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Sample records for elicits cyclooxygenase-2-driven prostaglandin

  1. Prostaglandin-dependent modulation of dopaminergic neurotransmission elicits inflammation-induced aversion in mice

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, Michael; Klawonn, Anna M.; Nilsson, Anna; Singh, Anand Kumar; Zajdel, Joanna; Björk Wilhelms, Daniel; Lazarus, Michael; Löfberg, Andreas; Jaarola, Maarit; Örtegren Kugelberg, Unn; Billiar, Timothy R.; Hackam, David J.; Sodhi, Chhinder P.; Breyer, Matthew D.; Jakobsson, Johan; Schwaninger, Markus; Schütz, Günther; Rodriguez Parkitna, Jan; Saper, Clifford B.; Blomqvist, Anders; Engblom, David

    2015-01-01

    Systemic inflammation causes malaise and general feelings of discomfort. This fundamental aspect of the sickness response reduces the quality of life for people suffering from chronic inflammatory diseases and is a nuisance during mild infections like common colds or the flu. To investigate how inflammation is perceived as unpleasant and causes negative affect, we used a behavioral test in which mice avoid an environment that they have learned to associate with inflammation-induced discomfort. Using a combination of cell-type–specific gene deletions, pharmacology, and chemogenetics, we found that systemic inflammation triggered aversion through MyD88-dependent activation of the brain endothelium followed by COX1-mediated cerebral prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) synthesis. Further, we showed that inflammation-induced PGE2 targeted EP1 receptors on striatal dopamine D1 receptor–expressing neurons and that this signaling sequence induced aversion through GABA-mediated inhibition of dopaminergic cells. Finally, we demonstrated that inflammation-induced aversion was not an indirect consequence of fever or anorexia but that it constituted an independent inflammatory symptom triggered by a unique molecular mechanism. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that PGE2-mediated modulation of the dopaminergic motivational circuitry is a key mechanism underlying the negative affect induced by inflammation. PMID:26690700

  2. Prostaglandin E2 requirement for transforming growth factor beta 1 inhibition of elicited macrophage 14 kDa phospholipase A2 release.

    PubMed Central

    McCord, M.; Bolognese, B.; Marshall, L. A.

    1995-01-01

    1. Cultured elicited-peritoneal macrophages release a soluble type II 14 kDa phospholipase A2 (PLA2) over time, reaching a plateau by 20-24 h of incubation and maintaining these levels over 72 h. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is also produced but does not plateau until 48-72 h. 2. Transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF beta 1) reduces cellular 14 kDa PLA2 and its subsequent release by approximately half, but does not alter PGE2 production. Co-incubation of TGF beta 1 with indomethacin interfered, in a concentration-dependent manner, with the ability of TGF beta 1 to reduce cellular 14 kDa PLA2 and its subsequent release over 24 h. The regulation of TGF beta 1 was not specific to indomethacin since other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs had the same effect. This suggested that cyclooxygenase activity was essential for TGF beta 1 to exert its effect and indeed, the addition of exogenous PGE2 restored the TGF beta 1 action. 3. PGE2 alone exerted a concentration-dependent negative feedback action on elicited-macrophage 14 kDa PLA2 release. The inhibitory concentration (IC50 = approximately 180 ng PGE2 ml-1) approximated the PGE2 levels measured in the 24 h macrophage conditioned media (85-140 ng PGE2 ml-1) where PLA2 release began to plateau. Further, incubation of cells with indomethacin over 48 h resulted in the enhancement of 14 kDa PLA2 activity compared to that released from untreated cells. Forskolin failed to inhibit 14 kDa PLA2 release, suggesting PGE2 was not acting through an increase in adenylate cyclase. 4. Taken together, the data are consistent with the immunosuppressive aspects reported for both mediators during inflammation and demonstrates the requirement of PGE2 for TGF beta 1 action on the elicited macrophage. Images Figure 3 PMID:8590973

  3. Prostaglandins as abortifacients.

    PubMed

    Karim, S M

    1971-12-30

    Clinical trials have demonstrated the use of prostaglandins as effective abortifacients. Continuous intravenous infusion of the drugs however has been associated with certain side effects at therapeutically effective doses, such as nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and a local erythematous reaction at the site of venepuncture. Higher doses result in more serious side effects such as vasovagal symptoms, pyrexia and tachycardia. Direct application of prostaglandins E2 or F2a into the uterine cavity has been shown to minimize the side effects. Appropriate doses of prostaglandins every one or 2 hours administered at the site of action between the fetal membrane and uterine wall (via the cervix) produce the strong and frequent uterine contractions necessary for the expulsion of the products of conception. A drawback of this method is the need for the uterine cavity to be continuously monitored as dosage is determined by the uterine response. Another effective method of terminating 1st and 2nd trimester pregnacy with minimal side effects is vaginal administration (into the posterior fornix) of 50 mg PGF2a or 20 mg PGE2 every 2 or 3 hours. Single injection of prostaglandins into the amniotic sac usually results in complete abortion. The method is simple but should be used only in pregnancies of over 12 weeks' gestation as the amniotic sac is inaccessible in the 1st trimester. The prostaglandin method, compared with other methods of abortion in the 1st trimester of pregnancy (e.g., suction or dilatation and curettage) is inferior in terms of time, expense and convenience. Incomplete abortion is quite common in the 1st trimester when prostaglandins are used. With respect to 2nd trimester methods (hypertonic saline and hysterotomy) however, prostaglandins given by intravaginal, intrauterine, or intraamniotic routes offer clear advantages.

  4. Bimatoprost and prostaglandin F(2 alpha) selectively stimulate intracellular calcium signaling in different cat iris sphincter cells.

    PubMed

    Spada, Clayton S; Krauss, Achim H-P; Woodward, David F; Chen, June; Protzman, Charles E; Nieves, Amelia L; Wheeler, Larry A; Scott, David F; Sachs, George

    2005-01-01

    Bimatoprost is a synthetic analog of prostaglandin F(2 alpha) ethanolamide (prostamide F(2 alpha)), and shares a pharmacological profile consistent with that of the prostamides. Like prostaglandin F(2 alpha) carboxylic acid, bimatoprost potently lowers intraocular pressure in dogs, primates and humans. In order to distinguish its mechanism of action from prostaglandin F(2 alpha), fluorescence confocal microscopy was used to examine the effects of bimatoprost, prostaglandin F(2 alpha) and 17-phenyl prostaglandin F(2 alpha) on calcium signaling in resident cells of digested cat iris sphincter, a tissue which exhibits contractile responses to both agonists. Constant superfusion conditions obviated effective conversion of bimatoprost. Serial challenge with 100 nM bimatoprost and prostaglandin F(2 alpha) consistently evoked responses in different cells within the same tissue preparation, whereas prostaglandin F(2 alpha) and 17-phenyl prostaglandin F(2 alpha) elicited signaling responses in the same cells. Bimatoprost-sensitive cells were consistently re-stimulated with bimatoprost only, and prostaglandin F(2 alpha) sensitive cells could only be re-stimulated with prostaglandin F(2 alpha). The selective stimulation of different cells in the same cat iris sphincter preparation by bimatoprost and prostaglandin F(2 alpha), along with the complete absence of observed instances in which the same cells respond to both agonists, strongly suggests the involvement of distinct receptors for prostaglandin F(2 alpha) and bimatoprost. Further, prostaglandin F(2 alpha) but not bimatoprost potently stimulated calcium signaling in isolated human embryonic kidney cells stably transfected with the feline- and human-prostaglandin F(2 alpha) FP-receptor and in human dermal fibroblast cells, and only prostaglandin F(2 alpha) competed with radioligand binding in HEK-feFP cells. These studies provide further evidence for the existence of a bimatoprost-sensitive receptor that is distinct from

  5. Prostaglandin E3 metabolism and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Peiying; Jiang, Yan; Fischer, Susan M.

    2015-01-01

    The anticancer activity of n-3 fatty acids, especially those derived from fish, such as eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid) (DHA), has been studied for centuries. While there is a growing body of evidence that EPA and DHA may influence cancer initiation and development through targeting multiple events of tumor development, the underlying mechanisms responsible for these activities are still not fully understood. A number of studies have suggested that the anticancer activities of EPA and DHA are associated with their effects on eicosanoid metabolism by which they inhibit prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production. In contrast to DHA, EPA can function as a substrate for cyclooxygenases (COXs) to synthesize unique 3-series prostaglandin compounds, especially PGE3. With advance technology in mass spectrometry, there is renewed interest in studying the role of PGE3 in EPA elicited anti-proliferative activity in various cancers, with some promising results. Here, we summarize the regulation of PGE3 synthesis in cancer cells and its role in EPA elicited anticancer activity. The development of PGE3 and its metabolites as potential biomarkers for future clinical evaluation of EPA and fish oil in cancer care is discussed. PMID:24657656

  6. Misidentification of prostamides as prostaglandins.

    PubMed

    Glass, Michelle; Hong, Jiwon; Sato, Timothy A; Mitchell, Murray D

    2005-07-01

    Prostaglandins and endogenous cannabinoid metabolites share the same lipid backbone with differing polar head groups at exactly the position through which a large molecule is attached to provide antigenicity and thus raise antisera. Hence, we hypothesized that antisera raised against prostaglandins linked to a large molecule such as BSA at the carboxyl functional group would also recognize endogenous cannabinoid metabolites and lead to highly misleading interpretations of data. We found major cross-reactivity of commercial antisera raised to prostaglandins with endocannabinoid metabolites. Furthermore, in a well-characterized cell line (WISH) or primary amnion tissue explants, endocannabinoid treatment led to increased production of endocannabinoid metabolites as opposed to primary prostaglandins. This was apparent only after separation of products by thin-layer chromatography, because they measured as prostaglandins by radioimmunoassay. These findings have major implications for our interpretation of data in situations in which these prostaglandin-like molecules are formed, and they stress the need for chromatographic or spectrometric confirmation of prostaglandin production detected by antibody-based methods. PMID:15863842

  7. Prostaglandins, bioassay and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Flower, R J

    2006-01-01

    The formation of the British Pharmacological Society coincided almost exactly with a series of ground-breaking studies that ushered in an entirely new field of research – that of lipid mediator pharmacology. For many years following their chemical characterisation, lipids were considered only to be of dietary or structural importance. From the 1930s, all this changed – slowly at first and then more dramatically in the 1970s and 1980s with the emergence of the prostaglandins (PGs), the first intercellular mediators to be clearly derived from lipids, in a dynamic on-demand system. The PGs exhibit a wide range of biological activities that are still being evaluated and their properties underlie the action of one of the world's all-time favourite medicines, aspirin, as well as its more modern congeners. This paper traces the development of the PG field, with particular emphasis on the skilful utilisation of the twin techniques of bioassay and analytical chemistry by U.K. and Swedish scientists, and the intellectual interplay between them that led to the award of a joint Nobel Prize to the principal researchers in the PG field, half a century after the first discovery of these astonishingly versatile mediators. PMID:16402103

  8. Femtomole analysis of prostaglandin pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    McGuffin, V L; Zare, R N

    1985-12-01

    An analytical method is described whereby the major classes of prostaglandins are fully resolved by microcolumn liquid chromatography and detected at the subfemtomole level by laser-induced fluorescence. The prostaglandins are labeled with the fluorescent reagent 4-bromo-methyl-7-methoxycoumarin and are subsequently separated on a high-efficiency fused-silica microcolumn (0.2 mm i.d., 1.06 m length, 150,000 theoretical plates). The optimal chromatographic conditions consist of a 3-micron octadecylsilica packing material and an isocratic mobile phase of 47.6% methanol, 23.8% acetonitrile, and 28.6% water. The prostaglandin derivatives are detected directly on the microcolumn by laser fluorimetry, using a helium/cadmium laser (325 nm, 15 mW) as the excitation source together with a simple filter/photo-multiplier optical detection system. In real sample matrices, the prostaglandin PGF2 alpha is readily quantifiable from the detection limit (0.3 fmol) to the formulation strength of the therapeutic agent Lutalyse (Upjohn), spanning more than six orders of magnitude in concentration. The simplicity and general applicability of the present analytical methodology and instrumentation suggest that this technique can be used to attack a wide variety of biomedically important problems with exceptional sensitivity and selectivity.

  9. Ludic Elicitation: Using Games for Knowledge Elicitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cao, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge elicitation from human beings is important for many fields, such as decision support systems, risk communication, and customer preference studying. Traditional approaches include observations, questionnaires, structured and semi-structured interviews, and group discussions. Many publications have been studying different techniques for a…

  10. Prostaglandin synthesis and catabolism in the gastric mucosa: studies in normal rabbits and rabbits immunized with prostaglandin E2

    SciTech Connect

    Redfern, J.S.

    1988-09-01

    Antral and fundic mucosal homogenates obtained from prostaglandin E2-immunized rabbits converted 14C-arachidonic acid to prostaglandin E2, 6-keto prostaglandin F1 alpha, prostaglandin F2 alpha, and prostaglandin D2. Percentage conversion of 14C-arachidonic acid to these prostaglandin products was not significantly different in prostaglandin E2-immunized rabbits compared with control rabbits (thyroglobulin-immunized and unimmunized rabbits combined). Synthesis of 6-keto prostaglandin F1 alpha, prostaglandin E2 and 13,14-dihydro 15-keto prostaglandin E2 from endogenous arachidonic acid after vortex mixing fundic mucosal homogenates was similar in prostaglandin E2 immunized rabbits and control rabbits. Both in prostaglandin E2-immunized rabbits and controls, 3H-prostaglandin E2 was catabolized extensively by the fundic mucosa, whereas 3H-6-keto prostaglandin F1 alpha, 3H-prostaglandin F2 alpha, and 3H-prostaglandin D2 were not catabolized to any appreciable extent. The rate of catabolism of PGs was not significantly different in prostaglandin E2-immunized rabbits and control rabbits, with the exception of prostaglandin F2 alpha which was catabolized slightly more rapidly in prostaglandin E2-immunized rabbits. These results indicate that development of gastric ulcers in prostaglandin E2-immunized rabbits is not associated with an alteration in the capacity of the gastric mucosa to synthesize or catabolize prostaglandins.

  11. The Enteropathy of Prostaglandin Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Adler, David H.; Phillips, John A.; Cogan, Joy D.; Iverson, Tina M.; Stein, Jeffrey A.; Brenner, David A.; Morrow, Jason D.; Boutaud, Olivier; Oates, John A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Small intestinal ulcers are frequent complications of therapy with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). We present here a genetic deficiency of eicosanoid biosynthesis that illuminates the mechanism of NSAID-induced ulcers of the small intestine. Methods Eicosanoids and metabolites were measured by isotope-dilution with mass spectrometry. cDNA was obtained by reverse transcription and sequenced following amplification with RT-PCR. Results We investigated the cause of chronic recurrent small intestinal ulcers, small bowel perforations, and gastrointestinal blood loss in a 45 year old male who was not taking any cyclooxygenase inhibitor. Prostaglandin metabolites in urine were significantly depressed. Serum thromboxane B2 (TxB2) production was 4.6% of normal controls (p<0.006) and serum 12-HETE was 1.3% of controls (p<0.005). Optical platelet aggregation with simultaneous monitoring of ATP release demonstrated absent granule secretion in response to ADP and a blunted aggregation response to ADP and collagen, but normal response to arachidonic acid (AA). LTB4 biosynthesis by ionophore activated leukocytes was only 3% of controls and urinary LTE4 was undetectable. These findings suggested deficient AA release from membrane phospholipids by cytosolic phospholipase A2-α (cPLA2-α) which regulates cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase mediated eicosanoid production by catalyzing the release of their substrate, AA. Sequencing of cPLA2-α cDNA demonstrated 2 heterozygous non-synonymous single base pair mutations: Ser111Pro (S111P) and Arg485His (R485H), as well as a known SNP: Lys651Arg (K651R). Conclusion Characterization of this cPLA2-α deficiency provides support for the importance of prostaglandins in protecting small intestinal integrity, and indicates that loss of prostaglandin biosynthesis is sufficient to produce small intestinal ulcers. PMID:19148786

  12. [Treatment of postpartal atony with prostaglandins].

    PubMed

    Heinzl, S; Hendry, M

    1986-01-01

    Uterine contraction can be brought about at any time with prostaglandins. This effect is exploited in the treatment of postpartal atonia. Prostaglandin was administered intravenously to 21 women for postpartal atonia. In 19 women the bleeding subsequently stopped. There were no side effects of the treatment. These results are presented and discussed with reference to other data in the literature.

  13. Homologous desensitization to prostaglandins in rabbit ileum

    SciTech Connect

    Musch, M.W.; Field, M.; Miller, R.J.; Stoff, J.S.

    1987-01-01

    Prostaglandins (PG's) increase short-circuit current (I/sub sc/), inhibit NaCl absorption, and stimulate Cl secretion in rabbit ileum. These changes occur with the following PGs; E/sub 3/, E/sub 1/, nitrilo-I/sub 2/ and, to a lesser extent, with A/sub 2/, D/sub 2/, and F/sub 2..cap alpha../. Arachidonic acid (AA) also stimulates secretion. The PG- or AA-stimulated I/sub sc/ does not persist, however, and on prolonged exposure tachyphylaxis develops. Resensitization of the I/sub sc/ response to PGE/sub 2/ is rapid, being essentially complete in 15 min after the PG is removed. Desensitization to AA is not reflected by diminished PG generation. PGE/sub 2/ release from the mucosa after AA addition is constant, although the AA-stimulated I/sub sc/ decreases. I/sub sc/ measurements indicate that PGE/sub 2/ at slightly below its EC/sub 50/ partially desensitizes and a near-maximal concentration completely desensitizes to PGE/sub 2/ but does not, however, inhibit the subsequent change in I/sub sc/ caused by theophylline or vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP). Adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) measurements suggest that desensitization applies to cAMP production. PGE/sub 2/ (10/sup -5/ M) increases mucosal cAMP three- to sevenfold, but this elevation is transient; a second challenge dose, which fails to elicit a I/sub sc/ change, also fails to increase mucosal cAMP. Adenylate cyclase measurements from untreated and PGE/sub 2/-treated enterocytes demonstrate a decrease in stimulation by PGE/sub 2/ but not in stimulation by VIP, fluoride, or 5-guanylylimidodiphosphate.

  14. Prostaglandins, Thromboxanes and Leukotrienes in Clinical Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Zipser, Robert D.; Laffi, Giacomo

    1985-01-01

    Although prostaglandin research began about 50 years ago, many of the most important advances in understanding the biochemistry, physiology and pharmacology have taken place within the past five to ten years. There is great potential for the extension of this research to the clinical practice of medicine. At this time, the most common interaction that clinicians have with the prostaglandin field is in administering nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, which function by inhibiting prostaglandins. The uses of these drugs include treating not only inflammation, but also dysmenorrhea, some renal disease, thrombotic diseases and some metabolic disorders. Prostaglandin analogs, with their potent effects on uterine contraction, are in common use in obstetrics. Other analogs, with gastric and duodenal cytoprotective effects are useful in treating peptic ulcer disease. Future benefits from prostaglandin and leukotriene research may include new therapy for inflammatory and hypersensitivity diseases such as asthma, inflammatory bowel diseases and dermatitis. PMID:3004043

  15. Eliciting Sound Memories.

    PubMed

    Harris, Anna

    2015-11-01

    Sensory experiences are often considered triggers of memory, most famously a little French cake dipped in lime blossom tea. Sense memory can also be evoked in public history research through techniques of elicitation. In this article I reflect on different social science methods for eliciting sound memories such as the use of sonic prompts, emplaced interviewing, and sound walks. I include examples from my research on medical listening. The article considers the relevance of this work for the conduct of oral histories, arguing that such methods "break the frame," allowing room for collaborative research connections and insights into the otherwise unarticulatable.

  16. Prostaglandins in human seminal plasma. Prostaglandins and related factors 46.

    PubMed

    Hamberg, M; Samuelsson, B

    1966-01-25

    This study on human seminal plasma sought after the compounds which either possess the dienone chromophore or can be converted into it by treatment with sodium hydroxide. In addition, this investigation led to the isolation of 8 more (PGs) prostaglandins which were present in higher concentrations than the previously recognized PGs. Samples of human seminal plasma were subjected to silicic acid chromatography, reversed phase partition chromatography, thin layer chromatography, and gas liquid chromatography which isolated those 8 PGs not previously recognized. 4 of these compounds, PGE1-217, PGE2-217, PGE1-278, and PGE2-278 were known from earlier studies but had not been isolated from natural sources. The other 4 were 19 hydroxy derivatives of the 4 abovementioned compounds. The concentrations of the previously recognized PGs were recently determined and it was found that the 19 hydroxy derivatives were present in concentrations 4 times higher than the PGE compounds.

  17. Prostaglandin ethanolamides attenuate damage in a human explant colitis model.

    PubMed

    Nicotra, Lauren L; Vu, Megan; Harvey, Benjamin S; Smid, Scott D

    2013-01-01

    Endocannabinoids are protective in animal colitis models. As endocannabinoids also form novel prostaglandin ethanolamides (prostamides) via COX-2, we investigated the effects of prostamides and other COX-2 mediators on tissue damage in an ex vivo human mucosal explant colitis model. Healthy human colonic mucosae were incubated with pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-1β to elicit colitis-like tissue damage. The PGF-ethanolamide analogue, bimatoprost decreased colitis scores which were reversed by a prostamide-specific antagonist AGN 211334, but not the FP receptor antagonist AL-8810. PGF-ethanolamide and PGE-ethanolamide also reduced cytokine-evoked epithelial damage. Anandamide was protective in the explant colitis model; however COX-2 inhibition did not alter its effects, associated with a lack of COX-2 induction in explant mucosal tissue. These findings support an anti-inflammatory role for prostamides and endocannabinoids in the human colon. PMID:23380599

  18. Enhancement of scleral macromolecular permeability with prostaglandins.

    PubMed Central

    Weinreb, R N

    2001-01-01

    PURPOSE: It is proposed that the sclera is a metabolically active and pharmacologically responsive tissue. These studies were undertaken to determine whether prostaglandin exposure can enhance scleral permeability to high-molecular-weight substances. METHODS: Topical prostaglandin F2 alpha (PGF2 alpha) was administered to monkeys to determine if this altered the amount of scleral matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Experiments also were performed to determine whether the prostaglandin F (FP) receptor and gene transcripts are expressed in normal human sclera. Permeability of organ-cultured human sclera following prostaglandin exposure then was studied and the amount of MMP released into the medium measured. Finally, the permeability of human sclera to basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2) was determined following prostaglandin exposure. RESULTS: Topical prostaglandin administration that reduced scleral collagen also increased scleral MMP-1, MMP-2, and MMP-3 by 63 +/- 35%, 267 +/- 210%, and 729 +/- 500%, respectively. FP receptor protein was localized in scleral fibroblasts, and FP receptor gene transcript was identified in sclera. Exposure to prostaglandin F2 alpha, 17-phenyltrinor, PGF2 alpha, or latanoprost acid increased scleral permeability by up to 124%, 183%, or 213%, respectively. In these cultures, MMP-1, MMP-2, and MMP-3 were increased by up to 37%, 267%, and 96%, respectively. Finally, transscleral absorption of FGF-2 was increased by up to 126% with scleral exposure to latanoprost. CONCLUSIONS: These studies demonstrate that the sclera is metabolically active and pharmacologically responsive to prostaglandins. Further, they demonstrate the feasibility of cotreatment with prostaglandin to enhance transscleral delivery of peptides, such as growth factors and high-molecular-weight substances, to the posterior segment of the eye. PMID:11797317

  19. Prostaglandin transporter mutations cause pachydermoperiostosis with myelofibrosis.

    PubMed

    Diggle, Christine P; Parry, David A; Logan, Clare V; Laissue, Paul; Rivera, Carolina; Restrepo, Carlos Martín; Fonseca, Dora J; Morgan, Joanne E; Allanore, Yannick; Fontenay, Michaela; Wipff, Julien; Varret, Mathilde; Gibault, Laure; Dalantaeva, Nadezhda; Korbonits, Márta; Zhou, Bowen; Yuan, Gang; Harifi, Ghita; Cefle, Kivanc; Palanduz, Sukru; Akoglu, Hadim; Zwijnenburg, Petra J; Lichtenbelt, Klaske D; Aubry-Rozier, Bérengère; Superti-Furga, Andrea; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Accadia, Maria; Brancati, Francesco; Sheridan, Eamonn G; Taylor, Graham R; Carr, Ian M; Johnson, Colin A; Markham, Alexander F; Bonthron, David T

    2012-08-01

    Pachydermoperiostosis, or primary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy (PHO), is an inherited multisystem disorder, whose features closely mimic the reactive osteoarthropathy that commonly accompanies neoplastic and inflammatory pathologies. We previously described deficiency of the prostaglandin-degrading enzyme 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (HPGD) as a cause of this condition, implicating elevated circulating prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) as causative of PHO, and perhaps also as the principal mediator of secondary HO. However, PHO is genetically heterogeneous. Here, we use whole-exome sequencing to identify recessive mutations of the prostaglandin transporter SLCO2A1, in individuals lacking HPGD mutations. We performed exome sequencing of four probands with severe PHO, followed by conventional mutation analysis of SLCO2A1 in nine others. Biallelic SLCO2A1 mutations were identified in 12 of the 13 families. Affected individuals had elevated urinary PGE(2), but unlike HPGD-deficient patients, also excreted considerable quantities of the PGE(2) metabolite, PGE-M. Clinical differences between the two groups were also identified, notably that SLCO2A1-deficient individuals have a high frequency of severe anemia due to myelofibrosis. These findings reinforce the key role of systemic or local prostaglandin excess as the stimulus to HO. They also suggest that the induction or maintenance of hematopoietic stem cells by prostaglandin may depend upon transporter activity. PMID:22553128

  20. Unconsciously elicited perceptual prior

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Raymond; Baria, Alexis T.; Flounders, Matthew W.; He, Biyu J.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence over the past decade suggests that vision is not simply a passive, feed-forward process in which cortical areas relay progressively more abstract information to those higher up in the visual hierarchy, but rather an inferential process with top-down processes actively guiding and shaping perception. However, one major question that persists is whether such processes can be influenced by unconsciously perceived stimuli. Recent psychophysics and neuroimaging studies have revealed that while consciously perceived stimuli elicit stronger responses in higher visual and frontoparietal areas than those that fail to reach conscious awareness, the latter can still drive high-level brain and behavioral responses. We investigated whether unconscious processing of a masked natural image could facilitate subsequent conscious recognition of its degraded counterpart (a black-and-white “Mooney” image) presented many seconds later. We found that this is indeed the case, suggesting that conscious vision may be influenced by priors established by unconscious processing of a fleeting image. PMID:27595010

  1. Prostaglandins and their receptors in insect biology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We treat the biological significance of prostaglandins (PGs) and their known receptors in insect biology. PGs and related eicosanoids are oxygenated derivatives of arachidonic acid (AA) and two other C20 polyunsaturated fatty acids. PGs are mostly appreciated in the context of biomedicine, but a gr...

  2. Prostaglandin I2 and prostaglandin E2 modulate human intrarenal artery contractility through prostaglandin E2-EP4, prostacyclin-IP, and thromboxane A2-TP receptors.

    PubMed

    Eskildsen, Morten P; Hansen, Pernille B L; Stubbe, Jane; Toft, Anja; Walter, Steen; Marcussen, Niels; Rasmussen, Lars M; Vanhoutte, Paul M; Jensen, Boye L

    2014-09-01

    Cyclooxygenase inhibitors decrease renal blood flow in settings with decreased effective circulating volume. The present study examined the hypothesis that prostaglandins, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and prostacyclin (PGI2), induce relaxation of human intrarenal arteries through PGE2-EP and PGI2-IP receptors. Intrarenal arteries were microdissected from human nephrectomy samples (n=53, median diameter ≈362 μm, 88% viable, 76% relaxed in response to acetylcholine). Rings were suspended in myographs to record force development. In vessels with K(+)-induced tension (EC70: -log [mol/L]=1.36±0.03), PGE2 and PGI2 induced concentration-dependent relaxation (-log EC50: PGE2=7.1±0.3 and PGI2=7.7). The response to PGE2 displayed endothelium dependence and desensitization. Relaxation by PGE2 was mimicked by an EP4 receptor agonist (CAY10598, EC50=6.7±0.2). The relaxation after PGI2 was abolished by an IP receptor antagonist (BR5064, 10(-8) mol/L). Pretreatment of quiescent arteries with PGE2 for 5 minutes (10(-6) mol/L) led to a significant right shift of the concentration-response to norepinephrine (EC50 from 6.6±0.1-5.9±0.1). In intrarenal arteries with K(+)-induced tone, PGE2 and PGI2 at 10(-5) mol/L elicited increased tension. This was abolished by thromboxane receptor (TP) antagonist (S18886, 10(-6) mol/L). A TP agonist (U46619, n=6) evoked tension (EC50=8.1±0.2) that was inhibited by S18886. Polymerase chain reaction and immunoblotting showed EP4, IP, and TP receptors in intrarenal arteries. In conclusion, PGE2 and PGI2 may protect renal perfusion by activating cognate IP and EP4 receptors associated with smooth muscle cells and endothelium in human intrarenal arteries and contribute to increased renal vascular resistance at high pathological concentrations mediated by noncognate TP receptor.

  3. Goiter formation following prostaglandin administration in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Lupulescu, A.

    1976-01-01

    Prostaglandins (PGE1 and PGE2) induced a hyperplastic microfollicular goiter with a high radioiodine (131I) thyroid uptake, increased endocytosis, a heavy autoradiographic (125I) reaction, and a moderate increase of thyroid hormones (T4, T3), thyroxine-binding globulin (TGB), and thyrotropin (TSH) concentrations in adult rats. Ultrastructurally, both prostaglandins (E1 and E2) markedly stimulated the thyroid cell activity and increased the number of pseudopodia, the size of colloid and dense granule populations, and the number of polysomes. Conversely, a hypofunction of thyroid glands with low radioiodine (131I) thyroid uptake, a decreased autoradiographic (125I) reaction, and a moderate decrease in T4, T3, TGB, and TSH concentrations were observed following prostaglandin F 2alpha. Ultrastructurally, a decrease in size of the colloid and dense granule population and the number of degenerative mitochondria occurred infollicular cells. An intense hyperplasia of parafollicular (C) cells, with abundant population of characteristic dense granules, could be seen in PGF 2alpha-treated rats. A marked decrease of radioiodine (131I) uptake, endocytosis, and autoradiographic (125I) reaction and a sharp decline in T4, T3, and TBG were observed in hypophysectomized and chronically prostaglandin-treated rats. Light and electron microscopy revealed signs of an advanced thyroid hypofunction with flat cuboidal cells, reduced microvilli, scarce endoplasmic reticulum, and few dense droplets. The present findings demonstrate that the chronic administration of prostaglandins exerts significant effects of thyroid gland and goiter formation (goitrogenesis), radioiodine metabolism, and hormone synthesis, and that these effects are mediated by TSH secretion. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 PMID:970439

  4. Effect of forskolin on alterations of vascular permeability induced with bradykinin, prostaglandin E1, adenosine, histamine and carrageenin in rats.

    PubMed

    Sugio, K; Daly, J W

    1983-07-01

    The effect of the diterpene forskolin on vascular permeability alone and in combination with bradykinin, prostaglandin E1, adenosine or histamine has been investigated in rats. Vascular permeability in rat skin was measured using [125I]-labelled bovine serum albumin ([125I]BSA) as a tracer. In addition, the effect of forskolin on footpad edema induced by the injection of a mixture of 2% carrageenin was determined. Forskolin caused a marked potentiation of the increase in vascular permeability in rat skin elicited by the intradermal injection of histamine or bradykinin. However, forskolin caused a significant suppression of the prostaglandin E1-induced vascular permeability response and at a low concentration suppressed the response to adenosine. Forskolin greatly potentiated the footpad edema induced with carrageenin in rats. Intravenous administration of the enzyme bromelain, which reduces plasma kininogen levels, inhibited the footpad edema induced with carrageenin or with a mixture of carrageenin and forskolin. Parenteral administration of a prostaglandin synthetase inhibitor, indomethacin, suppressed the footpad edema induced with carrageenin, but did not inhibit the footpad edema induced with a mixture of carrageenin and forskolin. An antihistamine, cyproheptadine, had no effect on carrageenin-induced footpad edema either in the presence or absence of forskolin. These results suggest that both bradykinin and prostaglandins are essential for the development of carrageenin-induced footpad edema and that bradykinin plays an important role in the potentiative effect of forskolin on footpad edema induced with carrageenin in rats.

  5. Prostaglandins and the regulation of parturition in mares.

    PubMed

    Ousey, J C; Fowden, A L

    2012-02-01

    Prostaglandins play an essential role during the perinatal period in the mare. Prostaglandin concentrations are low for the majority of pregnancy due to the regulatory action of progestagens on those enzymes responsible for metabolism of prostaglandins. Towards term, prostaglandin concentrations gradually increase, closely associated with upregulation of the fetal hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis, stimulation of the prostaglandin synthesising enzyme PGHS-2 and changes in the ratio of progestagens and oestrogens. Recent evidence in the mare indicates that proinflammatory cytokines are key mediators of prostaglandin synthesis both at term parturition in healthy mares and at preterm parturition associated with placental infection. Prostaglandin concentrations rise substantially during active labour and decline after birth, associated with delivery of the placenta. During induced labour, prostaglandin concentrations are variable depending on the proximity to spontaneous parturition at term. Once the proinflammatory endocrine cascade is initiated, it is difficult to prevent active labour by administration of drugs that reduce prostaglandin concentrations in peripheral plasma. Further work is needed to establish the inter-relationships between prostaglandin production and other endocrine changes associated with labour at term and preterm in the mare.

  6. Prostaglandin Endoperoxides. A New Concept Concerning the Mode of Action and Release of Prostaglandins*

    PubMed Central

    Hamberg, Mats; Svensson, Jan; Samuelsson, Bengt

    1974-01-01

    Methods were developed for quantitative determination of the three major metabolites of arachidonic acid in human platelets, i.e., 12L-hydroxy-5,8,10,14-eicosatetraenoic acid (HETE), 12L-hydroxy-5,8,10-heptadecatrienoic acid (HHT) and 8-(1-hydroxy-3-oxopropyl)-9,12L-dihydroxy-5,10-heptadecadienoic acid (PHD). Aggregation of washed platelets by thrombin was accompanied by release of 1163-2175 ng/ml of HETE, 1129-2430 ng/ml of HHT, and 998-2299 ng/ml of PHD. The amount of PGG2 (prostaglandin G2) produced as calculated from the sum of the amounts of its metabolites (HHT and PHD) was 2477-5480 ng/ml. In contrast, the amounts of PGE2 (prostaglandin E2) and PGF2α (prostaglandin F2α) released were approximately two orders of magnitude lower. In this system, the prostaglandins thus exert their biological action through the endoperoxides, which are almost exclusively metabolized to nonprostanoate structures and only to a small extent to the classical prostaglandins. Platelets from subjects given aspirin produced less than 5% of the above mentioned amounts of HHT and PHD, whereas the production of HETE was stimulated about 3-fold. This provides additional evidence for our earlier proposal [Hamberg, M., Svensson, J., Wakabayashi, T. & Samuelsson, B. (1974) Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. USA 71, 345-349] that the anti-aggregating effect of aspirin is through inhibition of PGG2 formation. PMID:4530264

  7. Captopril-induced Changes in Prostaglandin Production

    PubMed Central

    Swartz, Stephen L.; Williams, Gordon H.; Hollenberg, Norman K.; Levine, Lawrence; Dluhy, Robert G.; Moore, Thomas J.

    1980-01-01

    Captopril is a potent hypotensive agent whose efficacy has hitherto been attributed to its ability to alter either angiotensin II formation or kinin degradation. Our purpose was to examine captopril's acute effect on prostaglandin production, because changes in neither the renin-angiotensin nor the kallikrein-kinin systems appear adequate to account for the fall in arterial pressure. The plasma levels of angiotensin II, kinins, and prostaglandins were determined in response to increasing doses (5, 12.5, and 25 mg) of captopril and these responses were compared with the change in arterial pressure observed in nine supine normal male subjects studied on both a high (200 meq) and low (10 meq) sodium intake. Captopril significantly (P < 0.01) increased the levels of the 13,14-dihydro-15-keto metabolite of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2-M), a potent vasodilator, with similar responses being observed on both a high and a low sodium intake. No significant changes in the plasma levels of 6-keto-prostaglandin F 1α, or thromboxane B2, the stable products of prostacyclin and thromboxane A2, respectively, occurred. The depressor response to captopril correlated with the change in PGE2-M (r = 0.52, t = 5.44, P < 0.0001). On the other hand, although significant (P < 0.02) decrements in angiotensin II and increments in plasma kinins accompanied the hypotensive response in sodium-restricted subjects, in sodium-loaded subjects where the renin-angiotensin system was suppressed, no change in angiotensin II, and only a modest change in kinins was noted, even though significant (P < 0.01) decrements in diastolic blood pressure occurred (−10±2 mm Hg). Thus, changes in depressor prostaglandin production can better account for the hypotensive response to captopril, thereby extending to yet another vasoactive system an influence by this class of drugs and providing a new approach to dissecting the abnormality in the control of vascular tone in patients with hypertension. PMID:6997332

  8. UVB light upregulates prostaglandin synthases and prostaglandin receptors in mouse keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Black, Adrienne T.; Gray, Joshua P.; Shakarjian, Michael P.; Mishin, Vladimir; Laskin, Debra L.; Heck, Diane E.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.

    2008-10-01

    Prostaglandins belong to a class of cyclic lipid-derived mediators synthesized from arachidonic acid via COX-1, COX-2 and various prostaglandin synthases. Members of this family include prostaglandins such as PGE{sub 2}, PGF{sub 2{alpha}}, PGD{sub 2} and PGI{sub 2} (prostacyclin) as well as thromboxane. In the present studies we analyzed the effects of UVB on prostaglandin production and prostaglandin synthase expression in primary cultures of undifferentiated and calcium-differentiated mouse keratinocytes. Both cell types were found to constitutively synthesize PGE{sub 2}, PGD{sub 2} and the PGD{sub 2} metabolite PGJ{sub 2}. Twenty-four hours after treatment with UVB (25 mJ/cm{sup 2}), production of PGE{sub 2} and PGJ{sub 2} increased, while PGD{sub 2} production decreased. This was associated with increased expression of COX-2 mRNA and protein. UVB (2.5-25 mJ/cm{sup 2}) also caused marked increases in mRNA expression for the prostanoid synthases PGDS, mPGES-1, mPGES-2, PGFS and PGIS, as well as expression of receptors for PGE{sub 2} (EP1 and EP2), PGD{sub 2} (DP and CRTH2) and prostacyclin (IP). UVB was more effective in inducing COX-2 and DP in differentiated cells and EP1 and IP in undifferentiated cells. UVB readily activated keratinocyte PI-3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt, JNK and p38 MAP signaling pathways which are known to regulate COX-2 expression. While inhibition of PI3K suppressed UVB-induced mPGES-1 and CRTH2 expression, JNK inhibition suppressed mPGES-1, PGIS, EP2 and CRTH2, and p38 kinase inhibition only suppressed EP1 and EP2. These data indicate that UVB modulates expression of prostaglandin synthases and receptors by distinct mechanisms. Moreover, both the capacity of keratinocytes to generate prostaglandins and their ability to respond to these lipid mediators are stimulated by exposure to UVB.

  9. Pulmonary biosynthesis and metabolism of prostaglandins and related substances.

    PubMed Central

    Eling, T E; Ally, A I

    1984-01-01

    On passage through the lung vascular bed, prostaglandins are removed from the circulation by a transport carrier and subsequently inactivated by intracellular enzymes. However, PGI2 is not inactivated by the lung in vivo. Although PGI2 is an excellent substrate for the intracellular enzymes in vitro, PGI2 is not a substrate for the carrier system. Thus, the transport carrier determines which circulating prostaglandin is inactivated by the pulmonary vascular bed. Also, the lung has a high capacity for forming prostaglandins from arachidonic acid. Considerable differences exist between species in relation to amount and specific prostaglandin formed as determined by incubation of 11C-PGH2 with pulmonary microsomes. The pulmonary biosynthesis and metabolism of these prostaglandins and related substances are discussed. PMID:6428876

  10. Prostaglandin F2 alpha-induced response of the bovine ovary, oviduct (uterine tube), and uterus.

    PubMed

    Singh, L P; Sadiku, A; Verma, O P

    1979-12-01

    Tissue strips from the ovary, (uterine tube), and oviduct, and uterus of pregnant and nonpregnant cows were tested for their contractile response to prostaglandin F2 alpha (PGF2 alpha). When 2.1 x 10(-6)M PGF2 alpha was added to the uterine strips, tension of tissues from pregnant cows increased sharply; however, tension in tissues from nonpregnant cows only increased moderately. Similar concentrations failed to elicit any response from oviductal tissues of either group. Unlike the uterus and the oviduct, the ovaries contracted slowly and irregularly. They responded with varying degrees of stimulation; ovaries from pregnant cows with brief and mild stimulation and ovaries from nonpregnant cows with slower and relatively stronger stimulation. Results indicate that the bovine ovary contracts rhythmically and that its sensitivity to PGF2 alpha decreases during pregnancy in contrast to the bovine uterus which becomes increasingly sensitive during pregnancy.

  11. Sickness: From the focus on cytokines, prostaglandins, and complement factors to the perspectives of neurons.

    PubMed

    Poon, David Chun-Hei; Ho, Yuen-Shan; Chiu, Kin; Wong, Hoi-Lam; Chang, Raymond Chuen-Chung

    2015-10-01

    Systemic inflammation leads to a variety of physiological (e.g. fever) and behavioral (e.g. anorexia, immobility, social withdrawal, depressed mood, disturbed sleep) responses that are collectively known as sickness. While these phenomena have been studied for the past few decades, the neurobiological mechanisms by which sickness occurs remain unclear. In this review, we first revisit how the body senses and responds to infections and injuries by eliciting systemic inflammation. Next, we focus on how peripheral inflammatory molecules such as cytokines, prostaglandins, and activated complement factors communicate with the brain to trigger neuroinflammation and sickness. Since depression also involves inflammation, we further elaborate on the interrelationship between sickness and depression. Finally, we discuss how immune activation can modulate neurons in the brain, and suggest future perspectives to help unravel how changes in neuronal functions relate to sickness responses. PMID:26363665

  12. Suppression of newborn natural killer cell activity by prostaglandin E2

    SciTech Connect

    Milch, P.O.; Salvatore, W.; Luft, B.; Baker, D.A.

    1988-10-01

    The effect of prostaglandin E2 on natural killer cell activity of cord blood was examined. Natural killer cell activity, determined by chromium 51 release, was significantly reduced after prostaglandin E2 (1 microgram/ml) treatment. Prostaglandin E2 has been found to enhance the cellular spread of herpesvirus. Thus prostaglandins may enhance viral infections indirectly by suppressing natural killer cell activity.

  13. Identification and pharmacological characterization of the prostaglandin FP receptor and FP receptor variant complexes

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Y; Woodward, D F; Guzman, V M; Li, C; Scott, D F; Wang, J W; Wheeler, L A; Garst, M E; Landsverk, K; Sachs, G; Krauss, A H-P; Cornell, C; Martos, J; Pettit, S; Fliri, H

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: A prostamide analogue, bimatoprost, has been shown to be effective in reducing intraocular pressure, but its precise mechanism of action remains unclear. Hence, to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of this effect of bimatoprost, we focused on pharmacologically characterizing prostaglandin FP receptor (FP) and FP receptor variant (altFP) complexes. Experimental approach: FP receptor mRNA variants were identified by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The FP-altFP4 heterodimers were established in HEK293/EBNA cells co-expressing FP and altFP4 receptor variants. A fluorometric imaging plate reader was used to study Ca2+ mobilization. Upregulation of cysteine-rich angiogenic protein 61 (Cyr61) mRNA was measured by Northern blot analysis, and phosphorylation of myosin light chain (MLC) by western analysis. Key results: Six splicing variants of FP receptor mRNA were identified in human ocular tissues. Immunoprecipitation confirmed that the FP receptor is dimerized with altFP4 receptors in HEK293/EBNA cells co-expressing FP and altFP4 receptors. In the studies of the kinetic profile for Ca2+ mobilization, prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α) elicited a rapid increase in intracellular Ca2+ followed by a steady state phase. In contrast, bimatoprost elicited an immediate increase in intracellular Ca2+ followed by a second phase. The prostamide antagonist, AGN211335, selectively and dose-dependently inhibited the bimatoprost-initiated second phase of Ca2+ mobilization, Cyr61 mRNA upregulation and MLC phosphorylation, but did not block the action of PGF2α. Conclusion and implications: Bimatoprost lacks effects on the FP receptor but may interact with the FP-altFP receptor heterodimer to induce alterations in second messenger signalling. Hence, FP-altFP complexes may represent the underlying basis of bimatoprost pharmacology. PMID:18587449

  14. Prostaglandins and estradiol-induced attenuation of hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction.

    PubMed

    Sylvester, J T; Gordon, J B; Malamet, R L; Wetzel, R C

    1985-10-01

    Pretreatment with estradiol (20 mg IM) attenuated vasoreactivity to decreases in inspired PIO2, lowered baseline resistance measured under conditions of maximal vasodilation (PIO2 = 0 mm Hg), and appeared to increase prostaglandin release in isolated, blood-perfused lungs of juvenile female sheep. Indomethacin (40 micrograms/ml) inhibited prostaglandin release and restored hypoxic vasoreactivity in estrogen-treated lungs, but did not alter the estrogen-induced decrease in baseline resistance. These results suggest that estradiol enhanced the production of prostaglandins which secondarily attenuated hypoxic vasoreactivity. The estradiol-induced decrease in baseline resistance, however, must have been mediated by some other mechanism.

  15. Neural Circuitry Engaged by Prostaglandins during the Sickness Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Saper, Clifford B.; Romanovsky, Andrej A.; Scammell, Thomas E.

    2013-01-01

    During illnesses caused by infectious disease or other sources of inflammation, a suite of brain-mediated responses called the “sickness syndrome” occurs, including fever, anorexia, sleepiness, hyperalgesia, and elevated corticosteroid secretion. Much of the sickness syndrome is mediated by prostaglandins acting on the brain, and can be prevented by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, such as aspirin or ibuprofen, that block prostaglandin synthesis. By examining which prostaglandins are produced at which sites and how they interact with the nervous system, researchers have identified specific neural circuits that underlie the sickness syndrome. PMID:22837039

  16. Attenuated cardiovascular effects of prostaglandin I2 and prostaglandin F2 alpha in cold acclimated American bullfrogs, Rana catesbeiana.

    PubMed

    Herman, C A; Robleto, D O; Mata, P L; Lujan, M D

    1986-05-01

    American bullfrogs, Rana catesbeiana respond to prostaglandins with changes in heart rate and blood pressure. These studies compare responses of warm (22 degrees C) and cold acclimated (5 degrees C) bullfrogs to prostaglandins. Gas chromatographic analysis determined equivalent fatty acid profiles in total lipids of heart and artery tissue from warm and cold acclimated animals. Arachidonic acid was the fatty acid precursor found in greatest abundance in both groups. For cardiovascular experiments, bullfrogs were cannulated by using a T-cannula implanted in the right sciatic artery. In warm acclimated bullfrogs, preinfusion systemic arterial pressure (SAP) was 14.7 +/- 0.5 mm Hg, and heart rate was 33.0 +/- 1.7 beats/min. Cold acclimated bullfrogs had SAP values of 8.0 +/- 0.8 mm Hg, and heart rate was 6.9 +/- 0.3 beats/min. Arachidonic and eicosapentaenoic acid infusions (2,000 micrograms/kg body weight [bw]) were hypertensive in cold acclimated and hypotensive in warm acclimated animals. These effects were blocked by indomethacin (4 mg/kg bw). In both warm and cold acclimated bullfrogs, prostaglandin F2 alpha (3-100 micrograms/kg bw) was hypertensive, while prostaglandin I2 (0.03-3 micrograms/kg bw) was hypotensive, with both prostaglandins stimulating a greater absolute response in warm acclimated animals. In addition, both prostaglandins increased heart rate in warm but not in cold acclimated bullfrogs. The results suggest diminished cardiovascular sensitivity to prostaglandins at low environmental temperatures.

  17. The role of prostaglandines in peristalsis of the human colon.

    PubMed

    Bruch, H P; Schmidt, E; Laven, R; Kehrer, G; Wasner, K H

    1978-08-01

    Prostaglandines (PG) of the E and F series cause peristaltic activity in isolated longitudinal muscle strips of the human colon. As this phasic motor reaction can be varied by acetyl choline and adrenaline it was supposed, that prostaglandines contribute to peristalsis. The role of PG E and F in the human colon was studied by inhibiting the prostaglandine synthesis and by antagonizing the prostaglandine-effects. Indomethacin proved to be a suitable inhibitor. HR 546 was found a powerful antagonist. The effect of Pentagastrin and Cholecystokinin (CCK) on peristaltic activity were suppressed by Indomethacin and HR 546. The inhibition of peristalsis by Indomethacin and HR 546 was removed by high doses of PG E and F. On the basis of these results the role of PG for the motility of the gut is discussed.

  18. Effects of Prostaglandin Analogues on Aqueous Humor Outflow Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Nelson S.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) is the most prevalent risk factor for glaucoma. All treatments, whether surgical or pharmaceutical, are aimed at lowering IOP. Prostaglandin analogues are a first line therapy for glaucoma due to their ability to reduce IOP, once-daily dosing, efficacy, and minimal side-effect profile. Whereas prostaglandin analogues have been known to alter aqueous humor outflow through the unconventional (uveoscleral) pathway, more recent evidence suggests their action also occurs through the conventional (trabecular) pathway. Understanding how prostaglandin analogues successfully lower IOP is important, as this information may lead to the discovery of new molecular targets for future therapeutic intervention. This review explores the current understanding of prostaglandin analogue biology as it pertains to IOP reduction and improved aqueous humor outflow facility. PMID:24359106

  19. ERG oncogene modulates prostaglandin signaling in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Ahmed A; Tan, Shyh-Han; Sun, Chen; Shaheduzzaman, Syed; Hu, Ying; Petrovics, Gyorgy; Chen, Yongmei; Sesterhenn, Isabell A; Li, Hua; Sreenath, Taduru; McLeod, David G; Dobi, Albert; Srivastava, Shiv

    2011-02-15

    Androgen dependent induction of the ETS related gene (ERG) expression in more than half of all prostate cancers results from gene fusions involving regulatory sequence of androgen regulated genes (i.e. TMPRSS2, SLC45A3 and NDRG1) and protein coding sequence of the ERG. Emerging studies in experimental models underscore the functions of ERG in prostate tumorigenesis. However, biological and biochemical functions of ERG in prostate cancer (CaP) remain to be elucidated. This study suggests that ERG activation plays a role in prostaglandin signaling because knockdown of ERG expression in TMPRSS2-ERG fusion containing CaP cells leads to altered levels of the 15-hydroxy-prostaglandin dehydrogenase (HPGD), a tumor suppressor and prostaglandin catabolizing enzyme, and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) . We demonstrate that HPGD expression is regulated by the binding of the ERG protein to the core promoter of this gene. Moreover, prostaglandin E2 dependent cell growth and urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) expression are also affected by ERG knockdown. Together, these data imply that the ERG oncoprotein in CaP cells positively influence prostaglandin mediated signaling, which may contribute to tumor progression. PMID:21178489

  20. Pharmacogenomics of Prostaglandin and Leukotriene Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Cornejo-García, José A.; Perkins, James R.; Jurado-Escobar, Raquel; García-Martín, Elena; Agúndez, José A.; Viguera, Enrique; Pérez-Sánchez, Natalia; Blanca-López, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    Individual genetic background together with environmental effects are thought to be behind many human complex diseases. A number of genetic variants, mainly single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), have been shown to be associated with various pathological and inflammatory conditions, representing potential therapeutic targets. Prostaglandins (PTGs) and leukotrienes (LTs) are eicosanoids derived from arachidonic acid and related polyunsaturated fatty acids that participate in both normal homeostasis and inflammatory conditions. These bioactive lipid mediators are synthesized through two major multistep enzymatic pathways: PTGs by cyclooxygenase and LTs by 5-lipoxygenase. The main physiological effects of PTGs include vasodilation and vascular leakage (PTGE2); mast cell maturation, eosinophil recruitment, and allergic responses (PTGD2); vascular and respiratory smooth muscle contraction (PTGF2), and inhibition of platelet aggregation (PTGI2). LTB4 is mainly involved in neutrophil recruitment, vascular leakage, and epithelial barrier function, whereas cysteinyl LTs (CysLTs) (LTC4, LTD4, and LTE4) induce bronchoconstriction and neutrophil extravasation, and also participate in vascular leakage. PTGs and LTs exert their biological functions by binding to cognate receptors, which belong to the seven transmembrane, G protein-coupled receptor superfamily. SNPs in genes encoding these receptors may influence their functionality and have a role in disease susceptibility and drug treatment response. In this review we summarize SNPs in PTGs and LTs receptors and their relevance in human diseases. We also provide information on gene expression. Finally, we speculate on future directions for this topic. PMID:27708579

  1. Simulated microgravity upregulates an endothelial vasoconstrictor prostaglandin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sangha, D. S.; Han, S.; Purdy, R. E.

    2001-01-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide contributes to the vascular hyporesponsiveness to norepinephrine (NE) observed in carotid arteries from rats exposed to simulated microgravity. The goal of the present study was to determine whether a cyclooxygenase product of arachidonic acid also influences vascular responsiveness in this setting. Microgravity was simulated in rats by hindlimb unweighting (HU). After 20 days of HU, carotid arteries were isolated from control and HU-treated rats, and vascular rings were mounted in tissue baths for the measurement of isometric contraction. Two cyclooxygenase inhibitors, indomethacin and ibuprofen, and the selective thromboxane A(2) prostanoid-receptor antagonist, SQ-29548, had no effect on the contraction to NE in control vessels but markedly reduced contraction to NE in HU vessels. When the endothelium was removed, indomethacin no longer had any effect on the NE-induced contraction in HU vessels. In endothelium-intact vessels in the presence of indomethacin, the addition of the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, N(G)-L-nitro-arginine methyl ester, to the medium bathing HU vessels increased the contraction to NE to the level of that of the control vessels. These results indicate that HU treatment induced two endothelial changes in carotid artery that opposed each other. Nitric oxide activity was increased and was responsible for the vascular hyporesponsiveness to NE. The activity of a vasoconstrictor prostaglandin was also increased, and attenuated the vasodilating effect of nitric oxide.

  2. Evidence against a physiological role of prostaglandins in the regulation of noradrenaline release in the cat spleen.

    PubMed Central

    Dubocovich, M L; Langer, S Z

    1975-01-01

    1. The effects of prostaglandins E2 (PGE2) and indomethacin on responses and on noradrenaline overflow elicited by nerve stimulation were studied in the perfused cat's spleen, at different calcium concentrations in the perfusion medium: 0-26, 0-65 and 2-6 mve stimulation and in the overflow of the transmitter. PGE2 was more effective in reducing transmitter overflow at 5 than at 30 Hz. 3. Indomethacin, 14-0 muM, prevented the release of PGE-like material in the venous effluent of the spleen elicited by either nerve stimulation or by exogenous noradrenaline. 4. During exposure to 14-0 muM indomethacin there was no increase in responses to nerve stimulation or in the overflow of noradrenaline elicited by nerve stimulation at 5 or at 30 Hz. 5. Similar results to those obtained with exogenous PGE2 and with indomethacin in the presence of 2-6 mM calcium, were observed when the experiments were carried out in the presence of either 0-65 or 0-26 mM calcium. 6. In the presence of the alpha-adrenoceptor blocking agents, phenoxybenzamine (2-9 muM) or phentolamine (3-1 muM), the increase in transmitter overflow obtained during stimulation was 6-5 and 8-3-fold respectively. 7. Since inhibition of the synthesis of PGE did not increase transmitter overflow during nerve stimulation, it appears that the proposed negative feed-back mechanism mediated by endogenous prostaglandins does not play an important physiological role in the regulation of adrenergic neurotransmission in the cat spleen. In this tissue the major endogenous negative feed-back regulatory mechanism is triggered by the neurotransmitter through the activation of prejunctional alpha-adrenoceptors. PMID:171381

  3. Sulforaphane Inhibits Prostaglandin E2 Synthesis by Suppressing Microsomal Prostaglandin E Synthase 1

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jiping; Joplin, Denise G.; Cross, Janet V.; Templeton, Dennis J.

    2012-01-01

    Sulforaphane (SFN) is a dietary cancer preventive with incompletely characterized mechanism(s) of cancer prevention. Since prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) promotes cancer progression, we hypothesized that SFN may block PGE2 synthesis in cancer cells. We found that SFN indeed blocked PGE2 production in human A549 cancer cells not by inhibiting COX-2, but rather by suppressing the expression of microsomal prostaglandin E synthase (mPGES-1), the enzyme that directly synthesizes PGE2. We identified the Hypoxia Inducible Factor 1 alpha (HIF-1α) as the target of SFN-mediated mPGES-1 suppression. SFN suppressed HIF-1α protein expression and the presence of HIF-1α at the mPGES-1 promoter, resulting in reduced transcription of mPGES-1. Finally, SFN also reduced expression of mPGES-1 and PGE2 production in A549 xenograft tumors in mice. Together, these results point to the HIF-1α, mPGES-1 and PGE2 axis as a potential mediator of the anti-cancer effects of SFN, and illustrate the potential of SFN for therapeutic control of cancer and inflammation. Harmful side effects in patients taking agents that target the more upstream COX-2 enzyme render the downstream target mPGES-1 a significant target for anti-inflammatory therapy. Thus, SFN could prove to be an important therapeutic approach to both cancer and inflammation. PMID:23166763

  4. Suppression of Alzheimer-associated inflammation by microglial prostaglandin-E2 EP4 receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Woodling, Nathaniel S; Wang, Qian; Priyam, Prachi G; Larkin, Paul; Shi, Ju; Johansson, Jenny U; Zagol-Ikapitte, Irene; Boutaud, Olivier; Andreasson, Katrin I

    2014-04-23

    A persistent and nonresolving inflammatory response to accumulating Aβ peptide species is a cardinal feature in the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In response to accumulating Aβ peptide species, microglia, the innate immune cells of the brain, generate a toxic inflammatory response that accelerates synaptic and neuronal injury. Many proinflammatory signaling pathways are linked to progression of neurodegeneration. However, endogenous anti-inflammatory pathways capable of suppressing Aβ-induced inflammation represent a relatively unexplored area. Here we report that signaling through the prostaglandin-E2 (PGE2) EP4 receptor potently suppresses microglial inflammatory responses to Aβ42 peptides. In cultured microglial cells, EP4 stimulation attenuated levels of Aβ42-induced inflammatory factors and potentiated phagocytosis of Aβ42. Microarray analysis demonstrated that EP4 stimulation broadly opposed Aβ42-driven gene expression changes in microglia, with enrichment for targets of IRF1, IRF7, and NF-κB transcription factors. In vivo, conditional deletion of microglial EP4 in APPSwe-PS1ΔE9 (APP-PS1) mice conversely increased inflammatory gene expression, oxidative protein modification, and Aβ deposition in brain at early stages of pathology, but not at later stages, suggesting an early anti-inflammatory function of microglial EP4 signaling in the APP-PS1 model. Finally, EP4 receptor levels decreased significantly in human cortex with progression from normal to AD states, suggesting that early loss of this beneficial signaling system in preclinical AD development may contribute to subsequent progression of pathology.

  5. Cardiovascular effects of prostaglandin I2 and prostaglandin F2 alpha in the unanesthetized bullfrog, Rana catesbeiana.

    PubMed

    Robleto, D O; Herman, C A

    1988-04-01

    The cardiovascular effects of prostaglandin (PG)I2 and PGF2 alpha were compared in the unanesthetized American bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana). Control mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) were 25.7 +/- 1.1 mm Hg and 35.1 +/- 1.1 beats/min, respectively. Intravenous injections of PGI2 decreased MAP and increased HR in a dose-dependent fashion over the range of concentrations tested (0.03, 0.3, 3, and 10 micrograms/kg-body weight [bw]. Neither atropine (1 mg/kg-bw) nor verapamil (1 mg/kg-bw) treatment altered the MAP or HR responses to PGI2 (3 micrograms/kg-bw). However, propranolol (5 mg/kg-bw) significantly blunted the hypotensive effects without affecting the increase in HR. Prostaglandin F2 alpha (tested at 0.3, 3, 30, and 100 micrograms/kg-bw) increased both MAP and HR. Mean arterial pressure increased with concentrations greater than 0.3 microgram/kg-bw and reached peak effects at 30 micrograms/kg-bw. Prostaglandin F2 alpha increased HR at doses greater than 0.3 microgram/kg-bw. Neither the pressor nor positive chronotropic effects of PGF2 alpha (30 micrograms/kg-bw) were affected by atropine or propranolol. However, verapamil significantly attenuated the pressor effects without affecting the increase in HR. These results demonstrate that both prostaglandins have qualitatively similar effects on HR, but opposite effects on MAP. Prostaglandin I2 is a hypotensive prostaglandin, while PGF2 alpha is hypertensive. The pressor effects of PGF2 alpha are partially dependent on calcium influx. The positive chronotropic effects of both prostaglandins are independent of the autonomic nervous system, suggesting a different mechanism of action.

  6. Prostaglandin receptor EP4 in abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Cao, Richard Y; St Amand, Tim; Li, XinZhi; Yoon, Sung-Hee; Wang, Carol P; Song, Hui; Maruyama, Takayuki; Brown, Peter M; Zelt, David T; Funk, Colin D

    2012-07-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) pathogenesis is distinguished by vessel wall inflammation. Cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 and microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1, key components of the most well-characterized inflammatory prostaglandin pathway, contribute to AAA development in the 28-day angiotensin II infusion model in mice. In this study, we used this model to examine the role of the prostaglandin E receptor subtype 4 (EP4) and genetic knockdown of COX-2 expression (70% to 90%) in AAA pathogenesis. The administration of the prostaglandin receptor EP4 antagonist AE3-208 (10 mg/kg per day) to apolipoprotein E (apoE)-deficient mice led to active drug plasma concentrations and reduced AAA incidence and severity compared with control apoE-deficient mice (P < 0.01), whereas COX-2 genetic knockdown/apoE-deficient mice displayed only a minor, nonsignificant decrease in incidence of AAA. EP4 receptor protein was present in human and mouse AAA, as observed by using Western blot analysis. Aortas from AE3-208-treated mice displayed evidence of a reduced inflammatory phenotype compared with controls. Atherosclerotic lesion size at the aortic root was similar between all groups. In conclusion, the prostaglandin E(2)-EP4 signaling pathway plays a role in the AAA inflammatory process. Blocking the EP4 receptor pharmacologically reduces both the incidence and severity of AAA in the angiotensin II mouse model, potentially via attenuation of cytokine/chemokine synthesis and the reduction of matrix metalloproteinase activities.

  7. Control of parturition in the sow using progesterone and prostaglandin.

    PubMed

    Gooneratne, A; Hartmann, P E; McCauley, I; Martin, C E

    1979-12-01

    The effect of progesterone and prostaglandin administration on the timing of farrowing was studied in three groups of 25 sows each. Progesterone treatment (100 mg/day) on days 112, 113 and 114 of gestation (group I) significantly prolonged the gestation length to 116.4 +/- 0.4 (mean +/- s.e.) days compared to the control sows (group III; 115.5 +/- 0.2; P less than 0.05). Administration of prostaglandin (200 micrograms Cloprostanol intramuscularly) on day 115 of gestation following progesterone treatment (group II) resulted in a gestation length of 116.0 +/- 0.1 days, with the sows farrowing 25.4 +/- 1.0 h after the prostaglandin injection. 80% of the sows farrowed between 0800 and 1700 h of day 116 of gestation. Plasma progesterone levels were maintained by the exogenous progesterone during treatment. At farrowing, higher levels of progesterone were observed in groups I and II compared to controls. Prostaglandin treatment did not significantly alter withdrawal of progesterone in progesterone treated sows, suggesting that the actions of exogenous prostaglandin is primarily on the myometrium and the cervix. Hormonal treatment in late pregnancy did not have any adverse effects on piglet viability and growth rate, or subsequent reproductive performances of sows. Lactation was initiated normally, and the concentrations of lactose, protein, fat, IgG, Na+, Ca2+ and K+ in colostrum and milk were similar in all groups during the first 5 days of lactation.

  8. Impotence evaluated by the use of prostaglandin E1

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, T.I.; Yang, C.R.; Wang, S.J.; Chang, C.L.; Tzai, T.S.; Chang, C.H.; Wu, H.C.

    1989-06-01

    We screened 80 patients at our hospital for the differential diagnosis of impotence using intracavernous injection of prostaglandin E1 (20 micrograms). The rate of positive response was 78.8 per cent (63 patients). Neither systemic reactions nor priapism occurred. However, a considerable incidence (23.8 per cent, 19 of 80 patients) of tolerable injection pain was encountered. The 133-xenon penile washout study was conducted routinely in impotent men for hemodynamic evaluation of penile vascularity. In 80 patients a positive correlation between the response of intracavernous prostaglandin E1 injection and the result of the washout study was found (r equals 0.381, p less than 0.0002). We selected 14 subjects randomly to receive additional intravenous infusions of prostaglandin E1 (6 ampules, 120 micrograms total) for 3 days, after which another 133-xenon washout study was done. The washout studies before and after intravenous prostaglandin E1 infusion were compared, and 10 patients (71.4 per cent) appeared to obtain improvement in half-time clearance and penile blood flow. However, only 3 patients noticed improvement subjectively. We suggest that prostaglandin E1 could be a desirable alternative for the diagnosis and treatment of impotence.

  9. Essential role for hematopoietic prostaglandin D2 synthase in the control of delayed type hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Seema G; Newson, Justine; Rajakariar, Ravindra; Jacques, Thomas S; Hannon, Robert; Kanaoka, Yoshihide; Eguchi, Naomi; Colville-Nash, Paul; Gilroy, Derek W

    2006-03-28

    Hematopoietic prostaglandin D(2) synthase (hPGD(2)S) metabolizes cyclooxygenase-derived prostaglandin (PG) H(2) to PGD(2), which is dehydrated to cyclopentenone PGs, including 15-deoxy-Delta(12,14)-PGJ(2) (15d-PGJ(2)). PGD(2) acts through two receptors (DP1 and DP2/CRTH2), whereas 15d-PGJ(2) can activate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors or inhibit a range of proinflammatory signaling pathways, including NF-kappaB. Despite eliciting asthmatic and allergic reactions through the generation of PGD(2), it is not known what role hPGD(2)S plays in T helper (Th)1-driven adaptive immunity. To investigate this question, the severity and duration of a delayed type hypersensitivity reaction was examined in hPGD(2)S knockout and transgenic mice. Compared with their respective controls, knockouts displayed a more severe inflammatory response that failed to resolve, characterized histologically as persistent acute inflammation, whereas transgenic mice had little detectable inflammation. Lymphocytes isolated from inguinal lymph nodes of hPGD(2)S(-/-) animals showed hyperproliferation and increased IL-2 synthesis effects that were rescued by 15d-PGJ(2), but not PGD(2), working through either of its receptors. Crucially, 15d-PGJ(2) exerted its suppressive effects through the inhibition of NF-kappaB activation and not through peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor signaling. In contrast, lymph node cultures from transgenics proliferated more slowly and synthesized significantly less IL-2 than controls. Therefore, contrary to its role in driving Th2-like responses, this report shows that hPGD(2)S may act as an internal braking signal essential for bringing about the resolution of Th1-driven delayed type hypersensitivity reactions. Consequently, hPGD(2)S-derived cyclopentenone PGs may protect against inflammatory diseases, where T lymphocytes play a pathogenic role, as in rheumatoid arthritis, atopic eczema, and chronic rejection. PMID:16547141

  10. Prostaglandins, H2-receptor antagonists and peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Bright-Asare, P; Habte, T; Yirgou, B; Benjamin, J

    1988-01-01

    Peptic ulcer develops when offensive factors overwhelm defensive processes in the gastroduodenal mucosa. Offensive factors include NSAIDs, hydrochloric acid-peptic activity, bile reflux, and some products of the lipoxygenase pathway such as leukotriene B4; whereas defensive processes are largely mediated by prostaglandins through poorly understood mechanisms uniformly termed cytoprotection. Cytoprotection, a physiological process working through the products of arachidonic acid metabolism, may result from the net effect of the protective actions of prostaglandins versus the damaging actions of leukotrienes. Some prostaglandins also have antisecretory effects. Therefore the peptic ulcer healing effects of prostaglandin analogues, all of which have significant antisecretory activity, may be more due to their antisecretory effects than primarily to their effects on mucosal defences. Certain drug-induced gastroduodenal lesions, e.g. NSAID-induced ulcers, which are often unresponsive to H2-receptor antagonists, have been healed and their recurrence prevented by the use of PGE1 and PGE2 analogues. All the prostaglandin analogues investigated to date in humans have the potential for inducing abortion, an important side effect which may limit their worldwide use. The optimal prostaglandin analogue for ulcer healing should not induce abortion and should be potently cytoprotective. The predominant damaging agent in the development of peptic ulcer disease is gastric hydrochloric acid. Thus, the worldwide established efficacy and safety of H2-receptor antagonists such as cimetidine, ranitidine, famotidine and most recently of roxatidine acetate suggest that these agents have become the standard by which other forms of anti-ulcer therapy should be judged. PMID:2905237

  11. Suppression of Alzheimer-Associated Inflammation by Microglial Prostaglandin-E2 EP4 Receptor Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Woodling, Nathaniel S.; Wang, Qian; Priyam, Prachi G.; Larkin, Paul; Shi, Ju; Johansson, Jenny U.; Zagol-Ikapitte, Irene; Boutaud, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    A persistent and nonresolving inflammatory response to accumulating Aβ peptide species is a cardinal feature in the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In response to accumulating Aβ peptide species, microglia, the innate immune cells of the brain, generate a toxic inflammatory response that accelerates synaptic and neuronal injury. Many proinflammatory signaling pathways are linked to progression of neurodegeneration. However, endogenous anti-inflammatory pathways capable of suppressing Aβ-induced inflammation represent a relatively unexplored area. Here we report that signaling through the prostaglandin-E2 (PGE2) EP4 receptor potently suppresses microglial inflammatory responses to Aβ42 peptides. In cultured microglial cells, EP4 stimulation attenuated levels of Aβ42-induced inflammatory factors and potentiated phagocytosis of Aβ42. Microarray analysis demonstrated that EP4 stimulation broadly opposed Aβ42-driven gene expression changes in microglia, with enrichment for targets of IRF1, IRF7, and NF-κB transcription factors. In vivo, conditional deletion of microglial EP4 in APPSwe-PS1ΔE9 (APP-PS1) mice conversely increased inflammatory gene expression, oxidative protein modification, and Aβ deposition in brain at early stages of pathology, but not at later stages, suggesting an early anti-inflammatory function of microglial EP4 signaling in the APP-PS1 model. Finally, EP4 receptor levels decreased significantly in human cortex with progression from normal to AD states, suggesting that early loss of this beneficial signaling system in preclinical AD development may contribute to subsequent progression of pathology. PMID:24760848

  12. [Receptors involved in the mechanism of action of topical prostaglandines].

    PubMed

    Neacsu, Alina Mihaela

    2009-01-01

    Hypotensive effect to prostaglandins analogs (latanoprost, travoprost, tafluprost) means to increase uveoscleral outflow by action to FP receptors who generated extracellular matrix changes and intermuscular spaces changes. Syntetic prostamides analogs (bimatoprost) have a particulary action with a receptors most and intensive studied. The bimatoprost effect is the consequences to preferated stimulations on the specific receptors who have action only the tissue with prostaglandins activity is important to specify what the bimatoprost have dual effect: to uveoscleral outflow and classic outflow by increase hidraulic conductivity.

  13. [Receptors involved in the mechanism of action of topical prostaglandines].

    PubMed

    Neacsu, Alina Mihaela

    2009-01-01

    Hypotensive effect to prostaglandins analogs (latanoprost, travoprost, tafluprost) means to increase uveoscleral outflow by action to FP receptors who generated extracellular matrix changes and intermuscular spaces changes. Syntetic prostamides analogs (bimatoprost) have a particulary action with a receptors most and intensive studied. The bimatoprost effect is the consequences to preferated stimulations on the specific receptors who have action only the tissue with prostaglandins activity is important to specify what the bimatoprost have dual effect: to uveoscleral outflow and classic outflow by increase hidraulic conductivity. PMID:19697832

  14. Compartmentalization of prostaglandins in the canine kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan-Boyd, R.L.

    1986-01-01

    The kidney has been shown to synthesize all of the naturally occurring major prostaglandins which may be restricted to a discrete part of the kidney where their actions are physiologically important, such as the vascular compartment and the tubular compartment. In order to examine this concept of compartmentalization, the authors conducted a series of experiments to determine whether PGl/sub 2/, measured as 6-keto-pGF/sub 1..cap alpha../, produced in the kidney is restricted to the renal vascular compartment or whether it also has access to the tubular compartment. Experiments were performed in the pentobarbital-anesthetized dog. Increasing pre-glomerular levels of 6-keto-PFG/sub 1..cap alpha../ caused marked increases in both the urinary excretion and the renal venous outflow to 6-keto-PGF/sub 1..cap alpha../. When /sup 3/H-6-keto-PGF/sub 1..cap alpha../ was co-infused with inulin into the renal artery, 33% of the radioactivity and 23% of the inulin was recovered on first pass. With infusion of /sup 3/H-PGl/sub 2/ and inulin, 20% of the radioactivity and 28% of the inulin reached the urine on first pass. Radioactive PGl/sub 2/ appeared to be less filterable at the glomeruli than either /sup 3/H-6-keto-PGF/sub 1..cap alpha../ or inulin. In the final set of experiments, in which dogs were prepared for a ureteral stopped-flow study, the PGE/sub 2//U/P/sub In/ ratio a peak was observed proximal to the Na/sup +/ plateau but distal to the Na+ nadir. In light of the results from the stopped-flow study and the intrarenal infusion studies, they conclude that PGE/sub 2/ synthesized in the kidney enters both the renal and tubular compartments. In contrast, they find that 6-keto-PGF/sub 1..cap alpha../ of renal origin enters only the renal origin enters only the renal vascular compartment and not the tubular compartment.

  15. Characterization of Prostaglandin E2 Production by Candida albicans▿

    PubMed Central

    Erb-Downward, John R.; Noverr, Mairi C.

    2007-01-01

    Candida albicans produces lipid metabolites that are functionally similar to host prostaglandins. These studies, using mass spectrometry, demonstrate that C. albicans produces authentic prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) from arachidonic acid. Maximal PGE2 production was achieved at 37°C in stationary-phase culture supernatants and in cell-free lysates generated from stationary-phase cells. Interestingly, PGE2 production is inhibited by both nonspecific cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase inhibitors but not by inhibitors specific for the cyclooxygenase 2 isoenzyme. The C. albicans genome does not possess a cyclooxygenase homolog; however, several genes that may play a role in prostaglandin production from C. albicans were investigated. It was found that a C. albicans fatty acid desaturase homolog (Ole2) and a multicopper oxidase homolog (Fet3) play roles in prostaglandin production, with ole2/ole2 and fet3/fet3 mutant strains exhibiting reduced PGE2 levels compared with parent strains. This work demonstrates that the synthesis of PGE2 in C. albicans proceeds via novel pathways. PMID:17470538

  16. Influence of endogenous prostaglandins on mTAL injury.

    PubMed

    Silva, P; Rosen, S; Spokes, K; Taylor, M; Epstein, F H

    1990-11-01

    We altered renal prostaglandin production by isolated rat kidneys in several ways to see if this would influence the susceptibility of cells lining the medullary thick ascending limb to injury. Rats were fed a diet containing either safflower oil (high in linoleic acid) or fish oil (low in arachidonate precursors) as a source of fat. After 90 min of perfusion, the kidneys of rats fed safflower oil showed only 32.7 +/- 6.7% of medullary thick ascending limb cells near the inner medulla with severe damage, whereas the same zone in perfused kidneys of rats fed fish oil showed 96.6 +/- 1.3% severely damaged cells (P less than 0.01). The protection afforded by safflower oil was accompanied by a doubling of urinary excretion of PGE2 and 6-keto-PGF1 alpha, and was eliminated by indomethacin, which suppressed prostaglandin synthesis. Perfusion with bradykinin also greatly increased prostaglandin excretion and reduced severe medullary thick ascending limb damage in the deepest zone of the outer medulla from 51.3 +/- 6.6% in controls to 28.5 +/- 5.9% (P less than 0.02). The protection provided by bradykinin was also completely reversed by indomethacin. The results suggest that endogenous prostaglandins serve a protective function against hypoxic injury for cells of the medullary thick ascending limb.

  17. Reducing prostaglandin E2 production to raise cancer immunogenicity.

    PubMed

    Zelenay, Santiago; Reis E Sousa, Caetano

    2016-05-01

    Cyclooxygenases (COX), commonly upregulated in numerous cancers, generate prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), which has been implicated in key aspects of malignant growth including proliferation, invasion and angiogenesis. Recently, we showed that production of PGE2 by cancer cells dominantly enables progressive tumor growth via immune escape and that cyclooxygenase inhibitors synergize with immunotherapy to enhance tumor eradication. PMID:27467936

  18. [Medical treatments and practices. What should be done when a prostaglandin proves ineffective?].

    PubMed

    Nordmann, J-P

    2005-06-01

    Prostaglandin analogs are very frequently used as first-line therapy in the treatment of glaucoma. In some cases, they may be ineffective or insufficient or they may induce side effects. The absence of an ocular pressure-lowering effect of a prostaglandin is in general a class effect. Thus a switch to another prostaglandin will probably not be more effective. In such cases, it may be better to use another therapeutic class. On the other hand, the side effects of prostaglandin are more often directly related to the chemical structure of the drug used and may not occur with another prostaglandin. Consequently, considering the dramatic effect of prostaglandin on ocular pressure compared to other drugs, when one prostaglandin causes side effects, it may be useful to try another one before changing the drug family. PMID:16208240

  19. Effects of blood-dialyser interaction on prostaglandins in uraemic patients and in healthy man.

    PubMed

    Mahiout, A; Jörres, A; Hiss, R; Meinhold, H; Kessel, M

    1987-01-01

    The present study examines extracorporeal prostaglandin production during routine and simulated haemodialysis in healthy volunteers. The roles of dialyser membranes and alcohol washing procedures were investigated. The source of extracorporeal prostaglandin E2 was estimated by a specific platelet cyclo-oxygenase antagonist. Extracorporeal thromboxane production, with and without antagonist, was compared in an attempt to substantiate the role of the cyclo-oxygenase pathway by sources other than platelets. Clinical investigations show that prostaglandin liberation in the extracorporeal bloodstream is detectable. Additionally, laboratory results suggest an association between the type of dialyser membrane and extracorporeal prostaglandin release. The amount of prostaglandin E2 was reduced when dialysers were pre-washed with alcohol. Furthermore, it was experimentally possible to determine that a large part of extracorporeal prostaglandin E2 is released by sources other than platelets, suggesting a possible role of monocytes in extracorporeal prostaglandin production.

