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Sample records for ellis island national

  1. Ellis Island and the Peopling of America: The Official Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yans-McLaughlin, Virginia; Lightman, Marjorie

    This guide book helps to place the Ellis Island Museum (New York) and site within the context of the worldwide, continuing history of immigration. The guide views immigration as a continuing social process that brings people from one part of the world to another where they contribute the richness of their labor to their newly adopted home. Ethnic…

  2. 78 FR 74009 - Safety Zone; Nike Fireworks, Upper New York Bay, Ellis Island, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-10

    ..., 2011 (76 FR 69614). ] Table 1 1. Nike Fireworks Ellis Launch site: A barge located Island Safety Zone... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 Safety Zone; Nike Fireworks, Upper New York Bay, Ellis Island,...

  3. Welcome Home Annie: Rethinking Ellis Island and Annie Moore in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercurio, Mia

    2008-01-01

    The story of the United States and the people who have made it their home would not be complete without considering the experience of Irish immigrants--particularly the experience of Annie Moore, the first immigrant to be processed on Ellis Island. However, the story of Annie Moore, and how it has been recounted and taught to date, is inaccurate.…

  4. Six seconds per eyelid: the medical inspection of immigrants at Ellis Island 1892-1914.

    PubMed

    Birn, A E

    1997-01-01

    Beginning in 1892, immigrants to the United States were subject to a medical inspection, created to restrict the entry of persons with a"loathsome or dangerous contagious" disease or mental defficiency. Ellis Island, which received over 10 million newcomers between 1900 and 1914, served as the largest ever medical screening facility. Far from reflecting a unified policy, the medical inspection offered a complicated compromise amidst a swirl of competing interests. Many industrialists blamed the waves of Southern and Eastern European immigrants for urban joblessness, filth, unrest, overcrowding, and disease. In an era of depression, labor groups opposed immigrant competitors for scarce jobs. Nativists believed immigrants could not overcome their defects because these were genetically transmitted. Germ theory proponents recognized communication of microorganisms as the problem, with controlling the spread of infections as the solution. Many Progressive reformers held that the scientific screening of immigrants offered a systematic solution for the disorder. Dozens of immigrant aid societies struggled to attenuate the effects of the inspection, and as depression subsided after 1900, employers, too, favored the influx of immigrants. This paper examines the social and political basis for the inspection, its realization at Ellis Island, and the reasons for its inability to debar large numbers of immigrants.

  5. Fire Island National Seashore

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brock, John C.; Wright, C. Wayne; Patterson, Matt; Nayagandhi, Amar; Patterson, Judd

    2007-01-01

    These lidar-derived topographic maps were produced as a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Coastal and Marine Geology Program, the National Park Service (NPS), Northeast Coastal and Barrier Network, Inventory and Monitoring Program, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Wallops Flight Facility. The aims of the partnership that created this product are to develop advanced survey techniques for mapping barrier island geomorphology and habitats, and to enable the monitoring of ecological and geological change within National Seashores. This product is based on data from an innovative airborne lidar instrument under development at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, the NASA Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL).

  6. Immigration: From the Founding of Virginia to the Closing of Ellis Island. An Eyewitness History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wepman, Dennis

    It can be said that U.S. immigration started in 1607, when the first settlers joined the original colonists on the shores of the United States. Since then, people of every nation, ethnicity, and class have come to the United States, looking for freedom, prosperity, and stability. While originally immigrants flowed freely into the United States,…

  7. Havelock Ellis, eugenicist.

    PubMed

    Crozier, Ivan

    2008-06-01

    This article examines the contributions made towards eugenic thought in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries by Havelock Ellis (1859-1939). Ellis was a significant social reformer who worked on the problems of sexuality from a scientific-naturalist secular perspective. In the later phases of his work, after he had completed much of his writing on sexuality, Ellis concentrated on issues of feminism and eugenics--problems he thought were interlinked. In this paper, I integrate his ideas about these subjects, and consider the ways in which Ellis and other liberal social reformers created a 'eugenic subject' in order to frame their arguments about social problems. PMID:18534349

  8. Unconventional Therapist: Albert Ellis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinrach, Stephen G.

    1980-01-01

    Albert Ellis is one of counseling's most prolific authors, mostly on the topic of Rational Emotive Therapy. He has been a moving force in the cognitive behavior movement. In this interview Ellis discusses his theory and its application, and aspects of his personal and family life. (Author)

  9. Landscapes of Santa Rosa Island, Channel Islands National Park, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schumann, R. Randall; Minor, Scott A.; Muhs, Daniel R.; Pigati, Jeffery S.

    2014-01-01

    Santa Rosa Island (SRI) is the second-largest of the California Channel Islands. It is one of 4 east–west aligned islands forming the northern Channel Islands chain, and one of the 5 islands in Channel Islands National Park. The landforms, and collections of landforms called landscapes, of Santa Rosa Island have been created by tectonic uplift and faulting, rising and falling sea level, landslides, erosion and deposition, floods, and droughts. Landscape features, and areas delineating groups of related features on Santa Rosa Island, are mapped, classified, and described in this paper. Notable landscapes on the island include beaches, coastal plains formed on marine terraces, sand dunes, and sand sheets. In this study, the inland physiography has been classified into 4 areas based on relief and degree of fluvial dissection. Most of the larger streams on the island occupy broad valleys that have been filled with alluvium and later incised to form steep- to vertical-walled arroyos, or barrancas, leaving a relict floodplain above the present channel. A better understanding of the processes and mechanisms that created these landscapes enhances visitors’ enjoyment of their surroundings and contributes to improving land and resource management strategies in order to optimize and balance the multiple goals of conservation, preservation, restoration, and visitor experience.

  10. Plant communities of Santa Rosa Island, Channel Islands National Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Ronilee A.; Halvorson, William L.; Sawdo, Andell A.; Danielsen, Karen C.

    1990-01-01

    A survey of the plant communities on Santa Rosa Island, Channel Islands National Park, was conducted from January through July 1988.  Vegetation data were collected at 296 sites using a releve technique.  The plant communities described include: grassland, coastal marsh, caliche scrub, coastal sage scrub, lupine scrub, baccharis scrub, coastal bluff scrub, coastal dune scrub, mixed chaparral, mixed woodland, torrey pine woodland, closed-cone pine woodland, island oak woodland, riparian woodland, and riparian herbaceous vegetation. The areal extent of each community was mapper on USGS 7.5' topographic maps, and digitized for GIS manipulation.

  11. Dr. Ellis, Please Stand Up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meichenbaum, Robert

    1977-01-01

    The author speaks to Albert Ellis' article and considers the article too naive and simplistic. He particularly questions Ellis' final conclusion that RET is based on a strong empirical foundation. (HMV)

  12. EAARL topography: Fire Island National Seashore

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brock, John C.; Wright, C. Wayne; Patterson, Matt; Nayagandhi, Amar; Patterson, Judd

    2007-01-01

    This Web site contains 31 LIDAR-derived first return topography maps and GIS files for Fire Island National Seashore. These lidar-derived topographic maps were produced as a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Coastal and Marine Geology Program, the National Park Service (NPS), Northeast Coastal and Barrier Network, Inventory and Monitoring Program, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Wallops Flight Facility. The aims of the partnership that created this product are to develop advanced survey techniques for mapping barrier island geomorphology and habitats, and to enable the monitoring of ecological and geological change within National Seashores. This product is based on data from an innovative airborne lidar instrument under development at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, the NASA Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL).

  13. 36 CFR 7.65 - Assateague Island National Seashore.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Assateague Island National... INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.65 Assateague Island National Seashore... area via designated routes from the island. (9) Prior to entering and after leaving a public...

  14. 36 CFR 7.65 - Assateague Island National Seashore.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Assateague Island National... INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.65 Assateague Island National Seashore... area via designated routes from the island. (9) Prior to entering and after leaving a public...

  15. 36 CFR 7.65 - Assateague Island National Seashore.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Assateague Island National... INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.65 Assateague Island National Seashore... area via designated routes from the island. (9) Prior to entering and after leaving a public...

  16. 36 CFR 7.75 - Padre Island National Seashore.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Padre Island National... INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.75 Padre Island National Seashore. (a.... Provided, however, that the waters surrounding North and South Bird Islands and other designated...

  17. 36 CFR 7.75 - Padre Island National Seashore.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Padre Island National... INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.75 Padre Island National Seashore. (a.... Provided, however, that the waters surrounding North and South Bird Islands and other designated...

  18. 36 CFR 7.20 - Fire Island National Seashore.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Fire Island National Seashore... INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.20 Fire Island National Seashore. (a... in lands owned by the United States which are on the island, outside the authorized boundaries of...

  19. 36 CFR 7.73 - Buck Island Reef National Monument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Buck Island Reef National... INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.73 Buck Island Reef National Monument... Islands. (e) Fishing. (1) All forms of fishing are prohibited including, but not limited to,...

  20. 36 CFR 7.73 - Buck Island Reef National Monument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Buck Island Reef National... INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.73 Buck Island Reef National Monument... Islands. (e) Fishing. (1) All forms of fishing are prohibited including, but not limited to,...

  1. 36 CFR 7.75 - Padre Island National Seashore.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Padre Island National... INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.75 Padre Island National Seashore. (a.... Provided, however, that the waters surrounding North and South Bird Islands and other designated...

  2. 36 CFR 7.73 - Buck Island Reef National Monument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Buck Island Reef National... INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.73 Buck Island Reef National Monument... Islands. (e) Fishing. (1) All forms of fishing are prohibited including, but not limited to,...

  3. 36 CFR 7.73 - Buck Island Reef National Monument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Buck Island Reef National... INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.73 Buck Island Reef National Monument... Islands. (e) Fishing. (1) All forms of fishing are prohibited including, but not limited to,...

  4. 36 CFR 7.73 - Buck Island Reef National Monument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Buck Island Reef National... INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.73 Buck Island Reef National Monument... Islands. (e) Fishing. (1) All forms of fishing are prohibited including, but not limited to,...

  5. 36 CFR 7.75 - Padre Island National Seashore.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Padre Island National... INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.75 Padre Island National Seashore. (a.... Provided, however, that the waters surrounding North and South Bird Islands and other designated...

  6. Commentary on Albert Ellis' Article

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleiner, Frederic B.

    1977-01-01

    In a response to Albert Ellis' feature article, the author agrees with Ellis but feels that less time should be spent proving which counseling method is better than the next, and more time spent in comparative research as per clients' gains. (HMV)

  7. 36 CFR 7.20 - Fire Island National Seashore.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fire Island National Seashore. 7.20 Section 7.20 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.20 Fire Island National Seashore....

  8. 36 CFR 7.20 - Fire Island National Seashore.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Fire Island National Seashore. 7.20 Section 7.20 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.20 Fire Island National Seashore....

  9. 36 CFR 7.20 - Fire Island National Seashore.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Fire Island National Seashore. 7.20 Section 7.20 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.20 Fire Island National Seashore....

  10. 36 CFR 7.84 - Channel Islands National Park.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Channel Islands National Park. 7.84 Section 7.84 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.84 Channel Islands National Park....

  11. 36 CFR 7.84 - Channel Islands National Park.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Channel Islands National Park. 7.84 Section 7.84 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.84 Channel Islands National Park....

  12. 36 CFR 7.84 - Channel Islands National Park.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Channel Islands National Park. 7.84 Section 7.84 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.84 Channel Islands National Park....

  13. 36 CFR 7.84 - Channel Islands National Park.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Channel Islands National Park. 7.84 Section 7.84 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.84 Channel Islands National Park....

  14. 36 CFR 7.84 - Channel Islands National Park.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Channel Islands National Park. 7.84 Section 7.84 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.84 Channel Islands National Park....

  15. EAARL topography: Assateague Island National Seashore

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brock, John C.; Wright, C. Wayne; Patterson, Matt; Nayegandhi, Amar; Travers, Laurinda J.

    2007-01-01

    This Web site contains 58 lidar-derived bare earth topography maps and GIS files for the Assateague Island National Seashore. These lidar-derived topography maps were produced as a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Coastal and Marine Geology Program, FISC St. Petersburg, Florida, the National Park Service (NPS) South Florida/Caribbean Network Inventory and Monitoring Program, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Wallops Flight Facility. One objective of this research is to create techniques to survey coral reefs and barrier islands for the purposes of geomorphic change studies, habitat mapping, ecological monitoring, change detection, and event assessment. As part of this project, data from an innovative instrument under development at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, the NASA Experimental Airborne Advanced Research Lidar (EAARL) are being used. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in this realm for measuring subaerial and submarine topography wthin cross-environment surveys. High spectral resolution, water-column correction, and low costs were found to be key factors in providing accurate and affordable imagery to costal resource managers.

  16. EAARL topography: Gulf Islands National Seashore: Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brock, John C.; Wright, C. Wayne; Nayegandhi, Amar; Patterson, Matt; Wilson, Iris; Travers, Laurinda J.

    2007-01-01

    This Web site contains 33 lidar-derived bare earth topography maps and GIS files for the Gulf Islands National Seashore-Florida. These lidar-derived topography maps were produced as a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Coastal and Marine Geology Program, FISC St. Petersburg, Florida, the National Park Service (NPS), Gulf Coast Network, Network Inventory and Monitoring Program, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Wallops Flight Facility. One objective of this research is to create techniques to survey coral reefs and barrier islands for the purposes of geomorphic change studies, habitat mapping, ecological monitoring, change detection, and event assessment. As part of this project, data from an innovative instrument under development at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, the NASA Experimental Airborne Advanced Research Lidar (EAARL) are being used. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in this realm for measuring subaerial and submarine topography wthin cross-environment surveys. High spectral resolution, water-column correction, and low costs were found to be key factors in providing accurate and affordable imagery to costal resource managers.

  17. EAARL Topography-Padre Island National Seashore

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brock, John C.; Wright, C. Wayne; Nayegandhi, Amar; Patterson, Matt; Wilson, Iris; Travers, Laurinda J.

    2007-01-01

    This Web site contains 116 Lidar-derived bare earth topography maps and GIS files for Padre Island National Seashore-Texas. These Lidar-derived topography maps were produced as a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC) St. Petersburg, Florida, the National Park Service (NPS) Gulf Coast Network, Inventory and Monitoring Program, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Wallops Flight Facility. One objective of this research is to create techniques to survey coral reefs and barrier islands for the purposes of geomorphic change studies, habitat mapping, ecological monitoring, change detection, and event assessment. As part of this project, data from an innovative instrument under development at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, the NASA Experimental Airborne Advanced Research Lidar (EAARL) are being used. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in this realm for measuring subaerial and submarine topography wthin cross-environment surveys. High spectral resolution, water-column correction, and low costs were found to be key factors in providing accurate and affordable imagery to costal resource managers.

  18. EAARL topography: Gulf Islands National Seashore: Mississippi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brock, John C.; Wright, C. Wayne; Nayegandhi, Amar; Patterson, Matt; Wilson, Iris; Travers, Laurinda J.

    2007-01-01

    This Web site contains 30 lidar-derived bare earth topography maps and GIS files for the Gulf Islands National Seashore-Mississippi. These lidar-derived topography maps were produced as a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Coastal and Marine Geology Program, FISC St. Petersburg, Florida, the National Park Service (NPS) Gulf Coast Network, Inventory and Monitoring Program, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Wallops Flight Facility. One objective of this research is to create techniques to survey coral reefs and barrier islands for the purposes of geomorphic change studies, habitat mapping, ecological monitoring, change detection, and event assessment. As part of this project, data from an innovative instrument under development at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, the NASA Experimental Airborne Advanced Research Lidar (EAARL) are being used. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in this realm for measuring subaerial and submarine topography wthin cross-environment surveys. High spectral resolution, water-column correction, and low costs were found to be key factors in providing accurate and affordable imagery to costal resource managers.

  19. Ellis van Creveld syndome.

    PubMed

    Ghanekar, Jaishree; Sangrampurkar, Sujata; Hulinaykar, Raman; Ahmer, Tariq

    2009-07-01

    Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EVC) or chondroectodermal dysplasia is a rare autosomal recessive disorder. It is a tetrad of chondrodysplasia, ectodermal dysplasia, polydactyly, and congenital heart disease. In several case reports, dysplasia involving other organs has also been identified. The exact prevalence is unknown, but the syndrome seems more common among the Amish community. Many Indian cases have also been reported. This report describes a classical case of EVC syndrome in a 22 year old woman of Indian origin born of a consanginous marriage. The patient had chondrodysplasia of tubular bones resulting in disproportionate dwarfism, postaxial polydactyly, severely dystrophic nails, partially absent teeth, pectus excavatum with narrow chest, knock knees and AV canal defect. PMID:20329417

  20. Ellis-van Creveld syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Chondroectodermal dysplasia; EVC ... 1 of 2 Ellis-van Creveld syndrome genes ( EVC and EVC2 ). These genes are positioned next to ... performed for mutations in 1 of the 2 EVC genes Skeletal x-ray Ultrasound Urinalysis

  1. 36 CFR 7.12 - Gulf Islands National Seashore.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... and criteria of 36 CFR part 71. (ii) No motor vehicle shall be operated on a designated oversand route... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Gulf Islands National... INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.12 Gulf Islands National Seashore....

  2. 36 CFR 7.82 - Apostle Islands National Lakeshore.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... surface of a lake. (3) Notwithstanding the requirements of 36 CFR 2.12(a)(3), operation of an ice auger or... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Apostle Islands National... INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.82 Apostle Islands National...

  3. 36 CFR 7.82 - Apostle Islands National Lakeshore.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... surface of a lake. (3) Notwithstanding the requirements of 36 CFR 2.12(a)(3), operation of an ice auger or... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Apostle Islands National... INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.82 Apostle Islands National...

  4. 36 CFR 7.12 - Gulf Islands National Seashore.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... and criteria of 36 CFR part 71. (ii) No motor vehicle shall be operated on a designated oversand route... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Gulf Islands National... INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.12 Gulf Islands National Seashore....

  5. 36 CFR 7.82 - Apostle Islands National Lakeshore.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... surface of a lake. (3) Notwithstanding the requirements of 36 CFR 2.12(a)(3), operation of an ice auger or... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Apostle Islands National... INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.82 Apostle Islands National...

  6. 36 CFR 7.12 - Gulf Islands National Seashore.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... and criteria of 36 CFR part 71. (ii) No motor vehicle shall be operated on a designated oversand route... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Gulf Islands National... INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.12 Gulf Islands National Seashore....

  7. 36 CFR 7.12 - Gulf Islands National Seashore.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... and criteria of 36 CFR part 71. (ii) No motor vehicle shall be operated on a designated oversand route... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Gulf Islands National... INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.12 Gulf Islands National Seashore....

  8. 36 CFR 7.82 - Apostle Islands National Lakeshore.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... surface of a lake. (3) Notwithstanding the requirements of 36 CFR 2.12(a)(3), operation of an ice auger or... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Apostle Islands National... INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.82 Apostle Islands National...

  9. Weather and Climate Monitoring Protocol, Channel Islands National Park, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McEachern, Kathryn; Power, Paula; Dye, Linda; Rudolph, Rocky

    2008-01-01

    Weather and climate are strong drivers of population dynamics, plant and animal spatial distributions, community interactions, and ecosystem states. Information on local weather and climate is crucial in interpreting trends and patterns in the natural environment for resource management, research, and visitor enjoyment. This document describes the weather and climate monitoring program at the Channel Islands National Park (fig. 1), initiated in the 1990s. Manual and automated stations, which continue to evolve as technology changes, are being used for this program. The document reviews the history of weather data collection on each of the five Channel Islands National Park islands, presents program administrative structure, and provides an overview of procedures for data collection, archival, retrieval, and reporting. This program overview is accompanied by the 'Channel Islands National Park Remote Automated Weather Station Field Handbook' and the 'Channel Islands National Park Ranger Weather Station Field Handbook'. These Handbooks are maintained separately at the Channel Island National Park as 'live documents' that are updated as needed to provide a current working manual of weather and climate monitoring procedures. They are available on request from the Weather Program Manager (Channel Islands National Park, 1901 Spinnaker Dr., Ventura, CA 93001; 805.658.5700). The two Field Handbooks describe in detail protocols for managing the four remote automated weather stations (RAWS) and the seven manual Ranger Weather Stations on the islands, including standard operating procedures for equipment maintenance and calibration; manufacturer operating manuals; data retrieval and archiving; metada collection and archival; and local, agency, and vendor contracts.

  10. 75 FR 28643 - Pine Island, Matlacha Pass, Island Bay, and Caloosahatchee National Wildlife Refuges, Lee and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-21

    ... Register on June 27, 2007 (72 FR 35254), and extended the comment period in a notice in the Federal Register on April 2, 2008 (73 FR 17991). For more about the refuges, their purposes, and our CCP process... Fish and Wildlife Service Pine Island, Matlacha Pass, Island Bay, and Caloosahatchee National...

  11. Amchitka Island Environmental Analysis at Idaho National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Gracy Elias; W. F. Bauer; J.G. Eisenmenger; C.C. Jensen; B.K. Schuetz; T. C. Sorensen; B.M. White; A. L. Freeman; M. E. McIlwain

    2005-08-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) provided support to Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation (CRESP) in their activities which is supported by the Department of Energy (DOE) to assess the impact of past nuclear testing at Amchitka Island on the ecosystemof the island and surrounding ocean. INL participated in this project in three phases, Phase 1, Phase 2 and Phase 3.

  12. 77 FR 27185 - Availability of Seats for the Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary Advisory...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-09

    ... Whale National Marine Sanctuary Advisory Council AGENCY: Office of National Marine Sanctuaries (ONMS... the following vacant seats on the Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary Advisory.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary Advisory Council...

  13. 76 FR 38684 - Minor Boundary Revision at Virgin Islands National Park

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-01

    ... National Park Service Minor Boundary Revision at Virgin Islands National Park AGENCY: National Park Service....S.C. 4601- 9(c)(1), the boundary of the Virgin Islands National Park is modified to include an... the Island of St. John, immediately adjacent to the current boundary of the Virgin Islands...

  14. National priorities list sites: Rhode Island, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    The publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. It clearly describes what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. Compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund Program.

  15. Benthic substrate classification map: Gulf Islands National Seashore

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lavoie, Dawn; Flocks, James; Twichell, Dave; Rose, Kate

    2013-01-01

    The 2005 hurricane season was devastating for the Mississippi Gulf Coast. Hurricane Katrina caused significant degradation of the barrier islands that compose the Gulf Islands National Seashore (GUIS). Because of the ability of coastal barrier islands to help mitigate hurricane damage to the mainland, restoring these habitats prior to the onset of future storms will help protect the islands themselves and the surrounding habitats. During Hurricane Katrina, coastal barrier islands reduced storm surge by approximately 10 percent and moderated wave heights (Wamsley and others, 2009). Islands protected the mainland by preventing ocean waves from maintaining their size as they approached the mainland. In addition to storm protection, it is advantageous to restore these islands to preserve the cultural heritage present there (for example, Fort Massachusetts) and because of the influence that these islands have on marine ecology. For example, these islands help maintain a salinity regime favorable to oysters in the Mississippi Sound and provide critical habitats for many migratory birds and endangered species such as sea turtles (Chelonia mydas, Caretta caretta, and Dermochelys coriacea), Gulf sturgeon (Acipenser oxyrinchus desotoi), and piping plovers (Charadrius melodus) (U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 2009a). As land manager for the GUIS, the National Park Service (NPS) has been working with the State of Mississippi and the Mobile District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to provide a set of recommendations to the Mississippi Coastal Improvements Program (MsCIP) that will guide restoration planning. The final set of recommendations includes directly renourishing both West Ship Island (to protect Fort Massachusetts) and East Ship Island (to restore the French Warehouse archaeological site); filling Camille Cut to recreate a continuous Ship Island; and restoring natural regional sediment transport processes by placing sand in the littoral zone just east of Petit Bois

  16. 77 FR 56231 - Minor Boundary Revision at Virgin Islands National Park

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-12

    ... National Park Service Minor Boundary Revision at Virgin Islands National Park AGENCY: National Park Service....S.C. 4601- 9(c)(1)(ii), the boundary of the Virgin Islands National Park is modified to include an... States. The land is located at Estate Haulover on the east end of the Island of St. John,...

  17. 78 FR 4872 - Minor Boundary Revision at Governors Island National Monument

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-23

    ... National Park Service Minor Boundary Revision at Governors Island National Monument AGENCY: National Park..., pursuant to 16 U.S.C. 460l- 9(c)(1)(ii), the boundary of Governors Island National Monument is modified to... maintaining a dock necessary to provide safe waterborne access to the island. The boundary revision...

  18. Soils and vegetation of Santa Barbara Island, Channel Islands National Park, California, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halvorson, William L.; Fenn, Dennis B.; Allardice, William R.

    1988-01-01

    The multifaceted development of an erosion surface on Santa Barbara Island, Channel Islands National Park, California, has led to this study of the relationship between soils and vegetation. A dry Mediterranean climate and past attempts at farming and introductions of alien species have led to vegetative degradation accompanied by both gully and surface erosion. Soil and vegetation analyses show this erosion to be in a location of transition. The soils are Typic Chromoxererts (Vertisol Order) with high clay, salinity, and sodium contents. The vegetation is ecotonal in nature, grading from a principally alien annual grassland with Avena fatua and Atriplex semibaccata to a shrub community dominated by the native Suaeda californica. Management toward revegetation and stabilization of this island ecosystem will be difficult with high clay, saline-sodic soils and disturbed vegetation.

  19. Ellis-van Creveld syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sasalawad, Shilpa S; Hugar, Shivayogi M; Poonacha, K S; Mallikarjuna, Rachappa

    2013-01-01

    Ellis-van Creveld (EvC) syndrome or chondroectodermal dysplasia is an autosomal recessive disorder with characteristic clinical manifestations. The four principal characteristics are chondrodysplasia, polydactyly, ectodermal dysplasia and congenital heart defects. Its incidence in the general population is low. The oral manifestations of EvC syndrome include both soft tissues and teeth, but the dental literature on the subject is scarce. The present case describes the constant and variable oral findings in these patients, which can be diagnosed at any age, even during pregnancy. The presence of a variety of oral manifestations, such as fusion of upper lip to the gingival margin, presence of multiple frenula, abnormally shaped and microdontic teeth and congenitally missing teeth requires multidisciplinary dental treatment, with consideration for the high incidence of cardiac defects in these patients. PMID:23843404

  20. 76 FR 59159 - Record of Decision; Apostle Islands National Lakeshore, WI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-23

    ... National Park Service Record of Decision; Apostle Islands National Lakeshore, WI AGENCY: Department of the... General Management Plan/Wilderness Management Plan/Final Environmental Impact Statement, Apostle Islands... Plan (GMP)/Wilderness Management Plan for Apostle Islands National Lakeshore, Wisconsin. On June...

  1. 15 CFR Appendix A to Subpart G of... - Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary Boundary Coordinates

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Channel Islands National Marine... Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary Pt. 922, Subpt. G, App. A Appendix A to Subpart G of Part 922—Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary Boundary Coordinates Point Latitude (N) Longitude (W) 1...

  2. 15 CFR Appendix A to Subpart G of... - Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary Boundary Coordinates

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Channel Islands National Marine... Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary Pt. 922, Subpt. G, App. A Appendix A to Subpart G of Part 922—Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary Boundary Coordinates Point Latitude (N) Longitude (W) 1...

  3. 15 CFR Appendix A to Subpart G of... - Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary Boundary Coordinates

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Channel Islands National Marine... Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary Pt. 922, Subpt. G, App. A Appendix A to Subpart G of Part 922—Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary Boundary Coordinates Point Latitude (N) Longitude (W) 1...

  4. 36 CFR 228.80 - Operations within Misty Fjords and Admiralty Island National Monuments, Alaska.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Fjords and Admiralty Island National Monuments, Alaska. 228.80 Section 228.80 Parks, Forests, and Public... Operations within Misty Fjords and Admiralty Island National Monuments, Alaska. (a) Mineral activities on valid mining claims in the Misty Fjords and Admiralty Island National Monuments must be conducted...

  5. 15 CFR Appendix A to Subpart G of... - Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary Boundary Coordinates

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Channel Islands National Marine... Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary Pt. 922, Subpt. G, App. A Appendix A to Subpart G of Part 922—Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary Boundary Coordinates Point Latitude (N) Longitude (W) 1...

  6. 15 CFR Appendix A to Subpart G of... - Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary Boundary Coordinates

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Channel Islands National Marine... Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary Pt. 922, Subpt. G, App. A Appendix A to Subpart G of Part 922—Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary Boundary Coordinates Point Latitude (N) Longitude (W) 1...

  7. 36 CFR 228.80 - Operations within Misty Fjords and Admiralty Island National Monuments, Alaska.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Fjords and Admiralty Island National Monuments, Alaska. 228.80 Section 228.80 Parks, Forests, and Public... Operations within Misty Fjords and Admiralty Island National Monuments, Alaska. (a) Mineral activities on valid mining claims in the Misty Fjords and Admiralty Island National Monuments must be conducted...

  8. 36 CFR 228.80 - Operations within Misty Fjords and Admiralty Island National Monuments, Alaska.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Fjords and Admiralty Island National Monuments, Alaska. 228.80 Section 228.80 Parks, Forests, and Public... Operations within Misty Fjords and Admiralty Island National Monuments, Alaska. (a) Mineral activities on valid mining claims in the Misty Fjords and Admiralty Island National Monuments must be conducted...

  9. 36 CFR 228.80 - Operations within Misty Fjords and Admiralty Island National Monuments, Alaska.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Fjords and Admiralty Island National Monuments, Alaska. 228.80 Section 228.80 Parks, Forests, and Public... Operations within Misty Fjords and Admiralty Island National Monuments, Alaska. (a) Mineral activities on valid mining claims in the Misty Fjords and Admiralty Island National Monuments must be conducted...

  10. 36 CFR 228.80 - Operations within Misty Fjords and Admiralty Island National Monuments, Alaska.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Fjords and Admiralty Island National Monuments, Alaska. 228.80 Section 228.80 Parks, Forests, and Public... Operations within Misty Fjords and Admiralty Island National Monuments, Alaska. (a) Mineral activities on valid mining claims in the Misty Fjords and Admiralty Island National Monuments must be conducted...

  11. Mammoths and Humans as Late Pleistocene Contemporaries on Santa Rosa Island, Channel Islands National Park, California.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agenbroad, L. D.; Johnson, J.; Morris, D.; Stafford, T. W.

    2007-05-01

    AMS radiocarbon dating of a pygmy mammoth (Mammuthus exilis) thoracic vertebra and associated charcoal has provided evidence for the contemporaneity of the pygmy mammoth and early human remains on Santa Rosa Island, Channel Islands National Park, California. Charcoal associated with the vertebra dated 11,010 ±70 RC yr B.P. (B-133594). That date was significantly close to the extinction date for continental mammoths to warrant a date directly on the bone. The vertebral centrum was drilled and submitted for bone collagen dating by Stafford. The resultant date was 11,030 ±50 RC yr. B P (CAMS-71697), only 20 14C years older than the charcoal date. The significance of the dates was immediately apparent, because a date from human remains from the Arlington Springs Site (CA-SRI-173), Santa Rosa Island was 10,960 ±80 RC yr B.P. (CAMS-16810) (Johnson et al., 1999) - a date nearly identical with the M. exilis measurement. The contemporaneity of the mammoth bone date and human bone date indicates that mammoths were still extant on the islands when humans arrived. These data are from only one mammoth and one human ... more research needs to be done on the mammoth and human remains on the island. Was the contemporaneity coincidence, or the prelude to extinction?

  12. Survey of Ungulate Abundance on Santa Rosa Island, Channel Islands National Park, California, March 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Griffin, Paul C.; Schoenecker, Kate A.; Gogan, Peter J.P.; Lubow, Bruce C.

    2009-01-01

    Reliable estimates of elk (Cervus elaphus) and deer (Odocoileus hemionus) abundance on Santa Rosa Island, Channel Islands National Park, California, are required to assess the success of management actions directed at these species. We conducted a double-observer aerial survey of elk on a large portion of Santa Rosa Island on March 19, 2009. All four persons on the helicopter were treated as observers. We used two analytical approaches: (1) with three capture occasions corresponding to three possible observers, pooling the observations from the two rear-seat observers, and (2) with four capture occasions treating each observer separately. Approach 1 resulted in an estimate of 483 elk in the survey zone with a 95-percent confidence interval of 479 to 524 elk. Approach 2 resulted in an estimate of 489 elk in the survey zone with a 95-percent confidence interval of 471 to 535 elk. Approximately 5 percent of the elk groups that were estimated to have been present in the survey area were not seen by any observer. Fog prevented us from collecting double-observer observations for deer as intended on March 20. However, we did count 434 deer during the double-observer counts of elk on March 19. Both the calculated number of elk and the observed number of deer are minimal estimates of numbers of each ungulate species on Santa Rosa Island as weather conditions precluded us from surveying the entire island.

  13. Albert Ellis: An Efficient and Passionate Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dryden, Windy

    1989-01-01

    Presents interview of psychotherapist Albert Ellis who discusses his early days, the women in his life, and his personal characteristics and offers personal reflections on his professional career. (Author)

  14. Al Ellis: Up Close and Personal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckstein, Daniel; Ellis, Debbie Joffe

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the following article is to share some of the personal relationship comments and to provide a tribute to the significant 93 years that Albert Ellis lived and also make major contributions to the counseling profession.

  15. Amendment to the Solomon Islands National Provident Fund Act.

    PubMed

    1989-01-01

    On 6 June 1988 the Solomon Islands National Provident Fund Act was amended to allow the Solomon Islands National Provident Fund Board to grant loans to members of the Fund. In November 1989 under authority of this amendment the Board implemented a housing scheme for members of the Fund. It instituted loans for the purchase of residential homes from property owners, the construction of residential houses, and the redemption of bank loans obtained for purchase or construction of residential houses. To qualify for the loan the applicant must be a permanent employee, be an active member of the Fund, and less than 50 years old, and the house sought to be purchased or built must be on registered land.

  16. Contaminants assessment in the coral reefs of Virgin Islands National Park and Virgin Islands Coral Reef National Monument

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bargar, Timothy A.; Garrison, Virginia H.; Alvarez, David A.; Echols, Kathy

    2013-01-01

    Coral, fish, plankton, and detritus samples were collected from coral reefs in Virgin Islands National Park (VIIS) and Virgin Islands Coral Reef National Monument (VICR) to assess existing contamination levels. Passive water sampling using polar organic chemical integrative samplers (POCIS) and semi-permeable membrane devices found a few emerging pollutants of concern (DEET and galaxolide) and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons. Very little persistent organic chemical contamination was detected in the tissue or detritus samples. Detected contaminants were at concentrations below those reported to be harmful to aquatic organisms. Extracts from the POCIS were subjected to the yeast estrogen screen (YES) to assess potential estrogenicity of the contaminant mixture. Results of the YES (estrogen equivalency of 0.17–0.31 ng/L 17-β-estradiol) indicated a low estrogenicity likelihood for contaminants extracted from water. Findings point to low levels of polar and non-polar organic contaminants in the bays sampled within VICR and VIIS.

  17. Contaminants assessment in the coral reefs of Virgin Islands National Park and Virgin Islands Coral Reef National Monument.

    PubMed

    Bargar, Timothy A; Garrison, Virginia H; Alvarez, David A; Echols, Kathy R

    2013-05-15

    Coral, fish, plankton, and detritus samples were collected from coral reefs in Virgin Islands National Park (VIIS) and Virgin Islands Coral Reef National Monument (VICR) to assess existing contamination levels. Passive water sampling using polar organic chemical integrative samplers (POCIS) and semi-permeable membrane devices found a few emerging pollutants of concern (DEET and galaxolide) and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons. Very little persistent organic chemical contamination was detected in the tissue or detritus samples. Detected contaminants were at concentrations below those reported to be harmful to aquatic organisms. Extracts from the POCIS were subjected to the yeast estrogen screen (YES) to assess potential estrogenicity of the contaminant mixture. Results of the YES (estrogen equivalency of 0.17-0.31 ng/L 17-β-estradiol) indicated a low estrogenicity likelihood for contaminants extracted from water. Findings point to low levels of polar and non-polar organic contaminants in the bays sampled within VICR and VIIS.

  18. Quantifying anthropogenically driven morphologic changes on a barrier island: Fire Island National Seashore, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kratzmann, M.G.; Hapke, C.J.

    2012-01-01

    Beach scraping, beach replenishment, and the presence of moderate development have altered the morphology of the dunebeach system at Fire Island National Seashore, located on a barrier island on the south coast of Long Island, New York. Seventeen communities are interspersed with sections of natural, nonmodified land within the park boundary. Beach width, dune elevation change, volume change, and shoreline change were calculated from light detection and ranging (LIDAR), real-time kinematic global positioning system (RTK GPS), and beach profile data sets at two ???4 km long study sites. Each site contains both modified (developed, replenished, and/or scraped) and nonmodified (natural) areas. The analysis spans 9 years, from 1998 to 2007, which encompasses both scraping and replenishment events at Fire Island. The objectives of this study were to quantify and compare morphological changes in modified and nonmodified zones, and to identify erosional areas within the study sites. Areas of increased volume and shoreline accretion were observed at both sites and at the western site are consistent with sand replenishment activities. The results indicate that from 1998 to 2007 locations backed by development and that employed beach scraping and/or replenishment as erosion control measures experienced more loss of volume, width, and dune elevation as compared with adjacent nonmodified areas. A detailed analysis of one specific modification, beach scraping, shows distinct morphological differences in scraped areas relative to nonscraped areas of the beach. In general, scraped areas where there is development on the dunes showed decreases in all measured parameters and are more likely to experience overwash during storm events. Furthermore, the rapid mobilization of material from the anthropogenic (scraped) dune results in increased beach accretion downcoast. National park lands are immediately adjacent to developed areas on Fire Island, and even relatively small human

  19. 78 FR 62648 - Cat Island National Wildlife Refuge; West Feliciana Parish, Louisiana

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-22

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Cat Island National Wildlife Refuge; West Feliciana Parish, Louisiana AGENCY...) documents for Cat Island National Wildlife Refuge (NWR). We provide this notice in compliance with our CCP... notice, we initiate our process for developing a CCP for Cat Island NWR, West Feliciana Parish,...

  20. Geomorphology and Depositional Subenvironments of Gulf Islands National Seashore, Mississippi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morton, Robert A.; Rogers, Bryan E.

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is studying coastal hazards and coastal change to improve our understanding of coastal ecosystems and to develop better capabilities of predicting future coastal change. One approach to understanding the dynamics of coastal systems is to monitor changes in barrier-island subenvironments through time. This involves examining morphological and topographic change at temporal scales ranging from millennia to years and spatial scales ranging from tens of kilometers to meters. Of particular interest are the processes that produce those changes and the determination of whether or not those processes are likely to persist into the future. In these analyses of hazards and change, both natural and anthropogenic influences are considered. Quantifying past magnitudes and rates of coastal change and knowing the principal factors that govern those changes are critical to predicting what changes are likely to occur under different scenarios, such as short-term impacts of extreme storms or long-term impacts of sea-level rise. Gulf Islands National Seashore was selected for detailed mapping of barrier-island morphology and topography because the islands offer a diversity of depositional subenvironments and the islands' areas and positions have changed substantially in historical time. The geomorphologic and subenvironmental maps emphasize the processes that formed the surficial features and also serve as a basis for documenting which subenvironments are relatively stable, such as the beach ridge complex, and those which are highly dynamic, such as the beach and active overwash zones. The primary mapping procedures used supervised functions within a Geographic Information System (GIS) that classified depositional subenvironments and features (map units) and delineated boundaries of the features (shapefiles). The GIS classified units on the basis of tonal patterns of a feature in contrast to adjacent features observed on georeferenced aerial

  1. Energy Development in Island Nations (EDIN), Partnering to Increase Island Energy Security Around the World (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-06-01

    This fact sheet provides an overview of the international partnership for Energy Development in Island nations, including mission, goals, and organization. It also includes background on EDIN's three pilot projects: U.S. Virgin Islands, Iceland-Dominica Collaboration, and New Zealand-Geothermal Potential in the Pacific.

  2. 8. NORTH ELLIS WORKS LOOKING SOUTHWEST. BOTTLING HOUSE, RIGHT, FIVE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. NORTH ELLIS WORKS LOOKING SOUTHWEST. BOTTLING HOUSE, RIGHT, FIVE CHAMBER CONDENSER, AND BURIED NORTH ELLIS THREE PIPE INCLINED RETORT, BACKGROUND LEFT. - Mariscal Quicksilver Mine & Reduction Works, Terlingua, Brewster County, TX

  3. Ellis-van Creveld syndrome.

    PubMed

    Baujat, Geneviève; Le Merrer, Martine

    2007-06-04

    Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EVC) is a chondral and ectodermal dysplasia characterized by short ribs, polydactyly, growth retardation, and ectodermal and heart defects. It is a rare disease with approximately 150 cases reported worldwide. The exact prevalence is unknown, but the syndrome seems more common among the Amish community. Prenatal abnormalities (that may be detected by ultrasound examination) include narrow thorax, shortening of long bones, hexadactyly and cardiac defects. After birth, cardinal features are short stature, short ribs, polydactyly, and dysplastic fingernails and teeth. Heart defects, especially abnormalities of atrial septation, occur in about 60% of cases. Cognitive and motor development is normal. This rare condition is inherited as an autosomal recessive trait with variable expression. Mutations of the EVC1 and EVC2 genes, located in a head to head configuration on chromosome 4p16, have been identified as causative. EVC belongs to the short rib-polydactyly group (SRP) and these SRPs, especially type III (Verma-Naumoff syndrome), are discussed in the prenatal differential diagnosis. Postnatally, the essential differential diagnoses include Jeune dystrophy, McKusick-Kaufman syndrome and Weyers syndrome. The management of EVC is multidisciplinary. Management during the neonatal period is mostly symptomatic, involving treatment of the respiratory distress due to narrow chest and heart failure. Orthopedic follow-up is required to manage the bones deformities. Professional dental care should be considered for management of the oral manifestations. Prognosis is linked to the respiratory difficulties in the first months of life due to thoracic narrowness and possible heart defects. Prognosis of the final body height is difficult to predict.

  4. Ellis-van Creveld syndrome: its history.

    PubMed

    Muensterer, Oliver J; Berdon, Walter; McManus, Chris; Oestreich, Alan; Lachman, Ralph S; Cohen, M Michael; Done, Stephen

    2013-08-01

    The story of Ellis-van Creveld syndrome is one of serendipity. By chance, Simon van Creveld and Richard Ellis purportedly met on a train and combined their independently encountered patients with short stature, dental anomalies and polydactyly into one landmark publication in 1940. They included a patient used in work published previously by Rustin McIntosh without naming McIntosh as a coauthor. This patient was followed radiologically by Caffey for nearly two decades. In 1964, Victor McKusick felt compelled to investigate a brief report in an obscure pharmaceutical journal on an unusual geographic cluster of short-statured Amish patients in Pennsylvania. This review highlights the lives of the individuals involved in the discovery of Ellis-van Creveld syndrome in their historic context. PMID:23754541

  5. National Environmental/Energy Workforce Assessment, National Summary: South Dakota-Virgin Islands. Volume Four.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Field Research Center Inc., Iowa City, IA.

    This report is one in a four-volume National Summary which presents existing workforce levels, training programs and career potentials for each of the states, Washington, D.C., Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands. Each individual state program summary is followed by a depiction of the current and projected (1976-1981) workforce figures for the…

  6. 77 FR 12323 - Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the General Management Plan, Buck Island Reef National...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-29

    ... National Park Service Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the General Management Plan, Buck Island Reef National Monument, Virgin Islands AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Availability of a Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the General Management Plan (DEIS/GMP), Buck...

  7. 75 FR 30776 - Extension of Application Period for Seats for the Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-02

    ... Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary Advisory Council: Commercial Fishing Alternate, Education... affiliations; philosophy regarding the protection and management of marine resources; and possibly the...

  8. 36 CFR 7.46 - Virgin Islands Coral Reef National Monument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Virgin Islands Coral Reef... OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.46 Virgin Islands Coral.... Coast Guard and Territory of the Virgin Islands. (3) Anchoring will only be permitted in...

  9. 36 CFR 7.46 - Virgin Islands Coral Reef National Monument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Virgin Islands Coral Reef... OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.46 Virgin Islands Coral.... Coast Guard and Territory of the Virgin Islands. (3) Anchoring will only be permitted in...

  10. 36 CFR 7.46 - Virgin Islands Coral Reef National Monument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Virgin Islands Coral Reef... OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.46 Virgin Islands Coral.... Coast Guard and Territory of the Virgin Islands. (3) Anchoring will only be permitted in...

  11. John A. Scigliano Interviews Allan B. Ellis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scigliano, John A.

    2000-01-01

    This interview with Allan Ellis focuses on a history of computer applications in education. Highlights include work at the Harvard Graduate School of Education; the New England Education Data System; and efforts to create a computer-based distance learning and development program called ISVD (Information System for Vocational Decisions). (LRW)

  12. Ellie Mannette: Master of the Steel Drum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Svaline, J. Marc

    2001-01-01

    Presents an interview with Elliot ("Ellie") Mannette who has played a major role in the development and application of steel drums. States that he has spent most of his life designing and teaching the steel drums. Covers interview topics and background information on Mannette. (CMK)

  13. Your Biggest Game: Interview with Dave Ellis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparks, Dennis

    2001-01-01

    Interviews Dave Ellis, president of the Brande Foundation, who promotes life coaching to help leaders become more creative and effective by making them happier, more satisfied human beings. It provides an opportunity for people to look at all areas of their lives, determine what they want in these areas, and have the coach help them develop…

  14. Is barrier island geologic framework fractal? Evidence from Padre Island National Seashore, Texas, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wernette, P. A.; Weymer, B. A.; Everett, M. E.; Houser, C.

    2015-12-01

    The surface morphology of coastlines has been observed to be fractal over different length-scales. Whether this phenomena extends into the subsurface has not been previously examined. Recent assessments of shoreline change suggest that the statistical behavior of shoreline change is self-affine, where the nonstationary time-series exhibits long-range dependence (LRD) that can be approximated by a power law. The scaling exponent determines the fractal dimension where high spectral power at low frequencies dominates shoreline position over large spatial scales (~ 101 to 102 km). Here, we explore the fractality of subsurface barrier island framework geology through the lens of a portable electromagnetic induction (EMI) sensor. Responses of apparent conductivity σa measured by the EMI sensor at 3 kHz (~ 4 m depth) were collected along two alongshore surveys (100 and 10 km) in Padre Island National Seashore, Texas, USA. A 10 m step-size was used for the 100 km survey, whereas a 1 m step-size was used for the 10 km survey. Thus, each spatial data series consists of n ~ 10,000 data points enabling detailed tests for LRD using traditional wavelet analysis and unconventional forecasting FARIMA techniques. In general, high powers in the wavelets correspond to previously-identified Pleistocene paleo-channels suggesting that lower-frequencies dominate the signal and are geologically controlled. Higher frequencies are proposed to reflect small-scale variations in changing hydrology. Tests for LRD by the Hurst exponent and PSD plots suggest that autocorrelations are stronger in measurements that are closer together (i.e., 1 vs 10 m step-size) over the sensor footprint. Nonetheless, the scaling exponents for both surveys suggest that σa responses are fractal signals (over different spatial scales), reflecting a very rough distribution of varying barrier island framework geology.

  15. Gap Analysis of Benthic Mapping at Three National Parks: Assateague Island National Seashore, Channel Islands National Park, and Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rose, Kathryn V.; Nayegandhi, Amar; Moses, Christopher S.; Beavers, Rebecca; Lavoie, Dawn; Brock, John C.

    2012-01-01

    The National Park Service (NPS) Inventory and Monitoring (I&M) Program initiated a benthic habitat mapping program in ocean and coastal parks in 2008-2009 in alignment with the NPS Ocean Park Stewardship 2007-2008 Action Plan. With more than 80 ocean and Great Lakes parks encompassing approximately 2.5 million acres of submerged territory and approximately 12,000 miles of coastline (Curdts, 2011), this Servicewide Benthic Mapping Program (SBMP) is essential. This report presents an initial gap analysis of three pilot parks under the SBMP: Assateague Island National Seashore (ASIS), Channel Islands National Park (CHIS), and Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore (SLBE) (fig. 1). The recommended SBMP protocols include servicewide standards (for example, gap analysis, minimum accuracy, final products) as well as standards that can be adapted to fit network and park unit needs (for example, minimum mapping unit, mapping priorities). The SBMP requires the inventory and mapping of critical components of coastal and marine ecosystems: bathymetry, geoforms, surface geology, and biotic cover. In order for a park unit benthic inventory to be considered complete, maps of bathymetry and other key components must be combined into a final report (Moses and others, 2010). By this standard, none of the three pilot parks are mapped (inventoried) to completion with respect to submerged resources. After compiling the existing benthic datasets for these parks, this report has concluded that CHIS, with 49 percent of its submerged area mapped, has the most complete benthic inventory of the three. The ASIS submerged inventory is 41 percent complete, and SLBE is 17.5 percent complete.

  16. Ecology of juvenile hawksbills (Eretmochelys imbricata) at Buck Island Reef National Monument, US Virgin Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hart, Kristen M.; Sartain-Iverson, Autumn R.; Hillis-Starr, Zandy; Phillips, Brendalee; Mayor, Philippe A.; Roberson, Kimberly; Pemberton, Roy A.; Allen, Jason B.; Lundgren, Ian; Musick, Susanna

    2013-01-01

    Surveys of juvenile hawksbills around Buck Island Reef National Monument, US Virgin Islands from 1994 to 1999 revealed distributional patterns and resulted in a total of 75 individual hawksbill captures from all years; turtles ranged from 23.2 to 77.7 cm curved carapace length (CCL; mean 42.1 ± 12.3 cm SD). Juveniles concentrated where Zoanthid cover was highest. Length of time between recaptures, or presumed minimum site residency, ranged from 59 to 1,396 days (mean 620.8 ± 402.4 days SD). Growth rates for 23 juveniles ranged from 0.0 to 9.5 cm year−1 (mean 4.1 ± 2.4 cm year−1SD). Annual mean growth rates were non-monotonic, with the largest mean growth rate occurring in the 30–39 cm CCL size class. Gastric lavages indicated that Zoanthids were the primary food source for hawksbills. These results contribute to our understanding of juvenile hawksbill ecology and serve as a baseline for future studies or inventories of hawksbills in the Caribbean.

  17. A loggerhead shrike in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    A loggerhead shrike perches on a branch in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. The loggerhead shrike prefers grasslands, orchards and open areas with scattered trees throughout a range extending from southern Canada to southern Florida and the Gulf Coast. The Refuge encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects.

  18. Willets gather in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Willets gather around a plant in the shallow waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. Willets are best identified in flight by their black-and-white wing pattern; on the ground by their thick black bills and gray legs. They breed in southern Canada, the United States and the West Indies, wintering from the southern U.S. to central South America. The 92,000-acre refuge is a habitat for more than 330 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds.

  19. Roseate Spoonbill feeds in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    In the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, a roseate spoonbill searches the water for food. The birds, named for their brilliant pink color and paddle-shaped bill, feed in shallow water by swinging their bill back and forth, scooping up small fish and crustaceans. They typically inhabit mangroves on the coasts of southern Florida, Louisiana and Texas. The 92,000-acre refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center, is a habitat for more than 330 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds.

  20. A roseate spoonbill in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    A roseate spoonbill balancing on one leg is reflected in the waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. The birds, named for their brilliant pink color and paddle-shaped bill, feed in shallow water by swinging their bill back and forth, scooping up small fish and crustaceans. They typically inhabit mangroves on the coasts of southern Florida, Louisiana and Texas. The 92,000- acre refuge is a habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge also provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds.

  1. Roseate Spoonbills preen in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    In the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, two roseate spoonbills mirror each other as they preen their lipstick-colored feathers. The birds, named for their brilliant pink color and paddle-shaped bill, feed in shallow water by swinging their bill back and forth, scooping up small fish and crustaceans. They typically inhabit mangroves on the coasts of southern Florida, Louisiana and Texas. The 92,000-acre refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center, is a habitat for more than 330 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds.

  2. Two roseate spoonbills in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Two roseate spoonbills wade in the waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. The birds, named for their brilliant pink color and paddle-shaped bill, feed in shallow water by swinging their bill back and forth, scooping up small fish and crustaceans. They typically inhabit mangroves on the coasts of southern Florida, Louisiana and Texas. The 92,000-acre wildlife refuge is a habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge also provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds.

  3. 76 FR 20706 - South Farallon Islands Nonnative Mouse Eradication Project; Farallon National Wildlife Refuge...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-13

    ... Impact to guide the management of Farallon National Wildlife Refuge over a 15- year period (75 FR 5102... Fish and Wildlife Service South Farallon Islands Nonnative Mouse Eradication Project; Farallon National... project to eradicate nonnative mice from the South Farallon Islands, part of the Farallon...

