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Sample records for elin sundgaard jeanette

  1. Crossing the waters to the post-HAART era (or Jeanette meets Amalia).

    PubMed

    Mascolini, M

    1999-12-01

    The first time this reporter heard the term HAART was at the 1996 Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy (ICAAC). Now, highly active antiretroviral therapy is so common that some refer to the current state of treatment as "the post-HAART era." HAART initially meant a treatment that included one or two protease inhibitors (PIs) combined with two nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs). Initial reports on the effectiveness of that treatment strategy led some researchers to believe HIV could be eradicated completely; but that has not happened. The history of early HAART treatment and its evolution to its current use is described in detail. Tables show prescribing patterns with PIs and non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs); retrospective drug comparisons; and results of clinical trials. An extensive table shows the clinical implications of trading a PI for a reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitor in treatment. The role of amprenavir after failure of a first PI is discussed. The concept of drug holidays is explored, including cases of patients in Belgium. Several definitions of post-HAART are suggested. Extensive references and notes are provided.

  2. The Body, Gender, and Biotechnology in Jeanette Winterson's The Stone Gods.

    PubMed

    Dolezal, Luna

    2015-01-01

    In this article, I will argue that Winterson's use of satire and the common tropes of science fiction in her 2007 novel The Stone Gods provides an effective and important critique of the gender discrepancies arising in the implementation of aesthetic medical biotechnologies under the logic of neoliberal consumerism. In particular, engaging with aspects of Winterson's fictional landscape in Part 1 of The Stone Gods, I will explore the themes of bodily normalization, the medicalization of youth and appearance, and the notion that biotechnologies such as cosmetic surgery can inculcate happiness through some sort of "psychological cure." Ultimately, I will argue that Winterson's aim in this novel is to raise important questions about where rising standards of enhancement and appearance, implemented through biotechnologies, will take us and, furthermore, to demonstrate that the problems of the human condition require more than the surface fixes offered by consumption, technological innovation, and narcissistic body projects.

  3. The Body, Gender, and Biotechnology in Jeanette Winterson's The Stone Gods.

    PubMed

    Dolezal, Luna

    2015-01-01

    In this article, I will argue that Winterson's use of satire and the common tropes of science fiction in her 2007 novel The Stone Gods provides an effective and important critique of the gender discrepancies arising in the implementation of aesthetic medical biotechnologies under the logic of neoliberal consumerism. In particular, engaging with aspects of Winterson's fictional landscape in Part 1 of The Stone Gods, I will explore the themes of bodily normalization, the medicalization of youth and appearance, and the notion that biotechnologies such as cosmetic surgery can inculcate happiness through some sort of "psychological cure." Ultimately, I will argue that Winterson's aim in this novel is to raise important questions about where rising standards of enhancement and appearance, implemented through biotechnologies, will take us and, furthermore, to demonstrate that the problems of the human condition require more than the surface fixes offered by consumption, technological innovation, and narcissistic body projects. PMID:26095842

  4. Elin@: Electronic Library Information Navigator--Towards the "One Stop Shop" Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alwerud, Anna; Jorgensen, Lotte

    2005-01-01

    Libraries subscribe to thousands of electronic journals and they are difficult for end-users to find. Journal and publisher interfaces and functionalities differ considerably. The recent development in e-media calls for central management of the resources. Lund University Libraries' Head Office has developed a service for presentation and…

  5. A "Curling teacher" in mathematics education: teacher identities and pedagogy development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, Annica

    2011-12-01

    In this article, I outline processes that supported or hindered Elin, a mathematics teacher, to engage in pedagogy development. In a setting inspired by critical mathematics education, Elin was encouraged to bring societal themes into her upper secondary teaching so that mathematics was connected to social science subjects. A classroom environment was set up in which classroom discourses supported students' negotiations about their learning of mathematics. In this new pedagogical discourse, projects were introduced that while addressing the mandated mathematical topics of the curriculum, changed some key elements in how mathematics had been previously taught as well as the relationships between participants. Elin's narrated identities provided ways to understand shifts in Elin's ways of acting when gradually transforming her teaching. Elin's identities illuminated how she became aware of herself, her teaching organisation and her different ways of interacting with students. She identified and acted upon her perceptions of the new possibilities and different responsibilities that actors in mathematics classrooms have. Elin's fluctuating teacher identities reveal why she struggled at times and how she was constrained in becoming the teacher she wanted to become.

  6. "A Library They Deserve": The Baltimore Elementary and Middle School Library Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheldon, Steven B.; Davis, Marcia H.; Connolly, Faith

    2014-01-01

    The Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Foundation has partnered with Baltimore Education Research Consortium (BERC) to complete a series of reports examining the implementation and impact of the Baltimore Elementary and Middle School Library Project (Library Project). This report on the first year of the project examines the experiences of the…

  7. Sociology of Education: Research in the Caribbean.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bastick, Tony, Ed.; Ezenne, Austin, Ed.

    The chapters in this collection explore the premises, standards, requirements, and consequences of education in the Caribbean. Chapters in the first section, "Gender, Education and EmploymentBroken Promises," are: (1) "Educational Management from a Perspective of Care: Women Teachers in Trinidad and Tobago" (Jeanette Morris); (2) "Highly Educated,…

  8. Computational Thinking: A Digital Age Skill for Everyone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barr, David; Harrison, John; Conery, Leslie

    2011-01-01

    In a seminal article published in 2006, Jeanette Wing described computational thinking (CT) as a way of "solving problems, designing systems, and understanding human behavior by drawing on the concepts fundamental to computer science." Wing's article gave rise to an often controversial discussion and debate among computer scientists, cognitive…

  9. Exploring Issues about Computational Thinking in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Czerkawski, Betul C.; Lyman, Eugene W., III

    2015-01-01

    The term computational thinking (CT) has been in academic discourse for decades, but gained new currency in 2006, when Jeanette Wing used it to describe a set of thinking skills that students in all fields may require in order to succeed. Wing's initial article and subsequent writings on CT have been broadly influential; experts in…

  10. Reforming Personnel Preparation in Early Intervention: Issues, Models, and Practical Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winton, Pamela J., Ed.; And Others

    The 21 papers in this collection address changes and reforms in the preparation of teachers and other personnel concerned with early intervention with children having or at risk for disabilities. The papers are: (1) "Ecological Perspectives on Personnel Preparation: Rationale, Framework, and Guidelines for Change" (Pamela J. Winton, Jeanette A.…

  11. PILOT PROJECT CLOSE UP: ORD RESEARCH INVENTORY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Harvey, Jim and Elin Ulrich. 2004. Pilot Project Close Up: ORD Research Inventory. Changing Times. Pp. 1. (ERL,GB R1022).

