Science.gov

Sample records for elevation models lahar

  1. Modeling lahar behavior and hazards

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manville, Vernon; Major, Jon J.; Fagents, Sarah A.

    2013-01-01

    Lahars are highly mobile mixtures of water and sediment of volcanic origin that are capable of traveling tens to > 100 km at speeds exceeding tens of km hr-1. Such flows are among the most serious ground-based hazards at many volcanoes because of their sudden onset, rapid advance rates, long runout distances, high energy, ability to transport large volumes of material, and tendency to flow along existing river channels where populations and infrastructure are commonly concentrated. They can grow in volume and peak discharge through erosion and incorporation of external sediment and/or water, inundate broad areas, and leave deposits many meters thick. Furthermore, lahars can recur for many years to decades after an initial volcanic eruption, as fresh pyroclastic material is eroded and redeposited during rainfall events, resulting in a spatially and temporally evolving hazard. Improving understanding of the behavior of these complex, gravitationally driven, multi-phase flows is key to mitigating the threat to communities at lahar-prone volcanoes. However, their complexity and evolving nature pose significant challenges to developing the models of flow behavior required for delineating their hazards and hazard zones.

  2. Lahar Hazard Modeling at Tungurahua Volcano, Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorensen, O. E.; Rose, W. I.; Jaya, D.

    2003-04-01

    lahar-hazard-zones using a digital elevation model (DEM), was used to construct a hazard map for the volcano. The 10 meter resolution DEM was constructed for Tungurahua Volcano using scanned topographic lines obtained from the GIS Department at the Escuela Politécnica Nacional, Quito, Ecuador. The steep topographic gradients and rapid downcutting of most rivers draining the edifice prevents the deposition of lahars on the lower flanks of Tungurahua. Modeling confirms the high degree of flow channelization in the deep Tungurahua canyons. Inundation zones observed and shown by LAHARZ at Baños yield identification of safe zones within the city which would provide safety from even the largest magnitude lahar expected.

  3. Rain-triggered lahar susceptibility using a shallow landslide and surface erosion model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mead, Stuart; Magill, Christina; Hilton, James

    2016-11-01

    Lahars are mass flows containing variable concentrations of water and volcanic debris that can cause catastrophic impacts to life, livelihoods and infrastructure downstream from their volcanic origin. Accurate and quantitative information on lahar hazards are essential for reducing the impact of these events. Lahar hazard assessments often focus on the use of numeric or empirical models to describe flow behaviour and inundation areas, which rely on historic lahar events and expert elicitation to define model inputs. This results in qualitative or semi-quantitative estimates of hazard that do not account for the mechanics of lahar initiation or, in the case of rain-triggered lahars, the dependence of rainfall intensity and duration on initiation. Here we develop a method for calculating rain-triggered lahar susceptibility, defined as the occurrence probability of a particular lahar initial volume at a specific location. The model relies on terrain and deposit characteristics and a probabilistic measure of rainfall in the form of rainfall intensity-frequency-duration relationships. Results for a case study of the October 28, 1995 lahar at Mangatoetoenui stream, Ruapehu Volcano, New Zealand, indicate lahar volume is controlled by a characteristic timescale, relating the deposit depth H to the hydraulic diffusivity D0 in the ratio H2/D0. The timescale describes the transmission of positive pore pressures within the deposit, leading to shallow failure. As a consequence of this timescale, rainfall duration is the most important factor determining initial lahar sediment volume. Rainfall intensity plays a minor role, controlling the volume of water in the lahar mixture. This observation is consistent with power-law relationships used to determine lahar triggering rainfall thresholds. The rain-triggered lahar susceptibility approach developed here is anticipated to improve probabilistic lahar hazard assessments by providing quantitative, reproducible estimates of initial

  4. Challenges of modeling current very large lahars at Nevado del Huila Volcano, Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worni, Raphael; Huggel, Christian; Stoffel, M.; Pulgarín, B.

    2012-03-01

    Nevado del Huila, a glacier-covered volcano in the South of Colombia's Cordillera Central, had not experienced any historical eruptions before 2007. In 2007 and 2008, the volcano erupted with phreatic and phreatomagmatic events which produced lahars with flow volumes of up to about 300 million m3 causing severe damage to infrastructure and loss of lives. The magnitude of these lahars and the prevailing potential for similar or even larger events, poses significant hazards to local people and makes appropriate modeling a real challenge. In this study, we analyze the recent lahars to better understand the main processes and then model possible scenarios for future events. We used lahar inundation depths, travel duration, and flow deposits to constrain the dimensions of the 2007 event and applied LAHARZ and FLO-2D for lahar modeling. Measured hydrographs, geophone seismic sensor data and calculated peak discharges served as input data for the reconstruction of flow hydrographs and for calibration of the models. For model validation, results were compared with field data collected along the Páez and Simbola Rivers. Based on the results of the 2007 lahar simulation, we modeled lahar scenarios with volumes between 300 million and 1 billion m3. The approach presented here represents a feasible solution for modeling high-magnitude flows like lahars and allows an assessment of potential future events and related consequences for population centers downstream of Nevado del Huila.

  5. Loss Estimation Modeling Of Scenario Lahars From Mount Rainier, Washington State, Using HAZUS-MH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, T. J.; Cakir, R.

    2011-12-01

    We have adapted lahar hazard zones developed by Hoblitt and others (1998) and converted to digital data by Schilling and others (2008) into the appropriate format for HAZUS-MH, which is FEMA's loss estimation model. We assume that structures engulfed by cohesive lahars will suffer complete loss, and structures affected by post-lahar flooding will be appropriately modeled by the HAZUS-MH flood model. Another approach investigated is to estimate the momentum of lahars, calculate a lateral force, and apply the earthquake model, substituting the lahar lateral force for PGA. Our initial model used the HAZUS default data, which include estimates of building type and value from census data. This model estimated a loss of about 12 billion for a repeat lahar similar to the Electron Mudflow down the Puyallup River. Because HAZUS data are based on census tracts, this estimated damage includes everything in the census tract, even buildings outside of the lahar hazard zone. To correct this, we acquired assessors data from all of the affected counties and converted them into HAZUS format. We then clipped it to the boundaries of the lahar hazard zone to more precisely delineate those properties actually at risk in each scenario. This refined our initial loss estimate to about 6 billion with exclusion of building content values. We are also investigating rebuilding the lahar hazard zones applying Lahar-Z to a more accurate topographic grid derived from recent Lidar data acquired from the Puget Sound Lidar Consortium and Mount Rainier National Park. Final results of these models for the major drainages of Mount Rainier will be posted to the Washington Interactive Geologic Map (http://www.dnr.wa.gov/ResearchScience/Topics/GeosciencesData/Pages/geology_portal.aspx).

  6. The use of FLO2D numerical code in lahar hazard evaluation at Popocatépetl volcano: a 2001 lahar scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caballero, L.; Capra, L.

    2014-12-01

    Lahar modeling represents an excellent tool for designing hazard maps. It allows the definition of potential inundation zones for different lahar magnitude scenarios and sediment concentrations. Here, we present the results obtained for the 2001 syneruptive lahar at Popocatépetl volcano, based on simulations performed with FLO2D software. An accurate delineation of this event is needed, since it is one of the possible scenarios considered if magmatic activity increases its magnitude. One of the main issues for lahar simulation using FLO2D is the calibration of the input hydrograph and rheological flow properties. Here, we verified that geophone data can be properly calibrated by means of peak discharge calculations obtained by the superelevation method. Digital elevation model resolution also resulted as an important factor in defining the reliability of the simulated flows. Simulation results clearly show the influence of sediment concentrations and rheological properties on lahar depth and distribution. Modifying rheological properties during lahar simulation strongly affects lahar distribution. More viscous lahars have a more restricted aerial distribution and thicker depths, and resulting velocities are noticeably smaller. FLO2D proved to be a very successful tool for delimitating lahar inundation zones as well as generating different lahar scenarios not only related to lahar volume or magnitude, but also taking into account different sediment concentrations and rheologies widely documented as influencing lahar-prone areas.

  7. Modelling 2001 lahars at Popocatépetl volcano using FLO2D numerical code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caballero, L.; Capra, L.

    2013-12-01

    Popocatépetl volcano is located on the central part of the Transmexican Volcanic Belt. It is one of the most active volcanoes in Mexico and endanger more than 25 million people that lives in its surroundings. In the last months, the renewal of its volcanic activity put into alert scientific community. One of the possible scenarios is the 2001 explosive activity, which was characterized by a 8 km eruptive column and the subsequent formation of pumice flows up to 4 km from the crater. Lahars were generated few hours after, remobilizing the new deposits towards NE flank of the volcano, along Huiloac Gorge, almost reaching Santiago Xalitzintla town (Capra et al., 2004). The occurrence of a similar scenario makes very important to reproduce this event to delimitate accurately lahar hazard zones. In this work, 2001 lahar deposit is modeled using FLO2D numerical code. Geophone data is used to reconstruct initial hydrograph and sediment concentration. Sensitivity study of most important parameters used by this code like Manning, and α and β coefficients was conducted in order to achieve a good simulation. Results obtained were compared with field data and demonstrated a good agreement in thickness and flow distribution. A comparison with previously published data with laharZ program (Muñoz-Salinas, 2009) is also made. Additionally, lahars with fluctuating sediment concentrations but with similar volume are simulated to observe the influence of the rheological behavior on lahar distribution.

  8. Smoothed particle hydrodynamic modeling of volcanic debris flows: Application to Huiloac Gorge lahars (Popocatépetl volcano, Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddad, Bouchra; Palacios, David; Pastor, Manuel; Zamorano, José Juan

    2016-09-01

    Lahars are among the most catastrophic volcanic processes, and the ability to model them is central to mitigating their effects. Several lahars recently generated by the Popocatépetl volcano (Mexico) moved downstream through the Huiloac Gorge towards the village of Santiago Xalitzintla. The most dangerous was the 2001 lahar, in which the destructive power of the debris flow was maintained throughout the extent of the flow. Identifying the zone of hazard can be based either on numerical or empirical models, but a calibration and validation process is required to ensure hazard map quality. The Geoflow-SPH depth integrated numerical model used in this study to reproduce the 2001 lahar was derived from the velocity-pressure version of the Biot-Zienkiewicz model, and was discretized using the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method. The results of the calibrated SPH model were validated by comparing the simulated deposit depth with the field depth measured at 16 cross sections distributed strategically along the gorge channel. Moreover, the dependency of the results on topographic mesh resolution, initial lahar mass shape and dimensions is also investigated. The results indicate that to accurately reproduce the 2001 lahar flow dynamics the channel topography needed to be discretized using a mesh having a minimum 5 m resolution, and an initial lahar mass shape that adopted the source area morphology. Field validation of the calibrated model showed that there was a satisfactory relationship between the simulated and field depths, the error being less than 20% for 11 of the 16 cross sections. This study demonstrates that the Geoflow-SPH model was able to accurately reproduce the lahar path and the extent of the flow, but also reproduced other parameters including flow velocity and deposit depth.

  9. Secondary lahar hazard assessment for Villa la Angostura, Argentina, using Two-Phase-Titan modelling code during 2011 Cordón Caulle eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Córdoba, G.; Villarosa, G.; Sheridan, M. F.; Viramonte, J. G.; Beigt, D.; Salmuni, G.

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents the results of lahar modelling in the town of Villa La Angostura (Neuquén-Argentina) based on the Two-Phase-Titan modelling computer code. The purpose of this exercise is to provide decision makers with a useful tool to assess lahar hazard during the 2011 Puyehue-Cordón Caulle Volcanic Complex eruption. The possible occurrence of lahars mobilized from recent ash falls that could reach the city was analysed. The performance of the Two-Phase-Titan model using 15 m resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) developed from optical satellite images and from radar satellite images was evaluated. The output of these modellings showed inconsistencies that, based on field observations, were attributed to bad adjustment of the DEMs to real topography. Further testing of results using more accurate radar-based 10 m DEM, provided more realistic predictions. This procedure allowed us to simulate the path of flows from Florencia, Las Piedritas and Colorado creeks, which are the most hazardous streams for debris flows in Villa La Angostura. The output of the modelling is a valuable tool for city planning and risk management especially considering the glacial geomorphic features of the region, the strong urban development growth and the land occupation that has occurred in the last decade in Villa La Angostura and its surroundings.

  10. Simulation of three lahars in the Mount St Helens area, Washington using a one-dimensional, unsteady-state streamflow model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laenen, Antonius; Hansen, R.P.

    1988-01-01

    A one-dimensional, unsteady-state, open-channel model was used to analytically reproduce three lahar events. Factors contributing to the success of the modeling were: (1) the lahars were confined to a channel, (2) channel roughness was defined by field information, and (3) the volume of the flow remained relatively unchanged for the duration of the peak. Manning 's 'n ' values used in computing conveyance in the model were subject to the changing rheology of the debris flow and were calculated from field cross-section information (velocities used in these calculations were derived from super-elevation or run-up formulas). For the events modeled in this exercise, Manning 's 'n ' calculations ranged from 0.020 to 0.099. In all lahar simulations, the rheology of the flow changed in a downstream direction during the course of the event. Chen 's 'U ', the mudflow consistency index, changed approximately an order of magnitude for each event. The ' u ' values ranged from 5-2,260 kg/m for three events modeled. The empirical approach adopted in this paper is useful as a tool to help predict debris-flow behavior, but does not lead to understanding the physical processes of debris flows. (Author 's abstract)

  11. Simulating the Osceola Mudflow Lahar Event in the Pacific Northwest using a GPU Based 2-Dimensional Hydraulic Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, B. G.; Eppert, S.; Lohmann, D.; Li, S.; Goteti, G.; Kaheil, Y. H.

    2011-12-01

    At 4,400 meters, Mount Rainer has been the point of origin for several major lahar events. The largest event, termed the "Osceola Mudflow," occurred 5,500 years ago and covered an area of approximately 550km2 with a total volume of deposited material from 2 to 4km3. Particularly deadly, large lahars are estimated to have maximum flow velocities in of 100km/h with a density often described as "Flowing Concrete." While rare, these events typically cause total destruction within a lahar inundation zone. It is estimated that approximately 150,000 people live on top of previous deposits left by lahars which can be triggered by anything from earthquakes to glacial and chemical erosion of volcanic bedrock over time to liquefaction caused by extreme rainfall events. A novel methodology utilizing a 2 dimensional hydraulic model has been implemented allowing for high resolution (30m) lahar inundation maps to be generated. The utility of this model above or in addition to other methodologies such as that of Iverson (1998), lies in its portability to other lahar zones as well as its ability to model any total volume specified by the user. The process for generating lahar flood plains requires few inputs including: a Digital Terrain Map of any resolution (DTM), a mask defining the locations for lahar genesis, a raster of friction coefficients, and a time series depicting uniform material accumulation over the genesis mask which is allowed to flow down-slope. Finally, a significant improvement in speed has been made for solving the two dimensional model by utilizing the latest in graphics processing unit (GPU) technology which has resulted in a greater than 200 times speed up in model run time over previous CPU-based methods. The model runs for the Osceola Mudflow compare favorably with USGS derived inundation regions as derived using field measurements and GIS based approaches such as the LAHARZ program suit. Overall gradation of low to high risk match well, however the new

  12. Water, ice and mud: Lahars and lahar hazards at ice- and snow-clad volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waythomas, Christopher F.

    2014-01-01

    Large-volume lahars are significant hazards at ice and snow covered volcanoes. Hot eruptive products produced during explosive eruptions can generate a substantial volume of melt water that quickly evolves into highly mobile flows of ice, sediment and water. At present it is difficult to predict the size of lahars that can form at ice and snow covered volcanoes due to their complex flow character and behaviour. However, advances in experiments and numerical approaches are producing new conceptual models and new methods for hazard assessment. Eruption triggered lahars that are ice-dominated leave behind thin, almost unrecognizable sedimentary deposits, making them likely to be under-represented in the geological record.

  13. The use of FLO2D numerical code in lahar hazard evaluation at Popocatépetl volcano: a 2001-lahar scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caballero, L.; Capra, L.

    2014-07-01

    Lahar modelling represents an excellent tool to design hazard maps. It allows the definition of potential inundation zones for different lahar magnitude scenarios and sediment concentrations. Here we present the results obtained for the 2001 syneruptive lahar at Popocatépetl volcano, based on simulations performed with FLO2D software. An accurate delineation of this event is needed since it is one of the possible scenarios considered during a volcanic crisis. One of the main issues for lahar simulation using FLO2D is the calibration of the input hydrograph and rheologic flow properties. Here we verified that geophone data can be properly calibrated by means of peak discharge calculations obtained by superelevation method. Simulation results clearly show the influence of concentration and rheologic properties on lahar depth and distribution. Modifying rheologic properties during lahar simulation strongly affect lahar distribution. More viscous lahars have a more restricted aerial distribution, thicker depths, and resulting velocities are noticeable smaller. FLO2D proved to be a very successful tool to delimitate lahar inundation zones as well as to generate different lahar scenarios not only related to lahar volume or magnitude but also to take into account different sediment concentrations and rheologies widely documented to influence lahar prone areas.

  14. Secondary lahar hazard assessment for Villa la Angostura, Argentina, using Two-Phase-Titan modelling code during 2011 Cordón Caulle eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Córdoba, G.; Villarosa, G.; Sheridan, M. F.; Viramonte, J. G.; Beigt, D.; Salmuni, G.

    2014-10-01

    This paper shows the results of secondary lahar modelling in Villa La Angostura town (Neuquén-Argentina) based on the Two-Phase-Titan modelling computer code, which aimed to provide decision makers a useful tool to assess lahar hazard during the 2011 Puyehue-Cordón Caulle Volcanic Complex eruption. Possible occurrence of secondary lahars that could reach the city was analized. The performance of the Two-Phase-Titan model using 15 m resolution DEMs developed from optical satellite images and from radar satellite images was evaluated. The output of these modellings showed inconsistencies that, based on field observations, were attributed to bad adjustment of DEMs to real topography. Further testing of results using more accurate radar based 10 m DEM, proved more realistic predictions. The procedure allowed to simulate the path of flows from Florencia, Las Piedritas and Colorado creeks, which are the most influencing streams in Villa La Angostura. The output of the modelling is a valuable tool for city planning and risk management especially considering the glacial geomorphology features of the region, the strong urban development growth and the land occupation tendencies observed in last decade in Villa La Angostura and its surroundings.

  15. Lahar Properties and Propagation: The Influence of Bulking and Debulking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagents, S. A.; Baloga, S. M.

    2005-12-01

    Construction of physics-based models lahar flow processes is complicated by the need to account for varying topography, solid mass fractions and complex rheologic behaviors. The incorporation and loss of material (sediments or water) during the advance of a lahar can significantly influence the advance rate, mobility, rheology, and inundation limits of the flow, and therefore has consequences for destructive potential. We have developed a theoretical treatment based on the conservation of flow volume and mass to describe the effects of such processes on flow characteristics. We apply our model to a common scenario of lahar generation and evolution; the formation of an initially dilute flow by catastrophic breaching or ejection of a volcanic summit crater lake, followed by bulking due to incorporation of substrate materials, and later debulking due to sediment deposition. The key features of this model are time-dependence and the inclusion of two terms describing the influx or efflux of sediments to or from the flow, at a rate proportional to the volumetric flow rate. For lahars triggered by crater-lake water, we derive the time-evolution of flow behavior for comparison with the well-documented lahars of Mt. Ruapehu, New Zealand. Our model produces qualitatively realistic behavior with respect to flow depth and density profiles, downstream hydrograph evolution, erosional and depositional regimes, and transformations between streamflow, hyperconcentrated flow and debris flow conditions. However, there is a need for further testing with a suite of field data sets. These include detailed pre- and post-event topographic cross-sectional and longitudinal transects of potential lahar pathways, as well as observations on active lahars (i.e., discharge hydrographs at multiple downflow localities, high-water marks reflecting the passage of the peak stage, and observations of the flow erosional/depositional and rheologic/density regimes). The resulting calibration will allow

  16. Community Exposure to Lahar Hazards from Mount Rainier, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, Nathan J.; Soulard, Christopher E.

    2009-01-01

    Geologic evidence of past events and inundation modeling of potential events suggest that lahars associated with Mount Rainier, Washington, are significant threats to downstream development. To mitigate potential impacts of future lahars and educate at-risk populations, officials need to understand how communities are vulnerable to these fast-moving debris flows and which individuals and communities may need assistance in preparing for and responding to an event. To support local risk-reduction planning for future Mount Rainier lahars, this study documents the variations among communities in King, Lewis, Pierce, and Thurston Counties in the amount and types of developed land, human populations, economic assets, and critical facilities in a lahar-hazard zone. The lahar-hazard zone in this study is based on the behavior of the Electron Mudflow, a lahar that traveled along the Puyallup River approximately 500 years ago and was due to a slope failure on the west flank of Mount Rainier. This lahar-hazard zone contains 78,049 residents, of which 11 percent are more than 65 years in age, 21 percent do not live in cities or unincorporated towns, and 39 percent of the households are renter occupied. The lahar-hazard zone contains 59,678 employees (4 percent of the four-county labor force) at 3,890 businesses that generate $16 billion in annual sales (4 and 7 percent, respectively, of totals in the four-county area) and tax parcels with a combined total value of $8.8 billion (2 percent of the study-area total). Employees in the lahar-hazard zone are primarily in businesses related to manufacturing, retail trade, transportation and warehousing, wholesale trade, and construction. Key road and rail corridors for the region are in the lahar-hazard zone, which could result in significant indirect economic losses for businesses that rely on these networks, such as the Port of Tacoma. Although occupancy values are not known for each site, the lahar-hazard zone contains numerous

  17. Lahars of Mount Pinatubo, Philippines

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Newhall, Christopher G.; Stauffer, Peter H.; Hendley, James W.

    1997-01-01

    On June 15, 1991, Mount Pinatubo in the Philippines exploded in the second largest volcanic eruption on Earth this century. This eruption deposited more than 1 cubic mile (5 cubic kilometers) of volcanic ash and rock fragments on the volcano's slopes. Within hours, heavy rains began to wash this material down into the surrounding lowlands in giant, fast-moving mudflows called lahars. In the next four rainy seasons, lahars carried about half of the deposits off the volcano, causing even more destruction in the lowlands than the eruption itself.

  18. Digital Elevation Models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1993-01-01

    The Earth Science Information Center (ESIC) distributes digital cartographic/geographic data files produced by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) as part of the National Mapping Program. Digital cartographic data files may be grouped into four basic types. The first of these, called a Digital Line Graph (DLG), is the line map information in digital form. These data files include information on base data categories, such as transportation, hypsography, hydrography, and boundaries. The second type, called a Digital Elevation Model (DEM), consists of a sampled array of elevations for a number of ground positions at regularly spaced intervals. The third type is Land Use and Land Cover digital data which provides information on nine major classes of land use such as urban, agricultural, or forest as well as associated map data such as political units and Federal land ownership. The fourth type, the Geographic Names Information System, provides primary information for all known places, features, and areas in the United States identified by a proper name.

  19. Lahar hazard zones for eruption-generated lahars in the Lassen Volcanic Center, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, Joel E.; Clynne, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    Lahar deposits are found in drainages that head on or near Lassen Peak in northern California, demonstrating that these valleys are susceptible to future lahars. In general, lahars are uncommon in the Lassen region. Lassen Peak's lack of large perennial snowfields and glaciers limits its potential for lahar development, with the winter snowpack being the largest source of water for lahar generation. The most extensive lahar deposits are related to the May 1915 eruption of Lassen Peak, and evidence for pre-1915 lahars is sparse and spatially limited. The May 1915 eruption of Lassen Peak was a small-volume eruption that generated a snow and hot-rock avalanche, a pyroclastic flow, and two large and four smaller lahars. The two large lahars were generated on May 19 and 22 and inundated sections of Lost and Hat Creeks. We use 80 years of snow depth measurements from Lassen Peak to calculate average and maximum liquid water depths, 2.02 meters (m) and 3.90 m respectively, for the month of May as estimates of the 1915 lahars. These depths are multiplied by the areal extents of the eruptive deposits to calculate a water volume range, 7.05-13.6x106 cubic meters (m3). We assume the lahars were a 50/50 mix of water and sediment and double the water volumes to provide an estimate of the 1915 lahars, 13.2-19.8x106 m3. We use a representative volume of 15x106 m3 in the software program LAHARZ to calculate cross-sectional and planimetric areas for the 1915 lahars. The resultant lahar inundation zone reasonably portrays both of the May 1915 lahars. We use this same technique to calculate the potential for future lahars in basins that head on or near Lassen Peak. LAHARZ assumes that the total lahar volume does not change after leaving the potential energy, H/L, cone (the height of the edifice, H, down to the approximate break in slope at its base, L); therefore, all water available to initiate a lahar is contained inside this cone. Because snow is the primary source of water for

  20. A New Two-phase Flow Model Applied to the 2007 Crater Lake Break-out Lahar, Mt. Ruapehu, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheridan, M. F.; Cordoba, G.; Pitman, E.; Cronin, S. J.; Procter, J.

    2010-12-01

    The 2007 Crater Lake break-out lahar, Mt. Ruapehu, New Zealand, is a complex but well-characterized natural debris flow that follows an intricate course over an array of topographic features (see Manville et al., this conference). Detailed digital terrain data (DEM) and accurate flow characterization allow us to test our computational model with an unusually high level of control for such a large natural flood wave. The new two-phase flow code is imbedded within the TITAN2D framework (Patra et al. 2005) that is widely used in hazard assessment for both dry (granular) and wet (debris flow) flows (Murcia et al., 2010). Because TITAN2D is actually valid for dry flows (avalanches) we developed a new two-phase model based on balance laws for mass and momentum for each phase. The granular material is assumed to obey a Coulomb constitutive relation and the fluid is assumed to be inviscid. The Darcy-Weisbach formulation is used to account for bed friction, and a phenomenological drag coefficient mediates the momentum exchange between phases. The resulting system of 6 partial differential equations are depth averaged and correspond to the Savage and Hutter model in the limit of no fluid, and to the typical shallow water solutions (Ortiz, et al., 2005) for pure water. This model is capable of simulating particle volumetric fractions as dilute as 0.001 and as concentrated as 0.55. To confirm the usefulness of the new code for complex flows we used data from four observation stations at Ruapehu located at runout distances of 2 km, 5 km, 7 km and 9 km. The specific flow data that we compare with the model outcomes include: 1) arrival time of the flood front, 2) maximum flood depth, and 3) flow velocity. The computed values for these flow characteristics are all within about ± 10% of the observed figures. References: Manville, V., et al., 2010, Anatomy of a basin break-out flood: The 2007 Crater Lake break-out lahar, Mt. Ruapehu, New Zealand, this conference. Murcia, H

  1. Lahar Hazard Mapping of Mount Shasta, California: A GIS-based Delineation of Potential Inundation Zones in Mud and Whitney Creek Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClung, S. C.; Roberts, M.

    2005-12-01

    Mount Shasta, the southernmost stratovolcano in the Cascade Range (41.4°N) has frequently produced lahars of various magnitudes during the last 10,000 years. These include large flows of eruptive origin, reaching more than 40 km from the summit, and studies have shown that at least 70 debris flows of noneruptive origin have occurred during the last 1,000 years in various stream channels. The Mud and Whitney Creek drainages have historically produced more debris flows than any other glacier-headed channel on the volcano. Periods of accelerated glacial melt have produced lahars in Whitney Creek with a volume of 4 x 106 m3 and a runout distance of about 27 km from the summit. Mud Creek flows from 1924 to 1931 covered an area of more than 6 km2 near the community of McCloud with an estimated 23 x 106 m3 of mud. A much older lahar in Big Canyon Creek may have deposited a volume of 70 x 106 m3 over present day Mount Shasta City and beyond. The LAHARZ inundation modeling tool was used to objectively delineate lahar inundation zones in Whitney and Mud Creek basins based on a 30 m digital elevation model and a range of potential volumes extrapolated from local events. The predicted inundation areas for the largest volume modeled are between 31 and 34 km2, reaching distances of about 32 km from the summit, well within reach of populated areas and significant bodies of water on the NW and SE flanks of the volcano. The resulting lahar inundation hazard zones are discussed with a focus on model limitations, cartographic implications, and the advantages of using 3D hazard maps.

  2. The Mount Rainier Lahar Detection System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockhart, A. B.; Murray, T. L.

    2003-12-01

    To mitigate the risk of unheralded lahars from Mount Rainier, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Pierce County, Washington, installed a lahar-detection system on the Puyallup and Carbon rivers that originate on Mount Rainier's western slopes. The system, installed in 1998, is designed to automatically detect the passage of lahars large enough to potentially affect populated areas downstream (approximate volume threshold 40 million cubic meters), while ignoring small lahars, earthquakes, extreme weather and floods. Along each river valley upstream, arrays of independent lahar-monitoring stations equipped with geophones and short tripwires telemeter data to a pair of redundant computer base stations located in and near Tacoma at existing public safety facilities that are staffed around the clock. Monitored data consist of ground-vibration levels, tripwire status, and transmissions at regular intervals. The base stations automatically evaluate these data to determine if a dangerous lahar is passing through the station array. The detection algorithm requires significant ground vibration to occur at those stations in the array that are above the anticipated level of inundation, while lower level `deadman' stations, inundated by the flow, experience tripwire breakage or are destroyed. Once a base station detects a lahar, it alerts staff who execute a call-down of public-safety officials and schools, initiating evacuation of areas potentially at risk. Because the system's risk-mitigation task imposes high standards of reliability on all components, it has been under test for several years. To date, the system has operated reliably and without false alarms, including during the nearby M6.8 Nisqually Earthquake on February 28, 2001. The system is being turned over to Pierce County, and activated as part of their lahar warning system.

  3. Lahars simulation and field calibration in Popocatépetl Volcano (Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddad, B.; Zamorano, J. J.; Pastor, M.; Andrés, N.; Tanarro, L. M.; Palacios, D.

    2012-04-01

    The term "lahar" refers to the process generated in volcanoes by high sediment concentration flows that range from hyperconcentrated to Debris flows. This complex dynamic system represents a threat to people living near volcanoes. In order to delimitate hazardous area, mathematical models should be applied and tested. These models depend strongly on data collected in the field and, an additionally, good DEM is required to produce satisfactory results. Recent Popocatépetl lahars are well documented and as a result, they can be used to assess the accuracy of numerical models. In this work, SPH (Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics) depth integrated model created by Pastor in 2005 is applied to reproduce Popocatépetl lahars. The mathematical model is derived from the velocity-pressure version of the Biot-Zienkiewicz model and the assumed rheology corresponds to the Bingham model. On the other hand, a systematic collection of field data it's carried out by GFAM group in Popocatépetl volcano and it's included updating channel topography; as well as the factors: i) run out area boundary; ii) estimation of the velocity of the flow and iii) depth distribution of lahar's deposit. All this field data it's used for back analyses and calibration of the rheological parameters. Besides the calibration of rheological parameters, it is also investigated the effect of the topographic mesh resolution. Moreover, flow depth obtained by SPH model is systematically compared with field evidences along the lahar's path. Research funded by CGL2009-7343 project, Government of Spain.

  4. Causes, Dynamics and Impacts of Lahar Mass Flows due to the April 2015 Eruption of Calbuco Volcano, Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dussaillant, Alejandro; Russell, Andy; Meier, Claudio; Rivera, Andres; Mella, Mauricio; Garrido, Natalia; Hernandez, Jorge; Napoleoni, Felipe; Gonzalez, Cristian

    2016-04-01

    provides large volumes of sediment to distal portions of fluvial systems radiating from Calbuco, continuing impact on infrastructure and settlements, including secondary lahars due to rain and melt events. The database generated by this study hopes to contribute to further studies into lahars, including its use to test lahar numerical models.

  5. Lahar simulation with SPH and field calibration at the Colima Volcano (Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvo, Leticia; Haddad, Bouchra; Capra, Lucia; Palacios, David

    2015-04-01

    As a result of the frequent effusive activity of Volcán de Colima (10° 30'44''N, 103° 37'02'' W), the most active volcano in Mexico, plenty of rain triggered lahars are produced, especially during the rainy season. Along the recent period of activity, particularly from 2010, many of these lahars channelled through the main ravines of the volcano and reach large distances, representing high risk for more than 10,000 people at the surroundings. Modeling of lahars has become an important tool in the assessment of the related hazards, in order to undertake appropriate mitigation actions and reduce the associated risks. Recent lahars at the Colima Volcano are well documented, so they can be used to prove the accuracy of modelling. In this work, we used the SPH (Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics) method, a depth integrated coupled model created by Pastor in 2005, to replicate the propagation stage of 3 recent Colima lahars occurred on Montegrande ravine in 1992, 2011 and 2012. The studied events include hyperconcentrated, debris and a mixture of the previous flow natures. The inputs used for the SPH simulations were the initial point, volume of each lahar and an adapted morphology of its mass. Field data used to verify the SPH results include the stopping point of the lahar, its path, velocity and height values, as the floodplain area. All this information was a result of fieldwork recognition (cross section profiles of the inner part of the ravine) and free satellite imagery analysis. The best results were obtained using Bingham rheology. The proposed parameters to simulate Colima lahars were 20 Pa of yield strength and 30 Pa.s of viscosity for the 1992 lahar (hyperconcentrated flow), 200 Pa and 50 Pa.s in case of the 2011 debris flow, and finally 20 Pa and 24 Pa.s for the 2012 event, whose nature evolved from debris to an hyperconcentrated flow. In all cases a 1900 kg/m3 density was used. Highly accurate results showed the relevant role played by rheological

  6. Sedimentological processes in lahars: Insights from optically stimulated luminescence analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz-Salinas, Esperanza; Bishop, Paul; Zamorano, Jose-Juan; Sanderson, David

    2012-01-01

    A lahar is a sediment-laden flow capable of major destructive impacts on infrastructure and human life. How lahars transport sediment is thus a key issue for understanding lahar sedimentology and behavior, especially in terms of the lahar's hydraulic and rheological properties, which can be substantially altered as the lahar gains or loses material during its travel. In this research, we analyze lahar entrainment processes by evaluating luminescence signals (total photon counts) from lahar sediments using blue luminescence signals (BLSL). A portable OSL reader that analyzes several grams of polymineral and polygrain-size samples was applied. We use data from three lahars in the Tenenepanco and Huiloac gorges on Popocatépetl volcano (Mexico) to elucidate the ways in which lahars may gain, lose and transport sediment during flow. Sediment samples for luminescence analysis were taken through the full thickness of the lahar deposits at eight different sites for two lahars (1997 and 2001) and at one site for a lahar that occurred > 500 yrs ago. Mean luminescence values obtained for the 1997 lahar help to evaluate the relationship between the lahar entrainment processes and the drainage at the different sites. For the 2001 lahar this relationship was also established taking into account the channel slope. The main conclusion is that luminescence signals (total photon counts) can be used to detect entrained material in the flow because the bulked materials modify the final OSL signals. The application of this type of luminescence analysis thus has the potential to provide a better understanding of sediment entrainment in these sediment-laden flows.

  7. 1-Meter Digital Elevation Model specification

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arundel, Samantha T.; Archuleta, Christy-Ann M.; Phillips, Lori A.; Roche, Brittany L.; Constance, Eric W.

    2015-10-21

    In January 2015, the U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center began producing the 1-Meter Digital Elevation Model data product. This new product was developed to provide high resolution bare-earth digital elevation models from light detection and ranging (lidar) elevation data and other elevation data collected over the conterminous United States (lower 48 States), Hawaii, and potentially Alaska and the U.S. territories. The 1-Meter Digital Elevation Model consists of hydroflattened, topographic bare-earth raster digital elevation models, with a 1-meter x 1-meter cell size, and is available in 10,000-meter x 10,000-meter square blocks with a 6-meter overlap. This report details the specifications required for the production of the 1-Meter Digital Elevation Model.

  8. 1-Meter Digital Elevation Model specification

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arundel, Samantha T.; Archuleta, Christy-Ann M.; Phillips, Lori A.; Roche, Brittany L.; Constance, Eric W.

    2015-01-01

    In January 2015, the U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center began producing the 1-Meter Digital Elevation Model data product. This new product was developed to provide high resolution bare-earth digital elevation models from light detection and ranging (lidar) elevation data and other elevation data collected over the conterminous United States (lower 48 States), Hawaii, and potentially Alaska and the U.S. territories. The 1-Meter Digital Elevation Model consists of hydroflattened, topographic bare-earth raster digital elevation models, with a 1-meter x 1-meter cell size, and is available in 10,000-meter x 10,000-meter square blocks with a 6-meter overlap. This report details the specifications required for the production of the 1-Meter Digital Elevation Model.

  9. Measurement of post-eruptive deformation and depositional features from the 2009 Redoubt Volcanic Eruption using high-resolution digital elevation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAlpin, D. B.; Meyer, F.; Webley, P.

    2010-12-01

    We present a system to examine changes in volcanic morphology and topography using a new multi-sensor approach to produce high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs), and measure post-eruption volcanic deformation and depositional features, including lava domes, lahars, and pyroclastic flow deposits. The developed system exploits available data sets that have not been previously subjected to systematic or fully coordinated use. By employing readily available space borne remote sensing data, resources are used in a manner that is routine in method, but of sufficient quality and availability to answer many important geophysical questions. The multi-sensor approach involves a mix of stereoscopic optical, interferometric radar, and thermal space borne imagery to generate DEMs and multi-sensor analyses of volcanic activity. Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) data originates from the European Remote Sensing (ERS)-2 / Envisat Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR) tandem campaign, whose setup allows DEM generation with sub-meter accuracy in flat to moderately hilly terrain. For areas not suitable for SAR analysis, accurate elevations are determined by photogrammetric analysis of high-resolution, stereoscopic optical data from the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency’s (JAXA’s) Panchromatic Remote-sensing Instrument for Stereo Mapping (PRISM) carried by the Advanced Land-Observing Satellite (ALOS). The generated DEMs are associated with a time stamp and are stored in a database. The time annotation and elevation information of DEMs in volcanic areas that are subject to rapid and drastic topographic changes enable us to perform topographical correction of interferograms, with the appropriate elevation information. It also allows us to determine volume estimates of low-relief deposits such as lahars and other volcanic deposits along with their evolution over time. Higher relief features, such as volcanic domes, are similarly examined at a somewhat

  10. Nasadem Global Elevation Model: Methods and Progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crippen, R.; Buckley, S.; Agram, P.; Belz, E.; Gurrola, E.; Hensley, S.; Kobrick, M.; Lavalle, M.; Martin, J.; Neumann, M.; Nguyen, Q.; Rosen, P.; Shimada, J.; Simard, M.; Tung, W.

    2016-06-01

    NASADEM is a near-global elevation model that is being produced primarily by completely reprocessing the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) radar data and then merging it with refined ASTER GDEM elevations. The new and improved SRTM elevations in NASADEM result from better vertical control of each SRTM data swath via reference to ICESat elevations and from SRTM void reductions using advanced interferometric unwrapping algorithms. Remnant voids will be filled primarily by GDEM3, but with reduction of GDEM glitches (mostly related to clouds) and therefore with only minor need for secondary sources of fill.

  11. Rapid Loss of Andean Alpine Glaciers: A Reflection on Cotopaxi´s Long-Distance Historical Lahars and Future Lahar Scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mothes, P. A.; Hall, M. L.; Samaniego, P.; Francou, B.; Castro, M.; Hidalgo, X.

    2007-05-01

    Andean alpine glaciers are in rapid retreat, as witnessed by actual measurements, comparative imagery and popular memory. Overall glacier losses will diminish future water availability for human consumption as well as for lahar generation, the product of mixing incandescent eruptive materials with glacial ice and snow. The field study and modeling of long-distance historical lahars from Cotopaxi volcano, Ecuador has shown them to be some of the most voluminous and longest reported. Based on back calculations, peak discharges were commonly between 45,000-60,000 m3/sec, velocities reached 70 km/hr, and run outs attained 325 km. The last "super" debris flow was produced at Cotopaxi in 1877. Observations made after the 1877 eruption reported that the glacier had suffered about 10 meters of ice stripped off the top and the incision of deep gullies from melting and erosion by the scoria block-rich pyroclastic flows. Average reductions of 45% and 60%, respectively, of the area and volume of Cotopaxi´s 19 alpine glaciers during the last 30 years have left an ice cap of only 13 km2 and a volume of 0.60 km3. Descriptions by astute 18th and 19th century observers lead us to conclude that Cotopaxi glaciers were much more robust then, surpassing a total area of about 30 km2, a fact which contributed to generating large volume lahars and high discharges, during the waning "Little Ice Age". If an eruption similar to that of 1877 occurs at Cotopaxi in the future, reduced glacier sizes and the glaciers´ preferential distribution upon the cone will likely attenuate volcano-ice interactions and will lower the probability of "super" lahars being produced during eruptive periods. However, in the last 2000 years of eruptive activity, explosive eruptions display a large size span-- from weakly explosive events (VEI= 2) to highly explosive eruptive cycles (VEI= 4-5). Given the uncertainty of the size of the next explosive eruption of Cotopaxi, several scenarios for lahar generation must

  12. US GeoData Digital Elevation Models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2000-01-01

    Digital elevation model (DEM) data are arrays of regularly spaced elevation values referenced horizontally either to a Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) projection or to a geographic coordinate system. The grid cells are spaced at regular intervals along south to north profiles that are ordered from west to east. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) produces five primary types of elevation data: 7.5-minute DEM, 30-minute DEM, 1-degree DEM, 7.5-minute Alaska DEM, and 15-minute Alaska DEM.

  13. A comparison of the Landsat image and LAHARZ-simulated lahar inundation hazard zone by the 2010 Merapi eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seul-Ki; Lee, Chang-Wook; Lee, Saro

    2015-06-01

    Located above the Java subduction zone, Merapi Volcano is an active stratovolcano with a volcanic activity cycle of 1-5 years. Most Merapi eruptions are relatively small with volcanic explosivity index (VEI) of 1-3. However, the most recent eruption, which occurred in 2010, was quite violent with a VEI of 4 and 386 people were killed. In this study, lahars and pyroclastic flow zones were detected using optical Landsat images and the lahar and pyroclastic flow zone simulated using the LAHARZ program. To detect areal extents of lahar and pyroclastic flows using Landsat images, supervised classification was performed after atmospheric correction by using a cosine of the solar zenith correction (COST) model. As a result, the extracted dimensions of pyroclastic flows are nearly identical to the Calatrava Volcanic Province (CVP) monthly reports. Then, areas of potential lahar and pyroclastic flow inundation based on flow volume using the LAHARZ program were simulated and mapped. Finally, the detected lahars and pyroclastic flow zones were compared with the simulated potential zones using LAHARZ program and verified. Results showed satisfactory similarity (55.63 %) between the detected and simulated zone. The simulated zones using the LAHARZ program can be used as an essential volcanic hazard map for preventing life and property damages for Merapi Volcano and other hazardous volcanic areas. Also, the LAHARZ program can be used to map volcano hazards in other hazardous volcanic areas.

  14. Laharz_py: GIS tools for automated mapping of lahar inundation hazard zones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schilling, Steve P.

    2014-01-01

    Laharz_py is written in the Python programming language as a suite of tools for use in ArcMap Geographic Information System (GIS). Primarily, Laharz_py is a computational model that uses statistical descriptions of areas inundated by past mass-flow events to forecast areas likely to be inundated by hypothetical future events. The forecasts use physically motivated and statistically calibrated power-law equations that each has a form A = cV2/3, relating mass-flow volume (V) to planimetric or cross-sectional areas (A) inundated by an average flow as it descends a given drainage. Calibration of the equations utilizes logarithmic transformation and linear regression to determine the best-fit values of c. The software uses values of V, an algorithm for idenitifying mass-flow source locations, and digital elevation models of topography to portray forecast hazard zones for lahars, debris flows, or rock avalanches on maps. Laharz_py offers two methods to construct areas of potential inundation for lahars: (1) Selection of a range of plausible V values results in a set of nested hazard zones showing areas likely to be inundated by a range of hypothetical flows; and (2) The user selects a single volume and a confidence interval for the prediction. In either case, Laharz_py calculates the mean expected A and B value from each user-selected value of V. However, for the second case, a single value of V yields two additional results representing the upper and lower values of the confidence interval of prediction. Calculation of these two bounding predictions require the statistically calibrated prediction equations, a user-specified level of confidence, and t-distribution statistics to calculate the standard error of regression, standard error of the mean, and standard error of prediction. The portrayal of results from these two methods on maps compares the range of inundation areas due to prediction uncertainties with uncertainties in selection of V values. The Open-File Report

  15. Lahar hazards at Agua volcano, Guatemala

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schilling, S.P.; Vallance, J.W.; Matías, O.; Howell, M.M.

    2001-01-01

    At 3760 m, Agua volcano towers more than 3500 m above the Pacific coastal plain to the south and 2000 m above the Guatemalan highlands to the north. The volcano is within 5 to 10 kilometers (km) of Antigua, Guatemala and several other large towns situated on its northern apron. These towns have a combined population of nearly 100,000. It is within about 20 km of Escuintla (population, ca. 100,000) to the south. Though the volcano has not been active in historical time, or about the last 500 years, it has the potential to produce debris flows (watery flows of mud, rock, and debris—also known as lahars when they occur on a volcano) that could inundate these nearby populated areas.

  16. Lahar hazards at Mombacho Volcano, Nicaragua

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vallance, J.W.; Schilling, S.P.; Devoli, G.

    2001-01-01

    Mombacho volcano, at 1,350 meters, is situated on the shores of Lake Nicaragua and about 12 kilometers south of Granada, a city of about 90,000 inhabitants. Many more people live a few kilometers southeast of Granada in 'las Isletas de Granada and the nearby 'Peninsula de Aseses. These areas are formed of deposits of a large debris avalanche (a fast moving avalanche of rock and debris) from Mombacho. Several smaller towns with population, in the range of 5,000 to 12,000 inhabitants are to the northwest and the southwest of Mombacho volcano. Though the volcano has apparently not been active in historical time, or about the last 500 years, it has the potential to produce landslides and debris flows (watery flows of mud, rock, and debris -- also known as lahars when they occur on a volcano) that could inundate these nearby populated areas. -- Vallance, et.al., 2001

  17. Instrumental lahar monitoring at Merapi Volcano, Central Java, Indonesia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lavigne, F.; Thouret, J.-C.; Voight, B.; Young, K.; LaHusen, R.; Marso, J.; Suwa, H.; Sumaryono, A.; Sayudi, D.S.; Dejean, M.

    2000-01-01

    More than 50 volcanic debris flows or lahars were generated around Mt Merapi during the first rainy season following the nuees ardentes of 22 November 1994. The rainfalls that triggered the lahars were analyzed, using such instruments as weather radar and telemetered rain gauges. Lahar dynamics were also monitored, using new non-contact detection instrumentation installed on the slopes of the volcano. These devices include real-time seismic amplitude measurement (RSAM), seismic spectral amplitude measurement (SSAM) and acoustic flow monitoring (AFM) systems. Calibration of the various systems was accomplished by field measurements of flow velocities and discharge, contemporaneously with instrumental monitoring. The 1994–1995 lahars were relatively short events, their duration in the Boyong river commonly ranging between 30 min and 1 h 30 min. The great majority (90%) of the lahars was recognized at Kaliurang village between 13:00 and 17:30 h, due to the predominance of afternoon rainfalls. The observed mean velocity of lahar fronts ranged between 1.1 and 3.4 m/s, whereas the peak velocity of the flows varied from 11 to 15 m/s, under the Gardu Pandang viewpoint location at Kaliurang, to 8–10 m/s at a section 500 m downstream from this site. River slopes vary from 28 to 22 m/km at the two sites. Peak discharges recorded in various events ranged from 33 to 360 m3/s, with the maximum value of peak discharge 360 m3/s, on 20 May 1995. To improve the lahar warning system along Boyong river, some instrumental thresholds were proposed: large and potentially hazardous lahars may be detected by RSAM units exceeding 400, SSAM units exceeding 80 on the highest frequency band, or AFM values greater than 1500 mV on the low-gain, broad-band setting.

  18. Stochastic Downscaling of Digital Elevation Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasera, Luiz Gustavo; Mariethoz, Gregoire; Lane, Stuart N.

    2016-04-01

    High-resolution digital elevation models (HR-DEMs) are extremely important for the understanding of small-scale geomorphic processes in Alpine environments. In the last decade, remote sensing techniques have experienced a major technological evolution, enabling fast and precise acquisition of HR-DEMs. However, sensors designed to measure elevation data still feature different spatial resolution and coverage capabilities. Terrestrial altimetry allows the acquisition of HR-DEMs with centimeter to millimeter-level precision, but only within small spatial extents and often with dead ground problems. Conversely, satellite radiometric sensors are able to gather elevation measurements over large areas but with limited spatial resolution. In the present study, we propose an algorithm to downscale low-resolution satellite-based DEMs using topographic patterns extracted from HR-DEMs derived for example from ground-based and airborne altimetry. The method consists of a multiple-point geostatistical simulation technique able to generate high-resolution elevation data from low-resolution digital elevation models (LR-DEMs). Initially, two collocated DEMs with different spatial resolutions serve as an input to construct a database of topographic patterns, which is also used to infer the statistical relationships between the two scales. High-resolution elevation patterns are then retrieved from the database to downscale a LR-DEM through a stochastic simulation process. The output of the simulations are multiple equally probable DEMs with higher spatial resolution that also depict the large-scale geomorphic structures present in the original LR-DEM. As these multiple models reflect the uncertainty related to the downscaling, they can be employed to quantify the uncertainty of phenomena that are dependent on fine topography, such as catchment hydrological processes. The proposed methodology is illustrated for a case study in the Swiss Alps. A swissALTI3D HR-DEM (with 5 m resolution

  19. Lahar Infrasound Associated with Villarrica's March 3, 2015 Eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, J. B.; Palma, J.

    2015-12-01

    The paroxysmal eruption of Volcan Villarrica on March 3rd, 2015 produced a moderate-sized lahar, which descended more than 20 km within the Rio Correntoso/Turbio drainage. A three-element infrasound array 10 km from the summit, and 4 km from the lahar's closest approach, was used to track the flow's evolution as it progressed downstream. Array processing using cross correlation lag times as well as semblance techniques places important constraints on the lahar's dynamics, including the detection of an early flow pulse that traveled from 3 to 13 km at an average speed of 36 m/s. After the first six minutes of lahar advancement the signal evolves into a relatively stationary infrasonic tremor located ~11.5 km downstream and consistent with a notch in intervening topography. Diminishing tremor amplitude over the course of more than two hours constrain the flow duration and indicates progressively decreasing flow energy and/or confinement of the flow to more distant reaches. This study demonstrates the powerful capabilities of infrasound arrays for lahar study and suggests its potential implementation for hazard monitoring.

  20. Simulating Lahars Using A Rotating Drum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neather, Adam; Lube, Gert; Jones, Jim; Cronin, Shane

    2014-05-01

    A large (0.5 m in diameter, 0.15 m wide) rotating drum is used to investigate the erosion and deposition mechanics of lahars. To systematically simulate the conditions occurring in natural mass flows our experimental setup differs from the common rotating drum employed in industrial/engineering studies. Natural materials with their typical friction properties are used, as opposed to the frequently employed spherical glass beads; the drum is completely water-proof, so solid/air and solid/liquid mixtures can be investigated; the drum velocity and acceleration can be precisely controlled using a software interface to a micro-controller, allowing for the study of steady, unsteady and intermediate flow regimes. The drum has a toughened glass door, allowing high-resolution, high-speed video recording of the material inside. Vector maps of the velocities involved in the flows are obtained using particle image velocimetry (PIV). The changes in velocity direction and/or magnitude are used to locate the primary internal boundaries between layers of opposite flow direction, as well as secondary interfaces between shear layers. A range of variables can be measured: thickness and number of layers; the curvature of the free surface; frequency of avalanching; position of the centre of mass of the material; and the velocity profiles of the flowing material. Experiments to date have focussed on dry materials, and have had a fill factor of approximately 0.3. Combining these measured variables allows us to derive additional data of interest, such as mass and momentum flux. It is these fluxes that we propose will allow insight into the erosion/deposition mechanics of a lahar. A number of conclusions can be drawn to date. A primary interface separates flowing and passive region (this interface has been identified in previous studies). As well as the primary interface, the flowing layer separates into individual shear layers, with individual erosion/deposition and flow histories. This

  1. Digital Elevation Models Aid the Analysis of Flows at Hrad Vallis, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouginis-Mark, P. J.; Hamilton, C.; Garbeil, H.

    2015-12-01

    We have identified several landforms in the Hrad Vallis region of Mars (33.0o - 35.5oN, 216o - 218oW), which suggest that this area was covered by an ice sheet concurrent with volcanic eruptions. Using digital elevation models derived from High Resolution Imaging Science (HiRISE) and Context Camera (CTX) data, a reexamination of the area reveals a complex history including flow inflation and topographic control by transient topographic barriers. Among Amazonian-age outflow channels, Hrad Vallis is exceptional as it exhibits good evidence of magma/water interactions. It is inferred to have formed in association with a shallow igneous sill that melted part of the martian cryosphere and/or released water from an extensive aquifer to produce enormous lahar-like mud flows. Exposed ~30 m high dikes, 20 m high eroded mounds, and flow paths that are inconsistent with present-day topographic gradients, lead us to speculate that this area was covered by at least ~40 m of material (eolian deposits or ice) at the time of volcanic dike intrusion and flow emplacement. This material was subsequently removed leaving no clear morphologic signs (e.g., wind streaks, if eolian material; moraines, if ice). We favor the ice model because if this area was once ice-covered, it offers a plausible mode of formation (as pingoes) for some enigmatic 30 m high domes in the vicinity. At least one 120 km long flow from Hrad Vallis was emplaced as a pahoehoe-like flow that was confined by topographic obstacles and subsequently inflated to thickness of ~45 m. Although the direct relationship between this flow and Hrad Vallis remains to be determined, the inflated flow suggests a longer period of eruption/emplacement at a slower effusion rate than was previously believed.

  2. Comparative lahar hazard mapping at Volcan Citlaltépetl, Mexico using SRTM, ASTER and DTED-1 digital topographic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbard, Bernard E.; Sheridan, Michael F.; Carrasco-Núñez, Gerardo; Díaz-Castellón, Rodolfo; Rodríguez, Sergio Raúl

    2007-02-01

    In this study, we evaluated and compared the utility of spaceborne SRTM and ASTER DEMs with baseline DTED-1 "bald-earth" topography for mapping lahar inundation hazards from volcan Citlaltépetl, Mexico, a volcano which has had a history of producing debris flows of various extents. In particular, we tested the utility of these topographic datasets for resolving ancient valley-filling deposits exposed around the flanks of the volcano, for determining their magnitude using paleohydrologic methods and for forecasting their inundation limits in the future. We also use the three datasets as inputs to a GIS stream inundation flow model, LAHARZ, and compare the results. In general all three datasets, with spatial resolution of 90 m or better, were capable of resolving debris flow and lahar deposits at least 3 × 10 6 m 3 in volume or larger. Canopy- and slope-related height errors in the ASTER and SRTM DEMs limit their utility for measuring valley-filling cross-sectional area and deriving flow magnitude for the smallest deposits using a cross-sectional area to volume scaling equation. Height errors in the ASTER and SRTM DEMs also causes problems in resolving stream valley hydrography which controls lahar flow paths and stream valley morphology which controls lahar filling capacity. However, both of the two spaceborne DEM datasets are better than DTED-1 at resolving fine details in stream hydrography and erosional morphologies of volcaniclastics preserved in the valleys around the more humid, eastern flanks of the volcanic range. The results of LAHARZ flow inundation modeling using all three DEMs as inputs are remarkably similar and co-validate one another. For example, at Citlaltépetl all lahar simulations show that the city of Orizaba is the most vulnerable to flows similar in magnitude to, or larger than, one that occurred in 1920. Many of the other cities and towns illustrated are built higher up on terrace deposits of older debris flows, and are safe from all but

  3. Factors controlling erosion/deposition phenomena related to lahars at Volcán de Colima, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez, Rosario; Capra, Lucia; Coviello, Velio

    2016-08-01

    comparing rainfalls associated with lahars that originated after the last main eruptive episode that occurred in 2004-2005, we observed that higher accumulated rainfall was needed to trigger lahars in the 2013 and 2014 seasons, which points to a progressive stabilization of the volcano slope during a post-eruptive period. These results can be used as a tool to foresee the channel response to future volcanic activity, to improve the input parameters for lahar modeling and to better constrain the hazard zonation at Volcán de Colima.

  4. A global digital elevation model - GTOP030

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    1999-01-01

    GTOP030, the U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) digital elevation model (DEM) of the Earth, provides the flrst global coverage of moderate resolution elevation data.  The original GTOP30 data set, which was developed over a 3-year period through a collaborative effort led by the USGS, was completed in 1996 at the USGS EROS Data Center in Sioux Falls, South Dakota.  The collaboration involved contributions of staffing, funding, or source data from cooperators including the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the United Nations Environment Programme Global Resource Information Database (UNEP/GRID), the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), the Instituto Nacional de Estadistica Geografia e Informatica (INEGI) of Mexico, the Geographical Survey Institute (GSI) of Japan, Manaaki Whenua Landcare Research of New Zealand, and the Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research (SCAR). In 1999, work was begun on an update to the GTOP030 data set. Additional data sources are being incorporated into GTOP030 with an enhanced and improved data set planned for release in 2000.

  5. Alteration, slope-classified alteration, and potential lahar inundation maps of volcanoes for the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) Volcano Archive

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mars, John C.; Hubbard, Bernard E.; Pieri, David; Linick, Justin

    2015-01-01

    This study was undertaken during 2012–2013 in cooperation with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Since completion of this study, a new lahar modeling program (LAHAR_pz) has been released, which may produce slightly different modeling results from the LAHARZ model used in this study. The maps and data from this study should not be used in place of existing volcano hazard maps published by local authorities. For volcanoes without hazard maps and (or) published lahar-related hazard studies, this work will provide a starting point from which more accurate hazard maps can be produced. This is the first dataset to provide digital maps of altered volcanoes and adjacent watersheds that can be used for assessing volcanic hazards, hydrothermal alteration, and other volcanic processes in future studies.

  6. Rain-triggered lahars following the 2010 eruption of Merapi volcano, Indonesia: A major risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Bélizal, Edouard; Lavigne, Franck; Hadmoko, Danang Sri; Degeai, Jean-Philippe; Dipayana, Gilang Aria; Mutaqin, Bachtiar Wahyu; Marfai, Muh Aris; Coquet, Marie; Mauff, Baptiste Le; Robin, Anne-Kyria; Vidal, Céline; Cholik, Noer; Aisyah, Nurnaning

    2013-07-01

    The 2010 VEI 4 eruption of Merapi volcano deposited roughly ten times the volume of pyroclastic materials of the 1994 and 2006 eruptions, and is recognized as one of the most intense eruption since 1872. However, as the eruptive phase is now over, another threat endangers local communities: rain-triggered lahars. Previous papers on lahars at Merapi presented lahar-related risk following small-scale dome-collapse PDCs. Thus the aim of this study is to provide new insights on lahar-related risk following a large scale VEI 4 eruption. The paper highlights the high number of events (240) during the 2010-2011 rainy season (October 2010-May 2011). The frequency of the 2010-2011 lahars is also the most important ever recorded at Merapi. Lahars occurred in almost all drainages located under the active cone, with runout distances exceeding 15 km. The geomorphic impacts of lahars on the distal slope of the volcano are then explained as they directly threaten houses and infrastructures: creation of large corridors, avulsions, riverbank erosion and riverbed downcutting are detailed through local scale examples. Related damage is also studied: 860 houses damaged, 14 sabo-dams and 21 bridges destroyed. Sedimentological characteristics of volcaniclastic sediments in lahar corridors are presented, with emphasis on the resource in building material that they represent for local communities. Risk studies should not forget that thousands of people are exposing themselves to lahar hazard when they quarry volcaniclastic sediment on lahar corridors. Finally, the efficient community-based crisis management is explained, and shows how local people organize themselves to manage the risk: 3 fatalities were reported, although lahars reached densely populated areas. To summarize, this study provides an update of lahar risk issues at Merapi, with emphasis on the distal slope of the volcano where lahars had not occurred for 40 years, and where lahar corridors were rapidly formed.

  7. The anatomy of a lahar: Deciphering the 15th September 2012 lahar at Volcán de Colima, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez, R.; Capra, L.; Caballero, L.; Arámbula-Mendoza, R.; Reyes-Dávila, G.

    2014-02-01

    Volcán de Colima is one of the most active volcanoes in Mexico where lahars are a common phenomenon. Since the reactivation of the volcanic activity in 1991, lahars have become more frequent during the June-October rainy season, in this region. Therefore, Volcán de Colima represents a natural laboratory, ideal for the constant monitoring of lahars and to study factors controlling their origin, flow transport and deposition. Since 2007 the systematic detection of lahars in Volcán de Colima has been carried out using seismic data from the broadband stations of the RESCO network, the seismological network of Colima University, along with three rain gauge stations located on the southern ravines of the volcano. In 2011 a new monitoring station was built at 2000 m.a.s.l. along the Montegrande ravine, which consists of a geophone, a video camera and a rain gauge station coupled with a moisture sensor, transmitting in real time to the RESCO facilities at Colima University. With all the instrumentation currently installed on the volcano flanks, we could monitor and describe the lahar that occurred on 15th September 2012 along the Montegrande ravine, and correlate the monitoring data with information gathered by the field campaign conducted two days after the event. The high quality of collected data enabled us to describe the “anatomy” of this lahar. The event consisted of a lahar that lasted 40 min, triggered by 20 mm of accumulated rainfall with a maximum intensity of 95 mm/h. The lahar was characterized by three main surges at 4-5 minute intervals that formed an 80 cm-thick terrace. The first surge was a debris flow with a block-rich front followed by the main body that progressively diluted to a hyperconcentrated flow, from which a 40 cm-thick massive unit was emplaced (33 wt.% gravel and > 60 wt.% of sand); it was followed by a more dilute hyperconcentrated flow that left a massive 10 cm-thick sandy layer (80 wt.% of sand); the third surge deposited a 30-cm

  8. Digital elevation modeling via curvature interpolation for lidar data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Digital elevation model (DEM) is a three-dimensional (3D) representation of a terrain's surface - for a planet (including Earth), moon, or asteroid - created from point cloud data which measure terrain elevation. Its modeling requires surface reconstruction for the scattered data, which is an ill-p...

  9. Mechanism of sand slide - cold lahar induced by extreme rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuoka, Hiroshi; Yamada, Masumi; Dok, Atitkagna

    2014-05-01

    Along with the increasing frequencies of extreme rainfall events in almost every where on the earth, shallow slide - debris flow, i.e. cold lahars running long distance often occurs and claims downslope residents lives. In the midnight of 15 October 2013, Typhoon Wilpha attacked the Izu-Oshima, a active volcanic Island and the extreme rainfall of more than 800 mm / 24 hours was recorded. This downpour of more than 80 mm/hr lasted 4 hours at its peak and caused a number of cold lahars. The initial stage of those lahars was shallow slides of surface black volcanic ash deposits, containing mostly fine sands. The thickness was only 50 cm - 1 m. In the reconnaissance investigation, author found that the sliding surface was the boundary of two separate volcanic ash layers between the black and yellow colored and apparently showing contrast of permeability and hardness. Permeability contrast may have contributed to generation of excess pore pressure on the border and trigger the slide. Then, the unconsolidated, unpacked mass was easily fluidized and transformed into mud flows, that which volcanologists call cold lahars. Seismometers installed for monitoring the active volcano's activities, succeeded to detect many tremors events. Many are spikes but 5 larger and longer events were extracted. They lasted 2 -3 minutes and if we assume that this tremors reflects the runout movement, then we can calculate the mean velocity of the lahars. Estimated velocity was 45 - 60 km/h, which is much higher than the average speed 30 - 40 km/h of debris flows observed in Japan. Flume tests of volcanic ash flows by the Forestry and Forest Products Research Institute showed the wet volcanic ash can run at higher speed than other materials. The two tremor records were compare d with the local residents witnessed and confirmed by newspaper reported that the reach of the lahar was observed at the exact time when tremor ends. We took the black volcanic ash and conducted ring shear tests to

  10. Integrated research in constitutive modelling at elevated temperatures, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haisler, W. E.; Allen, D. H.

    1986-01-01

    Topics covered include: numerical integration techniques; thermodynamics and internal state variables; experimental lab development; comparison of models at room temperature; comparison of models at elevated temperature; and integrated software development.

  11. Digital Elevation Models of the Lunar Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, A. C.; Robinson, M. S.

    1999-01-01

    Several digital elevation models (DEMs) have been produced at a scale of 1km/pixel and covering approximately one-fifth of the lunar surface. These were produced mostly by semiautomatically matching the stereo available between Clementine UV/VIS images, although some localized DEMs have been produced by applying this technique to Apollo Metric stereo pairs, or by digitizing an existing Apollo Metric contour map. The DEMS that result from Clementine UV/VIS images, although Of Poorer height accuracy (1300-600 in for a single matched point) than the Clementine laser altimeter point measurements (<+/-100 m), do provide considerably higher spatial resolution (e.g., every kilometer vs. every tens of kilometers) and allow topography in the polar regions to be determined. Nadir-pointing Clementine UV-VIS stereo pairs are automatically stereo matched using a patch-based matcher and fed through A stereo intersection camera model to yield a digital terrain model (DTM) of longitude, latitude, and height points. The DTM for each stereo pair is then replotted and interpolated to form map-projected DEM tiles. The DEM files can then be fitted to absolute height laser altimeter points, or iteratively to each other, to form a DEM mosaic. Uncertainties in UV-VIS camera pointing and the need to accumulate a sufficiently good topographic S/N ratio necessitates the use of 1 km pixels for the UV-VIS derived DEMs. For Apollo Metric stereo, an internal camera geometry correction and a full photogrammetric block adjustment must be performed using ground- control points to derive a DEM. The image scale of Apollo Metric, as well as the stereo angle, allow for a DEM with 100 m pixels and a height accuracy of +/- 25m. Apollo Metric imagery had previously been used to derive contour maps for much of the lunar equatorial regions; however, to recover this information in digital form these maps must be digitized. Most of the mare areas mapped contain noticeable topographic noise. This results from

  12. Model-based approach for elevator performance estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esteban, E.; Salgado, O.; Iturrospe, A.; Isasa, I.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, a dynamic model for an elevator installation is presented in the state space domain. The model comprises both the mechanical and the electrical subsystems, including the electrical machine and a closed-loop field oriented control. The proposed model is employed for monitoring the condition of the elevator installation. The adopted model-based approach for monitoring employs the Kalman filter as an observer. A Kalman observer estimates the elevator car acceleration, which determines the elevator ride quality, based solely on the machine control signature and the encoder signal. Finally, five elevator key performance indicators are calculated based on the estimated car acceleration. The proposed procedure is experimentally evaluated, by comparing the key performance indicators calculated based on the estimated car acceleration and the values obtained from actual acceleration measurements in a test bench. Finally, the proposed procedure is compared with the sliding mode observer.

  13. Implications of different digital elevation models and preprocessing techniques to delineate debris flow inundation hazard zones in El Salvador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, E. R.; Griffin, R.; Irwin, D.

    2013-12-01

    Heavy rains and steep, volcanic slopes in El Salvador cause numerous landslides every year, posing a persistent threat to the population, economy and environment. Although potential debris inundation hazard zones have been delineated using digital elevation models (DEMs), some disparities exist between the simulated zones and actual affected areas. Moreover, these hazard zones have only been identified for volcanic lahars and not the shallow landslides that occur nearly every year. This is despite the availability of tools to delineate a variety of landslide types (e.g., the USGS-developed LAHARZ software). Limitations in DEM spatial resolution, age of the data, and hydrological preprocessing techniques can contribute to inaccurate hazard zone definitions. This study investigates the impacts of using different elevation models and pit filling techniques in the final debris hazard zone delineations, in an effort to determine which combination of methods most closely agrees with observed landslide events. In particular, a national DEM digitized from topographic sheets from the 1970s and 1980s provide an elevation product at a 10 meter resolution. Both natural and anthropogenic modifications of the terrain limit the accuracy of current landslide hazard assessments derived from this source. Global products from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) and the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer Global DEM (ASTER GDEM) offer more recent data but at the cost of spatial resolution. New data derived from the NASA Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) in 2013 provides the opportunity to update hazard zones at a higher spatial resolution (approximately 6 meters). Hydrological filling of sinks or pits for current hazard zone simulation has previously been achieved through ArcInfo spatial analyst. Such hydrological processing typically only fills pits and can lead to drastic modifications of original elevation values

  14. The Sensitivity of a Volcanic Flow Model to Digital Elevation Models From Diverse Sources: Digitized Map Contours and Airborne Interferometric Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, N. F.; Manville, V.; Heron, D. W.

    2001-12-01

    A growing trend in the field of volcanic hazard assessment is the use of computer models of a variety of flows to predict potential areas of devastation. The accuracy of these computer models depends on two factors, the nature and veracity of the flow model itself, and the accuracy of the topographic data set over which it is run. All digital elevation models (DEMs) contain innate errors. The nature of these depends on the accuracy of the original measurements of the terrain, and on the method used to build the DEM. We investigate the effect that these errors have on the performance of a simple volcanic flow model designed to delineate areas at risk from lahar inundation. The volcanic flow model was run over two DEMs of southern Ruapehu volcano derived from (1) digitized 1:50,000 topographic maps, and (2) airborne C-band synthetic aperture radar interferometry obtained using the NASA AIRSAR system. On steep slopes (exceeding 4 degrees), drainage channels are more likely to be incised deeply, and flow paths predicted by the model are generally in agreement for both DEMs despite the differing nature of the source data. Over shallow slopes (approx. 4 degrees and less), where channels are less deep and are more likely to meander, problems were encountered with flow path prediction in both DEMs due to interpolation errors and forestry. The predicted lateral and longitudinal extent of deposit inundation was also sensitive to the type of DEM used, most likely in response to the differing degrees of surface texture preserved in the DEMs. A technique to refine contour-derived DEMs and reduce the error in predicted flow paths was tested to improve the reliability of the modeled flow path predictions. The suitability of forthcoming topographic measurements acquired by a single-pass space-borne instrument, the NASA Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) are also tested.

  15. The Understanding of Elevation Dependent Warming from Climate Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangwala, I.; Miller, J. R.; Naud, C. M.; Sinsky, E.; Ghatak, D.; Chen, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Climate models, both global (GCMs) and regional (RCMs) climate models, provide useful insights into elevation dependent climate response under the increasing anthropogenic greenhouse forcing. They simulate variable response in climate as a function of elevation, including an amplified warming signal at higher elevations, under specific conditions. Moreover, they have been critical in elucidating some of the physical processes that cause elevation dependent warming (EDW). The models have also helped us to quantify sensitivities of those processes and feedbacks, and how these sensitivities vary as a function of elevation and other criteria. This has provided motivation within the scientific community to validate these insights in the selectively available high-elevation observations, as well as informed future needs for new observations and modeling experiments to understand the EDW phenomena. This presentation will provide a selective review of the issues discussed above as well as show results from the analysis of CMIP5 models on EDW in northern hemisphere mid-latitudes, and findings from high elevation observations in the Colorado Rocky Mountains.

  16. Influence of Elevation Data Source on 2D Hydraulic Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakuła, Krzysztof; Stępnik, Mateusz; Kurczyński, Zdzisław

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this paper is to analyse the influence of the source of various elevation data on hydraulic modelling in open channels. In the research, digital terrain models from different datasets were evaluated and used in two-dimensional hydraulic models. The following aerial and satellite elevation data were used to create the representation of terrain - digital terrain model: airborne laser scanning, image matching, elevation data collected in the LPIS, EuroDEM, and ASTER GDEM. From the results of five 2D hydrodynamic models with different input elevation data, the maximum depth and flow velocity of water were derived and compared with the results of the most accurate ALS data. For such an analysis a statistical evaluation and differences between hydraulic modelling results were prepared. The presented research proved the importance of the quality of elevation data in hydraulic modelling and showed that only ALS and photogrammetric data can be the most reliable elevation data source in accurate 2D hydraulic modelling.

  17. Elevation control system model for the DSS 13 antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gawronski, W.; Mellstrom, J. A.

    1991-01-01

    In order to meet the requirements for precision pointing of 34-m antennas, adequate control design and simulation software have to be developed along with a detailed description of the supporting analytical tools. This article describes a control system model for the elevation drive of the DSS 13 antenna. The model allows one to simulate elevation dynamics, cross-coupled dynamics in azimuth and elevation, and RF pointing error. A modal state-space model of the antenna structure was obtained from its finite-element model with a free rotating tipping structure. Model reduction techniques were applied separately for the antenna model and rate-loop model, thereby reducing the system order to one-third of the original one while preserving its dynamic properties. Extensive simulation results illustrate properties of the model.

  18. Lahar infrasound associated with Volcán Villarrica's 3 March 2015 eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Jeffrey B.; Palma, Jose L.

    2015-08-01

    The paroxysmal 2015 eruption of Volcán Villarrica (Chile) produced a 2.5 h long lahar, which descended more than 20 km within the Rio Correntoso/Turbio drainage and destroyed two small bridges. A three-element infrasound array 10 km from the summit, and 4 km from the lahar's closest approach, was used to study the flow's progression. Array processing using cross-correlation lag times and semblance places constraints on the lahar's dynamics, including detection of an initial flow pulse that traveled from 2 to 12 km at an average speed of 38 m/s. Subsequently, the lahar signal evolved to a relatively stationary infrasonic tremor located 10 to 12 km from the vent and adjacent to a topographic notch, through which sound may have preferentially diffracted toward the recording site. This study demonstrates the powerful capabilities of infrasound arrays for lahar study and suggests their potential application for future hazard monitoring.

  19. Gulf Stream model. [which considers surface elevation deviations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Surface elevation deviations in the Gulf Stream region off the eastern coast of the United States between Wallops Island, Virginia and Miami, Florida were investigated. The main causes of surface elevation deviations are geoid perturbations due to the continental shelf and the geostrophic adjustment of the density field due to the Gulf Stream. Quantitative surface elevation profiles were calculated based on geophysical measurements of gravity anomalies and hydrographic data. The results are presented graphically along with contemporaneous weather data. Comparisons are made between the profiles based on hydrographic data and a mean theoretical model. The theory of geostrophic flows including some classical Gulf Stream models is also presented briefly.

