Science.gov

Sample records for elucidation chemical defense

  1. Improving the Chemical Biological Defense Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-13

    nuclear (CBRN) defense preparedness, to reduce risks to the Warfighter, and to field the appropriate capabilities for sustained military operations with...radiological, and nuclear (CBRN) defense preparedness, to reduce risks to the Warfighter, and to field the appropriate capabilities for sustained military...at unnecessary risk of not being able to accomplish our national military strategy. The Chemical, Biological, Defense Program (CBDP) supports a

  2. Chemical defense lowers plant competitiveness.

    PubMed

    Ballhorn, Daniel J; Godschalx, Adrienne L; Smart, Savannah M; Kautz, Stefanie; Schädler, Martin

    2014-11-01

    Both plant competition and plant defense affect biodiversity and food web dynamics and are central themes in ecology research. The evolutionary pressures determining plant allocation toward defense or competition are not well understood. According to the growth-differentiation balance hypothesis (GDB), the relative importance of herbivory and competition have led to the evolution of plant allocation patterns, with herbivore pressure leading to increased differentiated tissues (defensive traits), and competition pressure leading to resource investment towards cellular division and elongation (growth-related traits). Here, we tested the GDB hypothesis by assessing the competitive response of lima bean (Phaseolus lunatus) plants with quantitatively different levels of cyanogenesis-a constitutive direct, nitrogen-based defense against herbivores. We used high (HC) and low cyanogenic (LC) genotypes in different competition treatments (intra-genotypic, inter-genotypic, interspecific), and in the presence or absence of insect herbivores (Mexican bean beetle, Epilachna varivestis) to quantify vegetative and generative plant parameters (above and belowground biomass as well as seed production). Highly defended HC-plants had significantly lower aboveground biomass and seed production than LC-plants when grown in the absence of herbivores implying significant intrinsic costs of plant cyanogenesis. However, the reduced performance of HC- compared to LC-plants was mitigated in the presence of herbivores. The two plant genotypes exhibited fundamentally different responses to various stresses (competition, herbivory). Our study supports the GDB hypothesis by demonstrating that competition and herbivory affect different plant genotypes differentially and contributes to understanding the causes of variation in defense within a single plant species.

  3. Elucidating induced plant defenses: the use of targeted metabolomics as a bridge from elicitation to response

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Dynamic plant defense responses to biotic attack involve the perception of specific biochemical elicitors associated with the offending agent, activation of signaling cascades, and the production of small molecules with complex protective roles. Chemical analyses are essential empirical tools for el...

  4. Department of Defense Chemical and Biological Defense Program. FY2002-2004 Performance Plan. Volume 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-04-01

    Defense Basic Research (Project CB1 )............................................................................ 52 3.4.2 Medical Biological Defense...Budget Activity (Program Element) CB Defense Chemical Defense Biological Defense BA1 - Basic Research (0601384BP) CB1 TC1 TB1 BA2 - Applied Research... nature of many of these efforts makes the identification of quantitative measures on an annual basis meaningless (for example, how many breakthroughs in

  5. [Chemical defense of plant to mammalian herbivore].

    PubMed

    Li, J; Liu, J

    2001-06-01

    The research progress in the chemical defense of plant to mammalian herbivore was reviewed in this paper. The plant secondary compounds mainly are phenolics, terpenoids and nitrogen-containing compounds. The defense efficiency of plant to mammalian herbivores is different with the types and content of secondary compounds in plant. Secondary compounds inhibited the foraging of mammalian herbivores by affecting the intake, digestion, metabolites and reproduction of animal. It is the main trends to study the mode of coevolution of plant and animals mediated by plant secondary compounds.

  6. Prevalence and Mechanisms of Dynamic Chemical Defenses in Tropical Sponges.

    PubMed

    Rohde, Sven; Nietzer, Samuel; Schupp, Peter J

    2015-01-01

    Sponges and other sessile invertebrates are lacking behavioural escape or defense mechanisms and rely therefore on morphological or chemical defenses. Studies from terrestrial systems and marine algae demonstrated facultative defenses like induction and activation to be common, suggesting that sessile marine organisms also evolved mechanisms to increase the efficiency of their chemical defense. However, inducible defenses in sponges have not been investigated so far and studies on activated defenses are rare. We investigated whether tropical sponge species induce defenses in response to artificial predation and whether wounding triggers defense activation. Additionally, we tested if these mechanisms are also used to boost antimicrobial activity to avoid bacterial infection. Laboratory experiments with eight pacific sponge species showed that 87% of the tested species were chemically defended. Two species, Stylissa massa and Melophlus sarasinorum, induced defenses in response to simulated predation, which is the first demonstration of induced antipredatory defenses in marine sponges. One species, M. sarasinorum, also showed activated defense in response to wounding. Interestingly, 50% of the tested sponge species demonstrated induced antimicrobial defense. Simulated predation increased the antimicrobial defenses in Aplysinella sp., Cacospongia sp., M. sarasinorum, and S. massa. Our results suggest that wounding selects for induced antimicrobial defenses to protect sponges from pathogens that could otherwise invade the sponge tissue via feeding scars.

  7. Prevalence and Mechanisms of Dynamic Chemical Defenses in Tropical Sponges

    PubMed Central

    Rohde, Sven; Nietzer, Samuel; Schupp, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Sponges and other sessile invertebrates are lacking behavioural escape or defense mechanisms and rely therefore on morphological or chemical defenses. Studies from terrestrial systems and marine algae demonstrated facultative defenses like induction and activation to be common, suggesting that sessile marine organisms also evolved mechanisms to increase the efficiency of their chemical defense. However, inducible defenses in sponges have not been investigated so far and studies on activated defenses are rare. We investigated whether tropical sponge species induce defenses in response to artificial predation and whether wounding triggers defense activation. Additionally, we tested if these mechanisms are also used to boost antimicrobial activity to avoid bacterial infection. Laboratory experiments with eight pacific sponge species showed that 87% of the tested species were chemically defended. Two species, Stylissa massa and Melophlus sarasinorum, induced defenses in response to simulated predation, which is the first demonstration of induced antipredatory defenses in marine sponges. One species, M. sarasinorum, also showed activated defense in response to wounding. Interestingly, 50% of the tested sponge species demonstrated induced antimicrobial defense. Simulated predation increased the antimicrobial defenses in Aplysinella sp., Cacospongia sp., M. sarasinorum, and S. massa. Our results suggest that wounding selects for induced antimicrobial defenses to protect sponges from pathogens that could otherwise invade the sponge tissue via feeding scars. PMID:26154741

  8. Physics of a ballistic missile defense - The chemical laser boost-phase defense

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grabbe, Crockett L.

    1988-01-01

    The basic physics involved in proposals to use a chemical laser based on satellites for a boost-phase defense are investigated. After a brief consideration of simple physical conditions for the defense, a calculation of an equation for the number of satellites needed for the defense is made along with some typical values of this for possible future conditions for the defense. Basic energy and power requirements for the defense are determined. A sumary is made of probable minimum conditions that must be achieved for laser power, targeting accuracy, number of satellites, and total sources for power needed.

  9. Chemical ecology of marine microbial defense.

    PubMed

    Engel, Sebastian; Jensen, Paul R; Fenical, William

    2002-10-01

    Because marine animals and plants are continuously exposed to a large diversity of potentially harmful microorganisms, it seems reasonable to hypothesize that potential hosts might produce bioactive compounds to deter microbial attack. However, little is known about how host metabolites may defend against harmful microbes or facilitate the growth or colonization of helpful symbionts. While there is a large body of literature describing the antimicrobial activities of marine secondary metabolites, we are only now beginning to understand how these compounds function in an ecological context. For example, there is mounting evidence that nontoxic concentrations of secondary metabolites can have significant effects on microbial behavior, suggesting that certain host-microbe interactions are chemically mediated. Herein, we discuss the importance of employing ecologically relevant assays to elucidate microbiological effects and the need to develop a better understanding of host-microbe associations within an ecologically realistic context. Continued research in this field along with improved techniques will certainly provide further insight into how microbes have influenced the evolution of secondary metabolite production in marine organisms.

  10. Process ichnology and the elucidation of physico-chemical stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gingras, Murray K.; MacEachern, James A.; Dashtgard, Shahin E.

    2011-06-01

    This paper sets out a philosophical approach to ichnological (trace fossil) analysis, which focuses on the interpretation of trace fossils as sedimentary structures rather than as paleontological entities per se. Using wide-ranging datasets and a large number of observations and interpretations, a "Process Ichnology" framework is proposed. This interpretive framework provides an improved means of estimating the presence and magnitude of various physical and chemical (i.e., physico-chemical) depositional stresses (e.g., water turbidity, sedimentation rates, substrate consistency, salinity, and oxygenation) in ancient sedimentary environments. Ichnological datasets that are considered include: 1) trace-fossil distributions; 2) ethological diversity and the range of diversity; 3) the significance of burrow linings; 4) trace-fossil size; and, 5) post-depositional compaction of trace fossils. From these data, higher-resolution estimates can be made for the determination of sedimentation rates, temporal variation in sedimentation rate, sediment consistency, and aspects of the bottom- and interstitial-water chemistries. Additionally, the character of depositional bypassing of sediment grains can be determined. The methodologies and interpretations herein are intended for use by non-ichnologists in a manner akin to the interpretation of physical sedimentary structures. However, the outlined framework is complementary to other methods of ichnological analysis, such as ichnofacies- or ichnofabric-analysis, and can be applied as such. Indeed, this method is a derivative of these and other earlier techniques, and should be employed where a systematic approach to obtaining high-resolution sedimentological interpretations is a required aspect of the study.