    At the January 2003 summit, many people were drawn to our vision of improving ORD's internal communications by creating a "go-to" page that consolicat...

  12. RAS Ordinary Meetings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-02-01

    At the October 2013 meeting the President presented the Gold Medal to Prof. Chris Chapman, the Eddington Medal to Prof. James Binney, and Winton Capital Award to Dr Katherine Joy. Prof. Bob White gave the Harold Jeffreys Lecture on "Building the dynamic crust of Iceland by rifting and volcanism". At the November meeting, Prof. Eline Tolstoy gave the George Darwin Lecture on "Galactic palaeontology".

  13. Astronomical observatory for shuttle. Phase A study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guthals, D. L.

    1973-01-01

    The design, development, and configuration of the astronomical observatory for shuttle are discussed. The characteristics of the one meter telescope in the spaceborne observatory are described. A variety of basic spectroscopic and image recording instruments and detectors which will permit a large variety of astronomical observations are reported. The stDC 37485elines which defined the components of the observatory are outlined.

  14. Calibration of an automatic TLD irradiator

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, J.C.; Pasciak, W.J. )

    1987-07-01

    The Panasonic UD-801 TLDs used in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's environmental monitoring program are calibrated using the Williston Elin Model 2001 Irradiator. This article describes the procedure used to calibrate this irradiator for the delivery of exposures in the range of 40 to 1200 mR. A select group of TLDs, another source, and an NBS-calibrated ion chamber were used to perform a secondary calibration of the WE-2001. Extraneous exposure contributions (background radiation from the irradiator's source and exposure occurring during TLD travel into and out of the irradiation chamber) were measured and evaluated. The WE-2001 TLD Irradiator was calibrated to a total uncertainty of {plus minus}3.2%; however, TLD travel time exposures were found to be quite significant for the short irradiation times typically used in environmental applications.

  15. Understanding alcohol expectancy effects: revisiting the placebo condition.

    PubMed

    Testa, Maria; Fillmore, Mark T; Norris, Jeanette; Abbey, Antonia; Curtin, John J; Leonard, Kenneth E; Mariano, Kristin A; Thomas, Margaret C; Nomensen, Kim J; George, William H; Vanzile-Tamsen, Carol; Livingston, Jennifer A; Saenz, Christopher; Buck, Philip O; Zawacki, Tina; Parkhill, Michele R; Jacques, Angela J; Hayman, Lenwood W

    2006-02-01

    This article summarizes a symposium organized and cochaired by Maria Testa and presented at the 2005 Annual Meeting of the Research Society on Alcoholism, in Santa Barbara, California. The symposium explored issues relevant to understanding the function of placebo conditions and to interpreting placebo effects. Cochair Mark Fillmore began with an overview of the use of placebo conditions in alcohol research, focusing on methodological issues. Jeanette Norris and her colleagues conducted a review of studies examining placebo conditions among women. They conclude that expectancy effects are limited to a few domains. Maria Testa and Antonia Abbey presented papers suggesting that placebo manipulations may result in unanticipated compensatory effects in actual or hypothetical social situations. That is, placebo participants may compensate for anticipated cognitive impairment through vigilant attention to situational cues. John Curtin's research suggests that the compensatory strategies of placebo participants appear to involve a sensitization of evaluative control, resulting in improved performance. Kenneth Leonard provided concluding remarks on the meaning of placebo effects and the value of placebo conditions in research.

  16. Louis J. Battan 1923”1986

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atlas, David

    Dr. Louis J. Battan died on October 29, 1986, after a short illness. Although he had been a professor of atmospheric sciences at the University of Arizon a since 1958 and director of the Institute of Atmospheric Physics there from 1973 to 1982 (and associate director from 1958 to 1973), his activities on the national and international scenes were so varied that he was known in different ways by the numerous communities with which he was involved. However, all who knew him shared his uncommonly good humor, took pride in his friendship, and respected his wisdom and good judgment. Lou is survived by his wife Jeanette, daughter Suzette, and son Paul.Battan was born in New York City on February 9, 1923. He was the second of four sons born to Annibale and Luisa Battan, immigrants to the United States from the village of Vigo in the Tyrolean Alps of Austria. He grew up in Brooklyn, N.Y., in a family environment that encouraged the highest moral standards and a devotion to hard work and self-reliance, qualities that remained with him throughout his life.

  17. Characterization of the nutraceutical quality and antioxidant activity in bell pepper in response to grafting.

    PubMed

    Chávez-Mendoza, Celia; Sánchez, Esteban; Carvajal-Millán, Elizabeth; Muñoz-Márquez, Ezequiel; Guevara-Aguilar, Alexandro

    2013-12-16

    The grafting of fruits and vegetables influences fruit quality. The aim of the present work was to assess the effect of the rootstock and the scion on the antioxidant activity and the content in vitamin C, total phenols, lycopene and β-carotene of bell pepper. The cultivars Fascinato and Jeanette were used as scion and Terrano was used as rootstock. Four harvests in the production cycle of the vegetable were analyzed in a cultivation system under shading nets. The results indicate statistical differences in the content of these bioactive compounds between the varieties, between grafting and not grafting and between sampling dates (p ≤ 0.05). The vitamin C content, β-carotene, and antioxidant capacity proved significantly higher in Fascinato than in Janette. On average, grafting increased β-carotene and vitamin C concentrations and improved the antioxidant capacity, but had no influence on the total phenol or lycopene contents. It is concluded that grafting to the rootstock Terrano improves the nutritional quality of the fruit produced in both varieties of bell pepper studied.