  4. 78 FR 70318 - Cat Island National Wildlife Refuge; West Feliciana Parish, Louisiana; Notice of Intent To...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-25

    ..., Louisiana, in a October 22, 2013, Federal Register notice (78 FR 62648). That notice complied with our CCP... Fish and Wildlife Service Cat Island National Wildlife Refuge; West Feliciana Parish, Louisiana; Notice... Act (NEPA) documents for Cat Island National Wildlife Refuge (NWR). We provided this notice...

  5. 76 FR 35467 - Deer and Vegetation Management Plan/Environmental Impact Statement, Fire Island National Seashore...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-17

    ... National Park Service Deer and Vegetation Management Plan/Environmental Impact Statement, Fire Island... Intent to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for a Deer and Vegetation Management Plan, Fire...) for a Deer and Vegetation Management Plan at Fire Island National Seashore, New York. The purpose...

  6. 76 FR 78309 - Hawaiian and Pacific Islands National Wildlife Refuge Complex; Wilderness Review and Legislative...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-16

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Hawaiian and Pacific Islands National Wildlife Refuge Complex; Wilderness... Islands National Wildlife Refuge Complex (Refuge Complex), to identify Wilderness Study Areas (WSAs), and...: Information about the Refuge Complex is available on our Web ] site http://www.pacificislands.fws.gov ....

  7. Gravitational Microlensing by the Ellis Wormhole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, F.

    2010-12-01

    A method to calculate light curves of the gravitational microlensing of the Ellis wormhole is derived in the weak-field limit. In this limit, lensing by the wormhole produces one image outside the Einstein ring and another image inside. The weak-field hypothesis is a good approximation in Galactic lensing if the throat radius is less than 1011 km. The light curves calculated have gutters of approximately 4% immediately outside the Einstein ring crossing times. The magnification of the Ellis wormhole lensing is generally less than that of Schwarzschild lensing. The optical depths and event rates are calculated for the Galactic bulge and Large Magellanic Cloud fields according to bound and unbound hypotheses. If the wormholes have throat radii between 100 and 107 km, are bound to the galaxy, and have a number density that is approximately that of ordinary stars, detection can be achieved by reanalyzing past data. If the wormholes are unbound, detection using past data is impossible.

  8. Coastal Change on Gulf Islands National Seashore during Hurricane Gustav: West Ship, East Ship, Horn, and Petit Bois Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stockdon, Hilary F.; Doran, Kara S.; Serafin, Katherine A.

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Hurricane Gustav made landfall on September 1, 2008, near Cocodrie, Louisiana, as a category 2 storm, with maximum sustained winds near 170 km/hr. Hurricane-force winds, with speeds in excess of 119 km/hr, extended along 270 km of the Louisiana coastline, from Marsh Island to the central barrier islands. Tropical-storm-force winds (speeds > 63 km/hr) were felt across the coasts of Mississippi and Alabama. Within this area of high wind and associated storm surge and waves lie the Mississippi barrier islands of West Ship, East Ship, Horn, and Petit Bois, part of the National Park Service (NPS) Gulf Islands National Seashore (GUIS). These east-west trending islands form a barrier between the Mississippi Sound to the north and the Gulf of Mexico to the south. The islands are generally less than 1 km wide with dune elevations ranging generally between 2 and 3 m, but reaching 6 m on Horn Island. The interaction of waves and currents with the low, sandy beaches forces a range of dynamic responses, such as dune erosion, overwash deposition, spit elongation, and island breaching. The passage of strong hurricanes (such as Camille in 1969 and Katrina in 2005), combined with a background signal of long-term shoreline retreat, has caused significant coastal changes on the Mississippi barrier islands, presenting management challenges for State and Federal officials, including NPS resource managers. At the request of the NPS, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has processed, analyzed, and interpreted pre- and post-Hurricane-Gustav lidar topographic data for West Ship, East Ship, Horn, and Petit Bois. These data and analyses can be used to better assess the storm vulnerability of portions of GUIS by characterizing the magnitude and spatial variability of hurricane-induced coastal changes, such as shoreline retreat, dune erosion, and beach volume change. This information will provide park managers with a greater understanding of the long-term evolution of these islands

  9. Strategies for International Cooperation in Support of Energy Development in Pacific Island Nations

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.; Voss, P.; Warren, A.; Baring-Gould, I.; Conrad, M.

    2012-05-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has been partnering with island communities around the world to address the technical, policy, social, and economic hurdles to deploying energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies (RETs) on small, islanded systems. The lessons learned from these partnerships are briefly summarized in this document with the goal of supporting the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA) in the development of specific near-term and longer-term strategies for island RET deployment.

  10. American avocets in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    A flock of American avocets take time to feed in the waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. Avocets are not commonly seen in the East, but range from Washington and Manitoba south to Texas and California. However, avocets may stray eastward to the Atlantic coast during their southward migration in the fall. Their common habitat is freshwater marshes and shallow marshy lakes. Much like spoonbills, they sweep their bills from side to side along the surface of the water to pick up crustaceans, aquatic insects and floating seeds. The Refuge encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects.

  11. Willets and avocets in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In the waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center, willets (left) and American avocets (right) attack the water below in a feeding frenzy. Willets inhabit coastal beaches, freshwater and salt marches, lakeshores and wet prairies, ranging from southern Canada and United States to the West Indies. Avocets are not commonly seen in the East, but range from Washington and Manitoba south to Texas and California. However, avocets may stray eastward to the Atlantic coast during their southward migration in the fall. Their common habitat is freshwater marshes and shallow marshy lakes. The Refuge encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects.

  12. 36 CFR 7.20 - Fire Island National Seashore.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the point of origin or destination on the island or from a point on the island to which access by... origin or destination of travel or is another point to which access by motor vehicle is permitted, is not... emergency involving the protection of life or a threatened substantial loss of property, travel by a...

  13. 75 FR 3981 - National Angel Island Day, 2010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-26

    ... Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty-fourth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc... Island Day, 2010 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation One hundred years ago, the Angel Island Immigration Station in San Francisco Bay opened for the first time, and an...

  14. EAARL Coastal Topography - Fire Island National Seashore 2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nayegandhi, Amar; Brock, John C.; Wright, C. Wayne; Stevens, Sara; Yates, Xan; Bonisteel, Jamie M.

    2008-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of Lidar-derived first surface (FS) and bare earth (BE) topography were produced as a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC), St. Petersburg, FL; the National Park Service (NPS), Northeast Coastal and Barrier Network, Kingston, RI; and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of Fire Island National Seashore in New York, acquired on April 29-30 and May 15-16, 2007. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural resource managers. An innovative airborne Lidar instrument originally developed at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, and known as the Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL) was used during data acquisition. The EAARL system is a raster-scanning, waveform-resolving, green-wavelength (532-nanometer) Lidar designed to map near-shore bathymetry, topography, and vegetation structure simultaneously. The EAARL sensor suite includes the raster-scanning, water-penetrating full-waveform adaptive Lidar, a down-looking red-green-blue (RGB) digital camera, a high-resolution multi-spectral color infrared (CIR) camera, two precision dual-frequency kinematic carrier-phase GPS receivers and an integrated miniature digital inertial measurement unit, which provide for submeter georeferencing of each laser sample. The nominal EAARL platform is a twin-engine Cessna 310 aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. A single pilot, a Lidar operator, and a data analyst constitute the crew for most survey operations. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in measuring sub-aerial and submarine coastal topography within cross-environmental surveys. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the EAARL system

  15. 77 FR 33239 - Prairie Stewardship Plan/Environmental Impact Statement, San Juan Island National Historical Park

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-05

    ... National Park Service Prairie Stewardship Plan/Environmental Impact Statement, San Juan Island National Historical Park AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental... Park Service (NPS) is initiating the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for...

  16. 75 FR 970 - Availability of Seats for the Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary Advisory...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-07

    ... Whale National Marine Sanctuary Advisory Council AGENCY: Office of National Marine Sanctuaries (ONMS... and alternate members of the following seats on its Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine... other various groups that help to focus efforts and attention on the humpback whale and its...

  17. Determining rates of Quaternary uplift across the Santa Rosa Island Fault, Channel Islands National Park, Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cyr, A.; Schmidt, K. M.; Minor, S. A.; Bedford, D.

    2014-12-01

    The northern Channel Islands, southern California, form the southern margin of the western Transverse Ranges. They constitute a roughly east-west trending emergent ridge uplifted as a result of south-vergent shortening and left-lateral slip, mostly on west-striking, north-dipping faults. Late Quaternary uplift of these islands is recorded by two prominent wave-cut platforms, which occur at elevations of ~5-7 and ~6-24 meters above sea level, have been attributed by previous workers to Marine Isotope Stages (MIS) 5a (~80ka) and 5e (~120 ka), and indicate low and somewhat spatially variable, uplift rates of 0.1-0.2 mm/yr. We have documented evidence of older, higher marine features, such as shoreline angles, beveled surfaces buried by aeolian sand, and pholad borings, in the interior of Santa Rosa Island. Our simple steady uplift models indicate that the highest of these paleo shore line markers, which occur at ~275 m, could be anywhere from ~1.2 Ma to ~2.7 Ma. However, despite their importance for understanding longer term uplift rates associated with the Santa Rosa Island fault and/or other faults, their ages remain unknown. As part of a cooperative effort with the National Park Service to complete a new Quaternary geologic map of the northern Channel Islands, we collected samples of quartz-bearing rock and sediment at seven locations on Santa Rosa Island, representative of 6 paleo shorelines spanning elevations between ~65 and ~275 meters above sea level, from both sides of the Santa Rosa Island fault. Rock samples were collected from moderately indurated fossiliferous marine sands that either contain pholad-bored clasts or overlie a beveled bedrock surface in order to determine 10Be exposure ages. Sediments were collected from where they directly overlie shoreline angles for determination of 10Be-26Al burial ages. Ages of these paleo sea level markers will enable us to test previous assumptions of steady island uplift, as well as allow us to test hypotheses

  18. Albert Ellis's Theoretical Ark: Reactions of a Reader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ginter, Earl J.

    1997-01-01

    Provides a brief reaction to Albert Ellis's "Postmodern Ethics for Active-Directive Counseling and Psychotherapy," which appears in this issue. Offers a condensed review of what has led up to Ellis's article. Pays special attention to the phrase "and/also" in relation to its implication for theory building and practice. (RJM)

  19. Second Language Acquisition Research: A Response to Rod Ellis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopkins, Diana; Nettle, Mark

    1994-01-01

    Two practicing English-as-a-Foreign-Language (EFL teachers respond to Rod Ellis' January 1993 article in "ELT Journal," which discussed importance of grammar instruction in EFL classrooms. Argues some of Ellis' assumptions about current classroom practices are inaccurate and a number of his "alternative" approaches to teaching grammar, such as…

  20. John Tracy Ellis and the Figure of the Catholic Intellectual

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conniff, Brian

    2006-01-01

    Fifty years after John Tracy Ellis challenged the quality and character of Catholic intellectual life, much work remains to be done. This essay explores Ellis's original assertions and places them in an overarching historical context that involves Flannery O'Connor and Thomas Merton.

  1. Carabid beetle diversity and distribution in Boston Harbor Islands national park area (Coleoptera, Carabidae)

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Robert L.; Rykken, Jessica; Farrell, Brian

    2011-01-01

    Abstract As part of an All Taxa Biodiversity Inventory in Boston Harbor Islands national park area, an inventory of carabid beetles on 13 islands was conducted. Intensive sampling on ten of the islands, using an assortment of passive traps and limited hand collecting, resulted in the capture of 6,194 specimens, comprising 128 species. Among these species were seven new state records for Massachusetts (Acupalpus nanellus, Amara aulica, Amara bifrons, Apenes lucidulus, Bradycellus tantillus, Harpalus rubripes and Laemostenus terricola terricola—the last also a new country record; in passing we report also new state records for Harpalus rubripes from New York and Pennsylvania, Amara ovata from Pennsylvania, and the first mainland New York records for Asaphidion curtum). For most islands, there was a clear relationship between species richness and island area. Two islands, however, Calf and Grape, had far more species than their relatively small size would predict. Freshwater marshes on these islands, along with a suite of hygrophilous species, suggested that habitat diversity plays an important role in island species richness. Introduced species (18) comprised 14.0% of the total observed species richness, compared to 5.5% (17 out of 306 species) documented for Rhode Island. We surmise that the higher proportion of introduced species on the islands is, in part, due to a higher proportion of disturbed and open habitats as well as high rates of human traffic. We predict that more active sampling in specialized habitats would bring the total carabid fauna of the Boston Harbor Islands closer to that of Rhode Island or eastern Massachusetts in richness and composition; however, isolation, human disturbance and traffic, and limited habitat diversity all contribute to reducing the species pool on the islands relative to that on the mainland. PMID:22371673

  2. Using Wavelet Decomposition to Assess the Development of Padre Island National Seashore, Texas, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wernette, P. A.; Weymer, B. A.; Houser, C.; Bishop, M. P.; Everett, M. E.; Reece, R.

    2015-12-01

    This study examines the relationship between modern barrier island morphology and offshore bathymetry to better understand the development history of Padre Island National Seashore (PAIS), Texas, USA. The widely accepted hypothesis for the development of PAIS is that the dunes on the mainland were partially submerged during the Holocene transgression, resulting in distinct islands that eventually coalesced by sediment transported alongshore; however, this hypothesis does not follow the development history of other barrier islands throughout the Gulf of Mexico. This study uses electromagnetic inductance (EMI) surveys, bathymetric contours, and island morphometrics to better understand the development of PAIS. A 100km long EMI survey was conducted to aid in identifying infilled subsurface paleochannels that dissect the island. Bathymetric contours were extracted from NOAA digital elevation models (DEMs) up to 7km offshore by offsetting the shoreline east in 1km intervals. Island width and volume, beach width and volume, and dune height and volume were extracted from a 100 km LiDAR-derived digital elevation model (DEM) using an automated approach. Apparent conductivity at all three frequencies (from the EMI survey), bathymetric contours, and island morphometrics were subsequently decomposed using a continuous wavelet transformation (CWT). Beach width, dune height, and dune volume exhibit a very similar waveform that coincides spatially with an inflection point in the waveform for the offshore bathymetric contours. Portions of the island proximal to the infilled paleochannels tend to have a wider beach and taller/higher volume dunes. The high degree of similarity between the subsurface paleochannels, offshore bathymetry, and island morphometrics support a new theory of development for PAIS. We argue that PAIS is not a series of partially submerged relict dunes, as previously proposed, rather that framework geology is an important factor affecting modern island

  3. Reason and emotion in psychotherapy: Albert Ellis.

    PubMed

    Dryden, W; Bond, F W

    1994-07-01

    To summarise then, in 1962 RET displayed important features still current. These include the interrelatedness of cognitive, emotive and behavioural processes, the important role that cognition plays in psychological problems, its humanistic view of the self, and the futility and dangers of self-rating. The emphasis on perpetuation rather than acquisition processes of emotional disturbance holds good now as it did then, and the core view of therapeutic change is essentially the same now as it was in 1962, despite further, more recent elaborations. Significant change has occurred in RET since 1962 that updates several of Ellis' original ideas. These include the distinction between interpretations (or inferences) and evaluations, the primary of musts in accounting for psychological disturbance, the clear distinction between healthy and unhealthy negative emotions and the greater role according to force and energy in the change process. In addition, a greater emphasis is placed on biological aspects of emotional disturbance now than 30 years ago. Finally, a greater range of cognitive, imaginal, emotive and behavioural methods are found in current RET literature than in Reason and Emotion in Psychotherapy, where Ellis restricts himself to illustrating a few cognitive and behavioural techniques. RET, then, has grown and developed over the past 30 years. In large part, this reflects the theory's flexibility and the competent people who have worked to make RET one of the most viable and widely used cognitive-behaviour therapies.

  4. GRAVITATIONAL MICROLENSING BY THE ELLIS WORMHOLE

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, F.

    2010-12-10

    A method to calculate light curves of the gravitational microlensing of the Ellis wormhole is derived in the weak-field limit. In this limit, lensing by the wormhole produces one image outside the Einstein ring and another image inside. The weak-field hypothesis is a good approximation in Galactic lensing if the throat radius is less than 10{sup 11} km. The light curves calculated have gutters of approximately 4% immediately outside the Einstein ring crossing times. The magnification of the Ellis wormhole lensing is generally less than that of Schwarzschild lensing. The optical depths and event rates are calculated for the Galactic bulge and Large Magellanic Cloud fields according to bound and unbound hypotheses. If the wormholes have throat radii between 100 and 10{sup 7} km, are bound to the galaxy, and have a number density that is approximately that of ordinary stars, detection can be achieved by reanalyzing past data. If the wormholes are unbound, detection using past data is impossible.

  5. Vector-borne diseases on Fire Island, New York (Fire Island National Seashore Science Synthesis Paper)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ginsberg, H.S.

    2005-01-01

    This paper discusses eleven tick-borne and five mosquito-borne pathogens that are known to occur at FIlS, or could potentially occur. The potential for future occurrence, and ecological factors that influence occurrence, are assessed for each disease. Lyme disease is the most common vector-borne disease on Fire Island. The Lyme spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, is endemic in local tick and wildlife populations. Public education, personal precautions against tick bite, and prompt treatment of early-stage infections can help manage the risk of Lyme disease on Fire Island. The pathogens that cause Human Monocytic Ehrlichiosis and Tularemia have been isolated from ticks or wildlife on Fire Island, and conditions suggest that other tickborne diseases (including Babesiosis, Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever, and Human Granulocytic Ehrlichiosis) might also occur, but these are far less common than Lyme disease, if present. West Nile Virus (WNV) is the primary mosquito- borne human pathogen that is known to occur on Fire Island. Ecological conditions and recent epizootiological events suggest that WNV occurs in foci that can shift from year to year. Therefore, a surveillance program with appropriate responses to increasing epizootic activity can help manage the risk of WNV transmission on Fire Island.

  6. 36 CFR 7.12 - Gulf Islands National Seashore.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... be based on needs for emergency service, resource protection, or resource management. (b) Off-road...-offs shall not be made within 500 feet of beaches. (2) Aircraft may be moored to island beaches, but... signs or uniform waterway markers. (4) Aircraft are prohibited from landing on or taking off from...

  7. National Environmental/Energy Workforce Assessment for Rhode Island.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Field Research Center Inc., Iowa City, IA.

    This report presents existing workforce levels, training programs and career potentials and develops staffing level projections (1976-1982) based on available information for the State of Rhode Island. The study concerns itself with the environmental pollution control areas of air, noise, potable water, pesticides, radiation, solid waste,…

  8. National Environmental/Energy Workforce Assessment for Virgin Islands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Field Research Center Inc., Iowa City, IA.

    This report presents existing workforce levels, training programs and career potentials and develops staffing level projections (1976-1982) based on available information for the Territory of the Virgin Islands. The study concerns itself with the environmental pollution control areas of air, noise, potable water, pesticides, radiation, solid…

  9. Language Use and Linguistic Nationalism in the Faroe Islands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knudsen, Karin Johanna L.

    2010-01-01

    Using data from the work of a Language Commission set by the Faroese Government in 2005 to formulate a proposal for an official Faroese language policy and findings from my own study on language use among young Faroe Islanders, this paper questions whether the present language policy in the Faroes is an effective strategy to maintain and protect a…

  10. 78 FR 32274 - Scorpion Pier Replacement Project, Channel Islands National Park, Santa Barbara County, California

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-29

    ... National Park Service Scorpion Pier Replacement Project, Channel Islands National Park, Santa Barbara... analysis process for the proposed replacement and potential relocation of the existing Scorpion Pier at..., Attn: Scorpion Pier Project, 1901 Spinnaker Drive, Ventura, CA 93001 or electronically to...

  11. 78 FR 5779 - Extension of Application Period for Seats for the Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-28

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Extension of Application Period for Seats for the Channel... Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary Advisory Council: Business Alternate, Non-consumptive Recreation... protection and management of marine resources; and possibly the length of residence in the area affected...

  12. 77 FR 27188 - Extension of Application Period for Seats for the Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-09

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Extension of Application Period for Seats for the Channel... Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary Advisory Council: Chumash Community Member and Alternate... management of marine resources; and possibly the length of residence in the area affected by the...

  13. Republic of the Marshall Islands: planning and implementation of a dental caries prevention program for an island nation.

    PubMed

    Tut, Ohnmar K; Greer, Mark H K; Milgrom, Peter

    2005-03-01

    The Republic of Marshall Islands (R.M.I.) is an island state in eastern Micronesia with a landmass of 70 square miles scattered across 750,000 square miles of the western Pacific Ocean with a national population of approximately 51,000. In a 2002 children's oral health survey, 85 percent of six year old children in the R.M.I. capital of Majuro were found to have had at least one carious tooth and 65 percent had 5 or more affected teeth. The mean caries prevalence among primary (or baby) teeth was 5.79 decayed or filled teeth (dft), a caries prevalence rate close to three times the U.S. national mean. While 12.3 percent were caries-free, 65.0 percent had experienced 5 or more affected teeth (rampant caries). Of these, less than 1 percent had received any form of dental treatment. Comparably remarkable early childhood dental disease rates were also observed on other populated islands and atolls. In response to the rampant dental disease shown to be affecting young children, the R.M.I. Ministry of Health has proposed the implementation of a strategy targeting the pre-natal / pen-natal environment, young parents, pre-school and elementary school children. PMID:18181475

  14. Vulnerability of National Park Service beaches to inundation during a direct hurricane landfall: Cumberland Island National Seashore

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stockdon, Hilary F.; Thompson, David M.; Fauver, Laura A.

    2007-01-01

    Cumberland Island National Seashore, a barrier-island coastal park in Georgia, is vulnerable to the powerful, sand-moving forces of hurricanes. Waves and storm surge associated with these strong tropical storms are part of the natural process of barrier-island evolution and can cause extensive morphologic changes in coastal parks, leading to reduced visitor accessibility and enjoyment. The vulnerability of park beaches to inundation, and associated extreme coastal change, during a direct hurricane landfall can be assessed by comparing the elevations of storm-induced mean-water levels (storm surge) to the elevations of the crest of the sand dune that defines the beach system. Maps detailing the inundation potential for Category 1-5 hurricanes can be used by park managers to determine the relative vulnerability of various barrier-island parks and to assess which areas of a particular park are more susceptible to inundation and extreme coastal changes.

  15. Ellis-van Creveld syndrome and dyserythropoiesis.

    PubMed

    Scurlock, Deven; Ostler, Daniel; Nguyen, Andy; Wahed, Amer

    2005-05-01

    Ellis-van Creveld (EVC) syndrome or chondroectodermal dysplasia is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by a variable spectrum of clinical findings. Classical EVC syndrome comprises a tetrad of clinical manifestations of chondrodystrophy, polydactyly, ectodermal dysplasia, and cardiac defects. In several case reports, dysplasia involving other organs has also been identified. Hematologic abnormalities have been rarely reported in patients with EVC syndrome. Here, we report a case of a 3-year-old Hispanic boy with EVC syndrome and marked dyserythropoiesis. The dyserythropoiesis may be part of an isolated myelodysplastic change or a primary myelodysplastic syndrome and likely represents an unusual EVC syndrome association. To our knowledge, this association has not been previously reported.

  16. EDIN-USVI Clean Energy Quarterly: Volume 1 November 2010, Energy Development in Island Nations, U.S. Virgin Islands (Newsletter)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-11-01

    This quarterly newsletter provides timely news and information about the plans and progress of the Energy Development in Island Nations U.S. Virgin Islands pilot project, including significant events and milestones, work undertaken by each of the five working groups, and EDIN-sponsored renewable energy and energy efficiency projects.

  17. EDIN-USVI Clean Energy Quarterly: Volume 1, Issue 2, March 2011, Energy Development in Island Nations, U.S. Virgin Islands (Newsletter)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-03-01

    This quarterly newsletter provides timely news and information about the plans and progress of the Energy Development in Island Nations U.S. Virgin Islands pilot project, including significant events and milestones, work undertaken by each of the five working groups, and project-related renewable energy and energy efficiency projects.

  18. Nitrogen Loads in Groundwater Entering Back Bays and Ocean from Fire Island National Seashore, Long Island, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schubert, Christopher E.; deVries, M. Peter; Finch, Anne J.

    2010-01-01

    Fire Island is a barrier island that lies south of central Long Island, N.Y. It is about 60 km (37 mi) long and 0.5 km (1/4 mi) wide and is bounded by the Great South Bay, Narrow Bay, and Moriches Bay estuaries to the north; by the Atlantic Ocean to the south; by Fire Island Inlet to the west; and by Moriches Inlet to the east (fig. 1). Fire Island National Seashore (FIIS) encompasses a 42-km (26-mi) length of Fire Island that is bordered by Robert Moses State Park to the west and Smith Point County Park to the east (fig. 2). Interspersed throughout FIIS are 17 residential beach communities that together contain about 4,100 homes. The barrier island's summer population increases 50-fold through the arrival of summer residents and vacationers. The National Park Service (NPS) has established several facilities on the island to accommodate visitors to FIIS. About 2.2 million people visit at least one of the 17 communities and (or) Smith Point County Park, the waterways surrounding Fire Island, or a FIIS facility annually (National Park Service, 2007). Combined visitation on a peak-season weekend day can be as high as 100,000 (National Park Service, 2002). Most homes and businesses in the 17 barrier-island communities discharge untreated wastewater directly to the shallow (water-table) aquifer through private septic systems and cesspools; the NPS facilities discharge wastewater to this aquifer through leach fields and cesspools. (The community of Ocean Beach (fig. 2) has a treatment plant that discharges to tidewater.) Contaminants in sewage entering the shallow groundwater move through the flow system and are ultimately discharged to adjacent marine surface waters, where they can pose a threat to coastal habitats. A contaminant of major concern is nitrogen, which is derived from fertilizers and human waste. The continuous inflow of nitrogen to surface-water bodies can lead to increased production of phytoplankton and macroalgae, which in turn can cause oxygen

  19. Genetics Home Reference: Ellis-van Creveld syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... bone growth that results in very short stature (dwarfism). People with this condition have particularly short forearms ... Ellis-van Creveld Syndrome Encyclopedia: Polydactyly Health Topic: Dwarfism Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (1 link) ...

  20. 75. SACRED HEART SCHOOL, 1324 ELLIS STREET SOUTH (REAR ELEVATION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    75. SACRED HEART SCHOOL, 1324 ELLIS STREET SOUTH (REAR ELEVATION FROM GREENE STREET 56/61A - Greene Street Historic District, Greene Street, Gordon Highway to Augusta Canal Bridge, Augusta, Richmond County, GA

  1. 33 CFR 147.1104 - Platform ELLEN & ELLY safety zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Platform ELLEN & ELLY safety zone... Ellen, 33°-34′-57″ N, 118°-07′-42″ W; and Platform Elly, 33°-35′-00″ N, 118°-07′-40″ W. (b) Regulations... serving either structure, (2) a vessel under 100 feet in length overall not engaged in towing, or (3)...

  2. 33 CFR 147.1104 - Platform ELLEN & ELLY safety zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Platform ELLEN & ELLY safety zone... Ellen, 33°-34′-57″ N, 118°-07′-42″ W; and Platform Elly, 33°-35′-00″ N, 118°-07′-40″ W. (b) Regulations... serving either structure, (2) a vessel under 100 feet in length overall not engaged in towing, or (3)...

  3. 33 CFR 147.1104 - Platform ELLEN & ELLY safety zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Platform ELLEN & ELLY safety zone... Ellen, 33°-34′-57″ N, 118°-07′-42″ W; and Platform Elly, 33°-35′-00″ N, 118°-07′-40″ W. (b) Regulations... serving either structure, (2) a vessel under 100 feet in length overall not engaged in towing, or (3)...

  4. 33 CFR 147.1104 - Platform ELLEN & ELLY safety zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Platform ELLEN & ELLY safety zone... Ellen, 33°-34′-57″ N, 118°-07′-42″ W; and Platform Elly, 33°-35′-00″ N, 118°-07′-40″ W. (b) Regulations... serving either structure, (2) a vessel under 100 feet in length overall not engaged in towing, or (3)...

  5. 33 CFR 147.1104 - Platform ELLEN & ELLY safety zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Platform ELLEN & ELLY safety zone... Ellen, 33°-34′-57″ N, 118°-07′-42″ W; and Platform Elly, 33°-35′-00″ N, 118°-07′-40″ W. (b) Regulations... serving either structure, (2) a vessel under 100 feet in length overall not engaged in towing, or (3)...

  6. Essential service standards for equitable national cardiovascular care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

    PubMed

    Brown, Alex; O'Shea, Rebekah L; Mott, Kathy; McBride, Katharine F; Lawson, Tony; Jennings, Garry L R

    2015-02-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) constitute the largest cause of death for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and remain the primary contributor to life expectancy differentials between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and non-Indigenous Australians. As such, CVD remains the most critical target for reducing the life expectancy gap. The Essential Service Standards for Equitable National Cardiovascular Care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people (ESSENCE) outline elements of care that are necessary to reduce disparity in access and outcomes for five critical cardiovascular conditions. The ESSENCE approach builds a foundation on which the gap in life expectancy between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and non-Indigenous Australians can be reduced. The standards purposefully focus on the prevention and management of CVD extending across the continuum of risk and disease. Each of the agreed essential service standards are presented alongside the most critical targets for policy development and health system reform aimed at mitigating population disparity in CVD and related conditions.

  7. 75 FR 57056 - Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge and Wallops Island National Wildlife Refuge, Accomack...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-17

    ..., including opportunities for hunting, fishing, wildlife observation and photography, and environmental...-dependent recreational opportunities such as fishing, hunting, and wildlife photography. Wallops Island...

  8. Coupled barrier island-resort model: 2. Tests and predictions along Ocean City and Assateague Island National Seashore, Maryland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNamara, D. E.; Werner, B. T.

    2008-03-01

    The fate of coastlines and their human settlements under the effects of global climate change will depend critically on the nonlinear dynamics of and feedbacks between shoreline processes and human agency. This hypothesis is explored on the barrier island coastline of Ocean City and Assateague Island National Seashore, Maryland, using a model-coupling natural coastal processes, including erosion, accretion, island overwash, alongshore sediment transport, dune growth and migration, inlet migration and ebb tidal delta growth to economics of tourist resort development through storm damage and beach and dune replenishment. Initiating the model in 1845, the RMS difference between model and measurements of the shoreline position in 2001 is 84.97 m compared to a net onshore migration of 472.2 m and the RMS difference between modeled and measured hotel room density in 2001 is 2950 rooms km-1 compared to a net gain of 28,824 rooms km-1. Simulations to year 3400 for a rate of sea level rise of 3.5 mm a-1 show a steady state barrier island position 158 m further offshore and 0.54 m lower in elevation compared to its natural counterpart. Changing the rate of sea level rise to 10.5 mm a-1 increases these differences to 288 m and 0.76 m. Changing storminess by increasing the standard deviation of storm size 50% diminishes coupling between resorts and barriers, bringing the natural and coupled attractors into near coincidence. These results suggest that predicted increases in the rate of sea level rise will lead to enhanced vulnerability for Ocean City.

  9. National priorities list sites: Puerto Rico and Virgin Islands, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    The publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. It clearly describes what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. Compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund Program.

  10. Geophysical data from offshore of the Gulf Islands National Seashore, Cat Island to Western Horn Island, Mississippi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pendleton, E.A.; Baldwin, W.E.; Danforth, W.W.; DeWitt, N.T.; Forde, A.S.; Foster, D.S.; Kelso, K.W.; Pfeiffer, W.R.; Turecek, A.M.; Flocks, J.G.; Twichell, D.C.

    2011-01-01

    This report contains the geophysical and geospatial data that were collected along the western offshore side of the Gulf Islands of Mississippi on the research vessel Tommy Munro during two cruises in 2010. Geophysical data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey in Woods Hole, Massachusetts, and St. Petersburg, Forida, in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Mobile District. Bathymetric-sonar, sidescan-sonar, and Chirp seismic-reflection data were acquired with the following equipment, respectively: Systems Engineering and Assessment, Ltd., SwathPlus interferometric sonars; Klein 3000 and 3900 dual-frequency sidescan sonars; and an EdgeTech 512i Chirp sub-bottom profiling system. The long-term goals of this mapping effort are to produce high-quality, high-resolution geologic maps and interpretations that can be utilized to identify sand resources within the region, to better understand the Holocene evolution, and to anticipate future changes in this coastal system. Processed geospatial data files and the geophysical data provided in this report help attain these goals.

  11. The developmental implications of migration from and between small island nations.

    PubMed

    Mckee, D L; Tisdell, C A

    1988-12-01

    This article discusses the role of migration in relieving population pressures, thus making continuing development possible, using small nations in the Caribbean and the South Pacific as examples. The Caribbean islands and many Pacific islands have used out-migration to ease population pressures in this century. Surplus labor has been emerging in various Caribbean nations, independent of the international marketing problems of plantation agriculture. Rural populations alienated from plantations have had to make do on questionable and/or remote land. Population surpluses appear to originate in rural areas, but little evidence exists to suggest that those surpluses are the basis for the emigration patterns of the Caribbean islands. Emigration does not solve population problems because when ambitious, skilled workers leave their country, their actions have little to do with the existence of domestic surplus labor and their leaving may do little to facilitate domestic labor absorption. Thus, if mini-states wish to sustain their hopes of economic expansion, they must find the means to employ their surplus labor. Since mainly skilled migrants leave, their going may actually slow development and retard opportunities for labor absorption. Population movements internal to the Caribbean region may further complicate surplus labor and/or population problems. If protective entry requirements impede normal inter-island relations, they may interfere with developmental processes. In general, migration is not a feasible strategy for population control for small island nations. While temporary migration has a more positive impact than other forms of migration, problems do exist. For example, temporary migration 1) can impose significant economic costs on the source-country, and 2) may result in the source country being unable to capitalize on its initial investment in training and education of temporary migrants. In conclusion, import substitution through cooperation between small

  12. The developmental implications of migration from and between small island nations.

    PubMed

    Mckee, D L; Tisdell, C A

    1988-12-01

    This article discusses the role of migration in relieving population pressures, thus making continuing development possible, using small nations in the Caribbean and the South Pacific as examples. The Caribbean islands and many Pacific islands have used out-migration to ease population pressures in this century. Surplus labor has been emerging in various Caribbean nations, independent of the international marketing problems of plantation agriculture. Rural populations alienated from plantations have had to make do on questionable and/or remote land. Population surpluses appear to originate in rural areas, but little evidence exists to suggest that those surpluses are the basis for the emigration patterns of the Caribbean islands. Emigration does not solve population problems because when ambitious, skilled workers leave their country, their actions have little to do with the existence of domestic surplus labor and their leaving may do little to facilitate domestic labor absorption. Thus, if mini-states wish to sustain their hopes of economic expansion, they must find the means to employ their surplus labor. Since mainly skilled migrants leave, their going may actually slow development and retard opportunities for labor absorption. Population movements internal to the Caribbean region may further complicate surplus labor and/or population problems. If protective entry requirements impede normal inter-island relations, they may interfere with developmental processes. In general, migration is not a feasible strategy for population control for small island nations. While temporary migration has a more positive impact than other forms of migration, problems do exist. For example, temporary migration 1) can impose significant economic costs on the source-country, and 2) may result in the source country being unable to capitalize on its initial investment in training and education of temporary migrants. In conclusion, import substitution through cooperation between small

  13. Assessing Shoreline Change for Post-hurricane Management of Park Resources in Gulf Islands National Seashore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hapke, C.; Beavers, R.

    2006-12-01

    Units of the Gulf Islands National Seashore on Santa Rosa Island in Florida were highly impacted during the hurricanes of 2004 (Ivan) and 2005 (Cindy, Dennis, Katrina and Rita). In addition to the loss of or damage to natural and cultural resources within the park, damage to park infrastructure, including park access roads and utilities, occurred in areas experiencing rapid shoreline retreat. The main park road was located as close as 50m to the pre-storm (2001) shoreline and was still under repair from damage incurred during Hurricane Ivan when the 2005 hurricanes struck the region. A new General Management Plan is under development for the Gulf Islands National Seashore. This plan, like the existing General Management Plan, strives to incorporate natural barrier island processes, and will guide future efforts to provide access to units of Gulf Islands National Seashore on Santa Rosa Island. To assess changes in island geomorphology and provide data for park management, the National Park Service and the U.S. Geological Survey are currently analyzing shoreline change to better understand historical shoreline change trends as well as short-term shoreline impact and recovery to severe storm events. Results show that over a 140-year period from the late 1800s to 2001, the average shoreline change rate was -0.3 m/yr. Areas of historic erosion, reaching a maximum rate of -1.4 m/yr, correspond to areas that experienced overwash and road damage during the 2004 hurricane season. During Hurricane Ivan, the shoreline eroded as much as 75 m, but within eight months many areas had recovered to near pre-storm positions. An exception is on the western end of the island near Pensacola Pass where the shoreline continued to erode as much as 86 m in the year following Ivan, and prior to the 2005 storm season. The shoreline erosion rate in the areas where the park road was heavily damaged doubled as a result of Ivan, increasing to -2.8 m/yr. Additional post-storm monitoring of this

  14. Energy Transition Initiative: Island Energy Snapshot - Trinidad and Tobago; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect

    2015-05-20

    This profile provides a snapshot of the energy landscape of Trinidad and Tobago, a two-island nation located off the coast of Venezuela. Trinidad and Tobago’s electricity rates are some of the lowest in the Caribbean at approximately $0.04 per kilowatt-hour (kWh), well below the regional average of $0.33/kWh.

  15. Energy Transition Initiative: Island Energy Snapshot - Antigua and Barbuda; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect

    2015-05-20

    This profile provides a snapshot of the energy landscape of Antigua and Barbuda, an independent nation in the Leeward Islands in the eastern Caribbean Sea. Antigua and Barbuda’s utility rates are approximately $0.37 U.S. dollars (USD) per kilowatt-hour (kWh), which is above the Caribbean regional average of $0.33 USD/kWh.

  16. 77 FR 16519 - Tongass National Forest Wrangell Ranger District; Alaska; Wrangell Island Project Environmental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-21

    ... environmental impact Statement was published in the Federal Register (77 FR 14727) on March 13, 2012 concerning... Forest Service Tongass National Forest Wrangell Ranger District; Alaska; Wrangell Island Project Environmental Impact Statement AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Corrected Notice of Intent to prepare...

  17. 75 FR 62415 - Nomans Land Island National Wildlife Refuge, Town of Chilmark, Martha's Vineyard, MA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-08

    ... the notice of intent we published in the Federal Register (69 FR 72210) on December 13, 2008. We... of availability in the Federal Register (75 FR 30052) on May 28, 2010. Nomans Land Island is a 628... of the National Wildlife Refuge System (NWRS), consistent with sound principles of fish and...

  18. The Pacific Way: Sustainability in Higher Education in the South Pacific Island Nations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corcoran, Peter Blaze; Koshy, Kanayathu Chacko

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to create an area profile of significant activity and possibility in higher education for sustainable development (ESD) in the island nations of the South Pacific Ocean. Design/methodology/approach: This is a descriptive research paper on philosophy, policy, and practice according to a methodology of…

  19. EAARL coastal topography-Assategue Island National Seashore, Maryland and Virginia, 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bonisteel-Cormier, J.M.; Nayegandhi, Amar; Wright, C.W.; Brock, J.C.; Nagle, D.B.; Vivekanandan, Saisudha; Klipp, E.S.; Fredericks, Xan; Stevens, Sara

    2011-01-01

    This DVD contains lidar-derived bare-earth (BE) and first-surface (FS) topography GIS datasets of a portion of the Assateague Island National Seashore in Maryland and Virginia. These datasets were acquired on March 19 and 24, 2010.

  20. Historical bac-barrier shoreline changes, Padre Island National Seashore, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Prouty, J.S. )

    1989-09-01

    Historical progradation rates of the Laguna Madre shoreline at Padre Island National Seashore have varied considerably, largely in response to rainfall fluctuations and perhaps grazing pressure. Analysis of aerial photographs indicates that near the northern margin of the National Seashore the shoreline prograded at an average rate of 26 ft/year between 1941 and 1950. The average rate of progradation increased to 42 ft/year between 1950 and 1964. Average rates then slowed in the late 1960s, and since 1969 the shoreline has prograded at an average rate of only 1 ft/year. Some areas of the shoreline are presently eroding. Early maps and accounts suggest that a century ago North Padre Island was largely vegetated. Overgrazing and a series of droughts in the late 19th and early 20th centuries denuded the island, and prevailing winds blew sand westward across the island into Laguna Madre. With higher than average rainfall in the past 2 decades and less grazing, the island has significantly revegetated. Winds now carry less sand to Laguna Madre; reduced sand supply is a major cause of present-day shoreline retreat.

  1. Amchitka Island Environmental Analysis Phase 4 Actinide Analysis At Idaho National laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Gracy Elias

    2005-11-01

    Idaho National Laboratory (INL) provided support to Vanderbilt University and Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation (CRESP) in their activites, supported by the Department of Energy (DOE), to assess the impact of past nuclear testing at Amchitka Island on the ecosystem of the island and surrounding ocean. INL participated in this project in four phases. INL support in the first three phases is documented in Report # INL/EXT-05-00361. The details of INL participation in Phase 4 (sample results, Quality Control (QC) results, and other related quality assurance documents) are included in this report.

  2. Water resources of the Apostle Islands National Lakeshore, northern Wisconsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rose, W.J.

    1988-01-01

    Ground-water use in the National Lakeshore is primarily for consumption by Lakeshore visitors and employees. Of 14 wells constructed from 1979-84, 4 were finished in glacial sand and gravel, and 10 were finished in sandstone. Specific capacities ranged from 0.63 to 50 gallon per minute per foot. Average concentrations of dissolved solids are moderate and concentrations of heavy metals did not exceed Wisconsin's primary health standard.

  3. Kelp forest monitoring. Channel Islands National Park (1991 annual report). Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, D.; Kushner, D.; Avery, W.

    1993-06-01

    This document describes the 1991 progress of the Channel Islands National Park Kelp Forest Monitoring Project. Population dynamics of 68 indicator species of algae, fish, and invertebrates were measured at 16 permanent transect sites in 1991 by divers using SCUBA and surface-supply-air. Survey dives were conducted at seven other locations for comparisons and general information. In 1991, nine sites had healthy kelp forests. Five others had some kelp growing on or near the transect, but were dominated somewhat by sea urchins. White sea urchins were present in moderate to high numbers at four sites with declines at two sites and an increase at one. Juvenile fish recruitment was down in 1991; however, young-of-year rockfish were numerous at San Miguel Island and juvenile sheepland and garibaldi were common at Santa Barbra and Anacapa Islands. Abalone recruitment modules proved effective at concentrating juveniles of several species. This year was a poor recruitment year for abalone.

  4. 78 FR 38359 - Approval of Record of Decision for Relocation of Cattle Point Road, San Juan Island National...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-26

    ... National Park Service Approval of Record of Decision for Relocation of Cattle Point Road, San Juan Island National Historical Park, San Juan County, Washington AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION... Environmental Quality (40 CFR 1505.2), the Department of the Interior, National Park Service has prepared...

  5. The action potential of Dionaea muscipula Ellis.

    PubMed

    Hodick, D; Sievers, A

    1988-04-01

    The intention of this investigation was to acquire more concise information about the nature of the action potential of Dionaea muscipula Ellis and the different types of cells generating and conducting it. It is shown by microelectrode measurements that, besides the sensory cells, all the major tissues of the trap lobes are excitable, firing action potentials with pronounced after-hyperpolarizations. The action potentials are strictly dependent on Ca(2+). Their peak depolarizations are shifted 25-27 mV in a positive direction after a tenfold increase in external Ca(2+) concentration. Perfusions with 1 mM ethylene glycol-bis(β-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) or 1 mM LaCl3 completely inhibit excitability. Magnesium ions only slightly affect the peak depolarizations but considerably prolong action potentials. Sodium azide and 2,4-dinitrophenol also abolish excitation, probably by reducing the intracellular ATP concentration. Furthermore, it is tested whether the sensory cells can be distinguished from the other cells of the trap by their electrical behaviour. The resting potentials of sensory cells (-161±7 mV) and mesophyll cells (-155±8 mV) are of the same magnitude. Changes in external ion concentrations affect resting and action potentials in both cell types in a similar way. Additional freeze-fracture studies of both cell types reveal similar numbers and distributions of intramembrane particles on the fracture faces of the plasma membrane, which is most likely the mechanosensor. These findings stress the view that the high mechanosensitivity of the sensory hair results from its anatomy and not from a specialized perception mechanism. It is proposed that trap closure is triggered by a rise in the cytoplasmic concentration of Ca(2+) or a Ca(2+)-activated regulatory complex, which must exceed a threshold concentration. Since the Ca(2+) influx during a single action potential does not suffice to reach this threshold, at least two stimulations

  6. An osprey at home in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    A Rough-legged hawk stares at the landscape from a perch in a tree in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. This type of hawk is rarely seen in Florida, ranging from northern Alaska through Manitoba and Newfoundland and wintering from California east to Virginia. The 92,000-acre refuge, which shares a boundary with the Kennedy Space Center, is habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles.

  7. An osprey at home in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    A Rough-legged Hawk fans its wings as it gently lands in a tree in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. This type of hawk is rarely seen in Florida, ranging from northern Alaska through Manitoba and Newfoundland and wintering from California east to Virginia. The 92,000-acre refuge, which shares a boundary with the Kennedy Space Center, is habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles.

  8. Feral Hogs Management at Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge: Analysis of Current Management Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenfeld, Arie; Hinkle, C. Ross; Epstein, Marc

    2002-01-01

    This ST1 Technical Memorandum (TM) summarizes a two-month project on feral hog management in Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge (MINWR). For this project, feral hogs were marked and recaptured, with the help of local trappers, to estimate population size and habitat preferences. Habitat covers included vegetation cover and Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) data for MINWR. In addition, an analysis was done of hunting records compiled by the Refuge and hog-car accidents compiled by KSC Security.

  9. In vitro antioxidant activity of polysaccharide from Gardenia jasminoides ellis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fan, Y.; Ge, Z.; Luo, A.

    2011-01-01

    A water-soluble polysaccharide, GP, was isolated from Gardenia jasminoides Ellis through hot water extraction followed by ethanol precipitation. The in vitro free radicals scavenging tests exhibited that GP has significant scavenging abilities especially for ABTS, DPPH, and hydroxyl radicals, which suggests that the polysaccharide GP is a novel antioxidant. ?? 2011 Academic Journals.

  10. An Information Theory Analysis of Interviews by Ellis and Rogers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lichtenberg, James W.; Tyndall, Larry W.

    Research on communication in counseling has identified/defined counselor communication behaviors which may affect client response and change. To further understand the pattern of interaction between counselor and client, transcripts of four initial interviews by Albert Ellis and two by Carl Rogers were analyzed for the pattern of responding within…

  11. Let's Nuke the Transpersonalists: A Response to Albert Ellis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilber, Ken

    1989-01-01

    Responds to Albert Ellis' 1986 article which proposed to use rational-emotive therapy (RET) to save the world from religious and psychological fanatics and nuclear war. Attempts to provide a more balanced view of religion, RET, non-RET therapies, and the role of psychology in averting nuclear war. (Author/ABL)

  12. Physical Illness and Subscription to Ellis' Irrational Beliefs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Diana DeVore; Lichtenberg, James W.

    Research has shown a generally positive correlation between a person's propensity for illness and certain psychological variables. To investigate the relationship between an individual's age, sex, and degree of subscription to each of Albert Ellis' 10 irrational beliefs and their frequency and type of illness, 122 adults completed the Irrational…

  13. Evolving Science in Adolescence: Comment on Ellis et al. (2012)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodge, Kenneth A.; Albert, Dustin

    2012-01-01

    Ellis et al. (2012) bring an evolutionary perspective to bear on adolescent risky behavioral development, clinical practice, and public policy. The authors offer important insights that (a) some risky behaviors may be adaptive for the individual and the species by being hard-wired due to fitness benefits and (b) interventions might be more…

  14. Affect, Albert Ellis, and Rational-Emotive Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, G. Barry

    1989-01-01

    Contends affect is integral component of Rational Emotive Therapy model. Reviews affective aspect of the model in terms of theoretical constructs and therapeutic techniques. Makes references to author-observed interactions of Albert Ellis and describes his life-style to permit inferences regarding the role of affect. Includes commentary by Ellis…

  15. Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy after Ellis: Predictions for the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinrach, Stephen G.; Ellis, Albert; DiGiuseppe, Raymond; Bernard, Michael E.; Dryden, Windy; Kassinove, Howard; Morris, G. Barry; Vernon, Ann; Wolfe, Janet

    1995-01-01

    Nine members of the institute for Rational-Emotive Therapy's (REBT) International Training Standards and Review Committee predicted the status of REBT 25 to 50 years after the death of Albert Ellis. Will REBT continue to exist in its own right or be incorporated into newer forms of cognitive behavior therapy? (EMK)

  16. Reconstructing Social Constructionism: A Response to Albert Ellis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guterman, Jeffrey T.