  11. Activated chemical defenses suppress herbivory on freshwater red algae.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Keri M; Hay, Mark E

    2013-04-01

    The rapid life cycles of freshwater algae are hypothesized to suppress selection for chemical defenses against herbivores, but this notion remains untested. Investigations of chemical defenses are rare for freshwater macrophytes and absent for freshwater red algae. We used crayfish to assess the palatability of five freshwater red algae relative to a palatable green alga and a chemically defended aquatic moss. We then assessed the roles of structural, nutritional, and chemical traits in reducing palatability. Both native and non-native crayfish preferred the green alga Cladophora glomerata to four of the five red algae. Batrachospermum helminthosum, Kumanoa holtonii, and Tuomeya americana employed activated chemical defenses that suppressed feeding by 30-60 % following damage to algal tissues. Paralemanea annulata was defended by its cartilaginous structure, while Boldia erythrosiphon was palatable. Activated defenses are thought to reduce ecological costs by expressing potent defenses only when actually needed; thus, activation might be favored in freshwater red algae whose short-lived gametophytes must grow and reproduce rapidly over a brief growing season. The frequency of activated chemical defenses found here (three of five species) is 3-20× higher than for surveys of marine algae or aquatic vascular plants. If typical for freshwater red algae, this suggests that (1) their chemical defenses may go undetected if chemical activation is not considered and (2) herbivory has been an important selective force in the evolution of freshwater Rhodophyta. Investigations of defenses in freshwater rhodophytes contribute to among-system comparisons and provide insights into the generality of plant-herbivore interactions and their evolution.

  12. Why biosynthetic genes for chemical defense compounds cluster.

    PubMed

    Takos, Adam M; Rook, Fred

    2012-07-01

    In plants, the genomic clustering of non-homologous genes for the biosynthesis of chemical defense compounds is an emerging theme. Gene clustering is also observed for polymorphic sexual traits under balancing selection, and examples in plants are self-incompatibility and floral dimorphy. The chemical defense pathways organized as gene clusters are self-contained biosynthetic modules under opposing selection pressures and adaptive polymorphisms, often the presence or absence of a functional pathway, are observed in nature. We propose that these antagonistic selection pressures favor closer physical linkage between beneficially interacting alleles as the resulting reduction in recombination maintains a larger fraction of the fitter genotypes. Gene clusters promote the stable inheritance of functional chemical defense pathways in the dynamic ecological context of natural populations. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Elucidating the genetic basis for Escherichia coli defense against silver toxicity using mutant arrays.

    PubMed

    Xiu, Zongming; Liu, Yuanyuan; Mathieu, Jacques; Wang, Jing; Zhu, Dongqiang; Alvarez, Pedro J J

    2014-05-01

    Bacterial adaptation and defense mechanisms against silver are poorly understood at the genetic level. A library of Escherichia coli gene-deletion mutants was used to show that clones lacking sodB (coding for oxidative stress protection), lon (protein damage repair), or cusR (metal efflux pump) are quite sensitive to silver (with 7.3 ± 9.1%, 5.3 ± 1.8%, and 0.4 ± 0.1% of cells surviving, respectively, compared with 90.1 ± 5.4% survival for wild-type E. coli, after 6-h exposure to 8 mg/L AgNO(3)), suggesting the importance of the coded functions as defense mechanisms. Mutants lacking pgaB or wcaD, which code for production of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), also showed significant (p < 0.05) sensitivity to silver exposure (23.4 ± 16.2% and 23.1 ± 32.6% survival, respectively). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with scanning TEM/energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis showed accumulation of silver nanoparticles within EPS, suggesting that EPS serve as a protective barrier that also immobilizes dissolved silver as silver nanoparticles.

  14. Department of Defense Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear Defense Program Overview

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-04-06

    effectively execute the National Strategy for Combating Weapons of Mass Destruction. Ensure all capabilities are integrated and coordinated within the... BACTERIA VIRUSES RICKETTSIAE GENETIC ENGINEERED MICRO-ORGANISMS BWCW CLEARLY CHEMICAL CLEARLY BIOLOGICAL Traditional Nuclear Nuclear Bombs Nuclear Missiles...systems integration, and information flow in a timely and cost effective manner Goal 5 Leverage DOD CBRN defense expertise to support vital national

  15. Medical defense against blistering chemical warfare agents.

    PubMed

    Smith, W J; Dunn, M A

    1991-08-01

    First used in World War I, chemical blistering agents present a serious medical threat that has stimulated renewed interest in the light of extensive use in recent conflicts. Current medical management cannot yet prevent or minimize injury from the principal agent of concern--sulfur mustard. Research directed at this goal depends on defining effective intervention in the metabolic alterations induced by exposure to sulfur mustard.

  16. Egg Production Constrains Chemical Defenses in a Neotropical Arachnid

    PubMed Central

    Nazareth, Taís M.; Machado, Glauco

    2015-01-01

    Female investment in large eggs increases the demand for fatty acids, which are allocated for yolk production. Since the biosynthetic pathway leading to fatty acids uses the same precursors used in the formation of polyketides, allocation trade-offs are expected to emerge. Therefore, egg production should constrain the investment in chemical defenses based on polyketides, such as benzoquinones. We tested this hypothesis using the harvestman Acutiosoma longipes, which produces large eggs and releases benzoquinones as chemical defense. We predicted that the amount of secretion released by ovigerous females (OFs) would be smaller than that of non-ovigerous females (NOF). We also conducted a series of bioassays in the field and in the laboratory to test whether egg production renders OFs more vulnerable to predation. OFs produce less secretion than NOFs, which is congruent with the hypothesis that egg production constrains the investment in chemical defenses. Results of the bioassays show that the secretion released by OFs is less effective in deterring potential predators (ants and spiders) than the secretion released by NOFs. In conclusion, females allocate resources to chemical defenses in a way that preserves a primary biological function related to reproduction. However, the trade-off between egg and secretion production makes OFs vulnerable to predators. We suggest that egg production is a critical moment in the life of harvestman females, representing perhaps the highest cost of reproduction in the group. PMID:26331946

  17. STICK INSECT CHEMICAL DEFENSES: POTENTIAL FOR USEFUL CHEMISTRY (ORDER PHASMATODEA)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Insects make up the most numerous and diverse group of organisms on the planet, yet make up one of the least explored groups of organisms in natural products research (Dossey, A. T., Nat. Prod Rep. 2010, 27, 1737–1757). For about five years our stick insect chemical defense research has led to sever...

  18. Chemical approaches to the elucidation of template biosynthesis: study of replication and reverse transcription

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knorre, Dmitrii G.; Kudryashova, Natal'ya V.; Lavrik, Ol'ga I.

    1998-05-01

    Chemical approaches to the elucidation of DNA template biosynthesis using DNA polymerases and reverse transcriptases, predominantly DNA polymerase I from E. coli and reverse transcriptase from HIV-1, are considered. Special attention is paid to the comparison of chemical modification and X-ray structural analysis data as well as to quantitative aspects of the interaction of DNA polymerases with templates, primers, and nucleoside 5'-triphosphates. New versions of a catalytically competent labelling method developed in the course of investigation of these enzymes are described. The data obtained in the analysis of replication complexes using primer analogues with photoreactive groups are presented. The bibliography includes 98 references.

  19. Space-Based Chemical Lasers in strategic defense

    SciTech Connect

    Wildt, D. )

    1992-07-01

    The Strategic Defense Initiative Organization (SDIO) has made significant progress in developing Space-Based chemical Laser (SBL) technologies and in studying the SBLs global defense capability. In this mission, a constellation of several orbiting laser platforms provides continuous global defense by intercepting threatening missiles in their boost phase, including short range ballistic missiles (SRBMs). An optional smaller constellation provides defense against launches from the low and midlatitude regions. In addition, SBLs have utility in other important related missions such as surveillance, air defense and discrimination. The hardware necessary to build such a system has been developed to the point where it is mature and ready for demonstration in space. Advances have been made in each of the following major areas of the SBL: laser device; optics/beam control; beam pointing; ATP (acquisition, tracking and pointing); uncooled optics; and laser lethality. Integration of the key laser and beam control technologies is now occurring in the ground-based ALI experiment, and a space demonstration experiment, Star LITE, is in the planning and concept development phase.

  20. Chemical and genetic defenses against disease in insect societies.

    PubMed

    Stow, Adam; Beattie, Andrew

    2008-10-01

    The colonies of ants, bees, wasps and termites, the social insects, consist of large numbers of closely related individuals; circumstances ideal for contagious diseases. Antimicrobial assays of these animals have demonstrated a wide variety of chemical defenses against both bacteria and fungi that can be broadly classified as either external antiseptic compounds or internal immune molecules. Reducing the disease risks inherent in colonies of social insects is also achieved by behaviors, such as multiple mating or dispersal, that lower genetic relatedness both within- and among colonies. The interactions between social insects and their pathogens are complex, as illustrated by some ants that require antimicrobial and behavioral defenses against highly specialized fungi, such as those in the genus Cordyceps that attack larvae and adults and species in the genus Escovopsis that attack their food supplies. Studies of these defenses, especially in ants, have revealed remarkably sophisticated immune systems, including peptides induced by, and specific to, individual bacterial strains. The latter may be the result of the recruitment by the ants of antibiotic-producing bacteria but the extent of such three-way interactions remains unknown. There is strong experimental evidence that the evolution of sociality required dramatic increases in antimicrobial defenses and that microbes have been powerful selective agents. The antimicrobial chemicals and the insect-killing fungi may be useful in medicine and agriculture, respectively.