  18. Bioactive Compounds and Antioxidant Activity in Different Grafted Varieties of Bell Pepper.

    PubMed

    Chávez-Mendoza, Celia; Sanchez, Esteban; Muñoz-Marquez, Ezequiel; Sida-Arreola, Juan Pedro; Flores-Cordova, Maria Antonia

    2015-06-23

    Grafting favors the presence of bioactive compounds in the bell pepper, but many species and varieties have not yet been analyzed in this sense, including commonly grafted varieties. The aim of the present study is to characterize the content in β-carotenes, vitamin C, lycopene, total phenols, and the antioxidant activity of bell pepper (Capsicum annum L.) using the cultivar/rootstock combinations: Jeanette/Terrano (yellow), Sweet/Robusto (green), Fascinato/Robusto (red), Orangela/Terrano (orange), and Fascinato/Terrano (red). The plants were grown in a net-shading system and harvested on three sampling dates of the same crop cycle. The results show statistical differences (p ≤ 0.05) between cultivar/rootstock combinations and sampling dates for the content in bioactive compounds and antioxidant activity. Fascinato/Robusto presented the highest concentration of lycopene and total phenols as well as the greatest antioxidant activity of all cultivar/rootstock combinations evaluated. In addition, it was found that the best sampling time for the peppers to have the highest concentrations of bioactive compounds and antioxidant activity was September.

  19. Bioactive Compounds and Antioxidant Activity in Different Grafted Varieties of Bell Pepper

    PubMed Central

    Chávez-Mendoza, Celia; Sanchez, Esteban; Muñoz-Marquez, Ezequiel; Sida-Arreola, Juan Pedro; Flores-Cordova, Maria Antonia

    2015-01-01

    Grafting favors the presence of bioactive compounds in the bell pepper, but many species and varieties have not yet been analyzed in this sense, including commonly grafted varieties. The aim of the present study is to characterize the content in β-carotenes, vitamin C, lycopene, total phenols, and the antioxidant activity of bell pepper (Capsicum annum L) using the cultivar/rootstock combinations: Jeanette/Terrano (yellow), Sweet/Robusto (green), Fascinato/Robusto (red), Orangela/Terrano (orange), and Fascinato/Terrano (red). The plants were grown in a net-shading system and harvested on three sampling dates of the same crop cycle. The results show statistical differences (p ≤ 0.05) between cultivar/rootstock combinations and sampling dates for the content in bioactive compounds and antioxidant activity. Fascinato/Robusto presented the highest concentration of lycopene and total phenols as well as the greatest antioxidant activity of all cultivar/rootstock combinations evaluated. In addition, it was found that the best sampling time for the peppers to have the highest concentrations of bioactive compounds and antioxidant activity was September. PMID:26783714

  20. Wind profiler observations of a sting jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughan, G.; Parton, G.

    2009-09-01

    Some of the most damaging surface winds experienced in midlatitude cyclonic storms have been attributed to a phenomenon known as a sting jet. Previous studies have deduced how sting jets develop from their mid-tropospheric origin, but there have been no direct observations of these wind features in the mid-troposphere. During windstorm Jeanette on the 27th October 2002, the tip of the storm's cloud head passed over a VHF wind profiler at Aberystwyth, Wales, allowing the structure of a sting jet to be measured with high spatial and temporal resolution. These observations showed a multiple slantwise structure to the sting jet region with two tails of increased winds which persisted after the passing of the cloud head aloft. Simulations by the Met Office Unified Model (UM) showed that the slantwise structure followed ?w surfaces, and that the sting jet descended along ? surfaces as it passed over the UK, accelerating and drying during its descent. The horizontal and vertical scales of the observed structures are compatible with slantwise convection releasing Conditional Symmetric Instability within the cloud head. Further observations of the sting jet were obtained by a UHF wind profiler at Cardington in eastern England, where the sting jet had merged with the cold conveyor belt circulating around the storm. An unstable temperature profile in the lowest kilometre over Cardington enabled damaging gusts of strong winds to be brought to the surface in convective plumes; however, this strong vertical mixing was not represented correctly in the UM.

  1. Bioactive Compounds and Antioxidant Activity in Different Grafted Varieties of Bell Pepper.

    PubMed

    Chávez-Mendoza, Celia; Sanchez, Esteban; Muñoz-Marquez, Ezequiel; Sida-Arreola, Juan Pedro; Flores-Cordova, Maria Antonia

    2015-01-01

    Grafting favors the presence of bioactive compounds in the bell pepper, but many species and varieties have not yet been analyzed in this sense, including commonly grafted varieties. The aim of the present study is to characterize the content in β-carotenes, vitamin C, lycopene, total phenols, and the antioxidant activity of bell pepper (Capsicum annum L.) using the cultivar/rootstock combinations: Jeanette/Terrano (yellow), Sweet/Robusto (green), Fascinato/Robusto (red), Orangela/Terrano (orange), and Fascinato/Terrano (red). The plants were grown in a net-shading system and harvested on three sampling dates of the same crop cycle. The results show statistical differences (p ≤ 0.05) between cultivar/rootstock combinations and sampling dates for the content in bioactive compounds and antioxidant activity. Fascinato/Robusto presented the highest concentration of lycopene and total phenols as well as the greatest antioxidant activity of all cultivar/rootstock combinations evaluated. In addition, it was found that the best sampling time for the peppers to have the highest concentrations of bioactive compounds and antioxidant activity was September. PMID:26783714