    1996-01-01

    Offers a response to Albert Ellis' critique of social constructionist models in mental health counseling. Focuses on views of reality and on the distinctions between content and process, and examines formal and informal content. Likewise clarifies viewpoints on diagnosis and the client/counselor relationship. (EMK)

  17. Albert Ellis Revisited: Vague, General or Mild Religion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Floyd, William A.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the writings of Albert Ellis dealing with religion and psychotherapy. Advocates a liberal form of theism in which (1) the use of symbolism and ritual are stressed; (2) faith is taken seriously but not as history or science; and (3) the importance of theology is affirmed. (JAC)

  18. Must the Rational Emotive Therapist Be like Albert Ellis?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Norbert

    1980-01-01

    Some counselors may avoid using Rational Emotive Therapy (RET) because they feel they cannot deal with clients in the active-directive manner of Albert Ellis, originator of RET. Some of the ways in which less actively directive counselors may use RET techniques are discussed. (Author)

  19. An Empirical Evaluation of Ellis' Rational Emotive Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Loyd S.; Couch, R. David

    Ellis' rational emotive theory is based on the assumption that people are born with a potential for both rational and irrational thinking. To analyze the relationship of irrational beliefs to sensitivity, depression, submission, anxiety, and neuroticism, an Irrationality Scale, containing eight irrational beliefs, was constructed from a review of…

  20. Counselors' Evaluation of Rogers-Perls-Ellis's Relationship Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodward, Wallace S.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Participants (12 employment counselors and 10 counselor supervisors) attending a three-week workshop on enhancing relationship skills, evaluated the Rogers, Perls, Ellis film, Three Approaches to Psychotherapy, on 15 skills. Results indicate there was general agreement between the counselors and the supervisors when judging levels of therapist…

  1. Gravity-Driven Thin Film Flow of an Ellis Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Kheyfets, Vitaly O.

    2014-01-01

    The thin film lubrication approximation has been studied extensively for moving contact lines of Newtonian fluids. However, many industrial and biological applications of the thin film equation involve shear-thinning fluids, which often also exhibit a Newtonian plateau at low shear. This study presents new numerical simulations of the three-dimensional (i.e. two-dimensional spreading), constant-volume, gravity-driven, free surface flow of an Ellis fluid. The numerical solution was validated with a new similarity solution, compared to previous experiments, and then used in a parametric study. The parametric study centered around rheological data for an example biological application of thin film flow: topical drug delivery of anti-HIV microbicide formulations, e.g. hydroxyethylcellulose (HEC) polymer solutions. The parametric study evaluated how spreading length and front velocity saturation depend on Ellis parameters. A lower concentration polymer solution with smaller zero shear viscosity (η0), τ1/2, and λ values spread further. However, when comparing any two fluids with any possible combinations of Ellis parameters, the impact of changing one parameter on spreading length depends on the direction and magnitude of changes in the other two parameters. In addition, the isolated effect of the shear-thinning parameter, λ, on the front velocity saturation depended on τ1/2. This study highlighted the relative effects of the individual Ellis parameters, and showed that the shear rates in this flow were in both the shear-thinning and plateau regions of rheological behavior, emphasizing the importance of characterizing the full range of shear-rates in rheological measurements. The validated numerical model and parametric study provides a useful tool for future steps to optimize flow of a fluid with rheological behavior well-described by the Ellis constitutive model, in a range of industrial and biological applications. PMID:25309029

  2. Gravity-Driven Thin Film Flow of an Ellis Fluid.

    PubMed

    Kheyfets, Vitaly O; Kieweg, Sarah L

    2013-12-01

    The thin film lubrication approximation has been studied extensively for moving contact lines of Newtonian fluids. However, many industrial and biological applications of the thin film equation involve shear-thinning fluids, which often also exhibit a Newtonian plateau at low shear. This study presents new numerical simulations of the three-dimensional (i.e. two-dimensional spreading), constant-volume, gravity-driven, free surface flow of an Ellis fluid. The numerical solution was validated with a new similarity solution, compared to previous experiments, and then used in a parametric study. The parametric study centered around rheological data for an example biological application of thin film flow: topical drug delivery of anti-HIV microbicide formulations, e.g. hydroxyethylcellulose (HEC) polymer solutions. The parametric study evaluated how spreading length and front velocity saturation depend on Ellis parameters. A lower concentration polymer solution with smaller zero shear viscosity (η 0), τ 1/2, and λ values spread further. However, when comparing any two fluids with any possible combinations of Ellis parameters, the impact of changing one parameter on spreading length depends on the direction and magnitude of changes in the other two parameters. In addition, the isolated effect of the shear-thinning parameter, λ, on the front velocity saturation depended on τ 1/2. This study highlighted the relative effects of the individual Ellis parameters, and showed that the shear rates in this flow were in both the shear-thinning and plateau regions of rheological behavior, emphasizing the importance of characterizing the full range of shear-rates in rheological measurements. The validated numerical model and parametric study provides a useful tool for future steps to optimize flow of a fluid with rheological behavior well-described by the Ellis constitutive model, in a range of industrial and biological applications. PMID:25309029

  3. Well network installation and hydrogeologic data collection, Assateague Island National Seashore, Worcester County, Maryland, 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Banks, William S.L.; Masterson, John P.; Johnson, Carole D.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, as part of its Climate and Land Use Change Research and Development Program, is conducting a multi-year investigation to assess potential impacts on the natural resources of Assateague Island National Seashore, Maryland that may result from changes in the hydrologic system in response to projected sea-level rise. As part of this effort, 26 monitoring wells were installed in pairs along five east-west trending transects. Each of the five transects has between two and four pairs of wells, consisting of a shallow well and a deeper well. The shallow well typically was installed several feet below the water table—usually in freshwater about 10 feet below land surface (ft bls)—to measure water-level changes in the shallow groundwater system. The deeper well was installed below the anticipated depth to the freshwater-saltwater interface—usually in saltwater about 45 to 55 ft bls—for the purpose of borehole geophysical logging to characterize local differences in lithology and salinity and to monitor tidal influences on groundwater. Four of the 13 shallow wells and 5 of the 13 deeper wells were instrumented with water-level recorders that collected water-level data at 15-minute intervals from August 12 through September 28, 2010. Data collected from these instrumented wells were compared with tide data collected north of Assateague Island at the Ocean City Inlet tide gage, and precipitation data collected by National Park Service staff on Assateague Island. These data indicate that precipitation events coupled with changes in ambient sea level had the largest effect on groundwater levels in all monitoring wells near the Atlantic Ocean and Chincoteague and Sinepuxent Bays, whereas precipitation events alone had the greatest impact on shallow groundwater levels near the center of the island. Daily and bi-monthly tidal cycles appeared to have minimal influence on groundwater levels throughout the island and the water-level changes that were

  4. Larviciding offshore islands reduces adulticidal treatment of populated areas adjacent to national wildlife refuges.

    PubMed

    Hribar, Lawrence J; Fussell, Edsel M; Leal, Andrea L

    2011-12-01

    The Florida Keys Mosquito Control District has conducted larvicide missions on uninhabited offshore islands of the Great White Heron National Wildlife Refuge and the National Key Deer Refuge since 2003. The objective of these missions is to reduce the need to apply adulticides on nearby populated islands where private lands are interspersed with refuge lands that support a diverse assemblage of native butterflies and insect-pollinated plants on Big Pine Key, No Name Key, Little Torch Key, Middle Torch Key, and Big Torch Key (the Torch Keys). More than 800 visits were made to refuge islands by Florida Keys Mosquito Control District personnel; 334 aerial larvicide missions were flown. From 2003 to 2010, a marked reduction in adult mosquito numbers was seen on Big Pine Key, and to a lesser extent on No Name Key. Seasonal distribution of mosquitoes was not different, however. Number of aerial adulticide missions flown on Big Pine Key, No Name Key, and the Torch Keys was 2, 1, and 2 in 2003; 9, 10, and 7 in 2004; 4, 4, and 2 in 2005; 6, 6, and 7 in 2006; 1, 0, and 0 in 2007; 3, 2, and 4 in 2008; 4, 3, and 4 in 2009; and 1, 1, and 3 in 2010, respectively. This is a dramatic reduction from prior years; from 1998 to 2002, 57 aerial adulticide missions were flown on Big Pine Key, 45 missions were flown on No Name Key, and 38 on the Torch Keys. Larviciding is an important component of an integrated approach to mosquito management that seeks to reduce environmental impacts on the national wildlife refuges.

  5. Coastal vulnerability assessment of Fire Island National Seashore to sea-level rise

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pendleton, Elizabeth A.; Williams, S. Jeffress; Thieler, E. Robert

    2004-01-01

    A coastal vulnerability index (CVI) was used to map the relative vulnerability of the coast to future sea-level rise within Fire Island National Seashore (FIIS), New York. The CVI ranks the following in terms of their physical contribution to sea-level rise-related coastal change: geomorphology, regional coastal slope, rate of relative sea-level rise, shoreline change rates, mean tidal range and mean wave height. The rankings for each variable were combined and an index value calculated for 1-minute grid cells covering the park. The CVI highlights those regions where the physical effects of sea-level rise might be the greatest. This approach combines the coastal system's susceptibility to change with its natural ability to adapt to changing environmental conditions, yielding a quantitative, although relative, measure of the park's natural vulnerability to the effects of sea-level rise. Fire Island consists of stable and washover dominated portions of barrier beach backed by lagoons, tidal wetlands and marsh. The areas most vulnerable to sea-level rise are those with the highest historic occurrence of overwash and the highest rates of shoreline change. Implementation of large-scale beach nourishment and other coastal engineering alternatives being considered for Fire Island could alter the CVI computed here. The CVI provides an objective technique for evaluation and long-term planning by scientists and park managers.

  6. Kelp forest monitoring 1993 annual report. Channel Islands National Park. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kushner, D.; Walder, R.; Gorodezky, L.; Lerma, D.; Richards, D.

    1993-06-01

    The 1993 results of the Channel Islands National Park Kelp Forest Monitoring Project are described in this report. Population dynamics of 68 taxa or categories of algea, fish, and invertebrates were measured at 16 permanent sites around the five islands within the park. Survey techniques utilized SCUBA and surface-supplied-air, and included quadrats, band transects, random contacts, fish transects, video transects, size frequency measurements, artificial recruitment modules, and species list surveys. Temperature data was collected using Sea Data batheothermographs, and HOBOTEMP temperature loggers. Temperature loggers were installed at each of the sixteen sites. Size frequency measurements were taken from artifical recruitment modules at nine sites. In 1993, 13 sites had giant kelp, Macrocysts pyrifera, forests, one site was dominated by the aggregating red sea cucumber, pachythyone rubra, one site was dominated by red sea urchins, Strongylocentrotus franciscanus, and another by purple sea urchins, S. purpuratus. The 13 sites with kelp forests consisted of 10 mature and three young kelp forests. Wasting disease was observed in sea stars and wasting syndrome was apparent in sea urchins. Sea urchins wasting syndrome appears to have caused mass mortality of purple sea urchins, S. purpuratus, at two Santa Barbara Island sites.

  7. Geochemical evidence for airborne dust additions to soils in Channel Islands National Park, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muhs, D.R.; Budahn, J.R.; Johnson, D.L.; Reheis, M.; Beann, J.; Skipp, G.; Fisher, E.; Jones, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    There is an increasing awareness that dust plays important roles in climate change, biogeochemical cycles, nutrient supply to ecosystems, and soil formation. In Channel Islands National Park, California, soils are clay-rich Vertisols or Alfisols and Mollisols with vertic properties. The soils are overlain by silt-rich mantles that contrast sharply with the underlying clay-rich horizons. Silt mantles contain minerals that are rare or absent in the volcanic rocks that dominate these islands. Immobile trace elements (Sc-Th-La and Ta-Nd-Cr) and rare-earth elements show that the basalt and andesite on the islands have a composition intermediate between upper-continental crust and oceanic crust. In contrast, the silt fractions and, to a lesser extent, clay fractions of the silt mantle have compositions closer to average upper-continental crust and very similar to Mojave Desert dust. Island shelves, exposed during the last glacial period, could have provided a source of eolian sediment for the silt mantles, but this is not supported by mineralogical data. We hypothesize that a more likely source for the silt-rich mantles is airborne dust from mainland California and Baja California, either from the Mojave Desert or from the continental shelf during glacial low stands of sea. Although average winds are from the northwest in coastal California, easterly winds occur numerous times of the year when "Santa Ana" conditions prevail, caused by a high-pressure cell centered over the Great Basin. The eolian silt mantles constitute an important medium of plant growth and provide evidence that abundant eolian silt and clay may be delivered to the eastern Pacific Ocean from inland desert sources. ?? 2007 Geological Society of America.

  8. Nest fate and productivity of American Oystercatchers, Cumberland Island National Seashore, Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sabine, J.B.; Schweitzer, Sara H.; Meyers, J.M.

    2006-01-01

    The American Oystercatcher (Haematopus palliatus) is listed as a species of high priority by the U.S. Shorebird Conservation Plan and is state-listed as rare in Georgia; however, biologists have not focused on identifying the causes of egg and hatchling losses. In 2003 and 2004, continuous video monitoring was used to document reproductive success of American Oystercatchers and identify causes of nest failure at Cumberland Island National Seashore, Georgia. The modified Mayfield method and program CONTRAST were used to determine and compare survival of eggs and nestlings. Eleven pairs made 32 nest attempts during two seasons. Nine attempts were successful, fledging 15 chicks. Daily survival of clutches was 0.973 (95% CI = 0.960-0.987) for 2003, 0.985 (95% CI = 0.974-0.995) for 2004, and 0.979 (95% CI = 0.970-0.987) for combined years. Daily survival was greater on the North End, than on the South End of the island (X21 = 7.211, P = 0.007). Eighteen of 20 nest failures during the egg stage and one of eight chick losses were documented. Egg predators included raccoon (Procyon lotor, N = 9), bobcat (Lynx rufus, N = 3), and American Crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos, N = 1). A ghost crab (Ocypode quadata) preyed on one chick. Other causes of nest failure were tidal overwash (N = 1), horse trampling (N = 1), abandonment (N = 2), and human destruction (N = 1). The North End of the island has one of the highest reproductive rates reported along the Atlantic coast. Predator control may be an effective means of increasing reproductive success on the South End of the island.

  9. Evolving science in adolescence: comment on Ellis et al. (2012).

    PubMed

    Dodge, Kenneth A; Albert, Dustin

    2012-05-01

    Ellis et al. (2012) bring an evolutionary perspective to bear on adolescent risky behavioral development, clinical practice, and public policy. The authors offer important insights that (a) some risky behaviors may be adaptive for the individual and the species by being hard-wired due to fitness benefits and (b) interventions might be more successful if they move with, rather than against, the natural tendencies of an adolescent. Ellis and colleagues criticize the field of developmental psychopathology, but we see the 2 fields as complementary. Their position would be enhanced by integrating it with contemporary perspectives on dynamic cascades through which normative behavior turns into genuinely maladaptive outcomes, dual processes in adolescent neural development, and adolescent decision making. Finally, they rightly note that innovation is needed in interventions and policies toward adolescent problem behavior.

  10. Gravitational Microlensing by Ellis Wormhole: Second Order Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukmanova, Regina; Kulbakova, Aliya; Izmailov, Ramil; Potapov, Alexander A.

    2016-07-01

    Gravitational lensing is the effect of light bending in a gravitational field. It can be used as a possible observational method to detect or exclude the existence of wormholes. In this work, we extend the work by Abe on gravitational microlensing by Ellis wormhole by including the second order deflection term. Using the lens equation and definition of Einstein radius, we find the angular locations of the physical image inside and outside Einstein ring. The work contains a comparative analysis of light curves between the Schwarzschild black hole and the Ellis wormhole that can be used to distinguish such objects though such distinctions are too minute to be observable even in the near future. We also tabulate the optical depth and event rate for lensing by bulge and Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) stars.

  11. On the importance of stratigraphic control for vertebrate fossil sites in Channel Islands National Park, California, USA: Examples from new Mammuthus finds on San Miguel Island

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pigati, Jeffery S.; Muhs, Daniel R.; McGeehin, John P.

    2016-01-01

    Quaternary vertebrate fossils, most notably mammoth remains, are relatively common on the northern Channel Islands of California. Well-preserved cranial, dental, and appendicular elements of Mammuthus exilis (pygmy mammoth) and Mammuthus columbi (Columbian mammoth) have been recovered from hundreds of localities on the islands during the past half-century or more. Despite this paleontological wealth, the geologic context of the fossils is described in the published literature only briefly or not at all, which has hampered the interpretation of associated 14C ages and reconstruction of past environmental conditions. We recently discovered a partial tusk, several large bones, and a tooth enamel plate (all likely mammoth) at two sites on the northwest flank of San Miguel Island, California. At both localities, we documented the stratigraphic context of the fossils, described the host sediments in detail, and collected charcoal and terrestrial gastropod shells for radiocarbon dating. The resulting 14C ages indicate that the mammoths were present on San Miguel Island between ∼20 and 17 ka as well as between ∼14 and 13 ka (thousands of calibrated 14C years before present), similar to other mammoth sites on San Miguel, Santa Cruz, and Santa Rosa Islands. In addition to documenting the geologic context and ages of the fossils, we present a series of protocols for documenting and reporting geologic and stratigraphic information at fossil sites on the California Channel Islands in general, and in Channel Islands National Park in particular, so that pertinent information is collected prior to excavation of vertebrate materials, thus maximizing their scientific value.

  12. Improving Asian American, Native Hawaiian, and Pacific Islander Health: National Organizations Leading Community Research Initiatives

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Won Kim; Weir, Rosy Chang; Ro, Margeurite; Ko, Kathy Lim; Panapasa, Sela; Bautista, Roxanna; Asato, Lloyd; Chung, Corina; Cabllero, Jeffery; Islam, Nadia

    2012-01-01

    Background Functionally, many CBPR projects operate through a model of academic partners providing research expertise and community partners playing a supporting role. Objectives To demonstrate how national umbrella organizations deeply rooted in communities, cognizant of community needs, and drawing on the insights and assets of community partners, can lead efforts to address health disparities affecting their constituents through research. Methods Case studies of two Asian American, Native Hawaiian, and Pacific Islander national organizations Results Strategically engaging a diverse range of partners and securing flexible funding mechanisms that support research were important facilitators. Main challenges included limited interest of local community organizations whose primary missions as service or health care providers may deprioritize research. Conclusions Efforts to make research relevant to the work of community partners and to instill the value of research in community partners, as well as flexible funding mechanisms, may help to promote community-driven research. PMID:22643786

  13. Coastal vulnerability assessment of Cumberland Island National Seashore (CUIS) to sea-level rise

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pendleton, Elizabeth A.; Thieler, E. Robert; Jeffress Williams, S.

    2004-01-01

    A coastal vulnerability index (CVI) was used to map the relative vulnerability of the coast to future sea-level rise within Cumberland Island National Seashore in Georgia. The CVI ranks the following in terms of their physical contribution to sea-level rise-related coastal change: geomorphology, regional coastal slope, rate of relative sea-level rise, historical shoreline change rates, mean tidal range and mean significant wave height. The rankings for each input variable were combined and an index value calculated for 1-minute grid cells covering the park. The CVI highlights those regions where the physical effects of sea-level rise might be the greatest. This approach combines the coastal system's susceptibility to change with its natural ability to adapt to changing environmental conditions, yielding a quantitative, although relative, measure of the park's natural vulnerability to the effects of sea-level rise. The CVI provides an objective technique for evaluation and long-term planning by scientists and park managers. Cumberland Island National Seashore consists of stable to washover-dominated portions of barrier beach backed by wetland, marsh, mudflat and tidal creek. The areas within Cumberland that are likely to be most vulnerable to sea-level rise are those with the lowest foredune ridge and highest rates of shoreline erosion.

  14. A rescued pelican flies to freedom at the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge near KSC.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    A white pelican named 'Fisheater' by its rescuers, beats its wings as it flies to freedom at the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. The pelican was found covered in crude oil from a contaminated ditch in northern Indiana in November, and was rescued by a local Police Department, treated, and flown to the Back to Nature Wildlife Refuge in Orlando, Fla. for care and rest. It is being released today to join a flock of about 30 other white pelicans that are wintering on the refuge. Before its release, however, Kat Royer, with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, placed on it a leg band issued by the U.S. Department of the Interior's Bird Banding Laboratory. White pelicans inhabit marshy lakes and along the Pacific and Texas coasts. They winter from Florida and southern California south to Panama, chiefly in coastal lagoons. They are frequently seen flying in long lines, flapping and sailing in unison, but also ride rising air currents to soar gracefully in circles. The Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects.

  15. Coastal Vulnerability Assessment of Padre Island National Seashore (PAIS) to Sea-Level Rise

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pendleton, Elizabeth A.; Thieler, E. Robert; Williams, S. Jeffress; Beavers, Rebecca S.

    2004-01-01

    A coastal vulnerability index (CVI) was used to map the relative vulnerability of the coast to future sea-level rise within Padre Island National Seashore in Texas. The CVI ranks the following in terms of their physical contribution to sea-level rise-related coastal change: geomorphology, regional coastal slope, rate of relative sea-level rise, shoreline change rates, mean tidal range and mean significant wave height. The rankings for each variable were combined and an index value calculated for 1-minute grid cells covering the park. The CVI highlights those regions where the physical effects of sea-level rise might be the greatest. This approach combines the coastal system's susceptibility to change with its natural ability to adapt to changing environmental conditions, yielding a quantitative, although relative, measure of the park's natural vulnerability to the effects of sea-level rise. The CVI provides an objective technique for evaluation and long-term planning by scientists and park managers. Padre Island National Seashore consists of stable to washover dominated portions of barrier beach backed by wetland, marsh, tidal flat, or grassland. The areas within Padre that are likely to be most vulnerable to sea-level rise are those with the highest occurrence of overwash and the highest rates of shoreline change.

  16. Mapping outdoor recreationists' perceived social values for ecosystem services at Hinchinbrook Island National Park, Australia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    van Riper, Carena J.; Kyle, Gerard T.; Sutton, Stephen G.; Barnes, Melinda; Sherrouse, Benson C.

    2012-01-01

    Coastal ecosystems are increasingly faced with human impacts. To better understand these changing conditions, biophysical and economic values of nature have been used to prioritize spatial planning efforts and ecosystem-based management of human activities. Less is known, however, about how to characterize and represent non-material values in decision-making. We collected on-site and mailback survey data (n = 209), and analyzed these data using the Social Values for Ecosystem Services (SolVES) GIS application to incorporate measures of social value and natural resource conditions on Hinchinbrook Island National Park, Australia. Our objectives in this paper are to: 1) determine the spatial distribution and point density of social values for ecosystem services; 2) examine the relationship between social values and natural resource conditions; and 3) compare social value allocations between two subgroups of outdoor recreationists. Results suggest that high priority areas exist on Hinchinbrook's land and seascapes according to the multiple values assigned to places by outdoor recreationists engaged in consumptive (e.g., fishing) and non-consumptive (e.g., hiking) activities. We examine statistically significant spatial clustering across two subgroups of the survey population for three value types that reflect Recreation, Biological Diversity, and Aesthetic qualities. The relationship between the relative importance of social values for ecosystem services and spatially-defined ecological data is explored to guide management decision-making in the context of an island national park setting.

  17. 75 FR 38768 - Rehabilitation of Floodwater Retarding Structure No. 10 of the Mountain Creek Watershed, Ellis...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-06

    ... Mountain Creek Watershed, Ellis County, TX AGENCY: Natural Resources Conservation Service. ACTION: Notice... prepared for the rehabilitation of Floodwater Retarding Structure No. 10 of the Mountain Creek...

  18. Hydrogeology of Southern Cumberland Island, Georgia. Kings Bay Environmental Monitoring Program Cumberland Island national seashore, 1990. Research report

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, S.K.

    1991-01-01

    The aqueous geochemistry of three aquifers at a 9-square mile study site on the southern end of Cumberland Island, Georgia was investigated at 10 wells on the southern end of the island. The geochemistry of the surficial aquifer varied spatially across the island. The ground water types in the surficial aquifer ranged from sodium-chloride to calcium-bicarbonate, depending on the location. A zone of dispersion associated with the freshwater-saltwater interface was encountered in the Pliocene-Miocene age aquifer and the Miocena-age sand aquifer, but was not encountered in the surficial aquifer. The zone of dispersion resulted from mixing of fresh carbonate ground water seawater. The freshwater region of the zone of dispersion (3%-5% seawater) was characterized by a calcium-chloride water type which likely resulted from freshwater-seawater mixing, calcium carbonate dissolution, and reverse ion exchange.

  19. Predicted sex ratio of juvenile Hawksbill Seaturtles inhabiting Buck Island Reef national monument, U.S. Virgin Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geis, A.; Wibbels, T.; Phillips, B.; Hillis-Starr, Z.; Meylan, A.; Meylan, P.; Diez, C.; Van Dam, R.

    2003-01-01

    Hawksbill Seaturtles have temperature-dependent sex determination. As such, the resulting sex ratios are of conservational and ecological significance. Buck Island Reef is an interesting location for sex ratio studies since it represents a natural and unexploited foraging ground for hawksbills in the Caribbean. To examine sex ratios, blood samples were obtained from juvenile Hawksbill Seaturtles captured on Buck Island Reef over a four-year period. We used a radioimmunoassay to determine testosterone levels in those samples and compared those values to testosterone levels of juvenile hawksbills from the Caribbean whose sex has been verified by laparoscopy. The results of this study reveal a significantly female-biased sex ratio (approximately 80% female) occurs in this juvenile aggregation inhabiting Buck Island Reef.

  20. Rational Emotive Behavioural Therapy: The Evolution of a Revolution: Interview With Dr. Debbie Joffe Ellis, Work Partner and Wife of Dr. Albert Ellis, the Creator of REBT.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Debbie Joffe; Rovira, Montse

    2015-02-01

    Recognized as one of the most influential thinkers and psychologists, Albert Ellis PhD (1913-2007) revolutionized Psychology when he created the first cognitive psychotherapy, Rational Emotive Behavioral Therapy. After he passed away, Dr. Debbie Joffe Ellis continues spreading his legacy around the world. Psychologist, lecturer, writer, trainer, she dedicates her life to disseminate REBT and extend it through different statements, from the social to the educational, from the academic to the clinical. In this interview, she goes through her own history and her husband's one, bringing us closer to understanding Albert Ellis as the leading figure in his field, and the oneness they experienced through their professional and personal relationship.

  1. A GIS Analysis of Seagrass Resources and Condition Within Padre Island National Seashore, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Onuf, Christopher P.; Ingold, Jaimie J.

    2007-01-01

    A survey of the seagrass resources of Padre Island National Seashore was conducted in fall 2002 and 2003, with additional sampling through 2006, to resolve distribution questions. Location coordinates were recorded to thousandths of minutes of latitude and longitude and converted to decimal degrees (minus decimal degrees for longitude) for import into ArcView (Environmental Systems Research Institute, Inc.). The seagrass core frequency data were developed as a theme in ArcView and overlaid on digital orthophoto quarter quadrangles of the U.S. Geological Survey to show sample depth with respect to mean sea level and frequency of occurrence of seagrass for five samples collected from every station sampled. These data were used to draw boundaries of area submerged at mean sea level and seagrass meadow in relation to the boundary of Padre Island National Seashore. Frequency of seagrass occurrence, mean plant height, shoot density, plant height multiplied by shoot density, live biomass, and dead biomass on a 1' latitude by 0.25' longitude grid were collected, and their distribution was plotted in space and according to depth. A User Guide for displaying data in ArcView is included at the end of this report. Seagrasses covered almost two-thirds of the regularly flooded part of Laguna Madre within the borders of Padre Island National Seashore. Comparisons with earlier surveys showed that substantial areas of seagrass cover had been lost in deep water between 1988 and 1998 as a result of a persistent phytoplankton bloom, and little recovery has occurred since. Maximum depth of seagrass occurrence responded to changes in water clarity. In contrast, much of the cover at shallow to intermediate depths lost at the south end of the study area between 1988 and 1998 was replaced by 2003. The seven stations with greatest plant height were located in this area of recent recolonization. Continuity of cover as measured by frequency of occurrence was high except near the edge of

  2. Long-term and Storm-related Shoreline Change Trends in the Florida Gulf Islands National Seashore

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hapke, Cheryl J.; Christiano, Mark

    2007-01-01

    EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Coastal erosion on Northern Gulf of Mexico barrier islands is an ongoing issue that was exacerbated by the storm seasons of 2004 and 2005 when several hurricanes made landfall in the Gulf of Mexico. Two units of the Gulf Islands National Seashore (GUIS), located on Santa Rosa Island, a barrier island off the Panhandle coast of Florida, were highly impacted during the hurricanes of 2004 (Ivan) and 2005 (Cindy, Dennis, Katrina and Rita). In addition to the loss of or damage to natural and cultural resources within the park, damage to park infrastructure, including park access roads and utilities, occurred in areas experiencing rapid shoreline retreat. The main park road was located as close as 50 m to the pre-storm (2001) shoreline and was still under repair from damage incurred during Hurricane Ivan when the 2005 hurricanes struck. A new General Management Plan is under development for the Gulf Islands National Seashore. This plan, like the existing General Management Plan, strives to incorporate natural barrier island processes, and will guide future efforts to provide access to units of Gulf Islands National Seashore on Santa Rosa Island. To assess changes in island geomorphology and provide data for park management, the National Park Service and the U.S. Geological Survey are currently analyzing shoreline change to better understand long-term (100+ years) shoreline change trends as well as short-term shoreline impact and recovery to severe storm events. Results show that over an ~140-year period from the late 1800s to May 2004, the average shoreline erosion rates in the Fort Pickens and Santa Rosa units of GUIS were -0.7m/yr and -0.1 m/yr, respectively. Areas of historic erosion, reaching a maximum rate of -1.3 m/yr, correspond to areas that experienced overwash and road damage during the 2004 hurricane season.. The shoreline eroded as much as ~60 m during Hurricane Ivan, and as much as ~88 m over the course of the 2005 storm season. The

  3. Long-term and storm-related shoreline change trends in the Florida Gulf Islands National Seashore

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hapke, C.J.; Christiano, M.

    2007-01-01

    Coastal erosion on Northern Gulf of Mexico barrier islands is an ongoing issue that was exacerbated by the storm seasons of 2004 and 2005 when several hurricanes made landfall in the Gulf of Mexico. Two units of the Gulf Islands National Seashore (GUIS), located on Santa Rosa Island, a barrier island off the Panhandle coast of Florida, were highly impacted during the hurricanes of 2004 (Ivan) and 2005 (Cindy, Dennis, Katrina and Rita). In addition to the loss of or damage to natural and cultural resources within the park, damage to park infrastructure, including park access roads and utilities, occurred in areas experiencing rapid shoreline retreat. The main park road was located as close as 50 m to the pre-storm (2001) shoreline and was still under repair from damage incurred during Hurricane Ivan when the 2005 hurricanes struck. A new General Management Plan is under development for the Gulf Islands National Seashore. This plan, like the existing General Management Plan, strives to incorporate natural barrier island processes, and will guide future efforts to provide access to units of Gulf Islands National Seashore on Santa Rosa Island. To assess changes in island geomorphology and provide data for park management, the National Park Service and the U.S. Geological Survey are currently analyzing shoreline change to better understand long-term (100+ years) shoreline change trends as well as short-term shoreline impact and recovery to severe storm events. Results show that over an ~140-year period from the late 1800s to May 2004, the average shoreline erosion rates in the Fort Pickens and Santa Rosa units of GUIS were -0.7m/yr and -0.1 m/yr, respectively. Areas of historic erosion, reaching a maximum rate of -1.3 m/yr, correspond to areas that experienced overwash and road damage during the 2004 hurricane season. The shoreline eroded as much as ~60 m during Hurricane Ivan, and as much as ~88 m over the course of the 2005 storm season. The shoreline erosion rates in

  4. Fluvial system response to late Pleistocene-Holocene sea-level change on Santa Rosa Island, Channel Islands National Park, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumann, R. Randall; Pigati, Jeffrey S.; McGeehin, John P.

    2016-09-01

    Santa Rosa Island (SRI) is one of four east-west aligned islands forming the northern Channel Islands chain, and one of the five islands in Channel Islands National Park, California, USA. The island setting provides an unparalleled environment in which to record the response of fluvial systems to major changes of sea level. Many of the larger streams on the island occupy broad valleys that have been filled with alluvium and later incised to form steep- to vertical-walled arroyos, leaving a relict floodplain as much as 12-14 m above the present channel. The period of falling sea level between the end of the last interglacial highstand at ~ 80 ka and the last glacial lowstand at ~ 21 ka was marked by erosion and incision in the uplands and by deposition of alluvial sediment on the exposed marine shelf. Sea level rose relatively rapidly following the last glacial lowstand of - 106 m, triggering a shift from an erosional to a depositional sedimentary regime. Accumulation of sediment occurred first through vertical and lateral accretion in broad, shallow channels on the shelf. Channel avulsion and delta sedimentation produced widespread deposition, creating lobes or wedges of sediment distributed across relatively large areas of the shelf during the latest Pleistocene. Backfilling of valleys onshore (landward of present sea level) appears to have progressed in a more orderly and predictable fashion throughout the Holocene primarily because the streams were confined to their valleys. Vertical aggradation locally reduced stream gradients, causing frequent overbank flooding and lateral channel shift by meandering and/or avulsion. Local channel gradient and morphology, short-term climate variations, and intrinsic controls also affected the timing and magnitudes of these cut, fill, and flood events, and are reflected in the thickness and spacing of the episodic alluvial sequences. Floodplain aggradation within the valleys continued until at least 500 years ago, followed by

  5. Fluvial system response to late Pleistocene-Holocene sea-level change on Santa Rosa Island, Channel Islands National Park, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schumann, R. Randall; Pigati, Jeffery S.; McGeehin, John P.

    2016-01-01

    Santa Rosa Island (SRI) is one of four east-west aligned islands forming the northern Channel Islands chain, and one of the five islands in Channel Islands National Park, California, USA. The island setting provides an unparalleled environment in which to record the response of fluvial systems to major changes of sea level. Many of the larger streams on the island occupy broad valleys that have been filled with alluvium and later incised to form steep- to vertical-walled arroyos, leaving a relict floodplain as much as 12–14 m above the present channel. The period of falling sea level between the end of the last interglacial highstand at ~ 80 ka and the last glacial lowstand at ~ 21 ka was marked by erosion and incision in the uplands and by deposition of alluvial sediment on the exposed marine shelf. Sea level rose relatively rapidly following the last glacial lowstand of − 106 m, triggering a shift from an erosional to a depositional sedimentary regime. Accumulation of sediment occurred first through vertical and lateral accretion in broad, shallow channels on the shelf. Channel avulsion and delta sedimentation produced widespread deposition, creating lobes or wedges of sediment distributed across relatively large areas of the shelf during the latest Pleistocene. Backfilling of valleys onshore (landward of present sea level) appears to have progressed in a more orderly and predictable fashion throughout the Holocene primarily because the streams were confined to their valleys. Vertical aggradation locally reduced stream gradients, causing frequent overbank flooding and lateral channel shift by meandering and/or avulsion. Local channel gradient and morphology, short-term climate variations, and intrinsic controls also affected the timing and magnitudes of these cut, fill, and flood events, and are reflected in the thickness and spacing of the episodic alluvial sequences. Floodplain aggradation within the valleys continued until at least 500 years ago

  6. Coastal vulnerability assessment of Gulf Islands National Seashore (GUIS) to sea-level rise

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pendleton, Elizabeth A.; Hammar-Klose, Erika S.; Thieler, E. Robert; Williams, S. Jeffress

    2004-01-01

    A coastal vulnerability index (CVI) was used to map the relative vulnerability of the coast to future sea-level rise within Gulf Islands National Seashore (GUIS) in Mississippi and Florida. The CVI ranks the following in terms of their physical contribution to sea-level rise-related coastal change: geomorphology, regional coastal slope, rate of relative sea-level rise, shoreline change rates, mean tidal range and mean wave height. The rankings for each variable were combined and an index value calculated for 1-minute grid cells covering the park. The CVI highlights those regions where the physical effects of sea-level rise might be the greatest. This approach combines the coastal system's susceptibility to change with its natural ability to adapt to changing environmental conditions, yielding a quantitative, although relative, measure of the park's natural vulnerability to the effects of sea-level rise. The Gulf Islands in Mississippi and Florida consist of stable and washover dominated portions of barrier beach backed by wetland and marsh. The areas likely to be most vulnerable to sea-level rise are those with the highest occurrence of overwash, the highest rates of shoreline change, the gentlest regional coastal slope, and the highest rates of relative sea-level rise. The CVI provides an objective technique for evaluation and long-term planning by scientists and park managers.

  7. Coastal vulnerability assessment of Assateague Island National Seashore (ASIS) to sea-level rise

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pendleton, Elizabeth A.; Williams, S. Jeffress; Thieler, E. Robert

    2004-01-01

    A coastal vulnerability index (CVI, http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2004/1020/html/cvi.htm) was used to map relative vulnerability of the coast to future sea-level rise within Assateague Island National Seashore (ASIS) in Maryland and Virginia. The CVI ranks the following in terms of their physical contribution to sea-level rise-related coastal change: geomorphology, regional coastal slope, rate of relative sea-level rise, shoreline change rates, mean tidal range and mean wave height. Rankings for each variable were combined and an index value calculated for 1-minute grid cells covering the park. The CVI highlights those regions where the physical effects of sea-level rise might be the greatest. This approach combines the coastal system's susceptibility to change with its natural ability to adapt to changing environmental conditions, yielding a quantitative, although relative, measure of the park's natural vulnerability to the effects of sea-level rise. The CVI provides an objective technique for evaluation and long-term planning by scientists and park managers. Assateague Island consists of stable and washover dominated portions of barrier beach backed by wetland and marsh. The areas within Assateague that are likely to be most vulnerable to sea-level rise are those with the highest occurrence of overwash and the highest rates of shoreline change.

  8. Climate and Human Pressures on Fresh Groundwater in Coral Atoll Island Nations in the Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, I.; Falkland, T.; Perez, P.; Dray, A.; Overmars, M.; Metai, E.

    2004-12-01

    Population centres in low, coral atolls have water supply problems that are amongst the most acute in the world. Limited land areas and highly permeable soils severely restrict surface water storage, forcing heavy reliance on groundwater. Fresh groundwater is extremely vulnerable to contamination through both natural processes, such as seawater intrusion following storm surges, sea-level rise and droughts, and human activities, such as overpumping, sewerage and waste disposal. Restricted land areas and seawater intrusion also limit fresh groundwater quantities, particularly in frequent ENSO-related droughts. Demand for water is increasing due to natural population growth, inward migration and to growing urbanisation. There are few water professionals in many small island nations. Assessment of groundwater resources is inadequate and application of conventional hydrology often gives erroneous information, such as the assumption of potential evaporation from coconut trees. Water use for traditional and introduced crops competes with community water supplies. Limited resources and isolation restrict the potential for exports so that reliance on aid is systemic. The agendas of developed world aid institutions sometimes conflict with traditions and cultures of small island communities. At the core of water management problems are lack of resource assessment and demand and land tenure and conflicts between the requirements of urbanised societies and the traditional values and rights of subsistence communities. Reforms of governance and provision of water resource knowledge to communities are critical. Long-term, regional partnerships and tools for reducing conflicts over water resources are needed to promote self-reliance.

  9. Blue-winged teals in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Two male blue-winged teals are joined by a female in the waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. The teals inhabit marshes, shallow ponds and lakes from British Columbia, Quebec and Newfoundland to North Carolina, the Gulf Coast and southern California, wintering as far south as South America. The 92,000- acre wildlife refuge is a habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge also provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds.

  10. Roseate Spoonbill squawks at intruder in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    In the shallow waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, a roseate spoonbill squawks at nearby intruders. The birds, named for their brilliant pink color and paddle-shaped bill, feed in shallow water by swinging their bill back and forth, scooping up small fish and crustaceans. They typically inhabit mangroves on the coasts of southern Florida, Louisiana and Texas. The 92,000-acre refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center, is a habitat for more than 330 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds.

  11. Roseate Spoonbill displays wings in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    A female roseate spoonbill (left) displays her colorful wings to the male at right in a mating ritual in Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. The birds, named for their brilliant pink color and paddle-shaped bill, feed in shallow water by swinging their bill back and forth, scooping up small fish and crustaceans. They typically inhabit mangroves on the coasts of southern Florida, Louisiana and Texas. The 92,000-acre refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center, is a habitat for more than 330 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds.

  12. Roseate Spoonbill displays wings in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    A female roseate spoonbill displays her colorful wings in a mating ritual in Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. The birds, named for their brilliant pink color and paddle-shaped bill, feed in shallow water by swinging their bill back and forth, scooping up small fish and crustaceans. They typically inhabit mangroves on the coasts of southern Florida, Louisiana and Texas. The 92,000-acre refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center, is a habitat for more than 330 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds.

  13. CURRENT APPLICATIONS OF THREE MILE ISLAND-2 CORE AND DEBRIS HANDLING AT THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY

    SciTech Connect

    Carmack, William Jonathan; Braase, Lori Ann

    2015-09-01

    Fuel recovery from severe accidents requires careful planning and execution. The Idaho National Laboratory played a key role in the Three Mile Island (TMI) fuel and core recovery. This involved technology development to locate and handle the damaged fuel; characterization of fuel and debris; analysis of fuel interaction with structural components and materials; development of fuel drying technology for long-term storage. However, one of the critical activities from the TMI project was the extensive effort document all the activities and archive the reports and photos. A historical review of the TMI project at the INL leads to the identification of current applications and considerations for facility designs, fuel handling, robotic applications, material characterization, etc.

  14. Effects of human activity of breeding American Oystercatchers, Cumberland Island National Seashore, Georgia, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sabine, J.B.; Meyers, J.M.; Moore, C.T.; Schweitzer, Sara H.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract.-Increased human use of coastal areas threatens the United States population of American Oystercatchers (Haematopus palliatus), a species of special concern. Biologists often attribute its low numbers and reproductive success to human disturbance, but the mechanism by which human presence reduces reproductive success is not well understood. During the 2003 and 2004 breeding seasons, 32 nesting attempts of American Oystercatchers were studied on Cumberland Island National Seashore (CINS). Behavior was examined with and without human activity in the area to determine how human activity affected behavior. The oystercatchers' behavioral responses (proportion time) were analyzed with and without human or intraspecific disturbances using mixed models regression analysis. Proportions of time human activities were present (137 m and vehicular activity should be minimized at current levels or less.

  15. A rescued pelican flies to freedom at the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge near KSC.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    A white pelican named 'Fisheater' by its rescuers soars to open water in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge as it flies to freedom. The pelican was found covered in crude oil from a contaminated ditch in northern Indiana in November, and was rescued by a local Police Department, treated, and flown to the Back to Nature Wildlife Refuge in Orlando, Fla. for care and rest. It is being released today to join a flock of about 30 other white pelicans that are wintering on the refuge, some of which are nearby. Before its release, however, Kat Royer, with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, placed on it a leg band issued by the U.S. Department of the Interior's Bird Banding Laboratory. White pelicans inhabit marshy lakes and along the Pacific and Texas coasts. They winter from Florida and southern California south to Panama, chiefly in coastal lagoons. They are frequently seen flying in long lines, flapping and sailing in unison, but also ride rising air currents to soar gracefully in circles. The Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects.

  16. A rescued pelican is released at the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge near KSC.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    A rescued white pelican, dubbed 'Fisheater' by his rescuers, takes a tentative step and stretches its wings after being let go at the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. Looking on is Mark Epstein, with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, who had held the bird while Kat Royer, also with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, placed on it a leg band issued by the U.S. Department of the Interior's Bird Banding Laboratory. The pelican was found covered in crude oil from a contaminated ditch in northern Indiana in November, and was rescued by a local Police Department, treated, and flown to the Back to Nature Wildlife Refuge in Orlando, Fla. for care and rest. It is being released to join a flock of about 30 other white pelicans that are wintering on the refuge. White pelicans inhabit marshy lakes and along the Pacific and Texas coasts. They winter from Florida and southern California south to Panama, chiefly in coastal lagoons. They are frequently seen flying in long lines, flapping and sailing in unison, but also ride rising air currents to soar gracefully in circles. The Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects.

  17. Dandy-Walker malformation in Ellis-van Creveld syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zangwill, K M; Boal, D K; Ladda, R L

    1988-09-01

    We report on 2 Old Order Amish patients with Ellis-van Creveld (EvC) syndrome and the Dandy-Walker malformation; a similar case is noted in the literature. Pedigree analysis of our patients documents extensive inbreeding in successive generations. Considering the rarity of EvC syndrome and Dandy-Walker malformation as isolated malformations, the appearance of both in our 2 patients plus the patient in the literature suggests that Dandy-Walker malformation may be a manifestation in the EvC syndrome. However, in this isolate the coincidental occurrence of 2 rare recessive traits cannot be excluded. PMID:3223493

  18. Ellis-van Creveld syndrome: A rare clinical entity.

    PubMed

    Kamal, Reet; Dahiya, Parveen; Kaur, Simerpreet; Bhardwaj, Rohit; Chaudhary, Karun

    2013-01-01

    Ellis-van Creveld (EVC) syndrome is a genetic disorder with autosomal recessive transmission, which may clinically present as small stature, short limbs, fine sparse hair, hypoplastic fingernails, multiple musculofibrous frenula, conical teeth, hypoplasia of the enamel, hypodontia, and malocclusion. Heart defects, especially abnormalities of atrial septation, have been found in about 60% of cases. The mutation in EVC and EVC2 gene is responsible for this syndrome. The presence of multiple orodental findings makes this syndrome important for dentists. The aim of this article is to present a rare case of EVC syndrome in a 10-year-old girl along with the review of literature.

  19. Ellis-van Creveld Syndrome with Sagittal Craniosynostosis.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Andrew S; Weathers, William M; Wolfswinkel, Erik M; Bollo, Robert J; Hollier, Larry H; Buchanan, Edward P

    2015-06-01

    Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EVC) is a rare disorder (the incidence is estimated at around 7/1,000,000) characterized by the clinical tetrad of chondrodystrophy, polydactyly, ectodermal dysplasia, and cardiac anomalies. Sagittal synostosis is characterized by a dolichocephalic head shape resulting from premature fusion of the sagittal suture. Both are rare disorders, which have never been reported together. We present a case of EVC and sagittal synostosis. We report the clinical features of a Hispanic boy with EVC and sagittal craniosynostosis who underwent cranial vault remodeling. The presentation of this patient is gone over in detail. A never before reported case of EVC and sagittal synostosis is presented in detail.

  20. Guaiane-type sesquiterpenoid glucosides from Gardenia jasminoides Ellis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yang; Gao, Hao; Dai, Yi; Xiao, Gao-Keng; Zhu, Hua-Jie; Yao, Xin-Sheng

    2011-05-01

    Two new guaiane-type sesquiterpenoid glucosides (1 and 2) were isolated from the fruit of Gardenia jasminoides Ellis. Their structures were elucidated to be (1R,7R,10S)-11-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-4-guaien-3-one (1) and (1R,7R,10S)-7-hydroxy-11-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-4-guaien-3-one (2) by one- and two-dimensional NMR techniques ((1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, HSQC, HMBC and NOESY), MS, CD spectrometry and chemical methods. PMID:21491483

  1. Chemical constituents from the fruits of Gardenia jasminoides Ellis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yang; Feng, Xiao-Lin; Gao, Hao; Xie, Zuo-Lei; Dai, Yi; Huang, Xiao-Jun; Kurihara, Hiroshi; Ye, Wen-Cai; Zhong, Yi; Yao, Xin-Sheng

    2012-04-01

    A new lignan glucoside, (+)-(7S,8R,8'R)-lyoniresinol 9-O-β-D-(6″-O-trans-sinapoyl)glucopyranoside (1), and a new iridoid glucoside, 10-O-trans-sinapoylgeniposide (2), together with eight known compounds, were isolated from the fruits of Gardenia jasminoides Ellis. The structures of the isolates were elucidated by extensive spectroscopic studies, including UV, IR, 1D and 2D NMR, ESI-MS, HR-ESI-MS, and CD experiments. The short-term-memory-enhancement activities of some compounds were evaluated on an Aβ transgenic drosophila model. PMID:22245087

  2. 75 FR 57441 - Availability of Seats for the Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary Advisory...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-21

    ..., Conservation, Tourism, Lana`i Island Representative, and Moloka`i Island Representative. Applicants are chosen... concern throughout the sanctuary, offering recommendations on specific issues, and aiding in achieving...

  3. Archive of bathymetry and backscatter data collected in 2014 nearshore Breton and Gosier Islands, Breton National Wildlife Refuge, Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeWitt, Nancy T.; Fredericks, Jake J.; Flocks, James G.; Miselis, Jennifer L.; Locker, Stanley D.; Kindinger, Jack G.; Bernier, Julie C.; Kelso, Kyle W.; Reynolds, Billy J.; Wiese, Dana S.; Browning, Trevor

    2016-08-01

    As part of the Barrier Island Monitoring Project, scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center conducted nearshore geophysical surveys off Breton and Gosier Islands, Louisiana, in July and August of 2014. To assist the United States Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) with restoration planning efforts, the USGS was tasked with answering fundamental questions about the physical environment of the southern Chandeleur Islands, including the geology, morphology, and oceanography. Baseline data needed to answer these questions were either insufficient or missing. The USGS conducted a comprehensive geologic investigation in the summer of 2014, collecting geophysical and sedimentological data.Breton Island, located at the southern end of the Chandeleur Island chain in southeastern Louisiana, was recognized as a natural, globally significant nesting sanctuary for several bird species and was established as the Breton National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in 1904. The areal extent of Breton Island has diminished 90 percent since 1920. Land loss is attributed to ongoing relative sea-level rise, diminished sediment supply, and storm impacts. The bird population on Breton Island has also declined over the years, most notably after Hurricane George in 1998 and after Hurricane Katrina in 2015; the latter completely submerged the island. Despite decreasing habitable acreage, migratory seabirds continue to return and nest on Breton Island. To prevent the island from being submerged in the future, and to protect, stabilize, and provide more nesting and foraging areas for the bird population, the USFWS proposed a restoration effort to rebuild Breton Island to its pre-Katrina footprint.This data series serves as an archive of processed interferometric swath and single-beam bathymetry data, and side-scan sonar data, collected in the nearshore of Breton and Gosier Islands, NWR, Louisiana. The data were collected during two USGS cruises (USGS

  4. Archive of bathymetry and backscatter data collected in 2014 nearshore Breton and Gosier Islands, Breton National Wildlife Refuge, Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeWitt, Nancy T.; Fredericks, Jake J.; Flocks, James G.; Miselis, Jennifer L.; Locker, Stanley D.; Kindinger, Jack G.; Bernier, Julie C.; Kelso, Kyle W.; Reynolds, Billy J.; Wiese, Dana S.; Browning, Trevor

    2016-01-01

    As part of the Barrier Island Monitoring Project, scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center conducted nearshore geophysical surveys off Breton and Gosier Islands, Louisiana, in July and August of 2014. To assist the United States Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) with restoration planning efforts, the USGS was tasked with answering fundamental questions about the physical environment of the southern Chandeleur Islands, including the geology, morphology, and oceanography. Baseline data needed to answer these questions were either insufficient or missing. The USGS conducted a comprehensive geologic investigation in the summer of 2014, collecting geophysical and sedimentological data.Breton Island, located at the southern end of the Chandeleur Island chain in southeastern Louisiana, was recognized as a natural, globally significant nesting sanctuary for several bird species and was established as the Breton National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in 1904. The areal extent of Breton Island has diminished 90 percent since 1920. Land loss is attributed to ongoing relative sea-level rise, diminished sediment supply, and storm impacts. The bird population on Breton Island has also declined over the years, most notably after Hurricane George in 1998 and after Hurricane Katrina in 2015; the latter completely submerged the island. Despite decreasing habitable acreage, migratory seabirds continue to return and nest on Breton Island. To prevent the island from being submerged in the future, and to protect, stabilize, and provide more nesting and foraging areas for the bird population, the USFWS proposed a restoration effort to rebuild Breton Island to its pre-Katrina footprint.This data series serves as an archive of processed interferometric swath and single-beam bathymetry data, and side-scan sonar data, collected in the nearshore of Breton and Gosier Islands, NWR, Louisiana. The data were collected during two USGS cruises (USGS

  5. Energy Transition Initiative: Island Energy Snapshot - Barbados; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect

    2015-06-01

    This profile provides a snapshot of the energy landscape of Barbados, an independent nation in the Lesser Antilles island chain in the eastern Caribbean. Barbados’ electricity rates are approximately $0.28 per kilowatt-hour (kWh), below the Caribbean regional average of $0.33/kWh.

  6. 3 CFR 8947 - Proclamation 8947 of March 25, 2013. Establishment of the San Juan Islands National Monument

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Proclamation 8947 of March 25, 2013. Establishment of the San Juan Islands National Monument 8947 Proclamation 8947 Presidential Documents Proclamations... still in use. These early explorers led the way for 19th century European and American traders...

  7. Energy Transition Initiative: Island Energy Snapshot - Haiti; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect

    2015-06-01

    This profile provides a snapshot of the energy landscape of Haiti, an independent nation that occupies the western portion of the island of Hispaniola in the northern Caribbean Sea. Haiti’s utility rates are roughly $0.35 U.S. dollars (USD) per kilowatt-hour (kWh), above the Caribbean regional average of $0.33 USD/kWh.

  8. Energy Transition Initiative: Island Energy Snapshot - Palau; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect

    2015-06-01

    This profile provides a snapshot of the energy landscape of Palau, an independent island nation geographically located in the Micronesia region. Palau’s residential electricity rates are approximately $0.28 U.S. dollars (USD) per kilowatt-hour (kWh), more than twice the average U.S. residential rate of $0.13 USD/kWh.

  9. Public Education of the Prairie Island Sioux: An Interim Report. National Study of American Indian Education, Series I, No. 10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harkins, Arthur M.; And Others

    As a part of the Final Report of the National Study of American Indian Education, this study was conducted at the Prairie Island Indian Reservation located in southeastern Minnesota. The document presents a historical background of the small peninsula (approximately 10 miles long and 2 miles wide) and its inhabitants, the Sioux Indians, which…

  10. 76 FR 55107 - Draft Environmental Impact Statement for General Management Plan, Gulf Islands National Seashore...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-06

    ... alternatives. Alternative 2 would reduce the level of infrastructure rebuilt on the barrier islands and allow... of the Gulf of Mexico's barrier islands and coastal environments. Interpretive programs would focus on illustrating how barrier islands act as protectors of the mainland coastline, and the part...

  11. Herpetofaunal Inventories of the National Parks of South Florida and the Caribbean: Volume II. Virgin Islands National Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rice, Kenneth G.; Waddle, J. Hardin; Crockett, Marquette E.; Carthy, R.R.; Percival, H. Franklin

    2005-01-01

    Amphibian declines and extinctions have been documented around the world, often in protected natural areas. Concern for this alarming trend has focused attention on the need to document all species of amphibians that occur within U.S. National Parks and to search for any signs that amphibians may be declining. This study, an inventory of amphibian species in Virgin Islands National Park, was conducted from 2001 to 2003. The goals of the project were to create a georeferenced inventory of amphibian species, use new analytical techniques to estimate proportion of sites occupied by each species, look for any signs of amphibian decline (missing species, disease, die-offs, etc.), and to establish a protocol that could be used for future monitoring efforts. Several sampling methods were used to accomplish these goals. Visual encounter surveys and anuran vocalization surveys were conducted in all habitats throughout the park to estimate the proportion of sites or proportion of area occupied (PAO) by amphibian species in each habitat. Line transect methods were used to estimate density of some amphibian species and double observer analysis was used to refine counts based on detection probabilities. Opportunistic collections were used to augment the visual encounter methods for rare species. Data were collected during four sampling periods and every major trail system throughout the park was surveyed. All of the amphibian species believed to occur on St. John were detected during these surveys. One species not previously reported, the Cuban treefrog (Osteopilus septentrionalis), was also added to the species list. That species and two others (Eleutherodactylus coqui and Eleutherodactylus lentus) bring the total number of introduced amphibians on St. John to three. We detected most of the reptile species thought to occur on St. John, but our methods were less suitable for reptiles compared to amphibians. No amphibian species appear to be in decline at this time. We found no

  12. Energy Transition Initiative: Island Energy Snapshot - Belize; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect

    2015-03-01

    This profile provides a snapshot of the energy landscape of Belize, a Central American country bordering Mexico to the north, Guatemala to the west and south, and the Caribbean Sea to the east. Although not an island nation, Belize is included in this energy snapshot series because it is a member of the Caribbean Community (CARICOM), an alliance of 15 Caribbean nations in the region.