  1. The Department of Defense Chemical and Biological Defense Program: An Enabler of the Third Offset Strategy.

    PubMed

    Roos, Jason; Chue, Calvin; DiEuliis, Diane; Emanuel, Peter

    The US Department of Defense (DOD) established programs to defend against chemical and biological weapons 100 years ago because military leaders understood that the operational capability of the US military is diminished when service member health is compromised. These threats to operational readiness can be from an overt attack using chemical and biological threats but may also arise from natural exposures. In the current era of rapidly emerging technologies, adversaries are not only rediscovering chemical and biological weapons; they are also displaying an increased propensity to employ them to cause strategic instability among deployed forces or nations undergoing conflict. The United States's investments in its Chemical and Biological Defense Program (CBDP) can be a critical enabler of the third offset strategy, which is a DOD initiative that seeks to maximize force capability to offset emerging threats. To realize this vision, the CBDP must make fundamental changes in acquiring and employing effective technologies so that enemy use of chemical and biological agents against US assets is no longer a viable option. Maximization of US force health status will provide a strategic advantage over theater opponents more vulnerable to operational degradation from chemical and biological threats.

  2. Chemical and Biological Defense: Designated Entity Needed to Identify, Align, and Manage DOD’s Infrastructure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    Nuclear Defense Program Analysis and Integration Office (PAIO), CBDP’s analytical arm, recommended in 2008 that the CBDP Enterprise identify required...no CBDP Enterprise-wide impetus to address the infrastructure recommendations. The Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Nuclear , Chemical...Biological Defense Program CBRN chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear CBRNE chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear , and high-yield

  3. Chemical Defense as a Condition-Dependent Trait in Harvestmen.

    PubMed

    Nazareth, Taís M; Sudatti, Daniela B; Machado, Glauco

    2016-10-01

    The expression of costly traits often depends on the amount of food available to the individuals. Chemical defenses are costly, thus their production should be condition-dependent. Here, we tested the hypothesis that an increase in food availability and an acetate-supplemented diet will increase the production of chemical defenses by the harvestman Magnispina neptunus, which releases alkylated benzoquinones biosynthesized using acetate as a precursor. We manipulated the diet of the individuals and created four experimental groups: well-fed with acetate, well-fed without acetate, poorly-fed with acetate, and poorly-fed without acetate. Well-fed individuals produced secretions with higher mass and concentration of benzoquinones than poorly-fed individuals, but we detected no significant effect of the acetate supplement. Thus, the production of benzoquinones is condition-dependent, and even short periods of dietary restriction may make individuals more vulnerable to predators, imposing fitness consequences to chemically-protected arthropods that biosynthesize their own defensive compounds.

  4. Chemical synthesis and structure elucidation of bovine kappa-casein (1-44).

    PubMed

    Bansal, Paramjit S; Grieve, Paul A; Marschke, Ronald J; Daly, Norelle L; McGhie, Emily; Craik, David J; Alewood, Paul F

    2006-02-24

    The caseins (alphas1, alphas2, beta, and kappa) are phosphoproteins present in bovine milk that have been studied for over a century and whose structures remain obscure. Here we describe the chemical synthesis and structure elucidation of the N-terminal segment (1-44) of bovine kappa-casein, the protein which maintains the micellar structure of the caseins. kappa-Casein (1-44) was synthesised by highly optimised Boc solid-phase peptide chemistry and characterised by mass spectrometry. Structure elucidation was carried out by circular dichroism and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. CD analysis demonstrated that the segment was ill defined in aqueous medium but in 30% trifluoroethanol it exhibited considerable helical structure. Further, NMR analysis showed the presence of a helical segment containing 26 residues which extends from Pro8 to Arg34. This is the first report which demonstrates extensive secondary structure within the casein class of proteins.

  5. Chemical synthesis and structure elucidation of bovine {kappa}-casein (1-44)

    SciTech Connect

    Bansal, Paramjit S.; Grieve, Paul A.; Marschke, Ronald J.; Daly, Norelle L.; McGhie, Emily; Craik, David J.; Alewood, Paul F. . E-mail: p.alewood@imb.uq.edu.au

    2006-02-24

    The caseins ({alpha}{sub s1}, {alpha}{sub s2}, {beta}, and {kappa}) are phosphoproteins present in bovine milk that have been studied for over a century and whose structures remain obscure. Here we describe the chemical synthesis and structure elucidation of the N-terminal segment (1-44) of bovine {kappa}-casein, the protein which maintains the micellar structure of the caseins. {kappa}-Casein (1-44) was synthesised by highly optimised Boc solid-phase peptide chemistry and characterised by mass spectrometry. Structure elucidation was carried out by circular dichroism and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. CD analysis demonstrated that the segment was ill defined in aqueous medium but in 30% trifluoroethanol it exhibited considerable helical structure. Further, NMR analysis showed the presence of a helical segment containing 26 residues which extends from Pro{sup 8} to Arg{sup 34}. This is First report which demonstrates extensive secondary structure within the casein class of proteins.

  6. Global change effects on plant chemical defenses against insect herbivores.

    PubMed

    Bidart-Bouzat, M Gabriela; Imeh-Nathaniel, Adebobola

    2008-11-01

    This review focuses on individual effects of major global change factors, such as elevated CO2, O3, UV light and temperature, on plant secondary chemistry. These secondary metabolites are well-known for their role in plant defense against insect herbivory. Global change effects on secondary chemicals appear to be plant species-specific and dependent on the chemical type. Even though plant chemical responses induced by these factors are highly variable, there seems to be some specificity in the response to different environmental stressors. For example, even though the production of phenolic compounds is enhanced by both elevated CO2 and UV light levels, the latter appears to primarily increase the concentrations of flavonoids. Likewise, specific phenolic metabolites seem to be induced by O3 but not by other factors, and an increase in volatile organic compounds has been particularly detected under elevated temperature. More information is needed regarding how global change factors influence inducibility of plant chemical defenses as well as how their indirect and direct effects impact insect performance and behavior, herbivory rates and pathogen attack. This knowledge is crucial to better understand how plants and their associated natural enemies will be affected in future changing environments.

  7. Elucidation of the Mechanism by Which Catecholamine Stress Hormones Liberate Iron from the Innate Immune Defense Proteins Transferrin and Lactoferrin ▿

    PubMed Central

    Sandrini, Sara M.; Shergill, Raminder; Woodward, Jonathan; Muralikuttan, Remya; Haigh, Richard D.; Lyte, Mark; Freestone, Primrose P.

    2010-01-01

    The ability of catecholamine stress hormones and inotropes to stimulate the growth of infectious bacteria is now well established. A major element of the growth induction process has been shown to involve the catecholamines binding to the high-affinity ferric-iron-binding proteins transferrin (Tf) and lactoferrin, which then enables bacterial acquisition of normally inaccessible sequestered host iron. The nature of the mechanism(s) by which the stress hormones perturb iron binding of these key innate immune defense proteins has not been fully elucidated. The present study employed electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and chemical iron-binding analyses to demonstrate that catecholamine stress hormones form direct complexes with the ferric iron within transferrin and lactoferrin. Moreover, these complexes were shown to result in the reduction of Fe(III) to Fe(II) and the loss of protein-complexed iron. The use of bacterial ferric iron uptake mutants further showed that both the Fe(II) and Fe(III) released from the Tf could be directly used as bacterial nutrient sources. We also analyzed the transferrin-catecholamine interactions in human serum and found that therapeutically relevant concentrations of stress hormones and inotropes could directly affect the iron binding of serum-transferrin so that the normally highly bacteriostatic tissue fluid became significantly more supportive of the growth of bacteria. The relevance of these catecholamine-transferrin/lactoferrin interactions to the infectious disease process is considered. PMID:19820086

  8. Assistant to the secretary of defense for nuclear and chemical and biological defense programs (ATSD(NCB)). Change 1

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, R.

    1996-03-01

    This Change 1 to DoD Directive 5134.8, dated June 8, 1994, is provided to DTIC. NOTE: In accordance with Section 904 of the DoD Authorization Act for FY 1996 (P.L. 104-106), this change redesignates the Assistant to the Secretary of Defense for Atomic Energy (ATSD(AE)) as the Assistant to the Secretary of Defense for Nuclear and Chemical and Biological Defense Programs (ATSD(NCB)).

  9. Chemical-biological defense remote sensing: what's happening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrico, John P.

    1998-08-01

    The proliferation of weapons of mass destruction (WMD) continues to be a serious threat to the security of the US. Proliferation of chemical and biological (CB) weapons is particularly disturbing, and the threats posed can be devastating. Critical elements of the US efforts to reduce and counter WMD proliferation include: (1) the location and characterization of WMD facilities and capabilities worldwide; (2) the ability to rapidly detect and identify the use of CB weapons for expeditious warning and reporting on the battlefield; and (3) the capability to mitigate deleterious consequences of a CB incident through effective protective and medical treatment measures. Remote sensing has been touted as a key technology in these efforts. Historically, the role of remote sensing in CB defense has been to provide early warning of an attack from an extended distance. However, additional roles for remote sensing in CB defense, as well as applications in related missions, are possible and should be pursued. This paper examines what has been happening in remote sensing over the past decade to address needs in this area. Accomplishments, emerging technologies, programmatic issues, and opportunities for the future are covered. The Department of Defence chemical- biological, the Department of Energy's Chemical Analysis by Laser Interrogation of Proliferation Effluents, and other agency related programs are examined. Also, the status of remote sensing in the commercial market arena for environmental monitoring, its relevance to the WMD counterproliferation program, and opportunities for technology transfer are discussed. A course of action for the future is recommended.

  10. Nine-size system for chemical defense gloves. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Robinette, K.M.; Annis, J.F.

    1986-07-01

    The purpose of this effort was to meet the need for improved sizing of chemical defense gloves for Air Force men and women. A nine-size system was developed from available hand data. The development process and size values are presented in this report. Some summary statistics and regression equations are provided to aid investigators who may wish to make modifications. Although the anthropometric sizing system outlined in this report is statistically sound, it is experimental. The authors recommend that anthropometric fit-testing be conducted prior to full-scale glove production.