  2. Characterization of the nutraceutical quality and antioxidant activity in bell pepper in response to grafting.

    PubMed

    Chávez-Mendoza, Celia; Sánchez, Esteban; Carvajal-Millán, Elizabeth; Muñoz-Márquez, Ezequiel; Guevara-Aguilar, Alexandro

    2013-01-01

    The grafting of fruits and vegetables influences fruit quality. The aim of the present work was to assess the effect of the rootstock and the scion on the antioxidant activity and the content in vitamin C, total phenols, lycopene and β-carotene of bell pepper. The cultivars Fascinato and Jeanette were used as scion and Terrano was used as rootstock. Four harvests in the production cycle of the vegetable were analyzed in a cultivation system under shading nets. The results indicate statistical differences in the content of these bioactive compounds between the varieties, between grafting and not grafting and between sampling dates (p ≤ 0.05). The vitamin C content, β-carotene, and antioxidant capacity proved significantly higher in Fascinato than in Janette. On average, grafting increased β-carotene and vitamin C concentrations and improved the antioxidant capacity, but had no influence on the total phenol or lycopene contents. It is concluded that grafting to the rootstock Terrano improves the nutritional quality of the fruit produced in both varieties of bell pepper studied. PMID:24352022

  3. NASA's Earth Observations of the Global Environment: Our Changing Planet and the View from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Michael D.

    2006-01-01

    This presentation focuses on the latest spectacular images from NASA's remote sensing missions like TRMM, SeaWiFS, Landsat 7, Terra, and Aqua which will be visualized and explained in the context of global change and man's impact on our world's environment. Visualizations of global data currently available from Earth orbiting satellites include the Earth at night with its city lights, high resolutions of tropical cyclone Eline and the resulting flooding of Mozambique as well as flybys of Cape Town, South Africa with its dramatic mountains and landscape, imagery of fires that occurred globally, with a special emphasis on fires in the western US during summer 2001. Visualizations of the global atmosphere and oceans are shown and demonstrations of the 3-dimensional structure of hurricane and cloud structures derived from recently launched Earth-orbiting satellites are are presented with other topics with a dynamic theater-style , along with animations of satellite launch deployments and orbital mapping to highlight aspects of Earth observations from space.

  4. Exploring New Ways to Deliver Value to Healthcare Organizations: Algorithmic Testing, Data Integration, and Diagnostic E-consult Service.

    PubMed

    Risin, Semyon A; Chang, Brian N; Welsh, Kerry J; Kidd, Laura R; Moreno, Vanessa; Chen, Lei; Tholpady, Ashok; Wahed, Amer; Nguyen, Nghia; Kott, Marylee; Hunter, Robert L

    2015-01-01

    As the USA Health Care System undergoes transformation and transitions to value-based models it is critical for laboratory medicine/clinical pathology physicians to explore opportunities and find new ways to deliver value, become an integral part of the healthcare team. This is also essential for ensuring financial health and stability of the profession when the payment paradigm changes from fee-for-service to fee-for-performance. About 5 years ago we started searching for ways to achieve this goal. Among other approaches, the search included addressing the laboratory work-ups for specialists' referrals in the HarrisHealth System, a major safety net health care organization serving mostly indigent and underserved population of Harris County, TX. We present here our experience in improving the efficiency of laboratory testing for the referral process and in building a prototype of a diagnostic e-consult service using rheumatologic diseases as a starting point. The service incorporates algorithmic testing, integration of clinical, laboratory and imaging data, issuing structured comprehensive consultation reports, incorporating all the relevant information, and maintaining personal contacts and an e-line of communications with the primary providers and referral center personnel. Ongoing survey of providers affords testimony of service value in terms of facilitating their work and increasing productivity. Analysis of the cost effectiveness and of other value indicators is currently underway. We also discuss our pioneering experience in building pathology residents and fellows training in integrated diagnostic consulting service.

  5. An improved method of measuring tropospheric NO2, NO3, HO2, and RO2 by Matrix Isolation and Electronic Spin Resonance (MIESR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The MIESR method consists of two steps (1) collection of the radicals present in the ambient air at 77K in a polycrystalline D2O matrix and (2) identification and quantification of the different radicals in the laboratory by Electron Spin Resonance spectroscopy. In step (1), the sampling efficiency for sampling NO2 and RO2 was determined to be greater than or equal to 95 percent, with a measured accuracy of plus or minus 5 percent. In step (2), after collection, the samples are maintained at 77 K and spectra are recorded in the laboratory using a standard 9.5 GHz ESR system (Varian E-line). About 50 individual scans of each spectrum are recorded and digitally averaged in order to improve the signal-to-noise ratio. The ESR-spectra are analyzed with a recently developed numerical procedure which was demonstrated to allow speciation of NO2, NO3, HO2, CH3C(O)O2, and the sum of the alkylperoxy radicals. The detection limit is 5ppt for HO2, RO2, and NO2 and 3ppt for NO3 due to its narrower ESR-linewidth.

  6. Exploring New Ways to Deliver Value to Healthcare Organizations: Algorithmic Testing, Data Integration, and Diagnostic E-consult Service.