  13. Astrometric Image Centroid Displacements due to Gravitational Microlensing by the Ellis Wormhole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toki, Yukiharu; Kitamura, Takao; Asada, Hideki; Abe, Fumio

    2011-10-01

    Continuing work initiated in an earlier publication, we study the gravitational microlensing effects of the Ellis wormhole in the weak-field limit. First, we find a suitable coordinate transformation, such that the lens equation and analytic expressions of the lensed image positions can become much simpler. Second, we prove that two images always appear for the weak-field lens by the Ellis wormhole. By using these analytic results, we discuss astrometric image centroid displacements due to gravitational microlensing by the Ellis wormhole. The astrometric image centroid trajectory by the Ellis wormhole is different from the standard one by a spherical lensing object that is expressed by the Schwarzschild metric. The anomalous shift of the image centroid by the Ellis wormhole lens is smaller than that by the Schwarzschild lens, provided that the impact parameter and the Einstein ring radius are the same. Therefore, the lensed image centroid by the Ellis wormhole moves slower. Such a difference, although it is very small, will be, in principle, applicable for detecting or constraining the Ellis wormhole by using future high-precision astrometry observations. In particular, the image centroid position gives us additional information, so that the parameter degeneracy existing in photometric microlensing can be partially broken. The anomalous shift reaches the order of a few micro arcseconds, if our galaxy hosts a wormhole with throat radius larger than 105 km. When the source moves tangentially to the Einstein ring, for instance, the maximum position shift of the image centroid by the Ellis wormhole is 0.18 normalized by the Einstein ring radius. For the same source trajectory, the maximum difference between the centroid displacement by the Ellis wormhole lens and that by the Schwarzschild one with the same Einstein ring radius is -0.16 in the units of the Einstein radius, where the negative means that the astrometric displacement by the Ellis wormhole lens is smaller

  14. ASTROMETRIC IMAGE CENTROID DISPLACEMENTS DUE TO GRAVITATIONAL MICROLENSING BY THE ELLIS WORMHOLE

    SciTech Connect

    Toki, Yukiharu; Kitamura, Takao; Asada, Hideki; Abe, Fumio

    2011-10-20

    Continuing work initiated in an earlier publication, we study the gravitational microlensing effects of the Ellis wormhole in the weak-field limit. First, we find a suitable coordinate transformation, such that the lens equation and analytic expressions of the lensed image positions can become much simpler. Second, we prove that two images always appear for the weak-field lens by the Ellis wormhole. By using these analytic results, we discuss astrometric image centroid displacements due to gravitational microlensing by the Ellis wormhole. The astrometric image centroid trajectory by the Ellis wormhole is different from the standard one by a spherical lensing object that is expressed by the Schwarzschild metric. The anomalous shift of the image centroid by the Ellis wormhole lens is smaller than that by the Schwarzschild lens, provided that the impact parameter and the Einstein ring radius are the same. Therefore, the lensed image centroid by the Ellis wormhole moves slower. Such a difference, although it is very small, will be, in principle, applicable for detecting or constraining the Ellis wormhole by using future high-precision astrometry observations. In particular, the image centroid position gives us additional information, so that the parameter degeneracy existing in photometric microlensing can be partially broken. The anomalous shift reaches the order of a few micro arcseconds, if our galaxy hosts a wormhole with throat radius larger than 10{sup 5} km. When the source moves tangentially to the Einstein ring, for instance, the maximum position shift of the image centroid by the Ellis wormhole is 0.18 normalized by the Einstein ring radius. For the same source trajectory, the maximum difference between the centroid displacement by the Ellis wormhole lens and that by the Schwarzschild one with the same Einstein ring radius is -0.16 in the units of the Einstein radius, where the negative means that the astrometric displacement by the Ellis wormhole lens is

  15. Analysis of the Shallow Groundwater Flow System at Fire Island National Seashore, Suffolk County, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schubert, Christopher E.

    2010-01-01

    Fire Island National Seashore (FIIS) occupies 42 kilometers of the barrier island for which it is named that lies off the southern shore of Suffolk County, N.Y. Freshwater in the highly permeable, sandy aquifer underlying Fire Island is bounded laterally by marine surface waters and at depth by saline groundwater. Interspersed throughout FIIS are 17 pre-existing residential communities that in summer months greatly increase in population through the arrival of summer residents and vacationers; in addition, the National Park Service (NPS) has established several facilities on the island to accommodate visitors to FIIS. The 2.2 million people estimated by the NPS to visit Fire Island annually impact groundwater quality through the release of waste-derived contaminants, such as nutrients, pathogens, and organic compounds, into the environment. Waste-contaminated groundwater can move through the aquifer and threaten the ecological health of the adjacent back-barrier estuaries to which much of the groundwater ultimately discharges. In 2004, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the NPS, began a 3-year investigation to (1) collect groundwater levels and water-quality (nutrient) samples, (2) develop a three-dimensional model of the shallow (water-table) aquifer system and adjacent marine surface waters, and (3) calculate nitrogen loads in simulated groundwater discharges from the aquifer to back-barrier estuaries and the ocean. The hydrogeology of the shallow aquifer system was characterized from the results of exploratory drilling, geophysical surveying, water-level monitoring, and water-quality sampling. The investigation focused on four areas-the communities of Kismet and Robbins Rest, the NPS Visitor Center at Watch Hill, and the undeveloped Otis Pike Fire Island High Dune Wilderness. Thirty-five observation wells were installed within FIIS to characterize subsurface hydrogeology and establish a water-table monitoring network in the four study areas

  16. Morphodynamics of a mesotidal rocky beach: Palmeras beach, Gorgona Island National Natural Park, Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-García, A. M.; Bernal, G. R.; Osorio, A. F.; Botero, V.

    2014-10-01

    The response of a rocky beach to different possible combinations of hydrodynamic conditions (tides, waves, oceanic currents) has been little studied. In this work, the morphodynamic response to different hydrodynamic forcing is evaluated from sedimentological and geomorphological analysis in seasonal and medium term (19 years) scale in Palmeras beach, located in the southwest of Gorgona Island National Natural Park (NNP), a mesotidal rocky island on the Colombian Pacific continental shelf. Palmeras is an important nesting area of two types of marine turtles, with no anthropogenic stress. In the last years, coastal erosion has reduced the beach width, restricting the safe areas for nesting and conservation of these species. Until now, the sinks, sources, reservoirs, rates, and paths of sediments were unknown, as well as their hydrodynamic forcing. The beach seasonal variability, from October 2010 to August 2012, was analyzed based on biweekly or monthly measurements of five beach profiles distributed every 200 m along the 1.2 km of beach length. The main paths for sediment transport were defined from the modeling of wave currents with the SMC model (Coastal Modeling System), as well as the oceanic currents, simulated for the dry and wet seasons of 2011 using the ELCOM model (Estuary and Lake COmputer Model). Extreme morphologic variations over a time span of 19 years were analyzed with the Hsu and Evans beach static equilibrium parabolic model, from one wave diffraction point which dominates the general beach plan shape. The beach lost 672 m3/m during the measuring period, and erosional processes were intensified during the wet season. The beach trends responded directly to a wave mean energy flux change, resulting in an increase of up to 14 m in the width northward and loss of sediments in the beach southward. This study showed that to obtain the integral morphodynamic behavior of a rocky beach it is necessary to combine information of hydrodynamic, sedimentology

  17. Ambient noise and temporal patterns of boat activity in the US Virgin Islands National Park.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Maxwell B; Mooney, T Aran

    2015-09-15

    Human activity is contributing increasing noise to marine ecosystems. Recent studies have examined the effects of boat noise on marine fishes, but there is limited understanding of the prevalence of this type of sound source. This investigation tracks vessel noise on three reefs in the US Virgin Islands National Park over four months in 2013. Ambient noise levels ranged from 106 to 129dBrms re 1μPa (100Hz-20kHz). Boat noise occurred in 6-12% of samples. In the presence of boat noise, ambient noise in a low-frequency band (100-1000Hz) increased by >7dB above baseline levels and sound levels were significantly higher. The frequency with the most acoustic energy shifted to a significantly lower frequency when boat noise was present during the day. These results indicate the abundance of boat noise and its overlap with reef organism sound production, raising concern for the communication abilities of these animals.

  18. Gallinules in the waters of KSC-Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    A mother gallinule (right) calls her two chicks to enter the algae-covered water in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. Gallinules, called Moorhens in the Old World, are duck-like swimming birds that constantly bob their heads while moving. They are identified by the prominent red bill with yellow tip and red frontal shield as well as white feathers under the tail, as shown here on the mother. Gallinules range throughout the Americas, from southern Canada to southern South America, inhabiting freshwater marshes and ponds with cattails and other aquatic vegetation. The 92,000-acre wildlife refuge is a habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds.

  19. Black-necked stilts share nesting in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    A black-necked stilt waits near its nesting mate nest in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. Stilts usually produce three or four brown-spotted buff eggs in a shallow depression lined with grass or shell fragments. In the nesting season they are particularly agressive. Stilts are identified by a distinct head pattern of black and white, very long red legs, and straight, very thin bill. Their habitat is salt marshes and shallow coastal bays from Delaware and northern South America in the East, and freshwater marshes from Oregon and Saskatchewan to the Gulf Coast. The 92,000-acre wildlife refuge is a habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge also provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds.

  20. A white pelican and egrets in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    A white pelican and several small egrets rest on the bank of a pond in in the waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. White pelicans inhabit marshy lakes and along the Pacific and Texas coasts. They winter from Florida and southern California south to Panama, chiefly in coastal lagoons. They are frequently seen flying in long lines, flapping and sailing in unison, but also ride rising air currents to soar gracefully in circles. The range of the egret includes southern and eastern states, Mexico, Central and South America, and the West Indies. The Refuge encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects.

  1. Black-necked stilts share nesting in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    A Black-necked Stilt sits on its nest in the waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. Stilts are identified by a distinct head pattern of black and white, very long red legs, and straight, very thin bill. They usually produce three or four brown-spotted buff eggs in a shallow depression lined with grass or shell fragments. In the nesting season they are particularly agressive. Their habitat is salt marshes and shallow coastal bays from Delaware and northern South America in the East, and freshwater marshes from Oregon and Saskatchewan to the Gulf Coast. The 92,000-acre wildlife refuge is a habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge also provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds.

  2. Black-necked stilts share nesting in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    A pair of black-necked stilts protect their grass-lined nest in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. Stilts usually produce three or four brown-spotted buff eggs in a shallow depression lined with grass or shell fragments. In the nesting season they are particularly agressive. Stilts are identified by a distinct head pattern of black and white, very long red legs, and straight, very thin bill. Their habitat is salt marshes and shallow coastal bays from Delaware and northern South America in the East, and freshwater marshes from Oregon and Saskatchewan to the Gulf Coast. The 92,000-acre wildlife refuge is a habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge also provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds.

  3. Fact or fiction? A critique of the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Survey 2002.

    PubMed

    Chikritzhs, Tanya; Brady, Maggie

    2006-05-01

    The ability of policy makers, practitioners and the broader public to respond appropriately in reducing the harms caused by alcohol misuse depends in large part on our understanding of the nature of the problem. In the case of consumption patterns and associated harms among indigenous minority peoples--in Australia and elsewhere--such an understanding is often difficult to achieve. There are a host of reasons for this including cultural differences between indigenous peoples and the broader populations within which they are located, cultural heterogeneity among indigenous peoples themselves, political and economic disadvantages which exacerbate misuse and its effects, methodological difficulties in the appropriate design of data collection instruments, sampling issues and the issues in the interpretation of data. All these difficulties mean that we need to subject any studies of substance misuse among indigenous peoples to a high level of scrutiny. This is particularly the case when such studies are conducted by organisations that are generally regarded as 'authoritative' sources of information. Chikritzhs & Brady have done this in the case of the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Survey 2002, conducted by the Australian Bureau of Statistics. In their review of this and other surveys, they demonstrate that to produce valid information about indigenous alcohol misuse, as well as having the skills to conduct broad population surveys, it is necessary to have an understanding of both methods of collecting data on alcohol consumption and Indigenous cultures themselves.

  4. Effects of ungulate management on vegetation at Hakalau Forest National Wildlife Refuge, Hawai'i Island

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hess, S.C.; Jeffrey, J.J.; Pratt, L.W.; Ball, D.L.

    2010-01-01

    We compiled and analysed data from 1987-2004 on vegetation monitoring during feral ungulate management at Hakalau Forest National Wildlife Refuge, a tropical montane rainforest on the island of Hawai'i All areas in the study had previously been used by ungulates, but cattle (Bos taurus) were removed and feral pig (Sus scrofa) populations were reduced during the study period. We monitored six line-intercept transects, three in previously high ungulate use areas and three in previously low ungulate use areas. We measured nine cover categories with the line-intercept method: native ferns; native woody plants; bryophytes; lichens; alien grasses; alien herbs; litter; exposed soil; and coarse woody debris. Vegetation surveys were repeated four times over a 16-year period. Vegetation monitoring revealed a strong increase in native fern cover and slight decreases in cover of bryophytes and exposed soil. Mean cover of native plants was generally higher in locations that were formerly lightly grazed, while alien grass and herb cover was generally higher in areas that were heavily grazed, although these effects were not statistically significant. These responses may represent early serai processes in forest regeneration following the reduction of feral ungulate populations. In contrast to many other Hawaiian forests which have become invaded by alien grasses and herbs after ungulate removal, HFNWR has not experienced this effect.

  5. Rational emotive therapy-a study of initial therapy sessions of Albert Ellis.

    PubMed

    Becker, I M; Rosenfeld, J G

    1976-10-01

    Because psychotherapy is what a therapist does, and not necessarily what he says he does, it is important to observe the activity of leaders in the field during their sessions. Twenty taped initial psychotherapy sessions by Albert Ellis were selected randomly from 70 recently recorded ones. Typescripts of each session were made, and two raters naive to the purposes were trained to place each of Ellis' statements into 1 of 17 categories. Each category consisted of a therapeutic technique. Some of these were ones that Ellis did during the 20 sessions examined was related very closely to what he has claimed to do, but that he did vary considerably from client to client.

  6. Marsh, mudflat and tidal creek assessment Cumberland Island National Seashore. Kings Bay Environmental Monitoring Program cumberland island national seashore. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Nakashima, L.D.

    1991-01-01

    The project was designed to determine whether backbarrier dredging for the Kings Bay Naval Base is affecting marsh habitat sustainability on Cumberland Island. Research was predicated on the hypothesis that if the operation is indeed exerting an influence on Cumberland Island, it will most likely be first perceived in the effect it has on the rates of supply and delivery of sediments to the marshes and mudflats. The authors located three comparable sites, which experience a different level of exposure to the effects of dredging. Second, we initiated a time-series of marsh/mudflat sedimentation measurements, which are expected to be continued in future years. Finally, we compared six different methods for monitoring sedimentation, all of which are currently in practice.

  7. Anatahan Island

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    ... of the Mariana Islands in 1914 (the first year of World War l) and Germany released the islands to Japan in 1919. Japan received a ... States by the United Nations. The wreckage of a World War II B-29 Superfortress, a four-engine propeller-driven bomber, lies on the north ...

  8. Ellis-van Creveld syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Shah, B; Ashok, L; Sujatha, G P

    2008-01-01

    Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EvC) is a disease complex, where all the three embryonic layers appear to be involved. This disorder is also called as Chondroectodermal dysplasia. EvC is an autosomal recessive disorder resulting from mutations in these patients. Mutations in the two genes EVC and EVC2, have been identified to cause the condition. It has been considered as a skeletal dysplasia with an incidence of approximately 1 out of 1,50,000 live births. A high prevalence has been reported among certain populations like Amish and Arabs of Gaza strip. There are more than 300 cases of EvC reported into the literature. About 50-60% of cases have been reported with congenital cardiac malformations. PMID:18974540

  9. Ellis-van Creveld Syndrome: Mutations Uncovered in Lebanese Families.

    PubMed

    Valencia, Maria; Tabet, Lara; Yazbeck, Nadine; Araj, Alia; Ruiz-Perez, Victor L; Charaffedine, Khalil; Fares, Farah; Badra, Rebecca; Farra, Chantal

    2015-01-01

    Background. Ellis-van Creveld (EvC) syndrome is a rare, autosomal recessive disorder characterized by short stature, short limbs, growth retardation, polydactyly, and ectodermal defects with cardiac anomalies occurring in around 60% of cases. EVC syndrome has been linked to mutations in EVC and EVC2 genes. Case Presentation. We report EvC syndrome in two unrelated Lebanese families both having homozygous mutations in the EVC2 gene, c.2653C>T (p.(Arg885(*))) and c.2012_2015del (p.(Leu671(*))) in exons 15 and 13, respectively, with the latter being reported for the first time. Conclusion. Although EvC has been largely described in the medical literature, clinical features of this syndrome vary. While more research is required to explore other genes involved in EvC, early diagnosis and therapeutic care are important to achieve a better quality of life.

  10. Ellis-van Creveld syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Shah, B; Ashok, L; Sujatha, G P

    2008-01-01

    Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EvC) is a disease complex, where all the three embryonic layers appear to be involved. This disorder is also called as Chondroectodermal dysplasia. EvC is an autosomal recessive disorder resulting from mutations in these patients. Mutations in the two genes EVC and EVC2, have been identified to cause the condition. It has been considered as a skeletal dysplasia with an incidence of approximately 1 out of 1,50,000 live births. A high prevalence has been reported among certain populations like Amish and Arabs of Gaza strip. There are more than 300 cases of EvC reported into the literature. About 50-60% of cases have been reported with congenital cardiac malformations.

  11. FLANDERS FIELDS MEMORIAL IN TRAFFIC ISLAND ON EAST DRIVE. VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FLANDERS FIELDS MEMORIAL IN TRAFFIC ISLAND ON EAST DRIVE. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - Rock Island National Cemetery, Rock Island Arsenal, 0.25 mile north of southern tip of Rock Island, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  12. 78 FR 64002 - South Farallon Islands Invasive House Mouse Eradication Project; Farallon National Wildlife...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-25

    ... house mice from the South Farallon Islands, see our August 16, 2013, notice (78 FR 50082). Public... FR 50082) announcing the availability of the DEIS for a proposed project to eradicate non-native... Fish and Wildlife Service South Farallon Islands Invasive House Mouse Eradication Project;...

  13. 76 FR 18775 - Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument; Monument Management Plan, Comprehensive...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-05

    ... ecosystems with a biomass of top predators that exceeds the Great Barrier Reef's. At the conclusion of a 3..., Howland Island, Jarvis Island, Johnston Atoll, Kingman Reef, Palmyra Atoll, and Wake Atoll. When the draft... the following methods: E-mail: Pacific_Reefs@fws.gov . Fax: (808) 792-9586. U.S. Mail: Susan...

  14. 78 FR 18789 - Establishment of the San Juan Islands National Monument

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-28

    ... Sig.) Billing code 3295-F3 ] TD28MR13.011 [FR Doc. 2013-07408 Filed 3-27-13; 8:45 am] Billing code... Sound lies an archipelago of over 450 islands, rocks, and pinnacles known as the San Juan Islands....

  15. 77 FR 13147 - Boston Harbor Islands National Recreation Area Advisory Council; Notice of Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-05

    ... may contact Superintendent Bruce Jacobson at Boston Harbor Islands, 408 Atlantic Avenue, Suite 228... Jacobson, (617) 223-8667. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Advisory Council was appointed by the Director of... management plan and the operations of the Boston Harbor Islands NRA. Dated: February 21, 2012. Bruce...

  16. 75 FR 6699 - Boston Harbor Islands National Recreation Area Advisory Council; Notice of Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-10

    ... Bruce Jacobson at Boston Harbor Islands, 408 Atlantic Avenue, Suite 228, Boston, MA 02110 or (617) 223..., Boston, MA. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Superintendent Bruce Jacobson, (617) 223-8667. SUPPLEMENTARY... Boston Harbor Islands NRA. Dated: January 15, 2010. Bruce Jacobson, Superintendent, Boston Harbor...

  17. EAARL Coastal Topography-Assateague Island National Seashore, 2008: Bare Earth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bonisteel, Jamie M.; Nayegandhi, Amar; Brock, John C.; Wright, C. Wayne; Stevens, Sara; Yates, Xan; Klipp, Emily S.

    2009-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of lidar-derived bare-earth (BE) topography were produced as a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC), St. Petersburg, FL; the National Park Service (NPS), Northeast Coastal and Barrier Network, Kingston, RI; and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of the Assateague Island National Seashore in Maryland and Virginia, acquired March 24-25, 2008. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural-resource managers. An innovative airborne lidar instrument originally developed at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, and known as the Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL) was used during data acquisition. The EAARL system is a raster-scanning, waveform-resolving, green-wavelength (532-nanometer) lidar designed to map near-shore bathymetry, topography, and vegetation structure simultaneously. The EAARL sensor suite includes the raster-scanning, water-penetrating full-waveform adaptive lidar, a down-looking red-green-blue (RGB) digital camera, a high-resolution multi-spectral color infrared (CIR) camera, two precision dual-frequency kinematic carrier-phase GPS receivers, and an integrated miniature digital inertial measurement unit, which provide for sub-meter georeferencing of each laser sample. The nominal EAARL platform is a twin-engine Cessna 310 aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. A single pilot, a lidar operator, and a data analyst constitute the crew for most survey operations. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in measuring sub-aerial and submarine coastal topography within cross-environmental surveys. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the EAARL system, and the

  18. EAARL Coastal Topography and Imagery-Naval Live Oaks Area, Gulf Islands National Seashore, Florida, 2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nagle, David B.; Nayegandhi, Amar; Yates, Xan; Brock, John C.; Wright, C. Wayne; Bonisteel, Jamie M.; Klipp, Emily S.; Segura, Martha

    2010-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced color-infrared (CIR) imagery and elevation measurements of lidar-derived bare-earth (BE) topography, first-surface (FS) topography, and canopy-height (CH) datasets were produced collaboratively by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), St. Petersburg Science Center, St. Petersburg, FL; the National Park Service (NPS), Gulf Coast Network, Lafayette, LA; and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of the Naval Live Oaks Area in Florida's Gulf Islands National Seashore, acquired June 30, 2007. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural-resource managers. An innovative airborne lidar instrument originally developed at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, and known as the Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL), was used during data acquisition. The EAARL system is a raster-scanning, waveform-resolving, green-wavelength (532-nanometer) lidar designed to map near-shore bathymetry, topography, and vegetation structure simultaneously. The EAARL sensor suite includes the raster-scanning, water-penetrating full-waveform adaptive lidar, a down-looking red-green-blue (RGB) digital camera, a high-resolution multispectral CIR camera, two precision dual-frequency kinematic carrier-phase GPS receivers, and an integrated miniature digital inertial measurement unit, which provide for sub-meter georeferencing of each laser sample. The nominal EAARL platform is a twin-engine Cessna 310 aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. A single pilot, a lidar operator, and a data analyst constitute the crew for most survey operations. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in measuring sub-aerial and submarine coastal topography within cross-environmental surveys. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area

  19. EAARL Coastal Topography-Assateague Island National Seashore, 2008: First Surface

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bonisteel, Jamie M.; Nayegandhi, Amar; Brock, John C.; Wright, C. Wayne; Stevens, Sara; Yates, Xan; Klipp, Emily S.

    2009-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of lidar-derived first-surface (FS) topography were produced as a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC), St. Petersburg, FL; the National Park Service (NPS), Northeast Coastal and Barrier Network, Kingston, RI; and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of the Assateague Island National Seashore in Maryland and Virginia, acquired March 24-25, 2008. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural-resource managers. An innovative airborne lidar instrument originally developed at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, and known as the Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL), was used during data acquisition. The EAARL system is a raster-scanning, waveform-resolving, green-wavelength (532-nanometer) lidar designed to map near-shore bathymetry, topography, and vegetation structure simultaneously. The EAARL sensor suite includes the raster-scanning, water-penetrating full-waveform adaptive lidar, a down-looking red-green-blue (RGB) digital camera, a high-resolution multi-spectral color infrared (CIR) camera, two precision dual-frequency kinematic carrier-phase GPS receivers, and an integrated miniature digital inertial measurement unit, which provide for sub-meter georeferencing of each laser sample. The nominal EAARL platform is a twin-engine Cessna 310 aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. A single pilot, a lidar operator, and a data analyst constitute the crew for most survey operations. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in measuring sub-aerial and submarine coastal topography within cross-environmental surveys. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the EAARL system, and the

  20. Chemical fingerprinting of Gardenia jasminoides Ellis by HPLC-DAD-ESI-MS combined with chemometrics methods.

    PubMed

    Han, Yan; Wen, Jun; Zhou, Tingting; Fan, Guorong

    2015-12-01

    A fingerprint analysis method has been developed for characterization and discrimination of Gardenia jasminoides Ellis from different areas. The chemometrics methods including similarity evaluation, principal components analysis (PCA) and hierarchical clustering analysis (HCA) were introduced to identify more useful chemical markers for improving the quality control standard of dried ripe fruits of G. jasminoides Ellis. Then the selected chemical markers were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HPLC-DAD-ESI-MS) qualitatively and quantitatively. 23 characteristic peaks were assigned while 19 peaks of them were identified by comparing retention times, UV and MS spectra with authentic compounds or literature data. Moreover, 14 of them were determined quantitatively which could effectively evaluate the quality of G. jasminoides Ellis. This study was expected to provide comprehensive information for the quality evaluation of G. jasminoides Ellis, which would be a valuable reference for further study and development of this herb and related medicinal products. PMID:26041243

  1. Galapagos Islands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This true-color image of the Galapagos Islands was acquired on March 12, 2002, by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASA's Terra satellite. The Galapagos Islands, which are part of Ecuador, sit in the Pacific Ocean about 1000 km (620 miles) west of South America. As the three craters on the largest island (Isabela Island) suggest, the archipelago was created by volcanic eruptions, which took place millions of years ago. Unlike most remote islands in the Pacific, the Galapagos have gone relatively untouched by humans over the past few millennia. As a result, many unique species have continued to thrive on the islands. Over 95 percent of the islands' reptile species and nearly three quarters of its land bird species cannot be found anywhere else in the world. Two of the more well known are the Galapagos giant tortoise and marine iguanas. The unhindered evolutionary development of the islands' species inspired Charles Darwin to begin The Origin of Species eight years after his visit there. To preserve the unique wildlife on the islands, the Ecuadorian government made the entire archipelago a national park in 1959. Each year roughly 60,000 tourists visit these islands to experience what Darwin did over a century and a half ago. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  2. Accuracy assessment of a mobile terrestrial lidar survey at Padre Island National Seashore

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lim, Samsung; Thatcher, Cindy A.; Brock, John C.; Kimbrow, Dustin R.; Danielson, Jeffrey J.; Reynolds, B.J.

    2013-01-01

    The higher point density and mobility of terrestrial laser scanning (light detection and ranging (lidar)) is desired when extremely detailed elevation data are needed for mapping vertically orientated complex features such as levees, dunes, and cliffs, or when highly accurate data are needed for monitoring geomorphic changes. Mobile terrestrial lidar scanners have the capability for rapid data collection on a larger spatial scale compared with tripod-based terrestrial lidar, but few studies have examined the accuracy of this relatively new mapping technology. For this reason, we conducted a field test at Padre Island National Seashore of a mobile lidar scanner mounted on a sport utility vehicle and integrated with a position and orientation system. The purpose of the study was to assess the vertical and horizontal accuracy of data collected by the mobile terrestrial lidar system, which is georeferenced to the Universal Transverse Mercator coordinate system and the North American Vertical Datum of 1988. To accomplish the study objectives, independent elevation data were collected by conducting a high-accuracy global positioning system survey to establish the coordinates and elevations of 12 targets spaced throughout the 12 km transect. These independent ground control data were compared to the lidar scanner-derived elevations to quantify the accuracy of the mobile lidar system. The performance of the mobile lidar system was also tested at various vehicle speeds and scan density settings (e.g. field of view and linear point spacing) to estimate the optimal parameters for desired point density. After adjustment of the lever arm parameters, the final point cloud accuracy was 0.060 m (east), 0.095 m (north), and 0.053 m (height). The very high density of the resulting point cloud was sufficient to map fine-scale topographic features, such as the complex shape of the sand dunes.

  3. National Grid Deep Energy Retrofit Pilot, Massachusetts and Rhode Island (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2014-03-01

    Between December, 2009 and December, 2012 42 deep energy retrofit (DER) projects were completed through a DER pilot program sponsored by National Grid and conducted in Massachusetts and Rhode Island. 37 of these projects were comprehensive retrofits while 5 were partial DERs, meaning that high performance retrofit was implemented for a single major enclosure component or a limited number of major enclosure components. The 42 DER projects represent 60 units of housing. The comprehensive projects all implemented a consistent "package" of measures in terms of the performance targeted for major building components. Projects exhibited some variations in the approach to implementing the retrofit package. Pre- and post-retrofit air leakage measurements were performed for each of the projects. Each project also reported information about project costs including identification of energy-related costs. Post-retrofit energy-use data was obtained for 29 of the DER projects. Post-retrofit energy use was analyzed based on the net energy used by the DER project regardless of whether the energy was generated on site or delivered to the site. Homeowner surveys were returned by 12 of the pilot participants. Based on the community experience, this DER package is expected to result in yearly source energy use near 110 MMBtu/year or approximately 40% below the Northeast regional average. Larger to medium sized homes that successful implement these retrofits can be expected to achieve source EUI that is comparable to Passive House targets for new construction. The community of DER projects show post-retrofit airtightness below 1.5 ACH50 to be eminently achievable.

  4. Energy Transition Initiative: Island Energy Snapshot - Puerto Rico (Fact Sheet); NREL(National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect

    2015-03-01

    This profile provides a snapshot of the energy landscape of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico - a U.S. territory located about 60 miles east of the Dominican Republic and directly west of the U.S. Virgin Islands.

  5. 76 FR 53941 - Boston Harbor Islands National Recreation Area Advisory Council; Notice of Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-30

    ... Bruce Jacobson at Boston Harbor Islands, 408 Atlantic Avenue, Suite 228, Boston, MA 02110, or (617) 223..., Boston, MA. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Superintendent Bruce Jacobson, (617) 223-8667....

  6. 75 FR 52023 - Boston Harbor Islands National Recreation Area Advisory Council; Notice of Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-24

    ... want further information concerning the meeting may contact Superintendent Bruce Jacobson at Boston... INFORMATION CONTACT: Superintendent Bruce Jacobson, (617) 223-8667. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Advisory...: August 13, 2010. Bruce Jacobson, Superintendent, Boston Harbor Islands NRA. BILLING CODE P...

  7. Synthetic ultraviolet light filtering chemical contamination of coastal waters of Virgin Islands national park, St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands.

    PubMed

    Bargar, Timothy A; Alvarez, David A; Garrison, Virginia H

    2015-12-15

    Contamination of surface waters by synthetic ultraviolet light (UV) filtering chemicals is a concern for the Virgin Islands National Park (VINP). Discrete water samples were collected from VINP bays to determine UV filter chemical presence in the coastal waters. Spatial distribution and the potential for partitioning between subsurface waters and the sea surface microlayer (SML) were also examined. The UV filter chemicals 4-methylbenzylidene camphor, benzophenone-3, octinoxate, homosalate, and octocrylene were detected at concentrations up to 6073 ng/L (benzophenone-3). Concentrations for benzophenone-3 and homosalate declined exponentially (r(2)=0.86 to 0.98) with distance from the beach. Limited data indicate that some UV filter chemicals may partition to the SML relative to the subsurface waters. Contamination of VINP coastal waters by UV filter chemicals may be a significant issue, but an improved understanding of the temporal and spatial variability of their concentrations would be necessary to better understand the risk they present. PMID:26581812

  8. Synthetic ultraviolet light filtering chemical contamination of coastal waters of Virgin Islands National Park, St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bargar, Timothy A.; Alvarez, David; Garrison, Virginia H.

    2015-01-01

    Contamination of surface waters by synthetic ultraviolet light (UV) filtering chemicals is a concern for the Virgin Islands National Park (VINP). Discrete water samples were collected from VINP bays to determine UV filter chemical presence in the coastal waters. Spatial distribution and the potential for partitioning between subsurface waters and the sea surface microlayer (SML) were also examined. The UV filter chemicals 4-methylbenzylidene camphor, benzophenone-3, octinoxate, homosalate, and octocrylene were detected at concentrations up to 6073 ng/L (benzophenone-3). Concentrations for benzophenone-3 and homosalate declined exponentially (r2 = 0.86 to 0.98) with distance from the beach. Limited data indicate that some UV filter chemicals may partition to the SML relative to the subsurface waters. Contamination of VINP coastal waters by UV filter chemicals may be a significant issue, but an improved understanding of the temporal and spatial variability of their concentrations would be necessary to better understand the risk they present.

  9. Distribution and abundance of elkhorn coral, Acropora palmata, and prevalence of white-band disease at Buck Island Reef National Monument, St. Croix, US Virgin Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mayor, P.A.; Rogers, C.S.; Hillis-Starr, Z.-M.

    2006-01-01

    In the 1970s and 1980s elkhorn coral, Acropora palmata, declined dramatically throughout the Caribbean primarily due to white-band disease (WBD). In 2005, elkhorn coral was proposed for listing as threatened under the US Endangered Species Act. WBD was first documented at Buck Island Reef National Monument (BIRNM). Together with hurricanes WBD reduced live elkhorn coral coverage by probably over 90%. In the past decade some recovery has been observed at BIRNM. This study assessed the distribution and abundance of elkhorn coral and estimated the prevalence of WBD at the monument. Within an area of 795 ha, we estimated 97,232-134,371 (95% confidence limits) elkhorn coral colonies with any dimension of connected live tissue greater than one meter, about 3% of which were infected by WBD. Despite some recovery, the elkhorn coral density remains low and WBD may continue to present a threat to the elkhorn coral population. ?? Springer-Verlag 2006.

  10. Distribution and abundance of elkhorn coral, Acropora palmata, and prevalence of white-band disease at Buck Island Reef National Monument, St. Croix, US Virgin Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayor, Philippe A.; Rogers, Caroline S.; Hillis-Starr, Zandy M.

    2006-05-01

    In the 1970s and 1980s elkhorn coral, Acropora palmata, declined dramatically throughout the Caribbean primarily due to white-band disease (WBD). In 2005, elkhorn coral was proposed for listing as threatened under the US Endangered Species Act. WBD was first documented at Buck Island Reef National Monument (BIRNM). Together with hurricanes WBD reduced live elkhorn coral coverage by probably over 90%. In the past decade some recovery has been observed at BIRNM. This study assessed the distribution and abundance of elkhorn coral and estimated the prevalence of WBD at the monument. Within an area of 795 ha, we estimated 97,232 134,371 (95% confidence limits) elkhorn coral colonies with any dimension of connected live tissue greater than one meter, about 3% of which were infected by WBD. Despite some recovery, the elkhorn coral density remains low and WBD may continue to present a threat to the elkhorn coral population.

  11. Synthetic ultraviolet light filtering chemical contamination of coastal waters of Virgin Islands national park, St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands.

    PubMed

    Bargar, Timothy A; Alvarez, David A; Garrison, Virginia H

    2015-12-15

    Contamination of surface waters by synthetic ultraviolet light (UV) filtering chemicals is a concern for the Virgin Islands National Park (VINP). Discrete water samples were collected from VINP bays to determine UV filter chemical presence in the coastal waters. Spatial distribution and the potential for partitioning between subsurface waters and the sea surface microlayer (SML) were also examined. The UV filter chemicals 4-methylbenzylidene camphor, benzophenone-3, octinoxate, homosalate, and octocrylene were detected at concentrations up to 6073 ng/L (benzophenone-3). Concentrations for benzophenone-3 and homosalate declined exponentially (r(2)=0.86 to 0.98) with distance from the beach. Limited data indicate that some UV filter chemicals may partition to the SML relative to the subsurface waters. Contamination of VINP coastal waters by UV filter chemicals may be a significant issue, but an improved understanding of the temporal and spatial variability of their concentrations would be necessary to better understand the risk they present.

  12. EAARL coastal topography and imagery-Fire Island National Seashore, New York, 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vivekanandan, Saisudha; Klipp, E.S.; Nayegandhi, Amar; Bonisteel-Cormier, J.M.; Brock, J.C.; Wright, C.W.; Nagle, D.B.; Fredericks, Xan; Stevens, Sara

    2010-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced color-infrared (CIR) imagery and elevation measurements of lidar-derived bare-earth (BE) and first-surface (FS) topography datasets were produced collaboratively by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center, St. Petersburg, FL, and the National Park Service (NPS), Northeast Coastal and Barrier Network, Kingston, RI. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of a portion of the Fire Island National Seashore in New York, acquired on July 9 and August 3, 2009. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural-resource managers. An innovative airborne lidar instrument originally developed at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, and known as the Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL), was used during data acquisition. The EAARL system is a raster-scanning, waveform-resolving, green-wavelength (532-nanometer) lidar designed to map near-shore bathymetry, topography, and vegetation structure simultaneously. The EAARL sensor suite includes the raster-scanning, water-penetrating full-waveform adaptive lidar, a down-looking red-green-blue (RGB) digital camera, a high-resolution multispectral CIR camera, two precision dual-frequency kinematic carrier-phase GPS receivers, and an integrated miniature digital inertial measurement unit, which provide for sub-meter georeferencing of each laser sample. The nominal EAARL platform is a twin-engine Cessna 310 aircraft, but the instrument was deployed on a Pilatus PC-6. A single pilot, a lidar operator, and a data analyst constitute the crew for most survey operations. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in measuring sub-aerial and submarine coastal topography within cross-environmental surveys. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the EAARL system, and the resulting data were then processed using the Airborne Lidar

  13. EAARL Coastal Topography-Fire Island National Seashore, New York, Post-Nor'Ida, 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nayegandhi, Amar; Vivekanandan, Saisudha; Brock, J.C.; Wright, C.W.; Nagle, D.B.; Bonisteel-Cormier, J.M.; Fredericks, Xan; Stevens, Sara

    2010-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of lidar-derived bare-earth (BE) and first-surface (FS) topography datasets were produced collaboratively by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center, St. Petersburg, FL, and the National Park Service (NPS), Northeast Coastal and Barrier Network, Kingston, RI. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of a portion of the Fire Island National Seashore in New York, acquired post-Nor'Ida (November 2009 nor'easter) on December 4, 2009. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural-resource managers. An innovative airborne lidar instrument originally developed at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, and known as the Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL), was used during data acquisition. The EAARL system is a raster-scanning, waveform-resolving, green-wavelength (532-nanometer) lidar designed to map near-shore bathymetry, topography, and vegetation structure simultaneously. The EAARL sensor suite includes the raster-scanning, water-penetrating full-waveform adaptive lidar, a down-looking red-green-blue (RGB) digital camera, a high-resolution multispectral color-infrared (CIR) camera, two precision dual-frequency kinematic carrier-phase GPS receivers, and an integrated miniature digital inertial measurement unit, which provide for sub-meter georeferencing of each laser sample. The nominal EAARL platform is a twin-engine aircraft, but the instrument was deployed on a Pilatus PC-6. A single pilot, a lidar operator, and a data analyst constitute the crew for most survey operations. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in measuring sub-aerial and submarine coastal topography within cross-environmental surveys. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the EAARL system, and the resulting data were then processed using the Airborne

  14. Spatial and temporal assessment of back-barrier erosion on Cumberland Island National Seashore, Georgia, 2011–2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Calhoun, Daniel L.; Riley, Jeffrey W.

    2016-07-15

    Much research has been conducted to better understand erosion and accretion processes for the seaward zones of coastal barrier islands; however, at Cumberland Island National Seashore, Georgia, the greater management concern is the effect that erosion is having on the resources of the island’s western shoreline, or the back barrier. Catastrophic slumping and regular rates of erosion greater than 1 meter per year threaten important habitat, historical and pre-historical resources, and modern infrastructure on the island. Prior research has helped National Park Service (NPS) staff identify the most severe and vulnerable areas, but in order to develop effective management actions, information is needed on what forces and conditions cause erosion. To this end, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the NPS, conducted two longitudinal surveys, one each at the beginning and end of the approximately year-long monitoring period from late 2011 to early 2013, along five selected segments of the back barrier of the Cumberland Island National Seashore. Monitoring stations were constructed at four of these locations that had previously been identified as erosional hotspots. The magnitude of erosion at each location was quantified to determine the relative influence of causative agents. Results indicate that erosion is, in general, highly variable within and among these segments of the Cumberland Island National Seashore’s back barrier. Observed erosion ranged from a maximum of 2.5 meters of bluff-line retreat to some areas that exhibited no net erosion over the 1-year study period. In terms of timing of erosion, three of the four sites were primarily affected by punctuated erosional events that were coincident with above-average high tides and elevated wind speeds. The fourth site exhibited steady, low-magnitude retreat throughout the study period. While it is difficult to precisely subscribe certain amounts of erosion to specific agents, this study provides

  15. Spatial and temporal assessment of back-barrier erosion on Cumberland Island National Seashore, Georgia, 2011–2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Calhoun, Daniel L.; Riley, Jeffrey W.

    2016-01-01

    Much research has been conducted to better understand erosion and accretion processes for the seaward zones of coastal barrier islands; however, at Cumberland Island National Seashore, Georgia, the greater management concern is the effect that erosion is having on the resources of the island’s western shoreline, or the back barrier. Catastrophic slumping and regular rates of erosion greater than 1 meter per year threaten important habitat, historical and pre-historical resources, and modern infrastructure on the island. Prior research has helped National Park Service (NPS) staff identify the most severe and vulnerable areas, but in order to develop effective management actions, information is needed on what forces and conditions cause erosion. To this end, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the NPS, conducted two longitudinal surveys, one each at the beginning and end of the approximately year-long monitoring period from late 2011 to early 2013, along five selected segments of the back barrier of the Cumberland Island National Seashore. Monitoring stations were constructed at four of these locations that had previously been identified as erosional hotspots. The magnitude of erosion at each location was quantified to determine the relative influence of causative agents. Results indicate that erosion is, in general, highly variable within and among these segments of the Cumberland Island National Seashore’s back barrier. Observed erosion ranged from a maximum of 2.5 meters of bluff-line retreat to some areas that exhibited no net erosion over the 1-year study period. In terms of timing of erosion, three of the four sites were primarily affected by punctuated erosional events that were coincident with above-average high tides and elevated wind speeds. The fourth site exhibited steady, low-magnitude retreat throughout the study period. While it is difficult to precisely subscribe certain amounts of erosion to specific agents, this study provides

  16. Factors affecting marine debris deposition at French Frigate Shoals, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands Marine National Monument, 1990-2006.

    PubMed

    Morishige, Carey; Donohue, Mary J; Flint, Elizabeth; Swenson, Christopher; Woolaway, Christine

    2007-08-01

    Data on the amount and type of small debris items deposited on the beaches of the Hawaiian Islands National Wildlife Refuge Tern Island station, French Frigate Shoals were collected over 16 years. We calculated deposition rates and investigated the relationship among deposition and year, season, El Niño and La Niña events from 1990 to 2006. In total 52,442 debris items were collected with plastic comprising 71% of all items collected. Annual debris deposition varied significantly (range 1116-5195 items) but was not influenced by season. Debris deposition was significantly greater during El Niño events as compared to La Niña events. Although often deduced to influence floating marine pollution, this study provides the first quantitative evidence of the influence of El Niño/La Niña cycles on marine debris deposition. PMID:17572447

  17. Operational research to inform a sub-national surveillance intervention for malaria elimination in Solomon Islands

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Successful reduction of malaria transmission to very low levels has made Isabel Province, Solomon Islands, a target for early elimination by 2014. High malaria transmission in neighbouring provinces and the potential for local asymptomatic infections to cause malaria resurgence highlights the need for sub-national tailoring of surveillance interventions. This study contributes to a situational analysis of malaria in Isabel Province to inform an appropriate surveillance intervention. Methods A mixed method study was carried out in Isabel Province in late 2009 and early 2010. The quantitative component was a population-based prevalence survey of 8,554 people from 129 villages, which were selected using a spatially stratified sampling approach to achieve uniform geographical coverage of populated areas. Diagnosis was initially based on Giemsa-stained blood slides followed by molecular analysis using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Local perceptions and practices related to management of fever and treatment-seeking that would impact a surveillance intervention were also explored using qualitative research methods. Results Approximately 33% (8,554/26,221) of the population of Isabel Province participated in the survey. Only one subject was found to be infected with Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) (96 parasites/μL) using Giemsa-stained blood films, giving a prevalence of 0.01%. PCR analysis detected a further 13 cases, giving an estimated malaria prevalence of 0.51%. There was a wide geographical distribution of infected subjects. None reported having travelled outside Isabel Province in the previous three months suggesting low-level indigenous malaria transmission. The qualitative findings provide warning signs that the current community vigilance approach to surveillance will not be sufficient to achieve elimination. In addition, fever severity is being used by individuals as an indicator for malaria and a trigger for timely treatment-seeking and case reporting

  18. An empirical investigation of Albert Ellis's binary model of distress.

    PubMed

    David, Daniel; Montgomery, Guy H; Macavei, Bianca; Bovbjerg, Dana H

    2005-04-01

    In the current literature, distress is typically described according to a unitary model: High levels of distress are conceptualized as a high level of negative affect while low levels of distress are typically conceptualized as a low level of negative affect. On the other hand, Albert Ellis (1994) and some of his rational-emotive and cognitive-behavioral professional colleagues have more recently described distress as a binary construct composed of two different components: functional negative feelings (e.g., sad) and dysfunctional negative feelings (e.g., worthless). In two studies using 55 U.S. breast-cancer patients and 45 Romanian breast-cancer patients, respectively, we compared hypotheses derived from unitary and binary models of distress. The results revealed that in a stressful situation (i.e., upcoming breast surgery) high levels of irrational beliefs were associated with a high level of both functional and dysfunctional negative feelings while low levels of irrational beliefs were associated with a low level of dysfunctional negative feelings and a high level of functional negative feelings. Thus, that support for the binary model of distress found in both U.S. and Romanian samples suggests both the robustness and the generalizability of the results. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

  19. Growth charts for children with Ellis-van Creveld syndrome.

    PubMed

    Verbeek, Sabine; Eilers, Paul H C; Lawrence, Kate; Hennekam, Raoul C M; Versteegh, Florens G A

    2011-02-01

    Ellis-van Creveld (EvC) syndrome is a congenital malformation syndrome with marked growth retardation. In this study, specific growth charts for EvC patients were derived to allow better follow-up of growth and earlier detection of growth patterns unusual for EvC. With the use of 235 observations of 101 EvC patients (49 males, 52 females), growth charts for males and females from 0 to 20 years of age were derived. Longitudinal and cross-sectional data were collected from an earlier review of growth data in EvC, a database of EvC patients, and from recent literature. To model the growth charts, the GAMLSS package for the R statistical program was used. Height of EvC patients was compared to healthy children using Dutch growth charts. Data are presented both on a scale for age and on a scale for the square root of age. Compared to healthy Dutch children, mean height standard deviation score values for male and female EvC patients were -3.1 and -3.0, respectively. The present growth charts should be useful in the follow-up of EvC patients. Most importantly, early detection of growth hormone deficiency, known to occur in EvC, will be facilitated.

  20. Three new triterpenoid saponins from root of Gardenia jasminoides Ellis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Lu, Jincai; Lv, Chongning; Xu, Tanye; Jia, Lingyun

    2012-12-01

    Three new compounds (Gardeniside A-C), 11α,12α-epoxy-3β-[(O-β-D-glucuronopyranoside-6'-O-methly ester)oxy]olean-28,13-olide (1), siaresinolic acid 3-O-β-D-glucuronopyranoside-6'-O-methly ester (2), and 3-O-β-D- glucuronopyranoside-6'-O-methly ester-siaresinolic acid-28-O-β-D- glucopyranoside (3), with seven known compounds oleanolic acid 3-O-β-D- glucuronopyranoside-6'-O-methly ester (4), oleanolic acid 3-O-β-D- glucuropyranoside (5), hederagenin 3-O-β-D- glucuronopyranoside-6'-O- methly ester (6), chikusetsusaponin IVa methyl ester (7), chikusetsusaponin (8), chikusetsusaponin IVa butyl ester (9), siaresinolic acid 28-o-β-d-glucopyranosyl ester (10) were isolated from the root of Gardenia jasminoides Ellis. Six compounds (1, 4-7, and 9) showed cytotoxic activities against HeLa, A549, MCF-7 and A354-S2 cell lines. PMID:22796399

  1. 76 FR 18773 - Marianas Trench Marine National Monument, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, et al...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-05

    ... miles (nmi); the Volcanic Unit encompasses each designated volcanic feature and the surrounding... Volcanic Unit includes approximately 55,912 acres of submerged lands, and the Islands Unit encompasses... management with respect to fishery-related activities regulated pursuant to the Magnuson-Stevens...

  2. 78 FR 50082 - South Farallon Islands Invasive House Mouse Eradication Project; Farallon National Wildlife...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-16

    ... Wildlife Refuge (Refuge) over a 15-year period (75 FR 5102, February 1, 2010). The wildlife management goal... published a notice of intent (NOI) to prepare an EIS (76 FR 20706, April 13, 2011). We then developed a..., invertebrates, and plants, as well as to enhance ecosystem processes on the islands. The South Farallon...

  3. Pijin at School in Solomon Islands: Language Ideologies and the Nation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jourdan, Christine

    2013-01-01

    In this article, I analyze the reasons that have excluded Pijin, the lingua franca of Solomon Islands, South West Pacific, from being used as a medium of instruction, and why this may now become possible. Following a short sociolinguistic sketch, I present the colonial and post-colonial linguistic ideologies that shaped sociolinguistic…

  4. 75 FR 54377 - Cattle Point Road Relocation; Draft Environmental Impact Statement; San Juan Island National...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-07

    ... on the southeastern tip of San Juan Island is threatened by coastal erosion at the base of the slope... the slope in lieu of road realignment options). The Scoping Report included comments and agency.... Alternative B: Hybrid Mid-Slope Realignment--This alternative is the ``agency preferred'' alternative....

  5. Water quality and aquatic communities of upland wetlands, Cumberland Island National Seashore, Georgia, April 1999 to July 2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frick, Elizabeth A.; Gregory, M. Brian; Calhoun, Daniel L.; Hopkins, Evelyn H.

    2002-01-01

    Cumberland Island is the southernmost and largest barrier island along the coast of Georgia. The island contains about 2,500 acres of freshwater wetlands that are located in a variety of physical settings, have a wide range of hydroperiods, and are influenced to varying degrees by surface and ground water, rainwater, and seawater. In 1999-2000, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the National Park Service, conducted a water-quality study of Cumberland Island National Seashore to document and interpret the quality of a representative subset of surface- and ground-water resources for management of the seashore's natural resources. As part of this study, historical ground-water, surface-water, and ecological studies conducted on Cumberland Island also were summarized. Surface-water samples from six wetland areas located in the upland area of Cumberland Island were collected quarterly from April 1999 to March 2000 and analyzed for major ions, nutrients, trace elements, and field water-quality constituents including specific conductance, pH, temperature, dissolved oxygen, alkalinity, tannin and lignin, and turbidity. In addition, water temperature and specific conductance were recorded continuously from two wetland areas located near the mean high-tide mark on the Atlantic Ocean beaches from April 1999 to July 2000. Fish and invertebrate communities from six wetlands were sampled during April and December 1999. The microbial quality of the near-shore Atlantic Ocean was assessed in seawater samples collected for 5 consecutive days in April 1999 at five beaches near campgrounds where most recreational water contact occurs. Ground-water samples were collected from the Upper Floridan aquifer in April 1999 and from the surficial aquifer in April 2000 at 11 permanent wells and 4 temporary wells (drive points), and were analyzed for major ions, nutrients, trace elements, and field water-quality constituents (conductivity, pH, temperature, dissolved oxygen, and

  6. Evolution and Impacts of a New Inlet Formed in Fire Island National Park by Superstorm Sandy (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flood, R. D.; Flagg, C. N.; Goff, J. A.; Austin, J. A.; Schwab, W. C.; Denny, J. F.; Christensen, B. A.; Browne, C. M.; Saustrup, S.