  11. Department of Defense Hazardous Chemical Warning Labeling System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-01

    LAPELING SYSTEM TABLE OF CONTENTS Page Foreword j Table of Contents ii Introduction 1 Data Elements of the DoD Label 4 Hazardous Material Label Sections 5...Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) Polyester Phenolic Resin !-I DoD Hazardous Materials Information System Dart - Benz,’nc AR 1-8 Ma terala Safnty Data...129.u 1ion)2ryLabelli ng (A,•,3I Z129.1I - 19837) 2-1 / DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE HAZARDOUS CHEMICAL WARNING LABELING SYSTEM On August 29, l987, the

  12. Genome streamlining and chemical defense in a coral reef symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Kwan, Jason C.; Donia, Mohamed S.; Han, Andrew W.; Hirose, Euichi; Haygood, Margo G.; Schmidt, Eric W.

    2012-01-01

    Secondary metabolites are ubiquitous in bacteria, but by definition, they are thought to be nonessential. Highly toxic secondary metabolites such as patellazoles have been isolated from marine tunicates, where their exceptional potency and abundance implies a role in chemical defense, but their biological source is unknown. Here, we describe the association of the tunicate Lissoclinum patella with a symbiotic α-proteobacterium, Candidatus Endolissoclinum faulkneri, and present chemical and biological evidence that the bacterium synthesizes patellazoles. We sequenced and assembled the complete Ca. E. faulkneri genome, directly from metagenomic DNA obtained from the tunicate, where it accounted for 0.6% of sequence data. We show that the large patellazoles biosynthetic pathway is maintained, whereas the remainder of the genome is undergoing extensive streamlining to eliminate unneeded genes. The preservation of this pathway in streamlined bacteria demonstrates that secondary metabolism is an essential component of the symbiotic interaction. PMID:23185008

  13. Allocation of chemical and structural defenses in the sponge Melophlus sarasinorum

    PubMed Central

    Rohde, Sven; Schupp, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    Sponges have evolved a variety of chemical and structural defense mechanisms to avoid predation. While chemical defense is well established in sponges, studies on structural defense are rare and with ambiguous results. We used field and laboratory experiments to investigate predation patterns and the anti-predatory defense mechanisms of the sponge Melophlus sarasinorum, a common inhabitant of Indo-pacific coral reefs. Specifically, we aimed to investigate whether M. sarasinorum is chemically or structurally defended against predation and if the defenses are expressed differently in the ectosomal and choanosomal tissue of the sponge. Chemical defense was measured as feeding deterrence, structural defense as feeding deterrence and toughness. Our results demonstrated that chemical defense is evenly distributed throughout the sponge and works in conjunction with a structurally defended ectosome to further reduce predation levels. The choanosome of the sponge contained higher protein levels, but revealed no structural defense. We conclude that the equal distribution of chemical defenses throughout M. sarasinorum is in accordance with Optimal Defense Theory (ODT) in regards to fish predation, while structural defense supports ODT by being restricted to the surface layer which experiences the highest predation risks from mesograzers. PMID:21461028

  14. Elucidating environmental dimensions of neurological disorders and disease: Understanding new tools from federal chemical testing programs.

    PubMed

    McPartland, Jennifer; Dantzker, Heather; Portier, Christopher

    2017-09-01

    Federal agencies are making significant investments to advance predictive approaches to evaluate chemical hazards and risks. Environmental Defense Fund (EDF) believes that engagement with the broader scientific community is critical to building and maintaining a strong biological foundation for these approaches. On June 18-19, 2015, EDF organized a meeting to 1) foster a conversation between federal scientists advancing predictive approaches and environmental health researchers investigating environmental exposures and neurological outcomes, and 2) explore opportunities and challenges for the use of federal chemical high-throughput in vitro screening (HTS) data in hypothesis-driven research toward, ultimately, improved data for public health decision-making. The meeting achieved its objectives. Government scientists showcased their chemical testing programs and vision for how emerging data may be used to meet agency missions. Environmental health researchers shared their experiences using federal HTS data, offered recommendations for strengthening federal HTS platforms, and expressed great interest in continued engagement with evolving federal chemical testing initiatives. The meeting provided an invaluable exchange between two scientific communities with a shared interest in protecting public health from harmful environmental exposures, but who have not sufficiently engaged with each other. Discussions identified opportunities and work ahead for the use of HTS data in hypothesis-driven research. Though the meeting focused on neurological outcomes, the purpose, objectives and experience of the meeting are broadly applicable. EDF strongly encourages more discourse and collaboration between federal and non-government scientists working to understand environmental influences on health outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Chemical reactivity of graphene oxide towards amines elucidated by solid-state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vacchi, Isabella A.; Spinato, Cinzia; Raya, Jésus; Bianco, Alberto; Ménard-Moyon, Cécilia

    2016-07-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) is an attractive nanomaterial for many applications. Controlling the functionalization of GO is essential for the design of graphene-based conjugates with novel properties. But, the chemical composition of GO has not been fully elucidated yet. Due to the high reactivity of the oxygenated moieties, mainly epoxy, hydroxyl and carboxyl groups, several derivatization reactions may occur concomitantly. The reactivity of GO with amine derivatives has been exploited in the literature to design graphene-based conjugates, mainly through amidation. However, in this study we undoubtedly demonstrate using magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR that the reaction between GO and amine functions occurs via ring opening of the epoxides, and not by amidation. We also prove that there is a negligible amount of carboxylic acid groups in two GO samples obtained by a different synthesis process, hence eliminating the possibility of amidation reactions with amine derivatives. This work brings additional insights into the chemical reactivity of GO, which is fundamental to control its functionalization, and highlights the major role of MAS NMR spectroscopy for a comprehensive characterization of derivatized GO.Graphene oxide (GO) is an attractive nanomaterial for many applications. Controlling the functionalization of GO is essential for the design of graphene-based conjugates with novel properties. But, the chemical composition of GO has not been fully elucidated yet. Due to the high reactivity of the oxygenated moieties, mainly epoxy, hydroxyl and carboxyl groups, several derivatization reactions may occur concomitantly. The reactivity of GO with amine derivatives has been exploited in the literature to design graphene-based conjugates, mainly through amidation. However, in this study we undoubtedly demonstrate using magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR that the reaction between GO and amine functions occurs via ring opening of the epoxides, and not by

  16. Proposal of a defense application for a chemical oxygen laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takehisa, K.

    2015-05-01

    Defense application for a chemical oxygen laser (COL) is explained. Although a COL has not yet been successful in lasing, the oscillator was estimated to produce a giant pulse with the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of ~0.05ms which makes the damage threshold for the mirrors several-order higher than that for a typical solid-state laser with a ~10ns pulse width. Therefore it has a potential to produce MJ class output considering the simple scalability of being a chemical laser. Since within 0.05ms a supersonic aircraft can move only a few centimeters which is roughly equal to the spot size of the focused beam at ~10km away using a large-diameter focusing mirror, a COL has a potential to make a damage to an enemy aircraft by a single shot without beam tracking. But since the extracted beam can propagate up to a few kilometers due to the absorption in the air, it may be suitable to use in space. While a chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL) can give a pulsed output with a width of ~2 ms using a high-pressure singlet oxygen generator (SOG). Therefore a pulsed COIL may also not require beam tracking if a target aircraft is approaching. Another advantage for these pulsed high-energy lasers (HELs) is that, in case of propagating in cloud or fog, much less energy is required for a laser for aerosol vaporization (LAV) than that of a LAV for a CW HEL. Considerations to use a COL as a directed energy weapon (DEW) in a point defense system are shown.

  17. Chemical Defense by Erythrolactones in the Euryhaline Ciliated Protist, Pseudokeronopsis erythrina.

    PubMed

    Buonanno, Federico; Anesi, Andrea; Giuseppe, Graziano Di; Guella, Graziano; Ortenzi, Claudio

    2017-02-01

    Pseudokeronopsis erythrina produces three new secondary metabolites, erythrolactones A2, B2 and C2, and their respective sulfate esters (A1, B1, C1), the structures of which have been recently elucidated on the basis of NMR spectroscopic data coupled to high resolution mass measurements (HR-MALDI-TOF). An analysis of the discharge of the protozoan pigment granules revealed that the non-sulfonated erythrolactones are exclusively stored in these cortical organelles, which are commonly used by a number of ciliates as chemical weapons in offense/defense interactions with prey and predators. We evaluated the toxic activity of pigment granule discharge on a panel of free-living ciliates and micro-invertebrates, and the activity of each single purified erythrolactone on three ciliate species. We also observed predator-prey interactions of P. erythrina with unicellular and multicellular predators. Experimental results confirm that only P. erythrina cells with discharged pigment granules were preferentially or exclusively hunted and eaten by at least some of its predators, whereas almost all intact (fully pigmented) cells remained alive. Our results indicate that erythrolactones are very effective as a chemical defense in P. erythrina.

  18. Chemical reactivity of graphene oxide towards amines elucidated by solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Vacchi, Isabella A; Spinato, Cinzia; Raya, Jésus; Bianco, Alberto; Ménard-Moyon, Cécilia

    2016-07-14

    Graphene oxide (GO) is an attractive nanomaterial for many applications. Controlling the functionalization of GO is essential for the design of graphene-based conjugates with novel properties. But, the chemical composition of GO has not been fully elucidated yet. Due to the high reactivity of the oxygenated moieties, mainly epoxy, hydroxyl and carboxyl groups, several derivatization reactions may occur concomitantly. The reactivity of GO with amine derivatives has been exploited in the literature to design graphene-based conjugates, mainly through amidation. However, in this study we undoubtedly demonstrate using magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR that the reaction between GO and amine functions occurs via ring opening of the epoxides, and not by amidation. We also prove that there is a negligible amount of carboxylic acid groups in two GO samples obtained by a different synthesis process, hence eliminating the possibility of amidation reactions with amine derivatives. This work brings additional insights into the chemical reactivity of GO, which is fundamental to control its functionalization, and highlights the major role of MAS NMR spectroscopy for a comprehensive characterization of derivatized GO.