  20. Prostaglandin ethanolamides (prostamides): in vitro pharmacology and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Matias, I; Chen, J; De Petrocellis, L; Bisogno, T; Ligresti, A; Fezza, F; Krauss, A H-P; Shi, L; Protzman, C E; Li, C; Liang, Y; Nieves, A L; Kedzie, K M; Burk, R M; Di Marzo, V; Woodward, D F

    2004-05-01

    We investigated whether prostaglandin ethanolamides (prostamides) E(2), F(2alpha), and D(2) exert some of their effects by 1) activating prostanoid receptors either per se or after conversion into the corresponding prostaglandins; 2) interacting with proteins for the inactivation of the endocannabinoid N-arachidonoylethanolamide (AEA), for example fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), thereby enhancing AEA endogenous levels; or 3) activating the vanilloid receptor type-1 (TRPV1). Prostamides potently stimulated cat iris contraction with potency approaching that of the corresponding prostaglandins. However, prostamides D(2), E(2), and F(2alpha) exhibited no meaningful interaction with the cat recombinant FP receptor, nor with human recombinant DP, EP(1-4), FP, IP, and TP prostanoid receptors. Prostamide F(2alpha) was also very weak or inactive in a panel of bioassays specific for the various prostanoid receptors. None of the prostamides inhibited AEA enzymatic hydrolysis by FAAH in cell homogenates, or AEA cellular uptake in intact cells. Furthermore, less than 3% of the compounds were hydrolyzed to the corresponding prostaglandins when incubated for 4 h with homogenates of rat brain, lung, or liver, and cat iris or ciliary body. Very little temperature-dependent uptake of prostamides was observed after incubation with rat brain synaptosomes or RBL-2H3 cells. We suggest that prostamides' most prominent pharmacological actions are not due to transformation into prostaglandins, activation of prostanoid receptors, enhancement of AEA levels, or gating of TRPV1 receptors, but possibly to interaction with novel receptors that seem to be functional in the cat iris. PMID:14757851

  1. Long-term assessment of prostaglandin analogs and timolol fixed combinations vs prostaglandin analogs monotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ai-Wei; Gan, Lin-Yang; Yao, Xiang; Zhou, Jian

    2016-01-01

    AIM To draw a Meta-analysis over the comparison of the intraocular pressure (IOP)-lowering efficacy and safety between the commonly used fixed-combinations of prostaglandin analogs and 0.5% timolol with prostaglandin analogs (PGAs) monotherapy. METHODS After searching the published reports from MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, all randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs) comparing the fixed combination of PGAs/timolol therapy (FCs) and PGAs monotherapy with treatment duration at least 6mo were included. The efficacy outcomes were mean diurnal IOP, percentage of participants whose IOP were lower than 18 mm Hg, incidence of visual field change, while the safety outcomes included corneal side effects, hyperemia and eye irritation. The analysis was carried out in RevMan version 5.3 software. RESULTS After six-month medical intervention, the mean diurnal IOP of FCs was lower than PGAs (MD -1.14, 95% CI -1.82 to -0.46, P=0.001); the percentage of target IOP achieving between FCs and PGAs showed no significant difference (RR 1.18, 95% CI 0.97 to 1.43, P=0.10). No statistically significant differences of the incidence of hyperemia (RR 0.67, 95% CI 0.45 to 1.01, P=0.06) and eye irritation (RR 1.20, 95% CI 0.95 to 1.51, P=0.12) between the FCs and PGAs monotherapy were detected. Only one research involved in corneal events, result of this trial revealed no difference between two intervention groups regarding corneal effects (central endothelial cell density, MD -0.20, 95% CI -0.72 to 0.32, P=0.45; central corneal thickness, MD -0.01, 95% CI -0.02 to 0.00, P=0.23). The evaluation of visual field change was not performed due to the limited duration of the trials included in this Meta-analysis. CONCLUSION The long-term efficacy of the FCs overweighed the PGAs monotherapy in lowering IOP, but in the incidence of hyperemia and eye irritation syndromes, the differences are not statically significant. More RCTs with detailed and authentic data over the assessments of

  2. The expression of prostaglandin-E2 and its receptor in the oviduct of Chinese brown frog (Rana dybowskii).

    PubMed

    Hu, Ruiqi; Xi, Liqin; Cao, Qing; Yang, Rui; Liu, Yuning; Sheng, Xia; Han, Yingying; Yuan, Zhengrong; Guo, Yan; Weng, Qiang; Xu, Meiyu

    2016-07-01

    The Chinese brown frog (Rana dybowskii) has one special physiological phenomenon, which is that its oviduct expands prior to hibernation rather than in the breeding period. In this study, we investigated the immunolocalization and expression levels of prostaglandin-E2 (PGE2), cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 and COX-2, as well as one of its receptor subtypes 4 (EP4) in the oviduct of Rana dybowskii during the pre-hibernation and breeding period. PGE2, COX-1, COX-2 and EP4 have been observed in glandular and epithelial cells in the breeding period, whereas only in the epithelial cells during the pre-hibernation. Consistently, the protein levels of COX-2 and EP4 were higher in the pre-hibernation as compared to the breeding period, but the diversity of COX-1 was not obvious. In addition, oviductal PGE2 concentration was also significantly higher in the pre-hibernation. These results suggested that prostaglandin-E2 may play an important autocrine or paracrine role in oviductal cell proliferation and differentiation of Rana dybowskii during pre-hibernation. PMID:27246901

  3. Prostaglandin-E2 is a potent inhibitor of human interleukin 12 production

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    During human immunodeficiency virus infection and allergic diseases, characterized by a dominant T helper (Th) 2 response, overproduction of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is observed. In this paper we studied the effect of PGE2 on interleukin (IL)-12 synthesis, because this cytokine has been described to be essential in induction of Th1 responses. IL-12 synthesis was induced in monocytes that were stimulated with Neisseria meningitidis-derived lipopolysaccharide in whole blood cultures. PGE2 almost completely inhibited lipopolysaccharide induced IL-12 production, whereas IL-6 production was only partially inhibited by PGE2. In contrast, the production of IL-10 was approximately twofold enhanced at these conditions. The effects of PGE2 were due to its cAMP- inducing capacity, since they could be mimicked by other cAMP inducers. Recombinant human IL-10 also inhibited IL-12 and IL-6 production. However, the inhibitory effect of PGE2 on IL-12 production was independent of IL-10 since neutralizing anti-IL-10 antibodies were unable to reverse this inhibition. These results suggest that the capacity of an antigen to induce PGE2 synthesis may play a crucial role in the development of either a Th1 or Th2 response. PMID:7836930

  4. Identification of the Major Prostaglandin Glycerol Ester Hydrolase in Human Cancer Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Manna, Joseph D.; Wepy, James A.; Hsu, Ku-Lung; Chang, Jae Won; Cravatt, Benjamin F.; Marnett, Lawrence J.

    2014-01-01

    Prostaglandin glycerol esters (PG-Gs) are produced as a result of the oxygenation of the endocannabinoid, 2-arachidonoylglycerol, by cyclooxygenase 2. Understanding the role that PG-Gs play in a biological setting has been difficult because of their sensitivity to enzymatic hydrolysis. By comparing PG-G hydrolysis across human cancer cell lines to serine hydrolase activities determined by activity-based protein profiling, we identified lysophospholipase A2 (LYPLA2) as a major enzyme responsible for PG-G hydrolysis. The principal role played by LYPLA2 in PGE2-G hydrolysis was confirmed by siRNA knockdown. Purified recombinant LYPLA2 hydrolyzed PG-Gs in the following order of activity: PGE2-G > PGF2α-G > PGD2-G; LYPLA2 hydrolyzed 1- but not 2-arachidonoylglycerol or arachidonoylethanolamide. Chemical inhibition of LYPLA2 in the mouse macrophage-like cell line, RAW264.7, elicited an increase in PG-G production. Our data indicate that LYPLA2 serves as a major PG-G hydrolase in human cells. Perturbation of this enzyme should enable selective modulation of PG-Gs without alterations in endocannabinoids, thereby providing a means to decipher the unique functions of PG-Gs in biology and disease. PMID:25301951

  5. Solute concentration affects bradykinin-mediated increases in renal prostaglandin E2

    SciTech Connect

    Zenser, T.V.; Davis, E.S.; Rapp, N.S.; Davis, B.B.

    1981-12-01

    The effects of solute concentration on the bradykinin-mediated increase in inner medullary slice prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) synthesis were investigated. PG content was determined by specific RIA. Bradykinin stimulation was prevented by the addition of the following solutes to Krebs buffer: 1.0 M urea, 0.5 or 1.0 M NaCl, 0.5 or 1.0 M mannitol, 1.0 M urea plus 0.5 M NaCl, or 1.0 M mannitol plus 0.5 M NaCl. By contrast, basal PGE2 synthesis was increased by 1.0 M mannitol or by 1.0 M mannitol plus 0.5 M NaCl, but decreased by 1.0 M urea. Urea elicited a concentration-dependent, reversible inhibition of bradykinin stimulation, with 0.01 M urea being the lowest effective concentration. By contrast, basal PGE2 synthesis was only reduced at a urea concentration greater than 0.6 M. Arachidonic acid-mediated increases in both PGE2 and PGF2 alpha synthesis were not prevented by 1.0 M urea. The latter suggests that neither PG endoperoxide synthetase nor PG endoperoxide E isomerase are inhibited by urea. The data indicate that different hypertonic solutions have different effects on basal PG production, but all inhibit bradykinin stimulation.

  6. [Possible significance of prostaglandins in the pathogenesis of Crohn's disease].

    PubMed

    Schmidt, E; Bruch, H P; Walter, K

    1977-04-01

    Prostaglandins (E1, E2, F2alpha) produce and intensify peristaltic contractions in the healthy human intestinal muscle system according to dosage (threshold I-10(-4) microng/ml--maximum effective concentration 1 microng/ml). By subsequent introduction of adrenaline, the intestinal muscle system activated by prostaglandines can be completely relaxed again. Intestinal muscles from patients with Crohn's disease show a marked deviation from this behaviour: 1. The intestinal muscle system is extremely sensitive to prostagladins: maximum concentrations are already reached by about a thousand times smaller concentration than in the intestines. 2. The dose of adrenaline does not lead to dialtion, which is usual, but to contraction of the muscle system. These changes in the contractility of the intestine can explain some components of the clinical symptomatology of Crohn's disease.

  7. Stereoscopy Amplifies Emotions Elicited by Facial Expressions

    PubMed Central

    Kätsyri, Jari; Häkkinen, Jukka

    2015-01-01

    Mediated facial expressions do not elicit emotions as strongly as real-life facial expressions, possibly due to the low fidelity of pictorial presentations in typical mediation technologies. In the present study, we investigated the extent to which stereoscopy amplifies emotions elicited by images of neutral, angry, and happy facial expressions. The emotional self-reports of positive and negative valence (which were evaluated separately) and arousal of 40 participants were recorded. The magnitude of perceived depth in the stereoscopic images was manipulated by varying the camera base at 15, 40, 65, 90, and 115 mm. The analyses controlled for participants’ gender, gender match, emotional empathy, and trait alexithymia. The results indicated that stereoscopy significantly amplified the negative valence and arousal elicited by angry expressions at the most natural (65 mm) camera base, whereas stereoscopy amplified the positive valence elicited by happy expressions in both the narrowed and most natural (15–65 mm) base conditions. Overall, the results indicate that stereoscopy amplifies the emotions elicited by mediated emotional facial expressions when the depth geometry is close to natural. The findings highlight the sensitivity of the visual system to depth and its effect on emotions. PMID:27551358

  8. Stereoscopy Amplifies Emotions Elicited by Facial Expressions.

    PubMed

    Hakala, Jussi; Kätsyri, Jari; Häkkinen, Jukka

    2015-12-01

    Mediated facial expressions do not elicit emotions as strongly as real-life facial expressions, possibly due to the low fidelity of pictorial presentations in typical mediation technologies. In the present study, we investigated the extent to which stereoscopy amplifies emotions elicited by images of neutral, angry, and happy facial expressions. The emotional self-reports of positive and negative valence (which were evaluated separately) and arousal of 40 participants were recorded. The magnitude of perceived depth in the stereoscopic images was manipulated by varying the camera base at 15, 40, 65, 90, and 115 mm. The analyses controlled for participants' gender, gender match, emotional empathy, and trait alexithymia. The results indicated that stereoscopy significantly amplified the negative valence and arousal elicited by angry expressions at the most natural (65 mm) camera base, whereas stereoscopy amplified the positive valence elicited by happy expressions in both the narrowed and most natural (15-65 mm) base conditions. Overall, the results indicate that stereoscopy amplifies the emotions elicited by mediated emotional facial expressions when the depth geometry is close to natural. The findings highlight the sensitivity of the visual system to depth and its effect on emotions. PMID:27551358

  9. Stereoscopy Amplifies Emotions Elicited by Facial Expressions.

    PubMed

    Hakala, Jussi; Kätsyri, Jari; Häkkinen, Jukka

    2015-12-01

    Mediated facial expressions do not elicit emotions as strongly as real-life facial expressions, possibly due to the low fidelity of pictorial presentations in typical mediation technologies. In the present study, we investigated the extent to which stereoscopy amplifies emotions elicited by images of neutral, angry, and happy facial expressions. The emotional self-reports of positive and negative valence (which were evaluated separately) and arousal of 40 participants were recorded. The magnitude of perceived depth in the stereoscopic images was manipulated by varying the camera base at 15, 40, 65, 90, and 115 mm. The analyses controlled for participants' gender, gender match, emotional empathy, and trait alexithymia. The results indicated that stereoscopy significantly amplified the negative valence and arousal elicited by angry expressions at the most natural (65 mm) camera base, whereas stereoscopy amplified the positive valence elicited by happy expressions in both the narrowed and most natural (15-65 mm) base conditions. Overall, the results indicate that stereoscopy amplifies the emotions elicited by mediated emotional facial expressions when the depth geometry is close to natural. The findings highlight the sensitivity of the visual system to depth and its effect on emotions.

  10. [Effect of prostaglandin synthesis inhibitors of diabetic cystoid macular edema].

    PubMed

    Kieselbach, G; Juen, S

    1990-01-01

    In most cases, diabetic macular edema is treated successfully with central laser photocoagulation. However, only few studies report such favorable results in cystoid macular edema, which has a poor visual prognosis. In the present prospective study on diabetics with cystoid macular edema, aged less than 40 years, a better visual outcome was obtained in patients treated with prostaglandin synthesis inhibitors than in an untreated group. PMID:2345629

  11. Effects of nonhypotensive endotoxemia in conscious rats: Role of prostaglandins

    SciTech Connect

    Burnier, M.; Waeber, B.; Aubert, J.F.; Nussberger, J.; Brunner, H.R. )

    1988-03-01

    A nonhypotensive dose of endotoxin was administered to normal conscious rats to evaluate the vascular and humoral effects of endotoxemia per se. Mean blood pressure and heart rate remained stable during the 45 min infusion of Escherichia coli endotoxin. However, a marked increase in plasma renin activity plasma epinephrine and plasma norepinephrine was observed during infusion in endotoxin-treated rats when compared with the vehicle-treated animals. In addition, the blood pressure response to exogenous norepinephrine was significantly reduced during nonhypotensive endotoxemia. Significant changes in regional blood flow distribution, as assessed by radiolabeled microspheres, were observed in endotoxemic rats; in particular a decrease in renal blood flow, and an increase in coronary blood flow were found. The role of prostaglandins in the vascular and humoral alterations induced by nonhypotensive endotoxemia was also examined. Pretreatment with indomethacin (5 mg) prevent the increase in plasma renin activity as well as plasma catecholamine levels. On the contrary, the decreased vascular reactivity and the reduction in renal blood flow observed during endotoxemia were not affected by prostaglandin synthesis inhibition. Thus significant vascular and humoral changes have been found during endotoxemia even in absence of hypotension. The humoral but not the vascular effects of endotoxemia were abolished when prostaglandin synthesis was inhibited.

  12. Evaluation of the role of prostaglandins E and F in acalculous gallbladder disease

    SciTech Connect

    Deshpande, Y.G.; Kaminski, D.L.; Thomas, L.

    1986-03-01

    Prostaglandins have been shown to play a role in gallbladder disease. This study was performed to evaluate prostaglandin E and F production by human gallbladder mucosal cells and muscle tissue from patients undergoing cholecystectomy for acalculous gallbladder disease. These results were compared to values produced by gall bladders removed from patients with no known gallbladder disease. Five patient underwent cholecystectomy for acute and five for chronic acalculous cholecystitis. Gallbladder mucosal cells were separated from muscle wall by submucosal injection of EDTA and shaking in tissue culture media. Prostaglandin levels were measured in mucosal cell and muscle tissue homogenate by radioimmunoassay (ng/mg homogenate protein). Homogenate prostaglandin E concentrations were significantly increased in mucosa and muscle tissue in gall bladders from patients with acute acalculous cholecystitis. Chronic acalculous gallbladder disease was not associated with changes in prostaglandin formation when compared to values produced by gall bladders from asymptomatic patients. Acute acalculous cholecystitis may be a prostaglandin mediated disorder.

  13. Attenuation of Ischemic Liver Injury by Prostaglandin E1 Analogue, Misoprostol, and Prostaglandin I2 Analogue, OP-41483

    PubMed Central

    Totsuka, Eishi; Todo, Satoru; Zhu, Yue; Ishizaki, Naoki; Kawashima, Yoshiyuki; Jin, Maeng Bong; Urakami, Atsushi; Shimamura, Tsuyoshi; Starzl, Thomas E

    2010-01-01

    Background Prostaglandin has been reported to have protective effects against liver injury. Use of this agent in clinical settings, however, is limited because of drug-related side effects. This study investigated whether misoprostol, prostaglandin E1 analogue, and OP-41483, prostaglandin I2 analogue, which have fewer adverse effects with a longer half-life, attenuate ischemic liver damage. Study Design Thirty beagle dogs underwent 2 hours of hepatic vascular exclusion using venovenous bypass. Misoprostol was administered intravenously for 30 minutes before ischemia and for 3 hours after reperfusion. OP-41483 was administered intraportally for 30 minutes before ischemia (2 μg/kg/min) and for 3 hours after reperfusion (0.5 μg/kg/min). Animals were divided into five groups: untreated control group (n = 10); high-dose misoprostol (total 100 μg/kg) group (MP-H, n = 5); middle-dose misoprostol (50 μg/kg) group (MP-M, n = 5); low-dose misoprostol (25 μg/kg) group (MP-L, n = 5); and OP-41483 group (OP, n = 5). Animal survival, hepatic tissue blood flow (HTBF), liver function, and histology were analyzed. Results Two-week animal survival rates were 30% in control, 60% in MP-H, 100% in MP-M, 80% in MP-L, and 100% in OP. The treatments with prostaglandin analogues improved HTBF, and attenuated liver enzyme release, adenine nucleotrides degradation, and histologic abnormalities. In contrast to the MP-H animals that exhibited unstable cardiovascular systems, the MP-M, MP-L, and OP animals experienced only transient hypotension. Conclusions These results indicate that misoprostol and OP-41483 prevent ischemic liver damage, although careful dose adjustment of misoprostol is required to obtain the best protection with minimal side effects. PMID:9740185

  14. Mechanical stimulation of skeletal muscle cells mitigates glucocorticoid-induced decreases in prostaglandin production and prostaglandin synthase activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chromiak, J. A.; Vandenburgh, H. H.

    1994-01-01

    The glucocorticoid dexamethasone (Dex) induces a decline in protein synthesis and protein content in tissue cultured, avian skeletal muscle cells, and this atrophy is attenuated by repetitive mechanical stretch. Since the prostaglandin synthesis inhibitor indomethacin mitigated this stretch attenuation of muscle atrophy, the effects of Dex and mechanical stretch on prostaglandin production and prostaglandin H synthase (PGHS) activity were examined. In static cultures, 10(-8) M Dex reduced PGF2 alpha production 55-65% and PGE2 production 84-90% after 24-72 h of incubation. Repetitive 10% stretch-relaxations of non-Dex-treated cultures increased PGF2 alpha efflux 41% at 24 h and 276% at 72 h, and increased PGE2 production 51% at 24 h and 236% at 72 h. Mechanical stimulation of Dex-treated cultures increased PGF2 alpha production 162% after 24 h, returning PGF2 alpha efflux to the level of non-Dex-treated cultures. At 72 h, stretch increased PGF2 alpha efflux 65% in Dex-treated cultures. Mechanical stimulation of Dex-treated cultures also increased PGE2 production at 24 h, but not at 72 h. Dex reduced PGHS activity in the muscle cultures by 70% after 8-24 h of incubation, and mechanical stimulation of the Dex-treated cultures increased PGHS activity by 98% after 24 h. Repetitive mechanical stimulation attenuates the catabolic effects of Dex on cultured skeletal muscle cells in part by mitigating the Dex-induced declines in PGHS activity and prostaglandin production.

  15. A bilateral antidiuresis to renal artery infusion of prostaglandin E1 in dogs treated with phenylbutazone

    PubMed Central

    Hall, W. J.; Hensey, O. J.; O'Neill, P.; Sheehan, J. D.

    1978-01-01

    1. In acute experiments, high levels of endogenous prostaglandins, provoked by operative stress, could obscure or alter the actions of infused prostaglandins on the kidney. For this reason we decided to compare the effects of infusing prostaglandin E1 into the renal artery of the dog before and after the administration of phenylbutazone, a prostaglandin synthetase inhibitor. 2. Infusion of prostaglandin E1 into the left renal artery of the pre-phenylbutazone treated dog undergoing a mannitol diuresis increased renal plasma flow, glomerular filtration rate and the excretion of salt and water. The findings are in general agreement with those reported by others. 3. Following phenylbutazone administration the vascular and saluretic actions of prostaglandin E1 were unchanged but a reduced diuretic effect was observed. The response to a low dose of prostaglandin E1 (0·05 μg/min) was reduced from 1·46 ± 0·15 to 0·96 ± 0·16 ml./min (P < 0·001) and the response to a high dose (0·5 μg/min) from 1·82 ± 0·19 to 0·99 ± 0·31 ml./min (P < 0·002). 4. A significantly less dilute urine was excreted during prostaglandin infusion in the dog after phenylbutazone treatment than before. The reduction in the diuretic response was of the same order as the decrease in the free water clearance response, while the increase in osmolar clearance was unchanged. 5. In water-loaded dogs treated with phenylbutazone, infusion of prostaglandin E1 into the left renal artery had a biphasic effect on urine output from the left kidney. An initial diuretic response to a low dose of prostaglandin E1 disappeared with the infusion of higher doses, and antidiuresis developed in the immediate post-infusion period. 6. As prostaglandin was infused into the left kidney progressive antidiuresis was seen in the non-infused right kidney. 7. It is concluded that endogenous prostaglandins do not obscure or alter the vascular and saluretic actions of intrarenal prostaglandin E1. The findings question

  16. Distinguishing Between Social Reinforcement and Social Elicitation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloom, Kathleen

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the distinction between species-typical (elicitation) and operant reinforcement interpretations of infant/adult social interaction; considers procedural and analytic components of Poulson's 1983 paper (v36 p471-89); and clarifies differences in Poulson's interpretation and the author's interpretation of the vocal conditioning studies of…

  17. Eliciting User Requirements Using Appreciative Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzales, Carol Kernitzki

    2010-01-01

    Many software development projects fail because they do not meet the needs of users, are over-budget, and abandoned. To address this problem, the user requirements elicitation process was modified based on principles of Appreciative Inquiry. Appreciative Inquiry, commonly used in organizational development, aims to build organizations, processes,…

  18. Ureaplasma diversum infection in vitro alters prostaglandin E2 and prostaglandin F2a production by bovine endometrial cells without affecting cell viability.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, J J; Quinn, P A; Fortier, M A

    1994-01-01

    Bovine epithelial and stromal cells of the endometrium were inoculated with Ureaplasma diversum, pathogenic strain 2312, at 10(6) or 10(3) color-changing units (ccu)/ml in the presence of 1% fetal bovine serum (depleted of steroids by dextran-charcoal treatment) to assess the effect of infection on prostaglandin biosynthesis. When the inoculum of U. diversum was 10(6) ccu/ml, the concentration of U. diversum in the culture medium decreased with time. U. diversum was found on the epithelial and stromal cell monolayers, increasing in titer 100-fold, indicating that attachment and eventually growth occurred. When the inoculum was 10(3) ccu/ml, the titer of U. diversum remained the same or increased in the supernatant and increased on epithelial and stromal cells. The effect of infection was evaluated by measurement of the primary prostaglandin produced by each cell type, prostaglandin F2a for epithelial cells and prostaglandin E2 for stromal cells. Infection with U. diversum significantly decreased prostaglandin F2a accumulation, by 44.7% +/- 6.0% at 10(6) ccu/ml (P < or = 0.005) and 15.8% +/- 5.3% at 10(3) ccu/ml (P < or = 0.05) in epithelial cells. Prostaglandin E2 accumulation by stromal cells was decreased by 34.0% +/- 4.0% at 10(6) ccu/ml (P < or = 0.001) and by 13.5% +/- 2.7% at 10(3) ccu/ml (P < or = 0.005). Infection with 10(6) ccu/ml did not alter endometrial cell viability, as shown by protein measurement, trypan blue dye exclusion, and cell plating efficiency tests. Thus, alterations in prostaglandin production were not due to cell deterioration. These observations suggest that U. diversum can alter prostaglandin E2 and prostaglandin F2a patterns in primary cultures of bovine endometrial cells without affecting cell viability. PMID:8168914

  19. Prostaglandin E2 levels and platelet function are different in cord blood compared to adults.

    PubMed

    Schlagenhauf, Axel; Haidl, Harald; Leschnik, Bettina; Leis, Hans-Joerg; Heinemann, Akos; Muntean, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal platelets support primary haemostasis and thrombin generation as well as adult platelets, despite observable hypoaggregability in vitro. High prostaglandin E2 levels at accouchement could account for inhibited platelet function via the EP4 receptor. We set out to determine prostaglandin E2 plasma levels in cord blood of healthy neonates and evaluate the impact of prostaglandin E2 on platelet function in adult and cord blood samples. Prostaglandin E2 plasma levels were measured in cord blood and venous adult blood using GC-MS. Impact of prostaglandin E2 on platelet aggregation was measured by spiking cord blood and adult samples. Contributions of EP3 and EP4 receptors were evaluated using respective antagonists. Intracellular cAMP concentrations were measured using a commercial ELISA-kit. Prostaglandin E2 plasma levels were substantially higher in cord blood than in adult samples. Spiking with prostaglandin E2 resulted in a slight but consistent reduction of platelet aggregation in adult blood, but response to PGE2 was blunted in cord blood samples. Aggregation response of spiked adult samples was still higher than with non-spiked cord blood samples. Blockage of EP4 receptors resulted in improved platelet aggregation in adult platelets upon prostaglandin E2 spiking, while aggregation in cord blood samples remained unaltered. Intracellular cAMP concentrations after preincubation with prostaglandin E2 were only increased in adult samples. In conclusion, very high prostaglandin E2 concentrations in cord blood affect platelet function. This effect may partially explain neonatal platelet hypoaggregability. Peak levels of prostaglandin E2 can potentially protect against birth stress-induced platelet activation.

  20. Treatment of vasospastic disease with prostaglandin E1.

    PubMed Central

    Clifford, P C; Martin, M F; Sheddon, E J; Kirby, J D; Baird, R N; Dieppe, P A

    1980-01-01

    Prostaglandin E1, a vasodilator and potent inhibitor of platelet aggregation, was administered to 26 patients with severe vasospastic disease of the hands. Patients tolerated infusions well and reported appreciable symptomatic improvement. Five of eight ischaemic ulcers healed in six weeks. Non-invasive studies of blood flow were used to observe haemodynamic changes during and after infusions. The Doppler-derived radial artery pulsatility index fell from 8.8 +/- 0.6 to 4.6 +/0 0.5 (mean +/- SEM), indicating hand vasodilatation. This fall was maintained 24 hours after infusion (5.9 +/- 0.9), but the index had returned to normal values at two weeks. The amplitude of finger pulse volume recordings increased (5.6 +/- 0.7 mm to 23.8 +/- 3.4 mm) and was raised two and six weeks after infusion (13.5 +/- 2.1 mm). Hand temperature measured by infrared radiometry also increased (27.4 +/- 0.7 degrees C to 31.2 +/- 1.2 degrees C). Intensity of digital vasospasm induced by cold water challenge was not objectively affected by prostaglandin E1 despite an increased finger temperature after infusion. Nevertheless, patients reported less frequent and severe attacks. Prostaglandin E1 given by central venous infusion is a safe new vasoactive agent that can produce appreciable symptomatic improvement by increasing digital perfusion, which may last for several weeks after treatment. Further study will define its mode of action and its place in the management of peripheral vascular disease. PMID:7427564

  1. Scalable synthesis of a prostaglandin EP4 receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Gauvreau, Danny; Dolman, Sarah J; Hughes, Greg; O'Shea, Paul D; Davies, Ian W

    2010-06-18

    The evolution of scalable, economically viable synthetic approaches to the potent and selective prostaglandin EP4 antagonist 1 is presented. The chromatography-free synthesis of multikilogram quantities of 1 using a seven-step sequence (six in the longest linear sequence) is described. This approach has been further modified in an effort to identify a long-term manufacturing route. Our final synthesis involves no step requiring cryogenic (< -25 degrees C) conditions; comprises a total of four steps, only three of which are in the longest linear synthesis; and features the use of two consecutive iron-catalyzed Friedel-Crafts substitutions.

  2. Cholinergic neuromodulation by prostaglandin D2 in canine airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Tamaoki, J; Sekizawa, K; Graf, P D; Nadel, J A

    1987-10-01

    To determine whether prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) modulates cholinergic neurotransmission in airway smooth muscle and, if so, what the mechanism of action is, we studied bronchial segments from dogs under isometric conditions in vitro. PGD2 (10(-8)-10(-5) M) elicited dose-dependent muscle contraction, which was reduced after blockade of muscarinic receptors, so that 50% effective dose (ED50) increased from 1.3 +/- 0.3 X 10(-6) to 3.9 +/- 1.0 X 10(-6) M by atropine (10(-6) M) (mean +/- SE, P less than 0.05). Physostigmine, at a concentration insufficient to alter base-line tension (10(-8) M), enhanced the PGD2-induced contraction and decreased ED50 to 6.4 +/- 0.5 X 10(-7) M (P less than 0.05). When added at the highest doses that did not cause spontaneous contraction (1.9 +/- 0.5 X 10(-7) M), PGD2 increased the contractile response to electrical field stimulation (1-50 Hz) by 21.9 +/- 6.6% (P less than 0.001). In contrast to this effect, the response to administered acetylcholine was not affected by PGD2. On the other hand, PGD2-induced augmentation of the response to electrical field stimulation (5 Hz) was further increased from 23.6 +/- 3.0 to 70.4 +/- 8.8% in the presence of physostigmine (10(-8) M) and was abolished by atropine but not affected by the alpha-adrenergic antagonist phentolamine or the histamine H1-blocker pyrilamine. These results suggest that the contraction of airway smooth muscle induced by PGD2 is in in part mediated by a cholinergic action and that PGD2 prejunctionally augments the parasympathetic contractile response, likely involving the accelerated release of acetylcholine at the neuromuscular junction.

  3. Essays on probability elicitation scoring rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firmino, Paulo Renato A.; dos Santos Neto, Ademir B.

    2012-10-01

    In probability elicitation exercises it has been usual to considerer scoring rules (SRs) to measure the performance of experts when inferring about a given unknown, Θ, for which the true value, θ*, is (or will shortly be) known to the experimenter. Mathematically, SRs quantify the discrepancy between f(θ) (the distribution reflecting the expert's uncertainty about Θ) and d(θ), a zero-one indicator function of the observation θ*. Thus, a remarkable characteristic of SRs is to contrast expert's beliefs with the observation θ*. The present work aims at extending SRs concepts and formulas for the cases where Θ is aleatory, highlighting advantages of goodness-of-fit and entropy-like measures. Conceptually, it is argued that besides of evaluating the personal performance of the expert, SRs may also play a role when comparing the elicitation processes adopted to obtain f(θ). Mathematically, it is proposed to replace d(θ) by g(θ), the distribution that model the randomness of Θ, and do also considerer goodness-of-fit and entropylike metrics, leading to SRs that measure the adherence of f(θ) to g(θ). The implications of this alternative perspective are discussed and illustrated by means of case studies based on the simulation of controlled experiments. The usefulness of the proposed approach for evaluating the performance of experts and elicitation processes is investigated.

  4. Olfactory receptor for prostaglandin F2α mediates male fish courtship behavior.

    PubMed

    Yabuki, Yoichi; Koide, Tetsuya; Miyasaka, Nobuhiko; Wakisaka, Noriko; Masuda, Miwa; Ohkura, Masamichi; Nakai, Junichi; Tsuge, Kyoshiro; Tsuchiya, Soken; Sugimoto, Yukihiko; Yoshihara, Yoshihiro

    2016-07-01

    Pheromones play vital roles for survival and reproduction in various organisms. In many fishes, prostaglandin F2α acts not only as a female reproductive hormone, facilitating ovulation and spawning, but also as a sex pheromone inducing male reproductive behaviors. Here, we unravel the molecular and neural circuit mechanisms underlying the pheromonal action of prostaglandin F2α in zebrafish. Prostaglandin F2α specifically activates two olfactory receptors with different sensitivities and expression in distinct populations of ciliated olfactory sensory neurons. Pheromone information is then transmitted to two ventromedial glomeruli in the olfactory bulb and further to four regions in higher olfactory centers. Mutant male zebrafish deficient in the high-affinity receptor exhibit loss of attractive response to prostaglandin F2α and impairment of courtship behaviors toward female fish. These findings demonstrate the functional significance and activation of selective neural circuitry for the sex pheromone prostaglandin F2α and its cognate olfactory receptor in fish reproductive behavior. PMID:27239939

  5. Canine gastric mucosal vasodilation with prostaglandins and histamine analogs

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, J.G.; Nies, A.S.

    1982-10-01

    The effect of direct intragastric artery infusion of prostaglandins E2 and I2, arachidonic acid, dimaprit (histamine H2 agonist), and 2',2'-pyridylethylamine (histamine H1 agonist) on gastric mucosal blood flow was examined in dogs to elucidate the relationship between gastric secretory state and mucosal blood flow in dogs. These compounds were chosen because of their diverse effect on gastric acid secretion. Gastric fundus blood flow was measured both electromagnetically with a flow probe around the left gastric artery which supplies the fundus almost exclusively, and by the radioactive microsphere technique. Intraarterial infusion of all the compounds resulted in gastric mucosal vasodilation even though PGE2, PGI2, and arachidonic acid inhibit gastric acid secretion, dimaprit stimulated gastric acid secretion, and 2',2'-pyridylethylamine does not affect gastric acid secretion. There was total agreement in the blood flow measurements by the two different techniques. Our data suggest that gastric acid secretion and gastric vasodilation are independently regulated. In addition, the validity of the studies in which the aminopyrine clearance indicates that prostaglandins are mucosal vasoconstrictors needs to be questioned because of the reliance of those measurements on the secretory state of the stomach.

  6. Prostaglandins inhibit lipoprotein lipase gene expression in macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Desanctis, J B; Varesio, L; Radzioch, D

    1994-01-01

    In the present investigation of the effects of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) on lipoprotein lipase (LPL) gene expression in macrophages, we observed that treatment of macrophages with PGE2 increased the levels of adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP), while the addition of exogenous 5-bromo-cAMP to macrophage cultures resulted in down-regulation of LPL expression. Using indomethacin (INDO), an inhibitor of cyclo-oxygenase and prostaglandins production, we determined that PGE2 acts as a feedback inhibitor of LPL expression. We found that inhibited secretion of LPL protein in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated macrophages could be restored to control levels by the addition of INDO to the medium. In contrast, INDO did not reverse the inhibition of LPL mRNA induced by LPS. Overall, our results have demonstrated that PGE2 is a potent inhibitor of LPL gene expression and indicated that its action may play an important physiological role in the regulation of LPL gene expression during bacterial infections. Images Figure 1 Figure 4 Figure 7 PMID:8039811

  7. The Elicitation of Vocal Responses from Preschool Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Champley, Elizabeth Hyne; Andrews, Moya L.

    1993-01-01

    This article discusses the construction of tasks used to elicit vocal responses from preschool children with and without communication disorders. Procedures to elicit valid and reliable responses are proposed, and a sample assessment protocol is presented. (Author/DB)

  8. Prostaglandin E2-prostaglandin E receptor subtype 4 (EP4) signaling mediates UV irradiation-induced systemic immunosuppression.

    PubMed

    Soontrapa, Kitipong; Honda, Tetsuya; Sakata, Daiji; Yao, Chengcan; Hirata, Takako; Hori, Shohei; Matsuoka, Toshiyuki; Kita, Yoshihiro; Shimizu, Takao; Kabashima, Kenji; Narumiya, Shuh

    2011-04-19

    UV radiation induces systemic immunosuppression. Because nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs suppress UV-induced immunosuppression, prostanoids have been suspected as a crucial mediator of this UV effect. However, the identity of the prostanoid involved and its mechanism of action remain unclear. Here, we addressed this issue by subjecting mice deficient in each prostanoid receptor individually or mice treated with a subtype-specific antagonist to UV irradiation. Mice treated with an antagonist for prostaglandin E receptor subtype 4 (EP4), but not those deficient in other prostanoid receptors, show impaired UV-induced immunosuppression, whereas administration of an EP4 agonist rescues the impairment of the UV-induced immunosuppression in indomethacin-treated mice. The EP4 antagonist treatment suppresses an increase in the number of CD4(+)/forkhead box P3-positive (Foxp3(+)) regulatory T cells (Treg cells) in the peripheral lymph nodes (LNs) and dendritic cells expressing DEC205 in the LNs and the skin after UV irradiation. Furthermore, the EP4 antagonist treatment down-regulates UV-induced expression of receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) in skin keratinocytes. Finally, administration of anti-RANKL antibody abolishes the restoration of UV-induced immunosuppression by EP4 agonism in indomethacin-treated mice. Thus, prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2))-EP4 signaling mediates UV-induced immunosuppression by elevating the number of Treg cells through regulation of RANKL expression in the epidermis.

  9. Antagonist-elicited cannabis withdrawal in humans.

    PubMed

    Gorelick, David A; Goodwin, Robert S; Schwilke, Eugene; Schwope, David M; Darwin, William D; Kelly, Deanna L; McMahon, Robert P; Liu, Fang; Ortemann-Renon, Catherine; Bonnet, Denis; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2011-10-01

    Cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonists have potential therapeutic benefits, but antagonist-elicited cannabis withdrawal has not been reported in humans. Ten male daily cannabis smokers received 8 days of increasingly frequent 20-mg oral Δ⁹-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) dosages (40-120 mg/d) around-the-clock to standardize cannabis dependence while residing on a closed research unit. On the ninth day, double-blind placebo or 20- (suggested therapeutic dose) or 40-mg oral rimonabant, a CB1-cannabinoid receptor antagonist, was administered. Cannabis withdrawal signs and symptoms were assessed before and for 23.5 hours after rimonabant. Rimonabant, THC, and 11-hydroxy-THC plasma concentrations were quantified by mass spectrometry. The first 6 subjects received 20-mg rimonabant (1 placebo); the remaining 4 subjects received 40-mg rimonabant (1 placebo). Fourteen subjects enrolled; 10 completed before premature termination because of withdrawal of rimonabant from clinical development. Three of 5 subjects in the 20-mg group, 1 of 3 in the 40-mg group, and none of 2 in the placebo group met the prespecified withdrawal criterion of 150% increase or higher in at least 3 visual analog scales for cannabis withdrawal symptoms within 3 hours of rimonabant dosing. There were no significant associations between visual analog scale, heart rate, or blood pressure changes and peak rimonabant plasma concentration, area-under-the-rimonabant-concentration-by-time curve (0-8 hours), or peak rimonabant/THC or rimonabant/(THC + 11-hydroxy-THC) plasma concentration ratios. In summary, prespecified criteria for antagonist-elicited cannabis withdrawal were not observed at the 20- or 40-mg rimonabant doses. These data do not preclude antagonist-elicited withdrawal at higher rimonabant doses.

  10. Antagonist-elicited cannabis withdrawal in humans.

    PubMed

    Gorelick, David A; Goodwin, Robert S; Schwilke, Eugene; Schwope, David M; Darwin, William D; Kelly, Deanna L; McMahon, Robert P; Liu, Fang; Ortemann-Renon, Catherine; Bonnet, Denis; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2011-10-01

    Cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonists have potential therapeutic benefits, but antagonist-elicited cannabis withdrawal has not been reported in humans. Ten male daily cannabis smokers received 8 days of increasingly frequent 20-mg oral Δ⁹-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) dosages (40-120 mg/d) around-the-clock to standardize cannabis dependence while residing on a closed research unit. On the ninth day, double-blind placebo or 20- (suggested therapeutic dose) or 40-mg oral rimonabant, a CB1-cannabinoid receptor antagonist, was administered. Cannabis withdrawal signs and symptoms were assessed before and for 23.5 hours after rimonabant. Rimonabant, THC, and 11-hydroxy-THC plasma concentrations were quantified by mass spectrometry. The first 6 subjects received 20-mg rimonabant (1 placebo); the remaining 4 subjects received 40-mg rimonabant (1 placebo). Fourteen subjects enrolled; 10 completed before premature termination because of withdrawal of rimonabant from clinical development. Three of 5 subjects in the 20-mg group, 1 of 3 in the 40-mg group, and none of 2 in the placebo group met the prespecified withdrawal criterion of 150% increase or higher in at least 3 visual analog scales for cannabis withdrawal symptoms within 3 hours of rimonabant dosing. There were no significant associations between visual analog scale, heart rate, or blood pressure changes and peak rimonabant plasma concentration, area-under-the-rimonabant-concentration-by-time curve (0-8 hours), or peak rimonabant/THC or rimonabant/(THC + 11-hydroxy-THC) plasma concentration ratios. In summary, prespecified criteria for antagonist-elicited cannabis withdrawal were not observed at the 20- or 40-mg rimonabant doses. These data do not preclude antagonist-elicited withdrawal at higher rimonabant doses. PMID:21869692

  11. Eliciting promises from children reduces cheating.

    PubMed

    Heyman, Gail D; Fu, Genyue; Lin, Jianyan; Qian, Miao K; Lee, Kang

    2015-11-01

    Widespread cheating can undermine rules that are necessary for maintaining social order. Preventing cheating can be a challenge, especially with regard to children, who as a result of their limited executive function skills may have particular difficulty with resisting temptation to cheat. We examined one approach designed to help children resist this temptation: eliciting a verbal commitment to not cheat. We tested 4- to 7-year-olds (total N = 330) and found that starting at 5 years of age, a verbal commitment to not cheat led to a substantial reduction in cheating. The results suggest that verbal commitments can be used to help children overcome temptations and comply with rules.

  12. Effects of Prostaglandin F2α on Corpora Lutea Formation and Function in Mated Bitches

    PubMed Central

    Paradis, M.; Post, K.; Mapletoft, R. J.

    1983-01-01

    Fifteen mated bitches were used to study the effects of prostaglandin F2α on ovarian endocrine function during the early and midluteal phase. Five dogs were kept as controls, five were given 250 μg/kg prostaglandin F2α twice daily between the first and fifth day of metestrus, and five were similarly treated with prostaglandin F2α between 31 and 35 days of metestrus. Function of corpora lutea was monitored by measuring serum progesterone concentrations during the first 45 days of gestation. Dogs treated with prostaglandin F2α during the early luteal phase had progesterone concentrations similar to controls and pregnancies were undisturbed in both groups. A dramatic decrease in serum progesterone concentration and abortion resulted after prostaglandin F2α administration at midpregnancy. These results indicate that prostaglandin F2α was not luteolytic during the early luteal phase and was therefore ineffective for preventing pregnancy at that time. However, at the dosage and frequency used in this study, prostaglandin F2α was luteolytic and abortifacient at midgestation. PMID:17422289

  13. Piglet mortality: the impact of induction of farrowing using prostaglandins and oxytocin.

    PubMed

    Kirkden, R D; Broom, D M; Andersen, I L

    2013-04-01

    Induction is usually carried out by administering prostaglandins (prostaglandin F2α or a synthetic analogue). Other hormones, most commonly oxytocin, may also be given. The primary objective is to increase the synchrony of farrowing. This facilitates farrowing supervision, early fostering and 'all in, all out' management of the farrowing house, all of which have the potential to decrease piglet mortality. However, there are also risks, including decreased piglet viability when farrowing is induced too early and an increased probability of dystocia associated with oxytocin use. What are the effects of induction procedures on mortality in pigs? With respect to prostaglandins, studies show that the date of induction and the level of supervision provided are important factors affecting piglet mortality. We recommend administering prostaglandins no earlier than 2d before the expected farrowing date for the herd. Some studies have reported that prostaglandin induction decreases stillbirth and live-born mortality and this is probably due to increased farrowing supervision. The incidence of postpartum dysgalactia syndrome is also decreased in herds with a high prevalence of this condition. Inconsistent effects on the progress of farrowing are reported following the routine administration of oxytocin 20-24h after prostaglandin. Although there is generally no effect on stillbirth rate, dystocia may increase. Earlier administration of low doses may decrease stillbirths, but this requires further research. Carbetocin, a long-acting analogue of oxytocin, is a possible alternative. We recommend that prostaglandin induction be used in conjunction with skilled farrowing supervision to decrease piglet mortality.

  14. Prostaglandin E2 represses interleukin 1 beta-induced inflammatory mediator output from pregnant human myometrial cells through the EP2 and EP4 receptors.

    PubMed

    Mosher, Andrea A; Rainey, Kelly J; Giembycz, Mark A; Wood, Stephen; Slater, Donna M

    2012-07-01

    Inflammatory mediators, including prostaglandins, cytokines, and chemokines, are strongly implicated in the mechanism of human labor, though their precise roles remain unknown. Here we demonstrate that interleukin 1 beta (IL-1beta) significantly increased the expression and release of interleukin-8 (CXCL8), monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (CCL2), and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (CSF2) by primary human myometrial cells. However, this effect was repressed by prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)). As PGE(2) can activate four distinct PGE(2) receptors (EP(1), EP(2), EP(3), and EP(4)) to elicit various responses, we sought to define the EP receptor(s) responsible for this repression. Using selective EP receptor agonists and a selective EP(4) antagonist, we show that PGE(2) mediates the repression of IL-1beta-induced release of CXCL8, CCL2, and CSF2 via activation of the EP(2) and EP(4) receptors. The use of siRNA gene-specific knockdown further confirmed a role for both receptors. Real-time RT-PCR demonstrated that EP(2) was the most highly expressed of all four EP receptors at the mRNA level in human myometrial cells, and immunocytochemistry showed that EP(2) protein is abundantly present throughout the cells. Interestingly, PGE(2) does not appear to reduce mRNA expression of CXCL8, CCL2, and CSF2. Our results demonstrate that PGE(2) can elicit anti-inflammatory responses via activation of the EP(2) and EP(4) receptors in lower segment term pregnant human myometrial cells. Further elucidation of the EP receptor-mediated signaling pathways in the pregnant human uterus may be beneficial for optimizing the maintenance of pregnancy, induction of labor or indeed treatment of preterm labor.

  15. Acute prostaglandin reduction with indomethacin and chronic prostaglandin reduction with an essential fatty acid deficient diet both decrease plasma flow to the renal papilla in the rat.

    PubMed

    Ganguli, M; Tobian, L; Ferris, T; Johnson, M A

    1989-07-01

    Renal distribution of prostaglandin synthetase is mainly medullary, whereas the major degrading enzyme, prostaglandin dehydrogenase is primarily cortical. This suggests that prostaglandins (PG) released from the renal medulla could affect the medullary blood vessels. In two different experiments we studied the role of PG in the regulation of renal papillary plasma flow in the rat. First study: PG synthesis were stimulated in 34 adult Sprague-Dawley rats by bleeding from the femoral artery 1% of the body weight over a period of 10 minutes. Following this, indomethacin (a PG inhibitor, 10 mg/kg i.v.) was given slowly and then renal papillary plasma flow was measured 25 minutes after the end of infusion. In 17 indomethacin rats the renal papillary plasma flow averaged 18.8 ml/100 g/minute, whereas it averaged 23.0 in 17 non-indomethacin rats given diluent, an 18% reduction (p less than .025). Second study: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were made prostaglandin deficient by fasting rats for one week, followed by 10% dextrose fluid for one week and subsequent institution of an essential fatty acid (EFA) deficient diet for two weeks. With urinary PG excretion in prostaglandin deficient rats 28 ng/24 hours compared to 149 ng in control rats, they could be considered as prostaglandin deficient. When renal papillary plasma flow was measured, the 16 prostaglandin deficient rats had a 16% lower papillary plasma flow than 16 control rats, 21.6 vs 25.6 (p less than .005). These results clearly demonstrate that PG inhibition in rats decreases plasma flow to the papilla, strongly suggesting that PG are vasodilators for the vessels supplying the renal papilla.

  16. Interactive effect of histamine and prostaglandin D2 on nasal allergic symptoms in rats.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Ashequr; Inoue, Toshio; Ago, Jun; Ishikawa, Takashi; Kamei, Chiaki

    2007-01-12

    This study was undertaken to investigate the interactive effect of histamine and prostaglandin D(2) in nasal allergic symptoms in rats. The intranasal application of histamine at doses lower than 10 mumol/site caused no sneezing or nasal rubbing. In addition, prostaglandin D(2) also showed no significant increase in these responses, even at a dose of 10 nmol/site. On the other hand, the simultaneous instillation of histamine and prostaglandin D(2) resulted in a 1000 times more potent effect in inducing nasal symptoms than the administration of histamine alone. Thus, prostaglandin D(2) enhanced the actions of histamine in inducing sneezing and nasal rubbing in a dose-dependent manner, and significant effects were observed at doses higher than 1 nmol/site. The responses induced by the simultaneous application of histamine and prostaglandin D(2) were inhibited by chlorpheniramine, cyproheptadine, BW A868C and ramatroban. Chlorpheniramine and cyproheptadine showed the dose-related inhibition of nasal symptoms induced by the combined administration of histamine (10 nmol) and prostaglandin D(2) (10 nmol), but the effect of cyproheptadine was relatively weak compared with chlorpheniramine. Moreover, BW A868C and ramatroban also showed the inhibition of nasal symptoms induced by the simultaneous administration of histamine and prostaglandin D(2) in a dose-dependent manner. BW A868C was more potent in inhibiting the nasal symptoms than ramatroban. These results clearly indicate that prostaglandin D(2) showed a synergistic effect on sneezing and nasal rubbing induced by histamine in rats, and its effect occurred through both prostaglandin D(2) and CRTH2 (chemoattractant receptor-homologous molecule expressed on TH2 cells) receptors.

  17. Isolated sleep paralysis elicited by sleep interruption.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, T; Miyasita, A; Sasaki, Y; Inugami, M; Fukuda, K

    1992-06-01

    We elicited isolated sleep paralysis (ISP) from normal subjects by a nocturnal sleep interruption schedule. On four experimental nights, 16 subjects had their sleep interrupted for 60 minutes by forced awakening at the time when 40 minutes of nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sleep had elapsed from the termination of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep in the first or third sleep cycle. This schedule produced a sleep onset REM period (SOREMP) after the interruption at a high rate of 71.9%. We succeeded in eliciting six episodes of ISP in the sleep interruptions performed (9.4%). All episodes of ISP except one occurred from SOREMP, indicating a close correlation between ISP and SOREMP. We recorded verbal reports about ISP experiences and recorded the polysomnogram (PSG) during ISP. All of the subjects with ISP experienced inability to move and were simultaneously aware of lying in the laboratory. All but one reported auditory/visual hallucinations and unpleasant emotions. PSG recordings during ISP were characterized by a REM/W stage dissociated state, i.e. abundant alpha electroencephalographs and persistence of muscle atonia shown by the tonic electromyogram. Judging from the PSG recordings, ISP differs from other dissociated states such as lucid dreaming, nocturnal panic attacks and REM sleep behavior disorders. We compare some of the sleep variables between ISP and non-ISP nights. We also discuss the similarities and differences between ISP and sleep paralysis in narcolepsy. PMID:1621022

  18. Isolated sleep paralysis elicited by sleep interruption.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, T; Miyasita, A; Sasaki, Y; Inugami, M; Fukuda, K

    1992-06-01

    We elicited isolated sleep paralysis (ISP) from normal subjects by a nocturnal sleep interruption schedule. On four experimental nights, 16 subjects had their sleep interrupted for 60 minutes by forced awakening at the time when 40 minutes of nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sleep had elapsed from the termination of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep in the first or third sleep cycle. This schedule produced a sleep onset REM period (SOREMP) after the interruption at a high rate of 71.9%. We succeeded in eliciting six episodes of ISP in the sleep interruptions performed (9.4%). All episodes of ISP except one occurred from SOREMP, indicating a close correlation between ISP and SOREMP. We recorded verbal reports about ISP experiences and recorded the polysomnogram (PSG) during ISP. All of the subjects with ISP experienced inability to move and were simultaneously aware of lying in the laboratory. All but one reported auditory/visual hallucinations and unpleasant emotions. PSG recordings during ISP were characterized by a REM/W stage dissociated state, i.e. abundant alpha electroencephalographs and persistence of muscle atonia shown by the tonic electromyogram. Judging from the PSG recordings, ISP differs from other dissociated states such as lucid dreaming, nocturnal panic attacks and REM sleep behavior disorders. We compare some of the sleep variables between ISP and non-ISP nights. We also discuss the similarities and differences between ISP and sleep paralysis in narcolepsy.

  19. Effects of methylxanthines on urinary prostaglandin E excretion in rats.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, K; Kogo, H; Aizawa, Y

    1981-04-01

    Effect of methylxanthines (theophylline, theobromine and caffeine) on urinary prostaglandin E (PGE) excretion in male rats was studied. Oral administration of xanthines significantly increased the urinary excretion of PGE. Dose-response studies showed that the maximal excretion of urinary PGE and water was obtained by administration of theophylline (50 mg/kg), where the increase in PGE was about 20 times that of the control. The excretion of urinary sodium, potassium and chloride was also markedly increased by xanthines, particularly, theophylline. Increases in urinary PGE excretion, urine volume and electrolytes excretion were inhibited by 10 mg/kg of indomethacin administered prior to theophylline. The increase of urinary PGE excretion after theophylline administration (50 mg/kg) preceded increases in water and sodium excretion. These results suggest that renal PGE mediates, at least in part, the diuretic effect of theophylline. PMID:7311144

  20. Metabolism of prostaglandin E1 in dog kidneys

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, J.

    1970-01-01

    1. The biotransformation of prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) was studied in the isolated, perfused dog kidneys. 2. An average 43% of PGE1 was converted into the less polar metabolite I by a single passage through the kidney. As the re-circulation of the perfusate continued, PGE1 was converted not only into metabolite I but also the least polar metabolite II. The velocity of the conversion of PGE1 into metabolite I was significantly greater than that into metabolite II. Usually, six passages elapsed before maximum degradation of PGE1 occurred. 3. Further separation with silicic acid column chromatography and gas-liquid chromatography showed that metabolite II consists of two individual metabolites, metabolite IIa and metabolite IIb. 4. The present study indicates that the kidney biotransforms PGE1 rather rapidly into three metabolites which are less polar than PGE1. PMID:5492900

  1. [Tafluprost--a novel prostaglandin F2alpha analogue].

    PubMed

    Petrov, S Iu

    2014-01-01

    The review provides a brief history of the evolution of ophthalmic containers: from glass vials to plastic bottles with obligatory preservatives and, finally, to preservative-free polypropylene single-use single-dose tubes. A brief characteristic of benzalkonium chloride, the most commonly used preservative, including mechanisms of its antiseptic activity and ocular toxicity is given. The problem of ocular surface damage, especially in glaucoma patients, due to the long-term use of preserved eye drops, is discussed. Pharmacodynamics of tafluprost, the first commercially available preservative-free single-dose prostaglandin analogue, is described. Operating characteristics of experimental preclinical studies and the first three phases of clinical trials of tafluprost are provided. Post-approval studies of the comparative efficacy and tolerability of the new drug are analyzed and its prospects for clinical use are assessed.

  2. Prostaglandin inhibitor and radiotherapy in advanced head and neck cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Pillsbury, H.C. III; Webster, W.P.; Rosenman, J.

    1986-05-01

    Radiotherapy is the usual mode of treatment for unresectable head and neck cancer. To improve cure rates, extend survival, and reduce morbidity, we use accelerated hyperfractionation radiotherapy and an adjuvant drug to inhibit prostaglandin synthesis. In this study, 19 patients received 300 rad/day of radiotherapy in two equally divided doses to a total dose averaging 6,200 rad. Either indomethacin, 25 mg, or placebo was given four times a day in a double-blind fashion during therapy. Radiation mucositis was graded as 0 to 4+; pain, nutritional status, and tumor status were monitored daily and recorded biweekly. Evaluation of the data showed delayed mucositis in the experimental group for grades 1 to 3, with a significant difference at grade 3 compared with controls. The significance of a long-term comparison of cure rates would be doubtful considering the heterogeneity of the primary sites and regional disease in this group coupled with the small size of our study.

  3. Prostaglandin endoperoxide H synthases: peroxidase hydroperoxide specificity and cyclooxygenase activation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiayan; Seibold, Steve A; Rieke, Caroline J; Song, Inseok; Cukier, Robert I; Smith, William L

    2007-06-22

    The cyclooxygenase (COX) activity of prostaglandin endoperoxide H synthases (PGHSs) converts arachidonic acid and O2 to prostaglandin G2 (PGG2). PGHS peroxidase (POX) activity reduces PGG2 to PGH2. The first step in POX catalysis is formation of an oxyferryl heme radical cation (Compound I), which undergoes intramolecular electron transfer forming Intermediate II having an oxyferryl heme and a Tyr-385 radical required for COX catalysis. PGHS POX catalyzes heterolytic cleavage of primary and secondary hydroperoxides much more readily than H2O2, but the basis for this specificity has been unresolved. Several large amino acids form a hydrophobic "dome" over part of the heme, but when these residues were mutated to alanines there was little effect on Compound I formation from H2O2 or 15-hydroperoxyeicosatetraenoic acid, a surrogate substrate for PGG2. Ab initio calculations of heterolytic bond dissociation energies of the peroxyl groups of small peroxides indicated that they are almost the same. Molecular Dynamics simulations suggest that PGG2 binds the POX site through a peroxyl-iron bond, a hydrogen bond with His-207 and van der Waals interactions involving methylene groups adjoining the carbon bearing the peroxyl group and the protoporphyrin IX. We speculate that these latter interactions, which are not possible with H2O2, are major contributors to PGHS POX specificity. The distal Gln-203 four residues removed from His-207 have been thought to be essential for Compound I formation. However, Q203V PGHS-1 and PGHS-2 mutants catalyzed heterolytic cleavage of peroxides and exhibited native COX activity. PGHSs are homodimers with each monomer having a POX site and COX site. Cross-talk occurs between the COX sites of adjoining monomers. However, no cross-talk between the POX and COX sites of monomers was detected in a PGHS-2 heterodimer comprised of a Q203R monomer having an inactive POX site and a G533A monomer with an inactive COX site.

  4. The source of thromboxane and prostaglandins in experimental inflammation.

    PubMed Central

    Higgs, G. A.; Moncada, S.; Salmon, J. A.; Seager, K.

    1983-01-01

    Although cyclo-oxygenase products have been detected at inflammatory sites the tissue of origin remains uncertain. Inflammatory exudates were collected from rats 4, 6, 8, 12 or 24 h after subcutaneous implantation of carrageenin-impregnated sponges. Concentrations of the cyclo-oxygenase products prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), 6-oxo-PGF1 alpha and thromboxane B2 (TXB2) in inflammatory exudates and serum (obtained from blood clotted at 37 degrees C) were measured by specific radioimmunoassays. TXB2 concentrations in exudates increased to about 100 ng ml-1 at 8 h but decreased to less than 20 ng ml-1 after 24 h. PGE2 concentrations increased from 4-12 h and remained between 80 and 120 ng ml-1 from 12-24 h. 6-oxo-PGF1 alpha had the same time course as that of PGE2 but concentrations were approximately one third of PGE2 values. TXB2 concentrations in serum from thrombocytopaenic rats were less than 5% of control values. Thrombocytopaenia did not affect TXB2, PGE2 or 6-oxo-PGF1 alpha concentrations or total leukocyte numbers in inflammatory exudates. Methotrexate-induced neutropaenia did not affect serum TXB2 concentrations but cyclo-oxygenase products (including TXB2) in 6 h inflammatory exudates were reduced by 60-95%. Colchicine (1.0 mg kg-1 s.c.) prevented leukocyte accumulation in sponge exudates and this was accompanied by a reduction in TXB2, PGE2 and 6-oxo-PGF1 alpha concentrations at 6 h. These results indicate that platelets are the source of TXB2 in clotting blood but do not contribute to cyclo-oxygenase activity in experimental inflammation. The results also suggest that migrating leukocytes are the major source of thromboxane and to a lesser degree prostaglandins in acute 6 h inflammatory exudates. PMID:6652359

  5. Role of EP4 receptor and prostaglandin transporter in prostaglandin E2-induced alteration in colonic epithelial barrier integrity.

    PubMed

    Lejeune, Manigandan; Leung, Pearl; Beck, Paul L; Chadee, Kris

    2010-11-01

    Prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) is a proinflammatory lipid mediator produced in excess in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). PGE(2) couples to and signals via four different E-prostanoid (EP) receptors, namely EP1, EP2, EP3, and EP4. In this study, we determined a role for PGE(2) and EP4 receptors in altering colonic epithelial barrier integrity. In healthy colonic mucosa, EP4 receptors were localized on apical plasma membrane of epithelial cells at the tip of mucosal folds, whereas, in patients with IBD and in rats with dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis, they were diffusely overexpressed throughout the mucosa. Similarly, expression of EP4 receptor was polarized in T84 colonic epithelial monolayer and mimics the normal epithelium. Apical exposure of T84 monolayer with high levels of PGE(2) decreased barrier integrity, which was abrogated by an EP4 receptor antagonist. To reveal the mechanism of vectorial transport of basally produced PGE(2) toward apical EP4 receptors, we identified prostaglandin transporters (PGT) in human colonic epithelia. PGT were least expressed on epithelial cells at the colonic mucosal folds of control subjects but overexpressed in epithelial cells of patients with IBD or animals with DSS-induced colitis. T84 monolayer also expressed PGT, which increased twofold following stimulation with TNF-α. Importantly, in T84 monolayer stimulated with TNF-α, there was a corresponding increase in the uptake and vectorial transport of (3)H-PGE(2) to the apical surface. Knockdown or pharmacological inhibition of PGT significantly decreased vectorial transport of (3)H-PGE(2). These studies unravel a mechanism whereby EP4 receptor and PGT play a role in PGE(2)-induced alteration of epithelial barrier integrity in colitis.

  6. Reward positivity elicited by predictive cues.

    PubMed

    Holroyd, Clay B; Krigolson, Olav E; Lee, Seung

    2011-03-30

    A recent theory holds that a component of the human event-related brain potential called the reward positivity reflects a reward prediction error signal. We investigated this idea in gambling-like task in which, on each trial, a visual stimulus predicted a subsequent rewarding or nonrewarding outcome with 80% probability. Consistent with earlier results, we found that the reward positivity was larger to unexpected than to expected outcomes. In addition, we found that the predictive cues also elicited a reward positivity, as proposed by the theory. These results indicate that the reward positivity reflects the initial assessment of whether a trial will end in success or failure and the reappraisal of that information once the outcome actually occurs.

  7. Assessing pragmatic skills in elicited production.

    PubMed

    de Villiers, Peter

    2004-02-01

    In developing a test of pragmatic skills for children ages 4 to 9 years, we focused on a number of functional language skills that are important for children's success in early schooling and for the development of fluent reading and writing. They included (1) wh-question asking, (2) communicative role taking, (3) linking events in a cohesive narrative, and (4) articulating the mental states of the characters in a story. All of the proposed items provide specific referential support and pragmatic motivation for the forms and content to be produced by the child. The pictured materials and elicitation prompts constrain the range of appropriate utterances, so the children's productions are more easily scored than an open-ended spontaneous speech sample. All tasks described show a clear developmental trend, a clear separation between the performance of typically developing and language-impaired children, and no performance differences between African American English- and Mainstream American English-speaking children.

  8. The release of prostaglandin E2 from the skin of the plaice, Pleuronectes platessa L.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, A. A.; Fletcher, T. C.; Smith, G. M.

    1979-01-01

    1 A fungal extract which produces a cutaneous hypersensitivity reaction in the plaice, Pleuronectes platessa L., was incubated in vitro with the skin of this teleost fish. Samples of incubation media were assayed for smooth muscle stimulating activity. 2 Prostaglandin E2 was identified by bioassay, thin-layer chromatography, ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy and gas chromatography--mass spectrometry. Release from challenged skin was maximum after 60 min incubation. 3 Analysis of the fatty acid composition of plaice skin showed that although arachidonic acid was present (3% of total fatty acids), the precursor of prostaglandin E3, eicosapentaenoic acid contributed 9% of total. 4 Indomethacin (50 mg/kg i.p) did not inhibit the erythema induced by the fungal extract, whilst a dose of 1 mg/kg maximally inhibited prostaglandin release from skin on incubation in vitro. 5 It is concluded that prostaglandins do not have an exclusive role in the mediation of the hypersensitivity reaction. PMID:465893

  9. Aspirin-like drugs may block pain independently of prostaglandin synthesis inhibition.

    PubMed

    Brune, K; Beck, W S; Geisslinger, G; Menzel-Soglowek, S; Peskar, B M; Peskar, B A

    1991-03-15

    Using flurbiprofen, a chiral anti-inflammatory and analgesic 2-arylpropionic acid derivative, the enantiomers of which are not converted to each other (less than 5%) in rats or man, we obtained evidence that prostaglandin synthesis inhibition is primarily mediating the anti-inflammatory activity but prostaglandin synthesis independent mechanisms contribute to the analgesic effects. Thus, the S-form inhibited prostaglandin synthesis, inflammation and nociception in rats. The R-form had much less effect on prostaglandin synthesis and did not affect inflammation. It did, however, block nociception in rats almost as potently as the S-form. S-flurbiprofen, in contrast to the R-form, was clearly ulcerogenic in the gastrointestinal mucosa. These results indicate additional molecular mechanisms of analgesia and suggest the use of R-arylpropionic acids as analgesics.

  10. Celecoxib Improves Host Defense through Prostaglandin Inhibition during Histoplasma capsulatum Infection

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Priscilla Aparecida Tartari; Trindade, Bruno Caetano; Secatto, Adriana; Nicolete, Roberto; Peres-Buzalaf, Camila; Ramos, Simone Gusmão; Sadikot, Ruxana; Bitencourt, Claudia da Silva

    2013-01-01

    Prostaglandins act as mediators of inflammation and, similar to cytokines, function as immune modulators during innate and adaptive immune responses. Therefore, using a pharmacological inhibitor, celecoxib, we investigated the role of prostaglandins in host defense against Histoplasma capsulatum infection in C57BL/6 mice. Our results showed that treatment with celecoxib inhibited cyclooxygenase 2, reduced the total fungal burden, and reduced the concentration of PGE2, cytokines, lymphocytes, neutrophils, and mononuclear cells in the bronchoalveolar space and lung parenchyma. In addition, celecoxib treatment increased the synthesis of nitric oxide, IFN-γ, LTB4, and the phagocytic capacity of alveolar macrophages. Moreover, celecoxib treatment increased the survival of mice after infection with a lethal inoculum of H. capsulatum. These results suggest that prostaglandins alter the host immune response and play an important role in the pathogenesis of histoplasmosis. Thus, the inhibition of prostaglandins could be a valuable immunomodulatory strategy and antifungal therapy for histoplasmosis treatment. PMID:23818746

  11. Hindlimb unloading elicits anhedonia and sympathovagal imbalance.

    PubMed

    Moffitt, Julia A; Grippo, Angela J; Beltz, Terry G; Johnson, Alan Kim

    2008-10-01

    The hindlimb-unloaded (HU) rat model elicits cardiovascular deconditioning and simulates the physiological adaptations to microgravity or prolonged bed rest in humans. Although psychological deficits have been documented following bed rest and spaceflight in humans, few studies have explored the psychological effects of cardiovascular deconditioning in animal models. Given the bidirectional link established between cardiac autonomic imbalance and psychological depression in both humans and in animal models, we hypothesized that hindlimb unloading would elicit an alteration in sympathovagal tone and behavioral indexes of psychological depression. Male, Sprague-Dawley rats confined to 14 days of HU displayed anhedonia (a core feature of human depression) compared with casted control (CC) animals evidenced by reduced sucrose preference (CC: 81 +/- 2.9% baseline vs. HU: 58 +/- 4.5% baseline) and reduced (rightward shift) operant responding for rewarding electrical brain stimulation (CC: 4.4 +/- 0.3 muA vs. 7.3 +/- 1.0 muA). Cardiac autonomic blockade revealed elevated sympathetic [CC: -54 +/- 14.1 change in (Delta) beats/min vs. HU: -118 +/- 7.6 Delta beats/min] and reduced parasympathetic (CC: 45 +/- 11.8 Delta beats/min vs. HU: 8 +/- 7.3 Delta beats/min) cardiac tone in HU rats. Heart rate variability was reduced (CC: 10 +/- 1.4 ms vs. HU: 7 +/- 0.7 ms), and spectral analysis of blood pressure indicated loss of total, low-, and high-frequency power, consistent with attenuated baroreflex function. These data indicate that cardiovascular deconditioning results in sympathovagal imbalance and behavioral signs consistent with psychological depression. These findings further elucidate the pathophysiological link between cardiovascular diseases and affective disorders.

  12. Inhibition of rabbit erythroid 15-lipoxygenase and sheep vesicular gland prostaglandin H synthase by gallic esters.

    PubMed

    Luther, H; Jordanov, D; Ludwig, P; Schewe, T

    1991-02-01

    Gallic acid esters possessing a varying chain length of their alcohol moiety were tested for their inhibitory potencies on 15-lipoxygenase from rabbit reticulocytes and prostaglandin H synthase from sheep vesicular glands. Octyl gallate and decyl gallate proved to be the most powerful inhibitors of both enzymes showing concentrations of half-inhibition of about 0.25 mumol/l for the reticulocyte lipoxygenase and of about 25 mumol/l for the prostaglandin H synthase.

  13. [Do prostaglandins protect other cells besides those of the gastrointestinal epithelium?].

    PubMed

    Müller, P; Dammann, H G; Simon, B

    1982-08-01

    Prostaglandins in very low concentrations, which do not inhibit acid secretion, do protect the mucosa of the gastrointestinal tract against a great number of noxious agents. Similar effects could be shown recently in hepatic, pancreatic, renal, and myocardial tissue. The mechanism of cytoprotective action remains unclear. Since cytoprotection is quite ubiquitous, a common mechanism as for instance stabilisation of membranes seems to be effective. It remains to be seen, if this protective action of prostaglandins can be used in therapy.

  14. Nutritional modulation of mineralocorticoid and prostaglandin production: potential role in prevention and treatment of gastric pathology.

    PubMed

    McCarty, M F

    1983-08-01

    Various lines of evidence indicate that aldosterone and prostaglandins may play physiological roles in protecting the gastric mucosa. This would suggest that low-sodium, high-potassium diets, and supplementation with essential fatty acids that are efficient prostaglandin precursors (as in evening primrose oil), may have value in the prevention and treatment of gastric ulcer and gastritis. A low-sodium, high-potassium diet may also reduce the risk of gastric cancer.

  15. Circadian variations of prostaglandin E2 and F2 alpha release in the golden hamster retina.

    PubMed

    de Zavalía, Nuria; Fernandez, Diego C; Sande, Pablo H; Keller Sarmiento, María I; Golombek, Diego A; Rosenstein, Ruth E; Silberman, Dafne M

    2010-02-01

    Circadian variations of prostaglandin E2 and F2alpha release were examined in the golden hamster retina. Both parameters showed significant diurnal variations with maximal values at midnight. When hamsters were placed under constant darkness for 48 h, the differences in prostaglandin release between subjective mid-day and subjective midnight persisted. Western blot analysis showed that cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 levels were significantly higher at midnight than at mid-day, and at subjective midnight than at subjective mid-day, whereas no changes in COX-2 levels were observed among these time points. Immunohistochemical studies indicated the presence of COX-1 and COX-2 in the inner (but not outer) retina. Circadian variations of retinal prostaglandin release were also assessed in suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN)-lesioned animals. Significant differences in retinal prostaglandin release between subjective mid-day and subjective midnight were observed in SCN-lesioned animals. These results indicate that hamster retinal prostaglandin release is regulated by a retinal circadian clock independent from the SCN. Thus, the present results suggest that the prostaglandin/COX-1 system could be a retinal clock output or part of the retinal clock mechanism.

  16. Flow-induced prostaglandin E2 release regulates Na and K transport in the collecting duct.

    PubMed

    Flores, Daniel; Liu, Yu; Liu, Wen; Satlin, Lisa M; Rohatgi, Rajeev

    2012-09-01

    Fluid shear stress (FSS) is a critical regulator of cation transport in the collecting duct (CD). High-dietary sodium (Na) consumption increases urine flow, Na excretion, and prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) excretion. We hypothesize that increases in FSS elicited by increasing tubular flow rate induce the release of PGE(2) from renal epithelial cells into the extracellular compartment and regulate ion transport. Media retrieved from CD cells exposed to physiologic levels of FSS reveal several fold higher concentration of PGE(2) compared with static controls. Treatment of CD cells with either cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) or COX-2 inhibitors during exposure to FSS limited the increase in PGE(2) concentration to an equal extent, suggesting COX-1 and COX-2 contribute equally to FSS-induced PGE(2) release. Cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2), the principal enzyme that generates the COX substrate arachidonic acid, is regulated by mitogen-activated protein-kinase-dependent phosphorylation and intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)), both signaling processes, of which, are activated by FSS. Inhibition of the ERK and p38 pathways reduced PGE(2) release by 53.3 ± 8.4 and 32.6 ± 11.3%, respectively, while antagonizing the JNK pathway had no effect. In addition, chelation of [Ca(2+)](i) limited the FSS-mediated increase in PGE(2) concentration by 47.5 ± 7.5% of that observed in untreated sheared cells. Sheared cells expressed greater phospho-cPLA2 protein abundance than static cells; however, COX-2 protein expression was unaffected (P = 0.064) by FSS. In microperfused CDs, COX inhibition enhanced flow-stimulated Na reabsorption and abolished flow-stimulated potassium (K) secretion, but did not affect ion transport at a slow flow rate, implicating that high tubular flow activates autocrine/paracrine PGE(2) release and, in turn, regulates flow-stimulated cation transport. In conclusion, FSS activates cPLA2 to generate PGE(2) that regulates flow-mediated Na and K transport in

  17. Prostaglandin synthesis by chicken and rat lung microsomes

    SciTech Connect

    Craig-Schmidt, M.C.; Faircloth, S.A.; Wu-Wang, C.Y.

    1986-03-01

    A comparison between chicken and rat lung was made for microsomal prostaglandin (PG) synthesis from 1-/sup 14/C-arachidonic acid. Microsomal protein (2.0 mg) from chicken or rat lung was incubated in the presence of 20 ..mu..g of 1-/sup 14/C-arachidonic acid (specific activity = 3 x 10/sup 6/ dpm/..mu..mol for chicken; 6 x 10/sup 6/ dpm/..mu..mol for rat), 0.05 M Tris-HCl buffer (pH = 8.0), 0.5 mM epinephrine, and 1 mM reduced glutathione in a total volume of 0.5 ml in a 37/sup 0/C water bath with shaking for 15 min. After acidification with 1 M HCl to pH 3, prostaglandins were extracted with ethyl acetate. The products of the reactions were separated by reversed phase chromatography, and the radioactivity of each prostanoid fraction was determined. The predominant prostanoid synthesized by chicken lung microsomes was PGE/sub 2/, followed by much lower amounts of thromboxane B/sub 2/ (TXB/sub 2/), PGF/sub 2//sub ..cap alpha../ and PGD/sub 2/. In at lung, 6-keto-PGF/sub 1//sub ..cap alpha../ was the predominant product formed, with minor amounts of 6-keto-PGE/sub 1/, TXB/sub 2/, PGF/sub 2//sub ..cap alpha../ and PGD/sub 2/. In rat lung, 6-keto-FGF/sub 1//sub ..cap alpha../ was the predominant product formed, with minor amounts of 6-keto-PGF/sub 1//sub ..cap alpha../ was the predominant product formed, with minor amounts of 6-keto-PGE/sub 1/, TXB/sub 2/, PGF/sub 2//sub ..cap alpha../, PGE/sub 2/ and PGD/sub 2/ being formed. Enzyme specific activity (pmol of PG produced per mg microsomal protein per min) was 11.9 for PGE/sub 2/ produced by chicken lung and 16. 7 for 6-keto-P/sub 1//sub ..cap alpha../ produced by rat lung. Thus, there appears to be a species variation in chicken compared to rat for the lung prostanoids which are known to cause bronchial dilation.

  18. Expert elicitation of population-level effects of disturbance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fleishman, Erica; Burgman, Mark; Runge, Michael C.; Schick, Robert S; Krauss, Scott; Popper, Arthur N.; Hawkins, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Expert elicitation is a rigorous method for synthesizing expert knowledge to inform decision making and is reliable and practical when field data are limited. We evaluated the feasibility of applying expert elicitation to estimate population-level effects of disturbance on marine mammals. Diverse experts estimated parameters related to mortality and sublethal injury of North Atlantic right whales (Eubalaena glacialis). We are now eliciting expert knowledge on the movement of right whales among geographic regions to parameterize a spatial model of health. Expert elicitation complements methods such as simulation models or extrapolations from other species, sometimes with greater accuracy and less uncertainty.

  19. Web-based tool for expert elicitation of the variogram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truong, Phuong N.; Heuvelink, Gerard B. M.; Gosling, John Paul

    2013-02-01

    The variogram is the keystone of geostatistics. Estimation of the variogram is deficient and difficult when there are no or too few observations available due to budget constraints or physical and temporal obstacles. In such cases, expert knowledge can be an important source of information. Expert knowledge can also fulfil the increasing demand for an a priori variogram in Bayesian geostatistics and spatial sampling optimization. Formal expert elicitation provides a sound scientific basis to reliably and consistently extract knowledge from experts. In this study, we aimed at applying existing statistical expert elicitation techniques to extract the variogram of a regionalized variable that is assumed to have either a multivariate normal or lognormal spatial probability distribution from expert knowledge. To achieve this, we developed an elicitation protocol and implemented it as a web-based tool to facilitate the elicitation of beliefs from multiple experts. Our protocol has two main rounds: elicitation of the marginal probability distribution and elicitation of the variogram. The web-based tool has three main components: a web interface for expert elicitation and feedback; a component for statistical computation and mathematical pooling of multiple experts' knowledge; and a database management component. Results from a test case study show that the protocol is adequate and that the online elicitation tool functions satisfactorily. The web-based tool is free to use and supports scientists to conveniently elicit the variogram of spatial random variables from experts. The source code is available from the journal FTP site under the GNU General Public License.

  20. Expert Elicitation of Population-Level Effects of Disturbance.

    PubMed

    Fleishman, Erica; Burgman, Mark; Runge, Michael C; Schick, Robert S; Kraus, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Expert elicitation is a rigorous method for synthesizing expert knowledge to inform decision making and is reliable and practical when field data are limited. We evaluated the feasibility of applying expert elicitation to estimate population-level effects of disturbance on marine mammals. Diverse experts estimated parameters related to mortality and sublethal injury of North Atlantic right whales (Eubalaena glacialis). We are now eliciting expert knowledge on the movement of right whales among geographic regions to parameterize a spatial model of health. Expert elicitation complements methods such as simulation models or extrapolations from other species, sometimes with greater accuracy and less uncertainty. PMID:26610972

  1. Determination of 6-keto prostaglandin F1α and its metabolites in human plasma by LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Enzler, Mark; Schipp, Stefan; Nicolas, Laurent B; Dingemanse, Jasper; Siethoff, Christoph

    2012-07-15

    An HPLC-MS/MS method was developed and validated for the quantification of 6-keto prostaglandin F1α, the stable hydrolysis product of prostacyclin, and its metabolites 2,3-dinor-6-keto prostaglandin F1α and 6,15-diketo-13,14-dihydro prostaglandin F1α in human plasma. For sample preparation, a solid phase extraction step was combined with a column switching approach for analytes enrichment and further sample clean-up of the processed sample. The assay was validated in the concentration range 50.0-5000 pg/mL for 6-keto prostaglandin F1α and 6,15-diketo-13,14-dihydro prostaglandin F1α, and 100-10,000 pg/mL for 2,3-dinor-6-keto prostaglandin F1α. The inter-batch precision was better than 12.7%, 9.2%, and 9.4% for 6-keto prostaglandin F1α, 2,3-dinor-6-keto prostaglandin F1α, and 6,15-diketo-13,14-dihydro prostaglandin F1α, respectively. The inter-batch accuracy was between 97.3% and 100.8% for 6-keto prostaglandin F1α, between 97.5% and 103.0% for 2,3-dinor-6-keto prostaglandin F1α, and between 92.0% and 100.0% for 6,15-diketo-13,14-dihydro prostaglandin F1α. Further it has been demonstrated that the analytes were stable in plasma for 20 h at room temperature, during three freeze-and-thaw cycles, for 96 days at -25 °C storage temperature, and 50h in the autosampler tray at room temperature.

  2. [Effect of thrombin and prostaglandins E and F on various indices of carbohydrate metabolism in human platelets].