  20. Causes, Dynamics and Impacts of Lahars Generated by the April, 2015 Calbuco Eruption, Chile.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, A. J.; Dussaillant, A. R.; Meier, C. I.; Rivera, A.; Barra, M. M.; Urzua, N. G.; Hernandez, J. F.; Napoleoni, F.; Gonzalez, C.

    2015-12-01

    Calbuco is a 2015m high, glacier capped, stratovolcano in the heavily populated Los Lagos district of southern Chile with a history of large volcanic eruptions in 1893-95, 1906-7, 1911-12, 1917, 1932, 1945, 1961 and 1972. Calbuco experienced a powerful 90 minute eruption at 18:04h on 22 April, 2015 followed by additional major eruptions at 01:00h and 13:10h on 23 & 30 April, respectively, resulting in the evacuation of 6500 people and the imposition of a 20 km radius exclusion zone. Pyroclastic flows descended into several river catchments radiating from the volcano with lahars travelling distances of up to 14 km, reaching populated areas. We present preliminary findings regarding the causes, dynamics and impacts of lahars generated by the April 2015 eruption. Pyroclastic flows melted glacier ice and snow generating the largest lahars in the Rio Este and Rio Blanco Sur on the southern flanks of the volcano. Lahar deposits in the Rio Blanco Norte were buried by pyroclastic flow deposits with measured temperatures of up to 282°C three months after emplacement. Lahar erosional impacts included bedrock erosion, alluvial channel incision, erosion of surficial deposits and the felling of large areas of forest. Depositional landforms included boulder run-ups on the outsides of channel bends, boulder clusters and large woody debris jams. Lahars deposited up to 8m of sediment within distal reaches. Deposits on the southern flanks of Calbuco indicate the passage of multiple pulses of contrasting rheology. Lahar occurrence and magnitude was controlled by the pre-eruption distribution of snow and ice on the volcano. Pre-existing lahar channels controlled flows to lower piedmont zones where routing was determined by palaeo lahar geomorphology. Ongoing erosion of proximal pyroclastic flow and lahar deposits provides large volumes of sediment to distal portions of fluvial systems radiating from Calbuco.

  1. Generation of a new Greenland Ice Sheet Digital Elevation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagarajan, S.; Csatho, B. M.; Schenk, A. F.; Babonis, G. S.; Scambos, T. A.; Haran, T. M.; Kjaer, K. H.; Korsgaard, N. J.

    2011-12-01

    Currently available Digital Elevation Models(DEMs) of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) were originally derived from radar altimetry data, e.g. Bamber (Bamber et al., 2001) and later improved by photoclinometry to fill the regions between orbits (Scambos and Haran, 2002). The elevation error of these DEMs is a few meters in the higher part (above 2000 m) of the ice sheet, but it can be as much as 50-100 meters in marginal regions. The relatively low resolution and accuracy poses a problem, especially for ice sheet modeling. Although accurate elevation data have been collected by airborne and spaceborne laser altimetry (airborne: Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM) (1993-present), Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor(LVIS) (2007,2009 and 2011); spaceborne: Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) (2003-2009)) and DEMs have been derived from stereo satellite imagery (e.g., SPOT (40 m), ASTER (15 m)), a high resolution, consistent DEM of GrIS is not yet available. This is due to various problems, such as different error sources in the data and different dates of data acquisition. In order to overcome these difficulties, we generated a multi-resolution DEM of GrIS, reflecting June 2008 conditions, by fusing a photoclinometry DEM, SPOT and ASTER DEMs as well as elevations from ICESat, ATM and LVIS laser altimetry. The new multi-resolution DEM has a resolution of 40 m x 40 m in the marginal ice sheet regions and 250 m elsewhere. The ice sheet margin is mapped from SPOT and Landsat imagery and SPOT DEMs are used to cover the complex topography of ice sheet marginal regions. The accuracy of SPOT DEMs is approximately ± 6 m except in the areas covered by clouds regions, where the SPOT elevations were replaced by ASTER DEMs. The ASTER DEMs were checked and improved by the DEM derived from aerial photography from the 1980s. A new photoclinometry DEM, derived from Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) imagery

  2. Carving and adaptive drainage enforcement of grid digital elevation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soille, Pierre; Vogt, Jürgen; Colombo, Roberto

    2003-12-01

    An effective and widely used method for removing spurious pits in digital elevation models consists of filling them until they overflow. However, this method sometimes creates large flat regions which in turn pose a problem for the determination of accurate flow directions. In this study, we propose to suppress each pit by creating a descending path from it to the nearest point having a lower elevation value. This is achieved by carving, i.e., lowering, the terrain elevations along the detected path. Carving paths are identified through a flooding simulation starting from the river outlets. The proposed approach allows for adaptive drainage enforcement whereby river networks coming from other data sources are imposed to the digital elevation model only in places where the automatic river network extraction deviates substantially from the known networks. An improvement to methods for routing flow over flat regions is also introduced. Detailed results are presented over test areas of the Danube basin.

  3. Evaluation Digital Elevation Model Generated by Synthetic Aperture Radar Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makineci, H. B.; Karabörk, H.

    2016-06-01

    Digital elevation model, showing the physical and topographical situation of the earth, is defined a tree-dimensional digital model obtained from the elevation of the surface by using of selected an appropriate interpolation method. DEMs are used in many areas such as management of natural resources, engineering and infrastructure projects, disaster and risk analysis, archaeology, security, aviation, forestry, energy, topographic mapping, landslide and flood analysis, Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Digital elevation models, which are the fundamental components of cartography, is calculated by many methods. Digital elevation models can be obtained terrestrial methods or data obtained by digitization of maps by processing the digital platform in general. Today, Digital elevation model data is generated by the processing of stereo optical satellite images, radar images (radargrammetry, interferometry) and lidar data using remote sensing and photogrammetric techniques with the help of improving technology. One of the fundamental components of remote sensing radar technology is very advanced nowadays. In response to this progress it began to be used more frequently in various fields. Determining the shape of topography and creating digital elevation model comes the beginning topics of these areas. It is aimed in this work , the differences of evaluation of quality between Sentinel-1A SAR image ,which is sent by European Space Agency ESA and Interferometry Wide Swath imaging mode and C band type , and DTED-2 (Digital Terrain Elevation Data) and application between them. The application includes RMS static method for detecting precision of data. Results show us to variance of points make a high decrease from mountain area to plane area.

  4. Extreme rainfall-induced lahars and dike breaching, 30 November 2006, Mayon Volcano, Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paguican, E. M. R.; Lagmay, A. M. F.; Rodolfo, K. S.; Rodolfo, R. S.; Tengonciang, A. M. P.; Lapus, M. R.; Baliatan, E. G.; Obille, E. C.

    2009-10-01

    On 29-30 November 2006, heavy rains from Supertyphoon Durian remobilized volcanic debris on the southern and eastern slopes of Mount Mayon, generating major lahars that caused severe loss of life and property in downstream communities. The nearby Legaspi City weather station recorded 495.8 mm of rainfall over 1.5 days at rates as high as 47.5 mm/h, far exceeding the initiation threshold for Mayon lahars. For about 18 h, floods and lahars from the intense and prolonged rainfall overtopped river bends, breaching six dikes through which they created new paths, buried downstream communities in thick, widespread deposits, and caused most of the 1,266 fatalities. In order to mitigate damage from future lahars, the deposits were described and analyzed for clues to their generation and impact on structures and people. Post-disaster maps were generated from raw ASTER and SPOT images, using automated density slicing to characterize lahar deposits, flooded areas, croplands, and urbanized areas. Fieldwork was undertaken to check the accuracy of the maps, especially at the edges of the lahar deposits, and to measure the deposit thicknesses. The Durian event was exceptional in terms of rainfall intensity, but the dikes eventually failed because they were designed and built according to flood specifications, not to withstand major lahars.

  5. Variations in population exposure and sensitivity to lahar hazards from Mount Rainier, Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Nathan; Soulard, Christopher

    2009-12-01

    Although much has been done to understand, quantify, and delineate volcanic hazards, there are fewer efforts to assess societal vulnerability to these hazards, particularly demographic differences in exposed populations or spatial variations in exposure to regional hazards. To better understand population diversity in volcanic hazard zones, we assess the number and types of people in a single type of hazard zone (lahars) for 27 communities downstream of Mount Rainier, Washington (USA). Using various socioeconomic and hazard datasets, we estimate that there are more than 78 000 residents, 59 000 employees, several dependent-population facilities (e.g., child-day-care centers, nursing homes) and numerous public venues (e.g., churches, hotels, museums) in a Mount Rainier lahar-hazard zone. We find that communities vary in the primary category of individuals in lahar-prone areas—exposed populations are dominated by residents in some communities (e.g., Auburn), employees in others (e.g., Tacoma), and tourists likely outnumber both of these groups in yet other areas (e.g., unincorporated Lewis County). Population exposure to potential lahar inundation varies considerably—some communities (e.g., Auburn) have large numbers of people but low percentages of them in hazard zones, whereas others (e.g., Orting) have fewer people but they comprise the majority of a community. A composite lahar-exposure index is developed to help emergency managers understand spatial variations in community exposure to lahars and results suggest that Puyallup has the highest combination of high numbers and percentages of people and assets in lahar-prone areas. Risk education and preparedness needs will vary based on who is threatened by future lahars, such as residents, employees, tourists at a public venue, or special-needs populations at a dependent-care facility. Emergency managers must first understand the people whom they are trying to prepare before they can expect these people to take

  6. Variations in population exposure and sensitivity to lahar hazards from Mount Rainier, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, N.; Soulard, C.

    2009-01-01

    Although much has been done to understand, quantify, and delineate volcanic hazards, there are fewer efforts to assess societal vulnerability to these hazards, particularly demographic differences in exposed populations or spatial variations in exposure to regional hazards. To better understand population diversity in volcanic hazard zones, we assess the number and types of people in a single type of hazard zone (lahars) for 27 communities downstream of Mount Rainier, Washington (USA). Using various socioeconomic and hazard datasets, we estimate that there are more than 78 000 residents, 59 000 employees, several dependent-population facilities (e.g., child-day-care centers, nursing homes) and numerous public venues (e.g., churches, hotels, museums) in a Mount Rainier lahar-hazard zone. We find that communities vary in the primary category of individuals in lahar-prone areas-exposed populations are dominated by residents in some communities (e.g., Auburn), employees in others (e.g., Tacoma), and tourists likely outnumber both of these groups in yet other areas (e.g., unincorporated Lewis County). Population exposure to potential lahar inundation varies considerably-some communities (e.g., Auburn) have large numbers of people but low percentages of them in hazard zones, whereas others (e.g., Orting) have fewer people but they comprise the majority of a community. A composite lahar-exposure index is developed to help emergency managers understand spatial variations in community exposure to lahars and results suggest that Puyallup has the highest combination of high numbers and percentages of people and assets in lahar-prone areas. Risk education and preparedness needs will vary based on who is threatened by future lahars, such as residents, employees, tourists at a public venue, or special-needs populations at a dependent-care facility. Emergency managers must first understand the people whom they are trying to prepare before they can expect these people to take

  7. Variations in community exposure to lahar hazards from multiple volcanoes in Washington State (USA)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Diefenbach, Angela K.; Wood, Nathan J.; Ewert, John W.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how communities are vulnerable to lahar hazards provides critical input for effective design and implementation of volcano hazard preparedness and mitigation strategies. Past vulnerability assessments have focused largely on hazards posed by a single volcano, even though communities and officials in many parts of the world must plan for and contend with hazards associated with multiple volcanoes. To better understand community vulnerability in regions with multiple volcanic threats, we characterize and compare variations in community exposure to lahar hazards associated with five active volcanoes in Washington State, USA—Mount Baker, Glacier Peak, Mount Rainier, Mount Adams and Mount St. Helens—each having the potential to generate catastrophic lahars that could strike communities tens of kilometers downstream. We use geospatial datasets that represent various population indicators (e.g., land cover, residents, employees, tourists) along with mapped lahar-hazard boundaries at each volcano to determine the distributions of populations within communities that occupy lahar-prone areas. We estimate that Washington lahar-hazard zones collectively contain 191,555 residents, 108,719 employees, 433 public venues that attract visitors, and 354 dependent-care facilities that house individuals that will need assistance to evacuate. We find that population exposure varies considerably across the State both in type (e.g., residential, tourist, employee) and distribution of people (e.g., urban to rural). We develop composite lahar-exposure indices to identify communities most at-risk and communities throughout the State who share common issues of vulnerability to lahar-hazards. We find that although lahars are a regional hazard that will impact communities in different ways there are commonalities in community exposure across multiple volcanoes. Results will aid emergency managers, local officials, and the public in educating at-risk populations and developing

  8. Characteristics of the syneruptive-spouted type lahar generated by the September 2014 eruption of Mount Ontake, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Hisashi; Chiba, Tatsuro; Kishimoto, Hiroshi; Naruke, Shino

    2016-08-01

    Mount Ontake erupted at 11:52 am on September 27, 2014, which generated pyroclastic density currents, ballistic projectiles, ash falls, and a small-scale lahar that spouted directly from craters formed by the eruption. Because this lahar may have been generated by water released from within these craters, we refer to this lahar as a "syneruptive-spouted type lahar" in this study. The lahar of the 2014 eruption was small relative to the other syneruptive type lahars reported in the past that were snowmelt type or crater lake breakout type lahars. Nevertheless, in the 2014 event, the syneruptive-spouted type lahar extended approximately 5 km downstream from the Jigokudani crater via the Akagawa River, with an estimated total volume of ~1.2 × 105 m3. We have reviewed other representative syneruptive-spouted type lahars that have been reported in Japan. The syneruptive-spouted type lahar attributed to the September 2014 eruption had the longest runout distance and largest volume of all cases studied. The mineral assemblage identified from samples of the lahar deposits is similar to that of ash-fall deposits from the same eruption. Previous workers deduced that the ash was derived mainly from shallow depths (within 2 km of the surface). The syneruptive-spouted type lahar deposits are therefore also considered to have originated from shallow depths. A syneruptive-spouted type lahar is a small-scale phenomenon that causes little direct damage to infrastructure, but has long-term influence on water quality. Increases in turbidity and decreases in pH are expected to occur in the Mount Ontake area downstream of Nigorisawa after heavy rainfall events in the future. Therefore, the potential indirect (but long term) damage of syneruptive-spouted type lahars should be considered for hazard mapping and planning volcanic disaster prevention measures.

  9. The effects of wavelet compression on Digital Elevation Models (DEMs)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oimoen, M.J.

    2004-01-01

    This paper investigates the effects of lossy compression on floating-point digital elevation models using the discrete wavelet transform. The compression of elevation data poses a different set of problems and concerns than does the compression of images. Most notably, the usefulness of DEMs depends largely in the quality of their derivatives, such as slope and aspect. Three areas extracted from the U.S. Geological Survey's National Elevation Dataset were transformed to the wavelet domain using the third order filters of the Daubechies family (DAUB6), and were made sparse by setting 95 percent of the smallest wavelet coefficients to zero. The resulting raster is compressible to a corresponding degree. The effects of the nulled coefficients on the reconstructed DEM are noted as residuals in elevation, derived slope and aspect, and delineation of drainage basins and streamlines. A simple masking technique also is presented, that maintains the integrity and flatness of water bodies in the reconstructed DEM.

  10. Improving merge methods for grid-based digital elevation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitão, J. P.; Prodanović, D.; Maksimović, Č.

    2016-03-01

    Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) are used to represent the terrain in applications such as, for example, overland flow modelling or viewshed analysis. DEMs generated from digitising contour lines or obtained by LiDAR or satellite data are now widely available. However, in some cases, the area of study is covered by more than one of the available elevation data sets. In these cases the relevant DEMs may need to be merged. The merged DEM must retain the most accurate elevation information available while generating consistent slopes and aspects. In this paper we present a thorough analysis of three conventional grid-based DEM merging methods that are available in commercial GIS software. These methods are evaluated for their applicability in merging DEMs and, based on evaluation results, a method for improving the merging of grid-based DEMs is proposed. DEMs generated by the proposed method, called MBlend, showed significant improvements when compared to DEMs produced by the three conventional methods in terms of elevation, slope and aspect accuracy, ensuring also smooth elevation transitions between the original DEMs. The results produced by the improved method are highly relevant different applications in terrain analysis, e.g., visibility, or spotting irregularities in landforms and for modelling terrain phenomena, such as overland flow.

  11. Lahar Hazards at Concepción volcano, Nicaragua

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vallance, J.W.; Schilling, S.P.; Devoli, G.; Howell, M.M.

    2001-01-01

    Concepción is one of Nicaragua’s highest and most active volcanoes. The symmetrical cone occupies the northeastern half of a dumbbell shaped island called Isla Ometepa. The dormant volcano, Maderas, occupies the southwest half of the island. A narrow isthmus connects Concepción and Maderas volcanoes. Concepción volcano towers more than 1600 m above Lake Nicaragua and is within 5 to 10 km of several small towns situated on its aprons at or near the shoreline. These towns have a combined population of nearly 5,000. The volcano has frequently produced debris flows (watery flows of mud, rock, and debris—also known as lahars when they occur on a volcano) that could inundate these nearby populated areas. Concepción volcano has erupted more than 25 times in the last 120 years. Its first recorded activity was in AD 1883. Eruptions in the past century, most of which have originated from a small summit crater, comprise moderate explosions, ash that falls out of eruption plumes (called tephra), and occasional lava flows. Near the summit area, there are accumulations of rock that were emplaced hot (pyroclastic deposits), most of which were hot enough to stick together during deposition (a process called welding). These pyroclastic rocks are rather weak, and tend to break apart easily. The loose volcanic rock remobilizes during heavy rain to form lahars. Volcanic explosions have produced blankets of tephra that are distributed downwind, which on Isla Ometepe is mostly to the west. Older deposits at the west end of the island that are up to 1 m thick indicate larger explosive events have happened at Concepción volcano in prehistoric time. Like pyroclastic-flow deposits, loose tephra on the steep slopes of the volcano provides source material that heavy rainstorms and earthquakes can mobilize to trigger debris flow.

  12. Reducing risk from lahar hazards: concepts, case studies, and roles for scientists

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pierson, Thomas C.; Wood, Nathan J.; Driedger, Carolyn L.

    2014-01-01

    Lahars are rapid flows of mud-rock slurries that can occur without warning and catastrophically impact areas more than 100 km downstream of source volcanoes. Strategies to mitigate the potential for damage or loss from lahars fall into four basic categories: (1) avoidance of lahar hazards through land-use planning; (2) modification of lahar hazards through engineered protection structures; (3) lahar warning systems to enable evacuations; and (4) effective response to and recovery from lahars when they do occur. Successful application of any of these strategies requires an accurate understanding and assessment of the hazard, an understanding of the applicability and limitations of the strategy, and thorough planning. The human and institutional components leading to successful application can be even more important: engagement of all stakeholders in hazard education and risk-reduction planning; good communication of hazard and risk information among scientists, emergency managers, elected officials, and the at-risk public during crisis and non-crisis periods; sustained response training; and adequate funding for risk-reduction efforts. This paper reviews a number of methods for lahar-hazard risk reduction, examines the limitations and tradeoffs, and provides real-world examples of their application in the U.S. Pacific Northwest and in other volcanic regions of the world. An overriding theme is that lahar-hazard risk reduction cannot be effectively accomplished without the active, impartial involvement of volcano scientists, who are willing to assume educational, interpretive, and advisory roles to work in partnership with elected officials, emergency managers, and vulnerable communities.

  13. How processing digital elevation models can affect simulated water budgets

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kuniansky, E.L.; Lowery, M.A.; Campbell, B.G.

    2009-01-01

    For regional models, the shallow water table surface is often used as a source/sink boundary condition, as model grid scale precludes simulation of the water table aquifer. This approach is appropriate when the water table surface is relatively stationary. Since water table surface maps are not readily available, the elevation of the water table used in model cells is estimated via a two-step process. First, a regression equation is developed using existing land and water table elevations from wells in the area. This equation is then used to predict the water table surface for each model cell using land surface elevation available from digital elevation models (DEM). Two methods of processing DEM for estimating the land surface for each cell are commonly used (value nearest the cell centroid or mean value in the cell). This article demonstrates how these two methods of DEM processing can affect the simulated water budget. For the example presented, approximately 20% more total flow through the aquifer system is simulated if the centroid value rather than the mean value is used. This is due to the one-third greater average ground water gradients associated with the centroid value than the mean value. The results will vary depending on the particular model area topography and cell size. The use of the mean DEM value in each model cell will result in a more conservative water budget and is more appropriate because the model cell water table value should be representative of the entire cell area, not the centroid of the model cell.

  14. A study of the Taisho lahar generated by the 1926 eruption of Tokachidake Volcano, central Hokkaido, Japan, and implications for the generation of cohesive lahars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uesawa, Shimpei

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the generation mechanisms of lahars is important for improving volcanic hazard assessments. The Taisho lahar (TL) was generated during the 1926 eruption of Tokachidake Volcano, Japan, and was considered a typical snowmelt lahar caused by the runout of hot debris onto a snow-covered slope. A similar mechanism produced a huge mud flow during the 1985 eruption of Nevado del Ruiz, Colombia. However, the origin of water in such lahars remains a controversial topic because the calculated water mass is based on the assumption that all of the snow on the runout area of the TL was melted, although this is much less than the estimated water volume in the TL estimated by previous studies. I have re-examined proximal deposits of the TL and their paleomagnetic characteristics in order to better understand the eruption sequence and formation of the TL. The TL produced two debris avalanche deposits and a surge-like deposit that had relatively high emplacement temperature (~ 350 °C). The deposits are composed of hydrothermally altered andesitic gravel, sand and mud. The high clay content (3-5 wt.% clay in the < 2 mm fraction) and sedimentary characteristics indicate that the flow was a cohesive lahar, most likely induced by collapse of a hydrothermally altered pyroclastic cone (hypocenter). The presence of the surge deposit indicates that the TL was not caused by simple collapse of a cinder cone but by a phreatic explosion that resulted in sector collapse. This suggests that the hydrothermal system was related to the 1926 eruption. The present-day volcano has a large hydrothermal system (1 × 106 m3 water) beneath the active crater. This study indicates that hydrothermal system explosions can trigger cohesive lahars that contain both snow melt and hydrothermal pore water, and this indicates the need to monitor hydrothermal systems.

  15. Extraction of terrain features from digital elevation models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Price, Curtis V.; Wolock, David M.; Ayers, Mark A.

    1989-01-01

    Digital elevation models (DEMs) are being used to determine variable inputs for hydrologic models in the Delaware River basin. Recently developed software for analysis of DEMs has been applied to watershed and streamline delineation. The results compare favorably with similar delineations taken from topographic maps. Additionally, output from this software has been used to extract other hydrologic information from the DEM, including flow direction, channel location, and an index describing the slope and shape of a watershed.

  16. Modeling Saturn Ring Temperature Variations as Solar Elevation Decreases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spilker, L.; Flandes, A.; Altobelli, N.; Leyrat, C.; Pilorz, S.; Ferrari, C.

    2008-12-01

    After more than four years in orbit around Saturn, the Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) has acquired a wide-ranging set of thermal measurements of Saturn's main rings (A, B, C and Cassini Division). Temperatures were retrieved for the lit and unlit rings over a variety of ring geometries that include solar phase angle, spacecraft elevation, solar elevation and local hour angle. To first order, the largest temperature changes on the lit face of the rings are driven by variations in phase angle while differences in temperature with changing spacecraft elevation and local time are a secondary effect. Decreasing ring temperature with decreasing solar elevation are observed for both the lit and unlit faces of the rings after phase angle and local time effects are taken into account. For the lit rings, decreases of 2- 4 K are observed in the C ring and larger decreases, 7-10 and 10 - 13 K, are observed in the A and B rings respectively. Our thermal data cover a range of solar elevations from -21 to -8 degrees (south side of the rings). We test two simple models and evaluate how well they fit the observed decreases in temperature. The first model assumes that the particles are so widely spaced that they do not cast shadows on one another while the second model assumes that the particles are so close together they essentially form a slab. The optically thinnest and optically thickest regions of the rings show the best fits to these two end member models. We also extrapolate to the expected minimum ring temperatures at equinox. This research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with NASA and at CEA Saclay supported by the "Programme National de Planetologie". Copyright 2008 California Institute of Technology. Government sponsorship acknowledged.

  17. Tree-ring based reconstruction of past lahar activity at Popocat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bollschweiler, M.; Stoffel, M.; Vázquez Selem, L.; Palacios, D.

    2009-04-01

    Lahars are rapid, saturated flows of water and rock fragments that occur on volcanoes and that can be triggered either by volcanic activity or by intense precipitation falling on unconsolidated volcanic deposits. As their occurrence is unpredictable, as the flow contains sometimes considerably large rock fragments and as the flow is able to travel long distances even on gentle gradients, lahars represent one of the most destructive natural disasters in terms of loss of human lives and property damage. In order to realistically assess hazards, knowledge on the occurrence and timing of past lahar activity is of crucial importance. However, archival data on past events is usually scarce or completely missing. Tree-ring records have repeatedly proved to be a reliable data source for the reconstruction of past geomorphic events. However, tree rings have hardly ever been applied for the identification of past lahars. Therefore, it was the aim of this study (i) to identify and describe disturbances in tree growth induced by well-documented lahar events and on this basis (ii) to recognize older, unknown lahar events with tree-ring analyses. Based on these goals, we collected 140 tree-ring series from 62 trees (Abies religiosa, Pinus hartwegii, Pinus ayacahuite) standing inside or adjacent to the lahar channel in the Huiloac gorge at Popocatépetl volcano, central Mexico. Most commonly, the known lahar events of 1997 and 2001 resulted in abrupt changes in tree-ring width as well as injuries. The same growth disturbances could be identified in the tree-ring series, indicating that five previously unknown lahar events would have occurred during the 20th century. Popocatépetl is one of the best surveyed volcanoes in the world and past eruptions are precisely noted in archives. As most of these unknown events occurred during periods with no volcanic activity, we believe that they were rainfall-induced rather than related to volcanic activity. This study revealed the potential

  18. The Rational Polynomial Coefficients Modification Using Digital Elevation Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alidoost, F.; Azizi, A.; Arefi, H.

    2015-12-01

    The high-resolution satellite imageries (HRSI) are as primary dataset for different applications such as DEM generation, 3D city mapping, change detection, monitoring, and deformation detection. The geo-location information of HRSI are stored in metadata called Rational Polynomial Coefficients (RPCs). There are many methods to improve and modify the RPCs in order to have a precise mapping. In this paper, an automatic approach is presented for the RPC modification using global Digital Elevation Models. The main steps of this approach are: relative digital elevation model generation, shift parameters calculation, sparse point cloud generation and shift correction, and rational polynomial fitting. Using some ground control points, the accuracy of the proposed method is evaluated based on statistical descriptors in which the results show that the geo-location accuracy of HRSI can be improved without using Ground Control Points (GCPs).

  19. The sensitivity of a volcanic flow model to digital elevation model accuracy: experiments with digitised map contours and interferometric SAR at Ruapehu and Taranaki volcanoes, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, N. F.; Manville, V.; Heron, D. W.

    2003-01-01

    A growing trend in the field of volcanic hazard assessment is the use of computer models of a variety of flows to predict potential areas of devastation. These can be compared against historic and geologic evidence of past events for model calibration, or used to construct hazard zone maps for mitigation and planning purposes. The accuracy of these computer models depends on two factors, the nature and veracity of the flow model itself, and the accuracy of the topographic data set over which it is run. All digital elevation models (DEMs) contain innate errors. The nature of these depends on the accuracy of the original measurements of the terrain, and on the method used to build the DEM. In this paper we investigate the effect that these errors have on the performance of a volcanic flow model designed to delineate areas at risk from lahar inundation. The model was run over two DEMs of southern Ruapehu volcano derived from (1) digitised 1:50 000 topographic maps, and (2) airborne C-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR) interferometry obtained using the NASA AIRSAR system. On steep slopes of ˜4° or more, drainage channels are more likely to be incised deeply, and flow paths predicted by the model are generally in agreement for both DEMs despite the differing nature of the source data. Over shallow slopes (˜<4°), where channels are less deep and are more likely to meander, problems were encountered with flow path prediction in both DEMs due to interpolation errors between contours, and due to forestry. The predicted lateral and longitudinal extent of deposit inundation was also sensitive to the type of DEM used, most likely in response to the differing degrees of surface texture preserved in the DEMs. A technique to refine contour-derived DEMs and reduce the error in predicted flow paths was tested to improve the reliability of the modelled flow path predictions. In areas where high-resolution topographic maps are unavailable, forthcoming topographic measurements

  20. Digital elevation model visibility including Earth's curvature and atmosphere refraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santossilva, Ewerton; Vieiradias, Luiz Alberto

    1990-03-01

    There are some instances in which the Earth's curvature and the atmospheric refraction, optical or electronic, are important factors when digital elevation models are used for visibility calculations. This work deals with this subject, suggesting a practical approach to solve this problem. Some examples, from real terrain data, are presented. The equipment used was an IBM-PC like computer with a SITIM graphic card.

  1. Catastrophic precipitation-triggered lahar at Casita volcano, Nicaragua: Occurrence, bulking and transformation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scott, K.M.; Vallance, J.W.; Kerle, N.; Macias, J.L.; Strauch, W.; Devoli, G.

    2005-01-01

    A catastrophic lahar began on 30 October 1998, as hurricane precipitation triggered a small flank collapse of Casita volcano, a complex and probably dormant stratovolcano. The initial rockslide-debris avalanche evolved on the flank to yield a watery debris flood with a sediment concentration less than 60 per cent by volume at the base of the volcano. Within 2-5 km, however, the watery flow entrained (bulked) enough sediment to transform entirely to a debris flow. The debris flow, 6 km downstream and 1??2 km wide and 3 to 6 m deep, killed 2500 people, nearly the entire populations of the communities of El Porvenir and Rolando Rodriguez. These 'new towns' were developed in a prehistoric lahar pathway: at least three flows of similar size since 8330 14C years BP are documented by stratigraphy in the same 30-degree sector. Travel time between perception of the flow and destruction of the towns was only 2??5-3??0 minutes. The evolution of the flow wave occurred with hydraulic continuity and without pause or any extraordinary addition of water. The precipitation trigger of the Casita lahar emphasizes the nee d, in volcano hazard assessments, for including the potential for non-eruption-related collapse lahars with the more predictable potential of their syneruption analogues. The flow behaviour emphasizes that volcano collapses can yield not only volcanic debris avalanches with restricted runouts, but also mobile lahars that enlarge by bulking as they flow. Volumes and hence inundation areas of collapse-runout lahars can increase greatly beyond their sources: the volume of the Casita lahar bulked to at least 2??6 times the contributing volume of the flank collapse and 4??2 times that of the debris flood. At least 78 per cent of the debris flow matrix (sediment < -1??0??; 2 mm) was entrained during flow. Copyright c 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Mount Baker lahars and debris flows, ancient, modern, and future

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tucker, David S; Scott, Kevin M.; Grossman, Eric E.; Linneman, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Holocene lahars and large debris flows (>106 m3) have left recognizable deposits in the Middle Fork Nooksack valley. A debris flow in 2013 resulting from a landslide in a Little Ice Age moraine had an estimated volume of 100,000 m3, yet affected turbidity for the entire length of the river, and produced a slug of sediment that is currently being reworked and remobilized in the river system. Deposits of smaller-volume debris flows, deposited as terraces in the upper valley, may be entirely eroded within a few years. Consequently, the geologic record of small debris flows such as those that occurred in 2013 is probably very fragmentary. Small debris flows may still have significant impacts on hydrology, biology, and human uses of rivers downstream. Impacts include the addition of waves of fine sediment to stream loads, scouring or burying salmon-spawning gravels, forcing unplanned and sudden closure of municipal water intakes, damaging or destroying trail crossings, extending river deltas into estuaries, and adding to silting of harbors near river mouths.

  3. Online, On Demand Access to Coastal Digital Elevation Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, J.; Bristol, S.; Long, D.; Thompson, S.

    2014-12-01

    Process-based numerical models for coastal waves, water levels, and sediment transport are initialized with digital elevation models (DEM) constructed by interpolating and merging bathymetric and topographic elevation data. These gridded surfaces must seamlessly span the land-water interface and may cover large regions where the individual raw data sources are collected at widely different spatial and temporal resolutions. In addition, the datasets are collected from different instrument platforms with varying accuracy and may or may not overlap in coverage. The lack of available tools and difficulties in constructing these DEMs lead scientists to 1) rely on previously merged, outdated, or over-smoothed DEMs; 2) discard more recent data that covers only a portion of the DEM domain; and 3) use inconsistent methodologies to generate DEMs. The objective of this work is to address the immediate need of integrating land and water-based elevation data sources and streamline the generation of a seamless data surface that spans the terrestrial-marine boundary. To achieve this, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is developing a web processing service to format and initialize geoprocessing tasks designed to create coastal DEMs. The web processing service is maintained within the USGS ScienceBase data management system and has an associated user interface. Through the map-based interface, users define a geographic region that identifies the bounds of the desired DEM and a time period of interest. This initiates a query for elevation datasets within federal science agency data repositories. A geoprocessing service is then triggered to interpolate, merge, and smooth the data sources creating a DEM based on user-defined configuration parameters. Uncertainty and error estimates for the DEM are also returned by the geoprocessing service. Upon completion, the information management platform provides access to the final gridded data derivative and saves the configuration parameters

  4. Landsat TM and ETM+ Time Sequence of Lahar Hazards on Fuego Volcano, Guatemala

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reif, S. L.; Bluth, G. J.; Rose, W. I.; Matias, O.

    2003-12-01

    Volcanic hazards pose a threat to a large number of the world's population, especially secondary hazards due to remobilization of volcanic material such as landslides and lahars. Many hazard-prone areas would benefit by remote sensing tools for hazard mitigation. In this study, we propose to use remote sensing and GIS techniques to map these hazard prone areas around Fuego volcano, Guatemala and provide information to local organizations to assist in mitigation. Fuego is a steep sided volcano with a history of large eruptive events, including the well-studied 1974 eruption, that have extruded a large amount of material onto the upper reaches of its watersheds. The volcano is well studied, but historically more emphasis has been placed on eruption processes. A study of the way material moves down Fuego and to the extent that it moves is needed to help mitigate the range of potential hazards. We propose an in-depth remote sensing survey to map the hazard-prone areas. The study will consist of processing 20 years (15 cloud-free images) of Landsat TM and ETM+ data to look at changes in landforms and vegetation. Vegetation indices will be calculated to locate areas devoid of vegetation and a masking process will be used These area changes will be related to field measurements to create GIS to measure the area of these zones. layers denoting geometry changes in the channels around Fuego. These changes will be loaded into a GIS, along with regional climate data, DEMs, hydrologic data, infrastructure, and information about the known volcanic activity recorded in the area by the local volcanologists. Modeling of lahars using LAHARZ and climate data will also be done to determine an estimate of the amount of material moved and to what distances it can be transported. A field survey undertaken in January 2003 acquired GPS ground truth data of landslide boundaries and channel volumes for the GIS. The deposits that were seen in the channels 10 km from the source of the sediment

  5. Registering Thematic Mapper imagery to digital elevation models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frew, J.

    1984-01-01

    The problems encountered when attempting to register Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) data to U.S. geological survey digital elevation models (DEMs) are examined. It is shown that TM and DEM data are not available in the same map projection, necessitating geometric transformation of one of the data type, that the TM data are not accurately located in their nominal projection, and that TM data have higher resolution than most DEM data, but oversampling the DEM data to TM resolution introduces systematic noise. Further work needed in this area is discussed.

  6. Applications of hydrologic information automatically extracted from digital elevation models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jenson, S.K.

    1991-01-01

    Digital elevation models (DEMs) can be used to derive a wealth of information about the morphology of a land surface. Traditional raster analysis methods can be used to derive slope, aspect, and shaded relief information; recently-developed computer programs can be used to delineate depressions, overland flow paths, and watershed boundaries. These methods were used to delineate watershed boundaries for a geochemical stream sediment survey, to compare the results of extracting slope and flow paths from DEMs of varying resolutions, and to examine the geomorphology of a Martian DEM. -Author

  7. The anatomy of a lahar: deciphering the 15th September 2012 lahar at Volcán de Colima, México

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez, Rosario; Capra, Lucia; Caballero, Lizeth; Arámbula, Raúl; Reyes, Gabriel

    2014-05-01

    Volcán de Colima is one of the most active volcanoes in Mexico where lahars area common phenomenon. Since the reactivation of the volcanic activity in 1991, lahars have become more frequent during the June-October rainy season, in this region. Therefore, Volcán de Colima represents a natural laboratory, ideal for the constant monitoring of lahars and to study factors controlling their origin, flow transport and deposition. Since 2007 the systematic detection of lahars in Volcán de Colima has been carried out using seismic data from the broadband stations of the RESCO network, the seismological network of Colima University, along with three rain gauge stations located on the southern ravines of the volcano. In 2011 a new monitoring station was built at 2000 m.a.s.l. along the Montegrande ravine, which consists of a geophone, a video camera and a rain gauge station coupled with a moisture sensor, transmitting in real time to the RESCO facilities at Colima University. With all the instrumentation currently installed on the volcano flanks, we could monitor and describe the lahar that occurred on 15th September 2012 along the Montegrande ravine, and correlate the monitoring data with information gathered by the field campaign conducted two days after the event. The high quality of collected data enabled us to describe the "anatomy" of this lahar. The event consisted of a lahar that lasted 40 minutes, triggered by 20 mm of accumulated rainfall with a maximum intensity of 95 mm/h. The lahar was characterized by three main surges at 4-5 minutes intervals that formed a 80 cm-thick terrace. The first surge was a debris flow with a block-rich front followed by the main body that progressively diluted to an hyperconcentrated flow, from which a 40 cm-thick massive unit was emplaced (33 wt% gravel and >60 wt% of sand); it was followed by a more dilute hyperconcentrated flow that left a massive 10 cm-thick sandy layer (80 wt% of sand); the third surge deposited a 30-cm thick

  8. Modelling of aluminium sheet forming at elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Boogaard, A. H.; Huétink, J.

    2004-06-01

    The formability of Al-Mg sheet can be improved considerably, by increasing the temperature. By heating the sheet in areas with large shear strains, but cooling it on places where the risk of necking is high, the limiting drawing ratio can be increased to values above 2.5. At elevated temperatures, the mechanical response of the material becomes strain rate dependent. To accurately simulate warm forming of aluminium sheet, a material model is required that incorporates the temperature and strain-rate dependency. In this paper simulations are presented of the deep drawing of a cylindrical cup, using shell elements. It is demonstrated that the familiar quadratic Hill yield function is not capable of describing the plastic deformation of aluminium. Hardening can be described successfully with a physically based material model for temperatures up to 200 °C. At higher temperatures and very low strain rates, the flow curve deviates significantly from the model.

  9. Void-Filled SRTM Digital Elevation Model of Afghanistan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chirico, Peter G.; Barrios, Boris

    2005-01-01

    EXPLANATION The purpose of this data set is to provide a single consistent elevation model to be used for national scale mapping, GIS, remote sensing applications, and natural resource assessments for Afghanistan's reconstruction. For 11 days in February of 2000, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency ian Space Agency (ASI) flew X-band and C-band radar interferometry onboard the Space Shuttle Endeavor. The mission covered the Earth between 60?N and 57?S and will provide interferometric digital elevation models (DEMs) of approximately 80% of the Earth's land mass when processing is complete. The radar-pointing angle was approximately 55? at scene center. Ascending and descending orbital passes generated multiple interferometric data scenes for nearly all areas. Up to eight passes of data were merged to form the final processed Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) DEMs. The effect of merging scenes averages elevation values recorded in coincident scenes and reduces, but does not completely eliminate, the amount of area with layover and terrain shadow effects. The most significant form of data processing for the Afghanistan DEM was gap-filling areas where the SRTM data contained a data void. These void areas are as a result of radar shadow, layover, standing water, and other effects of terrain as well as technical radar interferometry phase unwrapping issues. To fill these gaps, topographic contours were digitized from 1:200,000 - scale Soviet General Staff Topographic Maps which date from the middle to late 1980's. Digital contours were gridded to form elevation models for void areas and subsequently were merged with the SRTM data through GIS and image processing techniques. The data contained in this publication includes SRTM DEM quadrangles projected and clipped in geographic coordinates for the entire country. An index of all available SRTM DEM quadrangles is displayed here: Index_Geo_DD.pdf. Also

  10. Integrated firn elevation change model for glaciers and ice caps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saß, Björn; Sauter, Tobias; Braun, Matthias

    2016-04-01

    We present the development of a firn compaction model in order to improve the volume to mass conversion of geodetic glacier mass balance measurements. The model is applied on the Arctic ice cap Vestfonna. Vestfonna is located on the island Nordaustlandet in the north east of Svalbard. Vestfonna covers about 2400 km² and has a dome like shape with well-defined outlet glaciers. Elevation and volume changes measured by e.g. satellite techniques are becoming more and more popular. They are carried out over observation periods of variable length and often covering different meteorological and snow hydrological regimes. The elevation change measurements compose of various components including dynamic adjustments, firn compaction and mass loss by downwasting. Currently, geodetic glacier mass balances are frequently converted from elevation change measurements using a constant conversion factor of 850 kg m-³ or the density of ice (917 kg m-³) for entire glacier basins. However, the natural conditions are rarely that static. Other studies used constant densities for the ablation (900 kg m-³) and accumulation (600 kg m-³) areas, whereby density variations with varying meteorological and climate conditions are not considered. Hence, each approach bears additional uncertainties from the volume to mass conversion that are strongly affected by the type and timing of the repeat measurements. We link and adapt existing models of surface energy balance, accumulation and snow and firn processes in order to improve the volume to mass conversion by considering the firn compaction component. Energy exchange at the surface is computed by a surface energy balance approach and driven by meteorological variables like incoming short-wave radiation, air temperature, relative humidity, air pressure, wind speed, all-phase precipitation, and cloud cover fraction. Snow and firn processes are addressed by a coupled subsurface model, implemented with a non-equidistant layer discretisation. On

  11. Record of late holocene debris avalanches and lahars at Iliamna Volcano, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waythomas, C.F.; Miller, T.P.; Beget, J.E.

    2000-01-01

    Iliamna Volcano is a 3053-meter high, glaciated stratovolcano in the southern Cook Inlet region of Alaska and is one of seven volcanoes in this region that have erupted multiple times during the past 10,000 yr. Prior to our studies of Iliamna Volcano, little was known about the frequency, magnitude, and character of Holocene volcanic activity. Here we present geologic evidence of the most recent eruptive activity of the volcano and provide the first outline of Late Holocene debris-avalanche and lahar formation. Iliamna has had no documented historical eruptions but our recent field investigations indicate that the volcano has erupted at least twice in the last 300 yr. Clay-rich lahar deposits dated by radiocarbon to ???1300 and ???90 yr BP are present in two major valleys that head on the volcano. These deposits indicate that at least two large, possibly deep-seated, flank failures of the volcanic edifice have occurred in the last 1300 yr. Noncohesive lahar deposits likely associated with explosive pyroclastic eruptions date to 2400-1300,>1500,???300, and <305 yr BP. Debris-avalanche deposits from recent and historical small-volume slope failures of the hydrothermally altered volcanic edifice cover most of the major glaciers on the volcano. Although these deposits consist almost entirely of hydrothermally altered rock debris and snow and ice, none of the recently generated debris avalanches evolved to lahars. A clay-rich lahar deposit that formed <90??60 radiocarbon yr BP and entered the Johnson River Valley southeast of the volcano cannot be confidently related to an eruption of Iliamna Volcano, which has had no known historical eruptions. This deposit may record an unheralded debris avalanche and lahar. ?? 2000 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Preparation of the Digital Elevation Model for Orthophoto CR Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Švec, Z.; Pavelka, K.

    2016-06-01

    The Orthophoto CR is produced in co-operation with the Land Survey Office and the Military Geographical and Hydrometeorological Office. The product serves to ensure a defence of the state, integrated crisis management, civilian tasks in support of the state administration and the local self-government of the Czech Republic as well. It covers the whole area of the Republic and for ensuring its up-to-datedness is reproduced in the biennial period. As the project is countrywide, it keeps the project within the same parameters in urban and rural areas as well. Due to economic reasons it cańt be produced as a true ortophoto because it requires large side and forward overlaps of the aerial photographs and a preparation of the digital surface model instead of the digital terrain model. Use of DTM without some objects of DSM for orthogonalization purposes cause undesirable image deformations in the Orthophoto. There are a few data sets available for forming a suitable elevation model. The principal source should represent DTMs made from data acquired by the airborne laser scanning of the entire area of the Czech Republic that was carried out in the years 2009-2013, the DMR4G in the grid form and the DMR5G in TIN form respectively. It can be replenished by some vector objects (bridges, dams, etc.) taken from the geographic base data of the Czech Republic or obtained by new stereo plotting. It has to be taken into account that the option of applying DSM made from image correlation is also available. The article focuses on the possibilities of DTM supplement for ortogonalization. It looks back to the recent transition from grid to hybrid elevation models, problems that occurred, its solution and getting some practical remarks. Afterwards it assesses the current state and deals with the options for updating the model. Some accuracy analysis are included.

  13. Levee crest elevation profiles derived from airborne lidar-based high resolution digital elevation models in south Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Palaseanu-Lovejoy, Monica; Thatcher, Cindy A.; Barras, John A.

    2014-01-01

    This study explores the feasibility of using airborne lidar surveys to derive high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) and develop an automated procedure to extract levee longitudinal elevation profiles for both federal levees in Atchafalaya Basin and local levees in Lafourche Parish. Generally, the use of traditional manual surveying methods to map levees is a costly and time consuming process that typically produces cross-levee profiles every few hundred meters, at best. The purpose of our paper is to describe and test methods for extracting levee crest elevations in an efficient, comprehensive manner using high resolution lidar generated DEMs. In addition, the vertical uncertainty in the elevation data and its effect on the resultant estimate of levee crest heights is addressed in an assessment of whether the federal levees in our study meet the USACE minimum height design criteria.

  14. Accuracy Assessment of Digital Elevation Models Using GPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farah, Ashraf; Talaat, Ashraf; Farrag, Farrag A.

    2008-01-01

    A Digital Elevation Model (DEM) is a digital representation of ground surface topography or terrain with different accuracies for different application fields. DEM have been applied to a wide range of civil engineering and military planning tasks. DEM is obtained using a number of techniques such as photogrammetry, digitizing, laser scanning, radar interferometry, classical survey and GPS techniques. This paper presents an assessment study of DEM using GPS (Stop&Go) and kinematic techniques comparing with classical survey. The results show that a DEM generated from (Stop&Go) GPS technique has the highest accuracy with a RMS error of 9.70 cm. The RMS error of DEM derived by kinematic GPS is 12.00 cm.

  15. Elevated Temperature Testing and Modeling of Advanced Toughened Ceramic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a final report for the period of 12/1/03 through 11/30/04 for NASA Cooperative Agreement NCC3-776, entitled "Elevated Temperature Testing and Modeling of Advanced Toughened Ceramic Materials." During this final period, major efforts were focused on both the determination of mechanical properties of advanced ceramic materials and the development of mechanical test methodologies under several different programs of the NASA-Glenn. The important research activities made during this period are: 1. Mechanical properties evaluation of two gas-turbine grade silicon nitrides. 2) Mechanical testing for fuel-cell seal materials. 3) Mechanical properties evaluation of thermal barrier coatings and CFCCs and 4) Foreign object damage (FOD) testing.

  16. Probabilistic Digital Elevation Model Generation For Spatial Accuracy Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalobeanu, A.

    2008-12-01

    We propose a new method for the measurement of high resolution topography from a stereo pair. The main application area is the study of planetary surfaces. Digital elevation models (DEM) computed from image pairs using state of the art algorithms usually lack quantitative error estimates. This can be a major issue when the result is used to measure actual physical parameters, such as slope or terrain roughness. Thus, we propose a new method to infer a dense bidimensional disparity map from two images, that also estimates the spatial distribution of errors. We adopt a probabilistic approach, which provides a rigorous framework for parameter estimation and uncertainty evaluation. All the parameters are described in terms of random variables within a Bayesian framework. We start by defining a forward model, which mainly consists of warping the observed scene using B-Splines and using a spatially adaptive radiometric change map for robustness purposes. An a priori smoothness model is introduced in order to stabilize the solution. Solving the inverse problem to recover the disparity map requires to optimize a global non-convex energy function, which is difficult in practice due to multiple local optima. A deterministic optimization technique based on a multi-grid strategy, followed by a local energy analysis at the optimum, allows to recover the a posteriori probability density function (pdf) of the disparity, which encodes both the optimal solution and the related error map. Finally, the disparity field is converted into a DEM through a geometric camera model. This camera model is either known initially, or calibrated automatically using the estimated disparity map and available measurements of the topography (existing low-resolution DEM or ground control points). Automatic calibration from uncertain disparity and topography measurements allows for efficient error propagation from the initial data to the generated elevation model. Results from Mars Express HRSC data

  17. Preliminary observations of voluminous ice-rich and water-rich lahars generated during the 2009 eruption of Redoubt, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waythomas, Christopher F.; Pierson, Thomas C.; Major, Jon J.; Scott, William E.

    2012-01-01

    Redoubt Volcano in south-central Alaska began erupting on March 15, 2009, and by April 4, 2009, had produced at least 20 explosive events that generated plumes of ash and lahars. The 3,108-m high, snow- and -ice-clad stratovolcano has an ice-filled summit crater that is breached to the north. The volcano supports about 4 km3 of ice and snow and about 1 km3 of this makes up the Drift glacier on the northern side of the volcano. Explosive eruptions between March 22 and April 4, which included the destruction of at least two lava domes, triggered significant lahars in the Drift River valley on March 23 and April 4 and several smaller lahars between March 24 and March 31. High-flow marks, character of deposits, areas of inundation, and estimates of flow velocity revealed that the lahars on March 23 and April 4 were the largest of the eruption. In the 2-km-wide upper Drift River valley, average flow depths were about 3–5 m. Average peak-flow velocities were likely between 10 and 15 ms-1, and peak discharges were on the order of 104–105 m3s-1. The area inundated by lahars on March 23 was at least 100 km2 and on April 4 about 125 km2. The lahars emplaced on March 23 and April 4 had volumes on the order of 107–108 m3 and were similar in size to the largest lahar of the 1989–90 eruption. The March 23 lahars were primarily flowing slurries of snow and ice entrained from the Drift glacier and seasonal snow and tabular blocks of river ice from the Drift River valley. Only a single, undifferentiated deposit up to 5 m thick was found and contained about 80–95 percent of poorly sorted, massive to imbricate assemblages of snow and ice. The deposit was frozen soon after it was emplaced and later eroded and buried by the April 4 lahar. The lahar of April 4, in contrast, was primarily a hyperconcentrated flow, as interpreted from 1- to 6-m thick deposits of massive to horizontally stratified sand-to-fine-gravel. Rock material in the April 4 lahar deposit is predominantly

  18. Fast Ray Tracing of Lunar Digital Elevation Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClanahan, Timothy P.; Evans, L. G.; Starr, R. D.; Mitrofanov, I.

    2009-01-01

    Ray-tracing (RT) of Lunar Digital Elevation Models (DEM)'s is performed to virtually derive the degree of radiation incident to terrain as a function of time, orbital and ephemeris constraints [I- 4]. This process is an integral modeling process in lunar polar research and exploration due to the present paucity of terrain information at the poles and mission planning activities for the anticipated spring 2009 launch of the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO). As part of the Lunar Exploration Neutron Detector (LEND) and Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) preparations RI methods are used to estimate the critical conditions presented by the combined effects of high latitude, terrain and the moons low obliquity [5-7]. These factors yield low incident solar illumination and subsequently extreme thermal, and radiation conditions. The presented research uses RT methods both for radiation transport modeling in space and regolith related research as well as to derive permanently shadowed regions (PSR)'s in high latitude topographic minima, e.g craters. These regions are of scientific and human exploration interest due to the near constant low temperatures in PSRs, inferred to be < 100 K. Hydrogen is thought to have accumulated in PSR's through the combined effects of periodic cometary bombardment and/or solar wind processes, and the extreme cold which minimizes hydrogen sublimation [8-9]. RT methods are also of use in surface position optimization for future illumination dependent on surface resources e.g. power and communications equipment.

  19. Modeling Ka-band low elevation angle propagation statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Thomas A.; Weinfield, John; Pearson, Chris; Ippolito, Louis J.

    1995-01-01

    The statistical variability of the secondary atmospheric propagation effects on satellite communications cannot be ignored at frequencies of 20 GHz or higher, particularly if the propagation margin allocation is such that link availability falls below 99 percent. The secondary effects considered in this paper are gaseous absorption, cloud absorption, and tropospheric scintillation; rain attenuation is the primary effect. Techniques and example results are presented for estimation of the overall combined impact of the atmosphere on satellite communications reliability. Statistical methods are employed throughout and the most widely accepted models for the individual effects are used wherever possible. The degree of correlation between the effects is addressed and some bounds on the expected variability in the combined effects statistics are derived from the expected variability in correlation. Example estimates are presented of combined effects statistics in the Washington D.C. area of 20 GHz and 5 deg elevation angle. The statistics of water vapor are shown to be sufficient for estimation of the statistics of gaseous absorption at 20 GHz. A computer model based on monthly surface weather is described and tested. Significant improvement in prediction of absorption extremes is demonstrated with the use of path weather data instead of surface data.

  20. Budapest, Hungary, Perspective View, SRTM Elevation Model with Landsat Overlay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    After draining the northern flank of the Alps Mountains in Germany and Austria, the Danube River flows east as it enters this west-looking scene (upper right) and forms the border between Slovakia and Hungary. The river then leaves the border as it enters Hungary and transects the Transdanubian Mountains, which trend southwest to northeast. Upon exiting the mountains, the river turns southward, flowing past Budapest (purplish blue area) and along the western margin of the Great Hungarian Plain.

    South and west of the Danube, the Transdanubian Mountains have at most only about 400 meters (about 1300 feet) of relief but they exhibit varied landforms, which include volcanic, tectonic, fluvial (river), and eolian (wind) features. A thick deposit of loess (dust deposits likely blown from ancient glacial outwash) covers much of this area, and winds from the northwest, funneled between the Alps and the Carpathian Mountains, are apparently responsible for a radial pattern of erosional streaks across the entire region.

    This image was generated from a Landsat satellite image draped over an elevation model produced by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). The view uses a 3-times vertical exaggeration to enhance topographic expression. The false colors of the scene result from displaying Landsat bands 1, 4, and 7 in blue, green, and red, respectively. Band 1 is visible blue light, but bands 4 and 7 are reflected infrared light. This band combination maximizes color contrasts between the major land cover types, namely vegetation (green), bare ground (red), and water (blue). Shading of the elevation model was used to further highlight the topographic features.

    Elevation data used in this image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on

  1. High-resolution digital elevation model of lower Cowlitz and Toutle Rivers, adjacent to Mount St. Helens, Washington, based on an airborne lidar survey of October 2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mosbrucker, Adam

    2015-01-01

    The lateral blast, debris avalanche, and lahars of the May 18th, 1980, eruption of Mount St. Helens, Washington, dramatically altered the surrounding landscape. Lava domes were extruded during the subsequent eruptive periods of 1980–1986 and 2004–2008. More than three decades after the emplacement of the 1980 debris avalanche, high sediment production persists in the Toutle River basin, which drains the northern and western flanks of the volcano. Because this sediment increases the risk of flooding to downstream communities on the Toutle and lower Cowlitz Rivers, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), under the direction of Congress to maintain an authorized level of flood protection, continues to monitor and mitigate excess sediment in North and South Fork Toutle River basins to help reduce this risk and to prevent sediment from clogging the shipping channel of the Columbia River. From October 22–27, 2007, Watershed Sciences, Inc., under contract to USACE, collected high-precision airborne lidar (light detection and ranging) data that cover 273 square kilometers (105 square miles) of lower Cowlitz and Toutle River tributaries from the Columbia River at Kelso, Washington, to upper North Fork Toutle River (below the volcano's edifice), including lower South Fork Toutle River. These data provide a digital dataset of the ground surface, including beneath forest cover. Such remotely sensed data can be used to develop sediment budgets and models of sediment erosion, transport, and deposition. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) used these lidar data to develop digital elevation models (DEMs) of the study area. DEMs are fundamental to monitoring natural hazards and studying volcanic landforms, fluvial and glacial geomorphology, and surface geology. Watershed Sciences, Inc., provided files in the LASer (LAS) format containing laser returns that had been filtered, classified, and georeferenced. The USGS produced a hydro-flattened DEM from ground-classified points at

  2. High-resolution digital elevation model of Mount St. Helens crater and upper North Fork Toutle River basin, Washington, based on an airborne lidar survey of September 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mosbrucker, Adam

    2014-01-01

    The lateral blast, debris avalanche, and lahars of the May 18th, 1980, eruption of Mount St. Helens, Washington, dramatically altered the surrounding landscape. Lava domes were extruded during the subsequent eruptive periods of 1980–1986 and 2004–2008. More than three decades after the emplacement of the 1980 debris avalanche, high sediment production persists in the North Fork Toutle River basin, which drains the northern flank of the volcano. Because this sediment increases the risk of flooding to downstream communities on the Toutle and Cowlitz Rivers, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), under the direction of Congress to maintain an authorized level of flood protection, built a sediment retention structure on the North Fork Toutle River in 1989 to help reduce this risk and to prevent sediment from clogging the shipping channel of the Columbia River. From September 16–20, 2009, Watershed Sciences, Inc., under contract to USACE, collected high-precision airborne lidar (light detection and ranging) data that cover 214 square kilometers (83 square miles) of Mount St. Helens and the upper North Fork Toutle River basin from the sediment retention structure to the volcano's crater. These data provide a digital dataset of the ground surface, including beneath forest cover. Such remotely sensed data can be used to develop sediment budgets and models of sediment erosion, transport, and deposition. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) used these lidar data to develop digital elevation models (DEMs) of the study area. DEMs are fundamental to monitoring natural hazards and studying volcanic landforms, fluvial and glacial geomorphology, and surface geology. Watershed Sciences, Inc., provided files in the LASer (LAS) format containing laser returns that had been filtered, classified, and georeferenced. The USGS produced a hydro-flattened DEM from ground-classified points at Castle, Coldwater, and Spirit Lakes. Final results averaged about five laser last

  3. Object representations at multiple scales from digital elevation models

    PubMed Central

    Drăguţ, Lucian; Eisank, Clemens

    2011-01-01

    In the last decade landform classification and mapping has developed as one of the most active areas of geomorphometry. However, translation from continuous models of elevation and its derivatives (slope, aspect, and curvatures) to landform divisions (landforms and landform elements) is filtered by two important concepts: scale and object ontology. Although acknowledged as being important, these two issues have received surprisingly little attention. This contribution provides an overview and prospects of object representation from DEMs as a function of scale. Relationships between object delineation and classification or regionalization are explored, in the context of differences between general and specific geomorphometry. A review of scales issues in geomorphometry—ranging from scale effects to scale optimization techniques—is followed by an analysis of pros and cons of using cells and objects in DEM analysis. Prospects for coupling multi-scale analysis and object delineation are then discussed. Within this context, we propose discrete geomorphometry as a possible approach between general and specific geomorphometry. Discrete geomorphometry would apply to and describe land-surface divisions defined solely by the criteria of homogeneity in respect to a given land-surface parameter or a combination of several parameters. Homogeneity, in its turn, should always be relative to scale. PMID:21760655

  4. Object representations at multiple scales from digital elevation models.

    PubMed

    Drăguţ, Lucian; Eisank, Clemens

    2011-06-15

    In the last decade landform classification and mapping has developed as one of the most active areas of geomorphometry. However, translation from continuous models of elevation and its derivatives (slope, aspect, and curvatures) to landform divisions (landforms and landform elements) is filtered by two important concepts: scale and object ontology. Although acknowledged as being important, these two issues have received surprisingly little attention.This contribution provides an overview and prospects of object representation from DEMs as a function of scale. Relationships between object delineation and classification or regionalization are explored, in the context of differences between general and specific geomorphometry. A review of scales issues in geomorphometry-ranging from scale effects to scale optimization techniques-is followed by an analysis of pros and cons of using cells and objects in DEM analysis. Prospects for coupling multi-scale analysis and object delineation are then discussed. Within this context, we propose discrete geomorphometry as a possible approach between general and specific geomorphometry. Discrete geomorphometry would apply to and describe land-surface divisions defined solely by the criteria of homogeneity in respect to a given land-surface parameter or a combination of several parameters. Homogeneity, in its turn, should always be relative to scale. PMID:21760655

  5. Interpolation of phenological phases on a digital elevation model (DEM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schöngaßner, Thomas C.; Scheifinger, Helfried

    2010-05-01

    The main objective of the VegDyn project (a cooperation between Joanneum Research, Institute of Digital Image Processing, LFZ Raumberg-Gumpenstein and ZAMG) consists in quantifying and modelling the relationship between individual growth stages of grassland on the one hand and atmospheric parameters, remotely sensed data and phenological observations on the other. The model simulates the beginning and the end of the vegetation period and the growth stages of grassland with temperature as input variable. Thus it will be possible to explore changes of the timing of the vegetation period and the growth stages of grassland in possible future climate scenarios, which are calculated by climate models. In the context of the VegDyn project we developed methods for the spatial interpolation of phenological phases on a digital elevation model with a 250 m grid resolution in the complex terrain of the Alps. The final result is a series of maps of long term mean entry dates and maps of entry dates of individual years, which can for instance be related with the Net Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) parameter maps from satellite observations. Apart from the yearly input via the conventional observational network based on voluntary observers and the input via the web interface, the Austrian phenological data base is still being supplemented by data from the paper archive. The elevation of the station network ranges from 100 to 1700 m. The station density can reach up to 100 or more stations per phase and season during 1951 - 2009. From more than 280 observed phases including phases from wild (woody and herbaceous) and agricultural plants those have been selected, which are related to cultivated grassland and which can be detected by remote sensing. In order to be selected for spatial interpolation the phase must satisfy a number of criteria: a minimum number of stations and, in order to have a meaningful long term mean entry date, a minimum number of observations per station

  6. Seismic characterisation of lahars at Volcán de Colima, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez, R.; Suriñach, E.; Capra, L.; Arámbula-Mendoza, R.; Reyes-Dávila, G.

    2016-02-01

    Volcán de Colima is one of the most active volcanoes in Mexico, not only for its eruptive history, but also for its annual occurrence of lahars. This makes the volcano a natural laboratory for monitoring and studying lahar processes. Since 2011, monitoring instruments have been deployed along the highly active Montegrande ravine, with at least three lahar events per year. Here, we report the datasets of three events collected during the 2012 and 2013 seasons, then interpret the acquired data. An event classification scheme based on lahar magnitude, duration and seismic characteristics is presented to distinguish "single-pulse" events (SPEs) from "multi-pulse" events (MPE). SPEs lasted approximately 60 min, had average velocities of ~2 m/s and mean peak discharges of ~24 m3/s. MPEs endured for more than 3 h, reached mean velocities of ~4.5 m/s and peak discharges of ~60 m3/s (for block-rich surges). The seismic signal-analysis also allowed us to discriminate physical flow fluctuations within single lahars, i.e. between the arrival of block-rich fronts and subsequent variations in flow discharge. The exponential regression analysis showed a best fit, with correlation coefficients around 0.92 and exponential coefficients of ~0.01 s, for the block-rich fronts, with seismic amplitudes increasing from 4.8 × 10-4 to 2.3 × 10-3 m/s and frequency ranges from 10 to 20 Hz. The variations in flow discharge were distinguished by lower amplitudes of ~5.7 × 10-4 m/s than those of the block-rich fronts and with frequency ranges of 10-40 Hz. The results presented in this paper demonstrate that the seismic data of events allowed us to describe and discriminate among different flow types; these records are thus a useful investigation tool for lahar events that have a seismic record but are not observed directly. We propose that a seismic early warning system can be developed to help civil protection authorities in designing risk mitigation strategies.

  7. Comparative lahar hazard mapping at Volcan Citlaltépetl, Mexico using SRTM, ASTER and DTED-1 digital topographic data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hubbard, Bernard E.; Sheridan, Michael F.; Carrasco-Nunez, Gerardo; Diaz-Castellon, Rodolfo; Rodriguez, Sergio R.

    2007-01-01

    Finally, ASTERs 60 km swath width and 8% duty cycle presents a challenge for mapping lahar inundation hazards at E–W oriented stream valleys in low-latitude areas with persistent cloud cover. However, its continued operations enhances its utility as a means for updating the continuous but one-time coverage of SRTM, and for filling voids in the SRTM dataset such as those that occur along steep-sided valleys prone to hazards from future lahars.

  8. Mitigation of hazards from future lahars from Mount Merapi in the Krasak River channel near Yogyakarta, central Java

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ege, John R.; ,

    1983-01-01

    Procedures for reducing hazards from future lahars and debris flows in the Krasak River channel near Yogyakarta, Central Java, Indonesia, include (1) determining the history of the location, size, and effects of previous lahars and debris flows, and (2) decreasing flow velocities. The first may be accomplished by geologic field mapping along with acquiring information by interviewing local residents, and the second by increasing the cross sectional area of the river channel and constructing barriers in the flow path.

  9. An evaluation of onshore digital elevation models for modelling tsunami inundation zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, Jonathan; Latief, Hamzah; Kongko, Widjo; Harig, Sven; Horspool, Nick; Hanung, Raditya; Rojali, Aditia; Maher, Nicola; Fuchs, Annika; Hossen, Jakir; Upi, Supriyati; Edi, Dewanto; Rakowsky, Natalja; Cummins, Phil

    2015-06-01

    A sensitivity study is undertaken to assess the utility of different onshore digital elevation models (DEM) for simulating the extent of tsunami inundation using case studies from two locations in Indonesia. We compare airborne IFSAR, ASTER and SRTM against high resolution LiDAR and stereo-camera data in locations with different coastal morphologies. Tsunami inundation extents modelled with airborne IFSAR DEMs are comparable with those modelled with the higher resolution datasets and are also consistent with historical run-up data, where available. Large vertical errors and poor resolution of the coastline in the ASTER and SRTM elevation datasets cause the modelled inundation extent to be much less compared with the other datasets and observations. Therefore ASTER and SRTM should not be used to underpin tsunami inundation models. a model mesh resolution of 25 m was sufficient for estimating the inundated area when using elevation data with high vertical accuracy in the case studies presented here. Differences in modelled inundation between digital terrain models (DTM) and digital surface models (DSM) for LiDAR and IFSAR are greater than differences between the two data types. Models using DTM may overestimate inundation while those using DSM may underestimate inundation when a constant Manning’s roughness value is used. We recommend using DTM for modelling tsunami inundation extent with further work needed to resolve the scale at which surface roughness should be parameterised.

  10. Monitoring the Dynamic of a Fluvial Channel after Lahar Disturbance: Huiloac Gorge (Popocatepetl Volcano, Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andres, N.; Palacios, D.; Zamorano, J. J.; Tanarro, L. M.; Renschler, C.; Sanjosé, J. J.; Atkinson, A.

    2009-04-01

    Volcanic eruptions generate disturbances that affect hydrological systems (Major, 2003) by depositing large volumes of sediments in watersheds that exceed amounts common to non-volcanic river systems (Montgomery, 2005). If the eruption releases abundant melt water, the river system may respond immediately by forming hazardous flows called lahars. River system recovery following eruptive and laharic impact is an important process, but it has received little attention (Gran and Montgomery, 2005) despite the fact that Major et al. (2000) and Hayes et al. (2002) have shown that these disruptions cause long term instability and their effects persist for decades. Lahar deposits resulting from interaction between volcanic activity and the glacier located above the Huiloac Gorge on the northern slope of Popocatepetl volcano (19°02´ N, 98°62´ W, 5,424 m), have infilled the gorge (Palacios, 1995; Palacios et al., 1998 and 2001; Capra et al., 2004; Muñoz, 2007). All of the major lahars that occurred on the volcano in 1995 (4 km), 1997 (21 km), and 2001 (14 km) have channelled through Huiloac Gorge, and have dramatically altered its morphology and dynamics through erosion and deposition. The present study traces these changes in the aftermath of the laharic events that occurred from 1997-2001. A sector of the channel, located at 3200m-3240m altitude, of 500 m long and 15 to 20 m wide, in the mid-section of the gorge, was chosen as the control site. Precipitation is heaviest there and is most apt to trigger secondary post-eruptive lahars. ArcGis software was used to draw 6 geomorphic maps of the site showing spatial variations in the landforms for the period February 2002 - February 2008. In addition, 29 cross-profiles were made of the gorge for the same time interval, excluding February 2004. The volume of sediment eroded and deposited was calculated for each date by comparing variations in the height of the floor and banks of the gorge depicted in the cross-profile, and

  11. High Resolution Digital Elevation Models of Pristine Explosion Craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farr, T. G.; Krabill, W.; Garvin, J. B.

    2004-01-01

    In order to effectively capture a realistic terrain applicable to studies of cratering processes and landing hazards on Mars, we have obtained high resolution digital elevation models of several pristine explosion craters at the Nevada Test Site. We used the Airborne Terrain Mapper (ATM), operated by NASA's Wallops Flight Facility to obtain DEMs with 1 m spacing and 10 cm vertical errors of 4 main craters and many other craters and collapse pits. The main craters that were mapped are Sedan, Scooter, Schooner, and Danny Boy. The 370 m diameter Sedan crater, located on Yucca Flat, is the largest and freshest explosion crater on Earth that was formed under conditions similar to hypervelocity impact cratering. As such, it is effectively pristine, having been formed in 1962 as a result of a controlled detonation of a 100 kiloton thermonuclear device, buried at the appropriate equivalent depth of burst required to make a simple crater. Sedan was formed in alluvium of mixed lithology and subsequently studied using a variety of field-based methods. Nearby secondary craters were also formed at the time and were also mapped by ATM. Adjacent to Sedan and also in alluvium is Scooter, about 90 m in diameter and formed by a high-explosive event. Schooner (240 m) and Danny Boy (80 m) craters were also important targets for ATM as they were excavated in hard basalt and therefore have much rougher ejecta. This will allow study of ejecta patterns in hard rock as well as engineering tests of crater and rock avoidance and rover trafficability. In addition to the high resolution DEMs, crater geometric characteristics, RMS roughness maps, and other higher-order derived data products will be generated using these data. These will provide constraints for models of landing hazards on Mars and for rover trafficability. Other planned studies will include ejecta size-frequency distribution at the resolution of the DEM and at finer resolution through air photography and field measurements

  12. Eruption-triggered avalanche, flood, and lahar at Mount St. Helens - Effects of winter snowpack

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waitt, R.B., Jr.; Pierson, T.C.; MacLeod, N.S.; Janda, R.J.; Voight, B.; Holcomb, R.T.

    1983-01-01

    An explosive eruption of Mount St. Helens on 19 March 1982 had substantial impact beyond the vent because hot eruption products interacted with a thick snowpack. A blast of hot pumice, dome rocks, and gas dislodged crater-wall snow that avalanched through the crater and down the north flank. Snow in the crater swiftly melted to form a transient lake, from which a destructive flood and lahar swept down the north flank and the North Fork Toutle River.

  13. Uncertainty Analysis of LROC NAC Derived Elevation Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, K.; Yates, D. G.; Speyerer, E.; Robinson, M. S.

    2012-12-01

    One of the primary objectives of the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) [1] is to gather stereo observations with the Narrow Angle Camera (NAC) to generate digital elevation models (DEMs). From an altitude of 50 km, the NAC acquires images with a pixel scale of 0.5 meters, and a dual NAC observation covers approximately 5 km cross-track by 25 km down-track. This low altitude was common from September 2009 to December 2011. Images acquired during the commissioning phase and those acquired from the fixed orbit (after 11 December 2011) have pixel scales that range from 0.35 meters at the south pole to 2 meters at the north pole. Alimetric observations obtained by the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) provide measurements of ±0.1 m between the spacecraft and the surface [2]. However, uncertainties in the spacecraft positioning can result in offsets (±20m) between altimeter tracks over many orbits. The LROC team is currently developing a tool to automatically register alimetric observations to NAC DEMs [3]. Using a generalized pattern search (GPS) algorithm, the new automatic registration adjusts the spacecraft position and pointing information during times when NAC images, as well as LOLA measurements, of the same region are acquired to provide an absolute reference frame for the DEM. This information is then imported into SOCET SET to aide in creating controlled NAC DEMs. For every DEM, a figure of merit (FOM) map is generated using SOCET SET software. This is a valuable tool for determining the relative accuracy of a specific pixel in a DEM. Each pixel in a FOM map is given a value to determine its "quality" by determining if the specific pixel was shadowed, saturated, suspicious, interpolated/extrapolated, or successfully correlated. The overall quality of a NAC DEM is a function of both the absolute and relative accuracies. LOLA altimetry provides the most accurate absolute geodetic reference frame with which the NAC DEMs can be compared. Offsets

  14. LROC NAC Digital Elevation Model of Gruithuisen Gamma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braden, S.; Tran, T. N.; Robinson, M. S.