  19. Localization of Defensive Chemicals in Two Congeneric Butterflies (Euphydryas, Nymphalidae).

    PubMed

    Mason, Peri A; Deane Bowers, M

    2017-05-01

    Many insect species sequester compounds acquired from their host plants for defense against natural enemies. The distribution of these compounds is likely to affect both their efficacy as defenses, and their costs. In this study we examined the distribution of sequestered iridoid glycosides (IGs) in two congeneric species of nymphalid butterfly, Euphydryas anicia and E. phaeton, and found that the pattern of localization of IGs differed between the two species. Although IG concentrations were quite high in the heads of both species, the relative concentrations in wings and abdomens differed substantially. Euphydryas anicia had relatively high IG concentrations in their abdomens and low IG concentrations in their wings, whereas the reverse was true in E. phaeton. We interpret these results in light of two current hypotheses regarding where sequestered chemicals should be localized: that they should be found in wings, which would allow non-lethal sampling by predators; and that their distribution is constrained by the distribution of tissue types to which sequestered compounds bind. We also offer the third hypothesis, that costs of storage may differ among body parts, and that the localization of compounds may reflect a cost-reduction strategy. Results from E. phaeton were consistent with all three of these non-mutually exclusive hypotheses, whereas results from E. anicia were only consistent with the notion that tissue bias among body parts plays a role in IG distribution. The finding that these two congeneric butterflies exhibit different patterns of IG localization suggests that they have been shaped by different selection regimes.

  20. Chemical structure elucidation from ¹³C NMR chemical shifts: efficient data processing using bipartite matching and maximal clique algorithms.

    PubMed

    Koichi, Shungo; Arisaka, Masaki; Koshino, Hiroyuki; Aoki, Atsushi; Iwata, Satoru; Uno, Takeaki; Satoh, Hiroko

    2014-04-28

    Computer-assisted chemical structure elucidation has been intensively studied since the first use of computers in chemistry in the 1960s. Most of the existing elucidators use a structure-spectrum database to obtain clues about the correct structure. Such a structure-spectrum database is expected to grow on a daily basis. Hence, the necessity to develop an efficient structure elucidation system that can adapt to the growth of a database has been also growing. Therefore, we have developed a new elucidator using practically efficient graph algorithms, including the convex bipartite matching, weighted bipartite matching, and Bron-Kerbosch maximal clique algorithms. The utilization of the two matching algorithms especially is a novel point of our elucidator. Because of these sophisticated algorithms, the elucidator exactly produces a correct structure if all of the fragments are included in the database. Even if not all of the fragments are in the database, the elucidator proposes relevant substructures that can help chemists to identify the actual chemical structures. The elucidator, called the CAST/CNMR Structure Elucidator, plays a complementary role to the CAST/CNMR Chemical Shift Predictor, and together these two functions can be used to analyze the structures of organic compounds.

  1. Dexterity testing of chemical-defense gloves. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Robinette, K.M.; Ervin; Zehner, G.F.

    1986-05-01

    Chemical-defense gloves (12.5-mil Epichlorohydron/Butyl, 14-mil Epichlorohydron/Butyl, and 7-mil Butyl with Nomex overgloves) were subjected to four dexterity tests (O'Connor Finger Dexterity Test, Pennsylvania Bi-Manual Worksample-Assembly, Minnesota Rate of Manipulation Turning, and the Crawford Small Test). Results indicated that subjects performances were most impaired by the 7-mil Butyl with Nomex overglove. Though differences between the other three gloved conditions were not always statistically significant, subjects performed silghtly better while wearing the Epichlorohydron/Butyl gloves, no matter which thickness, than they did while wearing the 15-mil butyl gloves. High negative correlation between anthropometry and gloved tests scores of subjects suggested that poor glove fit may also have affected subjects performances.

  2. beta-Glucosidases as detonators of plant chemical defense.

    PubMed

    Morant, Anne Vinther; Jørgensen, Kirsten; Jørgensen, Charlotte; Paquette, Suzanne Michelle; Sánchez-Pérez, Raquel; Møller, Birger Lindberg; Bak, Søren

    2008-06-01

    Some plant secondary metabolites are classified as phytoanticipins. When plant tissue in which they are present is disrupted, the phytoanticipins are bio-activated by the action of beta-glucosidases. These binary systems--two sets of components that when separated are relatively inert--provide plants with an immediate chemical defense against protruding herbivores and pathogens. This review provides an update on our knowledge of the beta-glucosidases involved in activation of the four major classes of phytoanticipins: cyanogenic glucosides, benzoxazinoid glucosides, avenacosides and glucosinolates. New aspects of the role of specific proteins that either control oligomerization of the beta-glucosidases or modulate their product specificity are discussed in an evolutionary perspective.

  3. Packaging and Delivery of Chemical Weapons: A Defensive Trojan Horse Stratagem in Chromodorid Nudibranchs

    PubMed Central

    Carbone, Marianna; Gavagnin, Margherita; Haber, Markus; Guo, Yue-Wei; Fontana, Angelo; Manzo, Emiliano; Genta-Jouve, Gregory; Tsoukatou, Maria; Rudman, William B.; Cimino, Guido; Ghiselin, Michael T.; Mollo, Ernesto

    2013-01-01

    Background Storage of secondary metabolites with a putative defensive role occurs in the so-called mantle dermal formations (MDFs) that are located in the more exposed parts of the body of most and very likely all members of an entire family of marine mollusks, the chromodorid nudibranchs (Gastropoda: Opisthobranchia). Given that these structures usually lack a duct system, the mechanism for exudation of their contents remains unclear, as does their adaptive significance. One possible explanation could be that they are adapted so as to be preferentially attacked by predators. The nudibranchs might offer packages containing highly repugnant chemicals along with parts of their bodies to the predators, as a defensive variant of the strategic theme of the Trojan horse. Methodology and Principal Findings We detected, by quantitative 1H-NMR, extremely high local concentrations of secondary metabolites in the MDFs of six species belonging to five chromodorid genera. The compounds were purified by chromatographic methods and subsequently evaluated for their feeding deterrent properties, obtaining dose-response curves. We found that only distasteful compounds are accumulated in the reservoirs at concentrations that far exceed the values corresponding to maximum deterrent activity in the feeding assays. Other basic evidence, both field and experimental, has been acquired to elucidate the kind of damage that the predators can produce on both the nudibranchs' mantles and the MDFs. Significance As a result of a long evolutionary process that has progressively led to the accumulation of defensive chemical weapons in localized anatomical structures, the extant chromodorid nudibranchs remain in place when molested, retracting respiratory and chemosensory organs, but offering readily accessible parts of their body to predators. When these parts are masticated or wounded by predators, breakage of the MDFs results in the release of distasteful compounds at extremely high

  4. Chemical composition of inks of diverse marine molluscs suggests convergent chemical defenses.

    PubMed

    Derby, Charles D; Kicklighter, Cynthia E; Johnson, P M; Zhang, Xu

    2007-05-01

    Some marine molluscs, notably sea hares, cuttlefish, squid, and octopus, release ink when attacked by predators. The sea hare Aplysia californica releases secretions from the ink gland and opaline gland that protect individuals from injury or death from predatory spiny lobsters through a combination of mechanisms that include chemical deterrence, sensory disruption, and phagomimicry. The latter two mechanisms are facilitated by millimolar concentrations of free amino acids (FAA) in sea hare ink and opaline, which stimulate the chemosensory systems of predators, ultimately leading to escape by sea hares. We hypothesize that other inking molluscs use sensory disruption and/or phagomimicry as a chemical defense. To investigate this, we examined concentrations of 21 FAA and ammonium in the defensive secretions of nine species of inking molluscs: three sea hares (Aplysia californica, Aplysia dactylomela, Aplysia juliana) and six cephalopods (cuttlefish: Sepia officinalis; squid: Loligo pealei, Lolliguncula brevis, Dosidicus gigas; octopus: Octopus vulgaris, Octopus bimaculoides). We found millimolar levels of total FAA and ammonium in these secretions, and the FAA in highest concentration were taurine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, alanine, and lysine. Crustaceans and fish, which are major predators of these molluscs, have specific receptor systems for these FAA. Our chemical analysis supports the hypothesis that inking molluscs have the potential to use sensory disruption and/or phagomimicry as a chemical defense.

  5. Department of Defense Chemical, Biological, Radiological, and Nuclear Defense Program. FY2003-2005 Performance Plan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-05-01

    on capabilities. In order to validate the process, the initial baseline assessment focused on the traditional warfighter mission, or passive defense...and homeland security, while updating the assessment of passive defense capabilities. In addition, the baseline capability assessment establishes an...from tech base. Integrate counterforce, passive defense, and hazard/incident software models into a complete system. Develop logistics documentation

  6. 78 FR 60887 - Expressions of Interest (EOI) for Chemical Defense Demonstration Projects

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-02

    ... SECURITY Expressions of Interest (EOI) for Chemical Defense Demonstration Projects AGENCY: Office of Health... the Department of Homeland Security Office of Health Affairs (OHA), is seeking Expressions of Interest... chemical defense demonstration project relative to a specific venue (e.g., indoor sports stadium, outdoor...

  7. Chemical defense and chemical variation in some tropical Pacific species of Halimeda (Halimedaceae; Chlorophyta)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Valerie J.; van Alstyne, Kathryn L.