    PubMed

    Makarov, S A; Kudriavtseva, G V; Kolotilova, A I

    1985-01-01

    After incubation of intact thrombocytes with prostaglandins E2 and F2 alpha stimulation of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and glutathione reductase activities as well as an increase in the rate of sedoheptulose-7-phosphate accumulation were found. Thrombin inhibited the glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity by 30% in these thrombocytes. Addition of thrombin, following the incubation of thrombocytes with prostaglandins, removed the activating effect of the prostaglandins on the pentosephosphate pathway reactions, inhibited glutathione reductase and lactate dehydrogenase.

  3. Basic emotions elicited by odors and pictures.

    PubMed

    Croy, Ilona; Olgun, Selda; Joraschky, Peter

    2011-12-01

    The sense of olfaction is often reported to have a special relationship with emotional processing. Memories triggered by olfactory cues often have a very emotional load. On the other hand, basic negative or positive emotional states should be sufficient to cover the most significant functions of the olfactory system including ingestion, hazard avoidance, and social communication. Thus, we investigated whether different basic emotions can be evoked in healthy people through the sense of olfaction. We asked 119 participants which odor evokes one of the six basic emotions (happiness, disgust, anger, anxiety, sadness, and surprise); another 97 participants were asked about pictures evoking those emotions. The results showed that almost every participant could name an olfactory elicitor for happiness or disgust. Olfactory elicitors of anxiety were reported less frequently, but they were still reported by three-quarters of the participants. However, for sadness and anger only about half of the participants reported an olfactory elicitor, whereas significantly more named a visual cue. Olfactory emotion elicitors were mainly related to the classes of culture, plants, and food, and visual emotion elicitors were largely related to humans. This data supports the hypothesis that in the vast majority of people, few differentiated emotions can be elicited through the olfactory channel. These emotions are happiness, disgust, and anxiety.

  4. Acting green elicits a literal warm glow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taufik, Danny; Bolderdijk, Jan Willem; Steg, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Environmental policies are often based on the assumption that people only act environmentally friendly if some extrinsic reward is implicated, usually money. We argue that people might also be motivated by intrinsic rewards: doing the right thing (such as acting environmentally friendly) elicits psychological rewards in the form of positive feelings, a phenomenon known as warm glow. Given the fact that people's psychological state may affect their thermal state, we expected that this warm glow could express itself quite literally: people who act environmentally friendly may perceive the temperature to be higher. In two studies, we found that people who learned they acted environmentally friendly perceived a higher temperature than people who learned they acted environmentally unfriendly. The underlying psychological mechanism pertains to the self-concept: learning you acted environmentally friendly signals to yourself that you are a good person. Together, our studies show that acting environmentally friendly can be psychologically rewarding, suggesting that appealing to intrinsic rewards can be an alternative way to encourage pro-environmental actions.

  5. The prostaglandin transporter (PGT) as a potential mediator of ovulation.

    PubMed

    Yerushalmi, Gil M; Markman, Svetlana; Yung, Yuval; Maman, Ettie; Aviel-Ronen, Sarit; Orvieto, Raoul; Adashi, Eli Y; Hourvitz, Ariel

    2016-05-11

    Prostaglandins (PGs) play an important role in the ovulatory process. However, the role of the PG transporter (PGT) in this context remains unknown. We report that the expression of PGT, a transmembrane PG carrier protein, is markedly up-regulated in preovulatory human granulosa cells (GCs). Treatment with human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), an ovulatory trigger, significantly increases the expression of PGT mRNA and protein in human GCs both in vivo and in vitro. The hCG-induced increase in the expression of PGT in cultured human GCs is mediated via protein kinase A and protein kinase C by way of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathway. PGT in cultured human GCs mediates the uptake of PGE2, thereby regulating its extracellular concentration. In vivo treatment of mice with PGT inhibitors effectively blocks ovulation and markedly attenuates the expression of key ovulatory genes. We hypothesize that the inhibition of PGT activity in GCs increases the extracellular concentration of PGE2, the ability of which to exert its ovulatory effect is compromised by desensitization of its cognate receptors. Together, these findings support the idea that PGT is an important mediator of ovulation and that its inhibitors may be viewed as potential candidates for nonhormonal contraception. These findings may also fill the gap in the understanding of PGT signaling, enhance the understanding of ovulatory disorders, and facilitate the treatment of infertility or subfertility in women by using nonsteroidal PG-based therapeutic approaches. PMID:27169804

  6. Prostaglandin-modulated umbilical cord blood hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Cutler, Corey; Multani, Pratik; Robbins, David; Kim, Haesook T; Le, Thuy; Hoggatt, Jonathan; Pelus, Louis M; Desponts, Caroline; Chen, Yi-Bin; Rezner, Betsy; Armand, Philippe; Koreth, John; Glotzbecker, Brett; Ho, Vincent T; Alyea, Edwin; Isom, Marlisa; Kao, Grace; Armant, Myriam; Silberstein, Leslie; Hu, Peirong; Soiffer, Robert J; Scadden, David T; Ritz, Jerome; Goessling, Wolfram; North, Trista E; Mendlein, John; Ballen, Karen; Zon, Leonard I; Antin, Joseph H; Shoemaker, Daniel D

    2013-10-24

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) is a valuable source of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) for use in allogeneic transplantation. Key advantages of UCB are rapid availability and less stringent requirements for HLA matching. However, UCB contains an inherently limited HSC count, which is associated with delayed time to engraftment, high graft failure rates, and early mortality. 16,16-Dimethyl prostaglandin E2 (dmPGE2) was previously identified to be a critical regulator of HSC homeostasis, and we hypothesized that brief ex vivo modulation with dmPGE2 could improve patient outcomes by increasing the "effective dose" of HSCs. Molecular profiling approaches were used to determine the optimal ex vivo modulation conditions (temperature, time, concentration, and media) for use in the clinical setting. A phase 1 trial was performed to evaluate the safety and therapeutic potential of ex vivo modulation of a single UCB unit using dmPGE2 before reduced-intensity, double UCB transplantation. Results from this study demonstrated clear safety with durable, multilineage engraftment of dmPGE2-treated UCB units. We observed encouraging trends in efficacy, with accelerated neutrophil recovery (17.5 vs 21 days, P = .045), coupled with preferential, long-term engraftment of the dmPGE2-treated UCB unit in 10 of 12 treated participants.

  7. Differential Stem and Progenitor Cell Trafficking by Prostaglandin E2

    PubMed Central

    Hoggatt, Jonathan; Mohammad, Khalid S.; Singh, Pratibha; Hoggatt, Amber F.; Chitteti, Brahmananda Reddy; Speth, Jennifer M.; Hu, Peirong; Poteat, Bradley A.; Stilger, Kayla N.; Ferraro, Francesca; Silberstein, Lev; Wong, Frankie K.; Farag, Sherif S.; Czader, Magdalena; Milne, Ginger L.; Breyer, Richard M.; Serezani, Carlos H.; Scadden, David T.; Guise, Theresa; Srour, Edward F.; Pelus, Louis M.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY To maintain lifelong production of blood cells, hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) are tightly regulated by inherent programs and extrinsic regulatory signals received from their microenvironmental niche. Long-term repopulating HSC (LT-HSC) reside in several, perhaps overlapping, niches that produce regulatory molecules/signals necessary for homeostasis and increased output following stress/injury 1–5. Despite significant advances in specific cellular or molecular mechanisms governing HSC/niche interactions, little is understood about regulatory function within the intact mammalian hematopoietic niche. Recently, we and others described a positive regulatory role for Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) on HSC function ex vivo 6,7. While exploring the role of endogenous PGE2 we unexpectedly observed hematopoietic egress after nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) treatment. Surprisingly, this was independent of the SDF-1/CXCR4 axis. Stem and progenitor cells were found to have differing mechanisms of egress, with HSC transit to the periphery dependent on niche attenuation and reduction in the retentive molecule osteopontin (OPN). Hematopoietic grafts mobilized with NSAIDs had superior repopulating ability and long-term engraftment. Treatment of non-human primates and healthy human volunteers confirmed NSAID-mediated egress in higher species. PGE2 receptor knockout mice demonstrated that progenitor expansion and stem/progenitor egress resulted from reduced EP4 receptor signaling. These results not only uncover unique regulatory roles for EP4 signaling in HSC retention in the niche but also define a rapidly translatable strategy to therapeutically enhance transplantation. PMID:23485965

  8. Therapeutic targets in prostaglandin E2 signaling for neurologic disease

    PubMed Central

    Cimino, P.J.; Keene, C. Dirk; Breyer, Richard M.; Montine, Kathleen S.; Montine, Thomas J.

    2009-01-01

    Prostaglandins (PGs) are potent autocrine and paracrine oxygenated lipid molecules that contribute appreciably to physiologic and pathophysiologic responses in almost all organs, including brain. Emerging data indicate that the PGs, and more specifically PGE2, play a central role in brain diseases including ischemic injury and several neurodegenerative diseases. Given concerns over the potential toxicity from protracted use of cyclooxygenase inhibitors in the elderly, attention is now focused on blocking PGE2 signaling that is mediated by interactions with four distinct G protein-coupled receptors, EP1-4, which are differentially expressed on neuronal and glial cells throughout the central nervous system. EP1 activation has been shown to mediate Ca2+-dependent neurotoxicity in ischemic injury. EP2 activation has been shown to mediate microglial-induced paracrine neurotoxicity as well as suppress microglia internalization of aggregated neurotoxic peptides. Animal models support the potential efficacy of targeting specific EP receptor subtypes in Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and ischemic stroke. However promising these preclinical studies are, they have yet to be followed by clinical trials targeting any EP receptor in neurologic diseases. PMID:18691044

  9. Prostaglandin E2 Prevents Disuse-Induced Cortical Bone Loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jee, Webster S. S.; Akamine, T.; Ke, Hua Zhu; Li, Xiao Jian; Tang, L. Y.; Zeng, Q. Q.

    1992-01-01

    The object of this study was to determine whether prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) can prevent disuse (underloaded)-induced cortical bone loss as well as add extra bone to underloaded bones. Thirteen-month-old retired female Sprague-Dawley breeders served as controls or were subjected to simultaneous right hindlimb immobilization by bandaging and daily subcutaneous doses of 0, 1, 3, or 6 mg PGE2/kg/d for two and six weeks. Histomorphometric analyses were performed on double-fluorescent labeled undecalcified tibial shaft sections (proximal to the tibiofibular junction). Disuse-induced cortical bone loss occurred by enlarging the marrow cavity and increasing intracortical porosity. PGE2 treatment of disuse shafts further increased intracortical porosity above that in disuse alone controls. This bone loss was counteracted by enhancement of periosteal and corticoendosteal bone formation. Stimulation of periosteal and corticoendosteal bone formation slightly enlarged the total tissue (cross-sectional) area and inhibited marrow cavity enlargement. These PGE2-induced activities netted the same percentage of cortical bone with a different distribution than the beginning and age related controls. These findings indicate the PGE2-induced increase in bone formation compensated for the disuse and PGE2-induced bone loss, and thus prevented immobilization induced bone loss.

  10. Prostaglandin F receptor expression in intrauterine tissues of pregnant rats

    PubMed Central

    Kanca, Halit; Yar, Atiye Seda; Helvacioğlu, Fatma; Menevşe, Sevda; Çalgüner, Engin; Erdoğan, Deniz

    2014-01-01

    In this investigation, we studied the expression and localization of rat prostaglandin F (FP) receptor in uterine tissues of rats on gestational Days 10, 15, 18, 20, 21, 21.5 and postpartal Days 1 and 3 using Western blotting analysis, real-time PCR, and immunohistochemistry. A high level of immunoreactivity was observed on gestational Days 20, 21, and 21.5 with the most significant signals found on Day 20. FP receptor protein was expressed starting on gestational Day 15, and a fluctuating unsteady increase was observed until delivery. Uterine FP receptor mRNA levels were low between Days 10 and 18 of gestation (p < 0.05). The transcript level increased significantly on Day 20 and peaked on Day 21.5 just before labor (p < 0.05). There was a positive correlation between FP receptor mRNA expression and serum estradiol levels (rs = 0.78; p < 0.01) along with serum estradiol/progesterone ratios (rs = 0.79; p < 0.01). In summary, we observed an increase FP receptor expression in rat uterus with advancing gestation, a marked elevation of expression at term, and a concominant decrease during the postpartum period. These findings indicate a role for uterine FP receptors in the mediation of uterine contractility at term. PMID:24136214

  11. Prostaglandins temporally regulate cytoplasmic actin bundle formation during Drosophila oogenesis.

    PubMed

    Spracklen, Andrew J; Kelpsch, Daniel J; Chen, Xiang; Spracklen, Cassandra N; Tootle, Tina L

    2014-02-01

    Prostaglandins (PGs)--lipid signals produced downstream of cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes--regulate actin dynamics in cell culture and platelets, but their roles during development are largely unknown. Here we define a new role for Pxt, the Drosophila COX-like enzyme, in regulating the actin cytoskeleton--temporal restriction of actin remodeling during oogenesis. PGs are required for actin filament bundle formation during stage 10B (S10B). In addition, loss of Pxt results in extensive early actin remodeling, including actin filaments and aggregates, within the posterior nurse cells of S9 follicles; wild-type follicles exhibit similar structures at a low frequency. Hu li tai shao (Hts-RC) and Villin (Quail), an actin bundler, localize to all early actin structures, whereas Enabled (Ena), an actin elongation factor, preferentially localizes to those in pxt mutants. Reduced Ena levels strongly suppress early actin remodeling in pxt mutants. Furthermore, loss of Pxt results in reduced Ena localization to the sites of bundle formation during S10B. Together these data lead to a model in which PGs temporally regulate actin remodeling during Drosophila oogenesis by controlling Ena localization/activity, such that in S9, PG signaling inhibits, whereas at S10B, it promotes Ena-dependent actin remodeling.

  12. Sequential induction of prostaglandin E and D synthases in inflammation

    SciTech Connect

    Schuligoi, Rufina . E-mail: rufina.schuligoi@meduni-graz.at; Grill, Magdalena; Heinemann, Akos; Peskar, Bernhard A.; Amann, Rainer

    2005-09-30

    Enhanced biosynthesis of prostaglandin (PG)D{sub 2} and subsequent formation of 15-deoxy-{delta}{sup 12,14}-PGJ{sub 2} has been suggested to contribute to resolution of inflammation. The primary aim of the present study in mouse heart was, therefore, to determine at the transcriptional level if there is sequential induction of PGE and PGD synthases (S) during inflammation. Expression of interleukin (IL)-1{beta} in heart was enhanced 4 h after systemic inflammation and declined thereafter within 3-5 days to basal levels. In contrast to cyclooxygenase-2 and membrane-bound (m)-PGES-1, which both peaked 4 h after endotoxin administration, hematopoietic (H)-PGDS expression was enhanced only 48 h after endotoxin. The expression of lipocalin-type (L)-PGDS was not significantly influenced. mRNA encoding the putative target of 15-deoxy-{delta}{sup 12,14}-PGJ{sub 2}, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma}, was enhanced between 4 and 24 h after induction of inflammation. Treatment of mice with acetylsalicylic acid or indomethacin at doses effective to cause near-complete inhibition of PGE{sub 2} and PGD{sub 2} biosynthesis in heart ex vivo resulted in enhanced expression of IL-1{beta} 24 h after endotoxin administration. These results provide additional support for the hypothesis of a shift towards PGD{sub 2} biosynthesis during resolution of inflammation.

  13. Prostaglandin E2 signals white-to-brown adipogenic differentiation.

    PubMed

    García-Alonso, Verónica; Clària, Joan

    2014-01-01

    The formation of new adipocytes from precursor cells is a crucial aspect of normal adipose tissue function. During the adipogenic process, adipocytes differentiated from mesenchymal stem cells give rise to two main types of fat: white adipose tissue (WAT) characterized by the presence of adipocytes containing large unilocular lipid droplets, and brown adipose tissue (BAT) composed by multilocular brown adipocytes packed with mitochondria. WAT is not only important for energy storage but also as an endocrine organ regulating whole body homeostasis by secreting adipokines and other mediators, which directly impact metabolic functions in obesity. By contrast, BAT is specialized in dissipating energy in form of heat and has salutary effects in combating obesity and associated disorders. Unfortunately, WAT is the predominant fat type, whereas BAT is scarce and located in discrete pockets in adult humans. Luckily, another type of brown adipocytes, called beige or brite (brown-in-white) adipocytes, with similar functions to those of "classical" brown adipocytes has recently been identified in WAT. In this review, a close look is given into the role of bioactive lipid mediators in the regulation of adipogenesis, with a special emphasis on the role of the microsomal prostaglandin E (PGE) synthase-1, a terminal enzyme in PGE2 biosynthesis, as a key regulator of white-to-brown adipogenesis in WAT. PMID:26317053

  14. Prostaglandin E2 protects lower airways against bronchoconstriction.

    PubMed

    Hartney, John M; Coggins, Kenneth G; Tilley, Stephen L; Jania, Leigh A; Lovgren, Alysia Kern; Audoly, Laurent P; Koller, Beverly H

    2006-01-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), similar to beta-adrenergic receptor agonists, can protect airways from bronchoconstriction and resulting increase in airway resistance induced by a number of agents, including cholinergic receptor agonists and antigen. We examined the impact of sustained alterations in PGE2 pathways on changes in airway resistance. Genetic methods were utilized to alter PGE2 metabolism and signal transduction in the murine lung. PGE2 levels were elevated by generating mice lacking 15-hydroxyprostaglandin (Hpgd-/-), the major catabolic enzyme of PGE2, and by generating a transgenic line in which mouse PGE2 synthase (Ptges) expression is driven by a human lung-specific promoter, hSP-C. Conversely, to determine the impact of loss of PGE2 on airway reactivity, we examined mice lacking this synthase (Ptges-/-) and receptors that mediate the actions of PGE2, particularly the PGE2 EP2 receptor (Ptger2). Diminished capacity to produce and respond to PGE2 did not alter the response of mice to cholinergic stimuli. In contrast, the responsiveness to cholinergic stimulation was dramatically altered in animals with elevated PGE2 levels. The Hpgd-/- and hSP-C-Ptges transgenic lines both showed attenuated airway responsiveness to methacholine as measured by lung resistance. Thus, whereas compromise of the Ptges/PGE2/Ptger2 pathway does not alter airway responsiveness, genetic modulation that elevates PGE2 levels in the lung attenuates airway responsiveness. PMID:16113047

  15. Hangover headache and prostaglandins: prophylactic treatment with tolfenamic acid.

    PubMed

    Kaivola, S; Parantainen, J; Osterman, T; Timonen, H

    1983-03-01

    Tolfenamic acid (TA), a potent inhibitor of prostaglandin (PG) biosynthesis and action, was tested prophylactically against hangover symptoms in 30 healthy volunteers in a double-blind cross-over study. One capsule of TA (200 mg) or placebo was taken before starting to drink alcohol and another before going to bed. The hangover symptoms were evaluated in the morning. TA was found significantly better than placebo in the subjective evaluation of drug efficacy (p less than 0.001) and in reducing the reported hangover symptoms in general (p less than 0.01). In the TA group, significantly lower symptom scores were obtained for headache (p less than 0.01), and for nausea, vomiting, irritation, tremor, thirst and dryness of mouth (all p less than 0.05). In a separate study with eight participants, plasma levels of PGs were followed during ingestion of alcohol with or without TA. The plasma concentrations of PGE2 and TXB2 (a metabolite of thromboxane A2) were lower in the TA group during alcohol ingestion, while PGF2 alpha and 6-keto-PGF1 alpha (a metabolite of prostacyclin) were unaffected. TXB2 correlated with blood alcohol levels in a U-shaped manner.

  16. Prostaglandin-E2 Mediated Increase in Calcium and Phosphate Excretion in a Mouse Model of Distal Nephron Salt Wasting

    PubMed Central

    Soleimani, Manoocher; Barone, Sharon; Xu, Jie; Alshahrani, Saeed; Brooks, Marybeth; McCormack, Francis X.; Smith, Roger D.; Zahedi, Kamyar

    2016-01-01

    Contribution of salt wasting and volume depletion to the pathogenesis of hypercalciuria and hyperphosphaturia is poorly understood. Pendrin/NCC double KO (pendrin/NCC-dKO) mice display severe salt wasting under basal conditions and develop profound volume depletion, prerenal renal failure, and metabolic alkalosis and are growth retarded. Microscopic examination of the kidneys of pendrin/NCC-dKO mice revealed the presence of calcium phosphate deposits in the medullary collecting ducts, along with increased urinary calcium and phosphate excretion. Confirmatory studies revealed decreases in the expression levels of sodium phosphate transporter-2 isoforms a and c, increases in the expression of cytochrome p450 family 4a isotypes 12 a and b, as well as prostaglandin E synthase 1, and cyclooxygenases 1 and 2. Pendrin/NCC-dKO animals also had a significant increase in urinary prostaglandin E2 (PGE-2) and renal content of 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE) levels. Pendrin/NCC-dKO animals exhibit reduced expression levels of the sodium/potassium/2chloride co-transporter 2 (NKCC2) in their medullary thick ascending limb. Further assessment of the renal expression of NKCC2 isoforms by quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR) reveled that compared to WT mice, the expression of NKCC2 isotype F was significantly reduced in pendrin/NCC-dKO mice. Provision of a high salt diet to rectify volume depletion or inhibition of PGE-2 synthesis by indomethacin, but not inhibition of 20-HETE generation by HET0016, significantly improved hypercalciuria and salt wasting in pendrin/NCC dKO mice. Both high salt diet and indomethacin treatment also corrected the alterations in NKCC2 isotype expression in pendrin/NCC-dKO mice. We propose that severe salt wasting and volume depletion, irrespective of the primary originating nephron segment, can secondarily impair the reabsorption of salt and calcium in the thick ascending limb of Henle and/or proximal tubule, and reabsorption of sodium and

  17. A facile reproducible radioimmunoassay of the mixed metabolites of prostaglandins E, suitable for measurement of relative differences of phospholipase/prostaglandin synthetase activity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Fretland, D J; Cammarata, P S

    1984-04-01

    A relatively simple, reproducible, radioimmunoassay for the mixed metabolites of prostaglandins E (U-PGE-M) in rat and human urine is described. Results of the assay of treated versus control urine extracts correlate well with differences expected from treatments known to alter in vivo phospholipase/prostaglandin synthetase activity. Cross-reactivity of heterogeneous metabolite antiserum with 5 available endogenous prostaglandins and a single metabolite was determined and showed little or no cross reaction. Sensitivity, within-assay precision, interassay reproducibility, and parallelism were also determined and found acceptable. Excretion rates of U-PGE-M by rats and humans were determined, and statistically significant differences could be shown, although absolute values were smaller than estimated absolute values obtained from mass-spectrometric measurements of single, purified metabolites. Normal human male excretion rates differed significantly from those of females. Injection of prostaglandin E1 caused a significant rise in U-PGE-M excretion in rats whereas aspirin and indomethacin caused it to fall. U-PGE-M excretion rates of spontaneous hypertensive rats were significantly less than rates of normotensive controls. Adrenalectomy resulted in excretion of significantly larger amounts of U-PGE-M than in normal or sham-operated controls. A screen of clinically active pharmacological agents and hormones gave results consistent with previously published reports. PMID:6427792

  18. Stage-dependent reduction in T colony formation in Hodgkin's disease. Coincidence with monocyte synthesis of prostaglandins.

    PubMed Central

    Bockman, R S

    1980-01-01

    Prostaglandin synthesis and T lymphocyte colony formation have been examined in previously untreated patients with Hodgkin's disease. Mononuclear cells have been isolated from peripheral blood and spleens of these patients. Significant augmentation in prostaglandin E levels were noted in the mononuclear cell cutures from Hodgkin's disease patients compared with controls (1.64 +/- 0.29 vs. 0.39 +/- 0.09 ng/10(6) cells, P < 0.005). Measured prostaglandin E levels increased with advancing stage of disease. Virtually all of the prostaglandins were synthesized by the adherent monocyte cell population. Prostaglandin E was the major product. Clonal expansion of a T lymphocyte precursor cell, which gives rise to colonies > 50 cells, was determined by a layered soft agar method. T colony formation was significantly reduced in patients with stage II, III, and IV disease. There were progressively reduced colony numbers seen with advancing stage of disease (609 +/- 209, 416 +/- 158, 207 +/- 58 compared with normals 2,274 +/- 360 colonies/10(6) cells plated; P < 0.005). The addition of inhibitors of endogenous prostaglandin synthesis resulted in significant augmentation of T colony number. However, a consistent relative decrease in T colony number was seen even when endogenous prostaglandin E synthesis was blocked. It would appear that both the prostaglandin-dependent and independent T colony precursor cells are lost with progressive stage of disease. A causative role of augmented prostaglandin synthesis in this stage-dependent reduction of T colony formation could not be established. PMID:6967491

  19. Introducing Forum Theatre to Elicit and Advocate Children's Views

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammond, Nick

    2013-01-01

    Eliciting and advocating the voice of the child remains at the heart of international political agenda and also remains a central role for educational psychologists (EPs). Previous research indicates that EPs tend to use language-based methods for eliciting and advocating views of children. However, these approaches are often limited. Taking a…

  20. Freeze or Flee? Negative Stimuli Elicit Selective Responding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Estes, Zachary; Verges, Michelle

    2008-01-01

    Humans preferentially attend to negative stimuli. A consequence of this automatic vigilance for negative valence is that negative words elicit slower responses than neutral or positive words on a host of cognitive tasks. Some researchers have speculated that negative stimuli elicit a general suppression of motor activity, akin to the freezing…

  1. Science Teachers' Elicitation Practices: Insights for Formative Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ateh, Comfort M.

    2015-01-01

    In evaluating teachers' instructional decisions during instruction, it is clear that the nature of their elicitation is crucial for student learning. When instructional decisions are informed by information about students' conceptual understanding, significant learning is possible. This article examined the elicitation practices of two high school…

  2. Elicited Emotions and Cognitive Functioning in Preschool Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blau, Rivka; Klein, Pnina S.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the effects of eliciting positive and negative emotions on various cognitive functions of four- to five-year-old preschool children were examined. Emotions were elicited through presentations of "happy" and "sad" video clips, before the children performed the cognitive tasks. Behavioural (facial expressions) and physiological (heart…

  3. Prostaglandin F{sub 2{alpha}} regulates cytokine responses of mast cells through the receptors for prostaglandin E

    SciTech Connect

    Kaneko, Izumi; Hishinuma, Takanori; Suzuki, Kaori; Owada, Yuji; Kitanaka, Noriko; Kondo, Hisatake; Goto, Junichi; Furukawa, Hiroshi; Ono, Masao

    2008-03-14

    There is an increasing body of evidence that prostanoids modulate mast cell functions and contribute to the development of allergic inflammation. The present study aimed to identify an undetermined function of prostaglandin (PG) F{sub 2{alpha}} in mast cell activation and the signaling mechanism involved in it. Simultaneous quantification of prostanoids by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry revealed the constitutive release of PGF{sub 2{alpha}}, thromboxane B{sub 2}, and 6-keto-PGF{sub 1{alpha}} from bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs). Upon activation of BMMCs by lipopolysaccharide, the cytokine production in BMMCs was enhanced when the culture was supplemented with PGF{sub 2{alpha}}. However, F prostanoid receptor-a selective receptor for PGF{sub 2{alpha}}-was not detected in BMMCs. Further investigations performed using prostanoid receptor antagonists revealed an alternative mechanism wherein the receptors for PGE species-E prostanoid receptors-mediated the PGF{sub 2{alpha}} signal in BMMCs. The present study provides an insight into a novel function of PGF{sub 2{alpha}}, i.e., an autocrine accelerator for mast cell activation.

  4. Long-term anabolic effects of prostaglandin-E2 on tibial diaphyseal bone in male rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jee, Webster S. S.; Ke, Hua Zhu; Li, Xiao Jian

    1991-01-01

    The effects of long-term prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) on tibial diaphyseal bone were studied in 7-month-old male Sprague-Dawley rats given daily subcutaneous injections of 0, 1, 3 and 6 mg PGE2/kg/day for 60, 120 and 180 days. The tibial shaft was measured by single photon absorptiometry and dynamic histomorphometric analyses were performed on double-fluorescent labeled undecalcified tibial diaphyseal bone samples. Exogenous PGE2 administration produced the following transient changes in a dose-response manner between zero and 60 days: (1) increased bone width and mineral density; (2) increased total tissue and total bone areas; (3) decreased marrow area; (4) increased periosteal and corticoendosteal lamellar bone formation; (5) activated corticoendosteal lamellar and woven trabecular bone formation; and (6) activated intracortical bone remodeling. A new steady-state of increased tibial diaphyseal bone mass and elevated bone activities were observed from day 60 onward. The elevated bone mass level attained after 60 days of PGE2 treatment was maintained at 120 and 180 days. These observations indicate that the powerful anabolic effects of PGE2 will increase both periosteal and corticoendosteal bone mass and sustain the transient increase in bone mass with continuous daily administration of PGE2.

  5. Sensitivity of lymphocytes to prostaglandin E2 increases in subjects over age 70.

    PubMed Central

    Goodwin, J S; Messner, R P

    1979-01-01

    We examined the sensitivity of lymphocytes from different age groups to inhibition by prostaglandin E2. Phytohemagglutinin-stimulated cultures of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 12 healthy subjects over the age of 70 were much more sensitive to inhibition by exogenously added prostaglandin E2 than were cells from 17 young controls (ID50 congruent to 10 nM for the subjects over 70 vs. greater than 3 micronM for the young controls). The more senstivie lymphocytes from a subject over 70 were to prostaglandin E2, the lower was his or her response to phytohemagglutinin (r = 0.75, P less than 0.01). The mean responses to phytohemagglutinin of the peripheral blood mononuclear cells from the subjects over 70 were significantly depressed compared to the young controls. Addition of indomethacin, a prostaglandin synthetase inhibitor, to the cultures resulted in an increase in [3H]thymidine incorporation of 140 +/- 16% in the cells of the subjects over 70 vs. a 36 +/- 3% increase in the young controls (mean +/- SEM, P less than 0.001). The mean phytohemagglutinin response of the subjects over 70 was 40% of the control response without indomethacin. With addition of indomethacin the response of subjects over 70 rose to 72% of control. Thus, increased sinsitivity to prostaglandin E2 appears to be responsible in part for the depressed mitogen response of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from healthy subjects over 70. PMID:457862

  6. Conceptus-derived prostaglandins regulate gene expression in the endometrium prior to pregnancy recognition in ruminants

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Thomas E.; Forde, Niamh; Dorniak, Piotr; Hansen, Thomas R.; Romero, Jared J.; Lonergan, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    In cattle, the blastocyst hatches from the zona pellucida on days 8 to 9 and then forms a conceptus that grows and elongates into an ovoid and then filamentous shape between days 9 and 16. The growing conceptus synthesizes and secretes prostaglandins and interferon tau. Our hypothesis was that the ovoid conceptus exerts a local effect on the endometrium prior to maternal recognition of pregnancy on day 16 in cattle. In Study One, synchronized cyclic heifers received nothing or 20 in vitro produced blastocysts on day 7, and uteri were collected on day 13. Interferon tau was not detected by radioimmunoassay in the uterine flush of pregnant heifers containing multiple ovoid conceptuses; however, total prostaglandin levels were higher in the uterine lumen of pregnant as compared to cyclic heifers. Microarray analysis revealed that 44 genes were increased in the endometrium of day 13 pregnant as compared to cyclic heifers, and many of those genes were classical Type I IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs). Studies Two and Three determined effects of infusing prostaglandins at the levels produced by the elongating day 14 conceptus into the uterine lumen of cyclic ewes on ISG expression in the endometrium. Results indicated that prostaglandin infusion increased the abundance of several ISGs in the endometrium. These studies support the hypothesis that the day 13 conceptus secretes prostaglandins that act locally in a paracrine manner to alter gene expression in the endometrium prior to pregnancy recognition in cattle. PMID:23966582

  7. Radiation-induced increases in sensitivity of cataleptic behavior to haloperidol: possible involvement of prostaglandins

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph, J.A.; Kandasamy, S.B.; Hunt, W.A.; Dalton, T.K.; Stevens, S.

    1988-02-01

    The effects of radiation exposure on haloperidol-induced catalepsy were examined in order to determine whether elevated prostaglandins, through an action on dopaminergic autoreceptors, could be involved in the radiation-induced increase in the potency of this neuroleptic. Cataleptic behavior was examined in animals irradiated with various doses of gamma photons (1-150 Gy) and pretreated with a subthreshold dose of haloperidol (0.1 mg/kg). This approach was chosen to maximize any synergistic effects of radiation and haloperidol. After irradiation with doses less than or equal to 30 Gy, the combined treatment of haloperidol and radiation produced catalepsy, whereas neither treatment alone had an effect. This observed catalepsy could be blocked with prior administration of indomethacin, a prostaglandin synthesis inhibitor. Animals exposed to doses of radiation less than or equal to 50 Gy and no haloperidol, however, displayed apparent catalepsy. This effect was also antagonized by indomethacin. Prostaglandins can induce catalepsy and when administered in subthreshold doses along with subthreshold doses of haloperidol, catalepsy was observed. In order to assess a possible action of prostaglandins and radiation on dopaminergic activity, the functioning of striatal dopaminergic autoreceptors was examined by determining the effects of varying concentrations of haloperidol on the K+-evoked release of dopamine from striatal slices obtained from parallel groups of animals treated as above. Results indicated that sensitivity to haloperidol increased (higher K+-evoked dopamine release) in slices from irradiated or prostaglandin-treated animals and that this increase in sensitivity was blocked by indomethacin.

  8. Prostaglandin E and F2 alpha receptors in human myometrium during the menstrual cycle and in pregnancy and labor

    SciTech Connect

    Giannopoulos, G.; Jackson, K.; Kredentser, J.; Tulchinsky, D.

    1985-12-15

    The binding of prostaglandins E1 and F2 alpha has been studied in the human myometrium and cervix during the menstrual cycle and in the myometrium of pregnant patients at term before and during labor. Tritium-labeled prostaglandin E1 and F2 alpha binding was saturable and reversible. Scatchard analysis of tritium-labeled prostaglandin E1 binding was linear, which suggests a single class of high-affinity binding sites with an estimated apparent equilibrium dissociation constant of 2.5 to 5.4 nmol/L and inhibitor affinities of 0.9, 273, 273, and 217 nmol/L for prostaglandins E2, A1, B1, and F2 alpha, respectively. Scatchard analysis of tritium-labeled prostaglandin F2 alpha, binding was also linear, but the affinity of these binding sites was much lower, with an average dissociation constant of 50 nmol/L and inhibitor affinities of 1.6, 2.2, and 11.2 nmol/L for prostaglandins E1, E2, and A1, respectively. In nonpregnant patients, the concentrations and affinities of tritium-labeled prostaglandin E1 binding sites were similar in the myometrium during the proliferative and secretory phases of the menstrual cycle, but the concentration of these sites was much lower in the cervix. The concentration of the tritium-labeled prostaglandin E1 binding sites was significantly lower in the myometrium of pregnant patients at term than in the myometrium of nonpregnant patients. The concentrations and affinities of tritium-labeled prostaglandin E1 binding sites were not significantly different in the upper and lower myometrium of pregnant patients at term or in the myometrium of such patients before and during labor. The concentrations of the tritium-labeled prostaglandin F2 alpha binding sites during the menstrual cycle and in pregnancy at term were similar to those of tritium-labeled prostaglandin E1 binding sites.

  9. Multifactorial regulation of prostaglandin synthesis in preovulatory goldfish ovarian follicles.

    PubMed

    Kellner, R G; Van der Kraak, G

    1992-04-01

    Goldfish preovulatory ovarian follicles (prior to germinal vesicle breakdown) were utilized for studies investigating the actions of activators of different signal transduction pathways on prostaglandin (PG) production. The protein kinase C (PKC) activators phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA; 100-400 nM), 1-oleoyl-2-acetylglycerol (5 and 25 micrograms/ml), and 1,2-dioctanoylglycerol (10 and 50 micrograms/ml) stimulated PGE production; the inactive phorbol 4 alpha-phorbol didecanoate, which does not activate PKC, had no effect. Calcium ionophore A23187 (0.25-4.0 microM) stimulated PGE production and acted in a synergistic manner with activators of PKC. Although produced in lower amounts than PGE, PGF was stimulated by PMA and A23187. The direct activator of phospholipase A2, melittin (0.1-1.0 microM), stimulated a dose-related increase in PGE production, whereas chloroquine (100 microM), a putative inhibitor of phospholipase A2, blocked basal and PMA + A23187-stimulated PGE production. Several drugs known to elevate intracellular levels of cAMP including the phosphodiesterase inhibitor 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (0.1-1.0 mM), forskolin (10 microM), and dibutyryl cAMP (dbcAMP; 5 mM) attenuate PMA + A23187-stimulated PGE production. Melittin-stimulated production of PGE was inhibited by dbcAMP, suggesting that the action of cAMP was distal to the activation of phospholipase A2. In summary, these studies demonstrate that activation of PKC and elevation of intracellular calcium levels stimulate PG production, in part, through activation of phospholipase A2. The adenylate cyclase/cAMP signalling pathway is inhibitory to PG production by goldfish ovarian follicles. PMID:1315582

  10. Prostaglandin D2-loaded microspheres effectively activate macrophage effector functions.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Priscilla Aparecida Tartari; Bitencourt, Claudia da Silva; dos Santos, Daiane Fernanda; Nicolete, Roberto; Gelfuso, Guilherme Martins; Faccioli, Lúcia Helena

    2015-10-12

    Biodegradable lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) microspheres (MS) improve the stability of biomolecules stability and allow enable their sustained release. Lipid mediators represent a strategy for improving host defense; however, most of these mediators, such as prostaglandin D2 (PGD2), have low water solubility and are unstable. The present study aimed to develop and characterize MS loaded with PGD2 (PGD2-MS) to obtain an innovative tool to activate macrophages. PGD2-MS were prepared using an oil-in-water emulsion solvent extraction-evaporation process, and the size, zeta potential, surface morphology and encapsulation efficiency were determined. It was also evaluated in vitro the phagocytic index, NF-κB activation, as well as nitric oxide and cytokine production by alveolar macrophages (AMs) in response to PGD2-MS. PGD2-MS were spherical with a diameter of 5.0±3.3 μm and regular surface, zeta potential of -13.4±5.6 mV, and 36% of encapsulation efficiency, with 16-26% release of entrapped PGD2 at 4 and 48 h, respectively. PGD2-MS were more efficiently internalized by AMs than unloaded-MS, and activated NF-κB more than free PGD2. Moreover, PGD2-MS stimulated the production of nitric oxide, TNF-α, IL-1β, and TGF-β, more than free PGD2, indicating that microencapsulation increased the activating effect of PGD2 on cells. In LPS-pre-treated AMs, PGD2-MS decreased the release of IL-6 but increased the production of nitric oxide and IL-1β. These results show that the morphological characteristics of PGD2-MS facilitated interaction with, and activation of phagocytic cells; moreover, PGD2-MS retained the biological activities of PGD2 to trigger effector mechanisms in AMs. It is suggested that PGD2-MS represent a strategy for therapeutic intervention in the lungs of immunocompromised subjects.

  11. The effect of prostaglandins on experimental storage disease in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Joh, K.; Riede, U. N.; Zahradnik, H. P.

    1990-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of prostaglandins (PGs) on the release of lysosomes into the extracellular space in experimentally-induced storage disease in rats. The generalized phospholipidosis was induced by oral administration of chlorphentermine to Wistar rats. PG-E2 or PG-F2 alpha (50 micrograms/100 g) was injected intravenously into rats with phospholipidosis. Control rats were injected with the same amount of saline. Twenty-four hours later, extracellular and intracellular lysosomes were analysed morphometrically in electromicrographs of the liver, kidney, myocardium, skeletal muscle, aorta and cervix uteri, having been stained with acid-phosphatase. The morphometric parameters used were the numerical density of lysosomes per unit volume and the volume density of lysosomes per unit volume. The results show that, in comparison with the controls, a volumetric increase of extracellular lysosomes and a volumetric decrease of intracellular lysosomes were achieved by PG-E2 or PG-F2 alpha administration in several organs, but not in the myocardium or skeletal muscles. The effect of PG-F2 alpha was greater than that of PG-E2 in the liver and kidney, while the effect of PG-E2 was greater than that of PG-F2 alpha in the aorta and cervix uteri. These results indicate that PGs influence the discharge of storage lysosomes in bipolar epithelial cells in the liver and kidney, and also influence the release of non-storing lysosomes in apolar mesenchymal cells in the aorta and cervix uteri. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:2331405

  12. Metabolism of aromatic amines by prostaglandin H synthase.

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, J A; Eling, T E

    1985-01-01

    The metabolism of aromatic amines by the peroxidase activity of prostaglandin H synthase (PHS) has been studied in this laboratory by use of two model compounds, the carcinogenic primary amine 2-aminofluorene (2-AF) and the substituted amine aminopyrine (AP). 2-AF is oxidized by PHS to 2, 2-azobisfluorene, 2-aminodifluorenylamine, 2-nitrofluorene, polymeric material, and products covalently bound to macromolecules. In the presence of phenolic compounds, 2-AF oxidation results in the formation of amine/phenol adducts. The data are consistent with a one-electron mechanism of 2-AF oxidation by PHS; furthermore, an N-hydroxy intermediate is not involved in 2-AF metabolism by PHS. PHS also catalyzes the binding of 2-AF to DNA in vitro. Unique 2-AF/DNA adducts were isolated and are distinct from the N-(deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-2-AF adduct formed from the reaction of N-hydroxy-2-AF with DNA. These new adducts represent a marker unique to peroxidative activation of 2-AF. AP is oxidized by the peroxidase activity of PHS to the cation radical, with one molecule of hydroperoxy fatty acid reduced for every two molecules of AP free radical formed. The decay of the AP radical follows second order kinetics, supporting the proposed mechanism in which the AP radical disproportionates to an iminium cation, followed by hydrolysis of this species to the demethylated amine and formaldehyde. In the presence of glutathione, the cation radical is reduced to the parent amine, resulting in the formation of the glutathione thiyl radical. It thus appears that both primary and substituted aromatic amines may undergo one-electron oxidation by PHS. PMID:3938394

  13. Metabolism of aromatic amines by prostaglandin H synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, J.A.; Eling, T.E.

    1985-12-01

    The metabolism of aromatic amines by the peroxidase activity of prostaglandin H synthase (PHS) has been studied in this laboratory by use of two model compounds, the carcinogenic primary amine 2-aminofluorene (2-AF) and the substituted amine aminopyrine (AP). 2-AF is oxidized by PHS to 2, 2-azobisfluorene, 2-aminodifluorenylamine, 2-nitrofluorene, polymeric material, and products covalently bound to macromolecules. In the presence of phenolic compounds, 2-AF oxidation results in the formation of amine-phenol adducts. The data are consistent with a one-electron mechanism of 2-AF oxidation by PHS; furthermore, an N-hydroxy intermediate is not involved in 2-AF metabolism by PHS. PHS also catalyzes the binding of 2-AF to DNA in vitro. Unique 2-AF/DNA adducts were isolated and are distinct from the N-(deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-2-AF adduct formed from the reaction of N-hydroxy-2-AF with DNA. These new adducts represent a marker unique to peroxidative activation of 2-AF. AP is oxidized by the peroxidase activity of PHS to the cation radical, with one molecule of hydroperoxy fatty acid reduced for every two molecules of AP free radical formed. The decay of the AP radical follows second order kinetics, supporting the proposed mechanism in which the AP radical disproportionates to an iminium cation, followed by hydrolysis of this species to the demethylated amine and formaldehyde. In the presence of glutathione, the cation radical is reduced to the parent amine, resulting in the formation of the glutathione thiyl radical. It thus appears that both primary and substituted aromatic amines may undergo one-electron oxidation by PHS. 19 references.

  14. Opposing roles of Prostaglandin D2 receptors in ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Sturm, Eva M.; Radnai, Balazs; Jandl, Katharina; Stančić, Angela; Parzmair, Gerald P.; Högenauer, Christoph; Kump, Patrizia; Wenzl, Heimo; Petritsch, Wolfgang; Pieber, Thomas R.; Schuligoi, Rufina; Marsche, Gunther; Ferreirós, Nerea; Heinemann, Akos; Schicho, Rudolf

    2014-01-01

    Pro-resolution functions were reported for Prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) in colitis, but the role of its two receptors, DP and in particular CRTH2 are less well defined. We investigated DP and CRTH2 expression and function during human and murine ulcerative colitis (UC). Expression of receptors was measured by flow cytometry on peripheral blood leukocytes, and by immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting in colon biopsies of patients with active UC and healthy individuals. Receptor involvement in UC was evaluated in a mouse model of DSS colitis. DP and CRTH2 expression changed in leukocytes of patients with active UC in a differential manner. In UC patients, DP showed higher expression in neutrophils but lower in monocytes as compared to control subjects. In contrast, CRTH2 was decreased in eosinophils, NK and CD3+ T cells but not in monocytes and CD3+/CD4+ T cells. The decrease of CRTH2 on blood eosinophils clearly correlated with disease activity. DP correlated positively with disease activity in eosinophils but inversely in neutrophils. CRTH2 internalized upon treatment with PGD2 and 11-dehydroTXB2 in eosinophils of controls. Biopsies of UC patients revealed an increase of CRTH2-positive cells in the colonic mucosa and high CRTH2 protein content. The CRTH2 antagonist CAY10595 improved while the DP antagonist MK0524 worsened inflammation in murine colitis. DP and CRTH2 play differential roles in UC. Although expression of CRTH2 on blood leukocytes is downregulated in UC, CRTH2 is present in colon tissue where it may contribute to inflammation whereas DP likely promotes anti-inflammatory actions. PMID:24929001

  15. Cyclooxygenase and prostaglandins in somatic cell populations of the testis.

    PubMed

    Frungieri, Mónica B; Calandra, Ricardo S; Mayerhofer, Artur; Matzkin, María E

    2015-04-01

    Prostaglandins (PGs) are synthesized through the action of the rate-limiting enzyme cyclooxygenase (COX) and further specific enzymes. The development of Cox-deficient mice in the 1990s gave insights into the reproductive roles of PGs. Female Cox-knockout mice were subfertile or infertile. Interestingly, fertility was not affected in male mice deficient in Cox, suggesting that PGs may not be critical for the functioning of the testis. However, this conclusion has recently been challenged by observations of important roles for PGs in both physiological and pathological processes in the testis. The two key somatic cell types in the testis, Leydig and Sertoli cells, express the inducible isoenzyme COX2 and produce PGs. Testicular COX2 expression in these somatic cells is regulated by hormonal input (FSH, prolactin (PRL), and testosterone) as well as by IL1β. PGs modulate steroidogenesis in Leydig cells and glucose uptake in Sertoli cells. Hence, the COX2/PG system in Leydig and Sertoli cells acts as a local modulator of testicular activity, and consequently may regulate spermatogenic efficiency. In addition to its expression in Leydig and Sertoli cells, COX2 has been detected in the seminiferous tubule wall, and in testicular macrophages and mast cells of infertile patients. These observations highlight the possible relevance of PGs in testicular inflammation associated with idiopathic infertility. Collectively, these data indicate that the COX2/PG system plays crucial roles not only in testicular physiology (i.e., development, steroidogenesis, and spermatogenesis), but more importantly in the pathogenesis or maintenance of infertility status in the male gonad. Further studies of these actions could lead to new therapeutic approaches to idiopathic male infertility.

  16. Ovarian cancer stem-like cells elicit the polarization of M2 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing; Cai, Da-Jun; Li, Bin

    2015-06-01

    Ovarian cancer is a life‑threatening disease in females worldwide. The polarization of macrophages is crucial in oncogenesis and the development of ovarian cancer. Increasing evidence has supported the correlation between ovarian cancer stem‑like cells (OCSCs) and macrophages, however, whether OCSCs can affect the polarization of macrophages and the underlying mechanisms involved remain to be elucidated. To examine the interplay between OCSCs and macrophages, a co‑culture system was used to detect the effect of OCSCs on macrophage polarization. The expression of cluster of differentiation 206+ and the secretion of interleukin‑10 were significantly increased and the production of tumor necrosis factor‑α was suppressed, confirming macrophage polarization to M2 macrophages. Further investigation of the macrophages in a Transwell culture system with OCSCs revealed polarization to the M2 macrophages to a similar extent, indicating that the cytokines of the OCSCs, rather than direct cell‑cell contact, are important for the polarization of M2 macrophages. Furthermore, the expression levels of chemokine (C‑C motif) ligand (CCL)2, cyclooxygenase (COX)‑2 and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) were increased in the Transwell system and the inhibition of COX‑2, but not CCL2, significantly decreased the polarization of the M2 macrophages. In addition, mechanistic analysis revealed the importance of the COX‑2/PGE2 pathway in OCSCs to activate Janus kinase (JAK) signaling in macrophages to elicit M2 polarization. These findings provided the first evidence, to the best of our knowledge, that OCSCs are capable of altering macrophages into the M2 phenotype via the overexpression of COX‑2 and the increased production of PGE2 cytokines and that the JAK signaling pathway in macrophages is important for this alteration. The present study provided evidence supporting possible molecular targets for cancer treatment.

  17. Upregulation of Cyclooxygenase-2/Prostaglandin E2 (COX-2/PGE2) Pathway Member Multiple Drug Resistance-Associated Protein 4 (MRP4) and Downregulation of Prostaglandin Transporter (PGT) and 15-Prostaglandin Dehydrogenase (15-PGDH) in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kochel, Tyler J.; Goloubeva, Olga G.; Fulton, Amy M.

    2016-01-01

    Elevated levels of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) are indicators of a poor prognosis in breast cancer. Using several independent publicly available breast cancer gene expression databases, we investigated other members of the PGE2 pathway. PGE2 is produced by COX-2 and actively exported by multiple drug resistance-associated protein 4 (MRP4) into the extracellular microenvironment, where PGE2 can bind four cognate EP receptors (EP1–EP4) and initiate diverse biological signaling pathways. Alternatively, PGE2 is imported via the prostaglandin transporter (PGT) and metabolized by 15-prostaglandin dehydrogenase (15-PGDH/HPGD). We made the novel observation that MRP4, PGT, and 15-PGDH are differentially expressed among distinct breast cancer molecular subtypes; this finding was confirmed in independent datasets. In triple-negative breast cancer, the observed gene expression pattern (high COX-2, high MRP4, low PGT, and low 15-PGDH) would favor high levels of tumor-promoting PGE2 in the tumor microenvironment that may contribute to the overall poor prognosis of triple-negative breast cancer. PMID:27257388

  18. Upregulation of Cyclooxygenase-2/Prostaglandin E2 (COX-2/PGE2) Pathway Member Multiple Drug Resistance-Associated Protein 4 (MRP4) and Downregulation of Prostaglandin Transporter (PGT) and 15-Prostaglandin Dehydrogenase (15-PGDH) in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kochel, Tyler J; Goloubeva, Olga G; Fulton, Amy M

    2016-01-01

    Elevated levels of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) are indicators of a poor prognosis in breast cancer. Using several independent publicly available breast cancer gene expression databases, we investigated other members of the PGE2 pathway. PGE2 is produced by COX-2 and actively exported by multiple drug resistance-associated protein 4 (MRP4) into the extracellular microenvironment, where PGE2 can bind four cognate EP receptors (EP1-EP4) and initiate diverse biological signaling pathways. Alternatively, PGE2 is imported via the prostaglandin transporter (PGT) and metabolized by 15-prostaglandin dehydrogenase (15-PGDH/HPGD). We made the novel observation that MRP4, PGT, and 15-PGDH are differentially expressed among distinct breast cancer molecular subtypes; this finding was confirmed in independent datasets. In triple-negative breast cancer, the observed gene expression pattern (high COX-2, high MRP4, low PGT, and low 15-PGDH) would favor high levels of tumor-promoting PGE2 in the tumor microenvironment that may contribute to the overall poor prognosis of triple-negative breast cancer. PMID:27257388

  19. Chain-shortening of prostaglandin F2 alpha by rat liver peroxisomes.

    PubMed

    Diczfalusy, U; Alexson, S E; Pedersen, J I

    1987-05-14

    Liver peroxisomes were isolated from di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate treated rats by isopycnic sucrose gradient centrifugation of a light mitochondrial fraction. Incubation of prostaglandin F2 alpha with purified peroxisomes resulted in conversion into a more polar product(s). In contrast, incubation with mitochondrial fractions and microsomal fractions under the same conditions did not result in any detectable conversion. The polar material obtained from a preparative incubation was purified by high performance liquid chromatography and characterized by radio-gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The structure of the polar compound was shown to be 5,7,11-trihydroxy-tetranorprost-9-enoic acid (tetranor-prostaglandin F1 alpha). Prostaglandin F2 alpha was thus chain-shortened by four carbon atoms. PMID:3472523

  20. Promising alternative clinical uses of prostaglandin F2α analogs: beyond the eyelashes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Young M; Diehl, Joseph; Levins, Paul C

    2015-04-01

    Prostaglandin F2α analogs, commonly prescribed for glaucoma treatment, have been shown to induce side effects such as cutaneous hypertrichosis and hyperpigmentation. Therefore, these medications have theoretic applications in the treatment of alopecia and disorders of hypopigmentation. We reviewed the literature to find original studies assessing the use of prostaglandin F2α analogs in these settings. Studies and reports were analyzed in regards to androgenic alopecia, alopecia areata, chemotherapy-induced alopecia, vitiligo, and hypopigmented scarring. Based on the results of these studies, and consideration of pathophysiologic mechanism, the most promising applications for prostaglandin F2α analogs include androgenic alopecia, chemotherapy-induced alopecia, and alopecia areata concurrently treated with corticosteroids. PMID:25601618

  1. TISSUE REGENERATION. Inhibition of the prostaglandin-degrading enzyme 15-PGDH potentiates tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongyou; Desai, Amar; Yang, Sung Yeun; Bae, Ki Beom; Antczak, Monika I; Fink, Stephen P; Tiwari, Shruti; Willis, Joseph E; Williams, Noelle S; Dawson, Dawn M; Wald, David; Chen, Wei-Dong; Wang, Zhenghe; Kasturi, Lakshmi; Larusch, Gretchen A; He, Lucy; Cominelli, Fabio; Di Martino, Luca; Djuric, Zora; Milne, Ginger L; Chance, Mark; Sanabria, Juan; Dealwis, Chris; Mikkola, Debra; Naidoo, Jacinth; Wei, Shuguang; Tai, Hsin-Hsiung; Gerson, Stanton L; Ready, Joseph M; Posner, Bruce; Willson, James K V; Markowitz, Sanford D

    2015-06-12

    Agents that promote tissue regeneration could be beneficial in a variety of clinical settings, such as stimulating recovery of the hematopoietic system after bone marrow transplantation. Prostaglandin PGE2, a lipid signaling molecule that supports expansion of several types of tissue stem cells, is a candidate therapeutic target for promoting tissue regeneration in vivo. Here, we show that inhibition of 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15-PGDH), a prostaglandin-degrading enzyme, potentiates tissue regeneration in multiple organs in mice. In a chemical screen, we identify a small-molecule inhibitor of 15-PGDH (SW033291) that increases prostaglandin PGE2 levels in bone marrow and other tissues. SW033291 accelerates hematopoietic recovery in mice receiving a bone marrow transplant. The same compound also promotes tissue regeneration in mouse models of colon and liver injury. Tissues from 15-PGDH knockout mice demonstrate similar increased regenerative capacity. Thus, 15-PGDH inhibition may be a valuable therapeutic strategy for tissue regeneration in diverse clinical contexts.

  2. Stretch-induced prostaglandins and protein turnover in cultured skeletal muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandenburgh, Herman H.; Hatfaludy, Sophia; Sohar, Istvan; Shansky, Janet

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to determine whether mechanical stimulation of cultured muscle cells influences prostaglandin efflux rates and whether they are related to stretch-induced alterations in protein turnover rates. The materials and methods of the experiment, including cell cultures, mechanical stimulation, protein synthesis, and degradation assays are outlined, and emphasis is placed on the effect of short-term mechanical stimulation in basal medium prostaglandin efflux from cultured skeletal muscle and stretch-induced alterations in prostaglandins efflux in complete medium. The major finding of the study is that mechanical stimulation of tissue-cultured skeletal-muscle cells under conditions inducing skeletal-muscle hypertropy increases the efflux of PGE(2) and PGE(2-alpha) but not 6-keto-PGF(1-alpha), the prostacyclin product.

  3. High-Throughput Quantification of Bioactive Lipids by MALDI Mass Spectrometry: Application to Prostaglandins

    PubMed Central

    Manna, Joseph D.; Reyzer, Michelle L.; Latham, Joey C.; Weaver, C. David; Marnett, Lawrence J.; Caprioli, Richard M.

    2011-01-01

    Analysis and quantification of analytes in biological systems is a critical component of metabolomic investigations of cell function. The most widely used methods employ chromatographic separation followed by mass spectrometric analysis, which requires significant time for sample preparation and sequential chromatography. We introduce a novel high-throughput, separation-free methodology based on MALDI mass spectrometry that allows for the parallel analysis of targeted metabolomes. Proof-of-concept is demonstrated by analysis of prostaglandins and glyceryl prostaglandins. Derivatization to incorporate a charged moiety into ketone-containing prostaglandins dramatically increases the signal-to-noise ratio relative to underivatized samples. This resulted in an increased dynamic range (15 fmol – 2000 fmol on plate) and improved linearity (r2= 0.99). The method was adapted for high-throughput screening methods for enzymology and drug discovery. Application to cellular metabolomics was also demonstrated. PMID:21770391

  4. Inhibition of the Prostaglandin Degrading Enzyme 15-PGDH Potentiates Tissue Regeneration *

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yongyou; Desai, Amar; Yang, Sung Yeun; Bae, Ki Beom; Antczak, Monika I.; Fink, Stephen P.; Tiwari, Shruti; Willis, Joseph E.; Williams, Noelle S.; Dawson, Dawn M.; Wald, David; Chen, Wei-Dong; Wang, Zhenghe; Kasturi, Lakshmi; Larusch, Gretchen A.; He, Lucy; Cominelli, Fabio; Di Martino, Luca; Djuric, Zora; Milne, Ginger L.; Chance, Mark; Sanabria, Juan; Dealwis, Chris; Mikkola, Debra; Naidoo, Jacinth; Wei, Shuguang; Tai, Hsin-Hsiung; Gerson, Stanton L.; Ready, Joseph M.; Posner, Bruce; Willson, James K. V.; Markowitz, Sanford D.

    2015-01-01

    Tissue regeneration is a medical challenge faced in injury from disease and during medical treatments such as bone marrow transplantation. Prostaglandin PGE2, which supports expansion of several types of tissue stem cells, is a candidate therapeutic target for promoting tissue regeneration in vivo. Here we show that inhibition of 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15-PGDH), a prostaglandin-degrading enzyme, potentiates tissue regeneration in multiple organs in mice. In a chemical screen, we identify a small-molecule inhibitor of 15-PGDH (SW033291) that increases prostaglandin PGE2 levels in bone marrow and other tissues. SW033291 accelerates hematopoietic recovery in mice receiving a bone marrow transplant. SW033291 also promotes tissue regeneration in mouse models of colon and liver injury. Tissues from 15-PGDH knockout mice demonstrate similar increased regenerative capacity. These findings raise the possibility that inhibiting 15-PGDH could be a useful therapeutic strategy in several distinct clinical settings. PMID:26068857

  5. Promising alternative clinical uses of prostaglandin F2α analogs: beyond the eyelashes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Young M; Diehl, Joseph; Levins, Paul C

    2015-04-01

    Prostaglandin F2α analogs, commonly prescribed for glaucoma treatment, have been shown to induce side effects such as cutaneous hypertrichosis and hyperpigmentation. Therefore, these medications have theoretic applications in the treatment of alopecia and disorders of hypopigmentation. We reviewed the literature to find original studies assessing the use of prostaglandin F2α analogs in these settings. Studies and reports were analyzed in regards to androgenic alopecia, alopecia areata, chemotherapy-induced alopecia, vitiligo, and hypopigmented scarring. Based on the results of these studies, and consideration of pathophysiologic mechanism, the most promising applications for prostaglandin F2α analogs include androgenic alopecia, chemotherapy-induced alopecia, and alopecia areata concurrently treated with corticosteroids.

  6. Prostaglandins A1 and E1 influence gene expression in an established insect cell line (BCIRL-HzAM1)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In work to determine the biochemical mechanisms of prostaglandin (PG) action in insect cells, we posed the hypothesis that prostaglandins (PGs) influence gene expression. In separate experiments, we exposed the BCIRL-HzAM1 cell line (derived from pupal ovarian tissue of the cotton bollworm, Helicov...

  7. Dendritic cells express hematopoietic prostaglandin D synthase and function as a source of prostaglandin D2 in the skin.

    PubMed

    Shimura, Chieko; Satoh, Takahiro; Igawa, Ken; Aritake, Kosuke; Urade, Yoshihiro; Nakamura, Masataka; Yokozeki, Hiroo

    2010-01-01

    Prostaglandin D2 (PGD2), an arachidonic acid metabolite, has been implicated in allergic responses. A major source of PGD2 in the skin is mast cells that express hematopoietic PGD synthase (H-PGDS). In this study, we show the expression of H-PGDS in human dendritic cells (DCs) and the regulatory mechanisms by which DCs produce PGD2. We detected H-PGDS in epidermal Langerhans cells, dermal DCs, plasmacytoid DCs, and myeloid DCs. Monocyte-derived DCs rapidly secreted PGD2 when stimulated with the calcium ionophore A23187. More importantly, pretreatment of monocyte-derived DCs with PMA (phorbol 12-myrisate 13-acetate) synergistically enhanced the rapid PGD2 secretion induced by A23187, whereas PMA alone did not induce PGD2 secretion. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) reduced H-PGDS expression, but interferon-gamma followed by LPS induced significant PGD2 production in a delayed time course at 6 hours. This effect was associated with inhibition of LPS-induced H-PGDS reduction. Interestingly, an irritant compound, SDS, also induced a rapid PGD2 release. PGD2 synergistically enhanced CCL22/macrophage-derived chemokine synthesis in interferon-gamma-treated human keratinocytes. In addition, bone marrow-derived DCs from wild-type mice stimulated lymph node cells to produce higher amounts of interleukin-17 than did DCs from mice lacking the H-PGDS gene. Thus, DCs could be an important source of skin PGD2 and may mediate or regulate skin inflammation by releasing PGD2 in response to various stimuli, contributing to the innate and/or acquired immune responses.

  8. Curcumin blocks prostaglandin E2 biosynthesis through direct inhibition of the microsomal prostaglandin E2 synthase-1.

    PubMed

    Koeberle, Andreas; Northoff, Hinnak; Werz, Oliver

    2009-08-01

    Prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) plays a crucial role in the apparent link between tumor growth and chronic inflammation. Cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 and microsomal PGE(2) synthase-1, which are overexpressed in many cancers, are functionally coupled and thus produce massive PGE(2) in various tumors. Curcumin, a polyphenolic beta-diketone from tumeric with anti-carcinogenic and anti-inflammatory activities, was shown to suppress PGE(2) formation and to block the expression of COX-2 and of microsomal PGE(2) synthase-1. Here, we identified microsomal PGE(2) synthase-1 as a molecular target of curcumin and we show that inhibition of microsomal PGE(2) synthase-1 activity is the predominant mechanism of curcumin to suppress PGE(2) biosynthesis. Curcumin reversibly inhibited the conversion of PGH(2) to PGE(2) by microsomal PGE(2) synthase-1 in microsomes of interleukin-1beta-stimulated A549 lung carcinoma cells with an IC(50) of 0.2 to 0.3 micromol/L. Closely related polyphenols (e.g., resveratrol, coniferyl alcohol, eugenol, rosmarinic acid) failed in this respect, and isolated ovine COX-1 and human recombinant COX-2 were not inhibited by curcumin up to 30 micromol/L. In lipopolysaccharide-stimulated human whole blood, curcumin inhibited COX-2-derived PGE(2) formation from endogenous or from exogenous arachidonic acid, whereas the concomitant formation of COX-2-mediated 6-keto PGF(1)alpha and COX-1-derived 12(S)-hydroxy-5-cis-8,10-trans-heptadecatrienoic acid was suppressed only at significant higher concentrations. Based on the key function of PGE(2) in inflammation and carcinogenesis, inhibition of microsomal PGE(2) synthase-1 by curcumin provides a molecular basis for its anticarcinogenic and anti-inflammatory activities.

  9. Foley catheter balloon vs locally applied prostaglandins for cervical ripening and labor induction: a systematic review and metaanalysis.

    PubMed

    Vaknin, Zvi; Kurzweil, Yaffa; Sherman, Dan

    2010-11-01

    We performed a metaanalysis of publications comparing the efficacy and safety of cervical ripening and labor induction by Foley catheter balloon (FCB) vs locally applied prostaglandins (LAPG) in the third trimester of pregnancy. Twenty-seven randomized controlled trials (1966-2008; 3532 participants) were selected from MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CENTRAL searches. There was no significant difference between FCB and LAPG in cesarean delivery rates. LAPG had a significantly increased risk of excessive uterine activity (P = .001). FCB had a significantly higher risk of oxytocin induction/augmentation during labor (P = .0002). Cervical prostaglandin-E2 was less effective (P = .04), and vaginal prostaglandin-E1 bore a significantly higher risk of excessive uterine activity (P < .0001) and meconium staining (P = .04). We concluded that FCB and LAPG result in similar cesarean delivery rates, that FCB bears a higher risk of oxytocin use for labor induction and/or augmentation, and that LAPG carries a higher risk of contraction abnormalities.

  10. Morphologic study of changes of collagenous tissue in the amnion and cervix during prostaglandin-induced abortion and delivery.

    PubMed

    Manabe, Y; Yoshida, Y

    1990-07-01

    Marked dissociation of the cervical collagenous tissue during prostaglandin-induced abortion is well recognized, but the response of collagenous tissue of the amnion to prostaglandin treatment is not known. A morphologic study of amniotic collagenous tissue was performed after prostaglandin-induced abortion and prostaglandin-induced term delivery. The collagenous fibers of the amnion were found to be closely packed with no ground substances and formed in a thick layer. Cervical collagenous tissue of the same patients showed a marked dissociation of fibers and abundant ground substance. The fetus was often delivered within a complete sac at midtrimester. These findings suggest differences in collagenous tissue responses to prostaglandin treatment between the amnion and cervix. PMID:2375370

  11. [Role of interstitial cells in prostaglandin synthesis in the kidney medulla].

    PubMed

    Sokolova, R I; Vikhert, A M

    1976-01-01

    An electron-microscopic study of the interstitial cells of the medulla of the kidneys was carried out after the administration of the inhibitor of prostaglandine synthesis -- indometacine. Under these conditions the amount of lipid granules in the interstitial cells increased significantly. The authors consider the results of study to be an evident proof of participation of lipid granules in the synthetic function of the interstitial cells as a "depôt" of a chemical precursor of prostaglandines synthesized by the interstitial cells.

  12. Melittin stimulates liver glycogenolysis and the release of prostaglandin D2 and thromboxane B2.

    PubMed Central

    García-Sáinz, J A; Hernández-Sotomayor, S M; Macías-Silva, M

    1990-01-01

    Melittin stimulates glycogenolysis and induces vasoconstriction in perfused rat liver. The effect was rapid and associated with production and release of prostaglandin D2 and thromboxane B2. Indomethacin blocked the release of these eicosanoids and the stimulation of glycogenolysis induced by melittin. Ibuprofen blocked the release of prostaglandin D2 induced by melittin and markedly attenuated that of thromboxane B2. Interestingly, the initial burst of glucose output induced by melittin was not inhibited by ibuprofen, although the duration of the glycogenolytic action of the peptide was greatly diminished. PMID:2375756

  13. [Change in the estrous cycle of mice under the effect of prostaglandin F2 alpha].

    PubMed

    Persianinov, L S; Massal'skaia, L M

    1976-01-01

    It was shown that specific reception in female mice to prostaglandine F2alpha maturated in the process of ontogenesis since the vaginal reaction and the weight of the reproductive organs in the immature female animals failed to alter under its effect. In the sexually mature mice prostaglandine F2alpha arrested the course of the estral cycle and caused an untimely occurrence of the next estrus for a more prolonged time than normal, irrespective of the phase of the estral cycle during which it was administered.

  14. [Methods of artificial termination of pregnancy with special consideration of the use of prostaglandin (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Kepp, R

    1976-09-01

    For termination of a pregnancy up until the 12th week, the method of choice is suction curettage. The dilation of the cervical canal is made easier and sometimes the embryo is aborted if a viscid preparation containing Prostaglandin F 22 is injected intracervically 12 hours prior to the scheduled procedure. For termination of pregnancy after the 14th week, prostaglandin is superior to all other methods. It can be used intraamnially, extra-amnially or intravenously. Not enough information and experience is available in Europe regarding the intravaginal application.

  15. The influence of pre-induction vaginal prostaglandin E2 gel upon subsequent labour.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, I Z; Embrey, M P

    1978-09-01

    Eight hundred and three patients with singleton viable pregnancies and fetal cephalic presentation were given prostaglandin E2 in viscous gel by intravaginal instillation the evening before planned surgical induction. When the cervix was 'ripe', surgical induction was avoided in 65.9 per cent of primigravidae and 87.5 per cent of multigravidae; the administration of epidural analgesia was less frequent, the rate of spontaneous vaginal delivery greater, the Caesarean section rate lower, and the state of the newborn at delivery better than in those patients who required surgical induction. Side effects attributable to the prostaglandin gel were rare as were complications.

  16. Cloning and expression of the rabbit prostaglandin EP2 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Youfei; Stillman, Brett A; Zhang, Yahua; Schneider, André; Saito, Osamu; Davis, Linda S; Redha, Reyadh; Breyer, Richard M; Breyer, Matthew D

    2002-01-01

    Background Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) has multiple physiologic roles mediated by G protein coupled receptors designated E-prostanoid, or "EP" receptors. Evidence supports an important role for the EP2 receptor in regulating fertility, vascular tone and renal function. Results The full-length rabbit EP2 receptor cDNA was cloned. The encoded polypeptide contains 361 amino acid residues with seven hydrophobic domains. COS-1 cells expressing the cloned rabbit EP2 exhibited specific [3H]PGE2 binding with a Kd of 19.1± 1.7 nM. [3H]PGE2 was displaced by unlabeled ligands in the following order: PGE2>>PGD2=PGF2α=iloprost. Binding of [3H]PGE2 was also displaced by EP receptor subtype selective agonists with a rank order of affinity consistent with the EP2 receptor (butaprost>AH13205>misoprostol>sulprostone). Butaprost free acid produced a concentration-dependent increase in cAMP accumulation in rabbit EP2 transfected COS-1 cells with a half-maximal effective concentration of 480 nM. RNase protection assay revealed high expression in the ileum, spleen, and liver with lower expression in the kidney, lung, heart, uterus, adrenal gland and skeletal muscle. In situ hybridization localized EP2 mRNA to the uterine endometrium, but showed no distinct localization in the kidney. EP2 mRNA expression along the nephron was determined by RT-PCR and its expression was present in glomeruli, MCD, tDL and CCD. In cultured cells EP2 receptor was not detected in collecting ducts but was detected in renal interstitial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells. EP2 mRNA was also detected in arteries, veins, and preglomerular vessels of the kidney. Conclusion EP2 expression pattern is consistent with the known functional roles for cAMP coupled PGE2 effects in reproductive and vascular tissues and renal interstitial cells. It remains uncertain whether it is also expressed in renal tubules. PMID:12097143

  17. CCSI Risk Estimation: An Application of Expert Elicitation

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, David W.; Dalton, Angela C.

    2012-10-01

    The Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative (CCSI) is a multi-laboratory simulation-driven effort to develop carbon capture technologies with the goal of accelerating commercialization and adoption in the near future. One of the key CCSI technical challenges is representing and quantifying the inherent uncertainty and risks associated with developing, testing, and deploying the technology in simulated and real operational settings. To address this challenge, the CCSI Element 7 team developed a holistic risk analysis and decision-making framework. The purpose of this report is to document the CCSI Element 7 structured systematic expert elicitation to identify additional risk factors. We review the significance of and established approaches to expert elicitation, describe the CCSI risk elicitation plan and implementation strategies, and conclude by discussing the next steps and highlighting the contribution of risk elicitation toward the achievement of the overarching CCSI objectives.

  18. Spoonerisms as Sequencer Conflicts: Evidence from Artifically Elicited Errors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baars, Bernard J.; Motley, Michael T.

    1976-01-01

    Presents evidence that spoonerisms result from a conflict in word sequencing that carries through to phoneme sequencing, and in the process illustrates the use of some techniques for the experimental elicitation of spoonerisms. (Author/RK)

  19. Prostaglandins induce early growth response 1 transcription factor mediated microsomal prostaglandin E2 synthase up-regulation for colorectal cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Stamatakis, Konstantinos; Jimenez-Martinez, Marta; Jimenez-Segovia, Alba; Chico-Calero, Isabel; Conde, Elisa; Galán-Martínez, Javier; Ruiz, Julia; Pascual, Alejandro; Barrocal, Beatriz; López-Pérez, Ricardo; García-Bermejo, María Laura; Fresno, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase2 (COX2) has been associated with cell growth, invasiveness, tumor progression and metastasis of colorectal carcinomas. However, the downstream prostaglandin (PG)-PG receptor pathway involved in these effects is poorly characterized. We studied the PG-pathway in gene expression databases and we found that PTGS2 (prostaglandin G/H synthase and cyclooxygenase) and PTGES (prostaglandin E synthase) are co-expressed in human colorectal tumors. Moreover, we detected that COX2 and microsomal Prostaglandin E2 synthase 1 (mPGES1) proteins are both up-regulated in colorectal human tumor biopsies. Using colon carcinoma cell cultures we found that COX2 overexpression significantly increased mPGES1 mRNA and protein. This up-regulation was due to an increase in early growth response 1 (EGR1) levels and its transcriptional activity. EGR1 was induced by COX2-generated PGF2α. A PGF2α receptor antagonist, or EGR1 silencing, inhibited the mPGES1 induction by COX2 overexpression. Moreover, using immunodeficient mice, we also demonstrated that both COX2- and mPGES1-overexpressing carcinoma cells were more efficient forming tumors. Our results describe for the first time the molecular pathway correlating PTGS2 and PTGES in colon cancer progression. We demonstrated that in this pathway mPGES1 is induced by COX2 overexpression, via autocrine PGs release, likely PGF2α, through an EGR1-dependent mechanism. This signaling provides a molecular explanation to PTGS2 and PTGES association and contribute to colon cancer advance, pointing out novel potential therapeutic targets in this oncological context. PMID:26498686

  20. The new vaccines: building viruses that elicit antitumor immunity

    PubMed Central

    Restifo, Nicholas P

    2007-01-01

    Whereas cancer cells are poor immunogens, some viruses are capable of eliciting powerful and lifelong immunity. Recombinant viruses and plasmid DNA encoding tumor-associated antigens can elicit powerful and specific immune responses that can be enhanced by the use of cytokines and costimulatory molecules. These immune responses have destroyed growing tumor cells in experimental animal models. For the first time, immunotherapeutic strategies that employ recombinant viruses are being tested in clinical trials with cancer patients. PMID:8902391

  1. Elicitation of natural language representations of uncertainty using computer technology

    SciTech Connect

    Tonn, B.; Goeltz, R.; Travis, C.; Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN )

    1989-01-01

    Knowledge elicitation is an important aspect of risk analysis. Knowledge about risks must be accurately elicited from experts for use in risk assessments. Knowledge and perceptions of risks must also be accurately elicited from the public in order to intelligently perform policy analysis and develop and implement programs. Oak Ridge National Laboratory is developing computer technology to effectively and efficiently elicit knowledge from experts and the public. This paper discusses software developed to elicit natural language representations of uncertainty. The software is written in Common Lisp and resides on VAX Computers System and Symbolics Lisp machines. The software has three goals, to determine preferences for using natural language terms for representing uncertainty; likelihood rankings of the terms; and how likelihood estimates are combined to form new terms. The first two goals relate to providing useful results for those interested in risk communication. The third relates to providing cognitive data to further our understanding of people's decision making under uncertainty. The software is used to elicit natural language terms used to express the likelihood of various agents causing cancer in humans and cancer resulting in various maladies, and the likelihood of everyday events. 6 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. The role of synthetic prostaglandines in the induction of therapeutical miscarriage.

    PubMed

    Rolfini, G; Rolfini, E; Letta, C

    1995-01-01

    The Authors tell about their experience on the use of prostaglandins in patients admitted to the fourth Division of the II Institute of the Maternity Home of the Umberto I General Hospital in Rome, suffering from fetal pathologies not compatible with an autonomous life. They describe the effects of the drugs used, underlying their effectiveness in the induction of therapeutical miscarriage.

  3. [The inhibition of prostaglandin induced uterine contractions by diazoxide in vitro (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Schneider-Affeld, F; Rüttgers, H; Hter, J; Kubli, F

    1977-02-01

    The tocolytic efficiency of Diazoxide, a benzothiadiazine derivative with pronounced musculotropic action, was tested on the isolated uteri of non-gravid and gravid rats. Regular uterine contractions were induced by the prostaglandines E2 and F2 alpha. Their amplitude and frequency could be suppressed totally or subtotally. Contraction intervals lasted 4--22 min. The basal tone was reduced in most cases.

  4. Prostaglandins modify phosphorylation of specific proteins in the insect cell line BCIRL-HzAM1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Prostaglandins (PGs) play crucial roles in vertebrate biology, particularly in immune functions. Because PGs also mediate specific cell functions in insect immunity, we are investigating how these signaling molecules affect insect cells. We reported that PGs, notably PGA1, PGA2, and PGE1, up and/or ...

  5. Prostaglandin E2 inhibits tumor necrosis factor-alpha RNA through PKA type I.

    PubMed

    Stafford, Jennifer B; Marnett, Lawrence J

    2008-02-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) is a cytokine that may contribute to the pathogenesis of septic shock, rheumatoid arthritis, cancer, and diabetes. Prostaglandins endogenously produced by macrophages act in an autocrine fashion to limit TNF-alpha production. We investigated the timing and signaling pathway of prostaglandin-mediated inhibition of TNF-alpha production in Raw 264.7 and J774 macrophages. TNF-alpha mRNA levels were rapidly modulated by PGE(2) or carbaprostacylin. PGE(2) or carbaprostacyclin prevented and rapidly terminated on-going TNF-alpha gene transcription within 15 min of prostaglandin treatment. Selective activation of PKA type I, but not PKA type II or Epac, with chemical analogs of cAMP was sufficient to inhibit LPS-induced TNF-alpha mRNA levels. The mechanisms by which prostaglandins limit TNF-alpha mRNA levels may underlie endogenous regulatory mechanisms that limit inflammation, and may have important implications for understanding chronic inflammatory disease pathogenesis. PMID:18060853

  6. Use of Prostaglandin E2 in the Management of Missed Abortion, Missed Labour, and Hydatidiform Mole

    PubMed Central

    Karim, S. M. M.