    2009-12-01

    The Gruithuisen Domes have long been of interest as examples of non-mare volcanism [1]. Their form suggests extrusion of silica-rich magmas, possibly dating to 3.7-3.85 Ga (around the same time as the Iridum event), and were subsequently embayed by mare [2,3]. Non-mare volcanism is indicated by spectral features known as “red spots” which have (a) high albedo, (b) strong absorption in the ultraviolet, and (c) a wide range of morphologies [4,5,6]. The composition of red spot domes is still unknown, but dacitic or rhyolitic KREEP-rich compositions [5] and mature, low iron and low titanium agglutinate-rich soils [7] have been suggested. The existence of non-mare volcanism has major implications for the thermal history and crustal evolution of the Moon. A new digital elevation model (DEM), derived from stereo image pairs acquired with the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) Narrow Angle Camera (NAC), allows detailed investigation of the morphology and thus origin of Mons Gruithuisen Gamma (36.6° N, 40.5° W). The 10 meter per pixel DEM shows relief of ~1500 meters from the summit plateau of Gruithuisen Gamma to the nearby mare surface. This measurement is close to previous estimates of over 1200 meters from Apollo era images [4]. Previous estimates also suggested that the overall slopes ranged from 15-30° [7]. Radial profiles (n=25) across the eastern two-thirds of the Gruithuisen Gamma DEM show that the overall slope is 17-18° along the north- and northeastern-facing slopes, 14° along the eastern-most edge, 12° on the side facing the contact of the dome material and highlands material, and 11° on the directly southern-facing slope. The north-south diameter of the dome is ~24 km and the east-west diameter is ~18 km. The textures on each slope are remarkably similar and distinct from the highlands and crater slopes, with irregular furrows oriented down-slope. The same furrowed texture is not seen on mare domes, which are generally much smoother, flatter

  15. An approach to source characterization of tremor signals associated with eruptions and lahars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumagai, Hiroyuki; Mothes, Patricia; Ruiz, Mario; Maeda, Yuta

    2015-11-01

    Tremor signals are observed in association with eruption activity and lahar descents. Reduced displacement ( D R) derived from tremor signals has been used to quantify tremor sources. However, tremor duration is not considered in D R, which makes it difficult to compare D R values estimated for different tremor episodes. We propose application of the amplitude source location (ASL) method to characterize the sources of tremor signals. We used this method to estimate the tremor source location and source amplitude from high-frequency (5-10 Hz) seismic amplitudes under the assumption of isotropic S-wave radiation. We considered the source amplitude to be the maximum value during tremor. We estimated the cumulative source amplitude ( I s) as the offset value of the time-integrated envelope of the vertical seismogram of tremor corrected for geometrical spreading and medium attenuation in the 5-10-Hz band. For eruption tremor signals, we also estimated the cumulative source pressure ( I p) from an infrasonic envelope waveform corrected for geometrical spreading. We studied these parameters of tremor signals associated with eruptions and lahars and explosion events at Tungurahua volcano, Ecuador. We identified two types of eruption tremor at Tungurahua: noise-like inharmonic waveforms and harmonic oscillatory signals. We found that I s increased linearly with increasing source amplitude for lahar tremor signals and explosion events, but I s increased exponentially with increasing source amplitude for inharmonic eruption tremor signals. The source characteristics of harmonic eruption tremor signals differed from those of inharmonic tremor signals. We found a linear relation between I s and I p for both explosion events and eruption tremor. Because I p may be proportional to the total mass involved during an eruption episode, this linear relation suggests that I s may be useful to quantify eruption size. The I s values we estimated for inharmonic eruption tremor were

  16. Syn and post- emplacement transformations of the Misti (Peru) volcanic debris avalanches into lahars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, K.; Van Wyk de Vries, B.; Thouret, J.

    2012-12-01

    We identify stratigraphic, sedimentological and structural variations in lithofacies of debris-avalanche deposits from El Misti volcano in the Quebrada San Lazaro and Río Chili Valley, near the city of Arequipa (south Peru), to determine lithofacies transformations. We describe the internal process associated to the external conditions acting on debris-avalanche deposits in order to assess stages of transformations from the proximal to distal debris-avalanche deposits and the associated epiclastic deposits. Syn-emplacement transformations inside the volcanic debris-avalanche deposits in the upper course of the Rio Chili Valley: within a few meters, the proximal block facies of the sheared debris-avalanche deposit is transformed at the contact of the ash-rich alluvial deposits in thick units comprising a strongly sheared base of the deposit, then stratified matrix dominated beds with normally sorted boulders aligned with the beds. This is interpreted as the effect of strong shearing inside the confined and proximal debris avalanche during motion, which generated a localised stretching near the base of the deposit and the bulking of the thin water saturated basal layers: the bearing capacity of the matrix debris- avalanche is modified, the block facies has been transformed in a stratified matrix facies. The transformations by bulking along a strong sheared contact contribute to reduce the run-out distance of the debris avalanches in the Río Chili valley. Post-deposition evolutions of the debris-avalanche deposits in the Quebrada San Lazaro: in the upper course of the valley, the landslides in the debris- avalanche deposits related to water circulation destabilise the covering scree and volcanic colluvium dipping at 70°. The fragmentation and sorting due to gravity and water are the external processes which separate matrix and block elements; This is the first stage of transformation. The remobilisation of these separated fractions into lahars transforms this

  17. Monitoring the Dynamic of a Fluvial Channel after Lahar Disturbance: Huiloac Gorge (Popocatepetl Volcano, Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andres, N.; Palacios, D.; Zamorano, J. J.; Tanarro, L. M.; Renschler, C.; Sanjosé, J. J.; Atkinson, A.

    2009-04-01

    Volcanic eruptions generate disturbances that affect hydrological systems (Major, 2003) by depositing large volumes of sediments in watersheds that exceed amounts common to non-volcanic river systems (Montgomery, 2005). If the eruption releases abundant melt water, the river system may respond immediately by forming hazardous flows called lahars. River system recovery following eruptive and laharic impact is an important process, but it has received little attention (Gran and Montgomery, 2005) despite the fact that Major et al. (2000) and Hayes et al. (2002) have shown that these disruptions cause long term instability and their effects persist for decades. Lahar deposits resulting from interaction between volcanic activity and the glacier located above the Huiloac Gorge on the northern slope of Popocatepetl volcano (19°02´ N, 98°62´ W, 5,424 m), have infilled the gorge (Palacios, 1995; Palacios et al., 1998 and 2001; Capra et al., 2004; Muñoz, 2007). All of the major lahars that occurred on the volcano in 1995 (4 km), 1997 (21 km), and 2001 (14 km) have channelled through Huiloac Gorge, and have dramatically altered its morphology and dynamics through erosion and deposition. The present study traces these changes in the aftermath of the laharic events that occurred from 1997-2001. A sector of the channel, located at 3200m-3240m altitude, of 500 m long and 15 to 20 m wide, in the mid-section of the gorge, was chosen as the control site. Precipitation is heaviest there and is most apt to trigger secondary post-eruptive lahars. ArcGis software was used to draw 6 geomorphic maps of the site showing spatial variations in the landforms for the period February 2002 - February 2008. In addition, 29 cross-profiles were made of the gorge for the same time interval, excluding February 2004. The volume of sediment eroded and deposited was calculated for each date by comparing variations in the height of the floor and banks of the gorge depicted in the cross-profile, and

  18. Integrated research in constitutive modelling at elevated temperatures, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haisler, W. E.; Allen, D. H.

    1986-01-01

    Four current viscoplastic models are compared experimentally with Inconel 718 at 1100 F. A series of tests were performed to create a sufficient data base from which to evaluate material constants. The models used include Bodner's anisotropic model; Krieg, Swearengen, and Rhode's model; Schmidt and Miller's model; and Walker's exponential model.

  19. An evaluation of onshore digital elevation models for tsunami inundation modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, J.; Latief, H.; Kongko, W.; Harig, S.; Horspool, N.; Hanung, R.; Rojali, A.; Maher, N.; Fountain, L.; Fuchs, A.; Hossen, J.; Upi, S.; Dewanto, S. E.; Cummins, P. R.

    2012-12-01

    Tsunami inundation models provide fundamental information about coastal areas that may be inundated in the event of a tsunami along with additional parameters such as flow depth and velocity. This can inform disaster management activities including evacuation planning, impact and risk assessment and coastal engineering. A fundamental input to tsunami inundation models is adigital elevation model (DEM). Onshore DEMs vary widely in resolution, accuracy, availability and cost. A proper assessment of how the accuracy and resolution of DEMs translates into uncertainties in modelled inundation is needed to ensure results are appropriately interpreted and used. This assessment can in turn informdata acquisition strategies depending on the purpose of the inundation model. For example, lower accuracy elevation data may give inundation results that are sufficiently accurate to plan a community's evacuation route but not sufficient to inform engineering of a vertical evacuation shelters. A sensitivity study is undertaken to assess the utility of different available onshore digital elevation models for tsunami inundation modelling. We compare airborne interferometric synthetic aperture radar (IFSAR), ASTER and SRTM against high resolution (<1 m horizontal resolution, < 0.15 m vertical accuracy) LiDAR or stereo-camera data in three Indonesian locations with different coastal morphologies (Padang, West Sumatra; Palu, Central Sulawesi; and Maumere, Flores), using three different computational codes (ANUGA, TUNAMI-N3 and TsunAWI). Tsunami inundation extents modelled with IFSAR are comparable with those modelled with the high resolution datasets and with historical tsunami run-up data. Large vertical errors (> 10 m) and poor resolution of the coastline in the ASTER and SRTM elevation models cause modelled inundation to be much less compared with models using better data and with observations. Therefore we recommend that ASTER and SRTM should not be used for modelling tsunami

  20. Comparison of 7.5-minute and 1-degree digital elevation models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Isaacson, Dennis L.; Ripple, William J.

    1995-01-01

    We compared two digital elevation models (DEM's) for the Echo Mountain SE quadrangle in the Cascade Mountains of Oregon. Comparisons were made between 7.5-minute (1:24,000-scale) and 1-degree (1:250,000-scale) images using the variables of elevation, slope aspect, and slope gradient. Both visual and statistical differences are presented.

  1. Elevation dependency of the surface climate change signal: A model study

    SciTech Connect

    Giorgi, F.; Hurrell, J.W.; Marinucci, M.R.

    1997-02-01

    Results are presented from a present-day and a doubled CO{sub 2} experiment over the Alpine region with a nested regional climate model. The simulated temperature change signal shows a substantial elevation dependency, mostly during the winter and spring seasons, resulting in more pronounced warming at high elevations than low elevations. This is caused by a depletion of snowpack in doubled CO{sub 2} conditions and further enhanced by the snow-albedo feedback. This result is consistent with some observed temperature trends for anomalously warm years over the Alpine region and suggests that high elevation temperature changes could be used as an early detection tool for global warming. Changes in precipitation, as well as other components of the surface energy and water budgets, also show an elevation signal, which may have important implications for impact assessments in high elevation regions. 22 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Incorporating Community Knowledge to Lahar Hazard Maps: Canton Buenos Aires Case Study, at Santa Ana (Ilamatepec) Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajo, J. V.; Martinez-Hackert, B.; Polio, C.; Gutierrez, E.

    2015-12-01

    Santa Ana (Ilamatepec) Volcano is an active composite volcano located in the Apaneca Volcanic Field located in western part of El Salvador, Central America. The volcano is surrounded by rural communities in its proximal areas and the second (Santa Ana, 13 km) and fourth (Sonsosante, 15 km) largest cities of the country. On October 1st, 2005, the volcano erupted after months of increased activity. Following the eruption, volcanic mitigation projects were conducted in the region, but the communities had little or no input on them. This project consisted in the creation of lahar volcanic hazard map for the Canton Buanos Aires on the northern part of the volcano by incorporating the community's knowledge from prior events to model parameters and results. The work with the community consisted in several meetings where the community members recounted past events. They were asked to map the outcomes of those events using either a topographic map of the area, a Google Earth image, or a blank paper poster size. These maps have been used to identify hazard and vulnerable areas, and for model validation. These maps were presented to the communities and they accepted their results and the maps.

  3. Lahar Hazards at Casita and San Cristóbal Volcanoes, Nicaragua

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vallance, J.W.; Schilling, S.P.; Devoli, G.; Reid, M.E.; Howell, M.M.; Brien, D.L.

    2004-01-01

    to form ash-fall deposits (tephra), debris avalanches, lava flows, and hot flowing mixtures of ash and rock (called pyroclastic flows). The chronology of activity at Casita is rather poorly known. Its last documented eruption occurred 8300 years ago, and included a pyroclastic flow. Tephra deposits exposed in the east crater suggest the possibility of subsequent eruptions. Work prior to Hurricane Mitch suggested that a part of the volcano’s apron that included the area inundated during the 1998 event south of Casita was a lahar pathway. Erosion during Hurricane Mitch revealed that at least three large lahars descended this pathway to distances of up to 10 km. This report describes the hazards of landslides and lahars in general, and discusses potential hazards from future landslides and lahars at San Cristóbal and Casita volcanoes in particular. The report also shows, in the accompanying lahar hazard-zonation maps, which areas are likely to be at risk from future landslides and lahars at Casita and San Cristóbal.

  4. Influence of elevation modelling on hydrodynamic simulations of a tidally-dominated estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falcão, Ana Paula; Mazzolari, Andrea; Gonçalves, Alexandre B.; Araújo, Maria Amélia V. C.; Trigo-Teixeira, António

    2013-08-01

    Hydrodynamic simulation of estuaries requires a single digital elevation model (DEM) resulting from merging of both topographic and bathymetric data. These two datasets are usually produced using different technologies, co-ordinate systems and datums. Intertidal data in particular are often lacking due to the difficulty of data acquisition using conventional survey techniques. This paper presents a fast, accurate and low-cost methodology to fill this gap and highlights the effect of the digital elevation model characteristics, such as the interpolation method and spatial resolution, on modelled water levels and flooded areas. The Lima river estuary, located in North-western Portugal, is used as a case study. Validation tests for commonly available spatial interpolators showed ordinary kriging to be the most adequate interpolator. Digital elevation models with regular grids of 5 m and 50 m resolution were used, together with the original (not interpolated) elevation dataset, as input to a finite element hydrodynamic model for astronomic tide simulation. Results indicate that the larger differences between using different elevation models occur at low tide during spring tide, marginally impacting the flood modelling. The effect of a vertical offset of the chart datum with respect to a part of the digital elevation model was finally investigated, showing a limited influence in the determination of the water levels.

  5. A prehistoric lahar-dammed lake and eruption of Mount Pinatubo described in a Philippine aborigine legend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodolfo, Kelvin S.; Umbal, Jesse V.

    2008-10-01

    The prehistoric eruptions of Mount Pinatubo have followed a cycle: centuries of repose terminated by a caldera-forming eruption with large pyroclastic flows; a post-eruption aftermath of rain-triggered lahars in surrounding drainages and dome-building that fills the caldera; and then another long quiescent period. During and after the eruptions lahars descending along volcano channels may block tributaries from watersheds beyond Pinatubo, generating natural lakes. Since the 1991 eruption, the Mapanuepe River valley in the southwestern sector of the volcano has been the site of a large lahar-dammed lake. Geologic evidence indicates that similar lakes have occupied this site at least twice before. An Ayta legend collected decades before Mount Pinatubo was recognized as a volcano describes what is probably the younger of these lakes, and the caldera-forming eruption that destroyed it.

  6. Downstream dilution of a lahar: transition from debris flow to hyperconcentrated streamflow.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pierson, T.C.; Scott, K.M.

    1985-01-01

    Nearly instantaneous melting of snow and ice by the March 19, 1982, eruption of Mount St. Helens, released a 4 X 106 m3 flood of water from the crater that was converted to a lahar (volcanic debris flow) through erosion and incorporation of sediment by the time it reached the base of the volcano. Over the next 81 km that it traveled down the Toutle River, the flood wave was progressively diluted through several mechanisms. A transformation from debris flow to hyperconcentrated streamflow began to occur about 27 km downstream from the crater, when the total sediment concentration had decreased to about 78% by weight (57% by volume).-from Authors

  7. Eruption of the nevado del ruiz volcano, Colombia, on 13 november 1985: tephra fall and lahars.

    PubMed

    Naranjo, J L; Sigurdsson, H; Carey, S N; Fritz, W

    1986-08-29

    A small Plinian eruption of the Nevado del Ruiz volcano in Colombia ejected 3.5 x 10(10) kilograms of mixed dacite and andesite tephra on 13 November 1985, with a maximum column height of 31 kilometers above sea level. Small pyroclastic flows and surges, generated during the initial stage of the eruption, caused surface melting of approximately 10% of the volcano's ice cap, leading to meltwater floods. The erosive floods incorporated soils and loose sediments from the volcano's flanks and developed into lahars, which claimed at least 25,000 lives.

  8. Eruption of the nevado del ruiz volcano, Colombia, on 13 november 1985: tephra fall and lahars.

    PubMed

    Naranjo, J L; Sigurdsson, H; Carey, S N; Fritz, W

    1986-08-29

    A small Plinian eruption of the Nevado del Ruiz volcano in Colombia ejected 3.5 x 10(10) kilograms of mixed dacite and andesite tephra on 13 November 1985, with a maximum column height of 31 kilometers above sea level. Small pyroclastic flows and surges, generated during the initial stage of the eruption, caused surface melting of approximately 10% of the volcano's ice cap, leading to meltwater floods. The erosive floods incorporated soils and loose sediments from the volcano's flanks and developed into lahars, which claimed at least 25,000 lives. PMID:17732038

  9. An algorithm for treating flat areas and depressions in digital elevation models using linear interpolation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Digital elevation model (DEM) data are essential to hydrological applications and have been widely used to calculate a variety of useful topographic characteristics, e.g., slope, flow direction, flow accumulation area, stream channel network, topographic index, and others. Excep...

  10. Postglacial lahars and potential hazards in the White Salmon River system on the southwest flank of Mount Adams, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vallance, James W.

    1999-01-01

    Mount Adams, a stratovolcano in southwestern Washington State, formed during Pleistocene time and reached roughly its present size before the end of the Fraser glaciation, which occurred between 25,000 and 12,000 years ago. Since the last glaciation, Mount Adams has erupted at least nine times, producing eight peripheral lava flows and a cinder cone at the summit but no pyroclastic flows. No stratigraphic evidence was found for the occurrence of lahars concurrently with eruptions; in fact, at least one lahar and one debris avalanche occurred during apparently dormant intervals.

  11. Frozen Martian lahars? Evaluation of morphology, degradation and geologic development in the Utopia-Elysium transition zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, G. B. M.

    2013-09-01

    Regional coverage of high-resolution data from the CTX camera has permitted new, detailed morphologic analysis of the enigmatic Utopia-Elysium flows which dominate the transition zone between Elysium volcanic province and Utopia Planitia. Based on topographic and morphologic analysis of the Galaxias region, this study supports the lahar hypothesis put forth by previous works and suggests that the center and the margins of the outflow deposits have very diverse morphologies that can be explained by varying degrees of water drainage and freezing. Regular channel and flood plain deposits are found in the central part of the outflow deposits, whereas the marginal deposits are interpreted to contain significant amount of ice because of their distinct morphological properties (smooth, lobate flow-fronts with upward convex snouts, unusual crater morphologies, raised rim fractures and localized flow fronts indicating rheomorphism). Thus, this study suggest that, unlike terrestrial lahars, lahar emplacement under Martian conditions only drain in the central parts, whereas the water in the margins of the outflow deposit (∼75% of the total outflow deposit in the Galaxias region) freezes up resulting in a double-layered deposit consisting of ice-rich core with an ice-poor surface layer. It is here furthermore suggested that continued intrusive volcanic activity was highly affected by the presence of the ice-rich lahar deposits, generating ground-ice-volcano interactions resulting in a secondary suite of morphologies. These morphologies include seventeen ridges that are interpreted to be möberg ridges (due to their NW-SE orientation, distinct ridge-crests and association with fractures and linear ridges) and depressions with nested faults interpreted to be similar to terrestrial ice-cauldrons, which form by enhanced subglacial geothermal activity including subglacial volcanic eruptions. These sub-lahar intrusions caused significant volatile loss in the ice-rich core of the

  12. Process-scale modeling of elevated wintertime ozone in Wyoming.

    SciTech Connect

    Kotamarthi, V. R.; Holdridge, D. J.; Environmental Science Division

    2007-12-31

    Measurements of meteorological variables and trace gas concentrations, provided by the Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality for Daniel, Jonah, and Boulder Counties in the state of Wyoming, were analyzed for this project. The data indicate that highest ozone concentrations were observed at temperatures of -10 C to 0 C, at low wind speeds of about 5 mph. The median values for nitrogen oxides (NOx) during these episodes ranged between 10 ppbv and 20 ppbv (parts per billion by volume). Measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) during these periods were insufficient for quantitative analysis. The few available VOCs measurements indicated unusually high levels of alkanes and aromatics and low levels of alkenes. In addition, the column ozone concentration during one of the high-ozone episodes was low, on the order of 250 DU (Dobson unit) as compared to a normal column ozone concentration of approximately 300-325 DU during spring for this region. Analysis of this observation was outside the scope of this project. The data analysis reported here was used to establish criteria for making a large number of sensitivity calculations through use of a box photochemical model. Two different VOCs lumping schemes, RACM and SAPRC-98, were used for the calculations. Calculations based on this data analysis indicated that the ozone mixing ratios are sensitive to (a) surface albedo, (b) column ozone, (c) NOx mixing ratios, and (d) available terminal olefins. The RACM model showed a large response to an increase in lumped species containing propane that was not reproduced by the SAPRC scheme, which models propane as a nearly independent species. The rest of the VOCs produced similar changes in ozone in both schemes. In general, if one assumes that measured VOCs are fairly representative of the conditions at these locations, sufficient precursors might be available to produce ozone in the range of 60-80 ppbv under the conditions modeled.

  13. Validating Flood Mapping Products Using a Digital Elevation Model Comparison Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fayne, J.

    2014-12-01

    This preliminary study assessed the validity of a pixel analysis elevation comparison technique and determined necessary steps for improvement. The pixel analysis sought to assess the probability of a flood occurring in a particular area by comparing the spatial extent of flood mapping products to the local elevation. The method was developed to determine if the physical relationship between elevation and floods as shown in satellite images is accurately represented in a flood mapping product. The data incorporated in this study are raster digital elevation model (DEM) tiles, a scene from Landsat 5 during a flood period, and a scene from the NASA DEVELOP Flood Disasters Team Flood Product. Pixels representing flooded areas were compared to the elevation height pixels using horizontal transect lines to create pixel value profiles across a 727 km transect of Vietnam and Cambodia. The elevation model comparison validates the Flood Product by depicting water presence in alignment with areas of low elevation. Initial findings indicate that the technique can be used to improve the assessment of flood mapping products in transects less than 10 km. Future research will focus on streamlining the pixel analysis process to yield comprehensive results for larger areas.

  14. Relationship between geomorphology and lithotypes of lahar deposit from Chokai volcano, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minami, Y.; Ohba, T.; Hayashi, S.; Kataoka, K.

    2013-12-01

    Chokai volcano, located in the northern Honshu arc in Japan, is an andesitic stratovolcano that collapsed partly at ca. 2500 years ago. A post collapse lahar deposit (Shirayukigawa lahar deposit) is distributed in the northern foot of the volcanic edifice. The deposit consists of 16 units of debris flow, hyperconcentrated flow and streamflow deposits. The Shirayukigawa lahar deposit has a total thickness of 30 m and overlies the 2.5-ka Kisakata debris avalanche deposit. Shirayukigawa lahar deposit forms volcanic fan and volcanic apron. The volcanic fan is subdivided into four areas on the basis of slope angles and of geomorphological features: 1) steeply sloped area, 2) moderately sloped area, 3) gently sloped area and 4) horizontal area. From sedimentary facies and structures, each unit of the Shirayukigawa lahar deposit is classified into one of four lithotypes: clast-supported debris flow deposit (Cc), matrix-supported debris flow deposit (Cm1), hyperconcentrated flow deposit (Cm2) and streamflow deposit (Sl). Each type has the following lithological characteristics. The lithotypes are well correlated with the geomorphology of the volcanic fan. The steeply-sloped and the moderately-sloped areas are dominated by Cc, Cm1, and Cm2, and The horizontal area are dominated by Sl. Debris flow deposit (Cc) is massive, very poorly sorted, partly graded, and clast-supported with polymictic clasts dominated by subrounded to rounded volcanic clasts. Matrix is sandy to muddy. Preferred clast orientation are present. Debris flow deposit (Cm1) is massive, very poorly sorted, and matrix-supported with polymictic clasts dominated by subrounded to rounded volcanic clasts. Matrix is sandy to muddy. Some layers exhibit coarse-tail normal/inverse grading. Most clasts are oriented. Hyperconcentrated flow deposit (Cm2) is massive to diffusely laminated, very poorly sorted and matrix-supported with polymictic clasts dominated by subrounded to rounded volcanic rocks. Matrix is sandy. The

  15. Calculation and Error Analysis of a Digital Elevation Model of Hofsjokull, Iceland from SAR Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barton, Jonathan S.; Hall, Dorothy K.; Sigurosson, Oddur; Williams, Richard S., Jr.; Smith, Laurence C.; Garvin, James B.

    1999-01-01

    Two ascending European Space Agency (ESA) Earth Resources Satellites (ERS)-1/-2 tandem-mode, synthetic aperture radar (SAR) pairs are used to calculate the surface elevation of Hofsjokull, an ice cap in central Iceland. The motion component of the interferometric phase is calculated using the 30 arc-second resolution USGS GTOPO30 global digital elevation product and one of the ERS tandem pairs. The topography is then derived by subtracting the motion component from the other tandem pair. In order to assess the accuracy of the resultant digital elevation model (DEM), a geodetic airborne laser-altimetry swath is compared with the elevations derived from the interferometry. The DEM is also compared with elevations derived from a digitized topographic map of the ice cap from the University of Iceland Science Institute. Results show that low temporal correlation is a significant problem for the application of interferometry to small, low-elevation ice caps, even over a one-day repeat interval, and especially at the higher elevations. Results also show that an uncompensated error in the phase, ramping from northwest to southeast, present after tying the DEM to ground-control points, has resulted in a systematic error across the DEM.

  16. Assessment of Required Accuracy of Digital Elevation Data for Hydrologic Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenward, T.; Lettenmaier, D. P.

    1997-01-01

    The effect of vertical accuracy of Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) on hydrologic models is evaluated by comparing three DEMs and resulting hydrologic model predictions applied to a 7.2 sq km USDA - ARS watershed at Mahantango Creek, PA. The high resolution (5 m) DEM was resempled to a 30 m resolution using method that constrained the spatial structure of the elevations to be comparable with the USGS and SIR-C DEMs. This resulting 30 m DEM was used as the reference product for subsequent comparisons. Spatial fields of directly derived quantities, such as elevation differences, slope, and contributing area, were compared to the reference product, as were hydrologic model output fields derived using each of the three DEMs at the common 30 m spatial resolution.

  17. TERRAIN: A computer program to process digital elevation models for modeling surface flow

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, P.M.; Levine, D.A.; Hunsaker, C.T.; Timmins, S.P.

    1995-08-01

    This document provides a step by step procedure, TERRAIN, for processing digital elevation models to calculate overland flow paths, watershed boundaries, slope, and aspect. The algorithms incorporated into TERRAIN have been used at two different geographic scales: first for small research watersheds where surface wetness measurements are made, and second for regional water modeling for entire counties. For small areas methods based on flow distribution may be more desirable, especially if time-dependent flow models are to be used. The main improvement in TERRAIN compared with earlier programs on which it is based is that it combines the conditioning routines, which remove depressions to avoid water storage, into a single process. Efficiency has also been improved, reducing run times as much as 10:1 and enabling the processing of very large grids in strips for regional modeling. Additionally, the ability to calculate the nutrient load delivered any cell in a watershed has been added. These improvements make TERRAIN a powerful tool for modeling surface flow.

  18. The Importance of Precise Digital Elevation Models (DEM) in Modelling Floods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demir, Gokben; Akyurek, Zuhal

    2016-04-01

    Digital elevation Models (DEM) are important inputs for topography for the accurate modelling of floodplain hydrodynamics. Floodplains have a key role as natural retarding pools which attenuate flood waves and suppress flood peaks. GPS, LIDAR and bathymetric surveys are well known surveying methods to acquire topographic data. It is not only time consuming and expensive to obtain topographic data through surveying but also sometimes impossible for remote areas. In this study it is aimed to present the importance of accurate modelling of topography for flood modelling. The flood modelling for Samsun-Terme in Blacksea region of Turkey is done. One of the DEM is obtained from the point observations retrieved from 1/5000 scaled orthophotos and 1/1000 scaled point elevation data from field surveys at x-sections. The river banks are corrected by using the orthophotos and elevation values. This DEM is named as scaled DEM. The other DEM is obtained from bathymetric surveys. 296 538 number of points and the left/right bank slopes were used to construct the DEM having 1 m spatial resolution and this DEM is named as base DEM. Two DEMs were compared by using 27 x-sections. The maximum difference at thalweg of the river bed is 2m and the minimum difference is 20 cm between two DEMs. The channel conveyance capacity in base DEM is larger than the one in scaled DEM and floodplain is modelled in detail in base DEM. MIKE21 with flexible grid is used in 2- dimensional shallow water flow modelling. The model by using two DEMs were calibrated for a flood event (July 9, 2012). The roughness is considered as the calibration parameter. From comparison of input hydrograph at the upstream of the river and output hydrograph at the downstream of the river, the attenuation is obtained as 91% and 84% for the base DEM and scaled DEM, respectively. The time lag in hydrographs does not show any difference for two DEMs and it is obtained as 3 hours. Maximum flood extents differ for the two DEMs

  19. Tectonic development of the Northwest Bonaparte Basin, Australia by using Digital Elevation Model (DEM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahid, Ali; Salim, Ahmed Mohamed Ahmed; Ragab Gaafar, Gamal; Yusoff, AP Wan Ismail Wan

    2016-02-01

    The Bonaparte Basin consist of majorly offshore part is situated at Australia's NW continental margin, covers an area of approx. 270,000km2. Bonaparte Basin having a number of sub-basins and platform areas of Paleozoic and Mesozoic is structurally complex. This research established the geologic and geomorphologic studies using Digital Elevation Model (DEM) as a substitute approach in morphostructural analysis to unravel the geological complexities. Although DEMs have been in practice since 1990s, they still have not become common tool for mapping studies. The research work comprised of regional structural analysis with the help of integrated elevation data, satellite imageries, available open topograhic images and internal geological maps with interpreted seismic. The structural maps of the study area have been geo-referenced which further overlaid onto SRTM data and satellite images for combined interpretation which facilitate to attain Digital Elevation Model of the study area. The methodology adopts is to evaluate and redefine development of geodynamic processes involved in formation of Bonaparte Basin. The main objectives is to establish the geological histories by using digital elevation model. The research work will be useful to incorporate different tectonic events occurred at different Geological times in a digital elevation model. The integrated tectonic analysis of different digital data sets benefitted substantially from combining them into a common digital database. Whereas, the visualization software facilitates the overlay and combined interpretation of different data sets which is helpful to reveal hidden information not obvious or accessible otherwise for regional analysis.

  20. A Model for Predicting Persistent Elevation of Factor VIII among Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Samai, Alyana A.; Boehme, Amelia K.; Shaban, Amir; George, Alexander J.; Dowell, Lauren; Monlezun, Dominique J.; Leissinger, Cindy; Schluter, Laurie; El Khoury, Ramy; Martin-Schild, Sheryl

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Elevated levels of coagulation factor VIII (FVIII) may persist independent of the acute-phase response; however, this relationship has not been investigated relative to acute ischemic stroke (AIS). We examined the frequency and predictors of persistently elevated FVIII in AIS patients. Methods AIS patients admitted between July 2008 and May 2014 with elevated baseline FVIII levels and repeat FVIII levels drawn for more than 7 days postdischarge were included. The patients were dichotomized by repeat FVIII level for univariate analysis at 150% and 200% activity thresholds. An adjusted model was developed to predict the likelihood of persistently elevated FVIII levels. Results Among 1616 AIS cases, 98 patients with elevated baseline FVIII had repeat FVIII levels. Persistent FVIII elevation was found in more than 75% of patients. At the 150% threshold, the prediction score ranged from 0 to 7 and included black race, female sex, prior stroke, hyperlipidemia, smoking, baseline FVIII > 200%, and baseline von Willebrand factor (vWF) level greater than 200%. At the 200% threshold, the prediction score ranged from 0–5 and included female sex, prior stroke, diabetes mellitus, baseline FVIII level greater 200%, and baseline vWF level greater than 200%. For each 1-point increase in score, the odds of persistent FVIII at both the 150% threshold (odds ratio [OR] = 10.4, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.63–66.9, P = .0134) and 200% threshold (OR = 10.2, 95% CI 1.82–57.5, P = .0083) increased 10 times. Conclusion Because an elevated FVIII level confers increased stroke risk, our model for anticipating a persistently elevated FVIII level may identify patients at high risk for recurrent stroke. FVIII may be a target for secondary stroke prevention. PMID:26777556

  1. Vapor pressure and boiling point elevation of slash pine black liquors: Predictive models with statistical approach

    SciTech Connect

    Zaman, A.A.; McNally, T.W.; Fricke, A.L.

    1998-01-01

    Vapor-liquid equilibria and boiling point elevation of slash pine kraft black liquors over a wide range of solid concentrations (up to 85% solids) has been studied. The liquors are from a statistically designed pulping experiment for pulping slash pine in a pilot scale digester with four cooking variables of effective alkali, sulfidity, cooking time, and cooking temperature. It was found that boiling point elevation of black liquors is pressure dependent, and this dependency is more significant at higher solids concentrations. The boiling point elevation data at different solids contents (at a fixed pressure) were correlated to the dissolved solids (S/(1 {minus} S)) in black liquor. Due to the solubility limit of some of the salts in black liquor, a change in the slope of the boiling point elevation as a function of the dissolved solids was observed at a concentration of around 65% solids. An empirical method was developed to describe the boiling point elevation of each liquor as a function of pressure and solids mass fraction. The boiling point elevation of slash pine black liquors was correlated quantitatively to the pulping variables, using different statistical procedures. These predictive models can be applied to determine the boiling point rise (and boiling point) of slash pine black liquors at processing conditions from the knowledge of pulping variables. The results are presented, and their utility is discussed.

  2. A theoretical model of cytosolic calcium elevation following wounding in urothelial cell monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appleby, Peter A.; Shabir, Saqib; Southgate, Jennifer; Walker, Dawn

    2013-02-01

    Scratch wounding of a urothelial cell monolayer triggers a number of events including the release of soluble, diffusible signalling factors and mechanical stimulation of cells at the wound edge. These events cause a sustained elevation in cytosolic calcium concentration in the cells surrounding the wound and a transient rise in those further away. The precise form of this calcium transient is believed to play a central role in determining the subsequent response of individual cells and ultimately leads to a co-ordinated, population-level response that rapidly closes the wound. Here we present a framework for modelling the initial phases of this process. We combine a PDE model of diffusion in the extracellular medium and an ODE model of calcium signalling that has been tailored to represent urothelial cells. The ODE model is capable of generating a wide range of calcium transients, including spikes, bursts, oscillations and sustained elevations in the cytosolic calcium concentration. In multi-cell simulations of scratch wounding in a perfusion flow we find that the spatial position of the cells relative to the wound site leads to distinct classes of calcium response, with cells proximal to the wound exhibiting a sustained elevation and cells distal to the wound exhibiting a more transient elevation. We compare these results to existing experimental data and generate a number of novel predictions that could be used to test the model experimentally.

  3. Facies associations of rain-generated versus crater lake-withdrawal lahar deposits from Quaternary volcanoes, central Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordano, G.; De Rita, D.; Fabbri, M.; Rodani, S.

    2002-11-01

    Two syneruption lahar deposit successions from Quaternary Italian volcanoes are presented, displaying different facies associations interpreted to reflect different water sources. The lahar deposits associated with the White Trachytic Tuff Cupa (WTTC) ignimbrites from the Quaternary Roccamonfina volcano, located 150 km to the southeast of Rome, have been interpreted in terms of rain-generated lahars. The WTTC ignimbrites are made of more than 1 km 3 of loose pumice and lava lithic debris emplaced along the hyperbolic slope of the volcano at ca. 300 ka during an interglacial period characterised by mild and wet climate. The lahar deposits are organised in a coarsening-upward, aggradational, and back-stepping succession of medium- to thick-bedded, progressively juvenile-poorer, non-cohesive debris flow to fluvial deposits. Box-shaped channels cut the WTTC ignimbrites along the steep upper slopes. Channels are filled with lava lithic-rich fluvial to hyperconcentrated-flow sand and conglomerate, which are interpreted as lag deposits related to processes of bulking due to the removal of light pumice and ash debris from the upper slope. Along the lower slopes of the volcano and in the surrounding ring plains where the average slope inclination decreases to few degrees, lahars emplaced an aggradational succession of bedded, ash-rich, hyperconcentrated-flow deposits entirely derived from WTTC components. The succession coarsens upward with increasing presence of lava-rich conglomerate lenses, fluvial in origin, interpreted to record the progressive restoration through time of the drainage network. The succession is cut by incised gullies filled with polygenetic fluvial deposits which indicate the restoration of intererruption condition. By contrast, the ca. 23-ka, small-volume, Peperino Albano phreatomagmatic eruption from Colli Albani volcano, located 30 km to the southeast of Rome, emplaced a valley-ponded, block and ash ignimbrite, which, along the western slope of the

  4. Segregating two simultaneous sounds in elevation using temporal envelope: Human psychophysics and a physiological model

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Jeffrey S.; O'Connor, Kevin N.; Sutter, Mitchell L.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to segregate simultaneous sound sources based on their spatial locations is an important aspect of auditory scene analysis. While the role of sound azimuth in segregation is well studied, the contribution of sound elevation remains unknown. Although previous studies in humans suggest that elevation cues alone are not sufficient to segregate simultaneous broadband sources, the current study demonstrates they can suffice. Listeners segregating a temporally modulated noise target from a simultaneous unmodulated noise distracter differing in elevation fall into two statistically distinct groups: one that identifies target direction accurately across a wide range of modulation frequencies (MF) and one that cannot identify target direction accurately and, on average, reports the opposite direction of the target for low MF. A non-spiking model of inferior colliculus neurons that process single-source elevation cues suggests that the performance of both listener groups at the population level can be accounted for by the balance of excitatory and inhibitory inputs in the model. These results establish the potential for broadband elevation cues to contribute to the computations underlying sound source segregation and suggest a potential mechanism underlying this contribution. PMID:26233004

  5. Digital elevation model (DEM) of Cascadia, latitude 39N-53N, longitude 116W-133W

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haugerud, Ralph A.

    1999-01-01

    This report contains a 250-meter digital elevation model (DEM) for Cascadia (latitude 39N - 53N, longitude 116W - 133W), a region that encompasses the Cascade volcanic arc, the Cascadia subduction zone, and the Juan de Fuca Ridge system. The DEM is distributed as file cascdem.tar.gz (39 MB; 78MB uncompressed).

  6. Modeling forest ecosystem responses to elevated carbon dioxide and ozone using artificial neural networks.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Peter E; Cseke, Leland J; Miller, R Michael; Collart, Frank R

    2014-10-21

    Rising atmospheric levels of carbon dioxide and ozone will impact productivity and carbon sequestration in forest ecosystems. The scale of this process and the potential economic consequences provide an incentive for the development of models to predict the types and rates of ecosystem responses and feedbacks that result from and influence of climate change. In this paper, we use phenotypic and molecular data derived from the Aspen Free Air CO2 Enrichment site (Aspen-FACE) to evaluate modeling approaches for ecosystem responses to changing conditions. At FACE, it was observed that different aspen clones exhibit clone-specific responses to elevated atmospheric levels of carbon dioxide and ozone. To identify the molecular basis for these observations, we used artificial neural networks (ANN) to examine above and below-ground community phenotype responses to elevated carbon dioxide, elevated ozone and gene expression profiles. The aspen community models generated using this approach identified specific genes and subnetworks of genes associated with variable sensitivities for aspen clones. The ANN model also predicts specific co-regulated gene clusters associated with differential sensitivity to elevated carbon dioxide and ozone in aspen species. The results suggest ANN is an effective approach to predict relevant gene expression changes resulting from environmental perturbation and provides useful information for the rational design of future biological experiments.

  7. Perturbation and melting of snow and ice by the 13 November 1985 eruption of Nevado del Ruiz, Colombia, and consequent mobilization, flow and deposition of lahars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pierson, T.C.; Janda, R.J.; Thouret, J.-C.; Borrero, C.A.

    1990-01-01

    A complex sequence of pyroclastic flows and surges erupted by Nevado del Ruiz volcano on 13 November 1985 interacted with snow and ice on the summit ice cap to trigger catastrophic lahars (volcanic debris flows), which killed more than 23,000 people living at or beyond the base of the volcano. The rapid transfer of heat from the hot eruptive products to about 10 km2 of the snowpack, combined with seismic shaking, produced large volumes of meltwater that flowed downslope, liquefied some of the new volcanic deposits, and generated avalanches of saturated snow, ice and rock debris within minutes of the 21:08 (local time) eruption. About 2 ?? 107 m3 of water was discharged into the upper reaches of the Molinos, Nereidas, Guali, Azufrado and Lagunillas valleys, where rapid entrainment of valley-fill sediment transformed the dilute flows and avalanches to debris flows. Computed mean velocities of the lahars at peak flow ranged up to 17 m s-1. Flows were rapid in the steep, narrow upper canyons and slowed with distance away from the volcano as flow depth and channel slope diminished. Computed peak discharges ranged up to 48,000 m3 s-1 and were greatest in reaches 10 to 20 km downstream from the summit. A total of about 9 ?? 107 m3 of lahar slurry was transported to depositional areas up to 104 km from the source area. Initial volumes of individual lahars increased up to 4 times with distance away from the summit. The sedimentology and stratigraphy of the lahar deposits provide compelling evidence that: (1) multiple initial meltwater pulses tended to coalesce into single flood waves; (2) lahars remained fully developed debris flows until they reached confluences with major rivers; and (3) debris-flow slurry composition and rheology varied to produce gradationally density-stratified flows. Key lessons and reminders from the 1985 Nevado del Ruiz volcanic eruption are: (1) catastrophic lahars can be generated on ice- and snow-capped volcanoes by relatively small eruptions; (2

  8. Coupling of digital elevation model and rainfall-runoff model in storm drainage network design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gumbo, Bekithemba; Munyamba, Nelson; Sithole, George; Savenije, Hubert H. G.

    Often planners and engineers are faced with various options and questions in storm drainage network design e.g. flow pattern, direction, runoff quantity and therefore size of drain, or scenario after a road, airfield or building has been constructed. In most instances planning without drainage in mind has caused failure or extensive damage to property including the storm water drains which channel the water away. With the advent of various modelling and geographic information systems (GIS) tools this problem can be averted. The University of Zimbabwe’s (UZ) main campus had its storm drainage network reconstructed at a cost of about US$100 000, because of persistent flooding. This paper describes a method of assessing the effectiveness of storm drainage networks by combining a digital elevation model (DEM) with a rainfall-runoff model based on the Soil Conservation Service South African manual (SCS-SA). The UZ campus was used as the test site. The DEM was generated from aerial photographs and the data imported into ArcView. The 3.0 km 2 basin was then delineated into sub-catchments using ArcView Hydro extension tools. The land-use, watershed and soil map of the UZ were merged in ArcView and initial curve numbers (CN) assigned. Using three years of daily rainfall data, runoff and peak flows were calculated for each sub-catchment. By overlaying the natural flow lines derived from the DEM with the reconstructed physical drains a comparison of the flow direction and the orientation of the drains was achieved. Peak flows where calculated for each delineated watershed and the results used to check the adequacy of the trapezoidal concrete lined drains. A combination of a DEM and rainfall-runoff model within a GIS platform proves to be useful in estimating runoff on partly urbanised watersheds and in determining the size and orientation of storm drains. It is particularly useful for new areas where development is being contemplated.

  9. A seamless, high-resolution digital elevation model (DEM) of the north-central California coast

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foxgrover, Amy C.; Barnard, Patrick L.

    2012-01-01

    A seamless, 2-meter resolution digital elevation model (DEM) of the north-central California coast has been created from the most recent high-resolution bathymetric and topographic datasets available. The DEM extends approximately 150 kilometers along the California coastline, from Half Moon Bay north to Bodega Head. Coverage extends inland to an elevation of +20 meters and offshore to at least the 3 nautical mile limit of state waters. This report describes the procedures of DEM construction, details the input data sources, and provides the DEM for download in both ESRI Arc ASCII and GeoTIFF file formats with accompanying metadata.

  10. ICESat Lidar and Global Digital Elevation Models: Application to DESDynI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carabajal, Claudia C.; Harding, David J.; Suchdeo, Vijay P.

    2010-01-01

    Geodetic control is extremely important in the production and quality control of topographic data sets, enabling elevation results to be referenced to an absolute vertical datum. Global topographic data with improved geodetic accuracy achieved using global Ground Control Point (GCP) databases enable more accurate characterization of land topography and its change related to solid Earth processes, natural hazards and climate change. The multiple-beam lidar instrument that will be part of the NASA Deformation, Ecosystem Structure and Dynamics of Ice (DESDynI) mission will provide a comprehensive, global data set that can be used for geodetic control purposes. Here we illustrate that potential using data acquired by NASA's Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite (ICEsat) that has acquired single-beam, globally distributed laser altimeter profiles (+/-86deg) since February of 2003 [1, 2]. The profiles provide a consistently referenced elevation data set with unprecedented accuracy and quantified measurement errors that can be used to generate GCPs with sub-decimeter vertical accuracy and better than 10 m horizontal accuracy. Like the planned capability for DESDynI, ICESat records a waveform that is the elevation distribution of energy reflected within the laser footprint from vegetation, where present, and the ground where illuminated through gaps in any vegetation cover [3]. The waveform enables assessment of Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) with respect to the highest, centroid, and lowest elevations observed by ICESat and in some cases with respect to the ground identified beneath vegetation cover. Using the ICESat altimetry data we are developing a comprehensive database of consistent, global, geodetic ground control that will enhance the quality of a variety of regional to global DEMs. Here we illustrate the accuracy assessment of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) DEM produced for Australia, documenting spatially varying elevation biases of several meters

  11. Gravity modeling reveals that the "Miocene Pyrenean peneplain" developed at high elevation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosch, Gemma V.; Van Den Driessche, Jean; Robert, Alexandra; Babault, Julien; Le Carlier, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Geodynamics that shaped the present morphology of the western Mediterranean are mostly linked to the African-Eurasia collision and the extension related to the Mediterranean opening. The Pyrenean chain formed by the collision between the Iberian microplate and the Eurasian plate from the Eocene to the late Oligocene. This resulted in lithosphere thickening especially below the Central Pyrenees that becomes thinner eastwards. Whether the later thinning of the lithosphere in the easternmost Pyrenees involves the removal of the lithospheric mantle or not is debated. This issue joins the problematics about the origin of the high-elevation of the "Miocene Pyrenean peneplain" remnants. Indeed the most striking feature of the Pyrenean morphology is the occurrence of high-elevation, low relief erosional surfaces that are interpreted as the remnants of a Miocene single planation surface, dissected and reworked by Quaternary fluvial and glacial erosion. Two end-member interpretations have proposed to explain the high elevation of this original surface. The first considers that the Miocene Pyrenean peneplain develops near sea-level and was later uplifted, the second claims that the planation surface developed at high elevation in response to the inhibition of erosion consecutively to the progressive rise of the base-level of the Pyrenean drainage network. The first interpretation implies the return to normal crustal thickness by erosion and later uplift by removal of the lithospheric mantle. The second interpretation considers that the mean elevation of the original planation surface matches the thickness of the lithosphere below the chain, taking into account some hundred meters of isostatic rebound due to Quaternary erosion. To test these interpretations, we first restore the Miocene original planation surface by mapping and interpolating the high-elevation, low relief surfaces across the Pyrenees. We then performed 1D and 2D gravity models that we compare with recent

  12. In-flow evolution of lahar deposits from video-imagery with implications for post-event deposit interpretation, Mount Semeru, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starheim, Colette C. A.; Gomez, Christopher; Davies, Tim; Lavigne, Franck; Wassmer, Patrick

    2013-04-01

    The hazardous and unpredictable nature of lahars makes them challenging to study, yet the in-flow processes characterizing these events are important to understand. As a result, much of the previous research on lahar sedimentation and flow processes has been derived from experimental flows or stratigraphic surveys of post-event deposits. By comparison, little is known on the time-dependent sediment and flow dynamics of lahars in natural environments. Using video-footage of seven lahars on the flanks of Semeru Volcano (East Java, Indonesia), the present study offers new insights on the in-flow evolution of sediment in natural lahars. Video analysis revealed several distinctive patterns of sediment entrainment and deposition that varied with time-related fluctuations in flow. These patterns were used to generate a conceptual framework describing possible processes of formation for subsurface architectural features identified in an earlier lateral survey of lahar deposits on Semeru Volcano (Gomez and Lavigne, 2010a). The formation of lateral discontinuities was related to the partial erosion of transitional bank deposits followed by fresh deposition along the erosional contact. This pattern was observed over the course of several lahar events and within individual flows. Observations similarly offer potential explanations for the formation of lenticular features. Depending on flow characteristics, these features appeared to form by preferential erosion or deposition around large stationary blocks, and by deposition along channel banks during episodes of channel migration or channel constriction. Finally, conditions conducive to the deposition of fine laminated beds were observed during periods of attenuating and surging flow. These results emphasize the difficulties associated with identifying process-structure relationships solely from post-event deposit interpretation and illustrate that an improved understanding of the time-dependent sediment dynamics in lahars may

  13. Comparative Analysis of Global Digital Elevation Models and Ultra-Prominent Mountain Peaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grohmann, Carlos H.

    2016-06-01

    Global Digital Elevation Models (GDEMs) are datasets of vital importance for regional-scale analysis in areas such as geomorphology, [paleo]climatology, oceanography and biodiversity. In this work I present a comparative assessment of the datasets ETOPO1 (1' resolution), GTOPO30, GLOBE, SRTM30 PLUS, GMTED2010 and ACE2 (30") against the altitude of the world's ultra prominent peaks. GDEMs' elevations show an expected tendency of underestimating the peak's altitude, but differences reach 3,500 m. None of the GDEMs captures the full range of elevation on Earth and they do not represent well the altitude of the most prominent peaks. Some of these problems could be addressed with the release of NASADEM, but the smoothing effect caused by moving-window resampling can only be tackled by using new techniques, such as scale-adaptative kernels and curvature-based terrain generalisation.

  14. A computational-grid based system for continental drainage network extraction using SRTM digital elevation models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curkendall, David W.; Fielding, Eric J.; Pohl, Josef M.; Cheng, Tsan-Huei

    2003-01-01

    We describe a new effort for the computation of elevation derivatives using the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) results. Jet Propulsion Laboratory's (JPL) SRTM has produced a near global database of highly accurate elevation data. The scope of this database enables computing precise stream drainage maps and other derivatives on Continental scales. We describe a computing architecture for this computationally very complex task based on NASA's Information Power Grid (IPG), a distributed high performance computing network based on the GLOBUS infrastructure. The SRTM data characteristics and unique problems they present are discussed. A new algorithm for organizing the conventional extraction algorithms [1] into a cooperating parallel grid is presented as an essential component to adapt to the IPG computing structure. Preliminary results are presented for a Southern California test area, established for comparing SRTM and its results against those produced using the USGS National Elevation Data (NED) model.

  15. Subreflector model depending on elevation for the Tianma 65m Radio Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zheng-Xiong; Wang, Jin-Qing; Chen, Lan

    2016-08-01

    A subreflector adjustment system for the Tianma 65 m radio telescope, administered by Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, has been installed to compensate for gravitational deformation of the main reflector and the structure supporting the subreflector. The position and attitude of the subreflector are variable in order to improve the efficiency at different elevations. The subreflector model has the goal of improving the antenna's performance. A new fitting formulation which is different from the traditional formulation is proposed to reduce the fitting error in the Y direction. The only difference in the subreflector models of the 65m radio telescope is the bias of a constant term in the Z direction. We have investigated the effect of movements of the subreflector on the pointing of the antenna. The results of these performance measurements made by moving the antenna in elevation show that the subreflector model can effectively improve the efficiency of the 65 m radio telescope at each elevation. An antenna efficiency of about 60% at the Ku band is reached in the whole angular range of elevation.

  16. Initial Everglades Depth Estimation Network (EDEN) Digital Elevation Model Research and Development

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, John W.; Price, Susan D.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction The Everglades Depth Estimation Network (EDEN) offers a consistent and documented dataset that can be used to guide large-scale field operations, to integrate hydrologic and ecological responses, and to support biological and ecological assessments that measure ecosystem responses to the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (Telis, 2006). To produce historic and near-real time maps of water depths, the EDEN requires a system-wide digital elevation model (DEM) of the ground surface. Accurate Everglades wetland ground surface elevation data were non-existent before the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) undertook the collection of highly accurate surface elevations at the regional scale. These form the foundation for EDEN DEM development. This development process is iterative as additional high accuracy elevation data (HAED) are collected, water surfacing algorithms improve, and additional ground-based ancillary data become available. Models are tested using withheld HAED and independently measured water depth data, and by using DEM data in EDEN adaptive management applications. Here the collection of HAED is briefly described before the approach to DEM development and the current EDEN DEM are detailed. Finally future research directions for continued model development, testing, and refinement are provided.

  17. Appending High-Resolution Elevation Data to GPS Speed Traces for Vehicle Energy Modeling and Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, E.; Burton, E.; Duran, A.; Gonder, J.

    2014-06-01

    Accurate and reliable global positioning system (GPS)-based vehicle use data are highly valuable for many transportation, analysis, and automotive considerations. Model-based design, real-world fuel economy analysis, and the growing field of autonomous and connected technologies (including predictive powertrain control and self-driving cars) all have a vested interest in high-fidelity estimation of powertrain loads and vehicle usage profiles. Unfortunately, road grade can be a difficult property to extract from GPS data with consistency. In this report, we present a methodology for appending high-resolution elevation data to GPS speed traces via a static digital elevation model. Anomalous data points in the digital elevation model are addressed during a filtration/smoothing routine, resulting in an elevation profile that can be used to calculate road grade. This process is evaluated against a large, commercially available height/slope dataset from the Navteq/Nokia/HERE Advanced Driver Assistance Systems product. Results will show good agreement with the Advanced Driver Assistance Systems data in the ability to estimate road grade between any two consecutive points in the contiguous United States.

  18. Simulation of braided river elevation model time series with multiple-point statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirot, Guillaume; Straubhaar, Julien; Renard, Philippe

    2014-06-01

    A new method is proposed to generate successive topographies in a braided river system. Indeed, braided river morphology models are a key factor influencing river-aquifer interactions and have repercussions in ecosystems, flood risk or water management. It is essentially based on multivariate multiple-point statistics simulations and digital elevation models as training data sets. On the one hand, airborne photography and LIDAR acquired at successive time steps have contributed to a better understanding of the geomorphological processes although the available data are sparse over time and river scales. On the other hand, geostatistics provide simulation tools for multiple and continuous variables, which allow the exploration of the uncertainty of many assumption scenarios. Illustration of the approach demonstrates the ability of multiple-point statistics to produce realistic topographies from the information provided by digital elevation models at two time steps.

  19. Statistical correction of lidar-derived digital elevation models with multispectral airborne imagery in tidal marshes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buffington, Kevin J.; Dugger, Bruce D.; Thorne, Karen M.; Takekawa, John

    2016-01-01

    Airborne light detection and ranging (lidar) is a valuable tool for collecting large amounts of elevation data across large areas; however, the limited ability to penetrate dense vegetation with lidar hinders its usefulness for measuring tidal marsh platforms. Methods to correct lidar elevation data are available, but a reliable method that requires limited field work and maintains spatial resolution is lacking. We present a novel method, the Lidar Elevation Adjustment with NDVI (LEAN), to correct lidar digital elevation models (DEMs) with vegetation indices from readily available multispectral airborne imagery (NAIP) and RTK-GPS surveys. Using 17 study sites along the Pacific coast of the U.S., we achieved an average root mean squared error (RMSE) of 0.072 m, with a 40–75% improvement in accuracy from the lidar bare earth DEM. Results from our method compared favorably with results from three other methods (minimum-bin gridding, mean error correction, and vegetation correction factors), and a power analysis applying our extensive RTK-GPS dataset showed that on average 118 points were necessary to calibrate a site-specific correction model for tidal marshes along the Pacific coast. By using available imagery and with minimal field surveys, we showed that lidar-derived DEMs can be adjusted for greater accuracy while maintaining high (1 m) resolution.

  20. Where’s the Ground Surface? – Elevation Bias in LIDAR-derived Digital Elevation Models Due to Dense Vegetation in Oregon Tidal Marshes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) is a powerful resource for coastal and wetland managers and its use is increasing. Vegetation density and other land cover characteristics influence the accuracy of LIDAR-derived ground surface digital elevation models; however the degree to wh...

  1. A Seamless, High-Resolution, Coastal Digital Elevation Model (DEM) for Southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnard, Patrick L.; Hoover, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    A seamless, 3-meter digital elevation model (DEM) was constructed for the entire Southern California coastal zone, extending 473 km from Point Conception to the Mexican border. The goal was to integrate the most recent, high-resolution datasets available (for example, Light Detection and Ranging (Lidar) topography, multibeam and single beam sonar bathymetry, and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (IfSAR) topography) into a continuous surface from at least the 20-m isobath to the 20-m elevation contour. This dataset was produced to provide critical boundary conditions (bathymetry and topography) for a modeling effort designed to predict the impacts of severe winter storms on the Southern California coast (Barnard and others, 2009). The hazards model, run in real-time or with prescribed scenarios, incorporates atmospheric information (wind and pressure fields) with a suite of state-of-the-art physical process models (tide, surge, and wave) to enable detailed prediction of water levels, run-up, wave heights, and currents. Research-grade predictions of coastal flooding, inundation, erosion, and cliff failure are also included. The DEM was constructed to define the general shape of nearshore, beach and cliff surfaces as accurately as possible, with less emphasis on the detailed variations in elevation inland of the coast and on bathymetry inside harbors. As a result this DEM should not be used for navigation purposes.

  2. Comparison of Surface Flow Features from Lidar-Derived Digital Elevation Models with Historical Elevation and Hydrography Data for Minnehaha County, South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poppenga, Sandra K.; Worstell, Bruce B.; Stoker, Jason M.; Greenlee, Susan K.

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has taken the lead in the creation of a valuable remote sensing product by incorporating digital elevation models (DEMs) derived from Light Detection and Ranging (lidar) into the National Elevation Dataset (NED), the elevation layer of 'The National Map'. High-resolution lidar-derived DEMs provide the accuracy needed to systematically quantify and fully integrate surface flow including flow direction, flow accumulation, sinks, slope, and a dense drainage network. In 2008, 1-meter resolution lidar data were acquired in Minnehaha County, South Dakota. The acquisition was a collaborative effort between Minnehaha County, the city of Sioux Falls, and the USGS Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center. With the newly acquired lidar data, USGS scientists generated high-resolution DEMs and surface flow features. This report compares lidar-derived surface flow features in Minnehaha County to 30- and 10-meter elevation data previously incorporated in the NED and ancillary hydrography datasets. Surface flow features generated from lidar-derived DEMs are consistently integrated with elevation and are important in understanding surface-water movement to better detect surface-water runoff, flood inundation, and erosion. Many topographic and hydrologic applications will benefit from the increased availability of accurate, high-quality, and high-resolution surface-water data. The remotely sensed data provide topographic information and data integration capabilities needed for meeting current and future human and environmental needs.

  3. Evaluating LMA and CLAMP: Using information criteria to choose a model for estimating elevation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, I.; Green, W.; Zaitchik, B.; Brandon, M.; Hickey, L.

    2005-12-01

    The morphology of leaves and composition of the flora respond strongly to the moisture and temperature of their environment. Elevation and latitude correlate, at first order, to these atmospheric parameters. An obvious modern example of this relationship between leaf morphology and environment is the tree line, where boreal forests give way to artic (high latitude) or alpine (high elevation) tundra. Several quantitative methods, all of which rely on uniformitarianism, have been developed to estimate paleoelevation using fossil leaf morphology. These include 1) the univariate leaf-margin analysis (LMA), which estimates mean annual temperature (MAT) by the positive linear correlation between MAT and P, the proportion of entire or smooth to non-entire or toothed margined woody dicot angiosperm leaves within a flora and 2) the Climate Leaf Analysis Multivariate Program (CLAMP) which uses Canonical Correspondence Analysis (CCA) to estimate MAT, moist enthalpy, and other atmospheric parameters using 31 explanatory leaf characters from woody dicot angiosperms. Given a difference in leaf-estimated MAT or moist enthalpy between contemporaneous, synlatitudinal fossil floras-one at sea-level, the other at an unknown paleoelevation-paleoelevation may be estimated. These methods have been widely applied to orogenic settings and concentrate particularly in the Western US. We introduce the use of information criteria to compare different models for estimating elevation and show how the additional complexity of the CLAMP analytical methodology does not necessarily improve on the elevation estimates produced by simpler regression models. In addition, we discuss the signal-to-noise ratio in the data, give confidence intervals for detecting elevations, and address the problem of spatial autocorrelation and irregular sampling in the data.

  4. 2009 ERUPTION OF REDOUBT VOLCANO: Lahars, Oil, and the Role of Science in Hazards Mitigation (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swenson, R.; Nye, C. J.

    2009-12-01

    In March, 2009, Redoubt Volcano erupted for the third time in 45 years. More than 19 explosions produced ash plumes to 60,000 ft asl, lahar flows of mud and ice down the Drift river ~30 miles to the coast, and tephra fall up to 1.5 mm onto surrounding communities. The eruption had severe impact on many operations. Airlines were forced to cancel or divert hundreds of international and domestic passenger and cargo flights, and Anchorage International airport closed for over 12 hours. Mudflows and floods down the Drift River to the coast impacted operations at the Drift River Oil Terminal (DROT) which was forced to shut down and ultimately be evacuated. Prior mitigation efforts to protect the DROT oil tank farm from potential impacts associated with a major eruptive event were successful, and none of the 148,000 barrels of oil stored at the facility was spilled or released. Nevertheless, the threat of continued eruptive activity at Redoubt, with the possibility of continued lahar flows down the Drift River alluvial fan, required an incident command post be established so that the US Coast Guard, Alaska Dept. of Environmental Conservation, and the Cook Inlet Pipeline Company could coordinate a response to the potential hazards. Ultimately, the incident command team relied heavily on continuous real-time data updates from the Alaska Volcano Observatory, as well as continuous geologic interpretations and risk analysis by the USGS Volcanic Hazards group, the State Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys and the University of Alaska Geophysical Institute, all members of the collaborative effort of the Alaska Volcano Observatory. The great success story that unfolded attests to the efforts of the incident command team, and their reliance on real-time scientific analysis from scientific experts. The positive results also highlight how pre-disaster mitigation and monitoring efforts, in concert with hazards response planning, can be used in a cooperative industry

  5. The enormous Chillos Valley Lahar: An ash-flow-generated debris flow from Cotopaxi Volcano, Ecuador

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mothes, P.A.; Hall, M.L.; Janda, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    The Chillos Valley Lahar (CVL), the largest Holocene debris flow in area and volume as yet recognized in the northern Andes, formed on Cotopaxi volcano's north and northeast slopes and descended river systems that took it 326 km north-northwest to the Pacific Ocean and 130+ km east into the Amazon basin. In the Chillos Valley, 40 km downstream from the volcano, depths of 80-160 m and valley cross sections up to 337000m2 are observed, implying peak flow discharges of 2.6-6.0 million m3/s. The overall volume of the CVL is estimated to be ???3.8 km3. The CVL was generated approximately 4500 years BP by a rhyolitic ash flow that followed a small sector collapse on the north and northeast sides of Cotopaxi, which melted part of the volcano's icecap and transformed rapidly into the debris flow. The ash flow and resulting CVL have identical components, except for foreign fragments picked up along the flow path. Juvenile materials, including vitric ash, crystals, and pumice, comprise 80-90% of the lahar's deposit, whereas rhyolitic, dacitic, and andesitic lithics make up the remainder. The sand-size fraction and the 2- to 10-mm fraction together dominate the deposit, constituting ???63 and ???15 wt.% of the matrix, respectively, whereas the silt-size fraction averages less than ???10 wt.% and the clay-size fraction less than 0.5 wt.%. Along the 326-km runout, these particle-size fractions vary little, as does the sorting coefficient (average = 2.6). There is no tendency toward grading or improved sorting. Limited bulking is recognized. The CVL was an enormous non-cohesive debris flow, notable for its ash-flow origin and immense volume and peak discharge which gave it characteristics and a behavior akin to large cohesive mudflows. Significantly, then, ash-flow-generated debris flows can also achieve large volumes and cover great areas; thus, they can conceivably affect large populated regions far from their source. Especially dangerous, therefore, are snowclad volcanoes

  6. A comparative study of spherical and flat-Earth geopotential modeling at satellite elevations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrott, M. H.; Hinze, W. J.; Braile, L. W.

    1985-01-01

    Flat-Earth and spherical-Earth geopotential modeling of crustal anomaly sources at satellite elevations are compared by computing gravity and scalar magnetic anomalies perpendicular to the strike of variably dimensioned rectangular prisms at altitudes of 150, 300, and 450 km. Results indicate that the error caused by the flat-Earth approximation is less than 10% in most geometric conditions. Generally, error increase with larger and wider anomaly sources at higher altitudes. For most crustal source modeling applications at conventional satellite altitudes, flat-Earth modeling can be justified and is numerically efficient.

  7. A geomorphology based approach for digital elevation model fusion - case study in Danang City, Vietnam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, T. A.; Raghavan, V.; Masumoto, S.; Vinayaraj, P.; Yonezawa, G.

    2014-04-01

    Global Digital Elevation Model (DEM) is considered as vital spatial information and finds wide use in several applications. Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) Global DEM (GDEM) and Shuttle Radar Topographic Mission (SRTM) DEM offer almost global coverage and provide elevation data for geospatial analysis. However, GDEM and SRTM still contain some height errors that affect the quality of elevation data significantly. This study aims to examine methods to improve the resolution as well as accuracy of available free DEMs by data fusion technique and evaluating the results with high quality reference DEM. The DEM fusion method is based on the accuracy assessment of each global DEM and geomorphological characteristics of the study area. Land cover units were also considered to correct the elevation of GDEM and SRTM with respect to the bare earth surface. Weighted averaging method was used to fuse the input DEMs based on landform classification map. According to the landform types, the different weights were used for GDEM and SRTM. Finally, a denoising algorithm (Sun et al., 2007) was applied to filter the output fused DEM. This fused DEM shows excellent correlation to the reference DEM having correlation coefficient R2 = 0.9986 and the accuracy was also improved from Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) 14.9 m in GDEM and 14.8 m in SRTM into 11.6 m in fused DEM.

  8. Modelling Periglacial Processes on Low-Relief High-Elevation Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, J. L.; Knudsen, M. F.; Egholm, D. L.

    2014-12-01

    Are low-relief high-elevation surfaces generally a result of uplift of flat surfaces formed close to sea-level or can they be formed "in situ" by climate dependent surface processes such as those associated with glaciation? This question is important to resolve in order to understand the geological history in many regions of the world. The glacial buzzsaw concept suggests that intense glacial erosion focused at the equilibrium-line altitude (ELA) leads to a concentration in surface area close to the ELA. However, even in predominantly glacial landscapes, such as the Scandinavian Mountains, the high surfaces often have nonglacial characteristics and show pre-glacial inheritance of cosmogenic nuclide concentrations. This suggests that subglacial erosion is not the dominant erosion mechanism. Anderson (2002) showed that periglacial frost-driven processes working over timescales of millions of years form low-curvature parabolic surfaces at accordant elevation across intervening valleys. The rate of these erosion processes is limited by the slow diffusive transport of regolith in the periglacial domain. We elaborate on this idea by quantifying frost cracking and frost creep in a numerical model as a function of mean annual air temperature and sediment thickness. This allows us to incorporate periglacial processes into a long-term landscape evolution model where surface elevation, sediment thickness, and climate evolve over time. With this model we are able to explore the slow feedbacks between periglacial erosion, sediment transport, and the evolving topography. We show that smooth peaks, convex hillslopes, and a few meters thick regolith cover at high elevation are emergent properties of the landscape evolution model. By varying climate and other model parameters, we discuss how the landscape evolution model can be used for obtaining more insight into the conditions needed for formation of low-relief surfaces at high elevation. Anderson, R. S. Modeling the tor

  9. Modeling the population dynamics of Culex quinquefasciatus (Diptera: Culcidae), along an elevational gradient in Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ahumada, Jorge A.; LaPointe, Dennis; Samuel, Michael D.

    2004-01-01

    We present a population model to understand the effects of temperature and rainfall on the population dynamics of the southern house mosquito, Culex quinquefasciatus Say, along an elevational gradient in Hawaii. We use a novel approach to model the effects of temperature on population growth by dynamically incorporating developmental rate into the transition matrix, by using physiological ages of immatures instead of chronological age or stages. We also model the effects of rainfall on survival of immatures as the cumulative number of days below a certain rain threshold. Finally, we incorporate density dependence into the model as competition between immatures within breeding sites. Our model predicts the upper altitudinal distributions of Cx. quinquefasciatus on the Big Island of Hawaii for self-sustaining mosquito and migrating summer sink populations at 1,475 and 1,715 m above sea level, respectively. Our model predicts that mosquitoes at lower elevations can grow under a broader range of rainfall parameters than middle and high elevation populations. Density dependence in conjunction with the seasonal forcing imposed by temperature and rain creates cycles in the dynamics of the population that peak in the summer and early fall. The model provides a reasonable fit to the available data on mosquito abundance for the east side of Mauna Loa, Hawaii. The predictions of our model indicate the importance of abiotic conditions on mosquito dynamics and have important implications for the management of diseases transmitted by Cx. quinquefasciatus in Hawaii and elsewhere.

  10. Application of a two-pool model to soil carbon dynamics under elevated CO2.

    PubMed

    van Groenigen, Kees Jan; Xia, Jianyang; Osenberg, Craig W; Luo, Yiqi; Hungate, Bruce A

    2015-12-01

    Elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations increase plant productivity and affect soil microbial communities, with possible consequences for the turnover rate of soil carbon (C) pools and feedbacks to the atmosphere. In a previous analysis (Van Groenigen et al., 2014), we used experimental data to inform a one-pool model and showed that elevated CO2 increases the decomposition rate of soil organic C, negating the storage potential of soil. However, a two-pool soil model can potentially explain patterns of soil C dynamics without invoking effects of CO2 on decomposition rates. To address this issue, we refit our data to a two-pool soil C model. We found that CO2 enrichment increases decomposition rates of both fast and slow C pools. In addition, elevated CO2 decreased the carbon use efficiency of soil microbes (CUE), thereby further reducing soil C storage. These findings are consistent with numerous empirical studies and corroborate the results from our previous analysis. To facilitate understanding of C dynamics, we suggest that empirical and theoretical studies incorporate multiple soil C pools with potentially variable decomposition rates. PMID:26313640

  11. Application of a two-pool model to soil carbon dynamics under elevated CO2.

    PubMed

    van Groenigen, Kees Jan; Xia, Jianyang; Osenberg, Craig W; Luo, Yiqi; Hungate, Bruce A

    2015-12-01

    Elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations increase plant productivity and affect soil microbial communities, with possible consequences for the turnover rate of soil carbon (C) pools and feedbacks to the atmosphere. In a previous analysis (Van Groenigen et al., 2014), we used experimental data to inform a one-pool model and showed that elevated CO2 increases the decomposition rate of soil organic C, negating the storage potential of soil. However, a two-pool soil model can potentially explain patterns of soil C dynamics without invoking effects of CO2 on decomposition rates. To address this issue, we refit our data to a two-pool soil C model. We found that CO2 enrichment increases decomposition rates of both fast and slow C pools. In addition, elevated CO2 decreased the carbon use efficiency of soil microbes (CUE), thereby further reducing soil C storage. These findings are consistent with numerous empirical studies and corroborate the results from our previous analysis. To facilitate understanding of C dynamics, we suggest that empirical and theoretical studies incorporate multiple soil C pools with potentially variable decomposition rates.

  12. Impact of land-surface elevation and riparian evapotranspiration seasonality on groundwater budget in MODFLOW models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajami, Hoori; Meixner, Thomas; Maddock, Thomas; Hogan, James F.; Guertin, D. Phillip

    2011-09-01

    Riparian groundwater evapotranspiration (ETg) constitutes a major component of the water balance especially in many arid and semi-arid environments. Although spatial and temporal variability of riparian ETg are controlled by climate, vegetation and subsurface characteristics, depth to water table (DTWT) is often considered the major controlling factor. Relationships between ETg rates and DTWT, referred to as ETg curves, are implemented in MODFLOW ETg packages (EVT, ETS1 and RIP-ET) with different functional forms. Here, the sensitivity of the groundwater budget in MODFLOW groundwater models to ETg parameters (including ETg curves, land-surface elevation and ETg seasonality) are investigated. A MODFLOW model of the hypothetical Dry Alkaline Valley in the Southwestern USA is used to show how spatial representation of riparian vegetation and digital elevation model (DEM) processing methods impact the water budget when RIPGIS-NET (a GIS-based ETg program) is used with MODFLOW's RIP-ET package, and results are compared with the EVT and ETS1 packages. Results show considerable impact on ETg and other groundwater budget components caused by spatial representation of riparian vegetation, vegetation type, fractional coverage areas and land-surface elevation. RIPGIS-NET enhances ETg estimation in MODFLOW by incorporating vegetation and land-surface parameters, providing a tool for ecohydrology studies, riparian ecosystem management and stream restoration.

  13. Perspectives on open access high resolution digital elevation models to produce global flood hazard layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampson, Christopher; Smith, Andrew; Bates, Paul; Neal, Jeffrey; Trigg, Mark

    2015-12-01

    Global flood hazard models have recently become a reality thanks to the release of open access global digital elevation models, the development of simplified and highly efficient flow algorithms, and the steady increase in computational power. In this commentary we argue that although the availability of open access global terrain data has been critical in enabling the development of such models, the relatively poor resolution and precision of these data now limit significantly our ability to estimate flood inundation and risk for the majority of the planet's surface. The difficulty of deriving an accurate 'bare-earth' terrain model due to the interaction of vegetation and urban structures with the satellite-based remote sensors means that global terrain data are often poorest in the areas where people, property (and thus vulnerability) are most concentrated. Furthermore, the current generation of open access global terrain models are over a decade old and many large floodplains, particularly those in developing countries, have undergone significant change in this time. There is therefore a pressing need for a new generation of high resolution and high vertical precision open access global digital elevation models to allow significantly improved global flood hazard models to be developed.

  14. a New High-Resolution Elevation Model of Greenland Derived from Tandem-X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wessel, B.; Bertram, A.; Gruber, A.; Bemm, S.; Dech, S.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we present for the first time the new digital elevation model (DEM) for Greenland produced by the TanDEM-X (TerraSAR add-on for digital elevation measurement) mission. The new, full coverage DEM of Greenland has a resolution of 0.4 arc seconds corresponding to 12 m. It is composed of more than 7.000 interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) DEM scenes. X-Band SAR penetrates the snow and ice pack by several meters depending on the structures within the snow, the acquisition parameters, and the dielectricity constant of the medium. Hence, the resulting SAR measurements do not represent the surface but the elevation of the mean phase center of the backscattered signal. Special adaptations on the nominal TanDEM-X DEM generation are conducted to maintain these characteristics and not to raise or even deform the DEM to surface reference data. For the block adjustment, only on the outer coastal regions ICESat (Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite) elevations as ground control points (GCPs) are used where mostly rock and surface scattering predominates. Comparisons with ICESat data and snow facies are performed. In the inner ice and snow pack, the final X-Band InSAR DEM of Greenland lies up to 10 m below the ICESat measurements. At the outer coastal regions it corresponds well with the GCPs. The resulting DEM is outstanding due to its resolution, accuracy and full coverage. It provides a high resolution dataset as basis for research on climate change in the arctic.