    1988-03-01

    Over a dozen species of the genus Halimeda have been chemically investigated and found to produce the diterpenoid metabolites halimedatrial (1) and halimedatetraacetate (2) in varying concentrations. These meabolites have been proposed to play a role in chemical defense against herbivores based on their chemical structures and their demonstrated biological activities in laboratory and aquarium assays. We examined and compared the feeding deterrent effects of these two compounds tovard herbivorous fishes in field experiments on Guam reefs. Halimedatrial is a more effective feeding deterrent than halimedatetraacetate. It is the major secondary metabolite in young Halimeda macroloba and in the newly produced segments of growing plants. The organic extracts from young plants and new segments were significantly more deterrent than extracts from mature plant tissue. Some populations of Halimeda growing in reef-slope habitats, where herbivory is intense, also have high concentrations of halimedatrial. We compared extracts between reef slope and reef flat collections of Halimeda opuntia on Guam and Pohnpei (= Ponape), and H. discoidea and H. macroloba on Guam. We found that halimedtrial was the major metabolite in reef-slope collections of H. opuntia from Pohnpei and Pago Bay, Guam, and that halimedatetraacetate was the major metabolite a non-reef slope populations. In the cases examined, chemical defenses were greatest in (1) plant parts and (2) populations that were at greatest risk to herbivores.

  8. GENE ARRAYS FOR ELUCIDATING MECHANISTIC DATA FROM MODELS OF MALE INFERTILITY AND CHEMICAL EXPOSURE IN MICE, RATS AND HUMANS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gene arrays for elucidating mechanistic data from models of male infertility and chemical exposure in mice, rats and humans
    John C. Rockett and David J. Dix
    Gamete and Early Embryo Biology Branch, Reproductive Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects ...

  9. GENE ARRAYS FOR ELUCIDATING MECHANISTIC DATA FROM MODELS OF MALE INFERTILITY AND CHEMICAL EXPOSURE IN MICE, RATS AND HUMANS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gene arrays for elucidating mechanistic data from models of male infertility and chemical exposure in mice, rats and humans
    John C. Rockett and David J. Dix
    Gamete and Early Embryo Biology Branch, Reproductive Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects ...

  10. Miniature mass spectrometer for chemical sensing in homeland defense applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Mahadeva P.; Houseman, John

    2003-07-01

    A Miniature Mass Spectrometer (MMS) with an array detector has been developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). The spectrometer has a focal plane geometry, and an array detector that can measure the intensities of different masses simultaneously after their separation along the focal plane. In the past, the large mass, size and the lack of an array detector with high gain (such as an electron multiplier) did not allow the application of focal plane mass spectrometer to the measurement that required high sensitivity and portability. In the JPL developed-MMS, miniaturization has been accomplished by using rare earth magnet material and novelties in the design of the magnetic and electric sectors. A new ion detector was developed for the measurement of the intensities of different mass ions. The array detector is based on the conversion sequence of ions into electrons into photons and their final measurement by a photon array detector. MMS possesses high sensitivity, specificity, and fast response time and can be used as a universal chemical analyzer. It will find application in a variety of Home Defense tasks. MMS is presently being applied for the detection of propellants (hydrazine and its derivatives). The instrument will have a mass of 1-2 kg and consume a power of 2-4 W for operation

  11. Elucidation of defense-related signaling responses to spot blotch infection in bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    PubMed

    Sahu, Ranabir; Sharaff, Murali; Pradhan, Maitree; Sethi, Avinash; Bandyopadhyay, Tirthankar; Mishra, Vinod K; Chand, Ramesh; Chowdhury, Apurba K; Joshi, Arun K; Pandey, Shree P

    2016-04-01

    Spot blotch disease, caused by Bipolaris sorokiniana, is an important threat to wheat, causing an annual loss of ~17%. Under epidemic conditions, these losses may be 100%, yet the molecular responses of wheat to spot blotch remain almost uncharacterized. Moreover, defense-related phytohormone signaling genes have been poorly characterized in wheat. Here, we have identified 18 central components of salicylic acid (SA), jasmonic acid (JA), ethylene (ET), and enhanced disease susceptibility 1 (EDS1) signaling pathways as well as the genes of the phenylpropanoid pathway in wheat. In time-course experiments, we characterized the reprogramming of expression of these pathways in two contrasting genotypes: Yangmai #6 (resistant to spot blotch) and Sonalika (susceptible to spot blotch). We further evaluated the performance of a population of recombinant inbred lines (RILs) by crossing Yangmai#6 and Sonalika (parents) and subsequent selfing to F10 under field conditions in trials at multiple locations. We characterized the reprogramming of defense-related signaling in these RILs as a consequence of spot blotch attack. During resistance to spot blotch attack, wheat strongly elicits SA signaling (SA biogenesis as well as the NPR1-dependent signaling pathway), along with WRKY33 transcription factor, followed by an enhanced expression of phenylpropanoid pathway genes. These may lead to accumulation of phenolics-based defense metabolites that may render resistance against spot blotch. JA signaling may synergistically contribute to the resistance. Failure to elicit SA (and possibly JA) signaling may lead to susceptibility against spot blotch infection in wheat.

  12. Department of Defense Chemical and Biological Defense Program. Annual Report to Congress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-01

    C8 Sustain: Decontamination - Advanced Development Products ............................................................. C10 Annex D: List of...defense secondary equipment items (e.g., consumables such as decontamination kits, detection kits, and filters). Depot maintenance and contractor...Project Managers (JPMs) execute acquisition programs in the areas of Medical, Contamination Avoidance, Biological Defense, Decontamination

  13. Spatial distribution of defense chemicals and markers and the maintenance of chemical variation.

    PubMed

    Andrew, Rose L; Peakall, Rod; Wallis, Ian R; Foley, William J

    2007-03-01

    Exploring the spatial distribution of variation in plant secondary metabolites is critical for understanding the evolutionary ecology of biochemical diversity in wild organisms. In the present study, concentrations of foliar sideroxylonal, an important and highly heritable defense chemical of Eucalyptus melliodora, displayed strong, fine-scale spatial autocorrelation. The spatial patterns observed could promote associational effects on herbivore foraging decisions, which may influence the selection pressures exerted on sideroxylonal content. Multiple chemical traits have roles in certain eucalypt-herbivore interactions, and the spatial characteristics of the herbivore foraging environment are therefore determined by these different factors. We used a model of E. melliodora intake by common brushtail possums (Trichosurus vulpecula), based on the combined effects of two chemical traits, to explore this idea and found that the spatial patterns were different to those of sideroxylonal alone. Spatial genetic autocorrelation, examined using microsatellites, was strong and occurred at a fine scale, implying that restricted gene flow might allow genetic patches to respond to selection relatively independently. Local two-dimensional genetic autocorrelation, explored using a new heuristic method, was highly congruent with the pattern of local phenotypic variation observed for sideroxylonal, suggesting that the genetic variance underlying the sideroxylonal variation is similarly structured. Our results suggest that the spatial distribution of genetic and phenotypic variation could influence both the selective pressure imposed by herbivores on eucalypt defenses and the potential of populations to respond to natural selection. Spatial context should be considered in future studies of plant-herbivore interactions.

  14. Elucidation of the chemical environment for zinc species in an electron-rich zinc-incorporated zeolite

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jing-Feng; Wang, Kai-Xue; Wang, Jian-Qiang; Li, Lu; Jiang, Yan-Mei; Guo, Xing-Xing; Chen, Jie-Sheng

    2013-06-15

    An electron-rich zinc-modified zeolite has been prepared by the incorporation of zinc vapor into the channels of a dehydrated HY (protonated zeolite Y). The chemical environment of the zinc species in the electron-rich zeolite has been elucidated on the basis of X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The formation of univalent zinc (Zn{sup +}) within the electron-rich zeolite was observed upon the irradiation of X-ray from either a synchrotron radiation source or a conventional X-ray diffractometer. The X-ray irradiation initiated the electron transfer from the electron-rich framework of zeolite Y to the nearby Zn{sup 2+} cations, generating Zn{sup +} species. The variation of the coordination environment of the zinc species upon interaction with water molecules has also been investigated. - Graphical abstract: The chemical environment of the zinc species in an electorn-rich zeolite has been elucidated on the basis of X-ray absorption spectroscopy. - Highlights: • An electron-rich zinc-incorporated zeolite has been prepared by chemical vapor reaction. • Univalent zinc is detected after the electron-rich zeolite is irradiated with X-ray. • The chemical environment of the zinc species is elucidated by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. • The coordination environment of the zinc species changes upon interaction with water molecules.

  15. Department of Defense Chemical and Biological Defense Program. Volume 2: FY2002-2004 Performance Plan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-04-01

    52 3.4.1 CB Defense Basic Research (Project CB1 ...Defense BA1 - Basic Research (0601384BP) CB1 TC1 TB1 BA2 - Applied Research (0602384BP) CB2 TC2 TB2 BA3 - Advanced Technology Development...always well suited for evaluating the progress of S&T efforts. The long term nature of many of these efforts makes the identification of quantitative

  16. Elucidating the Chemical Complexity of Organic Aerosol Constituents Measured During the Southeastern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yee, L.; Isaacman, G. A.; Spielman, S. R.; Worton, D. R.; Zhang, H.; Kreisberg, N. M.; Wilson, K. R.; Hering, S. V.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2013-12-01

    Thousands of volatile organic compounds are uniquely created in the atmosphere, many of which undergo chemical transformations that result in more highly-oxidized and often lower vapor pressure species. These species can contribute to secondary organic aerosol, a complex mixture of organic compounds that is still not chemically well-resolved. Organic aerosol collected on filters taken during the Southeastern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) constitute hundreds of unique chemical compounds. Some of these include known anthropogenic and biogenic tracers characterized using standardized analytical techniques (e.g. GC-MS, UPLC, LC-MS), but the majority of the chemical diversity has yet to be explored. By employing analytical techniques involving sample derivatization and comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC x GC) with high-resolution-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (HR-ToF-MS), we elucidate the chemical complexity of the organic aerosol matrix along the volatility and polarity grids. Further, by utilizing both electron impact (EI) and novel soft vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) ionization mass spectrometry, a greater fraction of the organic mass is fully speciated. The GC x GC-HR-ToF-MS with EI/VUV technique efficiently provides an unprecedented level of speciation for complex ambient samples. We present an extensive chemical characterization and quantification of organic species that goes beyond typical atmospheric tracers in the SOAS samples. We further demonstrate that complex organic mixtures can be chemically deconvoluted by elucidation of chemical formulae, volatility, functionality, and polarity. These parameters provide insight into the sources (anthropogenic vs. biogenic), chemical processes (oxidation pathways), and environmental factors (temperature, humidity), controlling organic aerosol growth in the Southeastern United States.