    1970-01-01

    Treatment of six cases of missed abortion and one case of hydatidiform mole with intravenous infusion of prostaglandin E2 resulted in complete abortion in all cases. Of 15 patients with missed labour, 14 were delivered successfully with similar treatment. The technique appears to be a safe, reliable, and rapid method of managing missed abortion, missed labour, and hydatidiform mole. PMID:5448780

  7. Interaction among beta-endorphin, nitric oxide and prostaglandins during ovulation in rats.

    PubMed

    Faletti, A G; Mohn, C; Farina, M; Lomniczi, A; Rettori, V

    2003-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between beta-endorphin and nitric oxide (NO) during the ovulatory process in rats. Immature rats were treated with equine chorionic gonadotrophin-hCG to induce ovulation. An intrabursal injection of beta-endorphin stimulated nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity. This effect was completely reversed when naltrexone was co-injected with beta-endorphin. The stimulatory action of beta-endorphin on NOS activity was studied to determine whether it was exerted via prostaglandins. Treatment with prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) completely reversed the beta-endorphin-induced stimulation of NOS activity. Moreover, intrabursal injection of meloxicam, an inhibitor of cyclooxygenase 2, increased NOS activity, but this effect was not altered by co-injection with beta-endorphin. The presence of both endothelial NOS (eNOS) and inducible NOS (iNOS) in the ovary at 10 h after hCG treatment was studied by western blot analysis. Local administration of beta-endorphin inhibited the expression of eNOS protein, whereas expression of iNOS protein was not detectable. Ovarian beta-endorphin content was diminished at 10 h after hCG injection. Treatment with prostaglandin synthesis inhibitors in vivo augmented the ovarian beta-endorphin content. In conclusion, these results indicate that beta-endorphin stimulates the activity of ovarian NOS indirectly by inhibiting prostaglandin production. PMID:12683918

  8. The endometrial expression of prostaglandin cascade components in lactating dairy cows fed different polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Dirandeh, E; Towhidi, A; Pirsaraei, Z Ansari; Saberifar, T; Akhlaghi, A; Roodbari, A Rezaei

    2015-01-15

    Feeding n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) increases the endometrial percentages of linoleic and arachidonic acids (AA), enhances the synthesis of prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α), and improves uterine health. In contrary, the n-3 PUFA, eicosapentaenoic acid, and docosahexaenoic acid may play pivotal roles by suppressing the synthesis of uterine PGF2α, a component being centrally involved in the control of the bovine estrous cycle and in early embryo survival. The objectives of the present study were to determine the effect of feeding a diet enriched in either α-linolenic acid (n-3) or linolenic acid (n-6) on the uterine expression of genes related to prostaglandin cascade and uterine release of PGF2α (measured as 13, 14-dihydro-15-keto PGF2α [PGFM]). From calving to 60 days in milk, cows (n = 24) were fed isonitrogenous, isocaloric, and isolipidic diets that differed in the ratio of n-3/n-6 PUFA. Treatments including palm oil ([PLM]; saturated FA, n = 8), soybean whole roast ([SOY]; n-6, n = 8), and linseed extruded ([LIN]; n-3, n = 8). At 30 days in milk, the ovulatory cycles of cows were synchronized using 2 injections of PGF2α with a 14-day interval. On day 15 postovulation, cows were injected with oxytocin and blood samples were collected to monitor the uterine release of PGF2α (measured as PGFM) and uterine endometrial biopsies were prepared to evaluate the expression of genes related to prostaglandin cascade (prostaglandin F synthase [PGFS], prostaglandin E synthase [PGES], prostaglandin endoperoxide synthase-2 [PGHS-2]), phospholipase A2 (PLA2), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors [PPAR]). Results showed that uterine endometrial PPAR-δ genes were higher in cows fed LIN (3.17-fold) compared with cows fed PLM or SOY (P < 0.05). The messenger RNA (mRNA) level of PGES in the LIN group was threefold as high as those found in SOY and PLM diets (P < 0.05). The mean relative gene expression of PLA2 and PGFS was increased in animals fed the SOY diet (2

  9. Peptide-induced prostaglandin biosynthesis in the renal-vein-constricted kidney

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Stuart I.; Zipser, Robert; Needleman, Philip

    1981-01-01

    The ipsilateral kidney was removed from a rabbit 48h after unilateral partial renal-vein-constriction and was perfused with Krebs–Henseleit media at 37°C. Hourly administration of a fixed dose of bradykinin to the renal-vein-constricted kidney demonstrated a marked time-dependent increase in the release of bioassayable prostaglandin E2 and thromboxane A2 into the venous effluent as compared with the response of the contralateral control kidney. The renal-vein-constricted kidney produced up to 60 times more prostaglandin E2 in response to bradykinin after 6h of perfusion as compared with the contralateral kidney; thromboxane A2 was not demonstratable in the contralateral kidney. Inhibition of protein synthesis de novo in the perfused renal-vein-constricted kidney with cycloheximide lessened the hormone-stimulated increase in prostaglandin E2 by 94% and in thromboxane A2 by 90% at 6h of perfusion. Covalent acetylation of the renal cyclo-oxygenase by prior oral administration of aspirin to the rabbit inhibited initial bradykinin-stimulated prostaglandin E2 biosynthesis 71% at 1h of perfusion. However, there was total recovery from aspirin in the renal-vein-constricted kidney by 2h of perfusion after bradykinin stimulation. Total cyclo-oxygenase activity as measured by [14C]arachidonate metabolism to labelled prostaglandins by renal cortical and renal medullary microsomal fractions prepared from 6h-perfused kidneys demonstrated that renal-vein-constricted kidney-cortical cyclo-oxygenase activity was significantly greater than the contralateral-kidney-cortical conversion, whereas medullary arachidonate metabolism was comparable in both the renal-vein-constricted kidney and contralateral kidney. These data suggest that perfusion of a renal-vein-constricted kidney initiates a time-dependent induction of synthesis of prostaglandin-producing enzymes, which appear to be primarily localized in the renal cortex. The presence of the synthetic capacity to generate very potent

  10. Prostaglandin synthetase and prostacyclin synthetase in mature rat skeletal muscles: immunohistochemical localisation to arterioles, tendons and connective tissues.

    PubMed Central

    McLennan, I S; Macdonald, R E

    1991-01-01

    Mature skeletal muscles produce appreciable quantities of prostacyclin (PGI2) and smaller amounts of PGF2 alpha and PGE2, but the sources of these prostaglandins within skeletal muscle are unknown. Monoclonal antibodies to prostaglandin synthetase and prostacyclin synthetase were used to determine which muscle cells produce prostaglandins. The antibody to prostacyclin synthetase stained the tendon, fascia, epimysium and the arteries leading to the muscles. The endothelia of arterioles were also stained in the tibialis anterior and cremaster but not in the soleus muscles. Only trace levels of immunoreactivity were observed with the antibody to prostaglandin synthetase in normal muscles. However, immunoreactivity was observed in the muscles of rats that had been pretreated with aspirin, a drug that inhibits and stabilises prostaglandin synthetase. In muscles of the aspirin-treated rats, all cell types that were stained by the antiprostacyclin synthetase also reacted weakly with the antibody to prostaglandin synthetase. In addition, some cells in the endomysium were strongly stained with the antiprostaglandin synthetase but not with the antiprostacyclin synthetase. We conclude that (1) at least one aspect of the regulation of blood flow in the microcirculation of slow muscles is different from that of fast muscles, (2) that the tendon and connective tissue is the major source of PGI2 in mature skeletal muscles, and (3) that the prostaglandin-dependent effects of insulin and some other stimuli on skeletal muscle may be mediated by the muscle's arterioles or connective tissue. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:1810931

  11. Prostaglandins attenuate cardiac contractile dysfunction produced by free radical generation but not by hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, K M; Karmazyn, M

    1997-11-01

    The aim of this study was to examine and compare the potential influence of cyclooxygenase or lipoxygenase derived metabolites of arachidonic acid on myocardial injury produced either by a free radical generating system consisting of purine plus xanthine oxidase or that produced by hydrogen peroxide. A free radical generating system consisting of purine (2.3 mM) and xanthine oxidase (10 U/L) as well as hydrogen peroxide (75 microM) produced significant functional changes in the absence of either significant deficits in high energy phosphates or ultrastructural damage. Prostaglandin F2 alpha (30 nM) significantly attenuated both the negative inotropic effect of purine plus xanthine oxidase as well as the ability of the free radical generator to elevate diastolic pressure. An identical concentration of prostaglandin 12 (prostacyclin) significantly reduced diastolic pressure elevation only and had no effect on contractile depression. The salutary effects of the two PGs occurred in the absence of any inhibitory influence on superoxide anion generation produced by the purine and xanthine oxidase reaction. None of prostaglandins modulated the response to hydrogen peroxide. In addition, neither prostaglandin E2 nor leukotrienes exerted any effect on changes produced by either type of oxidative stress. A 5 fold elevation in the concentrations of free radical generators or hydrogen peroxide produced extensive injury as characterized by a virtual total loss in contractility, 400% elevation in diastolic pressure, ultrastructural damage and significant depletions in high energy phosphate content. None of these effects were modulated by eicosanoid treatment. Our results therefore demonstrate a selective ability of both prostaglandin F2 alpha and to a lesser extent prostacyclin, to attenuate dysfunction produced by purine plus xanthine oxidase but not hydrogen peroxide. It is possible that these eicosanoids may represent endogenous protective factors under conditions of enhanced

  12. Influence of prostaglandins and thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) on hormone secretion and growth in wether lambs.

    PubMed

    Davis, S L; Anfinson, M S; Klindt, J; Ohlson, D L

    1977-06-01

    A series of experiments were conducted in ewes and whether (castrate male) lambs to evaluate the influence of prostaglandins on secretion of anabolic hormones and to determine if repeated injections of prostaglandin (PG) F2alpha would chronically influence the secretion of these hormones and perhaps growth rate as well. A single intravenous injection of PGA1 and PGB1 (100 microgram/kg) exerted no significant (P greater than .10) influence on plasma concentrations of prolactin (PRL), growth hormone (GH) or thyrotropin (TSH) in ewes. PGA1, but not PGB1, stimulated an increase in the plasma concentration of insulin. Infusion of PGF2alpha for 5.5 hr into ewes resulted in increased (P less than .05) plasma concentrations of both GH and ARL while TSH and insulin were not significantly influenced. Prostaglandin F2alpha, when injected subcutaneously into wether lambs (10 mg twice weekly) stimulated (P less than .05) plasma GH concentrations after the first injection, but not after 3 weeks of treatment. Changes in plasma PRL or TSH were not observed consistently in the lambs treated chronically with PGF2alpha or TRH. Prostaglandin F2alpha, in the present studies, and PGE1 in previously reported studies (1-3), has been demonstrated to be stimulatory to the secretion of PRL and GH. In contrast, PGA1 and PGB1, which lack an 11-hydroxyl group, failed to influence the secretion of either PRL or GH. It would, therefore, appear that the 11-hydroxyl group is a structural requirement for prostaglandins to influence the secretion of these two hormones in sheep. Treatment with thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH), alone or in combination with PGF 2alpha, significantly (P less than .05) increased growth rate (average daily gains) while PGF2alpha did not, despite the fact that both compounds exerted similar effects on plasma GH.

  13. The Role of Prostaglandins and COX-Enzymes in Chondrogenic Differentiation of ATDC5 Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Caron, Marjolein M. J.; Emans, Pieter J.; Sanen, Kathleen; Surtel, Don A. M.; Cremers, Andy; Ophelders, Daan; van Rhijn, Lodewijk W.; Welting, Tim J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives NSAIDs are used to relieve pain and decrease inflammation by inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX)-catalyzed prostaglandin (PG) synthesis. PGs are fatty acid mediators involved in cartilage homeostasis, however the action of their synthesizing COX-enzymes in cartilage differentiation is not well understood. In this study we hypothesized that COX-1 and COX-2 have differential roles in chondrogenic differentiation. Methods ATDC5 cells were differentiated in the presence of COX-1 (SC-560, Mofezolac) or COX-2 (NS398, Celecoxib) specific inhibitors. Specificity of the NSAIDs and inhibition of specific prostaglandin levels were determined by EIA. Prostaglandins were added during the differentiation process. Chondrogenic outcome was determined by gene- and protein expression analyses. Results Inhibition of COX-1 prevented Col2a1 and Col10a1 expression. Inhibition of COX-2 resulted in decreased Col10a1 expression, while Col2a1 remained unaffected. To explain this difference expression patterns of both COX-enzymes as well as specific prostaglandin concentrations were determined. Both COX-enzymes are upregulated during late chondrogenic differentiation, whereas only COX-2 is briefly expressed also early in differentiation. PGD2 and PGE2 followed the COX-2 expression pattern, whereas PGF2α and TXA2 levels remained low. Furthermore, COX inhibition resulted in decreased levels of all tested PGs, except for PGD2 and PGF2α in the COX-1 inhibited condition. Addition of PGE2 and PGF2α resulted in increased expression of chondrogenic markers, whereas TXA2 increased expression of hypertrophic markers. Conclusions Our findings point towards a differential role for COX-enzymes and PG-production in chondrogenic differentiation of ATDC5 cells. Ongoing research is focusing on further elucidating the functional partition of cyclooxygenases and specific prostaglandin production. PMID:27050768

  14. Inhibition of the Prostaglandin Transporter PGT Lowers Blood Pressure in Hypertensive Rats and Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Yuling; Jasmin, Jean-Francois; Seki, Yoshinori; Lisanti, Michael P.; Charron, Maureen J.; Lefer, David J.; Schuster, Victor L.

    2015-01-01

    Inhibiting the synthesis of endogenous prostaglandins with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs exacerbates arterial hypertension. We hypothesized that the converse, i.e., raising the level of endogenous prostaglandins, might have anti-hypertensive effects. To accomplish this, we focused on inhibiting the prostaglandin transporter PGT (SLCO2A1), which is the obligatory first step in the inactivation of several common PGs. We first examined the role of PGT in controlling arterial blood pressure blood pressure using anesthetized rats. The high-affinity PGT inhibitor T26A sensitized the ability of exogenous PGE2 to lower blood pressure, confirming both inhibition of PGT by T26A and the vasodepressor action of PGE2 T26A administered alone to anesthetized rats dose-dependently lowered blood pressure, and did so to a greater degree in spontaneously hypertensive rats than in Wistar-Kyoto control rats. In mice, T26A added chronically to the drinking water increased the urinary excretion and plasma concentration of PGE2 over several days, confirming that T26A is orally active in antagonizing PGT. T26A given orally to hypertensive mice normalized blood pressure. T26A increased urinary sodium excretion in mice and, when added to the medium bathing isolated mouse aortas, T26A increased the net release of PGE2 induced by arachidonic acid, inhibited serotonin-induced vasoconstriction, and potentiated vasodilation induced by exogenous PGE2. We conclude that pharmacologically inhibiting PGT-mediated prostaglandin metabolism lowers blood pressure, probably by prostaglandin-induced natriuresis and vasodilation. PGT is a novel therapeutic target for treating hypertension. PMID:26121580

  15. [Effect of prostaglandins F2 and F2 alpha on the pentosephosate pathway in human blood platelets].

    PubMed

    Makarov, S A; Kudriavtseva, G V; Kolotilova, A I

    1983-01-01

    Rates of glucose-6-phosphate oxidation and formation of sedoheptulose-7-phosphate were increased after 10 min preincubation of human blood platelets with prostaglandins F2 and F2a. When the preincubation was prolonged up to 60 min, the prostaglandins activating effect was manifested only as an increase in sedoheptulose-7-phosphate content. Preincubation of thrombocytes with dibutyryl-cAMP led to an increase in the rate of ribose-5-phosphate consumption as well as of sedoheptulose-7-phosphate formation. Chlorpromazine hydrochloride decreased the rates of glucose-6-phosphate and 6-phosphogluconate oxidation in extracts of human thrombocytes and inhibited the activating effect of prostaglandins on sedoheptulose-7-phosphate formation.

  16. Inhibitors of phosphodiesterases PDE2, PDE3, and PDE4 do not increase the sinoatrial tachycardia of noradrenaline and prostaglandin PGE₁ in mice.

    PubMed

    Galindo-Tovar, Alejandro; Vargas, María Luisa; Kaumann, Alberto J

    2016-02-01

    Phosphodiesterases PDE2, PDE3, and PDE4 are expressed in murine sinoatrial cells. PDE3 and/or PDE4 reduce heart rate but apparently do not influence the tachycardia mediated through sinoatrial β1- and β2-adrenoceptors despite the high content of sinoatrial cAMP. The function of PDE2 is, however, uncertain. Prostaglandin PGE1 elicits sinoatrial tachycardia through EP receptors, but the control by phosphodiesterases is unknown. We investigated on spontaneously beating right atria of mice the effects of the PDE2 inhibitors Bay 60-7550 and EHNA on basal beating and the tachycardia produced by noradrenaline (3 nM) and PGE1 (1 μM). Bay 60-7550 (1 μM), but not EHNA (10 μM), increased basal sinoatrial beating. EHNA also failed to produce tachycardia in the presence of the adenosine deaminase inhibitor 2'-deoxycoformycin (10 μM), remaining inconclusive whether PDE2 reduces basal sinoatrial beating. Rolipram (10 μM) and cilostamide (300 nM) caused moderate tachycardia. The tachycardia evoked by Bay 60-7550 was similar in the absence and presence of rolipram. Noradrenaline elicited stable tachycardia that was not increased by Bay 60-7550. A stable tachycardia caused by PGE1 was not increased by the inhibitors of PDE2, PDE3, and PDE4. Unlike PDE3 and PDE4 which reduce murine basal sinoatrial beating, a possible effect of PDE2 needs further research. The stable tachycardia produced by noradrenaline and PGE1, together with the lack potentiation by the inhibitors of PDE2, PDE3, and PDE4, suggests that cAMP generated at the receptor compartments is hardly hydrolyzed by these phophodiesterases. Evidence from human volunteers is consistent with this proposal.

  17. 15-Deoxy-{delta}{sup 12,14}-prostaglandin J{sub 2}-induced down-regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase in association with HSP70 induction

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Jinah; Lee, Hyun-Il; Chang, Young-Sun; Lee, Soo Jae; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Park, Sang Ick . E-mail: parksi@nih.go.kr

    2007-05-25

    A natural ligand of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}), 15-deoxy-{delta}{sup 12,14}-prostaglandin J{sub 2} (15d-PGJ{sub 2}), decreases endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression by an unknown mechanism. Here we found that 15d-PGJ{sub 2}-induced eNOS reduction is inversely associated with heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) induction in endothelial cells. Treatment of cells with 15d-PGJ{sub 2} decreased eNOS protein expression in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, but independently of PPAR{gamma} with no effect on mRNA levels. Although 15d-PGJ{sub 2} elicited endothelial apoptosis, inhibition of both pan-caspases and cathepsins failed to reverse reduction of eNOS protein. Interestingly, we observed that 15d-PGJ{sub 2} induced HSP70 in a dose-dependent manner. Immunoprecipitation and heat shock treatment demonstrated that eNOS reduction was strongly related to HSP70 induction. Cellular fractionation revealed that treatment with 15d-PGJ{sub 2} increased eNOS distribution 2.5-fold from soluble to insoluble fractions. These findings provide new insights into mechanisms whereby eNOS regulation by 15d-PGJ{sub 2} is related to HSP70 induction.

  18. Expert elicitation on the uncertainties associated with chronic wasting disease.

    PubMed

    Tyshenko, Michael G; Oraby, Tamer; Darshan, Shalu; Westphal, Margit; Croteau, Maxine C; Aspinall, Willy; Elsaadany, Susie; Krewski, Daniel; Cashman, Neil

    2016-01-01

    A high degree of uncertainty exists for chronic wasting disease (CWD) transmission factors in farmed and wild cervids. Evaluating the factors is important as it helps to inform future risk management strategies. Expert opinion is often used to assist decision making in a number of health, science, and technology domains where data may be sparse or missing. Using the "Classical Model" of elicitation, a group of experts was asked to estimate the most likely values for several risk factors affecting CWD transmission. The formalized expert elicitation helped structure the issues and hence provide a rational basis for estimating some transmission risk factors for which evidence is lacking. Considered judgments regarding environmental transmission, latency of CWD transmission, management, and species barrier were provided by the experts. Uncertainties for many items were determined to be large, highlighting areas requiring more research. The elicited values may be used as surrogate values until research evidence becomes available. PMID:27556566

  19. Expert elicitation on the uncertainties associated with chronic wasting disease.

    PubMed

    Tyshenko, Michael G; Oraby, Tamer; Darshan, Shalu; Westphal, Margit; Croteau, Maxine C; Aspinall, Willy; Elsaadany, Susie; Krewski, Daniel; Cashman, Neil

    2016-01-01

    A high degree of uncertainty exists for chronic wasting disease (CWD) transmission factors in farmed and wild cervids. Evaluating the factors is important as it helps to inform future risk management strategies. Expert opinion is often used to assist decision making in a number of health, science, and technology domains where data may be sparse or missing. Using the "Classical Model" of elicitation, a group of experts was asked to estimate the most likely values for several risk factors affecting CWD transmission. The formalized expert elicitation helped structure the issues and hence provide a rational basis for estimating some transmission risk factors for which evidence is lacking. Considered judgments regarding environmental transmission, latency of CWD transmission, management, and species barrier were provided by the experts. Uncertainties for many items were determined to be large, highlighting areas requiring more research. The elicited values may be used as surrogate values until research evidence becomes available.

  20. Gender differences in preschoolers' help-eliciting communication.

    PubMed

    Thompson, R B

    1999-09-01

    Gender differences in help-eliciting communication and the relationship of such utterances with ability were explored. A sample of 71 preschoolers (38 boys, 33 girls; mean age 4 years 3 months) were videotaped as they solved a difficult puzzle. Spontaneous talk was analyzed for orientation (to whom or to what an utterance referred) and for the frequency of utterances coded as help eliciting. Significant main effects for gender were observed, with more frequent help-eliciting utterances (HEUs) made by the girls than by the boys, particularly HEUs about themselves (self-disclosing). Although the girls' HEUs were not predictive of ability on the puzzle, the boys' were. No gender differences in puzzle-solving ability were observed. Findings are discussed with regard to problem solving and social/linguistic development. PMID:10515069

  1. 15-deoxy prostaglandin J2, the nonenzymatic metabolite of prostaglandin D2, induces apoptosis in keratinocytes of human hair follicles: a possible explanation for prostaglandin D2-mediated inhibition of hair growth.

    PubMed

    Joo, Hyun Woo; Kang, Yoo Ri; Kwack, Mi Hee; Sung, Young Kwan

    2016-07-01

    Recent studies have shown that prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) and its nonenzymatic metabolite, 15-deoxy-Δ(12,14)-prostaglandin J2 (15-dPGJ2), inhibit in vitro growth of explanted human hair follicles and inhibit hair growth in mice through the GPR44 (DP2). However, the underlying mechanism is still unclear. In this study, we first investigated the expression of DP2 in human hair follicles and in cultured follicular cells. We found that DP2 is strongly expressed in the outer root sheath (ORS) cells and weakly expressed in the dermal papilla (DP) cells. We observed slight growth stimulation when ORS and DP cells were treated with PGD2. We also observed slight growth stimulation when DP and ORS cells were treated with low concentrations (0.5 and 1 μM) of 15-dPGJ2. However, 5 μM 15-dPGJ2 inhibited the viability and caused apoptosis of both cell types. Exposure of cultured human hair follicles to 15-dPGJ2 resulted in significant apoptosis in follicular keratinocytes. Altogether, our data provide an evidence that 15-dPGJ2 promotes apoptosis in follicular keratinocytes and provide rationale for developing remedies for the prevention and treatment of hair loss based on DP2 antagonism.

  2. Biologically inspired robots elicit a robust fear response in zebrafish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladu, Fabrizio; Bartolini, Tiziana; Panitz, Sarah G.; Butail, Sachit; Macrı, Simone; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2015-03-01

    We investigate the behavioral response of zebrafish to three fear-evoking stimuli. In a binary choice test, zebrafish are exposed to a live allopatric predator, a biologically-inspired robot, and a computer-animated image of the live predator. A target tracking algorithm is developed to score zebrafish behavior. Unlike computer-animated images, the robotic and live predator elicit a robust avoidance response. Importantly, the robotic stimulus elicits more consistent inter-individual responses than the live predator. Results from this effort are expected to aid in hypothesis-driven studies on zebrafish fear response, by offering a valuable approach to maximize data-throughput and minimize animal subjects.

  3. TGF-beta 1 inhibits both endotoxin-induced prostaglandin synthesis and expression of the TIS10/prostaglandin synthase 2 gene in murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Reddy, S T; Gilbert, R S; Xie, W; Luner, S; Herschman, H R

    1994-02-01

    Activated macrophages produce substantial quantities of paracrine mediators, including cytokines, nitric oxide, and prostaglandins. Transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-beta) is a potent modulator of immune function. TGF-beta inhibits the cytotoxic activity of endotoxin/lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated macrophage cell lines and primary macrophage cultures, reducing their expression of cytokines and nitric oxide. In this report we demonstrate that TGF-beta also attenuates the LPS-induced synthesis and secretion of prostaglandin E2 in murine RAW 264.7 macrophage cells. Macrophage activation also induces accumulation of the recently described ligand-responsive prostaglandin synthase (PGS) TIS10/PGS-2. While TGF-beta alone has no effect on expression from the TIS10/PGS-2 gene, this cytokine inhibits LPS-induced TIS10/PGS-2 protein accumulation and synthesis, as well as LPS-induced TIS10/PGS-2 message accumulation in RAW 264.7 cells. TGF-beta concentrations in the range of 0.1-1.0 ng/ml (4-40 pM) maximally inhibit LPS-induced TIS10/PGS-2 message accumulation. In contrast, neither LPS nor TGF-beta has any effect on the level of PGS-1 (EC 1.14.99.1) message. TGF-beta also attenuates LPS-induced accumulation of unspliced TIS10/PGS-2 transcripts in RAW 264.7 cells, suggesting that this cytokine exerts its effects on TIS10/PGS-2 expression at the transcriptional level. TGF-beta inhibits the LPS-induced accumulation of TIS10/PGS-2 protein and message in cultured murine peritoneal macrophages, as well as in macrophage cell lines.

  4. Release of prostaglandins from the isolated frog ventricle and associated changes in endogenous cyclic nucleotide levels.

    PubMed Central

    Flitney, F W; Singh, J

    1980-01-01

    1. A study has been made of the decline in contractility and some associated metabolic changes which occur in the isolated frog ventricle during the development of hypodynamic depression. 2. The release of two identified prostaglandins (PG), E1 and E2, together with several as yet unknown prostaglandin-related substances (PRS), accompanies the development of hypodynamic depression. There is a close correlation between the extent to which the isometric twitch is depressed and the quantity of prostaglandin released into the superfusate. 3. Fractionation of extracts of 'used' superfusates, using preparative-scale thin-layer chromatography, revealed the presence of six major components, four of which (PGE1 and PGE2 and two unidentified components) were found to be cardioactive and potentiated contraction when tested subsequently on hypodynamic preparations. 4. Two agents which influence prostaglandin biosynthesis, arachidonic acid and indomethacin, are found to affect both the rate at which the hypodynamic state develops and the extent to which the 'steady-state' twitch tension is depressed, in a dose-dependent manner. Indomethacin, a PG-synthetase inhibitor, accelerates the decay and depresses the final 'steady-state' tension attained, whereas arachidonic acid, the principal precursor for prostaglandin biosynthesis, has the converse effects. 5. Measurements of endogenous 3'5'-cyclic nucleotide levels reveal a time-dependent decrease in intracellular adenosine 3'5'-cyclic monophosphate (3'5'-cyclic AMP) and a concomitant increase in guanosine 3'5' cyclic monophosphate (3'5'-cyclic GMP). The decline in isometric twitch tension is paralleled almost exactly by an equivalent reduction in the ratio 3'5'-cyclic AMP: 3'5'-cyclic GMP. 6. Superfusion of isolated ventricles with Ringer solution containing exogenous, lipid-soluble derivatives of 3'5'-cyclic AMP and 3'5'-cyclic GMP affects both the rate of decline of the isometric twitch and the steady-state tension ultimately

  5. Inhibition of microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1 by aminothiazoles decreases prostaglandin E2 synthesis in vitro and ameliorates experimental periodontitis in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kats, Anna; Båge, Tove; Georgsson, Pierre; Jönsson, Jörgen; Quezada, Hernán Concha; Gustafsson, Anders; Jansson, Leif; Lindberg, Claes; Näsström, Karin; Yucel-Lindberg, Tülay

    2013-01-01

    The potent inflammatory mediator prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is implicated in the pathogenesis of several chronic inflammatory conditions, including periodontitis. The inducible enzyme microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1 (mPGES-1), catalyzing the terminal step of PGE2 biosynthesis, is an attractive target for selective PGE2 inhibition. To identify mPGES-1 inhibitors, we investigated the effect of aminothiazoles on inflammation-induced PGE2 synthesis in vitro, using human gingival fibroblasts stimulated with the cytokine IL-1β and a cell-free mPGES-1 activity assay, as well as on inflammation-induced bone resorption in vivo, using ligature-induced experimental periodontitis in Sprague-Dawley rats. Aminothiazoles 4-([4-(2-naphthyl)-1,3-thiazol-2-yl]amino)phenol (TH-848) and 4-(3-fluoro-4-methoxyphenyl)-N-(4-phenoxyphenyl)-1,3-thiazol-2-amine (TH-644) reduced IL-1β-induced PGE2 production in fibroblasts (IC50 1.1 and 1.5 μM, respectively) as well as recombinant mPGES-1 activity, without affecting activity or expression of the upstream enzyme cyclooxygenase-2. In ligature-induced experimental periodontitis, alveolar bone loss, assessed by X-ray imaging, was reduced by 46% by local treatment with TH-848, compared to vehicle, without any systemic effects on PGE2, 6-keto PGF1α, LTB4 or cytokine levels. In summary, these results demonstrate that the aminothiazoles represent novel mPGES-1 inhibitors for inhibition of PGE2 production and reduction of bone resorption in experimental periodontitis, and may be used as potential anti-inflammatory drugs for treatment of chronic inflammatory diseases, including periodontitis.—Kats, A., Båge, T., Georgsson, P., Jönsson, J., Quezada, H. C., Gustafsson, A., Jansson, L., Lindberg, C., Näsström, K., Yucel-Lindberg, T. Inhibition of microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1 by aminothiazoles decreases prostaglandin E2 synthesis in vitro and ameliorates experimental periodontitis in vivo. PMID:23447581

  6. [Changes in prostaglandin systhetase activity in mouse tissues as affected by S-[N-(3-aminopropyl)-2-aminoethyl] thiophosphoric acid].

    PubMed

    Prianishnikova, E N; Zhulanova, Z I; Romantsev, E F

    1980-01-01

    Effect of various concentrations of a radioprotector S-[N-(3 aminopropyl)-2-aminoethyl] thiophosphoric acid on the activity of prostaglandine synthetase was studied in mouse liver microsomes as well as in the soluble fractions of testicules and brain in vitro. The activity of prostaglandine synthetase was estimated by monitoring the formation of labelled PGF2 alpha and PGE2 from I-14C-arachidonic acid. The radioprotector at concentration 1.66 mg/ml stimulated formation of PGF2 alpha in all the tissues studied. At the lower concentrations of the radioprotector only slight stimulation of the biosynthesis of prostaglandines in testicules was noted. No effect on their synthesis in the brain soluble fraction could be observed while in the liver microsomes it was inhibited. The radioprotective substance studied apparently affected the cyclooxygenase activity, which is a key enzyme in the prostaglandine-synthesizing system.

  7. [Cerebral malaria with renal insufficiency in a 5 months pregnant woman. The use of prostaglandines for delivery (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Thonnier, C; Bruneu, A; Valmary, J; Capdevielle, P; Delprat, J

    1979-01-01

    Report of a typical case of cerebral malaria with coma during 3 days, pneumopathy and renal insufficiency with failure of concentration. The delivery of a dead foetus has been started by prostaglandines.

  8. The Elicited Language Inventory and the Influence of Contextual Cues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Lauren K.; Weber-Olsen, Marcia

    1980-01-01

    The Elicited Language Inventory (ELI) was administered in standardized fashion and in a modified procedure with contextually supported cues and grammatical morpheme use under the two ELI presentation conditions was compared with use of the same morphemes in spontaneous speech. Results favored modified use of the ELI with contextually cued items…

  9. Clinicians as Communication Partners: Developing a Mediated Discourse Elicitation Protocol

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hengst, Julie A.; Duff, Melissa C.

    2007-01-01

    This article presents the development and piloting of a mediated discourse elicitation protocol. Grounded in situated theories of communication and informed by mediated discourse analysis, this protocol selectively samples familiar discourse types in a manner designed to preserve interactional aspects of communication. Critically, the mediated…

  10. Eliciting Students' Beliefs about Who Is Good at Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morge, Shelby P.

    2007-01-01

    This article highlights a series of activities designed to elicit students' mathematics-related beliefs, particularly those related to gender. As a result of the activities, females in upper-level classes rated themselves as having less confidence than males, and viewing a movie clip was sufficient for some students to modify their descriptions of…

  11. Modification of commercially available simulators to elicit decision making behavior.

    PubMed

    Salud, Jonathan; Ononye, Chiagozie; Salud, Lawrence; Pugh, Carla

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, simulation training has emerged as an innovative method for decreasing error and teaching complex procedures. Simulation has also been a valuable tool for evaluating investigatory and analytic thinking. By adding a specific, clinically oriented modification to a commercially available simulator, we were able to elicit first-year emergency medicine resident perceptions, actions, and decisions.

  12. Eliciting Design Patterns for E-Learning Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Retalis, Symeon; Georgiakakis, Petros; Dimitriadis, Yannis

    2006-01-01

    Design pattern creation, especially in the e-learning domain, is a highly complex process that has not been sufficiently studied and formalized. In this paper, we propose a systematic pattern development cycle, whose most important aspects focus on reverse engineering of existing systems in order to elicit features that are cross-validated through…

  13. Eliciting Production of L2 Target Structures through Priming Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonough, Kim; Trofimovich, Pavel; Neumann, Heike

    2015-01-01

    This study focuses on the pedagogical applications of structural priming research in an English for academic purposes (EAP) context, investigating whether priming activities are an effective tool for eliciting production of target grammatical structures. University students across four EAP classes carried out a total of 6 information-exchange…

  14. Computational Support for Early Elicitation and Classification of Tone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bird, Steven; Lee, Haejoong

    2014-01-01

    Investigating a tone language involves careful transcription of tone on words and phrases. This is challenging when the phonological categories--the tones or melodies--have not been identified. Effects such as coarticulation, sandhi, and phrase-level prosody appear as obstacles to early elicitation and classification of tone. This article presents…

  15. Photo-Elicitation: Reflexivity on Method, Analysis, and Graphic Portraits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richard, Veronica M.; Lahman, Maria K. E.

    2015-01-01

    In this methodological discussion, the authors detail and reflect on the processes of using photo-elicitation interviewing as a way to align with positive qualitative methodologies, to gain access to participant beliefs and values, and to highlight participant voices through their choices of words and visuals. A review of the literature and an…

  16. Engaging Young Children in Research through Photo Elicitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pyle, Angela

    2013-01-01

    Embracing the new sociology of childhood, this paper describes a participatory research method built on a belief in the competency of young children. The paper begins with a critical review of the photo elicitation literature exploring the varied levels of children's participation. Drawing on the strengths of the previous research, a…

  17. Creating a Framework: Art Therapy Elicits the Narrative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harber, Karen

    2011-01-01

    A case study illustrates how art therapy was used to elicit the narrative of an adolescent male student in transition from incarceration to a transfer school setting. Childhood trauma was addressed in individual sessions and within a literacy group co-led by a reading specialist. The art therapist responded to the client's needs by broadening the…

  18. Stimulus Duration Preference at Electrode Sites Yielding Elicited Behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, V. C.

    1970-01-01

    The latency to display eating or drinking during hypothalamic stimulation was compared with the preferred duration of the same stimulus intensity in a self-stimulation situation. All the animals preferred longer stimulus durations than those required to elicit eating or drinking

  19. The Role of Elicited Verbal Imitation in Toddlers' Word Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodges, Rosemary; Munro, Natalie; Baker, Elise; McGregor, Karla; Docking, Kimberley; Arciuli, Joanne

    2016-01-01

    This study is about the role of elicited verbal imitation in toddler word learning. Forty-eight toddlers were taught eight nonwords linked to referents. During training, they were asked to imitate the nonwords. Naming of the referents was tested at three intervals (one minute later [uncued], five minutes, and 1-7 days later [cued]) and recognition…

  20. A Study of the Affective Responses Elicited by Occupational Stimuli

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoon, Craig G.

    1976-01-01

    The semantic differential was used to assess the properties of affect elicited by occupational stimuli. Vocationally committed men studying medicine, business, and engineering responded to a semantic differential containing occupational concepts. Results show a semantic space for all three groups composed of three orthogonal dimensions of affect…

  1. Elicited Role-Play of Commands and Requests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strage, Amy; And Others

    Children's ability to understand the implied messages in indirect speech was investigated using a role play elicitation task. Subjects were asked to complete story endings using puppets for several scenerios involving a mother and her four children. In each of the stories the mother gives an indirect directive which is supposed to get the children…

  2. Elicited Production of Relative Clauses in Children with Williams Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zukowski, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    Relative clauses have been implicated alternately as a strength and a weakness in the language of people with Williams Syndrome (WS). To clarify the facts, an elicited production test was administered to 10 people with WS (age 10-16 years), 10 typically developing children (age 4-7 years), and 12 typically developing adults. Nearly every WS…

  3. Using Automatic Speech Recognition Technology with Elicited Oral Response Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Troy L.; Davies, Randall S.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the use of automatic speech recognition (ASR) scored elicited oral response (EOR) tests to assess the speaking ability of English language learners. It also examined the relationship between ASR-scored EOR and other language proficiency measures and the ability of the ASR to rate speakers without bias to gender or native…

  4. Elicitation Support Requirements of Multi-Expertise Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bitter-Rijpkema, Marlies; Martens, Rob; Jochems, Wim

    2005-01-01

    Tools to support knowledge elicitation are used more and more in situations where employees or students collaborate using the computer. Studies indicate that differences exist between experts and novices regarding their methods of work and reasoning. However, the commonly preferred approach tends to deal with team members as a single system with…

  5. A Task that Elicits Reasoning: A Dual Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yankelewitz, Dina; Mueller, Mary; Maher, Carolyn A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on the forms of reasoning elicited as fourth grade students in a suburban district and sixth grade students in an urban district worked on similar tasks involving reasoning with the use of Cuisenaire rods. Analysis of the two data sets shows similarities in the reasoning used by both groups of students on specific tasks, and the…

  6. Teacher Burnout and Self-Efficacy in Eliciting Social Support.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brouwers, Andre; Evers, Will J. G.; Tomic, Welko

    This study examined the relationship between perceived lack of social support, perceived self-efficacy in eliciting support at the workplace, and the three successive burnout symptoms (emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and personal accomplishment) in a sample of 277 Dutch secondary school teachers. The study hypothesized that teachers'…

  7. Preparing Beginning Teachers to Elicit and Interpret Students' Mathematical Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sleep, Laurie; Boerst, Timothy A.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated how teacher education assignments can be designed to support beginning teachers in learning to do the work of teaching. We examined beginners' formative assessment practices--in particular, their eliciting and interpreting of students' mathematical thinking--in the context of an elementary mathematics methods assignment,…

  8. Influence of Epilobium extracts on prostaglandin biosynthesis and carrageenin induced oedema of the rat paw.

    PubMed

    Hiermann, A; Juan, H; Sametz, W

    1986-08-01

    Epilobium species have been used as remedies in folk-medicine for the treatment of pathophysiological processes of the prostata. In this paper the influence of extracts of Herba Epilobii angustifolii L. and Herba Epilobii parviflori Schreb. on prostaglandin biosynthesis and the carrageenin rat paw oedema is described. Aqueous extracts of Herba E. angustifolii reduced the release of prostaglandins I2, E2 and D2 (in the perfused rabbit ear) approximately 5 times more effectively than did similar extracts of Herba E. parviflori. Methanolic extracts were inactive. The aqueous extract of E. angustifolium strongly reduced the carrageenin-induced rat paw oedema whereas that of E. parviflorum was inactive. The chemical nature of the active compound(s) is as yet unknown but flavonoids and sitosterol derivatives can be excluded. PMID:3099091

  9. Antagonist of prostaglandin E2 receptor 4 induces metabolic alterations in liver of mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Ning; Zhang, Limin; An, Yanpeng; Zhang, Lulu; Song, Yipeng; Wang, Yulan; Tang, Huiru

    2015-03-01

    Prostaglandin E2 receptor 4 (EP4) is one of the receptors for prostaglandin E2 and plays important roles in various biological functions. EP4 antagonists have been used as anti-inflammatory drugs. To investigate the effects of an EP4 antagonist (L-161982) on the endogenous metabolism in a holistic manner, we employed a mouse model, and obtained metabolic and transcriptomic profiles of multiple biological matrixes, including serum, liver, and urine of mice with and without EP4 antagonist (L-161982) exposure. We found that this EP4 antagonist caused significant changes in fatty acid metabolism, choline metabolism, and nucleotide metabolism. EP4 antagonist exposure also induced oxidative stress to mice. Our research is the first of its kind to report information on the alteration of metabolism associated with an EP4 antagonist. This information could further our understanding of current and new biological functions of EP4.

  10. Arachidonic acid release and prostaglandin synthesis in a macrophage-like cell line exposed to asbestos.

    PubMed

    Brown, R C; Poole, A

    1984-10-01

    A macrophage-like cell line (P388D1) has been treated with asbestos and the release of arachidonic acid and its metabolites has been studied using two methods. In the first monolayer cultures of the cells were labelled with tritiated arachidonic acid and the release of label into the medium was quantified: secondly the synthesis and release of prostaglandins E2 and F2 alpha were followed using radioimmune assay. Crocidolite asbestos caused the greatest release of tritium while the medium from chrysotile-treated cultures contained more of both prostaglandins. Both of the fibrous dusts were significantly more active in both test systems than were the two 'inert' materials--titanium dioxide and milled sample of crocidolite. It is suggested that these phenomena are due to the effect of mineral dusts on phospholipase activity and that differences in this activity are associated with differences in the pathogenicity of various mineral dusts. PMID:6098173

  11. Ursolic acid from Plantago major, a selective inhibitor of cyclooxygenase-2 catalyzed prostaglandin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Ringbom, T; Segura, L; Noreen, Y; Perera, P; Bohlin, L

    1998-10-01

    A hexane extract of Plantago major was investigated by bioactivity-directed fractionation, using an in vitro cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) catalyzed prostaglandin biosynthesis inhibition assay, and resulted in the isolation of ursolic acid (1). This triterpenoid showed a significant COX-2 inhibitory effect, directly on the enzyme activity, with an IC50 value of 130 microM and a COX-2/COX-1 selectivity ratio of 0.6. The structural isomer oleanolic acid (2) was found to be less active than 1, with an IC50 value of 295 microM, but showed a similar selectivity ratio (0.8). Furthermore, no significant inhibition on COX-2 or COX-1 was observed by the triterpenoid, 18beta-glycyrrhetinic acid (3). The direct inhibitory effect of 1 and 2 on COX-2 catalyzed prostaglandin biosynthesis increased with preincubation, indicating a time-dependent inhibition, while the effect on COX-1 was found to be independent of preincubation time.

  12. Does Prostaglandin D2 hold the cure to male pattern baldness?

    PubMed Central

    Nieves, Ashley; Garza, Luis A.

    2014-01-01

    Lipids in the skin are the most diverse in the entire human body. Their bioactivity in health and disease is underexplored. Prostaglandin D2 has recently been identified as a factor which is elevated in the bald scalp of men with androgenetic alopecia and has the capacity to decrease hair lengthening. An enzyme which synthesizes it, prostaglandin D2 synthase (PTGDS or lipocalin-PGDS) is hormone responsive in multiple other organs. PGD2 has two known receptors, GPR44 and PTGDR. GPR44 was found to be necessary for the decrease in hair growth by PGD2. This creates an exciting opportunity to perhaps create novel treatments for androgenetic alopecia which inhibit the activity of PTGDS, PGD2 or GPR44. This review discusses the current knowledge surrounding PGD2 and future steps needed to translate these findings into novel therapies for patients with androgenetic alopecia. PMID:24521203

  13. Effect of atenolol treatment on urinary prostaglandins E2 and F2 alpha in essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Rathaus, M; Magen, A; Rath-Wolfson, L; Shapira, J; Bernheim, J

    1983-12-01

    The urinary excretion of prostaglandins (PG) E2 and F2 alpha was measured by radioimmunoassay in 15 patients with essential hypertension, before and after 2 and 4 weeks of treatment with the selective beta 1-adrenergic blocker, atenolol. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure, pulse rate and plasma renin activity decreased significantly during the treatment. No change was observed in renal function and electrolyte balance. The 24-hour excretion of PGE2 and PGF2 alpha was also unaffected by the antihypertensive treatment. The above findings, in contrast with those previously observed with another beta-blocker, propranolol, suggest that tubular beta-receptors are not involved in the synthesis of PGs. The different hemodynamic effects of the two drugs are the most likely explanation for the different responses in prostaglandin excretion.

  14. Reduction of cervical resistance by prostaglandin suppositories prior to dilatation for induced abortion.

    PubMed

    Dingfelder, J R; Brenner, W E; Hendricks, C H; Staurovsky, L G

    1975-05-01

    Several recent reports citing increased rates of prematurity among women who have had induced first-trimester abortion suggest that forceful cervical dilatation may result in cervical incompetence in future pregnancy. There appear to be conflicting clinical impressions regarding the effectiveness on cervical softening and the reduction of cervical resistance produced by various prostaglandins. The development of the Electronic Force Monitor which is capable of precise measurement of the forces encountered in overcoming resistance during dilatation provided objective evidence with which to evaluate the effects of vaginally administered prostaglandin E2 and F2alpha suppositories. Suppositories were administered 3 hours prior to cervical dilatation, after which suction curettage was performed. Compared to the nonmedicated control group, patients receiving PGF2alpha suppositories exhibited greatly reduced cervical resistance, in some cases permitting direct introduction of the suction curette without need for any preliminary dilatation. Those patients receiving PGE2 suppositories showed an intermediate degree of cervical softening.

  15. [Vasodilation effects of prostaglandin E1 in patients with precapillary pulmonary hypertension].

    PubMed

    Munclinger, M; Kautzner, J; Serf, B

    1990-04-01

    Prostaglandin E1. (Prostavasin, Schwarz, FRG) was administered in a short-term infusion, 5-30 ng/kg/min., to five patients with precapillary pulmonary hypertension associated with lung disease. Significant pulmonary vasodilatation characterized by a drop of the median pressure in the pulmonary artery by 15% and of the pulmonary vascular resistance by 31% was achieved only in two patients. The authors observed a minimal incidence of side-effects; systemic hypotension observed in three patients was an undesirable manifestaútion. Prostaglandin E1 extends possibilities of a vasodilatating influence on precapillary pulmonary hypertension in lung disease. With regard to the different individual reactivity of patients it should be administered in this indication only under conditions of haemodynamic monitoring.

  16. High-quality crystals of human haematopoietic prostaglandin D synthase with novel inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Sachiko; Tsurumura, Toshiharu; Aritake, Kosuke; Furubayashi, Naoki; Sato, Masaru; Yamanaka, Mari; Hirota, Erika; Sano, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Tomoyuki; Tanaka, Tetsuo; Inaka, Koji; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Urade, Yoshihiro

    2010-07-01

    Human haematopoietic prostaglandin D synthase (H-PGDS; EC 5.3.99.2) produces prostaglandin D(2), an allergic and inflammatory mediator, in mast cells and Th2 cells. H-PGDS has been crystallized with novel inhibitors with half-maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC(50)) in the low nanomolar range by the counter-diffusion method onboard the Russian Service Module on the International Space Station. The X-ray diffraction of a microgravity-grown crystal of H-PGDS complexed with an inhibitor with an IC(50) value of 50 nM extended to 1.1 A resolution at 100 K using SPring-8 synchrotron radiation, which is one of the highest resolutions obtained to date for this protein.

  17. Synthesis of prostaglandin analogues, latanoprost and bimatoprost, using organocatalysis via a key bicyclic enal intermediate.

    PubMed

    Prévost, Sébastien; Thai, Karen; Schützenmeister, Nina; Coulthard, Graeme; Erb, William; Aggarwal, Varinder K

    2015-02-01

    Two antiglaucoma drugs, bimatoprost and latanoprost, which are analogues of the prostaglandin, PGF2α, have been synthesized in just 7 and 8 steps, respectively. The syntheses employ an organocatalytic aldol reaction that converts succinaldehyde into a key bicyclic enal intermediate, which is primed for attachment of the required lower and upper side chains. By utilizing the crystalline lactone, the drug molecules were prepared in >99% ee.

  18. Intraocular pressure dynamics with prostaglandin analogs: a clinical application of the water-drinking test

    PubMed Central

    Özyol, Pelin; Özyol, Erhan; Baldemir, Ercan

    2016-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the clinical applicability of the water-drinking test in treatment-naive primary open-angle glaucoma patients. Methods Twenty newly diagnosed primary open-angle glaucoma patients and 20 healthy controls were enrolled in this prospective study. The water-drinking test was performed at baseline and 6 weeks and 3 months after prostaglandin analog treatment. Peak and fluctuation of intraocular pressure (IOP) measurements obtained with the water-drinking test during follow-up were analyzed. Analysis of variance for repeated measures and paired and unpaired t-tests were used for statistical analysis. Results The mean baseline IOP values in patients with primary open-angle glaucoma were 25.1±4.6 mmHg before prostaglandin analog treatment, 19.8±3.7 mmHg at week 6, and 17.9±2.2 mmHg at month 3 after treatment. The difference in mean baseline IOP of the water-drinking tests was statistically significant (P<0.001). At 6 weeks of prostaglandin analog treatment, two patients had high peak and fluctuation of IOP measurements despite a reduction in baseline IOP. After modifying treatment, patients had lower peak and fluctuation of IOP values at month 3 of the study. Conclusion Peak and fluctuation of IOP in response to the water-drinking test were lower with prostaglandin analogs compared with before medication. The water-drinking test can represent an additional benefit in the management of glaucoma patients, especially by detecting higher peak and fluctuation of IOP values despite a reduced mean IOP. Therefore, it could be helpful as a supplementary method in monitoring IOP in the clinical practice. PMID:27555742

  19. [Concentration of prostaglandins and cyclic adenosine-3',5'-monophosphate in the tissues of rats].

    PubMed

    Komissarenko, V P; Slavnov, V N; Epsheĭn, E V; Malinkovich, V D

    1977-04-01

    The content of prostaglandines (PG) and cyclic 3',5'-adenosine monphosphate (cAMP) was investigated in rat tissues by the radioisotopic method of competitive binding. Maximum quantities of both PG and cAMP were revealed in the same most actively functioning organs: the brain, incretory glands, small intestine. Fatty tissue showed minimum quantities of these substances. Results indicate a close functional relationship between the PG synthesis and adenylatecyclase activity in the body tissues.

  20. Evaluation of prostaglandin biosynthetic activity in canine basilar artery following subarachnoid injection of blood.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, T; Murota, S I; Wakai, S; Asano, T; Sano, K

    1981-11-01

    Transformation of arachidonic acid into prostaglandins was investigated in the basilar artery by incubating sections of artery with carbon-14-labeled arachidonic acid. Thin-layer radiochromatography revealed that, in normal canine basilar arteries, 14C-arachidonic acid was transformed mainly to 6-keto-prostaglandin (PG)F1 alpha, a spontaneous metabolite of prostacyclin (PGI2). Among other prostaglandins, only a small amount of PGF2 alpha was detected, whereas PGD2, PGE2, and thromboxane B2 were not. Arteries removed on Days 3 and 8 after subarachnoid blood injection showed a prostaglandin synthesis profile similar to that in the normal cerebral artery. In borate-buffered saline (0.1M borate buffer, pH 9.0/0.15M NaCl = 1:9, vol/vol), canine basilar artery produced a PGI2-like substance that inhibited adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-induced platelet aggregation. Its anti-aggregatory activity was completely abolished by acidification. Aspirin likewise inhibited production of the anti-aggregatory substance. From these results, it was concluded that the anti-aggregatory activity was due solely to the production of PGI2 by the arterial specimen. Based on the above results, PGI2 biosynthetic activity in the cerebral artery exposed to subarachnoid blood injection was bioassayed by measuring the inhibitory activity of the incubation product upon ADP-induced platelet aggregation following incubation of the arteries in borate-buffered saline for 5 to 30 minutes at 20 degrees C, using synthetic PGI2-Na as a standard. The synthetic activity of PGI2 in the artery exposed to subarachnoid blood injection had diminished remarkably by Days 3 and 8. This diminution of PGI2 synthesis in the cerebral artery may be involved in the pathogenesis of cerebral vasospasm.

  1. Prostaglandin synthesis inhibitors reduce Cannabis and restraint stress induced increase in rat brain serotonin concentrations.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, S K; Bhattacharya, D

    1983-01-01

    Cannabis resin (CI) produced a dose-related increase in rat brain serotonin concentrations, whereas restraint stress produced maximal rise of the neurotransmitter concentrations at 1 h, followed by a tendency to normalise by 4 h. The prostaglandin (PG) synthesis inhibitors, diclofenac and paracetamol, antagonized CI and restraint stress induced rise in serotonin concentrations. The findings lend credence to earlier reports that PG synthesis inhibitors antagonize serotonin-mediated neuropharmacological actions of CI and restraint stress in rats.

  2. Exosomes account for vesicle-mediated transcellular transport of activatable phospholipases and prostaglandins[S

    PubMed Central

    Subra, Caroline; Grand, David; Laulagnier, Karine; Stella, Alexandre; Lambeau, Gérard; Paillasse, Michael; De Medina, Philippe; Monsarrat, Bernard; Perret, Bertrand; Silvente-Poirot, Sandrine; Poirot, Marc; Record, Michel

    2010-01-01

    Exosomes are bioactive vesicles released from multivesicular bodies (MVB) by intact cells and participate in intercellular signaling. We investigated the presence of lipid-related proteins and bioactive lipids in RBL-2H3 exosomes. Besides a phospholipid scramblase and a fatty acid binding protein, the exosomes contained the whole set of phospholipases (A2, C, and D) together with interacting proteins such as aldolase A and Hsp 70. They also contained the phospholipase D (PLD) / phosphatidate phosphatase 1 (PAP1) pathway leading to the formation of diglycerides. RBL-2H3 exosomes also carried members of the three phospholipase A2 classes: the calcium-dependent cPLA2-IVA, the calcium-independent iPLA2-VIA, and the secreted sPLA2-IIA and V. Remarkably, almost all members of the Ras GTPase superfamily were present, and incubation of exosomes with GTPγS triggered activation of phospholipase A2 (PLA2)and PLD2. A large panel of free fatty acids, including arachidonic acid (AA) and derivatives such as prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and 15-deoxy-Δ12,14-prostaglandinJ2 (15-d PGJ2), were detected. We observed that the exosomes were internalized by resting and activated RBL cells and that they accumulated in an endosomal compartment. Endosomal concentrations were in the micromolar range for prostaglandins; i.e., concentrations able to trigger prostaglandin-dependent biological responses. Therefore exosomes are carriers of GTP-activatable phospholipases and lipid mediators from cell to cell. PMID:20424270

  3. Mechanical stimulation of skeletal muscle mitigates glucocorticoid induced decreases in prostaglandin synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chromiak, Joseph A.; Vandenburgh, Herman H.

    1993-01-01

    The glucocorticoid dexamethasone (Dex) induces a decline in protein synthesis and protein content of tissue cultured, avian skeletal muscle cells, and this atrophy is attenuated by repetitive mechanical stretch. Since the prostaglandin synthesis inhibitor indomethacin mitigated this stretch attenuation of muscle atrophy, the role of prostaglandins as growth modulators in these processes was examined. Dex at 10(exp -8) M reduced PGF(sub 2(alpha)) production 55 percent - 65 percent and PGE(sub 2) production 84 - 90 percent after 24 - 72 h of incubation in static cultures. Repetitive 10 percent stretch-relaxations of the non-Dex treated cultures increased PGF(sub 2(alpha)) efflux 41 percent at 24 h and 276 percent at 72 h and increased PGE(sub 2) production 51 percent at 24 h and 236 percent at 72 h. Mechanical stimulation of Dex treated cultures increased PGF(sub 2(alpha)) production 162 percent after 24 h, thus returning PGF(sub 2(alpha)) efflux to the level of non-Dex treated cultures. At 72 h, stretch increased PGF(sub 2(alpha)) efflux 65 percent in Dex treated cultures, but PGF(sub 2(alpha)) production was 45-84 percent less than non-Dex treated cultures. Mechanical stimulation of Dex treated cultures increased PGE(sub 2) production at 24 h, but not at 72 h. Dex reduced prostaglandin H synthase (PGHS) activity in the muscle cultures by 70 percent after 8 - 24 h of incubation, and mechanical stimulation increased PGHS activity of the Dex treated cultures by 98 percent. It is concluded that repetitive mechanical stimulation attenuates the catabolic effects of Dex on cultured skeletal muscle cells in part by reversing the Dex-induced declines in PGHS activity and prostaglandin production.

  4. Improvement in the quality of hematopoietic prostaglandin D synthase crystals in a microgravity environment.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Hiroaki; Tsurumura, Toshiharu; Aritake, Kosuke; Furubayashi, Naoki; Takahashi, Sachiko; Yamanaka, Mari; Hirota, Erika; Sano, Satoshi; Sato, Masaru; Kobayashi, Tomoyuki; Tanaka, Tetsuo; Inaka, Koji; Urade, Yoshihiro

    2011-01-01

    Human hematopoietic prostaglandin synthase, one of the better therapeutic target enzymes for allergy and inflammation, was crystallized with 22 inhibitors and in three inhibitor-free conditions in microgravity. Most of the space-grown crystals showed better X-ray diffraction patterns than the terrestrially grown ones, indicating the advantage of a microgravity environment on protein crystallization, especially in the case of this protein. PMID:21169700

  5. Oral E2 prostaglandins affect endocrine cell populations in the gastric antrum of the rat.

    PubMed

    Uribe, A; Grimelius, L; Theodorsson, L E; Riis-Angelo, L; Johansson, C

    1989-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate antral endocrine cell populations and tissue and circulating hormone levels following a 4-week oral regimen with prostaglandin E2 (25, 250 and 5000 micrograms/kg-1 b.i.d.) or a stable methyl analogue (5 and 50 micrograms kg-1 b.i.d.). Epithelial hyperplasia of the gastric antrum was observed with the highest dose of prostaglandin E2 and both doses of the analogue, as evaluated by stereological methods and conventional cell count. The treatments significantly affected the endocrine cell population. Somatostatin-immunoreactive cells were increased in proportion to the increased epithelial cellularity and plasma levels of somatostatin were increased in parallel. The tissue content of somatostatin-like immunoreactivity differed according to the extraction procedure used, and was significantly higher than controls in specimens extracted in neutral water. In the neutral extracts an immunoreactive somatostatin of unidentified molecular structure dominated quantitatively over somatostatin 14 and 28, which were the major components in acetic acid extracts. The serotonin-immunoreactive cell population was also significantly increased by natural prostaglandin E2 and the analogue but the gastrin cell population was not significantly affected by treatments. Accordingly, no significant changes were observed in tissue or plasma gastrin levels. It is concluded that the epithelial hyperplasia of the antral epithelia produced by E2 prostaglandins is associated with selective changes of endocrine cell populations. The changes were proportional to the increases of epithelial cellularity and required quantitative determination of the total antral volume to be detected.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Characterization of a thromboxane A2/prostaglandin H2 receptor in guinea pig lung membranes using a radioiodinated thromboxane mimetic

    SciTech Connect

    Saussy, D.L. Jr.; Mais, D.E.; Dube, G.P.; Magee, D.E.; Brune, K.A.; Kurtz, W.L.; Williams, C.M. )

    1991-01-01

    Thromboxane A2 (TXA2) and prostaglandin H2 (PGH2) are potent constrictors of airway smooth muscle and may mediate some of the pulmonary effects of leukotrienes. To date, the TXA2/PGH2 receptor in lung has not been well characterized. In this report, we describe the evaluation of the TXA2/PGH2 receptor in guinea pig lung membranes using the new radiolabeled TXA2 mimetic (1S(1 alpha,2 beta(5Z),3 alpha(1E,3S*),4 alpha))-7-(3-(3-hydroxy-4-(4'- iodophenoxy)-1-butenyl)-7-oxabicyclo-(2.2.1)heptan-2-yl)-5-h eptenoic acid (IBOP). IBOP elicited a dose-dependent contraction of guinea pig lung parenchymal strips (EC50 = 3.03 +/- 0.97 nM, three experiments), which was blocked by the TXA2/PGH2 antagonists SQ29548 (pKB = 7.44 +/- 0.2, three experiments), BM13505 (pKB = 6.29 +/- 0.26, three experiments), and I-PTA-OH (pKB = 5.82 +/- 0.36, three experiments). In radioligand binding studies, the binding of (125I)IBOP to guinea pig lung membranes prepared from perfused lungs was saturable, displaceable, and dependent upon protein concentration. Binding was optimal at pH 6.5 and was enhanced by the addition of mono- and divalent cations. The standard assay buffer was 25 mM 3-(N-morpholino)propanesulfonic acid, pH 6.5, 100 mM NaCl, 5 mM MgCl2. Binding was inhibited by pretreatment with dithiothreitol, N-ethylmaleimide, or beta-mercaptoethanol. Binding was unaffected by the addition of guanine nucleotide analogs at concentrations up to 300 microM. Analysis of the time course of binding of (125)IBOP at 30 degrees yielded k-1 = 0.0447 min-1, k1 = 2.49 x 10(8) M-1 min-1, and Kd = k-1/k1 = 180 pM. Computer analysis of equilibrium binding studies using nonlinear methods (LUNDON-1) revealed a single class of noninteracting binding sites with a Kd of 86.9 +/- 11.9 pM and a Bmax of 81.8 +/- 7.7 fmol/mg of protein (three experiments).

  7. The prostaglandin E2 receptor EP4 is integral to a positive feedback loop for prostaglandin E2 production in human macrophages infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Tomoyasu; Zhao, Xiaomin; Gan, Huixian; Koyasu, Shigeo; Remold, Heinz G

    2013-09-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is an important biological mediator involved in the defense against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection. Previously, we reported that in macrophages (Mϕs), infection with avirulent Mtb H37Ra resulted in inhibition of necrosis by an inhibitory effect on mitochondrial permeability transition via the PGE2 receptor EP2. However, human Mϕs also express EP4, a PGE2 receptor functionally closely related to EP2 that also couples to stimulatory guanine nucleotide binding protein, but the functional differences between EP2 and EP4 in Mtb-infected Mϕs have been unclear. EP4 antagonist addition to H37Ra-infected Mϕs inhibited the expression of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2) and microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1 (mPGES-1), which are involved in PGE2 production. Moreover, H37Ra infection induced PGE2 production through the Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2/p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway. Induction of COX2 and mPGES-1 expression by TLR2 stimulation or Mtb infection was increased after additional stimulation with EP4 agonist. Hence, in Mtb-infected Mϕs, PGE2 production induced by pathogen recognition receptors/p38 MAPK signaling is up-regulated by EP4-triggered signaling to maintain an effective PGE2 concentration.

  8. Prostaglandin I2 Attenuates Prostaglandin E2-Stimulated Expression of Interferon γ in a β-Amyloid Protein- and NF-κB-Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Pu; Guan, Pei-Pei; Yu, Xin; Zhang, Li-Chao; Su, Ya-Nan; Wang, Zhan-You

    2016-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) has been recently identified as being involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). However, the role of an important COX-2 metabolic product, prostaglandin (PG) I2, in AD development remains unknown. Using mouse-derived astrocytes as well as APP/PS1 transgenic mice as model systems, we firstly elucidated the mechanisms of interferon γ (IFNγ) regulation by PGE2 and PGI2. Specifically, PGE2 accumulation in astrocytes activated the ERK1/2 and NF-κB signaling pathways by phosphorylation, which resulted in IFNγ expression. In contrast, the administration of PGI2 attenuated the effects of PGE2 on stimulating the production of IFNγ via inhibiting the translocation of NF-κB from the cytosol to the nucleus. Due to these observations, we further studied these prostaglandins and found that both PGE2 and PGI2 increased Aβ1–42 levels. In detail, PGE2 induced IFNγ expression in an Aβ1–42-dependent manner, whereas PGI2-induced Aβ1–42 production did not alleviate cells from IFNγ inhibition by PGI2 treatment. More importantly, our data also revealed that not only Aβ1–42 oligomer but also fibrillar have the ability to induce the expression of IFNγ via stimulation of NF-κB nuclear translocation in astrocytes of APP/PS1 mice. The production of IFNγ finally accelerated the deposition of Aβ1–42 in β-amyloid plaques. PMID:26869183

  9. Cyclooxygenase-2 and Prostaglandin E2 Signaling through Prostaglandin Receptor EP-2 Favor the Development of Myocarditis during Acute Trypanosoma cruzi Infection.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Néstor A; Camacho, Mercedes; Vila, Luis; Íñiguez, Miguel A; Chillón-Marinas, Carlos; Cuervo, Henar; Poveda, Cristina; Fresno, Manuel; Gironès, Núria

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation plays an important role in the pathophysiology of Chagas disease, caused by Trypanosoma cruzi. Prostanoids are regulators of homeostasis and inflammation and are produced mainly by myeloid cells, being cyclooxygenases, COX-1 and COX-2, the key enzymes in their biosynthesis from arachidonic acid (AA). Here, we have investigated the expression of enzymes involved in AA metabolism during T. cruzi infection. Our results show an increase in the expression of several of these enzymes in acute T. cruzi infected heart. Interestingly, COX-2 was expressed by CD68+ myeloid heart-infiltrating cells. In addition, infiltrating myeloid CD11b+Ly6G- cells purified from infected heart tissue express COX-2 and produce prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) ex vivo. T. cruzi infections in COX-2 or PGE2-dependent prostaglandin receptor EP-2 deficient mice indicate that both, COX-2 and EP-2 signaling contribute significantly to the heart leukocyte infiltration and to the release of chemokines and inflammatory cytokines in the heart of T. cruzi infected mice. In conclusion, COX-2 plays a detrimental role in acute Chagas disease myocarditis and points to COX-2 as a potential target for immune intervention.

  10. [Cardiovascular effect of 15(S)-15-methyl-prostaglandin F2alpha].

    PubMed

    Retzke, U; Schwarz, R

    1978-01-01

    The reaction of the cardiovascular system on one intramuscular injection of 250 microgram 15-methyl-prostaglandin F2alpha was examined in 14 normotensive healthy pregnant women between 7th and 11th weeks of gestation with the method of quantitative sphygmometry with unbloody graphic recording of arterial blood pressure and direct electronic determination of velocity of aortic pulse wave. The tests were done in 10 patients in intervals of 5 minutes for one hour and in 4 subjects for 12 hours in intervals of one hour. Systolic blood pressure remains nearly constant, but diastolic blood pressure increases and then decreases significantly. Heart rate decreases significantly. Aortic pulse wave velocity decreases in a characteristic manner. Analogous to the biphasic behaviour of blood pressure cardiac output decreases significantly, but then increases insignificantly. The inverse changes of total peripheral resistance are insignificant. Comparing these reactions with the cardiovascular effects of prostaglandin F2alpha or E2, 15-methyl-prostaglandin F2alpha shows the smallest circulatory alterations.

  11. Role of IL-1 beta and prostaglandins in beta 2-microglobulin-induced bone mineral dissolution.

    PubMed

    Moe, S M; Hack, B K; Cummings, S A; Sprague, S M

    1995-02-01

    beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2m) induces an osteoclast-mediated net calcium efflux from neonatal mouse calvariae which occurs only after 48 hours of incubation, suggesting that beta 2m acts via other growth factors. To further test this hypothesis, calvariae were incubated with and without beta 2m in the presence of the prostaglandin inhibitor indomethacin, anti-interleukin-1 beta antibody (anti-IL-1 beta), or interleukin-1 beta receptor antagonist (IL-1 beta RA). The addition of beta 2m to the culture medium stimulated, whereas indomethacin inhibited basal calcium efflux following 48 hours. However, the difference (delta) between the calcium efflux induced in calvariae incubated with and without beta 2m in basal medium and that in calvariae incubated with and without beta 2m in indomethacin supplemented medium was similar, suggesting a prostaglandin independent mechanism. There was a time dependent increase in PGE2 in basal medium which was unaffected by beta 2m. In contrast, pre-incubating calvariae with either anti-IL-1 beta or IL-1 beta RA did not alter basal calcium efflux but completely blocked the beta 2m induced calcium efflux. Anti-IL-1 beta had no effect on the basal release of beta-glucuronidase but partially blocked the beta 2m induced release of beta-glucuronidase. Thus, the beta 2m-induced calcium efflux observed in neonatal mouse calvariae is dependent on interleukin-1 beta but not prostaglandins.

  12. The identification of prostaglandins E2, F2α and A2 from rabbit kidney medulla

    PubMed Central

    Lee, J. B.; Crowshaw, K.; Takman, B. H.; Attrep, Katherine A.; Gougoutas, J. Z.

    1967-01-01

    Rabbit kidney medulla (10kg.) was homogenized in 5mm-disodium hydrogen phosphate and deproteinized with ethanol, and the concentrated supernatant solution was extracted at pH8 with light petroleum and at pH2 with chloroform. The acidic lipids present in the chloroform phase were separated on silicic acid columns into three biologically active fractions. The first fraction contained only vasodepressor activity; the second fraction contained both vasodepressor and non-vascular-smooth-muscle-stimulating activity; the third fraction contained both vasopressor and non-vascular-smooth-muscle-stimulating activity. Purification of each fraction by reversed-phase partition and thick-layer chromatography yielded three pure acids. Thin-layer chromatographic, spectroscopic and mass-spectral analysis of the acids and their methyl esters established their structures as prostaglandins E2, F2α and A2. Evidence is presented demonstrating that part or all of the prostaglandin A2 is formed during the isolation procedures from endogenous prostaglandin E2. PMID:16742553

  13. Role of prostaglandin D2/CRTH2 pathway on asthma exacerbation induced by Aspergillus fumigatus

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haixia; Zheng, Mingrui; Qiao, Jianou; Dang, Yajie; Zhang, Pengyu; Jin, Xianqiao

    2014-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is often associated in asthmatic patients with the exacerbation of asthma symptoms. The pathomechanism of this phenomenon has not been fully understood. Here, we evaluated the immunological mechanisms and the role of the prostaglandin D2/ Chemoattractant Receptor-Homologous Molecule Expressed on Th2 Cells (CRTH2) pathway in the development of Aspergillus-associated asthma exacerbation. We studied the effects of A. fumigatus on airway inflammation and bronchial hyper-responsiveness in a rat model of chronic asthma. Inhalation delivery of A. fumigatus conidia increased the airway eosinophilia and bronchial hyper-responsiveness in ovalbumin-sensitized, challenged rats. These changes were associated with prostaglandin D2 synthesis and CRTH2 expression in the lungs. Direct inflammation occurred in ovalbumin-sensitized, challenged animals, whereas pre-treatment with an antagonist against CRTH2 nearly completely eliminated the A. fumigatus-induced worsening of airway eosinophilia and bronchial hyper-responsiveness. Our data demonstrate that production of prostaglandin D2 followed by eosinophil recruitment into the airways via a CRTH2 receptor are the major pathogenic factors responsible for the A. fumigatus-induced enhancement of airway inflammation and responsiveness. PMID:24329550

  14. Antihypertensive effects of selective prostaglandin E2 receptor subtype 1 targeting

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Youfei; Zhang, Yahua; Wu, Jing; Qi, Zhonghua; Yang, Guangrui; Dou, Dou; Gao, Yuansheng; Chen, Lihong; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Davis, Linda S.; Wei, Mingfeng; Fan, Xuefeng; Carmosino, Monica; Hao, Chuanming; Imig, John D.; Breyer, Richard M.; Breyer, Matthew D.

    2007-01-01

    Clinical use of prostaglandin synthase–inhibiting NSAIDs is associated with the development of hypertension; however, the cardiovascular effects of antagonists for individual prostaglandin receptors remain uncharacterized. The present studies were aimed at elucidating the role of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) E-prostanoid receptor subtype 1 (EP1) in regulating blood pressure. Oral administration of the EP1 receptor antagonist SC51322 reduced blood pressure in spontaneously hypertensive rats. To define whether this antihypertensive effect was caused by EP1 receptor inhibition, an EP1-null mouse was generated using a “hit-and-run” strategy that disrupted the gene encoding EP1 but spared expression of protein kinase N (PKN) encoded at the EP1 locus on the antiparallel DNA strand. Selective genetic disruption of the EP1 receptor blunted the acute pressor response to Ang II and reduced chronic Ang II–driven hypertension. SC51322 blunted the constricting effect of Ang II on in vitro–perfused preglomerular renal arterioles and mesenteric arteriolar rings. Similarly, the pressor response to EP1-selective agonists sulprostone and 17-phenyltrinor PGE2 were blunted by SC51322 and in EP1-null mice. These data support the possibility of targeting the EP1 receptor for antihypertensive therapy. PMID:17710229

  15. Gastroprotective Effect of Geopropolis from Melipona scutellaris Is Dependent on Production of Nitric Oxide and Prostaglandin

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro-Junior, Jerônimo Aparecido; Franchin, Marcelo; Cavallini, Miriam Elias; Denny, Carina; de Alencar, Severino Matias; Ikegaki, Masaharu; Rosalen, Pedro Luiz

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the gastroprotective activity of ethanolic extract of geopropolis (EEGP) from Melipona scutellaris and to investigate the possible mechanisms of action. The gastroprotective activity of the EEGP was evaluated using model ulcer induced by ethanol. To elucidate the possible mechanisms of action, we investigated the involvement of the nonprotein sulfhydryl (NP-SH) groups, nitric oxide and prostaglandins. In addition, the antisecretory activity of EEGP was also evaluated by pylorus ligated model. The EEGP orally administrated (300 mg/kg) reduced the ulcerative lesions induced by the ethanol (P < 0.05). Regarding the mechanism of action, the prior administration of nitric oxide and prostaglandins antagonists suppressed the activity of gastroprotective EEGP (P < 0.05). On the other hand the gastroprotective activity of EEGP was kept in the group pretreated with the antagonist of the NP-SH groups; furthermore the antisecretory activity was not significant (P > 0.05). These results support the alternative medicine use of geopropolis as gastroprotective and the activities observed show to be related to nitric oxide and prostaglandins production. PMID:25949263

  16. Major role of adipocyte prostaglandin E2 in lipolysis-induced macrophage recruitment.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaoqian; Cifarelli, Vincenza; Sun, Shishuo; Kuda, Ondrej; Abumrad, Nada A; Su, Xiong

    2016-04-01

    Obesity induces accumulation of adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs), which contribute to both local and systemic inflammation and modulate insulin sensitivity. Adipocyte lipolysis during fasting and weight loss also leads to ATM accumulation, but without proinflammatory activation suggesting distinct mechanisms of ATM recruitment. We examined the possibility that specific lipid mediators with anti-inflammatory properties are released from adipocytes undergoing lipolysis to induce macrophage migration. In the present study, we showed that conditioned medium (CM) from adipocytes treated with forskolin to stimulate lipolysis can induce migration of RAW 264.7 macrophages. In addition to FFAs, lipolytic stimulation increased release of prostaglandin E2(PGE2) and prostaglandin D2(PGD2), reflecting cytosolic phospholipase A2α activation and enhanced cyclooxygenase (COX) 2 expression. Reconstituted medium with the anti-inflammatory PGE2potently induced macrophage migration while different FFAs and PGD2had modest effects. The ability of CM to induce macrophage migration was abolished by treating adipocytes with the COX2 inhibitor sc236 or by treating macrophages with the prostaglandin E receptor 4 antagonist AH23848. In fasted mice, macrophage accumulation in adipose tissue coincided with increases of PGE2levels and COX1 expression. Collectively, our data show that adipocyte-originated PGE2with inflammation suppressive properties plays a significant role in mediating ATM accumulation during lipolysis. PMID:26912395

  17. Interactions between ADH and prostaglandins in isolated erythrocyte-perfused rat kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Lieberthal, W.; Vasilevsky, M.L.; Valeri, C.R.; Levinsky, N.G.

    1987-02-01

    Interactions between antidiuretic hormone (ADH) and renal prostaglandins in the regulation of sodium reabsorption and urinary concentrating ability were studied in isolated erythrocyte-perfused rat kidneys (IEPK). In this model, hemodynamic characteristics are comparable to those found in vivo, and tubular morphology is preserved throughout the period of perfusion. (Deamino)-D-arginine vasopressin (dDAVP) markedly reduced fractional sodium excretion (FE/sub Na/) in the IEPK. After indomethacin, FE/sub Na/ fell still further. In the absence of dDAVP indomethacin had no effect on sodium excretion. dDAVP increased urine osmolality in the IEPK. When prostaglandin synthesis was blocked with indomethacin, urinary osmolality increased further. In isolated kidneys perfused without erythrocytes (IPK), dDAVP decreased FE/sub Na/ from 14.5 +/- 1.8% to 9.6 +/- 1.2%. dDAVP increased urine osmolality only modestly in the IPK and indomethacin did not increase concentrating ability further. Thus the IEPK (unlike the IPK) can excrete markedly hypertonic urine in response to ADH. ADH also enhances tubular reabsorption of sodium in the IEPK. Prostaglandins inhibit both these actions of ADH but do not directly affect sodium excretion in the absence of the hormone. Prostaglandius were measured by radioimmunoassay.

  18. CRTH2, a prostaglandin D2 receptor, mediates depression-related behavior in mice.

    PubMed

    Onaka, Yusuke; Shintani, Norihito; Nakazawa, Takanobu; Haba, Ryota; Ago, Yukio; Wang, Hyper; Kanoh, Takuya; Hayata-Takano, Atsuko; Hirai, Hiroyuki; Nagata, Kin-Ya; Nakamura, Masataka; Hashimoto, Ryota; Matsuda, Toshio; Waschek, James A; Kasai, Atsushi; Nagayasu, Kazuki; Baba, Akemichi; Hashimoto, Hitoshi

    2015-05-01

    Depression is a complex neuropsychiatric disorder with an unclear molecular etiology. Inflammatory cytokines and molecular intermediates (including prostaglandins) are suggested to be involved in depression; however, the roles of prostaglandins and their respective receptors are largely unknown in depression. Using genetic and pharmacological approaches, we show here that chemoattractant receptor-homologous molecule expressed on T helper type 2 cells (CRTH2), a second receptor for prostaglandin D2 (PGD2), mediates depression-related behavior in mice. CRTH2-deficient (CRTH2(-/-)) mice showed antidepressant-like activity in a chronic corticosterone treatment-induced depression. Consistent with this observation, the pharmacological inhibition of CRTH2 via the clinically available drug ramatroban also rescued abnormal social interaction and depression-related behavior in well-established models, including chronic corticosterone-, lipopolysaccharide-, and tumor-induced pathologically relevant depression models. Importantly, chronic stress via corticosterone treatment increased mRNA levels in PGD2-producing enzymes, such as cyclooxygenase-2 and lipocalin-type PGD2 synthase, in the brain. Furthermore, the activity of the hippocampal noradrenergic system but not the dopaminergic or serotonergic systems was increased in CRTH2(-/-) mice. Together with the observation that untreated CRTH2(-/-) mice showed antidepressant-like activity in the forced swim test, these results provide evidence that central CRTH2-mediated signaling is critically involved in depression-related behavior. PMID:25698598

  19. PPADS does not block contraction-induced prostaglandin E2 synthesis in cat skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    McCord, Jennifer L.; Hayes, Shawn G.; Kaufman, Marc P.

    2008-01-01

    Pyridoxal-phosphate-6-azophenyl-2′-4-disulfonate (PPADS), a purinergic 2 (P2) receptor antagonist, has been shown to attenuate the exercise pressor reflex in cats. In vitro, however, PPADS has been shown to block the production of prostaglandins, some of which play a role in evoking the exercise pressor reflex. Thus the possibility exists that PPADS blocks the exercise pressor reflex through a reduction in prostaglandin synthesis rather than through the blockade of P2 receptors. Using microdialysis, we collected interstitial fluid from skeletal muscle to determine prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) concentrations during the intermittent contraction of the triceps surae muscle before and after a popliteal arterial injection of PPADS (10 mg/kg). We found that the PGE2 concentration increased in response to the intermittent contraction before and after the injection of PPADS (both, P < 0.05). PPADS reduced the pressor response to exercise (P < 0.05) but had no effect on the magnitude of PGE2 production during contraction (P = 0.48). These experiments demonstrate that PPADS does not block the exercise pressor reflex through a reduction in PGE2 synthesis. We suggest that PGE2 and P2 receptors play independent roles in stimulating the exercise pressor reflex. PMID:18790832

  20. Evidence for selective regulation of the phosphorylation of myocyte proteins by isoproterenol and prostaglandin E1.

    PubMed

    Hayes, J S; Bowling, N; King, K L; Boder, G B

    1982-01-12

    Both isoproterenol and prostaglandin E1 increased the activation state of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase in cultured myocytes; however, only isoproterenol enhanced phosphorylase activity and contractile state. Following the incubation of intact myocytes with 32PO3-(4), 32 phosphoproteins were resolved from total cellular proteins by electrophoresis in sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gels followed by autoradiography. Isoproterenol stimulated 32PO3-(4) incorporation into 16 proteins, including 2 phosphoproteins not observed under control conditions. By contrast, prostaglandin E1 neither caused a measurable change in the protein phosphorylation pattern nor interfered with isoproterenol's capacity to do so. Isoproterenol stimulated myocyte protein phosphorylation in either the presence or absence of extracellular Ca2+. The results suggest that the regulation of protein phosphorylation following adenylate cyclase stimulation is: (1) an agonist-specific process and not due solely to a random accumulation of intracellular cycle AMP and activation of protein kinase; (2) the Ca2+ mobilization component of beta-receptor activation does not account for the paradoxical effects of isoproterenol and prostaglandin E1; (3) activation of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase does not always result in an enhancement of protein phosphorylation.