  15. Spatial disaggregation of satellite-derived irradiance using a high-resolution digital elevation model

    SciTech Connect

    Ruiz-Arias, Jose A.; Tovar-Pescador, Joaquin; Cebecauer, Tomas; Suri, Marcel

    2010-09-15

    Downscaling of the Meteosat-derived solar radiation ({proportional_to}5 km grid resolution) is based on decomposing the global irradiance and correcting the systematic bias of its components using the elevation and horizon shadowing that are derived from the SRTM-3 digital elevation model (3 arc sec resolution). The procedure first applies the elevation correction based on the difference between coarse and high spatial resolution. Global irradiance is split into direct, diffuse circumsolar and diffuse isotropic components using statistical models, and then corrections due to terrain shading and sky-view fraction are applied. The effect of reflected irradiance is analysed only in the theoretical section. The method was applied in the eastern Andalusia, Spain, and the validation was carried out for 22 days on April, July and December 2006 comparing 15-min estimates of the satellite-derived solar irradiance and observations from nine ground stations. Overall, the corrections of the satellite estimates in the studied region strongly reduced the mean bias of the estimates for clear and cloudy days from roughly 2.3% to 0.4%. (author)

  16. Modeling Laser Altimeter Return Waveforms Over Complex Vegetation Using High-Resolution Elevation Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blair, J. Bryan; Hofton, Michelle A.

    1999-01-01

    The upcoming generation of laser altimeters record the interaction of emitted laser radiation with terrestrial surfaces in the form of a digitized waveform. We model these laser altimeter return waveforms as the sum of the reflections from individual surfaces within laser footprints, accounting for instrument-specific properties. We compare over 1000 modeled and recorded waveform pairs using the Pearson correlation. We show that we reliably synthesize the vertical structure information for vegetation canopies contained in a medium-large diameter laser footprint from a high-resolution elevation data set.

  17. Analysis of accuracy of digital elevation models created from captured data by digital photogrammetry method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudec, P.

    2011-12-01

    A digital elevation model (DEM) is an important part of many geoinformatic applications. For the creation of DEM, spatial data collected by geodetic measurements in the field, photogrammetric processing of aerial survey photographs, laser scanning and secondary sources (analogue maps) are used. It is very important from a user's point of view to know the vertical accuracy of a DEM. The article describes the verification of the vertical accuracy of a DEM for the region of Medzibodrožie, which was created using digital photogrammetry for the purposes of water resources management and modeling and resolving flood cases based on geodetic measurements in the field.

  18. Satellite Elevation Magnetic and Gravity Models of Major South American Plate Tectonic Features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonfrese, R. R. B.; Hinze, W. J.; Braile, L. W.; Lidiak, E. G.; Keller, G. R. (Principal Investigator); Longacre, M. B.

    1984-01-01

    Some MAGSAT scalar and vector magnetic anomaly data together with regional gravity anomaly data are being used to investigate the regional tectonic features of the South American Plate. An initial step in this analysis is three dimensional modeling of magnetic and gravity anomalies of major structures such as the Andean subduction zone and the Amazon River Aulacogen at satellite elevations over an appropriate range of physical properties using Gaus-Legendre quadrature integration method. In addition, one degree average free-air gravity anomalies of South America and adjacent marine areas are projected to satellite elevations assuming a spherical Earth and available MAGSAT data are processed to obtain compatible data sets for correlation. Correlation of these data sets is enhanced by reduction of the MAGSAT data to radial polarization because of the profound effect of the variation of the magnetic inclination over South America.

  19. Constitutive Modeling and Testing of Polymer Matrix Composites Incorporating Physical Aging at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veazie, David R.

    1998-01-01

    Advanced polymer matrix composites (PMC's) are desirable for structural materials in diverse applications such as aircraft, civil infrastructure and biomedical implants because of their improved strength-to-weight and stiffness-to-weight ratios. For example, the next generation military and commercial aircraft requires applications for high strength, low weight structural components subjected to elevated temperatures. A possible disadvantage of polymer-based composites is that the physical and mechanical properties of the matrix often change significantly over time due to the exposure of elevated temperatures and environmental factors. For design, long term exposure (i.e. aging) of PMC's must be accounted for through constitutive models in order to accurately assess the effects of aging on performance, crack initiation and remaining life. One particular aspect of this aging process, physical aging, is considered in this research.

  20. Determination of Martian Northern Polar Insolation Levels Using a Geodetic Elevation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrell, J. R.; Zuber, M. T.

    2000-08-01

    Solar insolation levels at the Martian polar caps bear significantly on the seasonal and climatic cycling of volatiles on that planet. In the northern hemisphere, the Martian surface slopes downhill from the equator to the pole such that the north polar cap is situated in a 5-km-deep hemispheric-scale depression. This large-scale topographic setting plays an important role in the insolation of the northern polar cap. Elevations measured by the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) provide comprehensive, high-accuracy topographical information required to precisely determine polar insolation. In this study, we employ a geodetic elevation model to quantify the north polar insolation and consider implications for seasonal and climatic changes. Additional information is contained in original extended abstract.

  1. Revealing topographic lineaments through IHS enhancement of DEM data. [Digital Elevation Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murdock, Gary

    1990-01-01

    Intensity-hue-saturation (IHS) processing of slope (dip), aspect (dip direction), and elevation to reveal subtle topographic lineaments which may not be obvious in the unprocessed data are used to enhance digital elevation model (DEM) data from northwestern Nevada. This IHS method of lineament identification was applied to a mosiac of 12 square degrees using a Cray Y-MP8/864. Square arrays from 3 x 3 to 31 x 31 points were tested as well as several different slope enhancements. When relatively few points are used to fit the plane, lineaments of various lengths are observed and a mechanism for lineament classification is described. An area encompassing the gold deposits of the Carlin trend and including the Rain in the southeast to Midas in the northwest is investigated in greater detail. The orientation and density of lineaments may be determined on the gently sloping pediment surface as well as in the more steeply sloping ranges.

  2. Determination of Martian Northern Polar Insolation Levels Using a Geodetic Elevation Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arrell, J. R.; Zuber, M. T.

    2000-01-01

    Solar insolation levels at the Martian polar caps bear significantly on the seasonal and climatic cycling of volatiles on that planet. In the northern hemisphere, the Martian surface slopes downhill from the equator to the pole such that the north polar cap is situated in a 5-km-deep hemispheric-scale depression. This large-scale topographic setting plays an important role in the insolation of the northern polar cap. Elevations measured by the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) provide comprehensive, high-accuracy topographical information required to precisely determine polar insolation. In this study, we employ a geodetic elevation model to quantify the north polar insolation and consider implications for seasonal and climatic changes. Additional information is contained in original extended abstract.

  3. An algorithm for treating flat areas and depressions in digital elevation models using linear interpolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Feifei; Stieglitz, Marc; McKane, Robert B.

    2012-06-01

    Digital elevation model (DEM) data are essential to hydrological applications and have been widely used to calculate a variety of useful topographic characteristics, e.g., slope, flow direction, flow accumulation area, stream channel network, topographic index, and others. Except for slope, none of the other topographic characteristics can be calculated until the flow direction at each pixel within a DEM is determined. However, flow direction cannot be accurately calculated until depressions and flat areas within a DEM have been rectified. This is a routine problem in hydrologic modeling, because virtually all DEMs contain flat and sink pixels, both real and artifactual, that if left untreated will prevent accurate simulation of hydrologic flow paths. Although a number of algorithms are available for rectifying flat and sink pixels in DEM data, treatment of flat areas and depressions and calculation of flow direction remain problematic for reasons of complexity and uncertainty. A new algorithm that effectively rectifies flat and sink pixels was developed and tested. The approach is to use linear interpolation between low elevation grid cells on the edge of each flat area or depression defined as outlets and higher elevation grid cells on the opposite side defined as inflow pixels. The implementation requires an iterative solution to accommodate the irregular geometry of flat areas or depressions and exceptions that arise. Linear interpolation across flat areas or depressions provides a natural way to scale elevation adjustments based on the vertical scale of the surrounding topography, thereby avoiding the addition or subtraction of arbitrary small numbers that we regard as a disadvantage in some prior techniques. Tests for two virtual terrains and one real terrain show that our algorithm effectively rectifies flat areas and depressions, even in low-relief terrain, and produces realistic patterns of flow accumulation and extracted channel networks.

  4. Development of a seamless multisource topographic/bathymetric elevation model of Tampa Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gesch, D.; Wilson, R.

    2001-01-01

    Many applications of geospatial data in coastal environments require knowledge of the nearshore topography and bathymetry. However, because existing topographic and bathymetric data have been collected independently for different purposes, it has been difficult to use them together at the land/water interface owing to differences in format, projection, resolution, accuracy, and datums. As a first step toward solving the problems of integrating diverse coastal datasets, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) are collaborating on a joint demonstration project to merge their data for the Tampa Bay region of Florida. The best available topographic and bathymetric data were extracted from the USGS National Elevation Dataset and the NOAA hydrographic survey database, respectively. Before being merged, the topographic and bathymetric datasets were processed with standard geographic information system tools to place them in a common horizontal reference frame. Also, a key part of the preprocessing was transformation to a common vertical reference through the use of VDatum, a new tool created by NOAA's National Geodetic Survey for vertical datum conversions. The final merged product is a seamless topographic/bathymetric model covering the Tampa Bay region at a grid spacing of 1 arc-second. Topographic LIDAR data were processed and merged with the bathymetry to demonstrate the incorporation of recent third party data sources for several test areas. A primary application of a merged topographic/bathymetric elevation model is for user-defined shoreline delineation, in which the user decides on the tidal condition (for example, low or high water) to be superimposed on the elevation data to determine the spatial position of the water line. Such a use of merged topographic/bathymetric data could lead to the development of a shoreline zone, which could reduce redundant mapping efforts by federal, state, and local agencies

  5. Open-Source Digital Elevation Model (DEMs) Evaluation with GPS and LiDAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalid, N. F.; Din, A. H. M.; Omar, K. M.; Khanan, M. F. A.; Omar, A. H.; Hamid, A. I. A.; Pa'suya, M. F.

    2016-09-01

    Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer-Global Digital Elevation Model (ASTER GDEM), Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), and Global Multi-resolution Terrain Elevation Data 2010 (GMTED2010) are freely available Digital Elevation Model (DEM) datasets for environmental modeling and studies. The quality of spatial resolution and vertical accuracy of the DEM data source has a great influence particularly on the accuracy specifically for inundation mapping. Most of the coastal inundation risk studies used the publicly available DEM to estimated the coastal inundation and associated damaged especially to human population based on the increment of sea level. In this study, the comparison between ground truth data from Global Positioning System (GPS) observation and DEM is done to evaluate the accuracy of each DEM. The vertical accuracy of SRTM shows better result against ASTER and GMTED10 with an RMSE of 6.054 m. On top of the accuracy, the correlation of DEM is identified with the high determination of coefficient of 0.912 for SRTM. For coastal zone area, DEMs based on airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR) dataset was used as ground truth data relating to terrain height. In this case, the LiDAR DEM is compared against the new SRTM DEM after applying the scale factor. From the findings, the accuracy of the new DEM model from SRTM can be improved by applying scale factor. The result clearly shows that the value of RMSE exhibit slightly different when it reached 0.503 m. Hence, this new model is the most suitable and meets the accuracy requirement for coastal inundation risk assessment using open source data. The suitability of these datasets for further analysis on coastal management studies is vital to assess the potentially vulnerable areas caused by coastal inundation.

  6. Use of upscaled elevation and surface roughness data in two-dimensional surface water models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hughes, J.D.; Decker, J.D.; Langevin, C.D.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we present an approach that uses a combination of cell-block- and cell-face-averaging of high-resolution cell elevation and roughness data to upscale hydraulic parameters and accurately simulate surface water flow in relatively low-resolution numerical models. The method developed allows channelized features that preferentially connect large-scale grid cells at cell interfaces to be represented in models where these features are significantly smaller than the selected grid size. The developed upscaling approach has been implemented in a two-dimensional finite difference model that solves a diffusive wave approximation of the depth-integrated shallow surface water equations using preconditioned Newton–Krylov methods. Computational results are presented to show the effectiveness of the mixed cell-block and cell-face averaging upscaling approach in maintaining model accuracy, reducing model run-times, and how decreased grid resolution affects errors. Application examples demonstrate that sub-grid roughness coefficient variations have a larger effect on simulated error than sub-grid elevation variations.

  7. Quantification of soil losses from tourist trails - use of Digital Elevation Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomczyk, Aleksandra

    2010-05-01

    Tourism impacts in protected mountain areas are one of the main concerns for land managers. Impact to environment is most visible at locations of highly concentrated activities like tourist trails, campsites etc. The main indicators of the tourist trail degradation are: vegetation loss (trampling of vegetation cover), change of vegetation type and composition, widening of the trails, muddiness and soil erosion. The last one is especially significant, since it can cause serious transformation of the land surface. Such undesirable changes cannot be repaired without high-cost management activities, and, in some cases they can made the trails difficult and unsafe to use. Scientific understanding of soil erosion related to human impact can be useful for more effective management of the natural protected areas. The aim of this study was to use of digital elevation models (DEMs) to precisely quantify of soil losses from tourist trails. In the study precise elevation data were gathered in several test fields of 4 by 5 m spatial dimension. Measurements were taken in 13 test fields, located in two protected natural areas in south Poland: Gorce National Park and Popradzki Landscape Park. The measuring places were located on trails characterized by different slope, type of vegetation and type of use. Each test field was established by four special marks, firmly dug into the ground. Elevation data were measured with the electronic total station. Irregular elevation points were surveying with essential elements of surrounding terrain surface being included. Moreover, surveys in fixed profile lines were done. For each test field a set of 30 measurements in control points has been collected and these data provide the base for verification of digital elevation models. Average density of the surveying was 70 points per square meter (1000 - 1500 elevation points per each test fields). Surveys in each test field were carried out in August and September of 2008, June 2009 and August

  8. Back to the Future: Have Remotely Sensed Digital Elevation Models Improved Hydrological Parameter Extraction?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarihani, B.

    2015-12-01

    Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) that accurately replicate both landscape form and processes are critical to support modeling of environmental processes. Pre-processing analysis of DEMs and extracting characteristics of the watershed (e.g., stream networks, catchment delineation, surface and subsurface flow paths) is essential for hydrological and geomorphic analysis and sediment transport. This study investigates the status of the current remotely-sensed DEMs in providing advanced morphometric information of drainage basins particularly in data sparse regions. Here we assess the accuracy of three available DEMs: (i) hydrologically corrected "H-DEM" of Geoscience Australia derived from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) data; (ii) the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer Global Digital Elevation Model (ASTER GDEM) version2 1-arc-second (~30 m) data; and (iii) the 9-arc-second national GEODATA DEM-9S ver3 from Geoscience Australia and the Australian National University. We used ESRI's geospatial data model, Arc Hydro and HEC-GeoHMS, designed for building hydrologic information systems to synthesize geospatial and temporal water resources data that support hydrologic modeling and analysis. A coastal catchment in northeast Australia was selected as the study site where very high resolution LiDAR data are available for parts of the area as reference data to assess the accuracy of other lower resolution datasets. This study provides morphometric information for drainage basins as part of the broad research on sediment flux from coastal basins to Great Barrier Reef, Australia. After applying geo-referencing and elevation corrections, stream and sub basins were delineated for each DEM. Then physical characteristics for streams (i.e., length, upstream and downstream elevation, and slope) and sub-basins (i.e., longest flow lengths, area, relief and slopes) were extracted and compared with reference datasets from LiDAR. Results showed that

  9. Enhancing a RADARSAT/ICESat Digital Elevation Model of West Antarctica Using MODIS Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haran, T. M.; Scambos, T. A.

    2007-12-01

    An image enhancement approach is used to develop a new digital elevation map of West Antarctica, combining multiple MODIS images and both radar altimetry and ICESat laser altimetry Digital Elevation Model (DEM) data. The method combines the wide image coverage of MODIS, and its high radiometric sensitivity (which equates to high sunward slope sensitivity), with the high precision and accuracy of ICESat and combined ICESat and radar altimetry DEMs. We calibrate brightness-to-slope relationships for several MODIS images of the central West Antarctic using smoothed DEMs derived from both sources. Using the calibrations, we then created, first, a slope map of the ice sheet surface from the image data (regressing slope information from many images), and then integrated this absolute slope map to yield complete DEMs for the region. ICESat (as of September 2007) has acquired a series of eleven near-repeat tracks over the Antarctic during the period September 2003 to April 2007, covering the continent to 86 deg S. ICESat data are acquired as a series of spot elevations, averaging a ~60m diameter surface region every ~172m. However, ICESat track paths have spacings wide enough (2 km at 85 deg; 20 - 50 km at 75 deg) that some surface ice dynamical features (e.g. flowlines, undulations, ice rises) are missed by the track data used to construct the ICESat DEM. Radar altimetry can provide some of the missing data north of 81.5 deg, but only to a maximum resolution of about 5 km. A set of cloud-cleared MODIS band 1 data from both the Aqua and Terra platforms acquired during the 2003-2004 austral summer, used in generating the Mosaic of Antarctica, MOA, surface morphology image map, were used for the image enhancement. Past analyses of the slope-brightness relationship for MODIS have shown ice surface slope precisions of +/- 0.00015. ICESat spot elevations have nominal precisions of ~5 cm under ideal conditions, although thin-cloud effects and mislocation errors can magnify these

  10. Filling the voids in the SRTM elevation model — A TIN-based delta surface approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luedeling, Eike; Siebert, Stefan; Buerkert, Andreas

    The Digital Elevation Model (DEM) derived from NASA's Shuttle Radar Topography Mission is the most accurate near-global elevation model that is publicly available. However, it contains many data voids, mostly in mountainous terrain. This problem is particularly severe in the rugged Oman Mountains. This study presents a method to fill these voids using a fill surface derived from Russian military maps. For this we developed a new method, which is based on Triangular Irregular Networks (TINs). For each void, we extracted points around the edge of the void from the SRTM DEM and the fill surface. TINs were calculated from these points and converted to a base surface for each dataset. The fill base surface was subtracted from the fill surface, and the result added to the SRTM base surface. The fill surface could then seamlessly be merged with the SRTM DEM. For validation, we compared the resulting DEM to the original SRTM surface, to the fill DEM and to a surface calculated by the International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT) from the SRTM data. We calculated the differences between measured GPS positions and the respective surfaces for 187,500 points throughout the mountain range (ΔGPS). Comparison of the means and standard deviations of these values showed that for the void areas, the fill surface was most accurate, with a standard deviation of the ΔGPS from the mean ΔGPS of 69 m, and only little accuracy was lost by merging it to the SRTM surface (standard deviation of 76 m). The CIAT model was much less accurate in these areas (standard deviation of 128 m). The results show that our method is capable of transferring the relative vertical accuracy of a fill surface to the void areas in the SRTM model, without introducing uncertainties about the absolute elevation of the fill surface. It is well suited for datasets with varying altitude biases, which is a common problem of older topographic information.

  11. An anisotropic thermomechanical damage model for concrete at transient elevated temperatures.

    PubMed

    Baker, Graham; de Borst, René

    2005-11-15

    The behaviour of concrete at elevated temperatures is important for an assessment of integrity (strength and durability) of structures exposed to a high-temperature environment, in applications such as fire exposure, smelting plants and nuclear installations. In modelling terms, a coupled thermomechanical analysis represents a generalization of the computational mechanics of fracture and damage. Here, we develop a fully coupled anisotropic thermomechanical damage model for concrete under high stress and transient temperature, with emphasis on the adherence of the model to the laws of thermodynamics. Specific analytical results are given, deduced from thermodynamics, of a novel interpretation on specific heat, evolution of entropy and the identification of the complete anisotropic, thermomechanical damage surface. The model is also shown to be stable in a computational sense, and to satisfy the laws of thermodynamics. PMID:16243703

  12. A geomorphology-based approach for digital elevation model fusion - case study in Danang city, Vietnam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, T. A.; Raghavan, V.; Masumoto, S.; Vinayaraj, P.; Yonezawa, G.

    2014-07-01

    Global digital elevation models (DEM) are considered a source of vital spatial information and find wide use in several applications. The Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) Global DEM (GDEM) and Shuttle Radar Topographic Mission (SRTM) DEM offer almost global coverage and provide elevation data for geospatial analysis. However, GDEM and SRTM still contain some height errors that affect the quality of elevation data significantly. This study aims to examine methods to improve the resolution as well as accuracy of available free DEMs by data fusion techniques and evaluating the results with a high-quality reference DEM. The DEM fusion method is based on the accuracy assessment of each global DEM and geomorphological characteristics of the study area. Land cover units were also considered to correct the elevation of GDEM and SRTM with respect to the bare-earth surface. The weighted averaging method was used to fuse the input DEMs based on a landform classification map. According to the landform types, the different weights were used for GDEM and SRTM. Finally, a denoising algorithm (Sun et al., 2007) was applied to filter the output-fused DEM. This fused DEM shows excellent correlation to the reference DEM, having a correlation coefficient R2 = 0.9986, and the accuracy was also improved from a root mean square error (RMSE) of 14.9 m in GDEM and 14.8 m in SRTM to 11.6 m in the fused DEM. The results of terrain-related parameters extracted from this fused DEM such as slope, curvature, terrain roughness index and normal vector of topographic surface are also very comparable to reference data.

  13. Ventricular dilation and elevated aqueductal pulsations in a new experimental model of communicating hydrocephalus

    SciTech Connect

    Wagshul, M.; Smith, S.; Wagshul, M.; McAllister, J.P.; Rashid, S.; Li, J.; Egnor, M.R.; Walker, M.L.; Yu, M.; Smith, S.D.; Zhang, G.; Chen, J.J.; Beneveniste, H.

    2009-03-01

    In communicating hydrocephalus (CH), explanations for the symptoms and clear-cut effective treatments remain elusive. Pulsatile flow through the cerebral aqueduct is often significantly elevated, but a clear link between abnormal pulsations and ventriculomegaly has yet to be identified. We sought to demonstrate measurement of pulsatile aqueductal flow of CSF in the rat, and to characterize the temporal changes in CSF pulsations in a new model of CH. Hydrocephalus was induced by injection of kaolin into the basal cisterns of adult rats (n = 18). Ventricular volume and aqueductal pulsations were measured on a 9.4 T MRI over a one month period. Half of the animals developed ventricular dilation, with increased ventricular volume and pulsations as early as one day post-induction, and marked chronic elevations compared to intact controls (volume: 130.15 {+-} 83.21 {mu}l vs. 15.52 {+-} 2.00 {mu}l; pulsations: 114.51 nl {+-} 106.29 vs. 0.72 {+-} 0.13 nl). Similar to the clinical presentation, the relationship between ventricular size and pulsations was quite variable. However, the pulsation time-course revealed two distinct sub-types of hydrocephalic animals: those with markedly elevated pulsations which persisted over time, and those with mildly elevated pulsations which returned to near normal levels after one week. These groups were associated with severe and mild ventriculomegaly respectively. Thus, aqueductal flow can be measured in the rat using high-field MRI and basal cistern-induced CH is associated with an immediate change in CSF pulsatility. At the same time, our results highlight the complex nature of aqueductal pulsation and its relationship to ventricular dilation.

  14. Investigation of potential sea level rise impact on the Nile Delta, Egypt using digital elevation models.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Emad; Khan, Sadiq Ibrahim; Hong, Yang

    2015-10-01

    In this study, the future impact of Sea Level Rise (SLR) on the Nile Delta region in Egypt is assessed by evaluating the elevations of two freely available Digital Elevation Models (DEMs): the SRTM and the ASTER-GDEM-V2. The SLR is a significant worldwide dilemma that has been triggered by recent climatic changes. In Egypt, the Nile Delta is projected to face SLR of 1 m by the end of the 21th century. In order to provide a more accurate assessment of the future SLR impact on Nile Delta's land and population, this study corrected the DEM's elevations by using linear regression model with ground elevations from GPS survey. The information for the land cover types and future population numbers were derived from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) land cover and the Gridded Population of the Worlds (GPWv3) datasets respectively. The DEM's vertical accuracies were assessed using GPS measurements and the uncertainty analysis revealed that the SRTM-DEM has positive bias of 2.5 m, while the ASTER-GDEM-V2 showed a positive bias of 0.8 m. The future inundated land cover areas and the affected population were illustrated based on two SLR scenarios of 0.5 m and 1 m. The SRTM DEM data indicated that 1 m SLR will affect about 3900 km(2) of cropland, 1280 km(2) of vegetation, 205 km(2) of wetland, 146 km(2) of urban areas and cause more than 6 million people to lose their houses. The overall vulnerability assessment using ASTER-GDEM-V2 indicated that the influence of SLR will be intense and confined along the coastal areas. For instance, the data indicated that 1 m SLR will inundate about 580 Km(2) (6%) of the total land cover areas and approximately 887 thousand people will be relocated. Accordingly, the uncertainty analysis of the DEM's elevations revealed that the ASTER-GDEM-V2 dataset product was considered the best to determine the future impact of SLR on the Nile Delta region. PMID:26410824

  15. Investigation of potential sea level rise impact on the Nile Delta, Egypt using digital elevation models.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Emad; Khan, Sadiq Ibrahim; Hong, Yang

    2015-10-01

    In this study, the future impact of Sea Level Rise (SLR) on the Nile Delta region in Egypt is assessed by evaluating the elevations of two freely available Digital Elevation Models (DEMs): the SRTM and the ASTER-GDEM-V2. The SLR is a significant worldwide dilemma that has been triggered by recent climatic changes. In Egypt, the Nile Delta is projected to face SLR of 1 m by the end of the 21th century. In order to provide a more accurate assessment of the future SLR impact on Nile Delta's land and population, this study corrected the DEM's elevations by using linear regression model with ground elevations from GPS survey. The information for the land cover types and future population numbers were derived from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) land cover and the Gridded Population of the Worlds (GPWv3) datasets respectively. The DEM's vertical accuracies were assessed using GPS measurements and the uncertainty analysis revealed that the SRTM-DEM has positive bias of 2.5 m, while the ASTER-GDEM-V2 showed a positive bias of 0.8 m. The future inundated land cover areas and the affected population were illustrated based on two SLR scenarios of 0.5 m and 1 m. The SRTM DEM data indicated that 1 m SLR will affect about 3900 km(2) of cropland, 1280 km(2) of vegetation, 205 km(2) of wetland, 146 km(2) of urban areas and cause more than 6 million people to lose their houses. The overall vulnerability assessment using ASTER-GDEM-V2 indicated that the influence of SLR will be intense and confined along the coastal areas. For instance, the data indicated that 1 m SLR will inundate about 580 Km(2) (6%) of the total land cover areas and approximately 887 thousand people will be relocated. Accordingly, the uncertainty analysis of the DEM's elevations revealed that the ASTER-GDEM-V2 dataset product was considered the best to determine the future impact of SLR on the Nile Delta region.

  16. Behavioural and pharmacological characterisation of the elevated "zero-maze" as an animal model of anxiety.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, J K; Grewal, S S; Fletcher, A; Bill, D J; Dourish, C T

    1994-09-01

    The elevated "zero-maze" is a modification of the elevated plus-maze model of anxiety in rats which incorporates both traditional and novel ethological measures in the analysis of drug effects. The novel design comprises an elevated annular platform with two opposite enclosed quadrants and two open, removing any ambiguity in interpretation of time spent on the central square of the traditional design and allowing uninterrupted exploration. Using this model, the reference benzodiazepine anxiolytics, diazepam (0.125-0.5 mg/kg) and chlordiazepoxide (0.5-2.0 mg/kg) significantly increased the percentage of time spent in the open quadrants (% TO) and the frequency of head dips over the edge of the platform (HDIPS), and reduced the frequency of stretched attend postures (SAP) from the closed to open quadrants. In contrast, the anxiogenic drug m-chlorophenyl-piperazine (mCPP; 0.25-1.0 mg/kg) induced the opposite effects, decreasing %TO and HDIPS, and increasing SAP. The 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin (8-OH-DPAT; 0.001-0.1 mg/kg) had no effects on either %TO or HDIPS, but did decrease SAP at 0.01 mg/kg although not at higher or lower doses. Similarly, the 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, ondansetron (0.0001-1.0 mg/kg) decreased SAP and increased %TO at 0.01 mg/kg, but not at other doses. The present data suggest that a combination of the novel "zero-maze" design and a detailed ethological analysis provides a sensitive model for the detection of anxiolytic/anxiogenic drug action.

  17. Watershed boundaries and digital elevation model of Oklahoma derived from 1:100,000-scale digital topographic maps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cederstrand, J.R.; Rea, A.H.

    1995-01-01

    This document provides a general description of the procedures used to develop the data sets included on this compact disc. This compact disc contains watershed boundaries for Oklahoma, a digital elevation model, and other data sets derived from the digital elevation model. The digital elevation model was produced using the ANUDEM software package, written by Michael Hutchinson and licensed from the Centre for Resource and Environmental Studies at The Australian National University. Elevation data (hypsography) and streams (hydrography) from digital versions of the U.S. Geological Survey 1:100,000-scale topographic maps were used by the ANUDEM package to produce a hydrologically conditioned digital elevation model with a 60-meter cell size. This digital elevation model is well suited for drainage-basin delineation using automated techniques. Additional data sets include flow-direction, flow-accumulation, and shaded-relief grids, all derived from the digital elevation model, and the hydrography data set used in producing the digital elevation model. The watershed boundaries derived from the digital elevation model have been edited to be consistent with contours and streams from the U.S. Geological Survey 1:100,000-scale topographic maps. The watershed data set includes boundaries for 11-digit Hydrologic Unit Codes (watersheds) within Oklahoma, and 8-digit Hydrologic Unit Codes (cataloging units) outside Oklahoma. Cataloging-unit boundaries based on 1:250,000-scale maps outside Oklahoma for the Arkansas, Red, and White River basins are included. The other data sets cover Oklahoma, and where available, portions of 1:100,000-scale quadrangles adjoining Oklahoma.

  18. Modeling Water-Surface Elevations and Virtual Shorelines for the Colorado River in Grand Canyon, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Magirl, Christopher S.; Breedlove, Michael J.; Webb, Robert H.; Griffiths, Peter G.

    2008-01-01

    Using widely-available software intended for modeling rivers, a new one-dimensional hydraulic model was developed for the Colorado River through Grand Canyon from Lees Ferry to Diamond Creek. Solving one-dimensional equations of energy and continuity, the model predicts stage for a known steady-state discharge at specific locations, or cross sections, along the river corridor. This model uses 2,680 cross sections built with high-resolution digital topography of ground locations away from the river flowing at a discharge of 227 m3/s; synthetic bathymetry was created for topography submerged below the 227 m3/s water surface. The synthetic bathymetry was created by adjusting the water depth at each cross section up or down until the model?s predicted water-surface elevation closely matched a known water surface. This approach is unorthodox and offers a technique to construct one-dimensional hydraulic models of bedrock-controlled rivers where bathymetric data have not been collected. An analysis of this modeling approach shows that while effective in enabling a useful model, the synthetic bathymetry can differ from the actual bathymetry. The known water-surface profile was measured using elevation data collected in 2000 and 2002, and the model can simulate discharges up to 5,900 m3/s. In addition to the hydraulic model, GIS-based techniques were used to estimate virtual shorelines and construct inundation maps. The error of the hydraulic model in predicting stage is within 0.4 m for discharges less than 1,300 m3/s. Between 1,300-2,500 m3/s, the model accuracy is about 1.0 m, and for discharges between 2,500-5,900 m3/s, the model accuracy is on the order of 1.5 m. In the absence of large floods on the flow-regulated Colorado River in Grand Canyon, the new hydraulic model and the accompanying inundation maps are a useful resource for researchers interested in water depths, shorelines, and stage-discharge curves for flows within the river corridor with 2002 topographic

  19. Falling paper: Navier-Stokes solutions, model of fluid forces, and center of mass elevation.

    PubMed

    Pesavento, Umberto; Wang, Z Jane

    2004-10-01

    We investigate the problem of falling paper by solving the two dimensional Navier-Stokes equations subject to the motion of a free-falling body at Reynolds numbers around 10(3). The aerodynamic lift on a tumbling plate is found to be dominated by the product of linear and angular velocities rather than velocity squared, as appropriate for an airfoil. This coupling between translation and rotation provides a mechanism for a brief elevation of center of mass near the cusplike turning points. The Navier-Stokes solutions further provide the missing quantity in the classical theory of lift, the instantaneous circulation, and suggest a revised model for the fluid forces.

  20. High Resolution Photogrammetric Digital Elevation Models Across Calving Fronts and Meltwater Channels in Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Bel, D. A.; Brown, S.; Zappa, C. J.; Bell, R. E.; Frearson, N.; Tinto, K. J.

    2014-12-01

    Photogrammetric digital elevation models (DEMs) are a powerful approach for understanding elevation change and dynamics along the margins of the large ice sheets. The IcePod system, mounted on a New York Air National Guard LC-130, can measure high-resolution surface elevations with a Riegl VQ580 scanning laser altimeter and Imperx Bobcat IGV-B6620 color visible-wavelength camera (6600x4400 resolution); the surface temperature with a Sofradir IRE-640L infrared camera (spectral response 7.7-9.5 μm, 640x512 resolution); and the structure of snow and ice with two radar systems. We show the use of IcePod imagery to develop DEMs across calving fronts and meltwater channels in Greenland. Multiple over-flights of the Kangerlussaq Airport ramp have provided a test of the technique at a location with accurate, independently-determined elevation. Here the photogrammetric DEM of the airport, constrained by ground control measurements, is compared with the Lidar results. In July 2014 the IcePod ice-ocean imaging system surveyed the calving fronts of five outlet glaciers north of Jakobshavn Isbrae. We used Agisoft PhotoScan to develop a DEM of each calving front using imagery captured by the IcePod systems. Adjacent to the ice sheet, meltwater plumes foster mixing in the fjord, moving warm ocean water into contact with the front of the ice sheet where it can undercut the ice front and trigger calving. The five glaciers provide an opportunity to examine the calving front structure in relation to ocean temperature, fjord circulation, and spatial scale of the meltwater plumes. The combination of the accurate DEM of the calving front and the thermal imagery used to constrain the temperature and dynamics of the adjacent plume provides new insights into the ice-ocean interactions. Ice sheet margins provide insights into the connections between the surface meltwater and the fate of the water at the ice sheet base. Surface meltwater channels are visualized here for the first time using

  1. Preparing for Volcanic Hazards: An Examination of Lahar Knowledge, Risk Perception, and Preparedness around Mount Baker and Glacier Peak, WA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corwin, K.; Brand, B. D.

    2015-12-01

    As the number of people living at risk from volcanic hazards in the U.S. Pacific Northwest continues to rise, so does the need for improved hazard science, mitigation, and response planning. The effectiveness of these efforts relies not only on scientists and policymakers, but on individuals and their risk perception and preparedness levels. This study examines the individual knowledge, perception, and preparedness of over 500 survey respondents living or working within the lahar zones of Mount Baker and Glacier Peak volcanoes. We (1) explore the common disconnect between accurate risk perception and adequate preparedness; (2) determine how participation in hazard response planning influences knowledge, risk perception, and preparedness; and (3) assess the effectiveness of current lahar hazard maps for public risk communication. Results indicate that a disconnect exists between perception and preparedness for the majority of respondents. While 82% of respondents accurately anticipate that future volcanic hazards will impact the Skagit Valley, this knowledge fails to motivate increased preparedness. A majority of respondents also feel "very responsible" for their own protection and provision of resources during a hazardous event (83%) and believe they have the knowledge and skills necessary to respond effectively to such an event (56%); however, many of these individuals still do not adequately prepare. When asked what barriers prevent them from preparing, respondents primarily cite a lack of knowledge about relevant local hazards. Results show that participation in response-related activities—a commonly recommended solution to this disconnect—minimally influences preparedness. Additionally, although local hazard maps successfully communicate the primary hazard—97% of respondents recognize the lahar hazard—many individuals incorrectly interpret other important facets of the maps. Those who participate in response-related activities fail to understand these

  2. Swift snowmelt and floods (lahars) caused by great pyroclastic surge at Mount St Helens volcano, Washington, 18 May 1980

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waitt, R.B.

    1989-01-01

    The initial explosions at Mount St. Helens, Washington, on the moring of 18 May 1980 developed into a huge pyroclastic surge that generated catastrophic floods off the east and west flanks of the volcano. Near-source surge deposits on the east and west were lithic, sorted, lacking in accretionary lapilli and vesiculated ash, not plastered against upright obstacles, and hot enough to char wood - all attributes of dry pyroclastic surge. Material deposited at the surge base on steep slopes near the volcano transformed into high-concentration lithic pyroclastic flows whose deposits contain charred wood and other features indicating that these flows were hot and dry. Stratigraphy shows that even the tail of the surge had passed the east and west volcano flanks before the geomorphically distinct floods (lahars) arrived. This field evidence undermines hypotheses that the turbulent surge was itself wet and that its heavy components segregated out to transform directly into lahars. Nor is there evidence that meters-thick snow-slab avalanches intimately mixed with the surge to form the floods. The floods must have instead originated by swift snowmelt at the base of a hot and relatively dry turbulent surge. Impacting hot pyroclasts probably transferred downslope momentum to the snow surface and churned snow grains into the surge base. Melting snow and accumulating hot surge debris may have moved initially as thousands of small thin slushflows. As these flows removed the surface snow and pyroclasts, newly uncovered snow was partly melted by the turbulent surge base; this and accumulating hot surge debris in turn began flowing, a self-sustaining process feeding the initial flows. The flows thus grew swiftly over tens of seconds and united downslope into great slushy ejecta-laden sheetfloods. Gravity accelerated the floods to more than 100 km/h as they swept down and off the volcano flanks while the snow component melted to form great debris-rich floods (lahars) channeled into

  3. Application of Low-Cost Digital Elevation Models to Detect Change in Forest Carbon Sequestration Projects

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth Glenn MacDicken

    2007-07-31

    This two-year study evaluated advanced multispectral digital imagery applications for assessment of forest carbon stock change. A series of bench and field studies in North Carolina and Ohio tested aerial assessments of forest change between two time periods using two software packages (ERDAS and TERREST) for Digital Elevation Model (DEM) creation, automated classification software (eCognition) for canopy segmentation and a multiple ranging laser designed to improve quality of elevation data. Results of the DEM software comparison showed that while TERREST has the potential to produce much higher resolution DEM than ERDAS, it is unable to resolve crucial canopy features adequately. Lab tests demonstrated that additional laser data improves image registration and Z-axis DEM quality. Data collected in the field revealed difficult challenges in correctly modeling the location of laser strike and subsequently determining elevations in both software packages. Automated software segmentation of tree canopies provided stem diameter and biomass carbon estimates that were within 3% of comparable ground based estimates in the Ohio site and produced similar biomass estimates for a limited number of plots in the Duke forest. Tree height change between time periods and canopy segmentation from multispectral imagery allowed calculation of forest carbon stock change at costs that are comparable to those for ground-based methods. This work demonstrates the potential of lower cost imagery systems enhanced with laser data to collect high quality imagery and paired laser data for forestry and environmental applications. Additional research on automated canopy segmentation and multi-temporal image registration is needed to refine these methods for commercial use.

  4. Combining criteria for delineating lahar- and flash-flood-prone hazard and risk zones for the city of Arequipa, Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thouret, J.-C.; Enjolras, G.; Martelli, K.; Santoni, O.; Luque, J. A.; Nagata, M.; Arguedas, A.; Macedo, L.

    2013-02-01

    Arequipa, the second largest city in Peru, is exposed to many natural hazards, most notably earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, landslides, lahars (volcanic debris flows), and flash floods. Of these, lahars and flash floods, triggered by occasional torrential rainfall, pose the most frequently occurring hazards that can affect the city and its environs, in particular the areas containing low-income neighbourhoods. This paper presents and discusses criteria for delineating areas prone to flash flood and lahar hazards, which are localized along the usually dry (except for the rainy season) ravines and channels of the Río Chili and its tributaries that dissect the city. Our risk-evaluation study is based mostly on field surveys and mapping, but we also took into account quality and structural integrity of buildings, available socio-economic data, and information gained from interviews with risk-managers officials. In our evaluation of the vulnerability of various parts of the city, in addition to geological and physical parameters, we also took into account selected socio-economic parameters, such as the educational and poverty level of the population, unemployment figures, and population density. In addition, we utilized a criterion of the "isolation factor", based on distances to access emergency resources (hospitals, shelters or safety areas, and water) in each city block. By combining the hazard, vulnerability and exposure criteria, we produced detailed risk-zone maps at the city-block scale, covering the whole city of Arequipa and adjacent suburbs. Not surprisingly, these maps show that the areas at high risk coincide with blocks or districts with populations at low socio-economic levels. Inhabitants at greatest risk are the poor recent immigrants from rural areas who live in unauthorized settlements in the outskirts of the city in the upper parts of the valleys. Such settlements are highly exposed to natural hazards and have little access to vital resources. Our

  5. Delineating small karst watersheds based on digital elevation model and eco-hydrogeological principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jie Luo, Guang; Jie Wang, Shi; Bai, Xiao Yong; Liu, Xiu Ming; Cheng, An Yun

    2016-03-01

    Dominated by specific eco-hydrogeological backgrounds, a small watershed delineated by using the traditional method is always inauthentic in karst regions because it cannot accurately reflect the eco-hydrological process of the dual structure of the surface and subsurface. This study proposes a new method for the delineation of small watersheds based on digital elevation models (DEMs) and eco-hydrogeological principles in karst regions. This method is applied to one section of the tributary area (Sancha River) of the Yangtze River in China. By comparing the quantity, shape, superimposition, and characteristics of the internal hydrological process of a small watershed extracted by using the digital elevation model with that extracted by using the proposed method of this study, we conclude that the small karst watersheds extracted by the new method accurately reflect the hydrological process of the river basin. Furthermore, we propose that the minimum unit of the river basin in karst regions should be the watershed, whose exit is the corrosion and corrasion baselevel and a further division of watershed may cause a significant inconsistency with the true eco-hydrological process.

  6. Propagation modeling of ocean-scattered low-elevation GPS signals for maritime tropospheric duct inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jin-Peng; Wu, Zhen-Sen; Zhao, Zhen-Wei; Zhang, Yu-Sheng; Wang, Bo

    2012-10-01

    The maritime tropospheric duct is a low-altitude anomalous refractivity structure over the ocean surface, and it can significantly affect the performance of many shore-based/shipboard radar and communication systems. We propose the idea that maritime tropospheric ducts can be retrieved from ocean forward-scattered low-elevation global positioning system (GPS) signals. Retrieval is accomplished by matching the measured power patterns of the signals to those predicted by the forward propagation model as a function of the modified refractivity profile. On the basis of a parabolic equation method and bistatic radar equation, we develop such a forward model for computing the trapped propagation characteristics of an ocean forward-scattered GPS signal within a tropospheric duct. A new GPS scattering initial field is defined for this model to start the propagation modeling. A preliminary test on the performance of this model is conducted using measured data obtained from a 2009-experiment in the South China Sea. Results demonstrate that this model can predict GPS propagation characteristics within maritime tropospheric ducts and serve as a forward model for duct inversion.

  7. Modeling the effects of elevated temperatures on action potential propagation in unmyelinated axons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, Mohit; Jenkins, Michael W.; Chiel, Hillel J.; Jansen, E. Duco

    2016-03-01

    Infrared lasers (λ=1.87 μm) are capable of inducing a thermally mediated nerve block in Aplysia and rat nerves. While this block is spatially precise and reversible in sensory and motor neurons, the mechanism of block is not clearly understood. Model predictions show that, at elevated temperatures, the rates of opening and closing of the voltage gated ion channels are disrupted and normal functioning of the gates is hindered. A model combining NEURON with Python is presented here that can simulate the behavior of unmyelinated nerve axons in the presence of spatially and temporally varying temperature distributions. Axon behavior and underlying mechanism leading to conduction block is investigated. The ability to understand the photothermal interaction of laser light and temperature dependence of membrane ion channels in-silico will help speed explorations of parameter space and guide future experiments testing the feasibility of selectively blocking pain conduction fibers (Photonic Analgesia of Nerves (PAIN)) in humans.

  8. Hydrologic analysis of a flood based on a new Digital Elevation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishio, M.; Mori, M.

    2015-06-01

    These The present study aims to simulate the hydrologic processes of a flood, based on a new, highly accurate Digital Elevation Model (DEM). The DEM is provided by the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism (MLIT) of Japan, and has a spatial resolution of five meters. It was generated by the new National Project in 2012. The Hydrologic Engineering Center - Hydrologic Modeling System (HEC-HMS) is used to simulate the hydrologic process of a flood of the Onga River in Iizuka City, Japan. A large flood event in the typhoon season in 2003 caused serious damage around the Iizuka City area. Precise records of rainfall data from the Automated Meteorological Data Acquisition System (AMeDAS) were input into the HEC-HMS. The estimated flood area of the simulation results by HEC-HMS was identical to the observed flood area. A watershed aggregation map is also generated by HEC-HMS around the Onga River.

  9. A time series of TanDEM-X digital elevation models to monitor a glacier surge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendt, Anja; Mayer, Christoph; Lambrecht, Astrid; Floricioiu, Dana

    2016-04-01

    Bivachny Glacier, a tributary of the more than 70 km long Fedchenko Glacier in the Pamir Mountains, Central Asia, is a surge-type glacier with three known surges during the 20th century. In 2011, the most recent surge started which, in contrast to the previous ones, evolved down the whole glacier and reached the confluence with Fedchenko Glacier. Spatial and temporal glacier volume changes can be derived from high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) based on bistatic InSAR data from the TanDEM-X mission. There are nine DEMs available between 2011 and 2015 covering the entire surge period in time steps from few months up to one year. During the surge, the glacier surface elevation increased by up to 130 m in the lower part of the glacier; and change rates of up to 0.6 m per day were observed. The surface height dataset was complemented with glacier surface velocity information from TerraSAR-X/ TanDEM-X data as well as optical Landsat imagery. While the glacier was practically stagnant in 2000 after the end of the previous surge in the 1990s, the velocity increase started in 2011 in the upper reaches of the ablation area and successively moved downwards and intensified, reaching up to 4.0 m per day. The combination of surface elevation changes and glacier velocities, both of high temporal and spatial resolution, provides the unique opportunity to describe and analyse the evolution of the surge in unprecedented detail. Especially the relation between the mobilization front and the local mass transport provides insight into the surge dynamics.

  10. Assessing the quality for hydrological applications of digital elevation models derived from contours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wise, Stephen

    2000-07-01

    Digital elevation models (DEMs) are becoming increasingly important tools in hydrological research and in water resources management. The quality of DEMs, however, normally is reported simply as the root mean square error of elevation, a statistic that fails to capture the numerous sources of error in DEMs or to predict their effect on the result of using the DEM. This paper presents a review of other approaches to assessing DEM quality, and argues that a full assessment of DEM quality must focus on the accuracy and reliability of the final product of the DEM analysis. A number of DEMs for the Slapton Ley catchments in Devon derived from digitized contour data are compared in an initial assessment of their sustainability for use in hydrological work. Two are available for purchase from data suppliers, and five more were created using a variety of interpolation techniques in widely available geographical information system software. The different interpretation methods produce DEMs with different artefacts, although analyses of the distribution of elevation values, and visual techniques, suggested that none of these were of a particularly pronounced nature. The results of using the DEMs to derive drainage networks and catchment areas showed that at the broad scale there was a high level of agreement between the DEMs. There were, however, important differences of detail. For example, some DEMs predicted drainage lines that occasionally crossed the original contours. The results of calculating the TOPMODEL topographic index showed far more variation, because the index is calculated for each pixel in the area, rather than being an aggregate result derived from numerous pixels. The main conclusion was that care should always be taken to assess the quality of a DEM before attempting to use it, and that results should always be checked to ensure that they appear to be reasonable.

  11. Validation of the ASTER Global Digital Elevation Model Version 2 over the conterminous United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gesch, Dean B.; Oimoen, Michael J.; Zhang, Zheng; Meyer, David J.; Danielson, Jeffrey J.

    2012-01-01

    The ASTER Global Digital Elevation Model Version 2 (GDEM v2) was evaluated over the conterminous United States in a manner similar to the validation conducted for the original GDEM Version 1 (v1) in 2009. The absolute vertical accuracy of GDEM v2 was calculated by comparison with more than 18,000 independent reference geodetic ground control points from the National Geodetic Survey. The root mean square error (RMSE) measured for GDEM v2 is 8.68 meters. This compares with the RMSE of 9.34 meters for GDEM v1. Another important descriptor of vertical accuracy is the mean error, or bias, which indicates if a DEM has an overall vertical offset from true ground level. The GDEM v2 mean error of -0.20 meters is a significant improvement over the GDEM v1 mean error of -3.69 meters. The absolute vertical accuracy assessment results, both mean error and RMSE, were segmented by land cover to examine the effects of cover types on measured errors. The GDEM v2 mean errors by land cover class verify that the presence of aboveground features (tree canopies and built structures) cause a positive elevation bias, as would be expected for an imaging system like ASTER. In open ground classes (little or no vegetation with significant aboveground height), GDEM v2 exhibits a negative bias on the order of 1 meter. GDEM v2 was also evaluated by differencing with the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) dataset. In many forested areas, GDEM v2 has elevations that are higher in the canopy than SRTM.

  12. Calibration of Mercury Laser Altimeter Data Using Digital Elevation Models Derived from Stereo Image Pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, R. S.; Barker, M. K.; Mazarico, E.; Neumann, G. A.

    2015-12-01

    Knowledge of Mercury's topography is crucial to understanding Mercury's complex geology and history, as well as its current rotation state. From onboard the MESSENGER spacecraft, the Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA) made around 26 million measurements of Mercury's topography, with radial and horizontal accuracies of ~10 m and ~100 m, respectively. Prior to orbit insertion in 2011, MESSENGER conducted three gravity-assist flybys of Mercury. During the January and October 2008 flybys, MLA made its first altimetric measurements, but the radial and horizontal accuracies were respectively limited to ~100 and ~1000 meters due to uncertainties in the spacecraft and planetary ephemerides. To reduce these geolocation uncertainties, the MLA flyby data have been compared to images taken by the Mercury Dual Imaging System (MDIS), another instrument on MESSENGER. Stereo image pairs acquired by MDIS were selected from a database of over 500,000 image pairs located within 5 degrees of the equator. The selected stereo pairs have high surface resolutions (~200 m/pixel), large overlap areas (overlap ratio > 0.3), and well-matched illumination conditions. Using the NASA Ames Stereo Pipeline, digital elevation models (DEMs) were constructed from the image pairs that contained MLA flyby data points. We then ran an alignment program on these DEMs to match included MLA altimetry bounce points as closely as possible to the DEM surfaces. The resulting estimated track displacements were aggregated, and the general trends of these displacements can be used to perform a full-flyby orbit adjustment. Such an adjustment would enable more reliable determination of Mercury's surface elevation and MESSENGER's trajectory during the 2008 flybys. Accurate elevation measurements from these flybys are especially important because they passed over the southern hemisphere, where MLA coverage from the orbital mission is sparse. Calibration of these MLA data will improve our knowledge of Mercury's orientation

  13. Bathymetric survey and digital elevation model of Little Holland Tract, Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Snyder, Alexander G.; Lacy, Jessica R.; Stevens, Andrew W.; Carlson, Emily M.

    2016-06-10

    The U.S. Geological Survey conducted a bathymetric survey in Little Holland Tract, a flooded agricultural tract, in the northern Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta (the “Delta”) during the summer of 2015. The new bathymetric data were combined with existing data to generate a digital elevation model (DEM) at 1-meter resolution. Little Holland Tract (LHT) was historically diked off for agricultural uses and has been tidally inundated since an accidental levee breach in 1983. Shallow tidal regions such as LHT have the potential to improve habitat quality in the Delta. The DEM of LHT was developed to support ongoing studies of habitat quality in the area and to provide a baseline for evaluating future geomorphic change. The new data comprise 138,407 linear meters of real-time-kinematic (RTK) Global Positioning System (GPS) elevation data, including both bathymetric data collected from personal watercraft and topographic elevations collected on foot at low tide. A benchmark (LHT15_b1) was established for geodetic control of the survey. Data quality was evaluated both by comparing results among surveying platforms, which showed systematic offsets of 1.6 centimeters (cm) or less, and by error propagation, which yielded a mean vertical uncertainty of 6.7 cm. Based on the DEM and time-series measurements of water depth, the mean tidal prism of LHT was determined to be 2,826,000 cubic meters. The bathymetric data and DEM are available at http://dx.doi.org/10.5066/F7RX9954. 

  14. Bathymetric survey and digital elevation model of Little Holland Tract, Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Snyder, Alexander G.; Lacy, Jessica R.; Stevens, Andrew W.; Carlson, Emily M.

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey conducted a bathymetric survey in Little Holland Tract, a flooded agricultural tract, in the northern Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta (the “Delta”) during the summer of 2015. The new bathymetric data were combined with existing data to generate a digital elevation model (DEM) at 1-meter resolution. Little Holland Tract (LHT) was historically diked off for agricultural uses and has been tidally inundated since an accidental levee breach in 1983. Shallow tidal regions such as LHT have the potential to improve habitat quality in the Delta. The DEM of LHT was developed to support ongoing studies of habitat quality in the area and to provide a baseline for evaluating future geomorphic change. The new data comprise 138,407 linear meters of real-time-kinematic (RTK) Global Positioning System (GPS) elevation data, including both bathymetric data collected from personal watercraft and topographic elevations collected on foot at low tide. A benchmark (LHT15_b1) was established for geodetic control of the survey. Data quality was evaluated both by comparing results among surveying platforms, which showed systematic offsets of 1.6 centimeters (cm) or less, and by error propagation, which yielded a mean vertical uncertainty of 6.7 cm. Based on the DEM and time-series measurements of water depth, the mean tidal prism of LHT was determined to be 2,826,000 cubic meters. The bathymetric data and DEM are available at http://dx.doi.org/10.5066/F7RX9954. 

  15. A stochastic, evolutionary model for range shifts and richness on tropical elevational gradients under Quaternary glacial cycles

    PubMed Central

    Colwell, Robert K.; Rangel, Thiago F.

    2010-01-01

    Quaternary glacial–interglacial cycles repeatedly forced thermal zones up and down the slopes of mountains, at all latitudes. Although no one doubts that these temperature cycles have left their signature on contemporary patterns of geography and phylogeny, the relative roles of ecology and evolution are not well understood, especially for the tropics. To explore key mechanisms and their interactions in the context of chance events, we constructed a geographical range-based, stochastic simulation model that incorporates speciation, anagenetic evolution, niche conservatism, range shifts and extinctions under late Quaternary temperature cycles along tropical elevational gradients. In the model, elevational patterns of species richness arise from the differential survival of founder lineages, consolidated by speciation and the inheritance of thermal niche characteristics. The model yields a surprisingly rich variety of realistic patterns of phylogeny and biogeography, including close matches to a variety of contemporary elevational richness profiles from an elevational transect in Costa Rica. Mountaintop extinctions during interglacials and lowland extinctions at glacial maxima favour mid-elevation lineages, especially under the constraints of niche conservatism. Asymmetry in temperature (greater duration of glacial than of interglacial episodes) and in lateral area (greater land area at low than at high elevations) have opposing effects on lowland extinctions and the elevational pattern of species richness in the model—and perhaps in nature, as well. PMID:20980317

  16. The conservation value of elevation data accuracy and model sophistication in reserve design under sea-level rise.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Mingjian; Hoctor, Tom; Volk, Mike; Frank, Kathryn; Linhoss, Anna

    2015-10-01

    Many studies have explored the value of using more sophisticated coastal impact models and higher resolution elevation data in sea-level rise (SLR) adaptation planning. However, we know little about to what extent the improved models and data could actually lead to better conservation outcomes under SLR. This is important to know because high-resolution data are likely to not be available in some data-poor coastal areas in the world and running more complicated coastal impact models is relatively time-consuming, expensive, and requires assistance by qualified experts and technicians. We address this research question in the context of identifying conservation priorities in response to SLR. Specifically, we investigated the conservation value of using more accurate light detection and ranging (Lidar)-based digital elevation data and process-based coastal land-cover change models (Sea Level Affecting Marshes Model, SLAMM) to identify conservation priorities versus simple "bathtub" models based on the relatively coarse National Elevation Dataset (NED) in a coastal region of northeast Florida. We compared conservation outcomes identified by reserve design software (Zonation) using three different model dataset combinations (Bathtub-NED, Bathtub-Lidar, and SLAMM-Lidar). The comparisons show that the conservation priorities are significantly different with different combinations of coastal impact models and elevation dataset inputs. The research suggests that it is valuable to invest in more accurate coastal impact models and elevation datasets in SLR adaptive conservation planning because this model-dataset combination could improve conservation outcomes under SLR. Less accurate coastal impact models, including ones created using coarser Digital Elevation Model (DEM) data can still be useful when better data and models are not available or feasible, but results need to be appropriately assessed and communicated. A future research priority is to investigate how

  17. Assessing the quality of digital elevation models obtained from mini unmanned aerial vehicles for overland flow modelling in urban areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitão, João P.; Moy de Vitry, Matthew; Scheidegger, Andreas; Rieckermann, Jörg

    2016-04-01

    Precise and detailed digital elevation models (DEMs) are essential to accurately predict overland flow in urban areas. Unfortunately, traditional sources of DEM, such as airplane light detection and ranging (lidar) DEMs and point and contour maps, remain a bottleneck for detailed and reliable overland flow models, because the resulting DEMs are too coarse to provide DEMs of sufficient detail to inform urban overland flows. Interestingly, technological developments of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) suggest that they have matured enough to be a competitive alternative to satellites or airplanes. However, this has not been tested so far. In this study we therefore evaluated whether DEMs generated from UAV imagery are suitable for urban drainage overland flow modelling. Specifically, 14 UAV flights were conducted to assess the influence of four different flight parameters on the quality of generated DEMs: (i) flight altitude, (ii) image overlapping, (iii) camera pitch, and (iv) weather conditions. In addition, we compared the best-quality UAV DEM to a conventional lidar-based DEM. To evaluate both the quality of the UAV DEMs and the comparison to lidar-based DEMs, we performed regression analysis on several qualitative and quantitative metrics, such as elevation accuracy, quality of object representation (e.g. buildings, walls and trees) in the DEM, which were specifically tailored to assess overland flow modelling performance, using the flight parameters as explanatory variables. Our results suggested that, first, as expected, flight altitude influenced the DEM quality most, where lower flights produce better DEMs; in a similar fashion, overcast weather conditions are preferable, but weather conditions and other factors influence DEM quality much less. Second, we found that for urban overland flow modelling, the UAV DEMs performed competitively in comparison to a traditional lidar-based DEM. An important advantage of using UAVs to generate DEMs in urban areas is

  18. Elevated free cholesterol in a p62 overexpression model of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Yvette; Kessler, Sonja M; Gemperlein, Katja; Bohle, Rainer M; Müller, Rolf; Haybaeck, Johannes; Kiemer, Alexandra K

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To characterize how insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) mRNA binding protein p62/IMP2-2 promotes steatohepatitis in the absence of dietary cholesterol. METHODS: Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) was induced in wild-type mice and in mice overexpressing p62 specifically in the liver by feeding the mice a methionine and choline deficient (MCD) diet for either two or four weeks. As a control, animals were fed a methionine and choline supplemented diet. Serum triglycerides, cholesterol, glucose, aspartate aminotransferase and alanine transaminase were determined by standard analytical techniques. Hepatic gene expression was determined by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Generation of reactive oxygen species in liver tissue was quantified as thiobarbituric acid reactive substances using a photometric assay and malondialdehyde as a standard. Tissue fatty acid profiles and cholesterol levels were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry after hydrolysis. Hepatocellular iron accumulation was determined by Prussian blue staining in paraffin-embedded formalin-fixed tissue. Filipin staining on frozen liver tissue was used to quantify hepatic free cholesterol levels. Additionally, nuclear localization of the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) subunit p65 was examined in frozen tissues. RESULTS: Liver-specific overexpression of the insulin-like growth factor 2 mRNA binding protein 2-2 (IGF2BP2-2/IMP2-2/p62) induces steatosis with regular chow and amplifies NASH-induced fibrosis in the MCD mouse model. Activation of NF-κB and expression of NF-κB target genes suggested an increased inflammatory response in p62 transgenic animals. Analysis of hepatic lipid composition revealed an elevation of monounsaturated fatty acids as well as increased hepatic cholesterol. Moreover, serum cholesterol was significantly elevated in p62 transgenic mice. Dietary cholesterol represents a critical factor for the development of NASH from hepatic steatosis

  19. ASTER-Derived 30-Meter-Resolution Digital Elevation Models of Afghanistan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chirico, Peter G.; Warner, Michael B.

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) is an imaging instrument aboard the Terra satellite, launched on December 19, 1999, as part of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Earth Observing System (EOS). The ASTER sensor consists of three subsystems: the visible and near infrared (VNIR), the shortwave infrared (SWIR), and the thermal infrared (TIR), each with a different spatial resolution (VNIR, 15 meters; SWIR, 30 meters, TIR 90 meters). The VNIR system has the capability to generate along-track stereo images that can be used to create digital elevation models (DEMs) at 30-meter resolution. Currently, the only available DEM dataset for Afghanistan is the 90-meter-resolution Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) data. This dataset is appropriate for macroscale DEM analysis and mapping. However, ASTER provides a low cost opportunity to generate higher resolution data. For this publication, study areas were identified around populated areas and areas where higher resolution elevation data were desired to assist in natural resource assessments. The higher resolution fidelity of these DEMs can also be used for other terrain analysis including landform classification and geologic structure analysis. For this publication, ASTER scenes were processed and mosaicked to generate 36 DEMs which were created and extracted using PCI Geomatics' OrthoEngine 3D Stereo software. The ASTER images were geographically registered to Landsat data with at least 15 accurate and well distributed ground control points with a root mean square error (RMSE) of less that one pixel (15 meters). An elevation value was then assigned to each ground control point by extracting the elevation from the 90-meter SRTM data. The 36 derived DEMs demonstrate that the software correlated on nearly flat surfaces and smooth slopes accurately. Larger errors occur in cloudy and snow-covered areas, lakes, areas with steep slopes, and

  20. Construction of a 3-arcsecond digital elevation model for the Gulf of Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Twomey, Erin R.; Signell, Richard P.

    2013-01-01

    A system-wide description of the seafloor topography is a basic requirement for most coastal oceanographic studies. The necessary detail of the topography obviously varies with application, but for many uses, a nominal resolution of roughly 100 m is sufficient. Creating a digital bathymetric grid with this level of resolution can be a complex procedure due to a multiplicity of data sources, data coverages, datums and interpolation procedures. This report documents the procedures used to construct a 3-arcsecond (approximately 90-meter grid cell size) digital elevation model for the Gulf of Maine (71°30' to 63° W, 39°30' to 46° N). We obtained elevation and bathymetric data from a variety of American and Canadian sources, converted all data to the North American Datum of 1983 for horizontal coordinates and the North American Vertical Datum of 1988 for vertical coordinates, used a combination of automatic and manual techniques for quality control, and interpolated gaps using a surface-fitting routine.

  1. TecDEM: A MATLAB Based Toolbox for understanding Tectonics from Digital Elevation Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahzad, F.; Mahmood, S. A.; Gloaguen, R.

    2009-04-01

    TecDEM is a MATLAB based tool box for understanding the tectonics from digital elevation models (DEMs) of any area. These DEMs can be derived from data of any spatial resolution (Low, medium and High). In the first step we extract drainage network from the DEMs using flow grid approach. Drainage network is a group of streams having elevation and catchment area information as a function of spatial locations. We implement an array of stream structure to study this drainage network. Knickpoints can be identified on each stream of the drainage network by a graphical user interface and are helpful for understanding stream morphology. Stream profile analysis in steady state condition is applied on all streams to calculate geomorphic parameters and regional uplift rates. Hack index is calculated for all the profiles at a certain interval and over the change of knickpoints. Reports menu of this tool box generates detailed statistics report, complete tabulated report, graphical output of each analyzed stream profile and Hack index profile. All the calculated values are part of stream structure and is saved as .mat file for later use with this tool box. The spatial distribution of geomorphic parameters, uplift rates and knickpoints are exported as a shape files for visualization in professional GIS software. We test this tool box on DEMs from different tectonic settings worldwide and received verifiable results with other studies.

  2. Astrocyte elevated gene-1 (AEG-1) promotes hepatocarcinogenesis: novel insights from a mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Jyoti; Siddiq, Ayesha; Emdad, Luni; Santhekadur, Prasanna Kumar; Chen, Dong; Gredler, Rachel; Shen, Xue-Ning; Robertson, Chadia L.; Dumur, Catherine I.; Hylemon, Phillip B.; Mukhopadhyay, Nitai D.; Bhere, Deepak; Shah, Khalid; Ahmad, Rushdy; Giashuddin, Shah; Stafflinger, Jillian; Subler, Mark A.; Windle, Jolene J.; Fisher, Paul B.; Sarkar, Devanand

    2012-01-01

    Astrocyte elevated gene-1 (AEG-1) is a key contributor to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) development and progression. To enhance our understanding of the role of AEG-1 in hepatocarcinogenesis, a transgenic mouse with hepatocyte-specific expression of AEG-1 (Alb/AEG1) was developed. Treating Alb/AEG-1, but not Wild type (WT) mice, with N-nitrosodiethylamine (DEN), resulted in multinodular HCC with steatotic features and associated modulation of expression of genes regulating invasion, metastasis, angiogenesis and fatty acid synthesis. Hepatocytes isolated from Alb/AEG-1 mice displayed profound resistance to chemotherapeutics and growth factor deprivation with activation of pro-survival signaling pathways. Alb/AEG-1 hepatocytes also exhibited marked resistance towards senescence, which correlated with abrogation of activation of a DNA damage response. Conditioned media (CM) from Alb/AEG-1 hepatocytes induced marked angiogenesis with elevation in several coagulation factors. Among these factors, AEG-1 facilitated association of Factor XII (FXII) mRNA with polysomes resulting in increased translation. siRNA-mediated knockdown of FXII resulted in profound inhibition of AEG-1-induced angiogenesis. Conclusion We uncover novel aspects of AEG-1 functions, including induction of steatosis, inhibition of senescence and activation of coagulation pathway to augment aggressive hepatocarcinogenesis. The Alb/AEG-1 mouse provides an appropriate model to scrutinize the molecular mechanism of hepatocarcinogenesis and to evaluate the efficacy of novel therapeutic strategies targeting HCC. PMID:22689379

  3. Using noble gas tracers to constrain a groundwater flow model with recharge elevations: A novel approach for mountainous terrain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doyle, Jessica M.; Gleeson, Tom; Manning, Andrew H.; Mayer, K. Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Environmental tracers provide information on groundwater age, recharge conditions, and flow processes which can be helpful for evaluating groundwater sustainability and vulnerability. Dissolved noble gas data have proven particularly useful in mountainous terrain because they can be used to determine recharge elevation. However, tracer-derived recharge elevations have not been utilized as calibration targets for numerical groundwater flow models. Herein, we constrain and calibrate a regional groundwater flow model with noble-gas-derived recharge elevations for the first time. Tritium and noble gas tracer results improved the site conceptual model by identifying a previously uncertain contribution of mountain block recharge from the Coast Mountains to an alluvial coastal aquifer in humid southwestern British Columbia. The revised conceptual model was integrated into a three-dimensional numerical groundwater flow model and calibrated to hydraulic head data in addition to recharge elevations estimated from noble gas recharge temperatures. Recharge elevations proved to be imperative for constraining hydraulic conductivity, recharge location, and bedrock geometry, and thus minimizing model nonuniqueness. Results indicate that 45% of recharge to the aquifer is mountain block recharge. A similar match between measured and modeled heads was achieved in a second numerical model that excludes the mountain block (no mountain block recharge), demonstrating that hydraulic head data alone are incapable of quantifying mountain block recharge. This result has significant implications for understanding and managing source water protection in recharge areas, potential effects of climate change, the overall water budget, and ultimately ensuring groundwater sustainability.

  4. ArcticDEM; A Publically Available, High Resolution Elevation Model of the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morin, Paul; Porter, Claire; Cloutier, Michael; Howat, Ian; Noh, Myoung-Jong; Willis, Michael; Bates, Brian; Willamson, Cathleen; Peterman, Kennith

    2016-04-01

    A Digital Elevation Model (DEM) of the Arctic is needed for a large number of reasons, including: measuring and understanding rapid, ongoing changes to the Arctic landscape resulting from climate change and human use and mitigation and adaptation planning for Arctic communities. The topography of the Arctic is more poorly mapped than most other regions of Earth due to logistical costs and the limits of satellite missions with low-latitude inclinations. A convergence of civilian, high-quality sub-meter stereo imagery; petascale computing and open source photogrammetry software has made it possible to produce a complete, very high resolution (2 to 8-meter posting), elevation model of the Arctic. A partnership between the US National Geospatial-intelligence Agency and a team led by the US National Science Foundation funded Polar Geospatial Center is using stereo imagery from DigitalGlobe's Worldview-1, 2 and 3 satellites and the Ohio State University's Surface Extraction with TIN-based Search-space Minimization (SETSM) software running on the University of Illinois's Blue Water supercomputer to address this challenge. The final product will be a seemless, 2-m posting digital surface model mosaic of the entire Arctic above 60 North including all of Alaska, Greenland and Kamchatka. We will also make available the more than 300,000 individual time-stamped DSM strip pairs that were used to assemble the mosaic. The Arctic DEM will have a vertical precision of better than 0.5m and can be used to examine changes in land surfaces such as those caused by permafrost degradation or the evolution of arctic rivers and floodplains. The data set can also be used to highlight changing geomorphology due to Earth surface mass transport processes occurring in active volcanic and glacial environments. When complete the ArcticDEM will catapult the Arctic from the worst to among the best mapped regions on Earth.

  5. A Digital Elevation Model for Seaside, Oregon: Procedures, Data Sources, and Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venturato, A. J.

    2004-12-01

    As part of a pilot study to modernize Flood Insurance Rate Maps for the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), a digital elevation model (DEM) was developed for the purpose of modeling tsunami inundation for Seaside, Oregon. The DEM consists of elevation data values with a horizontal grid spacing of 1/3 arc seconds, or approximately 10 meters. The DEM was generated from several topographic and bathymetric data sources, requiring significant processing challenges. These challenges included conversion to a single specified projection, units, horizontal datum, and vertical datum; analysis and removal of errant data from hydrographic, topographic, and LIDAR surveys; and a point-by-point analysis of overlapping data sources. Data were collected from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration National Ocean Service and National Geophysical Data Center, the U.S. Geological Survey, the Oregon Geospatial Data Center, the University of Oregon, and the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries. Data were converted into formats compatible with ESRI ArcGIS 3.3 software. ArcGIS was used for spatial analysis, error correction, and surface grid development using triangular irregular networking. Post-processing involved a consistency analysis and comparison with original data and control data sources. The final DEM was compared with a previous DEM developed for tsunami inundation modeling in 1997. Significant shoreline differences were found between the DEMs, resulting in an analysis of the shoreline changes around the mouth of the Necanicum River. The shoreline analysis includes a spatial analysis of digital orthophotos over the recent past and a review of historical accretion and erosion rates along the Columbia River littoral cell.

  6. Prediction of Wind Speeds Based on Digital Elevation Models Using Boosted Regression Trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, P.; Etienne, C.; Tian, J.; Krauß, T.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper a new approach is presented to predict maximum wind speeds using Gradient Boosted Regression Trees (GBRT). GBRT are a non-parametric regression technique used in various applications, suitable to make predictions without having an in-depth a-priori knowledge about the functional dependancies between the predictors and the response variables. Our aim is to predict maximum wind speeds based on predictors, which are derived from a digital elevation model (DEM). The predictors describe the orography of the Area-of-Interest (AoI) by various means like first and second order derivatives of the DEM, but also higher sophisticated classifications describing exposure and shelterness of the terrain to wind flux. In order to take the different scales into account which probably influence the streams and turbulences of wind flow over complex terrain, the predictors are computed on different spatial resolutions ranging from 30 m up to 2000 m. The geographic area used for examination of the approach is Switzerland, a mountainious region in the heart of europe, dominated by the alps, but also covering large valleys. The full workflow is described in this paper, which consists of data preparation using image processing techniques, model training using a state-of-the-art machine learning algorithm, in-depth analysis of the trained model, validation of the model and application of the model to generate a wind speed map.

  7. Elevated Intracranial Pressure and Cerebral Edema following Permanent MCA Occlusion in an Ovine Model

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Adam J.; Vink, Robert; Helps, Stephen C.; Knox, Steven J.; Blumbergs, Peter C.; Turner, Renée J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Malignant middle cerebral artery (MCA) stroke has a disproportionately high mortality due to the rapid development of refractory space-occupying cerebral edema. Animal models are essential in developing successful anti-edema therapies; however to date poor clinical translation has been associated with the predominately used rodent models. As such, large animal gyrencephalic models of stroke are urgently needed. The aim of the study was to characterize the intracranial pressure (ICP) response to MCA occlusion in our recently developed ovine stroke model. Materials and Methods 30 adult female Merino sheep (n = 8–12/gp) were randomized to sham surgery, temporary or permanent proximal MCA occlusion. ICP and brain tissue oxygen were monitored for 24 hours under general anesthesia. MRI, infarct volume with triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) staining and histology were performed. Results No increase in ICP, radiological evidence of ischemia within the MCA territory but without space-occupying edema, and TTC infarct volumes of 7.9+/-5.1% were seen with temporary MCAO. Permanent MCAO resulted in significantly elevated ICP, accompanied by 30% mortality, radiological evidence of space-occupying cerebral edema and TTC infarct volumes of 27.4+/-6.4%. Conclusions Permanent proximal MCAO in the sheep results in space-occupying cerebral edema, raised ICP and mortality similar to human malignant MCA stroke. This animal model may prove useful for pre-clinical testing of anti-edema therapies that have shown promise in rodent studies. PMID:26121036

  8. Robust Mosaicking of Stereo Digital Elevation Models from the Ames Stereo Pipeline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Tae Min; Moratto, Zachary M.; Nefian, Ara Victor

    2010-01-01

    Robust estimation method is proposed to combine multiple observations and create consistent, accurate, dense Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) from lunar orbital imagery. The NASA Ames Intelligent Robotics Group (IRG) aims to produce higher-quality terrain reconstructions of the Moon from Apollo Metric Camera (AMC) data than is currently possible. In particular, IRG makes use of a stereo vision process, the Ames Stereo Pipeline (ASP), to automatically generate DEMs from consecutive AMC image pairs. However, the DEMs currently produced by the ASP often contain errors and inconsistencies due to image noise, shadows, etc. The proposed method addresses this problem by making use of multiple observations and by considering their goodness of fit to improve both the accuracy and robustness of the estimate. The stepwise regression method is applied to estimate the relaxed weight of each observation.