  17. Department of Defense Chemical and Biological Defense Programs: DoD Advance Planning Briefing for Industry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-16

    Tech Development - Adv Dev for CB Prep at Univ of Med & Dentistry of NJ - Miniaturization of CB Detectors - Biodefense Statewide Med Response - Bio...aerobiolgoical research, forensic genomics and certified forensic biological threat agent capability 28 Biological Defense Homeland Security Support Program

  18. Soil nutrient effects on oviposition preference, larval performance, and chemical defense of a specialist insect herbivore.

    PubMed

    Prudic, Kathleen L; Oliver, Jeffrey C; Bowers, M Deane

    2005-05-01

    This study examined the effects of increased leaf nitrogen in natural host-plants (Plantago spp.) on female oviposition preference, larval performance, and larval chemical defense of the butterfly Junonia coenia. Increased availability of soil nutrients caused the host-plant's foliar nitrogen to increase and its chemical defense to decrease. Larval performance did not correlate with increases in foliar nitrogen. Larval growth rate and survival were equivalent across host-plant treatments. However, larvae raised on fertilized host-plants showed concomitant decreases in chemical defense as compared to larvae reared on unfertilized host-plants. Since most butterfly larvae cannot move long distances during their first few instars and are forced to feed upon the plant on which they hatched, J. coenia larval chemical defense is determined, in large part, by female oviposition choice. Female butterflies preferred host-plants with high nitrogen over host-plants with low nitrogen; however, this preference was also mediated by plant chemical defense. Female butterflies preferred more chemically defended host-plants when foliar nitrogen was equivalent between host-plants. J. coenia larvae experience intense predation in the field, especially when larvae are not chemically well defended. Any qualitative or quantitative variation in plant allelochemical defense has fitness consequences on these larvae. Thus, these results indicate that females may be making sub-optimal oviposition decisions under a nutrient-enriched regime, when predators are present. Given the recent increase in fertilizer application and nitrogen deposition on the terrestrial landscape, these interactions between female preference, larval performance, and larval chemical defense may result in long-term changes in population dynamics and persistence of specialist insects.

  19. Experimental and geological approaches to elucidate chemical change in sporopollenin over geological time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, Wesley; Lomax, Barry; Jardine, Phillip

    2016-04-01

    Sporopollenin is the primary biopolymer comprising the walls of sporomorphs (pollen and spores), both in extant material and found within the fossil record. Maturation processes associated with sedimentation and burial over geological timescales have long been considered to dramatically alter the chemical nature of organic material, most notably via oxidation. Here we present experimental data derived from simulated maturation, analyses of Carboniferous fossil material, and modern-day material. Our data demonstrate the core structure of sporopollenin undergoes only minor chemical adjustments at lower grades of maturation, with the over-riding chemical signature remaining identifiable as that of sporopollenin, showing strong resemblance to modern material. This modern signature can, in specific cases be preserved in the geological record, demonstrated by the near-pristine chemical composition of megaspores preserved in cave deposits of Pennsylvanian age (Carboniferous, c. 310 Ma). Conversely, the labile component associated with sporopollenin is found to readily defunctionalise and repolymerise to generate a new polyalkyl macromolecule in situ. The labile component is shown to be held in position via ester linkages; a common chemical feature observed in extant sporopollenin. This combined experimental and geological investigation provides insights into i) the preservation of chemical signatures within the fossil record, ii) considerations for sample preparation when undertaking chemical analysis of fossil sporomorphs, and iii) the long-term evolutionary stasis of sporopollenin, spanning geological time.

  20. The resource economics of chemical and structural defenses across nitrogen supply gradients.

    PubMed

    Craine, Joseph; Bond, William; Lee, William G; Reich, Peter B; Ollinger, Scott

    2003-12-01

    In order to better understand the role of nutrient supplies in determining the prevalence of plant defense types, we investigated the theoretical relationships between ecosystem N supply and the net C gain of shoots that were undefended or defended in one of three ways: (1) by N-free chemical compounds, (2) by N-containing chemical compounds, or (3) by structural defenses. By extending economic models of shoot resource balance to include the relative value of C and N, depreciation, and amortization, we were able to show that the relative net C gain of the three defense types were similar to changes in their generally understood abundance along an N supply gradient. At low N supply, the additional C acquired when investing C in defense is much higher than investing N in defenses. Only at high N supply is it better to invest large quantities of N in defense rather than additional photosynthesis. In a sensitivity analysis, net C gain of shoots was most sensitive to factors that affect the relative value of C and N and the rate of herbivory. Although there is support for the relative value of C and N influencing defense strategies, more research is necessary to understand why tannins are not more prevalent at high N supply and why moderate amounts of N-based defenses are not used at low N supply.

  1. Differential allocation of constitutive and induced chemical defenses in pine tree juveniles: a test of the optimal defense theory.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Xoaquín; Zas, Rafael; Sampedro, Luis

    2012-01-01

    Optimal defense theory (ODT) predicts that the within-plant quantitative allocation of defenses is not random, but driven by the potential relative contribution of particular plant tissues to overall fitness. These predictions have been poorly tested on long-lived woody plants. We explored the allocation of constitutive and methyl-jasmonate (MJ) inducible chemical defenses in six half-sib families of Pinus radiata juveniles. Specifically, we studied the quantitative allocation of resin and polyphenolics (the two major secondary chemicals in pine trees) to tissues with contrasting fitness value (stem phloem, stem xylem and needles) across three parts of the plants (basal, middle and apical upper part), using nitrogen concentration as a proxy of tissue value. Concentration of nitrogen in the phloem, xylem and needles was found to be greater higher up the plant. As predicted by the ODT, the same pattern was found for the concentration of non-volatile resin in the stem. However, in leaf tissues the concentrations of both resin and total phenolics were greater towards the base of the plant. Two weeks after MJ application, the concentrations of nitrogen in the phloem, resin in the stem and total phenolics in the needles increased by roughly 25% compared with the control plants, inducibility was similar across all plant parts, and families differed in the inducibility of resin compounds in the stem. In contrast, no significant changes were observed either for phenolics in the stems, or for resin in the needles after MJ application. Concentration of resin in the phloem was double that in the xylem and MJ-inducible, with inducibility being greater towards the base of the stem. In contrast, resin in the xylem was not MJ-inducible and increased in concentration higher up the plant. The pattern of inducibility by MJ-signaling in juvenile P. radiata is tissue, chemical-defense and plant-part specific, and is genetically variable.

  2. Differential Allocation of Constitutive and Induced Chemical Defenses in Pine Tree Juveniles: A Test of the Optimal Defense Theory

    PubMed Central

    Zas, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    Optimal defense theory (ODT) predicts that the within-plant quantitative allocation of defenses is not random, but driven by the potential relative contribution of particular plant tissues to overall fitness. These predictions have been poorly tested on long-lived woody plants. We explored the allocation of constitutive and methyl-jasmonate (MJ) inducible chemical defenses in six half-sib families of Pinus radiata juveniles. Specifically, we studied the quantitative allocation of resin and polyphenolics (the two major secondary chemicals in pine trees) to tissues with contrasting fitness value (stem phloem, stem xylem and needles) across three parts of the plants (basal, middle and apical upper part), using nitrogen concentration as a proxy of tissue value. Concentration of nitrogen in the phloem, xylem and needles was found to be greater higher up the plant. As predicted by the ODT, the same pattern was found for the concentration of non-volatile resin in the stem. However, in leaf tissues the concentrations of both resin and total phenolics were greater towards the base of the plant. Two weeks after MJ application, the concentrations of nitrogen in the phloem, resin in the stem and total phenolics in the needles increased by roughly 25% compared with the control plants, inducibility was similar across all plant parts, and families differed in the inducibility of resin compounds in the stem. In contrast, no significant changes were observed either for phenolics in the stems, or for resin in the needles after MJ application. Concentration of resin in the phloem was double that in the xylem and MJ-inducible, with inducibility being greater towards the base of the stem. In contrast, resin in the xylem was not MJ-inducible and increased in concentration higher up the plant. The pattern of inducibility by MJ-signaling in juvenile P. radiata is tissue, chemical-defense and plant-part specific, and is genetically variable. PMID:22470508

  3. Effects of physical conditioning on heat tolerance in chemical-defense gear. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Nauss, M.M.

    1986-06-01

    Today the threat of chemical warfare is real. The only effective defense is the use of chemical defense gear and gas masks. Since they render chemical-warfare gases and liquids impermeable to penetration, they also prohibit sweat evaporation in conditions of thermal stress and thus, contribute to heat illness development. Historically, it has been the hot, humid tropics where United Nation's peacekeeping forces have been called, thus the use of chemical-defense gear in these regions is a realistic possibility and heat illness could affect the outcome of any mission carried out there. The human body only operates within a narrow range of core temparatures, and heat illness is the result of a breakdown in homeostasis. Many factors influence heat tolerance, thus maintaining core temperature within a safe range. Adequate hydration, acclimitization to heat, low body weight, young age, low alcohol intake, and physical fitness all contribute to heat tolerance. This proposal attempts to look specifically at the effect of physical conditioning on heat tolerance in chemical-defense gear as a possible solution to the heat-stress problem noted in this gear. Trainee graduates attending technical training schools at Lackland AFB, Texas, will be tested for maximum oxygen uptake (VO/2max) and heat tolerance time (HTT) in chemical defense gear on bicycle ergometers at Brooks AFB, Texas. Half of these subjects will be physically conditioned for 12 weeks.