    PubMed

    Risin, Semyon A; Chang, Brian N; Welsh, Kerry J; Kidd, Laura R; Moreno, Vanessa; Chen, Lei; Tholpady, Ashok; Wahed, Amer; Nguyen, Nghia; Kott, Marylee; Hunter, Robert L

    2015-01-01

    As the USA Health Care System undergoes transformation and transitions to value-based models it is critical for laboratory medicine/clinical pathology physicians to explore opportunities and find new ways to deliver value, become an integral part of the healthcare team. This is also essential for ensuring financial health and stability of the profession when the payment paradigm changes from fee-for-service to fee-for-performance. About 5 years ago we started searching for ways to achieve this goal. Among other approaches, the search included addressing the laboratory work-ups for specialists' referrals in the HarrisHealth System, a major safety net health care organization serving mostly indigent and underserved population of Harris County, TX. We present here our experience in improving the efficiency of laboratory testing for the referral process and in building a prototype of a diagnostic e-consult service using rheumatologic diseases as a starting point. The service incorporates algorithmic testing, integration of clinical, laboratory and imaging data, issuing structured comprehensive consultation reports, incorporating all the relevant information, and maintaining personal contacts and an e-line of communications with the primary providers and referral center personnel. Ongoing survey of providers affords testimony of service value in terms of facilitating their work and increasing productivity. Analysis of the cost effectiveness and of other value indicators is currently underway. We also discuss our pioneering experience in building pathology residents and fellows training in integrated diagnostic consulting service. PMID:26116586

  7. A comparison of sole carbon source utilization patterns and phospholipid fatty acid profiles to detect changes in the root microflora of hydroponically grown crops.

    PubMed

    Khalil, S; Bååth, E; Alsanius, B; Englund, J E; Sundin, P; Gertsson, U E; Jensén, P

    2001-04-01

    Sole carbon source utilization (SCSU) patterns and phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) profiles were compared with respect to their potential to characterize root-inhabiting microbial communities of hydroponically grown crops. Sweet pepper (Capsicum annum cv. Evident), lettuce (Lactuca sativa cv. Grand Rapids), and four different cultivars of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum cvs. Gitana, Armada, Aromata, and Elin) were grown in 1-L black plastic beakers placed in a cultivation chamber with artificial light. In addition to the harvest of the plants after 6 weeks, plants of one tomato cultivar, cv. Gitana, were also harvested after 4 and 8 weeks. The cultivation in this study was performed twice. Principal component analysis was used to analyze the data. Both characterization methods had the ability to discriminate between the root microflora of different plant species, cultivars, and one tomato cultivar at different ages. Differences in both SCSU patterns and PLFA profiles were larger between plant species than between cultivars, but for both methods the largest differences were between the two cultivations. Still, the differences between treatments were always due to differences in the same PLFAs in both cultivations. This was not the case for the SCSU patterns when different plant ages were studied. Furthermore, PLFA profiles showed less variation between replicates than did SCSU patterns. This larger variation observed among the SCSU data indicates that PLFA may be more useful to detect changes in the root microflora of hydroponically grown crops than the SCSU technique.

  8. Comparative Study of Multicast Protection Algorithms Using Shared Links in 100GET Transport Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulaiman, Samer; Haidine, Abdelfattah; Lehnert, Ralf; Tuerk, Stefan

    In recent years new challenges have emerged in the telecommunications market resulting from the increase of network traffic and strong competition. Because of that, service providers feel constrained to replace expensive and complex IP-routers with a cheap and simple solution which guarantees the requested quality of services (QoS) with low cost. One of these solutions is to use the Ethernet technology as a switching layer, which results in using the cheap Ethernet services (E-Line, E-LAN and E-Tree) and to replace the expensive IP-routers. To achieve this migration step, new algorithms that support the available as well as the future services have to be developed. In this paper, we investigate the multicast protection issue. Three multicast protection algorithms based on the shared capacity between primary and backup solutions are proposed and evaluated. The blocking probability is used to evaluate the performance of the proposed algorithms. The sub-path algorithm resulted in a low blocking probability compared with the other algorithms.

  9. Lassen Known Geothermal Resource Area, California: audio-magnetotelluric, telluric profiling, and self-potential studies

    SciTech Connect

    Christopherson, K.R.; Hoover, D.B.; Lewis, V.; Radtke, B.; Senterfit, R.M.

    1980-01-01

    During the summer of 1979, geophysical work was done in the Lassen KGRA in northeastern California to assess the geothermal potential of the area. As part of the study, 68 audio-magnetotelluric (AMT) soundings were made and 2 telluric and self-potential (SP) profiles were done. The AMT station locations are shown. The scalar resistivities were contoured for 7.5 and 27 hertz data at north-south and east-west E-line orientations. The contour maps are complex, reflecting both lateral changes in geology and geothermal activity. The locations of the telluric and self-potential traverses are given. The profiles for traverse 1 show varied SP and telluric responses. The variations are probably geologically related with the drop in SP voltage and telluric resistivity on the east end of the traverse caused by a lateral lithology change. The profiles for traverse 2 show a sharp drop in SP voltage combined with a sharp increase in telluric resistivity near station 6. This could be associated with large-scale intrusive features (a ring dike) which trend to the northwest.

  10. Tracking changes in natural organic carbon character during artificial infiltration using flourescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, Stephan J.; Lavonen, Elin; McCleaf, Philip; Hummel, Angelica; Berggren Kleja, Dan; Johansson, Per-Olof

    2016-04-01

    In many Nordic countries more than half of the drinking water is produced using surface water. Artificial infiltration allows increasing water withdrawal from groundwater but may not be sustainable during longer periods. Here we report results from a one year study on changes in dissolved organic carbon concentration (DOC) and DOC character along the whole infiltration area starting with the stream water until the drinking water plant raw water intake. Both DOC, fluorescence spectroscopy and LC-OCD are used to understand the observed changes in the aquatic phase. Large seasonal changes close to the infiltration basin contrasts with stable conditions further away. Selective removal of terrestrial type of DOC is coherent using both analytical techniques. A simple empirical relationship between Humic like material and absorbance developed elsewhere also holds in this system (Köhler et al 2016). Fluorescence is a fast and promising tool for tracking changes in natural organic carbon character during artificial infiltration. References Stephan J. Köhler, Elin Lavonen, Alexander Keucken, Philippe Schmitt-Kopplin, Tom Spanjer and Kenneth Persson. Upgrading coagulation with hollow-fibre nanofiltration for improved organic matter removal during surface water treatment Water research (2016) 89:232-240.