    2013-12-01

    Superstorm Sandy impacted the New York / New Jersey area on October 29, 2012 and brought a storm surge of 1.5 to 2.5 m and waves with a significant wave height of 9.5 m to the south shore of Long Island, New York. The storm cut three inlets across Fire Island barrier islands. Two of the inlets were closed mechanically, but the third inlet, cut through a wilderness area of the Fire Island National Seashore, remains open and provides a rare opportunity to study the evolution and dynamics of an unmanaged inlet. This new inlet formed where Fire Island is narrow and is near the site of an earlier inlet that closed in 1825. Great South Bay (GSB) is located between Fire Island and the Long Island mainland. The salinity in GSB increased by 5 salinity units following the breach and has remained high. GSB has had chronic water quality issues associated with a high population density that may be moderated by flow related to the new inlet. Water flow through the new inlet is controlled by the difference between offshore tide and GSB tide, but GSB tide does not appear to have been altered by flow through the inlet. This is different from the traditional view of inlet dynamics where a balance is sought between channel cross-sectional area, tidal prism (which together give channel velocity) and longshore sediment transport. At SoMAS we have been monitoring the evolution of the new inlet since its formation. We have conducted overflights at 1 to 3 week intervals to track the changing inlet geometry and the location of flood-tidal and ebb-tidal deltas. We have also done small-boat bathymetric surveys of the channel itself every 3 to 5 weeks to track the shape and cross-sectional area of the channel. The channel was quite small shortly after the breach with a depth of about 2 m. The channel grew fast as it cut into underlying fine-grain sediments, reaching a depth of over 6 m following several late winter storms. The inlet channel initially migrated quickly to the west, but its

  7. Assessing Chemistry-Learning Competencies of Students in Isolated Rural Senior High Schools by Using the National Examination: A Case Study of Simeulue Island, Indonesia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adlim, M-; Soewarno, S.; Ali, Hasbi; Ibrahim, Armia; Umar, Hasmunir; Ismail, Khairil; Gani, Usman A.; Hasan, Ishak; Yasin, Burhanuddin

    2014-01-01

    This study explored learning competency based on the Indonesian National Examination focusing especially on chemistry performance and the circumstances of senior high school students and teachers in rural areas of Simeulue Island, Indonesia. The National Examination total score and chemistry score for students in rural areas were consistently…

  8. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service get ready to release a rescued pelican at the Merritt Island National

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Under a rain-filled sky, Mark Epstein holds a rescued white pelican while Kat Royer fixes a leg band on it before releasing it at the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. Epstein and Royer are with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The bird was found covered in crude oil from a contaminated ditch in northern Indiana in November, and was rescued by a local Police Department, treated, and flown to the Back to Nature Wildlife Refuge in Orlando, Fla. for care and rest. The pelican, dubbed 'Fisheater' by its rescuers, will be let go to join a flock of about 30 other white pelicans that are wintering on the refuge. White pelicans inhabit marshy lakes and along the Pacific and Texas coasts. They winter from Florida and southern California south to Panama, chiefly in coastal lagoons. They are frequently seen flying in long lines, flapping and sailing in unison, but also ride rising air currents to soar gracefully in circles. The Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects.

  9. Kelp forest monitoring 1994 annual report. Channel Islands National Park. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kushner, D.; Lerma, D.; Richards, D.

    1994-12-31

    The 1994 results of the Channel Islands Natonal Park Kelp Forest Monitoring Project are described in this report. Population dynamics of 68 taxa or categories of algae, fish, and invertebrates were measured at 16 permanent sites around the five islands within the park. Survey techniques utilized SCUBA and surface-supplied-air, and included quadrants, band transects, random point contacts, fish transects, video transects, size frequency measurements, artificial recruitment modules, and species list surveys. Temperature data was collected using temperature loggers deployed at each of the sixteen sites. Size frequency measurements were taken from artificial recruitment modules at ten sites. In 1994, 13 sites had giant kelp, Macrocystis pyrifera, forests, one site was dominated by the aggregating red sea cucumber, Pachythyone rubra, one site was dominated by red sea urchins, Strongylocentrotus francisanus, and another by purple sea urchins, S. purpuratus. Wasting disease was observed in sea stars and wasting syndrome was apparent in sea urchins.

  10. Oral manifestations in Ellis-van Creveld syndrome: report of five cases.

    PubMed

    Cahuana, Abel; Palma, Camila; Gonzáles, Wilber; Geán, Esther

    2004-01-01

    Ellis-van Creveld syndrome, or chondroectodermal dysplasia, is an autosomal recessive disorder with characteristic clinical manifestations. Its incidence in the general population is low. The oral manifestations of Ellis-van Creveld are found in soft tissues and teeth, but the dental literature on the subject is scarce. In the last 20 years, 5 cases of Ellis-van Creveld syndrome have been followed at the Pediatric Dentistry Service of the Hospital Sant Joan de Déu, Barcelona. The present study describes the constant and variable oral findings in these patients, which play an important role in the diagnosis criteria for the syndrome. The presence of a great variety of oral manifestations such as fusion of the upper lip to the gingival margin, presence of multiple frenula, abnormally shaped and microdontic teeth, and congenitally missing teeth requires multidisciplinary dental treatment, with consideration for the high incidence of cardiac defects in these patients. PMID:15185812

  11. Sand Resources, Regional Geology, and Coastal Processes of the Chandeleur Islands Coastal System: an Evaluation of the Breton National Wildlife Refuge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lavoie, Dawn

    2009-01-01

    Breton National Wildlife Refuge, the Chandeleur Islands chain in Louisiana, provides habitat and nesting areas for wildlife and is an initial barrier protecting New Orleans from storms. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in partnership with the University of New Orleans Pontchartrain Institute for Environmental Sciences undertook an intensive study that included (1) an analysis of island change based on historical maps and remotely sensed shoreline and topographic data; (2) a series of lidar surveys at 3- to 4-month intervals after Hurricane Katrina to determine barrier island recovery potential; (3) a discussion of sea level rise and effects on the islands; (4) an analysis of sea floor evolution and sediment dynamics in the refuge over the past 150 years; (5) an assessment of the local sediment transport and sediment resource availability based on the bathymetric and subbottom data; (6) a carefully selected core collection effort to groundtruth the geophysical data and more fully characterize the sediments composing the islands and surrounds; (7) an additional survey of the St. Bernard Shoals to assess their potential as a sand resource; and (8) a modeling study to numerically simulate the potential response of the islands to the low-intensity, intermediate, and extreme events likely to affect the refuge over the next 50 years. Results indicate that the islands have become fragmented and greatly diminished in subaerial extent over time: the southern islands retreating landward as they reorganize into subaerial features, the northern islands remaining in place. Breton Island, because maintenance of the Mississippi River-Gulf Outlet (MRGO) outer bar channel requires dredging, is deprived of sand sufficient to sustain itself. Regional sediment transport trends indicate that large storms are extremely effective in transporting sand and controlling the shoreline development and barrier island geometry. Sand is transported north and south from a divergent zone near

  12. The Tourism Carrying Capacity of Underwater Trails in Isabel Island National Park, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ríos-Jara, Eduardo; Galván-Villa, Cristian Moisés; Rodríguez-Zaragoza, Fabián Alejandro; López-Uriarte, Ernesto; Muñoz-Fernández, Vicente Teófilo

    2013-08-01

    The popularity of ecotourism in the marine protected areas of Mexico has increased over the last 10 years; in particular there is a large development of a SCUBA diving industry in the Mexican Pacific including Isabel Island. Given the risks associated with human activity in the marine environments around this island, we propose two ecotourism management strategies: (1) the creation and use of underwater trails, and (2) the estimation of the specific tourism carrying capacity (TCC) for each trail. Six underwater trails were selected in sites that presented elements of biological, geological, and scenic interest, using information obtained during field observations. The methodology used to estimate the TCC was based upon the physical and biological conditions of each site, the infrastructure and equipment available, and the characteristics of the service providers and the administrators of the park. Correction factors of the TCC included elements of the quality of the visit and the threat and vulnerability of the marine environment of each trail (e.g., divers' expertise, size and distance between groups of divers, accessibility, wind, coral coverage). The TCC values ranged between 1,252 and 1,642 dives/year/trail, with a total of 8,597 dives/year for all six trails. Although these numbers are higher than the actual number of recreational visitors to the island (~1,000 dives per year), there is a need for adequate preventive management if the diving sites are to maintain their esthetic appeal and biological characteristics. Such management might be initially directed toward using only the sites and the TCC proposed here.

  13. The tourism carrying capacity of underwater trails in Isabel Island National Park, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Ríos-Jara, Eduardo; Galván-Villa, Cristian Moisés; Rodríguez-Zaragoza, Fabián Alejandro; López-Uriarte, Ernesto; Muñoz-Fernández, Vicente Teófilo

    2013-08-01

    The popularity of ecotourism in the marine protected areas of Mexico has increased over the last 10 years; in particular there is a large development of a SCUBA diving industry in the Mexican Pacific including Isabel Island. Given the risks associated with human activity in the marine environments around this island, we propose two ecotourism management strategies: (1) the creation and use of underwater trails, and (2) the estimation of the specific tourism carrying capacity (TCC) for each trail. Six underwater trails were selected in sites that presented elements of biological, geological, and scenic interest, using information obtained during field observations. The methodology used to estimate the TCC was based upon the physical and biological conditions of each site, the infrastructure and equipment available, and the characteristics of the service providers and the administrators of the park. Correction factors of the TCC included elements of the quality of the visit and the threat and vulnerability of the marine environment of each trail (e.g., divers' expertise, size and distance between groups of divers, accessibility, wind, coral coverage). The TCC values ranged between 1,252 and 1,642 dives/year/trail, with a total of 8,597 dives/year for all six trails. Although these numbers are higher than the actual number of recreational visitors to the island (~1,000 dives per year), there is a need for adequate preventive management if the diving sites are to maintain their esthetic appeal and biological characteristics. Such management might be initially directed toward using only the sites and the TCC proposed here.

  14. The tourism carrying capacity of underwater trails in Isabel Island National Park, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Ríos-Jara, Eduardo; Galván-Villa, Cristian Moisés; Rodríguez-Zaragoza, Fabián Alejandro; López-Uriarte, Ernesto; Muñoz-Fernández, Vicente Teófilo

    2013-08-01

    The popularity of ecotourism in the marine protected areas of Mexico has increased over the last 10 years; in particular there is a large development of a SCUBA diving industry in the Mexican Pacific including Isabel Island. Given the risks associated with human activity in the marine environments around this island, we propose two ecotourism management strategies: (1) the creation and use of underwater trails, and (2) the estimation of the specific tourism carrying capacity (TCC) for each trail. Six underwater trails were selected in sites that presented elements of biological, geological, and scenic interest, using information obtained during field observations. The methodology used to estimate the TCC was based upon the physical and biological conditions of each site, the infrastructure and equipment available, and the characteristics of the service providers and the administrators of the park. Correction factors of the TCC included elements of the quality of the visit and the threat and vulnerability of the marine environment of each trail (e.g., divers' expertise, size and distance between groups of divers, accessibility, wind, coral coverage). The TCC values ranged between 1,252 and 1,642 dives/year/trail, with a total of 8,597 dives/year for all six trails. Although these numbers are higher than the actual number of recreational visitors to the island (~1,000 dives per year), there is a need for adequate preventive management if the diving sites are to maintain their esthetic appeal and biological characteristics. Such management might be initially directed toward using only the sites and the TCC proposed here. PMID:23661221

  15. Late Quaternary sea-level history and the antiquity of mammoths (Mammuthus exilis and Mammuthus columbi), Channel Islands National Park, California, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhs, Daniel R.; Simmons, Kathleen R.; Groves, Lindsey T.; McGeehin, John P.; Randall Schumann, R.; Agenbroad, Larry D.

    2015-05-01

    Fossils of Columbian mammoths (Mammuthus columbi) and pygmy mammoths (Mammuthus exilis) have been reported from Channel Islands National Park, California. Most date to the last glacial period (Marine Isotope Stage [MIS] 2), but a tusk of M. exilis (or immature M. columbi) was found in the lowest marine terrace of Santa Rosa Island. Uranium-series dating of corals yielded ages from 83.8 ± 0.6 ka to 78.6 ± 0.5 ka, correlating the terrace with MIS 5.1, a time of relatively high sea level. Mammoths likely immigrated to the islands by swimming during the glacial periods MIS 6 (~ 150 ka) or MIS 8 (~ 250 ka), when sea level was low and the island-mainland distance was minimal, as during MIS 2. Earliest mammoth immigration to the islands likely occurred late enough in the Quaternary that uplift of the islands and the mainland decreased the swimming distance to a range that could be accomplished by mammoths. Results challenge the hypothesis that climate change, vegetation change, and decreased land area from sea-level rise were the causes of mammoth extinction at the Pleistocene/Holocene boundary on the Channel Islands. Pre-MIS 2 mammoth populations would have experienced similar or even more dramatic changes at the MIS 6/5.5 transition.

  16. Substance use and abuse by Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders: preliminary results from four national epidemiologic studies.

    PubMed Central

    Price, Rumi Kato; Risk, Nathan K.; Wong, Mamie Mee; Klingle, Renee Storm

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors analyzed four recent large national surveys to assess the degree of use and abuse of a wide range of psychoactive substances across subgroups of Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (AAPIs) and in comparison with whites. METHOD: The surveys analyzed were the 1999 National Household Survey on Drug Abuse, the 1992 National Longitudinal Alcohol Epidemiologic Survey, and the 1995 National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health In-School and In-Home surveys. The AAPI sample sizes varied from 900 to more than 4,500 across the four surveys. RESULTS: Among major racial groups, use of major substances is lowest for AAPIs. Among disaggregated AAPI groups, Japanese Americans have the highest substance use rates. Mixed-heritage AAPIs are at high risk for substance use, even after controlling for cultural protective factors and socioeconomic measures. Differential rates correspond to the ranking of several acculturation and socioeconomic indices. CONCLUSION: The results, while preliminary, point to the importance of rethinking ethnic and racial classifications for estimating substance use and abuse, for studying substance abuse problems in mixed-heritage adolescents, and for studying socioenvironmental and potentially genetic protective factors. PMID:12435826

  17. "Their Experience Is the Immigrant Experience": Ellis Island, Documentary Film, and Rhetorically Reversible Whiteness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irwin, Meryl J.

    2013-01-01

    Political advocates on the ideological right have long taken seriously what their counterparts on the left have not: white racialized affect. As left activists and scholars have alternately lamented and raged over the steady creep of the "middle" to the "right," they have documented in detail the outcomes of whites' refusal to engage in "genuine"…

  18. Immigration beyond Ellis Island: Suggestions for Teaching about Immigration in the Now

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hossain, Kazi I.

    2014-01-01

    America's history books abound with stories of immigrants who contributed to the development of this country. In terms of social studies curriculum, all states require schools to teach about immigration. However, the question is how to teach this topic in a manner that will give students--elementary through high school--a better understanding of…

  19. A Resource Guide for Celebrating the Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island, 1986. Bulletin 1783.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerr, Myrtle; Cookston, James S.

    Compiled to help celebrate the 100th anniversary of the Statue of Liberty, this selection of books, periodicals, audiovisuals, and other educational resources was intended to help stimulate discussion, promote projects, and create awareness of the Statue of Liberty Centennial. Listed are 24 books, 18 magazine articles, and 3 films about the Statue…

  20. From Ellis Island to LAX: immigrant prospects in the American city.

    PubMed

    Waldinger, R

    1996-01-01

    "This article seeks to bring the ¿urban' back into immigration research. Each immigrant receiving area has its own particular group of newcomers, and the economic and political structures of the immigrant receiving areas are also distinctive. Those structures are not all determining, as immigrant trajectories are shaped by the interaction between distinctive urban institutions and the specific characteristics of the relevant ethnic groups. But in the last analysis, the urban context makes a difference, as this study shows by examining the leading [U.S.] immigrant destinations--New York and Los Angeles."

  1. Ober's Island, One of the Review Islands on Rainy Lake, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Ober's Island, One of the Review Islands on Rainy Lake, bounded on the south by The Hawk Island and on the north by The Crow Island. These islands are located seven miles east of Ranier, Minnesota, three miles west of Voyageur National Park, and one mile south of the international border of the United States of America and Canada. The legal description of Mallard Island is Lot 6, Section 19, T-17-N, R-22-W, Koochiching County, Minnesota, Ranier, Koochiching County, MN

  2. Kelp forest monitoring 1992 annual report. Channel Islands National Park. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, D.; Kushner, D.

    1992-12-31

    The 1992 results of the Channel Islands Natioanl Park Kelp Forest Monitoring Project are described in this report. Population dynamics of 68 taxa or categories of algae, fish, and invertebrates were measured at 16 permanent sites around the five islands within the park. Survey techniques utilized SCUBA and surface-supplied-air, and included quadrats, band transects, random point contacts, fish and video transects, photogrammetric plots, size frequency measurements, artifical recruitment habitats, and species list surveys. Some batheothermograph data was collected. In 1992, nine sites and healthy kelp forests while seven were mostly barren. The seven barren sites consisted of one that was dominated by the aggregated red sea cucumber, Pachythyone rubra, one was barren with high sedimentation, one was domainated by red sea urchins, Strongylocentrotus franciscanus, and four sites were dominated by purple sea urchins, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, three of which had signs of a developing kelp forest. Wasting disease was observed in sea stars and a wasting syndrome was observed in sea urchins. Fish recruitment appeared to be late this year. Size frequency measurements were taken from artificial recruitment modules (previously named `abalone recruitment modules`) at six of the sites.

  3. Knowledge and use of prevention measures for chikungunya virus among visitors — Virgin Islands National Park, 2015

    PubMed Central

    Cherry, Cara C.; Beer, Karlyn D.; Fulton, Corey; Wong, David; Buttke, Danielle; Staples, J. Erin; Ellis, Esther M.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background In June 2014, the mosquito-borne chikungunya virus (CHIKV) emerged in the U.S. Virgin Islands (USVI), a location where tourists comprise the majority of the population during peak season (January–April). Limited information is available concerning visitors’ CHIKV awareness and prevention measures. Methods We surveyed a convenience sample of Virgin Islands National Park visitors aged ≥18 years. Respondents completed a questionnaire assessing CHIKV knowledge, attitudes, and practices; health information-seeking practices; and demographics. Results Of 783 persons contacted, 443 (57%) completed the survey. Fewer than half (208/441 [47%]) were aware of CHIKV. During trip preparation, 28% of respondents (126/443) investigated USVI-specific health concerns. Compared with persons unaware of CHIKV, CHIKV-aware persons were more likely to apply insect repellent (134/207 [65%] versus 111/231 [48%]; p < 0.001), wear long-sleeves and long pants (84/203 [41%] versus 57/227 [25%]; p < 0.001), and wear insect repellent-treated clothing (36/204 [18%] versus 22/227 [10%]; p = 0.02). Conclusions The majority of visitors surveyed did not research destination-related health concerns and were unaware of CHIKV. However, CHIKV awareness was associated with using multiple prevention measures to reduce disease risk. These findings underscore the importance of providing tourists with disease education upon destination arrival. PMID:27597388

  4. Relevance of cryptic fishes in biodiversity assessments: A case study at Buck Island Reef National Monument, St. Croix

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith-Vaniz, W.F.; Jelks, H.L.; Rocha, L.A.

    2006-01-01

    Because cryptic fishes are difficult to accurately survey, they are undersampled components of coral reef habitats, and their ecological roles have been generally ignored. Fifty-eight enclosed stations were sampled in shoreline, nearshore reef, lagoon, backreef, forereef, and bank/shelf habitats with an ichthyocide (rotenone) at Buck Island Reef National Monument, St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands. Our samples included 55 families and 228 species, 60 previously unreported from St. Croix. Fish assemblages varied across habitat zones with the shoreline assemblage the most distinct. Only 8% of the species were present in all habitats. Multi-dimensional scaling plots of habitat characteristics and Bray-Curtis similarities of fish assemblages revealed similar patterns. Dominant and rare taxa are enumerated for each habitat sampled. Rotenone and visual census data are compared. While visual surveys accumulated more species per unit of effort, rotenone samples accumulated more species by area. Only 36% of the 228 species sampled with rotenone were visually detected, while 70% of the 115 species visually detected were also collected with rotenone. The use of rotenone is controversial but important for obtaining reasonably complete inventories of reef fishes. Misconceptions about rotenone and the advantages and limitations of alternative biodiversity assessment methods are discussed. ?? 2006 Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science of the University of Miami.

  5. Sediment capture in flood plains of the Mississippi River: A case study in Cat Island National Wildlife Refuge, Louisiana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, M.; Bentley, S. J., Sr.

    2015-03-01

    To plan restoration of the Mississippi River Delta, it is imperative to know how much sediment the Mississippi River currently provides. Recent research has demonstrated that between Tarbert Landing and St Francisville on the Mississippi, as much as 67 million metric tons (Mt) per year is lost from river transport, of which ~16 Mt is muddy suspended sediment. So where does this sediment go? Two pathways for loss have been proposed: riverbed storage, and overbank deposition in regions that lack manmade levées. Cat Island National Wildlife Refuge, on the unleveed Mississippi River east bank near St Francisville, Louisiana, consists of undisturbed bottomland forest that is inundated most years by river flooding. To determine fluvial sediment accumulation rates (SAR) from flooding, pushcores 40-50 cm long were collected then dated by Pb-210 and Cs-137 geochronology. Preliminary data suggests that muddy sediment accumulation is 10-13% of muddy suspended sediment lost from river transport along this river reach.

  6. "Endeavoring to Carry On Their Work": The National Debate Over Midwives and Its Impact in Rhode Island, 1890-1940.

    PubMed

    Caron, Simone M

    2017-01-01

    This article analyzes the national discourse over "the problem" of midwifery in medical literature and examines the impact of this dialogue on Rhode Island from 1890 to 1940. Doctors did not speak as a monolithic bloc on this "problem": some blamed midwives while others impugned poorly trained physicians. This debate led to curricula reform and to state laws to regulate midwifery. The attempt to eliminate midwives in the 1910s failed because of a shortage of trained obstetricians, and because of cultural barriers between immigrant and mainstream communities. A decrease in immigration, an increase in trained obstetricians, the growing notion of midwives as relics of an outdated past, and the emergence of insurance plans to cover "modern" hospital births led to a decline in midwifery. PMID:27502612

  7. Ellis-van Creveld syndrome: report of 15 cases in an inbred kindred.

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, E O; Janovitz, D; de Albuquerque, S C

    1980-01-01

    An inbred kindred with 15 cases of the autosomal recessive Ellis-van Creveld syndrome is reported. The ages of the 12 living affected varied between 3 and 82 years. The main characteristics include polydactyly of the hands and feet and several other skeletal anomalies, oral manifestations, and malformations of the heart in 50% of the living affected. Images PMID:7218275

  8. Productive and Reproductive Work on the Family Farm: Changes Among Ethnic Groups in Ellis County, Kansas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flora, Cornelia Butler; Stitz, John

    This report is based on data obtained from historical documents, quantitative analysis of state agricultural censuses for 1885, 1895, and 1905, and interviews with farm women of Volga and German heritages, aged 14 to 87. The participation of women in wheat-based farming systems in Ellis County, Kansas, is examined as related to the ethnic…

  9. Rational Emotive Therapy--A Study of Initial Therapy Sessions of Albert Ellis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Irving M.; Rosenfeld, Joseph G.

    1976-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to see which specific techniques Albert Ellis, the founder of the school of therapy known as Rational Emotive Therapy, uses during an initial therapy session and also to see what percentage of time each technique was utilized. (Author)

  10. The Importance of Voice in Supervision: A Response to Ellis and Robbins (1993) and Bernstein (1993).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Twohey, Denise

    1993-01-01

    Comments two responses to author's article "Listening for the Voices of Care and Justice in Counselor Supervision" (Twohey and Volker, 1993). Responds to Ellis and Robbins (1993) by clarifying perspective on relationship between moral decision making and supervision. Takes issue with Bernstein's (1993) comments about superiority of instrumental…

  11. Overgeneralization from a Narrow Focus: A Response to Ellis et al. (2008) and Bitchener (2008)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, Cuiqin

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a critical analysis of two recent studies on error correction, Ellis, Sheen, Murakami, and Takashima (2008) and Bitchener (2008) and argues that neither study constitutes evidence for error correction based on discussion of the comparability of participants, design issues, and analysis flaws in both studies. The paper further…

  12. 77 FR 66979 - Ellis Road/American Electric Corporation, Jacksonville, Duval County, FL, Notice of Settlement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-08

    ... Ms. Paula V. Painter. Submit your comments by Site name Ellis Road/American Electric Corporation Site... . Email. Painter.Paula@epa.gov . U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 61 Forsyth Street SW., Atlanta, Georgia 30303. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Paula V. Painter at 404/562-8887. Dated: October 18,...

  13. Endorsements of Ellis' Irrational Beliefs as a Function of DSM-III Psychotic Diagnosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newark, Charles S.; Whitt, J. Kenneth

    1983-01-01

    Examined opinions of normal subjects (N=120) and patients diagnosed as manic and schizophrenic (N=150) regarding Ellis's 11 irrational beliefs. Results showed that the schizophrenia and major depressive groups endorsed three and four irrational beliefs respectively with no endorsement from the normal and manic groups. (LLL)

  14. An Interview with...Ed Ellis: Working To Improve Education for Adolescents with Learning Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casareno, Alexander

    2002-01-01

    An interview with Edwin S. Ellis, an expert on cognitive-based interventions and curriculum for students with learning disabilities (LD) focuses on the roots of his interest in strategic learning, the teacher's role in effective schooling, the need to go beyond labels, knowledge elaboration in learning, effective learning strategies for adolescent…

  15. Supervisory Theory into Practice: Differential Perception of Supervision by Ekstein, Ellis, Polster, and Rogers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodyear, Rodney K.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Compared the supervision that four psychologists (Ekstein, Ellis, Polster, and Rogers) each provided to the same supervisee. Subjects were 58 counseling supervisors who evaluated videotaped supervision sessions. Results showed the supervisors were perceived as differing in attractiveness, role, and supervisory methods, generally consistent with…

  16. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service get ready to release a rescued pelican at the Merritt Island National

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Under a rain-filled sky, Mark Epstein, with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, gets ready to release a rescued white pelican. At right is Kat Royer, also with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, who has fixed on it a leg band issued by the U.S. Department of the Interior's Bird Banding Laboratory. In the background is Christine Wise who is involved with rescue and rehabilitation of Florida wild animals. Wise brought the pelican to the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge for its release. The bird was found covered in crude oil from a contaminated ditch in northern Indiana in November, and was rescued by a local Police Department, treated, and flown to the Back to Nature Wildlife Refuge in Orlando, Fla. for care and rest. The pelican, dubbed 'Fisheater' by its rescuers, is being let go to join a flock of about 30 other white pelicans that are wintering on the refuge. White pelicans inhabit marshy lakes and along the Pacific and Texas coasts. They winter from Florida and southern California south to Panama, chiefly in coastal lagoons. They are frequently seen flying in long lines, flapping and sailing in unison, but also ride rising air currents to soar gracefully in circles. The Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects.

  17. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service get ready to release a rescued pelican at the Merritt Island National

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Mark Epstein, with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, holds a white pelican that will be released under a rain-filled sky at the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. The bird was found covered in crude oil from a contaminated ditch in northern Indiana in November, and was rescued by a local Police Department, treated, and flown to the Back to Nature Wildlife Center in Orlando, Fla. for care and rest. After Kat Royer, who is with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, fits the bird with a leg band issued by the U.S. Department of the Interior's Bird Banding Laboratory, the pelican will be let go to join a flock of about 30 other white pelicans that are wintering on the refuge. White pelicans inhabit marshy lakes and along the Pacific and Texas coasts. They winter from Florida and southern California south to Panama, chiefly in coastal lagoons. They are frequently seen flying in long lines, flapping and sailing in unison, but also ride rising air currents to soar gracefully in circles. The Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects.

  18. 32 CFR 935.62 - Island Attorney.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Island Attorney. 935.62 Section 935.62 National... WAKE ISLAND CODE Judiciary § 935.62 Island Attorney. There is an Island Attorney, appointed by the General Counsel as needed. The Island Attorney shall serve at the pleasure of the General Counsel....

  19. 32 CFR 935.62 - Island Attorney.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Island Attorney. 935.62 Section 935.62 National... WAKE ISLAND CODE Judiciary § 935.62 Island Attorney. There is an Island Attorney, appointed by the General Counsel as needed. The Island Attorney shall serve at the pleasure of the General Counsel....

  20. 32 CFR 935.62 - Island Attorney.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Island Attorney. 935.62 Section 935.62 National... WAKE ISLAND CODE Judiciary § 935.62 Island Attorney. There is an Island Attorney, appointed by the General Counsel as needed. The Island Attorney shall serve at the pleasure of the General Counsel....

  1. 32 CFR 935.62 - Island Attorney.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Island Attorney. 935.62 Section 935.62 National... WAKE ISLAND CODE Judiciary § 935.62 Island Attorney. There is an Island Attorney, appointed by the General Counsel as needed. The Island Attorney shall serve at the pleasure of the General Counsel....

  2. 32 CFR 935.62 - Island Attorney.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Island Attorney. 935.62 Section 935.62 National... WAKE ISLAND CODE Judiciary § 935.62 Island Attorney. There is an Island Attorney, appointed by the General Counsel as needed. The Island Attorney shall serve at the pleasure of the General Counsel....

  3. Evaluation of marsh development processes at Fire Island National Seashore: Recent and historic perspectives

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roman, C.T.; King, D.R.; Cahoon, D.R.; Lynch, J.C.; Appleby, P.G.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose and significance of the study: Salt marshes are dynamic environments, increasing in vertical elevation and migrating, often landward, as sea level rises. With sea level rise greater than marsh elevation increase, marshes can be submerged, marsh soils become waterlogged, and plant growth becomes stressed, often resulting in conversion of vegetation-dominated marsh to mudflat or open water habitat. Given that the rate of sea level rise is expected to accelerate over the next century and that some marshes in the northeast are becoming submerged (e.g., Jamaica Bay, NY), it is important to understand the processes that control marsh development. More specifically, the objectives of this project were to quantify vertical marsh elevation change in relation to recent rates of sea-level rise and to investigate factors or processes that are most influential in controlling the development and maintenance of Fire Island salt marshes.

  4. Inventory of Data Sources Used for Watershed Condition Assessments of Fire Island National Seashore, Gateway National Recreation Area, and Sagamore Hill National Historic Site, New York and New Jersey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benotti, Mark J.

    2008-01-01

    The natural resources and watershed conditions of National Park units in the New York-New Jersey area - Gateway National Recreation Area (GATE), Sagamore Hill National Historic Site (SAHI), and Fire Island National Seashore (FIIS) - are threatened by different degrees of urbanization and direct or indirect human use. Such threats as nutrient enrichment, sedimentation, exotic species invasion, water pollution, and development pose serious management concerns for these parks. Limited investigations of the status of different natural resources at or near each park have been conducted, but a comprehensive understanding of the natural resources and watershed conditions at FIIS, GATE, and SAHI is needed. This report details the sources of spatial data and metadata assembled into a Geographic Information System (GIS) for the purpose of assessing natural resources and watershed conditions at GATE, SAHI, and FIIS.

  5. 75 FR 77615 - Availability of Seats for the Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary Advisory...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-13

    ... Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary Advisory Council: Honolulu County (primary only), Research (alternate only), Commercial Shipping, Whale Watching, Ocean Recreation, Business/ Commerce, Citizen-at-Large...; community and professional affiliations; philosophy regarding the protection and management of...

  6. 77 FR 61632 - Final Environmental Impact Statement for Cattle Point Road Relocation, San Juan Island National...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-10

    ... National Historic Landmark. A Notice of Intent to begin the conservation planning and environmental impact... open house was hosted by the Park in the town of Friday Harbor on October 26, 2010 (approximately...

  7. Stability and instability of Ellis and phantom wormholes: Are there ghosts?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandi, K. K.; Potapov, A. A.; Izmailov, R. N.; Tamang, A.; Evans, J. C.

    2016-05-01

    It is concluded in the literature that the Ellis wormhole is unstable under small perturbations and would either decay to the Schwarzschild black hole or expand away to infinity. While this deterministic conclusion of instability is correct, we show that the Ellis wormhole reduces to the Schwarzschild black hole only when the Ellis solution parameter γ assumes a complex value -i . We shall then reexamine the stability of Ellis and phantom wormholes from the viewpoint of local and asymptotic observers by using a completely different approach, viz., we adapt Tangherlini's nondeterministic, prequantal statistical simulation about photon motion in the real optical medium to an effective medium reformulation of motions obtained via Hamilton's optical-mechanical analogy in a gravity field. A crucial component of Tangherlini's idea is the observed increase of momentum of the photons entering a real medium. We show that this fact has a heuristic parallel in the effective medium version of the Pound-Rebka experiment in gravity. Our conclusion is that there is a nonzero probability that Ellis and phantom wormholes could appear stable or unstable depending on the location of observers and on the values of γ , leading to the possibility of ghost wormholes (like ghost stars). The Schwarzschild horizon, however, would always certainly appear to be stable (R =1 , T =0 ) to observers regardless of their location. Phantom wormholes of bounded mass in the extreme limit a →-1 are also shown to be stable just as the Schwarzschild black hole is. We shall propose a thought experiment showing that our nondeterministic results could be numerically translated into observable deterministic signatures of ghost wormholes.

  8. Hydrogeomorphic Classification of Wetlands on Mt. Desert Island, Maine, Including Hydrologic Susceptibility Factors for Wetlands in Acadia National Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nielsen, Martha G.

    2006-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the National Park Service, developed a hydrogeomorphic (HGM) classification system for wetlands greater than 0.4 hectares (ha) on Mt. Desert Island, Maine, and applied this classification using map-scale data to more than 1,200 mapped wetland units on the island. In addition, two hydrologic susceptibility factors were defined for a subset of these wetlands, using 11 variables derived from landscape-scale characteristics of the catchment areas of these wetlands. The hydrologic susceptibility factors, one related to the potential hydrologic pathways for contaminants and the other to the susceptibility of wetlands to disruptions in water supply from projected future changes in climate, were used to indicate which wetlands (greater than 1 ha) in Acadia National Park (ANP) may warrant further investigation or monitoring. The HGM classification system consists of 13 categories: Riverine-Upper Perennial, Riverine-Nonperennial, Riverine- Tidal, Depressional-Closed, Depressional-Semiclosed, Depressional-Open, Depressional-No Ground-Water Input, Mineral Soil Flat, Organic Soil Flat, Tidal Fringe, Lacustrine Fringe, Slope, and Hilltop/Upper Hillslope. A dichotomous key was developed to aid in the classification of wetlands. The National Wetland Inventory maps produced by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service provided the wetland mapping units used for this classification. On the basis of topographic map information and geographic information system (GIS) layers at a scale of 1:24,000 or larger, 1,202 wetland units were assigned a preliminary HGM classification. Two of the 13 HGM classes (Riverine-Tidal and Depressional-No Ground-Water Input) were not assigned to any wetlands because criteria for determining those classes are not available at that map scale, and must be determined by more site-specific information. Of the 1,202 wetland polygons classified, which cover 1,830 ha in ANP, 327 were classified as Slope, 258 were

  9. Aspirations and Tensions in Developing International Mindedness: Case Study of Two Students in an IB School in an Indian Ocean Island Nation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poonoosamy, Mico

    2016-01-01

    International mindedness is considered by many educational researchers and organizations as a determining feature in international education. This article used data as part of a PhD case study inquiry to explore how international mindedness is developed by two students in an IB school in an Indian Ocean Island Nation. Through a qualitative…

  10. Late Quaternary sea-level history and the antiquity of mammoths (Mammuthus exilis and Mammuthus columbi), Channel Islands NationalPark, California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muhs, Daniel R.; Simmons, Kathleen R.; Groves, Lindsey T.; McGeehin, John P.; Schumann, R. Randall; Agenbroad, Larry D.

    2015-01-01

    Fossils of Columbian mammoths (Mammuthus columbi) and pygmy mammoths (Mammuthus exilis) have been reported from Channel Islands National Park, California. Most date to the last glacial period (Marine Isotope Stage [MIS] 2), but a tusk of M. exilis (or immature M. columbi) was found in the lowest marine terrace of Santa Rosa Island. Uranium-series dating of corals yielded ages from 83.8 ± 0.6 ka to 78.6 ± 0.5 ka, correlating the terrace with MIS 5.1, a time of relatively high sea level. Mammoths likely immigrated to the islands by swimming during the glacial periods MIS 6 (~ 150 ka) or MIS 8 (~ 250 ka), when sea level was low and the island–mainland distance was minimal, as during MIS 2. Earliest mammoth immigration to the islands likely occurred late enough in the Quaternary that uplift of the islands and the mainland decreased the swimming distance to a range that could be accomplished by mammoths. Results challenge the hypothesis that climate change, vegetation change, and decreased land area from sea-level rise were the causes of mammoth extinction at the Pleistocene/Holocene boundary on the Channel Islands. Pre-MIS 2 mammoth populations would have experienced similar or even more dramatic changes at the MIS 6/5.5 transition.

  11. Is Angel Island the Ellis Island of the West? Teaching Multiple Perspective-Taking in American Immigration History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ciardiello, A. Vincent

    2012-01-01

    Education in the twenty-first century requires that all students learn the social studies skills that help them understand the complex issues related to civic ideals and practices. One of these skills is developing multiple perspective-taking. Many educators believe that this critical thinking ability is not only for upper level students but also…

  12. Effect of storms on Barrier Island dynamics, Core Banks, Cape Lookout National Seashore, North Carolina, 1960-2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Riggs, Stanley R.; Ames, Dorothea V.

    2007-01-01

    The effect of storms on long-term dynamics of barrier islands was evaluated on Core Banks, a series of barrier islands that extend from Cape Lookout to Okracoke Inlet in the Cape Lookout National Seashore, North Carolina. Shoreline and elevation changes were determined by comparing 77 profiles and associated reference markers established by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) on Core Banks from June 1960 to July 1962 to a follow-up survey by Godfrey and Godfrey (G&G) in 1971 and a survey by the Department of Geology at East Carolina University (ECU) in 2001, in which 57 of the original 77 profiles were located. Evaluation of the baseline data associated with the USACE study supplies an important record of barrier island response to two specific storm events—Hurricane Donna in September 1960 and the Ash Wednesday extra-tropical cyclone in March 1962. The 1962 USACE survey was followed by 9 years characterized by no major storms; this low-energy period was captured by the G&G survey in 1971. The G&G survey was followed by 22 years characterized by occasional small to moderate storms. Starting in 1993, however, and continuing through 1999, the North Carolina coast experienced a major increase in storm activity, with seven major hurricanes impacting Core Banks. Both the USACE 1960–1962 and G&G 1962–1971 surveys produced short-term data sets that reflected very different sets of weather conditions. The ECU 2001 survey data were then compared with the USACE 1960 survey data to develop a long-term (41 years) data set for shoreline erosion on Core Banks. Those resulting long-term data were compared with the long-term (52 years) data sets by the North Carolina Division of Coastal Management (NCDCM) from 1940–1992 and 1946–1998; a strong positive correlation and very similar rates of average annual erosion resulted. However, the ECU and NCDCM long-term data sets did not correlate with either of the USACE and G&G short-term survey data and had very different

  13. Integrating Social Marketing into Sustainable Resource Management at Padre Island National Seashore: An Attitude-Based Segmentation Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Po-Hsin; Sorice, Michael G.; Nepal, Sanjay K.; Cheng, Chia-Kuen

    2009-06-01

    High demand for outdoor recreation and increasing diversity in outdoor recreation participants have imposed a great challenge on the National Park Service (NPS), which is tasked with the mission to provide open access for quality outdoor recreation and maintain the ecological integrity of the park system. In addition to management practices of education and restrictions, building a sense of natural resource stewardship among visitors may also facilitate the NPS ability to react to this challenge. The purpose of our study is to suggest a segmentation approach that is built on the social marketing framework and aimed at influencing visitor behaviors to support conservation. Attitude toward natural resource management, an indicator of natural resource stewardship, is used as the basis for segmenting park visitors. This segmentation approach is examined based on a survey of 987 visitors to the Padre Island National Seashore (PAIS) in Texas in 2003. Results of the K-means cluster analysis identify three visitor segments: Conservation-Oriented, Development-Oriented, and Status Quo visitors. This segmentation solution is verified using respondents’ socio-demographic backgrounds, use patterns, experience preferences, and attitudes toward a proposed regulation. Suggestions are provided to better target the three visitor segments and facilitate a sense of natural resource stewardship among them.

  14. Integrating social marketing into sustainable resource management at Padre Island National Seashore: an attitude-based segmentation approach.

    PubMed

    Lai, Po-Hsin; Sorice, Michael G; Nepal, Sanjay K; Cheng, Chia-Kuen

    2009-06-01

    High demand for outdoor recreation and increasing diversity in outdoor recreation participants have imposed a great challenge on the National Park Service (NPS), which is tasked with the mission to provide open access for quality outdoor recreation and maintain the ecological integrity of the park system. In addition to management practices of education and restrictions, building a sense of natural resource stewardship among visitors may also facilitate the NPS ability to react to this challenge. The purpose of our study is to suggest a segmentation approach that is built on the social marketing framework and aimed at influencing visitor behaviors to support conservation. Attitude toward natural resource management, an indicator of natural resource stewardship, is used as the basis for segmenting park visitors. This segmentation approach is examined based on a survey of 987 visitors to the Padre Island National Seashore (PAIS) in Texas in 2003. Results of the K-means cluster analysis identify three visitor segments: Conservation-Oriented, Development-Oriented, and Status Quo visitors. This segmentation solution is verified using respondents' socio-demographic backgrounds, use patterns, experience preferences, and attitudes toward a proposed regulation. Suggestions are provided to better target the three visitor segments and facilitate a sense of natural resource stewardship among them.

  15. 76 FR 30303 - Tongass National Forest; Alaska; Bell Island Geothermal Leases Supplemental Environmental Impact...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-25

    ...The U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Tongass National Forest will prepare a supplemental environmental impact statement (SEIS) to a 2008 programmatic environmental impact statement (PEIS) titled Geothermal Leasing in the Western United States. This analysis is needed for consent determination to allow the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) to issue three pending leases to a private......

  16. The Nation's Report Card Science 2011 State Snapshot Report. Rhode Island. Grade 8, Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2012

    2012-01-01

    A representative sample of 122,000 eighth-graders participated in the 2011 National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) science assessment, which is designed to measure students' knowledge and abilities in the areas of physical science, life science, and Earth and space sciences. This report covers the overall results, achievement level…

  17. Biological inventory of anchialine pools in the Pu'uhonua o Hōnaunau National Historical Park and Pu'ukoholā Heiau National Historical Site, Hawaii Island

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tango, Lori K.; Foote, David; Magnacca, Karl N.; Foltz, Sarah J.; Cutler, Kerry

    2012-01-01

    Inventories for major groups of invertebrates were completed at anchialine pool complexes in Pu‘uhonua o Hōnaunau National Historical Park (PUHO) and Pu‘ukoholā Heiau National Historic Site (PUHE) on the island of Hawai‘i. Nine pools within two pool complexes were surveyed at PUHO, along with one extensive pool at the terminus of Makeāhua Gulch at PUHE. At both parks, inventories documented previously unreported diversity, with pool complexes at PUHO exhibiting greater species richness for most taxa than the pool at PUHE. Inventories at PUHO recorded five species of molluscs, four species of crustaceans (including the candidate endangered shrimp Metabetaeus lohena), two species of Orthoptera, four species of Odonata (including the candidate endangered damselfly Megalagrion xanthomelas), fourteen species of Diptera, nine taxa of plankton, and thirteen species of ants; inventories at the PUHE pool produced only one species of mollusc, two species of crustacean, at least one species of Orthoptera, four species of Odonata, thirty species of Diptera, five taxa of plankton, and four species of ants. Further survey work may be necessary to document the full diversity of pool fauna, especially in species-rich groups like the Diptera. Inventory data will be used to generate a network wide database of species presence and distribution, and will aid in developing management plans for anchialine pool resources.

  18. Monitoring bank erosion at the Locke Island Archaeological National Register District: Summary of 1996/1997 field activities

    SciTech Connect

    Nickens, P.R.; Bjornstad, B.N.; Nickens, P.R.; Cadoret, N.A.; Wright, M.K.

    1998-08-01

    Locke Island is located in the Columbia River in south-central Washington. The US Department of Energy (DOE) owns Locke Island as part of its Hanford Site. In the 1960s and 1970s, as a result of intensive irrigation developments on the inland shoreline to the east of the island, the White Bluffs, which form the eastern boundary of the Columbia River channel in this area, began to show geological failures as excess irrigation water seeped out along the bluffs. One of the largest such failures, known as the Locke Island Landslide, is located just east of Locke Island. By the early 1980s, this landslide mass had moved westward into the river channel toward the island and was diverting the current at the island`s eastern perimeter. Erosion of the bank in the center of the island accelerated, threatening the cultural resources. By the early 1990s, the erosion had exposed cultural features and artifacts along the bank, leading to the beginning of intermittent monitoring of the cutbank. In 1994, DOE initiated more scheduled, systematic monitoring of island erosion to better understand the physical processes involved as well as mitigate ongoing loss of the archaeological record.

  19. Effect of storms on Barrier Island dynamics, Core Banks, Cape Lookout National Seashore, North Carolina, 1960-2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Riggs, Stanley R.; Ames, Dorothea V.

    2007-01-01

    The effect of storms on long-term dynamics of barrier islands was evaluated on Core Banks, a series of barrier islands that extend from Cape Lookout to Okracoke Inlet in the Cape Lookout National Seashore, North Carolina. Shoreline and elevation changes were determined by comparing 77 profiles and associated reference markers established by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) on Core Banks from June 1960 to July 1962 to a follow-up survey by Godfrey and Godfrey (G&G) in 1971 and a survey by the Department of Geology at East Carolina University (ECU) in 2001, in which 57 of the original 77 profiles were located. Evaluation of the baseline data associated with the USACE study supplies an important record of barrier island response to two specific storm events—Hurricane Donna in September 1960 and the Ash Wednesday extra-tropical cyclone in March 1962. The 1962 USACE survey was followed by 9 years characterized by no major storms; this low-energy period was captured by the G&G survey in 1971. The G&G survey was followed by 22 years characterized by occasional small to moderate storms. Starting in 1993, however, and continuing through 1999, the North Carolina coast experienced a major increase in storm activity, with seven major hurricanes impacting Core Banks. Both the USACE 1960–1962 and G&G 1962–1971 surveys produced short-term data sets that reflected very different sets of weather conditions. The ECU 2001 survey data were then compared with the USACE 1960 survey data to develop a long-term (41 years) data set for shoreline erosion on Core Banks. Those resulting long-term data were compared with the long-term (52 years) data sets by the North Carolina Division of Coastal Management (NCDCM) from 1940–1992 and 1946–1998; a strong positive correlation and very similar rates of average annual erosion resulted. However, the ECU and NCDCM long-term data sets did not correlate with either of the USACE and G&G short-term survey data and had very different

  20. Validating national landslide susceptibility and hazard maps for Caribbean island countries: the case of Dominica and tropical storm Erika.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Westen, Cees; Jetten, Victor; Alkema, Dinand

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to generate national-scale landslide susceptibility and hazard maps for four Caribbean islands, as part of the World Bank project CHARIM (Caribbean Handbook on Disaster Geoinformation Management, www.charim.net). This paper focuses on the results for the island country of Dominica, located in the Eastern part of the Caribbean, in-between Guadalupe and Martinique. The available data turned out to be insufficient to generate reliable results. We therefore generated a new database of disaster events for Dominica using all available data, making use of many different sources. We compiled landslide inventories for five recent rainfall events from the maintenance records of the Ministry of Public Works, and generated a completely new landslide inventory using multi-temporal visual image interpretation, and generated an extensive landslide database for Dominica. We analyzed the triggering conditions for landslides as far as was possible given the available data, and generated rainfall magnitude-frequency relations. We applied a method for landslide susceptibility assessment which combined bi-variate statistical analysis, that provided indications on the importance of the possible contributing factors, with an expert-based iterative weighing approach using Spatial Multi-Criteria Evaluation. The method is transparent, as the stakeholders (e.g. the engineers and planners from the four countries) and other consultants can consult the criteria trees and evaluate the standardization and weights, and make adjustments. The landslide susceptibility map was converted into a landslide hazard map using landslide density and frequencies for so called major, moderate and minor triggering events. The landslide hazard map was produced in May 2015. A major rainfall event occurred on Dominica following the passage of tropical storm Erika on 26 to 28 August 2015. An event-based landslide inventory for this event was produced by UNOSAT using very high resolution

  1. Tuberculosis patients’ knowledge and beliefs about tuberculosis: a mixed methods study from the Pacific Island nation of Vanuatu

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The setting for this study was the Pacific island nation of Vanuatu, an archipelago of 82 islands, located in the South Pacific Ocean. Our objective was to assess the knowledge, attitudes and practices of tuberculosis (TB) patients towards TB. Methods This was a descriptive study using qualitative and quantitative methods. Quantitative analysis was based on the responses provided to closed questions, and we present frequencies to describe the TB patients’ knowledge, attitudes and practice relating to TB. Qualitative analysis was based on open questions permitting fuller explanations. We used thematic analysis and developed a posteriori inductive categories to draw conclusions. Results Thirty five TB patients were interviewed; 22 (63%) were male. They attributed TB to cigarettes, kava, alcohol, contaminated food, sharing eating utensils and “kastom” (the local term for the traditional way of life, but also for sorcery). Most (94%) did not attribute TB to a bacterial cause. However, almost all TB patients (89%) thought that TB was best treated at a hospital with antibiotics. Three quarters (74%) experienced stigma after their TB diagnosis. Seeking health care from a traditional healer was common; 54% of TB patients stated that they would first consult a traditional healer for any illness. When seeking a diagnosis for signs and symptoms of TB, 34% first consulted a traditional healer. Patients cited cost, distance and beliefs about TB causation as reasons for first consulting a traditional healer or going to the hospital. Of the TB patients who consulted a traditional healer first, there was an average of two weeks delay before they consulted the health service. In some cases, however, the delay was up to six years. Conclusion The majority of the TB patients interviewed did not attribute TB to a bacterial cause. Consulting a traditional healer for health care, including while seeking a diagnosis for TB symptoms, was common and may have delayed

  2. Novel and recurrent EVC and EVC2 mutations in Ellis-van Creveld syndrome and Weyers acrofacial dyostosis.

    PubMed

    D'Asdia, Maria Cecilia; Torrente, Isabella; Consoli, Federica; Ferese, Rosangela; Magliozzi, Monia; Bernardini, Laura; Guida, Valentina; Digilio, Maria Cristina; Marino, Bruno; Dallapiccola, Bruno; De Luca, Alessandro

    2013-02-01

    Ellis van Creveld syndrome and Weyers acrofacial dysostosis are allelic disorders caused by mutations in EVC or EVC2 genes. We illustrate the results of direct analysis of whole EVC and EVC2 genes' coding regions in 32 unrelated families with clinical diagnosis of Ellis van Creveld syndrome and in 2 families with Weyers acrofacial dysostosis. We identified mutations in 27/32 (84%) cases with Ellis van Creveld syndrome and 2/2 cases with Weyers acrofacial dysostosis. Of the Ellis van Creveld syndrome cases, 20/27 (74%) had a mutation in EVC and 7/27 (26%) in EVC2 genes. The two subjects with Weyers acrofacial dysostosis had a heterozygous mutation in the last exon of EVC2. In total, we detected 25 independent EVC and 11 independent EVC2 mutations. Nineteen EVC mutations (19/25, 76%) and 4 EVC2 mutations (4/11, 36%) were novel. Also one EVC2 gene mutation found in Weyers acrofacial dysostosis was novel. In 5 unrelated cases with a clinical diagnosis of Ellis van Creveld syndrome, we did not find any mutation in either EVC or EVC2 genes. Current findings expand the Ellis van Creveld syndrome and Weyers acrofacial dysostosis mutation spectra, and provide further evidence that the last exon of EVC2 gene is a hot spot for Weyers acrofacial dysostosis mutations. Accordingly, EVC2 exon 22 should be analyzed with priority by mutation screening in individuals with a suspected diagnosis of Weyers acrofacial dysostosis.

  3. Diabetes and Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Other Pacific Islander > Diabetes Diabetes and Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders Asian Americans, in general, have the same ... However, there are differences within the Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander population. From a national survey, Native Hawaiians/ ...

