen Lyseon Lukeo) France: Mr. Rene Cavaroz (Teacher), Mr. Vincent Hardy, Mr. Antoine Lesuffleur (Lycee Chartier, Bayeux) Germany: Ms. Dorothee Barth, Mr. Walter Czech (Teacher), Mr. Uwe Kranz, Ms. Karin Wieland (Immanuel-Kant-Gymnasium, Leinfelden-Echterdingen, Baden-Wuerttemberg) Greece: Ms. Agni Ioannidi, Ms. Elena Katifori, Mr. Vassilis Samiotis, Mr. Vassillos Tzotzes (Teacher) (Second Varvakelo Experimental Lyceum, Athens) Ireland: Mr. Declan Maccuarta (Teacher), Mr. Colm Mcloughlin (St. Peter's College, Wexford, Co. Wexford) Italy: Mr. Pasquale Ciarletta, Ms. Francesca D'elia, Ms. Ada Fortugna (Teacher), Mr. Alfredo Pudano (Liceo Scientifico `Leonardo da Vinci', Reggio Calabria) The Netherlands: Mr. Alex De Beer, Mr. Klaas Huijbregts, Mr. Ruud Nellen (Norbertuscollege, Rosendaal) Spain: Mr. Aritz Atela Aio, Mr. Julen Sarasola Manich (Teacher), Mr. Jon Huertas Rodriquez (Txorierri Batxilergoko Institua, Derio Bizkaia) Sweden: Mr. Rahman Amanullah, Mr. Kjell L. Bonander (Teacher), Mr. Tomas Oppelstrup, Ms. Christin Wiedemann (Saltsjoebadens Samskola, Saltsjoebaden) United Kingdom: Mr. Michael Ching, Dr. Richard Field (Teacher) (Oundle School, Peterborough) National Committees Further information about the national contests may be obtained from the National Committees: Belgium: Dr. C. Sterken, Vrije Universiteit

  1. PREFACE: Turbulent Mixing and Beyond Turbulent Mixing and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abarzhi, Snezhana I.; Gauthier, Serge; Rosner, Robert

    2008-10-01

    ) Institute for Laser Engineering (ILE), Osaka, Japan (Division Head: Dr K Nishihara) Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT), Chicago, USA (College of Science and Letters, Department of Applied Mathematics: Dr S I Abarji) and thanks them for making this event possible. The Organizing Committee appreciates the assistance of Suzie Radosic (administrator and assistant, ICTP) Daniil Ilyin (web-master, Chicago) Elena Magnus (assistant, Chicago) We express our gratitude for the help with the Conference Program to the members of the Scientific Advisory Committee S I Abarzhi (The University of Chicago, Illinois Institute of Technology, USA) G Ahlers (University of California at Santa Barbara, USA) M J Andrews (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Texas A & M University, USA) S I Anisimov (Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics, Russia) E Bodenschatz (Max Plank Institute, Gottingen, Germany) S Dalziel (DAMTP, University of Cambridge, UK) R Ecke (Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA) H J Fernando (Arizona State University, USA) S Gauthier (Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique, France) G A Glatzmaier (University of California at Santa Cruz, USA) W A Goddard III (California Institute of Technology, USA) L P Kadanoff (The University of Chicago, USA) D Q Lamb (The University of Chicago, USA) D P Lathrop (University of Maryland, USA) S Lebedev (Imperial College, UK) P Manneville (Ecole Polytechnique, France) D I Meiron (California Institute of Technology, USA) H Nagib (Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, USA) J Niemela (International Center for Theoretical Physics, Italy) K Nishihara (Institute for Laser Engineering, Osaka, Japan) S A Orszag (Yale University, USA) E Ott (University of Maryland, USA) N Peters (RWTS, Aachen, Germany) S B Pope (Cornell, USA) B A Remington (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, USA) R Rosner (Argonne National Laboratory and The University of Chicago, USA) A Schmidt (Naval Research Laboratory, USA) K R Sreenivasan (International Centre for Theoretical Physics

  2. EDITORIAL: Focus on Cold and Ultracold Molecules FOCUS ON COLD AND ULTRACOLD MOLECULES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Lincoln D.; Ye, Jun