  9. Bathymetry and digital elevation models of Coyote Creek and Alviso Slough, South San Francisco Bay, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foxgrover, Amy C.; Finlayson, David P.; Jaffe, Bruce E.; Fregoso, Theresa A.

    2011-01-01

    The bathymetry surveys were conducted using the state-of-the-art research vessel R/V Parke Snavely outfitted with an interferometric sidescan sonar for swath mapping in extremely shallow water. We provide high-resolution bathymetric data collected by the USGS. For the 2010 baseline survey we have merged the bathymetry with aerial lidar data that were collected for the USGS during the same time period to create a seamless, high-resolution digital elevation model (DEM) of the study area. The series of bathymetry datasets are provided at 1 m resolution and the 2010 bathymetric/topographic DEM at 2 m resolution. The data are formatted as both X, Y, Z text files and ESRI Arc ASCII files that are accompanied by FGDC compliant metadata.

  10. Vegetation Cover Mapping Based on Remote Sensing and Digital Elevation Model Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korets, M. A.; Ryzhkova, V. A.; Danilova, I. V.; Prokushkin, A. S.

    2016-06-01

    An algorithm of forest cover mapping based on combined GIS-based analysis of multi-band satellite imagery, digital elevation model, and ground truth data was developed. Using the classification principles and an approach of Russian forest scientist Kolesnikov, maps of forest types and forest growing conditions (FGC) were build. The first map is based on RS-composite classification, while the second map is constructed on the basis of DEM-composite classification. The spatial combination of this two layers were also used for extrapolation and mapping of ecosystem carbon stock values (kgC/m2). The proposed approach was applied for the test site area (~3600 km2), located in the Northern Siberia boreal forests of Evenkia near Tura settlement.

  11. Modeling the response of plants and ecosystems to elevated CO{sub 2} and climate change

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, J.F.; Hilbert, D.W.; Chen, Jia-lin; Harley, P.C.; Kemp, P.R.; Leadley, P.W.

    1992-03-01

    While the exact effects of elevated CO{sub 2} on global climate are unknown, there is a growing consensus among climate modelers that global temperature and precipitation will increase, but that these changes will be non-uniform over the Earth`s surface. In addition to these potential climatic changes, CO{sub 2} also directly affects plants via photosynthesis, respiration, and stomatal closure. Global climate change, in concert with these direct effects of CO{sub 2} on plants, could have a significant impact on both natural and agricultural ecosystems. Society`s ability to prepare for, and respond to, such changes depends largely on the ability of climate and ecosystem researchers to provide predictions of regional level ecosystem responses with sufficient confidence and adequate lead time.

  12. Modeling the response of plants and ecosystems to elevated CO sub 2 and climate change

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, J.F.; Hilbert, D.W.; Chen, Jia-lin; Harley, P.C.; Kemp, P.R.; Leadley, P.W.

    1992-03-01

    While the exact effects of elevated CO{sub 2} on global climate are unknown, there is a growing consensus among climate modelers that global temperature and precipitation will increase, but that these changes will be non-uniform over the Earth's surface. In addition to these potential climatic changes, CO{sub 2} also directly affects plants via photosynthesis, respiration, and stomatal closure. Global climate change, in concert with these direct effects of CO{sub 2} on plants, could have a significant impact on both natural and agricultural ecosystems. Society's ability to prepare for, and respond to, such changes depends largely on the ability of climate and ecosystem researchers to provide predictions of regional level ecosystem responses with sufficient confidence and adequate lead time.

  13. Digital Elevation Model, 0.25 m, Barrow Environmental Observatory, Alaska, 2013

    DOE Data Explorer

    Cathy Wilson; Garrett Altmann

    2015-11-20

    This 0.25m horizontal resolution digital elevation model, DEM, was developed from Airborne Laser Altimetry flown by Aerometric Inc, now known as Quantum Spatial, Inc. on 12 July, 2013. One Mission was flown and the data jointly processed with LANL personnel to produce a 0.25m DEM covering a region approximately 2.8km wide and 12.4km long extending from the coast above North Salt Lagoon to south of Gas Well Road. This DEM encompasses a diverse range of hydrologic, geomorphic, geophysical and biological features typical of the Barrow Peninsula. Vertical accuracy at the 95% confidence interval was computed as 0.143m. The coordinate system, datum, and geoid for this DEM are UTM Zone 4N, NAD83 (2011), NAVD88 (GEOID09).

  14. Global detection of large lunar craters based on the CE-1 digital elevation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Lei; Mu, Lingli; Wang, Xinyuan; Li, Chao; Ji, Wei; Zhao, Jinjin; Cai, Heng

    2013-12-01

    Craters, one of the most significant features of the lunar surface, have been widely researched because they offer us the relative age of the surface unit as well as crucial geological information. Research on crater detection algorithms (CDAs) of the Moon and other planetary bodies has concentrated on detecting them from imagery data, but the computational cost of detecting large craters using images makes these CDAs impractical. This paper presents a new approach to crater detection that utilizes a digital elevation model instead of images; this enables fully automatic global detection of large craters. Craters were delineated by terrain attributes, and then thresholding maps of terrain attributes were used to transform topographic data into a binary image, finally craters were detected by using the Hough Transform from the binary image. By using the proposed algorithm, we produced a catalog of all craters ⩾10 km in diameter on the lunar surface and analyzed their distribution and population characteristics.

  15. Drainage networks and watersheds delineation derived from TIN-based digital elevation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, Henrique Rennó de Azeredo; Freitas, Corina da Costa; Rosim, Sergio; Oliveira, João Ricardo de Freitas

    2016-07-01

    Triangulated Irregular Networks (TIN) efficiently define terrain models from which drainage networks and watersheds can be extracted with important applications in hydrology. In this work, the TIN model is represented by a constrained Delaunay triangulation obtained from contour lines and sampled points. Paths of steepest descent calculated from the TIN are connected by processing the triangles according to an associated priority, then forming a drainage graph structure proposed to generate drainage networks from accumulated flows. Major problems such as flat areas and pits that create inconsistencies in the terrain model and discontinuities in flows are removed with procedures that interpolate the elevation values of particular points on the TIN. Drainage networks are defined by arbitrary threshold values, and their associated watersheds and subwatersheds are then delineated. TIN results are qualitatively and quantitatively compared to an available reference drainage network, and also to regular grid results generated with the TerraHidro system. The drainage networks automatically obtained from the drainage graph highly agree to the main courses of water on the terrain, indicating that the TIN is an attractive alternative terrain model for hydrological purposes, and that the proposed drainage graph can be used for the automatic extraction of drainage networks that are consistent with real-world hydrological patterns.

  16. Modeling shoot water contents in high-elevation Picea rubens during winter.

    PubMed

    Boyce, R L; Friedland, A J; Macdonald, V N

    1992-12-01

    During the winter of 1990-1991, a meteorological tower was established at an 880-m elevation site within the spruce-fir zone on Mt. Moosilauke, New Hampshire, USA. Hourly means of air, needle and trunk temperatures, wind velocity, relative humidity and solar radiation were recorded. On a weekly basis, shoots that had elongated during the preceding growing season were collected from four red spruce (Picea rubens Sarg.) trees and their relative water contents (RWC) determined. Cuticular resistances of needles from these shoots were measured four times during the winter.Measured meteorological parameters were used in a previously developed model to simulate changes in red spruce shoot RWC during the winter. The modeled results were compared to measured shoot RWCs. The predictive power of the model was improved when it was modified to include measured values of cuticular resistance and needle and trunk temperatures. The new version of the model accurately predicted RWC from late December 1990 to the beginning of April 1991, after which spring recharge appeared to occur. We conclude that water lost from foliage was easily replaced by stored reserves and that uptake of water by the roots was not required to maintain an adequate foliar water content during the winter.

  17. Grid digital elevation model based algorithms for determination of hillslope width functions through flow distance transforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jintao; Chen, Xi; Zhang, Xingnan; Hoagland, Kyle D.

    2012-04-01

    Recently developed hillslope storage dynamics theory can represent the essential physical behavior of a natural system by accounting explicitly for the plan shape of a hillslope in an elegant and simple way. As a result, this theory is promising for improving catchment-scale hydrologic modeling. In this study, grid digital elevation model (DEM) based algorithms for determination of hillslope geometric characteristics (e.g., hillslope units and width functions in hillslope storage dynamics models) are presented. This study further develops a method for hillslope partitioning, established by Fan and Bras (1998), by applying it on a grid network. On the basis of hillslope unit derivation, a flow distance transforms method (TD∞) is suggested in order to decrease the systematic error of grid DEM-based flow distance calculation caused by flow direction approximation to streamlines. Hillslope width transfer functions are then derived to convert the probability density functions of flow distance into hillslope width functions. These algorithms are applied and evaluated on five abstract hillslopes, and detailed tests and analyses are carried out by comparing the derivation results with theoretical width functions. The results demonstrate that the TD∞ improves estimations of the flow distance and thus hillslope width function. As the proposed procedures are further applied in a natural catchment, we find that the natural hillslope width function can be well fitted by the Gaussian function. This finding is very important for applying the newly developed hillslope storage dynamics models in a real catchment.

  18. Preliminary development of digital elevation and relief models for ICESat-2 onboard processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leigh, H. W.; Magruder, L. A.; Carabajal, C. C.

    2012-12-01

    ATLAS (Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System) is a photon-counting laser ranging instrument that will fly onboard NASA's ICESat-2 mission to collect global altimetry data for the primary purpose of determining volumetric changes in the Polar Regions. While photon-counting systems provide the advantage of using small, low power lasers, they are typically much more susceptible to noise and require the use of sophisticated algorithms both onboard and in ground based processing to ensure capture of valid data and production of accurate data products. An onboard receiver algorithm is being developed for ATLAS to ensure that valid data is returned while adhering to the 577 Gb/day limit on data telemetry. The onboard receiver algorithm makes use of multiple onboard databases, two of which are the DEM (Digital Elevation Model) and the DRM (Digital Relief Map). The DEM provides start and stop times for software-induced range gating on the ATLAS detectors, and is a nested, three-tiered grid to account for a 6 km overall constraint on the allowable limit for ranging acquisition. The DRM contains the maximum values of relief seen across 140m- and 700m-long flight path segments, which are used in statistically determining the presence of a valid surface return and in deciding which bands to telemeter. Both onboard databases are to be primarily constructed from existing digital elevation models and must provide global coverage referenced to latitude and longitude. Production of the grids is complicated by the lack of global data products of sufficient resolution and accuracy such that preliminary analysis is required for DEM selection and usage in addition to the determination of how to intelligently merge differing data sets. This initial investigation is also focused on determining the impact of the selected DEM quality on the ICESat-2 onboard algorithms as well as the precipitated error induced on the DRM. These results are required in order to determine the expected

  19. Accuracy assessment of photogrammetric digital elevation models generated for the Schultz Fire burn area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muise, Danna K.

    This paper evaluates the accuracy of two digital photogrammetric software programs (ERDAS Imagine LPS and PCI Geomatica OrthoEngine) with respect to high-resolution terrain modeling in a complex topographic setting affected by fire and flooding. The site investigated is the 2010 Schultz Fire burn area, situated on the eastern edge of the San Francisco Peaks approximately 10 km northeast of Flagstaff, Arizona. Here, the fire coupled with monsoon rains typical of northern Arizona drastically altered the terrain of the steep mountainous slopes and residential areas below the burn area. To quantify these changes, high resolution (1 m and 3 m) digital elevation models (DEMs) were generated of the burn area using color stereoscopic aerial photographs taken at a scale of approximately 1:12000. Using a combination of pre-marked and post-marked ground control points (GCPs), I first used ERDAS Imagine LPS to generate a 3 m DEM covering 8365 ha of the affected area. This data was then compared to a reference DEM (USGS 10 m) to evaluate the accuracy of the resultant DEM. Findings were then divided into blunders (errors) and bias (slight differences) and further analyzed to determine if different factors (elevation, slope, aspect and burn severity) affected the accuracy of the DEM. Results indicated that both blunders and bias increased with an increase in slope, elevation and burn severity. It was also found that southern facing slopes contained the highest amount of bias while northern facing slopes contained the highest proportion of blunders. Further investigations compared a 1 m DEM generated using ERDAS Imagine LPS with a 1 m DEM generated using PCI Geomatica OrthoEngine for a specific region of the burn area. This area was limited to the overlap of two images due to OrthoEngine requiring at least three GCPs to be located in the overlap of the imagery. Results indicated that although LPS produced a less accurate DEM, it was much more flexible than OrthoEngine. It was also

  20. Scoria cones on Mars: Detailed investigation of morphometry based on high-resolution digital elevation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brož, Petr; Čadek, Ondřej; Hauber, Ernst; Rossi, Angelo Pio

    2015-09-01

    We analyze the shapes of 28 hypothesized scoria cones in three regions on Mars, i.e., Ulysses and Hydraotes Colles and Coprates Chasma. Using available High-Resolution Imaging Science Experiment and Context Camera (CTX) digital elevation models, we determine the basic morphometric characteristics of the cones and estimate from ballistic modeling the physical parameters of volcanic eruptions that could have formed them. When compared to terrestrial scoria cones, most of the studied cones show larger volumes (up to 4.2 × 109 m3), larger heights (up to 573 m), and smaller average slopes. The average slopes of the Ulysses, Hydraotes, and Coprates cones range between 7° and 25°, and the maximum slopes only rarely exceed 30°, which suggests only a minor role of scoria redistribution by avalanching. Ballistic analysis indicates that all cones were formed in a similar way, and their shapes are consistent with an ejection velocity about 2 times larger and a particle size about 20 times smaller than on Earth. Our results support the hypothesis that the investigated edifices were formed by low-energy Strombolian volcanic eruptions and hence are equivalent to terrestrial scoria cones. The cones in Hydraotes Colles and Coprates Chasma are on average smaller and steeper than the cones in Ulysses Colles, which is likely due to the difference in topographic elevation and the associated difference in atmospheric pressure. This study provides the expected morphometric characteristics of Martian scoria cones, which can be used to identify landforms consistent with this type of activity elsewhere on Mars and distinguish them from other conical edifices.

  1. Measuring Change in Arctic Coastal Environments Using Repeat Aerial Photography and SfM Elevation Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbs, A.; Nolan, M.; Kinsman, N.; Richmond, B. M.

    2015-12-01

    Aerial- and ground-based photography can provide valuable information about coastal environments in space and time including the presence or absence of shorefast ice, beach characteristics and morphology, high-water indicators produced during storm surge events, bluff failure mechanisms, and habitat identification. Recent advances in digital photogrammetry and construction of Digital Elevation Models (DEM) using Structure-from-Motion (SfM) algorithms allow for improved mapping and analysis of coastal change in 3-dimensions at a relatively low cost. For example, analyses can include delineating shorelines based on a tidal datum, mapping inundation extent based on a known or modeled flood level, or quantifying volumetric change. Repeat aerial surveys and associated orthophoto and DEM construction serve as a powerful monitoring tool that can provide insights into the mechanisms responsible for coastal change. Along the extensive and remote coast of Alaska, high-quality imagery and elevation data are rare, in part because traditional methods of acquiring the data are cost prohibitive. Here we evaluate the usefulness of data sets acquired using small aircraft and SfM techniques for evaluating seasonal change to the beach and permafrost bluffs at Barter Island, Alaska during the summer of 2014. Considerable bluff retreat and morphological change were measured along a 2.7 km stretch of coast with net mean volume loss of approximately 28,000 ± 540 m3 between the top and the base of the bluffs. The pattern of change was dominantly landward retreat of the top of the bluffs and removal of the debris fan at the base of the bluffs. Barrier-spit overwash and migration and deposition of storm berms were also observed and accurately measured. Our results suggest that this is a cost-effective method for mapping coastal change in remote environments leading to a similar data acquisition effort for the State of Alaska, primarily for shoreline and coastal hazard mapping purposes

  2. New Techniques and Metrics for Describing Rivers Using High Resolution Digital Elevation Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, P.; McKean, J. A.; Poulsen, F.; Ochoski, N.; Wheaton, J. M.

    2013-12-01

    Techniques for collecting high resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) of fluvial environments are cheaper and more widely accessible than ever before. These DEMs improve over traditional transect-based approaches because they represent the channel bed as a continuous surface. Advantages beyond the obvious more accurate representations of channel area and volume include the three dimensional representation of geomorphic features that directly influence the behavior of river organisms. It is possible to identify many of these habitats using topography alone, but when combined with the spatial arrangement of these areas within the channel, a more holistic view of biologic existence can be gleaned from the three dimensional representation of the channel. We present a new approach for measuring and describing channels that leverages the continuous nature of digital elevation model surfaces. Delivered via the River Bathymetry Toolkit (RBT) this approach is capable of not only reproducing the traditional transect-based metrics, but also includes novel techniques for generating stage independent channel measurements, regardless of the flow that occurred at the time of data capture. The RBT also possesses the capability of measuring changes over time, accounting for uncertainty using approaches adopted from the Geomorphic Change Detection (GCD) literature and producing maps and metrics for erosion and deposition. This new approach is available via the River Bathymetry Toolit that is structured to enable repeat systematic measurements over an unlimited number of sites. We present how this approach has been applied to over 500 sites in the Pacific Northwest as part of the Columbia Habitat Mapping Program (CHaMP). We demonstrate the new channel metrics for a range of these sites, both at the observed and simulated flows as well as examples of changes in channel morphology over time. We present an analysis comparing these new metrics against traditional transect based

  3. A comparison of U.S. geological survey seamless elevation models with shuttle radar topography mission data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gesch, D.; Williams, J.; Miller, W.

    2001-01-01

    Elevation models produced from Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) data will be the most comprehensive, consistently processed, highest resolution topographic dataset ever produced for the Earth's land surface. Many applications that currently use elevation data will benefit from the increased availability of data with higher accuracy, quality, and resolution, especially in poorly mapped areas of the globe. SRTM data will be produced as seamless data, thereby avoiding many of the problems inherent in existing multi-source topographic databases. Serving as precursors to SRTM datasets, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has produced and is distributing seamless elevation datasets that facilitate scientific use of elevation data over large areas. GTOPO30 is a global elevation model with a 30 arc-second resolution (approximately 1-kilometer). The National Elevation Dataset (NED) covers the United States at a resolution of 1 arc-second (approximately 30-meters). Due to their seamless format and broad area coverage, both GTOPO30 and NED represent an advance in the usability of elevation data, but each still includes artifacts from the highly variable source data used to produce them. The consistent source data and processing approach for SRTM data will result in elevation products that will be a significant addition to the current availability of seamless datasets, specifically for many areas outside the U.S. One application that demonstrates some advantages that may be realized with SRTM data is delineation of land surface drainage features (watersheds and stream channels). Seamless distribution of elevation data in which a user interactively specifies the area of interest and order parameters via a map server is already being successfully demonstrated with existing USGS datasets. Such an approach for distributing SRTM data is ideal for a dataset that undoubtedly will be of very high interest to the spatial data user community.

  4. Building a 2.5D Digital Elevation Model from 2D Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padgett, Curtis W.; Ansar, Adnan I.; Brennan, Shane; Cheng, Yang; Clouse, Daniel S.; Almeida, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    When projecting imagery into a georeferenced coordinate frame, one needs to have some model of the geographical region that is being projected to. This model can sometimes be a simple geometrical curve, such as an ellipse or even a plane. However, to obtain accurate projections, one needs to have a more sophisticated model that encodes the undulations in the terrain including things like mountains, valleys, and even manmade structures. The product that is often used for this purpose is a Digital Elevation Model (DEM). The technology presented here generates a high-quality DEM from a collection of 2D images taken from multiple viewpoints, plus pose data for each of the images and a camera model for the sensor. The technology assumes that the images are all of the same region of the environment. The pose data for each image is used as an initial estimate of the geometric relationship between the images, but the pose data is often noisy and not of sufficient quality to build a high-quality DEM. Therefore, the source imagery is passed through a feature-tracking algorithm and multi-plane-homography algorithm, which refine the geometric transforms between images. The images and their refined poses are then passed to a stereo algorithm, which generates dense 3D data for each image in the sequence. The 3D data from each image is then placed into a consistent coordinate frame and passed to a routine that divides the coordinate frame into a number of cells. The 3D points that fall into each cell are collected, and basic statistics are applied to determine the elevation of that cell. The result of this step is a DEM that is in an arbitrary coordinate frame. This DEM is then filtered and smoothed in order to remove small artifacts. The final step in the algorithm is to take the initial DEM and rotate and translate it to be in the world coordinate frame [such as UTM (Universal Transverse Mercator), MGRS (Military Grid Reference System), or geodetic] such that it can be saved in

  5. Trib3 Is Elevated in Parkinson's Disease and Mediates Death in Parkinson's Disease Models

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaotian; Zareen, Neela; Rao, Apeksha; Berman, Zachary; Volpicelli-Daley, Laura; Bernd, Paulette; Crary, John F.; Levy, Oren A.; Greene, Lloyd A.

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by the progressive loss of select neuronal populations, but the prodeath genes mediating the neurodegenerative processes remain to be fully elucidated. Trib3 (tribbles pseudokinase 3) is a stress-induced gene with proapoptotic activity that was previously described as highly activated at the transcriptional level in a 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) cellular model of PD. Here, we report that Trib3 immunostaining is elevated in dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) of human PD patients. Trib3 protein is also upregulated in cellular models of PD, including neuronal PC12 cells and rat dopaminergic ventral midbrain neurons treated with 6-OHDA, 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+), or α-synuclein fibrils (αSYN). In the toxin models, Trib3 induction is substantially mediated by the transcription factors CHOP and ATF4. Trib3 overexpression is sufficient to promote neuronal death; conversely, Trib3 knockdown protects neuronal PC12 cells as well as ventral midbrain dopaminergic neurons from 6-OHDA, MPP+, or αSYN. Mechanism studies revealed that Trib3 physically interacts with Parkin, a prosurvival protein whose loss of function is associated with PD. Elevated Trib3 reduces Parkin expression in cultured cells; and in the SNpc of PD patients, Parkin levels are reduced in a subset of dopaminergic neurons expressing high levels of Trib3. Loss of Parkin at least partially mediates the prodeath actions of Trib3 in that Parkin knockdown in cellular PD models abolishes the protective effect of Trib3 downregulation. Together, these findings identify Trib3 and its regulatory pathways as potential targets to suppress the progression of neuron death and degeneration in PD. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Parkinson's disease (PD) is the most common neurodegenerative movement disorder. Current treatments ameliorate symptoms, but not the underlying neuronal death. Understanding the core neurodegenerative processes in PD is a

  6. Some safe and sensible shortcuts for efficiently upscaled updates of existing elevation models.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knudsen, Thomas; Aasbjerg Nielsen, Allan

    2013-04-01

    The Danish national elevation model, DK-DEM, was introduced in 2009 and is based on LiDAR data collected in the time frame 2005-2007. Hence, DK-DEM is aging, and it is time to consider how to integrate new data with the current model in a way that improves the representation of new landscape features, while still preserving the overall (very high) quality of the model. In LiDAR terms, 2005 is equivalent to some time between the palaeolithic and the neolithic. So evidently, when (and if) an update project is launched, we may expect some notable improvements due to the technical and scientific developments from the last half decade. To estimate the magnitude of these potential improvements, and to devise efficient and effective ways of integrating the new and old data, we currently carry out a number of case studies based on comparisons between the current terrain model (with a ground sample distance, GSD, of 1.6 m), and a number of new high resolution point clouds (10-70 points/m2). Not knowing anything about the terms of a potential update project, we consider multiple scenarios ranging from business as usual: A new model with the same GSD, but improved precision, to aggressive upscaling: A new model with 4 times better GSD, i.e. a 16-fold increase in the amount of data. Especially in the latter case speeding up the gridding process is important. Luckily recent results from one of our case studies reveal that for very high resolution data in smooth terrain (which is the common case in Denmark), using local mean (LM) as grid value estimator is only negligibly worse than using the theoretically "best" estimator, i.e. ordinary kriging (OK) with rigorous modelling of the semivariogram. The bias in a leave one out cross validation differs on the micrometer level, while the RMSE differs on the 0.1 mm level. This is fortunate, since a LM estimator can be implemented in plain stream mode, letting the points from the unstructured point cloud (i.e. no TIN generation) stream

  7. Evaluation of a gully headcut retreat model using multitemporal aerial photographs and digital elevation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campo-Bescós, M. A.; Flores-Cervantes, J. H.; Bras, R. L.; Casalí, J.; Giráldez, J. V.

    2013-12-01

    large fraction of soil erosion in temperate climate systems proceeds from gully headcut growth processes. Nevertheless, headcut retreat is not well understood. Few erosion models include gully headcut growth processes, and none of the existing headcut retreat models have been tested against long-term retreat rate estimates. In this work the headcut retreat resulting from plunge pool erosion in the Channel Hillslope Integrated Landscape Development (CHILD) model is calibrated and compared to long-term evolution measurements of six gullies at the Bardenas Reales, northeast Spain. The headcut retreat module of CHILD was calibrated by adjusting the shape factor parameter to fit the observed retreat and volumetric soil loss of one gully during a 36 year period, using reported and collected field data to parameterize the rest of the model. To test the calibrated model, estimates by CHILD were compared to observations of headcut retreat from five other neighboring gullies. The differences in volumetric soil loss rates between the simulations and observations were less than 0.05 m3 yr-1, on average, with standard deviations smaller than 0.35 m3 yr-1. These results are the first evaluation of the headcut retreat module implemented in CHILD with a field data set. These results also show the usefulness of the model as a tool for simulating long-term volumetric gully evolution due to plunge pool erosion.

  8. Rejuvenating Poldered Landscapes: A Numerical Model of Elevation Equilibrium in Coastal Bangladesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasich, C. M.; Gilligan, J. M.; Goodbred, S. L., Jr.; Wilson, C.; Hale, R. P.; Wallace Auerbach, L.

    2015-12-01

    The low-lying, coastal region of Bangladesh has relied on poldering (surrounding islands and flood-prone areas with embankments) since the 1960s to mitigate flooding and tidal inundation. The result has been an increase in total arable land and the ability to sustain food production for one of the most densely populated countries in the world. However, poldering has had the unintended consequences of starving embanked landscapes of sediment. To mitigate the effects of subsiding interiors, some poldered communities have used tidal river management (TRM) to allow water and sediment exchange between the polders and the tidal network. Anecdotal reports claim great success in some locations, but not in others. To date, there has been very little quantitative analysis. Here, we use a simple numerical model of tidal inundation and subsequent sediment accretion to examine the potential impacts of TRM at a poldered island, Polder 32 (P32), and the adjacent mangrove forest in southwest Bangladesh. Our model employs mass balance with variable incoming suspended sediment concentration (SSC). We use tidal gauge and SSC data as inputs and test the model against measured accretion values at P32. Sensitivity analysis of model parameters narrows the range of realistic parameter inputs. Preliminary results suggest that it would take ~10-20 years for P32 to re-equilibrate to the natural surrounding land elevations with a restored direct tidal channel connection. Since a direct tidal channel connection is unfeasible and would displace the local population, future work will attempt to constrain time frames for inundation to more closely model TRM efforts. We also plan to add a bedload component and multidimensionality. The present model provides a simple framework for understanding sediment accretion in southwest Bangladesh and helps generate more complex questions about making the delta more sustainable in the face of sea level rise and population growth.

  9. Physical model of anode glow patterns in elevated-pressure gas discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islamov, R. Sh.

    2001-10-01

    A physical self-consistent model is developed to explain single spots or complex current structures at the anode of elevated-pressure parallel-plate dc discharges. The model is based on a fluid description of electron and ion transport coupled with Poisson's equation and involves a pair of coupled reaction-diffusion equations of an activator-inhibitor-type. This system of one-dimensional equations containing no phenomenological (adjustable) parameters allows one to find the current-density (activator) and anode potential drop (inhibitor) distributions on the anode surface. In a certain range of supply voltage, an anode glow stratification, resulting in the formation of separate glowing regions, takes place. However, the growth of perturbations and formation of a spatially periodic current pattern are complicated by competition between the current stripes, leading to suppressing of the neighboring current stripes. The bifurcation behavior of the model with respect to the characteristic electron energy, recombination coefficient, and discharge gap has been analyzed. The properties of a single anode current structure, including the normal current density effect, have been investigated. The application of these results to available findings in experiments and two-dimensional numerical simulations is discussed.

  10. Physical model of anode glow patterns in elevated-pressure gas discharges.

    PubMed

    Islamov, R S

    2001-10-01

    A physical self-consistent model is developed to explain single spots or complex current structures at the anode of elevated-pressure parallel-plate dc discharges. The model is based on a fluid description of electron and ion transport coupled with Poisson's equation and involves a pair of coupled reaction-diffusion equations of an activator-inhibitor-type. This system of one-dimensional equations containing no phenomenological (adjustable) parameters allows one to find the current-density (activator) and anode potential drop (inhibitor) distributions on the anode surface. In a certain range of supply voltage, an anode glow stratification, resulting in the formation of separate glowing regions, takes place. However, the growth of perturbations and formation of a spatially periodic current pattern are complicated by competition between the current stripes, leading to suppressing of the neighboring current stripes. The bifurcation behavior of the model with respect to the characteristic electron energy, recombination coefficient, and discharge gap has been analyzed. The properties of a single anode current structure, including the normal current density effect, have been investigated. The application of these results to available findings in experiments and two-dimensional numerical simulations is discussed.

  11. Digital elevation model and orthophotographs of Greenland based on aerial photographs from 1978-1987.

    PubMed

    Korsgaard, Niels J; Nuth, Christopher; Khan, Shfaqat A; Kjeldsen, Kristian K; Bjørk, Anders A; Schomacker, Anders; Kjær, Kurt H

    2016-01-01

    Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) play a prominent role in glaciological studies for the mass balance of glaciers and ice sheets. By providing a time snapshot of glacier geometry, DEMs are crucial for most glacier evolution modelling studies, but are also important for cryospheric modelling in general. We present a historical medium-resolution DEM and orthophotographs that consistently cover the entire surroundings and margins of the Greenland Ice Sheet 1978-1987. About 3,500 aerial photographs of Greenland are combined with field surveyed geodetic ground control to produce a 25 m gridded DEM and a 2 m black-and-white digital orthophotograph. Supporting data consist of a reliability mask and a photo footprint coverage with recording dates. Through one internal and two external validation tests, this DEM shows an accuracy better than 10 m horizontally and 6 m vertically while the precision is better than 4 m. This dataset proved successful for topographical mapping and geodetic mass balance. Other uses include control and calibration of remotely sensed data such as imagery or InSAR velocity maps. PMID:27164457

  12. Digital elevation model and orthophotographs of Greenland based on aerial photographs from 1978-1987.

    PubMed

    Korsgaard, Niels J; Nuth, Christopher; Khan, Shfaqat A; Kjeldsen, Kristian K; Bjørk, Anders A; Schomacker, Anders; Kjær, Kurt H

    2016-05-10

    Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) play a prominent role in glaciological studies for the mass balance of glaciers and ice sheets. By providing a time snapshot of glacier geometry, DEMs are crucial for most glacier evolution modelling studies, but are also important for cryospheric modelling in general. We present a historical medium-resolution DEM and orthophotographs that consistently cover the entire surroundings and margins of the Greenland Ice Sheet 1978-1987. About 3,500 aerial photographs of Greenland are combined with field surveyed geodetic ground control to produce a 25 m gridded DEM and a 2 m black-and-white digital orthophotograph. Supporting data consist of a reliability mask and a photo footprint coverage with recording dates. Through one internal and two external validation tests, this DEM shows an accuracy better than 10 m horizontally and 6 m vertically while the precision is better than 4 m. This dataset proved successful for topographical mapping and geodetic mass balance. Other uses include control and calibration of remotely sensed data such as imagery or InSAR velocity maps.

  13. Digital elevation model and orthophotographs of Greenland based on aerial photographs from 1978–1987

    PubMed Central

    Korsgaard, Niels J.; Nuth, Christopher; Khan, Shfaqat A.; Kjeldsen, Kristian K.; Bjørk, Anders A.; Schomacker, Anders; Kjær, Kurt H.

    2016-01-01

    Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) play a prominent role in glaciological studies for the mass balance of glaciers and ice sheets. By providing a time snapshot of glacier geometry, DEMs are crucial for most glacier evolution modelling studies, but are also important for cryospheric modelling in general. We present a historical medium-resolution DEM and orthophotographs that consistently cover the entire surroundings and margins of the Greenland Ice Sheet 1978–1987. About 3,500 aerial photographs of Greenland are combined with field surveyed geodetic ground control to produce a 25 m gridded DEM and a 2 m black-and-white digital orthophotograph. Supporting data consist of a reliability mask and a photo footprint coverage with recording dates. Through one internal and two external validation tests, this DEM shows an accuracy better than 10 m horizontally and 6 m vertically while the precision is better than 4 m. This dataset proved successful for topographical mapping and geodetic mass balance. Other uses include control and calibration of remotely sensed data such as imagery or InSAR velocity maps. PMID:27164457

  14. Effects of elevated temperature on the viscoplastic modeling of graphite/polymeric composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, Thomas S.

    1991-01-01

    To support the development of new materials for the design of next generation supersonic transports, a research program is underway at NASA to assess the long term durability of advanced polymer matrix composites (PMC's). One of main objectives of the program was to explore the effects of elevated temperature (23 to 200 C) on the constitutive model's material parameters. To achieve this goal, test data on the observed nonlinear, stress-strain behavior of IM7/5260 and IM7/8320 composites under tension and compression loading were collected and correlated against temperature. These tests, conducted under isothermal conditions using variable strain rates, included such phenomena as stress relaxation and short term creep. The second major goal was the verification of the model by comparison of analytical predictions and test results for off axis and angle ply laminates. Correlation between test and predicted behavior was performed for specimens of both material systems over a range of temperatures. Results indicated that the model provided reasonable predictions of material behavior in load or strain controlled tests. Periods of loading, unloading, stress relaxation, and creep were accounted for.

  15. Modeling Surface Structure Derived from Laser Altimeter Return Waveforms Using High-Resolution Elevation Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blair, J. Bryan; Hofton, M. A.

    1999-01-01

    The upcoming generation of operational spaceborne laser altimeters (i.e VCL and GLAS) record the interaction of emitted laser radiation with terrestrial surfaces in the form of a digitized waveform. We show that we can accurately model return laser altimeter waveforms as the sum of the reflections from individual surfaces within laser footprints. In one case, we predict return waveforms using high resolution elevation data generated by a small-footprint laser altimeter in a dense tropical forest. We compare over 3000 modeled and recorded waveform pairs using the Pearson correlation. The modeled and recorded waveforms are highly correlated, with a mean correlation of 0.90 and a median of 0.95. The mean correlation is highly dependent on the relative positions of the data sets. By shifting the relative locations of the two compared data sets, we infer that the data are colocated to within 0.4$\\sim$m horizontally and 0.12$\\sim$m vertically. The high degree of correlation shows that we can reliably synthesize the vertical structure information measured by medium-large footprint laser altimeters for complex, dense vegetation.

  16. Seismic analysis of the 13 October 2012 Te Maari, New Zealand, lake breakout lahar: Insights into flow dynamics and the implications on mass flow monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, B.; Jolly, A. D.; Procter, J. N.

    2016-09-01

    On 6 August 2012 an eruption of the upper Te Maari vent Tongariro volcano and subsequent debris flow in the Mangatetipua channel created a debris dam and ephemeral lake. The lake reached its maximum volume of 50,000 m3 by 13 October, initiating dam breaching at 22:30 NZDT (11:30 UTC) after a period of intense rainfall. The breach eventually grew to 29 × 12 m, causing eroded debris flow sediment and water to remobilize as a lahar. The event, comprising multiple surges, lasted ~ 30 min, and displaced 57,000 m3 of remobilized sediment up to 4.5 km downstream. To determine the dynamics of the event, the seismic signals generated by the lahar were compared with active seismic source data collected in February 2013. The comparison used a common frequency band range of 3-10 Hz to compute amplitude for four near-field seismic stations. For periods with signal-to-noise ratios above 2.0, we obtained lahar amplitude distributions that match best the equivalent active source amplitudes within ~ 0.5 km of the dam breakout. The accumulated seismic energy of the lahar was estimated at 1.93 × 109 Nm, whereas the peak energy was 6.88 × 107 Nm. Results of this work may improve the characterization of future mass flow events in the Te Maari/Mangatetipua area through the calibration of seismic stations used in this study.

  17. Validation of the Aster Global Digital Elevation Model Version 3 Over the Conterminous United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gesch, D.; Oimoen, M.; Danielson, J.; Meyer, D.

    2016-06-01

    The ASTER Global Digital Elevation Model Version 3 (GDEM v3) was evaluated over the conterminous United States in a manner similar to the validation conducted for the original GDEM Version 1 (v1) in 2009 and GDEM Version 2 (v2) in 2011. The absolute vertical accuracy of GDEM v3 was calculated by comparison with more than 23,000 independent reference geodetic ground control points from the U.S. National Geodetic Survey. The root mean square error (RMSE) measured for GDEM v3 is 8.52 meters. This compares with the RMSE of 8.68 meters for GDEM v2. Another important descriptor of vertical accuracy is the mean error, or bias, which indicates if a DEM has an overall vertical offset from true ground level. The GDEM v3 mean error of -1.20 meters reflects an overall negative bias in GDEM v3. The absolute vertical accuracy assessment results, both mean error and RMSE, were segmented by land cover type to provide insight into how GDEM v3 performs in various land surface conditions. While the RMSE varies little across cover types (6.92 to 9.25 meters), the mean error (bias) does appear to be affected by land cover type, ranging from -2.99 to +4.16 meters across 14 land cover classes. These results indicate that in areas where built or natural aboveground features are present, GDEM v3 is measuring elevations above the ground level, a condition noted in assessments of previous GDEM versions (v1 and v2) and an expected condition given the type of stereo-optical image data collected by ASTER. GDEM v3 was also evaluated by differencing with the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) dataset. In many forested areas, GDEM v3 has elevations that are higher in the canopy than SRTM. The overall validation effort also included an evaluation of the GDEM v3 water mask. In general, the number of distinct water polygons in GDEM v3 is much lower than the number in a reference land cover dataset, but the total areas compare much more closely.

  18. Validation of the ASTER Global Digital Elevation Model version 3 over the conterminous United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gesch, Dean B.; Oimoen, Michael J.; Danielson, Jeffrey J.; Meyer, David

    2016-01-01

    The ASTER Global Digital Elevation Model Version 3 (GDEM v3) was evaluated over the conterminous United States in a manner similar to the validation conducted for the original GDEM Version 1 (v1) in 2009 and GDEM Version 2 (v2) in 2011. The absolute vertical accuracy of GDEM v3 was calculated by comparison with more than 23,000 independent reference geodetic ground control points from the U.S. National Geodetic Survey. The root mean square error (RMSE) measured for GDEM v3 is 8.52 meters. This compares with the RMSE of 8.68 meters for GDEM v2. Another important descriptor of vertical accuracy is the mean error, or bias, which indicates if a DEM has an overall vertical offset from true ground level. The GDEM v3 mean error of −1.20 meters reflects an overall negative bias in GDEM v3. The absolute vertical accuracy assessment results, both mean error and RMSE, were segmented by land cover type to provide insight into how GDEM v3 performs in various land surface conditions. While the RMSE varies little across cover types (6.92 to 9.25 meters), the mean error (bias) does appear to be affected by land cover type, ranging from −2.99 to +4.16 meters across 14 land cover classes. These results indicate that in areas where built or natural aboveground features are present, GDEM v3 is measuring elevations above the ground level, a condition noted in assessments of previous GDEM versions (v1 and v2) and an expected condition given the type of stereo-optical image data collected by ASTER. GDEM v3 was also evaluated by differencing with the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) dataset. In many forested areas, GDEM v3 has elevations that are higher in the canopy than SRTM. The overall validation effort also included an evaluation of the GDEM v3 water mask. In general, the number of distinct water polygons in GDEM v3 is much lower than the number in a reference land cover dataset, but the total areas compare much more closely.

  19. Myocardial infarction, ST-elevation and non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction and modelled daily pollution concentrations: a case-crossover analysis of MINAP data

    PubMed Central

    Butland, Barbara K; Atkinson, Richard W; Milojevic, Ai; Heal, Mathew R; Doherty, Ruth M; Armstrong, Ben G; MacKenzie, Ian A; Vieno, Massimo; Lin, Chun; Wilkinson, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate associations between daily concentrations of air pollution and myocardial infarction (MI), ST-elevation MI (STEMI) and non-ST-elevation MI (NSTEMI). Methods Modelled daily ground-level gaseous, total and speciated particulate pollutant concentrations and ground-level daily mean temperature, all at 5 km×5 km horizontal resolution, were linked to 202 550 STEMI and 322 198 NSTEMI events recorded on the England and Wales Myocardial Ischaemia National Audit Project (MINAP) database. The study period was 2003–2010. A case-crossover design was used, stratified by year, month and day of the week. Data were analysed using conditional logistic regression, with pollutants modelled as unconstrained distributed lags 0–2 days. Results are presented as percentage change in risk per 10 µg/m3 increase in the pollutant relevant metric, having adjusted for daily mean temperature, public holidays, weekly influenza consultation rates and a sine-cosine annual cycle. Results There was no evidence of an association between MI or STEMI and any of O3, NO2, PM2.5, PM10 or selected PM2.5 components (sulfate and elemental carbon). For NSTEMI, there was a positive association with daily maximum 1-hour NO2 (0.27% (95% CI 0.01% to 0.54%)), which persisted following adjustment for O3 and adjustment for PM2.5. The association appeared to be confined to the midland and southern regions of England and Wales. Conclusions The study found no evidence of an association between the modelled pollutants (including components) investigated and STEMI but did find some evidence of a positive association between NO2 and NSTEMI. Confirmation of this association in other studies is required.

  20. Myocardial infarction, ST-elevation and non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction and modelled daily pollution concentrations: a case-crossover analysis of MINAP data

    PubMed Central

    Butland, Barbara K; Atkinson, Richard W; Milojevic, Ai; Heal, Mathew R; Doherty, Ruth M; Armstrong, Ben G; MacKenzie, Ian A; Vieno, Massimo; Lin, Chun; Wilkinson, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate associations between daily concentrations of air pollution and myocardial infarction (MI), ST-elevation MI (STEMI) and non-ST-elevation MI (NSTEMI). Methods Modelled daily ground-level gaseous, total and speciated particulate pollutant concentrations and ground-level daily mean temperature, all at 5 km×5 km horizontal resolution, were linked to 202 550 STEMI and 322 198 NSTEMI events recorded on the England and Wales Myocardial Ischaemia National Audit Project (MINAP) database. The study period was 2003–2010. A case-crossover design was used, stratified by year, month and day of the week. Data were analysed using conditional logistic regression, with pollutants modelled as unconstrained distributed lags 0–2 days. Results are presented as percentage change in risk per 10 µg/m3 increase in the pollutant relevant metric, having adjusted for daily mean temperature, public holidays, weekly influenza consultation rates and a sine-cosine annual cycle. Results There was no evidence of an association between MI or STEMI and any of O3, NO2, PM2.5, PM10 or selected PM2.5 components (sulfate and elemental carbon). For NSTEMI, there was a positive association with daily maximum 1-hour NO2 (0.27% (95% CI 0.01% to 0.54%)), which persisted following adjustment for O3 and adjustment for PM2.5. The association appeared to be confined to the midland and southern regions of England and Wales. Conclusions The study found no evidence of an association between the modelled pollutants (including components) investigated and STEMI but did find some evidence of a positive association between NO2 and NSTEMI. Confirmation of this association in other studies is required. PMID:27621827

  1. Assessment of Fluctuating Reservoir Elevations Using Hydraulic Models and Impacts to Larval Pacific Lamprey Rearing Habitat in the Bonneville Pool

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Robert P.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Perkins, William A.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2015-02-24

    This report presents the results of a modeling assessment of likely lamprey larval habitat that may be impacted by dewatering of the major tributary delta regions in the Bonneville Pool of the Columbia River. This assessment was conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Portland District (CENWP). The goal of the study was to provide baseline data about how the regions of interest would potentially be impacted at three river flows (10, 50, and 90 percent exceedance flow) for four different forebay elevations at Bonneville Dam. Impacts of unsteady flows at The Dalles Dam and changing forebay elevation at Bonneville Dam for a 2-week period were also assessed. The area of dewatered regions was calculated by importing modeled data outputs into a GIS and then calculating the change in inundated area near tributary deltas for the four Bonneville forebay surface elevations. From the modeled output we determined that the overall change in area is less sensitive to elevations changes during higher river discharges. Changing the forebay elevation at Bonneville and the resulting impact to total dewatered regions was greater at the lowest modeled river flow (97 kcfs) and showed the greatest variation at the White Salmon/Hood River delta regions followed by the Wind, Klickitat and the Little White Salmon rivers. To understand how inundation might change on a daily and hourly basis. Unsteady flow models were run for a 2-week period in 2002 and compared to 2014. The water surface elevation in the upstream pool closely follows that of the Bonneville Dam forebay with rapid changes of 1 to 2-ft possible. The data shows that 2.5-ft variation in water surface elevation occurred during this period in 2002 and a 3.7-ft change occurred in 2014. The duration of these changes were highly variable and generally did not stay constant for more than a 5-hr period.

  2. Tyrosine triple mutated AAV2-BDNF gene therapy in a rat model of transient IOP elevation

    PubMed Central

    Igarashi, Tsutomu; Kobayashi, Maika; Kameya, Shuhei; Fujimoto, Chiaki; Nakamoto, Kenji; Takahashi, Hisatomo; Igarashi, Toru; Miyake, Noriko; Iijima, Osamu; Hirai, Yukihiko; Shimada, Takashi; Okada, Takashi; Takahashi, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We examined the neuroprotective effects of exogenous brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which provides protection to retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in rodents, in a model of transient intraocular pressure (IOP) elevation using a mutant (triple Y-F) self-complementary adeno-associated virus type 2 vector encoding BDNF (tm-scAAV2-BDNF). Methods The tm-scAAV2-BDNF or control vector encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP; tm-scAAV2-GFP) was intravitreally administered to rats, which were then divided into four groups: control, ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury only, I/R injury with tm-scAAV2-GFP, and tm-scAAV2-BDNF. I/R injury was then induced by transiently increasing IOP, after which the rats were euthanized to measure the inner retinal thickness and cell counts in the RGC layer. Results Intravitreous injection of tm-scAAV2-BDNF resulted in high levels of BDNF expression in the neural retina. Histological analysis showed that the inner retinal thickness and cell numbers in the RGC layer were preserved after transient IOP elevation in eyes treated with tm-scAAV2-BDNF but not in the other I/R groups. Significantly reduced glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) immunostaining after I/R injury in the rats that received tm-scAAV2-BDNF indicated reduced retinal stress, and electroretinogram (ERG) analysis confirmed preservation of retinal function in the tm-scAAV2-BDNF group. Conclusions These results demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of neuroprotective gene therapy using tm-scAAV2-BDNF to protect the inner retina from transiently high intraocular pressure. An in vivo gene therapeutic approach to the clinical management of retinal diseases in conditions such as glaucoma, retinal artery occlusion, hypertensive retinopathy, and diabetic retinopathy thus appears feasible. PMID:27440998

  3. Optimisation modelling predicts leaf trait variation and response to elevated CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepper, D. A.; McMurtrie, R. E.; Norby, R. J.

    2009-12-01

    The capacities of a plant to obtain the resources it requires and the efficiencies of use of those resources are important determinants of the rate of plant carbon production. Such capacities and efficiencies rely strongly on plant traits, across all relevant scales of plant function (molecular to whole plant). Within inherent (genetic) constraints to the expression of plant traits by any one plant species, a plant would do well to adjust its traits in such a way as to maximise production. We test this hypothesis using a simple plant carbon-nitrogen model applied to a free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) experiment on sweetgum forest at Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA. The sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua) stand, exposed to ambient atmospheric CO2 or air enriched with CO2 to 550 ppm since 1998, has shown a positive response of net primary productivity (NPP) to elevated CO2 compared to the ambient control. Experiments like this one have been conducted to gauge the response of the biosphere to the significant increase in atmospheric CO2 concentration. In this study we use optimisation modelling to maximise photosynthetic nitrogen use efficiency and output corresponding optimal leaf traits, including (on a per unit leaf area basis): leaf nitrogen content (N), leaf mass (LMA), maximum rate of CO2 assimilation (Amax), average rate of CO2 assimilation (A), and leaf respiration (R). The optimal leaf traits change under a diminishing light level with canopy depth. Integration over canopy depth provides an estimate of canopy total carbon (carbon allocated to leaves), carbon production, canopy carbon export (carbon allocation to wood, fine roots and reproductive structures), and plant N demand to support a canopy comprised of optimal leaves. Thus, simulated plant N demand depends on leaf traits and light level. When simulated plant N demand exceeds N availability, leaf area adjustment occurs, which has impacts on canopy total carbon, carbon production, and canopy carbon export (plant

  4. Modeling Elevation and Aspect Controls on Emerging Ecohydrologic Processes and Ecosystem Patterns Using the Component-based Landlab Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nudurupati, S. S.; Istanbulluoglu, E.; Adams, J. M.; Hobley, D. E. J.; Gasparini, N. M.; Tucker, G. E.; Hutton, E. W. H.

    2014-12-01

    Topography plays a commanding role on the organization of ecohydrologic processes and resulting vegetation patterns. In southwestern United States, climate conditions lead to terrain aspect- and elevation-controlled ecosystems, with mesic north-facing and xeric south-facing vegetation types; and changes in biodiversity as a function of elevation from shrublands in low desert elevations, to mixed grass/shrublands in mid elevations, and forests at high elevations and ridge tops. These observed patterns have been attributed to differences in topography-mediated local soil moisture availability, micro-climatology, and life history processes of plants that control chances of plant establishment and survival. While ecohydrologic models represent local vegetation dynamics in sufficient detail up to sub-hourly time scales, plant life history and competition for space and resources has not been adequately represented in models. In this study we develop an ecohydrologic cellular automata model within the Landlab component-based modeling framework. This model couples local vegetation dynamics (biomass production, death) and plant establishment and competition processes for resources and space. This model is used to study the vegetation organization in a semiarid New Mexico catchment where elevation and hillslope aspect play a defining role on plant types. Processes that lead to observed plant types across the landscape are examined by initializing the domain with randomly assigned plant types and systematically changing model parameters that couple plant response with soil moisture dynamics. Climate perturbation experiments are conducted to examine the plant response in space and time. Understanding the inherently transient ecohydrologic systems is critical to improve predictions of climate change impacts on ecosystems.

  5. Holocene lahars and their byproducts along the historical path of the White River between Mount Rainier and Seattle: Geological Society of America Field Trip

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, T A; Zehfuss, P H; Atwater, B F; Vallance, J W; Brenniman, H

    2003-10-16

    Clay-poor lahars of late Holocene age from Mount Rainier change down the White River drainage into lahar-derived fluvial and deltaic deposits that filled an arm of Puget Sound between the sites of Auburn and Seattle, 110-150 km downvalley from the volcano's summit. Lahars in the debris-flow phase left cobbly and bouldery deposits on the walls of valleys within 70 km of the summit. At distances of 80-110 km, transitional (hyperconcentrated) flows deposited pebbles and sand that coat terraces in a gorge incised into glacial drift and the mid-Holocene Osceola Mudflow. On the broad, level floor of the Kent valley at 110-130 km, lahars in the runout or streamflow phase deposited mostly sand-size particles that locally include the trunks of trees probably entrained by the flows. Beyond 130 km, in the Duwamish valley of Tukwila and Seattle, laminated andesitic sand derived from Mount Rainier built a delta northward across the Seattle fault. This distal facies, warped during an earthquake in A.D. 900-930, rests on estuarine mud at depths as great as 20 m. The deltaic filling occurred in episodes that appear to overlap in time with the lahars. As judged from radiocarbon ages of twigs and logs, at least three episodes of distal deposition postdate the Osceola Mudflow. One of these episodes occurred about 2200-2800 cal yr B.P., and two others occurred 1700-1000 cal yr B.P. The most recent episode ended by about the time of the earthquake of A.D. 900-930. The delta's northward march to Seattle averaged between 6 and 14 m/yr in the late Holocene.

  6. Thermomechanical model to assess stresses developed during elevated-temperature cleaning of coated optics.

    PubMed

    Liddell, H P H; Lambropoulos, J C; Jacobs, S D

    2014-09-10

    A thermomechanical model is developed to estimate the stress response of an oxide coating to elevated-temperature chemical cleaning. Using a hafnia-silica multilayer dielectric pulse compressor grating as a case study, we demonstrate that substrate thickness can strongly affect the thermal stress response of the thin-film coating. As a result, coatings on large, thick substrates may be susceptible to modes of stress-induced failure (crazing or delamination) not seen in small parts. We compare the stress response of meter-scale optics to the behavior of small-scale test or "witness" samples, which are expected to be representative of their full-size counterparts. The effects of materials selection, solution temperature, and heating/cooling rates are explored. Extending the model to other situations, thermal stress results are surveyed for various combinations of commonly used materials. Seven oxide coatings (hafnia, silica, tantala, niobia, alumina, and multilayers of hafnia-silica and alumina-silica) and three glass substrates (BK7, borosilicate float glass, and fused silica) are examined to highlight some interesting results.

  7. Indian monsoon and the elevated-heat-pump mechanism in a coupled aerosol-climate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Errico, Miriam; Cagnazzo, Chiara; Fogli, Pier Giuseppe; Lau, William K. M.; Hardenberg, Jost; Fierli, Federico; Cherchi, Annalisa

    2015-09-01

    A coupled aerosol-atmosphere-ocean-sea ice climate model is used to explore the interaction between aerosols and the Indian summer monsoon precipitation on seasonal-to-interannual time scales. Results show that when increased aerosol loading is found on the Himalayas slopes in the premonsoon period (April-May), intensification of early monsoon rainfall over India and increased low-level westerly flow follow, in agreement with the elevated-heat-pump mechanism. The increase in rainfall during the early monsoon season has a cooling effect on the land surface. In the same period, enhanced surface cooling may also be amplified through solar dimming by more cloudiness and aerosol loading, via increased dust transported by low-level westerly flow. The surface cooling causes subsequent reduction in monsoon rainfall in July-August over India. The time-lagged nature of the reasonably realistic response of the model to aerosol forcing suggests that absorbing aerosols, besides their potential key roles in impacting monsoon water cycle and climate, may influence the seasonal variability of the Indian summer monsoon.

  8. Growing wheat in Biosphere 2 under elevated CO2: observations and modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tubiello, F. N.; Mahato, T.; Morton, T.; Druitt, J. W.; Volk, T.; Marino, B. D.

    1999-01-01

    Spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L., cv. Yecora Rojo) was grown in the intensive agricultural biome (IAB) of Biosphere 2 during the l995-l996 winter/spring season. Environmental conditions were characterized by a day/night temperature regime of 27/17 degrees C, relative humidity (RH) levels around 45%, mean atmospheric CO2 concentration of 450 ppmv, and natural light conditions with mean intensities about half of outside levels. Weekly samples of above-ground plant matter were collected throughout the growing season and phenological events recorded. A computer model, CERES-Wheat, previously tested under both field and controlled conditions, was used to simulate the observed crop growth and to help in data analysis. We found that CERES-Wheat simulated the data collected at Biosphere 2 to within 10% of observed, thus suggesting that wheat growth inside the IAB was comparable to that documented in other environments. The model predicts phenological stages and final dry matter (DM) production within l0% of the observed data. Measured DM production rates, normalized for light absorbed by the crop. suggested photosynthetic efficiencies intermediate between those observed under optimal field conditions and those recorded in NASA-Controlled Ecological Life-Support Systems (CELSS). We suggest that such a difference can be explained primarily in terms of low light levels inside the IAB, with additional effects due to elevated CO2 concentrations and diffuse light fractions.

  9. Numerical Modeling of Magnesium Alloy Sheet Metal Forming at Elevated Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Myeong-Han; Oh, Soo-Ik; Kim, Heon-Young; Kim, Hyung-Jong; Choi, Yi-Chun

    2007-05-17

    The development of light-weight vehicle is in great demand for enhancement of fuel efficiency and dynamic performance. The vehicle weight can be reduced effectively by using lightweight materials such as magnesium alloys. However, the use of magnesium alloys in sheet forming processes is still limited because of their low formability at room temperature and the lack of understanding of the forming process of magnesium alloys at elevated temperatures. In this study, uniaxial tensile tests of the magnesium alloy AZ31B-O at various temperatures were performed to evaluate the mechanical properties of this alloy relevant for forming of magnesium sheets. To construct a FLD (forming limit diagram), a forming limit test were conducted at temperature of 100 and 200 deg. C. For the evaluation of the effects of the punch temperature on the formability of a rectangular cup drawing with AZ31B-O, numerical modelling was conducted. The experiment results indicate that the stresses and possible strains of AZ31B-O sheets largely depend on the temperature. The stress decreases with temperature increase. Also, the strain increase with temperature increase. The numerical modelling results indicate that formability increases with the decrease in the punch temperature at the constant temperature of the die and holder.

  10. Growing wheat in Biosphere 2 under elevated CO2: observations and modeling.

    PubMed

    Tubiello, F N; Mahato, T; Morton, T; Druitt, J W; Volk, T; Marino, B D

    1999-01-01

    Spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L., cv. Yecora Rojo) was grown in the intensive agricultural biome (IAB) of Biosphere 2 during the l995-l996 winter/spring season. Environmental conditions were characterized by a day/night temperature regime of 27/17 degrees C, relative humidity (RH) levels around 45%, mean atmospheric CO2 concentration of 450 ppmv, and natural light conditions with mean intensities about half of outside levels. Weekly samples of above-ground plant matter were collected throughout the growing season and phenological events recorded. A computer model, CERES-Wheat, previously tested under both field and controlled conditions, was used to simulate the observed crop growth and to help in data analysis. We found that CERES-Wheat simulated the data collected at Biosphere 2 to within 10% of observed, thus suggesting that wheat growth inside the IAB was comparable to that documented in other environments. The model predicts phenological stages and final dry matter (DM) production within l0% of the observed data. Measured DM production rates, normalized for light absorbed by the crop. suggested photosynthetic efficiencies intermediate between those observed under optimal field conditions and those recorded in NASA-Controlled Ecological Life-Support Systems (CELSS). We suggest that such a difference can be explained primarily in terms of low light levels inside the IAB, with additional effects due to elevated CO2 concentrations and diffuse light fractions. PMID:11542248

  11. Water Uptake and Carbon Assimilation in Maize at Elevated and ambient CO2: Modeling and Measurement.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timlin, Dennis; Chun, Jong-Ahn; Kim, Soo-Hyung; Yang, Yang; Fleisher, David; Reddy, Vangimalla

    2013-04-01

    Potential transpiration in crops is dependent on both plant and environmental properties. Carbon dioxide content of the atmosphere is linked to potential transpiration because CO2 diffuses onto water saturated surfaces within plant stomata. At high CO2 concentrations, CO2 diffuses rapidly into stomata and therefore stomata do not have to remain open to the atmosphere for long periods of time. This results in lower transpiration rates per unit CO2 assimilated at elevated CO2 concentrations. The objective of this study was to measure CO2 assimilation and water uptake by maize under different irrigation regimes and two CO2 concentrations. The data were then used to evaluate the ability of the maize model MaizSim to simulate the effects of water stress and CO2 on water use and photosynthesis. MaizSim uses a Farquhar type photosynthesis model coupled a Ball-Berry stomatal control model. Non-linear beta functions are used to estimate the effects of temperature on growth and development processes. The experimental data come from experiments in outdoor, sunlit growth chambers at the USDA-ARS Beltsville Agricultural Research Center. The eight treatments comprised two levels of carbon dioxide concentrations (400 and 800 ppm) and four levels of water stress (well-watered control, mild, moderate, and severe). The water stress treatments were applied at both CO2 levels. Water contents were monitored hourly by a Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR) system. The model simulated higher water contents at the same time after applying water stress at the high CO2 treatment than for the low CO2 treatment as was found in the measured data. Measurement of water uptake by roots and carbon assimilation rates in the chambers will be addressed.

  12. Seasonal and Interannual Variations of Ice Sheet Surface Elevation at the Summit of Greenland: Observed and Modeled

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zwally, H. Jay; Jun, Li; Koblinsky, Chester J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Observed seasonal and interannual variations in the surface elevation over the summit of the Greenland ice sheet are modeled using a new temperature-dependent formulation of firn-densification and observed accumulation variations. The observed elevation variations are derived from ERS (European Remote Sensing)-1 and ERS-2 radar altimeter data for the period between April 1992 and April 1999. A multivariate linear/sine function is fitted to an elevation time series constructed from elevation differences measured by radar altimetry at orbital crossovers. The amplitude of the seasonal elevation cycle is 0.25 m peak-to-peak, with a maximum in winter and a minimum in summer. Inter-annually, the elevation decreases to a minimum in 1995, followed by an increase to 1999, with an overall average increase of 4.2 cm a(exp -1) for 1992 to 1999. Our densification formulation uses an initial field-density profile, the AWS (automatic weather station) surface temperature record, and a temperature-dependent constitutive relation for the densification that is based on laboratory measurements of crystal growth rates. The rate constant and the activation energy commonly used in the Arrhenius-type constitutive relation for firn densification are also temperature dependent, giving a stronger temperature and seasonal amplitudes about 10 times greater than previous densification formulations. Summer temperatures are most important, because of the strong non-linear dependence on temperature. Much of firn densification and consequent surface lowering occurs within about three months of the summer season, followed by a surface build-up from snow accumulation until spring. Modeled interannual changes of the surface elevation, using the AWS measurements of surface temperature and accumulation and results of atmospheric modeling of precipitation variations, are in good agreement with the altimeter observations. In the model, the surface elevation decreases about 20 cm over the seven years due

  13. Exploring the Role of Genetic Algorithms and Artificial Neural Networks for Interpolation of Elevation in Geoinformation Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagheri, H.; Sadjadi, S. Y.; Sadeghian, S.

    2013-09-01

    One of the most significant tools to study many engineering projects is three-dimensional modelling of the Earth that has many applications in the Geospatial Information System (GIS), e.g. creating Digital Train Modelling (DTM). DTM has numerous applications in the fields of sciences, engineering, design and various project administrations. One of the most significant events in DTM technique is the interpolation of elevation to create a continuous surface. There are several methods for interpolation, which have shown many results due to the environmental conditions and input data. The usual methods of interpolation used in this study along with Genetic Algorithms (GA) have been optimised and consisting of polynomials and the Inverse Distance Weighting (IDW) method. In this paper, the Artificial Intelligent (AI) techniques such as GA and Neural Networks (NN) are used on the samples to optimise the interpolation methods and production of Digital Elevation Model (DEM). The aim of entire interpolation methods is to evaluate the accuracy of interpolation methods. Universal interpolation occurs in the entire neighbouring regions can be suggested for larger regions, which can be divided into smaller regions. The results obtained from applying GA and ANN individually, will be compared with the typical method of interpolation for creation of elevations. The resulting had performed that AI methods have a high potential in the interpolation of elevations. Using artificial networks algorithms for the interpolation and optimisation based on the IDW method with GA could be estimated the high precise elevations.

  14. Assessing water erosion in small watersheds using WEPP with GIS and digital elevation models

    SciTech Connect

    Cochrane, T.A.; Flanagan, D.C.

    1999-07-01

    Watershed erosion is a cause of nonpoint source pollution that can have an adverse effect on downstream and ecosystem water quality. Three different approaches using geographical information systems (GIS) and digital elevation models (DEMs) are described and evaluated for applying the Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) model to assess water erosion in small watersheds. The first approach describes a typical application of the watershed version of WEPP using GIS only as an aid for construction of required input files. The second approach presents an automated method for the application of WEPP through the extraction of hillslopes and channels from DEMs. The third approach was WEPP model simulations on all possible flowpaths within a watershed. The three methods were applied to six research watersheds: one from Treynor, IA, two from Watkinsville, Ga., and three from Holly Springs, Miss. A statistical analysis for all methods and watersheds compared the predicted vs. measured runoff and sediment yield from watershed outlets on an event-by-event basis for runoff and sediment loss. The results indicate that the automatic hillslope method performs as well as the manual technique for all watersheds. A comparison of erosion from only hillslopes for all three methods indicates that the flowpath method is statistically comparable to the other methods. Results of the analysis suggest that, given an accurate DEM and valid input data for a simple watershed, the automatic hillslope method can be used to facilitate the application of the watershed version of WEPP, and that predictions should be comparable to an expert user's application of WEPP.

  15. Digital Elevation Model from Non-Metric Camera in Uas Compared with LIDAR Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayamit, O. M.; Pedro, M. F.; Ernesto, R. R.; Fernando, B. L.

    2015-08-01

    Digital Elevation Model (DEM) data as a representation of surface topography is highly demanded for use in spatial analysis and modelling. Aimed to that issue many methods of acquisition data and process it are developed, from traditional surveying until modern technology like LIDAR. On the other hands, in a past four year the development of Unamend Aerial System (UAS) aimed to Geomatic bring us the possibility to acquire data about surface by non-metric digital camera on board in a short time with good quality for some analysis. Data collectors have attracted tremendous attention on UAS due to possibility of the determination of volume changes over time, monitoring of the breakwaters, hydrological modelling including flood simulation, drainage networks, among others whose support in DEM for proper analysis. The DEM quality is considered as a combination of DEM accuracy and DEM suitability so; this paper is aimed to analyse the quality of the DEM from non-metric digital camera on UAS compared with a DEM from LIDAR corresponding to same geographic space covering 4 km2 in Artemisa province, Cuba. This area is in a frame of urban planning whose need to know the topographic characteristics in order to analyse hydrology behaviour and decide the best place for make roads, building and so on. Base on LIDAR technology is still more accurate method, it offer us a pattern for test DEM from non-metric digital camera on UAS, whose are much more flexible and bring a solution for many applications whose needs DEM of detail.

  16. Modeling of Firn Compaction for Estimating Ice-Sheet Mass Change from Observed Ice-Sheet Elevation Change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jun; Zwally, H. Jay

    2011-01-01

    Changes in ice-sheet surface elevation are caused by a combination of ice-dynamic imbalance, ablation, temporal variations in accumulation rate, firn compaction and underlying bedrock motion. Thus, deriving the rate of ice-sheet mass change from measured surface elevation change requires information on the rate of firn compaction and bedrock motion, which do not involve changes in mass, and requires an appropriate firn density to associate with elevation changes induced by recent accumulation rate variability. We use a 25 year record of surface temperature and a parameterization for accumulation change as a function of temperature to drive a firn compaction model. We apply this formulation to ICESat measurements of surface elevation change at three locations on the Greenland ice sheet in order to separate the accumulation-driven changes from the ice-dynamic/ablation-driven changes, and thus to derive the corresponding mass change. Our calculated densities for the accumulation-driven changes range from 410 to 610 kg/cu m, which along with 900 kg/cu m for the dynamic/ablation-driven changes gives average densities ranging from 680 to 790 kg/cu m. We show that using an average (or "effective") density to convert elevation change to mass change is not valid where the accumulation and the dynamic elevation changes are of opposite sign.

  17. Echolocation with bat buzz emissions: model and biomimetic sonar for elevation estimation.

    PubMed

    Kuc, Roman

    2012-01-01

    Just prior to capture the Buzz II emissions of some mouth-emitting bats, such as Eptesicus fuscus, are observed to exhibit spectra having multiple peaks. This paper proposes an echolocation strategy that uses such spectra with energy concentrated in specific frequency bands for determining target elevation. A biomimetic sonar was implemented to produce a tri-modal spectrum by driving a speaker with a signal rich in harmonics. The emission magnitudes at these harmonic frequencies measured as a function of elevation in the zero-azimuth plane form distinct beams. A template was formed from the ratio of the first harmonic and fundamental magnitudes to determine elevation. The elevation estimator exhibited a sub-degree accuracy (SD = 0.4° over a 20° interval centered at the elevation at which these two beams intersect in the zero-azimuth plane. Spectral cues from -40° to +10° elevation allow a qualitative non-linear control of sonar orientation to drive the target to the beam-intersection point where quantitative elevation estimates are available.

  18. Shoreline extraction from light detection and ranging digital elevation model data and aerial images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousef, Amr; Iftekharuddin, Khan M.; Karim, Mohammad A.

    2014-01-01

    There is an increased demand for understanding the accurate position of the shorelines. The automatic extraction of shorelines utilizing the digital elevation models (DEMs) obtained from light detection and ranging (LiDAR), aerial images, and multispectral images has become very promising. In this article, we develop two innovative algorithms that can effectively extract shorelines depending on the available data sources. The first is a multistep morphological technique that works on LiDAR DEM with respect to a tidal datum, whereas the second depends on the availability of training data to extract shorelines from LiDAR DEM fused with aerial images. Unlike similar techniques, the morphological approach detects and eliminates the outliers that result from waves, etc., by means of an anomaly test with neighborhood constraints. Additionally, it eliminates docks, bridges, and fishing piers along the extracted shorelines by means of Hough transform. The second approach extracts the shoreline by means of color space conversion of the aerial images and the support vector machines classifier to segment the fused data into water and land. We perform Monte-Carlo simulations to estimate the confidence interval for the error in shoreline position. Compared with other relevant techniques in literature, the proposed methods offer better accuracy in shoreline extraction.

  19. Problems and Solutions for InSAR Digital Elevation Model Generation of Mountainous Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eineder, M.

    2004-06-01

    During the last decade, the techniques to generate digital elevation models (DEM) from SAR interferometry have been demonstrated and refined to a quasi-operational status using data from the ERS tandem mission. With this experience and an improved single-pass system concept, data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) acquired in 2000 have been used to produce a global DEM with unprecedented quality. However, under the extreme viewing conditions in mountainous terrain both ERS and SRTM suffer from or even fail due to the radar specific layover and shadow effect that leaves significant areas uncovered and poses severe problems to phase unwrapping. The paper quantifies the areas leading to layover and shadow, and shows innovative ways to overcome shadow and improve phase unwrapping in general. The paper is organized in three major sections. Firstly, the problem to map slopes is addressed in a simplified statistical way. Strategies to optimize the incidence angle for single and multiple observations are proposed. Secondly, a new algorithm is presented that makes the best from shadow by actively using it to help phase unwrapping. Thirdly, an outlook on the use of deltak interferometry for phase unwrapping is given. The paper aims to improve the understanding of the mapping geometry of radar systems and the data currently available and to improve the concepts of future systems and missions.

  20. Quality Assessment for the First Part of the Tandem-X Global Digital Elevation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brautigam, B.; Martone, M.; Rizzoli, P.; Gonzalez, C.; Wecklich, C.; Borla Tridon, D.; Bachmann, M.; Schulze, D.; Zink, M.

    2015-04-01

    TanDEM-X is an innovative synthetic aperture radar (SAR) mission with the main goal to generate a global and homogeneous digital elevation model (DEM) of the Earth's land masses. The final DEM product will reach a new dimension of detail with respect to resolution and quality. The absolute horizontal and vertical accuracy shall each be less than 10 m in a 90% confidence interval at a pixel spacing of 12 m. The relative vertical accuracy specification for the TanDEM-X mission foresees a 90% point-to-point error of 2 m (4 m) for areas with predominant terrain slopes smaller than 20% (greater than 20%) within a 1° longitude by 1° latitude cell. The global DEM is derived from interferometric SAR acquisitions performed by two radar satellites flying in close orbit formation. Interferometric performance parameters like the coherence between the two radar images have been monitored and evaluated throughout the mission. In a further step, over 500,000 single SAR scenes are interferometrically processed, calibrated, and mosaicked into a global DEM product which will be completely available in the second half of 2016. This paper presents an up-todate quality status of the single interferometric acquisitions as well as of 50% of the final DEM. The overall DEM quality of these first products promises accuracies well within the specification, especially in terms of absolute height accuracy.

  1. A new lunar digital elevation model from the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter and SELENE Terrain Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, M. K.; Mazarico, E.; Neumann, G. A.; Zuber, M. T.; Haruyama, J.; Smith, D. E.

    2016-07-01

    We present an improved lunar digital elevation model (DEM) covering latitudes within ±60°, at a horizontal resolution of 512 pixels per degree (∼60 m at the equator) and a typical vertical accuracy ∼3 to 4 m. This DEM is constructed from ∼ 4.5 ×109 geodetically-accurate topographic heights from the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) onboard the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, to which we co-registered 43,200 stereo-derived DEMs (each 1° × 1°) from the SELENE Terrain Camera (TC) (∼1010 pixels total). After co-registration, approximately 90% of the TC DEMs show root-mean-square vertical residuals with the LOLA data of <5 m compared to ∼ 50% prior to co-registration. We use the co-registered TC data to estimate and correct orbital and pointing geolocation errors from the LOLA altimetric profiles (typically amounting to <10 m horizontally and <1 m vertically). By combining both co-registered datasets, we obtain a near-global DEM with high geodetic accuracy, and without the need for surface interpolation. We evaluate the resulting LOLA + TC merged DEM (designated as "SLDEM2015") with particular attention to quantifying seams and crossover errors.

  2. The Need of Nested Grids for Aerial and Satellite Images and Digital Elevation Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villa, G.; Mas, S.; Fernández-Villarino, X.; Martínez-Luceño, J.; Ojeda, J. C.; Pérez-Martín, B.; Tejeiro, J. A.; García-González, C.; López-Romero, E.; Soteres, C.