  4. Archive of single-beam bathymetry data collected during USGS cruise 07CCT01 nearshore of Fort Massachusetts and within Camille Cut, West and East Ship Islands, Gulf Islands National Seashore, Mississippi, July 2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeWitt, Nancy T.; Flocks, James G.; Reynolds, B.J.; Hansen, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The Gulf Islands National Seashore (GUIS) is composed of a series of barrier islands along the Mississippi - Alabama coastline. Historically these islands have undergone long-term shoreline change. The devastation of Hurricane Katrina in 2005 prompted questions about the stability of the barrier islands and their potential response to future storm impacts. Additionally, there was concern from the National Park Service (NPS) about the preservation of the historical Fort Massachusetts, located on West Ship Island. During the early 1900s, Ship Island was an individual island. In 1969 Hurricane Camille breached Ship Island, widening the cut and splitting it into what is now known as West Ship Island and East Ship Island. In July of 2007, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) was able to provide the NPS with a small bathymetric survey of Camille Cut using high-resolution single-beam bathymetry. This provided GUIS with a post-Katrina assessment of the bathymetry in Camille Cut and along the northern shoreline directly in front of Fort Massachusetts. Ultimately, this survey became an initial bathymetry dataset toward a larger USGS effort included in the Northern Gulf of Mexico (NGOM) Ecosystem Change and Hazard Susceptibility Project (http://ngom.usgs.gov/gomsc/mscip/). This report serves as an archive of the processed single-beam bathymetry. Data products herein include gridded and interpolated digital depth surfaces and x,y,z data products. Additional files include trackline maps, navigation files, geographic information system (GIS) files, Field Activity Collection System (FACS) logs, and formal Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) metadata. Scanned images of the handwritten FACS logs and digital FACS logs are also provided as PDF files. Refer to the Acronyms page for description of acronyms and abbreviations used in this report or hold the cursor over an acronym for a pop-up explanation. The USGS St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center assigns a unique

  5. The gene for the Ellis-van Creveld syndrome is located on chromosome 4p16.

    PubMed

    Polymeropoulos, M H; Ide, S E; Wright, M; Goodship, J; Weissenbach, J; Pyeritz, R E; Da Silva, E O; Ortiz De Luna, R I; Francomano, C A

    1996-07-01

    Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EVC) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by disproportionate dwarfism, polydactyly, and congenital heart disease. This rare disorder is found with increased frequency among the Old Order Amish community in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. We have used linkage analysis to localize the gene responsible for the EVC phenotype in nine interrelated Amish pedigrees and three unrelated families from Mexico, Ecuador, and Brazil. We now report the linkage for the Ellis-van Creveld syndrome gene to markers on the distal short arm of human chromosome 4, with Zmax = 6.91 at theta = 0.02 for marker HOX7, in a region proximal to the FGFR3 gene responsible for the achondroplasia phenotype. PMID:8661097

  6. Search for astrophysical rotating Ellis wormholes with x-ray reflection spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Menglei; Cardenas-Avendano, Alejandro; Bambi, Cosimo; Kleihaus, Burkhard; Kunz, Jutta

    2016-07-01

    Recently, two of us have found numerically rotating Ellis wormholes as solutions of four-dimensional Einstein gravity coupled to a phantom field. In this paper, we investigate possible observational signatures to identify similar objects in the Universe. These symmetric wormholes have a mass and are compact, so they may look like black holes. We study the iron line profile in the x-ray reflection spectrum of a thin accretion disk around rotating Ellis wormholes and we find some specific observational signatures that can be used to distinguish these objects from Kerr black holes. We simulate some observations with XIS/Suzaku assuming typical parameters for a bright active galactic nucleus and we conclude that current x-ray missions cannot apply strong constraints.

  7. Homogenate extraction of gardenia yellow pigment from Gardenia Jasminoides Ellis fruit using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xingyi; Mang, Yili; Shen, Fengqiong; Xie, Jie; Su, Weike

    2014-08-01

    Homogenate extraction technology was developed for extraction of gardenia yellow pigment from Gardenia jasminoides Ellis fruit. The operating parameters affecting the color value of gardenia yellow pigment were studied on the basis of a Box-Behnken design and response surface methodology. Results showed that the optimum extraction conditions were as follows: extraction time 41 s, ethanol concentration 50 %, ratio of liquid to material 15:1 (mL:g) and particle size 1.7 mm. Under the optimum condition, the experimental color value was 52.37 g(-1), which was in keeping with the predicted one. Compared with the heat extraction method, the color value of gardenia yellow pigment of homogenate extraction was higher and the extraction time was shorter. Homogenate extraction method is an ideal means for extraction of gardenia yellow pigment from Gardenia jasminoides Ellis fruit. PMID:25114350

  8. Identification and quantification of constituents of Gardenia jasminoides Ellis (Zhizi) by HPLC-DAD-ESI-MS.

    PubMed

    Bergonzi, M C; Righeschi, C; Isacchi, B; Bilia, A R

    2012-09-15

    A simple, rapid and specific HPLC method was carried out for the analysis of characteristic constituents in Gardenia jasminoides Ellis (Zhizi), namely iridoids, caffeoyl quinic acid derivatives and crocins. The separation was successfully obtained using a C(18) column by gradient elution with mixtures of methanol and water as mobile phases; detection wavelength was set at 240 nm for iridoid glycosides, 315 nm for quinic acid derivatives and 438 nm for crocins. The analytical method was validated and the quantification of active compounds, namely iridoids, was performed. Linearity, precision, repeatability, stability, accuracy, limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) were also reported. This assay was successfully applied for qualitative and quantitative analysis of five commercial samples of G. jasminoides Ellis. PMID:23107748

  9. Prosthodontic Rehabilitation for a Patient with Ellis-Van Creveld Syndrome: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Muhammad Musaab; Taylor, Philip D

    2016-03-01

    Patients suffering from Ellis-Van-Creveld syndrome are a challenge for dental management. Aesthetics are a major concern with limited manual dexterity, making choice of treatment critical. A 38 year old female diagnosed with Ellis-Van-Creveld syndrome presented with stained teeth and un-aesthetic smile and related that to her low self-esteem and depression. Intra-oral examination revealed mal-aligned megadont central incisors in the maxillary arch, fused mandibular canines with laterals and missing central incisors with space discrepancy and pronounced reverse over jet and overbite. Treatment involved non-surgical periodontal management, fabrication of veneers and dentine bonded crowns for maxillary anteriors and fixed-fixed resin retained bridge for mandibular arch. PMID:27039477

  10. [From gene to disease; EVC, EVC2, and Ellis-van Creveld syndrome].

    PubMed

    van Hagen, J M; Baart, J A; Gille, J J P

    2005-04-23

    Ellis-van Creveld syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterised by short stature with short limbs, postaxial polydactyly and congenital cardiac defects. The syndrome can be caused by mutations in the EVC gene or the EVC2 gene. The genes are located close to each other in a head-to-head configuration on chromosome 4p16. Clinical diagnosis can be confirmed by DNA analysis, which is currently offered by two laboratories in Italy.

  11. The Frank Ellis memorial lecture: the use of three-dimensional imaging in gynaecological radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Viswanathan, A N

    2008-02-01

    The use of three-dimensional image guidance in radiation therapy has increased dramatically over the past decade. In gynaecological malignancies, three-dimensional image guidance assists with both external beam and brachytherapy treatment planning, increasing the accuracy of dose delivery. During his lifetime, Frank Ellis made significant contributions to gynaecological brachytherapy. This lecture will focus on novel advances in three-dimensional image-guided radiation therapy for cervical cancer, with the ultimate goal of improving outcomes for our patients.

  12. Energy Transition Initiative: Island Energy Snapshot - Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect

    2015-06-01

    This profile provides a snapshot of the energy landscape of the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI), a commonwealth in political union with the United States that is located in the northern Pacific Ocean. CNMI’s electricity rates for residential customers range from $0.19 to $0.33 U.S. dollars (USD) per kilowatt-hour (kWh), above the average U.S. residential rate of $0.13 USD/kWh.

  13. Identification of shallow volcanic structures in Timanfaya National Park (Lanzarote, Canary Islands) through combined geophysical prospecting techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Ortiz, David; Montesinos, Fuensanta G.; Martin-Crespo, Tomas; Solla, Mercedes; Arnoso, Jose; Velez, Emilio

    2014-05-01

    The Timanfaya National Park is a volcanic area, which occupies a surface area of about 51 sq. km in the southwest of Lanzarote Island (Canary Archipelago, Spain). The 1730-1736 eruption gave rise to this volcanic landscape with more than 30 volcanic cones formed in different phases of basaltic type eruptions. It was one of the most important volcanic events occurred in the Canary Archipelago over the last 500 years. Several canyons ("jameos") are crossing this landscape in all directions, being created while the surface of the lava cooled off, and broke into pieces, falling down into the several tubes. Its location and identification is important to prevent hazards or to achieve a good exploitation from a visitor viewpoint in a restricted touristic area as the Timanfaya National Park. The use of prospective techniques to investigate the near subsurface structure of the park is very complicated, and only some regional study through gravity, magnetism and seismicity have been undertaken to attempt to model the deeper crustal structure of Lanzarote Island. This work presents a new study about the location of recent lava tubes at the volcanic area of Timanfaya National Park by the analysis and joint interpretation of high-resolution gravity, ground penetrating radar (GPR), and electromagnetic induction (EMI) data obtained over areas which had not been surveyed up to date. The studied lava flows are located at the Calderas Quemadas zone. The processed GPR radargram displays a complex pattern of reflections along the whole profile up to ~9 m depth. The strongest reflections can be grouped in four different areas defined by several hyperbolic reflections. Direct visual inspections carried out in the field allow confirming the occurrence of lava tubes at two of the locations where hyperbolic reflections are defined. Then, the strong reflections observed have been interpreted as the effect of the roof and bottom interfaces of several lava tubes. A microgravity survey along

  14. Existing Whole-House Solutions Case Study: National Grid Deep Energy Retrofit Pilot, Massachusetts and Rhode Island

    SciTech Connect

    2014-03-01

    Between December, 2009 and December, 2012 42 deep energy retrofit (DER) projects were completed through a pilot program sponsored by National Grid and conducted in Massachusetts and Rhode Island. Thirty-seven of these projects were comprehensive retrofits while five were partial DERs, meaning that high performance retrofit was implemented for a single major enclosure component or a limited number of major enclosure components. Building Science Corporation developed a consistent "package" of measures in terms of the performance targeted for major building components. Pre- and post-retrofit air leakage measurements were performed for each of the projects. Each project also reported information about project costs including identification of energy-related costs. Post-retrofit energy-use data was obtained for 29 of the DER projects, and was analyzed based on the net energy used by the DER project regardless of whether the energy was generated on site or delivered to the site. Based on the community experience, this DER package is expected to result in yearly source energy use near 110 MMBtu/year or approximately 40% below the Northeast regional average. Larger to medium sized homes that successful implement these retrofits can be expected to achieve source EUI that is comparable to Passive House targets for new construction. The community of DER projects show post-retrofit airtightness below 1.5 ACH50 to be eminently achievable.

  15. Ober's Island: The Mallard Ober's Island, One of the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Ober's Island: The Mallard - Ober's Island, One of the Review Islands on Rainy Lake, bounded on the south by The Hawk Island and on the north by The Crow Island. These islands are located seven miles east of Ranier, Minnesota, three miles west of Voyageur National Park, and one mile south of the international border of the United States of America and Canada. The legal description of Mallard Island is Lot 6, Section 19, T-17-N, R-22-W, Koochiching County, Minnesota, Ranier, Koochiching County, MN

  16. Taking prisoners: Havelock Ellis, Sigmund Freud, and the construction of homosexuality, 1897-1951.

    PubMed

    Crozier, I D

    2000-12-01

    This paper addresses the efforts of both Havelock Ellis and Sigmund Freud to posit a theory of homosexuality, and especially considers their efforts to (re-)negotiate each other's theories. Its central premise derives from the sociology of scientific knowledge: that it is not what is written, but the way that what is written is treated by ensuing experts, that makes knowledge. In the case study used in this paper, Ellis and Freud struggle to posit what they consider to be the proper model for understanding homosexual desire. They utilize aspects of each other's word, but are careful not to appear to be following each other too closely. Such a struggle to establish different schools of thought is exemplified by the informal negotiations engaged in when a student, Joseph Wortis, made contact with both Freud and Ellis. Again following sociology of scientific knowledge precepts, these informal negotiations (contained in published and archival letters) are used to show how knowledge claims are constructed, deconstructed any reconstructed by the actors who have stakes in the outcome of what is to be regarded as knowledge in the relevant communities.

  17. 76 FR 68066 - Addition of the Cook Islands to the List of Nations Entitled to Special Tonnage Tax Exemption

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-03

    ... Cook Islands are exempt from special tonnage taxes and light money in ports of the United States. This... from the payment of light money. DATES: This amendment is effective November 3, 2011. The exemption from special tonnage taxes and light money ] for vessels registered in the Cook Islands...

  18. Diomede Islands, Bering Straight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The Diomede Islands consisting of the western island Big Diomede (also known as Imaqliq, Nunarbuk or Ratmanov Island), and the eastern island Little Diomede (also known as Krusenstern Island or Inaliq), are two rocky islands located in the middle of the Bering Strait between Russia and Alaska. The islands are separated by an international border and the International Date Line which is approximately 1.5 km from each island; you can look from Alaska into tomorrow in Russia. At the closest land approach between the United States, which controls Little Diomede, and Russia, which controls Big Diomede, they are 3 km apart. Little Diomede Island constitutes the Alaskan City of Diomede, while Big Diomede Island is Russia's easternmost point. The first European to reach the islands was the Russian explorer Semyon Dezhnev in 1648. The text of the 1867 treaty finalizing the sale of Alaska uses the islands to designate the border between the two nations.

    The image was acquired July 8, 2000, covers an area of 13.5 x 10.8 km, and is located at 65.8 degrees north latitude, 169 degrees west longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  19. Pacific Island landbird monitoring annual report, Haleakalā National Park, 2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Judge, Seth W.; Camp, Richard J.; Hart, Patrick J.

    2013-01-01

    Haleakalā National Park (HALE) was surveyed for landbirds and habitat characteristics from March 20 through July 26, 2012. This information provides data in the time-series of landbird monitoring for long-term trends in forest bird distribution, density, and abundance. The Kīpahulu District of eastern Haleakalā Volcano was surveyed using point-transect distance sampling to estimate bird abundance. We surveyed 160 stations and detected a total of 2,830 birds from 12 species. Half of the species were native and half were non-native. Numbers of detections per species ranged from 1 to 849. There were sufficient detections of seven species to allow density estimation. Āpapane (Himatione sanguinea) was the most widely distributed and abundant native species detected in the survey. ‘Alauahio (Paroreomyza montana newtoni), Maui ‘Amakihi (Hemignathus virens wilsoni), and I‘iwi (Vestiaria coccinea) were widespread and occurred in relatively modest densities. Only eight Kiwikiu (Pseudonestor xanthophrys) and 20 ‘Ākohekohe (Palmeria dolei) were detected and were restricted to high elevation wet forest. We estimated an abundance of 495 ± 261individuals of Kiwikiu in a 2,036 ha inference area which likely includes the entire suitable habitat for this species in HALE. For ‘Ākohekohe, we estimated an abundance of 1,150 ± 389 individuals in the 1,458 ha inference area. There was a strong representation of non-native landbirds in the survey area. The Japanese White-eye (Zosterops japonicus), Japanese Bush-warbler (Cettia diphone), and Red-billed Leiothrix (Leiothrix lutea) accounted for nearly half of all landbird detections. Each species was common in predominantly native forests. Vegetation and topographic characteristics were recorded on 160 landbird monitoring stations. HALE canopy and understory composition was predominantly native, especially at elevations above 1,100 m. Much of the forest canopy was comprised of `ohi`a (Metrosideros polymorpha) interspersed

  20. Seasonal Variation of Total Mercury Burden in the American Alligator (Alligator Mississippiensis) at Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge (MINWR), Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nilsen, Frances M.; Dorsey, Jonathan E.; Long, Stephen E.; Schock, Tracey B.; Bowden, John A.; Lowers, Russell H.; Guillette, Louis J., Jr.

    2016-01-01

    Seasonal variation of mercury (Hg) is not well studied in free-ranging wildlife. Atmospheric deposition patterns of Hg have been studied in detail and have been modeled for both global and specific locations with great accuracy and correlates to environment impact. However, monitoring these trends in wildlife is complicated due to local environmental parameters (e.g., rainfall, humidity, pH, bacterial composition) that can affect the transformation of atmospheric Hg to the biologically available forms. Here, we utilized an abundant and healthy population of American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) at Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge (MINWR), FL, and assessed Hg burden in whole blood samples over a span of 7 years (2007 2014; n 174) in an effort to assess seasonal variation of total [Hg]. While the majority of this population is assumed healthy, 18 individuals with low body mass indices (BMI, defined in this study) were captured throughout the 7 year sampling period. These individual alligators exhibited [Hg] that were not consistent with the observed overall seasonal [Hg] variation, and were statistically different from the healthy population of alligators. The alligators with low BMI had elevated concentrations of Hg compared to their age/sex/season matched counterparts with normal BMI. Statistically significant differences were found between the winter and spring seasons for animals with normal BMI. The data in this report supports the conclusion that organismal total [Hg] do fluctuate directly with seasonal deposition rates as well as other seasonal environmental parameters, such as average rainfall and prevailing wind direction. This study highlights the unique environment of MINWR to permit annual assessment of apex predators, such as the American alligator, to determine detailed environmental impact of contaminants of concern.

  1. Abundance, distribution, and removals of feral pigs at Big Island National Wildlife Refuge Complex 2010–2015

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leopold, Christina R.; Hess, Steve; Kendall, Steve J.; Judge, Seth W.

    2016-01-01

    The Hakalau Forest Unit (HFU) of Big Island National Wildlife Refuge Complex (BINWRC) has intensively monitored non-native ungulate presence and distribution during surveys of all managed areas since 1988. In this report we: 1) provide results from recent ungulate surveys and the number of removals at HFU to determine the distribution, abundance, and efficacy of removals of feral pigs, the dominant ungulate, from 2010 to 2015; 2) present results of surveys of the presence and distribution of several ungulate species at the Kona Forest Unit (KFU) of BINWRC from November of 2012 to April of 2015; 3) present results of surveys of weed presence and cover at both refuge units; and 4) present comparative analyses of forest canopy cover at KFU from visual estimates and geospatial imagery. Removals of feral pigs at HFU appear to have significantly decreased pig abundance over the study period from 2010–2015. A grand total of 1,660 feral pigs were removed from managed areas of HFU from 2010 until September of 2015. Management units 2 and 4 contained the majority of pigs at HFU. Recent surveys recorded high densities of pigs in the unenclosed, unmanaged area of Lower Maulua, reaching 14.9 ± (3.2) pigs/km2 in March of 2015. The total amount of ungulate sign ranged from 22.2 to 54.3 percent of plots surveyed at KFU from November of 2012 to April of 2015. The ability to differentiate sign of ungulate species remains problematic at KFU; although there appears to have been a significant decline in feral cattle sign at KFU, this result is likely to be unreliable because cattle and pig sign were not differentiated consistently during later surveys. Spatial distributions in weed cover are distinctive; however, some weed species may not be reliably represented due to observers’ inconsistencies in recording data and abilities to recognize less common weeds.

  2. Vegetation and non-native ungulate monitoring at the Big Island National Wildlife Refuge Complex 2010–2014.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hess, Steven C.; Leopold, Christina R.; Kendall, Steven J.

    2015-01-01

    The Hakalau Forest Unit (HFU) of Big Island National Wildlife Refuge Complex (BINWRC) has intensively managed feral cattle (Bos taurus) and pigs (Sus scrofa) and monitored non-native ungulate presence and distribution during surveys of all managed areas since 1988. We: 1) provide results from recent ungulate surveys at HFU to determine current feral pig abundance and distribution; 2) present results of surveys of ungulate presence and distribution at the Kona Forest Unit (KFU); 3) present results of surveys of weed presence and cover at both refuge units; and 4) present baseline results from long-term vegetation monitoring plots at KFU. Overall pig abundance appears to have decreased at HFU, although not significantly, over the period from 2010 to 2014. Management units 2 and 4 contained the majority of pigs at HFU. Pig density outside of adjacent managed areas has declined significantly from 2010 to 2014 for unknown reasons. Ungulate sign occurred in > 50% of plots at KFU during the November 2012 and September 2013 surveys, but ungulate sign occurred in < 28% of plots during three other surveys. The ability to differentiate sign of ungulate species remains problematic at KFU. Changes in weed cover do not yet demonstrate any strong temporal pattern. Spatial patterns are more pronounced; however, some weed species may not be reliably represented due to observers’ abilities to recognize less common weeds. Nonetheless, the distribution and cover of fireweed (Senecio madagascariensis) at KFU may have increased over the study period. Vegetation surveys documented baseline floristic composition and forest structure at KFU. It is not known if this current amount of emerging cover is sufficient for long-term self-sustaining forest canopy regeneration; however, numerous ‘ōhi‘a seedlings were found in the wet forest and mesic ‘ōhi‘a habitats, indicating an ample viable seed source and robust potential for forest regeneration.

  3. Substance use and dependence among Native Hawaiians, Other Pacific Islanders, and Asian ethnic groups in the United States: contrasting multiple-race and single-race prevalence rates from a national survey.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Joseph T; Wang, Cynthia; Price, Rumi Kato

    2010-01-01

    The percentage of multiracial youth appears to be increasing in the United States. However, little has been disseminated about problem behaviors among multiracial Native Hawaiians, Other Pacific Islanders, and Asians on a national level. Using the National Survey on Drug Use and Health, the authors compared multiple-race Native Hawaiians, Other Pacific Islanders, and Asians, while disaggregating by ethnic subgroups, with single-race individuals within respective Asian ethnic subgroups and Caucasians for prevalence of alcohol/drug use and dependence. For multiple-race Native Hawaiians, Other Pacific Islanders, and Asians, high rates of alcohol dependence were observed compared with both single-race Native Hawaiian, Other Pacific Islander, and Asian subgroups and single-race Caucasians; for some multiracial Native Hawaiians, Other Pacific Islanders, and Asians, high rates of drug dependence were also observed.

  4. EAARL Coastal Topography and Imagery-Assateague Island National Seashore, Maryland and Virginia, Post-Nor'Ida, 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bonisteel-Cormier, J.M.; Nayegandhi, Amar; Brock, J.C.; Wright, C.W.; Nagle, D.B.; Klipp, E.S.; Vivekanandan, Saisudha; Fredericks, Xan; Stevens, Sara

    2010-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced color-infrared (CIR) imagery and elevation measurements of lidar-derived bare-earth (BE) and first-surface (FS) topography datasets were produced collaboratively by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center, St. Petersburg, FL, and the National Park Service (NPS), Northeast Coastal and Barrier Network, Kingston, RI. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of a portion of the Assateague Island National Seashore in Maryland and Virginia, acquired post-Nor'Ida (November 2009 nor'easter) on November 28 and 30, 2009. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural-resource managers. An innovative airborne lidar instrument originally developed at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, and known as the Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar(EAARL), was used during data acquisition. The EAARL system is a raster-scanning, waveform-resolving, green-wavelength (532-nanometer) lidar designed to map near-shore bathymetry, topography, and vegetation structure simultaneously. The EAARL sensor suite includes the raster-scanning, water-penetrating full-waveform adaptive lidar, a down-looking red-green-blue (RGB) digital camera, a high-resolution multispectral color-infrared (CIR) camera, two precision dual-frequency kinematic carrier-phase GPS receivers, and an integrated miniature digital inertial measurement unit, which provide for sub-meter georeferencing of each laser sample. The nominal EAARL platform is a twin-engine aircraft, but the instrument was deployed on a Pilatus PC-6. A single pilot, a lidar operator, and a data analyst constitute the crew for most survey operations. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in measuring sub-aerial and submarine coastal topography within cross-environmental surveys. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the EAARL system, and

  5. 15 CFR Appendix A to Subpart Q of... - Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale, National Marine Sanctuary Boundary Description and Coordinates...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... data have been referenced to WGS84 (NAD83) and have been converted to geographic (latitude and... (Big Island) 2 20°16′5.3″20°17′59.9″ −155°51′0.5″−155°51′17.2″ 13 Keahole Pt., Hawaii (Big Island) 2 19...). ER29NO99.002 Bound No. (Fig.2) Geographic Name No. of Points Latitude Longitude 14 Kawaihae Harbor,...

  6. 15 CFR Appendix A to Subpart Q of... - Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale, National Marine Sanctuary Boundary Description and Coordinates...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... data have been referenced to WGS84 (NAD83) and have been converted to geographic (latitude and... (Big Island) 2 20°16′5.3″20°17′59.9″ −155°51′0.5″−155°51′17.2″ 13 Keahole Pt., Hawaii (Big Island) 2 19...). ER29NO99.002 Bound No. (Fig.2) Geographic Name No. of Points Latitude Longitude 14 Kawaihae Harbor,...

  7. 15 CFR Appendix A to Subpart Q of... - Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale, National Marine Sanctuary Boundary Description and Coordinates...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... data have been referenced to WGS84 (NAD83) and have been converted to geographic (latitude and... (Big Island) 2 20°16′5.3″20°17′59.9″ −155°51′0.5″−155°51′17.2″ 13 Keahole Pt., Hawaii (Big Island) 2 19...). ER29NO99.002 Bound No. (Fig.2) Geographic Name No. of Points Latitude Longitude 14 Kawaihae Harbor,...

  8. 15 CFR Appendix A to Subpart Q of... - Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale, National Marine Sanctuary Boundary Description and Coordinates...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... data have been referenced to WGS84 (NAD83) and have been converted to geographic (latitude and... (Big Island) 2 20°16′5.3″20°17′59.9″ −155°51′0.5″−155°51′17.2″ 13 Keahole Pt., Hawaii (Big Island) 2 19...). ER29NO99.002 Bound No. (Fig.2) Geographic Name No. of Points Latitude Longitude 14 Kawaihae Harbor,...

  9. 15 CFR Appendix A to Subpart Q of... - Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale, National Marine Sanctuary Boundary Description and Coordinates...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... data have been referenced to WGS84 (NAD83) and have been converted to geographic (latitude and... (Big Island) 2 20°16′5.3″20°17′59.9″ −155°51′0.5″−155°51′17.2″ 13 Keahole Pt., Hawaii (Big Island) 2 19...). ER29NO99.002 Bound No. (Fig.2) Geographic Name No. of Points Latitude Longitude 14 Kawaihae Harbor,...

  10. Archive of side scan sonar and swath bathymetry data collected during USGS cruise 10CCT01 offshore of Cat Island, Gulf Islands National Seashore, Mississippi, March 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeWitt, Nancy T.; Flocks, James G.; Pfeiffer, William R.; Wiese, Dana S.

    2010-01-01

    In March of 2010, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted geophysical surveys east of Cat Island, Mississippi (fig. 1). The efforts were part of the USGS Gulf of Mexico Science Coordination partnership with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) to assist the Mississippi Coastal Improvements Program (MsCIP) and the Northern Gulf of Mexico (NGOM) Ecosystem Change and Hazards Susceptibility Project by mapping the shallow geological stratigraphic framework of the Mississippi Barrier Island Complex. These geophysical surveys will provide the data necessary for scientists to define, interpret, and provide baseline bathymetry and seafloor habitat for this area and to aid scientists in predicting future geomorpholocial changes of the islands with respect to climate change, storm impact, and sea-level rise. Furthermore, these data will provide information for barrier island restoration, particularly in Camille Cut, and provide protection for the historical Fort Massachusetts. For more information refer to http://ngom.usgs.gov/gomsc/mscip/index.html. This report serves as an archive of the processed swath bathymetry and side scan sonar data (SSS). Data products herein include gridded and interpolated surfaces, surface images, and x,y,z data products for both swath bathymetry and side scan sonar imagery. Additional files include trackline maps, navigation files, GIS files, Field Activity Collection System (FACS) logs, and formal FGDC metadata. Scanned images of the handwritten FACS logs and digital FACS logs are also provided as PDF files. Refer to the Acronyms page for expansion of acronyms and abbreviations used in this report or hold the cursor over an acronym for a pop-up explanation. The USGS St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center assigns a unique identifier to each cruise or field activity. For example, 10CCT01 tells us the data were collected in 2010 for the Coastal Change and Transport (CCT) study and the data were collected during the first field

  11. Short communication: Strengthening sub-national communicable disease surveillance in a remote Pacific Island country by adapting a successful African outbreak surveillance model.

    PubMed

    Nelesone, Tekaai; Durrheim, David N; Speare, Richard; Kiedrzynski, Tom; Melrose, Wayne D

    2006-01-01

    Successful communicable disease surveillance depends on effective bidirectional information flow between clinicians at the periphery and communicable disease control units at regional, national and global levels. Resource-poor countries often struggle to establish and maintain the crucial link with the periphery. A simple syndrome-based outbreak surveillance system initially developed and evaluated in Mpumalanga Province, South Africa was adapted for the Pacific island nation of Tuvalu. Eight syndromes were identified for surveillance: acute flaccid paralysis (poliomyelitis), profuse watery diarrhoea (cholera), diarrhoea outbreak, dysentery outbreak, febrile disease with abdominal symptoms and headache (typhoid), febrile disease with generalized non-blistering rash (measles), febrile disease with intense headache and/or neck stiffness with or without haemorrhagic rash (meningococcal meningitis), and outbreaks of other febrile diseases of unknown origin. A user-oriented manual, the Tuvalu Outbreak Manual (http://www.wepi.org/books/tom/), was developed to support introduction of the surveillance system. Nurses working in seven outer island clinics and the hospital outpatient department on the main island rapidly report suspected outbreaks and submit weekly zero-reports to the central communicable disease control unit. An evaluation of the system after 12 months indicated that the Outbreak Manual was regarded as very useful by clinic nurses, and there was early evidence of improved surveillance and response to the disease syndromes under surveillance. PMID:16398751

  12. Characterising reef fish populations and habitats within and outside the US Virgin Islands Coral Reef National Monument: A lesson in marine protected area design

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Monaco, Mark E.; Friedlander, A.M.; Caldow, Chris; Christensen, J.D.; Rogers, C.; Beets, J.; Miller, J.; Boulon, Rafe

    2007-01-01

    Marine protected areas are an important tool for management of marine ecosystems. Despite their utility, ecological design criteria are often not considered or feasible to implement when establishing protected areas. In 2001, the Virgin Islands Coral Reef National Monument (VICRNM) in St John, US Virgin Islands was established by Executive Order. The VICRNM prohibits almost all extractive uses. Surveys of habitat and fishes inside and outside of the VICRNM were conducted in 2002-2004. Areas outside the VICRNM had significantly more hard corals, greater habitat complexity, and greater richness, abundance and biomass of reef fishes than areas within the VICRNM. The administrative process used to delineate the boundaries of the VICRNM did not include a robust ecological characterisation of the area. Because of reduced habitat complexity within the VICRNM, the enhancement of the marine ecosystem may not be fully realised or increases in economically important reef fishes may take longer to detect. ?? 2007 The Authors. Journal compilation ?? 2007 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Reshaping US Navy Pacific response in mitigating disaster risk in South Pacific Island nations: adopting community-based disaster cycle management.

    PubMed

    Reaves, Erik J; Termini, Michael; Burkle, Frederick M

    2014-02-01

    The US Department of Defense continues to deploy military assets for disaster relief and humanitarian actions around the world. These missions, carried out through geographically located Combatant Commands, represent an evolving role the US military is taking in health diplomacy, designed to enhance disaster preparedness and response capability. Oceania is a unique case, with most island nations experiencing "acute-on-chronic" environmental stresses defined by acute disaster events on top of the consequences of climate change. In all Pacific Island nation-states and territories, the symptoms of this process are seen in both short- and long-term health concerns and a deteriorating public health infrastructure. These factors tend to build on each other. To date, the US military's response to Oceania primarily has been to provide short-term humanitarian projects as part of Pacific Command humanitarian civic assistance missions, such as the annual Pacific Partnership, without necessarily improving local capacity or leaving behind relevant risk-reduction strategies. This report describes the assessment and implications on public health of large-scale humanitarian missions conducted by the US Navy in Oceania. Future opportunities will require the Department of Defense and its Combatant Commands to show meaningful strategies to implement ongoing, long-term, humanitarian activities that will build sustainable, host nation health system capacity and partnerships. This report recommends a community-centric approach that would better assist island nations in reducing disaster risk throughout the traditional disaster management cycle and defines a potential and crucial role of Department of Defense's assets and resources to be a more meaningful partner in disaster risk reduction and community capacity building. PMID:24360285

  14. Reshaping US Navy Pacific response in mitigating disaster risk in South Pacific Island nations: adopting community-based disaster cycle management.

    PubMed

    Reaves, Erik J; Termini, Michael; Burkle, Frederick M

    2014-02-01

    The US Department of Defense continues to deploy military assets for disaster relief and humanitarian actions around the world. These missions, carried out through geographically located Combatant Commands, represent an evolving role the US military is taking in health diplomacy, designed to enhance disaster preparedness and response capability. Oceania is a unique case, with most island nations experiencing "acute-on-chronic" environmental stresses defined by acute disaster events on top of the consequences of climate change. In all Pacific Island nation-states and territories, the symptoms of this process are seen in both short- and long-term health concerns and a deteriorating public health infrastructure. These factors tend to build on each other. To date, the US military's response to Oceania primarily has been to provide short-term humanitarian projects as part of Pacific Command humanitarian civic assistance missions, such as the annual Pacific Partnership, without necessarily improving local capacity or leaving behind relevant risk-reduction strategies. This report describes the assessment and implications on public health of large-scale humanitarian missions conducted by the US Navy in Oceania. Future opportunities will require the Department of Defense and its Combatant Commands to show meaningful strategies to implement ongoing, long-term, humanitarian activities that will build sustainable, host nation health system capacity and partnerships. This report recommends a community-centric approach that would better assist island nations in reducing disaster risk throughout the traditional disaster management cycle and defines a potential and crucial role of Department of Defense's assets and resources to be a more meaningful partner in disaster risk reduction and community capacity building.

  15. 32 CFR 935.61 - Wake Island Court.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Wake Island Court. 935.61 Section 935.61... REGULATIONS WAKE ISLAND CODE Judiciary § 935.61 Wake Island Court. (a) The trial judicial authority for Wake Island is vested in the Wake Island Court. (b) The Wake Island Court consists of one or more...

  16. 32 CFR 935.61 - Wake Island Court.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Wake Island Court. 935.61 Section 935.61... REGULATIONS WAKE ISLAND CODE Judiciary § 935.61 Wake Island Court. (a) The trial judicial authority for Wake Island is vested in the Wake Island Court. (b) The Wake Island Court consists of one or more...

  17. 32 CFR 935.61 - Wake Island Court.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Wake Island Court. 935.61 Section 935.61... REGULATIONS WAKE ISLAND CODE Judiciary § 935.61 Wake Island Court. (a) The trial judicial authority for Wake Island is vested in the Wake Island Court. (b) The Wake Island Court consists of one or more...

  18. 32 CFR 935.61 - Wake Island Court.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Wake Island Court. 935.61 Section 935.61... REGULATIONS WAKE ISLAND CODE Judiciary § 935.61 Wake Island Court. (a) The trial judicial authority for Wake Island is vested in the Wake Island Court. (b) The Wake Island Court consists of one or more...

  19. 32 CFR 935.61 - Wake Island Court.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Wake Island Court. 935.61 Section 935.61... REGULATIONS WAKE ISLAND CODE Judiciary § 935.61 Wake Island Court. (a) The trial judicial authority for Wake Island is vested in the Wake Island Court. (b) The Wake Island Court consists of one or more...

  20. Venus Flytrap (Dionaea muscipula Solander ex Ellis) Contains Powerful Compounds that Prevent and Cure Cancer.

    PubMed

    Gaascht, François; Dicato, Mario; Diederich, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Chemoprevention uses natural or synthetic molecules without toxic effects to prevent and/or block emergence and development of diseases including cancer. Many of these natural molecules modulate mitogenic signals involved in cell survival, apoptosis, cell cycle regulation, angiogenesis, or on processes involved in the development of metastases occur naturally, especially in fruits and vegetables bur also in non-comestible plants. Carnivorous plants including the Venus flytrap (Dionaea muscipula Solander ex Ellis) are much less investigated, but appear to contain a wealth of potent bioactive secondary metabolites. Aim of this review is to give insight into molecular mechanisms triggered by compounds isolated from these interesting plants with either therapeutic or chemopreventive potential.

  1. Report of Two Siblings with Overlapping Features of Ellis-van Creveld and Weyers Acrodental Dysostosis

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Devi C.; Singh, Harkanwal P.; Kumar, Prince; Verma, Chanchal

    2012-01-01

    Skeletal dysplasias are a heterogenous group of disorders combining abnormalities in the skull and other skeletal bones. Weyers acrofacial dysostosis also known as Weyers acrodental dysostosis was first described in 1952, by Weyers, as a postaxial polydactyly, which had features distinct from, yet some in common with the Ellis-van Creveld Syndrome (EvC). Both the syndromes have been mapped to the same chromosome, 4p16. The cases reported here highlight the overlapping features of both syndromes, which are dissimilar in mode of inheritance and phenotypic severity, emphasizing the need for genetic analysis, to categorize these conditions. PMID:22616035

  2. Ellis-van Creveld syndrome with unusual oral and dental findings: A rare clinical entity.

    PubMed

    Shaik, Sameeulla; Raviraj, Jayam; Dirasantchu, Suresh; Venkata, Suman S

    2016-01-01

    Ellis-van Creveld (EVC) syndrome, a form of skeletal and chondroectodermal dysplasia, is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by a tetrad of disproportionate dwarfism, postaxial polydactyly, ectodermal dysplasia, and heart defects. In the present article, we hereby present a case of a 13-year-old girl of Indian ethnicity with EVC syndrome with a remarkable number of classical oral and dental features, with unusual findings such as taurodontism and talons cusp. Such dental findings were reported in few cases only. Despite the fact that oral manifestations play an important role in the diagnosis of EVC, only a few detailed reports have been published in the dental literature. PMID:27076836

  3. A rare case report of Ellis Van Creveld syndrome in an Indian patient and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Prashanth; Shetty, Deepthi; Priyadarshana, P.S.; Bhat, Smitha

    2015-01-01

    Ellis Van Creveld syndrome (EVC) is a rare genetic disorder having autosomal recessive inheritance affecting the Amish population of Pennsylvania in USA with incidence of 1:244,000 for the general population. This syndrome consists of characteristic features such as bilateral postaxial polydactyly, chondroectodermal dysplasia, congenital heart defects and hypoplastic nails and teeth. There are few case reports of this syndrome reported in dental literature. We report a case of a 17 year old female presenting typical features of this syndrome and the oral findings of this patient which are the key diagnostic features. PMID:26258022

  4. Ellis-van Creveld syndrome in adulthood: extending the clinical spectrum.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Andreu, Joaquín; Ray, Victor Glenn; Arribas, José María; Sánchez, Sergio Juan

    2015-06-01

    Ellis-van Creveld (EvC) syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive malformation disorder. Cardiac defects are observed in about 50% of EvC cases. Surgical data is lacking on the prognosis and life expectancy of EvC patients. Herein, we report the case of a 38-year-old man with EvC syndrome who underwent two surgical corrections for cardiac anomalies. This report supplements the available information on the clinical course of EvC syndrome in older patients.

  5. Ellis-van Creveld syndrome with unusual oral and dental findings: A rare clinical entity.

    PubMed

    Shaik, Sameeulla; Raviraj, Jayam; Dirasantchu, Suresh; Venkata, Suman S

    2016-01-01

    Ellis-van Creveld (EVC) syndrome, a form of skeletal and chondroectodermal dysplasia, is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by a tetrad of disproportionate dwarfism, postaxial polydactyly, ectodermal dysplasia, and heart defects. In the present article, we hereby present a case of a 13-year-old girl of Indian ethnicity with EVC syndrome with a remarkable number of classical oral and dental features, with unusual findings such as taurodontism and talons cusp. Such dental findings were reported in few cases only. Despite the fact that oral manifestations play an important role in the diagnosis of EVC, only a few detailed reports have been published in the dental literature.

  6. New R/V Falkor Multibeam Data from the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, J. R., Jr.; Kelley, C.; Boston, B.; Dechnik, B.; Habel, S.; Harrison, L.; Leonard, J.; Lichowski, F.; Luers, D.; Miller, J. E.; Orange, R.; Patterson, M. A.; Shiro, B.; Taylor, J.; Togia, H.; Tree, J. P.; Tucker, J.; Wagner, D.; Webster, J.; Wright, N.

    2014-12-01

    From March to June 2014, the Schmidt Ocean Institute, along with National Marine Sanctuaries and the National Science Foundation, supported 72 days of mapping surveys on two cruises using R/V Falkor in the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument (PMNM) located within the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands (NWHI). PMNM is one of the largest marine protected areas in the world. Approximately 127,000 km2, 35% of the PMNM, were surveyed using dual multibeam systems from less than 30 to >5000 meters water depth, and thus covering the habitat depth ranges for shallow living corals, mesophotic corals, drowned reefs, to deep-sea corals and sponge communities. A total of 18 seamounts, guyots, banks, or atoll flanks (e.g., Midway and Kure) were mapped in the upper northwestern section of the monument, including the generically named Bank 9 Seamount, which appears to be a composite of a younger Hawaiian seamount and an older Cretaceous guyot. The middle segment of the PMNM consists mostly of large volcanic rift zone ridges and broad carbonate platforms. The rift zones located there are comparable in shape and size with those off Maui and the Island of Hawai'i in the main islands. Likewise, the magnitude of the largest carbonate platform of Gardner Pinnacles suggests its original high island may have met or exceeded the enormity of the Island of Hawai'i. Furthermore, the new mapping data have revealed the detail of numerous landslides and their deposits all along the chain, including an unusual rift zone flank failure creating a knife-edge ridge off Pioneer Bank. Dives with the Pisces V submersible were previously carried out on this feature, where extensive filter feeding biological communities were discovered. Not to be overlooked, the sidescan backscatter component of the multibeam data proved essential for identifying subtle reef features, numerous carbonate terraces, and debris channels that appear to transport sediment down the edifice flanks to the deep seafloor

  7. [Temporal comparison of the composition and zonation of rocky intertidal organisms at Cocos Island National Park, Pacific, Costa Rica].

    PubMed

    Sibaja-Cordero, Jeffrey A; Cortés, Jorge

    2010-12-01

    Several biological and physical factors change the rocky shore communities. The desiccation time and the tolerance of the intertidal species produce the vertical zonation. In many studies around the world, a temporal change in this zonation is presented.In Costa Rica, only studies that include temporal trends were carried out in Punta Mala and Montezuma, Pacific coast in 80's. The rocky intertidal of the Cocos Island National Park, Costa Rica were surveyed photographically. The Chatham bay was sampled in three expeditions (January 2007, October 2007 and April 2008). Photos corresponding to 25x25cm quadrats were taken with the goal to determine diversity and composition differences in rocky shore organisms between sampling dates. The Wafer bay was sampled in January and October 2007. The intertidal of Chatham consists of basaltic rock, while Wafer has basaltic and ignimbrite boulders. The main difference between sites were the higher algae cover (erect-frondose forms) and number of organism bands at Chatham bay. Temporal change was not found in the total cover of sessile fauna and autotrophs. The barnacle Tetraclita stalactifera, that occurs above the algal fringe (lower intertidal), was the invertebrate with the highest coverage. The mobile fauna biodiversity presented no significant trend between sampled months. However, the identity of species, their cover and their abundance showed a moderate temporal change. In October 2007, when the sea surface temperature was 23 degrees C the infralittoral zone had an increase in green algae cover. The red algae (crust and erect-frondose forms) were dominant in January and April. The pulmonate limpet, Siphonaria gigas and a bacterial biofilm at mid littoral showed a negative association. The snails of the high littoral and the supralittoral zone showed a temporal change in their abundance, but with contrasting patterns between sites. The temporal variation in the assemblages increased from the supralittoral to the

  8. [Temporal comparison of the composition and zonation of rocky intertidal organisms at Cocos Island National Park, Pacific, Costa Rica].

    PubMed

    Sibaja-Cordero, Jeffrey A; Cortés, Jorge

    2010-12-01

    Several biological and physical factors change the rocky shore communities. The desiccation time and the tolerance of the intertidal species produce the vertical zonation. In many studies around the world, a temporal change in this zonation is presented.In Costa Rica, only studies that include temporal trends were carried out in Punta Mala and Montezuma, Pacific coast in 80's. The rocky intertidal of the Cocos Island National Park, Costa Rica were surveyed photographically. The Chatham bay was sampled in three expeditions (January 2007, October 2007 and April 2008). Photos corresponding to 25x25cm quadrats were taken with the goal to determine diversity and composition differences in rocky shore organisms between sampling dates. The Wafer bay was sampled in January and October 2007. The intertidal of Chatham consists of basaltic rock, while Wafer has basaltic and ignimbrite boulders. The main difference between sites were the higher algae cover (erect-frondose forms) and number of organism bands at Chatham bay. Temporal change was not found in the total cover of sessile fauna and autotrophs. The barnacle Tetraclita stalactifera, that occurs above the algal fringe (lower intertidal), was the invertebrate with the highest coverage. The mobile fauna biodiversity presented no significant trend between sampled months. However, the identity of species, their cover and their abundance showed a moderate temporal change. In October 2007, when the sea surface temperature was 23 degrees C the infralittoral zone had an increase in green algae cover. The red algae (crust and erect-frondose forms) were dominant in January and April. The pulmonate limpet, Siphonaria gigas and a bacterial biofilm at mid littoral showed a negative association. The snails of the high littoral and the supralittoral zone showed a temporal change in their abundance, but with contrasting patterns between sites. The temporal variation in the assemblages increased from the supralittoral to the

  9. National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program, Long Island-New Jersey (LINJ) Coastal Drainages Study Unit : scope of the Long Island-New Jersey Coastal Drainages Study-Unit investigation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ayers, Mark A.

    1994-01-01

    Scope of the Long Island-New Jersey Coastal Drainages Study-Unit InvestigationIn 1991, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) began a National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program to document the status of and trends in quality of a large representative part of the Nation's water resources and to provide a sound scientific understanding of the primary natural and human factors that affect the quality of these resources. The program is designed to produce long-term, consistent water-quality information that will be useful to policymakers and managers at national, State, and local levels.Investigations of 60 hydrologic systems (study units), which include parts of most major river basins and aquifer systems in the United States, are the building blocks of NAWQA. A framework has been established to ensure nationwide consistency in the approach to each study--in field and laboratory methods, in water-quality measurements, and in the supporting data requirements. Twenty studies were started in1991, 20 more have begun in 1994, and 20 are scheduled to begin in 1997.A major design feature of the program that will facilitate integration of water-quality information at national, regional, and local scales is coordination between the individual study-unit teams and the national synthesis effort at all stages of the inve stigations. Thus, results that relate to various topics addressed in the study-unit investigations will be integrated smoothly into NAWQA's national synthesis component. Teams have been developed to address the following topics of national importance: pesticides, nutrients, and volatile organic compounds. These teams are investigating the specific issues by means of comparative studies of a large set of hydrologic systems distributed over a wide range of environmental settings found in the 60 study-units.

  10. Use of remote sensing techniques to determine the effects of grazing on vegetation cover and dune elevation at Assateague Island National Seashore: impact of horses.

    PubMed

    De Stoppelaire, Georgia H; Gillespie, Thomas W; Brock, John C; Tobin, Graham A

    2004-11-01

    The effects of grazing by feral horses on vegetation and dune topography at Assateague Island National Seashore were investigated using color-infrared imagery, lidar surveys, and field measurements. Five pairs of fenced and unfenced plots (300 m2) established in 1993 on sand flats and small dunes with similar elevation, topography, and vegetation cover were used for this study. Color-infrared imagery from 1998 and field measurements from 2001 indicated that there was a significant difference in vegetation cover between the fenced and unfenced plot-pairs over the study period. Fenced plots contained a higher percentage of vegetation cover that was dominated by American beachgrass (Ammophila breviligulata). Lidar surveys from 1997, 1999, and 2000 showed that there were significant differences in elevation and topography between fenced and unfenced plot-pairs. Fenced plots were, on average, 0.63 m higher than unfenced plots, whereas unfenced plots had generally decreased in elevation after establishment in 1993. Results demonstrate that feral horse grazing has had a significant impact on dune formation and has contributed to the erosion of dunes at Assateague Island. The findings suggest that unless the size of the feral horse population is reduced, grazing will continue to foster unnaturally high rates of dune erosion into the future. In order to maintain the natural processes that historically occurred on barrier islands, much larger fenced exclosures would be required to prevent horse grazing. PMID:15633024

  11. Holocene vegetation history and fire regimes of Pseudotsuga menziesii forests in the Gulf Islands National Park Reserve, southwestern British Columbia, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, Jennifer D.; Lacourse, Terri

    2013-05-01

    Pollen analysis of a 9.03-m-long lake sediment core from Pender Island on the south coast of British Columbia was used to reconstruct the island's vegetation history over the last 10,000 years. The early Holocene was characterized by open mixed woodlands with abundant Pseudotsuga menziesii and a diverse understory including Salix and Rosaceae shrubs and Pteridium aquilinum ferns. The establishment of Quercus garryana savanna-woodland with P. menziesii and Acer macrophyllum followed deposition of the Mazama tephra until ~ 5500 cal yr BP, when these communities gave way to modern mixed P. menziesii forest. Charcoal analyses of the uppermost sediments revealed low charcoal accumulation over the last 1300 years with a mean fire return interval (mFRI) of 88 years. Fires were more frequent (mFRI = 50 yr) during the Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA) with warm, dry conditions facilitating a higher fire frequency than during the Little Ice Age, when fires were infrequent. Given the projected warming for the next 50-100 years, land managers considering the reintroduction of fire to the Gulf Islands National Park Reserve may want to consider using the mFRI of the MCA as a baseline reference in prescribed burning strategies.

  12. Use of remote sensing techniques to determine the effects of grazing on vegetation cover and dune elevation at assateague island national seashore: Impact of horses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    De Stoppelaire, G. H.; Gillespie, T.W.; Brock, J.C.; Tobin, G.A.

    2004-01-01

    The effects of grazing by feral horses on vegetation and dune topography at Assateague Island National Seashore were investigated using color-infrared imagery, lidar surveys, and field measurements. Five pairs of fenced and unfenced plots (300 m2) established in 1993 on sand flats and small dunes with similar elevation, topography, and vegetation cover were used for this study. Color-infrared imagery from 1998 and field measurements from 2001 indicated that there was a significant difference in vegetation cover between the fenced and unfenced plot-pairs over the study period. Fenced plots contained a higher percentage of vegetation cover that was dominated by American beachgrass (Ammophila breviligulata). Lidar surveys from 1997, 1999, and 2000 showed that there were significant differences in elevation and topography between fenced and unfenced plot-pairs. Fenced plots were, on average, 0.63 m higher than unfenced plots, whereas unfenced plots had generally decreased in elevation after establishment in 1993. Results demonstrate that feral horse grazing has had a significant impact on dune formation and has contributed to the erosion of dunes at Assateague Island. The findings suggest that unless the size of the feral horse population is reduced, grazing will continue to foster unnaturally high rates of dune erosion into the future. In order to maintain the natural processes that historically occurred on barrier islands, much larger fenced exclosures would be required to prevent horse grazing. ?? 2004 Springer Science+Business Media, Inc.

  13. Genetic Authentication of Gardenia jasminoides Ellis var. grandiflora Nakai by Improved RAPD-Derived DNA Markers.

    PubMed

    Mei, Zhiqiang; Zhou, Boxu; Wei, Chunli; Cheng, Jingliang; Imani, Saber; Chen, Hanchun; Fu, Junjiang

    2015-01-01

    The evergreen shrub, Gardenia jasminoides Ellis var. grandiflora Nakai is one of the most popular garden-plants, with significant ornamental importance. Here, we have cloned improved random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) derived fragments into T-vector, and developed sequence-characterized amplified region (SCAR) markers. These markers have been deposited in GenBank database with the accession numbers KP641310, KP641311, KP641312 and KP641313 respectively. The BLAST search of database confirmed the novelty of these markers. The four SCAR markers, namely ZZH11, ZZH31, ZZH41 and ZZH51 can specifically recognize the genetic materials of G. jasminoides from other plant species. Moreover, SCAR marker ZZH31 can be used to distinguish G. jasminoides Ellis var. grandiflora Nakai from other G. jasminoides on the market. Together, this study has developed four stably molecular SCAR markers by improved RAPD-derived DNA markers for the genetic identification and authentication, and for ecological conservation of medicinal and ornamental plant G. jasminoides. PMID:26569205

  14. Expression of the Ellis-van Creveld (Evc) gene in the rat tibial growth plate.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Takehito; Nakamura, Hiroaki; Hirata, Azumi; Yamamoto, Toshio

    2004-08-01

    Ellis-van Creveld (EvC) syndrome is an autosomal recessive chondrodysplasia characterized by short limbs, postaxial polydactyly, natal teeth, and dysplastic nails. The Ellis-van Creveld (EVC) gene, which is mutated in patients with EvC syndrome, has been identified by positional cloning. However, the physiological roles of the EVC gene have not been elucidated. Histopathological analyses of EvC syndrome have shown disturbed chondrocytic phenotypes during cartilage development. We therefore postulated that the EVC gene is a critical factor for chondrocytes during endochondral ossification. The present study focuses on the relationship between the Evc gene and chondrocytes, and examines Evc gene expression in the rat tibial growth plate at the mRNA and protein levels. Evc mRNA in tibial epiphyseal cartilage was expressed at postnatal day (P) 1, P28, and P56 by RT-PCR. Immunohistochemical analyses localized the Evc protein mainly in prehypertrophic and hypertrophic chondrocytes of the epiphyseal growth plate in the tibia during the embryonic and postnatal periods. Evc mRNA was also detected in prehypertrophic and hypertrophic chondrocytes by in situ hybridization. These results indicate that the Evc gene functions mainly in the prehypertrophic and hypertrophic chondrocytes of the epiphyseal growth plate. The data presented here are important for future studies of the underlying mechanism of chondrodysplasia in EvC syndrome.

  15. Analysis of seafloor change at Breton Island, Gosier Shoals, and surrounding waters, 1869–2014, Breton National Wildlife Refuge, Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flocks, James G.; Terrano, Joseph F.