    2009-05-01

    öhlich, A Griesmaier, T Pfau, H Saito, Y Kawaguchi and M Ueda High-energy-resolution molecular beams for cold collision studies L P Parazzoli, N Fitch, D S Lobser and H J Lewandowski Collisional effects in the formation of cold guided beams of polar molecules M Motsch, C Sommer, M Zeppenfeld, L D van Buuren, P W H Pinkse and G Rempe Towards sympathetic cooling of large molecules: cold collisions between benzene and rare gas atoms P Barletta, J Tennyson and P F Barker Efficient formation of ground-state ultracold molecules via STIRAP from the continuum at a Feshbach resonance Elena Kuznetsova, Marko Gacesa, Philippe Pellegrini, Susanne F Yelin and Robin Côté Emergent timescales in entangled quantum dynamics of ultracold molecules in optical lattices M L Wall and L D Carr Rotational state resolved photodissociation spectroscopy of translationally and vibrationally cold MgH+ ions: toward rotational cooling of molecular ions K Højbjerre, A K Hansen, P S Skyt, P F Staanum and M Drewsen Collective transverse cavity cooling of a dense molecular beam Thomas Salzburger and Helmut Ritsch A Stark decelerator on a chip Samuel A Meek, Horst Conrad and Gerard Meijer Deceleration of molecules by dipole force potential: a numerical simulation Susumu Kuma and Takamasa Momose Ultracold molecules: vehicles to scalable quantum information processing Kathy-Anne Brickman Soderberg, Nathan Gemelke and Cheng Chin Magnetic field modification of ultracold molecule-molecule collisions T V Tscherbul, Yu V Suleimanov, V Aquilanti and R V Krems Spectroscopy of 39K85Rb triplet excited states using ultracold a 3Σ+ state molecules formed by photoassociation J T Kim, D Wang, E E Eyler, P L Gould and W C Stwalley Pumping vortex into a Bose-Einstein condensate of heteronuclear molecules Z F Xu, R Q Wang and L You Intense atomic and molecular beams via neon buffer-gas cooling David Patterson, Julia Rasmussen and John M Doyle Dynamical properties of dipolar Fermi gases T Sogo, L He, T Miyakawa, S Yi, H Lu

  3. PREFACE: XVth International Conference on Calorimetry in High Energy Physics (CALOR2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akchurin, Nural

    2012-12-01

    /Saclay Irfu/SPP FRANCAVILLA, Paolo IFAE Barcelona GATAULLIN, Marat California Institute of Technology GATTO, Corrado INFN-Napoli GAUDIO, Gabriella INFN-Pavia GERMANI, Stefano INFN-Perugia Goldenzweig, Pablo University of Rochester GRAF, Norman SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory GROOM, Don Lawrence Berkeley Lab GUARDINCERRI, Elena Los Alamos National Laboratory HAUPTMAN, John Iowa State University HENRIQUES, Ana CERN HUANG, Jin Los Alamos National Laboratory HU, Tao IHEP-Beijing, CAS JIANG, Xiaodong Los Alamos National Laboratory JUI, Charles University of Utah KAPUSTINSKY, Jon Los Alamos National Laboratory KIBILKO, Mark SE Technical Sales, Inc. KIRSCHENMANN, Henning University of Hamburg KISTENEV, Edouard Brookhaven National Laboratory KLIMEK, Pawel Stockholm Universitet KROEGER, Robert University of Mississippi LECOQ, Paul CERN LEE, Sehwook Texas Tech University LEE, Sung-Won Texas Tech University LIVAN, Michele Pavia University LUTZ, Benjamin DESY MAGILL, Stephen Argonne National Laboratory MATHIS, Mark College of William and Mary MATTHEWS, John University of Utah MENKE, Sven Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik MOULSON, Matthew INFN-Frascati NAGEL, Martin Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik NAKAMURA, Isamu KEK NEMECEK, Stanislav FZU AVCR Praha NESSI-TEDALDI, Francesca ETH Zurich NOVOTNY, Rainer 2nd Physics Institute, University Giessen OREGLIA, Mark University of Chicago PERLOFF, Alexx Texas A&M University PETYT, David Rutherford Appleton Laboratory RAHMAT, Rahmat University of Mississippi RAMILLI, Marco Hamburg Universitaet ROSIER LEES, Sylvie LAPP- IN2P3-CNRS RUTHERFOORD, John University of Arizona SAKUMA, Tai Texas A&M University SANTIAGO CERQUEIRA, Augusto Federal University of Juiz de Fora SARRA, Ivano INFN-Frascati SEIDEL, Sally University of New Mexico SEIFERT, Frank TU Dresden, Germany SHAMIM, Mansoora University of Oregon SIMON, Frank Max-Planck-Institute for Physics STAFFAN, Paul Wiener Plein and Baus, Corp Dr. STAROVOITOV, Pavel DESY TABARELLI DE FATIS, Tommaso