  11. Translation from research to applications.

    PubMed

    Hunziker, Ernst; Spector, Myron; Libera, Jeanette; Gertzman, Arthur; Woo, Savio L-Y; Ratcliffe, Anthony; Lysaght, Michael; Coury, Arthur; Kaplan, David; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2006-12-01

    The article summarizes the collective views expressed at the fourth session of the workshop Tissue Engineering--the Next Generation, which was devoted to the translation of results of tissue engineering research into applications. Ernst Hunziker described the paradigm of a dual translational approach, and argued that tissue engineering should be guided by the dimensions and physiological setting of the bodily compartment to be repaired. Myron Spector discussed collagen-glycosaminoglycan (GAG) scaffolds for musculoskeletal tissue engineering. Jeanette Libera focused on the biological and clinical aspects of cartilage tissue engineering, and described a completely autologous procedure for engineering cartilage using the patient's own chondrocytes and blood serum. Arthur Gertzman reviewed the applications of allograft tissues in orthopedic surgery, and outlined the potential of allograft tissues as models for biological and medical studies. Savio Woo discussed a list of functional tissue engineering approaches designed to restore the biochemical and biomechanical properties of injured ligaments and tendons to be closer to that of the normal tissues. Specific examples of using biological scaffolds that have chemoattractants as well as growth factors with unique contact guidance properties to improve their healing process were shown. Anthony Ratcliffe discussed the translation of the results of research into products that are profitable and meet regulatory requirements. Michael Lysaght challenged the proposition that commercial and clinical failures of early tissue engineering products demonstrate a need for more focus on basic research. Arthur Coury described the evolution of tissue engineering products based on the example of Genzyme, and how various definitions of success and failure can affect perceptions and policies relative to the status and advancement of the field of tissue engineering.

  12. Review: Assessment of completeness of reporting in intervention studies using livestock: an example from pain mitigation interventions in neonatal piglets.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, A; Anthony, R; Bergamasco, L; Coetzee, J F; Dzikamunhenga, R S; Johnson, A K; Karriker, L A; Marchant-Forde, J N; Martineau, G P; Millman, S T; Pajor, E A; Rutherford, K; Sprague, M; Sutherland, M A; von Borell, E; Webb, S R

    2016-04-01

    Accurate and complete reporting of study methods, results and interpretation are essential components for any scientific process, allowing end-users to evaluate the internal and external validity of a study. When animals are used in research, excellence in reporting is expected as a matter of continued ethical acceptability of animal use in the sciences. Our primary objective was to assess completeness of reporting for a series of studies relevant to mitigation of pain in neonatal piglets undergoing routine management procedures. Our second objective was to illustrate how authors can report the items in the Reporting guidElines For randomized controLled trials for livEstoCk and food safety (REFLECT) statement using examples from the animal welfare science literature. A total of 52 studies from 40 articles were evaluated using a modified REFLECT statement. No single study reported all REFLECT checklist items. Seven studies reported specific objectives with testable hypotheses. Six studies identified primary or secondary outcomes. Randomization and blinding were considered to be partially reported in 21 and 18 studies, respectively. No studies reported the rationale for sample sizes. Several studies failed to report key design features such as units for measurement, means, standard deviations, standard errors for continuous outcomes or comparative characteristics for categorical outcomes expressed as either rates or proportions. In the discipline of animal welfare science, authors, reviewers and editors are encouraged to use available reporting guidelines to ensure that scientific methods and results are adequately described and free of misrepresentations and inaccuracies. Complete and accurate reporting increases the ability to apply the results of studies to the decision-making process and prevent wastage of financial and animal resources.

  13. The 30th International Symposium on Lattice Field Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamleh, Waseem; Leinweber, Derek; Mahbub, Selim; Matevosyan, Hrayr; Thomas, Anthony; Williams, Anthony; Young, Ross; Zanotti, James

    , Jeanette Roulston and Ramona Adorjan, who made our conference run perfectly. The contributions of Ben Menadue and Ben Owen in crafting this year's web presence and establishing our on-line payment and conference management interface to RegOnline are most gratefully received. Thanks to James Zanotti for his enormous efforts in organising the conference program and to Hrayr Matevosyan for his creation of the Lattice 2012 Conference logo. Financial support for Lattice 2012 is gratefully acknowledged. Our sponsors include the ARC Centre of Excellence for Particle Physics at the Terascale (CoEPP) , The University of Adelaide , SGI and especially the ARC Special Research Centre for the Subatomic Structure of Matter (CSSM) which provided very generous support for our conference. Finally, we thank the conference delegates who made the long journey to Australia and made the conference a resounding success.

  14. Solicited abstract: Global hydrological modeling and models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Chong-Yu

    2010-05-01

    , (3) state-of-the-art of existing global hydrological models, and (4) challenges. Acknowledgment: Thanks to Lebing Gong, Elin Widén-Nilsson, and Sven Halldin of Uppsala University for the team work in global hydrological models.

  15. Soft-tissue profile changes during widening and protraction of the maxilla in patients with cleft lip and palate compared with normal growth and development.