    2016-08-01

    Characterizing bathymetric change in coastal environments is an important component in understanding shoreline evolution, especially along barrier island platforms. Bathymetric change is a function of the regional sediment budget, long-term wave and current patterns, and episodic impact from high-energy events such as storms. Human modifications may also cause changes in seafloor elevation. This study, conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey in collaboration with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, evaluates bathymetric and volumetric change and sediment characteristics around Breton Island and Gosier Shoals located offshore of the Mississippi River Delta in Louisiana. This area has been affected by significant storm events such as Hurricane Katrina in 2005. Sedimentation patterns at Breton Island and offshore have also been modified by the excavation of a shipping channel north of the island. Four time periods are considered that encompass these episodes and include long-term change and short-term storm recovery: 1869–2014, 1869–1920, 1920–2014, and 2007–2014. Finally, sediment characteristics are reported in the context of seafloor elevation.

  16. The virgin land of quality management: a first measure of patient safety climate at the National Hospital of the Faroe Islands

    PubMed Central

    Kristensen, Solvejg; Túgvustein, Naina; Zachariassen, Hjørdis; Sabroe, Svend; Bartels, Paul; Mainz, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The Faroe Islands are formally part of the Kingdom of Denmark, but the islands enjoy extensive autonomy as home ruled. In Denmark, extensive quality management initiatives have been implemented throughout hospitals, this was not the case in the Faroese Islands in 2013. The purpose of this study is to investigate the patient safety culture in the National Hospital of the Faroe Islands prior to implementation of quality management initiatives. Methods The Danish version of the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ-DK) was distributed electronically to 557 staff members from five medical centers of the hospital, and one administrative unit. SAQ-DK has six cultural dimensions. The proportion of respondents with positive attitudes and mean scale scores were described, and comparison between medical specialties, and between clinical leaders and frontline staff was made using analysis of variance and chi-square test, respectively. Results The response rate was 65.8% (N=367). Job satisfaction was rated most favorable, and the perceived culture of the top management least favorable. Safety climate was the dimension with the greatest variability across the 28 units. The diagnostic center had the most favorable culture of all centers. More leaders than frontline staff had positive attitudes toward teamwork and safety climate, and working conditions, respectively. Also, the leaders perceived these dimensions more positive than the frontline staff, P<0.05. Among three management levels, the unit management was perceived most favorable and the top management least favorable. Conclusion The management group is recommended to raise awareness of their role in supporting a safe and caring environment for patients and staff, moreover the leaders should ensure that every day work achieves its objectives; keeping the patients safe. Furthermore, following the development in patient safety culture over time is recommended. PMID:27217800

  17. Training Preachers in the Ellis County Baptist Missionary Association of Texas in the Basics of Expository Preaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Timothy Darryle

    2011-01-01

    This project was designed to train active and potential preachers in the Ellis County Baptist Missionary Association of Texas in the basics of expository preaching. Chapter 1 outlines the ministry context at Heritage Baptist Church, the project's purpose, and the project's goals. Chapter 2 examines the biblical and theological rationale that…

  18. Psychological Chauvinism and Nuclear Holocaust: A Response to Albert Ellis and Defense of Non-Rational Emotive Therapies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Roger

    1989-01-01

    Claims Ellis' 1986 article on psychology and nuclear holocaust did not address certain key issues and made inaccurate criticisms of non-rational emotive therapies. Attempts to correct these errors and to emphasize the importance of open-minded cooperation among psychologists of differing theoretical persuasions. (Author)

  19. Multiplication végétative in vitro de Gardenia jasminoïdes Ellis: In vitro Vegetative Multiplication of Gardenia jasminoïdes Ellis.

    PubMed

    Dumanois, C; Godin, B; Bigot, C

    1984-11-01

    The vegetative propagation in vitro of Gardenia jasminoides Ellis, an ornamental shrub producing secondary metabolites useful in perfumery and pharmacy, has been investigated. In the presence of benzylaminopurine (0.3 to 1 mg l(-1)) and indoleacetic acid (1 mg l(-1)), axillary shoots arose from nodes of greenhause plants, but a decrease of morphogenic activity was noticed in subcultures. Mother plants have been developed in vitro from which shoots may be taken with the most effective system being a monthly subculture of nodal explants. As many as one million shoots per year could, theoretically, be produced from one shoot grown in vitro. Rooting occurred easily in three weeks in vitro in the presence of indoleacetic acid (1 mg l(-1)) and charcoal (2 g l(-1)) or in vivo by soaking the base of the shoot in the same auxin for two hours. After acclimatization, the rooted plants developed and flowered normally. The successive stages have been sufficiently well monitored to be used as an effective means of vegetative propagation. PMID:23195380

  20. Energy Transition Initiative: Island Energy Snapshot - Guam; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect

    2015-06-01

    This profile provides a snapshot of the energy landscape of Guam, an island territory of the United States located in the western Pacific Ocean. Guam’s electricity rates for residential customers start at $0.21 U.S. dollars (USD) per kilowatt-hour (kWh), above the average U.S. rate of $0.13 USD/kWh.1,2 Like

  1. Baseline element concentrations in soils and plants, Wattenmeer National Park, North and East Frisian Islands, Federal Republic of Germany

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Severson, R.C.; Gough, L.P.; van den Boom, G.

    1992-01-01

    Baseline element concentrations are given for dune grass (Ammophilia arenaria), willow (Salix repens), moss (Hylocomium splendens) and associated surface soils. Baseline and variability data for pH, ash, Al, As, Ba, C, Ca, Cd, Ce, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, K, La, Li, Mg, Mn, Na, Nb, Nd, Ni, P, Pb, S, Sc, Se, Sr, Th, Ti, V, Y, Yb, and Zn are reported; however, not all variables are reported for all media because, in some media, certain elements were below the analytical detection limit. Spatial variation in element concentration between five Frisian Islands are given for each of the sample media. In general, only a few elements in each media showed statistically significant differences between the islands sampled. The measured concentrations in all sample media exhibited ranges that cannot be attributed to anthropogenic additions of trace elements, with the possible exception of Hg and Pb in surface soils.Baseline element concentrations are given for dune grass (Ammophilia arenaria), willow (Salix repens), moss (Hylocomium splendens) and associated surface soils. Baseline and variability data for pH, ash, Al, As, Ba, C, Ca, Cd, Ce, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, K, La, Li, Mg, Mn, Na, Nb, Nd, Ni, P, Pb, S, Sc, Se, Sr, Th, Ti, V, Y, Yb, and Zn are reported; however, not all variables are reported for all media because, in some media, certain elements were below the analytical detection limit. Spatial variation in element concentration between five Frisian Islands are given for each of the sample media. In general, only a few elements in each media showed statistically significant differences between the islands sampled. The measured concentrations in all sample media exhibited ranges that cannot be attributed to anthropogenic additions of trace elements, with the possible exception of Hg and Pb in surface soils.

  2. The influence of vegetation on the hydrodynamics and geomorphology of a tree island in Everglades National Park (Florida, United States)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sullivan, Pamela L.; Engel, Victor C.; Ross, Michael S.; Price, René M.

    2013-01-01

    Transpiration-driven nutrient accumulation has been identified as a potential mechanism governing the creation and maintenance of wetland vegetation patterning. This process may contribute to the formation of nutrient-rich tree islands within the expansive oligotrophic marshes of the Everglades (Florida, United States). This study presents hydrogeochemical data indicating that tree root water uptake is a primary driver of groundwater ion accumulation across one of these islands. Sap flow, soil moisture, water level, water chemistry, and rainfall were measured to identify the relationships between climate, transpiration, and groundwater uptake by phreatophytes and to examine the effect this uptake has on groundwater chemistry and mineral formation in three woody plant communities of differing elevations. During the dry season, trees relied more on groundwater for transpiration, which led to a depressed water table and the advective movement of groundwater and dissolved ions, including phosphorus, from the surrounding marsh towards the centre of the island. Ion exclusion during root water uptake led to elevated concentrations of all major dissolved ions in the tree island groundwater compared with the adjacent marsh. Groundwater was predominately supersaturated with respect to aragonite and calcite in the lower-elevation woody communities, indicating the potential for soil formation. Elevated groundwater phosphorous concentrations detected in the highest-elevation woody community were associated with the leaching of inorganic sediments (i.e. hydroxyapatite) in the vadose zone. Understanding the complex feedback mechanisms regulating plant/groundwater/surface water interactions, nutrient dynamics, and potential soil formation is necessary to manage and restore patterned wetlands such as the Everglades.

  3. Canary Islands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This easterly looking view shows the seven major volcanic islands of the Canary Island chain (28.0N, 16.5W) and offers a unique view of the islands that have become a frequent vacation spot for Europeans. The northwest coastline of Africa, (Morocco and Western Sahara), is visible in the background. Frequently, these islands create an impact on local weather (cloud formations) and ocean currents (island wakes) as seen in this photo.

  4. Energy Transition Initiative, Island Energy Snapshot - Grenada (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2015-03-01

    This profile provides a snapshot of the energy landscape of Grenada - a small island nation consisting of the island of Grenada and six smaller islands in the southeastern Caribbean Sea - three of which are inhabited: Grenada, Carriacou, and Petite Martinique.

  5. The gene for the Ellis-van Creveld syndrome is located on chromosome 4p16

    SciTech Connect

    Polymeropoulos, M.H.; Ide, S.E.; Wright, M.

    1996-07-01

    Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EVC) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by disproportionate dwarfism, polydactyly, and congenital heart disease. This rare disorder is found with increased frequency among the Old Order Amish community in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. We have used linkage analysis to localize the gene responsible for the EVC phenotype in nine interrelated Amish pedigrees and three unrelated families from Mexico, Ecuador, and Brazil. We now report the linkage for the Ellisvan Creveld syndrome gene to markers on the distal short arm of human chromosome 4, with Z{sub max} = 6.91 at {theta} = 0.02 for marker HOX7, in a region proximal to the FGFR3 gene responsible for the achondroplasia phenotype. 17 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Venus Flytrap (Dionaea muscipula Solander ex Ellis) Contains Powerful Compounds that Prevent and Cure Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gaascht, François; Dicato, Mario; Diederich, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Chemoprevention uses natural or synthetic molecules without toxic effects to prevent and/or block emergence and development of diseases including cancer. Many of these natural molecules modulate mitogenic signals involved in cell survival, apoptosis, cell cycle regulation, angiogenesis, or on processes involved in the development of metastases occur naturally, especially in fruits and vegetables bur also in non-comestible plants. Carnivorous plants including the Venus flytrap (Dionaea muscipula Solander ex Ellis) are much less investigated, but appear to contain a wealth of potent bioactive secondary metabolites. Aim of this review is to give insight into molecular mechanisms triggered by compounds isolated from these interesting plants with either therapeutic or chemopreventive potential. PMID:23971004

  7. Stability analysis of a Morris-Thorne-Bronnikov-Ellis wormhole with pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Novikov, I. D. Shatskiy, A. A.

    2012-05-15

    The model of a spherical Morris-Thorne-Bronnikov-Ellis wormhole is analyzed for stability. The matter of this wormhole is composed of a radial monopole magnetic field and a quasi-perfect phantom fluid. In the stationary case, the energy density of this fluid is negative and equal in magnitude to twice the energy density of the magnetic field. There is no pressure of this fluid in the stationary case (phantom dust), while in the case where the fluid energy density deviates from its stationary value, the pressure is proportional to the deviation of the energy density from its stationary value. An example of a wormhole stable against radial perturbations has been obtained.

  8. Extracting and purifying R-phycoerythrin from Mediterranean red algae Corallina elongata Ellis & Solander.

    PubMed

    Rossano, R; Ungaro, N; D'Ambrosio, A; Liuzzi, G M; Riccio, P

    2003-03-20

    R-Phycoerythrin (R-PE) is a protein acting as a photosynthetic accessory pigment in red algae (Rodophyta). This protein has gained importance in many biotechnological applications in food science, immunodiagnostic, therapy, cosmetics, protein and cell labelling, and analytical processes. In this paper we report on a new, one step procedure for the extraction and purification of R-PE from a new source: the Mediterranean red algae Corallina elongata Ellis & Solander. This red algae contains mainly R-PE and is suitable for the production in culture. No other contaminating phycobiliproteins could be detected in the extracts. The method we propose for the purification is based on the use of hydroxyapatite, a chromatographic resin that can be produced in the laboratory at very low cost and can be used batch-wise with large amounts of extracts, alternative to chromatography, and therefore can be scaled up. Both the yield and the purity of R-PE are very good.

  9. Effect of crocetin from Gardenia jasminoides Ellis on sleep: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kuratsune, H; Umigai, N; Takeno, R; Kajimoto, Y; Nakano, T

    2010-09-01

    Crocetin is a pharmacologically active carotenoid compound of Gardenia jasminoides Ellis used as a traditional herbal medicine and natural colorant. The present pilot study investigated the effect of crocetin on sleep. The clinical trial comprised a double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover trial of 21 healthy adult men with a mild sleep complaint. It included two intervention periods of 2 weeks each, separated by a 2-week washout period. We measured objective sleep quality using an actigraph, and assessed the subjective symptoms using St Mary's Hospital Sleep Questionnaire. Actigraph data showed that after administration of crocetin, the number of wakening episodes was reduced compared to that of the placebo (p=0.025). Subjective data from St Mary's Hospital Sleep Questionnaire showed that crocetin tended to improve the quality of sleep compared to sleep before its intake. Additionally, no side effects from crocetin intake were observed. The results suggest that crocetin may contribute to improving the quality of sleep. PMID:20537515

  10. Phosphorus loading to McGrath and Ellis ponds, Kennebec County, Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nichols, Wallace J.; Sowles, J.W.; Lobao, J.J.

    1984-01-01

    McGrath and Ellis Ponds in south-central Maine have been identified as having nuisance algae blooms. In 1978, a cooperative study between the U.S. Geological Survey and the Maine Department Environmental Protection was begun to evaluate areas in which restoration effort would best improve water quality of the ponds. Streamflow and phosphorus data were collected from 28 tributaries to the ponds, April 1 through September 30, 1978 and 1979. Phosphorus yields from each tributary watershed were compared to determine their relative importance to the phosphorus budgets of the ponds. Three tributaries to the ponds were estimated to contribute 44 percent of the phosphorus load, yet drain only 22 percent of the watershed. Phosphorus input to the ponds likely would be most easily reduced by instituting phosphorus control practices in parts of the basin drained by the three tributaries. (USGS)

  11. Coastal change-potential assessment of Sleeping Bear Dunes, Indiana Dunes, and Apostle Islands National Lakeshores to lake-level changes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pendleton, Elizabeth A.; Thieler, E. Robert; Williams, S. Jeffress

    2007-01-01

    A change-potential index (CPI) was used to map the susceptibility of the shoreline to future lake-level change within Apostle Islands, Indiana Dunes, and Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshores (NL) along Lake Superior and Lake Michigan. The CPI in the Great Lakes setting ranks the following in terms of their physical contribution to lake-level related coastal change: geomorphology, regional coastal slope, rate and direction (i.e., rise and fall) of relative lake-level change, historical shoreline change rates, annual ice cover and mean significant wave height. The rankings for each input variable were combined, and an index value calculated for 1-minute bins covering the parks. The CPI highlights those regions where the physical effects of lake-level and coastal change might be the greatest. This approach combines the coastal system's potential for change with its natural ability to adapt to changing environmental conditions, yielding a quantitative, although relative, measure of the parks' natural susceptibility to the effects of lake-level variation. The CPI provides an objective technique for evaluation and long-term planning by scientists and park managers. The CPI is applied to the National Lakeshores of Apostle Islands, Indiana Dunes, and Sleeping Bear Dunes to test this methodology in lake settings. The National Lakeshores in this study consist of sand and gravel beaches, rock outcrops, and dune and glacial bluffs. The areas within these Great Lakes parks that are likely to experience the most lake-level-related coastal change are areas of unconsolidated sediment where regional coastal slope is low and wave energy is high.

  12. Nearshore benthic habitat GIS for the Channel Islands National Sanctuary and southern California State Fisheries Reserves. Volume 1

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cochrane, Guy R.; Nasby, Nicole M.; Reid, Jane A.; Waltenberger, Ben; Lee, Kristen M.

    2003-01-01

    The nearshore benthic habitat of the Santa Barbara coast and Channel Islands supports diverse marine life that is commercially, recreationally, and intrinsically valuable. Some of these resources are known to be endangered including a variety of rockfish and the white abalone. Agencies of the state of California and the United States have been mandated to preserve and enhance these resources. Data from sidescan sonar, bathymetry, video and dive observations, and physical samples are consolidated in a geographic information system (GIS). The GIS provides researchers and policymakers a view of the relationship among data sets to assist scienctific research and to help with economic and social policy-making decisions regarding this protected environment.

  13. 32 CFR 935.60 - Wake Island Judicial Authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Wake Island Judicial Authority. 935.60 Section... INSULAR REGULATIONS WAKE ISLAND CODE Judiciary § 935.60 Wake Island Judicial Authority. (a) The judicial authority under this part is vested in the Wake Island Court and the Wake Island Court of Appeals. (b)...

  14. 32 CFR 935.60 - Wake Island Judicial Authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Wake Island Judicial Authority. 935.60 Section... INSULAR REGULATIONS WAKE ISLAND CODE Judiciary § 935.60 Wake Island Judicial Authority. (a) The judicial authority under this part is vested in the Wake Island Court and the Wake Island Court of Appeals. (b)...

  15. 32 CFR 935.60 - Wake Island Judicial Authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Wake Island Judicial Authority. 935.60 Section... INSULAR REGULATIONS WAKE ISLAND CODE Judiciary § 935.60 Wake Island Judicial Authority. (a) The judicial authority under this part is vested in the Wake Island Court and the Wake Island Court of Appeals. (b)...

  16. 32 CFR 935.60 - Wake Island Judicial Authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Wake Island Judicial Authority. 935.60 Section... INSULAR REGULATIONS WAKE ISLAND CODE Judiciary § 935.60 Wake Island Judicial Authority. (a) The judicial authority under this part is vested in the Wake Island Court and the Wake Island Court of Appeals. (b)...

  17. 32 CFR 935.60 - Wake Island Judicial Authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Wake Island Judicial Authority. 935.60 Section... INSULAR REGULATIONS WAKE ISLAND CODE Judiciary § 935.60 Wake Island Judicial Authority. (a) The judicial authority under this part is vested in the Wake Island Court and the Wake Island Court of Appeals. (b)...

  18. Forest bird monitoring protocol for strategic habitat conservation and endangered species management on O'ahu Forest National Wildlife Refuge, Island of O'ahu, Hawai'i

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Camp, Richard J.; Gorresen, P. Marcos; Banko, Paul C.

    2011-01-01

    This report describes the results of a pilot forest bird survey and a consequent forest bird monitoring protocol that was developed for the O'ahu Forest National Wildlife Refuge, O'ahu Island, Hawai'i. The pilot survey was conducted to inform aspects of the monitoring protocol and to provide a baseline with which to compare future surveys on the Refuge. The protocol was developed in an adaptive management framework to track bird distribution and abundance and to meet the strategic habitat conservation requirements of the Refuge. Funding for this research was provided through a Science Support Partnership grant sponsored jointly by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS).

  19. LOUISIANA BARRIER ISLAND EROSION STUDY.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sallenger,, Asbury H.; Penland, Shea; Williams, S. Jeffress; Suter, John R.

    1987-01-01

    During 1986, the U. S. Geological Survey and the Louisiana Geological Survey began a five-year cooperative study focused on the processes which cause erosion of barrier islands. These processes must be understood in order to predict future erosion and to better manage our coastal resources. The study area includes the Louisiana barrier islands which serve to protect 41% of the nation's wetlands. These islands are eroding faster than any other barrier islands in the United States, in places greater than 20 m/yr. The study is divided into three parts: geological development of barrier islands, quantitative processes of barrier island erosion and applications of results. The study focuses on barrier islands in Louisiana although many of the results are applicable nationwide.

  20. Multibeam Synthesis of the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands Supports Diverse Research in the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, J. R.; Kelley, C. D.

    2010-12-01

    The Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument (PMNM) in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands (NWHI) was established in 2006 and is both the single largest conservation area under U.S. jurisdiction (366,631 km2), and one of the largest marine protected areas in the world. The NWHI stretches over 2200 km to the northwest of the 775 km-long Main or Southeastern Hawaiian Islands and contains 47 individual islands, seamounts, atolls, ridges, and submerged banks. The PMNM boundary is 100 nm (185 km) wide centered on the emergent landforms and thus nearly the entire monument (98%) is in deepwater (>100 m) beyond the range of technical wet diving. Because of its remote location, dedicated multibeam mapping of the PMNM region began only ten years ago, although research in the NWHI has taken place for decades. In an effort to consolidate the more recent systematic surveys with older transit data swaths for this region, a synthesis of all existing multibeam data was undertaken between 2009 and 2010. This dataset was then merged with the much lower resolution global bathymetry dataset to generate a more complete picture and allow users to visualize the remainder of the as yet unmapped features within and adjacent to the PMNM boundaries. One of the primary benefits of the synthesis has been to provide researchers with base maps for study site selection including submersible and ROV dive locations. In addition, fusion with the global dataset permits calculation of statistics using geospatial software and may serve as input for physical oceanographic models. With a number of different entities carrying out mapping activities in the PMNM in recent years, this data compilation also provides a road map showing where existing multibeam data are located so as to avoid duplication of effort. The synthesis was prepared with a grid cell interval of 120 m in order to accommodate the large area and water depths to >5000 m, although some of the individual surveys are of much higher

  1. [Photosensitization in cattle grazing on pastures of Brahciaria decumbens Stapf infested with Pithomyces chartarum (Berk. & Curt.) M.B. Ellis].

    PubMed

    Andrade, S O; da Silva Lopes, H O; de Almeida Barros, M; Leite, G G; Dias, S M; Saueressig, M; Nobre, D; Temperini, J A

    1978-01-01

    Aspects of photosensitization in bovines grazing on pastures of Brachiaria decumbens Stapf infested with Pithomyces chartarum (Berk. & Curt.) M.B. Ellis infested all pastures 45(2):117-136, 1978. This paper reports experimental studies on photosensitization in bovines grazing on different pastures of Brachiaria decumbens Stapf in the "Cerrados" region (Planaltina, DF). Climatic conditions, zinc content and occurence of fungi on pastures were investigated. Pithomyces chartarum (Berk. & Curt.) M.B. Ellis infested all pastures examined. Photosensitization was observed in one animal maintained on a pasture of B. decumbens formed with seeds from Australia. Clinical and necropsy data were similar to those related in literature for sporidesmin-intoxicated animals. An isolate of P. chartarum and samples of bovine bile were assayed for sporidesmin presence.

  2. [Photosensitization in cattle grazing on pastures of Brahciaria decumbens Stapf infested with Pithomyces chartarum (Berk. & Curt.) M.B. Ellis].

    PubMed

    Andrade, S O; da Silva Lopes, H O; de Almeida Barros, M; Leite, G G; Dias, S M; Saueressig, M; Nobre, D; Temperini, J A

    1978-01-01

    Aspects of photosensitization in bovines grazing on pastures of Brachiaria decumbens Stapf infested with Pithomyces chartarum (Berk. & Curt.) M.B. Ellis infested all pastures 45(2):117-136, 1978. This paper reports experimental studies on photosensitization in bovines grazing on different pastures of Brachiaria decumbens Stapf in the "Cerrados" region (Planaltina, DF). Climatic conditions, zinc content and occurence of fungi on pastures were investigated. Pithomyces chartarum (Berk. & Curt.) M.B. Ellis infested all pastures examined. Photosensitization was observed in one animal maintained on a pasture of B. decumbens formed with seeds from Australia. Clinical and necropsy data were similar to those related in literature for sporidesmin-intoxicated animals. An isolate of P. chartarum and samples of bovine bile were assayed for sporidesmin presence. PMID:573108

  3. Perspectives on Advertising Education: Curricula, Research--Descriptive, Research--Experimental, Industry/Educators' Cooperation, Special Interest Areas, and Instruction; Proceedings of the 1974 National Conference for University Professors of Advertising at the Univ. of Rhode Island.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeigler, Sherilyn K., Ed.

    This document contains all of the presentations given at the 1974 National American Academy of Advertising Conference in Newport, Rhode Island. The theme of the conference was "Perspectives on Advertising" and the areas of focus were curricula and instruction, descriptive and experimental research, cooperation between educators and the advertising…

  4. By Their Very Presence: Rethinking Research and Partnering for Change with Educators and Artists from Long Island's Shinnecock Nation Cultural Center and Museum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caracciolo, Diane

    2009-01-01

    This paper recounts the non-Native author's journey toward understanding and enacting Indigenous research paradigms in her home region of Long Island, New York. Unknown to most Long Islanders, their region, which extends over 100 miles eastward from Manhattan, contains two state recognized Native reserves--Shinnecock and Poospatuck. Long Island is…

  5. Archive of side scan sonar and swath bathymetry data collected during USGS cruise 10CCT03 offshore of the Gulf Islands National Seashore, Mississippi, from East Ship Island, Mississippi, to Dauphin Island, Alabama, April 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeWitt, Nancy T.; Flocks, James G.; Pfeiffer, William R.; Gibson, James N.; Wiese, Dana S.

    2012-01-01

    Data were collected aboard the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) SV Irvington, a 56-foot (ft) Kvichak Marine Industries, Inc., catamaran (fig. 2). Side scan sonar and multibeam bathymetry data were collected simultaneously along the tracklines. The side scan sonar towfish was towed off the starboard side just slightly behind the vessel, close to the seafloor. The multibeam transducer was attached to a retractable strut-arm lowered between the catamaran hulls. Navigation was acquired with an Applanix POS MV and differentially corrected using the broadcast signal from a local National Geodetic Survey (NGS) Continuously Operating Reference Station (CORS) beacon. See the digital FACS equipment log for details about the acquisition equipment used. Raw datasets were stored digitally and processed using HYPACK Inc., HYSWEEP software at the USACE Mobile, Ala., District office. For more information on processing refer to the Equipment and Processing page. Chirp seismic data were also collected during this survey and are archived separately.

  6. Movement and habitat use of Sika and White-tailed Deer on Assateague Island national seashore, Maryland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Diefenbach, Duane R.; Christensen, Sonja

    2009-01-01

    This research project was conducted to describe habitat use of sika deer (Cervus nippon) and white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) and possibly attribute the effects of ungulate herbivory to specific deer species, if spatial separation in habitat use could be identified. Sturm (2007) conducted an exclosure study to document the effect of feral horse (Equus caballus) herbivory, deer herbivory, and horse and deer herbivory combined on plant communities. Sturm (2007) found that ungulate herbivory reduced plant species richness, evenness, and diversity in the maritime forest and affected species composition in all habitats studied. Sturm (2007) also found that herbivory on some species could be directly attributable to either horse or deer. However, the effects of sika and white-tailed deer herbivory could not be separated via an exclosure study design because of the difficulty of passively excluding one deer species but not the other. We captured white-tailed deer and sika deer in January–March of 2006 and 2007 throughout the Maryland portion of Assateague Island. Deer were fitted with radio-collars and their survival and locations monitored via ground telemetry. Up to four locations were acquired per deer each week during early (May–June) and late (August–September) growth periods for vegetation on the island. Also, we estimated deer locations during a dormant vegetation period (November– December 2006). We used these data to estimate survival and harvest rates, document movements, and model habitat use. We captured and fitted 50 deer with radio-collars over the course of the study. Of these 50 deer, 36 were sika and 14 were white-tailed deer. Of the 36 sika deer, 10 were harvested, three were likely killed by hunters but not recovered, and one died of natural causes while giving birth. Of the 14 white-tailed deer, three were harvested, one was illegally killed, and two were censored because of study-related mortality. Annual survival was 0.48 (95% CI

  7. Lost island found

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An abandoned ll-by-5-km kidney-shaped chunk of freshwater ice, used as a research station for 25 years, was rediscovered after the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) lost track of the island for 6 months. The recent find may foreshadow another loss, however: The island is drifting through the Greenland Sea and into the North Atlantic where it should melt within several months and d u m p its cargo of oil drums, equipment, and a wrecked plane into the ocean.Known as Fletcher's Ice Island—after Joseph O. Fletcher, a member of the first team of researchers to inhabit the island and a recently retired NOAA climate researcher—the ice chunk has already melted to a third of its original 49 m thickness. A pilot flying over the area to measure annual pollution buildup in the Arctic located the drifting island 242 km from the North Pole near the International Date Line.

  8. From urban to national heat island: The effect of anthropogenic heat output on climate change in high population industrial countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, John; Heggie, Douglas

    2016-06-01

    The project presented here sought to determine whether changes in anthropogenic thermal emission can have a measurable effect on temperature at the national level, taking Japan and Great Britain as type examples. Using energy consumption as a proxy for thermal emission, strong correlations (mean r2 = 0.90 and 0.89, respectively) are found between national equivalent heat output (HO) and temperature above background levels Δt averaged over 5- to 8-yr periods between 1965 and 2013, as opposed to weaker correlations for CMIP5 model temperatures above background levels Δmt (mean r2 = 0.52 and 0.10). It is clear that the fluctuations in Δt are better explained by energy consumption than by present climate models, and that energy consumption can contribute to climate change at the national level on these timescales.

  9. Field testing of immunocontraception on white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) on Fire Island National Seashore, New York, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naugle, R.E.; Rutberg, A.T.; Underwood, H.B.; Turner, J.W.; Liu, I.K.; Kirkpatrick, J.F.; Lasley, B.L.; Allen, W.R.; Doberska, C.

    2002-01-01

    Application of contraception for the control of suburban populations of white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) has been much debated, but few data are available on field applications and even fewer on population effects. Between 1993 and 1997, 74-164 individually known female deer living on Fire Island, New York, USA, were treated remotely with an initial shot of 65 microg porcine zona pellucida (PZP) in Freund's complete adjuvant followed by booster injections of 65 microg PZP in Freund's incomplete adjuvant. Starting in 1996, progressively increasing numbers of deer were treated with vaccinating/marking darts. Estimates of population density and composition, using distance sampling methods, began in 1995 in selected portions of the study area. Between 1993 and 1997, fawning rates among individually known, treated adult females decreased by 78.9% from pretreatment rates. Population density in the most heavily treated area increased by 11% per year from 1995 to March 1998 and then decreased at 23% per year to October 2000. In 1999-2000 surveys, fawns comprised 13-14% of the total population in the most heavily treated area, versus 16-33% in nearby untreated areas. These results show that PZP can be delivered effectively to sufficient deer to affect population density and composition in some environments, but that technical and logistical improvements are needed before contraception can be used widely to manage suburban deer populations.

  10. Long-term ecological changes in the north Adriatic Sea: Epi-to Infauna turnover at the Brijuni islands national park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pifeas, Iason; Gallmetzer, Ivo; Haselmair, Alexandra; Stachowitsch, Michael; Zuschin, Martin

    2015-04-01

    The northern Adriatic Sea with its densely populated coastline experienced strong anthropogenic impacts during the last centuries. The Brijuni islands at the southern tip of Istria, Croatia, are a national park since 1983 and represent a study area of special interest when comparing impacted marine areas with regions under relatively long-term protection that were able to recover from the pressure of fishing and bottom trawling. The present study is part of a project on the historical ecology of the northern Adriatic sea and focusses on long-term ecological changes and benthic community shifts as a result of anthropogenic impacts since the Holocene transgression. Several cores of 1.5 m length and a diameter of 90 mm were taken close to the main island of Brijuni and sliced into smaller subunits for sediment analyses and the investigation of death assemblages. Hard part remains of molluscs, crustaceans, bryozoans, echinoderms and sedentary polychaetes were analysed for species composition, abundance and indicators for high biomass epifauna. Death assemblages were compared with surface samples of the recent fauna taken at the same area by grab-sampling and by divers using a 100 x 100 cm frame. Data analyses revealed a steep increase of species abundance and diversity in the early stages of the Holocene transgression, at the very bottom of the core, followed by a steady decline, representing a major shift from a previously epibenthic to an infauna dominated community. Towards the top of the core, this trend weakens, and in the uppermost 6 cm it even reverses indicating a possible recovery of the benthic communities since the protection of the area. By correlating down-core changes in benthic community structure with sediment parameters (grain size distribution, TOC, heavy metal content, concentrations of organic pollutants) and data from radiometric sediment dating, we can further improve our understanding of the timing and the magnitude of past ecological changes and

  11. Active movements in plants: Mechanism of trap closure by Dionaea muscipula Ellis.

    PubMed

    Markin, Vladislav S; Volkov, Alexander G; Jovanov, Emil

    2008-10-01

    The Venus flytrap (Dionaea muscipula Ellis) captures insects with one of the most rapid movements in the plant kingdom. We investigated trap closure by mechanical and electrical stimuli using the novel charge-injection method and high-speed recording. We proposed a new hydroelastic curvature mechanism, which is based on the assumption that the lobes possess curvature elasticity and are composed of outer and inner hydraulic layers with different hydrostatic pressure. The open state of the trap contains high elastic energy accumulated due to the hydrostatic pressure difference between the hydraulic layers of the lobe. Stimuli open pores connecting the two layers, water rushes from one hydraulic layer to another, and the trap relaxes to the equilibrium configuration corresponding to the closed state. In this paper we derived equations describing this system based on elasticity Hamiltonian and found closing kinetics. The novel charge-injection stimulation method gives insight into mechanisms of the different steps of signal transduction and response in the plant kingdom.

  12. Morphing structures of the Dionaea muscipula Ellis during the trap opening and closing

    PubMed Central

    Volkov, Alexander G; Forde-Tuckett, Victoria; Volkova, Maya I; Markin, Vladislav S

    2014-01-01

    The Venus flytrap is a marvelous plant that has intrigued scientists since the times of Charles Darwin. This carnivorous plant is capable of very fast movements to catch a prey. We found that the maximal speed of the trap closing in the Dionaea muscipula Ellis is about 130 000 times faster than the maximal speed of the trap opening. The mechanism and kinetics of this movement was debated for a long time. Here, the most recent Hydroelastic Curvature Model is applied to the analysis of this movement during closing and opening of the trap with or without a prey. Equations describing the trap movement were derived and verified with experimental data. Chloroform and ether, both anesthetic agents, induce action potentials and close the trap without the mechanical stimulation of trigger hairs. We tested this by dropping 10 μL of ether on the midrib inside the trap without touching any of the mechanosensitive trigger hairs. The trap closed slowly in 10 s. This is at least 20 times slower than the closing of the trap mechanically or electrically. The similar effect can be induced by placing 10 μL of chloroform on the midrib inside the trap, however, the lobes closing time in this case is as fast as closing after mechanical stimulation of the trigger hairs. PMID:24618927

  13. Morphing structures of the Dionaea muscipula Ellis during the trap opening and closing.

    PubMed

    Volkov, Alexander G; Forde-Tuckett, Victoria; Volkova, Maya I; Markin, Vladislav S

    2014-01-01

    The Venus flytrap is a marvelous plant that has intrigued scientists since the times of Charles Darwin. This carnivorous plant is capable of very fast movements to catch a prey. We found that the maximal speed of the trap closing in the Dionaea muscipula Ellis is about 130,000 times faster than the maximal speed of the trap opening. The mechanism and kinetics of this movement was debated for a long time. Here, the most recent Hydroelastic Curvature Model is applied to the analysis of this movement during closing and opening of the trap with or without a prey. Equations describing the trap movement were derived and verified with experimental data. Chloroform and ether, both anesthetic agents, induce action potentials and close the trap without the mechanical stimulation of trigger hairs. We tested this by dropping 10 μL of ether on the midrib inside the trap without touching any of the mechanosensitive trigger hairs. The trap closed slowly in 10 s. This is at least 20 times slower than the closing of the trap mechanically or electrically. The similar effect can be induced by placing 10 μL of chloroform on the midrib inside the trap, however, the lobes closing time in this case is as fast as closing after mechanical stimulation of the trigger hairs.

  14. Two Adult Patients with Ellis-van Creveld Syndrome Extending the Clinical Spectrum.

    PubMed

    Rudnik-Schöneborn, S; Zerres, K; Graul-Neumann, L; Wiegand, S; Mellerowicz, H; Hehr, U

    2011-09-01

    Ellis-van Creveld (EvC) syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive malformation syndrome with the main features cardiac defects, postaxial hexadactyly, mesomelic shortening of the limbs, short ribs, dysplastic nails and teeth, oral frenula and various other abnormalities while mental function is normal. We describe 2 adult EvC patients with the cardinal skeletal features of mesomelic short stature and severe, progressive genu valgum deformity, resulting from loss of function mutations in the EVC genes. While the genu valgum was the predominating and disabling feature in patient 1, patient 2 showed acroosteolyses in the distal phalanges and a symmetrical synostosis of metacarpals in his hands. Moreover, patient 2 developed synostoses in the additional fingers in adolescence which had not been present at the age of 12 years, suggesting a further progression of skeletal disease. Joint fusion of phalanges so far has not been reported in EvC syndrome. Our data further expand the phenotypic spectrum of EvC related skeletal malformations and contribute important new information on the clinical course of EvC syndrome with increasing age.

  15. Analysis of Ellis van Creveld syndrome gene products: implications for cardiovascular development and disease.

    PubMed

    Sund, Kristen Lipscomb; Roelker, Stephanie; Ramachandran, Vijaya; Durbin, Lisa; Benson, D Woodrow

    2009-05-15

    Mutations identified in a cohort of patients with atrioventricular septal defects as a part of Ellis van Creveld syndrome (EvC syndrome) led us to study the role of two non-homologous genes, EVC and LBN, in heart development and disease pathogenesis. To address the cause of locus heterogeneity resulting in an indistinguishable heart-hand phenotype, we carried out in situ hybridization and immunofluorescence and identified co-localization of Evc and Lbn mRNA and protein. In the heart, expression was identified to be strongest in the secondary heart field, including both the outflow tract and the dorsal mesenchymal protrusion, but was also found in mesenchymal structures of the atrial septum and the atrioventricular cushions. Finally, we studied the transcriptional hierarchy of EVC and LBN but did not find any evidence of direct transcriptional interregulation between the two. Due to the locus heterogeneity of human mutations predicted to result in a loss of protein function, a bidirectional genomic organization and overlapping expression patterns, we speculate that these proteins function coordinately in cardiac development and that loss of this coordinate function results in the characteristics of EvC syndrome.

  16. Growth hormone analysis and treatment in Ellis-van Creveld syndrome.

    PubMed

    Versteegh, Florens G A; Buma, Sannine A; Costin, Gertrude; de Jong, Wilfried C; Hennekam, Raoul C M

    2007-09-15

    Little is known on growth, growth hormone (GH) levels and GH treatment in patients with Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EvC). The aim of the present study was to assess growth, growth hormone status and the possible effectiveness of GH treatment in literature and in a small series of EvC patients. A review of literature indicated retarded growth for most EvC patients (-2 to -4.5 SDS) and minimal data on GH levels or treatment which did not allow any conclusion. We studied eight EvC patients, seven of whom were treated with GH. Four were GH deficient (GHD) and four were GH sufficient. In all patients treated with GH, first year growth velocity increased. In three of the four GHD and in one GH-sufficient patient a gain in height SDS was noted. In the present small EvC series GHD occurred more often than expected. Patient acquisition through the Growth Hormone Database will have caused a significant bias, but the present results indicate that GH treatment may improve growth in at least some patients with EvC. Therefore we conclude that EvC patients may benefit from being tested for GHD and, if indicated, treated. In addition a prospective study to evaluate GH status and linear growth in patients with EvC as well as the potential effectiveness of GH treatment is warranted.

  17. Ellis-van Creveld syndrome associated with chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction.

    PubMed

    Iwakura, Hideo; Fujii, Katsunori; Furutani, Yoshiyuki; Takatani, Tomozumi; Ebata, Ryota; Nakanishi, Toshio; Mitsunaga, Tetsuya; Saito, Takeshi; Kishimoto, Takashi; Yoshida, Hideo; Shimojo, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    Ellis-van Creveld (EVC) syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by hypoplastic nails, polydactyly, and achondroplasia. Patients usually exhibit normal cognitive function and no remarkable developmental delay. We herein present an unusual case of EVC syndrome. A Japanese 2-year-old boy was born at term, but immediately developed severe respiratory failure due to thorax deformity, postaxial polydactyly and nail hypoplasia. We identified a novel pattern of germinal compound heterozygous nonsense EVC2 mutations of c.1814C > A (p. S605X) and c.2653C > T (p. R885X), leading to the diagnosis of EVC syndrome. Interestingly, he also had severe developmental delay, and suddenly developed excessive abdominal distension at the age of 2. On surgery, extensive necrotic bowel with chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction was noted. This is, to our knowledge, a most severe phenotype of EVC syndrome, illustrating that the specific pattern of EVC2 compound heterozygous mutations may cause severe developmental delay and intestinal malfunction.

  18. Mutations in a new gene in Ellis-van Creveld syndrome and Weyers acrodental dysostosis.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Perez, V L; Ide, S E; Strom, T M; Lorenz, B; Wilson, D; Woods, K; King, L; Francomano, C; Freisinger, P; Spranger, S; Marino, B; Dallapiccola, B; Wright, M; Meitinger, T; Polymeropoulos, M H; Goodship, J

    2000-03-01

    Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EvC, MIM 225500) is an autosomal recessive skeletal dysplasia characterized by short limbs, short ribs, postaxial polydactyly and dysplastic nails and teeth. Congenital cardiac defects, most commonly a defect of primary atrial septation producing a common atrium, occur in 60% of affected individuals. The disease was mapped to chromosome 4p16 in nine Amish subpedigrees and single pedigrees from Mexico, Ecuador and Brazil. Weyers acrodental dysostosis (MIM 193530), an autosomal dominant disorder with a similar but milder phenotype, has been mapped in a single pedigree to an area including the EvC critical region. We have identified a new gene (EVC), encoding a 992-amino-acid protein, that is mutated in individuals with EvC. We identified a splice-donor change in an Amish pedigree and six truncating mutations and a single amino acid deletion in seven pedigrees. The heterozygous carriers of these mutations did not manifest features of EvC. We found two heterozygous missense mutations associated with a phenotype, one in a man with Weyers acrodental dysostosis and another in a father and his daughter, who both have the heart defect characteristic of EvC and polydactyly, but not short stature. We suggest that EvC and Weyers acrodental dysostosis are allelic conditions.

  19. 50 CFR 32.59 - Rhode Island.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Rhode Island. 32.59 Section 32.59 Wildlife... § 32.59 Rhode Island. The following refuge units have been opened for hunting and/or fishing and are listed in alphabetical order with applicable refuge-specific regulations. Block Island National...

  20. 40 CFR 81.356 - Virgin Islands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Virgin Islands. 81.356 Section 81.356... Islands. Virgin Islands—SO2 Designated area Does not meet primary standards Does not meet secondary standards Cannot be classified Better than national standards Virgin Islands AQCR: St. Croix (southern) 1...

  1. 50 CFR 32.59 - Rhode Island.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Rhode Island. 32.59 Section 32.59 Wildlife... § 32.59 Rhode Island. The following refuge units have been opened for hunting and/or fishing and are listed in alphabetical order with applicable refuge-specific regulations. Block Island National...

  2. 50 CFR 32.59 - Rhode Island.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Rhode Island. 32.59 Section 32.59 Wildlife... § 32.59 Rhode Island. The following refuge units have been opened for hunting and/or fishing and are listed in alphabetical order with applicable refuge-specific regulations. Block Island National...

  3. 40 CFR 81.356 - Virgin Islands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Virgin Islands. 81.356 Section 81.356... Islands. Virgin Islands—SO2 Designated area Does not meet primary standards Does not meet secondary standards Cannot be classified Better than national standards Virgin Islands AQCR: St. Croix (southern) 1...

  4. 50 CFR 32.59 - Rhode Island.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Rhode Island. 32.59 Section 32.59 Wildlife... § 32.59 Rhode Island. The following refuge units have been opened for hunting and/or fishing and are listed in alphabetical order with applicable refuge-specific regulations. Block Island National...

  5. 40 CFR 81.356 - Virgin Islands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Virgin Islands. 81.356 Section 81.356... Islands. Virgin Islands—SO2 Designated area Does not meet primary standards Does not meet secondary standards Cannot be classified Better than national standards Virgin Islands AQCR: St. Croix (southern) 1...

  6. 40 CFR 81.356 - Virgin Islands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Virgin Islands. 81.356 Section 81.356... Islands. Virgin Islands—SO2 Designated area Does not meet primary standards Does not meet secondary standards Cannot be classified Better than national standards Virgin Islands AQCR: St. Croix (southern) 1...

  7. 50 CFR 32.59 - Rhode Island.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Rhode Island. 32.59 Section 32.59 Wildlife... § 32.59 Rhode Island. The following refuge units have been opened for hunting and/or fishing and are listed in alphabetical order with applicable refuge-specific regulations. Block Island National...

  8. 78 FR 52783 - Boston Harbor Islands Advisory Council Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-26

    ... National Park Service Boston Harbor Islands Advisory Council Meeting AGENCY: National Park Service... Islands Advisory Council. The agenda includes discussion of 2016 celebration planning for the 300th Anniversary of Boston Light, 20th Anniversary of Boston Harbor Islands National Recreation Area (NRA),...

  9. Akpatok Island

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Akpatok Island lies in Ungava Bay in northern Quebec, Canada. Accessible only by air, Akpatok Island rises out of the water as sheer cliffs that soar 500 to 800 feet (150 to 243 m) above the sea surface. The island is an important sanctuary for cliff-nesting seabirds. Numerous ice floes around the island attract walrus and whales, making Akpatok a traditional hunting ground for native Inuit people. This image was acquired by Landsat 7's Enhanced Thematic Mapper plus (ETM+) sensor on January 22, 2001. Image provided by the USGS EROS Data Center Satellite Systems Branch

  10. Island Hopping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Gayle

    2009-01-01

    At some institutions, it may feel as though faculty live on one island and advancement staff on another. The islands form part of an archipelago, and they exchange ambassadors and send emissaries occasionally, but interactions are limited. It may even seem as though the two groups speak different languages, deal in different currencies, and abide…

  11. Reproductive Ecology Of The Florida Scrub-Jay (Aphelocoma Coerulescens) On John F. Kennedy Space Center/Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge: A Long-Term Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Geoffry M.; Breininger, David R.; Larson, Vicky L.; Oddy, Donna M.; Smith, Rebecca B.; Stolen, Eric D.

    2005-01-01

    From 1988 to 2002 we studied the breeding ecology of Florida Scrub-Jays (Aphelocoma coerulescens) on John F. Kennedy Space Center/Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. We examined phenology, clutch size, hatching failure rates, fledgling production, nest success, predation rates, sources egg and nestling mortality, and the effects of helpers on these measures. Nesting phenology was similar among sites. Mean clutch size at Titan was significantly larger than at HC or T4. Pairs with helpers did not produce larger clutches than pairs without helpers. Fledgling production at T4 was significantly greater than at HC and similar to Titan. Pairs with helpers at HC produced significantly more fledglings than pairs without helpers; helpers did not influence fledgling production at the other sites. Nest success at HC and Titan was low, 19% and 32% respectively. Nest success at T4 was 48% and was significantly greater than at HC. Average predation rates at all sites increased with season progression. Predation rates at all sight rose sharply by early June. The main cause of nest failure at all sites was predation, 93%.

  12. A Conservation Strategy for the Florida Scrub-Jay on John F. Kennedy Space Center/Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge: An Initial Scientific Basis for Recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breininger, D. R.; Larson, V. L.; Schaub, R.; Duncan, B. W.; Schmalzer, P. A.; Oddy, D. M.; Smith, R. B.; Adrian, F.; Hill, H., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    The Florida Scrub-Jay (Aphelocoma coerulescens) is an indicator of ecosystem integrity of Florida scrub, an endangered ecosystem that requires frequent fire. One of the largest populations of this federally threatened species occurs on John F. Kennedy Space Center/Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. Population trends were predicted using population modeling and field data on reproduction and survival of Florida Scrub-Jays collected from 1988 - 1995. Analyses of historical photography indicated that habitat suitability has been declining for 30 years. Field data and computer simulations suggested that the population declined by at least 40% and will decline by another 40% in 1 0 years, if habitat management is not greatly intensified. Data and computer simulations suggest that habitat suitability cannot deviate greatly from optimal for the jay population to persist. Landscape trajectories of vegetation structure, responsible for declining habitat suitability, are associated with the disruption of natural fire regimes. Prescribed fire alone can not reverse the trajectories. A recovery strategy was developed, based on studies of Florida Scrub-Jays and scrub vegetation. A reserve design was formulated based on conservation science principles for scrub ecosystems. The strategy emphasizes frequent fire to restore habitat, but includes mechanical tree cutting for severely degraded areas. Pine thinning across large areas can produce rapid increases in habitat quality. Site-specific strategies will need to be developed, monitored, and modified to achieve conditions suitable for population persistence.

  13. Spatial analysis of land use and shallow groundwater vulnerability in the watershed adjacent to Assateague Island National Seashore, Maryland and Virginia, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    LaMotte, A.E.; Greene, E.A.

    2007-01-01

    Spatial relations between land use and groundwater quality in the watershed adjacent to Assateague Island National Seashore, Maryland and Virginia, USA were analyzed by the use of two spatial models. One model used a logit analysis and the other was based on geostatistics. The models were developed and compared on the basis of existing concentrations of nitrate as nitrogen in samples from 529 domestic wells. The models were applied to produce spatial probability maps that show areas in the watershed where concentrations of nitrate in groundwater are likely to exceed a predetermined management threshold value. Maps of the watershed generated by logistic regression and probability kriging analysis showing where the probability of nitrate concentrations would exceed 3 mg/L (>0.50) compared favorably. Logistic regression was less dependent on the spatial distribution of sampled wells, and identified an additional high probability area within the watershed that was missed by probability kriging. The spatial probability maps could be used to determine the natural or anthropogenic factors that best explain the occurrence and distribution of elevated concentrations of nitrate (or other constituents) in shallow groundwater. This information can be used by local land-use planners, ecologists, and managers to protect water supplies and identify land-use planning solutions and monitoring programs in vulnerable areas. ?? 2006 Springer-Verlag.

  14. Analysis of Wading Bird use of Impounded Wetland Habitat on the Kennedy Space Center/Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, 1987-1998

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolen, Eric D.; Breininger, David R.; Smith, Rebecca B.; Quincy, Charlie (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This report summarizes results of the first eleven years of monthly aerial surveys of wading bird use of foraging habitats within impoundments on the Kennedy Space Center/Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. Some impoundments were used much more heavily by wading birds than were others. Analysis suggests that an increase in interspersion of open water and vegetated habitats is preferred foraging habitat. Many wading bird species increased their use of vegetated habitat in Fall and Winter when impoundments were flooded. The mean number of wading birds per survey was greatest during the Pre-nesting and Nesting seasons, declined during Post-nesting season, and was lowest during Winter when water levels within impoundments were high. During these times, shallow habitat along the IRL shoreline provided alternative habitats for wading birds. Various measures of monthly precipitation and impoundment water level were well correlated with the numbers of wading birds observed. Numbers of nesting attempts was steady during the study period, with the exception of an unusually high number of attempts in 1990. White Ibis accounted for over half of all wading bird nests counted. The mean number of nests per colony decreased during the study period, and the number of individual colonies increased.

  15. Use of indigenous small mammal populations to assess a National Priority List site: A case study at Naval Air Station, Whidbey Island

    SciTech Connect

    Hummell, R.A.

    1994-12-31

    Prior disposal activities at Naval Air Station, Whidbey Island resulted in the release of heavy metals and organic chemicals into the environment resulting in the site being placed on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 1990. This presentation reports an ecotoxicological study of indigenous populations of voles on the NPL site. The study attempted to provide three endpoints: (1) exposure, (2) individual effects, (3) population effects. Exposure was quantified during the study by comparing chemical concentrations in the tissues of voles live captured on site to tissue concentrations of mammals captured at site specific reference locations. Live trapped voles were also aged according to eye lens weights. Effects exerted on individuals were evaluated based on physiological measurements of the liver, kidney, and whole body as they correlated with age and chemical concentrations. Capture-recapture techniques and age structure analyses were used to develop survivorship curves and evaluate population stability and fitness. The study provides data that can be used to support ecological risk assessments required for CIRCLE investigations.