  1. Multiple roles of the prostaglandin D2 signaling pathway in reproduction.

    PubMed

    Rossitto, Moïra; Ujjan, Safdar; Poulat, Francis; Boizet-Bonhoure, Brigitte

    2015-01-01

    Prostaglandins signaling molecules are involved in numerous physiological processes. They are produced by several enzyme-limited reactions upon fatty acids, which are catalyzed by two cyclooxygenases and prostaglandin synthases. In particular, the prostaglandins E2 (PGE2), D2 (PGD2), and F2 (PGF2 α) have been shown to be involved in female reproductive mechanisms. Furthermore, widespread expression of lipocalin- and hematopoietic-PGD2 synthases in the male reproductive tract supports the purported roles of PGD2 in the development of both embryonic and adult testes, sperm maturation, and spermatogenesis. In this review, we summarize the putative roles of PGD2 signaling and the roles of both PGD2 synthases in testicular formation and function. We review the data reporting the involvement of PGD2 signaling in the differentiation of Sertoli and germ cells of the embryonic testis. Furthermore, we discuss the roles of lipocalin-PGD2 synthase in steroidogenesis and spermatogenesis, in terms of lipid molecule transport and PGD2 production. Finally, we discuss the hypothesis that PGD2 signaling may be affected in certain reproductive diseases, such as infertility, cryptorchidism, and testicular cancer.

  2. Muscle sympathetic nerve responses to physiological changes in prostaglandin production in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doerzbacher, K. J.; Ray, C. A.

    2001-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that prostaglandins may contribute to exercise-induced increases in muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA). To test this hypothesis, MSNA was measured at rest and during exercise before and after oral administration of ketoprofen, a cyclooxygenase inhibitor, or placebo. Twenty-one subjects completed two bouts of graded dynamic and isometric handgrip to fatigue. Each exercise bout was followed by 2 min of postexercise muscle ischemia. The second exercise bouts were performed after 60 min of rest in which 11 subjects were given ketoprofen (300 mg) and 10 subjects received a placebo. Ketoprofen significantly lowered plasma thromboxane B(2) in the drug group (from 36 +/- 6 to 22 +/- 3 pg/ml, P < 0.04), whereas thromboxane B(2) in the placebo group increased from 40 +/- 5 to 61 +/- 9 pg/ml from trial 1 to trial 2 (P < 0.008). Ketoprofen and placebo did not change sympathetic and cardiovascular responses to dynamic handgrip, isometric handgrip, and postexercise muscle ischemia. There was no relationship between thromboxane B(2) concentrations and MSNA or arterial pressure responses during both exercise modes. The data indicate that physiological increases or decreases in prostaglandins do not alter exercise-induced increases in MSNA and arterial pressure in humans. These findings suggest that contraction-induced metabolites other than prostaglandins mediate MSNA responses to exercise in humans.

  3. Intraplantar-injected ceramide in rats induces hyperalgesia through an NF-κB- and p38 kinase-dependent cyclooxygenase 2/prostaglandin E2 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Tim; Chen, Zhoumou; Muscoli, Carolina; Obeid, Lina M.; Salvemini, Daniela

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory pain represents an important unmet clinical need with important socioeconomic implications. Ceramide, a potent proinflammatory sphingolipid, has been shown to elicit mechanical hyperalgesia, but the mechanisms remain largely unknown. We now demonstrate that, in addition to mechanical hyperalgesia, intraplantar injection of ceramide (10 μg) led to the development of thermal hyperalgesia that was dependent on induction of the inducible cyclooxygenase (COX-2) and subsequent increase of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). The development of mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia and increased production of PGE2 was blocked by NS-398 (15–150 ng), a selective COX-2 inhibitor. The importance of the COX-2 to PGE2 pathway in ceramide signaling was underscored by the findings that intraplantar injection of a monoclonal PGE2 antibody (4 μg) blocked the development of hyperalgesia. Our results further revealed that COX-2 induction is regulated by NF-κB and p38 kinase activation, since intraplantar injection of SC-514 (0.1–1 μg) or SB 203580 (1–10 μg), well-characterized inhibitors of NF-κB and p38 kinase activation, respectively, blocked COX-2 induction and increased formation of PGE2 and thermal hyperalgesia in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, activation of NF-κB was dependent on upstream activation of p38 MAPK, since SB 203580 (10 μg) blocked p65 phosphorylation, whereas p38 kinase phosphorylation was unaffected by NF-κB inhibition by SC-514 (1 μg). Our findings not only provide mechanistic insight into the signaling pathways engaged by ceramide in the development of hyperalgesia, but also provide a potential pharmacological basis for developing inhibitors targeting the ceramide metabolic-to-COX-2 pathway as novel analgesics.—Doyle, T., Chen, Z., Muscoli, C., Obeid, L. M., Salvemini, D. Intraplantar-injected ceramide in rats induces hyperalgesia through an NF-κB- and p38 kinase-dependent cyclooxygenase 2/prostaglandin E2 pathway. PMID:21551240

  4. Prostaglandin potentiates 5-HT responses in stomach and ileum innervating visceral afferent sensory neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sojin; Jin, Zhenhua; Lee, Goeun; Park, Yong Seek; Park, Cheung-Seog; Jin, Young-Ho

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • Prostaglandin E2 (PGE{sub 2}) effect was tested on visceral afferent neurons. • PGE{sub 2} did not evoke response but potentiated serotonin (5-HT) currents up to 167%. • PGE{sub 2}-induced potentiation was blocked by E-prostanoid type 4 receptors antagonist. • PGE{sub 2} effect on 5-HT response was also blocked by protein kinase A inhibitor KT5720. • Thus, PGE{sub 2} modulate visceral afferent neurons via synergistic signaling with 5-HT. - Abstract: Gastrointestinal disorder is a common symptom induced by diverse pathophysiological conditions that include food tolerance, chemotherapy, and irradiation for therapy. Prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}) level increase was often reported during gastrointestinal disorder and prostaglandin synthetase inhibitors has been used for ameliorate the symptoms. Exogenous administration of PGE{sub 2} induces gastrointestinal disorder, however, the mechanism of action is not known. Therefore, we tested PGE{sub 2} effect on visceral afferent sensory neurons of the rat. Interestingly, PGE{sub 2} itself did not evoked any response but enhanced serotonin (5-HT)-evoked currents up to 167% of the control level. The augmented 5-HT responses were completely inhibited by a 5-HT type 3 receptor antagonist, ondansetron. The PGE{sub 2}-induced potentiation were blocked by a selective E-prostanoid type4 (EP{sub 4}) receptors antagonist, L-161,982, but type1 and 2 receptor antagonist AH6809 has no effect. A membrane permeable protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor, KT5720 also inhibited PGE{sub 2} effects. PGE{sub 2} induced 5-HT current augmentation was observed on 15% and 21% of the stomach and ileum projecting neurons, respectively. Current results suggest a synergistic signaling in visceral afferent neurons underlying gastrointestinal disorder involving PGE{sub 2} potentiation of 5-HT currents. Our findings may open a possibility for screen a new type drugs with lower side effects than currently using steroidal prostaglandin

  5. Novel contraceptive targets to inhibit ovulation: the prostaglandin E2 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Duffy, Diane M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is an essential intrafollicular regulator of ovulation. In contrast with the one-gene, one-protein concept for synthesis of peptide signaling molecules, production and metabolism of bioactive PGE2 requires controlled expression of many proteins, correct subcellular localization of enzymes, coordinated PGE2 synthesis and metabolism, and prostaglandin transport in and out of cells to facilitate PGE2 action and degradation. Elevated intrafollicular PGE2 is required for successful ovulation, so disruption of PGE2 synthesis, metabolism or transport may yield effective contraceptive strategies. METHODS This review summarizes case reports and studies on ovulation inhibition in women and macaques treated with cyclooxygenase inhibitors published from 1987 to 2014. These findings are discussed in the context of studies describing levels of mRNA, protein, and activity of prostaglandin synthesis and metabolic enzymes as well as prostaglandin transporters in ovarian cells. RESULTS The ovulatory surge of LH regulates the expression of each component of the PGE2 synthesis-metabolism-transport pathway within the ovulatory follicle. Data from primary ovarian cells and cancer cell lines suggest that enzymes and transporters can cooperate to optimize bioactive PGE2 levels. Elevated intrafollicular PGE2 mediates key ovulatory events including cumulus expansion, follicle rupture and oocyte release. Inhibitors of the prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (PTGS2) enzyme (also known as cyclooxygenase-2 or COX2) reduce ovulation rates in women. Studies in macaques show that PTGS2 inhibitors can reduce the rates of cumulus expansion, oocyte release, follicle rupture, oocyte nuclear maturation and fertilization. A PTGS2 inhibitor reduced pregnancy rates in breeding macaques when administered to simulate emergency contraception. However, PTGS2 inhibition did not prevent pregnancy in monkeys when administered to simulate monthly contraceptive use. CONCLUSION

  6. Nonlinear Analyses of Elicited Modal, Raised, and Pressed Rabbit Phonation

    PubMed Central

    Awan, Shaheen N.; Novaleski, Carolyn K.; Rousseau, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis The purpose of this study was to use nonlinear dynamic analysis methods such as phase space portraits and correlation dimension (D2) as well as descriptive spectrographic analyses to characterize acoustic signals produced during evoked rabbit phonation. Methods Seventeen New Zealand white breeder rabbits were used to perform the study. A Grass S-88 stimulator (SA Instrumentation, Encinitas, CA) and constant current isolation unit (Grass Telefactor, model PSIU6; West Warwick, RI) were used to provide electrical stimulation to laryngeal musculature, and transglottal airflow rate and stimulation current (mA) were manipulated to elicit modal, raised intensity, and pressed phonations. Central 1 second portions of the most stable portion of the acoustic waveform for modal, raised intensity, and pressed phonations were edited, and then analyzed via phase space portraits, Poincaré sections, and the estimation of the correlation dimension (D2). In an attempt to limit the effects of the highly variable and nonstationary characteristics of some of the signals being analyzed, D2 analysis was also performed on the most stable central 200 ms portion of the acoustic waveform. Descriptive analysis of each phonation was also conducted using sound spectrograms. Results Results showed that the complexity of phonation and the subsequent acoustic waveform is increased as transglottal airflow rate and degree of glottal adduction is manipulated in the evoked rabbit phonation model. In particular, phonatory complexity, as quantified via correlation dimension analyses and demonstrated via spectrographic characteristics, increases from “modal” (i.e., phonation elicited at just above the phonation threshold pressure) to raised intensity (phonation elicited by increasing transglottal airflow rate) to pressed (phonation elicited by increasing the stimulation current delivered to the larynx). Variations in a single dynamic dimension (airflow rate or adductory force

  7. Simplified Expert Elicitation Procedure for Risk Assessment of Operating Events

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald L. Boring; David Gertman; Jeffrey Joe; Julie Marble; William Galyean; Larry Blackwood; Harold Blackman

    2005-06-01

    This report describes a simplified, tractable, and usable procedure within the US Nuclear Regulator Commission (NRC) for seeking expert opinion and judgment. The NRC has increased efforts to document the reliability and risk of nuclear power plants (NPPs) through Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) and Human Reliability Analysis (HRA) models. The Significance Determination Process (SDP) and Accident Sequence Precursor (ASP) programs at the NRC utilize expert judgment on the probability of failure, human error, and the operability of equipment in cases where otherwise insufficient operational data exist to make meaningful estimates. In the past, the SDP and ASP programs informally sought the opinion of experts inside and outside the NRC. This document represents a formal, documented procedure to take the place of informal expert elicitation. The procedures outlined in this report follow existing formal expert elicitation methodologies, but are streamlined as appropriate to the degree of accuracy required and the schedule for producing SDP and ASP analyses.

  8. Conditioned craving cues elicit an automatic approach tendency.

    PubMed

    Van Gucht, Dinska; Vansteenwegen, Debora; Van den Bergh, Omer; Beckers, Tom

    2008-10-01

    In two experiments, we used a Pavlovian differential conditioning procedure to induce craving for chocolate. As a result of repeated pairing with chocolate intake, initially neutral cues came to elicit an automatic approach tendency in a speeded stimulus-response compatibility reaction time task. This automatic approach tendency, moreover, seemed to be sensitive to manipulations of extinction and renewal in the Pavlovian conditioning procedure. These findings corroborate and extend previous reports of automatic approach tendencies elicited by substance-relevant cues in addiction, while controlling for alternative accounts for such observations. Moreover, our data lend support to and extend learning models of cue-induced craving and addiction. Finally, we argue that the procedure we present here provides an ecologically valid behavioural tool that allows studying processes involved in cue-induced craving, addiction and relapse without relying on verbal report. PMID:18684435

  9. Expert elicitation for a national-level volcano hazard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bebbington, Mark; Stirling, Mark; Cronin, Shane; Wang, Ting; Jolly, Gill

    2016-04-01

    The quantification of volcanic hazard at national level is a vital pre-requisite to placing volcanic risk on a platform that permits meaningful comparison with other hazards such as earthquakes. New Zealand has up to a dozen dangerous volcanoes, with the usual mixed degrees of knowledge concerning their temporal and spatial eruptive history. Information on the 'size' of the eruptions, be it in terms of VEI, volume or duration, is sketchy at best. These limitations and the need for a uniform approach lend themselves to a subjective hazard analysis via expert elicitation. Approximately 20 New Zealand volcanologists provided estimates for the size of the next eruption from each volcano and, conditional on this, its location, timing and duration. Opinions were likewise elicited from a control group of statisticians, seismologists and (geo)chemists, all of whom had at least heard the term 'volcano'. The opinions were combined via the Cooke classical method. We will report on the preliminary results from the exercise.

  10. Voltage transients elicited by sudden step-up of auxin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pickard, B. G.

    1984-01-01

    It is hypothesized (i) that the molecular mechanism for the reception of friction and flexure and the mechanism by which auxin enhances ethylene production have in common a release of free calcium into the cytosol, (ii) that elevated cytosolic calcium initiates vesicle exocytosis, and (iii) that the vesicles release a factor or set of factors which depolarizes the plasmalemma and promotes ethylene synthesis. One consequence of such exocytosis should be small, extracellularly observable voltage transients. Transients, ranging in size up to 600 microvolts and possessing risetimes (10-90%) of approximately 200 ms, are known to be elicited in etiolated stems of Pisum sativum L. by friction and are here shown to be elicited by sudden increase of auxin concentration and also by a Ca2+ ionophore.

  11. A Step-Wise Approach to Elicit Triangular Distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, Marc W.

    2013-01-01

    Adapt/combine known methods to demonstrate an expert judgment elicitation process that: 1.Models expert's inputs as a triangular distribution, 2.Incorporates techniques to account for expert bias and 3.Is structured in a way to help justify expert's inputs. This paper will show one way of "extracting" expert opinion for estimating purposes. Nevertheless, as with most subjective methods, there are many ways to do this.

  12. Elicitation of macrophages from the peritoneal cavity of channel catfish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jenkins, J.A.; Klesius, P.H.

    1998-01-01

    Four chemicals were evaluated for elicitation of macrophages in peritoneal cavities of 250-300g healthy channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus. Cellular exudates were collected at 3, 5, 7, 10, 14, and 20 d following intraperitoneal injections with squalene, Freund's incomplete adjuvant (FIA), goat serum, thioglycollate, or as a control, phosphate-buffered saline. Injection with either squalene or FIA induced significantly greater (P ??? 0.0001) macrophage recruitment than the other chemicals. The effectiveness of squalene and FIA was compared further by macrophage collection daily for 7 d. Squalene and FIA elicited similarly high macrophage responses (P ??? 0.0450), the highest being 3.43 x 106 macrophages/mL (SE, 2.4 x l06) at 99% purity at day 2 and 2.1 X 106 macrophages/mL (SE, 0.7 x 106) at day 14 at 80% purity, respectively. In both experiments, the time after injection was not statistically significant, nor was there an interaction between time and chemicals. The occurrence of cells other than macrophages decreased with time to yield macrophage recoveries of 47-99% for squalene and 30-80% for FIA. Two subsets of macrophages were observed by means of flow cytometry. As demonstrated by chemiluminescence, the squalene-elicited cells produced high-energy oxygen compounds important to the phagocytic process.

  13. Intrathecal orphenadrine elicits spinal block in the rat.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Wen; Tzeng, Jann-Inn; Chen, Yu-Chung; Hung, Ching-Hsia; Wang, Jhi-Joung

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the local anesthetic effect of orphenadrine, an anti-muscarinic agent, in spinal anesthesia and its comparison with the local anesthetic lidocaine. After the rat was injected intrathecally, the spinal block of orphenadrine and lidocaine was constructed in a dosage-dependent fashion. The potency and duration of spinal anesthesia with orphenadrine were compared with that of lidocaine. Our data demonstrated that orphenadrine and lidocaine elicited dose-dependent spinal blockades on the motor function, sensory, and proprioception. On the 50% effective dose (ED50) basis, the ranks of potency in motor function, nociception, and proprioception were orphenadrine>lidocaine (P<0.01). At equipotent doses (ED25, ED50, ED75), the block duration elicited by orphenadrine was greater than that elicited by lidocaine (P<0.01). Orphenadrine, but not lidocaine, exhibited longer duration of nociceptive/sensory blockade than that of motor blockade at equipotent doses. Ineffective-dose orphenadrine as adjuvant did not enhance spinal anesthesia with lidocaine. The preclinical data revealed that orphenadrine with a more sensory-selective action over motor block exhibited more potent and longer spinal anesthesia when compared to lidocaine. PMID:25205132

  14. Elicited versus emitted behavior: Time to abandon the distinction.

    PubMed

    Domjan, Michael

    2016-03-01

    The concept of emitted behavior was formulated as a part of the original argument for the validity of a new kind of learning called operant conditioning. The rationale for operant conditioning contrasted it with Pavlovian or classical conditioning, which was (and remains) fundamentally based on responses to conditioned and unconditioned stimuli. Classical conditioned responses were said to be elicited. In contrast, operant behavior was viewed as emitted and controlled primarily by response consequences rather than antecedents. I argue that the distinction between emitted and elicited behavior is no longer warranted for three major reasons. First, the distinction was based on a view of Pavlovian conditioning that is no longer viable. Second, the distinction is incompatible with both empirical data and contemporary conceptualizations of operant behavior. Third, the only way to overcome these problems is to define emitted and elicited in terms of the type of conditioning (operant and classical) that produces these behaviors, but that approach makes the definitions circular and does not avoid implications of the terms that are misleading and counterproductive in light of contemporary research and thinking. PMID:26872681

  15. Modulation of phorbol ester-elicited events in mouse epidermis by dietary n-3 and n-6 fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Belury, M A; Leyton, J; Patrick, K E; Cumberland, A G; Locniskar, M; Fischer, S M

    1991-09-01

    Because arachidonic acid-derived eicosanoids are potent modulators of hyperproliferation and inflammation during skin tumor promotion with the phorbol ester, 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) (17, 18), it was hypothesized that dietary modification of epidermal fatty acids might modulate TPA-induced biochemical events in mouse skin. Semipurified diets containing 10% total fat composed of corn oil (CO) or a combination of CO and menhaden oil (MO) or coconut oil (CT) were fed to SENCAR mice for 4 weeks. Fatty acid composition of epidermal phospholipids generally reflected fatty acid composition of dietary oils fed to the mice. Since fatty acid-derived eicosanoids are thought to be essential in tumorigenesis, we compared the effects of dietary fats on prostaglandin E (PGE) production in epidermis treated with a single dose of TPA. TPA-induced PGE production in mouse epidermis from mice fed the MO diet was significantly reduced compared to PGE production in epidermal homogenates from mice fed the CO or CT diets. Type of dietary fats did not appear to modulate TPA-induced vascular permeability, however hyperplasia was slightly elevated in skins of mice fed MO. The subcellular distribution of protein kinase C, the plasma membrane receptor for TPA predominantly located in the cytosol (80%), was altered in epidermis from mice fed the MO diet compared to preparations from mice fed CO or CT diets which exhibited normal protein kinase C distribution. Our results suggest that n-3 rich dietary lipids modulate TPA-elicited events in mouse skin to a greater extent than diets containing higher proportions of saturated or n-6 fatty acids.

  16. Il-1β and prostaglandin E2 attenuate the hypercapnic as well as the hypoxic respiratory response via prostaglandin E receptor type 3 in neonatal mice.

    PubMed

    Siljehav, Veronica; Shvarev, Yuri; Herlenius, Eric

    2014-11-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) serves as a critical mediator of hypoxia, infection, and apnea in term and preterm babies. We hypothesized that the prostaglandin E receptor type 3 (EP3R) is the receptor responsible for PGE2-induced apneas. Plethysmographic recordings revealed that IL-1β (ip) attenuated the hypercapnic response in C57BL/6J wild-type (WT) but not in neonatal (P9) EP3R(-/-) mice (P < 0.05). The hypercapnic responses in brain stem spinal cord en bloc preparations also differed depending on EP3R expression whereby the response was attenuated in EP3R(-/-) preparations (P < 0.05). After severe hypoxic exposure in vivo, IL-1β prolonged time to autoresuscitation in WT but not in EP3R(-/-) mice. Moreover, during severe hypoxic stress EP3R(-/-) mice had an increased gasping duration (P < 0.01) as well as number of gasps (P < 0.01), irrespective of intraperitoneal treatment, compared with WT mice. Furthermore, EP3R(-/-) mice exhibited longer hyperpneic breathing efforts when exposed to severe hypoxia (P < 0.01). This was then followed by a longer period of secondary apnea before autoresuscitation occurred in EP3R(-/-) mice (P < 0.05). In vitro, EP3R(-/-) brain stem spinal cord preparations had a prolonged respiratory burst activity during severe hypoxia accompanied by a prolonged neuronal arrest during recovery in oxygenated medium (P < 0.05). In conclusion, PGE2 exerts its effects on respiration via EP3R activation that attenuates the respiratory response to hypercapnia as well as severe hypoxia. Modulation of the EP3R may serve as a potential therapeutic target for treatment of inflammatory and hypoxic-induced detrimental apneas and respiratory disorders in neonates.

  17. Seminal plasma induces prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase (PTGS) 2 expression in immortalized human vaginal cells: involvement of semen prostaglandin E2 in PTGS2 upregulation.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Theresa; Zalenskaya, Irina A; Sawyer, Lyn C; Chandra, Neelima; Doncel, Gustavo F

    2013-01-01

    Inflammation of the cervicovaginal mucosa is considered a risk factor for HIV infection in heterosexual transmission. In this context, seminal plasma (SP) may play an important role that is not limited to being the main carrier for the virions. It is known that SP induces an inflammatory reaction in the cervix called postcoital leukocytic reaction, which has been associated with promotion of fertility. The mechanisms by which SP triggers this reaction, however, have not been clearly established. Previously we reported the expression of prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (PTGS2), also known as cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2), in human vaginal cells in response to toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands and other proinflammatory stimuli. In this study, we demonstrate that SP induces transcriptional and translational increase of COX-2 expression in human vaginal cells and cervicovaginal tissue explants. Furthermore, SP potentiates vaginal PTGS2 expression induced by other proinflammatory stimulants, such as TLR ligands and a vaginal mucosal irritant (nonoxynol-9) in a synergistic manner. SP-induced PTGS2 expression is mediated by intracellular signaling pathways involving MAPKs and NF-κB. Using fractionation and functional analysis, seminal prostaglandin (PG)-E(2) was identified as a one of the major factors in PTGS2 induction. Given the critical role of this PG-producing enzyme in mucosal inflammatory processes, the finding that SP induces and potentiates the expression of PTGS2 in cervicovaginal cells and tissues has mechanistic implications for the role of SP in fertility-associated mucosal leukocytic reaction and its potential HIV infection-enhancing effect. PMID:23153564

  18. Importance of endogenous prostaglandins for the toxicity of cyclosporin A to rat endocrine and exocrine pancreas?

    PubMed Central

    Rünzi, M; Peskar, B M; von Schönfeld, J; Müller, M K

    1992-01-01

    Previous work has shown that cyclosporin A is toxic to the endocrine and exocrine pancreas. The aim of this study was to examine whether endogenous eicosanoids play a role in controlling cyclosporin A induced toxicity. Rats were treated for eight days with indomethacin (2 mg/kg, twice daily) in addition to cyclosporin A (5 or 10 mg/kg daily). Effects of drug treatments on exocrine (as assessed by amylase and protein secretion into the pancreatic juice) and endocrine (as assessed by the glucose dependent insulin release) pancreatic functions, and pancreatic formation of prostaglandins and thromboxane were evaluated. Treatment with cyclosporin A in the doses used did not inhibit eicosanoid formation by the pancreatic tissue ex vivo. Indomethacin caused significant inhibition of pancreatic formation of prostaglandin E2, 6k prostaglandin F1 alpha and thromboxane B2. Combined treatment with indomethacin and cyclosporin A (5 or 10 mg/kg) augmented cyclosporin A induced pancreatic toxicity with further impairment of insulin release, amylase secretion, and pancreatic juice protein content, but did not result in more pronounced inhibition of pancreatic eicosanoid formation. The increased toxicity of the combined treatment was, however, associated with raised cyclosporin A whole blood concentrations. The data suggest that the potentiation of pancreatic toxicity of cyclosporin A observed during coadministration of indomethacin is not the result of suppression of endogenous pancreatic eicosanoid biosynthesis, but more likely results from altered cyclosporin A pharmacokinetic which may be caused by an interference of indomethacin with the hepatic cytochrome P-450 dependent monooxygenase involved in cyclosporin A metabolism. The possibility that coadministration of non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs aggravates toxic effects in cyclosporin A treated patients should be considered. PMID:1280611

  19. Role of intracellular prostaglandin E₂ in cancer-related phenotypes in PC3 cells.

    PubMed

    Madrigal-Martínez, Antonio; Cazaña, Francisco J Lucio; Fernández-Martínez, y Ana B

    2015-02-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) affect many mechanisms that have been shown to play a role in prostate cancer. In PGE2-treated LNCaP cells, up-regulation of HIF-1α requires the internalization of PGE2, which is in sharp contrast with the generally accepted view that PGE2 acts through EP receptors located at the cell membrane. Here we aimed to study in androgen-independent PC3 cells the role of intracellular PGE2 in several events linked to prostate cancer progression. To this end, we used bromocresol green, an inhibitor of prostaglandin uptake that blocked the immediate rise in intracellular immunoreactive PGE2 following treatment with 16,16-dimethyl-PGE2. Bromocresol green prevented the stimulatory effect of 16,16-dimethyl-PGE on cell proliferation, adhesion, migration and invasion and on HIF-1α expression and activity, the latter assessed as the HIF-dependent activation of (i) a hypoxia response element-luciferase plasmid construct, (ii) production of angiogenic factor vascular endothelial growth factor-A and (iii) in vitro angiogenesis. The basal phenotype of PC3 cells was also affected by bromocresol green, that substantially lowered expression of HIF-1α, production of vascular endothelial growth factor-A and cell proliferation. These results, and the fact that we found functional intracellular EP receptors in PC3 cells, suggest that PGE2-dependent intracrine mechanisms play a role in prostate cancer Therefore, inhibition of the prostaglandin uptake transporter might be a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of prostate cancer.

  20. Effects of ethanol on synthesis of prostaglandin F2α in bovine females.

    PubMed

    De Barros, F R O; Bertan, C M; Dias, L O P; Fantini, D A; Ayres, G R; Marques, V B; Miguez, P H P; Binelli, M

    2010-10-01

    Ethanol stimulates the production of prostaglandins in many species. The purpose of this study was to verify the effect of ethanol on the production of prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α) and luteolysis in bovine females. In the first experiment, Holstein cows at day 17 of the oestrous cycle were treated with 100% ethanol (0.05 ml/kg of body weight, IV; n = 5), saline (0.05 ml/kg of body weight, IV; n = 4) or synthetic prostaglandin (150 μg of D-cloprostenol/cow, IM; n = 4). The plasma concentrations of 13, 14-dihydro-15-keto PGF2α (PGFM; the main metabolite of PGF2α measured in the peripheral blood) were assessed by radioimmunoassay (RIA). There was an acute release of PGFM in response to ethanol comparing to other treatments (p ≤ 0.05). However, only cows treated with PGF2α underwent luteolysis. In the second experiment, endometrial explants of cross-bred beef cows (n = 4) slaughtered at day 17 of the oestrous cycle were cultured for 4 h. During the last 3 h, the explants were cultured with medium supplemented with 0, 0.1, 1, 10 or 100 μl of 100% ethanol/ml. Medium samples were collected at hours 1 and 4 and concentrations of PGF2α were measured by RIA. Ethanol did not induce PGF2α production by the endometrium. In conclusion, ethanol does not cause luteolysis in cows because it stimulates production of PGF2α in extra-endometrial tissues.

  1. Production of prostaglandins in placentae and corpus luteum in pregnant hinds of red deer (Cervus elaphus).

    PubMed

    Korzekwa, A J; Szczepańska, A; Bogdaszewski, M; Nadolski, P; Malż, P; Giżejewski, Z

    2016-03-01

    Prostaglandins (PGs) are synthesized from arachidonic acid by prostaglandin synthase 2 (PTGS2) and specific terminal PG synthases such as PGES and PGFS. The role of PGs in the reproductive processes of domestic ruminants is well recognized, whereas in cervidae, it is almost unknown, although it is noteworthy because some species of this family are valued in meat production and trophies. The aim of this study was to determine an effective marker of pregnancy and investigate the production and secretion of PGs in placenta and CL tissue in pregnancy. In the preliminary experiment, the levels of progesterone and 17-β estradiol (RIA; N = 14 divided into seven pregnant and seven nonpregnant hinds) were measured in the peripheral blood. In the main experiment, a comparison of messenger RNA (real-time polymerase chain reaction) and protein expression (Western blotting) of PTGS2, PGES, and PGFS, the level of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and PGF2α in the placentae and CL in pregnant hinds (aged 3-4 years, ca. 100 days of pregnancy, N = 6). In pregnant hinds, the level of progesterone in the blood was higher than that in nonpregnant hinds (P < 0.05), whereas the level of E2 was similar in all animals (P > 0.05). The highest messenger RNA expression of PTGS2, PGES, and PGFS was observed in the placentae than in the CL (P < 0.05). The protein expression of PTGS2 and PGES was elevated in the placentae compared with the CL (P < 0.05). The PGE2 output was the highest in cotyledonary tissue (P < 0.05). Pregnancy development in hinds around 100 days is regulated by arachidonic acid metabolites, especially PGE2 produced by the placentae, which production increases in pregnancy. Further studies are required to unravel the mechanisms involved in the regulation of PG and biosynthetic enzymes in uteroplacental and ovarian tissues during pregnancy in red deer females. PMID:26553568

  2. Hypoxia activates the cyclooxygenase-2–prostaglandin E synthase axis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, James J.; Natsuizaka, Mitsuteru; Ohashi, Shinya; Wong, Gabrielle S.; Takaoka, Munenori; Michaylira, Carmen Z.; Budo, Daniela; Tobias, John W.; Kanai, Michiyuki; Shirakawa, Yasuhiro; Naomoto, Yoshio; Klein-Szanto, Andres J.P.; Haase, Volker H.; Nakagawa, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs), in particular HIF-1α, have been implicated in tumor biology. However, HIF target genes in the esophageal tumor microenvironment remain elusive. Gene expression profiling was performed upon hypoxia-exposed non-transformed immortalized human esophageal epithelial cells, EPC2-hTERT, and comparing with a gene signature of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). In addition to known HIF-1α target genes such as carbonic anhydrase 9, insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP3) and cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, prostaglandin E synthase (PTGES) was identified as a novel target gene among the commonly upregulated genes in ESCC as well as the cells exposed to hypoxia. The PTGES induction was augmented upon stabilization of HIF-1α by hypoxia or cobalt chloride under normoxic conditions and suppressed by dominant-negative HIF-1α. Whereas PTGES messenger RNA (mRNA) was negatively regulated by normoxia, PTGES protein remained stable upon reoxygenation. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) biosynthesis was documented in transformed human esophageal cells by ectopic expression of PTGES as well as RNA interference directed against PTGES. Moreover, hypoxia stimulated PGE2 production in a HIF-1α-dependent manner. In ESCC, PTGES was overexpressed frequently at the mRNA and protein levels. Finally, COX-2 and PTGES were colocalized in primary tumors along with HIF-1α and IGFBP3. Activation of the COX-2–PTGES axis in primary tumors was further corroborated by concomitant upregulation of interleukin-1β and downregulation of hydroxylprostaglandin dehydrogenase. Thus, PTGES is a novel HIF-1α target gene, involved in prostaglandin E biosynthesis in the esophageal tumor hypoxic microenvironment, and this has implications in diverse tumors types, especially of squamous origin. PMID:20042640

  3. Effect on prostaglandin F 2 alpha on sperm motility in vitro.

    PubMed

    Grünberger, W; Maier, U; Lunglmayr, G

    1981-01-01

    The effect of prostaglandin F 2 alpha (PGF2 alpha) on sperm motility in ejaculates from 53 subfertile men was investigated. The addition of PGF2 alpha in a concentration of 25 00 ng/ml isotonic salt solution to sperm samples resulted in a highly significant (p less than 0.025) increase in sperm motility; however, only two out of three samples responded in this way, the remainder being unaffected. Mean progressive sperm motility in responders increased by 32.8% of baseline value (determined 2h after liquefaction). In higher concentrations (25 000 ng/ml aliquots), PGF2 alpha was ineffective.

  4. Stimulation of intestinal mucosal adenyl cyclase by cholera enterotoxin and prostaglandins

    PubMed Central

    Kimberg, Daniel V.; Field, Michael; Johnson, Judith; Henderson, Antonia; Gershon, Elaine

    1971-01-01

    The effects of several prostaglandins (PG) and a highly purified preparation of cholera enterotoxin (CT) on intestinal mucosal adenyl cyclase activity and the effect of CT on intestinal mucosal cyclic 3′,5′-adenosine monophosphate concentration were determined in guinea pig and rabbit small intestine and were correlated with the effects of the same agents on ion transport. Adenyl cyclase activity, measured in a crude membrane fraction of the mucosa, was found at all levels of the small intestine with the highest activity per milligram protein in the duodenum. The prostaglandins, when added directly to the assay, increased adenyl cyclase activity; the greatest effect (2-fold increase) was obtained with PGE1 (maximal effect at 0.03 mM) and PGE2. The prostaglandins also increased short-circuit current (SCC) in isolated guinea pig ileal mucosa, with PGE1 and PGE2 again giving the greatest effects. The prior addition of theophylline (10 mM) reduced the subsequent SCC response to PGE1 and vice versa. It was concluded, therefore, that the SCC response to PGE1, like the response to theophylline, represented active Cl secretion. CT increased adenyl cyclase activity in guinea pig and rabbit ileal mucosa when preincubated with the mucosa from 1 to 2.5 hr in vitro or for 2.5 hr in vivo but not when added directly to the assay. The increments in activity caused by PGE1 and NaF were the same in CT-treated and control mucosa. Cyclic 3′,5′-AMP concentration in rabbit ileal mucosa was increased 3.5-fold after a 2 hr preincubation with CT in vitro. Phosphodiesterase activity in the crude membrane fraction of the mucosa was unaffected by either CT or PGE1. A variety of other agents including insulin, glucagon, parathormone, thyroid-stimulating hormone, L-thyroxine, thyrocalcitonin, vasopressin, and epinephrine all failed to change adenyl cyclase activity. It is concluded that CT and certain prostaglandins produce small intestinal fluid secretion by increasing mucosal adenyl

  5. Structures of prostaglandin F synthase from the protozoa Leishmania major and Trypanosoma cruzi with NADP.

    PubMed

    Moen, Spencer O; Fairman, James W; Barnes, Steve R; Sullivan, Amy; Nakazawa-Hewitt, Stephen; Van Voorhis, Wesley C; Staker, Bart L; Lorimer, Donald D; Myler, Peter J; Edwards, Thomas E

    2015-05-01

    The crystal structures of prostaglandin F synthase (PGF) from both Leishmania major and Trypanosoma cruzi with and without their cofactor NADP have been determined to resolutions of 2.6 Å for T. cruzi PGF, 1.25 Å for T. cruzi PGF with NADP, 1.6 Å for L. major PGF and 1.8 Å for L. major PGF with NADP. These structures were determined by molecular replacement to a final R factor of less than 18.6% (Rfree of less than 22.9%). PGF in the infectious protozoa L. major and T. cruzi is a potential therapeutic target.

  6. Estrus synchronization and fertility behavior in Black Bengal goats following either progesterone or prostaglandin treatment.

    PubMed

    Ishwar, A K; Pandey, J N

    1990-11-01

    Thirty-six Black Bengal female goats were in the study. They were divided into three groups of 12 goats each. Group I served as the control, Group II was treated with progesterone, Group III was administered prostaglandin F2alpha. There was 100% estrus synchronization in the PGF2alpha treated group and 90% in the progesterone treated group. The total number of kids produced in the PGF2 alpha treated group was 15 followed by 12 in the progesterone - treated group and 6 in the control group. The gestation length was found to be similar in all three groups. PMID:16726900

  7. Molecular characterization of prostaglandin F receptor (FP) and E receptor subtype 1 (EP₁) in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Kwok, Amy H Y; Wang, Yajun; Leung, Frederick C

    2012-09-01

    Prostaglandins E (PGE) and F (PGF) mediate diverse physiological functions via their cell surface receptors - prostaglandin E receptor (EP) subtypes 1, 2, 3 and 4 (EP(1); EP(2); EP(3); EP(4)) and F receptor (FP). In teleost fishes, PGE was implicated in gill epithelium ion transport, while both PGE and PGF were involved in oocyte maturation, follicular rupture and coordination of reproductive behaviors. However, little is known about the mechanisms behind their actions. In present study, we first identified the full-length ORF cDNA clones of three zebrafish prostaglandin E receptor subtype 1 (zEP(1)) isoforms - zEP(1a), zEP(1b) and zEP(1c) - and FP (zFP) from adult ovary. RT-PCR showed that zEP(1a), zEP(1b) and zFP are widely expressed in adult tissues, while zEP(1c) mRNA expression is mainly confined in brain and kidney. Using a pGL3-NFAT-RE luciferase reporter system, both zEP(1a) and zEP(1b) expressed in DF-1 cells were shown to be activated by PGE(2) potently while zEP(1c) and zFP were activated by PGF(2a) effectively, suggesting that the four receptors are functionally coupled to intracellular Ca(2+)-signaling pathway. Furthermore, EP1a and EP1b, but not EP1c were suggested to couple to cAMP-PKA signaling pathway using a pGL3-CRE luciferase reporter assay. Although zEP(1c) might originate as a paralog to zEP(1a) and zEP(1b), its functional coupling to PGF(2α) instead of PGE(2) suggested that zEP(1) isoforms might have sub-functionalized in their ligand binding and G protein coupling specificity, in addition to differential tissue distribution. Characterization of these receptors undoubtedly furthered our understanding on the diverse yet highly target-specific responses of prostaglandins in teleosts. PMID:22617193

  8. Inhibition of gonadotropin and prostaglandin stimulation of testicular steroidogenesis in malnourished rats.

    PubMed

    Nduka, E U; Dada, O A

    1984-01-01

    The effect of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) and prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) on testicular steroidogenesis in protein-deficient and refed rats was studied in vitro. The malnourished, refed, and control rats were found to secret testosterone in response to hCG and PGE1 stimulation. There was a significant reduction in the basal level of secretion in the malnourished rat testis (1.0 +/- 0.4 nMol/3 hr./Testis). Malnourished rats refed with adequate protein diet responded to hCG and PGE1 stimulation in a similar manner to normally-fed adult rats. PMID:6541885

  9. Effects of altering dietary fatty acid composition on prostaglandin synthesis and fertility.

    PubMed

    Abayasekara, D R; Wathes, D C

    1999-11-01

    Several studies over the past 20 years have demonstrated that subjects on diets composed of substances with high levels of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) (e.g. fish) have a decreased incidence of heart disease. On this basis, a recent report from the Department of Health has advised UK consumers to decrease the proportion of saturated as opposed to unsaturated fats in their diet and to increase the ratio of n-3 to n-6 PUFAs. This could be achieved by altering the amounts of these constituents in milk and meat. n-3 Fatty acids can most easily be added to animal feed as either fish oil or linseed oil and can be increased in the blood and milk of ruminants following protection to avoid hydrogenation in the rumen. In western countries the ratio of consumption of n-6 to n-3 PUFAs is greater than 10 and current evidence tends to suggest that a ratio nearer 5 would be more desirable and compatible with cardiovascular well being. As fertility in the UK dairy herd is already poor, it is important to establish whether alterations in dietary n-3 and n-6 PUFAs affects herd fertility before widespread changes in animal diets are recommended. Therefore, this review considers the role played by PUFAs and eicosanoids in fertility, with particular reference to the implications for farm livestock production. The evidence reviewed shows that alteration of the concentration and ratio of n-6 and n-3 PUFAs in feeds can influence prostaglandin synthesis/metabolism in a number of mammalian systems. The changed patterns of prostaglandin synthesis can as a consequence, affect the diverse functions (e.g. hormone secretion) that are normally mediated via prostaglandins. Similarly, changes in prostaglandin synthesis effected through manipulation of PUFAs has a major bearing on fertility (as PGs affect many reproductive parameters, e.g. ovulation). Several studies in cattle and other mammals, show that feeding or infusing different types of fat with varying PUFA content to females can

  10. Pharmacotherapy of intraocular pressure - part II. Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors, prostaglandin analogues and prostamides.

    PubMed

    Costagliola, Ciro; dell'Omo, Roberto; Romano, Mario R; Rinaldi, Michele; Zeppa, Lucia; Parmeggiani, Francesco

    2009-12-01

    The second part of this two part review (please see Expert Opinion on Pharmacotherapy 10(16)) reports the characteristics of other antiglaucoma medications: systemic (acetazomide) and topical (dorzolamide and brinzolamide) carbonic anhydrase inhibitors, which suppress aqueous humour formation; and prostaglandin analogues (latanoprost and travoprost) and prostamides (bimatoprost), which raise aqueous humour outflow. The pharmacologic properties of each compound and its efficacy in the medical treatment of glaucoma, mainly the primary open-angle form, are discussed briefly, focusing on the clinical evidence supporting their use. PMID:19929706

  11. Peripheral plasma levels of progesterone in pregnant goats and in pregnant goats treated with prostaglandin F2a.

    PubMed

    Bosu, W T; Serna Garibay, J A; Barker, C A

    1979-02-01

    Prostaglandin or prostaglandin analogues have been shown to be luteolytic in the pregnant goat. In this study the temporal changes in the plasma concentrations of progesterone during pregnancy and after administration of PGF2a to pregnant goats are described. PGF2a administration to pregnant goats at 30 and 65 days after breeding induced abortion within 34 to 75 hours. These abortions were accompanied by estrus and profuse muco-hemorrhagic discharges. When PGF2a was administered to pregnant goats 140 or 142 days after breeding, premature parturition occurred within 42 to 76 hours. Live kids were delivered in all cases. The plasma levels of progesterone in all pregnant goats showed dramatic decreases within 24 hours after the prostaglandin injections and continued to decrease gradually until abortions or premature parturition. Thereafter, the progesterone levels remained low for several days. PMID:16725398

  12. Distribution of Prostaglandin E2 in Gastric and Duodenal Mucosa: Possible Role in the Pathogenesis of Peptic Ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sill Moo; Yoo, Byung Chul; Lee, Hyo Rang; Chung, Hyuk; Lee, Young Soon

    1992-01-01

    Background Prostaglandin E which is present abundantly in the gastric mucosa is a powerful inhibitor of gastric acid secretion and a stimulus to gastric mucus production. In addition, prostaglandin E2 inhibits ulcer formation in animals, and the synthetic analogues of prostaglandin E have successfully been used in the treatment of patients with gastric and duodenal ulcer disease. To evaluate the role of endogenous prostaglandin E2 in the pathogenesis of the peptic ulcer disease, we measured mucosal prostaglandin E2 levels in patients with gastric and duodenal ulcer disease and compared with that of non-ulcer control persons. Methods The study population was made up of 44 non-ulcer persons, 36 patients with a benign gastric ulcer, and 48 with a duodenal ulcer. Every mucosai specimen, taken from the antrum and from the duodenal bulb, were homogenized, mixed with 1 M HCI, and centrifuged. After removal of the supernatant, precipitate was eluted with ethyl acetate in the Amprep C18 minicolumn. Then the extracted prostaglandin E2 in the ethyl acetate fractions was converted into its methyl oximate derivatives, and the prostaglandin E2 level was measured by radioimmunoassay. During the procedure any homogenized specimen which was looking grossly bloody was removed from the assay in order to avoid any possible contamination or prostaglandin E2 in blood. Results In non-ulcer persons, the mean values was 258.17±127.03 pg/mg. tissue in antrum and 121.07±67.46 pg/mg. tissue in duodenal bulb. The corresponding values were 186.42±70.51 pg/mg. tissue, 79.44±39.04 pg/mg. tissue in gastric ulcer patients and 204. 94 92.03 pg/mg. tissue, 99.66±56.10 pg/mgl. tissue in duodenal ulcer patients respectively. Gastric ulcer patients have the significantly lower level of the antral and duodenal prostaglandin E2 (p<0.005). Those levels of duodenal ulcer patients were also significantly lower than those of non-ulcer persons (p<0.025 & 0.05). Antral prostaglandin E2 level increased to

  13. Mutations in the prostaglandin transporter encoding gene SLCO2A1 cause primary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy and isolated digital clubbing.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Wenke; Kühnisch, Jirko; Tüysüz, Beyhan; Specker, Christof; Brouwers, Ad; Horn, Denise

    2012-04-01

    Digital clubbing is usually secondary to different acquired diseases. Primary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy (PHO) is a rare hereditary disorder with variable digital clubbing as the most prominent feature, subperiosteal new bone formation, and arthropathy. Recently, mutations in the 15-hydroxy-prostaglandin dehydrogenase (15-PGDH) encoding gene HPGD were found to cause PHO. Here, we identified three unrelated families with different mutations in the prostaglandin transporter (PGT) encoding gene SLCO2A1 which presumably result in reduced metabolic clearance by 15-PGDH due to diminished cellular uptake of prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) by mutant PGT. In two consanguineous families, homozygous mutations, an intragenic deletion that results in frameshift and a missense mutation, are associated with a severe PHO phenotype. In a third family, a heterozygous carrier of a stop mutation presents with isolated digital clubbing. Thus, our study further supports the importance of PGE(2) metabolism in the pathogenesis of digital clubbing and PHO. PMID:22331663

  14. Sample Size for Measuring Grammaticality in Preschool Children from Picture-Elicited Language Samples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisenberg, Sarita L.; Guo, Ling-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate whether a shorter language sample elicited with fewer pictures (i.e., 7) would yield a percent grammatical utterances (PGU) score similar to that computed from a longer language sample elicited with 15 pictures for 3-year-old children. Method: Language samples were elicited by asking forty…

  15. Developing Socio-Cultural Scaffolding Model to Elicit Learners's Speech Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Englishtina, Inti

    2015-01-01

    This study is concerned with developing scaffolding model to elicit bilingual kindergarten children's English speech production. It is aimed at describing what the teachers need in eliciting their students' speech production; how a scaffolding model should be developed to elicit the children's speech production; and how effective is the…

  16. Research Dilemmas Associated with Photo Elicitation in Comparative Early Childhood Education Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birkeland, Asta

    2013-01-01

    Photo elicitation has become an important method to produce data in qualitative research. There is quite an extensive literature indicating the benefits of photo elicitation in order to facilitate collaboration in meaning making between researcher and the interviewee. This article addresses dilemmas associated with using photo elicitation in a…

  17. Bromoenol Lactone, an Inhibitor of Calcium-Independent Phospholipase A2, Suppresses Carrageenan-Induced Prostaglandin Production and Hyperalgesia in Rat Hind Paw

    PubMed Central

    Tsuchida, Keiichiro; Ibuki, Takae; Matsumura, Kiyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Prostaglandin (PG) E2 and PGI2 are essential to hyperalgesia in inflammatory tissues. These prostaglandins are produced from arachidonic acid, which is cleaved from membrane phospholipids by the action of phospholipase A2 (PLA2). Which isozyme of PLA2 is responsible for the cleavage of arachidonic acid and the production of prostaglandins essential to inflammation-induced hyperalgesia is not clear. In this study, we examined the effects of two PLA2 isozyme-specific inhibitors on carrageenan-induced production of PGE2 and PGI2 in rat hind paw and behavioral nociceptive response to radiant heat. Local administration of bromoenol lactone (BEL), an inhibitor of calcium-independent PLA2 (iPLA2), significantly reduced carrageenan-induced elevation of prostaglandins in the inflamed foot pad 3 h after injection. It also ameliorated the hyperalgesic response between 1 h and 3 h after carrageenan injection. On the other hand, AACOCF3, an inhibitor of cytosolic PLA2, suppressed neither prostaglandin production nor the hyperalgesic response. BEL did not suppress the mRNA levels of iPLA2β, iPLA2γ, cyclooxygenase-2, microsomal prostaglandin E synthase, prostaglandin I synthase, or proinflammatory cytokines in the inflamed foot pad, indicating that BEL did not suppress inflammation itself. These results suggest that iPLA2 is involved in the production of prostaglandins and hyperalgesia at the inflammatory loci. PMID:26063975

  18. Albumin-Binding and Tumor Vasculature Determine the Antitumor Effect of 15-Deoxy-Δ12,14-Prostaglandin-J2 in vivo1

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Jai; Bansal, Ruchi; Post, Eduard; de Jager-Krikken, Alie; Lub-de Hooge, Marjolijn N; Poelstra, Klaas

    2009-01-01

    15-Deoxy-Δ12,14-prostaglandin-J2 (15d-PGJ2), a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) agonist, induces cell death in tumor cells in vitro; however, no study showed its in vivo effect on tumors. Here, we report that 15d-PGJ2 shows antitumor effects in vivo in mice. However, its effects correlate with tumor uptake of albumin, to which it reversibly binds. 15d-PGJ2 induces cell death in B16F10 melanoma and C26 colon carcinoma cells in vitro. These effects were not elicited through PPARγ-dependent pathways because an irreversible PPARγ antagonist GW9662 did not inhibit these effects. Caspase- and nuclear factor κB- (NF-κB) dependent pathways were found to be involved as determined with caspase-3/7 fluorescent assay and NF-κB containing plasmid transfection assay, respectively. Noticeably, 15d-PGJ2 had significantly stronger effects in C26 cells compared with B16 cells in all assays. However, in vivo, there was no effect on C26 tumors, yet it significantly inhibited the B16 tumor growth in mice by 75%. We found that 15d-PGJ2 rapidly bound to albumin and in vivo albumin greatly distributed to B16 tumors compared with C26 tumors, shown with γ-camera imaging and immunohistochemical staining. Albumin accumulation can be attributed to the large blood vessel diameter in B16 tumors and an enhanced permeability and retention effect. These findings suggest that 15d-PGJ2 can be an effective therapeutic agent for cancer, although its effects seem to be limited to the tumors allowing albumin penetration. PMID:20019843

  19. Prostaglandins and muscarinic agonists induce cyclic AMP attenuation by two distinct mechanisms in the pregnant-rat myometrium. Interaction between cyclic AMP and Ca2+ signals.

    PubMed Central

    Goureau, O; Tanfin, Z; Harbon, S

    1990-01-01

    In pregnant-rat myometrium (day 21 of gestation), isoprenaline-induced cyclic AMP accumulation, resulting from receptor-mediated activation of adenylate cyclase, was negatively regulated by prostaglandins [PGE2, PGF2 alpha; EC50 (concn. giving 50% of maximal response) = 2 nM] and by the muscarinic agonist carbachol (EC50 = 2 microM). PG-induced inhibition was prevented by pertussis-toxin treatment, supporting the idea that it was mediated by the inhibitory G-protein Gi through the inhibitory pathway of the adenylate cyclase. Both isoprenaline-induced stimulation and PG-evoked inhibition of cyclic AMP were insensitive to Ca2+ depletion. By contrast, carbachol-evoked attenuation of cyclic AMP accumulation was dependent on Ca2+ and was insensitive to pertussis toxin. The inhibitory effect of carbachol was mimicked by ionomycin. Indirect evidence was thus provided for the enhancement of cyclic AMP degradation by a Ca2(+)-dependent phosphodiesterase activity in the muscarinic-mediated effect. The attenuation of cyclic AMP elicited by carbachol coincided with carbachol-stimulated inositol phosphate (InsP3, InsP2 and InsP) generation, which displayed an almost identical EC50 (3 microM) and was similarly unaffected by pertussis toxin. Both carbachol effects were reproduced by oxotremorine, whereas pilocarpine (a partial muscarinic agonist) failed to induce any decrease in cyclic AMP accumulation and concurrently was unable to stimulate the generation of inositol phosphates. These data support our proposal for a carbachol-mediated enhancement of a Ca2(+)-dependent phosphodiesterase activity, compatible with the rises in Ca2+ associated with muscarinic-induced increased generation of inositol phosphates. They further illustrate that a cross-talk between the two major transmembrane signalling systems contributed to an ultimate decrease in cyclic AMP in the pregnant-rat myometrium near term. PMID:1700899

  20. TIS10, a phorbol ester tumor promoter-inducible mRNA from Swiss 3T3 cells, encodes a novel prostaglandin synthase/cyclooxygenase homologue.

    PubMed

    Kujubu, D A; Fletcher, B S; Varnum, B C; Lim, R W; Herschman, H R

    1991-07-15

    TIS10 is a primary response gene whose cDNA was cloned as a result of its rapid, superinducible expression in Swiss 3T3 cells in response to 12-O-Tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate. The 5'-untranslated region of the 3.9-kilobase TIS10 message contains only 124 nucleotides, whereas the 3'-untranslated region is almost 2 kilobases in length. Within this long 3' region, there are multiple repeats of the sequence ATTTA, a sequence often present in rapidly degraded mRNA species. Primer extension revealed that the TIS10 cDNA begins 16 base pairs downstream of the transcription start site for the TIS10 gene. The TIS10 cDNA encodes a predicted protein of 604 amino acids. A computer search identified striking similarities between the predicted TIS10 protein product and the murine, sheep, and human prostaglandin synthase/cyclooxygenase proteins. The TIS10 protein has many of the same conserved amino acids that are thought to be important for cyclooxygenase function. TIS10 mRNA is undetectable by Northern analysis in quiescent 3T3 cells. The TIS10 gene is rapidly and transiently induced by forskolin and serum, as well as by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate, in Swiss 3T3 cells. These agents elicit far more dramatic changes in TIS10 mRNA levels than in cyclooxygenase mRNA levels. The expression of the TIS10 gene appears to be highly cell type-restricted in cultured cell lines; of 12 cell lines tested under superinducing conditions, only the rodent embryonic Swiss 3T3 and Rat1 cell lines expressed TIS10 gene.

  1. Progesterone receptor expression declines in the guinea pig uterus during functional progesterone withdrawal and in response to prostaglandins.

    PubMed

    Welsh, Toni N; Hirst, Jonathan J; Palliser, Hannah; Zakar, Tamas

    2014-01-01

    Progesterone withdrawal is essential for parturition, but the mechanism of this pivotal hormonal change is unclear in women and other mammals that give birth without a pre-labor drop in maternal progesterone levels. One possibility suggested by uterine tissue analyses and cell culture models is that progesterone receptor levels change at term decreasing the progesterone responsiveness of the myometrium, which causes progesterone withdrawal at the functional level and results in estrogen dominance enhancing uterine contractility. In this investigation we have explored whether receptor mediated functional progesterone withdrawal occurs during late pregnancy and labor in vivo. We have also determined whether prostaglandins that induce labor cause functional progesterone withdrawal by altering myometrial progesterone receptor expression. Pregnant guinea pigs were used, since this animal loses progesterone responsiveness at term and gives birth in the presence of high maternal progesterone level similarly to primates. We found that progesterone receptor mRNA and protein A and B expression decreased in the guinea pig uterus during the last third of gestation and in labor. Prostaglandin administration reduced while prostaglandin synthesis inhibitor treatment increased progesterone receptor A protein abundance. Estrogen receptor-1 protein levels remained unchanged during late gestation, in labor and after prostaglandin or prostaglandin synthesis inhibitor administration. Steroid receptor levels were higher in the non-pregnant than in the pregnant uterine horns. We conclude that the decreasing expression of both progesterone receptors A and B is a physiological mechanism of functional progesterone withdrawal in the guinea pig during late pregnancy and in labor. Further, prostaglandins administered exogenously or produced endogenously stimulate labor in part by suppressing uterine progesterone receptor A expression, which may cause functional progesterone withdrawal, promote

  2. Eliciting Informative Feedback: The Peer-Prediction Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Nolan; Resnick, Paul; Zeckhauser, Richard

    Many recommendation and decision processes depend on eliciting evaluations of opportunities, products, and vendors. A scoring system is devised that induces honest reporting of feedback. Each rater merely reports a signal, and the system applies proper scoring rules to the implied posterior beliefs about another rater's report. Honest reporting proves to be a Nash Equilibrium. The scoring schemes can be scaled to induce appropriate effort by raters and can be extended to handle sequential interaction and continuous signals. We also address a number of practical implementation issues that arise in settings such as academic reviewing and on-line recommender and reputation systems.

  3. Unattractive infant faces elicit negative affect from adults.

    PubMed

    Schein, Stevie S; Langlois, Judith H

    2015-02-01

    We examined the relationship between infant attractiveness and adult affect by investigating whether differing levels of infant facial attractiveness elicit facial muscle movement correlated with positive and negative affect from adults (N=87) using electromyography. Unattractive infant faces evoked significantly more corrugator supercilii and levator labii superioris movement (physiological correlates of negative affect) than attractive infant faces. These results suggest that unattractive infants may be at risk for negative affective responses from adults, though the relationship between those responses and caregiving behavior remains elusive.

  4. Audio-vocal responses elicited in adult cochlear implant users

    PubMed Central

    Loucks, Torrey M.; Suneel, Deepa; Aronoff, Justin M.

    2015-01-01

    Auditory deprivation experienced prior to receiving a cochlear implant could compromise neural connections that allow for modulation of vocalization using auditory feedback. In this report, pitch-shift stimuli were presented to adult cochlear implant users to test whether compensatory motor changes in vocal F0 could be elicited. In five of six participants, rapid adjustments in vocal F0 were detected following the stimuli, which resemble the cortically mediated pitch-shift responses observed in typical hearing individuals. These findings suggest that cochlear implants can convey vocal F0 shifts to the auditory pathway that might benefit audio-vocal monitoring. PMID:26520350

  5. Simplifying Probability Elicitation and Uncertainty Modeling in Bayesian Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Paulson, Patrick R; Carroll, Thomas E; Sivaraman, Chitra; Neorr, Peter A; Unwin, Stephen D; Hossain, Shamina S

    2011-04-16

    In this paper we contribute two methods that simplify the demands of knowledge elicitation for particular types of Bayesian networks. The first method simplify the task of providing probabilities when the states that a random variable takes can be described by a new, fully ordered state set in which a state implies all the preceding states. The second method leverages Dempster-Shafer theory of evidence to provide a way for the expert to express the degree of ignorance that they feel about the estimates being provided.

  6. Peripheral prostaglandin E2 prolongs the sensitization of nociceptive dorsal root ganglion neurons possibly by facilitating the synthesis and anterograde axonal trafficking of EP4 receptors.

    PubMed

    St-Jacques, Bruno; Ma, Weiya

    2014-11-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), a well-known pain mediator enriched in inflamed tissues, plays a pivotal role in the genesis of chronic pain conditions such as inflammatory and neuropathic pain. PGE2-prolonged sensitization of nociceptive dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons (nociceptors) may contribute to the transition from acute to chronic pain. However, the underlying cellular mechanisms are poorly understood. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that facilitating synthesis and anterograde axonal trafficking of EP receptors contribute to PGE2-prolonged nociceptor sensitization. Intraplantar (i.pl.) injection of a stabilized PGE2 analog, 16,16 dimethyl PGE2 (dmPGE2), in a dose- and time-dependent manner, not only elicited primary tactile allodynia which lasted for 1d, but also prolonged tactile allodynia evoked by a subsequent i.pl. injection of dmPGE2 from 1d to 4d. Moreover, the duration of tactile allodynia was progressively prolonged following multiple sequential i.pl. injections of dmPGE2. Co-injection of the selective EP1 or EP4 receptor antagonist, the inhibitors of cAMP, PKA, PKC, PKCε or PLC as well as an interleukin-6 (IL-6) neutralizing antiserum differentially blocked primary tactile allodynia elicited by the 1st dmPGE2 and the prolonged tactile allodynia evoked by the 2nd dmPGE2, suggesting the involvement of these signaling events in dmPGE2-induced nociceptor activation and sensitization. Co-injection of a selective COX2 inhibitor or two EP4 antagonists prevented or shortened inflammagen-prolonged nociceptor sensitization. I.pl. injection of dmPGE2 or carrageenan time-dependently increased EP4 levels in L4-6 DRG neurons and peripheral nerves. EP4 was expressed in almost half of IB4-binding nociceptors of L4-6 DRG. Taken together, our data suggest that stimulating the synthesis and anterograde axonal trafficking to increase EP4 availability at the axonal terminals of nociceptors is likely a novel mechanism underlying PGE2-prolonged nociceptor

  7. Prostaglandin endoperoxide synthetase and the activation of benzo(a)pyrene to reactive metabolites in vivo in guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Garattini, E.; Coccia, P.; Romano, M.; Jiritano, L.; Noseda, A.; Salmona, M.

    1984-11-01

    The role of prostaglandin endoperoxide synthetase in the in vivo activation of benzo(a)pyrene to reactive metabolites capable of interacting irreversibly with cellular macromolecules was studied in guinea pig liver, lung, kidney, spleen, small intestine, colon, and brain. DNA and protein covalent binding experiments were made after systemic administration of acetylsalicylic acid (200 mg/kg) followed by radiolabeled benzo(a)pyrene (4 microgram/kg). Results are compared with a control situation in which the prostaglandin endoperoxide synthetase inhibitor (acetylsalicylic acid) was not administered. No decrease in the level of DNA or protein benzo(a)pyrene-derived covalent binding was observed in any of the tissues studied.

  8. Emotion Elicitation: A Comparison of Pictures and Films

    PubMed Central

    Uhrig, Meike K.; Trautmann, Nadine; Baumgärtner, Ulf; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Henrich, Florian; Hiller, Wolfgang; Marschall, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Pictures and film clips are widely used and accepted stimuli to elicit emotions. Based on theoretical arguments it is often assumed that the emotional effects of films exceed those of pictures, but to date this assumption has not been investigated directly. The aim of the present study was to compare pictures and films in terms of their capacity to induce emotions verified by means of explicit measures. Stimuli were (a) single pictures presented for 6 s, (b) a set of three consecutive pictures with emotionally congruent contents presented for 2 s each, (c) short film clips with a duration of 6 s. A total of 144 participants rated their emotion and arousal states following stimulus presentation. Repeated-measures ANOVAs revealed that the film clips and 3-picture version were as effective as the classical 1-picture method to elicit positive emotions, however, modulation toward positive valence was little. Modulation toward negative valence was more effective in general. Film clips were less effective than pictorial stimuli in producing the corresponding emotion states (all p < 0.001) and were less arousing (all p ≤ 0.02). Possible reasons for these unexpected results are discussed. PMID:26925007

  9. Hypoglycemic activity of withanolides and elicitated Withania somnifera.

    PubMed

    Gorelick, Jonathan; Rosenberg, Rivka; Smotrich, Avinoam; Hanuš, Lumír; Bernstein, Nirit

    2015-08-01

    Withania somnifera, known in India as Asghawhanda, is used traditionally to treat many medical problems including diabetes and has demonstrated therapeutic activity in various animal models as well as in diabetic patients. While much of W. somnifera's therapeutic activity is attributed to withanolides, their role in the anti-diabetic activity of W. somnifera has not been adequately studied. In the present study, we evaluated the anti-diabetic activity of W. somnifera extract and purified withanolides, as well as the effect of various elicitors on this activity. W. somnifera leaf and root extracts increased glucose uptake in myotubes and adipocytes in a dose dependent manner, with the leaf extract more active than the root extract. Leaf but not root extract increased insulin secretion in basal pancreatic beta cells but not in stimulated cells. Six withanolides isolated from W. somnifera were tested for anti-diabetic activity based on glucose uptake in skeletal myotubes. Withaferin A was found to increase glucose uptake, with 10μM producing a 54% increase compared with control, suggesting that withaferin A is at least partially responsible for W. somnifera's anti-diabetic activity. Elicitors applied to the root growing solutions affected the physiological state of the plants, altering membrane leakage or osmotic potential. Methyl salicylate and chitosan increased withaferin A content by 75% and 69% respectively, and extracts from elicited plants increased glucose uptake to a higher extent than non-elicited plants, demonstrating a correlation between increased content of withaferin A and anti-diabetic activity.

  10. Elicitation of dihydrobenzophenanthridine oxidase in Sanguinaria canadensis cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Ignatov, A; Clark, W G; Cline, S D; Psenak, M; Krueger, J; Coscia, C J

    1996-12-01

    Dihydrobenzophenanthridine (DHBP) oxidase catalyses the last step in the biogenesis of the benzo[c]phenanthridine alkaloid sanguinarine. Addition of autoclaved fungal preparations or putative plant defence signalling intermediates (jasmonic acid (JA), methyl jasmonate (MeJ), acetylsalicylic acid (ASA)) to Sanguinaria canadensis cell suspension cultures elicited an increase in the activity of DHBP oxidase. MeJ and ASA were better inducers of oxidase activity than were the fungal elicitor and JA. Enzyme-specific activity could be induced in a dose- and time-dependent manner up to 4- to 14-fold, respectively, when cells were treated with MeJ or with ASA. A change in total enzyme activity in cultured cells was observed only at the highest concentration of MeJ and not at any level of ASA tested. The results suggest that MeJ and ASA may play a role in the S. canadensis defence against pathogens by eliciting the enzymes involved in the synthesis of the phytoalexin benzophenanthridine alkaloids.

  11. Hypoglycemic activity of withanolides and elicitated Withania somnifera.

    PubMed

    Gorelick, Jonathan; Rosenberg, Rivka; Smotrich, Avinoam; Hanuš, Lumír; Bernstein, Nirit

    2015-08-01

    Withania somnifera, known in India as Asghawhanda, is used traditionally to treat many medical problems including diabetes and has demonstrated therapeutic activity in various animal models as well as in diabetic patients. While much of W. somnifera's therapeutic activity is attributed to withanolides, their role in the anti-diabetic activity of W. somnifera has not been adequately studied. In the present study, we evaluated the anti-diabetic activity of W. somnifera extract and purified withanolides, as well as the effect of various elicitors on this activity. W. somnifera leaf and root extracts increased glucose uptake in myotubes and adipocytes in a dose dependent manner, with the leaf extract more active than the root extract. Leaf but not root extract increased insulin secretion in basal pancreatic beta cells but not in stimulated cells. Six withanolides isolated from W. somnifera were tested for anti-diabetic activity based on glucose uptake in skeletal myotubes. Withaferin A was found to increase glucose uptake, with 10μM producing a 54% increase compared with control, suggesting that withaferin A is at least partially responsible for W. somnifera's anti-diabetic activity. Elicitors applied to the root growing solutions affected the physiological state of the plants, altering membrane leakage or osmotic potential. Methyl salicylate and chitosan increased withaferin A content by 75% and 69% respectively, and extracts from elicited plants increased glucose uptake to a higher extent than non-elicited plants, demonstrating a correlation between increased content of withaferin A and anti-diabetic activity. PMID:25796090

  12. Cognitive constraints on constituent order: Evidence from elicited pantomime

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Matthew L.; Mayberry, Rachel I.; Ferreira, Victor S.

    2014-01-01

    To what extent does human cognition influence the structure of human language? Recent experiments using elicited pantomime suggest that the prevalence of Subject-Object-Verb (SOV) order across the world's languages may arise in part because SOV order is most compatible with how we conceptually represent transitive events (Goldin-Meadow, So, Özyürek, & Mylander, 2008). However, this raises the question as to why non-SOV orders exist. Two recent studies (Meir, Lifshitz, Ilkbasaran, & Padden, 2010; Gibson et al., 2013) suggest that SOV might be suboptimal for describing events in which both the agent and patient are plausible agents (e.g. a woman pushing a boy); we call these “reversible” events. We replicate these findings using elicited pantomime and offer a new interpretation. Meir et al.'s (2010) account is framed largely in terms of constraints on comprehension, while Gibson et al.'s (2013) account involves minimizing the risk of information loss or memory degradation. We offer an alternative hypothesis that is grounded in constraints on production. We consider the implications of these findings for the distribution of constituent order in the world's spoken languages and for the structure of emerging sign languages. PMID:23792806

  13. Glyphosate Suppression of an Elicited Defense Response 1

    PubMed Central

    Sharon, Amir; Amsellem, Ziva; Gressel, Jonathan

    1992-01-01

    The major effort in developing pathogenic fungi into potential mycoherbicides is aimed at increasing fungal virulence to weeds without affecting crop selectivity. Specific suppression of biosynthesis of a phytoalexin derived from the shikimate pathway in Cassia obtusifolia L. by a sublethal dose (50 micromolar) of glyphosate increased susceptibility to the mycoherbicide Alternaria cassiae Jurair & Khan. Glyphosate applied with conidia suppressed phytoalexin synthesis beginning at 12 hours, but not an earlier period 8 to 10 hours after inoculation. The phytoalexin synthesis elicited by fungal inoculation was also suppressed by darkness. The magnitudes of virulence of the mycoherbicide in the dark or with glyphosate in the light were both higher than after inoculation in the light with the same concentration of conidia in the absence of glyphosate. Five times less inoculum was needed to cause disease symptoms when applied with glyphosate than without. Glyphosate did not render A. cassiae virulent on soybean (Glycine max), a crop related to the host. These results suggest that a specific inhibition of a weed's elicited defense response can be a safe way to enhance virulence and improve the efficacy of the mycoherbicide. ImagesFigure 1Figure 3Figure 6 PMID:16668691

  14. Expert elicitation survey on future wind energy costs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiser, Ryan; Jenni, Karen; Seel, Joachim; Baker, Erin; Hand, Maureen; Lantz, Eric; Smith, Aaron

    2016-10-01

    Wind energy supply has grown rapidly over the last decade. However, the long-term contribution of wind to future energy supply, and the degree to which policy support is necessary to motivate higher levels of deployment, depends—in part—on the future costs of both onshore and offshore wind. Here, we summarize the results of an expert elicitation survey of 163 of the world’s foremost wind experts, aimed at better understanding future costs and technology advancement possibilities. Results suggest significant opportunities for cost reductions, but also underlying uncertainties. Under the median scenario, experts anticipate 24–30% reductions by 2030 and 35–41% reductions by 2050 across the three wind applications studied. Costs could be even lower: experts predict a 10% chance that reductions will be more than 40% by 2030 and more than 50% by 2050. Insights gained through expert elicitation complement other tools for evaluating cost-reduction potential, and help inform policy and planning, R&D and industry strategy.

  15. Concert hall acoustics assessment with individually elicited attributes.

    PubMed

    Lokki, Tapio; Patynen, Jukka; Kuusinen, Antti; Vertanen, Heikki; Tervo, Sakari

    2011-08-01

    Concert hall acoustics was evaluated with a descriptive sensory analysis method by employing an individual vocabulary development technique. The goal was to obtain sensory profiles of three concert halls by eliciting perceptual attributes for evaluation and comparison of the halls. The stimuli were gathered by playing back anechoic symphony music from 34 loudspeakers on stage in each concert hall and recording the sound field with a microphone array. Four musical programs were processed for multichannel 3D sound reproduction in the actual listening test. Twenty screened assessors developed their individual set of attributes and performed a comparative evaluation of nine seats, three in each hall. The results contain the distinctive groups of elicited attributes and show good agreement within assessors, even though they applied individual attributes when rating the samples. It was also found that loudness and distance gave the strongest perceptual direction to the principal component basis. In addition, the study revealed that the perception of reverberance is related to the size of the space or to the enveloping reverberance, depending on the assessor.

  16. Epigenetic mechanisms elicited by nutrition in early life.

    PubMed

    Canani, Roberto Berni; Costanzo, Margherita Di; Leone, Ludovica; Bedogni, Giorgio; Brambilla, Paolo; Cianfarani, Stefano; Nobili, Valerio; Pietrobelli, Angelo; Agostoni, Carlo

    2011-12-01

    A growing number of studies focusing on the developmental origin of health and disease hypothesis have identified links among early nutrition, epigenetic processes and diseases also in later life. Different epigenetic mechanisms are elicited by dietary factors in early critical developmental ages that are able to affect the susceptibility to several diseases in adulthood. The studies here reviewed suggest that maternal and neonatal diet may have long-lasting effects in the development of non-communicable chronic adulthood diseases, in particular the components of the so-called metabolic syndrome, such as insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, obesity, dyslipidaemia, hypertension, and CVD. Both maternal under- and over-nutrition may regulate the expression of genes involved in lipid and carbohydrate metabolism. Early postnatal nutrition may also represent a vital determinant of adult health by making an impact on the development and function of gut microbiota. An inadequate gut microbiota composition and function in early life seems to account for the deviant programming of later immunity and overall health status. In this regard probiotics, which have the potential to restore the intestinal microbiota balance, may be effective in preventing the development of chronic immune-mediated diseases. More recently, the epigenetic mechanisms elicited by probiotics through the production of SCFA are hypothesised to be the key to understand how they mediate their numerous health-promoting effects from the gut to the peripheral tissues.

  17. Bronchial Hyperreactivity to Prostaglandin F2α and Histamine in Patients with Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Mathé, A. A.; Hedqvist, P.; Holmgren, A.; Svanborg, N.

    1973-01-01

    The influence on airway conductance of inhaled aerosols of prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α), histamine, and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) was studied in 10 patients with spirometrically reversible bronchial asthma and in 10 healthy subjects with no history of lung disorder. Both groups responded with bronchoconstriction after inhalation of PGF2α but the asthmatic patients were about 8,000 times more sensitive to the compound than were the healthy controls. In the patients, but not in the controls, PGF2α often caused a long-standing decrease in airway conductance with symptoms resembling allergen-provoked asthmatic attacks. On the other hand, the patients showed less than a 10-fold increase in sensitivity to histamine, and the ratio of histamine: PGF2α doses causing a 50% decrease of airway conductance was 2·6:1 and 2,400:1 in controls and patients respectively. Inhalation of PGE2 while moderately but consistently increasing airway conductance in controls, had a variable—occasionally slight bronchoconstrictive—effect in patients. The decrease in airway conductance by a given dose of PGF2α was little modified by the simultaneous inhalation of a 100-times higher PGE2 dose. It is suggested that endogenous, locally formed PGF2α may play an important part in the pathogenesis of bronchial asthma. PMID:4686554

  18. Pharmacological inhibition of interleukin-1 activity on T cells by hydrocortisone, cyclosporine, prostaglandins, and cyclic nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Tracey, D E; Hardee, M M; Richard, K A; Paslay, J W

    1988-01-01

    The effects of a panel of hormones and pharmacological agents on the activation of T cells by a combination of interleukin-1 and phytohemagglutinin (IL-1/PHA) was studied. Pharmacological effects on various stages of IL-1/PHA-induced interleukin-2 (IL-2) production by the cloned murine thymoma cell line LBRM-33-1A5.7 were dissected using a multi-step assay procedure. A 4-h lag phase in the kinetics of IL-2 production allowed the operational definition of an early, IL-1-dependent programming stage, followed by an IL-2-production stage of the assay. A cell-washing procedure between these stages was introduced in order to distinguish IL-1 receptor antagonists from functional IL-1/PHA antagonists. Hydrocortisone and cyclosporine were potent inhibitors (active in the nM range) of both stages of IL-2 production, suggesting that neither is an IL-1 receptor antagonist. The cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-elevating agents prostaglandin E2, dibutyryl cAMP, and theophylline inhibited IL-2 production during the early, IL-1-dependent programming stage. By contrast, prostaglandin F2 alpha and dibutyryl cyclic guanosine monophosphate did not appreciably inhibit IL-1/PHA activity. These results are discussed in relationship to the effects of these test agents in thymocyte IL-1 assays or mitogenesis assays and the implications toward understanding the mechanisms underlying IL-1/PHA activation of T cells.

  19. A dynamic Asp–Arg interaction is essential for catalysis in microsomal prostaglandin E2 synthase

    PubMed Central

    Brock, Joseph S.; Hamberg, Mats; Balagunaseelan, Navisraj; Goodman, Michael; Morgenstern, Ralf; Strandback, Emilia; Samuelsson, Bengt; Rinaldo-Matthis, Agnes; Haeggström, Jesper Z.

    2016-01-01

    Microsomal prostaglandin E2 synthase type 1 (mPGES-1) is responsible for the formation of the potent lipid mediator prostaglandin E2 under proinflammatory conditions, and this enzyme has received considerable attention as a drug target. Recently, a high-resolution crystal structure of human mPGES-1 was presented, with Ser-127 being proposed as the hydrogen-bond donor stabilizing thiolate anion formation within the cofactor, glutathione (GSH). We have combined site-directed mutagenesis and activity assays with a structural dynamics analysis to probe the functional roles of such putative catalytic residues. We found that Ser-127 is not required for activity, whereas an interaction between Arg-126 and Asp-49 is essential for catalysis. We postulate that both residues, in addition to a crystallographic water, serve critical roles within the enzymatic mechanism. After characterizing the size or charge conservative mutations Arg-126–Gln, Asp-49–Asn, and Arg-126–Lys, we inferred that a crystallographic water acts as a general base during GSH thiolate formation, stabilized by interaction with Arg-126, which is itself modulated by its respective interaction with Asp-49. We subsequently found hidden conformational ensembles within the crystal structure that correlate well with our biochemical data. The resulting contact signaling network connects Asp-49 to distal residues involved in GSH binding and is ligand dependent. Our work has broad implications for development of efficient mPGES-1 inhibitors, potential anti-inflammatory and anticancer agents. PMID:26755582

  20. Prostaglandin EP4 receptor enhances BCR-induced apoptosis of immature B cells.

    PubMed

    Prijatelj, Matevz; Celhar, Teja; Mlinaric-Rascan, Irena

    2011-08-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is emerging as an important co-modulator of B cell responses. Using a pharmacological approach, we aimed to delineate the role of PGE2 in B cell receptor (BCR) induced apoptosis of immature B cells. Gene and protein expression analyses showed that, of the four PGE2 receptors subtypes, only EP4 receptor is upregulated upon BCR cross-linking, leading to sensitization of WEHI 231 cells towards PGE2 mediated inhibitory effects. EP4 receptor antagonist ONO-AE3-208, was able to completely revert the observed effects of PGE2. The engagement of EP4 receptor promotes BCR-induced G0/G1 arrest of WEHI 231 cells, resulting in enhanced caspase mediated, BCR-induced apoptosis. We addressed, mechanistically, the interplay between BCR and EP4 receptor signaling components. Prostaglandin1-alcohol (Pge1-OH), a selective EP4 receptor agonist inhibits BCR-induced activation of NF-κB by suppression of BCR-induced IκBα phosphorylation. Disruption of prosurvival pathways is a possible mechanism by which PGE2 enhances BCR-induced apoptosis in immature B lymphocytes.

  1. Location of inhibitor binding sites in the human inducible prostaglandin E synthase, MPGES1.

    PubMed

    Prage, Edward B; Pawelzik, Sven-Christian; Busenlehner, Laura S; Kim, Kwangho; Morgenstern, Ralf; Jakobsson, Per-Johan; Armstrong, Richard N

    2011-09-01

    The inducible microsomal prostaglandin E(2) synthase 1 (MPGES1) is an integral membrane protein coexpressed with and functionally coupled to cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) generating the pro-inflammatory molecule PGE(2). The development of effective inhibitors of MPGES1 holds promise as a highly selective route for controlling inflammation. In this paper, we describe the use of backbone amide H/D exchange mass spectrometry to map the binding sites of different types of inhibitors of MPGES1. The results reveal the locations of specific inhibitor binding sites that include the GSH binding site and a hydrophobic cleft in the protein thought to accommodate the prostaglandin H(2) substrate. In the absence of three-dimensional crystal structures of the enzyme-bound inhibitors, the results provide clear physical evidence that three pharmacologically active inhibitors bind in a hydrophobic cleft composed of sections of transmembrane helices Ia, IIb, IIIb, and IVb at the interface of subunits in the trimer. In principle, the H/D exchange behavior of the protein can be used as a preliminary guide for optimization of inhibitor efficacy. Finally, a comparison of the structures and H/D exchange behavior of MPGES1 and the related enzyme MGST1 in the presence of glutathione and the inhibitor glutathione sulfonate confirms the unusual observation that two proteins from the same superfamily harbor GSH binding sites in different locations.