    2016-06-01

    Usual workflows for production, archiving, dissemination and use of Earth observation images (both aerial and from remote sensing satellites) pose big interoperability problems, as for example: non-alignment of pixels at the different levels of the pyramids that makes it impossible to overlay, compare and mosaic different orthoimages, without resampling them and the need to apply multiple resamplings and compression-decompression cycles. These problems cause great inefficiencies in production, dissemination through web services and processing in "Big Data" environments. Most of them can be avoided, or at least greatly reduced, with the use of a common "nested grid" for mutiresolution production, archiving, dissemination and exploitation of orthoimagery, digital elevation models and other raster data. "Nested grids" are space allocation schemas that organize image footprints, pixel sizes and pixel positions at all pyramid levels, in order to achieve coherent and consistent multiresolution coverage of a whole working area. A "nested grid" must be complemented by an appropriate "tiling schema", ideally based on the "quad-tree" concept. In the last years a "de facto standard" grid and Tiling Schema has emerged and has been adopted by virtually all major geospatial data providers. It has also been adopted by OGC in its "WMTS Simple Profile" standard. In this paper we explain how the adequate use of this tiling schema as common nested grid for orthoimagery, DEMs and other types of raster data constitutes the most practical solution to most of the interoperability problems of these types of data.

  3. Parallel Priority-Flood depression filling for trillion cell digital elevation models on desktops or clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Richard

    2016-11-01

    Algorithms for extracting hydrologic features and properties from digital elevation models (DEMs) are challenged by large datasets, which often cannot fit within a computer's RAM. Depression filling is an important preconditioning step to many of these algorithms. Here, I present a new, linearly scaling algorithm which parallelizes the Priority-Flood depression-filling algorithm by subdividing a DEM into tiles. Using a single-producer, multi-consumer design, the new algorithm works equally well on one core, multiple cores, or multiple machines and can take advantage of large memories or cope with small ones. Unlike previous algorithms, the new algorithm guarantees a fixed number of memory access and communication events per subdivision of the DEM. In comparison testing, this results in the new algorithm running generally faster while using fewer resources than previous algorithms. For moderately sized tiles, the algorithm exhibits ∼60% strong and weak scaling efficiencies up to 48 cores, and linear time scaling across datasets ranging over three orders of magnitude. The largest dataset on which I run the algorithm has 2 trillion (2×1012) cells. With 48 cores, processing required 4.8 h wall-time (9.3 compute-days). This test is three orders of magnitude larger than any previously performed in the literature. Complete, well-commented source code and correctness tests are available for download from a repository.

  4. Modeling char oxidation behavior under Zone II burning conditions at elevated pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, L.Q.; Mitchell, R.

    2009-01-15

    For accurate modeling of the coal combustion process at elevated pressures, account must be made for variations in char-particle structure. As pressure is increased, particle swelling increases during the devolatilization of certain bituminous coals, yielding a variety of char-particle structures, from uniform high-density particles to thin-walled non-uniform low-density particles having large internal void volumes. Since under Zone II burning conditions the char conversion rate depends upon the accessibility of the internal surfaces, the char structure plays a key role in determining particle burnout times. In our approach to characterize the impact of char structure on particle burning rates, effectiveness factors appropriate for thin-walled cenospherical particles and thick-walled particles having a few large cavities are defined and related to the effectiveness factor for uniform high-density particles that have no large voids, only a random distribution of pores having a mean pore size in the sub-micron range. For the uniform case, the Thiele modulus approach is used to account for Zone 11 type burning in which internal burning is limited by the combined effects of pore diffusion and the intrinsic chemical reactivity of the carbonaceous material. In the paper, the impact of having a variety of char structures in a mix of particles burning under Zone II burning conditions is demonstrated.

  5. 2010 bathymetric survey and digital elevation model of Corte Madera Bay, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foxgrover, Amy C.; Finlayson, David P.; Jaffe, Bruce E.; Takekawa, John Y.; Thorne, Karen M.; Spragens, Kyle A.

    2011-01-01

    A high-resolution bathymetric survey of Corte Madera Bay, California, was collected in early 2010 in support of a collaborative research project initiated by the San Francisco Bay Conservation and Development Commission and funded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The primary objective of the Innovative Wetland Adaptation in the Lower Corte Madera Creek Watershed Project is to develop shoreline adaptation strategies to future sea-level rise based upon sound science. Fundamental to this research was the development of an of an up-to-date, high-resolution digital elevation model (DEM) extending from the subtidal environment through the surrounding intertidal marsh. We provide bathymetric data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and have merged the bathymetry with a 1-m resolution aerial lidar data set that was collected by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration during the same time period to create a seamless, high-resolution DEM of Corte Madera Bay and the surrounding topography. The bathymetric and DEM surfaces are provided at both 1 m and 10 m resolutions formatted as both X, Y, Z text files and ESRI Arc ASCII files, which are accompanied by Federal Geographic Data Committee compliant metadata.

  6. Volcanic Risk Perception and Preparedness in Communities within the Mount Baker and Glacier Peak Lahar Hazard Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corwin, K.; Brand, B. D.

    2014-12-01

    A community's ability to effectively respond to and recover from natural hazards depends on both the physical characteristics of the hazard and the community's inherent resilience. Resilience is shaped by a number of factors including the residents' perception of and preparedness for a natural hazard as well as the level of institutional preparedness. This study examines perception of and preparedness for lahar hazards from Mount Baker and Glacier Peak in Washington's Skagit Valley. Through an online survey, this study isolates the influence of specific variables (e.g., knowledge, past experience, scientific background, trust in various information sources, occupation, self-efficacy, sense of community) on risk perception and explores reasons behind the frequent disconnect between perception and preparedness. We anticipate that individuals with more extensive education in the sciences, especially geology or earth science, foster greater trust in scientists and a more accurate knowledge, understanding, and perception of the volcanic hazards in their community. Additionally, little research exists examining the extent to which first responders and leaders in response-related institutions prepare on a personal level. Since these individuals work toward community preparedness professionally, we hypothesize that they will be more prepared at home than members of the general public. Finally, the Skagit Valley has a significant history of flooding. We expect that the need to respond to and recover from frequent flooding creates a community with an inherently higher level of preparedness for other hazards such as lahars. The results of this study will contribute to the understanding of what controls risk perception and the interplay between perception and preparedness. At a broader level, this study provides local and state-level emergency managers information to evaluate and improve response capabilities and communication with the public and key institutions in order to

  7. Stratigraphic And Lithofacies Study Of Distal Rain-Triggered Lahars: The Case Of West Coast Of Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulas, M.; Chunga, K.; Peña Carpio, E.; Falquez Torres, D. A.; Alcivar, R., Sr.; Lopez Coronel, M. C.

    2015-12-01

    The central zone of the coast of Ecuador at the north of Manabí Province, on the area comprised between Salango and Jama communities, is characterized by the presence of whitish to grey, centimeters to meters thick, consolidated to loose distal ash deposits. Recent archeological studies on Valdivia (3500 BC) and Manteña (800-1500 AC - Harris et al. 2004) civilizations remains link this deposits with the intense eruptive phases that afflicted Ecuador 700-900 years ago (Usselman, 2006). Stratigraphic evidences and bibliographic datations of paleosols (Estrada, 1962; Mothes and Hall, 2008), allowed to estimate that these deposits are linked with the 800 BP eruption of Quilotoa and the following eruptions of Cotopaxi. According to the Smith and Lowe classification (1991), the deposits outcropping on the coast (located at a distance greater than 160 km from the volcanic vents), varied from whitish to grey, loose to weakly consolidated, massive to weakly stratified, centimeters to meters thick, coarse to fine ash matrix layers (diluite streamflow facies) to massive, large angular to sub-rounded siltitic blocks-rich and coarse to medium ash matrix deposits (debris flow facies). These types of lithofacies are associated to a rain-triggered lahar (De Belizal et al., 2013). The presence in some stratigraphic sections of sharp contacts, laminated layers of very fine ash, and also cm-thick sand and silt layers between the ash beds of the same deposits permit to understand that the different pulses were generated in short periods and after a long period. Structures like water pipes imply that the lahar went into the sea (Schneider, 2004), and allow the reconstruction of the paleotopographic condition during the emplacement of these deposits. This study focuses on the characterization of these types of deposits, permit to understand the kind of risk that may affect the towns located on the coast of Ecuador after VEI 4 to 6 eruptions on short time and within years.

  8. Coastal Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) for tsunami hazard assessment on the French coasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maspataud, Aurélie; Biscara, Laurie; Hébert, Hélène; Schmitt, Thierry; Créach, Ronan

    2015-04-01

    Building precise and up-to-date coastal DEMs is a prerequisite for accurate modeling and forecasting of hydrodynamic processes at local scale. Marine flooding, originating from tsunamis, storm surges or waves, is one of them. Some high resolution DEMs are being generated for multiple coast configurations (gulf, embayment, strait, estuary, harbor approaches, low-lying areas…) along French Atlantic and Channel coasts. This work is undertaken within the framework of the TANDEM project (Tsunamis in the Atlantic and the English ChaNnel: Definition of the Effects through numerical Modeling) (2014-2017). DEMs boundaries were defined considering the vicinity of French civil nuclear facilities, site effects considerations and potential tsunamigenic sources. Those were identified from available historical observations. Seamless integrated topographic and bathymetric coastal DEMs will be used by institutions taking part in the study to simulate expected wave height at regional and local scale on the French coasts, for a set of defined scenarii. The main tasks were (1) the development of a new capacity of production of DEM, (2) aiming at the release of high resolution and precision digital field models referred to vertical reference frameworks, that require (3) horizontal and vertical datum conversions (all source elevation data need to be transformed to a common datum), on the basis of (4) the building of (national and/or local) conversion grids of datum relationships based on known measurements. Challenges in coastal DEMs development deal with good practices throughout model development that can help minimizing uncertainties. This is particularly true as scattered elevation data with variable density, from multiple sources (national hydrographic services, state and local government agencies, research organizations and private engineering companies) and from many different types (paper fieldsheets to be digitized, single beam echo sounder, multibeam sonar, airborne laser

  9. Differences in topographic characteristics computed from 100- and 1000-m resolution digital elevation model data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wolock, D.M.; McCabe, G.J.

    2000-01-01

    Topographic characteristics computed from 100- and 1000-m resolution digital elevation model (DEM) data are compared for 50 locations representing varied terrain in the conterminous USA. The topographic characteristics are three parameters used extensively in hydrological research and modelling - slope (S), specific catchment area (A(s)) and a wetness index computed as the logarithm of the specific catchment area divided by slope [ln(A(s)/S)]. Slope values computed from 1000-m DEMs are smaller than those computed from 100-m DEMs; specific catchment area and the wetness index are larger for the 1000-m DEMs compared with the 100-m DEMs. Most of the differences between the 100- and 1000-m resolution DEMs can be attributed to terrain-discretization effects in the computation of the topographic characteristics and are not the result of smoothing or loss of terrain detail in the coarse data. In general, the terrain-discretization effects are greatest on flat terrain with long length-scale features, and the smoothing effects are greatest on steep terrain with short length-scale features. For the most part, the differences in the average values of the topographic characteristics computed from 100- and 1000-m resolution DEMs are predictable; that is, biases in the mean values for the characteristics computed from a 1000-m DEM can be corrected with simple linear equations. Copyright (C) 2000 John Wiley and Sons, Ltd.Topographic characteristics computed from 100- and 1000-m resolution digital elevation model (DEM) data are compared for 50 locations representing varied terrain in the conterminous USA. The topographic characteristics are three parameters used extensively in hydrological research and modelling - slope (S), specific catchment area (As) and a wetness index computed as the logarithm of the specific catchment area divided by slope [In(As/S)]. Slope values computed from 1000-m DEMs are smaller than those computed from 100-m DEMs; specific catchment area and the

  10. Testing 3D landform quantification methods with synthetic drumlins in a real digital elevation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillier, John K.; Smith, Mike J.

    2012-06-01

    Metrics such as height and volume quantifying the 3D morphology of landforms are important observations that reflect and constrain Earth surface processes. Errors in such measurements are, however, poorly understood. A novel approach, using statistically valid ‘synthetic' landscapes to quantify the errors is presented. The utility of the approach is illustrated using a case study of 184 drumlins observed in Scotland as quantified from a Digital Elevation Model (DEM) by the ‘cookie cutter' extraction method. To create the synthetic DEMs, observed drumlins were removed from the measured DEM and replaced by elongate 3D Gaussian ones of equivalent dimensions positioned randomly with respect to the ‘noise' (e.g. trees) and regional trends (e.g. hills) that cause the errors. Then, errors in the cookie cutter extraction method were investigated by using it to quantify these ‘synthetic' drumlins, whose location and size is known. Thus, the approach determines which key metrics are recovered accurately. For example, mean height of 6.8 m is recovered poorly at 12.5 ± 0.6 (2σ) m, but mean volume is recovered correctly. Additionally, quantification methods can be compared: A variant on the cookie cutter using an un-tensioned spline induced about twice (× 1.79) as much error. Finally, a previously reportedly statistically significant (p = 0.007) difference in mean volume between sub-populations of different ages, which may reflect formational processes, is demonstrated to be only 30-50% likely to exist in reality. Critically, the synthetic DEMs are demonstrated to realistically model parameter recovery, primarily because they are still almost entirely the original landscape. Results are insensitive to the exact method used to create the synthetic DEMs, and the approach could be readily adapted to assess a variety of landforms (e.g. craters, dunes and volcanoes).

  11. Insights into elevation-dependent warming in the Tibetan Plateau-Himalayas from CMIP5 model simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palazzi, Elisa; Filippi, Luca; von Hardenberg, Jost

    2016-08-01

    We use the output of twenty-seven Global Climate Models participating in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5) to investigate the temperature changes and their dependence on the elevation in the Tibetan Plateau, Himalaya and Karakoram mountains and in the surrounding areas in historical model simulations and in future projections. The aim of this study is to explore if and to what extent the CMIP5 models show elevation-dependent warming (EDW) in this part of the globe and to investigate what are the driving factors at play and their relative importance. Our results indicate that the models show enhanced rates of warming at higher elevations in the Tibetan Plateau-Himalayan region in the twentieth century, and this phenomenon is projected to strengthen by the end of the twenty-first century under a high-emission scenario. We find a nonlinear relationship between the warming rates and the elevation, for both the minimum and the maximum temperature: regions with temperatures below the freezing level of water show more warming than the regions with temperatures above, likely suggesting a key role of mechanisms involving water phase changes, the presence/absence of snow and the snow-albedo feedback. We consider the main variables simulated by the CMIP5 models whose change may be related to temperature changes at higher elevations. We find that changes in surface albedo, atmospheric humidity and downward longwave radiation are relevant factors for EDW in the Tibetan Plateau-Himalayas, with surface albedo being the leading driver.

  12. Interrelations among pyroclastic surge, pyroclastic flow, and lahars in Smith Creek valley during first minutes of 18 May 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brantley, S.R.; Waitt, R.B.

    1988-01-01

    A devastating pyroclastic surge and resultant lahars at Mount St. Helens on 18 May 1980 produced several catastrophic flowages into tributaries on the northeast volcano flank. The tributaries channeled the flows to Smith Creek valley, which lies within the area devastated by the surge but was unaffected by the great debris avalanche on the north flank. Stratigraphy shows that the pyroclastic surge preceded the lahars; there is no notable "wet" character to the surge deposits. Therefore the lahars must have originated as snowmelt, not as ejected water-saturated debris that segregated from the pyroclastic surge as has been inferred for other flanks of the volcano. In stratigraphic order the Smith Creek valley-floor materials comprise (1) a complex valley-bottom facies of the pyroclastic surge and a related pyroclastic flow, (2) an unusual hummocky diamict caused by complex mixing of lahars with the dry pyroclastic debris, and (3) deposits of secondary pyroclastic flows. These units are capped by silt containing accretionary lapilli, which began falling from a rapidly expanding mushroom-shaped cloud 20 minutes after the eruption's onset. The Smith Creek valley-bottom pyroclastic facies consists of (a) a weakly graded basal bed of fines-poor granular sand, the deposit of a low-concentration lithic pyroclastic surge, and (b) a bed of very poorly sorted pebble to cobble gravel inversely graded near its base, the deposit of a high-concentration lithic pyroclastic flow. The surge apparently segregated while crossing the steep headwater tributaries of Smith Creek; large fragments that settled from the turbulent surge formed a dense pyroclastic flow along the valley floor that lagged behind the front of the overland surge. The unusual hummocky diamict as thick as 15 m contains large lithic clasts supported by a tough, brown muddy sand matrix like that of lahar deposits upvalley. This unit contains irregular friable lenses and pods meters in diameter, blocks incorporated from

  13. Volcanic Plume Elevation Model Derived From Landsat 8: examples on Holuhraun (Iceland) and Mount Etna (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Michele, Marcello; Raucoules, Daniel; Arason, Þórður; Spinetti, Claudia; Corradini, Stefano; Merucci, Luca

    2016-04-01

    The retrieval of both height and velocity of a volcanic plume is an important issue in volcanology. As an example, it is known that large volcanic eruptions can temporarily alter the climate, causing global cooling and shifting precipitation patterns; the ash/gas dispersion in the atmosphere, their impact and lifetime around the globe, greatly depends on the injection altitude. Plume height information is critical for ash dispersion modelling and air traffic security. Furthermore, plume height during explosive volcanism is the primary parameter for estimating mass eruption rate. Knowing the plume altitude is also important to get the correct amount of SO2 concentration from dedicated spaceborne spectrometers. Moreover, the distribution of ash deposits on ground greatly depends on the ash cloud altitude, which has an impact on risk assessment and crisis management. Furthermore, a spatially detailed plume height measure could be used as a hint for gas emission rate estimation and for ash plume volume researches, which both have an impact on climate research, air quality assessment for aviation and finally for the understanding of the volcanic system itself as ash/gas emission rates are related to the state of pressurization of the magmatic chamber. Today, the community mainly relies on ground based measurements but often they can be difficult to collect as by definition volcanic areas are dangerous areas (presence of toxic gases) and can be remotely situated and difficult to access. Satellite remote sensing offers a comprehensive and safe way to estimate plume height. Conventional photogrammetric restitution based on satellite imagery fails in precisely retrieving a plume elevation model as the plume own velocity induces an apparent parallax that adds up to the standard parallax given by the stereoscopic view. Therefore, measurements based on standard satellite photogrammeric restitution do not apply as there is an ambiguity in the measurement of the plume position

  14. Volcanic Plume Elevation Model Derived From Landsat 8: examples on Holuhraun (Iceland) and Mount Etna (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Michele, Marcello; Raucoules, Daniel; Arason, Þórður; Spinetti, Claudia; Corradini, Stefano; Merucci, Luca

    2016-04-01

    The retrieval of both height and velocity of a volcanic plume is an important issue in volcanology. As an example, it is known that large volcanic eruptions can temporarily alter the climate, causing global cooling and shifting precipitation patterns; the ash/gas dispersion in the atmosphere, their impact and lifetime around the globe, greatly depends on the injection altitude. Plume height information is critical for ash dispersion modelling and air traffic security. Furthermore, plume height during explosive volcanism is the primary parameter for estimating mass eruption rate. Knowing the plume altitude is also important to get the correct amount of SO2 concentration from dedicated spaceborne spectrometers. Moreover, the distribution of ash deposits on ground greatly depends on the ash cloud altitude, which has an impact on risk assessment and crisis management. Furthermore, a spatially detailed plume height measure could be used as a hint for gas emission rate estimation and for ash plume volume researches, which both have an impact on climate research, air quality assessment for aviation and finally for the understanding of the volcanic system itself as ash/gas emission rates are related to the state of pressurization of the magmatic chamber. Today, the community mainly relies on ground based measurements but often they can be difficult to collect as by definition volcanic areas are dangerous areas (presence of toxic gases) and can be remotely situated and difficult to access. Satellite remote sensing offers a comprehensive and safe way to estimate plume height. Conventional photogrammetric restitution based on satellite imagery fails in precisely retrieving a plume elevation model as the plume own velocity induces an apparent parallax that adds up to the standard parallax given by the stereoscopic view. Therefore, measurements based on standard satellite photogrammeric restitution do not apply as there is an ambiguity in the measurement of the plume position

  15. The modelling, simulation and experimental testing $60#?tjl$62#?>of the dynamic responses of an elevator system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrasate, Xabier; Kaczmarczyk, Stefan; Almandoz, Gaizka; Abete, José M.; Isasa, Inge

    2014-01-01

    Vertical vibrations affect passenger comfort during an elevator travel. This work presents the results of a study of vertical vibrations caused by torque ripple generated at the elevator drive system. Tests are performed on a 1:1 roping configuration laboratory model; the acceleration response at the suspended masses and at the drive machine, the machine shaft velocity and the three phase current intensities supplied to the machine are measured during several travels. The machine torque is estimated from the current intensities. A non-stationary model of an elevator is then developed to simulate the acceleration response. The model accommodates the drive system dynamics. The machine parameters are computed by means of the Finite Element Method simulation software FLUX. FLUX computes the amplitudes of the torque ripple and the radial forces at the air-gap. As the torque ripple computed by FLUX is smaller than that torque estimated from the machine currents, the latter is added as a perturbation to the controller generated torque. With respect to the car-counterweight-sheave-ropes assembly a five degree-of-freedom lumped-parameter model (LPM) and a novel distributed-parameter one (DPM) are developed. The elevator dynamics represented by the DPM is described by a partial differential equation set that is discretised by expanding the vertical displacements in terms of the linear stationary mode shapes of a system composed of three masses constrained by the suspension rope. The models are implemented in the MATLAB/Simulink computational environment and the system response is determined through numerical simulation. It is shown that the LPM forms a good approximation of the DPM. The frequency content of the computed and measured accelerations demonstrates that the elevator car vibrates at frequencies generated at the machine, especially when they are close to the system natural frequencies.

  16. Digital Elevation Models Aid the Analysis of Double Layered Ejecta (DLE) Impact Craters on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouginis-Mark, P. J.; Boyce, J. M.; Garbeil, H.

    2014-12-01

    Considerable debate has recently taken place concerning the origin of the inner and outer ejecta layers of double layered ejecta (DLE) craters on Mars. For craters in the diameter range ~10 to ~25 km, the inner ejecta layer of DLE craters displays characteristic grooves extending from the rim crest, and has led investigators to propose three hypotheses for their formation: (1) deposition of the primary ejecta and subsequent surface scouring by either atmospheric vortices or a base surge; (2) emplacement through a landslide of the near-rim crest ejecta; and (3) instabilities (similar to Gortler vortices) generated by high flow-rate, and high granular temperatures. Critical to resolving between these models is the topographic expression of both the ejecta layer and the groove geometry. To address this problem, we have made several digital elevation models (DEMs) from CTX and HiRISE stereo pairs using the Ames Stereo Pipeline at scales of 24 m/pixel and 1 m/pixel, respectively. These DEMs allow several key observations to be made that bear directly upon the origin of the grooves associated with DLE craters: (1) Grooves formed on the sloping ejecta layer surfaces right up to the preserved crater rim; (2) There is clear evidence that grooves traverse the topographic boundary between the inner and outer ejecta layers; and (3) There are at least two different sets of radial grooves, with smaller grooves imprinted upon the larger grooves. There are "deep-wide" grooves that have a width of ~200 m and a depth of ~10 m, and there are "shallow-narrow" grooves with a width of <50 m and depth <5 m. These two scales of grooves are not consistent with their formation analogous to a landslide. Two different sets of grooves would imply that, simultaneously, two different depths to the flow would have to exist if the grooves were formed by shear within the flow, something that is not physically possible. All three observations can only be consistent with a model of groove formation

  17. Assessment of multiresolution segmentation for delimiting drumlins in digital elevation models.

    PubMed

    Eisank, Clemens; Smith, Mike; Hillier, John

    2014-06-01

    Mapping or "delimiting" landforms is one of geomorphology's primary tools. Computer-based techniques such as land-surface segmentation allow the emulation of the process of manual landform delineation. Land-surface segmentation exhaustively subdivides a digital elevation model (DEM) into morphometrically-homogeneous irregularly-shaped regions, called terrain segments. Terrain segments can be created from various land-surface parameters (LSP) at multiple scales, and may therefore potentially correspond to the spatial extents of landforms such as drumlins. However, this depends on the segmentation algorithm, the parameterization, and the LSPs. In the present study we assess the widely used multiresolution segmentation (MRS) algorithm for its potential in providing terrain segments which delimit drumlins. Supervised testing was based on five 5-m DEMs that represented a set of 173 synthetic drumlins at random but representative positions in the same landscape. Five LSPs were tested, and four variants were computed for each LSP to assess the impact of median filtering of DEMs, and logarithmic transformation of LSPs. The testing scheme (1) employs MRS to partition each LSP exhaustively into 200 coarser scales of terrain segments by increasing the scale parameter (SP), (2) identifies the spatially best matching terrain segment for each reference drumlin, and (3) computes four segmentation accuracy metrics for quantifying the overall spatial match between drumlin segments and reference drumlins. Results of 100 tests showed that MRS tends to perform best on LSPs that are regionally derived from filtered DEMs, and then log-transformed. MRS delineated 97% of the detected drumlins at SP values between 1 and 50. Drumlin delimitation rates with values up to 50% are in line with the success of manual interpretations. Synthetic DEMs are well-suited for assessing landform quantification methods such as MRS, since subjectivity in the reference data is avoided which increases the

  18. Assessment of multiresolution segmentation for delimiting drumlins in digital elevation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisank, Clemens; Smith, Mike; Hillier, John

    2014-06-01

    Mapping or "delimiting" landforms is one of geomorphology's primary tools. Computer-based techniques such as land-surface segmentation allow the emulation of the process of manual landform delineation. Land-surface segmentation exhaustively subdivides a digital elevation model (DEM) into morphometrically-homogeneous irregularly-shaped regions, called terrain segments. Terrain segments can be created from various land-surface parameters (LSP) at multiple scales, and may therefore potentially correspond to the spatial extents of landforms such as drumlins. However, this depends on the segmentation algorithm, the parameterization, and the LSPs. In the present study we assess the widely used multiresolution segmentation (MRS) algorithm for its potential in providing terrain segments which delimit drumlins. Supervised testing was based on five 5-m DEMs that represented a set of 173 synthetic drumlins at random but representative positions in the same landscape. Five LSPs were tested, and four variants were computed for each LSP to assess the impact of median filtering of DEMs, and logarithmic transformation of LSPs. The testing scheme (1) employs MRS to partition each LSP exhaustively into 200 coarser scales of terrain segments by increasing the scale parameter (SP), (2) identifies the spatially best matching terrain segment for each reference drumlin, and (3) computes four segmentation accuracy metrics for quantifying the overall spatial match between drumlin segments and reference drumlins. Results of 100 tests showed that MRS tends to perform best on LSPs that are regionally derived from filtered DEMs, and then log-transformed. MRS delineated 97% of the detected drumlins at SP values between 1 and 50. Drumlin delimitation rates with values up to 50% are in line with the success of manual interpretations. Synthetic DEMs are well-suited for assessing landform quantification methods such as MRS, since subjectivity in the reference data is avoided which increases the

  19. Rats anticipate damaged rungs on the elevated ladder: Applications for rodent models of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Lopatin, Daniel; Caputo, Nicole; Damphousse, Chelsey; Pandey, Siyaram; Cohen, Jerome

    2015-03-01

    The present study examined rats' ability to anticipate undetectable wider gaps between rungs produced when they stepped on and dislodged damaged rungs while they traversed a slightly inclined elevated ladder. Rats in the first of three experiments reduced running speeds when they encountered four evenly spaced damaged rungs either always placed on the first or second half of the ladder (the break-a-way (BW) phase) but quickly recovered to their baseline (BL) levels when damaged rungs where replaced with intact rungs (the recovery phase). Rats previously exposed to damaged rungs over the first half of the ladder increased their speeds above BL on its second "safer" half during the recovery phase, a delayed "relief-like" positive contrast effect. In Experiment 2, other rats decreased their speeds more as they approached a single damaged rung at a fixed location when it occurred before than after the mid-point of the ladder. Although they quickly recovered to BL speeds on the portion of the ladder after the damaged rung or replaced intact rung, they never showed any "relief-like"/escape effects. Rats also reduced their likelihood of dislodging the damaged rung with a fore paw over extended BW training. In the third experiment rats encountered a more easily dislodged damaged rung that was signaled by a closer intact rung on half the trials. Under these conditions rats displayed a more reliable positive contrast "relief-like" effect. We discussed how traditional associative and cognitive theories of aversive conditioning account for these findings and their relationship to normal changes in dopamine production and possible effects of reduced production from the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) in the Basal ganglia in rodent models of Parkinson's disease. PMID:25747570

  20. Assessment of multiresolution segmentation for delimiting drumlins in digital elevation models.

    PubMed

    Eisank, Clemens; Smith, Mike; Hillier, John

    2014-06-01

    Mapping or "delimiting" landforms is one of geomorphology's primary tools. Computer-based techniques such as land-surface segmentation allow the emulation of the process of manual landform delineation. Land-surface segmentation exhaustively subdivides a digital elevation model (DEM) into morphometrically-homogeneous irregularly-shaped regions, called terrain segments. Terrain segments can be created from various land-surface parameters (LSP) at multiple scales, and may therefore potentially correspond to the spatial extents of landforms such as drumlins. However, this depends on the segmentation algorithm, the parameterization, and the LSPs. In the present study we assess the widely used multiresolution segmentation (MRS) algorithm for its potential in providing terrain segments which delimit drumlins. Supervised testing was based on five 5-m DEMs that represented a set of 173 synthetic drumlins at random but representative positions in the same landscape. Five LSPs were tested, and four variants were computed for each LSP to assess the impact of median filtering of DEMs, and logarithmic transformation of LSPs. The testing scheme (1) employs MRS to partition each LSP exhaustively into 200 coarser scales of terrain segments by increasing the scale parameter (SP), (2) identifies the spatially best matching terrain segment for each reference drumlin, and (3) computes four segmentation accuracy metrics for quantifying the overall spatial match between drumlin segments and reference drumlins. Results of 100 tests showed that MRS tends to perform best on LSPs that are regionally derived from filtered DEMs, and then log-transformed. MRS delineated 97% of the detected drumlins at SP values between 1 and 50. Drumlin delimitation rates with values up to 50% are in line with the success of manual interpretations. Synthetic DEMs are well-suited for assessing landform quantification methods such as MRS, since subjectivity in the reference data is avoided which increases the

  1. A robust interpolation method for constructing digital elevation models from remote sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chuanfa; Liu, Fengying; Li, Yanyan; Yan, Changqing; Liu, Guolin

    2016-09-01

    A digital elevation model (DEM) derived from remote sensing data often suffers from outliers due to various reasons such as the physical limitation of sensors and low contrast of terrain textures. In order to reduce the effect of outliers on DEM construction, a robust algorithm of multiquadric (MQ) methodology based on M-estimators (MQ-M) was proposed. MQ-M adopts an adaptive weight function with three-parts. The weight function is null for large errors, one for small errors and quadric for others. A mathematical surface was employed to comparatively analyze the robustness of MQ-M, and its performance was compared with those of the classical MQ and a recently developed robust MQ method based on least absolute deviation (MQ-L). Numerical tests show that MQ-M is comparative to the classical MQ and superior to MQ-L when sample points follow normal and Laplace distributions, and under the presence of outliers the former is more accurate than the latter. A real-world example of DEM construction using stereo images indicates that compared with the classical interpolation methods, such as natural neighbor (NN), ordinary kriging (OK), ANUDEM, MQ-L and MQ, MQ-M has a better ability of preserving subtle terrain features. MQ-M replaces thin plate spline for reference DEM construction to assess the contribution to our recently developed multiresolution hierarchical classification method (MHC). Classifying the 15 groups of benchmark datasets provided by the ISPRS Commission demonstrates that MQ-M-based MHC is more accurate than MQ-L-based and TPS-based MHCs. MQ-M has high potential for DEM construction.

  2. Applying SRTM digital elevation model to unravel Quaternary drainage in forested areas of Northeastern Amazonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantelli, Luiz Rogério; Rossetti, Dilce de Fátima; Albuquerque, Paulo Gurgel; Valeriano, Márcio de Morisson

    2009-12-01

    There has been an increasing number of articles stressing the advantage of applying remote sensing products of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) for rapidly enhancing the volume of geological data in Amazonian areas, where forest cover is dense and high, clouds are abundant and accessibility is limited. The majority of these studies has emphasized geomorphology as a tool for both discussing tectonic reactivations during the Cenozoic and reconstructing Quaternary paleolandscapes. This work applies Digital Elevation Model (DEM) derived from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) for delineating past morphological features under dense rainforest in an Amazonian lowland area. Previous use of this tool in southwestern Marajó Island (northern Brazil) helped to delineate, with exceptional precision, a paleochannel network hidden under the rainforest, which would be barely detected with other available remote sensing products. Fieldwork revealed that these paleochannels are related to palimpsest drainage systems developed mostly during the last 40,000 14C yr B.P. Measured altitudes acquired during topographic surveys attested that paleochannel areas are slightly higher than adjacent floodplains. This fact determined the successful application of SRTM-DEM for mapping paleochannels in Marajó Island. Integration of SRTM data with sedimentological information collected during fieldwork suggests paleoflows derived from continental areas located to south of the study area. This paleodrainage was active when the island was still connected to mainland. With island detachment due to reactivation of tectonic faults, the channels became abandoned and were progressively forested. The results obtained in the present study indicate that SRTM-DEM has high potential for unraveling similar morphological features from many other Amazonian areas with low topography and a dense forest cover.

  3. Assessment of multiresolution segmentation for delimiting drumlins in digital elevation models

    PubMed Central

    Eisank, Clemens; Smith, Mike; Hillier, John

    2014-01-01

    Mapping or “delimiting” landforms is one of geomorphology's primary tools. Computer-based techniques such as land-surface segmentation allow the emulation of the process of manual landform delineation. Land-surface segmentation exhaustively subdivides a digital elevation model (DEM) into morphometrically-homogeneous irregularly-shaped regions, called terrain segments. Terrain segments can be created from various land-surface parameters (LSP) at multiple scales, and may therefore potentially correspond to the spatial extents of landforms such as drumlins. However, this depends on the segmentation algorithm, the parameterization, and the LSPs. In the present study we assess the widely used multiresolution segmentation (MRS) algorithm for its potential in providing terrain segments which delimit drumlins. Supervised testing was based on five 5-m DEMs that represented a set of 173 synthetic drumlins at random but representative positions in the same landscape. Five LSPs were tested, and four variants were computed for each LSP to assess the impact of median filtering of DEMs, and logarithmic transformation of LSPs. The testing scheme (1) employs MRS to partition each LSP exhaustively into 200 coarser scales of terrain segments by increasing the scale parameter (SP), (2) identifies the spatially best matching terrain segment for each reference drumlin, and (3) computes four segmentation accuracy metrics for quantifying the overall spatial match between drumlin segments and reference drumlins. Results of 100 tests showed that MRS tends to perform best on LSPs that are regionally derived from filtered DEMs, and then log-transformed. MRS delineated 97% of the detected drumlins at SP values between 1 and 50. Drumlin delimitation rates with values up to 50% are in line with the success of manual interpretations. Synthetic DEMs are well-suited for assessing landform quantification methods such as MRS, since subjectivity in the reference data is avoided which increases the

  4. Elevated tph2 mRNA Expression in a Rat Model of Chronic Anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Donner, Nina C.; Johnson, Philip L.; Fitz, Stephanie D.; Kellen, Karen E.; Shekhar, Anantha; Lowry, Christopher A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Allelic variations in TPH2, the gene encoding tryptophan hydroxylase 2, the rate-limiting enzyme for brain serotonin (5-HT) biosynthesis, may be genetic predictors of panic disorder and panic responses to panicogenic challenges in healthy volunteers. To test the hypothesis that tph2 mRNA is altered in chronic anxiety states, we measured tph2 expression in an established rat model of panic disorder. Methods We implanted 16 adult, male rats with bilateral guide cannulae and then primed them with daily injections of the corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) receptor agonist, urocortin 1 (UCN1, 6 fmoles/100 nl per side, n = 8) or vehicle (n = 8) into the basolateral amygdaloid complex (BL) for 5 consecutive days. Anxiety-like behavior was assessed, 24 hr prior to and 48 hr following priming, in the social interaction (SI) test. A third group (n = 7) served as undisturbed home cage controls. All rats were killed 3 days after the last intra-BL injection to analyze tph2 and slc6a4 (gene encoding the serotonin transporter, SERT) mRNA expression in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DR), the main source of serotonergic projections to anxiety-related brain regions, using in situ hybridization histochemistry. Results UCN1 priming increased anxiety-related behavior in the SI test compared to vehicle-injected controls and elevated tph2, but not slc6a4, mRNA expression in DR subregions, including the ventrolateral DR/ventrolateral periaqueductal gray (DRVL/VLPAG), a subregion previously implicated in control of panic-related physiologic responses. Tph2 mRNA expression in the DRVL/VLPAG was correlated with increased anxiety-related behavior. Conclusion Our data support the hypothesis that chronic anxiety states are associated with dysregulated tph2 expression. PMID:22511363

  5. Variability in projected elevation dependent warming in boreal midlatitude winter in CMIP5 climate models and its potential drivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangwala, Imtiaz; Sinsky, Eric; Miller, James R.

    2016-04-01

    The future rate of climate change in mountains has many potential human impacts, including those related to water resources, ecosystem services, and recreation. Analysis of the ensemble mean response of CMIP5 global climate models (GCMs) shows amplified warming in high elevation regions during the cold season in boreal midlatitudes. We examine how the twenty-first century elevation-dependent response in the daily minimum surface air temperature [d(ΔTmin)/dz] varies among 27 different GCMs during winter for the RCP 8.5 emissions scenario. The focus is on regions within the northern hemisphere mid-latitude band between 27.5°N and 40°N, which includes both the Rocky Mountains and the Tibetan Plateau/Himalayas. We find significant variability in d(ΔTmin)/dz among the individual models ranging from 0.16 °C/km (10th percentile) to 0.97 °C/km (90th percentile), although nearly all of the GCMs (24 out of 27) show a significant positive value for d(ΔTmin)/dz. To identify some of the important drivers associated with the variability in d(ΔTmin)/dz during winter, we evaluate the co-variance between d(ΔTmin)/dz and the differential response of elevation-based anomalies in different climate variables as well as the GCMs' spatial resolution, their global climate sensitivity, and their elevation-dependent free air temperature response. We find that d(ΔTmin)/dz has the strongest correlation with elevation-dependent increases in surface water vapor, followed by elevation-dependent decreases in surface albedo, and a weak positive correlation with the GCMs' free air temperature response.

  6. The dark phase intraocular pressure elevation and retinal ganglion cell degeneration in a rat model of experimental glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Kwong, Jacky M K; Vo, Nancy; Quan, Ann; Nam, Michael; Kyung, Haksu; Yu, Fei; Piri, Natik; Caprioli, Joseph

    2013-07-01

    Intraocular pressure (IOP) elevation is considered as a major risk factor causing the progression of vision deterioration in glaucoma. Although it is known that the IOP level changes widely throughout the day and night, how the dark or light phase IOP elevation contributes to retinal ganglion cell (RGC) degeneration is still largely unclear. To examine the profile of IOP, modified laser photocoagulation was applied to the trabecular meshwork of Brown Norway rats and both light and dark phase IOPs were monitored approximately 1-2 times a week. The relationship between IOP elevation and RGC degeneration was investigated while RGC body loss was analyzed with Rbpms immunolabeling on retinal wholemount and axonal injury in the optic nerve was semi-quantified. The baseline awake dark and light IOPs were 30.4 ± 2.7 and 20.2 ± 2.1 mmHg respectively. The average dark IOP was increased to 38.2 ± 3.2 mmHg for five weeks after the laser treatment on 270° trabecular meshwork. However, there was no significant loss of RGC body and axonal injury. After laser treatment on 330° trabecular meshwork, the dark and light IOPs were significantly increased to 43.8 ± 4.6 and 23 ± 3.7 mmHg respectively for 5 weeks. The cumulative dark and light IOP elevations were 277 ± 86 and 113 ± 50 mmHg days respectively while the cumulative total (light and dark) IOP elevation was 213 ± 114 mmHg days. After 5 weeks, regional RGC body loss of 29.5 ± 15.5% and moderate axonal injury were observed. Axonal injury and loss of RGC body had a high correlation with the cumulative total IOP elevation (R(2) = 0.60 and 0.65 respectively). There was an association between the cumulative dark IOP elevation and RGC body loss (R(2) = 0.37) and axonal injury (R(2) = 0.51) whereas the associations between neuronal damages and the cumulative light IOP elevation were weak (for RGC body loss, R(2) = 0.01; for axonal injury, R(2) = 0.26). Simple linear regression model

  7. Stable isotopes and Digital Elevation Models to study nutrient inputs in high-Arctic lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calizza, Edoardo; Rossi, David; Costantini, Maria Letizia; Careddu, Giulio; Rossi, Loreto

    2016-04-01

    Ice cover, run-off from the watershed, aquatic and terrestrial primary productivity, guano deposition from birds are key factors controlling nutrient and organic matter inputs in high-Arctic lakes. All these factors are expected to be significantly affected by climate change. Quantifying these controls is a key baseline step to understand what combination of factors subtends the biological productivity in Arctic lakes and will drive their ecological response to environmental change. Basing on Digital Elevation Models, drainage maps, and C and N elemental content and stable isotope analysis in sediments, aquatic vegetation and a dominant macroinvertebrate species (Lepidurus arcticus Pallas 1973) belonging to Tvillingvatnet, Storvatnet and Kolhamna, three lakes located in North Spitsbergen (Svalbard), we propose an integrated approach for the analysis of (i) nutrient and organic matter inputs in lakes; (ii) the role of catchment hydro-geomorphology in determining inter-lake differences in the isotopic composition of sediments; (iii) effects of diverse nutrient inputs on the isotopic niche of Lepidurus arcticus. Given its high run-off and large catchment, organic deposits in Tvillingvatnet where dominated by terrestrial inputs, whereas inputs were mainly of aquatic origin in Storvatnet, a lowland lake with low potential run-off. In Kolhamna, organic deposits seem to be dominated by inputs from birds, which actually colonise the area. Isotopic signatures were similar between samples within each lake, representing precise tracers for studies on the effect of climate change on biogeochemical cycles in lakes. The isotopic niche of L. aricticus reflected differences in sediments between lakes, suggesting a bottom-up effect of hydro-geomorphology characterizing each lake on nutrients assimilated by this species. The presented approach proven to be an effective research pathway for the identification of factors subtending to nutrient and organic matter inputs and transfer

  8. Delineation of Flood Prone Areas using Digital Elevation Models: Scale Dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Leo, M.; Manfreda, S.; Sole, A.; Fiorentino, M.

    2009-04-01

    The delineation of the areas subject to flood inundations raises complex problems regarding the definition of hydrological forcing and the parametrization of models for flood wave propagation (e.g., Horritt & Bates, 2000, 2002). The increasing availability of new technologies for the measurement of surface elevation (eg GPS, SAR interferometry, radar and laser altimetry) led to an increase in the attraction of DEM-based procedures for the delineation of floodplains. In recent years, much effort has gone into the identification of flood prone areas through the use of hydrological and hydraulic studies carried out by River Basin Authorities (public institutions dedicated to river basins management). These studies are generally based on topographic surveys and numerical modelling for the flood wave propagation providing an enormous database rarely used for post processing. Manfreda et al. (2006) have recently used the technical documentation, produced during the definition of Hydrogeological Management Plan by the River Basin Authorities, to define a synthetic procedure for the delineation of flood inundation exposure. The relevance of such techniques lies in the ability to characterize, at least at first approximation, portions of the territory where is not possible to run expensive hydrological-hydraulic simulations. The development of simplified methodologies is taken further in the present study to investigate the relationship between areas exposed to flood inundation and the geomorphologic characteristics of the terrain (contributing area, local slope of the surface, curvature, TOPMODEL topographic index) showing a strong correlation with the TOPMODEL topographic index. Manfreda et al. (2006) also defined a new expression of the topographical index more suited to the task of delineating flood exposure directly from a DEM analysis. This permitted the definition of a fast procedure for the calculation of flood inundation areas using a threshold level (ITms) to

  9. The effects of digital elevation model resolution on the calculation and predictions of topographic wetness indices.

    SciTech Connect

    Drover, Damion, Ryan

    2011-12-01

    One of the largest exports in the Southeast U.S. is forest products. Interest in biofuels using forest biomass has increased recently, leading to more research into better forest management BMPs. The USDA Forest Service, along with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, University of Georgia and Oregon State University are researching the impacts of intensive forest management for biofuels on water quality and quantity at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. Surface runoff of saturated areas, transporting excess nutrients and contaminants, is a potential water quality issue under investigation. Detailed maps of variable source areas and soil characteristics would therefore be helpful prior to treatment. The availability of remotely sensed and computed digital elevation models (DEMs) and spatial analysis tools make it easy to calculate terrain attributes. These terrain attributes can be used in models to predict saturated areas or other attributes in the landscape. With laser altimetry, an area can be flown to produce very high resolution data, and the resulting data can be resampled into any resolution of DEM desired. Additionally, there exist many maps that are in various resolutions of DEM, such as those acquired from the U.S. Geological Survey. Problems arise when using maps derived from different resolution DEMs. For example, saturated areas can be under or overestimated depending on the resolution used. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of DEM resolution on the calculation of topographic wetness indices used to predict variable source areas of saturation, and to find the best resolutions to produce prediction maps of soil attributes like nitrogen, carbon, bulk density and soil texture for low-relief, humid-temperate forested hillslopes. Topographic wetness indices were calculated based on the derived terrain attributes, slope and specific catchment area, from five different DEM resolutions. The DEMs were resampled from LiDAR, which is a

  10. Digital Elevation Models of the Earth derived from space-based observations: Advances and potential for geomorphological studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouratidis, Antonios

    2013-04-01

    Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) are an inherently interdisciplinary topic, both due to their production and validation methods, as well as their significance for numerous disciplines. The most utilized contemporary topographic datasets worldwide are those of global DEMs. Several space-based sources have been used for the production of (almost) global DEMs, namely satellite Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) Interferometry/InSAR, stereoscopy of multispectral satellite images and altimetry, producing several versions of autonomous or mixed products (i.e. SRTM, ACE, ASTER-GDEM). Complementary space-based observations, such as those of Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS), are also used, mainly for validation purposes. The apparent positive impact of these elevation datasets so far has been consolidated by the plethora of related scientific, civil and military applications. Topography is a prominent element for almost all Earth sciences, but in Geomorphology it is even more fundamental. In geomorphological studies, elevation data and thus DEMs can be extensively used for the extraction of both qualitative and quantitative information, such as relief classification, determination of slope and slope orientation, delineation of drainage basins, extraction of drainage networks and much more. Global DEMs are constantly becoming finer, i.e. of higher spatial resolution and more "sensitive" to elevation changes, i.e. of higher vertical accuracy and these progresses are undoubtedly considered as a major breakthrough, each time a new improved global DEM is released. Nevertheless, for Geomorphology in particular, if not already there, we are close to the point in time, where the need for discrimination between DSM (Digital Surface Model) and DTM (Digital Terrain Model) is becoming critical; if the distinction between vegetation and man-made structures on one side (DSM), and actual terrain elevation on the other side (DTM) cannot be made, then, in many cases, any further

  11. Meteorological conditions associated to high sublimation amounts in semiarid high-elevation Andes decrease the performance of empirical melt models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayala, Alvaro; Pellicciotti, Francesca; MacDonell, Shelley; McPhee, James; Burlando, Paolo

    2015-04-01

    Empirical melt (EM) models are often preferred to surface energy balance (SEB) models to calculate melt amounts of snow and ice in hydrological modelling of high-elevation catchments. The most common reasons to support this decision are that, in comparison to SEB models, EM models require lower levels of meteorological data, complexity and computational costs. However, EM models assume that melt can be characterized by means of a few index variables only, and their results strongly depend on the transferability in space and time of the calibrated empirical parameters. In addition, they are intrinsically limited in accounting for specific process components, the complexity of which cannot be easily reconciled with the empirical nature of the model. As an example of an EM model, in this study we use the Enhanced Temperature Index (ETI) model, which calculates melt amounts using air temperature and the shortwave radiation balance as index variables. We evaluate the performance of the ETI model on dry high-elevation sites where sublimation amounts - that are not explicitly accounted for the EM model - represent a relevant percentage of total ablation (1.1 to 8.7%). We analyse a data set of four Automatic Weather Stations (AWS), which were collected during the ablation season 2013-14, at elevations between 3466 and 4775 m asl, on the glaciers El Tapado, San Francisco, Bello and El Yeso, which are located in the semiarid Andes of central Chile. We complement our analysis using data from past studies in Juncal Norte Glacier (Chile) and Haut Glacier d'Arolla (Switzerland), during the ablation seasons 2008-09 and 2006, respectively. We use the results of a SEB model, applied to each study site, along the entire season, to calibrate the ETI model. The ETI model was not designed to calculate sublimation amounts, however, results show that their ability is low also to simulate melt amounts at sites where sublimation represents larger percentages of total ablation. In fact, we

  12. Rockfall susceptibility mapping of Yosemite Valley (USA) using a high-resolution digital elevation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pannatier, A.; Oppikofer, T.; Jaboyedoff, M.; Stock, G. M.

    2009-04-01

    In Yosemite National Park (California, USA) rockfalls from the steep valley flanks are frequent (>600 documented events in 150 years) and threaten infrastructure in this popular tourist area. This study focuses on a methodology to map the susceptibility to rockfall initiation based on a high-resolution digital elevation model (HRDEM) obtained from aerial laser scanning (1 meter cell size). This methodology is based on geometric factors derived from the HRDEM, i.e., the steepness of the topography, the presence of joints or fractures enabling either a planar or a wedge failure mechanism, and a high denudation potential. The slope angle histogram computed using standard GIS routines was simulated using Gaussian distributions, which were attributed to different parts of the topography, i.e., the cliffs, the valley flanks and the valley floor. Slopes steeper than 36° are found to form cliffs and thus potentially lead to rockfalls. A morpho-structural analysis of the HRDEM was performed in Coltop3D software to determine the major discontinuity sets that shape the topography. Kinematic analyses were made for each of these 7 discontinuity sets in order to determine the HRDEM cells that fulfil the geometric criteria for a planar or wedge failure mechanism. Most of the cliffs in Yosemite Valley enable one or both of these failure mechanisms. The denudation potential was assessed using the sloping local base level (SLBL) concept. The SLBL defines a basal erosion surface and the above lying rock masses (up to 400 m in some of the vertical cliffs) are susceptible to erosion by mass wasting. A thickness of 20 m above the SLBL surface was chosen as lower limit for the denudation potential criterion. The HRDEM cells that satisfy 1, 2 or all 3 criteria are considered having low, moderate and high susceptibility to rockfall initiation. The areas with highest susceptibility (El Capitan, Glacier Point, Yosemite Falls and Half Dome) coincide well with post-glacial talus accumulations

  13. Geomorphic Map of Worcester County, Maryland, Interpreted from a LIDAR-Based, Digital Elevation Model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Newell, Wayne L.; Clark, Inga

    2008-01-01

    A recently compiled mosaic of a LIDAR-based digital elevation model (DEM) is presented with geomorphic analysis of new macro-topographic details. The geologic framework of the surficial and near surface late Cenozoic deposits of the central uplands, Pocomoke River valley, and the Atlantic Coast includes Cenozoic to recent sediments from fluvial, estuarine, and littoral depositional environments. Extensive Pleistocene (cold climate) sandy dune fields are deposited over much of the terraced landscape. The macro details from the LIDAR image reveal 2 meter-scale resolution of details of the shapes of individual dunes, and fields of translocated sand sheets. Most terrace surfaces are overprinted with circular to elliptical rimmed basins that represent complex histories of ephemeral ponds that were formed, drained, and overprinted by younger basins. The terrains of composite ephemeral ponds and the dune fields are inter-shingled at their margins indicating contemporaneous erosion, deposition, and re-arrangement and possible internal deformation of the surficial deposits. The aggregate of these landform details and their deposits are interpreted as the products of arid, cold climate processes that were common to the mid-Atlantic region during the Last Glacial Maximum. In the Pocomoke valley and its larger tributaries, erosional remnants of sandy flood plains with anastomosing channels indicate the dynamics of former hydrology and sediment load of the watershed that prevailed at the end of the Pleistocene. As the climate warmed and precipitation increased during the transition from late Pleistocene to Holocene, dune fields were stabilized by vegetation, and the stream discharge increased. The increased discharge and greater local relief of streams graded to lower sea levels stimulated down cutting and created the deeply incised valleys out onto the continental shelf. These incised valleys have been filling with fluvial to intertidal deposits that record the rising sea

  14. Synergetic merging of Cartosat-1 and RAMP to generate improved digital elevation model of Schirmacher oasis, east Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jawak, S. D.; Luis, A. J.

    2014-11-01

    Available digital elevation models (DEMs) of Antarctic region generated by using radar altimetry and the Antarctic digital database (ADD) indicate elevation variations of up to hundreds of meters, which necessitates the generation of local DEM and its validation by using ground reference. An enhanced digital elevation model (eDEM) of the Schirmacher oasis region, east Antarctica, is generated synergistically by using Cartosat-1 stereo pair-derived photogrammetric DEM (CartoDEM)-based point elevation dataset and multitemporal radarsat Antarctic mapping project version 2 (RAMPv2) DEM-based point elevation dataset. In this study, we analyzed suite of interpolation techniques for constructing a DEM from RAMPv2 and CartoDEM-based point elevation datasets, in order to determine the level of confidence with which the interpolation techniques can generate a better interpolated continuous surface, and eventually improves the elevation accuracy of DEM from synergistically fused RAMPv2 and CartoDEM point elevation datasets. RAMPv2 points and CartoDEM points were used as primary data for various interpolation techniques such as ordinary kriging (OK), simple kriging (SK), universal kriging (UK), disjunctive kriging (DK) techniques, inverse distance weighted (IDW), global polynomial (GP) with power 1 and 2, local polynomial (LP) and radial basis functions (RBF). Cokriging of 2 variables with second dataset was used for ordinary cokriging (OCoK), simple cokriging (SCoK), universal cokriging (UCoK) and disjunctive cokriging (DCoK). The IDW, GP, LP, RBF, and kriging methods were applied to one variable, while Cokriging experiments were employed on two variables. The experiment of dataset and its combination produced two types of point elevation map categorized as (1) one variable (RAMPv2 Point maps and CartoDEM Point maps) and (2) two variables (RAMPv2 Point maps + CartoDEM Point maps). Interpolated surfaces were evaluated with the help of differential global positioning system

  15. Combining MESSENGER Data in Production and Analysis of Digital Elevation Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, K. J.; Howington-Kraus, E.; Thomas, O. H.; Neumann, G. A.; Mazarico, E.; Kirk, R. L.; Weller, L. A.; Edmundson, K. L.; Stephens, J. S.; Sawyers, R. J.; Robinson, M. S.; Solomon, S. C.

    2012-12-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey is combining image and laser altimetry data of Mercury acquired from instruments on the MESSENGER [1] spacecraft for the production and analysis of digital elevation models (DEMs). Precise image measurements that tie Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA) [2] point data to Mercury Dual Imaging System (MDIS) [3] stereo pairs are obtained using the SOCET SET (®BAE Systems) digital photogrammetry software suite. These measurements will be added to existing Integrated Software for Imagers and Spectrometers [4] control networks used to produce global cartographic basemaps and a global DEM [5]. The MLA points serve as three-dimensional control points in a least-squares bundle adjustment [6] that improves image attitude and/or position parameters and generates improved triangulated ground coordinates for all tie and control points. The resulting point cloud is used to create an updated global DEM controlled to the MLA data. The MLA-to-MDIS image comparison also provides the boresight relationship between the two instruments. For quality assurance, several regional DEMs are created with SOCET SET for selected sites on Mercury that provide variation in terrain and observation conditions. These sites are used in the analysis and comparison of DEMs produced with a variety of methods and data sources (photogrammetry, photoclinometry, stereo techniques, and MLA), similar to comparisons that have been done for HRSC [7] and LRO [8] DEMs. Ultimately orthorectified cartographic products will be created by projecting MDIS images using the highest quality shape model available. [1] Solomon, S.C. et al., 2001. The MESSENGER mission to Mercury: Scientific objectives and implementation, Planet. Space Sci., 49, 1445-1465. [2] Zuber, M.T. et al., 2011. Orbital observations of Mercury with the Mercury Laser Altimeter, EPSC-DPS Joint Meeting, 6, abstract EPSC-DPS2011-278. [3] Hawkins, S.E. III et al., 2007. The Mercury Dual Imaging System on the MESSENGER spacecraft

  16. The use of UAV to document sloping landscapes to produce digital elevation models to examine environmental degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Themistocleous, K.; Agapiou, A.; Papadavid, G.; Christoforou, M.; Hadjimitsis, D. G.

    2015-10-01

    This paper focuses on the use of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) over the study area of Pissouri in Cyprus to document the sloping landscapes of the area. The study area has been affected by overgrazing, which has led to shifts in the vegetation patterns and changing microtopography of the soil. The UAV images were used to generate digital elevation models (DEMs) to examine the changes in microtopography. Next to that orthophotos were used to detect changes in vegetation patterns. The combined data of the digital elevation models and the orthophotos will be used to detect the occurrence of catastrophic shifts and mechanisms for desertification in the study area due to overgrazing. This study is part of the "CASCADE- Catastrophic shifts in dryland" project.

  17. Evolution and challenges of dynamic global vegetation models for some aspects of plant physiology and elevated atmospheric CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezende, L. F. C.; Arenque, B. C.; Aidar, S. T.; Moura, M. S. B.; Von Randow, C.; Tourigny, E.; Menezes, R. S. C.; Ometto, J. P. H. B.

    2016-07-01

    Dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs) simulate surface processes such as the transfer of energy, water, CO2, and momentum between the terrestrial surface and the atmosphere, biogeochemical cycles, carbon assimilation by vegetation, phenology, and land use change in scenarios of varying atmospheric CO2 concentrations. DGVMs increase the complexity and the Earth system representation when they are coupled with atmospheric global circulation models (AGCMs) or climate models. However, plant physiological processes are still a major source of uncertainty in DGVMs. The maximum velocity of carboxylation (Vcmax), for example, has a direct impact over productivity in the models. This parameter is often underestimated or imprecisely defined for the various plant functional types (PFTs) and ecosystems. Vcmax is directly related to photosynthesis acclimation (loss of response to elevated CO2), a widely known phenomenon that usually occurs when plants are subjected to elevated atmospheric CO2 and might affect productivity estimation in DGVMs. Despite this, current models have improved substantially, compared to earlier models which had a rudimentary and very simple representation of vegetation-atmosphere interactions. In this paper, we describe this evolution through generations of models and the main events that contributed to their improvements until the current state-of-the-art class of models. Also, we describe some main challenges for further improvements to DGVMs.

  18. Evolution and challenges of dynamic global vegetation models for some aspects of plant physiology and elevated atmospheric CO2.

    PubMed

    Rezende, L F C; Arenque, B C; Aidar, S T; Moura, M S B; Von Randow, C; Tourigny, E; Menezes, R S C; Ometto, J P H B

    2016-07-01

    Dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs) simulate surface processes such as the transfer of energy, water, CO2, and momentum between the terrestrial surface and the atmosphere, biogeochemical cycles, carbon assimilation by vegetation, phenology, and land use change in scenarios of varying atmospheric CO2 concentrations. DGVMs increase the complexity and the Earth system representation when they are coupled with atmospheric global circulation models (AGCMs) or climate models. However, plant physiological processes are still a major source of uncertainty in DGVMs. The maximum velocity of carboxylation (Vcmax), for example, has a direct impact over productivity in the models. This parameter is often underestimated or imprecisely defined for the various plant functional types (PFTs) and ecosystems. Vcmax is directly related to photosynthesis acclimation (loss of response to elevated CO2), a widely known phenomenon that usually occurs when plants are subjected to elevated atmospheric CO2 and might affect productivity estimation in DGVMs. Despite this, current models have improved substantially, compared to earlier models which had a rudimentary and very simple representation of vegetation-atmosphere interactions. In this paper, we describe this evolution through generations of models and the main events that contributed to their improvements until the current state-of-the-art class of models. Also, we describe some main challenges for further improvements to DGVMs. PMID:26498437

  19. Evolution and challenges of dynamic global vegetation models for some aspects of plant physiology and elevated atmospheric CO2.

    PubMed

    Rezende, L F C; Arenque, B C; Aidar, S T; Moura, M S B; Von Randow, C; Tourigny, E; Menezes, R S C; Ometto, J P H B

    2016-07-01

    Dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs) simulate surface processes such as the transfer of energy, water, CO2, and momentum between the terrestrial surface and the atmosphere, biogeochemical cycles, carbon assimilation by vegetation, phenology, and land use change in scenarios of varying atmospheric CO2 concentrations. DGVMs increase the complexity and the Earth system representation when they are coupled with atmospheric global circulation models (AGCMs) or climate models. However, plant physiological processes are still a major source of uncertainty in DGVMs. The maximum velocity of carboxylation (Vcmax), for example, has a direct impact over productivity in the models. This parameter is often underestimated or imprecisely defined for the various plant functional types (PFTs) and ecosystems. Vcmax is directly related to photosynthesis acclimation (loss of response to elevated CO2), a widely known phenomenon that usually occurs when plants are subjected to elevated atmospheric CO2 and might affect productivity estimation in DGVMs. Despite this, current models have improved substantially, compared to earlier models which had a rudimentary and very simple representation of vegetation-atmosphere interactions. In this paper, we describe this evolution through generations of models and the main events that contributed to their improvements until the current state-of-the-art class of models. Also, we describe some main challenges for further improvements to DGVMs.

  20. A propagation experiment for modelling high elevation angle land mobile satellite channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richharia, M.; Evans, B. G.; Butt, G.

    1990-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of a feasibility study for conducting high elevation angle propagation experiments in the European region for land mobile satellite communication. The study addresses various aspects of a proposed experiment. These include the selection of a suitable source for transmission, possibility of gathering narrow and wide band propagation data in various frequency bands, types of useful data, data acquisition technique, possible experimental configuration, and other experimental details.

  1. A computational model for exploratory activity of rats with different anxiety levels in elevated plus-maze.

    PubMed

    Costa, Ariadne A; Morato, Silvio; Roque, Antonio C; Tinós, Renato

    2014-10-30

    The elevated plus-maze is an apparatus widely used to study the level of anxiety in rodents. The maze is plus-shaped, with two enclosed arms and two open arms, and elevated 50cm from the floor. During a test, which usually lasts for 5min, the animal is initially put at the center and is free to move and explore the entire maze. The level of anxiety is measured by variables such as the percentage of time spent and the number of entries in the enclosed arms. High percentage of time spent at and number of entries in the enclosed arms indicate anxiety. Here we propose a computational model of rat behavior in the elevated plus-maze based on an artificial neural network trained by a genetic algorithm. The fitness function of the genetic algorithm is composed of reward (positive) and punishment (negative) terms, which are incremented as the computational agent (virtual rat) moves in the maze. The punishment term is modulated by a parameter that simulates the effects of different drugs. Unlike other computational models, the virtual rat is built independently of prior known experimental data. The exploratory behaviors generated by the model for different simulated pharmacological conditions are in good agreement with data from real rats.

  2. A computational model for exploratory activity of rats with different anxiety levels in elevated plus-maze.

    PubMed

    Costa, Ariadne A; Morato, Silvio; Roque, Antonio C; Tinós, Renato

    2014-10-30

    The elevated plus-maze is an apparatus widely used to study the level of anxiety in rodents. The maze is plus-shaped, with two enclosed arms and two open arms, and elevated 50cm from the floor. During a test, which usually lasts for 5min, the animal is initially put at the center and is free to move and explore the entire maze. The level of anxiety is measured by variables such as the percentage of time spent and the number of entries in the enclosed arms. High percentage of time spent at and number of entries in the enclosed arms indicate anxiety. Here we propose a computational model of rat behavior in the elevated plus-maze based on an artificial neural network trained by a genetic algorithm. The fitness function of the genetic algorithm is composed of reward (positive) and punishment (negative) terms, which are incremented as the computational agent (virtual rat) moves in the maze. The punishment term is modulated by a parameter that simulates the effects of different drugs. Unlike other computational models, the virtual rat is built independently of prior known experimental data. The exploratory behaviors generated by the model for different simulated pharmacological conditions are in good agreement with data from real rats. PMID:25128721

  3. Analysis of the influence of the digital elevation model characteristics on hydrodynamic simulations: the case of the Tagus River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falcão, Ana Paula; Pestana, Rita; Matias, Magda P.; Gonçalves, Alexandre; Heleno, Sandra

    2014-05-01

    Floods are one of the major and hazardous natural events, with the potential to cause fatalities, displacement of people and damage to the environment, to severely compromise economic development and to undermine the economic activities, as the Floods Directive of the European Union clearly recalls (Directive 2007/60/EC). This Directive establishes a framework for the assessment and management of flood risks. As such, it relies on hydrodynamic simulation of floods. For this a single digital elevation model valid for the whole study area is a requirement and its construction usually implies the use of topographic and bathymetric data collected by distinct equipment and methods, at different times and acquired with a variety of spatial resolutions and accuracies. In this paper we present a comparison of hydrodynamic simulation results, in flood extension and water elevation level, of a Tagus River flood event cover the period between 5pm of December 29th, 2000 until 1am of January 9th, 2001, by using the combined digital elevation model resampled at a cell size of 15m, 30m and 50m. The study area is a section of 70 km of the Tagus River, between Tramagal and Santarém. The Tagus River is the longest of the Iberian Peninsula and is responsible for periodical floods in one of the most important agricultural areas in Portugal. For this area a digital elevation model acquired in 2008 by advanced interferometric techniques is available (5m of spatial resolution), accurate in the floodplain area but with no information in river channel since the radar signal has no ability to penetrate into water, and 29 cross-sections acquired by eco-sounder equipment in 2012, with 3km intervals are available. In order to analyse and validate those differences, a dataset with SAR imagery, provided by ESA, and the water levels measured at Almourol hydrometric station were used.

  4. One-dimensional migration of interstitial clusters in SUS316L and its model alloys at elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satoh, Y.; Abe, H.; Matsukawa, Y.; Matsunaga, T.; Kano, S.; Arai, S.; Yamamoto, Y.; Tanaka, N.

    2015-05-01

    For self-interstitial atom (SIA) clusters in various concentrated alloys, one-dimensional (1D) migration is induced by electron irradiation around 300 K. But at elevated temperatures, the 1D migration frequency decreases to less than one-tenth of that around 300 K in iron-based bcc alloys. In this study, we examined mechanisms of 1D migration at elevated temperatures using in situ observation of SUS316L and its model alloys with high-voltage electron microscopy. First, for elevated temperatures, we examined the effects of annealing and short-term electron irradiation of SIA clusters on their subsequent 1D migration. In annealed SUS316L, 1D migration was suppressed and then recovered by prolonged irradiation at 300 K. In high-purity model alloy Fe-18Cr-13Ni, annealing or irradiation had no effect. Addition of carbon or oxygen to the model alloy suppressed 1D migration after annealing. Manganese and silicon did not suppress 1D migration after annealing but after short-term electron irradiation. The suppression was attributable to the pinning of SIA clusters by segregated solute elements, and the recovery was to the dissolution of the segregation by interatomic mixing under electron irradiation. Next, we examined 1D migration of SIA clusters in SUS316L under continuous electron irradiation at elevated temperatures. The 1D migration frequency at 673 K was proportional to the irradiation intensity. It was as high as half of that at 300 K. We proposed that 1D migration is controlled by the competition of two effects: induction of 1D migration by interatomic mixing and suppression by solute segregation.

  5. Microbial Priming and Protected Carbon Responses to Elevated CO2 at Local to Global Scales: a New Modeling Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulman, B. N.; Oishi, C.; Shevliakova, E.; Pacala, S. W.

    2013-12-01

    The soil carbon formulations commonly used in global carbon cycle models and Earth System models (ESMs) are based on first-order decomposition equations, where turnover of carbon is determined only by the size of the carbon pool and empirical functions of responses to temperature and moisture. These models do not include microbial dynamics or protection of carbon in microaggregates and mineral complexes, making them incapable of simulating important soil processes like priming and the influence of soil physical structure on carbon turnover. We present a new soil carbon dynamics model - Carbon, Organisms, Respiration, and Protection in the Soil Environment (CORPSE) - that explicitly represents microbial biomass and protected carbon pools. The model includes multiple types of carbon with different chemically determined turnover rates that interact with a single dynamic microbial biomass pool, allowing the model to simulate priming effects. The model also includes the formation and turnover of protected carbon that is inaccessible to microbial decomposers. The rate of protected carbon formation increases with microbial biomass. CORPSE has been implemented both as a stand-alone model and as a component of the NOAA Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) ESM. We calibrated the model against measured soil carbon stocks from the Duke FACE experiment. The model successfully simulated the seasonal pattern of heterotrophic CO2 production. We investigated the roles of priming and protection in soil carbon accumulation by running the model using measured inputs of leaf litter, fine roots, and root exudates from the ambient and elevated CO2 plots at the Duke FACE experiment. Measurements from the experiment showed that elevated CO2 caused enhanced root exudation, increasing soil carbon turnover in the rhizosphere due to priming effects. We tested the impact of increased root exudation on soil carbon accumulation by comparing model simulations of carbon accumulation under

  6. ELEVATING MECHANISM

    DOEpatents

    Frederick, H.S.; Kinsella, M.A.

    1959-02-24

    An elevator is described, which is arranged for movement both in a horizontal and in a vertical direction so that the elevating mechanism may be employed for servicing equipment at separated points in a plant. In accordance with the present invention, the main elevator chassis is suspended from a monorail. The chassis, in turn supports a vertically moveable carriage, a sub- carriage vertically moveable on the carriage, and a turntable carried by the sub- carriage and moveable through an arc of 90 with the equipment attached thereto. In addition, the chassis supports all the means required to elevate or rotate the equipment.

  7. Topogrid Derived 10 Meter Resolution Digital Elevation Model of Charleston, and Parts of Berkeley, Colleton, Dorchester and Georgetown Counties, South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chirico, Peter G.

    2005-01-01

    EXPLANATION The purpose of developing a new 10m resolution digital elevation model (DEM) of the Charleston Region was to more accurately depict geologic structure, surfical geology, and landforms of the Charleston County Region. Previously, many areas northeast and southwest of Charleston were originally mapped with a 20 foot contour interval. As a result, large areas within the National Elevation Dataset (NED) depict flat terraced topography where there was a lack of higher resolution elevation data. To overcome these data voids, the new DEM is supplemented with additional elevation data and break-lines derived from aerial photography and topographic maps. The resultant DEM is stored as a raster grid at uniform 10m horizontal resolution. The elevation model contained in this publication was prodcued utilizing the ANUDEM algorthim. ANUDEM allows for the inclusion of contours, streams, rivers, lake and water body polygons as well as spot height data to control the development of the elevation model. A preliminary statistical analysis using over 788 vertical elevation check points, primarily located in the northeastern part of the study area, derived from USGS 7.5 Minute Topographic maps reveals that the final DEM, has a vertical accuracy of ?3.27 meters. A table listing the elevation comparison between the elevation check points and the final DEM is provided.

  8. An automated approach for extracting Barrier Island morphology from digital elevation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wernette, Phillipe; Houser, Chris; Bishop, Michael P.

    2016-06-01

    The response and recovery of a barrier island to extreme storms depends on the elevation of the dune base and crest, both of which can vary considerably alongshore and through time. Quantifying the response to and recovery from storms requires that we can first identify and differentiate the dune(s) from the beach and back-barrier, which in turn depends on accurate identification and delineation of the dune toe, crest and heel. The purpose of this paper is to introduce a multi-scale automated approach for extracting beach, dune (dune toe, dune crest and dune heel), and barrier island morphology. The automated approach introduced here extracts the shoreline and back-barrier shoreline based on elevation thresholds, and extracts the dune toe, dune crest and dune heel based on the average relative relief (RR) across multiple spatial scales of analysis. The multi-scale automated RR approach to extracting dune toe, dune crest, and dune heel based upon relative relief is more objective than traditional approaches because every pixel is analyzed across multiple computational scales and the identification of features is based on the calculated RR values. The RR approach out-performed contemporary approaches and represents a fast objective means to define important beach and dune features for predicting barrier island response to storms. The RR method also does not require that the dune toe, crest, or heel are spatially continuous, which is important because dune morphology is likely naturally variable alongshore.

  9. Airborne Magnetic and Electromagnetic Data map Rock Alteration and Water Content at Mount Adams, Mount Baker and Mount Rainier, Washington: Implications for Lahar Hazards and Hydrothermal Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finn, C. A.; Deszcz-Pan, M.; Horton, R.; Breit, G.; John, D.

    2007-12-01

    High resolution helicopter-borne magnetic and electromagnetic (EM) data flown over the rugged, ice-covered, highly magnetic and mostly resistive volcanoes of Mount Rainier, Mount Adams and Mount Baker, along with rock property measurements, reveal the distribution of alteration, water and hydrothermal fluids that are essential to evaluating volcanic landslide hazards and understanding hydrothermal systems. Hydrothermally altered rocks, particularly if water saturated, can weaken stratovolcanoes, thereby increasing the potential for catastrophic sector collapses that can lead to far-traveled, destructive debris flows. Intense hydrothermal alteration significantly reduces the magnetization and resistivity of volcanic rock resulting in clear recognition of altered rock by helicopter magnetic and EM measurements. Magnetic and EM data, combined with geological mapping and rock property measurements, indicate the presence of appreciable thicknesses of hydrothermally altered rock west of the modern summit of Mount Rainier in the Sunset Amphitheater region, in the central core of Mount Adams north of the summit, and in much of the central cone of Mount Baker. We identify the Sunset Amphitheater region and steep cliffs at the western edge of the central altered zone at Mount Adams as likely sources for future debris flows. In addition, the EM data identified water-saturated rocks in the upper 100-200 m of the three volcanoes. The water-saturated zone could extend deeper, but is beyond the detection limits of the EM data. Water in hydrothermal fluids reacts with the volcanic rock to produce clay minerals. The formation of clay minerals and presence of free water reduces the effective stress, thereby increasing the potential for slope failure, and acts, with entrained melting ice, as a lubricant to transform debris avalanches into lahars. Therefore, knowing the distribution of water is also important for hazard assessments. Finally, modeling requires extremely low

  10. Tsunami Inundation, North of Phuket, Thailand ASTER Images and SRTM Elevation Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1

    The Indian Ocean coastline north of Phuket, Thailand is a major tourist destination that was in the path of the tsunami produced by a giant offshore earthquake on December 26, 2004. This disaster resulted in a heavy loss of life. These simulated natural color ASTER (Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer) images show a 27 kilometer (17-mile) long stretch of coast 80 kilometers (50 miles) north of the Phuket airport in the Khao Lak area on December 31 (middle) and also two years earlier (left). The changes along the coast are obvious (changing from green to grey) where the vegetation was stripped away by the tsunami.