  16. Novel mutations in EVC cause aberrant splicing in Ellis-van Creveld syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lisong; Luo, Chunyan; Ahmed, Mairaj K; Attaie, Ali B; Ye, Xiaoqian

    2016-04-01

    Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EvC) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by disproportionate chondrodysplasia, postaxial polydactyly, nail dystrophy, dental abnormalities and in a proportion of patients, congenital cardiac malformations. Weyers acrofacial dysostosis (Weyers) is another dominantly inherited disorder allelic to EvC syndrome but with milder phenotypes. Both disorders can result from loss-of-function mutations in either EVC or EVC2 gene, and phenotypes associated with the two gene mutations are clinically indistinguishable. We present here a clinical and molecular analysis of a Chinese family manifested specific features of EvC syndrome. Sequencing of both EVC and EVC2 identified two novel heterozygous splice site mutations c.384+5G>C in intron 3 and c.1465-1G>A in intron 10 in EVC, which were inherited from mother and father, respectively. In vitro minigene expression assay, RT-PCR and sequencing analysis demonstrated that c.384+5G>C mutation abolished normal splice site and created a new cryptic acceptor site within exon 4, whereas c.1465-1G>A mutation affected consensus splice junction site and resulted in full exon 11 skipping. These two aberrant pre-mRNA splicing processes both produced in-frame abnormal transcripts that possibly led to abolishment of important functional domains. To our knowledge, this is the first report of EVC mutations that cause EvC syndrome in Chinese population. Our data revealed that EVC splice site mutations altered splicing pattern and helped elucidate the pathogenesis of EvC syndrome. PMID:26621368

  17. Ellis-van Creveld Syndrome in Grey Alpine Cattle: Morphologic, Immunophenotypic, and Molecular Characterization.

    PubMed

    Muscatello, L V; Benazzi, C; Dittmer, K E; Thompson, K G; Murgiano, L; Drögemüller, C; Avallone, G; Gentile, A; Edwards, J F; Piffer, C; Bolcato, M; Brunetti, B

    2015-09-01

    Ellis-van Creveld (EvC) syndrome is a human autosomal recessive disorder caused by a mutation in either the EVC or EVC2 gene, and presents with short limbs, polydactyly, and ectodermal and heart defects. The aim of this study was to understand the pathologic basis by which deletions in the EVC2 gene lead to chondrodysplastic dwarfism and to describe the morphologic, immunohistochemical, and molecular hallmarks of EvC syndrome in cattle. Five Grey Alpine calves, with a known mutation in the EVC2 gene, were autopsied. Immunohistochemistry was performed on bone using antibodies to collagen II, collagen X, sonic hedgehog, fibroblast growth factor 2, and Ki67. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction was performed to analyze EVC1 and EVC2 gene expression. Autopsy revealed long bones that were severely reduced in length, as well as genital and heart defects. Collagen II was detected in control calves in the resting, proliferative, and hypertrophic zones and in the primary and secondary spongiosa, with a loss of labeling in the resting zone of 2 dwarfs. Collagen X was expressed in hypertrophic zone in the controls but was absent in the EvC cases. In affected calves and controls, sonic hedgehog labeled hypertrophic chondrocytes and primary and secondary spongiosa similarly. FGF2 was expressed in chondrocytes of all growth plate zones in the control calves but was lost in most EvC cases. The Ki67 index was lower in cases compared with controls. EVC and EVC2 transcripts were detected. Our data suggest that EvC syndrome of Grey Alpine cattle is a disorder of chondrocyte differentiation, with accelerated differentiation and premature hypertrophy of chondrocytes, and could be a spontaneous model for the equivalent human disease.

  18. Novel mutations in EVC cause aberrant splicing in Ellis-van Creveld syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lisong; Luo, Chunyan; Ahmed, Mairaj K; Attaie, Ali B; Ye, Xiaoqian

    2016-04-01

    Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EvC) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by disproportionate chondrodysplasia, postaxial polydactyly, nail dystrophy, dental abnormalities and in a proportion of patients, congenital cardiac malformations. Weyers acrofacial dysostosis (Weyers) is another dominantly inherited disorder allelic to EvC syndrome but with milder phenotypes. Both disorders can result from loss-of-function mutations in either EVC or EVC2 gene, and phenotypes associated with the two gene mutations are clinically indistinguishable. We present here a clinical and molecular analysis of a Chinese family manifested specific features of EvC syndrome. Sequencing of both EVC and EVC2 identified two novel heterozygous splice site mutations c.384+5G>C in intron 3 and c.1465-1G>A in intron 10 in EVC, which were inherited from mother and father, respectively. In vitro minigene expression assay, RT-PCR and sequencing analysis demonstrated that c.384+5G>C mutation abolished normal splice site and created a new cryptic acceptor site within exon 4, whereas c.1465-1G>A mutation affected consensus splice junction site and resulted in full exon 11 skipping. These two aberrant pre-mRNA splicing processes both produced in-frame abnormal transcripts that possibly led to abolishment of important functional domains. To our knowledge, this is the first report of EVC mutations that cause EvC syndrome in Chinese population. Our data revealed that EVC splice site mutations altered splicing pattern and helped elucidate the pathogenesis of EvC syndrome.

  19. Ellis-van Creveld syndrome and congenital heart defects: presentation of an additional 32 cases.

    PubMed

    Hills, Christine B; Kochilas, Lazaros; Schimmenti, Lisa A; Moller, James H

    2011-10-01

    Ellis-van Creveld (EVC) syndrome is a rare genetic abnormality that has been linked to a mutation in the EVC or EVC2 genes. Common atrium (CA) is an uncommon cardiac malformation, and yet it is commonly found in patients with EVC. We performed a retrospective review of the cases submitted to the Pediatric Cardiac Care Consortium (PCCC) between 1982 and 2007. A review of the English-language literature for previously published cases, as well as current genetic research findings, was also performed. Thirty-two pediatric patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) and EVC syndrome were identified in the PCCC database. Twenty-eight (88%) had an endocardial cushion defect, with 15 of these having primary failure of atrial septation resulting in CA. Persistent left superior vena cava (LSVC) and pulmonary venous connection abnormalities were common. The incidence of persistent LSVC and pulmonary venous abnormalities were greater than previously reported for patients with EVC. Our study reviews the reported literature and adds 32 additional cases from the PCCC database. Review of the cardiac phenotype in patients with EVC syndrome reveals a characteristic pattern of atrioventricular canal defects with systemic and pulmonary venous abnormalities. The frequent association of these abnormalities is strongly reminiscent of the cardiac phenotype found in patients with heterotaxy syndromes. Emerging molecular and developmental studies suggest that EVC and EVC2 proteins may be important for cilia function, which is implicated in the pathogenesis of heterotaxy syndromes. It is speculated that coordinate function between the EVC proteins is required for a cilia-dependent cardiac morphogenesis.

  20. Epigenetic deregulation of Ellis Van Creveld confers robust Hedgehog signaling in adult T-cell leukemia.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Ryutaro; Yamagishi, Makoto; Nakano, Kazumi; Yamochi, Toshiko; Yamochi, Tadanori; Fujikawa, Dai; Nakashima, Makoto; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Uchimaru, Kaoru; Utsunomiya, Atae; Watanabe, Toshiki

    2014-09-01

    One of the hallmarks of cancer, global gene expression alteration, is closely associated with the development and malignant characteristics associated with adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) as well as other cancers. Here, we show that aberrant overexpression of the Ellis Van Creveld (EVC) family is responsible for cellular Hedgehog (HH) activation, which provides the pro-survival ability of ATL cells. Using microarray, quantitative RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry we have demonstrated that EVC is significantly upregulated in ATL and human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-1)-infected cells. Epigenetic marks, including histone H3 acetylation and Lys4 trimethylation, are specifically accumulated at the EVC locus in ATL samples. The HTLV-1 Tax participates in the coordination of EVC expression in an epigenetic fashion. The treatment of shRNA targeting EVC, as well as the transcription factors for HH signaling, diminishes the HH activation and leads to apoptotic death in ATL cell lines. We also showed that a HH signaling inhibitor, GANT61, induces strong apoptosis in the established ATL cell lines and patient-derived primary ATL cells. Therefore, our data indicate that HH activation is involved in the regulation of leukemic cell survival. The epigenetically deregulated EVC appears to play an important role for HH activation. The possible use of EVC as a specific cell marker and a novel drug target for HTLV-1-infected T-cells is implicated by these findings. The HH inhibitors are suggested as drug candidates for ATL therapy. Our findings also suggest chromatin rearrangement associated with active histone markers in ATL.

  1. Ellis Van Creveld2 is Required for Postnatal Craniofacial Bone Development.

    PubMed

    Badri, Mohammed K; Zhang, Honghao; Ohyama, Yoshio; Venkitapathi, Sundharamani; Kamiya, Nobuhiro; Takeda, Haruko; Ray, Manas; Scott, Greg; Tsuji, Takehito; Kunieda, Tetsuo; Mishina, Yuji; Mochida, Yoshiyuki

    2016-08-01

    Ellis-van Creveld (EvC) syndrome is a genetic disorder with mutations in either EVC or EVC2 gene. Previous case studies reported that EvC patients underwent orthodontic treatment, suggesting the presence of craniofacial bone phenotypes. To investigate whether a mutation in EVC2 gene causes a craniofacial bone phenotype, Evc2 knockout (KO) mice were generated and cephalometric analysis was performed. The heads of wild type (WT), heterozygous (Het) and homozygous Evc2 KO mice (1-, 3-, and 6-week-old) were prepared and cephalometric analysis based on the selected reference points on lateral X-ray radiographs was performed. The linear and angular bone measurements were then calculated, compared between WT, Het and KO and statistically analyzed at each time point. Our data showed that length of craniofacial bones in KO was significantly lowered by ∼20% to that of WT and Het, the growth of certain bones, including nasal bone, palatal length, and premaxilla was more affected in KO, and the reduction in these bone length was more significantly enhanced at later postnatal time points (3 and 6 weeks) than early time point (1 week). Furthermore, bone-to-bone relationship to cranial base and cranial vault in KO was remarkably changed, i.e. cranial vault and nasal bone were depressed and premaxilla and mandible were developed in a more ventral direction. Our study was the first to show the cause-effect relationship between Evc2 deficiency and craniofacial defects in EvC syndrome, demonstrating that Evc2 is required for craniofacial bone development and its deficiency leads to specific facial bone growth defect. Anat Rec, 299:1110-1120, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. The inaugural Frank Ellis Lecture--latrogenic cancer: the impact of intensity-modulated radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hall, E J

    2006-05-01

    It is an honour and personal pleasure to give the inaugural Frank Ellis Lecture to celebrate his 100th birthday, and to acknowledge his enormous contributions to radiation oncology. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) allows dose to be concentrated in the tumour volume while sparing normal tissues. However, the downside to IMRT is the potential to increase the number of radiation-induced second cancers because more fields are used which involves a bigger volume of normal tissue exposed to lower doses. It has been estimated that IMRT may double the incidence of solid cancers in long-term survivors. This may be acceptable in older patients if balanced by an improvement in local tumour control and reduced toxicity. On the other hand, the incidence of second cancers is higher in children, so that doubling it may not be acceptable. IMRT represents a special case for children. First, they are more sensitive to radiation-induced cancer than adults. Second, radiation scattered from the treatment volume is more important in the small body of the child. Third, there is the question of genetic susceptibility, as many childhood cancers involve a germline mutation. The levels of leakage radiation in current Linacs can be reduced, but the cost would be substantial. An alternative strategy is to replace X-rays with protons. This is an advantage only if the proton machine uses a pencil scanning beam, as passive modulation of a scattering foil produces neutrons, which results in an effective dose to the patient higher than that characteristic of IMRT.

  3. Temporal Patterns of Protozooplankton Abundance and Their Food in Ellis Fjord, Princess Elizabeth Land, Eastern Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grey, J.; Laybourn-Parry, J.; Leakey, R. J. G.; McMinn, A.

    1997-07-01

    The abundance and biomass of ciliates, dinoflagellates and heterotrophic and phototrophic nanoflagellates were determined at three sites along an ice-covered Antarctic fjord between January and November 1993. The water column showed little in the way of temperature and salinity gradients during the study period. In general, the protozooplankton exhibited a seasonal variation which closely mirrored that of chlorophyllaand bacterioplankton. The fjord mouth, which was affected by the greatest marine influences, consistently had the highest densities of ciliates and the most diverse community, with up to 18 species during the sampling period. Small aloricate ciliates were present throughout the year withStrobilidiumspp. being dominant during the winter. Larger loricate and aloricate ciliates became more prominent during January and November, along with the autotrophic ciliateMesodinium rubrumand two mixotrophic species (Strombidium wulffiand a type resemblingTontonia) suggesting evidence of species successions. Data on dinoflagellates were less extensive, but these protists showed greatest species diversity in the middle reaches of the fjord. A total of 13 species of dinoflagellate was recorded. Ciliates made a significant contribution to the biomass of the microbial community in summer, particularly in the middle and at the seaward end of the fjord. In winter, heterotrophic flagellates (HNAN) and phototrophic nanoflagellates (PNAN) were the dominant component of protistan biomass. In terms of percentage contribution to the microbial carbon pool, bacteria dominated during winter and spring. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first seasonal study of an Antarctic fjord. The Ellis Fjord is very unproductive compared to lower latitude systems, and supports low biomass of phytoplankton and microbial plankton during most of the year. This relates to severe climatic and seasonal conditions, and the lack of allochthonous carbon inputs to the system. Thus, high latitude

  4. Archive of Side Scan Sonar and Swath Bathymetry Data collected during USGS Cruise 10CCT02 Offshore of Petit Bois Island Including Petit Bois Pass, Gulf Islands National Seashore, Mississippi, March 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pfeiffer, William R.; Flocks, James G.; DeWitt, Nancy T.; Forde, Arnell S.; Kelso, Kyle; Thompson, Phillip R.; Wiese, Dana S.

    2011-01-01

    In March of 2010, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted geophysical surveys offshore of Petit Bois Island, Mississippi, and Dauphin Island, Alabama (fig. 1). These efforts were part of the USGS Gulf of Mexico Science Coordination partnership with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) to assist the Mississippi Coastal Improvements Program (MsCIP) and the Northern Gulf of Mexico (NGOM) Ecosystem Change and Hazards Susceptibility Project by mapping the shallow geologic stratigraphic framework of the Mississippi Barrier Island Complex. These geophysical surveys will provide the data necessary for scientists to define, interpret, and provide baseline bathymetry and seafloor habitat for this area and to aid scientists in predicting future geomorphological changes of the islands with respect to climate change, storm impact, and sea-level rise. Furthermore, these data will provide information for barrier island restoration, particularly in Camille Cut, and protection for the historical Fort Massachusetts on Ship Island, Mississippi. For more information please refer to http://ngom.usgs.gov/gomsc/mscip/index.html. This report serves as an archive of the processed swath bathymetry and side scan sonar data (SSS). Data products herein include gridded and interpolated surfaces, seabed backscatter images, and ASCII x,y,z data products for both swath bathymetry and side scan sonar imagery. Additional files include trackline maps, navigation files, GIS files, Field Activity Collection System (FACS) logs, and formal FGDC metadata. Scanned images of the handwritten and digital FACS logs are also provided as PDF files. Refer to the Acronyms page for expansion of acronyms and abbreviations used in this report.

  5. Ground-water quality and discharge to Chincoteague and Sinepuxent Bays adjacent to Assateague Island National Seashore, Maryland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dillow, Jonathan J.A.; Banks, William S.L.; Smigaj, Michael J.

    2002-01-01

    , somatic coliphage, or bacteriophages of Bacteroides fragilis. About 3 percent of the sam-ples (3 of 87) had oxidized nitrogen concentra-tions that exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency?s Maximum Contaminant Level of 10.0 milligrams per liter. A statistical analysis showed that no significant relation exists between the presence of bacteria or coliphage and all variables, except the mean temperature of the water sample as measured in the field. Additionally, the concentration of total coliform bacteria had a statistically significant, moderately strong cor-relation with the concentration of sulfate and sample pH as measured at the U.S. Geological Survey National Water-Quality Laboratory in Denver, Colorado.

  6. Heron Island, Australia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Heron Island is located at the sourthern end of Australia's 2,050 km-long Great Barrier Reef. Surrounded by coral reef and home to over 1000 species of fish, scuba divers and scientists alike are drawn to the island's resort and research station. The true-color image above was taken by Space Imaging's Ikonos satellite with a resolution of 4 meters per pixel-high enough to see individual boats tied up at the small marina. The narrow channel leading from the marina to the ocean was blasted and dredged decades ago, before the island became a national park. Since then the Australian government has implemented conservation measures, such as limiting the number of tourists and removing or recycling, instead of incinerating, all trash. One of the applications of remote sensing data from Ikonos is environmental monitoring, including studies of coral reef health. For more information about the island, read Heron Island. Image by Robert Simmon, based on data copyright Space Imaging

  7. Hydrology and Water and Sediment Quality at James Campbell National Wildlife Refuge near Kahuku, Island of Oahu, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunt, Charles D.; De Carlo, Eric H.

    2000-01-01

    The James Campbell National Wildlife Refuge occupies two lowland marsh and pond complexes on the northern coastal plain of Oahu: the mostly natural ponds and wetlands of the Punamano Unit and the constructed ponds of the Kii Unit. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service manages the Refuge primarily to protect and enhance habitat for four endangered species of Hawaiian waterbirds. Kii Unit is fed by artesian wells and rainfall, whereas Punamano Unit is fed naturally by rainfall, runoff, and ground-water seepage. Streams drain from the uplands into lowland ditches that pass through Kii Unit on their way to the ocean. A high-capacity pump transfers water from the inner ditch terminus at Kii to the ocean outlet channel. Stormwaters also exit the inner ditch system over flood-relief swales near the outlet pump and through a culvert with a one-way valve. A hydrologic investigation was done from November 1996 through February 1998 to identify and quantify principal inflows and outflows of water to and from the Refuge, identify hydraulic factors affecting flooding, document ground-water/surface-water interactions, determine the adequacy of the current freshwater supply, and determine water and sediment quality. These goals were accomplished by installing and operating a network of stream-gaging stations, meteorology stations, and shallow ground-water piezometers, by computing water budgets for the two Refuge units, and by sampling and analyzing water and pond-bottom sediments for major ions, trace metals, and organic compounds. Streamflow during the study was dominated by winter stormflows, followed by a gradual recession of flow into summer 1997, as water that had been stored in alluvial fans drained to lowland ditches. Outflow at the ditch terminus in 1997 was 125 million gallons greater than measured inflow to the coastal plain, mainly reflecting gains from ground water along the ditches between outlying gages and the ditch terminus. Of the measured 1997 outflow, 98 percent

  8. Devon Island

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-17

    article title:  Mars Researchers Rendezvous on Remote Arctic Island   ... each summer since 1999, researchers from NASA's Haughton-Mars Project and the Mars Society reside at this "polar desert" location to study the geologic and ...

  9. Forecasting the impact of storm waves and sea-level rise on Midway Atoll and Laysan Island within the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument—a comparison of passive versus dynamic inundation models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Storlazzi, Curt D.; Berkowitz, Paul; Reynolds, Michelle H.; Logan, Joshua B.

    2013-01-01

    Two inundation events in 2011 underscored the potential for elevated water levels to damage infrastructure and affect terrestrial ecosystems on the low-lying Northwestern Hawaiian Islands in the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument. The goal of this study was to compare passive "bathtub" inundation models based on geographic information systems (GIS) to those that include dynamic water levels caused by wave-induced set-up and run-up for two end-member island morphologies: Midway, a classic atoll with islands on the shallow (2-8 m) atoll rim and a deep, central lagoon; and Laysan, which is characterized by a deep (20-30 m) atoll rim and an island at the center of the atoll. Vulnerability to elevated water levels was assessed using hindcast wind and wave data to drive coupled physics-based numerical wave, current, and water-level models for the atolls. The resulting model data were then used to compute run-up elevations using a parametric run-up equation under both present conditions and future sea-level-rise scenarios. In both geomorphologies, wave heights and wavelengths adjacent to the island shorelines increased more than three times and four times, respectively, with increasing values of sea-level rise, as more deep-water wave energy could propagate over the atoll rim and larger wind-driven waves could develop on the atoll. Although these increases in water depth resulted in decreased set-up along the islands’ shorelines, the larger wave heights and longer wavelengths due to sea-level rise increased the resulting wave-induced run-up. Run-up values were spatially heterogeneous and dependent on the direction of incident wave direction, bathymetry, and island configuration. Island inundation was modeled to increase substantially when wave-driven effects were included, suggesting that inundation and impacts to infrastructure and terrestrial habitats will occur at lower values of predicted sea-level rise, and thus sooner in the 21st century, than suggested

  10. Changing stakeholder relationships in nature reserve management: a case study on Snake Island-Laotie Mountain National Nature Reserve, Liaoning, China.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Dan; Wang, Ziyan; Lassoie, James; Wang, Xiaoping; Sun, Lixin

    2014-12-15

    The number and total area of nature reserves in China has increased rapidly over the past couple of decades; however, the ability to effectively manage these reserves has not kept pace and conflicts between conservation efforts and economic development have emerged. The Snake Island-Laotie Mountain National Nature Reserve (SILMNNR) currently is experiencing the challenges of balancing conservation with local community development. This paper uses components analysis of human ecosystems (HEC) to examine conflicts arising from the management of the nature reserve and uses a stakeholder analysis to identify and better understand stakeholder inter-relationships in the SILMNNR-HEC. The goal of this study is to identify critical factors influencing stakeholder relationships in order to find ways of relieving conflicts between the reserve management and development. The stakeholder analysis revealed that the key stakeholders in the SILMNNR-HEC are natural resources, the Liaoning SILMNNR Authority, local residents, and enterprise developers; however, there was unequal power among stakeholders in the decision making process affecting the nature reserve. The paper evaluated the conditions and processes of SILMNNR-HEC through a framework of stakeholder relationships where critical factors, such as policy, finance, technology, and labor, and their respective strengths and feedbacks among stakeholders, were assessed and showed unequal flows of power among stakeholders. Two approaches are provided for transforming the unbalanced relationships into a stable and sustainable framework to sustainably manage the nature reserve: the first is by changing stakeholder relationships from opposition to cooperation; and the second by enhancing feedbacks and dynamics among stakeholders. The analysis used in this paper can be used as a model to assess conflicts around other protected areas in China and elsewhere. PMID:25190597

  11. Dog leucocyte antigen class II diversity and relationships among indigenous dogs of the island nations of Indonesia (Bali), Australia and New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Runstadler, J A; Angles, J M; Pedersen, N C

    2006-11-01

    The genetic polymorphism at the dog leucocyte antigen (DLA) class II loci DQA1, DQB1 and DRB1 was studied in a large genetically diverse population of feral and wild-type dogs from the large island nations of Indonesia (Bali), Australia and New Guinea (Bali street dog, dingo and New Guinea singing dog, respectively). Sequence-based typing (SBT) of the hypervariable region of DLA-DRB1, -DQA1 and -DQB1 alleles was used to determine genetic diversity. No new DQA1 alleles were recognized among the three dog populations, but five novel DLA-DRB1 and 2 novel DLA-DQB1 allele sequences were detected. Additional unknown alleles were postulated to exist in Bali street dogs, as indicated by the large percentage of individuals (15%-33%) that had indeterminate DRB1, DQA1 and DQB1 alleles by SBT. All three groups of dogs possessed alleles that were relatively uncommon in conventional purebreds. The New Guinea singing dog and dingo shared alleles that were not present in the Bali street dogs. These findings suggested that the dingo was more closely related to indigenous dogs from New Guinea. Feral dog populations, in particular large ones such as that of Bali, show genetic diversity that existed prior to phenotypic selection for breeds originating from their respective regions. This diversity needs to be identified and maintained in the face of progressive Westernization. These populations deserve further study as potential model populations for the evolution of major histocompatibility complex alleles, for the study of canine genetic diversity, for the development of dog breeds and for studies on the comigration of ancestral human and dog populations.

  12. Dog leucocyte antigen class II diversity and relationships among indigenous dogs of the island nations of Indonesia (Bali), Australia and New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Runstadler, J A; Angles, J M; Pedersen, N C

    2006-11-01

    The genetic polymorphism at the dog leucocyte antigen (DLA) class II loci DQA1, DQB1 and DRB1 was studied in a large genetically diverse population of feral and wild-type dogs from the large island nations of Indonesia (Bali), Australia and New Guinea (Bali street dog, dingo and New Guinea singing dog, respectively). Sequence-based typing (SBT) of the hypervariable region of DLA-DRB1, -DQA1 and -DQB1 alleles was used to determine genetic diversity. No new DQA1 alleles were recognized among the three dog populations, but five novel DLA-DRB1 and 2 novel DLA-DQB1 allele sequences were detected. Additional unknown alleles were postulated to exist in Bali street dogs, as indicated by the large percentage of individuals (15%-33%) that had indeterminate DRB1, DQA1 and DQB1 alleles by SBT. All three groups of dogs possessed alleles that were relatively uncommon in conventional purebreds. The New Guinea singing dog and dingo shared alleles that were not present in the Bali street dogs. These findings suggested that the dingo was more closely related to indigenous dogs from New Guinea. Feral dog populations, in particular large ones such as that of Bali, show genetic diversity that existed prior to phenotypic selection for breeds originating from their respective regions. This diversity needs to be identified and maintained in the face of progressive Westernization. These populations deserve further study as potential model populations for the evolution of major histocompatibility complex alleles, for the study of canine genetic diversity, for the development of dog breeds and for studies on the comigration of ancestral human and dog populations. PMID:17092255

  13. Island of Okinawa, Japan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The island of Okinawa, (26.5N, 128.0E) largest of the Ryukyu Islands, Japan. The Ryukyu island group lies south of the main home islands of Japan in an arc towards the Chinese island Republic of Taiwan. As is typical throughout the Japanese home islands, intense urban development can be observed all over the island in this near vertical view.

  14. Ellis-van Creveld syndrome and Weyers acrodental dysostosis are caused by cilia-mediated diminished response to hedgehog ligands.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Perez, Victor L; Goodship, Judith A

    2009-11-15

    Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EvC; OMIM 225500) is a recessive disorder comprising chondrodysplasia, polydactyly, nail dysplasia, orofacial abnormalities and, in a proportion of patients, cardiovascular malformations. Weyers acrodental dysostosis (Weyers; OMIM 193530) is an allelic dominant disorder comprising polydactyly, nail dysplasia, and orofacial abnormalities. EvC results from loss-of-function mutations in EVC or EVC2, the phenotype associated with the mutations in these two genes being indistinguishable. Three convincing causative mutations have been identified in patients with Weyers acrodental dysostosis, which are clustered in the last coding exon of EVC2 and lead to production of a truncated protein lacking the final 43 amino acids. Localization and function of EVC and EVC2 are inferred from studying the murine orthologs. Both Evc and Evc2 proteins localize to the basal bodies of primary cilia and analysis of an Ellis-van Creveld mouse model, which includes the limb shortening and tooth abnormalities of EvC patients, has demonstrated Hedgehog signaling defects in the absence of Evc. The loss of Evc2 has not been studied directly, but Hedgehog signaling is impaired when a mutant murine Evc2 Weyer variant is expressed in vitro. We conclude that the phenotypic abnormalities in EvC and Weyers syndrome result from tissue specific disruption of the response to Hh ligands.

  15. Biomimetic robotic Venus flytrap (Dionaea muscipula Ellis) made with ionic polymer metal composites.

    PubMed

    Shahinpoor, Mohsen

    2011-12-01

    The work described in this paper is a novel design of a robotic Venus flytrap (VFT) (Dionaea muscipula Ellis) by means of ionic polymeric metal composite (IPMC) artificial muscles as distributed nanosensors and nanoactuators. Rapid muscular movements in carnivorous plants, such as VFT, which are triggered by antenna-like sensors (trigger hair), present a golden key to study distributed biomolecular motors. Carnivorous plants, such as VFT, possess built-in intelligence (trigger hairs), as a strategy to capture prey, that can be turned on in a controlled manner. In the case of the VFT, the prey that is lured by the sweet nectar in the VFT pair of jaw-like lobes has to flip and move the trigger hairs, which are colorless, bristle-like and pointed. The dynamically moved trigger hairs then electro-elastically send an electric signal to the internal ions in the lobe to migrate outwardly for the jaw-like lobes to close rapidly to capture the prey. The manner in which the VFT lobes bend inward to capture the prey shows a remarkable similarity with typical IPMCs bending in an electric field. Furthermore, the mechano-electrical sensing characteristics of IPMCs also show a remarkable resemblance to mechano-electrical trigger hairs on the lobes of the VFT. The reader is referred to a number of papers in connection with sensing and actuation of IPMCs in particular. Thus, one can integrate IPMC lobes with a common electrode in the middle of one end of the lobes to act like a spine and use IPMC bristles as trigger finger to sense the intrusion of a fly or insect to send a sensing signal to a solid state relay which then triggers the actuation circuit of the IPMC lobes to rapidly bend toward each other and close. The two lobes, which form the trap, are attached to the midrib common electrode which is conveniently termed the spine. The upper surface of each lobe is dished, and spaced along the free margins of the lobes with some 15-20 prong-like teeth. These are tough and pointed

  16. IslandViewer update: Improved genomic island discovery and visualization.

    PubMed

    Dhillon, Bhavjinder K; Chiu, Terry A; Laird, Matthew R; Langille, Morgan G I; Brinkman, Fiona S L

    2013-07-01

    IslandViewer (http://pathogenomics.sfu.ca/islandviewer) is a web-accessible application for the computational prediction and analysis of genomic islands (GIs) in bacterial and archaeal genomes. GIs are clusters of genes of probable horizontal origin and are of high interest because they disproportionately encode virulence factors and other adaptations of medical, environmental and industrial interest. Many computational tools exist for the prediction of GIs, but three of the most accurate methods are available in integrated form via IslandViewer: IslandPath-DIMOB, SIGI-HMM and IslandPick. IslandViewer GI predictions are precomputed for all complete microbial genomes from National Center for Biotechnology Information, with an option to upload other genomes and/or perform customized analyses using different settings. Here, we report recent changes to the IslandViewer framework that have vastly improved its efficiency in handling an increasing number of users, plus better facilitate custom genome analyses. Users may also now overlay additional annotations such as virulence factors, antibiotic resistance genes and pathogen-associated genes on top of current GI predictions. Comparisons of GIs between user-selected genomes are now facilitated through a highly requested side-by-side viewer. IslandViewer improvements aim to provide a more flexible interface, coupled with additional highly relevant annotation information, to aid analysis of GIs in diverse microbial species.

  17. Coastal tectonics on the eastern margin of the Pacific Rim: late Quaternary sea-level history and uplift rates, Channel Islands National Park, California, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhs, Daniel R.; Simmons, Kathleen R.; Schumann, R. Randall; Groves, Lindsey T.; DeVogel, Stephen B.; Minor, Scott A.; Laurel, DeAnna

    2014-12-01

    The Pacific Rim is a region where tectonic processes play a significant role in coastal landscape evolution. Coastal California, on the eastern margin of the Pacific Rim, is very active tectonically and geomorphic expressions of this include uplifted marine terraces. There have been, however, conflicting estimates of the rate of late Quaternary uplift of marine terraces in coastal California, particularly for the northern Channel Islands. In the present study, the terraces on San Miguel Island and Santa Rosa Island were mapped and new age estimates were generated using uranium-series dating of fossil corals and amino acid geochronology of fossil mollusks. Results indicate that the 2nd terrace on both islands is ˜120 ka and the 1st terrace on Santa Rosa Island is ˜80 ka. These ages correspond to two global high-sea stands of the Last Interglacial complex, marine isotope stages (MIS) 5.5 and 5.1, respectively. The age estimates indicate that San Miguel Island and Santa Rosa Island have been tectonically uplifted at rates of 0.12-0.20 m/ka in the late Quaternary, similar to uplift rates inferred from previous studies on neighboring Santa Cruz Island. The newly estimated uplift rates for the northern Channel Islands are, however, an order of magnitude lower than a recent study that generated uplift rates from an offshore terrace dating to the Last Glacial period. The differences between the estimated uplift rates in the present study and the offshore study are explained by the magnitude of glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) effects that were not known at the time of the earlier study. Set in the larger context of northeastern Pacific Rim tectonics, Channel Islands uplift rates are higher than those coastal localities on the margin of the East Pacific Rise spreading center, but slightly lower than those of most localities adjacent to the Cascadia subduction zone. The uplift rates reported here for the northern Channel Islands are similar to those reported for most

  18. Coastal tectonics on the eastern margin of the Pacific Rim: Late Quaternary sea-level history and uplift rates, Channel Islands National Park, California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muhs, Daniel R.; Simmons, Kathleen R.; Schumann, R. Randall; Groves, Lindsey T.; DeVogel, Stephen B.; Minor, Scott A.; Laurel, Deanna

    2014-01-01

    The Pacific Rim is a region where tectonic processes play a significant role in coastal landscape evolution. Coastal California, on the eastern margin of the Pacific Rm, is very active tectonically and geomorphic expressions of this include uplifted marine terraces. There have been, however, conflicting estimates of the rate of late Quaternary uplift of marine terraces in coastal California, particularly for the orthern Channel Islands. In the present study, the terraces on San Miguel Island and Santa Rosa Island were mapped and new age estimates were generated using uranium-series dating of fossil corals and amino acid geochronology of fossil mollusks. Results indicate that the 2nd terrace on both islands is ~120 ka and the 1st terrace on Santa Rosa Island is ~80 ka. These ages correspond to two global high-sea stands of the Last Interglacial complex, marine isotope stages (MIS) 5.5 and 51, respectively. The age estimates indicate that San Miguel Island and Santa Rosa Island have been tectonically uplifted at rates of 0.12e0.20 m/ka in the late Quaternary, similar to uplift rates inferred from previous studies on neighboring San Cruz Island. The newly estimated uplift rates for the northern Channel Islands are, however, an order of magnitude lower than a recent study that generated uplift rates from an offshore terrace dating to the Last Glacial period. The differences between the estimated uplift rates in the present study and the offshore study are explained by the magnitude of glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) effects that were not known at the time of the earlier study. Set in the larger context of northeastern Pacific Rim tectonics, Channel Islands uplift rates are higher than those coastal localities on the margin of the East Pacific Rise spreading center, but slightly lower than those of most localities adjacent to the Cascadia subduction zone. The uplift rates reported here for the northern Channel Islands are similar to those reported for most other

  19. Patterns and correlates of self-reported racial discrimination among Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adults, 2008–09: analysis of national survey data

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There is now considerable evidence that racism is a pernicious and enduring social problem with a wide range of detrimental outcomes for individuals, communities and societies. Although indigenous people worldwide are subjected to high levels of racism, there is a paucity of population-based, quantitative data about the factors associated with their reporting of racial discrimination, about the settings in which such discrimination takes place, and about the frequency with which it is experienced. Such information is essential in efforts to reduce both exposure to racism among indigenous people and the harms associated with such exposure. Methods Weighted data on self-reported racial discrimination from over 7,000 Indigenous Australian adults participating in the 2008–09 National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Survey, a nationally representative survey conducted by the Australian Bureau of Statistics, were analysed by socioeconomic, demographic and cultural factors. Results More than one in four respondents (27%) reported experiencing racial discrimination in the past year. Racial discrimination was most commonly reported in public (41% of those reporting any racial discrimination), legal (40%) and work (30%) settings. Among those reporting any racial discrimination, about 40% experienced this discrimination most or all of the time (as opposed to a little or some of the time) in at least one setting. Reporting of racial discrimination peaked in the 35–44 year age group and then declined. Higher reporting of racial discrimination was associated with removal from family, low trust, unemployment, having a university degree, and indicators of cultural identity and participation. Lower reporting of racial discrimination was associated with home ownership, remote residence and having relatively few Indigenous friends. Conclusions These data indicate that racial discrimination is commonly experienced across a wide variety of settings, with public

  20. 76 FR 38414 - James Campbell National Wildlife Refuge, Honolulu County, HI; Draft Comprehensive Conservation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-30

    ... the Federal Register on December 1, 2008 (74 FR 8564), announcing our intention to complete a CCP/EA... Fish and Wildlife Service James Campbell National Wildlife Refuge, Honolulu County, HI; Draft... Highway, Room 2C, Hale`iwa, HI 96712. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: David Ellis, Project Leader,...

  1. 32 CFR 935.151 - Island permit for boat and vehicle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Island permit for boat and vehicle. 935.151... AND INSULAR REGULATIONS WAKE ISLAND CODE Registration and Island Permits § 935.151 Island permit for boat and vehicle. (a) No person may use a privately owned motor vehicle or boat on Wake Island...

  2. 32 CFR 935.151 - Island permit for boat and vehicle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Island permit for boat and vehicle. 935.151... AND INSULAR REGULATIONS WAKE ISLAND CODE Registration and Island Permits § 935.151 Island permit for boat and vehicle. (a) No person may use a privately owned motor vehicle or boat on Wake Island...

  3. 32 CFR 935.151 - Island permit for boat and vehicle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Island permit for boat and vehicle. 935.151... AND INSULAR REGULATIONS WAKE ISLAND CODE Registration and Island Permits § 935.151 Island permit for boat and vehicle. (a) No person may use a privately owned motor vehicle or boat on Wake Island...

  4. 32 CFR 935.151 - Island permit for boat and vehicle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Island permit for boat and vehicle. 935.151... AND INSULAR REGULATIONS WAKE ISLAND CODE Registration and Island Permits § 935.151 Island permit for boat and vehicle. (a) No person may use a privately owned motor vehicle or boat on Wake Island...

  5. 32 CFR 935.151 - Island permit for boat and vehicle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Island permit for boat and vehicle. 935.151... AND INSULAR REGULATIONS WAKE ISLAND CODE Registration and Island Permits § 935.151 Island permit for boat and vehicle. (a) No person may use a privately owned motor vehicle or boat on Wake Island...

  6. On the mechanism of trap closure of Venus flytrap (Dionaea muscipula Ellis).

    PubMed

    Hodick, D; Sievers, A

    1989-08-01

    The rapid trap closure of Dionaea muscinula Ellis has been explained by either a loss of turgor pressure of the upper epidermis, which should thus become flexible, or by a sudden acid-induced wall loosening of the motor cells. According to our experiments both explanations are doubtful. Objections against the turgor mechanism come from the determination by extracellular measurements from the upper epidermis of action-potential amplitudes before and after trap closure. Neither time course nor amplitude of the action potentials are altered by trap closure. In contrast a rise in the apoplastic concentration of K(+) or Na(+), which are the only ions present in the trap in osmotically significant concentrations, from 1 to 10 mM reduces the action-potential amplitudes by 25% and 15%, respectively. Furthermore, after trap closure the upper epidermal cells retain a considerable cell sap osmolality of 0.41 mol·kg(-1) which equals that of the mesophyll cells as determined by incipient plasmolysis. A sudden cell-wall acidification causing movement is improbable since an acidification of the apoplast from pH 6 to pH 4 reduces action-potential amplitudes by 33% whereas the amplitudes measured extracellylarly from the mesophyll and lower epidermis remain unchanged by trap closure. In addition, buffering the apoplast at pH 6 does not prevent movement in traps which have been incised several times from the margin to the midrib to facilitate buffer diffusion into the mesophyll. Even an alkalinization of cell walls of plasmolysed leaf segments to pH 9 does not prevent considerable extensions of the mesophyll and subsequent movement of the specimens during deplasmolysis.These experiments make it very likely that the mesophyll cells are already extensible but are kept compressed in the open trap, thus developing tissue tension. The mechanism which prevents their extension as long as the trap is open can so far only be explained for traps which have been paralysed by a long

  7. Siberian Islands

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    ... Distinguishing Clouds from Ice over the East Siberian Sea, Russia     View Larger Image ... ocean are visible. The East Siberian Sea is part of the Arctic Ocean and is ice-covered most of the year. The New Siberian Islands are ...

  8. Hawaiian Islands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This Multiangle Imaging Spectro-Radiometer (MISR) image of five Hawaiian Islands was acquired by the instrument's vertical- viewing (nadir) camera on June 3, 2000. The image shows the islands of Oahu, Molokai, Lanai, Maui, and Kahoolawe. The prevailing Pacific trade winds bring higher levels of rainfall to the eastern slopes of the islands, leading to a greater abundance of vegetation on the windward coasts. The small change in observation angle across the nadir camera's field-of- view causes the right-hand portion of the image to be more affected by Sun glint, making the ocean surface appear brighter. Oahu is the westernmost of the islands seen in this image. Waikiki Beach and the city of Honolulu are located on the southern shore, to the west of Diamond Head caldera. MISR is one of several Earth-observing instruments on the Terra satellite, launched in December 1999. The Terra spacecraft, the flagship of a fleet of satellites dedicated to understanding our global environment, is part of NASA's Earth Sciences Enterprise, a long-term research program dedicated to understanding how human-induced and natural changes affect our world. Image courtesy NASA/GSFC/JPL, MISR Team

  9. Identification of one novel mutation in the EVC2 gene in a Chinese family with Ellis-van Creveld syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zeng; Bao, Kun; He, Jin-Wei; Fu, Wen-Zhen; Zhang, Chang-Qing; Zhang, Zhen-Lin

    2012-12-15

    Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EvC) is a rare autosomal recessive skeletal dysplasia characterized by short limbs, short ribs, postaxial polydactyly, and dysplastic nails and teeth. It is caused by biallelic mutations in the EVC or EVC2 gene. Here, we identified a novel nonsense mutation p.W828X (c.2484G>A) in exon 14 and a recurrent nonsense mutation p. R399X (c.1195C>T) in exon 10 of EVC2 gene in a Chinese boy with EvC. Identification of a novel genotype in EvC will provide clues to the phenotype-genotype relations and may assist not only in the clinical diagnosis of EvC but also in the interpretation of genetic information used for prenatal diagnosis and genetic counseling.

  10. Gardenia jasminoides Ellis ethanol extract and its constituents reduce the risks of gastritis and reverse gastric lesions in rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, Je-Hyuk; Lee, Dong-Ung; Jeong, Choon-Sik

    2009-06-01

    In this study we investigated the effects of Gardenia jasminoides Ellis (GJE) extract and its constituents, such as ursolic acid and genipin, on gastritis in rats and the growth of human gastric cancer cells. The GJE extract, ursolic acid and genipin showed the acid-neutralizing capacities, the antioxidant activities, and the inhibitory effects on the growth of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), which are almost equivalent to positive control compounds. In addition, the GJE extract and ursolic acid had cytotoxic activity against AGS and SUN638 gastric cancer cells. The genipin and ursolic acid inhibited significant HCl/ethanol-induced gastric lesions. Taken together, GJE extract and its constituents might have antigastritic activities, associated with the antioxidant activities, acid-neutralizing capacities, and anti-H. pylori action. Also, we could suggest that genipin and ursolic acid may be useful for the treatment and/or protection of gastritis. PMID:19425231

  11. Long Island Sound Curricular Resource Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Payne, Diana, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    Long Island Sound is an estuary of national significance and provides important economic, recreational, and aesthetic value to the citizens of Connecticut and New York. Investigations have been conducted regarding living marine resources and nutrient loading. However, Long Island Sound is often overlooked as an educational resource. This guide is…

  12. Streamlined Island

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-514, 15 October 2003

    This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) picture shows a streamlined island in Marte Vallis, a large outflow channel system that crosses the 180oW meridian between the Elysium and Amazonis regions of Mars. The flow patterns on the floor of Marte Vallis might be the remains of lava flows or mud flows. Marte is the Spanish word for Mars. Most of the largest valleys on the red planet are named for 'Mars' in various languages. This island is located near 21.8oN, 175.3oW. The picture covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) wide and is illuminated by sunlight from the lower left.

  13. Mapping of Eelgrass (Zostera marina) at Sidney Spit, Gulf Islands National Park Reserve of Canada, Using High Spatial Resolution Remote Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neill, Jennifer D.

    The main goal of this thesis was to evaluate the use of high spatial remote imagery to map the location and biophysical parameters of eelgrass in marine areas around Sidney Spit, a part of the Gulf Islands National Park Reserve of Canada (GINPRC). To meet this goal, three objectives were addressed: (1) Define key spectral variables that provide optimum separation between eelgrass and its associated benthic substrates, using in situ hyperspectral measurements, and simulated IKONOS and Landsat 7ETM+ spectral response; (2) evaluate the efficacy of these key variables in classification of the high spatial resolution imagery, AISA and IKONOS, at various levels of processing, to determine the processing methodology that offers the highest eelgrass mapping accuracy; and (3) evaluate the potential of "value-added" classification of two eelgrass biophysical indicators, LAI and epiphyte type. In situ hyperspectral measurements acquired at Sidney Spit in August 2008 provided four different data sets: above water spectra, below water spectral profiles, water-corrected spectra, and pure endmember spectra. In Chapter 3, these data sets were examined with first derivative analysis to determine the unique spectral variables of eelgrass and associated benthic substrates. The most effective variables in discriminating eelgrass from all other substrates were selected using data reduction statistics: M-statistic analysis and multiple discriminant analyses (MDA). These selected spectral variables enabled eelgrass classification accuracy of 98% when separating six classes on above water data: shallow (< 3 m deep) eelgrass, deep (> 3 m) eelgrass, shallow sand, deep sand, shallow green algae, and spectrally deep water. The variables were located mainly in the green wavelengths, where light penetrates to the greatest depth: the slope from 500 -- 530 nm, and the first derivatives at 566 nm, 580 nm, and 602 nm. The same data were classified with 96% accuracy after correcting for the water

  14. Classifying Pacific islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunn, Patrick D.; Kumar, Lalit; Eliot, Ian; McLean, Roger F.

    2016-12-01

    An earth-science-based classification of islands within the Pacific Basin resulted from the preparation of a database describing the location, area, and type of 1779 islands, where island type is determined as a function of the prevailing lithology and maximum elevation of each island, with an island defined as a discrete landmass composed of a contiguous land area ≥1 ha (0.01 km2) above mean high-water level. Reefs lacking islands and short-lived (<20 years) transient islands are not included. The principal aim of the classification is to assess the spatial diversity of the geologic and geomorphic attributes of Pacific islands. It is intended to be valid at a regional scale and based on two attributes: five types of lithology (volcanic, limestone, composite, continental, surficial) and a distinction between high and low islands. These attributes yielded eight island types: volcanic high and low islands; limestone high and low islands; composite high and low islands; reef (including all unconsolidated) islands; and continental islands. Most common are reef islands (36 %) and volcanic high islands (31 %), whereas the least common are composite low islands (1 %). Continental islands, 18 of the 1779 islands examined, are not included in maps showing the distribution of island attributes and types. Rationale for the spatial distributions of the various island attributes is drawn from the available literature and canvassed in the text. With exception of the few continental islands, the distribution of island types is broadly interpretable from the proximity of island-forming processes. It is anticipated the classification will become the basis for more focused investigation of spatial variability of the climate and ocean setting as well as the biological attributes of Pacific islands. It may also be used in spatial assessments of second-order phenomena associated with the islands, such as their vulnerability to various disasters, coastal erosion, or ocean pollution as

  15. Pathogenicity island mobility and gene content.

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Kelly Porter

    2013-10-01

    Key goals towards national biosecurity include methods for analyzing pathogens, predicting their emergence, and developing countermeasures. These goals are served by studying bacterial genes that promote pathogenicity and the pathogenicity islands that mobilize them. Cyberinfrastructure promoting an island database advances this field and enables deeper bioinformatic analysis that may identify novel pathogenicity genes. New automated methods and rich visualizations were developed for identifying pathogenicity islands, based on the principle that islands occur sporadically among closely related strains. The chromosomally-ordered pan-genome organizes all genes from a clade of strains; gaps in this visualization indicate islands, and decorations of the gene matrix facilitate exploration of island gene functions. A %E2%80%9Clearned phyloblocks%E2%80%9D method was developed for automated island identification, that trains on the phylogenetic patterns of islands identified by other methods. Learned phyloblocks better defined termini of previously identified islands in multidrug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae ATCC BAA-2146, and found its only antibiotic resistance island.

  16. Plant colonization, succession and ecosystem development on Surtsey with reference to neighbouring islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnússon, B.; Magnússon, S. H.; Ólafsson, E.; Sigurdsson, B. D.

    2014-10-01

    Plant colonization and succession on the volcanic island of Surtsey, formed in 1963, have been closely followed. In 2013, a total of 69 vascular plant species had been discovered on the island; of these, 59 were present and 39 had established viable populations. Surtsey had more than twice the species of any of the comparable neighbouring islands, and all of their common species had established on Surtsey. The first colonizers were dispersed by sea, but, after 1985, bird dispersal became the principal pathway with the formation of a seagull colony on the island and consequent site amelioration. This allowed wind-dispersed species to establish after 1990. Since 2007, there has been a net loss of species on the island. A study of plant succession, soil formation and invertebrate communities in permanent plots on Surtsey and on two older neighbouring islands (plants and soil) has revealed that seabirds, through their transfer of nutrients from sea to land, are major drivers of development of these ecosystems. In the area impacted by seagulls, dense grassland swards have developed and plant cover, species richness, diversity, plant biomass and soil carbon become significantly higher than in low-impact areas, which remained relatively barren. A similar difference was found for the invertebrate fauna. After 2000, the vegetation of the oldest part of the seagull colony became increasingly dominated by long-lived, rhizomatous grasses (Festuca, Poa, Leymus) with a decline in species richness and diversity. Old grasslands of the neighbouring islands Elliđaey (puffin colony, high nutrient input) and Heimaey (no seabirds, low nutrient input) contrasted sharply. The puffin grassland of Elliđaey was very dense and species-poor. It was dominated by Festuca and Poa, and very similar to the seagull grassland developing on Surtsey. The Heimaey grassland was significantly higher in species richness and diversity, and had a more even cover of dominants (Festuca

  17. Plant colonization, succession and ecosystem development on Surtsey with reference to neighbouring islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnússon, B.; Magnússon, S. H.; Ólafsson, E.; Sigurdsson, B. D.

    2014-06-01

    Plant colonization and succession on Surtsey volcanic island, formed in 1963, have been closely followed. In 2013, a total of 69 vascular plant species had been discovered on the island; of these 59 were present and 39 had established viable populations. Surtsey had more than twice the species of any of the comparable neighbouring islands and all their common species had established on Surtsey. The first colonizers were dispersed by sea, but after 1985 bird-dispersal became the principal pathway with the formation of a seagull colony on the island and consequent site amelioration. This allowed wind-dispersed species to establish after 1990. Since 2007 there has been a net loss of species on the island. A study of plant succession, soil formation and invertebrate communities in permanent plots on Surtsey and on two older neighbouring islands (plants and soil) has revealed that seabirds, through their transfer of nutrients from sea to land, are major drivers of development of these ecosystems. In the area impacted by seagulls dense grassland swards have developed and plant cover, species richness, diversity, plant biomass and soil carbon become significantly higher than in low-impact areas, which remained relatively barren. A similar difference was found for the invertebrate fauna. After 2000, the vegetation of the oldest part of the seagull colony became increasingly dominated by long-lived, rhizomatous grasses (Festuca, Poa, Leymus) with a decline in species richness and diversity. Old grasslands of the neighbouring islands Elliðaey (puffin colony, high nutrient input) and Heimaey (no seabirds, low nutrient input) contrasted sharply. The puffin grassland of Elliðaey was very dense and species-poor. Dominated by Festuca and Poa, it it was very similar to the seagull grassland developing on Surtsey. The Heimaey grassland was significantly higher in species richness and diversity, and had a more even cover of dominants (Festuca/Agrostis/Ranunculus). We forecast that

  18. Solomon Islands.

    PubMed

    1988-06-01

    The Solomon Islands, which form an archipelago in the Southwest Pacific about 1900 km northeast of Australia, are described. Included are brief descriptions about such points as geography, people, history, type of government, political conditions, economy, and foreign relations. In 1987 the population was 301,180 (49% under age 14); the annual growth rate was 3.67%. The infant mortality rate is 46/1000; the life expectancy, 54 years. Health conditions in the Solomons generally are adequate, and the country does not suffer from serious endemic diseases other than malaria, in both the vivax and falsiparum strains. Hospitals and pharmacies are limited to population centers and missions. PMID:12177986

  19. Island of Kauai, Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The island of Kauai, of the Hawaiian Island archipelago (22.0N, 159.5W) peeks out from scattered cloud cover. The island's volcanic origins are easily seen by the distinctive lava flow topography and lush vegetation.

  20. Museum spaces as psychological affordances: representations of immigration history and national identity.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Sahana; Salter, Phia S; Molina, Ludwin E

    2015-01-01

    The present research draws upon a cultural psychological perspective to consider how psychological phenomena are grounded in socio-cultural contexts. Specifically, we examine the association between representations of history at Ellis Island Immigration Museum and identity-relevant concerns. Pilot study participants (N = 13) took a total of 114 photographs of exhibits that they considered as most important in the museum. Results indicate that a majority of the photographs reflected neutral themes (n = 81), followed by nation-glorifying images (n = 24), and then critical themes that highlight injustices and barriers faced by immigrants (n = 9). Study 1 examines whether there is a preference for glorifying images, and if that preference is related to cultural-assimilationist conceptions of national identity (i.e., defining American identity in dominant group standards). We exposed a new sample of participants (N = 119) to photographs reflecting all three themes. Results indicate that participants expressed greater liking for glorifying images, followed by neutral images, and critical images. National identity moderated within-subject variation in liking scores. Study 2 included 35 visitors who completed a survey before engaging with the museum or after their visit. Results indicate that participants who had completed their visit, compared to participants who had not entered the museum, reported (i) higher endorsement of cultural-assimilationist identity, and (ii) increased support for exclusive immigration policies. Study 3 exposed participants (N = 257) to glorifying, critical, or neutral images. Results indicate that participants who were exposed to glorifying images, especially those endorsing cultural-assimilationist identity, demonstrate decreased perception of current-day racial injustice, and increased ethnocentric enforcement bias. We discuss how engagement with privileged narratives may serve dominant group ends and reproduce systems of privilege. PMID