  2. Comparison of prostaglandin E2 vaginal tablet with amniotomy and intravenous oxytocin for induction of labour.

    PubMed

    Lo, L; Ho, M W; Leung, P

    1994-05-01

    Prostaglandins have been increasingly used in obstetrical practice for cervical ripening and induction of labour. We set out to investigate the effectiveness of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) vaginal pessaries in inducing labour in the Chinese population in Hong Kong. In the period August, 1991 to August, 1992, we recruited 206 pregnant Chinese women who required induction of labour for various obstetrical indications into the trial. The study group had induction of labour by PGE2 vaginal pessaries and the control group underwent amniotomy plus oxytocin infusion. These patients were alternately assigned either method of induction. They were further divided into primiparous and multiparous (parity 1 and 2 only) groups. Only 101 primiparas and 99 multiparas were available in the final analysis of the trial. Various aspects of labour, delivery, maternal and fetal outcome were compared. For primiparas, the traditional combined induction was the preferred method. For multiparas, both induction methods were quite satisfactory and there was a trend toward lesser blood loss and pethidine requirement in the PGE2 users.

  3. A dynamic Asp-Arg interaction is essential for catalysis in microsomal prostaglandin E2 synthase.

    PubMed

    Brock, Joseph S; Hamberg, Mats; Balagunaseelan, Navisraj; Goodman, Michael; Morgenstern, Ralf; Strandback, Emilia; Samuelsson, Bengt; Rinaldo-Matthis, Agnes; Haeggström, Jesper Z

    2016-01-26

    Microsomal prostaglandin E2 synthase type 1 (mPGES-1) is responsible for the formation of the potent lipid mediator prostaglandin E2 under proinflammatory conditions, and this enzyme has received considerable attention as a drug target. Recently, a high-resolution crystal structure of human mPGES-1 was presented, with Ser-127 being proposed as the hydrogen-bond donor stabilizing thiolate anion formation within the cofactor, glutathione (GSH). We have combined site-directed mutagenesis and activity assays with a structural dynamics analysis to probe the functional roles of such putative catalytic residues. We found that Ser-127 is not required for activity, whereas an interaction between Arg-126 and Asp-49 is essential for catalysis. We postulate that both residues, in addition to a crystallographic water, serve critical roles within the enzymatic mechanism. After characterizing the size or charge conservative mutations Arg-126-Gln, Asp-49-Asn, and Arg-126-Lys, we inferred that a crystallographic water acts as a general base during GSH thiolate formation, stabilized by interaction with Arg-126, which is itself modulated by its respective interaction with Asp-49. We subsequently found hidden conformational ensembles within the crystal structure that correlate well with our biochemical data. The resulting contact signaling network connects Asp-49 to distal residues involved in GSH binding and is ligand dependent. Our work has broad implications for development of efficient mPGES-1 inhibitors, potential anti-inflammatory and anticancer agents.

  4. Neutrophils mediate Salmonella Typhimurium clearance through the GBP4 inflammasome-dependent production of prostaglandins.

    PubMed

    Tyrkalska, Sylwia D; Candel, Sergio; Angosto, Diego; Gómez-Abellán, Victoria; Martín-Sánchez, Fátima; García-Moreno, Diana; Zapata-Pérez, Rubén; Sánchez-Ferrer, Álvaro; Sepulcre, María P; Pelegrín, Pablo; Mulero, Victoriano

    2016-07-01

    Inflammasomes are cytosolic molecular platforms that alert the immune system about the presence of infection. Here we report that zebrafish guanylate-binding protein 4 (Gbp4), an IFNγ-inducible GTPase protein harbouring a C-terminal CARD domain, is required for the inflammasome-dependent clearance of Salmonella Typhimurium (ST) by neutrophils in vivo. Despite the presence of the CARD domain, Gbp4 requires the universal inflammasome adaptor Asc for mediating its antibacterial function. In addition, the GTPase activity of Gbp4 is indispensable for inflammasome activation and ST clearance. Mechanistically, neutrophils are recruited to the infection site through the inflammasome-independent production of the chemokine (CXC motif) ligand 8 and leukotriene B4, and then mediate bacterial clearance through the Gbp4 inflammasome-dependent biosynthesis of prostaglandin D2. Our results point to GBPs as key inflammasome adaptors required for prostaglandin biosynthesis and bacterial clearance by neutrophils and suggest that transient activation of the inflammasome may be used to treat bacterial infections.

  5. Oestrus synchronisation and fertility in black Bengal goats following administration of progesterone/prostaglandin and gonadotrophins.

    PubMed

    Ishwar, A K; Pandey, J N

    1992-03-01

    Oestrus synchronisation, fertility and kidding behaviour were studied in 44 Black Bengal goats. They were divided into six experimental groups: group 1, control; group 2, progesterone; group 3, progesterone, pregnant mare serum gonadotrophin (PMSG) and human chorionic gonadotrophin (HCG); group 4, prostaglandin F2 alpha (PGF2 alpha); group 5, PGF2 alpha, PMSG and HCG; group 6, PMSG and HCG. There was 100 per cent synchronisation of oestrus in the groups treated with progesterone, progesterone with PMSG and HCG, and prostaglandin with PMSG and HCG. In the other two treated groups the synchronisation was between 66 and 75 per cent. In the control group only 50 per cent of the animals came into oestrus during the period of observation. The duration of oestrus varied between 19 and 24 hours except in group 5 where it was 40.87 hours. Animals came on heat between 95 and 137 hours after treatment except in group 5 where the interval was only 18.87 hours. A maximum fertility of 75 per cent was observed in group 4 while the kidding percentage was greatest in group 2. There appeared to be no beneficial effect of superovulation on the number of kids produced. Gestation length was similar in all the groups. PMID:1585072

  6. Novel membrane-associated prostaglandin E synthase-2 from crustacean arthropods.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Kristella; Varvas, Külliki; Järving, Ivar; Samel, Nigulas

    2014-08-01

    Prostaglandins (PG) have been shown to play important physiological roles in insects and marine invertebrates, yet the knowledge of their biosynthetic pathways is often lacking. Recently, we described cyclooxygenases in two amphipod crustaceans, Gammarus sp. and Caprella sp. In the present study, we report the cloning and characterization of prostaglandin E synthases (PGES) from the same organisms. The amphipod membrane-bound PGES-2-type enzymes share about 40% of the amino acid sequence identity with human mPGES-2, contain a conserved Cys110-x-x-Cys113 motif and have very low heme-binding affinity. The recombinant enzymes purified in the absence of dithiothreitol specifically catalyze the isomerization of PGH2 into PGE2. The PGES activity is increased in the presence of reduced glutathione and inhibited with a sulfhydryl group inhibitor. We assume that the amphipod mPGES-2, unlike in their mammalian counterparts, is responsible for PGE2 synthesis, not only in vitro but also in vivo.

  7. Neutrophils mediate Salmonella Typhimurium clearance through the GBP4 inflammasome-dependent production of prostaglandins.

    PubMed

    Tyrkalska, Sylwia D; Candel, Sergio; Angosto, Diego; Gómez-Abellán, Victoria; Martín-Sánchez, Fátima; García-Moreno, Diana; Zapata-Pérez, Rubén; Sánchez-Ferrer, Álvaro; Sepulcre, María P; Pelegrín, Pablo; Mulero, Victoriano

    2016-01-01

    Inflammasomes are cytosolic molecular platforms that alert the immune system about the presence of infection. Here we report that zebrafish guanylate-binding protein 4 (Gbp4), an IFNγ-inducible GTPase protein harbouring a C-terminal CARD domain, is required for the inflammasome-dependent clearance of Salmonella Typhimurium (ST) by neutrophils in vivo. Despite the presence of the CARD domain, Gbp4 requires the universal inflammasome adaptor Asc for mediating its antibacterial function. In addition, the GTPase activity of Gbp4 is indispensable for inflammasome activation and ST clearance. Mechanistically, neutrophils are recruited to the infection site through the inflammasome-independent production of the chemokine (CXC motif) ligand 8 and leukotriene B4, and then mediate bacterial clearance through the Gbp4 inflammasome-dependent biosynthesis of prostaglandin D2. Our results point to GBPs as key inflammasome adaptors required for prostaglandin biosynthesis and bacterial clearance by neutrophils and suggest that transient activation of the inflammasome may be used to treat bacterial infections. PMID:27363812

  8. Effects of prostaglandin inhibition on intrarenal hemodynamics in acutely saline-loaded rats.

    PubMed

    Düsing, R; Melder, B; Kramer, H J

    1977-09-01

    We studied the effect of inhibition of the prostaglandin (PG)-synthesizing enzyme system in female Sprague-Dawley rats following acute expansion of the extracellular fluid volume (ECV). In 57 conscious rats expansion of the ECV with isotonic saline corresponding to an increase in body weight of 10% was induced. Prior to ECV expansion 31 rats received indomethacin (10 mg/kg of body wt) by stomach tube. In six non-ECV-expanded rats indomethacin had no effect on glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and renal plasma flow (RPF). In ECV-expanded rats pretreated with indomethacin, GFR was unaltered but 125I-hippuran clearance decreased, and filtration fraction significantly increased. Intrarenal 86Rb distribution was similar in control and ECV-expanded rats. Indomethacin caused a slight increase in relative cortical 86 RB activity in non-ECV-expanded rats, but had no effect on intrarenal 86Rb distribution in ECV-expanded rats. No difference in intracortical glomerular perfusion was noted between control and ECV-expanded rats. In indomethacin-treated ECV-expanded rats an increase in relative inner cortical perfusion was observed. Absolute perfusion remained unaltered. Thus the decrease in total RPF was entirely due to decreased perfusion of outer cortical nephrons. Renal prostaglandins therefore may play a permissive role for physical factors to promote renal sodium excretion in acute ECV expansion via changes in intrarenal hemodynamics. PMID:890884

  9. Neutrophils mediate Salmonella Typhimurium clearance through the GBP4 inflammasome-dependent production of prostaglandins

    PubMed Central

    Tyrkalska, Sylwia D.; Candel, Sergio; Angosto, Diego; Gómez-Abellán, Victoria; Martín-Sánchez, Fátima; García-Moreno, Diana; Zapata-Pérez, Rubén; Sánchez-Ferrer, Álvaro; Sepulcre, María P.; Pelegrín, Pablo; Mulero, Victoriano

    2016-01-01

    Inflammasomes are cytosolic molecular platforms that alert the immune system about the presence of infection. Here we report that zebrafish guanylate-binding protein 4 (Gbp4), an IFNγ-inducible GTPase protein harbouring a C-terminal CARD domain, is required for the inflammasome-dependent clearance of Salmonella Typhimurium (ST) by neutrophils in vivo. Despite the presence of the CARD domain, Gbp4 requires the universal inflammasome adaptor Asc for mediating its antibacterial function. In addition, the GTPase activity of Gbp4 is indispensable for inflammasome activation and ST clearance. Mechanistically, neutrophils are recruited to the infection site through the inflammasome-independent production of the chemokine (CXC motif) ligand 8 and leukotriene B4, and then mediate bacterial clearance through the Gbp4 inflammasome-dependent biosynthesis of prostaglandin D2. Our results point to GBPs as key inflammasome adaptors required for prostaglandin biosynthesis and bacterial clearance by neutrophils and suggest that transient activation of the inflammasome may be used to treat bacterial infections. PMID:27363812

  10. Tritium labeled amino acid conjugates of prostaglandins and thromboxanes as labeled ligands in prostanoid radioimmunoassay

    SciTech Connect

    Sautebin, L.; Kindahl, H.; Kumlin, M.; Granstroem, E.

    1985-09-01

    Conjugates of prostaglandins and thromboxanes with tritium labeled amino acids were prepared and employed as labeled ligands in prostaglandin and thromboxane radioimmunoassays. Assays for PGF2 alpha, 15-keto-13, 14-dihydro-PGF2 alpha, TXB2 and 15-keto-13,14-dihydro-TXB2 were evaluated in comparative studies using either these heterologous ligands or the corresponding homologous tritiated eicosanoid as tracers. Binding properties for the respective antibodies were found to be similar using either tracer. Three biological studies were also conducted, viz. study of the release of TXB2 during collagen induced platelet aggregation, of 15-keto-13,14-dihydro-TXB2 during guinea pig pulmonary anaphylaxis, and of PGF2 alpha during bovine luteolysis. The analyses gave comparable results using either the heterologous or the homologous assay. Thus, this type of labeled prostanoid conjugates may serve as a convenient alternative to homologous tracers in radioimmunoassay. Heterologous tracers may even in certain cases provide the only simple solution to the problem of preparing a labeled ligand of high specific activity.

  11. Involvement of prostaglandins in cachexia induced by T-cell leukemia in the rat.

    PubMed

    Roe, S Y; Cooper, A L; Morris, I D; Rothwell, N J

    1997-04-01

    We have previously demonstrated that experimentally induced T-cell leukemia in the rat results in a rapid and severe cachexia. This weight loss is largely due to a reduction in food intake, but is also accompanied by inappropriately high rates of energy expenditure. Increases in resting oxygen consumption (VO2) of 25% to 35% above the levels of pair-fed animals were observed over the period of weight loss. The present study investigated the possible involvement of prostaglandins in the cachexia induced by T-cell leukemia in the rat. Acute systemic injection of the cyclo-oxygenase inhibitors (indomethacin 1 mg/kg or flurbiprofen 1 mg/kg intraperitoneally [IP]) significantly reduced (by 14% and 10%, respectively) the increase in metabolic rate and also reversed the elevated body temperature of leukemic animals. Intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of indomethacin (0.2 mg/kg) had only modest effects on the increase in temperature or hypermetabolism of leukemic animals. Long-term daily injection of indomethacin or flurbiprofen (1 mg/kg/d IP) had no significant effect on food intake or body weight of leukemic animals, and neither treatment significantly affected disease status. Indomethacin significantly reduced the decline in epididymal fat pad weight of leukemic animals. These data indicate that prostaglandins, produced peripherally, are involved in the acute hypermetabolism associated with T-cell leukemia, but have little or no effect on the hypophagia or body weight loss of leukemic rats.

  12. Prostaglandin control of renal circulation in the unanesthetized dog and baboon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swain, J. A.; Vatner, S. F.; Heyndrickx, G. R.; Boettcher, D. H.

    1975-01-01

    Effects of indomethacin and meclofenamate, inhibitors of prostaglandin synthesis, were evaluated in the regulation of renal blood flow in conscious and anesthetized dogs and in tranquilized baboons, instrumented with arterial pressure catheters and renal blood flow probes. Indomethacin, 10 mg/kg, did not alter renal blood flow or resistance significantly in the conscious dog. In the anesthetized dog, however, indomethacin caused a reduction in renal blood flow and an elevation of renal vascular resistance. Meclofenamate, 4 mg/kg, reduced renal flow and increased renal vascular resistance in conscious dogs. In conscious dogs and tranquilized primates, indomethacin and meclofenamate reduced the reactive hyperemia in the renal bed. Methoxamine and angiotensin II infused in graded doses induced significantly greater renal vasoconstriction in conscious dogs in the presence of indomethacin. Thus, in the conscious animal, prostaglandins appear to play only a minor part in the control of renal circulation at rest, but they are of greater importance in mediating the renal responses to reactive hyperemia and to vasoconstriction.

  13. Binding of thromboxane A2/prostaglandin H2 agonists to human platelets.

    PubMed Central

    Halushka, P. V.; Kochel, P. J.; Mais, D. E.

    1987-01-01

    The competition of [125I]-9, 11 dimethylmethano-11, 12 methano-16-(3-iodo-4-hydroxyphenyl)-13, 14-dihydro-13-aza 15 alpha beta-omega-tetranor-thromboxane A2 ([125I]-PTA-OH), a thromboxane A2/prostaglandin H2 receptor antagonist, with a series of thromboxane A2/prostaglandin H2 (TXA2/PGH2) mimetics for binding to the putative TXA2/PGH2 receptor in washed human platelets was studied. The rank order potency for the series of mimetics to compete with [125I]-PTA-OH for binding was compared with their rank order potency for induction of platelet aggregation. The rank order potency for the mimetics to compete with [125I]-PTA-OH for binding was ONO-11113 greater than SQ-26655 greater than U44069 greater than U46619 = 9, 11-azo PGH2 greater than MB28767. This rank order potency was highly correlated with their rank order potency for inducing platelet aggregation (r = 0.992). Changes in the intra or extracellular concentrations of Na+ did not have a significant effect on the competition between U46619 and [125I]-PTA-OH for binding to the putative receptor. In summary, it appears that these TXA2/PGH2 mimetics activate human platelets through the putative TXA2/PGH2 receptor. PMID:3594077

  14. Conceptus elongation in ruminants: roles of progesterone, prostaglandin, interferon tau and cortisol.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Kelsey; Burns, Greg; Spencer, Thomas E

    2014-01-01

    The majority of pregnancy loss in ruminants occurs during the first three weeks after conception, particularly during the period of conceptus elongation that occurs prior to pregnancy recognition and implantation. This review integrates established and new information on the biological role of ovarian progesterone (P4), prostaglandins (PGs), interferon tau (IFNT) and cortisol in endometrial function and conceptus elongation. Progesterone is secreted by the ovarian corpus luteum (CL) and is the unequivocal hormone of pregnancy. Prostaglandins (PGs) and cortisol are produced by both the epithelial cells of the endometrium and the trophectoderm of the elongating conceptus. In contrast, IFNT is produced solely by the conceptus trophectoderm and is the maternal recognition of pregnancy signal that inhibits production of luteolytic pulses of PGF2α by the endometrium to maintain the CL and thus production of P4. Available results in sheep support the idea that the individual, interactive, and coordinated actions of P4, PGs, IFNT and cortisol regulate conceptus elongation and implantation by controlling expression of genes in the endometrium and/or trophectoderm. An increased knowledge of conceptus-endometrial interactions during early pregnancy in ruminants is necessary to understand and elucidate the causes of infertility and recurrent early pregnancy loss and provide new strategies to improve fertility and thus reproductive efficiency.

  15. Neuroprotection by selective allosteric potentiators of the EP2 prostaglandin receptor

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jianxiong; Ganesh, Thota; Du, Yuhong; Thepchatri, Pahk; Rojas, Asheebo; Lewis, Iestyn; Kurtkaya, Serdar; Li, Lian; Qui, Min; Serrano, Geidy; Shaw, Renee; Sun, Aiming; Dingledine, Ray

    2010-01-01

    Activation of the Gαs-coupled EP2 receptor for prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) promotes cell survival in several models of tissue damage. To advance understanding of EP2 functions, we designed experiments to develop allosteric potentiators of this key prostaglandin receptor. Screens of 292,000 compounds identified 93 that at 20 μM (i) potentiated the cAMP response to a low concentration of PGE2 by > 50%; (ii) had no effect on EP4 or β2 adrenergic receptors, the cAMP assay itself, or the parent cell line; and (iii) increased the potency of PGE2 on EP2 receptors at least 3-fold. In aqueous solution, the active compounds are largely present as nanoparticles that appear to serve as active reservoirs for bioactive monomer. From 94 compounds synthesized or purchased, based on the modification of one hit compound, the most active increased the potency of PGE2 on EP2 receptors 4- to 5-fold at 10 to 20 μM and showed substantial neuroprotection in an excitotoxicity model. These small molecules represent previously undescribed allosteric modulators of a PGE2 receptor. Our results strongly reinforce the notion that activation of EP2 receptors by endogenous PGE2 released in a cell-injury setting is neuroprotective. PMID:20080612

  16. Cervical dilatation in late first trimester termination by prostaglandin, hylase and isogel.

    PubMed

    Mandlekar, A V; Ganguli, A C; Krishna, U R; Purandare, V N

    1981-04-01

    Pre-operative dilatation of the cervix was attempted in 223 cases prior to vacuum aspiration in patients seeking late first trimester termination beyond ten weeks. 15 Me PGF2a was used in the form of vaginal suppositories, intramuscular and intracervical injections. Dilatation of cervix of 10 mm or more was achieved within 4 hours in 86% cases with intra-cervical injections. Gastro-intestinal disturbances caused by intra-muscular injections could be avoided by intra-cervical injections, as the amount of prostaglandin required was only 100 ugm, but the success rate was significantly lower. The success with multiple dose suppositories was 80%. There was no significant difference in the success with 1.5 mgm or 1.0 mgm dosage, but the side effects were significantly higher with 1.5 mgm suppositories. Intra-cervical Hylase did not dilate the cervix but successfully softened it within 5 minutes to make metallic dilatation simple. The hygroscopic Isogel tents achieved dilatation of 10 mm or more in 73% of the patients in 12 hours. The tents as well as intra-cervical prostaglandin injection had the disadvantage of requiring an additional theatre procedure prior to suction curettage.

  17. Prostaglandin E synthase is upregulated by Gas6 during cancer-induced venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Aghourian, Meghedi N; Lemarié, Catherine A; Bertin, Francois-René; Blostein, Mark D

    2016-02-11

    Venous thromboembolism is a common complication of cancer. Based on recent evidence that (1) growth arrest-specific 6 (Gas6) regulates the expression of tissue factor during venous thrombosis, and (2) cancer promotes a procoagulant milieu, we hypothesize that Gas6 may be involved in cancer-induced coagulopathy. Venous thrombi were induced in both wild-type (WT) and Gas6-deficient ((-/-)) mice with cancer. WT mice with cancer developed larger thrombi than their healthy counterparts; these larger thrombi induced by cancer were not seen in Gas6(-/-) mice. Whole genome microarray analysis of differential gene expression in WT and Gas6(-/-) endothelial cells exposed to M27 murine lung carcinoma cells reveal that Gas6 increases prostaglandin E synthase (Ptges) expression in endothelial cells. This was confirmed using real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunofluorescence staining. Culture of WT endothelial cells with M27 increases the secretion of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), the enzymatic product of Ptges, in WT but not in Gas6(-/-) endothelial cells. In WT endothelial cells, Ptges expression was regulated through extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 phosphorylation (ERK1/2). In vitro, PGE2 activates platelets after binding to its receptor, EP3. In vivo, EP3 receptor antagonism reversed the effect of cancer-induced thrombosis in WT mice. These results show that Gas6, through upregulation of PGE2, contributes to cancer-induced venous thrombosis. PMID:26585956

  18. Gastric cytoprotection beyond prostaglandins: cellular and molecular mechanisms of gastroprotective and ulcer healing actions of antacids.

    PubMed

    Tarnawski, Andrzej; Ahluwalia, Amrita; Jones, Michael K

    2013-01-01

    This article updates current views on gastric mucosal defense, injury, protection and ulcer healing with a focus on mucosal protective and ulcer healing actions of antacids. The gastric mucosa is continuously exposed to a variety of noxious factors, both endogenous such as: 0.1N hydrochloric acid, pepsin, bile acids, lysolecithin, H. pylori toxins and exogenous such as NSAIDs, ethanol and others. Gastric mucosal integrity is maintained by pre-epithelial, epithelial and post-epithelial defense mechanisms permitting the mucosa to withstand exposure to the above damaging factors. When mucosal defense is weakened or overwhelmed by injurious factors, injury develops in the form of erosions or ulcers. In the late 1970s Andre Robert and coworkers discovered that microgram amounts of a prostaglandin E2 analog protects the gastric mucosa against a variety of ulcerogenic and necrotizing agents - even such strong inducers of injury as 100% ethanol and boiling water. They proposed a new concept of cytoprotection. Subsequently, other compounds, such as sulfhydryls, sucralfate and epidermal growth factor were shown to exert protective action on gastric mucosa. Additionally, some antacids have been shown to exert a potent mucosal protective action against a variety of injurious factors and accelerate healing of erosions and gastric ulcers. These actions of antacids, especially hydrotalcite - the newest and the most extensively studied antacid - are due to activation of prostaglandin synthesis; binding to and inactivation of pepsin, bile acids and H. pylori toxins; induction of heat shock proteins; and, activation of genes encoding growth factors and their receptors.

  19. Absorption and elimination of a prostaglandin F analog, fenprostalene, in lactating dairy cows

    SciTech Connect

    Tomlinson, R.V.; Spires, H.R.; Bowen, J.L.

    1985-08-01

    Pharmacokinetic characteristics of the prostaglandin F2 alpha analog, fenprostalene, were studied in five lactating Holstein cows. Blood samples, milk, urine, and feces were collected for up to 7 d following a single subcutaneous injection of 1 mg of 13,14-hydrogen-3-fenprostalene in polyethylene glycol-400. The maximum concentration of tritium in plasma was observed 4 h after injection and declined by 48 h. Likewise, milk contained .53 ngeq/ml fenprostalene at 4 h and the concentration declined with a fractional disappearance rate of .069 X h to less than .03 ngeq/ml by 48 h. Milk was a very minor route of elimination of fenprostalene. Recovery of tritium in urine accounted for 55% of the total dose and recovery in feces accounted for an additional 43%. Residues from fenprostalene at 7 d after injection were less than .1 ppb in all edible tissues. Differences in the molecular structure, formulation, and route of injection of fenprostalene resulted in a slower rate of absorption and elimination of this analog than previously reported for other prostaglandin products. Nonetheless, the percentage of the injected dose of fenprostalene secreted in milk was not increased appreciably, and no persistent tissue residues of fenprostalene were observed.

  20. Estrous synchronization in captive collared peccaries (Pecari tajacu) using a prostaglandin F2α analog.

    PubMed

    Maia, Keilla Moreira; Peixoto, Gislayne Christianne Xavier; Campos, Lívia Batista; Silva, Andréia Maria da; Castelo, Thibério de Souza; Ricarte, Aracely Rafaelle Fernandes; Silva, Alexandre Rodrigues

    2014-12-01

    We verify the efficiency of a protocol for estrus synchronization in captive female collared peccaries (Pecaricari tajacu) using the prostaglandin analog D-cloprostenol. Five adult female collared peccaries received an intramuscular administration of 60 µg D-cloprostenol, which procedure was repeated after a 9-day interval. For 10 days after second the D-cloprostenol administration, females were monitored for changes in external genitalia, ovarian ultrasonography, vaginal cytology and reproductive hormonal dosage. As a result, four females synchronized their estrous at 9.5 ± 0.5 days after the second administration of the prostaglandin analog. Such females showed external signs of estrus, including vulvar opening, hyperemic vaginal mucosa, and vaginal mucus, concomitant with an increase in the proportion of superficial cells (52.2 ± 9.9%) verified through vaginal cytology. An estrogen peak of 22.7 ± 3.4 pg/ml was detected by hormonal dosage, and the presence of anechoic follicles measuring 0.29 ± 0.05 × 0.32 ± 0.07 mm were detected in the ovary by ultrasonography. Given these findings, we suggest that D-cloprostenol may be effective for use in estrus synchronization in collared peccaries.

  1. Aspirin inhibits interleukin 1-induced prostaglandin H synthase expression in cultured endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, K.K.; Sanduja, R.; Tsai, A.L.; Ferhanoglu, B.; Loose-Mitchell, D.S. )

    1991-03-15

    Prostaglandin H (PGH) synthase is a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of prostaglandins, thromboxane, and prostacyclin. In cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells, interleukin 1 (IL-1) is known to induce the synthesis of this enzyme, thereby raising the level of PGH synthase protein severalfold over the basal level. Pretreatment with aspirin at low concentrations inhibited more than 60% of the enzyme mass and also the cyclooxygenase activity in IL-1-induced cells with only minimal effects on the basal level of the synthase enzyme in cells without IL-1. Sodium salicylate exhibited a similar inhibitory action whereas indomethacin had no apparent effect. Similarly low levels of aspirin inhibited the increased L-({sup 35}S)methionine incorporation into PGH synthase that was induced by IL0-1 and also suppressed expression of the 2.7-kilobase PGH synthase mRNA. These results suggest that in cultured endothelial cells a potent inhibition of eicosanoid biosynthetic capacity can be effected by aspirin or salicylate at the level of PGH synthase gene expression. The aspirin effect may well be due to degradation of salicylate.

  2. Transforming growth factor beta 1 augments mitogen-induced prostaglandin synthesis and expression of the TIS10/prostaglandin synthase 2 gene both in Swiss 3T3 cells and in murine embryo fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, R S; Reddy, S T; Kujubu, D A; Xie, W; Luner, S; Herschman, H R

    1994-04-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta), a potent cytokine, modulates a wide variety of biological responses. Among its actions, TGF-beta can augment prostaglandin synthesis in several cell types. Although TGF-beta alone has no effect on prostaglandin production in Swiss 3T3 cells, we find that TGF-beta augments the ability of tetradecanoyl phorbol acetate (TPA) or serum to stimulate PGE2 production. The TIS10 gene is a primary response gene encoding a second form of prostaglandin synthase (PGS), the rate-limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis of prostaglandins, thromboxanes, and prostacyclins from arachidonic acid. TIS10/PGS-2 expression is induced by mitogens in Swiss 3T3 cells. TGF-beta also augments mitogen-induced synthesis and accumulation of TIS10/PGS-2 protein and induction of TIS10/PGS-2 message in Swiss 3T3 cells. In contrast, TGF-beta has little or no effect on the level of PGS-1 (EC1.14.99.1) message, either alone or in concert with TPA or serum. TGF-beta concentrations in the range of 0.01-0.10 ng/ml (0.4-4.0 pM) maximally enhance mitogen induction of TIS10/PGS-2 message. TPA-induced accumulation of unspliced TIS10/PGS-2 transcript is augmented by TGF-beta, suggesting that this cytokine exerts its effect on expression of the TIS10/PGS-2 gene by transcriptional regulation. TGF-beta also augments TPA-induced prostaglandin production, TIS10/PGS-2 antigen accumulation, and TIS10/PGS-2 message induction in primary cultures of mouse embryo fibroblasts. Dexamethasone attenuates TGF-beta enhancement of all these mitogen-induced responses: PGE2 accumulation, appearance of TIS10/PGS-2 protein and message, and accumulation of TIS10/PGS-2 unprocessed transcript.

  3. Effects of Long-Term Daily Administration of Prostaglandin-E2 on Maintaining Elevated Proximal Tibial Metaphyseal Cancellous Bone Mass in Male Rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ke, Hua Zhu; Jee, Webster S. S.; Mori, Satoshi; Li, Xiao Jian; Kimmel, Donald B.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of long-term prostaglandin E(sub 2) (PGE(sub 2)) on cancellous bone in proximal tibial metaphysis were studied in 7 month old male Sprague-Dawley rats given daily subcutaneous injections of 0, 1, 3, and 6 mg PGE(sub 2)/kg/day and sacrificed after 60, 120, and 180 days. Histomorphometric analyses were performed on double fluorescent-labeled undecalcified bone specimens. After 60 days of treatment, PGE(sub 2) produced diffusely labeled trabecular bone area, increased trabecular bone area, eroded and labeled trabecular perimeter, mineral apposition rate, and bone formation rate at all dose levels when compared with age-matched controls. In rats given PGE(sub 2) for longer time periods (120 and 180 days), trabecular bone area, diffusely labeled trabecular bone area, labeled perimeter, mineral apposition, and bone formation rates were sustained at the elevated levels achieved earlier at 60-day treatment. The eroded perimeter continued to increase until 120 days, then plateau. The observation that continuous systemic PGE(sub 2) administration to adult male rats elevated metaphyseal cancellous bone mass to 3.5-fold of the control level within 60 days and maintained it for another 120 days indicates that the powerful skeletal anabolic effects of PGE2 can be sustained with continuous administration .

  4. Control of cell cycle by metabolites of prostaglandin D2 through a non-cAMP mediated mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes-Fulford, M.; Fukushima, M.

    1993-01-01

    The dehydration products of PGD2, 9-deoxy-9 prostaglandin D2(PGJ2), 9-deoxy-delta 9, delta 12, delta 13 dehydroprostaglandin D2 (delta 12 PGJ2), and PGA2 all contain an unsaturated cyclopentenone structure which is characteristic of prostaglandins which effectively inhibit cell growth. It has been suggested that the action of the inhibitory prostaglandins may be through a cAMP mechanism. In this study, we use S49 wild type (WT) and adenylate cyclase variant (cyc-) cells to show that PGD2 and PGJ2 are not acting via a cyclic AMP mechanism. First, the increase in cyclic AMP in wild type S-49 cells is not proportional to its effects on DNA synthesis. More importantly, when S-49 cyc- cells were exposed to PGJ2, the adenylate cyclase (cyc-) mutant had decreased DNA synthesis with no change in its nominal cAMP content. Short-term (2 hours or less) exposure of the cyc- cells to prostaglandin J2 caused an inhibition of DNA synthesis. PGJ2 caused cytolysis at high concentrations. Long-term exposure (>14 hrs) of the cells to PGJ2, delta 12PGJ2 or delta 12, delta 14PGJ2 caused a cell cycle arrest in G1 demonstrating a cell cycle specific mechanism of action for growth inhibition by naturally occurring biological products independent of cAMP.

  5. Lipid Classes, Fatty Acid Composition, and Glycerolipid Molecular Species of the Red Alga Gracilaria vermiculophylla, a Prostaglandin-Producing Seaweed.

    PubMed

    Honda, Masaki; Ishimaru, Takashi; Itabashi, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    The red alga Gracilaria vermiculophylla is a well-known producer of prostaglandins, such as PGE2 and PGF2α. In this study, the characteristics of glycerolipids as substrates of prostaglandin production were clarified, and the lipid classes, fatty acid composition, and glycerolipid molecular species were investigated in detail. The major lipid classes were monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG), digalactosyldiacylglycerol (DGDG), and sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol (SQDG), as well as phosphatidylcholine (PC), which accounted for 43.0% of the total lipid profile. Arachidonic acid (20:4n-6), a prostaglandin precursor, and palmitic acid (16:0) were the predominant fatty acids in the total lipid profile. The 20:4n-6 content was significantly high in MGDG and PC (more than 60%), and the 16:0 content was significantly high in DGDG and SQDG (more than 50%). Chiral-phase high-performance liquid chromatography determined that fatty acids were esterified at the sn-1 and sn-2 positions of those lipids. The main glycerolipid molecular species were 20:4n-6/20:4n-6 (sn-1/sn-2) for MGDG (56.5%) and PC (40.0%), and 20:4n-6/16:0 for DGDG (75.4%) and SQDG (58.4%). Thus, it was considered that the glycerolipid molecular species containing one or two 20:4n-6 were the major substrates for prostaglandin production in G. vermiculophylla. PMID:27581490

  6. Development of a scintillation proximity binding assay for high-throughput screening of hematopoietic prostaglandin D2 synthase.

    PubMed

    Meleza, Cesar; Thomasson, Bobbie; Ramachandran, Chidambaram; O'Neill, Jason W; Michelsen, Klaus; Lo, Mei-Chu

    2016-10-15

    Prostaglandin D2 synthase (PGDS) catalyzes the isomerization of prostaglandin H2 (PGH2) to prostaglandin D2 (PGD2). PGD2 produced by hematopoietic prostaglandin D2 synthase (H-PGDS) in mast cells and Th2 cells is proposed to be a mediator of allergic and inflammatory responses. Consequently, inhibitors of H-PGDS represent potential therapeutic agents for the treatment of inflammatory diseases such as asthma. Due to the instability of the PGDS substrate PGH2, an in-vitro enzymatic assay is not feasible for large-scale screening of H-PGDS inhibitors. Herein, we report the development of a competition binding assay amenable to high-throughput screening (HTS) in a scintillation proximity assay (SPA) format. This assay was used to screen an in-house compound library of approximately 280,000 compounds for novel H-PGDS inhibitors. The hit rate of the H-PGDS primary screen was found to be 4%. This high hit rate suggests that the active site of H-PGDS can accommodate a large diversity of chemical scaffolds. For hit prioritization, these initial hits were rescreened at a lower concentration in SPA and tested in the LAD2 cell assay. 116 compounds were active in both assays with IC50s ranging from 6 to 807 nM in SPA and 82 nM to 10 μM in the LAD2 cell assay. PMID:27485270

  7. Prostaglandin A2 influences gene expression in an established insect cell line (BCIRL-HzAm1) cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Prostaglandins (PGs) and other eicosanoids are oxygenated metabolites of arachidonic acid and two other C20 polyunsaturated fatty acids. While most well studied in mammals, PGs exert important actions in insects and virtually all other invertebrates. We have been researching the mechanisms of PG a...

  8. Prostaglandin A2 significantly alters gene expression in an established insect cell line (BCIRL-HzAM1)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In previous work to determine the biochemical mechanisms of prostaglandin (PG) action in insect cells, we found that PGA1 and PGE1 influenced the expression of genes encoding proteins important for a variety of cellular functions. In the present study, we exposed the same cell line, BCIRL-HzAM1, to...

  9. Lipid Classes, Fatty Acid Composition, and Glycerolipid Molecular Species of the Red Alga Gracilaria vermiculophylla, a Prostaglandin-Producing Seaweed.

    PubMed

    Honda, Masaki; Ishimaru, Takashi; Itabashi, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    The red alga Gracilaria vermiculophylla is a well-known producer of prostaglandins, such as PGE2 and PGF2α. In this study, the characteristics of glycerolipids as substrates of prostaglandin production were clarified, and the lipid classes, fatty acid composition, and glycerolipid molecular species were investigated in detail. The major lipid classes were monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG), digalactosyldiacylglycerol (DGDG), and sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol (SQDG), as well as phosphatidylcholine (PC), which accounted for 43.0% of the total lipid profile. Arachidonic acid (20:4n-6), a prostaglandin precursor, and palmitic acid (16:0) were the predominant fatty acids in the total lipid profile. The 20:4n-6 content was significantly high in MGDG and PC (more than 60%), and the 16:0 content was significantly high in DGDG and SQDG (more than 50%). Chiral-phase high-performance liquid chromatography determined that fatty acids were esterified at the sn-1 and sn-2 positions of those lipids. The main glycerolipid molecular species were 20:4n-6/20:4n-6 (sn-1/sn-2) for MGDG (56.5%) and PC (40.0%), and 20:4n-6/16:0 for DGDG (75.4%) and SQDG (58.4%). Thus, it was considered that the glycerolipid molecular species containing one or two 20:4n-6 were the major substrates for prostaglandin production in G. vermiculophylla.

  10. A Hereditary Enteropathy Caused by Mutations in the SLCO2A1 Gene, Encoding a Prostaglandin Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Esaki, Motohiro; Hirano, Atsushi; Kubokura, Naoya; Asano, Kouichi; Kochi, Shuji; Yanai, Shunichi; Fuyuno, Yuta; Shimamura, Katsuyoshi; Hosoe, Naoki; Ogata, Haruhiko; Watanabe, Takashi; Aoyagi, Kunihiko; Ooi, Hidehisa; Watanabe, Kenji; Yasukawa, Shigeyoshi; Hirai, Fumihito; Matsui, Toshiyuki; Iida, Mitsuo; Yao, Tsuneyoshi; Hibi, Toshifumi; Kosaki, Kenjiro; Kanai, Takanori; Kitazono, Takanari; Matsumoto, Takayuki

    2015-01-01

    Previously, we proposed a rare autosomal recessive inherited enteropathy characterized by persistent blood and protein loss from the small intestine as chronic nonspecific multiple ulcers of the small intestine (CNSU). By whole-exome sequencing in five Japanese patients with CNSU and one unaffected individual, we found four candidate mutations in the SLCO2A1 gene, encoding a prostaglandin transporter. The pathogenicity of the mutations was supported by segregation analysis and genotyping data in controls. By Sanger sequencing of the coding regions, 11 of 12 other CNSU patients and 2 of 603 patients with a diagnosis of Crohn’s disease were found to have homozygous or compound heterozygous SLCO2A1 mutations. In total, we identified recessive SLCO2A1 mutations located at seven sites. Using RT-PCR, we demonstrated that the identified splice-site mutations altered the RNA splicing, and introduced a premature stop codon. Tracer prostaglandin E2 uptake analysis showed that the mutant SLCO2A1 protein for each mutation exhibited impaired prostaglandin transport. Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence analyses revealed that SLCO2A1 protein was expressed on the cellular membrane of vascular endothelial cells in the small intestinal mucosa in control subjects, but was not detected in affected individuals. These findings indicate that loss-of-function mutations in the SLCO2A1 gene encoding a prostaglandin transporter cause the hereditary enteropathy CNSU. We suggest a more appropriate nomenclature of “chronic enteropathy associated with SLCO2A1 gene” (CEAS). PMID:26539716

  11. High dietary niacin may increase prostaglandin formation but does not increase tumor formation in ApcMin/+ mice.

    PubMed

    Kwong, Alan M; Tippin, Brigette L; Materi, Alicia M; Buslon, Virgilio S; French, Samuel W; Lin, Henry J

    2011-01-01

    High doses of niacin (nicotinic acid) used to treat dyslipidemias cause flushing, due to high levels of prostaglandin D(2) (PGD(2)). GPR109A, a G-protein coupled receptor, triggers the flushing in the skin. In addition to boosting PGD(2), niacin binding to GPR109A activates the entire prostanoid cascade. We found that GPR109A occurs throughout the gastrointestinal tract. Mice that alternated between a 1% niacin diet and a control diet had higher urinary prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) metabolite levels when on niacin (2.8-fold increase; 95% confidence interval, 1.8-3.9). PGE(2) promotes tumors in the intestines, whereas PGD(2) may have an opposite effect, on the basis of our report showing that transgenic hematopoietic prostaglandin D synthase suppresses intestinal adenomas in Apc(Min/+) mice. To determine if either tumor growth or tumor suppression prevails, we fed Apc(Min/+) mice a 1% niacin diet and assessed tumor development. A 1% niacin diet did not affect the number of tumors scored histologically in Apc(Min/+) mice at 14 wk (33 mice on niacin, 33 controls). Although niacin stimulates production of various prostaglandins, our results support an interpretation that very high intakes of niacin are safe in relation to intestinal tumors in this model.

  12. Factors influencing feeding elicited by intracranial noradrenaline in rats.

    PubMed

    Matthews, J W; Booth, D A; Stolerman, I P

    1978-02-01

    An improved design of microcannula was used to inject noradrenaline into discrete areas of the rat hypothalamus. The area of the paraventricular nucleus was shown to be a more effective site than the midlateral anterior hypothalamus for eliciting feeding with noradrenaline (4.8 microgram). The magnitude but not the direction of the effect of noradrenaline on feeding was influenced by the day-night cycle. The facilitating effect of the drug reached significance in the light period but not in the dark period, possibly because the baseline food intake was higher by night than by day. The facilitation of feeding occurred whether the rats were maintained and tested on a diet of solid or liquid food.

  13. Molecular mimicry and horror autotoxicus: do chlamydial infections elicit autoimmunity?

    PubMed

    Swanborg, Robert H; Boros, Dov L; Whittum-Hudson, Judith A; Hudson, Alan P

    2006-11-30

    All species of the order Chlamydiales are obligate intracellular eubacterial pathogens of their various hosts. Two chlamydial species, Chlamydia trachomatis and Chlamydia pneumoniae, are primarily human pathogens, and each is known to cause important diseases. Some strains of C. trachomatis are sexually transmitted and frequently cause severe reproductive problems, primarily in women. Other strains of the organism serve as the aetiological agents for blinding trachoma, still the leading cause of preventable blindness in underdeveloped nations. C. pneumoniae is a respiratory pathogen known to cause community-acquired pneumonia. Importantly, both organisms engender an immunopathogenic response in the human host, and both have been associated with widely diverse, relatively common and currently idiopathic chronic diseases, most of which include an important autoimmune component. In this article, we explore the available experimental data regarding the possible elicitation of autoimmunity in various contexts by chlamydial infection, and we suggest several avenues for research to explore this potentially important issue further.

  14. Reliance on luck: identifying which achievement goals elicit superstitious behavior.

    PubMed

    Hamerman, Eric J; Morewedge, Carey K

    2015-03-01

    People often resort to superstitious behavior to facilitate goal achievement. We examined whether the specific type of achievement goal pursued influences the propensity to engage in superstitious behavior. Across six studies, we found that performance goals were more likely than learning goals to elicit superstitious behavior. Participants were more likely to engage in superstitious behavior at high than at low levels of chronic performance orientation, but superstitious behavior was not influenced by chronic learning orientation (Studies 1 and 2). Similarly, participants exhibited stronger preferences for lucky items when primed to pursue performance goals rather than learning goals (Studies 3 and 4). As uncertainty of goal achievement increased, superstitious behavior increased when participants pursued performance goals but not learning goals (Study 5). Finally, assignment to use a lucky (vs. unlucky) item resulted in greater confidence of achieving performance goals but not learning goals (Study 6).

  15. Biomimetic Antigenic Nanoparticles Elicit Controlled Protective Immune Response to Influenza

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Dustin P.; Rynda-Apple, Agnieszka; Harmsen, Ann L.; Harmsen, Allen G.; Douglas, Trevor

    2013-01-01

    Here we present a biomimetic strategy towards nanoparticle design for controlled immune response through encapsulation of conserved internal influenza proteins on the interior of virus like particles (VLPs) to direct CD8+ cytotoxic T cell protection. Programmed encapsulation and sequestration of the conserved nucleoprotein (NP) from influenza on the interior of a VLP, derived from the bacteriophage P22, results in a vaccine that provides multi-strain protection against 100 times lethal doses of influenza in an NP specific CD8+ T cell-dependent manner. VLP assembly and encapsulation of the immunogenic NP cargo protein is the result of a genetically programmed self-assembly making this strategy amendable to the quick production of vaccines to rapidly emerging pathogens. Addition of adjuvants or targeting molecules were not required for eliciting the protective response. PMID:23540530

  16. Elicitation: a tool for enriching the bioactive composition of foods.

    PubMed

    Baenas, Nieves; García-Viguera, Cristina; Moreno, Diego A

    2014-01-01

    Elicitation is a good strategy to induce physiological changes and stimulate defense or stress-induced responses in plants. The elicitor treatments trigger the synthesis of phytochemical compounds in fruits, vegetables and herbs. These metabolites have been widely investigated as bioactive compounds responsible of plant cell adaptation to the environment, specific organoleptic properties of foods, and protective effects in human cells against oxidative processes in the development of neurodegenerative and cardiovascular diseases and certain types of cancer. Biotic (biological origin), abiotic (chemical or physical origin) elicitors and phytohormones have been applied alone or in combinations, in hydroponic solutions or sprays, and in different selected time points of the plant growth or during post-harvest. Understanding how plant tissues and their specific secondary metabolic pathways respond to specific treatments with elicitors would be the basis for designing protocols to enhance the production of secondary metabolites, in order to produce quality and healthy fresh foods. PMID:25255755

  17. Ontological leveling and elicitation for complex industrial transactions

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, L.R.; Goldsmith, S.Y.; Spires, S.V.

    1998-11-01

    The authors present an agent-oriented mechanism that uses a central ontology as a means to conduct complex distributed transactions. This is done by instantiating a template object motivated solely by the ontology, then automatically and explicitly linking each temple element to an independently constructed interface component. Validation information is attached directly to the links so that the agent need not know a priori the semantics of data validity, merely how to execute a general validation process to satisfy the conditions given in the link. Ontological leveling is critical: all terms presented to informants must be semantically coherent within the central ontology. To illustrate this approach in an industrial setting, they discuss an existing implementation that conducted international commercial transactions on the World-Wide Web. Agents operating within a federated architecture construct, populate by Web-based elicitation, and manipulate a distributed composite transaction object to effect transport of goods over the US/Mexico border.

  18. Nest sanitation elicits egg discrimination in cuckoo hosts.

    PubMed

    Yang, Canchao; Chen, Min; Wang, Longwu; Liang, Wei; Møller, Anders Pape

    2015-11-01

    Nest sanitation is a nearly universal behavior in birds, while egg discrimination is a more specific adaptation that has evolved to counter brood parasitism. These two behaviors are closely related with nest sanitation being the ancestral behavior, and it has been hypothesized to constitute a preadaptation for egg discrimination. However, previous studies found little evidence to support this hypothesis. Here, we conducted an empirical test of the association between nest sanitation and egg discrimination in the barn swallow (Hirundo rustica) by inserting a single non-mimetic model egg or a non-mimetic model egg plus half a peanut shell into host nests. Compared to the rejection rate of single model eggs, barn swallows significantly increased egg rejection frequency if a half peanut shell was simultaneously introduced. Our result for the first time shows the impact of nest sanitation on egg discrimination and demonstrates that nest sanitation can elicit egg discrimination in hosts of brood parasites. This study provided evidence for nest sanitation being a preadaptation to egg discrimination by facilitating egg rejection, thereby significantly advancing our understanding of avian cognition of foreign objects. Furthermore, we suggest that egg discrimination behavior in many accepters and intermediate rejecters may be lost or diluted. Such egg discrimination can be elicited and restored after nest sanitation, implying a sensitive and rapid phenotypic response to increased risk of parasitism. Our study offers a novel perspective for investigating the role of so-called intermediate rejecter individuals or species in the long-term coevolutionary cycle between brood parasites and their hosts. PMID:26160343

  19. Promoting environmental sustainability via an expert elicitation process

    SciTech Connect

    Swor, Tom; Canter, Larry

    2011-09-15

    Environmental sustainability (ES) planning was applied to the 981-mile, commercially navigable Ohio River. Navigation improvement needs were identified within the broad study along with actions to restore aquatic and riparian ecological resources to a higher state of sustainability. The actions were identified via an Expert Elicitation Process (EEP) involving aquatic and riparian/terrestrial experts knowledgeable of Ohio River resources. The received information was synthesized into goals for the selected resources (Valued Ecosystem Components - or VECs), actions or measures to attain the goals, and monitoring to evaluate conditions. Finally, 26 types of ES actions were identified and classified into three ES alternatives. These alternatives were then evaluated relative to key decision criteria, and such evaluations, based on pertinent decision criteria, were also conducted for four navigation improvement alternatives. Finally, the best combination of ES and navigation alternatives was identified. The key lessons derived from this use of EEP were that: (1) EEP can support the preliminary identification of ES measures; however, more detailed study of specific designs and cost evaluations will be necessary; (2) the method promotes collaboration between key scientists and policymakers from governmental agencies and private sectors, and such collaboration will ultimately provide the foundation for implementation of sustainability actions; and (3) an effective EEP does not occur by accident, it requires careful planning, implementation, and documentation. - Research Highlights: > Use of an Expert Elicitation Process (EEP) is demonstrated in this study. > EEP was used to identify Environmental Sustainability (ES) needs for the Ohio River. > EEP helped develop consensus among resource experts on ES needs. > EEP promotes collaboration to identify and contribute to common resource goals. > EEP may be used in assessing cumulative effects and formulating restoration plans.

  20. Nest sanitation elicits egg discrimination in cuckoo hosts.

    PubMed

    Yang, Canchao; Chen, Min; Wang, Longwu; Liang, Wei; Møller, Anders Pape

    2015-11-01

    Nest sanitation is a nearly universal behavior in birds, while egg discrimination is a more specific adaptation that has evolved to counter brood parasitism. These two behaviors are closely related with nest sanitation being the ancestral behavior, and it has been hypothesized to constitute a preadaptation for egg discrimination. However, previous studies found little evidence to support this hypothesis. Here, we conducted an empirical test of the association between nest sanitation and egg discrimination in the barn swallow (Hirundo rustica) by inserting a single non-mimetic model egg or a non-mimetic model egg plus half a peanut shell into host nests. Compared to the rejection rate of single model eggs, barn swallows significantly increased egg rejection frequency if a half peanut shell was simultaneously introduced. Our result for the first time shows the impact of nest sanitation on egg discrimination and demonstrates that nest sanitation can elicit egg discrimination in hosts of brood parasites. This study provided evidence for nest sanitation being a preadaptation to egg discrimination by facilitating egg rejection, thereby significantly advancing our understanding of avian cognition of foreign objects. Furthermore, we suggest that egg discrimination behavior in many accepters and intermediate rejecters may be lost or diluted. Such egg discrimination can be elicited and restored after nest sanitation, implying a sensitive and rapid phenotypic response to increased risk of parasitism. Our study offers a novel perspective for investigating the role of so-called intermediate rejecter individuals or species in the long-term coevolutionary cycle between brood parasites and their hosts.

  1. Use of discrete choice experiments to elicit preferences

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, M; Bate, A; Eastmond, C; Ludbrook, A

    2001-01-01

    This paper considers the application of discrete choice experiments for eliciting preferences in the delivery of health care. Drawing upon the results from a recently completed systematic review, the paper summarises the application of this technique in health care. It then presents a case study applying the technique to rheumatology outpatient clinics. 200 patients were questioned about the importance of six attributes: staff seen (junior doctor or specialist nurse); time in waiting area; continuity of contact with same staff; provision of a phone-in/advice service; length of consultation; and change in pain levels. The systematic review indicated that discrete choice experiments have been applied to a wide number of areas and a number of methodological issues have been addressed. Consistent with this literature, the case study found evidence of both rationality and theoretical validity of responses. The approach was used to establish the relative importance of different attributes, how individuals trade between these attributes, and overall benefit scores for different clinic configurations. The value of attributes was estimated in terms of time, and this was converted to a monetary measure using the value of waiting time for public transport. Discrete choice experiments represent a potentially useful instrument for eliciting preferences. Future methodological work should explore issues related to the experimental design of the study, methods of data collection and analysis, and satisfaction with the economic axioms of the instrument. Collaborative work with psychologists and qualitative researchers will prove useful in this research agenda. Key Words: discrete choice experiments; patient preference; decision making; patient-caregiver communication PMID:11533440

  2. Cripto-1 vaccination elicits protective immunity against metastatic melanoma.

    PubMed

    Ligtenberg, M A; Witt, K; Galvez-Cancino, F; Sette, A; Lundqvist, A; Lladser, A; Kiessling, R

    2016-05-01

    Metastatic melanoma is a fatal disease that responds poorly to classical treatments but can be targeted by T cell-based immunotherapy. Cancer vaccines have the potential to generate long-lasting cytotoxic CD8(+) T cell responses able to eradicate established and disseminated tumors. Vaccination against antigens expressed by tumor cells with enhanced metastatic potential represents a highly attractive strategy to efficiently target deadly metastatic disease. Cripto-1 is frequently over-expressed in human carcinomas and melanomas, but is expressed only at low levels on normal differentiated tissues. Cripto-1 is particularly upregulated in cancer-initiating cells and is involved in cellular processes such as cell migration, invasion and epithelial-mesenchymal transition, which are hallmarks of aggressive cancer cells able to initiate metastatic disease. Here, we explored the potential of Cripto-1 vaccination to target metastatic melanoma in a preclinical model. Cripto-1 was overexpressed in highly metastatic B16F10 cells as compared to poorly metastatic B16F1 cells. Moreover, B16F10 cells grown in sphere conditions to enrich for cancer stem cells (CSC) progressively upregulated cripto1 expression. Vaccination of C57Bl/6 mice with a DNA vaccine encoding mouse Cripto-1 elicited a readily detectable/strong cytotoxic CD8(+) T cell response specific for a H-2 Kb-restricted epitope identified based on its ability to bind H-2(b) molecules. Remarkably, Cripto-1 vaccination elicited a protective response against lung metastasis and subcutaneous challenges with highly metastatic B16F10 melanoma cells. Our data indicate that vaccination against Cripto-1 represents a novel strategy to be tested in the clinic. PMID:27467944

  3. Noncanonical Roles of the Immune System in Eliciting Oncogene Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Casey, Stephanie C.; Bellovin, David I.; Felsher, Dean W.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Cancer is highly complex. The magnitude of this complexity makes it highly surprising that even the brief suppression of an oncogene can sometimes result in rapid and sustained tumor regression illustrating that cancers can be “oncogene addicted” [1-10]. The essential implication is that oncogenes may not only fuel the initiation of tumorigenesis, but in some cases necessarily their surfeit of activation is paramaount to maintain a neoplastic state [11]. Oncogene suppression acutely restores normal physiological programs that effectively overrides secondary genetic events and a cancer collapses [12,13]. Oncogene addiction is mediated both through both tumor intrinsic cell-autonomous mechanisms including proliferative arrest, apoptosis, differentiation and cellular senescence [1,2,4,12] but also host-dependent mechanisms that interact with these tumor intrinsic programs [14,15]. Notably, oncogene inactivation elicits a host immune response that involves specific immune effectors and cytokines that facilitate a remodeling of the tumor microenvironment including the shut down of angiogenesis and the induction of cellular senescence of tumor cells [16]. Hence, immune effectors are critically involved in tumor initiation and prevention [17-19] and progression [20], but also appear to be essential to tumor regression upon oncogene inactivation [21-23]. The understanding how the inactivation of an oncogene elicits a systemic signal in the host that prompts a deconstruction of a tumor could have important implications. The combination of oncogene-targeted therapy together with immunomodulatory therapy may be ideal for the development of both a robust tumor intrinsic as well as immunological effectively leading to sustained tumor regression. PMID:23571026

  4. Radiation-induced changes in the profile of spinal cord serotonin, prostaglandin synthesis, and vascular permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Siegal, T.; Pfeffer, M.R.

    1995-01-01

    To investigate the profile of biochemical and physiological changes induced in the rat spinal cord by radiation, over a period of 8 months. The thoraco-lumbar spinal cords of Fisher rats were irradiated to a dose of 15 Gy. The rats were then followed and killed at various times afterward. Serotonin (5-HT) and its major metabolite 5-hydroxyindole-3-acetic acid (5-HIAA) were assayed as well as prostaglandin synthesis. Microvessel permeability was assessed by quantitative evaluation of Evans blue dye extravasation. None of the rats developed neurologic dysfunction, and histologic examination revealed only occasional gliosis in the ventral white matter at 240 days after irradiation. Serotonin levels were unchanged at 2, 14, and 56 days after radiation but increased at 120 and 240 days in the irradiated cord segments when compared to both the nonirradiated thoracic and cervical segments (p < 0.01) and age-matched controls (p < 0.03). The calculated utilization ratio of serotonin (5-HIAA/5-HT) remained unchanged. Immediately after radiation (at 3 and 24 h) an abrupt but brief increase in the synthesis of prostaglandin-E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}), thromboxane (TXB{sub 2}), and prostacyclin [6 keto-PGF1{alpha} (6KPGF)] was noted, which returned to normal at 3 days. This was followed after 7 and 14 days by a significant fall off in synthesis of all three prostaglandins. Thereafter, at 28, 56, 120, and 240 days, escalated production of thromboxane followed, white prostacyclin synthesis remained markedly reduced (-88% of control level at 240 days). Up to 7 days after radiation the calculated TXB{sub 2}/6KPGF ratio remained balanced, regardless of the observed abrupt early fluctuations in their rate of synthesis. Later, between 7 and 240 days after radiation, a significant imbalance was present which became more pronounced over time. In the first 24 h after radiation, a 104% increase in microvessel permeability was observed which returned to normal by 3 days. 57 refs., 3 figs.

  5. Role of prostaglandins in spinal transmission of the exercise pressor reflex in decerebrated rats.

    PubMed

    Stone, A J; Copp, S W; Kaufman, M P

    2014-09-26

    Previous studies found that prostaglandins in skeletal muscle play a role in evoking the exercise pressor reflex; however the role played by prostaglandins in the spinal transmission of the reflex is not known. We determined, therefore, whether or not spinal blockade of cyclooxygenase (COX) activity and/or spinal blockade of endoperoxide (EP) 2 or 4 receptors attenuated the exercise pressor reflex in decerebrated rats. We first established that intrathecal doses of a non-specific COX inhibitor Ketorolac (100 μg in 10 μl), a COX-2-specific inhibitor Celecoxib (100 μg in 10 μl), an EP2 antagonist PF-04418948 (10 μg in 10 μl), and an EP4 antagonist L-161,982 (4 μg in 10 μl) effectively attenuated the pressor responses to intrathecal injections of arachidonic acid (100 μg in 10 μl), EP2 agonist Butaprost (4 ng in 10 μl), and EP4 agonist TCS 2510 (6.25 μg in 2.5 μl), respectively. Once effective doses were established, we statically contracted the hind limb before and after intrathecal injections of Ketorolac, Celecoxib, the EP2 antagonist and the EP4 antagonist. We found that Ketorolac significantly attenuated the pressor response to static contraction (before Ketorolac: 23 ± 5 mmHg, after Ketorolac 14 ± 5 mmHg; p<0.05) whereas Celecoxib had no effect. We also found that 8 μg of L-161,982, but not 4 μg of L-161,982, significantly attenuated the pressor response to static contraction (before L-161,982: 21 ± 4 mmHg, after L-161,982 12 ± 3 mmHg; p<0.05), whereas PF-04418948 (10 μg) had no effect. We conclude that spinal COX-1, but not COX-2, plays a role in evoking the exercise pressor reflex, and that the spinal prostaglandins produced by this enzyme are most likely activating spinal EP4 receptors, but not EP2 receptors.

  6. Angiotensin II and prostaglandin interactions on systemic and renal effects of L-NAME in humans.

    PubMed

    Perinotto, P; Biggi, A; Carra, N; Orrico, A; Valmadre, G; Dall'Aglio, P; Novarini, A; Montanari, A

    2001-08-01

    For investigation of whether interactions between prostaglandins and angiotensin II modulate renal response to acute nitric oxide synthesis inhibition in humans, seven young volunteers who were kept on a 240-mM Na diet underwent four experiments with 90 min of infusion of 3.0 microg/kg.min(-1) NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), each preceded by a 3-d treatment with placebo (PL), 50 mg of losartan (LOS), 75 to 125 mg of indomethacin (IND), or both drugs. Mean arterial pressure (MAP), GFR, effective renal plasma flow (ERPF), and Na excretion rate (UNaV) were measured at baseline and from 0 to 45 min and 45 to 90 min of L-NAME infusion. After PL, L-NAME reduced GFR by 5% at 45 min (P < 0.05) and by 9% at 90 min (P < 0.001), ERPF by 11 to 17% (P < 0.001), and UNaV by 28 to 45% (P < 0.001). MAP, unchanged at 45 min, rose by 5% (P < 0.001) at 90 min. LOS prevented pressor but not renal effects of L-NAME. With L-NAME+IND, MAP rose even at 45 min (+5%; P < 0.001 versus baseline) with a 10% rise at 90 min (P < 0.001). Changes in GFR (-13 to -20%), ERPF (-19 to -26%), and UNaV (-51 to -70%) were greater than those with L-NAME+PL or L-NAME+LOS (P < 0.05 to 0.001). With L-NAME+IND+LOS, MAP did not increase, and GFR, ERPF, and UNaV fell much less than with L-NAME+IND alone (P < 0.02 to 0.001) with no differences versus PL or LOS alone. Angiotensin II blockade does not affect renal changes caused by L-NAME but prevents their potentiation by prostaglandin inhibition. Thus, endogenous prostaglandins counteract renal actions of endogenous angiotensin II in Na-repleted humans even when nitric oxide synthesis is inhibited.

  7. Evaluation of genes involved in prostaglandin action in equine endometrium during estrous cycle and early pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Atli, Mehmet O; Kurar, Ercan; Kayis, Seyit A; Aslan, Selim; Semacan, Ahmet; Celik, Sefa; Guzeloglu, Aydin

    2010-10-01

    The aim was to evaluate expression of genes involved in the biosynthesis of prostaglandins (PTG), Prostaglandin H Synthase-1 (PTGS1) and PTGS2, PGF synthase (PTGFS), and PGE synthase (PTGES), PGF receptor (PTGFR), PGE receptors (PTGER2 and PTGER4), prostaglandin transporter (SLCO2A1) and hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase-15 (HPGD). Endometrial biopsies were obtained from mares on day of ovulation (d0, n=4), late diestrus (LD, n=4), early luteolysis (EL, n=4) and after luteolysis (AL, n=4) during the cycle. Stages of the cycle were confirmed by plasma progesterone concentrations measured daily and ultrasound examinations. Biopsies were also taken on days 14 (P14; n=4), 15 (P15, n=4), 18 (P18, n=4) and 22 (P22; n=4) of pregnancy. Relative mRNA expressions were quantified using real-time RT-PCR. A mixed model was fitted on the normalized data and least significant difference test (α=0.05) was employed. Expression of PTGS1 mRNA was low throughout the estrous cycle and early days of pregnancy, but upregulated on P18 and P22. PTGS2 expression was increased on EL, but it was suppressed by pregnancy on P15, P18, and P22. PTGFS expression was upregulated in both cyclic and pregnant mares compared to d0 and its level was the highest on LD. PTGFR expression was transiently increased on LD and EL and was suppressed during early pregnancy. Both PTGES and PTGER2 expressions were increased on LD, EL, and early pregnancy, but were decreased after the luteolysis in cyclic mares as they remained high on P18 and P22. PTGER4 expression did not change throughout the cycle and early pregnancy. Levels of HPGD and SLCO2A1 were significantly increased only on P22. In conclusion, PTGS2 expression increases around the time of luteolysis and concurrent upregulation of PTGFS and PTGES indicates that equine endometrium has increased capability of PTG production around the time of luteolysis. However, pregnancy reduces PTGS2 expression, but maintains the high levels of PTGES during early

  8. Role of the prostaglandin E2 EP1 receptor in traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Glushakov, Alexander V; Fazal, Jawad A; Narumiya, Shuh; Doré, Sylvain

    2014-01-01

    Brain injuries promote upregulation of so-called proinflammatory prostaglandins, notably prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), leading to overactivation of a class of its cognate G-protein-coupled receptors, including EP1, which is considered a promising target for treatment of ischemic stroke. However, the role of the EP1 receptor is complex and depends on the type of brain injury. This study is focused on the investigation of the role of the EP1 receptor in a controlled cortical impact (CCI) model, a preclinical model of traumatic brain injury (TBI). The therapeutic effects of post-treatments with a widely studied EP1 receptor antagonist, SC-51089, were examined in wildtype and EP1 receptor knockout C57BL/6 mice. Neurological deficit scores (NDS) were assessed 24 and 48 h following CCI or sham surgery, and brain immunohistochemical pathology was assessed 48 h after surgery. In wildtype mice, CCI resulted in an obvious cortical lesion and localized hippocampal edema with an associated significant increase in NDS compared to sham-operated animals. Post-treatments with the selective EP1 receptor antagonist SC-51089 or genetic knockout of EP1 receptor had no significant effects on cortical lesions and hippocampal swelling or on the NDS 24 and 48 h after CCI. Immunohistochemistry studies revealed CCI-induced gliosis and microglial activation in selected ipsilateral brain regions that were not affected by SC-51089 or in the EP1 receptor-deleted mice. This study provides further clarification on the respective contribution of the EP1 receptor in TBI and suggests that, under this experimental paradigm, the EP1 receptor would have limited effects in modulating acute neurological and anatomical pathologies following contusive brain trauma. Findings from this protocol, in combination with previous studies demonstrating differential roles of EP1 receptor in ischemic, neurotoxic, and hemorrhagic conditions, provide scientific background and further clarification of potential therapeutic

  9. Neuroinflammation and J2 prostaglandins: linking impairment of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and mitochondria to neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo-Pereira, Maria E; Rockwell, Patricia; Schmidt-Glenewinkel, Thomas; Serrano, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The immune response of the CNS is a defense mechanism activated upon injury to initiate repair mechanisms while chronic over-activation of the CNS immune system (termed neuroinflammation) may exacerbate injury. The latter is implicated in a variety of neurological and neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, multiple sclerosis, traumatic brain injury, HIV dementia, and prion diseases. Cyclooxygenases (COX-1 and COX-2), which are key enzymes in the conversion of arachidonic acid into bioactive prostanoids, play a central role in the inflammatory cascade. J2 prostaglandins are endogenous toxic products of cyclooxygenases, and because their levels are significantly increased upon brain injury, they are actively involved in neuronal dysfunction induced by pro-inflammatory stimuli. In this review, we highlight the mechanisms by which J2 prostaglandins (1) exert their actions, (2) potentially contribute to the transition from acute to chronic inflammation and to the spreading of neuropathology, (3) disturb the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and mitochondrial function, and (4) contribute to neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, as well as stroke, traumatic brain injury (TBI), and demyelination in Krabbe disease. We conclude by discussing the therapeutic potential of targeting the J2 prostaglandin pathway to prevent/delay neurodegeneration associated with neuroinflammation. In this context, we suggest a shift from the traditional view that cyclooxygenases are the most appropriate targets to treat neuroinflammation, to the notion that J2 prostaglandin pathways and other neurotoxic prostaglandins downstream from cyclooxygenases, would offer significant benefits as more effective therapeutic targets to treat chronic neurodegenerative diseases, while minimizing adverse side effects. PMID:25628533

  10. Neuroinflammation and J2 prostaglandins: linking impairment of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and mitochondria to neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Figueiredo-Pereira, Maria E.; Rockwell, Patricia; Schmidt-Glenewinkel, Thomas; Serrano, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The immune response of the CNS is a defense mechanism activated upon injury to initiate repair mechanisms while chronic over-activation of the CNS immune system (termed neuroinflammation) may exacerbate injury. The latter is implicated in a variety of neurological and neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, multiple sclerosis, traumatic brain injury, HIV dementia, and prion diseases. Cyclooxygenases (COX-1 and COX-2), which are key enzymes in the conversion of arachidonic acid into bioactive prostanoids, play a central role in the inflammatory cascade. J2 prostaglandins are endogenous toxic products of cyclooxygenases, and because their levels are significantly increased upon brain injury, they are actively involved in neuronal dysfunction induced by pro-inflammatory stimuli. In this review, we highlight the mechanisms by which J2 prostaglandins (1) exert their actions, (2) potentially contribute to the transition from acute to chronic inflammation and to the spreading of neuropathology, (3) disturb the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and mitochondrial function, and (4) contribute to neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, as well as stroke, traumatic brain injury (TBI), and demyelination in Krabbe disease. We conclude by discussing the therapeutic potential of targeting the J2 prostaglandin pathway to prevent/delay neurodegeneration associated with neuroinflammation. In this context, we suggest a shift from the traditional view that cyclooxygenases are the most appropriate targets to treat neuroinflammation, to the notion that J2 prostaglandin pathways and other neurotoxic prostaglandins downstream from cyclooxygenases, would offer significant benefits as more effective therapeutic targets to treat chronic neurodegenerative diseases, while minimizing adverse side effects. PMID:25628533

  11. Involvement of prostaglandins F/sub 2. cap alpha. / and E/sub 1/ with rabbit endometrium

    SciTech Connect

    Orlicky, D.J.

    1985-01-01

    Several growth factors and hormones are thought to play a role in the growth control of endometrial cells. The authors have shown that prostaglandin F/sub 2..-->../ (PGF/sub 2..cap alpha../) is a growth factor for primary cultures of rabbit endometrium cultured in chemically-defined serum-free medium and that prostaglandin E/sub 1/ (PGE/sub 1/) antagonizes the PGF/sub 2..-->../ induction of growth. Both (/sup 3/H)PGF/sub 2..cap alpha../ and (/sup 3/H)PGE/sub 1/ bind in a time and temperature dependent, dissociable, saturable and specific manner. The binding of (/sup 3/H)PGF/sub 2..cap alpha../ and (/sup 3/H)PGE/sub 1/ can be both down and up regulated and is enzyme sensitive. PGE /sub 1/ stimulates intracellular cAMP synthesis and accumulation in a time and concentration dependent manner. PGF/sub 2..cap alpha../ probably exerts its effects through an amiloride-sensitive intermediate. Both PGF/sub 2..cap alpha../ and PGE/sub 1/ are constitutively synthesized by these primary cultures, and they have shown this synthesis to be both drug and hormone sensitive. They hypothesize that it is the ratio, rather than the absolute quantities, of PGF/sub 2..cap alpha../ and PGE/sub 1/ which is of more importance in the regulation of endometrial cell growth. Furthermore, they believe this regulation of endometrial growth plays a role in control of proliferation during the decidual response and that a derangement in the ratio of these prostaglandins may lead to either infertility or hyperplasia. The ability of these cultures to synthesize prostaglandins in a hormonally regulatable manner may be of importance in the study of dysmenorrhea and uterine cramping as caused by the myometrial contracting prostaglandin, PGF/sub 2..cap alpha../.

  12. Effect of resveratrol and beta-sitosterol in combination on reactive oxygen species and prostaglandin release by PC-3 cells.

    PubMed

    Awad, Atif B; Burr, Andrew T; Fink, Carol S

    2005-03-01

    The objective of this project was to identify some possible mechanisms by which two common phytochemicals, resveratrol and beta-sitosterol, inhibit the growth of human prostate cancer PC-3 cells. These mechanisms include the effect of the phytochemicals on apoptosis, cell cycle progression, prostaglandin synthesis and the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Prostaglandins have been known to play a role in regulating cell growth and apoptosis. PC-3 cells were supplemented with 50 microM resveratrol or 16 microM beta-sitosterol alone or in combination for up to 5 days. Phytochemical supplementation resulted in inhibition in cell growth. beta-Sitosterol was more potent than resveratrol and the combination of the two resulted in greater inhibition than supplementation with either alone. Long-term supplementation with resveratrol or beta-sitosterol elevated basal prostaglandin release but beta-sitosterol was much more potent than resveratrol in this regard. beta-Sitosterol was more effective than resveratrol in inducing apoptosis and the combination had an intermediate effect after 1 day of supplementation. Cells supplemented with resveratrol were arrested at the G1 phase and at the G2/M phase in the case of beta-sitosterol while the combination resulted in cell arrest at the two phases of the cell cycle. beta-Sitosterol increased ROS production while resveratrol decreased ROS production. The combination of the two phytochemicals resulted in an intermediate level of ROS. The observed changes in prostaglandin levels and ROS production by these two phytochemicals may suggest their mediation in the growth inhibition. The reduction in ROS level and increase by resveratrol supplementation in PC-3 cells reflects the antioxidant properties of resveratrol. It was concluded that these phytochemicals may induce the inhibition of tumor growth by stimulating apoptosis and arresting cells at different locations in the cell cycle and the mechanism may involve alterations in

  13. In vivo induction of neutrophilia, lymphopenia, and diminution of neutrophil adhesion by stable analogs of prostaglandins E1, E2, and F2 alpha.

    PubMed Central

    Ulich, T. R.; Dakay, E. B.; Williams, J. H.; Ni, R. X.

    1986-01-01

    Stable analogs of prostaglandins E1, E2, and F2 alpha (M-PGE1, DM-PGE2, and M-PGF2 alpha) were found to induce marked changes in circulating white blood cell subsets in Brown-Norway rats after subcutaneous injection. Dose-response studies demonstrated that 1000 micrograms/kg of each prostaglandin induced a maximum neutrophilia in the range of 40-70% of the total white blood cell count (normal, 5-20%) and that as little as 5 micrograms/kg of M-PGE1 induced a significant neutrophilia (P less than 0.05). Kinetic studies demonstrated that the maximum neutrophilia occurred 4-6 hours after injection of each prostaglandin and was not accompanied by the release of morphologically immature neutrophil forms from the bone marrow. Splenectomy slightly diminished the average neutrophilia at 2 hours but not at 4-6 hours after injection, which suggests that release of neutrophils from the spleen partially contributed to the early neutrophilia. Adherence experiments employing whole heparinized blood from rats given prostaglandins 6 hours prior to sacrifice demonstrated that neutrophils exposed to prostaglandins in vivo have diminished adherence to nylon wool columns, which suggests that diminished adherence of the marginated neutrophil pool may contribute to the neutrophilia. The prostaglandin-induced neutrophilia was accompanied not by a significant change in total numbers of circulating white blood cells, but, rather, by a significant decrease in circulating mononuclear white blood cells, including T-helper, T-suppressor, and B cells. The combination of neutrophilia with lymphopenia has classically been attributed to the release of adrenal hormones and suggests 1) that prostaglandins may directly or indirectly cause the release of adrenal hormones, or 2) that adrenal hormones may mediate their effects on circulating white blood cell subsets via prostaglandins, or 3) that prostaglandins activate intracellular messenger systems that are also activated by adrenal hormones. PMID

  14. Low survival of mice following lethal gamma-irradiation after administration of inhibitors of prostaglandin synthesis.

    PubMed

    Hofer, M; Pospísil, M; Tkadlecek, L; Viklická, S; Pipalová, I; Holá, J

    1992-01-01

    An impairment of the survival of mice subjected to whole-body gamma-irradiation with a lethal dose of 10 Gy and treated with a repeated postirradiation administration of prostaglandin synthesis inhibitors (PGSIs), indomethacin or diclofenac, was observed. Morphological examination of the gastrointestinal tract and the estimation of blood loss into its lumen in animals treated with diclofenac did not show serious damage such as haemorrhages or perforation, but revealed structural injury to the intestinal mucosa indicating inflammatory processes. The lesions found are supposed to be connected with increased intestinal permeability which leads to endotoxin escape from the gut and a subsequent increased mortality rate of irradiated animals. It may be concluded that PGSIs are not suitable for the management of radiation sickness after an exposure to lethal doses of ionizing radiation.

  15. Prostaglandin E2 constrains systemic inflammation through an innate lymphoid cell–IL-22 axis**

    PubMed Central

    Duffin, Rodger; O’Connor, Richard A.; Crittenden, Siobhan; Forster, Thorsten; Yu, Cunjing; Zheng, Xiaozhong; Smyth, Danielle; Robb, Calum T.; Rossi, Fiona; Skouras, Christos; Tang, Shaohui; Richards, James; Pellicoro, Antonella; Weller, Richard B.; Breyer, Richard M.; Mole, Damian J.; Iredale, John P.; Anderton, Stephen M.; Narumiya, Shuh; Maizels, Rick M.; Ghazal, Peter; Howie, Sarah E.; Rossi, Adriano G.