    The image on the right is a copy of the later ASTER scene but it includes highlighting in red for areas that have elevations within 10 meters (33 feet) of sea level. This elevation information was supplied by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). The red areas appear to include most of the tsunami inundated areas.

    The geographic correspondence of the imaged damage and the highlighted elevation range is quite good in the middle and upper parts of the scene and is consistent with an early field report of about 10 meters of inundation. In the south, the elevation range corresponds to a much wider area than the actual damage, but this is to be expected for areas increasingly far from the coast. Offshore bathymetry (depth variations), coastal landforms, distance from the coast, and additional factors other than elevation range control the damage extent. But elevation measurements along the coast, as provided by SRTM, give a general indication of areas at risk, as now confirmed by ASTER.

    ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet with its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet). These data provide scientists

  11. Tsunami Inundation, North of Phuket, Thailand ASTER Images and SRTM Elevation Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1

    The Indian Ocean coastline north of Phuket, Thailand is a major tourist destination that was in the path of the tsunami produced by a giant offshore earthquake on December 26, 2004. This disaster resulted in a heavy loss of life. These simulated natural color ASTER (Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer) images show a 27 kilometer (17-mile) long stretch of coast 80 kilometers (50 miles) north of the Phuket airport in the Khao Lak area on December 31 (middle) and also two years earlier (left). The changes along the coast are obvious (changing from green to grey) where the vegetation was stripped away by the tsunami.

    The image on the right is a copy of the later ASTER scene but it includes highlighting in red for areas that have elevations within 10 meters (33 feet) of sea level. This elevation information was supplied by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). The red areas appear to include most of the tsunami inundated areas.

    The geographic correspondence of the imaged damage and the highlighted elevation range is quite good in the middle and upper parts of the scene and is consistent with an early field report of about 10 meters of inundation. In the south, the elevation range corresponds to a much wider area than the actual damage, but this is to be expected for areas increasingly far from the coast. Offshore bathymetry (depth variations), coastal landforms, distance from the coast, and additional factors other than elevation range control the damage extent. But elevation measurements along the coast, as provided by SRTM, give a general indication of areas at risk, as now confirmed by ASTER.

    ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet with its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet). These data provide scientists

  12. Analytical model of sea level elevation during a storm: Support for coastal flood risk assessment associated with cyclone passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maia, Natan Zambroni; Calliari, Lauro Julio; Nicolodi, João Luiz

    2016-08-01

    Sea level oscillations are a result of continuous astronomic, oceanographic, and atmospheric interactions on different time and intensity scales. Thus, the collective action of forcing factors such as tide, wind, atmospheric pressure, and wave action may lead to elevated sea levels during cyclone events over the continental shelf, abruptly impacting adjacent coasts. The objective of this study is to evaluate the potential risks of sea level rise and coastal flooding associated with the passage of cyclones in southern Brazil. An analytical model was developed based on extreme storm events from 1997 to 2008. The model identifies the impact of each forcing factor during temporary sea level rise. Through the development of a digital terrain model, it was possible to identify the areas most vulnerable to flooding by superimposing the terrain model onto calculated sea levels. During storm events, sea level elevations ranged from 2 to 5 m and show wind as the major forcing factor, followed by swells waves, astronomical tide and finally atmospheric pressure.

  13. Development of an object-based classification model for mapping mountainous forest cover at high elevation using aerial photography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lateb, Mustapha; Kalaitzidis, Chariton; Tompoulidou, Maria; Gitas, Ioannis

    2016-08-01

    Climate change and overall temperature increase results in changes in forest cover in high elevations. Due to the long life cycle of trees, these changes are very gradual and can be observed over long periods of time. In order to use remote sensing imagery for this purpose it needs to have very high spatial resolution and to have been acquired at least 50 years ago. At the moment, the only type of remote sensing imagery with these characteristics is historical black and white aerial photographs. This study used an aerial photograph from 1945 in order to map the forest cover at the Olympus National Park, at that date. An object-based classification (OBC) model was developed in order to classify forest and discriminate it from other types of vegetation. Due to the lack of near-infrared information, the model had to rely solely on the tone of the objects, as well as their geometric characteristics. The model functioned on three segmentation levels, using sub-/super-objects relationships and utilising vegetation density to discriminate forest and non-forest vegetation. The accuracy of the classification was assessed using 503 visually interpreted and randomly distributed points, resulting in a 92% overall accuracy. The model is using unbiased parameters that are important for differentiating between forest and non-forest vegetation and should be transferrable to other study areas of mountainous forests at high elevations.

  14. Elevation of Il6 is associated with disturbed let-7 biogenesis in a genetic model of depression

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Y B; Liu, J J; Villaescusa, J C; Åberg, E; Brené, S; Wegener, G; Mathé, A A; Lavebratt, C

    2016-01-01

    Elevation of the proinflammatory cytokine IL-6 has been implicated in depression; however, the mechanisms remain elusive. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that inhibit gene expression post-transcriptionally. The lethal-7 (let-7) miRNA family was suggested to be involved in the inflammation process and IL-6 was shown to be one of its targets. In the present study, we report elevation of Il6 in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) of a genetic rat model of depression, the Flinders Sensitive Line (FSL) compared to the control Flinders Resistant Line. This elevation was associated with an overexpression of LIN28B and downregulation of let-7 miRNAs, the former an RNA-binding protein that selectively represses let-7 synthesis. Also DROSHA, a key enzyme in miRNA biogenesis was downregulated in FSL. Running was previously shown to have an antidepressant-like effect in the FSL rat. We found that running reduced Il6 levels and selectively increased let-7i and miR-98 expression in the PFC of FSL, although there were no differences in LIN28B and DROSHA expression. Pri-let-7i was upregulated in the running FSL group, which associated with increased histone H4 acetylation. In conclusion, the disturbance of let-7 family biogenesis may underlie increased proinflammatory markers in the depressed FSL rats while physical activity could reduce their expression, possibly through regulating primary miRNA expression via epigenetic mechanisms. PMID:27529677

  15. Elevation of Il6 is associated with disturbed let-7 biogenesis in a genetic model of depression.

    PubMed

    Wei, Y B; Liu, J J; Villaescusa, J C; Åberg, E; Brené, S; Wegener, G; Mathé, A A; Lavebratt, C

    2016-01-01

    Elevation of the proinflammatory cytokine IL-6 has been implicated in depression; however, the mechanisms remain elusive. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that inhibit gene expression post-transcriptionally. The lethal-7 (let-7) miRNA family was suggested to be involved in the inflammation process and IL-6 was shown to be one of its targets. In the present study, we report elevation of Il6 in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) of a genetic rat model of depression, the Flinders Sensitive Line (FSL) compared to the control Flinders Resistant Line. This elevation was associated with an overexpression of LIN28B and downregulation of let-7 miRNAs, the former an RNA-binding protein that selectively represses let-7 synthesis. Also DROSHA, a key enzyme in miRNA biogenesis was downregulated in FSL. Running was previously shown to have an antidepressant-like effect in the FSL rat. We found that running reduced Il6 levels and selectively increased let-7i and miR-98 expression in the PFC of FSL, although there were no differences in LIN28B and DROSHA expression. Pri-let-7i was upregulated in the running FSL group, which associated with increased histone H4 acetylation. In conclusion, the disturbance of let-7 family biogenesis may underlie increased proinflammatory markers in the depressed FSL rats while physical activity could reduce their expression, possibly through regulating primary miRNA expression via epigenetic mechanisms. PMID:27529677

  16. Simulated effects of elevated CO{sub 2} on nitrogen cycling using the NuCM model

    SciTech Connect

    D.W. Johnson

    1998-10-14

    The interactions between elevated CO{sub 2} and N cycling were explored using simulations generated by the Nutrient Cycling Model (NuCM) for a Pinus taeda site at Duke, North Carolina and a mixed deciduous site at Walker Branch, Tennessee. The simulations tested whether N limitation would prevent growth increase in response to elevated CO{sub 2} and whether growth response to CO{sub 2} in N-limited systems could be facilitated by increased biomass/N (reduced concentration) and/or increased litter N mineralization. Nitrogen limitation precluded additional growth when target growth rates and litterfall were increased (simulating potential response to elevated CO{sub 2}) at the Duke site. At the Walker Branch site, increasing target growth and litterfall caused a slight (790) increases in growth. Reducing foliar N concentrations caused reduced growth because of N limitation created by reduced litter quality (C/N ratio), reduced decomposition and N accumulation in forest floor. These effects were most pronounced at the Duke site, where the forest floor N turnover rate was lower than at the Walker Branch site. Reducing wood N concentration allowed prolonged increases in growth because of greater biomass/N; however, N uptake was reduced, allowing greater N immobilization in the forest floor and soil. Increased N mineralization caused increased growth at the Duke site but not at Walker Branch.

  17. Elevated Temperature Primary Load Design Method Using Pseudo Elastic-Perfectly Plastic Model

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, Peter; Sham, Sam; Jetter, Robert I

    2012-01-01

    A new primary load design method for elevated temperature service has been developed. Codification of the procedure in an ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section III Code Case is being pursued. The proposed primary load design method is intended to provide the same margins on creep rupture, yielding and creep deformation for a component or structure that are implicit in the allowable stress data. It provides a methodology that does not require stress classification and is also applicable to a full range of temperature above and below the creep regime. Use of elastic-perfectly plastic analysis based on allowable stress with corrections for constraint, steady state stress and creep ductility is described. This approach is intended to ensure that traditional primary stresses are the basis for design, taking into account ductility limits to stress re-distribution and multiaxial rupture criteria.

  18. Elevation of glycoprotein nonmetastatic melanoma protein B in type 1 Gaucher disease patients and mouse models.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Gertjan; Wegdam, Wouter; Donker-Koopman, Wilma; Ottenhoff, Roelof; Gaspar, Paulo; Verhoek, Marri; Nelson, Jessica; Gabriel, Tanit; Kallemeijn, Wouter; Boot, Rolf G; Laman, Jon D; Vissers, Johannes P C; Cox, Timothy; Pavlova, Elena; Moran, Mary Teresa; Aerts, Johannes M; van Eijk, Marco

    2016-09-01

    Gaucher disease is caused by inherited deficiency of lysosomal glucocerebrosidase. Proteome analysis of laser-dissected splenic Gaucher cells revealed increased amounts of glycoprotein nonmetastatic melanoma protein B (gpNMB). Plasma gpNMB was also elevated, correlating with chitotriosidase and CCL18, which are established markers for human Gaucher cells. In Gaucher mice, gpNMB is also produced by Gaucher cells. Correction of glucocerebrosidase deficiency in mice by gene transfer or pharmacological substrate reduction reverses gpNMB abnormalities. In conclusion, gpNMB acts as a marker for glucosylceramide-laden macrophages in man and mouse and gpNMB should be considered as candidate biomarker for Gaucher disease in treatment monitoring. PMID:27642553

  19. Topogrid Derived 10 Meter Resolution Digital Elevation Model of the Shenandoah National Park and Surrounding Region, Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chirico, Peter G.; Tanner, Seth D.

    2004-01-01

    Explanation The purpose of developing a new 10m resolution DEM of the Shenandoah National Park Region was to more accurately depict geologic structure, surfical geology, and landforms of the Shenandoah National Park Region in preparation for automated landform classification. Previously, only a 30m resolution DEM was available through the National Elevation Dataset (NED). During production of the Shenandoah10m DEM of the Park the Geography Discipline of the USGS completed a revised 10m DEM to be included into the NED. However, different methodologies were used to produce the two similar DEMs. The ANUDEM algorithm was used to develop the Shenadoah DEM data. This algorithm allows for the inclusion of contours, streams, rivers, lake and water body polygons as well as spot height data to control the elevation model. A statistical analysis using over 800 National Geodetic Survey (NGS) first and second order vertical control points reveals that the Shenandoah10m DEM, produced as a part of the Appalachian Blue Ridge Landscape project, has a vertical accuracy of ?4.87 meters. The metadata for the 10m NED data reports a vertical accuracy of ?7m. A table listing the NGS control points, the elevation comparison, and the RMSE for the Shenandoah10m DEM is provided. The process of automated terrain classification involves developing statistical signatures from the DEM for each type of surficial deposit and landform type. The signature will be a measure of several characteristics derived from the elevation data including slope, aspect, planform curvature, and profile curvature. The quality of the DEM is of critical importance when extracting terrain signatures. The highest possible horizontal and vertical accuracy is required. The more accurate Shenandoah 10m DEM can now be analyzed and integrated with the geologic observations to yield statistical correlations between the two in the development of landform and surface geology mapping projects.

  20. Modeled responses of terrestrial ecosystems to elevated atmospheric CO2: A comparison of simulations by the biogeochemistry models of the Vegetation/Ecosystem Modeling and Analysis Project (VEMAP)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pan, Y.; Melillo, J.M.; McGuire, A.D.; Kicklighter, D.W.; Pitelka, L.F.; Hibbard, K.; Pierce, L.L.; Running, S.W.; Ojima, D.S.; Parton, W.J.; Schimel, D.S.; Borchers, J.; Neilson, R.; Fisher, H.H.; Kittel, T.G.F.; Rossenbloom, N.A.; Fox, S.; Haxeltine, A.; Prentice, I.C.; Sitch, S.; Janetos, A.; McKeown, R.; Nemani, R.; Painter, T.; Rizzo, B.; Smith, T.; Woodward, F.I.

    1998-01-01

    Although there is a great deal of information concerning responses to increases in atmospheric CO2 at the tissue and plant levels, there are substantially fewer studies that have investigated ecosystem-level responses in the context of integrated carbon, water, and nutrient cycles. Because our understanding of ecosystem responses to elevated CO2 is incomplete, modeling is a tool that can be used to investigate the role of plant and soil interactions in the response of terrestrial ecosystems to elevated CO2. In this study, we analyze the responses of net primary production (NPP) to doubled CO2 from 355 to 710 ppmv among three biogeochemistry models in the Vegetation/Ecosystem Modeling and Analysis Project (VEMAP): BIOME-BGC (BioGeochemical Cycles), Century, and the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM). For the conterminous United States, doubled atmospheric CO2 causes NPP to increase by 5% in Century, 8% in TEM, and 11% in BIOME-BGC. Multiple regression analyses between the NPP response to doubled CO2 and the mean annual temperature and annual precipitation of biomes or grid cells indicate that there are negative relationships between precipitation and the response of NPP to doubled CO2 for all three models. In contrast, there are different relationships between temperature and the response of NPP to doubled CO2 for the three models: there is a negative relationship in the responses of BIOME-BGC, no relationship in the responses of Century, and a positive relationship in the responses of TEM. In BIOME-BGC, the NPP response to doubled CO2 is controlled by the change in transpiration associated with reduced leaf conductance to water vapor. This change affects soil water, then leaf area development and, finally, NPP. In Century, the response of NPP to doubled CO2 is controlled by changes in decomposition rates associated with increased soil moisture that results from reduced evapotranspiration. This change affects nitrogen availability for plants, which influences NPP. In

  1. Simulation of elevated long-range plume transport using a mesoscale meteorological model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boybeyi, Zafer; Raman, Sethu

    A three-dimensional mesoscale meteorological model was used to construct a modeling system in order to investigate atmospheric dispersion in mesoscale flow fields. The mesoscale model was first coupled to a three-dimensional Monte Carlo (Lagrangian particle) dispersion model, and then an Eulerian dispersion model was embedded into the mesoscale model. Both the Eulerian model and the Monte Carlo model are based on the wind and turbulence fields simulated by the mesoscale model. The modeling system was then applied to the Tennessee Plume Study field experiments on 23 August 1978. The field experiments were basically designed to provide information on the dynamics of plume transport over long distances, and primarily targeted the plume from the Cumberland steam plant. Wind and turbulence fields were first simulated by the mesoscale model. The transport and diffusion of pollutants from the Cumberland steam plant were then simulated by the dispersion models, using these wind and turbulence fields. The results demonstrated that the modeling system generally performed satisfactorily, reproducing the trajectory and spread of the Cumberland plume.

  2. Comparing a FACE experiment with mechanistic ecohydrological modeling: which processes are reliably simulated under elevated CO2?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatichi, S.; Leuzinger, S.

    2013-12-01

    Scenarios for the future terrestrial carbon and water cycle rely on numerical tools that simulate the dynamics of vegetation from assimilation of carbon through stomata to long-term forest development at the global scale. However, these tools are rarely tested to perform well in conditions different from the historical climate and comparisons are mostly limited to carbon and energy fluxes. A combination of numerical modeling and observations is used here to investigate the capability of a mechanistic approach to simulate the hydrology and the vegetation behavior of a forest exposed to elevated CO2 concentrations. Specifically, we thoroughly compare data from a free air CO2 enrichment (FACE) experiment in a mature deciduous forest in Switzerland with realizations from a state-of-the-art ecohydrological model (Tethys-Chloris). Model realizations compare favorably with field observations of photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, sap flow, leaf and fruit litter, as well as qualitative changes in soil moisture. The simulated differences between CO2 scenarios for both the carbon and water balance are generally very small (less than 10%) and fall within the uncertainty of experimental observations. More problematic is the simulation of stem growth which is significantly higher in the modeled scenario with elevated CO2 but not in the observations even though current accuracy of field measurements precludes robust conclusions. These results demonstrate that while ecohydrological models can be used to reliably simulate multi-year energy, water, and carbon fluxes, evaluating the modeled carbon allocation remains critical. However, experimental evidence suggests that the structure of current vegetation models which use the photosynthesized carbon to directly drive plant growth should be revised because plant tissue growth is very sensitive to direct controls of environmental variables, independently of the amount of assimilated carbon.

  3. Three-dimensional geophysical mapping of rock alteration and water content at Mount Adams, Washington: Implications for lahar hazards

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Finn, C.A.; Deszcz-Pan, M.; Anderson, E.D.; John, D.A.

    2007-01-01

    Hydrothermally altered rocks, particularly if water saturated, can weaken stratovolcanoes, thereby increasing the potential for catastrophic sector collapses that can lead to far-traveled, destructive debris flows. Evaluating the hazards associated with such alteration is difficult because alteration has been mapped on few active volcanoes and the distribution and intensity of subsurface alteration are largely unknown on any active volcano. At Mount Adams, some Holocene debris flows contain abundant hydrothermal minerals derived from collapse of the altered, edifice. Intense hydrothermal alteration significantly reduces the resistivity and magnetization of volcanic rock, and therefore hydrothermally altered rocks can be identified with helicopter electromagnetic and magnetic measurements. Electromagnetic and magnetic data, combined with geological mapping and rock property measurements, indicate the presence of appreciable thicknesses of hydrothermally altered rock in the central core of Mount Adams north of the summit. We identify steep cliffs at the western edge of this zone as the likely source for future large debris flows. In addition, the electromagnetic data identified water in the brecciated core of the upper 100-200 m of the volcano. Water helps alter the rocks, reduces the effective stress, thereby increasing the potential for slope failure, and acts, with entrained melting ice, as a lubricant to transform debris avalanches into lahars. Therefore knowing the distribution of water is also important for hazard assessments. Our results demonstrate that high-resolution geophysical and geological observations can yield unprecedented views of the three-dimensional distribution of altered rock and shallow pore water aiding evaluation of the debris avalanche hazard.

  4. The 25 September 2007 eruption of Mount Ruapehu, New Zealand: Directed ballistics, surtseyan jets, and ice-slurry lahars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilgour, G.; Manville, V.; Della Pasqua, F.; Graettinger, A.; Hodgson, K. A.; Jolly, G. E.

    2010-03-01

    At 20:26 (NZDT) on 25 September 2007 a moderate gas-driven eruption beneath the summit Crater Lake of Mt. Ruapehu, New Zealand generated a directed ballistic fallout apron and surtseyan jet that impacted an area of c. 2.5 km 2 to the north of the vent. Two climbers were caught in the blast at a hut 600 m from the vent. Primary, ice-slurry lahars were generated in two catchments draining the summit region, including a flow that entered a commercial ski field. The ejecta consists of blocks of andesitic lava and scoria erupted during previous volcanic episodes, a variety of mineral-cemented lake-floor sediments, vent-fill debris and rare glassy material interpreted to be derived from a fresh batch of magma. A minority of clasts contain formerly molten elemental sulphur, indicating that vent temperatures at the base of the lake were in excess of 119 °C. The ballistic deposit is confined to a c. 40° wide swath directed northwards that extends up to 2 km from the inferred vent location beneath Crater Lake. The strong directionality of the jetted deposits and ballistic-free 'shadow-zones' sheltered by intervening topography all point to a relatively low-angle directed blast. Previous similar eruptions at Ruapehu also show preferred deposit orientations that are here correlated with an inclined and off-centre vent beneath Crater Lake. The 25 September 2007 eruption appears to have resulted from failure of a relatively shallow hydrothermal seal composed of elemental sulphur and other mineral precipitates developed in the vent breccia, which breached following overpressurization by a pulse of magmatic gases released from deeper in the conduit. This event highlights the potential hazard from relatively minor gas-driven eruptions at Ruapehu that can occur with little or no warning. Improved understanding of the eruption mechanism for this style of eruption will inform future risk assessments for Ruapehu and other similar volcanoes worldwide.

  5. Contextualization of Holocene beach ridge systems for relative sea-level reconstruction using the SRTM elevation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sander, Lasse; Raniolo, Luís Ariel; Alberdi, Ernesto; Pejrup, Morten

    2014-05-01

    Beach ridge plains are a common feature of prograding coastlines and they have in the past been widely used as geomorphological archives for the reconstruction of past coastal dynamics, event chronologies or late quaternary sea-level change. The most critical parameters for sea-level related research are the consistent definition and confidence of information on surface elevation of the beach ridge deposits. In most parts of the world, the availability of high-resolution geodata is very limited. The measurement of e.g. high-precision GPS (Global Positioning System) data is costly, time-consuming and essentially of limited spatial coverage. The SRTM (Shuttle Radar Topography Mission) dataset is a freely-available digital surface model covering landmasses between approximately 60° N and 56° S at a 90 m (3 arc seconds) resolution. The model elevations are indicated without decimals (integer) and are projected for the WGS84 ellipsoid. On a beach ridge plain at Caleta de los Loros, Río Negro, Argentina, we observed a good correlation of GPS-RTK (GPS-Real Time Kinematic) measurements (estimated vertical accuracy: <0,1 m) with the SRTM elevation model along a cross-ridge transect. An average vertical deviation of 0,96 m (SD: 0,48m) between the SRTM and the GPS-RTK-based elevations was determined for mostof the beach ridge transect (79% of length). Larger errors (maximum average error: 2,78 m, SD: 1,88 m) can be explained by eolian deposition and dune migration during the approx. 13 years between the date of SRTM data acquisition and our GPS measurement. This interpretation is supported by a multi-decadal sequence of Landsat false-color composites. Vegetation cover and rounding errors are further possible factors in explaining vertical deviation. The consistency of data quality was confirmed by a comparison study using a LiDAR (Light detection and ranging)-based digital elevation model (vertical accuracy: <0,1 m) to extract surface elevations on an extensive beach ridge

  6. Modeling evapotranspiration based on plant hydraulic theory can predict spatial variability across an elevation gradient and link to biogeochemical fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackay, D. S.; Frank, J.; Reed, D.; Whitehouse, F.; Ewers, B. E.; Pendall, E.; Massman, W. J.; Sperry, J. S.

    2012-04-01

    In woody plant systems transpiration is often the dominant component of total evapotranspiration, and so it is key to understanding water and energy cycles. Moreover, transpiration is tightly coupled to carbon and nutrient fluxes, and so it is also vital to understanding spatial variability of biogeochemical fluxes. However, the spatial variability of transpiration and its links to biogeochemical fluxes, within- and among-ecosystems, has been a challenge to constrain because of complex feedbacks between physical and biological controls. Plant hydraulics provides an emerging theory with the rigor needed to develop testable hypotheses and build useful models for scaling these coupled fluxes from individual plants to regional scales. This theory predicts that vegetative controls over water, energy, carbon, and nutrient fluxes can be determined from the limitation of plant water transport through the soil-xylem-stomata pathway. Limits to plant water transport can be predicted from measurable plant structure and function (e.g., vulnerability to cavitation). We present a next-generation coupled transpiration-biogeochemistry model based on this emerging theory. The model, TREEScav, is capable of predicting transpiration, along with carbon and nutrient flows, constrained by plant structure and function. The model incorporates tightly coupled mechanisms of the demand and supply of water through the soil-xylem-stomata system, with the feedbacks to photosynthesis and utilizable carbohydrates. The model is evaluated by testing it against transpiration and carbon flux data along an elevation gradient of woody plants comprising sagebrush steppe, mid-elevation lodgepole pine forests, and subalpine spruce/fir forests in the Rocky Mountains. The model accurately predicts transpiration and carbon fluxes as measured from gas exchange, sap flux, and eddy covariance towers. The results of this work demonstrate that credible spatial predictions of transpiration and related

  7. A digital elevation model of the Greenland Ice Sheet derived from combined laser and radar altimetry data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredenslund Levinsen, Joanna; Smith, Ben; Sørensen, Louise S.; Forsberg, René

    2014-05-01

    When estimating elevation changes of ice-covered surfaces from radar altimetry, it is important to correct for slope-induced errors. They cause the reflecting point of the pulse to move up-slope and thus return estimates in the wrong coordinates. Slope-induced errors can be corrected for by introducing a Digital Elevation Model (DEM). In this work, such a DEM is developed for the Greenland Ice Sheet using a combination of Envisat radar and ICESat laser altimetry. If time permits, CryoSat radar altimetry will be included as well. The reference year is 2010 and the spatial resolution 2.5 x 2.5 km. This is in accordance with the results obtained in the ESA Ice Sheets CCI project showing that a 5 x 5 km grid spacing is reasonable for ice sheet-wide change detection (Levinsen et al., 2013). Separate DEMs will be created for the given data sets, and the geostatistical spatial interpolation method collocation will be used to merge them, thus adjusting for potential inter-satellite biases. The final DEM is validated with temporally and spatially agreeing airborne lidar data acquired in the NASA IceBridge and ESA CryoVex campaigns. The motivation for developing a new DEM is based on 1) large surface changes presently being observed, and mainly in margin regions, hence necessitating updated topography maps for accurately deriving and correcting surface elevation changes, and 2) although radar altimetry is subject to surface penetration of the signal into the snowpack, data is acquired continuously in time. This is not the case with e.g. ICESat, where laser altimetry data were obtained in periods of active lasers, i.e. three times a year with a 35-day repeat track. Previous DEMs e.g. have 2007 as the nominal reference year, or they are built merely from ICESat data. These have elevation errors as small as 10 cm, which is lower than for Envisat and CryoSat. The advantage of an updated DEM consisting of combined radar and laser altimetry therefore is the possibility of

  8. Automated delineation of karst sinkholes from LiDAR-derived digital elevation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qiusheng; Deng, Chengbin; Chen, Zuoqi

    2016-08-01

    Sinkhole mapping is critical for understanding hydrological processes and mitigating geological hazards in karst landscapes. Current methods for identifying sinkholes are primarily based on visual interpretation of low-resolution topographic maps and aerial photographs with subsequent field verification, which is labor-intensive and time-consuming. The increasing availability of high-resolution LiDAR-derived digital elevation data allows for an entirely new level of detailed delineation and analyses of small-scale geomorphologic features and landscape structures at fine scales. In this paper, we present a localized contour tree method for automated extraction of sinkholes in karst landscapes. One significant advantage of our automated approach for sinkhole extraction is that it may reduce inconsistencies and alleviate repeatability concerns associated with visual interpretation methods. In addition, the proposed method has contributed to improving the sinkhole inventory in several ways: (1) detection of non-inventoried sinkholes; (2) identification of previously inventoried sinkholes that have been filled; (3) delineation of sinkhole boundaries; and (4) characterization of sinkhole morphometric properties. We applied the method to Fillmore County in southeastern Minnesota, USA, and identified three times as many sinkholes as the existing database for the same area. The results suggest that previous visual interpretation method might significantly underestimate the number of potential sinkholes in the region. Our method holds great potential for creating and updating sinkhole inventory databases at a regional scale in a timely manner.

  9. Intracerebellar vermis histamine facilitates memory consolidation in the elevated T maze model.

    PubMed

    Silva-Marques, Bruna; Gianlorenço, Anna Carolyna Lepesteur; Mattioli, Rosana

    2016-05-01

    Experimental evidence suggests that the cerebellum plays a more complex role in learning than simply regulating the motor response. Rather, it is thought to play a significant role in the consolidation of emotional memory in mice. Due to the difficulty of interpreting fear and anxiety behaviors-the standard methodology for the study of the histaminergic system and emotional memory-in mice, we propose a behavioral assessment of mice subjected to the Elevated T-maze after histamine microinjection of the cerebellar vermis. Young male Swiss albino mice weighing 25-35g were used. In addition, locomotor activity was tested in an open field test. Our data suggest that histamine did not affect memory consolidation during escape or open field behavior at the doses used in this study. However, we observed a significant increase in inhibitory avoidance on the second day in animals receiving a dose of 6.8nmol/0.5μl, suggesting that histamine facilitates the consolidation of inhibitory avoidance in mice.

  10. Burial of Emperor Augustus' villa at Somma Vesuviana (Italy) by post-79 AD Vesuvius eruptions and reworked (lahars and stream flow) deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrotta, Annamaria; Scarpati, Claudio; Luongo, Giuseppe; Aoyagi, Masanori

    2006-11-01

    A new archaeological site of Roman Age has been recently found engulfed in the products of Vesuvius activity at Somma Vesuviana, on the northern flank of the Somma-Vesuvius, 5 km from the vent. A 9 m deep, 30 by 35 m trench has revealed a monumental edifice tentatively attributed to the Emperor Augustus. Different than Pompeii and Herculaneum sites which were completely buried in the catastrophic eruption of 79 AD, this huge roman villa survived the effects of the 79 AD plinian eruption as suggested by stratigraphic and geochronologic data. It was later completely engulfed in the products of numerous explosive volcanic eruptions ranging from 472 AD to 1631 AD, which were separated by reworked material and paleosols. The exposed burial sequence is comprised of seven stratigraphic units. Four units are composed exclusively of pyroclastic products each emplaced during a unique explosive event. Two units are composed of volcaniclastic material (stream flow and lahars) emplaced during quiescent periods of the volcano. Finally, one unit is composed of both pyroclastic and volcaniclastic deposits. One of the more relevant volcanological results of this study is the detailed reconstruction of the destructive events that buried the Emperor Augustus' villa. Stratigraphic evidence shows the absence of any deposit associated with the 79 AD eruption at this site and that the building was extensively damaged (sacked) before it was engulfed by the products of subsequent volcanic eruptions and lahars. The products of the 472 AD eruption lie directly on the roman structures. They consist of scoria fall layers intercalated with massive and stratified pyroclastic density current deposits that caused limited damage to the structure. The impact on the building of penecontemporaneous lahars was more important; these caused the collapse of some structures. The remaining part of the building was subsequently entombed by the products of explosive eruptions (e.g. 512/536 eruption, 1631

  11. Digital Elevation Models of Greenland based on combined radar and laser altimetry as well as high-resolution stereoscopic imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levinsen, J. F.; Smith, B. E.; Sandberg Sorensen, L.; Khvorostovsky, K.; Simonsen, S. B.; Forsberg, R.

    2015-12-01

    A number of Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) of Greenland exist, each of which are applicable for different purposes. This study presents two such DEMs: One developed by merging contemporary radar and laser altimeter data, and one derived from high-resolution stereoscopic imagery. All products are made freely available. The former DEM covers the entire Greenland. It is specific to the year 2010, providing it with an advantage over previous models suffering from either a reduced spatial/ temporal data coverage or errors from surface elevation changes (SEC) occurring during data acquisition. Radar data are acquired with Envisat and CryoSat-2, and laser data with the Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite, the Land, Vegetation, and Ice Sensor, and the Airborne Topographic Mapper. Correcting radar data for errors from slope effects and surface penetration of the echoes, and merging these with laser data, yields a DEM capable of resolving both surface depressions as well as topographic features at higher altitudes. The spatial resolution is 2 x 2 km, making the DEM ideal for application in surface mass balance studies, SEC detection from radar altimetry, or for correcting such data for slope-induced errors. The other DEM is developed in a pilot study building the expertise to map all ice-free parts of Greenland. The work combines WorldView-2 and -3 as well as GeoEye1 imagery from 2014 and 2015 over the Disko, Narsaq, Tassilaq, and Zackenberg regions. The novelty of the work is the determination of the product specifications after elaborate discussions with interested parties from government institutions, the tourist industry, etc. Thus, a 10 m DEM, 1.5 m orthophotos, and vector maps are produced. This opens to the possibility of using orthophotos with up-to-date contour lines or for deriving updated coastlines to aid, e.g., emergency management. This allows for a product development directly in line with the needs of parties with specific interests in Greenland.

  12. A Coarse Grained Model for Methylcellulose: Spontaneous Ring Formation at Elevated Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wenjun; Larson, Ronald

    Methylcellulose (MC) is widely used as food additives and pharma applications, where its thermo-reversible gelation behavior plays an important role. To date the gelation mechanism is not well understood, and therefore attracts great research interest. In this study, we adopted coarse-grained (CG) molecular dynamics simulations to model the MC chains, including the homopolymers and random copolymers that models commercial METHOCEL A, in an implicit water environment, where each MC monomer modeled with a single bead. The simulations are carried using a LAMMPS program. We parameterized our CG model using the radial distribution functions from atomistic simulations of short MC oligomers, extrapolating the results to long chains. We used dissociation free energy to validate our CG model against the atomistic model. The CG model captured the effects of monomer substitution type and temperature from the atomistic simulations. We applied this CG model to simulate single chains up to 1000 monomers long and obtained persistence lengths that are close to those determined from experiment. We observed the chain collapse transition for random copolymer at 600 monomers long at 50C. The chain collapsed into a stable ring structure with outer diameter around 14nm, which appears to be a precursor to the fibril structure observed in the methylcellulose gel observed by Lodge et al. in the recent studies. Our CG model can be extended to other MC derivatives for studying the interaction between these polymers and small molecules, such as hydrophobic drugs.

  13. 2005 Crater Lake Formation, Lahar, Acidic Flood, and Gas Emission From Chiginagak Volcano, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, J. R.; Scott, W. E.; McGimsey, R. G.; Jorgenson, J.

    2005-12-01

    A 400-m-wide crater lake developed in the formerly snow-and-ice-filled crater of Mount Chiginagak volcano sometime between August 2004 and June 2005, presumably due to increased heat flux from the hydrothermal system. We are also evaluating the possible role of magma intrusion and degassing. In early summer 2005, clay-rich debris and an estimated 5.6 million cubic meters of acidic water from the crater exited through tunnels in the base of a glacier that breaches the south crater rim. Over 27 kilometers downstream, the acidic waters of the flood reached approximately 1.5 meters above current water levels and inundated an important salmon spawning drainage, acidifying at least the surface water of Mother Goose Lake (approximately 1 cubic kilometer in volume) and preventing the annual salmon run. No measurements of pH were taken until late August 2005. At that time the pH of water sampled from the Mother Goose Lake inlet, lake surface, and outlet stream (King Salmon River) was 3.2. Defoliation and leaf damage of vegetation along affected streams, in areas to heights of over 70 meters in elevation above flood level, indicates that a cloud of detrimental gas or aerosol accompanied the flood waters. Analysis of stream water, lake water, and vegetation samples is underway to better determine the agent responsible for the plant damage. This intriguing pattern of gas-damaged vegetation concentrated along and above the flood channels is cause for further investigation into potential hazards associated with Chiginagak's active crater lake. Anecdotal evidence from local lodge owners and aerial photographs from 1953 suggest that similar releases occurred in the mid-1970s and early 1950s.

  14. Does exposure to lahars risk affect people's risk-preferences and other attitudes? Field data from incentivized experiments and surveys in Arequipa - Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heitz, C.; Bchir, M. A.; Willinger, M.

    2012-04-01

    Many individuals are exposed to risks which are either difficult to insure or hard to mitigate, such as tsunamis, floods, volcanic eruption,... Little is known about how exposure to such risks shapes individuals' risk-preferences. Are they more (less) risk-averse than people who are unexposed to such hazard risk? We provide empirical evidence about this question for the case of individuals exposed to lahars risk. Lahars are sediments laden flows from volcanic origin. We compare the risk-attitude of people exposed - versus non-exposed ones - to lahars risk. The originality of our approach is that we combine standard survey data to behavioural data collected by means of incentivized experiments. We collected data in various locations of the city of Arequipa (Peru), a densely populated area down the volcano El Misti. Participants in our experiment were identified as (non-)exposed to lahars risk based on risk zoning. Our survey questionnaire allows us to compare assessed exposure and the perceived exposure. We elicit risk-preference, time-preference, and trusting behaviour (a measure of social capital) for each respondent in addition to standard survey data. Our field experiment involved a total of 209 respondents from exposed and non-exposed areas. While respondents endow legitimacy in risk reduction (more than 74%) to a national authority (Defensa Civil) in charge of the management of risk in the city, more than 64% of them consider that they are not sufficiently informed about the behaviours to adopt in case of a disaster. Respondents are therefore poorly motivated to adopt initiatives of self-protection (23%) and express instead high expectations with respect to authorities' actions for decreasing their vulnerability (73%). The experimental data show that participants who live in exposed areas are not significantly more risk-averse than those living in non-exposed ones. Furthermore, there is no significant difference in time-preference between exposed and non

  15. Parameter variation effects on temperature elevation in a steady-state, one-dimensional thermal model for millimeter wave exposure of one- and three-layer human tissue.

    PubMed

    Kanezaki, Akio; Hirata, Akimasa; Watanabe, Soichi; Shirai, Hiroshi

    2010-08-21

    The present study describes theoretical parametric analysis of the steady-state temperature elevation in one-dimensional three-layer (skin, fat and muscle) and one-layer (skin only) models due to millimeter-wave exposure. The motivation of this fundamental investigation is that some variability of warmth sensation in the human skin has been reported. An analytical solution for a bioheat equation was derived by using the Laplace transform for the one-dimensional human models. Approximate expressions were obtained to investigate the dependence of temperature elevation on different thermal and tissue thickness parameters. It was shown that the temperature elevation on the body surface decreases monotonically with the blood perfusion rate, heat conductivity and heat transfer from the body to air. Also revealed were the conditions where maximum and minimum surface temperature elevations were observed for different thermal and tissue thickness parameters. The surface temperature elevation in the three-layer model is 1.3-2.8 times greater than that in the one-layer model. The main reason for this difference is attributed to the adiabatic nature of the fat layer. By considering the variation range of thermal and tissue thickness parameters which causes the maximum and minimum temperature elevations, the dominant parameter influencing the surface temperature elevation was found to be the heat transfer coefficient between the body surface and air.

  16. Coupled DDD-FEM modeling on the mechanical behavior of microlayered metallic multilayer film at elevated temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Minsheng; Li, Zhenhuan

    2015-12-01

    To investigate the mechanical behavior of the microlayered metallic thin films (MMMFs) at elevated temperature, an enhanced discrete-continuous model (DCM), which couples rather than superposes the two-dimensional climb/glide-enabled discrete dislocation dynamics (2D-DDD) with the linearly elastic finite element method (FEM), is developed in this study. In the present coupling scheme, two especial treatments are made. One is to solve how the plastic strain captured by the DDD module is transferred properly to the FEM module as an eigen-strain; the other is to answer how the stress field computationally obtained by the FEM module is transferred accurately to the DDD module to drive those discrete dislocations moving correctly. With these two especial treatments, the interactions between adjacent dislocations and between dislocation pile-ups and inter-phase boundaries (IBs), which are crucial to the strengthening effect in MMMFs, are carefully taken into account. After verified by comparing the computationally predicted results with the theoretical solutions for a dislocation residing in a homogeneous material and nearby a bi-material interface, this 2D-DDD/FEM coupling scheme is used to model the tensile mechanical behaviors of MMMFs at elevated temperature. The strengthening mechanism of MMMFs and the layer thickness effect are studied in detail, with special attentions to the influence of dislocation climb on them.

  17. Catchment properties in the Kruger National Park derived from the new TanDEM-X Intermediate Digital Elevation Model (IDEM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baade, J.; Schmullius, C.

    2015-04-01

    Digital Elevation Models (DEM) represent fundamental data for a wide range of Earth surface process studies. Over the past years the German TanDEM-X mission acquired data for a new, truly global Digital Elevation Model with unpreceded geometric resolution, precision and accuracy. First processed data sets (i. e. IDEM) with a geometric resolution of 0.4 to 3 arcsec have been made available for scientific purposes. This includes four 1° x 1° tiles covering the Kruger National Park in South Africa. Here we document the results of a local scale IDEM validation exercise utilizing RTK-GNSS-based ground survey points from a dried out reservoir basin and its vicinity characterized by pristine open Savanna vegetation. Selected precursor data sets (SRTM1, SRTM90, ASTER-GDEM2) were included in the analysis and highlight the immense progress in satellite-based Earth surface surveying over the past two decades. Surprisingly, the high precision and accuracy of the IDEM data sets have only little impact on the delineation of watersheds and the calculation of catchment size. But, when it comes to the derivation of topographic catchment properties (e.g. mean slope, etc.) the high resolution of the IDEM04 is of crucial importance, if - from a geomorphologist's view - it was not for the disturbing vegetation.

  18. Documentation of programs used to determine a wetlands hydroperiod from model-simulated water-surface elevations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sonenshein, R.S.

    1996-01-01

    A technique has been developed to determine a wetlands hydroperiod by comparing simulated water levels from a ground-water flow model and land- surface elevation data through a geographic information system. The simulated water levels are compared with the land-surface elevation data to determine the height of the water surface above or below land surface for the area of interest. Finally, the hydroperiod is determined for established time periods using criteria specified by the user. The program application requires the use of geographic information system software (ARC/INFO), including the TIN and GRID subsystems of the software. The application consists of an ANSI compatible C program to translate ground- water data output from the U.S. Geological Survey modular three-dimensional, finite-difference, ground-water flow model (MODFLOW) into a format that can be used as input for the geographic information system programs (AML's). The application uses ARC/INFO AML programs and ARC/INFO menu interface programs to create digital spatial data layers of the land surface and water surface and to determine the hydroperiod. The technique can be used to evaluate and manage wetlands hydrology.

  19. A comparative study of spherical and flat-Earth geopotential modeling at satellite elevations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrott, M. H.; Hinze, W. J.; Braile, L. W.; Vonfrese, R. R. B.

    1985-01-01

    Flat-Earth modeling is a desirable alternative to the complex spherical-Earth modeling process. These methods were compared using 2 1/2 dimensional flat-earth and spherical modeling to compute gravity and scalar magnetic anomalies along profiles perpendicular to the strike of variably dimensioned rectangular prisms at altitudes of 150, 300, and 450 km. Comparison was achieved with percent error computations (spherical-flat/spherical) at critical anomaly points. At the peak gravity anomaly value, errors are less than + or - 5% for all prisms. At 1/2 and 1/10 of the peak, errors are generally less than 10% and 40% respectively, increasing to these values with longer and wider prisms at higher altitudes. For magnetics, the errors at critical anomaly points are less than -10% for all prisms, attaining these magnitudes with longer and wider prisms at higher altitudes. In general, in both gravity and magnetic modeling, errors increase greatly for prisms wider than 500 km, although gravity modeling is more sensitive than magnetic modeling to spherical-Earth effects. Preliminary modeling of both satellite gravity and magnetic anomalies using flat-Earth assumptions is justified considering the errors caused by uncertainties in isolating anomalies.

  20. A Combined SRTM Digital Elevation Model for Zanjan State of Iran Based on the Corrective Surface Idea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiamehr, Ramin

    2016-04-01

    One arc-second high resolution version of the SRTM model recently published for the Iran by the US Geological Survey database. Digital Elevation Models (DEM) is widely used in different disciplines and applications by geoscientist. It is an essential data in geoid computation procedure, e.g., to determine the topographic, downward continuation (DWC) and atmospheric corrections. Also, it can be used in road location and design in civil engineering and hydrological analysis. However, a DEM is only a model of the elevation surface and it is subject to errors. The most important parts of errors could be comes from the bias in height datum. On the other hand, the accuracy of DEM is usually published in global sense and it is important to have estimation about the accuracy in the area of interest before using of it. One of the best methods to have a reasonable indication about the accuracy of DEM is obtained from the comparison of their height versus the precise national GPS/levelling data. It can be done by the determination of the Root-Mean-Square (RMS) of fitting between the DEM and leveling heights. The errors in the DEM can be approximated by different kinds of functions in order to fit the DEMs to a set of GPS/levelling data using the least squares adjustment. In the current study, several models ranging from a simple linear regression to seven parameter similarity transformation model are used in fitting procedure. However, the seven parameter model gives the best fitting with minimum standard division in all selected DEMs in the study area. Based on the 35 precise GPS/levelling data we obtain a RMS of 7 parameter fitting for SRTM DEM 5.5 m, The corrective surface model in generated based on the transformation parameters and included to the original SRTM model. The result of fitting in combined model is estimated again by independent GPS/leveling data. The result shows great improvement in absolute accuracy of the model with the standard deviation of 3.4 meter.

  1. Quantifying the performance of automated GIS-based geomorphological approaches for riparian zone delineation using digital elevation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, D.; Barquín, J.; Álvarez-Cabria, M.; Peñas, F. J.

    2012-10-01

    Riparian zone delineation is a central issue for managing rivers and adjacent areas; however, criteria used to delineate them are still under debate. The area inundated by a 50-yr flood has been indicated as an optimal hydrological descriptor for riparian areas. This detailed hydrological information is usually only available for populated areas at risk of flooding. In this work we created several floodplain surfaces by means of two different GIS-based geomorphological approaches using digital elevation models (DEMs), in an attempt to find hydrologically meaningful potential riparian zones for river networks at the river basin scale. Objective quantification of the performance of the two geomorphologic models is provided by analysing coinciding and exceeding areas with respect to the 50-yr flood surface in different river geomorphological types.

  2. Determining the Suitability of Different Digital Elevation Models and Satellite Images for Fancy Maps. An Example of Cyprus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drachal, J.; Kawel, A. K.

    2016-06-01

    The article describes the possibility of developing an overall map of the selected area on the basis of publicly available data. Such a map would take the form designed by the author with the colors that meets his expectations and a content, which he considers to be appropriate. Among the data available it was considered the use of satellite images of the terrain in real colors and, in the form of shaded relief, digital terrain models with different resolutions of the terrain mesh. Specifically the considered data were: MODIS, Landsat 8, GTOPO-30, SRTM-30, SRTM-1, SRTM-3, ASTER. For the test area the island of Cyprus was chosen because of the importance in tourism, a relatively small area and a clearly defined boundary. In the paper there are shown and discussed various options of the Cyprus terrain image obtained synthetically from variants of Modis, Landsat and digital elevation models of different resolutions.

  3. Determination of fractal dimensions of digital elevation models for the watershed of Lake Jocasse, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Wagenseil, R.

    1991-01-01

    There are persistent difficulties in monitoring nonpoint source pollution and in the related field of hydrology. The problems stem from variations in spatial distribution which are poorly understood and difficult to model with established methods. Two recent developments may offer a solution, if they are combined with care. The first development is the increasing capability of computer mapping, called geographic information systems (GIS). These systems can store, retrieve, and manipulate data with an explicit spatial structure. The second development is the field of fractal mathematics. Fractal mathematics includes geometric sets which have simple descriptions, despite complex appearances. One family of such fractal sets are the Brownian surfaces, which capture many of the qualities of natural land surfaces in a simple statistical model. Up until now, the Brownian models have been constrained by the assumption that the same statistical relationship holds over the entire surface. This is called the constraint of stationarity. The need to study how the landscape differs by location leads to relaxing the constraint of stationarity. This, in turn, causes some profound changes in the model. A special computer program applies the new model to a set of three-dimensional digital maps of natural terrain (DEMs). The model performs well, and highlights differences in landforms. This suggests several new approaches to spatial variation.

  4. Repeat-swap homology modeling of secondary active transporters: updated protocol and prediction of elevator-type mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Vergara-Jaque, Ariela; Fenollar-Ferrer, Cristina; Kaufmann, Desirée; Forrest, Lucy R.

    2015-01-01

    Secondary active transporters are critical for neurotransmitter clearance and recycling during synaptic transmission and uptake of nutrients. These proteins mediate the movement of solutes against their concentration gradients, by using the energy released in the movement of ions down pre-existing concentration gradients. To achieve this, transporters conform to the so-called alternating-access hypothesis, whereby the protein adopts at least two conformations in which the substrate binding sites are exposed to one or other side of the membrane, but not both simultaneously. Structures of a bacterial homolog of neuronal glutamate transporters, GltPh, in several different conformational states have revealed that the protein structure is asymmetric in the outward- and inward-open states, and that the conformational change connecting them involves a elevator-like movement of a substrate binding domain across the membrane. The structural asymmetry is created by inverted-topology repeats, i.e., structural repeats with similar overall folds whose transmembrane topologies are related to each other by two-fold pseudo-symmetry around an axis parallel to the membrane plane. Inverted repeats have been found in around three-quarters of secondary transporter folds. Moreover, the (a)symmetry of these systems has been successfully used as a bioinformatic tool, called “repeat-swap modeling” to predict structural models of a transporter in one conformation using the known structure of the transporter in the complementary conformation as a template. Here, we describe an updated repeat-swap homology modeling protocol, and calibrate the accuracy of the method using GltPh, for which both inward- and outward-facing conformations are known. We then apply this repeat-swap homology modeling procedure to a concentrative nucleoside transporter, VcCNT, which has a three-dimensional arrangement related to that of GltPh. The repeat-swapped model of VcCNT predicts that nucleoside transport

  5. A model for the generation of localized transient [Na{sup +}] elevations in vascular smooth muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Fameli, Nicola; Kuo, Kuo-Hsing; Breemen, Cornelis van

    2009-11-20

    We present a stochastic computational model to study the mechanism of signaling between a source and a target ionic transporter, both localized on the plasma membrane (PM). In general this requires a nanometer-scale cytoplasmic space, or nanodomain, between the PM and a peripheral organelle to reflect ions back towards the PM. Specifically we investigate the coupling between Na{sup +} entry via the transient receptor potential canonical channel 6 (TRPC6) and the Na{sup +}/Ca{sup 2+} exchanger (NCX), a process which is essential for reloading the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) via the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca{sup 2+}ATPase (SERCA) and maintaining Ca{sup 2+} oscillations in activated vascular smooth muscle. Having previously modeled the flow of Ca{sup 2+} between reverse NCX and SERCA during SR refilling, this quantitative approach now allows us to model the upstream linkage of Na{sup +} entry through TRPC6 to reversal of NCX. We have implemented a random walk (RW) Monte Carlo (MC) model with simulations mimicking a diffusion process originating at the TRPC6 within PM-SR junctions. The model calculates the average Na{sup +} in the nanospace and also produces profiles as a function of distance from the source. Our results highlight the necessity of a strategic juxtaposition of the relevant ion translocators as well as other physical structures within the nanospaces to permit adequate Na{sup +} build-up to initiate NCX reversal and Ca{sup 2+} influx to refill the SR.

  6. The National Map - Elevation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gesch, Dean; Evans, Gayla; Mauck, James; Hutchinson, John; Carswell, William J.

    2009-01-01

    The National Elevation Dataset (NED) is the primary elevation data product produced and distributed by the USGS. The NED provides seamless raster elevation data of the conterminous United States, Alaska, Hawaii, and the island territories. The NED is derived from diverse source data sets that are processed to a specification with a consistent resolution, coordinate system, elevation units, and horizontal and vertical datums. The NED is the logical result of the maturation of the long-standing USGS elevation program, which for many years concentrated on production of topographic map quadrangle-based digital elevation models. The NED serves as the elevation layer of The National Map, and provides basic elevation information for earth science studies and mapping applications in the United States. The NED is a multi-resolution dataset that is updated bimonthly to integrate newly available, improved elevation source data. NED data are available nationally at grid spacings of 1 arc-second (approximately 30 meters) for the conterminous United States, and at 1/3 and 1/9 arc-seconds (approximately 10 and 3 meters, respectively) for parts of the United States. Most of the NED for Alaska is available at 2-arc-second (about 60 meters) grid spacing, where only lower resolution source data exist. Part of Alaska is available at the 1/3-arc-second resolution, and plans are in development for a significant upgrade in elevation data coverage of the State over the next 5 years. Specifications for the NED include the following: *Coordinate system: Geographic (decimal degrees of latitude and longitude), *Horizontal datum: North American Datum of 1983 (NAD 83), *Vertical datum: North American Vertical Datum of 1988 (NAVD 88) over the conterminous United States and varies in other areas, and *Elevation units: Decimal meters.

  7. A model of ocean basin crustal magnetization appropriate for satellite elevation anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Herman H.

    1987-01-01

    A model of ocean basin crustal magnetization measured at satellite altitudes is developed which will serve both as background to which anomalous magnetizations can be contrasted and as a beginning point for studies of tectonic modification of normal ocean crust. The model is based on published data concerned with the petrology and magnetization of the ocean crust and consists of viscous magnetization and induced magnetization estimated for individual crustal layers. Thermal remanent magnetization and chemical remanent magnetization are excluded from the model because seafloor spreading anomalies are too short in wavelength to be resolved at satellite altitudes. The exception to this generalization is found at the oceanic magnetic quiet zones where thermal remanent magnetization and chemical remanent magnetization must be considered along with viscous magnetization and induced magnetization.

  8. Evaluation of the U.S. Geological Survey standard elevation products in a two-dimensional hydraulic modeling application for a low relief coastal floodplain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Witt, Emitt C.

    2015-01-01

    Growing use of two-dimensional (2-D) hydraulic models has created a need for high resolution data to support flood volume estimates, floodplain specific engineering data, and accurate flood inundation scenarios. Elevation data are a critical input to these models that guide the flood-wave across the landscape allowing the computation of valuable engineering specific data that provides a better understanding of flooding impacts on structures, debris movement, bed scour, and direction. High resolution elevation data are becoming publicly available that can benefit the 2-D flood modeling community. Comparison of these newly available data with legacy data suggests that better modeling outcomes are achieved by using 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) lidar point data and the derived 1 m Digital Elevation Model (DEM) product relative to the legacy 3 m, 10 m, or 30 m products currently available in the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Elevation Dataset. Within the low topographic relief of a coastal floodplain, the newer 3DEP data better resolved elevations within the forested and swampy areas achieving simulations that compared well with a historic flooding event. Results show that the 1 m DEM derived from 3DEP lidar source provides a more conservative estimate of specific energy, static pressure, and impact pressure for grid elements at maximum flow relative to the legacy DEM data. Better flood simulations are critically important in coastal floodplains where climate change driven storm frequency and sea level rise will contribute to more frequent flooding events.

  9. Evaluation of the U.S. Geological Survey standard elevation products in a two-dimensional hydraulic modeling application for a low relief coastal floodplain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witt, Emitt C.

    2015-12-01

    Growing use of two-dimensional (2-D) hydraulic models has created a need for high resolution data to support flood volume estimates, floodplain specific engineering data, and accurate flood inundation scenarios. Elevation data are a critical input to these models that guide the flood-wave across the landscape allowing the computation of valuable engineering specific data that provides a better understanding of flooding impacts on structures, debris movement, bed scour, and direction. High resolution elevation data are becoming publicly available that can benefit the 2-D flood modeling community. Comparison of these newly available data with legacy data suggests that better modeling outcomes are achieved by using 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) lidar point data and the derived 1 m Digital Elevation Model (DEM) product relative to the legacy 3 m, 10 m, or 30 m products currently available in the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Elevation Dataset. Within the low topographic relief of a coastal floodplain, the newer 3DEP data better resolved elevations within the forested and swampy areas achieving simulations that compared well with a historic flooding event. Results show that the 1 m DEM derived from 3DEP lidar source provides a more conservative estimate of specific energy, static pressure, and impact pressure for grid elements at maximum flow relative to the legacy DEM data. Better flood simulations are critically important in coastal floodplains where climate change driven storm frequency and sea level rise will contribute to more frequent flooding events.

  10. Experimental vs. modeled water use in mature Norway spruce (Picea abies) exposed to elevated CO2

    PubMed Central

    Leuzinger, Sebastian; Bader, Martin K.-F.

    2012-01-01

    Rising levels of atmospheric CO2 have often been reported to reduce plant water use. Such behavior is also predicted by standard equations relating photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, and atmospheric CO2 concentration, which form the core of dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs). Here, we provide first results from a free air CO2 enrichment (FACE) experiment with naturally growing, mature (35 m) Picea abies (L.) (Norway spruce) and compare them to simulations by the DGVM LPJ-GUESS. We monitored sap flow, stem water deficit, stomatal conductance, leaf water potential, and soil moisture in five 35–40 m tall CO2-treated (550 ppm) trees over two seasons. Using LPJ-GUESS, we simulated this experiment using climate data from a nearby weather station. While the model predicted a stable reduction of transpiration of between 9% and 18% (at concentrations of 550–700 ppm atmospheric CO2), the combined evidence from various methods characterizing water use in our experimental trees suggest no changes in response to future CO2 concentrations. The discrepancy between the modeled and the experimental results may be a scaling issue: while dynamic vegetation models correctly predict leaf-level responses, they may not sufficiently account for the processes involved at the canopy and ecosystem scale, which could offset the first-order stomatal response. PMID:23087696

  11. Overland Flow Analysis Using Time Series of Suas-Derived Elevation Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeziorska, J.; Mitasova, H.; Petrasova, A.; Petras, V.; Divakaran, D.; Zajkowski, T.

    2016-06-01

    With the advent of the innovative techniques for generating high temporal and spatial resolution terrain models from Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) imagery, it has become possible to precisely map overland flow patterns. Furthermore, the process has become more affordable and efficient through the coupling of small UAS (sUAS) that are easily deployed with Structure from Motion (SfM) algorithms that can efficiently derive 3D data from RGB imagery captured with consumer grade cameras. We propose applying the robust overland flow algorithm based on the path sampling technique for mapping flow paths in the arable land on a small test site in Raleigh, North Carolina. By comparing a time series of five flights in 2015 with the results of a simulation based on the most recent lidar derived DEM (2013), we show that the sUAS based data is suitable for overland flow predictions and has several advantages over the lidar data. The sUAS based data captures preferential flow along tillage and more accurately represents gullies. Furthermore the simulated water flow patterns over the sUAS based terrain models are consistent throughout the year. When terrain models are reconstructed only from sUAS captured RGB imagery, however, water flow modeling is only appropriate in areas with sparse or no vegetation cover.

  12. Experimental vs. modeled water use in mature Norway spruce (Picea abies) exposed to elevated CO(2).

    PubMed

    Leuzinger, Sebastian; Bader, Martin K-F

    2012-01-01

    Rising levels of atmospheric CO(2) have often been reported to reduce plant water use. Such behavior is also predicted by standard equations relating photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, and atmospheric CO(2) concentration, which form the core of dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs). Here, we provide first results from a free air CO(2) enrichment (FACE) experiment with naturally growing, mature (35 m) Picea abies (L.) (Norway spruce) and compare them to simulations by the DGVM LPJ-GUESS. We monitored sap flow, stem water deficit, stomatal conductance, leaf water potential, and soil moisture in five 35-40 m tall CO(2)-treated (550 ppm) trees over two seasons. Using LPJ-GUESS, we simulated this experiment using climate data from a nearby weather station. While the model predicted a stable reduction of transpiration of between 9% and 18% (at concentrations of 550-700 ppm atmospheric CO(2)), the combined evidence from various methods characterizing water use in our experimental trees suggest no changes in response to future CO(2) concentrations. The discrepancy between the modeled and the experimental results may be a scaling issue: while dynamic vegetation models correctly predict leaf-level responses, they may not sufficiently account for the processes involved at the canopy and ecosystem scale, which could offset the first-order stomatal response. PMID:23087696

  13. Modeling of grain growth behavior of S34MnV steel at elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Mingyue; Xu, Bin; Li, Dianzhong; Li, Yiyi

    2013-05-01

    S34MnV steel is widely used as a fundamental material in manufacturing crankshaft in diesel engine. However, due to amount of addition of Manganese element in the steel, coarse grain and mixed grain are commonly observed after long time heating during the forging passes in industrial practice, which may seriously reduce the impact toughness of the material. In current study, based on the observed microstructure of S34MnV steel at different temperatures and heating times, an empirical model has been established which reflects the relationship between the final grain size and the initial grain size, as well as heating temperature and holding time. This model has been validated by a scaled sample, and we further represented a successful industrial application of this model to simulate the grain size distribution and evolution during a large crankthrow heating and forging process, which evidences its practical and promising perspective of our model with an aim of widely promoting the mechanical properties heavy marine components.

  14. On the constitutive model of nitrogen-containing austenitic stainless steel 316LN at elevated temperature.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Feng, Xiao; Wang, Xin; Liu, Changyong

    2014-01-01

    The nitrogen-containing austenitic stainless steel 316LN has been chosen as the material for nuclear main-pipe, which is one of the key parts in 3rd generation nuclear power plants. In this research, a constitutive model of nitrogen-containing austenitic stainless steel is developed. The true stress-true strain curves obtained from isothermal hot compression tests over a wide range of temperatures (900-1250°C) and strain rates (10(-3)-10 s(-1)), were employed to study the dynamic deformational behavior of and recrystallization in 316LN steels. The constitutive model is developed through multiple linear regressions performed on the experimental data and based on an Arrhenius-type equation and Zener-Hollomon theory. The influence of strain was incorporated in the developed constitutive equation by considering the effect of strain on the various material constants. The reliability and accuracy of the model is verified through the comparison of predicted flow stress curves and experimental curves. Possible reasons for deviation are also discussed based on the characteristics of modeling process.

  15. On the Constitutive Model of Nitrogen-Containing Austenitic Stainless Steel 316LN at Elevated Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; Feng, Xiao; Wang, Xin; Liu, Changyong

    2014-01-01

    The nitrogen-containing austenitic stainless steel 316LN has been chosen as the material for nuclear main-pipe, which is one of the key parts in 3rd generation nuclear power plants. In this research, a constitutive model of nitrogen-containing austenitic stainless steel is developed. The true stress-true strain curves obtained from isothermal hot compression tests over a wide range of temperatures (900–1250°C) and strain rates (10−3–10 s−1), were employed to study the dynamic deformational behavior of and recrystallization in 316LN steels. The constitutive model is developed through multiple linear regressions performed on the experimental data and based on an Arrhenius-type equation and Zener-Hollomon theory. The influence of strain was incorporated in the developed constitutive equation by considering the effect of strain on the various material constants. The reliability and accuracy of the model is verified through the comparison of predicted flow stress curves and experimental curves. Possible reasons for deviation are also discussed based on the characteristics of modeling process. PMID:25375345

  16. Digital elevation model of King Edward VII Peninsula, West Antarctica, from SAR interferometry and ICESat laser altimetry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baek, S.; Kwoun, Oh-Ig; Braun, Andreas; Lu, Zhiming; Shum, C.K.

    2005-01-01

    We present a digital elevation model (DEM) of King Edward VII Peninsula, Sulzberger Bay, West Antarctica, developed using 12 European Remote Sensing (ERS) synthetic aperture radar (SAR) scenes and 24 Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) laser altimetry profiles. We employ differential interferograms from the ERS tandem mission SAR scenes acquired in the austral fall of 1996, and four selected ICESat laser altimetry profiles acquired in the austral fall of 2004, as ground control points (GCPs) to construct an improved geocentric 60-m resolution DEM over the grounded ice region. We then extend the DEM to include two ice shelves using ICESat profiles via Kriging. Twenty additional ICESat profiles acquired in 2003-2004 are used to assess the accuracy of the DEM. After accounting for radar penetration depth and predicted surface changes, including effects due to ice mass balance, solid Earth tides, and glacial isostatic adjustment, in part to account for the eight-year data acquisition discrepancy, the resulting difference between the DEM and ICESat profiles is -0.57 ?? 5.88 m. After removing the discrepancy between the DEM and ICESat profiles for a final combined DEM using a bicubic spline, the overall difference is 0.05 ?? 1.35 m. ?? 2005 IEEE.

  17. CALIPSO Satellite Lidar Identification Of Elevated Dust Over Australia Compared With Air Quality Model PM60 Forecasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Stuart A.; Vaughan, Mark; Omar, Ali; Liu, Zhaoyan; Lee, Sunhee; Hu, Youngxiang; Cope, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Global measurements of the vertical distribution of clouds and aerosols have been recorded by the lidar on board the CALIPSO (Cloud Aerosol Lidar Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations) satellite since June 2006. Such extensive, height-resolved measurements provide a rare and valuable opportunity for developing, testing and validating various atmospheric models, including global climate, numerical weather prediction, chemical transport and air quality models. Here we report on the initial results of an investigation into the performance of the Australian Air Quality Forecast System (AAQFS) model in forecasting the distribution of elevated dust over the Australian region. The model forecasts of PM60 dust distribution are compared with the CALIPSO lidar Vertical Feature Mask (VFM) data product. The VFM classifies contiguous atmospheric regions of enhanced backscatter as either cloud or aerosols. Aerosols are further classified into six subtypes. By comparing forecast PM60 concentration profiles to the spatial distribution of dust reported in the CALIPSO VFM, we can assess the model s ability to predict the occurrence and the vertical and horizontal extents of dust events within the study area.

  18. [Generic ecosystem model for assessing the effects of elevated carbon dioxide on ecosystems]. [Annual] report, July 1, 1988--June 30, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, J.F.

    1989-12-31

    Development of simulation models of the effects of elevated CO{sub 2} on plant physiological processes requires close cooperation between modelers and experimentalists. In particular, the detailed process-based, leaf-level photosynthesis model currently in development at San Diego State University requires parameterization data for different plant species, levels within the canopy, and growth conditions. Validation of model predictions will require additional data. The purpose of this supplemental is to initiate ways in which different groups involved in elevated CO{sub 2} research can interact to advance the goals of both the individual research scientists and the CO{sub 2} Research Program.

  19. A fast topographic characterization of seismic station locations in Iran through integrated use of digital elevation models and GIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimzadeh, Sadra; Miyajima, Masakatsu; Kamel, Batoul; Pessina, Vera

    2015-10-01

    We present topographic slope positions of seismic stations within four independent networks (IGUT, IIEES, GSI, and BHRC) in Iran through integrated use of digital elevation models and GIS. Since topographic amplification factor (TAF) due to ground surface irregularity could be one of the reasons of earthquake wave amplification and unexpected damage of structures located on the top of ridges in many previous studies, the ridge stations in the study area are recognized using topographic position index (TPI) as a spatial-based scale-dependent approach that helps in classification of topographic positions. We also present the correlation between local topographic positions and V {/s 30} along with Voronoi tiles of two networks (IGUT and IIEES). The obtained results can be profitably used in seismology to establish homogeneous subnetworks based on Voronoi tiles with precise feedback and in the formulation of new ground motion prediction equations with respect to topographic position and topographic amplification factor.

  20. Use of a global model to understand speciated atmospheric mercury observations at five high-elevation sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss-Penzias, P.; Amos, H. M.; Selin, N. E.; Gustin, M. S.; Jaffe, D. A.; Obrist, D.; Sheu, G.-R.; Giang, A.

    2015-02-01

    Atmospheric mercury (Hg) measurements using the Tekran® analytical system from five high-elevation sites (1400-3200 m elevation), one in Asia and four in the western US, were compiled over multiple seasons and years, and these data were compared with the GEOS-Chem global model. Mercury data consisted of gaseous elemental Hg (GEM) and "reactive Hg" (RM), which is a combination of the gaseous oxidized (GOM) and particulate bound (< 2.5 μm) (PBM) fractions as measured by the Tekran® system. We used a subset of the observations by defining a "free tropospheric" (FT) data set by screening using measured water vapor mixing ratios. The oxidation scheme used by the GEOS-Chem model was varied between the standard run with Br oxidation and an alternative run with OH-O3 oxidation. We used this model-measurement comparison to help interpret the spatio-temporal trends in, and relationships among, the Hg species and ancillary parameters, to understand better the sources and fate of atmospheric RM. The most salient feature of the data across sites, seen more in summer relative to spring, was that RM was negatively correlated with GEM and water vapor mixing ratios (WV) and positively correlated with ozone (O3), both in the standard model and the observations, indicating that RM was formed in dry upper altitude air from the photo-oxidation of GEM. During a free tropospheric transport high RM event observed sequentially at three sites from Oregon to Nevada, the slope of the RM / GEM relationship at the westernmost site was -1020 ± 209 pg ng-1, indicating near-quantitative GEM-to-RM photochemical conversion. An improved correlation between the observations and the model was seen when the model was run with the OH-O3 oxidation scheme instead of the Br oxidation scheme. This simulation produced higher concentrations of RM and lower concentrations of GEM, especially at the desert sites in northwestern Nevada. This suggests that future work should investigate the effect of Br- and O3

  1. Hydrogen sulfide capture by limestone and dolomite at elevated pressure. 2: Sorbent particle conversion modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Zevenhoven, C.A.P.; Yrjas, K.P.; Hupa, M.M.

    1996-03-01

    The physical structure of a limestone or dolomite to be used in in-bed sulfur capture in fluidized bed gasifiers has a great impact on the efficiency of sulfur capture and sorbent use. In this study an unreacted shrinking core model with variable effective diffusivity is applied to sulfidation test data from a pressurized thermogravimetric apparatus (P-TGA) for a set of physically and chemically different limestone and dolomite samples. The particle size was 250--300 {micro}m for all sorbents, which were characterized by chemical composition analysis, particle density measurement, mercury porosimetry, and BET internal surface measurement. Tests were done under typical conditions for a pressurized fluidized-bed gasifier, i.e., 20% CO{sub 2}, 950 C, 20 bar. At these conditions the limestone remains uncalcined, while the dolomite is half-calcined. Additional tests were done at low CO{sub 2} partial pressures, yielding calcined limestone and fully calcined dolomite. The generalized model allows for determination of values for the initial reaction rate and product layer diffusivity.

  2. Development of status epilepticus, sustained calcium elevations and neuronal injury in a rat survival model of lethal paraoxon intoxication.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Laxmikant S; Carter, Dawn S; Phillips, Kristin F; Blair, Robert E; DeLorenzo, Robert J

    2014-09-01

    Paraoxon (POX) is an active metabolite of organophosphate (OP) pesticide parathion that has been weaponized and used against civilian populations. Exposure to POX produces high mortality. OP poisoning is often associated with chronic neurological disorders. In this study, we optimize a rat survival model of lethal POX exposures in order to mimic both acute and long-term effects of POX intoxication. Male Sprague-Dawley rats injected with POX (4mg/kg, ice-cold PBS, s.c.) produced a rapid cholinergic crisis that evolved into status epilepticus (SE) and death within 6-8min. The EEG profile for POX induced SE was characterized and showed clinical and electrographic seizures with 7-10Hz spike activity. Treatment of 100% lethal POX intoxication with an optimized three drug regimen (atropine, 2mg/kg, i.p., 2-PAM, 25mg/kg, i.m. and diazepam, 5mg/kg, i.p.) promptly stopped SE and reduced acute mortality to 12% and chronic mortality to 18%. This model is ideally suited to test effective countermeasures against lethal POX exposure. Animals that survived the POX SE manifested prolonged elevations in hippocampal [Ca(2+)]i (Ca(2+) plateau) and significant multifocal neuronal injury. POX SE induced Ca(2+) plateau had its origin in Ca(2+) release from intracellular Ca(2+) stores since inhibition of ryanodine/IP3 receptor lowered elevated Ca(2+) levels post SE. POX SE induced neuronal injury and alterations in Ca(2+) dynamics may underlie some of the long term morbidity associated with OP toxicity.

  3. Human cytomegalovirus infection leads to elevated levels of transplant arteriosclerosis in a humanized mouse aortic xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Abele-Ohl, S; Leis, M; Wollin, M; Mahmoudian, S; Hoffmann, J; Müller, R; Heim, C; Spriewald, B M; Weyand, M; Stamminger, T; Ensminger, S M

    2012-07-01

    Recent findings emphasized an important role of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection in the development of transplant arteriosclerosis. Therefore, the aim of this study was to develop a human peripheral blood lymphocyte (hu-PBL)/Rag-2(-/-) γc(-/-) mouse-xenograft-model to investigate both immunological as well as viral effector mechanisms in the progression of transplant arteriosclerosis. For this, sidebranches from the internal mammary artery were recovered during coronary artery bypass graft surgery, tissue-typed and infected with HCMV. Then, size-matched sidebranches were implanted into the infrarenal aorta of Rag-2(-/-) γc(-/-) mice. The animals were reconstituted with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) 7 days after transplantation. HCMV-infection was confirmed by Taqman-PCR and immunofluorescence analyses. Arterial grafts were analyzed by histology on day 40 after transplantation. PBMC-reconstituted Rag-2(-/-) γc(-/-) animals showed splenic chimerism levels ranging from 1-16% human cells. After reconstitution, Rag-2(-/-) γc(-/-) mice developed human leukocyte infiltrates in their grafts and vascular lesions that were significantly elevated after infection. Cellular infiltration revealed significantly increased ICAM-1 and PDGF-R-β expression after HCMV-infection of the graft. Arterial grafts from unreconstituted Rag-2(-/-) γc(-/-) recipients showed no vascular lesions. These data demonstrate a causative relationship between HCMV-infection as an isolated risk factor and the development of transplant-arteriosclerosis in a humanized mouse arterial-transplant-model possibly by elevated ICAM-1 and PDGF-R-β expression.

  4. Demographic projection of high-elevation white pines infected with white pine blister rust: a nonlinear disease model.