    PubMed

    Tindlund, R S; Rygh, P

    1993-09-01

    During the last 15 years, cleft lip and palate (CLP) patients with maxillary deficiency in the care of the Bergen CLP team have undergone an interceptive orthopedic treatment phase during the deciduous and mixed dentition period. The present study includes 68 patients who received maxillary transverse expansion by use of a modified quad-helix appliance and 98 cases given maxillary protraction by a facial mask. All cases were treated until an acceptable normal occlusion was attained. Lateral cephalograms were taken immediately before and after the active treatment periods. Sagittal changes of the soft-tissue profile during transverse expansion and protraction were analyzed separately for unilateral complete cleft lip and palate (UCLP) patients and bilateral complete cleft lip and palate (BCLP) patients. The soft-tissue profiles of the groups were compared to growth changes of noncleft age-matched children (NORM group). During the short period of maxillary transverse expansion (mean period, 3.5 months) no significant change of the soft-tissue profile was found, except in the protrusion of the lower lip in the BCLP group. During the period of maxillary protraction (mean periods, 12 months in the UCLP group and 15 months in the BCLP group) the soft-tissue profile improved significantly by reducing the characteristic tendency towards a concave profile in CLP patients with maxillary deficiency. Significant increases of the sagittal maxillomandibular lip relation (angle SS-N-SM: mean increase, 2.5 degrees) and the Holdaway-angle (H-angle: mean increase, 3.0 degrees) were found to be similar in the UCLP and BCLP groups. However, the use of different reference lines for evaluation of treatment effects upon the soft-tissue profile resulted in conflicting findings suggesting that anteriorly situated reference lines are more suitable for the evaluation of CLP patients. Thus, the esthetic line (E.line) indicated a favorable position of the lips after treatment; the subspinale

  16. NASA's Earth Observations of the Global Environment: Our Changing Planet and the View from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, michael D.

    2005-01-01

    A birds eye view of the Earth from afar and up close reveals the power and magnificence of the Earth and juxtaposes the simultaneous impacts and powerlessness of humankind. The NASA Electronic Theater presents Earth science observations and visualizations in an historical perspective. See the latest spectacular images from NASA remote sensing missions like TRMM, SeaWiFS, Landsat 7, Terra, and Aqua, which will be visualized and explained in the context of global change and man s impact on our world s environment. See visualizations of global data sets currently available from Earth orbiting satellites, including the Earth at night with its city lights. Shown in high resolution are visualizations of tropical cyclone Eline and the resulting flooding of Mozambique. See flybys of Cape Town, South Africa with its dramatic mountains and landscape, as well as satellite imagery of fires that occurred globally, with a special emphasis on fires in the western US during summer 2001, and how new satellite tools can be used to help fight these disasters from spreading further. See where and when lightning occurs globally, and how dramatic urbanization has been in the desert southwest since 1910. Spectacular visualizations of the global atmosphere and oceans are shown. Learn when and where carbon is absorbed by vegetation on the land and ocean as the product of photosynthesis. See demonstrations of the 3-dimensional structure of hurricanes and cloud structures derived from recently launched Earth-orbiting satellites, and how hurricanes can modify the sea surface temperature in their wake. See massive dust storms in the Middle East as well as dust transport sweeping from north Africa across the Atlantic to the Caribbean and Amazon basin. Learn where and how much the temperature of the Earth s surface has changed during the 20th century, as well as how sea ice has decreased over the Arctic region, how sea level has and is likely to continue to change, and how glaciers have

  17. PREFACE: Fourth Meeting on Constrained Dynamics and Quantum Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadoni, Mariano; Cavaglia, Marco; Nelson, Jeanette E.

    2006-04-01

    groups. In particular, help was provided to students and scientists from non-EU countries. It is our great pleasure to thank those people and institutions whose help and support was crucial to the success of the meeting. We appreciate the enthusiastic support of our colleagues of the academic community, especially those from the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare and the Universities of Cagliari, Pisa, Torino and Mississippi. Financial support was provided by the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, the Universities of Cagliari, Torino, Pisa and Mississippi. This was used largely to support participants, especially younger people. Special thanks go to Pietro Menotti (University of Pisa) and Stefano Sciuto (University of Torino) for their friendship and their universities' financial contributions. It is also a pleasure to acknowledge financial support from the Regione Autonoma della Sardegna and from Tiscali, the communications and Internet company, for providing free telephone cards. Technical support and local organisation was provided by the Sezione di Cagliari of the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare. Warmest thanks go to our administrative and technical staff - Maria Assunta Lecca and Simona Renieri, for their untiring assistance, and to Palmasera Village and Hotel Smeraldo for their splendid hospitality. And finally, our gratitude goes to all the participants and especially the many experienced scientists. Their contributions highlighted the meeting and were largely without support. The success of the meeting is due to them and to the enthusiasm of the younger participants. The Editors January 2006 COMMITTEES Organising Committee Mariano Cadoni (Università and INFN Cagliari) Marco Cavaglià (University of Mississippi) Jeanette E. Nelson (Università and INFN Torino) Advisory Committee Orfeu Bertolami (IST Lisboa, Portugal) Luca Bombelli (Univ. Mississippi) Steve Carlip (UC Davis, USA) Alessandro D'Adda (INFN Torino, Italy) Stanley Deser (Brandeis, USA

  18. PREFACE: Fourth Meeting on Constrained Dynamics and Quantum Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadoni, Mariano; Cavaglia, Marco; Nelson, Jeanette E.

    2006-04-01

    groups. In particular, help was provided to students and scientists from non-EU countries. It is our great pleasure to thank those people and institutions whose help and support was crucial to the success of the meeting. We appreciate the enthusiastic support of our colleagues of the academic community, especially those from the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare and the Universities of Cagliari, Pisa, Torino and Mississippi. Financial support was provided by the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, the Universities of Cagliari, Torino, Pisa and Mississippi. This was used largely to support participants, especially younger people. Special thanks go to Pietro Menotti (University of Pisa) and Stefano Sciuto (University of Torino) for their friendship and their universities' financial contributions. It is also a pleasure to acknowledge financial support from the Regione Autonoma della Sardegna and from Tiscali, the communications and Internet company, for providing free telephone cards. Technical support and local organisation was provided by the Sezione di Cagliari of the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare. Warmest thanks go to our administrative and technical staff - Maria Assunta Lecca and Simona Renieri, for their untiring assistance, and to Palmasera Village and Hotel Smeraldo for their splendid hospitality. And finally, our gratitude goes to all the participants and especially the many experienced scientists. Their contributions highlighted the meeting and were largely without support. The success of the meeting is due to them and to the enthusiasm of the younger participants. The Editors January 2006 COMMITTEES Organising Committee Mariano Cadoni (Università and INFN Cagliari) Marco Cavaglià (University of Mississippi) Jeanette E. Nelson (Università and INFN Torino) Advisory Committee Orfeu Bertolami (IST Lisboa, Portugal) Luca Bombelli (Univ. Mississippi) Steve Carlip (UC Davis, USA) Alessandro D'Adda (INFN Torino, Italy) Stanley Deser (Brandeis, USA