    2016-01-01

    Systemic inflammation, resulting from massive release of pro-inflammatory molecules into the circulatory system, is a major risk factor for severe illness, but the precise mechanisms underlying its control are incompletely understood. We observed that prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) through its receptor EP4 is down-regulated in human systemic inflammatory disease. Mice with reduced PGE2 synthesis develop systemic inflammation, associated with translocation of gut bacteria, which can be prevented by treating with EP4 agonists. Mechanistically, we demonstrate that PGE2–EP4 signaling directly acts on type 3 innate lymphoid cells (ILCs), promoting their homeostasis and driving them to produce interleukin-22 (IL-22). Disruption of the ILC/IL-22 axis impairs PGE2–mediated inhibition of systemic inflammation. Hence, PGE2–EP4 signaling inhibits systemic inflammation through ILC/IL-22 axis–dependent protection of gut barrier dysfunction. PMID:26989254

  16. Eicosanoids Derived From Arachidonic Acid and Their Family Prostaglandins and Cyclooxygenase in Psychiatric Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Yui, Kunio; Imataka, George; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Ohara, Naoki; Naito, Yukiko

    2015-01-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA)-derived lipid mediators are called eicosanoids. Eicosanoids have emerged as key regulators of a wide variety of physiological responses and pathological processes, and control important cellular processes. AA can be converted into biologically active compounds by metabolism by cyclooxygenases (COX). Beneficial effect of COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib add-on therapy has been reported in early stage of schizophrenia. Moreover, add-on treatment of celecoxib attenuated refractory depression and bipolar depression. Further, the COX/prostaglandin E pathway play an important role in synaptic plasticity and may be included in pathophysiology in autism spectrum disorders (ASD). In this regard, plasma transferrin, which is an iron mediator related to eicosanoid signaling, may be related to social impairment of ASD. COX-2 is typically induced by inflammatory stimuli in the majority of tissues, and the only isoform responsible for propagating the inflammatory response. Thus, COX-2 inhibitors considered as the best target for Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:26521945

  17. Changes in the prostaglandin levels in alcohol toxicity: effect of curcumin and N-acetylcysteine.

    PubMed

    Rajakrishnan, V; Jayadeep, A; Arun, O S; Sudhakaran, P R; Menon, V P

    2000-10-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the potential role of curcumin, the antioxidant principal from Curcuma longa Linn., and the sulphur-containing amino acid N-acetylcysteine against ethanol-induced changes in the levels of prostanoids. Biochemical assessment of liver damage was done by measuring the activities of serum enzymes (i.e., aspartate transaminase and alkaline phosphatase), which were significantly increased in rats fed ethanol, whereas the elevated levels of these enzymes were decreased after curcumin and N-acetylcysteine treatment to rats fed ethanol. We observed a significant increase in the levels of prostaglandins E(1), E(2), F(2alpha), and D(2) in liver, kidney, and brain. Administration of curcumin and N-acetylcysteine was shown to decrease the level of these prostanoids in the tissue studied. PMID:11120449

  18. Distinct Roles of Central and Peripheral Prostaglandin E2 and EP Subtypes in Blood Pressure Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Tianxin; Du, Yaomin

    2012-01-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is a major prostanoid with a wide variety of biological activities. PGE2 can influence blood pressure (BP) both positively and negatively. In particular, centrally administered PGE2 induces hypertension whereas systemic administration of PGE2 produces a hypotensive effect. These physiologically opposing effects are generated by the existence of multiple EP receptors, namely EP1–4, which are G protein-coupled receptors with distinct signaling properties. This review highlights the distinct roles of PGE2 in BP regulation and the involvement of specific EP receptor subtypes. American Journal of Hypertension, advance online publication 14 June 2012; doi:10.1038/ajh.2012.67 PMID:22695507

  19. Prostaglandin E₂ constrains systemic inflammation through an innate lymphoid cell-IL-22 axis.

    PubMed

    Duffin, Rodger; O'Connor, Richard A; Crittenden, Siobhan; Forster, Thorsten; Yu, Cunjing; Zheng, Xiaozhong; Smyth, Danielle; Robb, Calum T; Rossi, Fiona; Skouras, Christos; Tang, Shaohui; Richards, James; Pellicoro, Antonella; Weller, Richard B; Breyer, Richard M; Mole, Damian J; Iredale, John P; Anderton, Stephen M; Narumiya, Shuh; Maizels, Rick M; Ghazal, Peter; Howie, Sarah E; Rossi, Adriano G; Yao, Chengcan

    2016-03-18

    Systemic inflammation, which results from the massive release of proinflammatory molecules into the circulatory system, is a major risk factor for severe illness, but the precise mechanisms underlying its control are not fully understood. We observed that prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), through its receptor EP4, is down-regulated in human systemic inflammatory disease. Mice with reduced PGE2 synthesis develop systemic inflammation, associated with translocation of gut bacteria, which can be prevented by treatment with EP4 agonists. Mechanistically, we demonstrate that PGE2-EP4 signaling acts directly on type 3 innate lymphoid cells (ILCs), promoting their homeostasis and driving them to produce interleukin-22 (IL-22). Disruption of the ILC-IL-22 axis impairs PGE2-mediated inhibition of systemic inflammation. Hence, the ILC-IL-22 axis is essential in protecting against gut barrier dysfunction, enabling PGE2-EP4 signaling to impede systemic inflammation. PMID:26989254

  20. Prostaglandin E₂ constrains systemic inflammation through an innate lymphoid cell-IL-22 axis.

    PubMed

    Duffin, Rodger; O'Connor, Richard A; Crittenden, Siobhan; Forster, Thorsten; Yu, Cunjing; Zheng, Xiaozhong; Smyth, Danielle; Robb, Calum T; Rossi, Fiona; Skouras, Christos; Tang, Shaohui; Richards, James; Pellicoro, Antonella; Weller, Richard B; Breyer, Richard M; Mole, Damian J; Iredale, John P; Anderton, Stephen M; Narumiya, Shuh; Maizels, Rick M; Ghazal, Peter; Howie, Sarah E; Rossi, Adriano G; Yao, Chengcan

    2016-03-18

    Systemic inflammation, which results from the massive release of proinflammatory molecules into the circulatory system, is a major risk factor for severe illness, but the precise mechanisms underlying its control are not fully understood. We observed that prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), through its receptor EP4, is down-regulated in human systemic inflammatory disease. Mice with reduced PGE2 synthesis develop systemic inflammation, associated with translocation of gut bacteria, which can be prevented by treatment with EP4 agonists. Mechanistically, we demonstrate that PGE2-EP4 signaling acts directly on type 3 innate lymphoid cells (ILCs), promoting their homeostasis and driving them to produce interleukin-22 (IL-22). Disruption of the ILC-IL-22 axis impairs PGE2-mediated inhibition of systemic inflammation. Hence, the ILC-IL-22 axis is essential in protecting against gut barrier dysfunction, enabling PGE2-EP4 signaling to impede systemic inflammation.

  1. Structures of prostaglandin F synthase from the protozoa Leishmania major and Trypanosoma cruzi with NADP

    PubMed Central

    Moen, Spencer O.; Fairman, James W.; Barnes, Steve R.; Sullivan, Amy; Nakazawa-Hewitt, Stephen; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Staker, Bart L.; Lorimer, Donald D.; Myler, Peter J.; Edwards, Thomas E.

    2015-01-01

    The crystal structures of prostaglandin F synthase (PGF) from both Leishmania major and Trypanosoma cruzi with and without their cofactor NADP have been determined to resolutions of 2.6 Å for T. cruzi PGF, 1.25 Å for T. cruzi PGF with NADP, 1.6 Å for L. major PGF and 1.8 Å for L. major PGF with NADP. These structures were determined by molecular replacement to a final R factor of less than 18.6% (R free of less than 22.9%). PGF in the infectious protozoa L. major and T. cruzi is a potential therapeutic target. PMID:25945716

  2. Prostaglandin E2 modulation of blood pressure homeostasis: studies in rodent models

    PubMed Central

    Swan, Christina E.; Breyer, Richard M.

    2011-01-01

    Hypertension is a well established risk factor for cardiovascular diseases such as stroke and is the leading cause of chronic kidney failure. Although a number of pharmacologic agents are available for the treatment of hypertension including agents that affect the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), unmet needs in the treatment of hypertension suggest that identification of novel pharmacological targets would be an important healthcare goal. One potential target is prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), a potent lipid mediator with a diverse and sometimes opposing range of biological effects. PGE2 signals through four subtypes of G-protein coupled receptors designated EP1 through EP4. PGE2 functions primarily as a vasodepressor; under certain conditions PGE2 administration mediates vasopressor activity. This review focuses on the current understanding of the roles of PGE2 receptors in vascular reactivity, hypertension and end-organ damage. PMID:21801847

  3. A severe phenotype of Gitelman syndrome with increased prostaglandin excretion and favorable response to indomethacin

    PubMed Central

    Larkins, Nicholas; Wallis, Mathew; McGillivray, Barbara; Mammen, Cherry

    2014-01-01

    Our understanding of Gitelman syndrome (GS) and Bartter syndrome has continued to evolve with the use of genetic testing to more precisely define the tubular defects responsible. GS is caused by mutations in the SLC12A3 gene encoding the Na+–Cl− co-transporter of the distal convoluted tubule (NCCT) and tends to be associated with a milder salt-losing phenotype. We describe two female siblings presenting in infancy with a severe salt-losing tubulopathy and failure to thrive due to compound heterozygous mutations in the SLC12A3 gene encoding the NCCT. Both children were treated with indomethacin resulting in improved linear growth and polyuria. Some atypical biochemical findings in our cases are discussed including raised urinary prostaglandin (PGE2) excretion that normalized with intravenous fluid repletion. PMID:25852896

  4. Comparison of prostaglandin E2 tablets or Foley catheter for labour induction in grand multiparas.

    PubMed

    Al-Taani, M I

    2004-01-01

    The efficacy, safety and outcome of prostaglandin (PG)E2 was compared with Foley catheter for labour induction in grand multiparous women. At a hospital in Jordan, 147 women with Bishop score < or = 5 were randomized to receive 3 mg PGE2 vaginal tablets (n = 75) or 50 mL intracervical Foley catheter (n = 72). The change in Bishop score was significantly higher in the PGE2 group than the catheter group, and time from induction to delivery was significantly shorter in the PGE2 group. Significantly more women needed oxytocin for labour augmentation in the catheter than the PGE2 group and fetal distress was significantly more frequent. For grand multiparas, PGE2 vaginal tablets may be preferable for ripening the cervix as well as for labour induction.

  5. Prostaglandins may play a signal-coupling role during phagocytosis in Amoeba proteus.

    PubMed

    Prusch, R D; Goette, S M; Haberman, P

    1989-03-01

    Phagocytosis in Amoeba proteus can be induced with prostaglandins (PG). In addition, arachidonic acid (the fatty acid precursor to the PG-2 series) also induces phagocytosis. The induction of phagocytosis with arachidonic acid can be partially inhibited by the cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin. Phagocytosis in the amoeba can also be induced with the chemotactic peptide N-formylmethionyl-leucylphenylalanine (NFMLP). The peptide presumably induces phagocytosis by interacting with receptors on the amoeba surface, which may initiate the release of arachidonic acid from membrane lipids. NFMLP-induced phagocytosis can also be partially inhibited by indomethacin. It is suggested that PG's or biochemically related substances may play a signal-coupling role during phagocytosis in the amoeba.

  6. Effect of dietary vitamin E or selenium on prostaglandin dehydrogenase in hyperoxic rat lung

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    North, L. N.; Mathias, M. M.; Schatte, C. L.

    1984-01-01

    Weanling male rats were fed semipurified diets supplemented with 0, 60, or 600 IU/kg vitamin E or 0, 100, or 1000 ppb selenium. One group was injected daily with vitamin E at a rate equivalent to consumption of 60 IU/kg. Animals from all groups were sacrificed after exposure to normobaric oxygen or air for 48 h. Lung tissue was analyzed for the combined activity of prostaglandin dehydrogenase and reductase. Using the decline in enzyme activity as an indicator of susceptibility to oxygen poisoning, protection against hyperoxia was directly related to the level of vitamin E supplementation. Selenium supplemented at 100 ppb provided significant protection when compared to 0 ppb or 1000 ppb. The latter dose may have been marginally toxic. Thus dietary supplementation of vitamin E and selenium may influence the relative susceptibility of an animal to pulmonary oxygen poisoning.

  7. Prostaglandin-secreting cells: a portable first aid kit for tissue repair

    PubMed Central

    Rakoff-Nahoum, Seth; Medzhitov, Ruslan

    2007-01-01

    After intestinal injury, both the number and type of intestinal epithelial cells must be restored. Intestinal stem cells, located at the base of the intestinal crypt, repopulate the depleted crypt in a process known as compensatory proliferation. In this issue of the JCI, Brown et al. describe a new mechanism by which this process is regulated (see the related article beginning on page 258). Surprisingly, they find that a subset of stromal cells present within the intestinal tissue and expressing the proliferative factor prostaglandin-endoperoxidase synthase 2 (Ptgs2) is repositioned next to the intestinal stem cell compartment where local production of PGE2 controls injury-induced epithelial cell proliferation. PMID:17200710

  8. On the metabolism of prostaglandin F 2 in female subjects. II. Structures of six metabolites.

    PubMed

    Granström, E; Samuelsson, B

    1971-12-25

    In vitro studies of PG (prostaglandin) metabolism have shown that they can be transformed by oxidation of the allylic alcohol group at C-15 catalyzed by a PG-specific dehydrogenase. This report describes isolation and chemical studies of several metabolites of PGF2alpha in female subjects. Chromatography, assay of radioactivity, infrared spectrometry, oxidative ozonolysis, reduction with lithium aluminum hydride and sodium borohydride, and solvents were used to analyze the metabolites. Chromatography graphs, chemical diagrams of the metabolite structures, and mass spectrum graphs present the study data. PGF2alpha is transformed into a variety of compounds in man. The stereochemical features of the metabolites have not been rigorously determined. In fact, the metabolic pathways discussed must be considered tentative. The work does provide a chemical background for more detailed studies of the sequences of the transformations and the properties of the enzymes involved. The study elucidated the structures of 5 previously unrecognized metabolites.

  9. Up-regulation of cyclooxygenase-2 by product-prostaglandin E2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tjandrawinata, R. R.; Hughes-Fulford, M.

    1997-01-01

    The development of prostate cancer has been linked to high level of dietary fat intake. Our laboratory investigates the connection between cancer cell growth and fatty acid products. Studying human prostatic carcinoma PC-3 cells, we found that prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) increased cell growth and up-regulated the gene expression of its own synthesizing enzyme, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). PGE2 increased COX-2 mRNA expression dose-dependently with the highest levels of stimulation seen at the 3-hour period following PGE2 addition. The NSAID flurbiprofen (5 microM), in the presence of exogenous PGE2, inhibited the up-regulation of COX-2 mRNA and cell growth. These data suggest that the levels of local intracellular PGE2 play a major role in the growth of prostate cancer cells through an activation of COX-2 gene expression.

  10. Reduced progesterone and altered cotyledonary prostaglandin values induced by locoweed (Astragalus lentiginosus) in sheep

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, L.C.; James, L.F.; McMullen, R.W.; Panter, K.E.

    1985-09-01

    Feeding 300 or 400 g of dried spotted locoweed, Astragalus lentiginosus per day to 11 pregnant Columbia ewes from the 20th to the 50th days of their gestations resulted in dead and edematous fetuses. Aspartate aminotransferase values were increased, whereas serum progesterone values were significantly diminished in a dose-dependent manner by locoweed ingestion. Cotyledonary 6-keto-prostaglandin (PG)F1 alpha (400 g/day only) and PGF2 alpha (300 and 400 g/day) values were significantly increased, whereas PGE values were not affected by the treatment. Alterations in PG values in these sheep may be a mechanism for altering corpus luteum function and inducing fetal death, which would ultimately result in abortion.

  11. Export of cyclic AMP by avian red cells and inhibition by prostaglandin A/sub 1/

    SciTech Connect

    Heasley, L.E.

    1985-01-01

    The mechanism by which PGA/sub 1/ inhibits cAMP export by avian red cells was studied, to provide details on the molecular mechanism of a prostaglandin action and on the process of cAMP export itself. The interaction of PGA/sub 1/ with pigeon red cells is a multi-step process of uptake, metabolism and secretion. (/sup 3/H)PGA rapidly enters red cells and is promptly metabolized (V/sub max/ greater than or equal to 1 nmol/min/10/sup 7/ cells) to a compound (5) that remains in the aqueous layer after ethyl acetate extraction. Chromatographic analyses, amino acid content and fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry reveal that the polar metabolite is conjugated with glutathione (PGA/sub 1/-GSH) at C-11 via a thioether bond and is largely (80%) reduced to the C-9 hydroxyl derivative.

  12. Group V Secretory Phospholipase A2 Amplifies the Induction of Cyclooxygenase 2 and Delayed Prostaglandin D2 Generation in Mouse Bone Marrow Culture-Derived Mast Cells in a Strain-Dependent Manner.

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Bruno L.; Satake, Yoshiyuki; Kikawada, Eriya; Balestrieri, Barbara; Arm, Jonathan P.

    2006-01-01

    Activation of bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMC) with stem cell factor (SCF) or IgE and antigen elicits exocytosis and an immediate phase of prostaglandin (PG) D2 and leukotriene (LT) C4 generation. Activation of BMMC by SCF, IL-1β and IL-10 elicits a delayed phase of PGD2 generation dependent on cyclooxygenase (COX) 2 induction. Cytosolic phospholipase A2 α provides arachidonic acid in both phases and amplifies COX-2 induction. Pharmacological experiments implicate an amplifying role for secretory (s) PLA2. We used mice lacking the gene encoding group V sPLA2 (Pla2g5 −/−) to definitively test its role in eicosanoid generation by BMMC. Pla2g5 −/− BMMC on a C57BL/6 genetic background showed a modest reduction in exocytosis and immediate PGD2 generation after activation with SCF or with IgE and antigen, while LTC4 generation was not modified. Delayed-phase PGD2 generation and COX-2 induction were reduced ~35% in C57BL/6 Pla2g5 −/− BMMC and were restored by exogenous PGE2. There was no deficit in either phase of eicosanoid generation by Pla2g5 −/− BMMC on a BALB/c background. Thus, group V sPLA2 amplifies COX-2 expression and delayed phase PGD2 generation in a strain-dependent manner; it has at best a limited role in immediate eicosanoid generation by BMMC. PMID:17064958

  13. Activation of prostaglandin E2-EP4 signaling reduces chemokine production in adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Tang, Eva H C; Cai, Yin; Wong, Chi Kin; Rocha, Viviane Z; Sukhova, Galina K; Shimizu, Koichi; Xuan, Ge; Vanhoutte, Paul M; Libby, Peter; Xu, Aimin

    2015-02-01

    Inflammation of adipose tissue induces metabolic derangements associated with obesity. Thus, determining ways to control or inhibit inflammation in adipose tissue is of clinical interest. The present study tested the hypothesis that in mouse adipose tissue, endogenous prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) negatively regulates inflammation via activation of prostaglandin E receptor 4 (EP4). PGE2 (5-500 nM) attenuated lipopolysaccharide-induced mRNA and protein expression of chemokines, including interferon-γ-inducible protein 10 and macrophage-inflammatory protein-1α in mouse adipose tissue. A selective EP4 antagonist (L161,982) reversed, and two structurally different selective EP4 agonists [CAY10580 and CAY10598] mimicked these actions of PGE2. Adipose tissue derived from EP4-deficient mice did not display this response. These findings establish the involvement of EP4 receptors in this anti-inflammatory response. Experiments performed on adipose tissue from high-fat-fed mice demonstrated EP4-dependent attenuation of chemokine production during diet-induced obesity. The anti-inflammatory actions of EP4 became more important on a high-fat diet, in that EP4 activation suppressed a greater variety of chemokines. Furthermore, adipose tissue and systemic inflammation was enhanced in high-fat-fed EP4-deficient mice compared with wild-type littermates, and in high-fat-fed untreated C57BL/6 mice compared with mice treated with EP4 agonist. These findings provide in vivo evidence that PGE2-EP4 signaling limits inflammation. In conclusion, PGE2, via activation of EP4 receptors, functions as an endogenous anti-inflammatory mediator in mouse adipose tissue, and targeting EP4 may mitigate adipose tissue inflammation.

  14. Prostaglandin E{sub 2} regulates melanocyte dendrite formation through activation of PKC{zeta}

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, Glynis Fricke, Alex; Fender, Anne; McClelland, Lindy; Jacobs, Stacey

    2007-11-01

    Prostaglandins are lipid signaling intermediates released by keratinocytes in response to ultraviolet irradiation (UVR) in the skin. The main prostaglandin released following UVR is PGE{sub 2}, a ligand for 4 related G-protein-coupled receptors (EP{sub 1}, EP{sub 2}, EP{sub 3} and EP{sub 4}). Our previous work established that PGE{sub 2} stimulates melanocyte dendrite formation through activation of the EP{sub 1} and EP{sub 3} receptors. The purpose of the present report is to define the signaling intermediates involved in EP{sub 1}- and EP{sub 3}-dependent dendrite formation in human melanocytes. We recently showed that activation of the atypical PKC{zeta} isoform stimulates melanocyte dendricity in response to treatment with lysophosphatidylcholine. We therefore examined the potential contribution of PKC{zeta} activation on EP{sub 1}- and EP{sub 3}-dependent dendrite formation in melanocytes. Stimulation of the EP{sub 1} and EP{sub 3} receptors by selective agonists activated PKC{zeta}, and inhibition of PKC{zeta} activation abrogated EP{sub 1}- and EP{sub 3}-receptor-mediated melanocyte dendricity. Because of the importance of Rho-GTP binding proteins in the regulation of melanocyte dendricity, we also examined the effect of EP{sub 1} and EP{sub 3} receptor activation on Rac and Rho activity. Neither Rac nor Rho was activated upon treatment with EP{sub 1,3}-receptor agonists. We show that melanocytes express only the EP{sub 3A1} isoform, but not the EP{sub 3B} receptor isoform, previously associated with Rho activation, consistent with a lack of Rho stimulation by EP{sub 3} agonists. Our data suggest that PKC{zeta} activation plays a predominant role in regulation of PGE{sub 2}-dependent melanocyte dendricity.

  15. Inflammatory prostaglandin E2 signaling in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Ju; Wang, Qian; Johansson, Jenny U.; Liang, Xibin; Woodling, Nathaniel S.; Priyam, Prachi; Loui, Taylor M.; Merchant, Milton; Breyer, Richard M.; Montine, Thomas J.; Andreasson, Katrin

    2012-01-01

    Objective There is significant evidence for a central role of inflammation in the development of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Epidemiological studies indicate that chronic use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) reduces the risk of developing AD in healthy aging populations. As NSAIDs inhibit the enzymatic activity of the inflammatory cyclooxygenases COX-1 and COX-2, these findings suggest that downstream prostaglandin signaling pathways function in the pre-clinical development of AD. Here, we investigate the function of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) signaling through its EP3 receptor in the neuroinflammatory response to Aβ peptide. Methods The function of PGE2 signaling through its EP3 receptor was examined in vivo a model of subacute neuroinflammation induced by administration of Aβ42 peptides. Our findings were then confirmed in young adult APPSwe-PS1 ΔE9 transgenic mice. Results Deletion of the PGE2 EP3 receptor in a model of Aβ42 peptide-induced neuroinflammation reduced pro-inflammatory gene expression, cytokine production, and oxidative stress. In the APPSwe-PS1 ΔE9 model of Familial AD, deletion of the EP3 receptor blocked induction of pro-inflammatory gene and protein expression and lipid peroxidation. In addition, levels of Aβ peptides were significantly decreased, as were BACE-1 and β-CTF levels, suggesting that generation of Aβ peptides may be increased as a result of pro-inflammatory EP3 signaling. Finally, deletion of EP3 receptor significantly reversed the decline in pre-synaptic proteins seen in APPSwe-PS1 ΔE9 mice. Interpretation Our findings identify the PGE2 EP3 receptor as a novel pro-inflammatory, pro-amyloidogenic, and synaptotoxic signaling pathway, and suggest a role for COX-PGE2-EP3 signaling in the development of AD. PMID:22915243

  16. Parturition and recruitment of macrophages in cervix of mice lacking the prostaglandin F receptor.

    PubMed

    Yellon, Steven M; Ebner, Charlotte A; Sugimoto, Yukihiko

    2008-03-01

    Parturition does not occur in transgenic mice lacking the prostaglandin F receptor (Ptgfr(-/-)) because luteolysis is forestalled and progesterone production persists. Ovariectomy of pregnant Ptgfr(-/-) mice leads to a decline in circulating progesterone and delivery of live pups. The objective of the present study was to test the hypothesis that immigration of macrophages and increased innervation of the cervix of Ptgfr(-/-) mice was associated with ripening and parturition. The cervix of pregnant Ptgfr(-/-) mice was studied on Days 15-21 after breeding; additional groups were ovariectomized on Day 19 of pregnancy, and the cervix obtained on Day 20 of pregnancy before birth or the next day at about 24 h after birth. On Days 18-19 of pregnancy, macrophage numbers and nerve fiber density increased more than 3-fold compared with findings in nonpregnant or Day 15 or 21 pregnant Ptgfr(-/-) mice. The magnitude and time course of these changes were comparable to those found in wild-type controls that delivered on Day 19 after breeding. Thus, the mechanism regulating macrophage immigration, innervation, and cervical remodeling in Ptgfr(-/-) mice with delayed parturition is similar to wild-type controls that deliver at term. By contrast, ovariectomy forestalled the decrease in cervical macrophages in Ptgfr(-/-) mice. By Day 21 after breeding, macrophage numbers more than double those after ovariectomy, relative to those found in pregnant Ptgfr(-/-) mice, whereas nerve fiber density was the same regardless of birth. Density of collagen structure in these mice directly matched macrophage traffic in the cervix. The findings indicate that the prostaglandin F(2alpha) receptor and progesterone withdrawal are a necessary part of the final common pathway for ripening of the cervix and the process of parturition.

  17. Effects of dimethyl prostaglandin A1 on herpes simplex virus and human immunodeficiency virus replication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes-Fulford, M.; McGrath, M. S.; Hanks, D.; Erickson, S.; Pulliam, L.

    1992-01-01

    We have investigated the direct effect of dimethyl prostaglandin A1 (dmPGA1) on the replication of herpes simplex virus (HSV) and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). dmPGA1 significantly inhibited viral replication in both HSV and HIV infection systems at concentrations of dmPGA1 that did not adversely alter cellular DNA synthesis. The 50% inhibitory concentration (ID50) for several HSV type 1 (HSV-1) strains ranged from 3.8 to 5.6 micrograms/ml for Vero cells and from 4.6 to 7.3 micrograms/ml for human foreskin fibroblasts. The ID50s for two HSV-2 strains varied from 3.8 to 4.5 micrograms/ml for Vero cells; the ID50 was 5.7 micrograms/ml for human foreskin fibroblasts. We found that closely related prostaglandins did not have the same effect on the replication of HSV; dmPGE2 and dmPGA2 caused up to a 60% increase in HSV replication compared with that in untreated virus-infected cells. HIV-1 replication in acutely infected T cells (VB line) and chronically infected macrophages was assessed by quantitative decreases in p24 concentration. The effective ID50s were 2.5 micrograms/ml for VB cells acutely infected with HIV-1 and 5.2 micrograms/m for chronically infected macrophages. dmPGA1 has an unusual broad-spectrum antiviral activity against both HSV and HIV-1 in vitro and offers a new class of potential therapeutic agents for in vivo use.

  18. Studies on a novel series of acyl ester prodrugs of prostaglandin F2 alpha.

    PubMed Central

    Cheng-Bennett, A; Chan, M F; Chen, G; Gac, T; Garst, M E; Gluchowski, C; Kaplan, L J; Protzman, C E; Roof, M B; Sachs, G

    1994-01-01

    A novel series of prostaglandin F2 alpha (PGF2 alpha) prodrugs, with acyl ester groups at the 9, 11, and 15 positions, was prepared in order to design clinically acceptable prostaglandins for treating glaucoma. Studies involving isolated esterases and ocular tissue homogenates indicated that 9-acyl esters cannot provide a prodrug since PGF2 alpha would not be formed as a product. In contrast, 11-mono, 15-mono, and 11, 15-diesters were converted to PGF2 alpha in ocular tissues and could, therefore, be considered as prodrugs of PGF2 alpha. Carboxylesterase (CE) appeared critically important for the hydrolytic conversion of those PGF2 alpha prodrugs where the 11 or 15-OH group was esterified and such prodrugs were not substrates for acetylcholinesterase (ACHE) or butyrylcholinesterase (BuCHE). The enzymatic hydrolysis of PGF2 alpha-1-isopropyl ester was also investigated for comparative purposes. This PGF2 alpha prodrug was a good substrate for CE, but was also hydrolysed by BuCHE, albeit at a much slower rate. The most striking feature of the enzymatic hydrolysis of PGF2 alpha-1-isopropyl ester in ocular tissue homogenates was that it was much faster than for prodrugs esterified at the 11 and/or 15 positions. In terms of ocular hypotensive activity, all prodrugs which showed detectable conversion to nascent PGF2 alpha were potent ocular hypotensives. Although no separation of ocular hypotensive and ocular surface hyperaemic effects was apparent for PGF2 alpha-1-isopropyl ester, a temporal separation of these effects was apparent for the novel PGF2 alpha ester series. This difference may reflect an unfavourably rapid conversion of PGF2 alpha-1-isopropyl ester in ocular surface tissues compared with anterior segment tissues. PMID:7918269

  19. Cellular localization of ovarian prostaglandin endoperoxide synthase during pseudopregnancy in the rat.

    PubMed

    Curry, T E; Bryant, C; Clark, M R

    1991-05-01

    The specific cellular localization of prostaglandin endoperoxide (PGH) synthase, the enzyme responsible for initiating the conversion of arachidonic acid to prostaglandins, was studied throughout pseudopregnancy in the rat. Pseudopregnancy was induced by administration of eCG (20 IU) to immature, 27-day-old rats followed by hCG injection (10 IU) on Day 29. Animals were necropsied on Days 1 (Day 1 = 1 day post hCG), 5, 9, and 13 of pseudopregnancy. Ovaries were removed and processed for cellular identification of PGH synthase by immunohistochemistry. Immunoreactive PGH synthase was distributed throughout the CL at each of the 4 different days of pseudopregnancy, with the majority of the luteal cells exhibiting varying degrees of staining. The connective tissue centrum of the CL, however, lacked PGH synthase immunoreactivity. Quantitative assessment of the immunostaining distribution was accomplished with a computer-based image analysis program (Kontron IBAS). Results are expressed as the percentage of a digitized luteal area that contained intense immunoreactivity between Day 1 (0.6 +/- 0.2% immunoreactive area) and Day 5 (16.8 +/- 2.7%) of pseudopregnancy. The area of luteal immunostaining was similar on Day 5 and Day 9 (16.8 +/- 2.7% and 14.7 +/- 2.0%, respectively) followed by a decrease (p less than 0.05) in immunoreactivity on Day 13 (9.1 +/- 2.2%). The region of the CL adjacent to the germinal epithelium had an increase (p less than 0.01) in PG synthase staining distribution compared to the region of the CL adjacent to the ovarian medulla on all days of pseudopregnancy except Day 1. These findings demonstrate that PGH synthase is present in the rat CL throughout pseudopregnancy.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Human brain prostaglandin D synthase has been evolutionarily differentiated from lipophilic-ligand carrier proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Nagata, A; Suzuki, Y; Igarashi, M; Eguchi, N; Toh, H; Urade, Y; Hayaishi, O

    1991-01-01

    cDNAs for glutathione-independent prostaglandin D synthase were isolated from cDNA libraries of human brain. The longest cDNA insert was 837 base pairs long and contained a coding region of 570 base pairs corresponding to 190 amino acid residues with a calculated Mr of 21,016. Between two cDNA inserts isolated from the two different libraries, nucleotide substitutions were observed at 16 positions, including conservative amino acid substitutions at 2 positions and nonconservative substitutions at 5 positions, indicating genetic heterogeneity of this enzyme in humans. The computer-assisted homology search revealed that the enzyme is a member of the lipocalin superfamily, comprising secretory hydrophobic molecule transporters, showing the greatest homology (28.8-29.4% identity; 51.3-53.1% similarity) to alpha 1-microglobulin among the members of this superfamily. In a phylogenetic tree of the superfamily, this enzyme, alpha 1-microglobulin, and the gamma chain of the complement component C8 form a cluster separate from the other 14 members. The two distinctive characteristics of glutathione-independent prostaglandin D synthase, as compared to the other members of this superfamily, are its enzymatic properties and its association with membranes that were probably acquired after evolutionary divergence of the two lipocalins. Based on the observed sequence homology, the tertiary structure of the enzyme was deduced to consist of an eight-stranded anti-parallel beta-barrel forming a hydrophobic pocket. Furthermore, the Cys-65 residue in the pocket, which is conserved only in the human and rat enzymes but not in other lipocalins, was considered to be a putative active site of the enzyme. Images PMID:1902577

  1. Frondoside A inhibits breast cancer metastasis and antagonizes prostaglandin E receptors EP4 and EP2

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xinrong; Kundu, Namita; Collin, Peter D; Goloubeva, Olga; Fulton, Amy

    2013-01-01

    Frondoside A, derived from the sea cucumber Cucumaria frondosa has demonstrable anticancer activity in several models, however, the ability of Frondoside A to affect tumor metastasis has not been reported. Using a syngeneic murine model of metastatic breast cancer, we now show that Frondoside A has potent antimetastatic activity. Frondoside A given i.p. to mice bearing mammary gland implanted mammary tumors, inhibits spontaneous tumor metastasis to the lungs. The elevated Cyclooxygenase -2 activity in many malignancies promotes tumor growth and metastasis by producing high levels of PGE2 which acts on the prostaglandin E receptors, chiefly EP4 and EP2. We examined the ability of Frondoside A to modulate the functions of these EP receptors. We now show that Frondoside A antagonizes the prostaglandin E receptors EP2 and EP4. 3H-PGE2 binding to recombinant EP2 or EP4-expressing cells was inhibited by Frondoside A at low μM concentrations. Likewise, EP4 or EP2-linked activation of intracellular cAMP as well as EP4-mediated ERK1/2 activation were also inhibited by Frondoside A. Consistent with the antimetastatic activity observed in vivo, migration of tumor cells in vitro in response to EP4 or EP2 agonists was also inhibited by Frondoside A. These studies identify a new function for an agent with known antitumor activity, and show that the antimetastatic activity may be due in part to a novel mechanism of action. These studies add to the growing body of evidence that Frondoside A may be a promising new agent with potential to treat cancer and may also represent a potential new modality to antagonize EP4. PMID:21761157

  2. Prostaglandins and corticosterone in the oviparous female lizard, Podarcis sicula sicula, during reproduction.

    PubMed

    Gobbetti, A; Zerani, M; Bellini-Cardellini, L; Bolelli, G F

    1995-03-01

    The in vitro effects of prostaglandin F2 alpha (PGF2 alpha) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) on corticosterone release by ovarian follicles, corpora lutea (CL), and interrenals were studied in the female lizard, Podarcis sicula sicula, during reproduction. Follicles and CL studied in the female lizard, Podarcis sicula sicula, during reproduction. Follicles and CL were divided according to their different developmental stages; follicles: previtellogenic, early-vitellogenic, mid-vitellogenic and fully-grown; CL: CL1 (unshelled eggs in the oviducts), CL2 (shelled eggs in the oviducts), CL3 (eggs laid 6 h previously) and CL4 (eggs laid 48 h previously). Interrenals were divided according to the reproductive stages: pre-vitellogenesis, vitellogenesis, ovulation, post-ovulation, and post-deposition. PGF2 alpha release was highest in fully-grown follicles and PGE2 in early-vitellogenic follicles, corticosterone was highest in pre-vitellogenic and lowest in early-vitellogenic follicles. PGE2 decreased corticosterone in pre-vitellogenic, mid-vitellogenic and fully-grown follicles. PGF2 alpha release was highest in CL4, and PGE2 in CL1 and CL2, corticosterone was highest in CL4. PGF2 alpha increased corticosterone in CL1, CL2 and CL3. In interrenals, PGF2 alpha release was highest and PGE2 lowest during ovulation, corticosterone was highest during ovulation. PGF2 alpha increased and PGE2 decreased interrenal corticosterone during vitellogenesis, ovulation, and post-ovulation. In the plasma, PGF2 alpha levels were highest and PGE2 lowest during ovulation, corticosterone was highest during ovulation. These results suggest that corticosterone, modulated by PGF2 alpha and PGE2, is implied in the reproductive processes with different roles. In fact this steroid could favour ovulatory and luteolytic processes. In addition the hypothesis of an anti-vitellogenic role of corticosterone is discussed. PMID:7625183

  3. The roles of prostaglandin E2 and D2 in lipopolysaccharide-mediated changes in sleep

    PubMed Central

    Oishi, Yo; Yoshida, Kyoko; Scammell, Thomas E.; Urade, Yoshihiro; Lazarus, Michael; Saper, Clifford B.

    2014-01-01

    When living organisms become sick as a result of a bacterial infection, a suite of brain-mediated responses occur, including fever, anorexia and sleepiness. Systemic administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a common constituent of bacterial cell walls, increases body temperature and non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep in animals and induces the production of pro-inflammatory prostaglandins (PGs). Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is the principal mediator of fever, and both PGE2 and PGD2 regulate sleep–wake behavior. The extent to which PGE2 and PGD2 are involved in the effect of LPS on NREM sleep remains to be clarified. Therefore, we examined LPS-induced changes in body temperature and NREM sleep in mice with nervous system-specific knockouts (KO) for the PGE2 receptors, EP3 or EP4; in mice with total body KO of microsomal PGE synthase-1, or the PGD2 receptor DP; and in mice treated with the cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor meloxicam. We observed that LPS-induced NREM sleep was slightly attenuated in mice lacking EP4 receptors in the nervous system, but was not affected in any of the other KO mice or in mice pretreated with the COX inhibitor. These results suggest that the effect of LPS on NREM sleep is partially dependent on PGs and is likely mediated mainly by other pro-inflammatory substances. In addition, our data show that the main effect of LPS on body temperature is hypothermia in the absence of nervous system EP3 receptors or in the presence of a COX inhibitor. PMID:25532785

  4. Impaired leukocyte influx in cervix of postterm women not responding to prostaglandin priming

    PubMed Central

    Sahlin, Lena; Stjernholm-Vladic, Ylva; Roos, Nathalie; Masironi, Britt; Ekman-Ordeberg, Gunvor

    2008-01-01

    Background Prolonged pregnancies are associated with increased rate of maternal and fetal complications. Post term women could be divided into at least two subgroups, one where parturition is possible to induce by prostaglandins and one where it is not. Our aim was to study parameters in cervical biopsies in women with spontaneous delivery at term (controls) and compare to those that are successfully induced post term (responders), and those that are not induced (non-responders), by local prostaglandin treatment. Methods Stromal parameters examined in this study were the accumulation of leukocytes (CD45, CD68), mRNAs and/or proteins for the extracellular matrix degrading enzymes (matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, MMP-8 and MMP-9), their inhibitors (tissue inhibitor of MMP (TIMP)-1 and TIMP-2), interleukin-8 (IL-8), the platelet activating factor-receptor (PAF-R), syndecan-1 and estrogen binding receptors (estrogen receptor (ER)α, ERβ and G-coupled protein receptor (GPR) 30) as well as the proliferation marker Ki-67. Results The influx of leukocytes as assessed by CD45 was strongest in the responders, thereafter in the controls and significantly lower in the non-responders. IL-8, PAF-R and MMP-9, all predominantly expressed in leukocytes, showed significantly reduced immunostaining in the group of non-responders, while ERα and GPR30 were more abundant in the non-responders, as compared to the controls. Conclusion The impaired leukocyte influx, as reflected by the reduced number of CD45 positive cells as well as decreased immunostaining of IL-8, PAF-R and MMP-9 in the non-responders, could be one explanation of the failed ripening of the cervix in post term women. If the decreased leukocyte influx is a primary explanation to absent ripening or secondary, as a result of other factors, is yet to be established. PMID:18764934

  5. Potential mediation of prostaglandin E2 release from isolated human parietal cells by protein kinase C.

    PubMed

    Schepp, W; Schneider, J; Tatge, C; Schusdziarra, V; Classen, M

    1990-01-01

    Parietal cells are a major source of gastric mucosal prostaglandins in various species. We examined cholinergic stimulation of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) release from human parietal cells; using activators of the protein kinase C we attempted to get an indirect insight into cellular mechanisms which control PGE2 release. Gastric mucosal specimens were obtained at surgery and the cells were dispersed by collagenase and pronase E. Parietal cells were enriched to 65-80% by a Percoll gradient, and were incubated for 30 min. PGE2 release into the medium (radioimmunoassay) was 74-126 pg/10(6) cells/30 min under basal conditions and was 2.6-fold increased by carbachol (10(-5) and 10(-4) M). Similarly, PGE2 release was stimulated by phospholipase C (20-200 mU/ml, 364% above basal), 1-oleoyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerol (10(-9)-10(-5) M, 229%), 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA; 10(-9)-10(-5) M, 283%) and calcium ionophore A23187 (10(-7)-10(-5) M, 219%). Simultaneous presence of A23187 and TPA synergistically induced stimulation which was slightly higher than the sum of the individual responses. N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalene sulfonamide W-7, a putative calmodulin antagonist, inhibited TPA-induced PGE2 release at concentrations regarded specific for blocking calmodulin (IC50 = 1.5 X 0(-6) M). We conclude that in human parietal cells PGE2 is released upon cholinergic stimulation and that phospholipase C and protein kinase C are involved in the control of PGE2 release. We speculate that calmodulin might interact with a protein phosphorylated by protein kinase C to cause PGE2 release.

  6. Cocaine: effects on acoustic startle and startle elicited electrically from the cochlear nucleus.

    PubMed

    Harty, T P; Davis, M

    1985-01-01

    Startle-like responses can be elicited by single pulse electrical stimulation of nuclei within the acoustic startle pathway. Compared with acoustically-elicited startle, this technique provides a method for localizing the ultimate sites of action of a drug that affects the acoustic startle response. Strychnine (1 mg/kg) increased both acoustically-elicited startle and startle elicited from the ventral cochlear nucleus (VCN), the first central nucleus in the acoustic startle pathway. In contrast, cocaine (10 mg/kg) increased acoustically-elicited startle but depressed VCN-elicited startle. These results suggest that cocaine increases startle by acting on sensory rather than final motor systems and are discussed in relation to the putative effect of cocaine on dopamine neurotransmission and the involvement of dopamine in sensorimotor reactivity. PMID:3001807

  7. Alpha 1-adrenergic receptor-mediated phosphoinositide hydrolysis and prostaglandin E2 formation in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells. Possible parallel activation of phospholipase C and phospholipase A2

    SciTech Connect

    Slivka, S.R.; Insel, P.A.

    1987-03-25

    alpha 1-Adrenergic receptors mediate two effects on phospholipid metabolism in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK-D1) cells: hydrolysis of phosphoinositides and arachidonic acid release with generation of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). The similarity in concentration dependence for the agonist (-)-epinephrine in eliciting these two responses implies that they are mediated by a single population of alpha 1-adrenergic receptors. However, we find that the kinetics of the two responses are quite different, PGE2 production occurring more rapidly and transiently than the hydrolysis of phosphoinositides. The antibiotic neomycin selectively decreases alpha 1-receptor-mediated phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate hydrolysis without decreasing alpha 1-receptor-mediated arachidonic acid release and PGE2 generation. In addition, receptor-mediated inositol trisphosphate formation is independent of extracellular calcium, whereas release of labeled arachidonic acid is largely calcium-dependent. Moreover, based on studies obtained with labeled arachidonic acid, receptor-mediated generation of arachidonic acid cannot be accounted for by breakdown of phosphatidylinositol monophosphate, phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate, or phosphatidic acid. Further studies indicate that epinephrine produces changes in formation or turnover of several classes of membrane phospholipids in MDCK cells. We conclude that alpha 1-adrenergic receptors in MDCK cells appear to regulate phospholipid metabolism by the parallel activation of phospholipase C and phospholipase A2. This parallel activation of phospholipases contrasts with models described in other systems which imply sequential activation of phospholipase C and diacylglycerol lipase or phospholipase A2.

  8. Molecular cloning and spatio-temporal expression of the prostaglandin transporter: a basis for the action of prostaglandins in the bovine reproductive system.

    PubMed

    Banu, Sakhila K; Arosh, Joe A; Chapdelaine, Pierre; Fortier, Michel A

    2003-09-30

    Prostaglandins (PGs) play important roles in mammalian reproductive function through autocrine, paracrine, and endocrine actions. However, they predominate as charged anions and diffuse poorly across the plasma membrane. Recently, a PG transporter (PGT) has been found to mediate PG transport across cell membranes. In ruminants, endometrial PGs are transported by a vascular pathway to the ovary to regress or rescue the corpus luteum. There is no report on the role of PGT in the reproductive functions of any species. We have cloned and characterized the bovine PGT (bPGT) that transports different PGs in the following affinity order: PGE2 = PGF2alpha >/= PGD2 much greater than arachidonate. bPGT mRNA and protein are expressed in endometrium, myometrium, and the utero-ovarian plexus (UOP) during the estrous cycle. The level of bPGT expression is higher in endometrium and UOP on the side of corpus luteum between days 13 and 18 of the estrous cycle. bPGT protein is localized in endometrial stroma, luminal epithelial cells, myometrial smooth muscle cells, and vascular smooth muscle cells of uterine vein and artery. In UOP, bPGT is selectively expressed in vascular smooth muscle cells of uterine vein and ovarian artery. Spatio-temporal expression of bPGT in uterine tissues and UOP supports a significant role of bPGT in cellular and compartmental transport of PGs to mediate the endocrine action at the time of luteolysis or establishment of pregnancy in bovine. This study describes and proposes a role of PGT in the regulation of reproductive processes.

  9. Transport of prostaglandin F(2alpha) pulses from the uterus to the ovary at the time of luteolysis in ruminants is regulated by prostaglandin transporter-mediated mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Lee, JeHoon; McCracken, John A; Banu, Sakhila K; Rodriguez, Royce; Nithy, Thamizh K; Arosh, Joe A

    2010-07-01

    In ruminants, prostaglandin F2alpha (PGF(2alpha)) is the uterine luteolytic hormone. During luteolysis, PGF(2alpha) is synthesized and released from the endometrium in a pulsatile pattern. The unique structure of the vascular utero-ovarian plexus (UOP) allows transport of luteolytic PGF(2alpha) pulses directly from the uterus to the ovary, thus bypassing the systemic circulation. However, the underlying molecular mechanism is not known. The objective of the present study was to determine a role for PG transporter protein (PGT) in the compartmental transport of PGF(2alpha) from uterus to ovary through the UOP at the time of luteolysis using the sheep as a ruminant model. [(3)H]PGF(2alpha), with or without a PGT inhibitor, was infused into UOP, and PGF(2alpha) transport and PGT protein expression were determined. Results indicate that PGT protein is expressed in tunica intima, tunica media, and tunica adventitia of the utero-ovarian vein and the ovarian artery of the UOP, and the expression levels are higher on d 10-15 compared with d 3-6 of the estrous cycle. Pharmacological inhibition of PGT prevented transport of exogenous [(3)H]PGF(2alpha) as well as oxytocin-induced endogenous luteolytic PGF(2alpha) pulse up to 80% from uterine venous blood into ovarian arterial blood through the UOP at the time of luteolysis in sheep. Taken together, these results indicate that at the time of luteolysis, transport of PGF(2alpha) from uterus to ovary through the UOP is regulated by PGT-mediated mechanisms. These findings also suggest that impaired PGT-mediated transport of PGF(2alpha) from the utero-ovarian vein into the ovarian artery could adversely influence luteolysis and thus affect fertility in ruminants.

  10. Berberine, an isoquinoline alkaloid, inhibits melanoma cancer cell migration by reducing the expressions of cyclooxygenase-2, prostaglandin E2 and prostaglandin E2 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Tripti; Vaid, Mudit; Katiyar, Nandan; Sharma, Samriti; Katiyar, Santosh K.

    2011-01-01

    Melanoma is the leading cause of death from skin disease due, in large part, to its propensity to metastasize. We have examined the effect of berberine, an isoquinoline alkaloid, on human melanoma cancer cell migration and the molecular mechanisms underlying these effects using melanoma cell lines, A375 and Hs294. Using an in vitro cell migration assay, we show that over expression of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, its metabolite prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and PGE2 receptors promote the migration of cells. We found that treatment of A375 and Hs294 cells with berberine resulted in concentration-dependent inhibition of migration of these cells, which was associated with a reduction in the levels of COX-2, PGE2 and PGE2 receptors (EP2 and EP4). Treatment of cells with celecoxib, a COX-2 inhibitor, or transient transfection of cells with COX-2 small interfering RNA, also inhibited cell migration. Treatment of the cells with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), an inducer of COX-2 or PGE2, enhanced cell migration, whereas berberine inhibited TPA- or PGE2-promoted cell migration. Berberine reduced the basal levels as well as PGE2-stimulated expression levels of EP2 and EP4. Treatment of the cells with the EP4 agonist stimulated cell migration and berberine blocked EP4 agonist-induced cell migration activity. Moreover, berberine inhibited the activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), an upstream regulator of COX-2, in A375 cells, and treatment of cells with caffeic acid phenethyl ester, an inhibitor of NF-κB, inhibited cell migration. Together, these results indicate for the first time that berberine inhibits melanoma cell migration, an essential step in invasion and metastasis, by inhibition of COX-2, PGE2 and PGE2 receptors. PMID:20974686

  11. Intracrine prostaglandin E(2) signalling regulates hypoxia-inducible factor-1α expression through retinoic acid receptor-β.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Martínez, Ana B; Jiménez, María I Arenas; Manzano, Victoria Moreno; Lucio-Cazaña, Francisco J

    2012-12-01

    We have previously found in human renal proximal tubular HK-2 cells that hypoxia- and all-trans retinoic acid-induced hypoxia-inducible factor-1α up-regulation is accompanied by retinoic acid receptor-β up-regulation. Here we first investigated whether hypoxia-inducible factor-1α expression is dependent on retinoic acid receptor-β and our results confirmed it since (i) hypoxia-inducible factor-1α-inducing agents hypoxia, hypoxia-mimetic agent desferrioxamine, all-trans retinoic acid and interleukin-1β increased retinoic acid receptor-β expression, (ii) hypoxia-inducible factor-1α up-regulation was prevented by retinoic acid receptor-β antagonist LE-135 or siRNA retinoic acid receptor-β and (iii) there was direct binding of retinoic acid receptor-β to the retinoic acid response element in hypoxia-inducible factor-1α promoter upon treatment with all-trans retinoic acid and 16,16-dimethyl-prostaglandin E(2). Since intracellular prostaglandin E(2) mediates hypoxia-inducible factor-1α up-regulation in normoxia in HK-2 cells, we next investigated and confirmed, its role in the up-regulation of retinoic acid receptor-β in normoxia by hypoxia-inducible factor-1α-inducing agents all-trans retinoic acid, interleukin-1β and 16,16-dimethyl-prostaglandin E(2) by inhibiting cyclooxygenases, prostaglandin influx transporter or EP receptors. Interestingly, the hypoxia-induced increase in retinoic acid receptor-β expression and accumulation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α was also blocked by the inhibitors tested. This is the first time, to our knowledge, that retinoic acid receptor-β signalling is involved in the control of the expression of transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor-1α in both normoxia and hypoxia and that retinoic acid receptor-β expression is found to be strictly regulated by intracellular prostaglandin E(2). Given the relevance of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α in the kidney in terms of tumorigenesis, progressive renal failure, production

  12. Eliciting Parents' Individual Requirements for an Inclusive Digital School System.

    PubMed

    Eftring, Håkan; Rassmus-Gröhn, Kirsten; Hedvall, Per-Olof

    2016-01-01

    Parents often have a busy time sorting out their life puzzles, including getting information about their children's activities in school. More and more communication between teachers and parents take place via digital school systems. It can be hard for parents to find the information they are looking for and the teacher decides when information is sent and what communication method to use. All parents, but especially parents with disabilities, might have individual preferences on how to receive information and how to adapt meetings at school. In this paper we present a project where we involved parents and teachers in focus groups, an idea workshop and iterative user trials of a digital prototype. The goal was to elicit parents' individual requirements for an inclusive digital school system, where they can store their individual preferences about how and when to receive information from school and what requirements they have on meetings at school. Preliminary results show that we managed to create open and focused discussions among parents and teachers. The parents reacted very positively on an onboarding page with the possibility to quickly and easily enter preferences after their first log in, but more work needs to be done on how preferences are categorized on the onboarding page. Finally, parents need to get clear feedback from teachers and school when they have entered or updated preferences, so they can trust that their preferences will be met. PMID:27534306

  13. Augmentation of metastasis formation by thioglycollate-elicited macrophages.

    PubMed

    Gorelik, E; Wiltrout, R H; Brunda, M J; Holden, H T; Herberman, R B

    1982-05-15

    Inoculation of thioglycollate-elicited peritoneal exudate cells (PEC) into C57BL/6 mice reduced the rate of lung clearance of several intravenously (i.v.) injected murine tumor cells, and increased by up to 100-fold the number of artificially-induced metastatic lung nodules produced by the i.v. injection of B16 melanoma or Lewis lung carcinoma (3LL) tumor cells. Maximum effects were observed when PEC were injected either before, or shortly after, tumor cells. Modulation of lung clearance or metastasis formation was observed only with PEC and not with a variety of other cells, such as splenocytes, thymocytes P815 mastocytoma cells, or several macrophage-like cell lines (PU5-1.8 and IC-21). Lysates of PEC were as efficient in reducing lung clearance and augmenting metastasis formation as were intact viable PEC. Lysates of other cell types, including P815 and the macrophage-like cell lines, were unable to produce these effects. PEC populations, enriched for macrophages by adherence to plastic or by percoll density gradient sedimentation, also increased the number of B16-induced artificial metastasis, implicating the macrophage as the cell responsible for these observations. PMID:7095902

  14. Xylaria hypoxylon Lectin as Adjuvant Elicited Tfh Cell Responses.

    PubMed

    Kang, J; Zuo, Y; Guo, Q; Wang, H; Liu, Q; Liu, Q; Xia, G; Kang, Y

    2015-11-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) caused by FMD virus (FMDV) is a major health and economic problem in the farming industry. Vaccination of livestock against this highly infectious viral disease is crucial, and inactivated FMD vaccine has been effective at controlling infection. However, accumulated data show that the inactivated vaccine generates weak immune responses and that the oil formulation results in undesirable side effects. Mushroom lectins have recently been shown to display adjuvant effects when incorporated into DNA vaccines. In this study, to enhance the cellular immune response of FMDV antigen (146S), C57BL/6 mice were immunized with 146S combined with Xylaria hypoxylon lectin (XHL). The oil formulation (146S/Oil) was served as control group. Strong humoral immune responses were elicited in mice immunized with 146S/XHL as shown by high 146S antigen-specific IgG levels, and also in 146S/Oil group. Interestingly, XHL in conjunction with inactivated FMD vaccine activated strong Th1 and Tc1 cell responses, especially Tfh cell responses, in immunized mice. XHL stimulated dendritic cell maturation by upregulating expression of major histocompatibility complex II (MHCII) molecules and co-stimulatory molecules CD40 and CD86 in immunized mice. No XHL-specific IgG or inflammatory factors were detected indicating the safety of XHL as an adjuvant. Taken together, these results suggest the effectiveness of XHL at inducing cellular immune responses and therefore confirm its suitability as an adjuvant for inactivated FMD vaccine.

  15. Dreamed movement elicits activation in the sensorimotor cortex.

    PubMed

    Dresler, Martin; Koch, Stefan P; Wehrle, Renate; Spoormaker, Victor I; Holsboer, Florian; Steiger, Axel; Sämann, Philipp G; Obrig, Hellmuth; Czisch, Michael

    2011-11-01

    Since the discovery of the close association between rapid eye movement (REM) sleep and dreaming, much effort has been devoted to link physiological signatures of REM sleep to the contents of associated dreams [1-4]. Due to the impossibility of experimentally controlling spontaneous dream activity, however, a direct demonstration of dream contents by neuroimaging methods is lacking. By combining brain imaging with polysomnography and exploiting the state of "lucid dreaming," we show here that a predefined motor task performed during dreaming elicits neuronal activation in the sensorimotor cortex. In lucid dreams, the subject is aware of the dreaming state and capable of performing predefined actions while all standard polysomnographic criteria of REM sleep are fulfilled [5, 6]. Using eye signals as temporal markers, neural activity measured by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) was related to dreamed hand movements during lucid REM sleep. Though preliminary, we provide first evidence that specific contents of REM-associated dreaming can be visualized by neuroimaging. PMID:22036177

  16. Invisible visual stimuli elicit increases in alpha-band power.

    PubMed

    Bareither, Isabelle; Chaumon, Maximilien; Bernasconi, Fosco; Villringer, Arno; Busch, Niko A

    2014-09-01

    The cerebral cortex responds to stimuli of a wide range of intensities. Previous studies have demonstrated that undetectably weak somatosensory stimuli cause a functional deactivation or inhibition in somatosensory cortex. In the present study, we tested whether invisible visual stimuli lead to similar responses, indicated by an increase in EEG alpha-band power-an index of cortical excitability. We presented subliminal and supraliminal visual stimuli after estimating each participant's detection threshold. Stimuli consisted of peripherally presented small circular patches that differed in their contrast to a background consisting of a random white noise pattern. We demonstrate that subliminal and supraliminal stimuli each elicit specific neuronal response patterns. Supraliminal stimuli evoked an early, strongly phase-locked lower-frequency response representing the evoked potential and induced a decrease in alpha-band power from 400 ms on. By contrast, subliminal visual stimuli induced an increase of non-phase-locked power around 300 ms that was maximal within the alpha-band. This response might be due to an inhibitory mechanism, which reduces spurious visual activation that is unlikely to result from external stimuli. PMID:24872526

  17. Dreamed movement elicits activation in the sensorimotor cortex.

    PubMed

    Dresler, Martin; Koch, Stefan P; Wehrle, Renate; Spoormaker, Victor I; Holsboer, Florian; Steiger, Axel; Sämann, Philipp G; Obrig, Hellmuth; Czisch, Michael

    2011-11-01

    Since the discovery of the close association between rapid eye movement (REM) sleep and dreaming, much effort has been devoted to link physiological signatures of REM sleep to the contents of associated dreams [1-4]. Due to the impossibility of experimentally controlling spontaneous dream activity, however, a direct demonstration of dream contents by neuroimaging methods is lacking. By combining brain imaging with polysomnography and exploiting the state of "lucid dreaming," we show here that a predefined motor task performed during dreaming elicits neuronal activation in the sensorimotor cortex. In lucid dreams, the subject is aware of the dreaming state and capable of performing predefined actions while all standard polysomnographic criteria of REM sleep are fulfilled [5, 6]. Using eye signals as temporal markers, neural activity measured by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) was related to dreamed hand movements during lucid REM sleep. Though preliminary, we provide first evidence that specific contents of REM-associated dreaming can be visualized by neuroimaging.

  18. Point of view filming and the elicitation interview.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Jonathan; Gormley, Gerard J

    2016-08-01

    Face-to-face interviews are a fundamental research tool in qualitative research. Whilst this form of data collection can provide many valuable insights, it can often fall short of providing a complete picture of a research subject's experiences. Point of view (PoV) interviewing is an elicitation technique used in the social sciences as a means of enriching data obtained from research interviews. Recording research subjects' first person perspectives, for example by wearing digital video glasses, can afford deeper insights into their experiences. PoV interviewing can promote making visible the unverbalizable and does not rely as much on memory as the traditional interview. The use of such relatively inexpensive technology is gaining interest in health profession educational research and pedagogy, such as dynamic simulation-based learning and research activities. In this interview, Dr Gerry Gormley (a medical education researcher) talks to Dr Jonathan Skinner (an anthropologist with an interest in PoV interviewing), exploring some of the many crossover implications with PoV interviewing for medical education research and practice.

  19. Intraspleen DNA inoculation elicits protective cellular immune responses.

    PubMed

    Cano, A; Fragoso, G; Gevorkian, G; Terrazas, L I; Petrossian, P; Govezensky, T; Sciutto, E; Manoutcharian, K

    2001-04-01

    DNA immunization or inoculation is a recent vaccination method that induces both humoral and cellular immune responses in a range of hosts. Independent of the route or site of vaccination, the transfer of antigen-presenting cells (APC) or antigens into lymphoid organs is necessary. The aim of this investigation was to test whether intraspleen (i.s.) DNA inoculation is capable of inducing a protective immune response. We immunized mice by a single i.s. injection of a DNA construct expressing the immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy-chain variable domain (VH) in which the complementarity-determining regions (CDR) had been replaced by a Taenia crassiceps T-cell epitope. In these mice, immune responses and protective effects elicited by the vaccine were measured. We have shown here for the first time that i.s. DNA inoculation can induce protective cellular immune responses and activate CD8(+) T cells. Also, Ig V(H) appeared to be the minimal delivery unit of "antigenized" Ig capable of inducing T-cell activation in a lymphoid organ. The strategy of introducing T-cell epitopes into the molecular context of the V(H) domain in combination with i.s. DNA immunization could have important implications and applications for human immunotherapy.

  20. Invisible visual stimuli elicit increases in alpha-band power.

    PubMed

    Bareither, Isabelle; Chaumon, Maximilien; Bernasconi, Fosco; Villringer, Arno; Busch, Niko A

    2014-09-01

    The cerebral cortex responds to stimuli of a wide range of intensities. Previous studies have demonstrated that undetectably weak somatosensory stimuli cause a functional deactivation or inhibition in somatosensory cortex. In the present study, we tested whether invisible visual stimuli lead to similar responses, indicated by an increase in EEG alpha-band power-an index of cortical excitability. We presented subliminal and supraliminal visual stimuli after estimating each participant's detection threshold. Stimuli consisted of peripherally presented small circular patches that differed in their contrast to a background consisting of a random white noise pattern. We demonstrate that subliminal and supraliminal stimuli each elicit specific neuronal response patterns. Supraliminal stimuli evoked an early, strongly phase-locked lower-frequency response representing the evoked potential and induced a decrease in alpha-band power from 400 ms on. By contrast, subliminal visual stimuli induced an increase of non-phase-locked power around 300 ms that was maximal within the alpha-band. This response might be due to an inhibitory mechanism, which reduces spurious visual activation that is unlikely to result from external stimuli.

  1. Point of view filming and the elicitation interview.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Jonathan; Gormley, Gerard J

    2016-08-01

    Face-to-face interviews are a fundamental research tool in qualitative research. Whilst this form of data collection can provide many valuable insights, it can often fall short of providing a complete picture of a research subject's experiences. Point of view (PoV) interviewing is an elicitation technique used in the social sciences as a means of enriching data obtained from research interviews. Recording research subjects' first person perspectives, for example by wearing digital video glasses, can afford deeper insights into their experiences. PoV interviewing can promote making visible the unverbalizable and does not rely as much on memory as the traditional interview. The use of such relatively inexpensive technology is gaining interest in health profession educational research and pedagogy, such as dynamic simulation-based learning and research activities. In this interview, Dr Gerry Gormley (a medical education researcher) talks to Dr Jonathan Skinner (an anthropologist with an interest in PoV interviewing), exploring some of the many crossover implications with PoV interviewing for medical education research and practice. PMID:27438056

  2. Mesencephalic stimulation elicits inhibition of phrenic nerve activity in cat.

    PubMed

    Gallman, E A; Lawing, W L; Millhorn, D E

    1991-05-01

    1. Previous work from this laboratory has indicated that the mesencephalon is the anatomical substrate for a mechanism capable of inhibiting central respiratory drive in glomectomized cats for periods of up to 1 h or more following brief exposure to systemic hypoxia; phrenic nerve activity was used as an index of central respiratory drive. 2. The present study was undertaken to further localize the region responsible for the observed post-hypoxic inhibition of respiratory drive. We studied the phrenic nerve response to stimulations of the mesencephalon in anaesthetized, paralysed peripherally chemo-denervated cats with end-expired PCO2 and body temperature servo-controlled. 3. Stimulations of two types were employed. Electrical stimulation allowed rapid determination of sites from which phrenic inhibition could be elicited. Microinjections of excitatory amino acids were used subsequently in order to confine excitation to neuronal cell bodies and not axons of passage. 4. Stimulation of discrete regions of the ventromedial aspect of the mesencephalon in the vicinity of the red nucleus produced substantial inhibition of phrenic activity which lasted up to 45 min. Stimulation of other areas of the mesencephalon either produced no phrenic inhibition or resulted in a slight stimulation of phrenic activity. 5. The results are discussed in the context of the central respiratory response to hypoxia. PMID:1676420

  3. Eliciting Parents' Individual Requirements for an Inclusive Digital School System.

    PubMed

    Eftring, Håkan; Rassmus-Gröhn, Kirsten; Hedvall, Per-Olof

    2016-01-01

    Parents often have a busy time sorting out their life puzzles, including getting information about their children's activities in school. More and more communication between teachers and parents take place via digital school systems. It can be hard for parents to find the information they are looking for and the teacher decides when information is sent and what communication method to use. All parents, but especially parents with disabilities, might have individual preferences on how to receive information and how to adapt meetings at school. In this paper we present a project where we involved parents and teachers in focus groups, an idea workshop and iterative user trials of a digital prototype. The goal was to elicit parents' individual requirements for an inclusive digital school system, where they can store their individual preferences about how and when to receive information from school and what requirements they have on meetings at school. Preliminary results show that we managed to create open and focused discussions among parents and teachers. The parents reacted very positively on an onboarding page with the possibility to quickly and easily enter preferences after their first log in, but more work needs to be done on how preferences are categorized on the onboarding page. Finally, parents need to get clear feedback from teachers and school when they have entered or updated preferences, so they can trust that their preferences will be met.

  4. Treatment of obesity and pulmonary arterial hypertension with inhibitors of the prostaglandin transporter: evaluation of patent WO2014/204895A1.

    PubMed

    Dingemanse, Jasper; Bolli, Martin; Iglarz, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Prostaglandins display a wide array of pharmacological effects and prostaglandin analogs are already used in the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). After synthesis and release from cells, prostaglandins undergo reuptake by the prostaglandin transporter (PGT). WO2014/204895 claims the use of a series of trisubstituted triazine derivatives for the treatment of obesity and PAH. Composition of matter of these triazines has been claimed in WO2011/037610 and the compounds are described as potent inhibitors of the PGT. One compound (nr 146) was shown to improve high fat diet-induced glucose tolerance in a mouse model. In addition, this compound has been explored in the rat monocrotaline model of PAH and reduced characteristic features of the pathology. This class of compounds presents a potential new treatment paradigm in the treatment of obesity-related disorders and PAH. PMID:26099857

  5. Screening of plants used by Southern African traditional healers in the treatment of dysmenorrhoea for prostaglandin-synthesis inhibitors and uterine relaxing activity.

    PubMed

    Lindsey, K; Jäger, A K; Raidoo, D M; van Staden, J

    1999-01-01

    Plants used by Southern African traditional healers for the treatment of menstrual pains were screened for prostaglandin-synthesis inhibitors and the ability to reduce isolated uterine muscle contraction using the cyclooxygenase and in vitro uterine bioassays respectively. Prostaglandins are synthesized from arachidonic acid and the enzyme that drives this reaction is cyclooxygenase. The excessive production of prostaglandins by the myometrium and endometrium induces uterine contractions. Inhibition of cyclooxygenase and hence of the prostaglandin biosynthetic pathway may lead to relief of menstrual pain. Ten plants used by traditional healers for menstrual pains were assayed for cyclooxygenase inhibitory activity. Several plant extracts exhibited high inhibitory activity in the assay. The highest activities were obtained with ethanolic extracts of Siphonochilus aethiopicus, Cenchrus ciliaris and Solanum mauritianum. Generally ethanolic extracts gave higher activity than the aqueous extracts. None of the ethanolic plant extracts were able to relax or reduce the contractions of the precontracted guinea pig uterus. PMID:10075117

  6. The mouse anti-morphine constipation test--a simple laboratory test of the gastrointestinal side-effect potential of orally administered prostaglandin analogues.

    PubMed

    Christmas, A J

    1979-08-01

    A test is described which is simple, reliable and highly sensitive to the diarrhoea-inducing properties of orally administered prostaglandin analogues in mice. Comparison with human data shows similar orders of relative potency.

  7. [Depression of an increase of fatty acids in the blood of monkeys during stress by means of the administration of prostaglandin].

    PubMed

    Mikhaĭlov, M L; Beger, Kh M; Gnauk, G

    1975-04-01

    In examining the level and composition of free fatty acids in the blood plasma of monkeys there were revealed distinct shifts following stress (immobilization) which were prevented by a single administration of prostaglandine E2 directly before the stress. The authors analyze the role of prostaglandines in the capacity of a factor participating in the mechanism of a reverse association, and thus, limiting the lipolytic effect of neuromediators and hormones markedly secreted in case of stress.

  8. Cell cycle arrest by prostaglandin A1 at the G1/S phase interface with up-regulation of oncogenes in S-49 cyc- cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes-Fulford, M.

    1994-01-01

    Our previous studies have implied that prostaglandins inhibit cell growth independent of cAMP. Recent reports, however, have suggested that prostaglandin arrest of the cell cycle may be mediated through protein kinase A. In this report, in order to eliminate the role of c-AMP in prostaglandin mediated cell cycle arrest, we use the -49 lymphoma variant (cyc-) cells that lack adenylate cyclase activity. We demonstrate that dimethyl prostaglandin A1 (dmPGA1) inhibits DNA synthesis and cell growth in cyc- cells. DNA synthesis is inhibited 42% by dmPGA1 (50 microM) despite the fact that this cell line lacks cellular components needed for cAMP generation. The ability to decrease DNA synthesis depends upon the specific prostaglandin structure with the most effective form possessing the alpha, beta unsaturated ketone ring. Dimethyl PGA1 is most effective in inhibiting DNA synthesis in cyc- cells, with prostaglandins PGE1 and PGB1 being less potent inhibitors of DNA synthesis. DmPGE2 caused a significant stimulation of DNA synthesis. S-49 cyc- variant cells exposed to (30-50 microns) dmPGA1, arrested in the G1 phase of the cell cycle within 24 h. This growth arrest was reversed when the prostaglandin was removed from the cultured cells; growth resumed within hours showing that this treatment is not toxic. The S-49 cyc- cells were chosen not only for their lack of adenylate cyclase activity, but also because their cell cycle has been extensively studied and time requirements for G1, S, G2, and M phases are known. Within hours after prostaglandin removal the cells resume active DNA synthesis, and cell number doubles within 15 h suggesting rapid entry into S-phase DNA synthesis from the G1 cell cycle block.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  9. Protective effect of (±)α-tocopherol on brominated diphenyl ether-47-stimulated prostaglandin pathways in human extravillous trophoblasts in vitro.

    PubMed

    Park, Hae-Ryung; Loch-Caruso, Rita

    2015-10-01

    Brominated diphenyl ether (BDE)-47 is a prevalent flame retardant chemical found in human tissues and is linked to adverse pregnancy outcomes in humans. Because dysregulation of the prostaglandin pathway is implicated in adverse pregnancy outcomes, the present study investigates BDE-47 induction of prostaglandin synthesis in a human extravillous trophoblast cell line, HTR-8/SVneo, examining the hypothesis that BDE-47 increases generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) to stimulate the prostaglandin response. Treatment with 20 μM BDE-47 significantly increased mRNA expression of prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (PTGS2) at 4, 12 and 24 h, and 24-h treatment significantly increased cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 cellular protein expression and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) concentration in culture medium. The BDE-47-stimulated PGE2 release was inhibited by the COX inhibitors indomethacin and NS398, implicating COX activity. Exposure to 20 μM BDE-47 significantly increased ROS generation as measured by carboxydichlorofluorescein fluorescence, and this response was blocked by cotreatment with the peroxyl radical scavenger (±)-α-tocopherol. (±)-α-Tocopherol cotreatment suppressed BDE-47-stimulated increases of PGE2 release without significant effects on COX-2 mRNA and protein expression, implicating a role for ROS in post-translational regulation of COX activity. Because prostaglandins regulate trophoblast functions necessary for placentation and pregnancy, further investigation is warranted of BDE-47 impacts on trophoblast responses. PMID:26026498

  10. Protective Effect of (±)α-Tocopherol on Brominated Diphenyl Ether-47-Stimulated Prostaglandin Pathways in Human Extravillous Trophoblasts In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hae-Ryung; Loch-Caruso, Rita

    2015-01-01

    Brominated diphenyl ether (BDE)-47 is a prevalent flame retardant chemical found in human tissues and is linked to adverse pregnancy outcomes in humans. Because dysregulation of the prostaglandin pathway is implicated in adverse pregnancy outcomes, the present study investigates BDE-47 induction of prostaglandin synthesis in a human extravillous trophoblast cell line, HTR-8/SVneo, examining the hypothesis that BDE-47 increases generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) to stimulate the prostaglandin response. Treatment with 20 μM BDE-47 significantly increased mRNA expression of prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (PTGS2) at 4, 12 and 24 h, and 24-h treatment significantly increased cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 cellular protein expression and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) concentration in culture medium. The BDE-47-stimulated PGE2 release was inhibited by the COX inhibitors indomethacin and NS398, implicating COX activity. Exposure to 20 μM BDE-47 significantly increased ROS generation as measured by carboxydichlorofluorescein fluorescence, and this response was blocked by cotreatment with the peroxyl radical scavenger (±)-α-tocopherol. (±)-α-Tocopherol cotreatment suppressed BDE-47-stimulated increases of PGE2 release without significant effects on COX-2 mRNA and protein expression, implicating a role for ROS in post-translational regulation of COX activity. Because prostaglandins regulate trophoblast functions necessary for placentation and pregnancy, further investigation is warranted of BDE-47 impacts on trophoblast responses. PMID:26026498

  11. Single extra-amniotic injection of prostaglandin E2 in viscous gel to induce mid-trimester abortion.

    PubMed Central

    Mackenzie, I Z; Hillier, K; Embrey, M P

    1975-01-01

    In a preliminary study a single extra-amniotic injection of 1.5 mg of prostaglandin E-2 incorporated into an aqueous viscous gel was given to 24 patients aborted within 24 hours, and the mean induction-abortion interval (plus or minus S.E. of mean) was 13.5 plus or minus 1.5 hours. Vomiting occurred in seven patients, and transient severe uterine cramps, pallor, nausea, and shivering occurred in one patient immediately after injection. Complete abortion occurred in 20patients. A delay in the time taken to abort seemed to be associated with an immediate and rapid rise in uterine tone after the injection which required prompt analgesia; this probably reflected rapid decidual absorption and dissolution of the prostaglandins away from their site of action. The degree of distention of the catheter-retaining balloon did not influence abortion times. PMID:1111761

  12. Naturalistic Observations of Elicited Expressive Communication of Children with Autism: An Analysis of Teacher Instructions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiang, Hsu-Min

    2009-01-01

    This study observed expressive communication of 17 Australian and 15 Taiwanese children with autism who were mute or had limited spoken language during 2 hour regular school routines and analyzed teacher instructions associated with elicited expressive communication. Results indicated: (a) the frequency of occurrence of elicited expressive…

  13. Dynamic Assessment of Elicited Imitation: A Case Analysis of an Advanced L2 English Speaker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Compernolle, Rémi A.; Zhang, Haomin

    2014-01-01

    The focus of this paper is on the design, administration, and scoring of a dynamically administered elicited imitation test of L2 English morphology. Drawing on Vygotskian sociocultural psychology, particularly the concepts of zone of proximal development and dynamic assessment, we argue that support provided during the elicited imitation test…

  14. Concurrent Data Elicitation Procedures, Processes, and the Early Stages of L2 Learning: A Critical Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leow, Ronald P.; Grey, Sarah; Marijuan, Silvia; Moorman, Colleen

    2014-01-01

    Given the current methodological interest in eliciting direct data on the cognitive processes L2 learners employ as they interact with L2 data during the early stages of the learning process, this article takes a critical and comparative look at three concurrent data elicitation procedures currently employed in the SLA literature: Think aloud (TA)…

  15. The Use of Elicited Imitation in Second Language Acquisition Research. Working Papers on Bilingualism, No. 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naiman, Neil

    This paper reports on a study undertaken to investigate the relationship between elicited imitation data and comprehension data, as measured by a picture-identification task and a second language (L2) to first language (L1) translation task, and between elicited imitation data and production data, as measured by a spontaneous production task and…

  16. Identifying and Responding to Personal Stressors: Utilizing Photo Elicitation in Health Education Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Theresa

    2014-01-01

    The "Photo Elicitation Project" teaching idea applies the techniques of photo elicitation to stress prevention and management. This activity is designed to help students identify their personal stressors and to determine which stress prevention strategies are most useful for them. Objectives: students will be able to (a) identify current…

  17. Stone Soup: Photo-Elicitation as a Learning Tool in the Food Geography Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurtz, Hilda E.; Wood, Jason

    2014-01-01

    This paper showcases self-reflective and inclusive pedagogy using photo-elicitation in a food geography course assignment. The Stone Soup project positions students as both researchers and participant-subjects in a participant-driven photo-elicitation (PDPE) study of students' foodways. Student papers for this assignment demonstrate rich…

  18. Uncovering Pre-Service Teacher Beliefs about Young Children: A Photographic Elicitation Methodology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stockall, Nancy; Davis, Sara

    2011-01-01

    This illustrative paper provides an introduction to using mixed qualitative methods of photo-elicitation, face to face interviews and semiotic analysis to uncover pre-service students' beliefs about young children. The researchers share their experience on conducting a study using photo-elicitation and engaging pre-service teachers in a discussion…

  19. From Drawings to Diagrams: Maintaining Researcher Control during Graphic Elicitation in Qualitative Interviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varga-Atkins, Tunde; O'Brien, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Graphic elicitation, i.e. asking participants to draw, is an interview technique used to focus the interviewee on the given topic or gain extra meaning not covered verbally as part of the interview. This study analyses two interview contexts which included visual elicitation. It describes a successful example in which the researcher maintained…

  20. Episodic Development in Preschool Children's Play-Prompted and Direct-Elicited Narratives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ilgaz, Hande; Aksu-Koc, Ayhan

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated the premise that action, manifested here through pretend play, is a semiotic arena that can enhance narrative development. It was hypothesized that children would produce structurally more complex narratives in play-prompted elicitation than in direct elicitation conditions, and that this competence would increase with age.…

  1. Eliciting Covert Mental Operations, Concepts and Oral Language Skills in Young Bilingual Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollomon, John W.; And Others

    The purpose of this investigation was to design and test an information-eliciting question instrument in order to determine whether the structures in the verbal responses of young Mexican-American, bilingual children entering school would reveal the covert mental operations, concepts and oral language skills elicited. The basic objective was to…

  2. Photo-Elicitation and Visual Semiotics: A Unique Methodology for Studying Inclusion for Children with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stockall, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    The methodology in this paper discusses the use of photographs as an elicitation strategy that can reveal the thinking processes of participants in a qualitatively rich manner. Photo-elicitation techniques combined with a Piercian semiotic perspective offer a unique method for creating a frame of action for later participant analysis. Illustrative…

  3. Diesel Exhaust Inhalation Elicits Acute Vasoconstriction in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Peretz, Alon; Sullivan, Jeffrey H.; Leotta, Daniel F.; Trenga, Carol A.; Sands, Fiona N.; Allen, Jason; Carlsten, Chris; Wilkinson, Charles W.; Gill, Edward A.; Kaufman, Joel D.

    2008-01-01

    Background Traffic-related air pollution is consistently associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Recent human and animal studies suggest that exposure to air pollutants affects vascular function. Diesel exhaust (DE) is a major source of traffic-related air pollution. Objectives Our goal was to study the effects of short-term exposure to DE on vascular reactivity and on mediators of vascular tone. Methods In a double-blind, crossover, controlled exposure study, 27 adult volunteers (10 healthy and 17 with metabolic syndrome) were exposed in randomized order to filtered air (FA) and each of two levels of diluted DE (100 or 200 μg/m3 of fine particulate matter) in 2-hr sessions. Before and after each exposure, we assessed the brachial artery diameter (BAd) by B-mode ultrasound and collected blood samples for endothelin-1 (ET-1) and catecholamines. Postexposure we also assessed endothelium-dependent flow-mediated dilation (FMD). Results Compared with FA, DE at 200 μg/m3 elicited a decrease in BAd (0.11 mm; 95% confidence interval, 0.02–0.18), and the effect appeared linearly dose related with a smaller effect at 100 μg/m3. Plasma levels of ET-1 increased after 200 μg/m3 DE but not after FA (p = 0.01). There was no consistent impact of DE on plasma catecholamines or FMD. Conclusions These results demonstrate that short-term exposure to DE is associated with acute endothelial response and vasoconstriction of a conductance artery. Elucidation of the signaling pathways controlling vascular tone that underlie this observation requires further study. PMID:18629317

  4. Feeding-elicited cataplexy in orexin knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Erika L.; Baumann, Christian R.; Cano, Georgina; Scammell, Thomas E.; Mochizuki, Takatoshi

    2009-01-01

    Mice lacking orexin/hypocretin signaling have sudden episodes of atonia and paralysis during active wakefulness. These events strongly resemble cataplexy, episodes of sudden muscle weakness triggered by strong positive emotions in people with narcolepsy, but it remains unknown whether murine cataplexy is triggered by positive emotions. To determine whether positive emotions elicit murine cataplexy, we placed orexin knockout (KO) mice on a scheduled feeding protocol with regular or highly palatable food. Baseline sleep/wake behavior was recorded with ad lib regular chow. Mice were then placed on a scheduled feeding protocol in which they received 60% of their normal amount of chow 3 hr after dark onset for the next 10 days. Wild-type and KO mice rapidly entrained to scheduled feeding with regular chow, with more wake and locomotor activity prior to the feeding time. On day 10 of scheduled feeding, orexin KO mice had slightly more cataplexy during the food-anticipation period and more cataplexy in the second half of the dark period, when they may have been foraging for residual food. To test whether more palatable food increases cataplexy, mice were then switched to scheduled feeding with an isocaloric amount of Froot Loops, a food often used as a reward in behavioral studies. With this highly palatable food, orexin KO mice had much more cataplexy during the food-anticipation period and throughout the dark period. The increase in cataplexy with scheduled feeding, especially with highly palatable food, suggests that positive emotions may trigger cataplexy in mice, just as in people with narcolepsy. Establishing this connection helps validate orexin KO mice as an excellent model of human narcolepsy and provides an opportunity to better understand the mechanisms that trigger cataplexy. PMID:19362119

  5. Functional Changes in the Snail Statocyst System Elicited by Microgravity

    PubMed Central

    Balaban, Pavel M.; Malyshev, Aleksey Y.; Ierusalimsky, Victor N.; Aseyev, Nikolay; Korshunova, Tania A.; Bravarenko, Natasha I.; Lemak, M. S.; Roshchin, Matvey; Zakharov, Igor S.; Popova, Yekaterina; Boyle, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Background The mollusk statocyst is a mechanosensing organ detecting the animal's orientation with respect to gravity. This system has clear similarities to its vertebrate counterparts: a weight-lending mass, an epithelial layer containing small supporting cells and the large sensory hair cells, and an output eliciting compensatory body reflexes to perturbations. Methodology/Principal Findings In terrestrial gastropod snail we studied the impact of 16- (Foton M-2) and 12-day (Foton M-3) exposure to microgravity in unmanned orbital missions on: (i) the whole animal behavior (Helix lucorum L.), (ii) the statoreceptor responses to tilt in an isolated neural preparation (Helix lucorum L.), and (iii) the differential expression of the Helix pedal peptide (HPep) and the tetrapeptide FMRFamide genes in neural structures (Helix aspersa L.). Experiments were performed 13–42 hours after return to Earth. Latency of body re-orientation to sudden 90° head-down pitch was significantly reduced in postflight snails indicating an enhanced negative gravitaxis response. Statoreceptor responses to tilt in postflight snails were independent of motion direction, in contrast to a directional preference observed in control animals. Positive relation between tilt velocity and firing rate was observed in both control and postflight snails, but the response magnitude was significantly larger in postflight snails indicating an enhanced sensitivity to acceleration. A significant increase in mRNA expression of the gene encoding HPep, a peptide linked to ciliary beating, in statoreceptors was observed in postflight snails; no differential expression of the gene encoding FMRFamide, a possible neurotransmission modulator, was observed. Conclusions/Significance Upregulation of statocyst function in snails following microgravity exposure parallels that observed in vertebrates suggesting fundamental principles underlie gravi-sensing and the organism's ability to adapt to gravity changes. This

  6. Role of phosphodiesterase-4 on ethanol elicited locomotion and narcosis.

    PubMed

    Baliño, Pablo; Ledesma, Juan Carlos; Aragon, Carlos M G

    2016-02-01

    The cAMP signaling pathway has emerged as an important modulator of the pharmacological effects of ethanol. In this respect, the cAMP-dependent protein kinase has been shown to play an important role in the modulation of several ethanol-induced behavioral actions. Cellular levels of cAMP are maintained by the activity of adenylyl cyclases and phosphodiesterases. In the present work we have focused on ascertaining the role of PDE4 in mediating the neurobehavioral effects of ethanol. For this purpose, we have used the selective PDE4 inhibitor Ro 20-1724. This compound has been proven to enhance cellular cAMP response by PDE4 blockade and can be administered systemically. Swiss mice were injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) with Ro 20-1724 (0-5 mg/kg; i.p.) at different time intervals before ethanol (0-4 g/kg; i.p.) administration. Immediately after the ethanol injection, locomotor activity, loss of righting reflex, PKA footprint and enzymatic activity were assessed. Pretreatment with Ro 20-1724 increased ethanol-induced locomotor stimulation in a dose-dependent manner. Doses that increased locomotor stimulation did not modify basal locomotion or the suppression of motor activity produced by high doses of this alcohol. Ro 20-1724 did not alter the locomotor activation produced by amphetamine or cocaine. The time of loss of righting reflex evoked by ethanol was increased after pretreatment with Ro 20-1724. This effect was selective for the narcotic effects of ethanol since Ro 20-1724 did not affect pentobarbital-induced narcotic effects. Moreover, Ro 20-1724 administration increased the PKA footprint and enzymatic activity response elicited by ethanol. These data provide further evidence of the key role of the cAMP signaling pathway in the central effects of ethanol.