    PubMed

    Field, S G; Schoettle, A W; Klutsch, J G; Tavener, S J; Antolin, M F

    2012-01-01

    Matrix population models have long been used to examine and predict the fate of threatened populations. However, the majority of these efforts concentrate on long-term equilibrium dynamics of linear systems and their underlying assumptions and, therefore, omit the analysis of transience. Since management decisions are typically concerned with the short-term (< 100 years), asymptotic analyses could lead to inaccurate conclusions or, worse yet, critical parameters or processes of ecological concern may go undetected altogether. We present a stage-structured, deterministic, nonlinear, disease model which is parameterized for the population dynamics of high-elevation white pines in the face of infection with white pine blister rust (WPBR). We evaluate the model using newly developed software to calculate sensitivity and elasticity for nonlinear population models at any projected time step. We concentrate on two points in time, during transience and at equilibrium, and under two scenarios: a regenerating pine stand following environmental disturbance and a stand perturbed by the introduction of WPBR. The model includes strong density-dependent effects on population dynamics, particularly on seedling recruitment, and results in a structure favoring large trees. However, the introduction of WPBR and its associated disease-induced mortality alters stand structure in favor of smaller stages. Populations with infection probability (beta) > or = 0.1 do not reach a stable coexisting equilibrium and deterministically approach extinction. The model enables field observations of low infection prevalence among pine seedlings to be reinterpreted as resulting from disease-induced mortality and short residence time in the seedling stage. Sensitivities and elasticities, combined with model output, suggest that future efforts should focus on improving estimates of within-stand competition, infection probability, and infection cost to survivorship. Mitigating these effects where

  5. Pollutant emissions from and within a model gas turbine combustor at elevated pressures and temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drennan, S. A.; Peterson, C. O.; Khatib, F. M.; Sowa, W. A.; Samuelsen, G. S.

    1993-01-01

    Conventional and advanced gas turbine engines are coming under increased scrutiny regarding pollutant emissions. This, in turn, has created a need to obtain in-situ experimental data at practical conditions, as well as exhaust data, and to obtain the data in combustors that reflect modern designs. The in-situ data are needed to (1) assess the effects of design modifications on pollutant formation, and (2) develop a detailed data base on combustor performance for the development and verification of computer modeling. This paper reports on a novel high pressure, high temperature facility designed to acquire such data under controlled conditions and with access (optical and extractive) for in-situ measurements. To evaluate the utility of the facility, a model gas turbine combustor was selected which features practical hardware design, two rows of jets (primary and dilution) with four jets in each row, and advanced wall cooling techniques with laser drilled effusive holes. The dome is equipped with a flat-vaned swirler with vane angles of 60 degrees. Data are obtained at combustor pressures ranging from 2 to 10 atmospheres of pressure, levels of air preheat to 427 C, combustor reference velocities from 10.0 to 20.0 m/s, and an overall equivalence ratio of 0.3. Exit plane and in-situ measurements are presented for HC, O2, CO2, CO, and NO(x). The exit plane emissions of NO(x) correspond to levels reported from practical combustors and the in-situ data demonstrate the utility and potential for detailed flow field measurements.

  6. Assessing the quality of Digital Elevation Models obtained from mini-Unmanned Aerial Vehicles for overland flow modelling in urban areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitão, J. P.; Moy de Vitry, M.; Scheidegger, A.; Rieckermann, J.

    2015-06-01

    Precise and detailed Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) are essential to accurately predict overland flow in urban areas. Unfortunately, traditional sources of DEM remain a bottleneck for detailed and reliable overland flow models, because the resulting DEMs are too coarse to provide DEMs of sufficient detail to inform urban overland flows. Interestingly, technological developments of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) suggest that they have matured enough to be a competitive alternative to satellites or airplanes. However, this has not been tested so far. In this this study we therefore evaluated whether DEMs generated from UAV imagery are suitable for urban drainage overland flow modelling. Specifically, fourteen UAV flights were conducted to assess the influence of four different flight parameters on the quality of generated DEMs: (i) flight altitude, (ii) image overlapping, (iii) camera pitch and (iv) weather conditions. In addition, we compared the best quality UAV DEM to a conventional Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR)-based DEM. To evaluate both the quality of the UAV DEMs and the comparison to LiDAR-based DEMs, we performed regression analysis on several qualitative and quantitative metrics, such as elevation accuracy, quality of object representation (e.g., buildings, walls and trees) in the DEM, which were specifically tailored to assess overland flow modelling performance, using the flight parameters as explanatory variables. Our results suggested that, first, as expected, flight altitude influenced the DEM quality most, where lower flights produce better DEMs; in a similar fashion, overcast weather conditions are preferable, but weather conditions and other factors influence DEM quality much less. Second, we found that for urban overland flow modelling, the UAV DEMs performed competitively in comparison to a traditional LiDAR-based DEM. An important advantage of using UAVs to generate DEMs in urban areas is their flexibility that enables more frequent

  7. Monocular Elevation Deficiency - Double Elevator Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Eye Terms Conditions Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Monocular Elevation Deficiency/ Double Elevator Palsy En Español Read in Chinese What is monocular elevation deficiency (Double Elevator Palsy)? ...

  8. An urban scale inverse modelling for retrieving unknown elevated emissions with building-resolving simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Pramod; Singh, Sarvesh Kumar; Feiz, Amir-Ali; Ngae, Pierre

    2016-09-01

    This study illustrates an atmospheric source reconstruction methodology for identification of an unknown continuous point release in the geometrically complex urban environments. The methodology is based on the renormalization inversion theory coupled with a building resolving Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modelling approach which estimates the release height along with the projected location on the ground surface and the intensity of an unknown continuous point source in an urban area. An estimation of the release height in a three-dimensional urban environment is relatively more difficult from both technical and computational point of view. Thus, a salient feature of the methodology is to address the problem of vertical structure (i.e. height of a source) in atmospheric source reconstruction in three-dimensional space of an urban region. The inversion methodology presents a way to utilize a CFD model fluidyn-PANACHE in source reconstruction in the urban regions. The described methodology is evaluated with 20 trials of the Mock Urban Field Setting Test (MUST) field experiment in various atmospheric stability conditions varying from neutral to stable and very stable conditions. The retrieved source parameters in all the 20 trials are estimated close to their true source. The source height is retrieved within a factor of two and four in 55% and 75% of the MUST trials, respectively. The averaged location error for all 20 trials is obtained 14.54 m with a minimum of 3.58 m and maximum of 34.55 m. The averaged estimated release rate for all trials is overpredicted within a factor of 1.48 of the true source intensity and in 85% of the trials, it is retrieved within in factor of two. In source reconstruction with non-zero measurements, it was observed that the use of all concentration measurements instead of only non-zero essentially makes only the small differences in quality of the source reconstruction and gives a little additional information for better

  9. Elevated spinal monoamine neurotransmitters after antenatal hypoxia-ischemia in rabbit cerebral palsy model

    PubMed Central

    Drobyshevsky, Alexander; Takada, Silvia Honda; Luo, Kehuan; Derrick, Matthew; Yu, Lei; Quinlan, Katharina A.; Vasquez-Vivar, Jeannette; Nogueira, Maria Inês; Tan, Sidhartha

    2014-01-01

    We hypothesized that a deficiency in the descending serotonergic input to spinal cord may underlie postnatal muscle hypertonia after global antenatal hypoxic-ischemic injury in a rabbit model of cerebral palsy. Neurotransmitter content was determined by HPLC in the spinal cord of newborns with and without muscle hypertonia after fetal global hypoxic-ischemic brain injury and naïve controls. Contrary to our hypothesis, serotonin levels in both cervical and lumbar expansions and norepinephrine in cervical expansion were increased in hypertonic kits relative to non-hypertonic kits and controls, with unchanged number of serotonergic cells in caudal raphe by stereological count. Serotonergic fiber length per unit of volume was also increased in hypertonic kits’ cervical and lumbar spinal cord, both in dorsal and ventral horns. Gene expression of serotonin transporter was increased and 5-HTR2 receptors were decreased in hypertonic kits relative to controls in cervical and lumbar cord. Intrathecal administration of nonselective serotonin receptor inhibitor methysergide decreased muscle tone in hypertonic kits only. Conversely, intrathecal administration of serotonin solution increased muscle tone only in non-hypertonic kits. We speculate that maturation of serotonergic system in spinal cord may be directly affected by decreased corticospinal connectivity after antenatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury. PMID:25421613

  10. Long-term performance of ceramic matrix composites at elevated temperatures: Modelling of creep and creep rupture

    SciTech Connect

    Curtin, W.A.; Fabeny, B.; Ibnabdeljalil, M.; Iyengar, N.; Reifsnider, K.L.

    1996-07-31

    The models developed, contain explicit dependences on constituent material properties and their changes with time, so that composite performance can be predicted. Three critical processes in ceramic composites at elevated temperatures have been modeled: (1) creep deformation of composite vs stress and time-dependent creep of fibers and matrix, and failure of these components; (2) creep deformation of ``interface`` around broken fibers; and (3) lifetime of the composite under conditions of fiber strength loss over time at temperature. In (1), general evolution formulas are derived for relaxation time of matrix stresses and steady-state creep rate of composite; the model is tested against recent data on Ti-MMCs. Calculations on a composite of Hi-Nicalon fibers in a melt-infiltrated SiC matrix are presented. In (2), numerical simulations of composite failure were made to map out time-to-failure vs applied load for several sets of material parameters. In (3), simple approximate relations are obtained between fiber life and composite life that should be useful for fiber developers and testers. Strength degradation data on Hi-Nicalon fibers is used to assess composite lifetime vs fiber lifetime for Hi-Nicalon fiber composites.

  11. R-Baclofen Reverses a Social Behavior Deficit and Elevated Protein Synthesis in a Mouse Model of Fragile X Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Mei; Huang, Tianjian; Kader, Michael; Krych, Leland; Xia, Zengyan; Burlin, Thomas; Zeidler, Zachary; Zhao, Tingrui

    2015-01-01

    Background: Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common known inherited form of intellectual disability and the single genomic cause of autism spectrum disorders. It is caused by the absence of a fragile X mental retardation gene (Fmr1) product, FMRP, an RNA-binding translation suppressor. Elevated rates of protein synthesis in the brain and an imbalance between synaptic signaling via glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) are both considered important in the pathogenesis of FXS. In a mouse model of FXS (Fmr1 knockout [KO]), treatment with R-baclofen reversed some behavioral and biochemical phenotypes. A remaining crucial question is whether R-baclofen is also able to reverse increased brain protein synthesis rates. Methods: To answer this question, we measured regional rates of cerebral protein synthesis in vivo with the L-[1-14C]leucine method in vehicle- and R-baclofen–treated wildtype and Fmr1 KO mice. We further probed signaling pathways involved in the regulation of protein synthesis. Results: Acute R-baclofen administration corrected elevated protein synthesis and reduced deficits on a test of social behavior in adult Fmr1 KO mice. It also suppressed activity of the mammalian target of rapamycin pathway, particularly in synaptosome-enriched fractions, but it had no effect on extracellular-regulated kinase 1/2 activity. Ninety min after R-baclofen treatment, we observed an increase in metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 expression in the frontal cortex, a finding that may shed light on the tolerance observed in human studies with this drug. Conclusions: Our results suggest that treatment via activation of the GABA (GABA receptor subtype B) system warrants further study in patients with FXS. PMID:25820841

  12. Dramatic mass loss in extreme high-elevation areas of a western Himalayan glacier: observations and modeling.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Huabiao; Yang, Wei; Yao, Tandong; Tian, Lide; Xu, Baiqing

    2016-01-01

    Rapid climate change at high elevations has accelerated glacier retreat in the Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau. However, due to the lack of long-term glaciological measurements, there are still uncertainties regarding when the mass loss began and what the magnitude of mass loss is at such high elevations. Based on in situ glaciological observations during the past 9 years and a temperature-index mass balance model, this study investigates recent mass loss of the Naimona'nyi Glacier in the western Himalayas and reconstructs a 41-year (1973/74-2013/14) equilibrium line altitude (ELA) and glacier-wide mass loss. The result indicates that even at 6000 m above sea level (a.s.l.), the annual mass loss reaches ~0.73 m water equivalent (w.e.) during the past 9 years. Concordant with the abrupt climate shift in the end of 1980s, the ELA has dramatically risen from ~5969 ± 73 m a.s.l. during 1973/74-1988/89 to ~6193 ± 75 m a.s.l. during 1989/90-2013/14, suggesting that future ice cores containing uninterrupted climate records could only be recovered at least above 6200 m a.s.l. in the Naimona'nyi region. The glacier-wide mass balance over the past 41 years is averaged to be approximately -0.40 ± 0.17 m w.e., exhibiting a significant increase in the decadal average from -0.01 ± 0.15 to -0.69 ± 0.21 m w.e. PMID:27561411

  13. Digital Elevation Model Creation Using SfM on High-Altitude Snow-Covered Surfaces at Summit, Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millstein, J. D.; Hawley, R. L.

    2015-12-01

    Structure from Motion (SfM) provides a means through which a digital elevation model (DEM) can be constructed with data acquired at a relatively low cost when compared to other current alternatives. Using an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV), a large area can be efficiently covered at high spatial resolution to quantify regional topography. Structure from Motion applied to photogrammetric techniques from a UAV has proven to be a successful tool, but challenges to UAV-based SfM include high-altitude locations with few distinctive surface features and minor textural differences. In June 2015, we piloted a small UAV (Quest) in order to conduct a topographical survey of Summit Camp, Greenland using SfM. Summit Camp sits at a surface elevation of 3200 meters above sea level, and occupies a snow-covered surface. The flat, very uniform terrain proved to be a challenge when flying the UAV and processing imagery using SfM techniques. In this presentation we discuss the issues both with operating a UAV instrument platform at high-altitude in the polar regions and interpreting the resulting DEM from a snow-covered region. The final DEM of Summit Camp covers a large portion of the surface area directly impacted by camp activities. In particular, volume calculations of drifting snow gauge an estimate of the equipment hours that will be required to clear and unearth structures. Investigation of surface roughness at multiple length scales can similarly provide insight on the accuracy of the DEM when observing texturally uniform surfaces.

  14. Dramatic mass loss in extreme high-elevation areas of a western Himalayan glacier: observations and modeling

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Huabiao; Yang, Wei; Yao, Tandong; Tian, Lide; Xu, Baiqing

    2016-01-01

    Rapid climate change at high elevations has accelerated glacier retreat in the Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau. However, due to the lack of long-term glaciological measurements, there are still uncertainties regarding when the mass loss began and what the magnitude of mass loss is at such high elevations. Based on in situ glaciological observations during the past 9 years and a temperature-index mass balance model, this study investigates recent mass loss of the Naimona’nyi Glacier in the western Himalayas and reconstructs a 41-year (1973/74–2013/14) equilibrium line altitude (ELA) and glacier-wide mass loss. The result indicates that even at 6000 m above sea level (a.s.l.), the annual mass loss reaches ~0.73 m water equivalent (w.e.) during the past 9 years. Concordant with the abrupt climate shift in the end of 1980s, the ELA has dramatically risen from ~5969 ± 73 m a.s.l. during 1973/74–1988/89 to ~6193 ± 75 m a.s.l. during 1989/90–2013/14, suggesting that future ice cores containing uninterrupted climate records could only be recovered at least above 6200 m a.s.l. in the Naimona’nyi region. The glacier-wide mass balance over the past 41 years is averaged to be approximately −0.40 ± 0.17 m w.e., exhibiting a significant increase in the decadal average from −0.01 ± 0.15 to −0.69 ± 0.21 m w.e. PMID:27561411

  15. Dramatic mass loss in extreme high-elevation areas of a western Himalayan glacier: observations and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Huabiao; Yang, Wei; Yao, Tandong; Tian, Lide; Xu, Baiqing

    2016-08-01

    Rapid climate change at high elevations has accelerated glacier retreat in the Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau. However, due to the lack of long-term glaciological measurements, there are still uncertainties regarding when the mass loss began and what the magnitude of mass loss is at such high elevations. Based on in situ glaciological observations during the past 9 years and a temperature-index mass balance model, this study investigates recent mass loss of the Naimona’nyi Glacier in the western Himalayas and reconstructs a 41-year (1973/74–2013/14) equilibrium line altitude (ELA) and glacier-wide mass loss. The result indicates that even at 6000 m above sea level (a.s.l.), the annual mass loss reaches ~0.73 m water equivalent (w.e.) during the past 9 years. Concordant with the abrupt climate shift in the end of 1980s, the ELA has dramatically risen from ~5969 ± 73 m a.s.l. during 1973/74–1988/89 to ~6193 ± 75 m a.s.l. during 1989/90–2013/14, suggesting that future ice cores containing uninterrupted climate records could only be recovered at least above 6200 m a.s.l. in the Naimona’nyi region. The glacier-wide mass balance over the past 41 years is averaged to be approximately ‑0.40 ± 0.17 m w.e., exhibiting a significant increase in the decadal average from ‑0.01 ± 0.15 to ‑0.69 ± 0.21 m w.e.

  16. Tropical forest response to elevated CO2: Model-experiment integration at the AmazonFACE site.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleischer, K.

    2015-12-01

    The terrestrial biosphere's response to current and future elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide (eCO2) is a large source of uncertainty in future projections of the C cycle, climate and ecosystem functioning. In particular, the sensitivity of tropical rainforest ecosystems to eCO­2 is largely unknown even though the importance of tropical forests for biodiversity, carbon storage and regional and global climate feedbacks is unambiguously recognized. The AmazonFACE (Free-Air Carbon Enrichment) project will be the first ecosystem scale eCO2 experiment undertaken in the tropics, as well as the first to be undertaken in a mature forest. AmazonFACE provides the opportunity to integrate ecosystem modeling with experimental observations right from the beginning of the experiment, harboring a two-way exchange, i.e. models provide hypotheses to be tested, and observations deliver the crucial data to test and improve ecosystem models. We present preliminary exploration of observed and expected process responses to eCO2 at the AmazonFACE site from the dynamic global vegetation model LPJ-GUESS, highlighting opportunities and pitfalls for model integration of tropical FACE experiments. The preliminary analysis provides baseline hypotheses, which are to be further developed with a follow-up multiple model inter-comparison. The analysis builds on the recently undertaken FACE-MDS (Model-Data Synthesis) project, which was applied to two temperate FACE experiments and exceeds the traditional focus on comparing modeled end-target output. The approach has proven successful in identifying well (and less well) represented processes in models, which are separated for six clusters also here; (1) Carbon fluxes, (2) Carbon pools, (3) Energy balance, (4) Hydrology, (5) Nutrient cycling, and (6) Population dynamics. Simulation performance of observed conditions at the AmazonFACE site (a.o. from Manaus K34 eddy flux tower) will highlight process-based model deficiencies, and aid the separation

  17. The relationship between specific absorption rate and temperature elevation in anatomically based human body models for plane wave exposure from 30 MHz to 6 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Akimasa; Laakso, Ilkka; Oizumi, Takuya; Hanatani, Ryuto; Chan, Kwok Hung; Wiart, Joe

    2013-02-01

    According to the international safety guidelines/standard, the whole-body-averaged specific absorption rate (Poljak et al 2003 IEEE Trans. Electromagn. Compat. 45 141-5) and the peak spatial average SAR are used as metrics for human protection from whole-body and localized exposures, respectively. The IEEE standard (IEEE 2006 IEEE C95.1) indicates that the upper boundary frequency, over which the whole-body-averaged SAR is deemed to be the basic restriction, has been reduced from 6 to 3 GHz, because radio-wave energy is absorbed around the body surface when the frequency is increased. However, no quantitative discussion has been provided to support this description especially from the standpoint of temperature elevation. It is of interest to investigate the maximum temperature elevation in addition to the core temperature even for a whole-body exposure. In the present study, using anatomically based human models, we computed the SAR and the temperature elevation for a plane-wave exposure from 30 MHz to 6 GHz, taking into account the thermoregulatory response. As the primary result, we found that the ratio of the core temperature elevation to the whole-body-averaged SAR is almost frequency independent for frequencies below a few gigahertz; the ratio decreases above this frequency. At frequencies higher than a few gigahertz, core temperature elevation for the same whole-body averaged SAR becomes lower due to heat convection from the skin to air. This lower core temperature elevation is attributable to skin temperature elevation caused by the power absorption around the body surface. Then, core temperature elevation even for whole-body averaged SAR of 4 W kg-1 with the duration of 1 h was at most 0.8 °C, which is smaller than a threshold considered in the safety guidelines/standard. Further, the peak 10 g averaged SAR is correlated with the maximum body temperature elevations without extremities and pinna over the frequencies considered. These findings were confirmed

  18. Model-experiment synthesis at two FACE sites in the southeastern US. Forest ecosystem responses to elevated CO[2]. (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, A. P.; Zaehle, S.; De Kauwe, M. G.; Medlyn, B. E.; Dietze, M.; Hickler, T.; Iversen, C. M.; Jain, A. K.; Luo, Y.; McCarthy, H. R.; Parton, W. J.; Prentice, C.; Thornton, P. E.; Wang, S.; Wang, Y.; Warlind, D.; Warren, J.; Weng, E.; Hanson, P. J.; Oren, R.; Norby, R. J.

    2013-12-01

    Ecosystem observations from two long-term Free-Air CO[2] Enrichment (FACE) experiments (Duke forest and Oak Ridge forest) were used to evaluate the assumptions of 11 terrestrial ecosystem models and the consequences of those assumptions for the responses of ecosystem water, carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) fluxes to elevated CO[2] (eCO[2]). Nitrogen dynamics were the main constraint on simulated productivity responses to eCO[2]. At Oak Ridge some models reproduced the declining response of C and N fluxes, while at Duke none of the models were able to maintain the observed sustained responses. C and N cycles are coupled through a number of complex interactions, which causes uncertainty in model simulations in multiple ways. Nonetheless, the major difference between models and experiments was a larger than observed increase in N-use efficiency and lower than observed response of N uptake. The results indicate that at Duke there were mechanisms by which trees accessed additional N in response to eCO[2] that were not represented in the ecosystem models, and which did not operate with the same efficiency at Oak Ridge. Sequestration of the additional productivity under eCO[2] into forest biomass depended largely on C allocation. Allocation assumptions were classified into three main categories--fixed partitioning coefficients, functional relationships and a partial (leaf allocation only) optimisation. The assumption which best constrained model results was a functional relationship between leaf area and sapwood area (pipe-model) and increased root allocation when nitrogen or water were limiting. Both, productivity and allocation responses to eCO[2] determined the ecosystem-level response of LAI, which together with the response of stomatal conductance (and hence water-use efficiency; WUE) determined the ecosystem response of transpiration. Differences in the WUE response across models were related to the representation of the relationship of stomatal conductance to CO[2] and

  19. Digital elevation models in 10 minute time steps - a status report on 4D monitoring of an active erosional scar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, Andreas; Neugirg, Fabian; Hass, Erik; Jose, Steffen; Haas, Florian; Schmidt, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    In erosional research a variety of processes are well understood and have been mimicked under laboratory conditions. In complex natural systems such as Alpine environments a multitude of influencing factors tend to superimpose single processes in a mixed signal which impedes a reliable interpretation. These mixed signals can already be captured by geoscientific research approaches such as sediment collectors, erosion pins or remote sensing surveys. Nevertheless, they fail to distinguish between single processes and their individual impact on slope morphology. Throughout the last two years a highly active slope of unsorted glacial deposits in the northern Alps has been monitored by repeated terrestrial laser scans roughly every three months. Resulting high resolution digital elevation models of difference were produced to identify possible seasonal patterns. By reproducing the TLS results with a physically based erosion model (EROSION 3D) ran with in situ input data from rainfall simulations and a climate station a better understanding of individual mechanism could be achieved. However, the already elaborate combination of soil science and close range remote sensing could not answer all questions concerning the slopes behaviour, especially not for freeze and thaw cycles and the winter period. Therefore, an array of three fully automatic synchronised cameras was setup to generate continuous 3D surface models. Among the main challenges faced for the system were the energy supply and durability, perspectives of the cameras to avoid shadowing and to guarantee sufficient overlap, a certain robustness to withstand rough alpine weather conditions, the scaling of each 3D model by tracked ground control points and the automatic data handling. First results show individual processes sculpting the slope's morphology but further work is required to improve automatic point cloud creation and change monitoring.

  20. A Modified Johnson-Cook Model for Sheet Metal Forming at Elevated Temperatures and Its Application for Cooled Stress-Strain Curve and Spring-Back Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duc-Toan, Nguyen; Tien-Long, Banh; Young-Suk, Kim; Dong-Won, Jung

    2011-08-01

    In this study, a modified Johnson-Cook (J-C) model and an innovated method to determine (J-C) material parameters are proposed to predict more correctly stress-strain curve for tensile tests in elevated temperatures. A MATLAB tool is used to determine material parameters by fitting a curve to follow Ludwick's hardening law at various elevated temperatures. Those hardening law parameters are then utilized to determine modified (J-C) model material parameters. The modified (J-C) model shows the better prediction compared to the conventional one. As the first verification, an FEM tensile test simulation based on the isotropic hardening model for boron sheet steel at elevated temperatures was carried out via a user-material subroutine, using an explicit finite element code, and compared with the measurements. The temperature decrease of all elements due to the air cooling process was then calculated when considering the modified (J-C) model and coded to VUMAT subroutine for tensile test simulation of cooling process. The modified (J-C) model showed the good agreement between the simulation results and the corresponding experiments. The second investigation was applied for V-bending spring-back prediction of magnesium alloy sheets at elevated temperatures. Here, the combination of proposed J-C model with modified hardening law considering the unusual plastic behaviour for magnesium alloy sheet was adopted for FEM simulation of V-bending spring-back prediction and shown the good comparability with corresponding experiments.

  1. A Modified Johnson-Cook Model for Sheet Metal Forming at Elevated Temperatures and Its Application for Cooled Stress-Strain Curve and Spring-Back Prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Duc-Toan, Nguyen; Tien-Long, Banh; Young-Suk, Kim; Dong-Won, Jung

    2011-08-22

    In this study, a modified Johnson-Cook (J-C) model and an innovated method to determine (J-C) material parameters are proposed to predict more correctly stress-strain curve for tensile tests in elevated temperatures. A MATLAB tool is used to determine material parameters by fitting a curve to follow Ludwick's hardening law at various elevated temperatures. Those hardening law parameters are then utilized to determine modified (J-C) model material parameters. The modified (J-C) model shows the better prediction compared to the conventional one. As the first verification, an FEM tensile test simulation based on the isotropic hardening model for boron sheet steel at elevated temperatures was carried out via a user-material subroutine, using an explicit finite element code, and compared with the measurements. The temperature decrease of all elements due to the air cooling process was then calculated when considering the modified (J-C) model and coded to VUMAT subroutine for tensile test simulation of cooling process. The modified (J-C) model showed the good agreement between the simulation results and the corresponding experiments. The second investigation was applied for V-bending spring-back prediction of magnesium alloy sheets at elevated temperatures. Here, the combination of proposed J-C model with modified hardening law considering the unusual plastic behaviour for magnesium alloy sheet was adopted for FEM simulation of V-bending spring-back prediction and shown the good comparability with corresponding experiments.

  2. Coupling Aerosol-Cloud-Radiative Processes in the WRF-Chem Model: Investigating the Radiative Impact of Elevated Point Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, Elaine G.; Gustafson, William I.; Easter, Richard C.; Barnard, James C.; Ghan, Steven J.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Fast, Jerome D.

    2009-02-01

    The local and regional influence of elevated point sources on summertime aerosol forcing and cloud-aerosol interactions in northeastern North America was investigated using the WRF-Chem community model. The direct effects of aerosols on incoming solar radiation were simulated using existing modules to relate aerosol sizes and chemical composition to aerosol optical properties. Indirect effects were simulated by adding a prognostic treatment of cloud droplet number and adding modules that activate aerosol particles to form cloud droplets, simulate aqueous phase chemistry, and tie a two-moment treatment of cloud water (cloud water mass and cloud droplet number) to an existing radiation scheme. Fully interactive feedbacks thus were created within the modified model, with aerosols affecting cloud droplet number and cloud radiative properties, and clouds altering aerosol size and composition via aqueous processes, wet scavenging, and gas-phase-related photolytic processes. Comparisons of a baseline simulation with observations show that the model captured the general temporal cycle of aerosol optical depths (AODs) and produced clouds of comparable thickness to observations at approximately the proper times and places. The model slightly overpredicted SO2 mixing ratios and PM2.5 mass, but reproduced the range of observed SO2 to sulfate aerosol ratios, suggesting that atmospheric oxidation processes leading to aerosol sulfate formation are captured in the model. The baseline simulation was compared to a sensitivity simulation in which all emissions at model levels above the surface layer were set to zero, thus removing stack emissions. Instantaneous, site-specific differences for aerosol and cloud related properties between the two simulations could be quite large, as removing above-surface emission sources influenced when and where clouds formed within the modeling domain. When summed spatially over the finest resolution model domain (the extent of which corresponds to

  3. Determining sources of elevated salinity in pre-hydraulic fracturing water quality data using a multivariate discriminant analysis model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lautz, L. K.; Hoke, G. D.; Lu, Z.; Siegel, D. I.

    2013-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing has the potential to introduce saline water into the environment due to migration of deep formation water to shallow aquifers and/or discharge of flowback water to the environment during transport and disposal. It is challenging to definitively identify whether elevated salinity is associated with hydraulic fracturing, in part, due to the real possibility of other anthropogenic sources of salinity in the human-impacted watersheds in which drilling is taking place and some formation water present naturally in shallow groundwater aquifers. We combined new and published chemistry data for private drinking water wells sampled across five southern New York (NY) counties overlying the Marcellus Shale (Broome, Chemung, Chenango, Steuben, and Tioga). Measurements include Cl, Na, Br, I, Ca, Mg, Ba, SO4, and Sr. We compared this baseline groundwater quality data in NY, now under a moratorium on hydraulic fracturing, with published chemistry data for 6 different potential sources of elevated salinity in shallow groundwater, including Appalachian Basin formation water, road salt runoff, septic effluent, landfill leachate, animal waste, and water softeners. A multivariate random number generator was used to create a synthetic, low salinity (< 20 mg/L Cl) groundwater data set (n=1000) based on the statistical properties of the observed low salinity groundwater. The synthetic, low salinity groundwater was then artificially mixed with variable proportions of different potential sources of salinity to explore chemical differences between groundwater impacted by formation water, road salt runoff, septic effluent, landfill leachate, animal waste, and water softeners. We then trained a multivariate, discriminant analysis model on the resulting data set to classify observed high salinity groundwater (> 20 mg/L Cl) as being affected by formation water, road salt, septic effluent, landfill leachate, animal waste, or water softeners. Single elements or pairs of

  4. FDTD analysis of temperature elevation in the lens of human and rabbit models due to near-field and far-field exposures at 2.45 GHz.

    PubMed

    Oizumi, Takuya; Laakso, Ilkka; Hirata, Akimasa; Fujiwara, Osamu; Watanabe, Soichi; Taki, Masao; Kojima, Masami; Sasaki, Hiroshi; Sasaki, Kazuyuki

    2013-07-01

    The eye is said to be one of the most sensitive organs to microwave heating. According to previous studies, the possibility of microwave-induced cataract formation has been experimentally investigated in rabbit and monkey eyes, but not for the human eye due to ethical reasons. In the present study, the temperature elevation in the lens, the skin around the eye and the core temperature of numerical human and rabbit models for far-field and near-field exposures at 2.45 GHz are investigated. The temperature elevations in the human and rabbit models were compared with the threshold temperatures for inducing cataracts, thermal pain in the skin and reversible health effects such as heat exhaustion or heat stroke. For plane-wave exposure, the core temperature elevation is shown to be essential both in the human and in the rabbit models as suggested in the international guidelines and standards. For localised exposure of the human eye, the temperature elevation of the skin was essential, and the lens temperature did not reach its threshold for thermal pain. On the other hand, the lens temperature elevation was found to be dominant for the rabbit eye.

  5. A Modified Johnson-Cook Model to Predict Stress-strain Curves of Boron Steel Sheets at Elevated and Cooling Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duc-Toan, Nguyen; Tien-Long, Banh; Dong-Won, Jung; Seung-Han, Yang; Young-Suk, Kim

    2012-02-01

    In order to predict correctly stress-strain curve for tensile tests at elevated and cooling temperatures, a modification of a Johnson-Cook (J-C) model and a new method to determine (J-C) material parameters are proposed. A MATLAB tool is used to determine material parameters by fitting a curve to follow Ludwick and Voce's hardening law at various elevated temperatures. Those hardening law parameters are then utilized to determine modified (J-C) model material parameters. The modified (J-C) model shows the better prediction compared to the conventional one. An FEM tensile test simulation based on the isotropic hardening model for metal sheet at elevated temperatures was carried out via a user-material subroutine, using an explicit finite element code. The simulation results at elevated temperatures were firstly presented and then compared with the measurements. The temperature decrease of all elements due to the air cooling process was then calculated when considering the modified (J-C) model and coded to VUMAT subroutine for tensile test simulation. The modified (J-C) model showed the good comparability between the simulation results and the corresponding experiments.

  6. The effects of elevated CO2 concentration on competitive interaction between aceticlastic and syntrophic methanogenesis in a model microbial consortium

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Souichiro; Yoshida, Rina; Yamaguchi, Takashi; Sato, Tomoyuki; Yumoto, Isao; Kamagata, Yoichi

    2014-01-01

    Investigation of microbial interspecies interactions is essential for elucidating the function and stability of microbial ecosystems. However, community-based analyses including molecular-fingerprinting methods have limitations for precise understanding of interspecies interactions. Construction of model microbial consortia consisting of defined mixed cultures of isolated microorganisms is an excellent method for research on interspecies interactions. In this study, a model microbial consortium consisting of microorganisms that convert acetate into methane directly (Methanosaeta thermophila) and syntrophically (Thermacetogenium phaeum and Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus) was constructed and the effects of elevated CO2 concentrations on intermicrobial competition were investigated. Analyses on the community dynamics by quantitative RT-PCR and fluorescent in situ hybridization targeting their 16S rRNAs revealed that high concentrations of CO2 have suppressive effects on the syntrophic microorganisms, but not on the aceticlastic methanogen. The pathways were further characterized by determining the Gibbs free energy changes (ΔG) of the metabolic reactions conducted by each microorganism under different CO2 concentrations. The ΔG value of the acetate oxidation reaction (T. phaeum) under high CO2 conditions became significantly higher than -20 kJ per mol of acetate, which is the borderline level for sustaining microbial growth. These results suggest that high concentrations of CO2 undermine energy acquisition of T. phaeum, resulting in dominance of the aceticlastic methanogen. This study demonstrates that investigation on model microbial consortia is useful for untangling microbial interspecies interactions, including competition among microorganisms occupying the same trophic niche in complex microbial ecosystems. PMID:25400628

  7. Satellite-derived Digital Elevation Model (DEM) selection, preparation and correction for hydrodynamic modelling in large, low-gradient and data-sparse catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarihani, Abdollah A.; Callow, John N.; McVicar, Tim R.; Van Niel, Thomas G.; Larsen, Joshua R.

    2015-05-01

    Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) that accurately replicate both landscape form and processes are critical to support modelling of environmental processes. Topographic accuracy, methods of preparation and grid size are all important for hydrodynamic models to efficiently replicate flow processes. In remote and data-scarce regions, high resolution DEMs are often not available and therefore it is necessary to evaluate lower resolution data such as the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) and Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) for use within hydrodynamic models. This paper does this in three ways: (i) assessing point accuracy and geometric co-registration error of the original DEMs; (ii) quantifying the effects of DEM preparation methods (vegetation smoothed and hydrologically-corrected) on hydrodynamic modelling relative accuracy; and (iii) quantifying the effect of the hydrodynamic model grid size (30-2000 m) and the associated relative computational costs (run time) on relative accuracy in model outputs. We initially evaluated the accuracy of the original SRTM (∼30 m) seamless C-band DEM (SRTM DEM) and second generation products from the ASTER (ASTER GDEM) against registered survey marks and altimetry data points from the Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat). SRTM DEM (RMSE = 3.25 m,) had higher accuracy than ASTER GDEM (RMSE = 7.43 m). Based on these results, the original version of SRTM DEM, the ASTER GDEM along with vegetation smoothed and hydrologically corrected versions were prepared and used to simulate three flood events along a 200 km stretch of the low-gradient Thompson River, in arid Australia (using five metrics: peak discharge, peak height, travel time, terminal water storage and flood extent). The hydrologically corrected DEMs performed best across these metrics in simulating floods compared with vegetation smoothed DEMs and original DEMs. The response of model performance to grid size was non

  8. Elevation changes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jayko, A. S.; Marshall, G.A.; Carver, G.A.

    1992-01-01

    Elevation changes, as well as horizontal displacements of the Earth's surface, are an expected consequence of dip-slip displacement on earthquake faults. the rock surrounding and overlying the fault is forced to stretch and bend to accommodate fault slip. Slip in the case of the April 25 mainshock is thought to have occurred on a gently inclined plane dipping to the northeast at a small angle (see article on preliminary seismological results in this issue).The associated fault-plane solution implies that rock overlying the fault plane (the hanging-wall block west and south of the epicenter) rose and shifted to the northeast. The map on the next page shows the location of the epicenter and approximate extent of uplift and subsidence derived from estimates of the geometry, location. and slip on the buried fault plane. 

  9. Testing Pixel Translation Digital Elevation Models to Reconstruct Slip Histories: An Example from the Agua Blanca Fault, Baja California, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, J.; Wetmore, P. H.; Malservisi, R.; Ferwerda, B. P.; Teran, O.

    2012-12-01

    We use recently collected slip vector and total offset data from the Agua Blanca fault (ABF) to constrain a pixel translation digital elevation model (DEM) to reconstruct the slip history of this fault. This model was constructed using a Perl script that reads a DEM file (Easting, Northing, Elevation) and a configuration file with coordinates that define the boundary of each fault segment. A pixel translation vector is defined as a magnitude of lateral offset in an azimuthal direction. The program translates pixels north of the fault and prints their pre-faulting position to a new DEM file that can be gridded and displayed. This analysis, where multiple DEMs are created with different translation vectors, allows us to identify areas of transtension or transpression while seeing the topographic expression in these areas. The benefit of this technique, in contrast to a simple block model, is that the DEM gives us a valuable graphic which can be used to pose new research questions. We have found that many topographic features correlate across the fault, i.e. valleys and ridges, which likely have implications for the age of the ABF, long term landscape evolution rates, and potentially provide conformation for total slip assessments The ABF of northern Baja California, Mexico is an active, dextral strike slip fault that transfers Pacific-North American plate boundary strain out of the Gulf of California and around the "Big Bend" of the San Andreas Fault. Total displacement on the ABF in the central and eastern parts of the fault is 10 +/- 2 km based on offset Early-Cretaceous features such as terrane boundaries and intrusive bodies (plutons and dike swarms). Where the fault bifurcates to the west, the northern strand (northern Agua Blanca fault or NABF) is constrained to 7 +/- 1 km. We have not yet identified piercing points on the southern strand, the Santo Tomas fault (STF), but displacement is inferred to be ~4 km assuming that the sum of slip on the NABF and STF is

  10. Modeling the fate of elevated Cd, Cu and Zn in groundwater flowing from two sulfide mine pit lakes

    SciTech Connect

    Taufen, P.M.

    1996-10-01

    A study was made of observed reductions in the elevated levels of dissolved Cd, Cu and Zn over distances up to 1000m in groundwaters discharging from two acid mine pit lakes in southwestern Quebec, Canada. Groundwater flow from the lakes is chiefly in glacial till sediments on the bedrock. The shallow groundwaters were sampled for chemical analysis over two summers. Metal adsorption and mineral precipitation were assessed as a function of flow distance from the pit lakes. The tills were analyzed for their surface areas and content of organic C, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, MnO{sub 2}, and for total, oxide, carbonate and organic iron content. The tills were subjected to acid-base titrations to measure their adsorptive behavior towards Cd, Cu and Zn as a function of pH. Electrostatic adsorption models were found inapplicable to study results. However, distribution coefficients (K{sub d} values) for metal adsorption showed strong positive correlations with pH. Useful correlations with other till properties were absent.

  11. Development of an Antarctic digital elevation model by integrating cartographic and remotely sensed data: A geographic information system based approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongxing; Jezek, Kenneth C.; Li, Biyan

    1999-10-01

    We present a high-resolution digital elevation model (DEM) of the Antarctic. It was created in a geographic information system (GIS) environment by integrating the best available topographic data from a variety of sources. Extensive GIS-based error detection and correction operations ensured that our DEM is free of gross errors. The carefully designed interpolation algorithms for different types of source data and incorporation of surface morphologic information preserved and enhanced the fine surface structures present in the source data. The effective control of adverse edge effects and the use of the Hermite blending weight function in data merging minimized the discontinuities between different types of data, leading to a seamless and topographically consistent DEM throughout the Antarctic. This new DEM provides exceptional topographical details and represents a substantial improvement in horizontal resolution and vertical accuracy over the earlier, continental-scale renditions, particularly in mountainous and coastal regions. It has a horizontal resolution of 200 m over the rugged mountains, 400 m in the coastal regions, and approximately 5 km in the interior. The vertical accuracy of the DEM is estimated at about 100-130 m over the rugged mountainous area, better than 2 m for the ice shelves, better than 15 m for the interior ice sheet, and about 35 m for the steeper ice sheet perimeter. The Antarctic DEM can be obtained from the authors.

  12. Using X-band Weather Radar Measurements to Monitor the Integrity of Digital Elevation Models for Synthetic Vision Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Steve; UijtdeHaag, Maarten; Sayre, Jonathon

    2003-01-01

    Synthetic Vision Systems (SVS) provide pilots with displays of stored geo-spatial data representing terrain, obstacles, and cultural features. As comprehensive validation is impractical, these databases typically have no quantifiable level of integrity. Further, updates to the databases may not be provided as changes occur. These issues limit the certification level and constrain the operational context of SVS for civil aviation. Previous work demonstrated the feasibility of using a realtime monitor to bound the integrity of Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) by using radar altimeter measurements during flight. This paper describes an extension of this concept to include X-band Weather Radar (WxR) measurements. This enables the monitor to detect additional classes of DEM errors and to reduce the exposure time associated with integrity threats. Feature extraction techniques are used along with a statistical assessment of similarity measures between the sensed and stored features that are detected. Recent flight-testing in the area around the Juneau, Alaska Airport (JNU) has resulted in a comprehensive set of sensor data that is being used to assess the feasibility of the proposed monitor technology. Initial results of this assessment are presented.

  13. Capturing Micro-topography of an Arctic Tundra Landscape through Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) Acquired from Various Remote Sensing Platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas, S. A., Jr.; Tweedie, C. E.; Oberbauer, S. F.

    2013-12-01

    The need to improve the spatial and temporal scaling and extrapolation of plot level measurements of ecosystem structure and function to the landscape level has been identified as a persistent research challenge in the arctic terrestrial sciences. Although there has been a range of advances in remote sensing capabilities on satellite, fixed wing, helicopter and unmanned aerial vehicle platforms over the past decade, these present costly, logistically challenging (especially in the Arctic), technically demanding solutions for applications in an arctic environment. Here, we present a relatively low cost alternative to these platforms that uses kite aerial photography (KAP). Specifically, we demonstrate how digital elevation models (DEMs) were derived from this system for a coastal arctic landscape near Barrow, Alaska. DEMs of this area acquired from other remote sensing platforms such as Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS), Airborne Laser Scanning, and satellite imagery were also used in this study to determine accuracy and validity of results. DEMs interpolated using the KAP system were comparable to DEMs derived from the other platforms. For remotely sensing acre to kilometer square areas of interest, KAP has proven to be a low cost solution from which derived products that interface ground and satellite platforms can be developed by users with access to low-tech solutions and a limited knowledge of remote sensing.

  14. An efficient variant of the Priority-Flood algorithm for filling depressions in raster digital elevation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Guiyun; Sun, Zhongxuan; Fu, Suhua

    2016-05-01

    Depressions are common features in raster digital elevation models (DEMs) and they are usually filled for the automatic extraction of drainage networks. Among existing algorithms for filling depressions, the Priority-Flood algorithm substantially outperforms other algorithms in terms of both time complexity and memory requirement. The Priority-Flood algorithm uses a priority queue to process cells. This study proposes an efficient variant of the Priority-Flood algorithm, which considerably reduces the number of cells processed by the priority queue by using region-growing procedures to process the majority of cells not within depressions or flat regions. We present three implementations of the proposed variant: two-pass implementation, one-pass implementation and direct implementation. Experiments are conducted on thirty DEMs with a resolution of 3m. All three implementations run faster than existing variants of the algorithm for all tested DEMs. The one-pass implementation runs the fastest and the average speed-up over the fastest existing variant is 44.6%.

  15. Using X-band weather radar measurements to monitor the integrity of digital elevation models for synthetic vision systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Steven D.; Uijt de Haag, Maarten; Sayre, Jonathon

    2003-09-01

    Synthetic Vision Systems (SVS) provide pilots with displays of stored geo-spatial data representing terrain, obstacles, and cultural features. As comprehensive validation is impractical, these databases typically have no quantifiable level of integrity. Futher, updates to the databases may not be provided as changes occur. These issues limit the certification level and constrain the operational context of SVS for civil aviation. Previous work demonstrated the feasibility of using a real-time monitor to bound the integrity of Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) by using radar altimeter measurements during flight. This paper describes an extension of this concept to include X-band Weather Radar (WxR) measurements. This enables the monitor to detect additional classes of DEM errors and to reduce the exposure time associated with integrity threats. Feature extraction techniques are used along with a statistical assessment of similarity measures between the sensed and stored features that are detected. Recent flight-testing in the area around Juneau, Alaska Airport (JNU) has resulted in a comprehensive set of sensor data that is being used to assess the feasibility of the proposed monitor technology. Initial results of this assessment are presented.

  16. Extraction of cross sections from digital elevation model for one-dimensional dam-break wave propagation in mountain valleys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilotti, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Shallow Water Equations (SWE) provide a fundamental component for the quantification and mapping of hydraulic hazard. In steep mountain valleys, the use of one-dimensional SWE (also known as St. Venant Equations, SVE) is often legitimate and computationally competitive against two-dimensional solvers. However, in the same environment, the solution of SVE is hindered by the need of an accurate bathymetric reconstruction, which implies a number of cross sections which cannot be readily acquired by conventional field surveys. On the other hand, Digital Elevation Models (DEM) with resolution adequate for studies of flood propagation are available in many areas of the world. In this paper, I propose to compute cross sections automatically by operating along the channel network derived from a valley's raster DEM, on the basis of algorithms that hitherto have been used for geomorphological and hydrological purposes. The extraction process can be refined by varying cross section inter-distance and width, in order to prevent superimpositions that might occur due to the sinuosity of the thalweg and to better capture the valley's local topography. At the end of this process, the geometric functions needed by SVE solvers can be computed for each cross section. A software tool that implements the described algorithm is provided to the scientific community.

  17. Eruption-related lahars and sedimentation response downstream of Mount Hood: Field guide to volcaniclastic deposits along the Sandy River, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pierson, Tom C.; Scott, William E.; Vallance, James W.; Pringle, Patrick T.; O'Connor, Jim; Dorsey, Rebecca; Madin, Ian

    2009-01-01

    Late Holocene dome-building eruptions at Mount Hood during the Timberline and Old Maid eruptive periods resulted in numerous dome-collapse pyroclastic flows and lahars that moved large volumes of volcaniclastic sediment into temporary storage in headwater canyons of the Sandy River. During each eruptive period, accelerated sediment loading to the river through erosion and remobilization of volcanic fragmental debris resulted in very high sediment-transport rates in the Sandy River during rain- and snowmelt-induced floods. Large sediment loads in excess of the river's transport capacity led to channel aggradation, channel widening, and change to a braided channel form in the lowermost reach of the river, between 61 and 87 km downstream from the volcano. The post-eruption sediment load moved as a broad bed-material wave, which in the case of the Old Maid eruption took ~2 decades to crest 83 km downstream. Maximum post-eruption aggradation levels of at least 28 and 23 m were achieved in response to Timberline and Old Maid eruptions. In each case, downstream aggradation cycles were initiated by lahars, but the bulk of the aggradation was achieved by fluvial sediment transport and deposition. When the high rates of sediment supply began to diminish, the river degraded, incising the channel fills and forming progressively lower sets of degradational terraces. A variety of debris-flow, hyperconcentrated-flow, and fluvial (upper and lower flow regime) deposits record the downstream passage of the sediment waves that were initiated by these eruptions. The deposits also presage a hazard that may be faced by communities along the Sandy River when volcanic activity at Mount Hood resumes.

  18. A robust animal model of state anxiety: fear-potentiated behaviour in the elevated plus-maze.

    PubMed

    Korte, S Mechiel; De Boer, Sietse F

    2003-02-28

    Fear (i.e., decreased percentage time spent on open-arm exploration) in the elevated plus-maze can be potentiated by prior inescapable stressor exposure, but not by escapable stress. The use of fear-potentiated plus-maze behaviour has several advantages as compared to more traditional animal models of anxiety. (a) In contrast to the traditional (spontaneous) elevated plus-maze, which measures innate fear of open spaces, fear-potentiated plus-maze behaviour reflects an enhanced anxiety state (allostatic state). This "state anxiety" can be defined as an unpleasant emotional arousal in face of threatening demands or dangers. A cognitive appraisal of threat is a prerequisite for the experience of this type of emotion. (b) Depending on the stressor used (e.g., fear of shock, predator odour, swim stress, restraint, social defeat, predator stress (cat)), this enhanced anxiety state can last from 90 min to 3 weeks. Stress effects are more severe when rats are isolated in comparison to group housing. (c) Drugs can be administered in the absence of the original stressor and after stressor exposure. As a consequence, retrieval mechanisms are not affected by drug treatment. (d) Fear-potentiated plus-maze behaviour is sensitive to proven/putative anxiolytics and anxiogenics which act via mechanisms related to the benzodiazepine-gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor, but it is also sensitive to corticotropin-releasing receptor antagonists and glucocorticoid receptor antagonists and serotonin receptor agonists/antagonists complex (high predictive validity). (e) Fear-potentiated plus-maze behaviour is very robust, and experiments can easily be replicated in other labs. (f) Fear-potentiated plus-maze behaviour can be measured both in males and females. (g) Neural mechanisms involved in contextual fear conditioning, fear potentiation and state anxiety can be studied.Thus, fear-potentiated plus-maze behaviour may be a valuable measure in the understanding of neural mechanisms involved in

  19. Monitoring fine-sediment volume in the Colorado River ecosystem, Arizona: construction and analysis of digital elevation models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kaplinski, Matt; Hazel, Joseph E.; Grams, Paul E.; Davis, Philip A.

    2014-01-01

    Digital elevation models (DEMs) of eleven 2–5 kilometer reaches of the Colorado River ecosystem (CRE) in Grand Canyon were constructed from repeat bathymetric and topographic surveys collected between August 2000 and December 2004. The DEMs will be used by researchers to study the effects of Glen Canyon Dam (GCD) operations on the sediment resources of the CRE in Grand Canyon by quantifying morphological changes and sediment transfer within and among the study reaches. Airborne surveys collected light detection and ranging (lidar) and photogrammetric data, whereas ground topographic and bathymetric data were collected simultaneously on river trips. Surveys were conducted in August 2000, September 2000, May 2002, May 2004, November 2004, and December 2004. The aerial lidar and photogrammetric data were merged with the ground topographic and bathymetric data to create DEMs of the study areas with a grid resolution of 1 meter. For each survey period, the vertical component of uncertainty (specifically, reproducibility or precision) was estimated for each data type (lidar/photogrammetry, ground surveys, bathymetry) and for two different types of bed-surface texture (smooth and rough). The resulting DEMs from this study are a valuable contribution to ongoing efforts in assessing the effects of GCD operations on the CRE. The DEMs can be used to map the spatial characteristics of geomorphic change within the study reaches and to estimate sediment budgets for different time periods by calculating the difference in sediment volume between surveys. In addition, the DEMs provide essential boundary conditions for numerical models of sediment transport and deposition, as well as help define the spatial distribution of habitat for fisheries investigations.

  20. Renal expression of FGF23 and peripheral resistance to elevated FGF23 in rodent models of polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Spichtig, Daniela; Zhang, Hongbo; Mohebbi, Nilufar; Pavik, Ivana; Petzold, Katja; Stange, Gerti; Saleh, Lanja; Edenhofer, Ilka; Segerer, Stephan; Biber, Jürg; Jaeger, Philippe; Serra, Andreas L; Wagner, Carsten A

    2014-06-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) regulates phosphate homeostasis and is linked to cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality in chronic kidney disease. FGF23 rises in patients with CKD stages 2-3, but in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, the increase of FGF23 precedes the first measurable decline in renal function. The mechanisms governing FGF23 production and effects in kidney disease are largely unknown. Here we studied the relation between FGF23 and mineral homeostasis in two animal models of PKD. Plasma FGF23 levels were increased 10-fold in 4-week-old cy/+ Han:SPRD rats, whereas plasma urea and creatinine concentrations were similar to controls. Plasma calcium and phosphate levels as well as TmP/GFR were similar in PKD and control rats at all time points examined. Expression and activity of renal phosphate transporters, the vitamin D3-metabolizing enzymes, and the FGF23 co-ligand Klotho in the kidney were similar in PKD and control rats through 8 weeks of age, indicating resistance to FGF23, although phosphorylation of the FGF receptor substrate 2α protein was enhanced. In the kidneys of rats with PKD, FGF23 mRNA was highly expressed and FGF23 protein was detected in cells lining renal cysts. FGF23 expression in bone and spleen was similar in control rats and rats with PKD. Similarly, in an inducible Pkd1 knockout mouse model, plasma FGF23 levels were elevated, FGF23 was expressed in kidneys, but renal phosphate excretion was normal. Thus, the polycystic kidney produces FGF23 but is resistant to its action.

  1. Intracoronary Poloxamer 188 Prevents Reperfusion Injury in a Porcine Model of ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Bartos, Jason A.; Matsuura, Timothy R.; Tsangaris, Adamantios; Olson, Matthew; McKnite, Scott H.; Rees, Jennifer N.; Haman, Karen; Shekar, Kadambari Chandra; Riess, Matthias L.; Bates, Frank S.; Metzger, Joseph M.; Yannopoulos, Demetris

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Poloxamer 188 (P188) is a nonionic triblock copolymer believed to prevent cellular injury after ischemia and reperfusion. OBJECTIVES This study compared intracoronary infusion of P188 immediately after reperfusion with delayed infusion through a peripheral intravenous catheter in a porcine model of ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Cellular and mitochondrial injury were assessed. METHODS STEMI was induced in 55 pigs using 45 minutes of endovascular coronary artery occlusion. Pigs were then randomized to four groups: control, immediate intracoronary (IC) P188, delayed peripheral P188, and polyethylene glycol (PEG) infusion. Heart tissue was collected after 4 hours of reperfusion. Assessment of mitochondrial function or infarct size was performed. RESULTS Mitochondrial yield improved significantly with IC P188 treatment compared to control animals (0.25% vs. 0.13%) suggesting improved mitochondrial morphology and survival. Mitochondrial respiration and calcium retention were also significantly improved with immediate IC P188 compared to controls (complex I RCI: 7.4 vs. 3.7 and calcium retention (nmol): 1152 vs. 386). This benefit was only observed with activation of complex I of the mitochondrial respiratory chain suggesting a specific impact of ischemia and reperfusion on this complex. Infarct size and serum troponin I were significantly reduced by immediate IC P188 infusion (infarct size: 13.9% vs. 41.1% and troponin I (μg/L): 19.2 vs. 77.4 μg/L). Delayed P188 and PEG infusion did not provide a significant benefit. CONCLUSIONS Intracoronary infusion of P188 immediately upon reperfusion significantly reduces cellular and mitochondrial injury after ischemia and reperfusion in this clinically relevant porcine model of STEMI. The timing and route of delivery were critical to achieve the benefit.

  2. Modelling Late Cenozoic isostatic elevation changes in the Barents Sea and their implications for oceanic and climatic regimes: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butt, Faisal A.; Drange, Helge; Elverhøi, Anders; Otterå, Odd Helge; Solheim, Anders

    2002-08-01

    Late Cenozoic isostatic changes in the elevation of the Barents Sea are simulated using a numerical model. Isopach maps of the deposits off present-day Bear Island and Storfjorden troughs made earlier are used to calculate the thickness of sediment cover removed from the respective drainages basins at various time intervals during the last 2.3 Ma. Results indicate that Barents Sea was subaerially exposed at 2.3 Ma and major parts of it became submarine after 1 Ma. Barents Sea today receives around 40% of the warm and saline North Atlantic waters flowing into the Scotland-Greenland Ridge and about half of the Atlantic water entering the Arctic Ocean. It thus has an important role to play in the present-day ocean circulation pattern in the Polar North Atlantic region and water-mass transformations that take place in the Greenland-Iceland-Norwegian Sea and the Arctic Ocean. The effects of an uplifted Barents Sea on the oceanic regime and the Arctic sea-ice cover under the present-day forcings fields are studied using the Miami Isopycnic Coordinate Ocean Model. Preliminary results indicate that a subaerial Barents Sea causes an increased input of warm Atlantic waters into the Arctic Ocean through the Fram Strait which results in warming of the Atlantic water masses in the Arctic Ocean, followed by a reduction in the sea-ice cover. The obtained findings can be used to explain the apparent discrepancy in the late Cenozoic record of the sub-Arctic and Arctic regions whereby Fennoscandia, Iceland and Greenland are envisaged to have been covered by major ice sheets during late Pliocene whereas high Arctic areas such as Svalbard and NE Greenland were apparently free of any major ice.

  3. Prediction of vertical PM2.5 concentrations alongside an elevated expressway by using the neural network hybrid model and generalized additive model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Ya; Wang, Zhanyong; Lu, Qing-Chang; Liu, Chao; Peng, Zhong-Ren; Yu, Yue

    2016-10-01

    A study on vertical variation of PM2.5 concentrations was carried out in this paper. Field measurements were conducted at eight different floor heights outside a building alongside a typical elevated expressway in downtown Shanghai, China. Results show that PM2.5 concentration decreases significantly with the increase of height from the 3rd to 7th floor or the 8th to 15th floor, and increases suddenly from the 7th to 8th floor which is the same height as the elevated expressway. A non-parametric test indicates that the data of PM2.5 concentration is statistically different under the 7th floor and above the 8th floor at the 5% significance level. To investigate the relationships between PM2.5 concentration and influencing factors, the Pearson correlation analysis was performed and the results indicate that both traffic and meteorological factors have crucial impacts on the variation of PM2.5 concentration, but there is a rather large variation in correlation coefficients under the 7th floor and above the 8th floor. Furthermore, the back propagation neural network based on principal component analysis (PCA-BPNN), as well as generalized additive model (GAM), was applied to predict the vertical PM2.5 concentration and examined with the field measurement dataset. Experimental results indicated that both models can obtain accurate predictions, while PCA-BPNN model provides more reliable and accurate predictions as it can reduce the complexity and eliminate data co-linearity. These findings reveal the vertical distribution of PM2.5 concentration and the potential of the proposed model to be applicable to predict the vertical trends of air pollution in similar situations.

  4. A critical source area phosphorus index with topographic transport factors using high resolution LiDAR digital elevation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Ian; Murphy, Paul; Fenton, Owen; Shine, Oliver; Mellander, Per-Erik; Dunlop, Paul; Jordan, Phil

    2015-04-01

    A new phosphorus index (PI) tool is presented which aims to improve the identification of critical source areas (CSAs) of phosphorus (P) losses from agricultural land to surface waters. In a novel approach, the PI incorporates topographic indices rather than watercourse proximity as proxies for runoff risk, to account for the dominant control of topography on runoff-generating areas and P transport pathways. Runoff propensity and hydrological connectivity are modelled using the Topographic Wetness Index (TWI) and Network Index (NI) respectively, utilising high resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) derived from Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) to capture the influence of micro-topographic features on runoff pathways. Additionally, the PI attempts to improve risk estimates of particulate P losses by incorporating an erosion factor that accounts for fine-scale topographic variability within fields. Erosion risk is modelled using the Unit Stream Power Erosion Deposition (USPED) model, which integrates DEM-derived upslope contributing area and Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE) factors. The PI was developed using field, sub-field and sub-catchment scale datasets of P source, mobilisation and transport factors, for four intensive agricultural catchments in Ireland representing different agri-environmental conditions. Datasets included soil test P concentrations, degree of P saturation, soil attributes, land use, artificial subsurface drainage locations, and 2 m resolution LiDAR DEMs resampled from 0.25 m resolution data. All factor datasets were integrated within a Geographical Information System (GIS) and rasterised to 2 m resolution. For each factor, values were categorised and assigned relative risk scores which ranked P loss potential. Total risk scores were calculated for each grid cell using a component formulation, which summed the products of weighted factor risk scores for runoff and erosion pathways. Results showed that the new PI was able to predict

  5. Examining the role of Microcracks in Modelling the Permeability Evolution of Crustal Rocks at Elevated Hydrostatic Pressure.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, P. M.; Schubnel, A.; Meredith, P. G.; Young, P.

    2005-12-01

    A key consequence of the presence of void space within rock is its significant influence upon fluid transport properties. This observation is fundamental to our understanding of crustal evolution and energy resource management, for example the efficient recovery of hydrocarbon and water resources, and the safe disposal of hazardous waste. However, the processes responsible for porosity formation are diverse, ranging from depositional processes such as sedimentary sorting and grain alignment, through diagenetic processes such as compaction and cementation, to deformational processes such as microcracking. The porosity that evolves from the superposition of these processes over time may therefore have a complex geometry or fabric. In addition, many of these processes have an inherent directionality which may lead to anisotropy of the void space, and all have been shown to play important roles in influencing the fluid transport properties of rock. The measurement of permeability at elevated pressures and the calculation of permeability from other data (such as elastic wave velocity) remains non-trivial. In particular, in order to test models that predict such relations, ideally both elastic wave velocity and permeability should be measured simultaneously. In this study, we use a novel apparatus in order to measure elastic wave velocities (P and S) contemporaneously with permeability and porosity for three rock types, a high porosity sandstone (Bentheim), a tight sandstone (Crab Orchard), and a microcracked granite (Takidani). This laboratory data is then used with permeability models of Gueguen and Dienes and Kozeny-Carman to investigate the role that void space of differing apertures imparts on the measured permeability of different rock types. Using the Kachanov non-interactive effective medium theory, measured elastic wave velocities are inverted using a least square fit, permitting the recovery of crack density evolution with increasing hydrostatic pressure. This

  6. Elevated Uptake of Plasma Macromolecules by Regions of Arterial Wall Predisposed to Plaque Instability in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Mohri, Zahra; Rowland, Ethan M.; Clarke, Lindsey A.; De Luca, Amalia; Peiffer, Véronique; Krams, Rob; Sherwin, Spencer J.; Weinberg, Peter D.

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerosis may be triggered by an elevated net transport of lipid-carrying macromolecules from plasma into the arterial wall. We hypothesised that whether lesions are of the thin-cap fibroatheroma (TCFA) type or are less fatty and more fibrous depends on the degree of elevation of transport, with greater uptake leading to the former. We further hypothesised that the degree of elevation can depend on haemodynamic wall shear stress characteristics and nitric oxide synthesis. Placing a tapered cuff around the carotid artery of apolipoprotein E -/- mice modifies patterns of shear stress and eNOS expression, and triggers lesion development at the upstream and downstream cuff margins; upstream but not downstream lesions resemble the TCFA. We measured wall uptake of a macromolecular tracer in the carotid artery of C57bl/6 mice after cuff placement. Uptake was elevated in the regions that develop lesions in hyperlipidaemic mice and was significantly more elevated where plaques of the TCFA type develop. Computational simulations and effects of reversing the cuff orientation indicated a role for solid as well as fluid mechanical stresses. Inhibiting NO synthesis abolished the difference in uptake between the upstream and downstream sites. The data support the hypothesis that excessively elevated wall uptake of plasma macromolecules initiates the development of the TCFA, suggest that such uptake can result from solid and fluid mechanical stresses, and are consistent with a role for NO synthesis. Modification of wall transport properties might form the basis of novel methods for reducing plaque rupture. PMID:25531765

  7. Comment on "Improving ecophysiological simulation models to predict the impact of elevated CO2 concentration on crop productivity" by X. Yin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The paper listed in the title by Yin (2013) provides an excellent review of modeling approaches to predict the impact of elevated CO2 on crop productivity, as well as on the controversy regarding whether yield responses observed in free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) experiments are indeed lower than tho...

  8. An approach of crater automatic recognition based on contour digital elevation model from Chang'E Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, W.; Li, C.; Zhang, Z.; Li, H.; Feng, J.

    2015-12-01

    In order to provide fundamental information for exploration and related scientific research on the Moon and other planets, we propose a new automatic method to recognize craters on the lunar surface based on contour data extracted from a digital elevation model (DEM). First, we mapped 16-bits DEM to 256 gray scales for data compression, then for the purposes of better visualization, the grayscale is converted into RGB image. After that, a median filter is applied twice to DEM for data optimization, which produced smooth, continuous outlines for subsequent construction of contour plane. Considering the fact that the morphology of crater on contour plane can be approximately expressed as an ellipse or circle, we extract the outer boundaries of contour plane with the same color(gray value) as targets for further identification though a 8- neighborhood counterclockwise searching method. Then, A library of training samples is constructed based on above targets calculated from some sample DEM data, from which real crater targets are labeled as positive samples manually, and non-crater objects are labeled as negative ones. Some morphological feathers are calculated for all these samples, which are major axis (L), circumference(C), area inside the boundary(S), and radius of the largest inscribed circle(R). We use R/L, R/S, C/L, C/S, R/C, S/L as the key factors for identifying craters, and apply Fisher discrimination method on the sample library to calculate the weight of each factor and determine the discrimination formula, which is then applied to DEM data for identifying lunar craters. The method has been tested and verified with DEM data from CE-1 and CE-2, showing strong recognition ability and robustness and is applicable for the recognition of craters with various diameters and significant morphological differences, making fast and accurate automatic crater recognition possible.

  9. Use of Digital Elevation Models to understand map landforms and history of the magmatism Khibiny Massif (Kola Peninsula, Russia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chesalova, Elena; Asavin, Alex

    2016-04-01

    This work presents an improved geomorphological methodology that uses 3D model of relief, remotely-sensed data, geological, geophysical maps and tools of Geographical Information Systems. On the basis of maps of 1: 50,000 and 1: 200,000 the Digital Elevation model (DEM) of Khibiny massif was developed. We used software ARC / INFO v10.2 ESRI. A DEM was used for analyzing landform by extracting the slope gradient, curvature, valley pro?les, slope, aspect and so on. The results were gradually re?ned from the interpretation of satellite imagery and geological map Geomorphological analysis will allow us to determine spatial regularities in inner massive construction. We try to found areas where gas emissions (CH4/H2) enrich, according to morphometry, geology, tectonic and other environments. The main regional blocks were de?ned by different morphological evidences: impression zone, similar to subsidence caldera; uplift zone, domed area (located in the highest part of massif and zone of intersection of main faults) and others. It says that there are the few stages in the development of the Khibiny massif. There is no common concept of the consequence of intrudes magmatic phases now. And we hope that our geomorphical analysis take a new evidences about this problems. Locations of the blocks' borders (tectonic zones) were recognized by lineament analysis of valleys and tectonic faults presented in relief. Erosion system is represented by valleys of 4 ranks. It inherits the zone of tectonic disturbances 3 groups of faults were recognized: 1) Global lineament system cross whole peninsula - existing before Khibiny massif intrusion; 2) Faults associated with the formation of the intrusive phases sequence and magma differentiation and with later collision history during magma cooling; 3) Crack system related to neotectonic process. We believed that if different magmatic phases intrude in similar tectonic environment, the common spatial system of faults will be formed. Really we

  10. Computational model for calculating body-core temperature elevation in rabbits due to whole-body exposure at 2.45 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Akimasa; Sugiyama, Hironori; Kojima, Masami; Kawai, Hiroki; Yamashiro, Yoko; Fujiwara, Osamu; Watanabe, Soichi; Sasaki, Kazuyuki

    2008-06-01

    In the current international guidelines and standards with regard to human exposure to electromagnetic waves, the basic restriction is defined in terms of the whole-body average-specific absorption rate. The rationale for the guidelines is that the characteristic pattern of thermoregulatory response is observed for the whole-body average SAR above a certain level. However, the relationship between energy absorption and temperature elevation was not well quantified. In this study, we improved our thermal computation model for rabbits, which was developed for localized exposure on eye, in order to investigate the body-core temperature elevation due to whole-body exposure at 2.45 GHz. The effect of anesthesia on the body-core temperature elevation was also discussed in comparison with measured results. For the whole-body average SAR of 3.0 W kg-1, the body-core temperature in rabbits elevates with time, without becoming saturated. The administration of anesthesia suppressed body-core temperature elevation, which is attributed to the reduced basal metabolic rate.

  11. Landscape unit based digital elevation model development for the freshwater wetlands within the Arthur C. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge, Southeastern Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xie, Zhixiao; Liu, Zhongwei; Jones, John W.; Higer, Aaron L.; Telis, Pamela A.

    2011-01-01

    The hydrologic regime is a critical limiting factor in the delicate ecosystem of the greater Everglades freshwater wetlands in south Florida that has been severely altered by management activities in the past several decades. "Getting the water right" is regarded as the key to successful restoration of this unique wetland ecosystem. An essential component to represent and model its hydrologic regime, specifically water depth, is an accurate ground Digital Elevation Model (DEM). The Everglades Depth Estimation Network (EDEN) supplies important hydrologic data, and its products (including a ground DEM) have been well received by scientists and resource managers involved in Everglades restoration. This study improves the EDEN DEMs of the Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge, also known as Water Conservation Area 1 (WCA1), by adopting a landscape unit (LU) based interpolation approach. The study first filtered the input elevation data based on newly available vegetation data, and then created a separate geostatistical model (universal kriging) for each LU. The resultant DEMs have encouraging cross-validation and validation results, especially since the validation is based on an independent elevation dataset (derived by subtracting water depth measurements from EDEN water surface elevations). The DEM product of this study will directly benefit hydrologic and ecological studies as well as restoration efforts. The study will also be valuable for a broad range of wetland studies.

  12. Using the New Two-Phase-Titan to Evaluate Potential Lahar Hazard at Villa la Angostura, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheridan, M. F.; Cordoba, G. A.; Viramonte, J. G.; Folch, A.; Villarosa, G.; Delgado, H.

    2013-05-01

    flow at once in each of the basins is one half of the total. A second scenario assumed that half of the maximum could also happen. The volumetric solid concentration was chosen to be 30%, in agreement with the estimates of the deposited volume of the ash layers. The Argentinean National Commission of Space (CONAE) initially provided us with a digital elevation model (DEM) of 15 meters resolution. In the six simulations that we performed with this DEM we found that in all cases, the flow coming down slope in the Florencia basin stopped at the same place. A detailed survey that included a field inspection allowed us to discover that the DEM does not adequately reproduce the topography; it shows a non-existent barrier. Subsequently CONAE produced a 10 meter DEM of the area. Using this new DEM the simulation reached places not predicted by the program using the 15 meter DEM.

  13. The nature of isostasy on the moon - How big a Pratt-fall for Airy models. [crustal density-topographic elevation correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, S. C.

    1978-01-01

    The correlation between topographic elevation and the major element chemistry of the lunar surface in non-mare regions suggest that a Pratt-type isostatic mechanism may be important in the lunar highlands. Pratt isostasy involves compensation of greater elevation by lower crustal density. Computation of the bulk density from surface chemistry and normative mineralogy, followed by comparisons between calculated density and surface height, is suggested as a means of testing the applicability of the Pratt isostatic model to the moon. A Pratt-type lunar crustal model requires much smaller variations in lunar crustal thickness than those necessitated by a constant-density (Airy) isostatic model. Mechanisms to produce a crust regionally heterogeneous in composition early in lunar differentiation are also required for Pratt isostasy.

  14. Computational modeling of temperature elevation and thermoregulatory response in the brains of anesthetized rats locally exposed at 1.5 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Akimasa; Masuda, Hiroshi; Kanai, Yuya; Asai, Ryuichi; Fujiwara, Osamu; Arima, Takuji; Kawai, Hiroki; Watanabe, Soichi; Lagroye, Isabelle; Veyret, Bernard

    2011-12-01

    The dominant effect of human exposures to microwaves is caused by temperature elevation ('thermal effect'). In the safety guidelines/standards, the specific absorption rate averaged over a specific volume is used as a metric for human protection from localized exposure. Further investigation on the use of this metric is required, especially in terms of thermophysiology. The World Health Organization (2006 RF research agenda) has given high priority to research into the extent and consequences of microwave-induced temperature elevation in children. In this study, an electromagnetic-thermal computational code was developed to model electromagnetic power absorption and resulting temperature elevation leading to changes in active blood flow in response to localized 1.457 GHz exposure in rat heads. Both juvenile (4 week old) and young adult (8 week old) rats were considered. The computational code was validated against measurements for 4 and 8 week old rats. Our computational results suggest that the blood flow rate depends on both brain and core temperature elevations. No significant difference was observed between thermophysiological responses in 4 and 8 week old rats under these exposure conditions. The computational model developed herein is thus applicable to set exposure conditions for rats in laboratory investigations, as well as in planning treatment protocols in the thermal therapy.

  15. A semi-automated tool for reducing the creation of false closed depressions from a filled LIDAR-derived digital elevation model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waller, John S.; Doctor, Daniel H.; Terziotti, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Closed depressions on the land surface can be identified by ‘filling’ a digital elevation model (DEM) and subtracting the filled model from the original DEM. However, automated methods suffer from artificial ‘dams’ where surface streams cross under bridges and through culverts. Removal of these false depressions from an elevation model is difficult due to the lack of bridge and culvert inventories; thus, another method is needed to breach these artificial dams. Here, we present a semi-automated workflow and toolbox to remove falsely detected closed depressions created by artificial dams in a DEM. The approach finds the intersections between transportation routes (e.g., roads) and streams, and then lowers the elevation surface across the roads to stream level allowing flow to be routed under the road. Once the surface is corrected to match the approximate location of the National Hydrologic Dataset stream lines, the procedure is repeated with sequentially smaller flow accumulation thresholds in order to generate stream lines with less contributing area within the watershed. Through multiple iterations, artificial depressions that may arise due to ephemeral flow paths can also be removed. Preliminary results reveal that this new technique provides significant improvements for flow routing across a DEM and minimizes artifacts within the elevation surface. Slight changes in the stream flow lines generally improve the quality of flow routes; however some artificial dams may persist. Problematic areas include extensive road ditches, particularly along divided highways, and where surface flow crosses beneath road intersections. Limitations do exist, and the results partially depend on the quality of data being input. Of 166 manually identified culverts from a previous study by Doctor and Young in 2013, 125 are within 25 m of culverts identified by this tool. After three iterations, 1,735 culverts were identified and cataloged. The result is a reconditioned

  16. Utility Towers, Insulator Detail, Front Elevation, Side Elevation, Elevation, Double ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Utility Towers, Insulator Detail, Front Elevation