  19. Obituary: Jeannette Virginia Lincoln, 1915-2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coffey, Helen E.

    2004-12-01

    the WDC-A for STP and the STP Division Chief for NOAA NGDC. She was passionate about the World Data Center system and maintaining data archives for future generations. She would introduce herself as "I am the World Data Center for Solar-Terrestrial Physics." Attending many foreign and U.S. meetings, she constantly searched for new data sets to add to the STP collection. She retired in 1980 after 38 years of federal service. When she was inducted into the Colorado Women's Hall of Fame in March 2000, she said: "My work with the World Data Centers introduced me to colleagues worldwide that became a source of much enjoyment, seeing them periodically at the international scientific meetings in Europe, Asia, and Australia." She was a past chair of the Denver Section of the Society of Women Engineers and very active in encouraging girls to study math and science. A member of the Association of Federal Professional and Administrative Women (AFPAW) and the Federally Employed Women (FEW), she supported improving the status of women. Virginia categorized herself as a joiner. She was active in many organizations, achieving life membership in the American Association of University Women (AAUW) and the Young Women's Christian Association (YWCA). In her younger days she was a figure skater and she enjoyed square dancing, playing golf, and traveling. She also enjoyed the arts and held season tickets to the University of Colorado Artist Series, the Denver Center for the Performing Arts, the opera, and the Colorado Music Festival. She was preceded in death by her parents and her brother Rush. Survivors include a nephew, Rush B. Lincoln III, a niece Deborah Lincoln Niekras, four great nieces and a great nephew. Her memoirs, "My Busy Life: How I Never Stopped Enjoying It" by Jeanette Virginia Lincoln, are available at the Carnegie Library in Boulder, Colorado. Also available are her history of her father "Rush Blodget Lincoln, My Father - the General" and a history of her mother's family

  20. No Place to Hide: Missing Primitive Stars Outside Milky Way Uncovered

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-02-01

    few minor light chemical elements, have all been created by the various generations of stars. [2] As every rainbow demonstrates, white light can be split up into different colours. Astronomers artificially split up the light they receive from distant objects into its different colours (or wavelengths). However, where we distinguish seven rainbow colours, astronomers map hundreds of finely nuanced colours, producing a spectrum - a record of the different amounts of light the object emits in each narrow colour band. The details of the spectrum - more light emitted at some colours, less light at others - provide tell-tale signs about the chemical composition of the matter producing the light. [3] The Dwarf galaxies Abundances and Radial-velocities Team (DART) has members from institutes in nine different countries. More information This research was presented in a paper to appear in Astronomy and Astrophysics ("The NIR Ca II triplet at low metallicity", E. Starkenburg et al.). Another paper is also in preparation (Tafelmeyer et al.) that presents the UVES measurements of several primitive stars. The team is composed of Else Starkenburg, Eline Tolstoy, Amina Helmi, and Thomas de Boer (Kapteyn Astronomical Institute, University of Groningen, the Netherlands), Vanessa Hill (Laboratoire Cassiopée, Université de Nice Sophia Antipolis, Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur, CNRS, France), Jonay I. González Hernández (Observatoire de Paris, CNRS, Meudon, France and Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Spain), Mike Irwin (University of Cambridge, UK), Giuseppina Battaglia (ESO), Pascale Jablonka and Martin Tafelmeyer (Université de Genève, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Switzerland), Matthew Shetrone (University of Texas, McDonald Observatory, USA), and Kim Venn (University of Victoria, Canada). ESO, the European Southern Observatory, is the foremost intergovernmental astronomy organisation in Europe and the world's most productive astronomical observatory. It is

  1. NARRATIVE: A short history of my life in science A short history of my life in science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manson, Joseph R.

    2010-08-01

    institute directed by Professor Wolfgang Ernst. The story of how this particular collaboration developed is interesting because it illustrates again how important personal contacts and social interactions are in the progress of science. In 2007 I was contacted by Bodil Holst, then of the TU-Graz and now at the Technical University of Bergen in Norway, about the possibility of having one of her very bright graduate students visit Clemson for a few months as a part of his work in analyzing some He atom scattering data that they had taken on silica glass surfaces. A decade earlier Holst had been a postdoctoral research associate at the Toennies laboratory in Göttingen during several of the summers I was also there and, although we never worked directly together at that time, we had many interesting discussions about science and other subjects. The student, Wolfram Steurer, arrived in Clemson in the middle of the fall semester with his belongings in a bag that was smaller than the guitar he carried strapped over his back. He immediately created for himself a place in our department, and by the time he left three months later we had developed some rudimentary ideas of how to analyze the data he had, and we also suspected that this data might reveal some new aspects of the dynamics of glass surfaces that had not been realized before. Wolfram delved into this problem with a vengeance, and shortly afterwards we began a series of papers involving Holst, Ernst and Steurer and the Graz graduate students, Andreas Apfolter and Mattias Koch, as well as Elin Søndergård of the French CNRS laboratory located at the St Gobain Corporation's research facilities in Paris. It was this initial contact with Holst a decade earlier that eventually led to a productive period of research on glass surfaces, something that I would have never predicted beforehand, but a collaboration that shows every sign of continuing into the future to produce new and interesting results. So, this brings the history