  7. Efficacy and tolerability of brinzolamide/brimonidine suspension and prostaglandin analogs in patients previously treated with dorzolamide/timolol solution and prostaglandin analogs

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Jonathan S; Pang, Pierre M; Lo, Samuel C

    2016-01-01

    Objective Fixed combination glaucoma medication is increasingly used in glaucoma treatment. There is a lack of comparative study in the literature of non-beta blocker combination agents used adjunctively with a glaucoma agent in a different class. The objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of intraocular pressure (IOP) control and tolerability of non-beta blocker combination suspension with prostaglandin analogs (PGA) in patients with open angle glaucoma who were previously treated with beta blocker combination solution with PGA. Design Open-label retrospective review of patient records. Patients and methods This study looked at patients with open angle glaucoma taking dorzolamide/timolol solution with PGA that were switched to brinzolamide/brimonidine combination suspension with PGA. This study reviewed the charts of all patients who were at least 21 years old with a clinical diagnosis of open-angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension in at least one eye. Patients needed to have been treated with concomitant use of PGA and dorzolamide/timolol solution for at least one month. Patients using dorzolamide/timolol solution plus PGA with medication related ocular irritation were switched to brinzolamide/brimonidine suspension with the same PGA. Best-corrected visual acuity, ocular hyperemia grading, slit lamp biomicroscopy and Goldmann applanation tonometry measurements, and patient medication preferences were assessed at baseline, 1 month and 3 months. Results Forty eyes with open angle glaucoma. The mean age of the patients was 68 and 60% were females. The IOP before the switch was 17.2 and 16.5 (P=0.70) following the switch at 3 months. We found a decreasing trend of ocular hyperemia (P=0.064) and strong preference (P=0.011) for non-beta blocker combination suspension but no difference of visual acuity and slit lamp findings. Conclusion Brinzolamide/brimonidine combination suspension when used adjunctively with PGA is equally effective. Patients in this study

  8. Identification of prostaglandin E2 and leukotriene B4 in the synovial fluid of painful, dysfunctional temporomandibular joints.

    PubMed

    Quinn, J H; Bazan, N G

    1990-09-01

    It has been hypothesized that prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and leukotriene B4 (LTB4) should be present in the synovial fluid of inflamed, dysfunctional temporomandibular joints. An assay to identify PGE2 and LTB4 and platelet-activating factor (PAF) was used, and a strong correlation between the levels of these lipid mediators of pain and inflammation and an index of clinical joint pathology was found. PMID:2168477

  9. Effect of tienoxolol, a new diuretic beta-blocking agent, on urinary prostaglandin excretion in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Caussade, F.; Cloarec, A.

    1993-01-01

    1. The effects of tienoxolol, (ethyl 2-[3-[(1,1-dimethylethyl)amino]-2-hydroxypropoxy]-5- [(2-thienylcarbonyl) amino] benzoate, hydrochloride), a novel drug exhibiting both diuretic and beta-adrenoceptor blocking properties, were investigated on urinary 6-keto-prostaglandin F1 alpha (6-keto-PGF1 alpha) and PGE2 excretion in the rat and compared to those of reference diuretic (furosemide) and beta-adrenoceptor antagonists (acebutolol, propranolol). Since tienoxolol was shown to bind to A1 and A2 adenosine receptors, the action of theophylline was also evaluated. 2. Tienoxolol (8-128 mg kg-1, p.o.) induced a dose-related increase of 6-keto-PGF1 alpha excretion from 32 mg kg-1 but a significant elevation of urinary PGE2 levels was only reached after administration of 128 mg kg-1. However, renal prostaglandin concentrations were not modified by tienoxolol. 3. Furosemide (32 mg kg-1) displayed a strong diuretic activity but did not enhance 6-keto-PGF1 alpha excretion. Likewise, the latter was unaffected by acebutolol and propranolol (128 mg kg-1) and no significant diuresis was observed following administration of these two beta-blocking agents. Theophylline (64 mg kg-1), like tienoxolol, was able to induce both diuresis and urinary prostaglandin excretion. Furthermore, they bound with similar affinities to A1 and A2 adenosine receptors. This led to the suggestion that a relationship between P1-purinoceptors, prostaglandin release, diuresis and natriuresis could exist. 4. Oral co-administration of NECA (0.2 mg kg-1) with tienoxolol markedly reduced the urinary 6-keto-PGF1 alpha excretion observed when tienoxolol was administered alone. However, neither diuresis nor natriuresis were modified, demonstrating that the proposed relationship was untenable.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8098641

  10. Metaphors of Distress: Photo-Elicitation Enhances a Discourse Analysis of Parents' Accounts.

    PubMed

    Kantrowitz-Gordon, Ira; Vandermause, Roxanne

    2016-07-01

    In research on sensitive topics, photo-elicitation can be a profound aid to data collection and interpretation processes. Photo-elicitation methods were used in this manner in a discourse analysis of parents' distress at least 6 months after preterm birth. After an initial interview, participants were asked to take digital photographs representing their distress and to return for a second interview to discuss the photographs. The elicited photo representations supported participants' engagement with their current or past distress and generated new meanings from the reappraisal of old photographs. Photo-elicitation demonstrated the embodiment of parents' distress in the child and the placement of distress in specific locations. Photographs of documents showed the power of the written word in generating and maintaining distress. Participants used existing photographs from their child's photo history to generate rich metaphors for their distress as parents. These findings have implications for enhancing interpretive health research by incorporating photo-elicitation methods. PMID:25792488

  11. Metaphors of Distress: Photo-Elicitation Enhances a Discourse Analysis of Parents' Accounts.

    PubMed

    Kantrowitz-Gordon, Ira; Vandermause, Roxanne

    2016-07-01

    In research on sensitive topics, photo-elicitation can be a profound aid to data collection and interpretation processes. Photo-elicitation methods were used in this manner in a discourse analysis of parents' distress at least 6 months after preterm birth. After an initial interview, participants were asked to take digital photographs representing their distress and to return for a second interview to discuss the photographs. The elicited photo representations supported participants' engagement with their current or past distress and generated new meanings from the reappraisal of old photographs. Photo-elicitation demonstrated the embodiment of parents' distress in the child and the placement of distress in specific locations. Photographs of documents showed the power of the written word in generating and maintaining distress. Participants used existing photographs from their child's photo history to generate rich metaphors for their distress as parents. These findings have implications for enhancing interpretive health research by incorporating photo-elicitation methods.

  12. Comparison of elicitation methods for moral and affective beliefs in the theory of planned behaviour.

    PubMed

    Dean, M; Arvola, A; Vassallo, M; Lähteenmäki, L; Raats, M M; Saba, A; Shepherd, R

    2006-09-01

    Although the theory of planned behaviour (TPB) has been applied successfully in the area of food choice, it has been criticized for its pure utilitarian approach to the factors determining behaviour. Despite the increase in predictive power of the model with added components such as affective attitude and moral and ethical concerns, in most studies the elicitation process still only addresses people's utilitarian beliefs about the behaviour with little attention paid to other aspects. This study compares the traditional method of elicitation of advantages and disadvantages with two other methods (word association and open-ended) in the elicitations of beliefs, attitudes and moral concerns in relation to the consumption of organic foods. Results show the traditional method to be best for eliciting cognitive beliefs, open-ended emotion task for eliciting emotional beliefs and open-ended beliefs task best for moral concerns. The advantages and disadvantages of each method are discussed. PMID:16782230

  13. Prostaglandin E2 induces vascular endothelial growth factor secretion in prostate cancer cells through EP2 receptor-mediated cAMP pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xingya; Klein, Russell D

    2007-11-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) has been shown to induce expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and other signaling molecules in several cancers. PGE2 elicits its functions though four G-protein coupled membrane receptors (EP1-4). In this study, we investigated the role of EP receptors in PGE2-induced molecular events in prostate cancer cells. qRT-PCR analysis revealed that PC-3 cells express a substantially higher level of EP2 and moderately higher EP4 than DU145 and LNCaP cells. LNCaP cells had virtually no detectable EP2 mRNA. EP1 and EP3 mRNAs were not detected in these cells. Treatment of prostate cancer cells with PGE2 (1 nM-10 microM) increased both VEGF secretion and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) production. Levels of induction in PC-3 cells were greater than in DU145 and LNCaP cells. The selective EP2 agonist CAY10399 also significantly increased VEGF secretion and cAMP production in PC-3 cells, but not in DU145 and LNCaP cells. Moreover, PGE2 and CAY10399 increased mitogen activated protein kinase/extracellular signal regulated kinase (MAPK/Erk) and Akt phosphorylation in PC-3 and DU145 cells, but not in LNCaP cells. However, neither the MAPK/Erk inhibitor U0126 nor the PI3K/Akt inhibitor LY294002 abolished PGE2-induced VEGF secretion in PC-3 cells. We further demonstrated that the adenylate cyclase activator forskolin and the cAMP anologue 8-bromo-cAMP mimicked the effects of PGE2 on VEGF secretion in PC-3 cells. Meanwhile, the adenylate cyclase inhibitor 2'5'-dideoxyadenosine, at concentrations that inhibited PGE2-induced cAMP, significantly blocked PGE2-induced VEGF secretion in PC-3 cells. We conclude that PGE2-induced VEGF secretion in prostate cancer cells is mediated through EP2-, and possibly EP4-, dependent cAMP signaling pathways. PMID:17427962

  14. Prostaglandin E₂ protects murine lungs from bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis and lung dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Dackor, Ryan T; Cheng, Jennifer; Voltz, James W; Card, Jeffrey W; Ferguson, Catherine D; Garrett, Ryan C; Bradbury, J Alyce; DeGraff, Laura M; Lih, Fred B; Tomer, Kenneth B; Flake, Gordon P; Travlos, Gregory S; Ramsey, Randle W; Edin, Matthew L; Morgan, Daniel L; Zeldin, Darryl C

    2011-11-01

    Prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) is a lipid mediator that is produced via the metabolism of arachidonic acid by cyclooxygenase enzymes. In the lung, PGE(2) acts as an anti-inflammatory factor and plays an important role in tissue repair processes. Although several studies have examined the role of PGE(2) in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis in rodents, results have generally been conflicting, and few studies have examined the therapeutic effects of PGE(2) on the accompanying lung dysfunction. In this study, an established model of pulmonary fibrosis was used in which 10-12-wk-old male C57BL/6 mice were administered a single dose (1.0 mg/kg) of bleomycin via oropharyngeal aspiration. To test the role of prostaglandins in this model, mice were dosed, via surgically implanted minipumps, with either vehicle, PGE(2) (1.32 μg/h), or the prostacyclin analog iloprost (0.33 μg/h) beginning 7 days before or 14 days after bleomycin administration. Endpoints assessed at 7 days after bleomycin administration included proinflammatory cytokine levels and measurement of cellular infiltration into the lung. Endpoints assessed at 21 days after bleomycin administration included lung function assessment via invasive (FlexiVent) analysis, cellular infiltration, lung collagen content, and semiquantitative histological analysis of the degree of lung fibrosis (Ashcroft method). Seven days after bleomycin administration, lymphocyte numbers and chemokine C-C motif ligand 2 expression were significantly lower in PGE(2)- and iloprost-treated animals compared with vehicle-treated controls (P < 0.05). When administered 7 days before bleomycin challenge, PGE(2) also protected against the decline in lung static compliance, lung fibrosis, and collagen production that is associated with 3 wk of bleomycin exposure. However, PGE(2) had no therapeutic effect on these parameters when administered 14 days after bleomycin challenge. In summary, PGE(2) prevented the decline in lung static compliance and

  15. Robust hydrolysis of prostaglandin glycerol esters by human monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL).

    PubMed

    Savinainen, Juha R; Kansanen, Emilia; Pantsar, Tatu; Navia-Paldanius, Dina; Parkkari, Teija; Lehtonen, Marko; Laitinen, Tuomo; Nevalainen, Tapio; Poso, Antti; Levonen, Anna-Liisa; Laitinen, Jarmo T

    2014-11-01

    The primary route of inactivation of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol in the central nervous system is through enzymatic hydrolysis, mainly carried out by monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL), along with a small contribution by the α/β-hydrolase domain (ABHD) proteins ABHD6 and ABHD12. Recent methodological progress allowing kinetic monitoring of glycerol liberation has facilitated substrate profiling of the human endocannabinoid hydrolases, and these studies have revealed that the three enzymes have distinct monoacylglycerol substrate and isomer preferences. Here, we have extended this substrate profiling to cover four prostaglandin glycerol esters, namely, 15-deoxy-Δ(12,14)-prostaglandin J2-2-glycerol (15d-PGJ2-G), PGD2-G, PGE2-G, and PGF2 α-G. We found that the three enzymes hydrolyzed the tested substrates, albeit with distinct rates and preferences. Although human ABHD12 (hABHD12) showed only marginal activity toward PGE2-G, hABHD6 preferentially hydrolyzed PGD2-G, and human MAGL (hMAGL) robustly hydrolyzed all four. This was particularly intriguing for MAGL activity toward 15d-PGJ2-G whose hydrolysis rate rivaled that of the best monoacylglycerol substrates. Molecular modeling studies combined with kinetic analysis supported favorable interaction with the hMAGL active site. Long and short MAGL isoforms shared a similar substrate profile, and hMAGL hydrolyzed 15d-PGJ2-G also in living cells. The ability of 15d-PGJ2-G to activate the canonical nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor (Nrf2) signaling pathway used by 15d-PGJ2 was assessed, and these studies revealed for the first time that 15d-PGJ2 and 15d-PGJ2-G similarly activated Nrf2 signaling as well as transcription of target genes of this pathway. Our study challenges previous claims regarding the ability of MAGL to catalyze PG-G hydrolysis and extend the MAGL substrate profile beyond the classic monoacylglycerols. PMID:25140003

  16. cAMP-synthesis in a medullary thyroid carcinoma cell line: response to adrenergic agents and prostaglandines.

    PubMed

    Mertens, P R; Goretzki, P E; Keck, E

    1999-01-01

    Calcitonin secretion by C-cells is mediated through intracellular 3'5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and calcium signaling. Calcitonin release stimulation tests may take advantage of both signaling cascades in screening for medullary thyroid carcinomas (MTC). To elucidate the regulation of the adenylyl cyclase system we have determined cAMP levels of a calcitonin-expressing MTC cell line (RG) after exposure to adrenergic agents and prostaglandines. In early passages (20-30) cAMP concentrations were significantly elevated in RG cells after exposure to beta-adrenergic agents and prostaglandines E1 and E2. In advanced passages (60-80) the beta-adrenergic response was no longer detectable and adrenergic receptors were uncoupled from the adenylyl cyclase complex; while the effect of prostaglandines E1 and E2 remained unaffected. Preincubation with dexamethasone, in a process requiring protein new synthesis, re-established the adrenergic response in later passages, indicating that RG cells dedifferentiated in culture over time. Our in vitro findings suggest that MTC cell dedifferentiation may be accompanied by adrenergic receptor-uncoupling from the adenylate cyclase system and that this process may be reversed by dexamethasone incubation.

  17. Prostaglandin E Receptor Subtype 4 Signaling in the Heart: Role in Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury and Cardiac Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Yin; Tang, Eva Hoi Ching; Ma, Haichun

    2016-01-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is an endogenous lipid mediator, produced from the metabolism of arachidonic acids, upon the sequential actions of phospholipase A2, cyclooxygenases, and prostaglandin E synthases. The various biological functions governed by PGE2 are mediated through its four distinct prostaglandin E receptors (EPs), designated as EP1, EP2, EP3, and EP4, among which the EP4 receptor is the one most widely distributed in the heart. The availability of global or cardiac-specific EP4 knockout mice and the development of selective EP4 agonists/antagonists have provided substantial evidence to support the role of EP4 receptor in the heart. However, like any good drama, activation of PGE2-EP4 signaling exerts both protective and detrimental effects in the ischemic heart disease. Thus, the primary object of this review is to provide a comprehensive overview of the current progress of the PGE2-EP4 signaling in ischemic heart diseases, including cardiac hypertrophy and myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury. A better understanding of PGE2-EP4 signaling should promote the development of more effective therapeutic approaches to treat the ischemic heart diseases without triggering unwanted side effects. PMID:27190998

  18. Targeted prostaglandin E2 inhibition enhances antiviral immunity through induction of type I interferon and apoptosis in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Coulombe, François; Jaworska, Joanna; Verway, Mark; Tzelepis, Fanny; Massoud, Amir; Gillard, Joshua; Wong, Gary; Kobinger, Gary; Xing, Zhou; Couture, Christian; Joubert, Philippe; Fritz, Jörg H; Powell, William S; Divangahi, Maziar

    2014-04-17

    Aspirin gained tremendous popularity during the 1918 Spanish Influenza virus pandemic, 50 years prior to the demonstration of their inhibitory action on prostaglandins. Here, we show that during influenza A virus (IAV) infection, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) was upregulated, which led to the inhibition of type I interferon (IFN) production and apoptosis in macrophages, thereby causing an increase in virus replication. This inhibitory role of PGE2 was not limited to innate immunity, because both antigen presentation and T cell mediated immunity were also suppressed. Targeted PGE2 suppression via genetic ablation of microsomal prostaglandin E-synthase 1 (mPGES-1) or by the pharmacological inhibition of PGE2 receptors EP2 and EP4 substantially improved survival against lethal IAV infection whereas PGE2 administration reversed this phenotype. These data demonstrate that the mPGES-1-PGE2 pathway is targeted by IAV to evade host type I IFN-dependent antiviral immunity. We propose that specific inhibition of PGE2 signaling might serve as a treatment for IAV.

  19. Synergistic inhibitory effect of ascorbic acid and acetylsalicylic acid on prostaglandin E2 release in primary rat microglia.

    PubMed

    Fiebich, Bernd L; Lieb, Klaus; Kammerer, Norbert; Hüll, Michael

    2003-07-01

    Ascorbic acid (vitamin C) has been suggested to protect cerebral tissue in a variety of pathophysiological situations such as head trauma, ischemia or Alzheimer's disease. Most of these protective actions have been attributed to the antioxidative capacity of ascorbic acid. Besides the presence of elevated levels of oxygen radicals, prostaglandins produced by neurones and microglial cells seem to play an important role in prolonged tissue damage. We investigated whether ascorbic acid alone inhibits prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) synthesis and may augment the inhibitory effect of acetylsalicylic acid on prostaglandin synthesis. Ascorbic acid dose-dependently inhibited PGE2 synthesis in lipopolysaccharide-treated primary rat microglial cells (IC50 = 3.70 micro m). In combination with acetylsalicylic acid (IC50 = 1.85 micro m), ascorbic acid augmented the inhibitory effect of acetylsalicylic acid on PGE2 synthesis (IC50 = 0.25 micro m in combination with 100 micro m ascorbic acid). Ascorbic acid alone or in combination with acetylsalicylic acid did not inhibit cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) protein synthesis but inhibited COX-2 enzyme activity. Our results show that ascorbic acid and acetylsalicylic acid act synergistically in inhibiting PGE2 synthesis, which may help to explain a possible protective effect of ascorbic acid in various brain diseases.

  20. Effect of dexamethasone on proliferating osteoblasts: inhibition of prostaglandin E2 synthesis, DNA synthesis, and alterations in actin cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Hughes-Fulford, M; Appel, R; Kumegawa, M; Schmidt, J

    1992-11-01

    Elevated levels of glucocorticoids caused by disease (Cushing's syndrome) or therapeutic treatment of asthma are known to cause osteoporosis. Space flight, an environmental condition, is known to cause a rise in endogenous cortisols accompanied by a significant loss of bone and calcium. Long-term space inhabitants have lost up to 18% of weight bearing bone during long-term flight. This study demonstrates that elevated concentrations of glucocorticoids lower the endogenous production of PGE2 and interfere with osteoblast proliferation. Osteoblasts grown with dexamethasone had significantly lower DNA synthesis and endogenous synthesis of PGE2. Addition of exogenous dmPGE2 to the dexamethasone growth-inhibited cells stimulated DNA synthesis over twofold. In synchronous control cultures, we found that endogenous prostaglandin synthesis increased in late G1, preceding S-phase DNA synthesis by several hours. The addition of exogenous dexamethasone to synchronous cultures resulted in a significant decrease in the prostaglandin synthesis followed by a significant decrease in DNA synthesis in parallel cultures. Further, dexamethasone caused the actin cytoskeleton to collapse and the cell morphology to become rounded and spindle shaped. Addition of exogenous PGE2 to the dexamethasone-treated osteoblasts caused recovery of the actin architecture and phenotype. These data support the hypothesis that the glucocorticoid-mediated decrease in prostaglandin synthesis may be a contributing factor in the reduced bone quality and trabecular bone formation seen in glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis. PMID:1426038

  1. Prostaglandin D2 Inhibits Hair Growth and Is Elevated in Bald Scalp of Men with Androgenetic Alopecia

    PubMed Central

    Garza, Luis A.; Liu, Yaping; Yang, Zaixin; Alagesan, Brinda; Lawson, John A.; Norberg, Scott M.; Loy, Dorothy E.; Zhao, Tailun; Blatt, Hanz B.; Stanton, David C.; Carrasco, Lee; Ahluwalia, Gurpreet; Fischer, Susan M.; FitzGerald, Garret A.; Cotsarelis, George

    2012-01-01

    Testosterone is necessary for the development of male pattern baldness, known as androgenetic alopecia (AGA); yet, the mechanisms for decreased hair growth in this disorder are unclear. We show that prostaglandin D2 synthase (PTGDS) is elevated at the mRNA and protein levels in bald scalp compared to haired scalp of men with AGA. The product of PTGDS enzyme activity, prostaglandin D2 (PGD2), is similarly elevated in bald scalp. During normal follicle cycling in mice, Ptgds and PGD2 levels increase immediately preceding the regression phase, suggesting an inhibitory effect on hair growth. We show that PGD2 inhibits hair growth in explanted human hair follicles and when applied topically to mice. Hair growth inhibition requires the PGD2 receptor G protein (heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide)–coupled receptor 44 (GPR44), but not the PGD2 receptor 1 (PTGDR). Furthermore, we find that a transgenic mouse, K14-Ptgs2, which targets prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 expression to the skin, demonstrates elevated levels of PGD2 in the skin and develops alopecia, follicular miniaturization, and sebaceous gland hyperplasia, which are all hallmarks of human AGA. These results define PGD2 as an inhibitor of hair growth in AGA and suggest the PGD2-GPR44 pathway as a potential target for treatment. PMID:22440736

  2. Prostaglandin E2 regulates Th17 cell differentiation and function through cyclic AMP and EP2/EP4 receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Boniface, Katia; Bak-Jensen, Kristian S; Li, Ying; Blumenschein, Wendy M; McGeachy, Mandy J; McClanahan, Terrill K; McKenzie, Brent S; Kastelein, Robert A; Cua, Daniel J; de Waal Malefyt, René

    2009-03-16

    Prostaglandins, particularly prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), play an important role during inflammation. This is exemplified by the clinical use of cyclooxygenase 2 inhibitors, which interfere with PGE2 synthesis, as effective antiinflammatory drugs. Here, we show that PGE2 directly promotes differentiation and proinflammatory functions of human and murine IL-17-producing T helper (Th17) cells. In human purified naive T cells, PGE2 acts via prostaglandin receptor EP2- and EP4-mediated signaling and cyclic AMP pathways to up-regulate IL-23 and IL-1 receptor expression. Furthermore, PGE2 synergizes with IL-1beta and IL-23 to drive retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor (ROR)-gammat, IL-17, IL-17F, CCL20, and CCR6 expression, which is consistent with the reported Th17 phenotype. While enhancing Th17 cytokine expression mainly through EP2, PGE2 differentially regulates interferon (IFN)-gamma production and inhibits production of the antiinflammatory cytokine IL-10 in Th17 cells predominantly through EP4. Furthermore, PGE2 is required for IL-17 production in the presence of antigen-presenting cells. Hence, the combination of inflammatory cytokines and noncytokine immunomodulators, such as PGE2, during differentiation and activation determines the ultimate phenotype of Th17 cells. These findings, together with the altered IL-12/IL-23 balance induced by PGE2 in dendritic cells, further highlight the crucial role of the inflammatory microenvironment in Th17 cell development and regulation.

  3. The Prostaglandin Transporter: Eicosanoid Reuptake, Control of Signaling, and Development of High-Affinity Inhibitors as Drug Candidates

    PubMed Central

    Schuster, Victor L.; Chi, Yuling; Lu, Run

    2015-01-01

    We discovered the prostaglandin transporter (PGT) and cloned the human cDNA and gene. PGT transports extracellular prostaglandins (PGs) into the cytoplasm for enzymatic inactivation. PGT knockout mice have elevated prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and neonatal patent ductus arteriosus, which reflects PGT's control over PGE2 signaling at EP1/EP4 cell-surface receptors. Interestingly, rescued PGT knockout pups have a nearly normal phenotype, as do human PGT nulls. Given the benign phenotype of PGT genetic nulls, and because PGs are useful medicines, we have approached PGT as a drug target. Triazine library screening yielded a lead compound of inhibitory constant 50% (IC50) = 3.7 μM, which we developed into a better inhibitor of IC50 378 nM. Further structural improvements have yielded 26 rationally designed derivatives with IC50 < 100 nM. The therapeutic approach of increasing endogenous PGs by inhibiting PGT offers promise in diseases such as pulmonary hypertension and obesity. PMID:26330684

  4. Biochemistry of prostaglandin endoperoxide H synthase-1 and synthase-2 and their differential susceptibility to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Smith, W L; DeWitt, D L

    1995-05-01

    The principal pharmacological effects of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are due to their ability to inhibit prostaglandin synthesis. NSAIDs block the cyclooxygenase activities of the closely related PGH synthase-1 and PGH synthase-2 (PGHS-1 and PGHS-2) isozymes. NSAIDs are therapeutically useful due to their analgesic, anti-pyretic, anti-inflammatory, and anti-thrombogenic properties. Major side-effects of NSAIDs include their ulcerogenic and nephrotoxic activities. All clinically approved NSAIDs in general use today inhibit both PGHS-1 and PGHS-2. Recently, inhibitors have been identified that are selective toward PGHS-2 and that have potent analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities with minimal ulcerogenic activity. If the new PGHS-2 selective NSAIDs can effectively inhibit inflammatory prostaglandin synthesis by PGHS-2, without inhibiting PGHS-1 prostaglandin synthesis required to regulate sodium and water resorption, and renal blood flow, it is likely that these new drugs will also have significantly less renal toxicity than present-day NSAIDs. In this article, the mechanisms of actions of NSAIDs primarily at the biochemical level, including the reactions catalyzed by PGHSs, will be discussed. In addition, the biochemical properties of these isozymes, and the differential regulation of the PGHS-1 and PGHS-2 genes, will be examined. PMID:7631045

  5. Glomerular and tubular adaptive responses to acute nephron loss in the rat. Effect of prostaglandin synthesis inhibition.

    PubMed Central

    Pelayo, J C; Shanley, P F

    1990-01-01

    These studies, using in vivo micropuncture techniques in the Munich-Wistar rat, document the magnitude of changes in glomerular and tubular function and structure 24 h after approximately 75% nephron loss (Nx) and compared these results with those obtained in sham-operated rats. The contribution of either nephron hypertrophy or renal prostaglandin to these adjustments in nephron function was also explored. After acute Nx, single nephron GFR (SNGFR) was increased, on average by approximately 30%, due primarily to glomerular hyperperfusion and hypertension. The approximately 45% reduction in preglomerular and the constancy in postglomerular vascular resistances was entirely responsible for these adaptations. Although increases in fluid reabsorption in proximal convoluted tubules correlated closely with increase in SNGFR, the fractional fluid reabsorption between late proximal and early distal tubular segments was depressed. Nephron hypertrophy could not be substantiated based on either measurements of protein content in renal tissue homogenates or morphometric analysis of proximal convoluted tubules. However, acute Nx was associated with increased urinary excretory rates per functional nephron for 6-keto-PGF1 alpha and TXB2. Prostaglandin synthesis inhibition did not affect function in control nephrons, but this maneuver was associated with normalization of glomerular and tubular function in remnant nephrons. The results suggest that enhanced synthesis of cyclooxygenase-dependent products is one of the earliest responses to Nx, and even before hypertrophy the pathophysiologic effects of prostaglandin may be important contributors to the adaptations in remnant nephron function. PMID:1693376

  6. What monitor can replace the cathode-ray tube for visual stimulation to elicit multifocal electroretinograms?

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Celso Soiti; Shinoda, Kei; Matsumoto, Harue; Seki, Keisuke; Nagasaka, Eiichiro; Iwata, Takeshi; Mizota, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    To compare a conventional cathode-ray tube (CRT) screen to organic light-emitting diode (OLED) and liquid crystal display (LCD) screens as visual stimulators to elicit multifocal electroretinograms (mfERGs), mfERGs were recorded from seven eyes of seven healthy volunteers (21 ± 2 years). The mfERGs elicited by a conventional CRT screen (S710, Compaq Computer Co.) were compared to those elicited by a studio-grade master OLED monitor (PVM-1741, Sony, Japan) and a conventional LCD (S1721, Flexscan, Eizo Nanao Corp., Japan). The luminance changes of each monitor were measured with a photodiode. CRT, OLED, and LCD screens with a frame frequency of 60 Hz were studied. A hexagonal stimulus array with 61 stimulus elements was created on each monitor. The serial white stimuli of the OLED screen at 60 Hz did not fuse, and that of the LCD screens fused. The amplitudes of P1 and P2 of the first-order kernels of the mfERGs were not significantly different from those elicited by the CRT and OLED screens, and the P1 amplitude of the first-order kernel elicited by the LCD stimuli was significantly smaller than that elicited by the CRT in all the groups of the averaged hexagonal elements. The implicit times were approximately 10 ms longer in almost all components elicited by the LCD screen compared to those elicited by the CRT screen. The mfERGs elicited by monitors other than the CRT should be carefully interpreted, especially those elicited by LCD screens. The OLED had good performance, and we conclude that it can replace the CRT as a stimulator for mfERGs; however, a collection of normative data is recommended.

  7. A theoretical model of biochemical control engineering based on the relation between oestrogens/progestagens and prostaglandins.

    PubMed

    van der Veen, P H E

    2015-06-01

    A biological complex organism is involuntarily guided from all sides by measure and regulation systems. The human being is such a complex organism. Many cyclical processes are simultaneously at work, making it unclear how and why which process takes place at which moment. Noticeable examples are the 28-day menstrual cycle and the 40-week pregnancy. The time of activation in the middle of the menstrual is fairly clear. Hormonal changes also occur in this period. Why the hormonal changes occur, and what their relationship is with the activation of the processes is unclear. That is also the case during pregnancies. What is it that determines that a pregnancy should last an average of 40 weeks? What causes the changes in a complicated pregnancy? What are those changes? Prostaglandin concentrations have been found to have some relationship with these changes, but the activation of these changes and how to examine them is unknown. Using an example from practical experience, this article illustrates what Horrobin and Manku already reported in 1977, namely, the properties of prostaglandin E1 and 6-keto pgF1α: reversal effect with elevated concentration. The properties described is exceptionally suitable for the time of activation in a biochemically regulated measure and regulation system. These properties can help explain the occurrence of physiological cycles. The known electronic saw-tooth wave has a biochemical analogue with this. This paper describes the presumed relationship between hormones and the accompanying prostaglandins with the hormone effects based on what is known regarding their concentrations progress. This relationship reveals the practical consequences of the experimentally found sensitivity of biochemical effects with regard to the accompanying prostaglandins. This paper shows how the theoretical relationship between effects of oestrogens and progestagens result in a curve that comprise observable aspects of the Basal Body Temperature Curve. The

  8. Efficiency of oestrous synchronization by GnRH, prostaglandins and socio-sexual cues in the North African Maure goats.

    PubMed

    Rekik, M; Ben Othmane, H; Lassoued, N; Sakly, C

    2014-06-01

    This study aims to develop at different seasons, for local North African Maure goats, synchronizing protocols simultaneously to the standard 'S' protocol using progestagens in association with prostaglandins and gonadotropin. In late May, 40 goats were assigned to either the 'S' protocol or to a protocol where oestrus and ovulation were induced by the buck effect in single-injection progesterone-treated goats and provoking early luteolysis using prostaglandin 9 days after exposure to bucks 'B'. During the 72 h after the treatments ended, 15 and 5 goats expressed oestrus in the 'S' and 'B' protocols (p < 0.01). Mean time to oestrus was shorter for 'S' than for 'B' goats. Ovulation rate averaged 2.1 ± 0.22 and 1.60 ± 0.35 for, respectively, 'S' and 'B' goats (p > 0.05). During mid-September, 60 goats were assigned to either 'S' treatment, 'PGF' treatment where oestrus and ovulation were synchronized using two injections of prostaglandin 11 days apart or to 'GnRH' treatment where the goats had their oestrus and ovulation synchronized with a GnRH (day 0)-prostaglandin (day 6)-GnRH (day 9) sequence. More 'S' goats were detected in oestrus over the 96-h period after the end of the treatments (88.8, 73.7 and 55% in 'S', 'PGF' and 'GnRH' treatments, respectively; p < 0.05). Mean ovulation rates were 2.3 ± 0.27, 1.33 ± 0.27 and 1.33 ± 0.27 for, respectively, 'S', 'PGF' and 'GnRH' goats (p < 0.001). Despite a similar ovulatory response to 'S' protocol, efficiency of prostaglandin and GnRH-based treatments should be tested in mid-breeding season.

  9. Involvement of prostaglandins and histamine in radiation-induced temperature responses in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kandasamy, S.B.; Hunt, W.A. )

    1990-01-01

    Exposure of rats to 1-15 Gy of gamma radiation induced hyperthermia, whereas exposure to 20-150 Gy produced hypothermia. Since radiation exposure induced the release of prostaglandins (PGs) and histamine, the role of PGs and histamine in radiation-induced temperature changes was examined. Radiation-induced hyper- and hypothermia were antagonized by pretreatment with indomethacin, a cyclooxygenase inhibitor. Intracerebroventricular administration of PGE2 and PGD2 induced hyper- and hypothermia, respectively. Administration of SC-19220, a specific PGE2 antagonist, attenuated PGE2- and radiation-induced hyperthermia, but it did not antagonize PGD2- or radiation-induced hypothermia. Consistent with an apparent role of histamine in hypothermia, administration of disodium cromoglycate (a mast cell stabilizer), mepyramine (H1-receptor antagonist), or cimetidine (H2-receptor antagonist) attenuated PGD2- and radiation-induced hypothermia. These results suggest that radiation-induced hyperthermia is mediated via PGE2 and that radiation-induced hypothermia is mediated by another PG, possibly PGD2, via histamine.

  10. Regulation of cytoplasmic calcium: interactions between prostaglandins, prostacyclin, thromboxane A2, zinc, copper and taurine.

    PubMed

    Horrobin, D F; Manku, M S; Cunnane, S; Karmazyn, M; Morgan, R O; Ally, A I; Karmall, R A

    1978-02-01

    The regulation of cytoplasmic calcium is a key process in nerve tissue. Using a smooth muscle model we have shown that prostaglandin (PG) E2 probably regulates entry from extracellular fluid, whereas the release from intracellular stores depends on the interplay between thromboxane (TX) A2, PGEI and prostacyclin. Hormones and other agents interact with this system in the following ways: vasopressin, angiotensin and inositol mobilize arachidonic acid from membrane phospholipids and increase synthesis of PGE2 and TXA2, cortisol blocks this action. Prolactin and zinc mobilize dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid and increase synthesis of PGEI. These effects can be blocked by cortisol, lithium and taurine, three agents which on their own have no effect on basal PG production. Epileptogenic agents like penicillin and picrotoxin also stimulate PG synthesis, while diphenylhydantoin is a PG antagonist and diazepam is a TXA2 antagonist. The effects of all these agents occur at concentrations which are physiological in the case of the natural ones, and readily attained in human plasma in the case of the drgus. In view of recent evidence that calcium may be important in demyelination and considering the established role it plays in nerve conduction and synaptic transmission, we suggest that these observations may be of significance in understanding Friedreich's ataxia.

  11. Major urinary metabolites of 6-keto-prostaglandin F2α in mice.

    PubMed

    Kuklev, Dmitry V; Hankin, Joseph A; Uhlson, Charis L; Hong, Yu H; Murphy, Robert C; Smith, William L

    2013-07-01

    Western diets are enriched in omega-6 vs. omega-3 fatty acids, and a shift in this balance toward omega-3 fatty acids may have health benefits. There is limited information about the catabolism of 3-series prostaglandins (PG) formed from eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), a fish oil omega-3 fatty acid that becomes elevated in tissues following fish oil consumption. Quantification of appropriate urinary 3-series PG metabolites could be used for noninvasive measurement of omega-3 fatty acid tone. Here we describe the preparation of tritium- and deuterium-labeled 6-keto-PGF2α and their use in identifying urinary metabolites in mice using LC-MS/MS. The major 6-keto-PGF2α urinary metabolites included dinor-6-keto-PGF2α (~10%) and dinor-13,14-dihydro-6,15-diketo-PGF1α (~10%). These metabolites can arise only from the enzymatic conversion of EPA to the 3-series PGH endoperoxide by cyclooxygenases, then PGI3 by prostacyclin synthase and, finally, nonenzymatic hydrolysis to 6-keto-PGF2α. The 6-keto-PGF derivatives are not formed by free radical mechanisms that generate isoprostanes, and thus, these metabolites provide an unbiased marker for utilization of EPA by cyclooxygenases.

  12. Selective neutralization of prostaglandin E2 blocks inflammation, hyperalgesia, and interleukin 6 production in vivo

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    The role of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in the development of inflammatory symptoms and cytokine production was evaluated in vivo using a neutralizing anti-PGE2 monoclonal antibody 2B5. In carrageenan-induced paw inflammation, pretreatment of rats with 2B5 substantially prevented the development of tissue edema and hyperalgesia in affected paws. The antibody was shown to bind the majority of PGE2 produced at the inflammatory site. In adjuvant-induced arthritis, the therapeutic administration of 2B5 to arthritic rats substantially reversed edema in affected paws. Anti-PGE2 treatment also reduced paw levels of IL-6 RNA and serum IL-6 protein without modifying tumor necrosis factor RNA levels in the same tissue. In each model, the antiinflammatory efficacy of 2B5 was indistinguishable from that of the nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug indomethacin, which blocked the production of all PGs. These results indicate that PGE2 plays a major role in tissue edema, hyperalgesia, and IL-6 production at sites of inflammation, and they suggest that selective pharmacologic modulation of PGE2 synthesis or activity may provide a useful means of mitigating the symptoms of inflammatory disease. PMID:9064348

  13. Urinary Prostaglandin E2 Metabolite and Pancreatic Cancer Risk: Case-Control Study in Urban Shanghai

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jing; Wang, Jing; Du, Jinfeng; Xu, Hongli; Zhang, Wei; Ni, Quan-Xing; Yu, Herbert; Risch, Harvey A.; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gao, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer has been increasing in importance in Shanghai over the last four decades. The etiology of the disease is still unclear. Evidence suggests that the COX-2 pathway, an important component of inflammation, may be involved in the disease. We aimed to evaluate the association between urinary prostaglandin E2 metabolite (PGE-M) level and risk of pancreatic cancer. From a recent population-based case-control study in Shanghai, 200 pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cases and 200 gender- and age- frequency matched controls were selected for the present analysis. Urinary PGE-M was measured with a liquid chromatography/mass spectrometric assay. Adjusted unconditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). A positive association was observed between PGE-M leve and pancreatic cancer risk: OR = 1.63 (95% CI 1.01–2.63) for the third tertile compared to the first. Though the interactions were not statistically significant, the associations tended to be stronger among subjects with diabetes history (OR = 3.32; 95% CI 1.20–9.19) and higher meat intake (OR = 2.12; 95% CI 1.10–4.06). The result suggests that higher urinary PGE-M level may be associated with increased risk of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. PMID:25679523

  14. Pressor responses to centrally-administered prostaglandin E2 in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, H; Buñag, R D

    1981-01-01

    Blood pressure (BP) and heart rate became elevated when prostaglandin E2, (PGE2) was infused into the cerebral ventricles of awake and anesthetized rats. Frequency of sympathetic neural firing was also increased. While the magnitude of the pressor responses was larger in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) than in normotensive ones (NTRs), the accompanying increases in sympathetic nerve firing were not significantly different. Pressor effects were appreciable within 2 minutes after the start of th PGE2 infusion did not become maximal until 15 minutes later. By contrast, acceleration in sympathetic nerve firing was maximal within 2 minutes and then dwindled or remained stationary thereafter. Removal of sympathetic vasomotor tone by cervical section of the spinal cord abolished early phases without affecting subsequent peaks of the pressor response. The overall height of the pressor responses in hypophysectomized NTRs was half that in sham-operated controls. These results suggest that GPE2 acts centrally to elevate BP by increasing not only the sympathetic discharge but perhaps also the secretion of hypophysial hormones, such a vasopressin. In light of previous studies showing that SHRs secrete mor vasopressin, it was considered possible that their enhanced pressor responsiveness to PGEs could result from a greater release o endogenous vasopressin.

  15. Antagonism of the prostaglandin E receptor EP4 inhibits metastasis and enhances NK function.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Namita; Ma, Xinrong; Holt, Dawn; Goloubeva, Olga; Ostrand-Rosenberg, Suzanne; Fulton, Amy M

    2009-09-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is associated with aggressive breast cancers. The COX-2 product prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) acts through four G-protein-coupled receptors designated EP1-4. Malignant and immortalized normal mammary epithelial cell lines express all four EP. The EP4 antagonist AH23848 reduced the ability of tumor cells to colonize the lungs or to spontaneously metastasize from the mammary gland. EP4 gene silencing by shRNA also reduced the ability of mammary tumor cells to metastasize. Metastasis inhibition was lost in mice lacking either functional Natural Killer (NK) cells or interferon-gamma. EP4 antagonism inhibited MHC class I expression resulting in enhanced ability of NK cells to lyse mammary tumor target cells. These studies support the hypothesis that EP4 receptor antagonists reduce metastatic potential by facilitating NK-mediated tumor cell killing and that therapeutic targeting of EP4 may be an alternative approach to the use of COX inhibitors to limit metastatic disease.

  16. The role of iron in prostaglandin synthesis: ferrous iron mediated oxidation of arachidonic acid.

    PubMed

    Rao, G H; Gerrard, J M; Eaton, J W; White, J G

    1978-07-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA) is the essential substrate for production of platelet endoperoxides and thromboxanes. Iron or heme is an essential cofactor for the peroxidase, lipoxygenase and cyclo-oxygenase enzymes involved in formation of these products. The present study has examined the direct interactions between iron and arachidonic acid. Iron caused the oxidation of AA into more polar products which could be detected by UV absorbtion at 232 nM or the thiobarbituric acid (TBA) reaction. High pressure liquid chromatography, chem-ionization and electron-impact mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy suggest that the major product was a hydroperoxide of AA. Ferrous iron (Fe++) and oxygen were absolute requirements. Fe++ was converted to the ferric iron (Fe+++) state during oxidation of AA, but Fe+++ could not substitute for Fe++. No other enzymes, cofactors or ions were involved. Conversion of AA to a hydroperoxide by Fe++ was inhibited by the antioxidant, 2, (3)-Tert-butyl-4-hydroxyanisole, the radical scavenger, nitroblue tetrazolium, and iron chelating agents, including EDTA, imidazole and dihydroxybenzoic acid. The reaction was not affected by superoxide dismutase, catalase or aspirin. These findings and preliminary studies of the Fe++ induced oxidation product of AA as a substrate for prostaglandin synthesis and inhibitor of prostacyclin production indicate the critical role of Fe++ in AA activation.

  17. alpha-Lipoic acid inhibits inflammatory bone resorption by suppressing prostaglandin E2 synthesis.

    PubMed

    Ha, Hyunil; Lee, Jong-Ho; Kim, Ha-Neui; Kim, Hyun-Man; Kwak, Han Bok; Lee, Seungbok; Kim, Hong-Hee; Lee, Zang Hee

    2006-01-01

    alpha-Lipoic acid (LA) has been intensely investigated as a therapeutic agent for several pathological conditions, including diabetic polyneuropathy. In the present study, we examined the effects of LA on osteoclastic bone loss associated with inflammation. LA significantly inhibited IL-1-induced osteoclast formation in cocultures of mouse osteoblasts and bone marrow cells, but LA had only a marginal effect on osteoclastogenesis from bone marrow macrophages induced by receptor activator of NF-kappaB ligand (RANKL). LA inhibited both the sustained up-regulation of RANKL expression and the production of PGE2 induced by IL-1 in osteoblasts. In addition, treatment with either prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) or RANKL rescued IL-1-induced osteoclast formation inhibited by LA or NS398, a specific cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor, in cocultures. LA blocked IL-1-induced PGE2 production even in the presence of arachidonic acid, without affecting the expression of COX-2 and membrane-bound PGE2 synthase. Dihydrolipoic acid (the reduced form of LA), but not LA, attenuated recombinant COX-2 activity in vitro. LA also inhibited osteoclast formation and bone loss induced by IL-1 and LPS in mice. Our results suggest that the reduced form of LA inhibits COX-2 activity, PGE2 production, and sustained RANKL expression, thereby inhibiting osteoclast formation and bone loss in inflammatory conditions.

  18. Gliotransmission by Prostaglandin E2: A Prerequisite for GnRH Neuronal Function?

    PubMed Central

    Clasadonte, Jerome; Sharif, Ariane; Baroncini, Marc; Prevot, Vincent

    2011-01-01

    Over the past four decades it has become clear that prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), a phospholipid-derived signaling molecule, plays a fundamental role in modulating the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neuroendocrine system and in shaping the hypothalamus. In this review, after a brief historical overview, we highlight studies revealing that PGE2 released by glial cells such as astrocytes and tanycytes is intimately involved in the active control of GnRH neuronal activity and neurosecretion. Recent evidence suggests that hypothalamic astrocytes surrounding GnRH neuronal cell bodies may respond to neuronal activity with an activation of the erbB receptor tyrosine kinase signaling, triggering the release of PGE2 as a chemical transmitter from the glia themselves, and, in turn, leading to the feedback regulation of GnRH neuronal activity. At the GnRH neurohemal junction, in the median eminence of the hypothalamus, PGE2 is released by tanycytes in response to cell–cell signaling initiated by glial cells and vascular endothelial cells. Upon its release, PGE2 causes the retraction of the tanycyte end-feet enwrapping the GnRH nerve terminals, enabling them to approach the adjacent pericapillary space and thus likely facilitating neurohormone diffusion from these nerve terminals into the pituitary portal blood. In view of these new insights, we suggest that synaptically associated astrocytes and perijunctional tanycytes are integral modulatory elements of GnRH neuronal function at the cell soma/dendrite and nerve terminal levels, respectively. PMID:22649391

  19. Prostaglandin-induced abortion in swine: endocrine changes and influence on subsequent reproductive activity.

    PubMed

    Pressing, A L; Dial, G D; Stroud, C M; Almond, G W; Robison, O W

    1987-01-01

    Gilts were treated during midgestation with prostaglandin (PG) F to study the efficacy of different treatment regimens on induction of abortion and to determine the adverse consequences of PGF-induced abortion in swine. In study 1, pregnant purebred Duroc gilts (60 to 90 days of gestation) were given (IM) 500 micrograms of cloprostenol (n = 12), 20 mg of dinoprost tromethamine (n = 11), or 10 mg of dinoprost tromethamine repeated 12 hours later by an additional 10 mg of dinoprost tromethamine (n = 11). The percentage of gilts that aborted and percentage of aborted gilts that returned to estrus for each treatment group were as follows: cloprostenol, 91.7% and 100%, respectively; 20 mg of dinoprost tromethamine, 36.4% and 25.0%, respectively; and 10 + 10 mg of dinoprost tromethamine, 100% and 90.9%, respectively. Treatment with cloprostenol and with 10 + 10 mg of dinoprost tromethamine caused more gilts to abort (P less than 0.01) than did treatment with 20 mg of dinoprost tromethamine. Gilts that did not abort were given a second treatment with 10 + 10 mg of dinoprost tromethamine. When the abortions by gilts initially treated with 500 micrograms of cloprostenol or 10 + 10 mg of dinoprost tromethamine were combined with those re-treated with 10 + 10 mg of dinoprost tromethamine, 32 of 33 (97.0%) gilts aborted, and 30 of the 32 (93.8%) aborted gilts returned to estrus.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Prostaglandin E2 and Connexin 43 crosstalk in the osteogenesis induced by extracorporeal shockwave.

    PubMed

    Chen, Youbin; Xu, Jiankun; Liao, Haojie; Ma, Zebin; Zhang, Yuantao; Chen, Hongjiang; Huang, Zhonglian; Hu, Jun

    2016-09-01

    As a type of mechanical stimulation, extracorporeal shockwave (ESW) has been widely used in the clinic to treat bone fracture delayed union and non-unions. A large number of studies have shown beneficial effects of ESW in promoting fracture healing by inducing bone regeneration; however, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. ESW has been shown to induce the production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), which is essential for gap junction intercellular communication in response to mechanical stress. Among the 19 known gap junction subunits, connexin43 (Cx43) is the most prevalent for mediating the response of mechanical stress. However, to our knowledge, the effect of ESW on Cx43 expression has not been reported before. Herein, we propose that a crosstalk between PGE2 and Cx43 is involved in the enhancement of osteogenesis induced by ESW. We review the currently available data to propose an unrevealed, but important mechanism via which ESW treatment affects osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells.

  1. Induction of prostaglandin E(2) and interleukin-6 in gingival fibroblasts by oral biofilms.

    PubMed

    Belibasakis, Georgios N; Guggenheim, Bernhard

    2011-12-01

    Polymicrobial oral biofilms attaching on tooth surfaces can trigger inflammatory responses by the neighbouring tooth-supporting periodontal tissues. An excessive inflammatory response can cause destruction of the periodontal tissues, including the alveolar bone, thus resulting in periodontitis. Mediators of inflammation, such as prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2) ) and interleukin-6, are primary regulators of alveolar bone destruction in periodontitis. The present study aimed to comparatively investigate the effects of in vitro supragingival and subgingival biofilms, on the regulation of PGE(2) and interleukin-6 in human gingival fibroblasts. The cells were challenged with culture supernatants of the two biofilms for 6 h. Cyclo-oxygenase (COX)-2, an enzyme responsible for the conversion of PGE(2) , and interleukin-6 gene expression were analysed by quantitative real-time PCR. The production of PGE(2) and interleukin-6 by the cells was analysed by ELISA. While the supragingival biofilm did not induce significant changes, the subgingival biofilm caused an 8.6- and 2.9-fold enhancement of COX-2 and interleukin-6 gene expression, respectively, and a 72.5- and 1.5-fold enhancement of PGE(2) and interleukin-6 production, respectively. In conclusion, subgingival biofilms are potent inducers of PGE(2) in gingival fibroblasts, providing further mechanistic insights into the association of subgingival biofilms with bone resorption periodontitis.

  2. Epidural blood flow during prostaglandin E1 or trimethaphan induced hypotension.

    PubMed

    Abe, K; Kakiuchi, M; Shimada, Y

    1993-11-01

    To evaluate the effect of prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) or trimethaphan (TMP) induced hypotension on epidural blood flow (EBF) during spinal surgery, EBF was measured using the heat clearance method in 30 patients who underwent postero-lateral interbody fusion under isoflurane anaesthesia. An initial dose of 0.1 microgram.kg-1.min-1 of PGE1 (15 patients), or 10 micrograms.kg-1.min-1 of TMP (15 patients) was administered intravenously after the dural opening and the dose was adjusted to maintain the mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) at about 60 mmHg. The hypotensive drug was discontinued at the completion of the operative procedure. After starting PGE1 or TMP, MAP and rate pressure product (RPP) decreased significantly compared with preinfusion values (P < 0.01), and the degree of hypotension due to PGE1 remained constant until 60 min after its discontinuation. Heart rate (HR) did not change in either group. EBFF did not change during PGE1 infusion whereas in the TMP group, EBF decreased significantly at 30 and 60 min after the start of TMP (preinfusion: 45.9 +/- 13.9 ml/100g/min. 30 min: 32.3 +/- 9.9 ml/100 g/min (P < 0.05). 60 min: 30 +/- 7.5 ml/100 g/min (P < 0.05)). These results suggest that PGE1 may be preferable to TMP for hypotensive anaesthesia in spinal surgery because TMP decreased EBF.

  3. Effect of carprofen and indomethacin on gastric function, mucosal integrity and generation of prostaglandins in men.

    PubMed

    Konturek, S J; Kwiecien, N; Obtulowicz, W; Kiec-Dembinska, A; Polanski, M; Kopp, B; Sito, E; Oleksy, J

    1982-12-01

    The effects of indomethacin and carprofen on gastric secretion, serum gastrin level, electropotential difference, gastric microbleeding, DNA loss, mucosal blood flow and the production of mucosal prostaglandins (PGs) were investigated in a double-blind cross-over study in 18 healthy volunteers after one week of treatment. We did not observe any significant changes in basal and pentagastrin-stimulated gastric secretory parameters, serum gastrin level and electro-potential difference before and after treatment with these drugs. Mucosal blood flow was significantly reduced following indomethacin treatment. The most pronounced differences were found in endoscopic score studies of gastric mucosa. After indomethacin all subjects developed multiple erosions, submucosal haemorrhages, and half of them showed diffuse antral erythema. These effects were accompanied by a significant increase in both gastric microbleeding and DNA loss, and significant decrease in the production of PGE2. We concluded that carprofen, in contrast to indomethacin, did not alter gastric mucosal integrity and production of PGE2. This study indicates that the gastric mucosal damage by non-steroid anti-inflammatory compounds (NOSAC) depends upon the suppression of PGE2 biosynthesis, and that endogenous PGE2 is involved in the control of mucosal blood flow and mucosal integrity.

  4. [The effect of prostaglandin E1 on body temperature, catecholamines and stress hormones during prolonged surgery].

    PubMed

    Okuda, M; Amano, H; Furuhashi, K; Nakai, Y

    1996-01-01

    The effects of prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) on body temperature, catecholamines and stress hormones were evaluated in 10 patients undergoing elective prolonged surgery over 12 hours. PGE1 (0.03 microgram.kg-1.min-1) was administered in 5 patients and was not administered in 5 patients. Deep skin-surface temperature gradients were 5.1 +/- 2.3 degrees C in PGE1 non-administered group and 0.8 +/- 0.9 degree C in PGE1 administered group (P < 0.05). Pharyngeal-skin surface temperature gradients were 8.8 +/- 2.1 degrees C in PGE1 non-administered group and 1.5 +/- 1.5 degrees C in PGE1 administered group (P < 0.05). There were no significant differences between the two groups in respects to catecholamines, stress hormones, lactate level and blood sugar. PGE1 0.03 microgram.kg-1.min-1 is effective in maintaining peripheral circulation without causing body temperature changes during prolonged surgery.

  5. Regulation of prostaglandin E{sub 2} synthesis after brain irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Amy H.; Olschowka, John A.; Williams, Jacqueline P.; Okunieff, Paul; O'Banion, M. Kerry . E-mail: kerry_obanion@urmc.rochester.edu

    2005-05-01

    Purpose: A local tissue reaction, termed neuroinflammation, occurs after irradiation of brain tissue. Previous work suggested that cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 activity was important for changes in gene expression associated with neuroinflammation as well as increased prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}) levels seen after radiation treatment. Methods and materials: To begin to determine the contributions of other enzymes involved in PGE{sub 2} production, we examined protein levels of COX-1 and COX-2 as well as 2 PGE synthases (membrane and cytosolic PGES) 4 h after 35 Gy single dose irradiation to the brains of C3HeN mice. We also evaluated the effects of specific COX inhibitors on PGE{sub 2} production and PGES expression. Results: As expected, COX-2 expression increased after radiation exposure. Brain irradiation also increased tissue protein levels for both PGES isoforms. Specific COX-2 inhibition with NS398 lowered brain PGE{sub 2} levels by about 60%. Surprisingly, COX-1 inhibition with SC560 completely prevented the elevation of PGE{sub 2} seen after irradiation. Interestingly, NS398 reduced the membrane-associated PGES isoform, whereas SC560 treatment lowered cytosolic isoform levels below those seen in unirradiated controls. Conclusions: Taken together, these data indicate that both cyclooxygenases contribute to PGE{sub 2} production in irradiated brain and reveal dependence of PGES isoforms expression on specific cyclooxygenase activities.

  6. Prostaglandins in the perilymph of guinea pig with type II collagen induced ear diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, T.; Chiang, T.; Kitano, H.; Sudo, N.; Kim, S.Y.; Ha, S.; Woo, V.; Wolf, B.; Floyd, R.; Yoo, T.J.

    1986-03-01

    The authors have studied the prostaglandins (PGs) in the perilymph from guinea pig with type II collagen induced autoimmune ear disease. Hartly guinea pigs were immunized with type II collagen in CFA and auditory brain stem responses (ABR) were measured at 2, 3, 4, and 6 months after initial immunization perilymph was obtained and the levels of PGE2 and 6 keto-PGFl..cap alpha.. were measured by radioimmunoassays. Temporal bones were examined for the histopathologic changes. Immunized guinea pigs showed the evidence of hearing loss by ABR. The temporal bones showed the following changes: spiral ganglia degeneration, mild to moderate degree of degeneration in organ of Corti, infrequent very mild endolymphatic hydrops and labrynthitis. The perilymph from immunized animals contained about 5 times more PGE2 and about 3 times more 6 keto-PGFl..cap alpha.. than control animals. However, between these two groups, there was no difference in the CSF and sera levels of PGE2 and 6 keto-PGFl..cap alpha... Thus, this study suggests that these inflammatory mediators might be involved in the pathogenesis of collagen induced autoimmune inner ear disease.

  7. Prostaglandin E1 decreases the low-density-lipoprotein entry into rabbit arterial wall.

    PubMed Central

    Sinzinger, H.; Virgolini, I.; Lupattelli, G.; Molinari, E.; Gerakakis, A.; Angelberger, P.

    1991-01-01

    1. In 72 male rabbits fed a 1% cholesterol supplemented diet the effect of a 4 weeks daily infusion of prostaglandin E1 (PGE1, 20 micrograms kg-1 min-1 over 2 h) on [125I]-low density lipoprotein (LDL) accumulation (10 microCi; 0.5 mg protein ml-1) was examined versus sham-treatment after removal of the endothelium of the abdominal aorta by a Fogarthy catheter. 2. The uptake of [125I]-LDL was significantly (P less than 0.01) higher in endothelium-free aortic segments (showing the highest peak maximum at around 12 h after 125I-injection) as compared to aortic segments with endothelium intact (showing the lowest uptake of [125I]-LDL with the peak maximum at 48 h, last control time). Segments with the endothelium restored showed a similar LDL-retention curve to segments with endothelium however, being again significantly (P less than 0.01) higher. 3. PGE1-treatment caused reduction in LDL-accumulation, being significantly (P less than 0.001) pronounced in segments without endothelium and in segments with endothelium restored. 4. The findings indicate a beneficial effect of PGE1 in lipid metabolism by decreasing the LDL-influx into the arterial wall in-vivo. PMID:1933127

  8. Prognostic Value of Prostaglandin-endoperoxide Synthase 2 Polymorphisms in Prostate Cancer Recurrence after Radical Prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Cheng-Hsueh; Pao, Jiunn-Bey; Lu, Te-Ling; Lee, Hong-Zin; Lee, Yung-Chin; Liu, Chia-Chu; Huang, Chao-Yuan; Lin, Victor C.; Yu, Chia-Cheng; Yin, Hsin-Ling; Huang, Shu-Pin; Bao, Bo-Ying

    2016-01-01

    Backgroud: Increasing evidence suggests the involvement of chronic inflammation in the progression of prostate cancer, and prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (PTGS2), also known as cyclooxygenase-2, catalyzes the rate-limiting steps of the pathway. We hypothesized that genetic variants of PTGS2 can influence the outcome of prostate cancer patients. Methods: We genotyped five haplotype-tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to detect common genetic variations across the PTGS2 region in 458 prostate cancer patients treated with radical prostatectomy. Results: One SNP, rs4648302, was associated with disease recurrence. Five-year recurrence-free survival rate increased according to the number of variant alleles inherited (55.6%, 70.7%, and 100.0% for patients with different genotypes; P = 0.037), and the effect was maintained in multivariable analysis. Public dataset analyses also suggested that PTGS2 expression was correlated with prostate cancer prognosis. Conclusion: Our results indicated that PTGS2 could be a potential prognostic marker to improve the prediction of disease recurrence in prostate cancer patients. PMID:27647999

  9. Prostaglandin I2 Signaling Drives Th17 Differentiation and Exacerbates Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Weisong; Dowell, Dustin R.; Huckabee, Matthew M.; Newcomb, Dawn C.; Boswell, Madison G.; Goleniewska, Kasia; Lotz, Matthew T.; Toki, Shinji; Yin, Huiyong; Yao, Songyi; Natarajan, Chandramohan; Wu, Pingsheng; Sriram, Subramaniam; Breyer, Richard M.; FitzGerald, Garret A.; Peebles, R. Stokes

    2012-01-01

    Background Prostaglandin I2 (PGI2), a lipid mediator currently used in treatment of human disease, is a critical regulator of adaptive immune responses. Although PGI2 signaling suppressed Th1 and Th2 immune responses, the role of PGI2 in Th17 differentiation is not known. Methodology/Principal Findings In mouse CD4+CD62L+ naïve T cell culture, the PGI2 analogs iloprost and cicaprost increased IL-17A and IL-22 protein production and Th17 differentiation in vitro. This effect was augmented by IL-23 and was dependent on PGI2 receptor IP signaling. In mouse bone marrow-derived CD11c+ dendritic cells (BMDCs), PGI2 analogs increased the ratio of IL-23/IL-12, which is correlated with increased ability of BMDCs to stimulate naïve T cells for IL-17A production. Moreover, IP knockout mice had delayed onset of a Th17-associated neurological disease, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), and reduced infiltration of IL-17A-expressing mononuclear cells in the spinal cords compared to wild type mice. These results suggest that PGI2 promotes in vivo Th17 responses. Conclusion The preferential stimulation of Th17 differentiation by IP signaling may have important clinical implications as PGI2 and its analogs are commonly used to treat human pulmonary hypertension. PMID:22590492

  10. Cancer-associated immunodeficiency and dendritic cell abnormalities mediated by the prostaglandin EP2 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Li; Yamagata, Noboru; Yadav, Rajwardhan; Brandon, Suzanne; Courtney, Regina L.; Morrow, Jason D.; Shyr, Yu; Boothby, Mark; Joyce, Sebastian; Carbone, David P.; Breyer, Richard M.

    2003-01-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), a major COX metabolite, plays important roles in several facets of tumor biology. We characterized the contribution of the PGE2 EP2 receptor to cancer-associated immune deficiency using EP2–/– mice. EP2–/– mice exhibited significantly attenuated tumor growth and longer survival times when challenged with MC26 or Lewis lung carcinoma cell lines as compared with their wild-type littermates. While no differences in T cell function were observed, PGE2 suppressed differentiation of DCs from wild-type bone marrow progenitors, whereas EP2-null cells were refractory to this effect. Stimulation of cells in mixed lymphocyte reactions by wild-type DCs was suppressed by treatment with PGE2, while EP2–/–-derived DCs were resistant to this effect. In vivo, DCs, CD4+, and CD8+ T cells were significantly more abundant in draining lymph nodes of tumor-bearing EP2–/– mice than in tumor-bearing wild-type mice, and a significant antitumor cytotoxic T lymphocyte response could be observed only in the EP2–/– animals. Our data demonstrate an important role for the EP2 receptor in PGE2-induced inhibition of DC differentiation and function and the diminished antitumor cellular immune responses in vivo. PMID:12618527

  11. Acute ozone exposure increases plasma prostaglandin F2 alpha in ozone-sensitive human subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Schelegle, E.S.; Adams, W.C.; Giri, S.N.; Siefkin, A.D.

    1989-07-01

    Twenty O/sub 3/-sensitive and /sup 2/O O/sub 3/-nonsensitive subjects participated in a study to investigate the effects of disparate O/sub 3/ sensitivity on plasma prostaglandin F2 alpha responses consequent to exposure to ambient O3 concentrations. Subjects were selected from a pool of 75 normal healthy college-aged males who had been previously exposed to 0.35 ppm O3 for 1 h at an exercising VE of 60 L/min. The selection criterion used was the observed decrement in FEV1 after the O/sub 3/ exposure: O/sub 3/-sensitive, FEV1 decrement greater than 24%; O/sub 3/-nonsensitive, FEV1 decrement less than 11%. Each subject was exposed to filtered air and to 0.20 and 0.35 ppm O/sub 3/ for 80 min while exercising at a VE of 50 L/min. These experimental protocols were divided into two 40-min sessions separated by a period of 4 to 10 min. PGF2 alpha, FVC, FEV1, and FEF25-75 were evaluated before, during, and after each protocol. SGaw and Vtg were measured before and after each protocol. Plasma PGF2 alpha was significantly increased in the O/sub 3/-sensitive group during and after the 0.35-ppm O/sub 3/ exposure.

  12. Alterations in locomotor activity induced by radioprotective doses of 16,16-dimethyl prostaglandin E2

    SciTech Connect

    Landauer, M.R.; Walden, T.L.; Davis, H.D.; Dominitz, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    16,16-Dimethyl prostaglandin E2 (DiPGE2) is an effective radioprotectant when administered before irradiation. A notable side effect of this compound is sedation. In separate experiments, the dose-response determinations of the time course of locomotor activity and 30-day survival after 10 Gy gamma irradiation (LD100) were made. Adult male CD2F1 mice were injected subcutaneously with vehicle or DiPGE2 in doses ranging from 0.01 to 40 micrograms per mouse. A dose of 0.01 micrograms did not result in alterations in locomotor behaviour or enhance survival. Doses greater than 1 microgram produced ataxia and enhanced radiation survival in a dose-dependent fashion. Full recovery of locomotor activity did not occur until 6 and 30 hr after injection for the 10 microgram and 40 microgram groups, respectively. Radioprotection was observed when DiPGE2 was administered preirradiation but not postirradiation. Doses of 1 and 10 micrograms were maximally effective as a radioprotectant if injected 5 min prior to irradiation (80%-90% survival). A dose of 40 micrograms resulted in 100% survival when injected 5-30 min before irradiation. Therefore, increasing doses of DiPGE2 resulted in an enhanced effectiveness as a radioprotectant. However, the doses that were the most radioprotective were also the most debilitating to the animal.

  13. Bisabolol-induced gastroprotection against acute gastric lesions: role of prostaglandins, nitric oxide, and KATP+ channels.

    PubMed

    Bezerra, S B; Leal, L K A M; Nogueira, N A P; Pinto, N A N; Campos, A R

    2009-12-01

    The effects of Matricaria recutita and alpha-bisabolol, a bioactive component from Chamomile species, were investigated against gastric damage induced by absolute ethanol (96%, 1 mL per animal) in rats. The effects of M. recutita extract and alpha-bisabolol on gastric mucosal damage were assessed by determination of changes in mean gastric lesion area. Mechanistic studies were carried out at with 100 mg=kg alpha-bisabolol. We further examined the possible participation of prostaglandins, nitric oxide, and KATP+ channels in its mechanism. M. recutita reduced gastric damage in all doses tested. Alpha-bisabolol at oral doses of 50 and 100 mg=kg markedly attenuated the gastric lesions induced by ethanol to the extent of 87% and 96%, respectively. Pretreatments with the nitric oxide antagonist N-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (10 mg=kg, i.p.) or with indomethacin, an inhibitor of cyclooxygenase, failed to block effectively the gastroprotective effect of alpha-bisabolol. Furthermore, the alpha-bisabolol effect was significantly reduced in rats pretreated with glibenclamide, an inhibitor of KATP+ channel activation. Thus we provide evidence that alpha-bisabolol reduces the gastric damage induced by ethanol, at least in part, by the mechanism of activation of KATP+ channels. PMID:20041801

  14. Role of carbonic anhydrase in bone resorption induced by prostaglandin E2 in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, G. E.; Kenny, A. D.

    1985-01-01

    The possible role of carbonic anhydrase in bone resorption induced by prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) was studied using an in vitro neonatal mouse calvarial culture system. PGE2 (10 to the -6th M) was effective in stimulating resorption, as assessed by calcium release into culture media. This enhanced resorption was accompanied by significant increases in calvarial carbonic anhydrase activity over control values at 48 and 96 h. At 48 h, bones treated with PGE2 had 20 percent more carbonic anhydrase activity than controls. By 96 h, treated bones contained 79 percent more carbonic anhydrase activity than controls. PGE2-induced bone resorption was inhibited by the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor acetazolamide in a dose-dependent fashion from 10 to the -5th to 10 to the -4th M with 77 percent inhibition observed at 10 to the -4th M. The acetazolamide analogue CL 13,850 (N-t-butylacetazolamide), which does not inhibit carbonic anhydrase, failed to inhibit PGE2-induced resorption. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that carbonic anhydrase is a necessary component of the osteoclastic bone resorptive mechanism.

  15. Discovery and Characterization of 2-Acylaminoimidazole Microsomal Prostaglandin E Synthase-1 Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Schiffler, Matthew A; Antonysamy, Stephen; Bhattachar, Shobha N; Campanale, Kristina M; Chandrasekhar, Srinivasan; Condon, Bradley; Desai, Prashant V; Fisher, Matthew J; Groshong, Christopher; Harvey, Anita; Hickey, Michael J; Hughes, Norman E; Jones, Scott A; Kim, Euibong J; Kuklish, Steven L; Luz, John G; Norman, Bryan H; Rathmell, Richard E; Rizzo, John R; Seng, Thomas W; Thibodeaux, Stefan J; Woods, Timothy A; York, Jeremy S; Yu, Xiao-Peng

    2016-01-14

    As part of a program aimed at the discovery of antinociceptive therapy for inflammatory conditions, a screening hit was found to inhibit microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1 (mPGES-1) with an IC50 of 17.4 μM. Structural information was used to improve enzyme potency by over 1000-fold. Addition of an appropriate substituent alleviated time-dependent cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) inhibition. Further structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies led to 8, which had desirable potency (IC50 = 12 nM in an ex vivo human whole blood (HWB) assay) and absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) properties. Studies on the formulation of 8 identified 8·H3PO4 as suitable for clinical development. Omission of a lipophilic portion of the compound led to 26, a readily orally bioavailable inhibitor with potency in HWB comparable to celecoxib. Furthermore, 26 was selective for mPGES-1 inhibition versus other mechanisms in the prostanoid pathway. These factors led to the selection of 26 as a second clinical candidate. PMID:26653180

  16. Placental Origin of Prostaglandin F2α in the Domestic Cat

    PubMed Central

    Siemieniuch, Marta J.; Jursza, Ewelina; Szóstek, Anna Z.; Zschockelt, Lina; Boos, Alois; Kowalewski, Mariusz P.

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, the question was addressed whether the feline placenta can synthesize prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α). The PGFS protein was elevated, particularly at 2.5–3 weeks of pregnancy compared to 7-8 (P < 0.05) and 8.5–9 weeks (P < 0.001). Transcripts for PGFS were significantly upregulated at 2.5–3 weeks of pregnancy and then gradually declined towards the end of gestation (P < 0.001). Transcripts for PTGS2 were only upregulated in placentas from queens close to term (P < 0.001) compared with earlier phases. Staining of PTGS2 showed distinct positive signals in placentas obtained during the last week before labor, particularly in the strongly invading trophoblast surrounding blood vessels, and also in decidual cells. Shortly after implantation, signals for PGFS were localized in the trophoblast cells. Near term, PGFS staining was seen mainly in decidual cells. Both placental PGF2α and plasma PGFM were elevated towards the end of pregnancy (P < 0.001) compared with earlier weeks of pregnancy. The content of PGF2α in extracted placenta mirrored the PGFM level in plasma of pregnant females. During late gestation there is a significant increase in PGFM levels in maternal blood and of PGF2α levels in placental tissue concomitant with an upregulation of placental PTGS2. PMID:24659861

  17. Prostaglandin E2 inhibits collagen synthesis in dermal fibroblasts and prevents hypertrophic scar formation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jingling; Shu, Bin; Chen, Lei; Tang, Jinming; Zhang, Lijun; Xie, Julin; Liu, Xusheng; Xu, Yingbin; Qi, Shaohai

    2016-08-01

    Hypertrophic scarring is a common dermal fibroproliferative disorder characterized by excessive collagen deposition. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 ), an important inflammatory product synthesized via the arachidonic acid cascade, has been shown to act as a fibroblast modulator and to possess antifibroblastic activity. However, the mechanism underlying the antifibrotic effect of PGE2 remains unclear. In this study, we explored the effects of PGE2 on TGF-β1-treated dermal fibroblasts in terms of collagen production and to determine the regulatory pathways involved, as well as understand the antiscarring function of PGE2 in vivo. We found that PGE2 inhibited TGF-β1-induced collagen synthesis by regulating the balance of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP). It did so by upregulating cAMP through the E prostanoid (EP)2 receptor. We determined that inhibition of the TGF-β1/Smad pathway by PGE2 is associated with its ability to inhibit collagen synthesis. An in vivo study further confirmed that PGE2 inhibits hypertrophic scar formation by decreasing collagen production. Our results demonstrate that the novel anti-scarring function of PGE2 is achieved by balancing MMPs/TIMP expression and decreasing collagen production. PMID:26997546

  18. Plasmodium falciparum produces prostaglandins that are pyrogenic, somnogenic, and immunosuppressive substances in humans.

    PubMed

    Kilunga Kubata, B; Eguchi, N; Urade, Y; Yamashita, K; Mitamura, T; Tai, K; Hayaishi, O; Horii, T

    1998-09-21

    Plasmodium falciparum causes the most severe form of human malaria, which kills approximately 1.5-2.7 million people every year, but the molecular mechanisms underlying the clinical symptoms and the host-parasite interaction remain unclear. We show here that P. falciparum produces prostaglandins (PGs) D2, E2, and F2alpha. After incubation with 1 mM arachidonic acid (AA), cell homogenates of P. falciparum produced PGs as determined by enzyme immunoassay and gas chromatography-selected ion monitoring. PG production in the parasite homogenate was not affected by the nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs aspirin and indomethacin, and was partially heat resistant, whereas PG biosynthesis by mammalian cyclooxygenase was completely inhibited by these chemicals and by heat treatment. Addition of AA to the parasite cell culture markedly increased an ability of the parasite cell homogenate to produce PGs and of parasitized red blood cells to accumulate PGs in the culture medium. PGD2 and PGE2 accumulated in the culture medium at the stages of trophozoites and schizonts more actively than at the ring stage. These findings are the first evidence of the direct involvement of a malaria parasite in the generation of substances that are pyrogenic and injurious to the host defenses. We will discuss a possible contribution of the parasite-produced PGs to pathogenesis and host-parasite interaction of P. falciparum. PMID:9743538

  19. Prostaglandin F/sub 2. cap alpha. activates phosphoinositide hydrolysis in rat aorta

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-03-01

    The authors have previously demonstrated that norepinephrine (NE) and serotonin (5HT) activate a phosphoinositide-(PI) specific phospholipase C in rat aorta by interaction with ..cap alpha../sub 1/-adrenergic receptors and 5HT/sub 2/ receptor, respectively. They have subsequently noted that angiotensin II and vasopressin as well activate PI hydrolysis in the tissue. The most active agent they have thus far investigated is prostaglandin F/sub 2..cap alpha../ (PGF/sub 2..cap alpha../). Rat aortic rings were pre-labelled with (/sup 3/H)-inositol and then, in the presence of 10 mM LiCl, exposed to various doses of PGF/sub 2..cap alpha../. (/sup 3/H)-inositol monophosphate was the quantified by anion-exchange chromatography. After a 60 min incubation, PGF/sub 2..cap alpha../ caused a 10-15 fold increase over basal at maximal concentrations (0.1-1.0 mM). An EC/sub 50/ for PI hydrolysis was between 0.1-1.0 ..mu..M. PGF/sub 2..cap alpha../ caused maximal aortic contraction at 10 ..mu..M. PGF/sub 2..cap alpha../-induced PI hydrolysis, was inhibited by phorbol esters. These results suggest that PGF/sub 2..cap alpha../, similar to 5HT, NE, vasopressin and angiotensin II, causes vasoconstriction by activation of PI hydrolysis.

  20. Drosophila Fascin is a novel downstream target of prostaglandin signaling during actin remodeling.

    PubMed

    Groen, Christopher M; Spracklen, Andrew J; Fagan, Tiffany N; Tootle, Tina L

    2012-12-01

    Although prostaglandins (PGs)-lipid signals produced downstream of cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes-regulate actin cytoskeletal dynamics, their mechanisms of action are unknown. We previously established Drosophila oogenesis, in particular nurse cell dumping, as a new model to determine how PGs regulate actin remodeling. PGs, and thus the Drosophila COX-like enzyme Pxt, are required for both the parallel actin filament bundle formation and the cortical actin strengthening required for dumping. Here we provide the first link between Fascin (Drosophila Singed, Sn), an actin-bundling protein, and PGs. Loss of either pxt or fascin results in similar actin defects. Fascin interacts, both pharmacologically and genetically, with PGs, as reduced Fascin levels enhance the effects of COX inhibition and synergize with reduced Pxt levels to cause both parallel bundle and cortical actin defects. Conversely, overexpression of Fascin in the germline suppresses the effects of COX inhibition and genetic loss of Pxt. These data lead to the conclusion that PGs regulate Fascin to control actin remodeling. This novel interaction has implications beyond Drosophila, as both PGs and Fascin-1, in mammalian systems, contribute to cancer cell migration and invasion.