  4. List of Participants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-11-01

    Università di Napoli Federico II Elena Méndez Escobar University of Edinburgh Iulian Negru University of Craiova Emil NissimovInstitute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Sofia Teake NutmaCentre for Theoretical Physics, University of Groningen Niels Obers Niels Bohr Institute, København Olof Ohlsson SaxUppsala University Rodrigo OleaIstituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Milano Domenico OrlandoUniversité de Neuchâtel Marta Orselli Niels Bohr Institute, København Tomas OrtinInstituto de Física Teórica, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid Yaron OzTel Aviv University Enrico PajerLudwig-Maximilians-Universität, München Angel Paredes GalanUtrecht University Sara PasquettiUniversité de Neuchâtel Silvia PenatiUniversità di Milano-Bicocca Jan PerzKatholieke Universiteit Leuven Igor PesandoUniversità di Torino Tassos PetkouUniversity of Crete Marios PetropoulosCenter de Physique Théorique, École Polytechnique, Palaiseau Franco PezzellaIstituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Napoli Moises Picon PonceUniversity of Padova Marco PirroneUniversità di Milano-Bicocca Andrea PrinslooUniversity of Cape Town Joris RaeymaekersKatholieke Universiteit Leuven Alfonso RamalloUniversidade de Santiago de Compostela Carlo Alberto RattiUniversità di Milano-Bicocca Marco RauchPhysikalisches Institut, Universität Bonn Ronald Reid-EdwardsUniversity of Hamburg Patricia RitterUniversity of Edinburgh Peter RoenneDESY, Hamburg Jan RosseelUniversità di Torino Clement RuefService de Physique Théorique, CEA Saclay Felix RustMax-Planck-Institut für Physik, München Thomas RyttovNiels Bohr Institute, København and CERN, Geneva Agustin Sabio VeraCERN, Geneva Christian SaemannTrinity College, Dublin Houman Safaai SISSA, Trieste Henning SamtlebenÉcole Normale Supérieure, Lyon Alberto SantambrogioIstituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Milano Silviu Constantin SararuUniversity of Craiova Ricardo SchiappaCERN, Geneva Ionut Romeo SchiopuChalmers University, G

  5. Young Astronomers' Observe with ESO Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1995-11-01

    project concerned the actual construction of a working solar radio interferometer, a rather complex instrument that allows measurements of the long-wavelength radiation from the Sun and to map the locations in the solar corona where this radiation originates. The antennae and receiver were designed for frequences around 550 and 750 MHz and were built by the team members themselves. Radio signals from the Sun (as interference fringes) were effectively observed with this instrument, documenting the excellent functioning of this advanced equipment. Germany: Ms. Dorothee Barth, Mr. Walter Czech (Teacher), Mr. Uwe Kranz, Ms. Karin Wieland (Immanuel-Kant-Gymnasium, Leinfelden-Echterdingen, Baden-Wurttemberg) Following a careful planning phase, systematic observations of the 14-magnitude planet Pluto were made with a CCD camera and a 30-cm telescope during 18 nights in the spring and summer of this year. Five nearby stars were used to calibrate the resulting photometric measurements. In the end, this programme was shown to achieve a very good photometric accuracy of about +- 0.2 magnitude per measurement. The variation of Pluto's brightness was found to be about 0.7 magnitude for this particular instrumental combination (no filtre). It was thus possible to draw the lightcurve which was found to be in complete agreement with the established 6.4 day rotation period. Greece: Ms. Agni Ioannidi, Ms. Elena Katifori, Mr. Vassilis Samiotis, Mr. Vassillos Tzotzes (Teacher) (Varvakio Experimental Lyceum, Athens) The project starts out from a star of 1.56 solar mass and a certain density. From this, its size, luminosity, temperature, pressure and other parameters are calculated. With an analogue to the Titius-Bode law for planetary distances, a new planetary system is constructed. It has 5 planets, 3 of which are of the terrestrial type and the other 2 are giant gas planets, larger than Jupiter. Their physical characteristics are calculated. One planet (the 3rd from the central star) is

  6. Southern Fireworks above ESO Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-05-01

    - the PLANET observers turned their telescope and quickly obtained a series of CCD images in visual light of the sky region where the gamma-ray burst was detected, then shipped them off electronically to their Dutch colleagues [3]. Comparing the new photos with earlier ones in the digital sky archive, Vreeswijk, Galama and Rol almost immediately discovered a new, relatively bright visual source in the region of the gamma-ray burst, which they proposed as the optical counterpart of the burst, cf. their dedicated webpage at http://www.astro.uva.nl/~titus/grb990510/. The team then placed a message on the international Gamma-Ray Burster web-noteboard ( GCN Circular 310), thereby alerting their colleagues all over the world. One hour later, the narrow-field instruments on BeppoSax identified a new X-Ray source at the same location ( GCN Circular 311), thus confirming the optical identification. All in all, a remarkable synergy of human and satellite resources! Observations of GRB 990510 at ESO Vreeswijk, Galama and Rol, in collaboration with Nicola Masetti, Eliana Palazzi and Elena Pian of the BeppoSAX GRB optical follow-up team (led by Filippo Frontera ) and the Huntsville optical follow-up team (led by Chryssa Kouveliotou ), also contacted the European Southern Observatory (ESO). Astronomers at this Organization's observatories in Chile were quick to exploit this opportunity and crucial data were soon obtained with several of the main telescopes at La Silla and Paranal, less than 14 hours after the first detection of this event by the satellite. ESO PR Photo 22a/99 ESO PR Photo 22a/99 [Preview - JPEG: 211 x 400 pix - 72k] [Normal - JPEG: 422 x 800 pix - 212k] [High-Res - JPEG: 1582 x 3000 pix - 2.6M] ESO PR Photo 22b/99 ESO PR Photo 22b/99 [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 437 pix - 297k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 873 pix - 1.1M] [High-Res - JPEG: 2300 x 2509 pix - 5.9M] Caption to PR Photo 22a/99 : This wide-field photo was obtained with the Wide-Field Imager (WFI) at the MPG/ESO 2.2-m