  4. 2010 Department of Defense (DoD) Chemical and Biological Defense Program (CBDP) Portfolio

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    represent the key CBRN defense capabilities provided to the Warfighter, current as of March 2010. The schedules detailed in this document are based on...Program The JSTO-CBD S&T Strategy defined the following four goals: 1. Transition technologies 2. Ensure a robust S&T base 3. Answer science questions 4...Portfolio are derived from a strong medical and physical S&T base within the four JSTO-CBD Divisions. Throughout the acquisition lifecycle

  5. Chemical defense in harvestmen (arachnida, opiliones): do benzoquinone secretions deter invertebrate and vertebrate predators?

    PubMed

    Machado, Glauco; Carrera, Patricia C; Pomini, Armando M; Marsaioli, Anita J

    2005-11-01

    Two alkylated 1,4-benzoquinones were identified from the defensive secretion produced by the neotropical harvestman Goniosoma longipes (Gonyleptidae). They were characterized as 2,3-dimethyl-1,4-benzoquinone and 2-ethyl-3-methyl-1,4-benzoquinone. We tested the effectiveness of these benzoquinone secretions against several predator types, including invertebrates and vertebrates. Different predators were exposed to the harvestmen's gland secretion or to distilled water in laboratory bioassays. Our results indicate that secretions containing the 1,4-benzoquinones released by G. longipes can be an effective defense against predation, and that the effectiveness of the secretion is dependent on the predator type. The scent gland secretion repelled seven ant species, two species of large wandering spiders, and one frog species, but was not an effective defense against an opossum. Our study also demonstrates that the scent gland secretion of G. longipes can work as a chemical shield preventing the approach of three large predatory ants for at least 10 min. The chemical shield may protect the harvestman against successive attacks of the same ant worker and also allow the harvestman to flee before massive ant recruitment. Our data support the suggestion that chemical defenses may increase survival with some but not all potential predators. This variation in defense effectiveness may result from many interacting factors, including the attack strategy, size, learning ability, and physiology of the predators, as well as the chemical nature of the defensive compounds, type of emission, and amount of effluent released by the prey.

  6. Spider sedation induced by defensive chemicals of milliped prey*

    PubMed Central

    Carrel, James E.; Eisner, Thomas

    1984-01-01

    Wolf spiders (Lycosa spp.) show delayed induced sedation (total immobilization) of prolonged duration (in the order of days) after attacks upon millipeds (Glomeris marginata). The sedation is specifically attributable to glomerin and homoglomerin, two previously characterized quinazolinones present in the defensive secretion of Glomeris. Median sedative doses for the quinazolinones are in the range of 1-7 μg per spider, a fraction of the total (60-90 μg) present in the secretion of medium to full-grown millipeds. A sedative effect upon an invertebrate predator has not previously been demonstrated for an animal defense. Quinazolinones include the synthetic drug methaqualone (Quaalude), a potent human sedative. Images PMID:16593414

  7. Department of Defense Nuclear/Biological/Chemical (NBC) warfare defense. Annual report to Congress, June 1994. Final report, 1 October 1992-30 September 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    The National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1994, Public Law 103-160, Title XVII, Chemical and Biological Weapons Defense, section 1703, directed the Secretary of Defense to submit an assessment and a description of plans to improve readiness. The DoD objective is to enable our forces to survive, fight and win in NBC contaminated environments. Discussed are new management objectives impacted by declining resources and force structure versus an ever changing threat environment. Nuclear biological, Chemical, NBC, Defense, Logistics, Readiness, Training, Contamination avoidance, Protection, Decontamination.

  8. Mitochondrial Chemical Biology: New Probes Elucidate the Secrets of the Powerhouse of the Cell.

    PubMed

    Wisnovsky, Simon; Lei, Eric K; Jean, Sae Rin; Kelley, Shana O

    2016-08-18

    Mitochondria are energy-producing organelles with essential functions in cell biology, and mitochondrial dysfunction is linked to a wide range of human diseases. Efforts to better understand mitochondrial biology have been limited by the lack of tools for manipulating and detecting processes occurring within the organelle. Here, we highlight recent significant advances in mitochondrial chemical biology that have produced new tools and techniques for studying mitochondria. Specifically, we focus on the development of chemical tools to perturb mitochondrial biochemistry, probes allowing precise measurement of mitochondrial function, and new techniques for high-throughput characterization of the mitochondrial proteome. Taken together, these advances in chemical biology will enable exciting new directions in mitochondrial research.

  9. Elucidation of different inhibition mechanism of small chemicals on PtdInsP-binding domains using in silico docking experiments.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yonghwan; Yoon, Youngdae

    2014-05-15

    Phosphatidylinositides, most negatively charged lipids in cellular membranes, regulate diverse effector proteins through the interaction with their lipid binding domains. We have previously reported inhibitory effect of small chemicals on the interaction between PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 and Btk PH domain. Here, we report that the inhibitory effects of same sets of chemicals on Grp1 PH domain and epsin1 ENTH domain to elucidate diversity of inhibitory mechanisms upon different lipid binding domains. Among the chemicals, chemical 8 showed best inhibition in vitro assay for Grp1 PH domain and epsin1 ENTH domain, and then the interaction between small chemicals and lipid binding domains was further investigated by in silico docking experiments. As a result, it was concluded that the diverse inhibitory effects on different lipid binding domains were dependent on not only the number of interactions between small chemical and domain, but also additional interaction with positively charged surfaces as the secondary binding sites. This finding will help to develop lipid binding inhibitors as antagonists for lipid-protein interactions, and these inhibitors would be novel therapeutic drug candidates via regulating effector proteins involved in severe human diseases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Elucidation for Electro-chemical Degradation of Cross-linked Polyethylene Insulated Power Cable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyashita, Yoshitsugu

    The water treeing phenomenon has been recognized as an ultimate difficulty for long-term service life of cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE) insulated power cables. Elucidation of substantial mechanistic pathway of water treeing is quite important to suppress water treeing. Many factors which affect water treeing have been found, such as electrical stress, existence of water, temperature and mechanical stress, and somewhat complicated synergestic interaction between them has also been pointed out. These factors make water treeing very difficult to be understood. The author studied the role of water in this phenomenon. To obtain certain analogical evidence for water treeing, a series of experiments was conducted by employing, as substituents of water, several organic solvents which possess relatively high dielectric constant and dissimilar electrochemical behavior, respectively. Consequently, it was found that a new type of treeing in XLPE matrix could be generated by certain organic solvent without water, and such treeing became easier to incept and propagate when the solvent contained particular electrolyte. Further, it was also indicated that cation was more effective than anion on such solvent treeing. Water tree inception and propagation mechanism was discussed from these experimental results.

  11. Proposed Methodological Improvement in the Elucidation of Chemical Reaction Mechanisms Based on Chemist-Computer Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeigarnik, Andrew V.; Valdés-Pérez, Raúl E.; White, Brian S.

    2000-02-01

    A recent book by Roald Hoffmann explains for a general audience the methods of chemistry. It includes a chapter on the experimental study of chemical reaction mechanisms, which accurately describes the methodological status quo. As an expository vehicle, the book cites a 1960s study of the photolysis of ethane notable for the simplicity of the chemistry and the crisp and surprising character of the experimental observations. We use Hoffmann's exposition and his colorful depiction of current methodological weaknesses to argue for a chemist-computer collaborative search for the simpler mechanistic hypotheses consistent with experiment. We have used this method elsewhere to make specialized chemical contributions that are uniquely enabled by the man-machine interaction. The methods can be useful in the classroom to teach the specific skills needed by mechanistic chemists.

  12. Quantitative and qualitative shifts in defensive metabolites define chemical defense investment during leaf development in Inga, a genus of tropical trees.

    PubMed

    Wiggins, Natasha L; Forrister, Dale L; Endara, María-José; Coley, Phyllis D; Kursar, Thomas A

    2016-01-01

    Selective pressures imposed by herbivores are often positively correlated with investments that plants make in defense. Research based on the framework of an evolutionary arms race has improved our understanding of why the amount and types of defenses differ between plant species. However, plant species are exposed to different selective pressures during the life of a leaf, such that expanding leaves suffer more damage from herbivores and pathogens than mature leaves. We hypothesize that this differential selective pressure may result in contrasting quantitative and qualitative defense investment in plants exposed to natural selective pressures in the field. To characterize shifts in chemical defenses, we chose six species of Inga, a speciose Neotropical tree genus. Focal species represent diverse chemical, morphological, and developmental defense traits and were collected from a single site in the Amazonian rainforest. Chemical defenses were measured gravimetrically and by characterizing the metabolome of expanding and mature leaves. Quantitative investment in phenolics plus saponins, the major classes of chemical defenses identified in Inga, was greater for expanding than mature leaves (46% and 24% of dry weight, respectively). This supports the theory that, because expanding leaves are under greater selective pressure from herbivores, they rely more upon chemical defense as an antiherbivore strategy than do mature leaves. Qualitatively, mature and expanding leaves were distinct and mature leaves contained more total and unique metabolites. Intraspecific variation was greater for mature leaves than expanding leaves, suggesting that leaf development is canalized. This study provides a snapshot of chemical defense investment in a speciose genus of tropical trees during the short, few-week period of leaf development. Exploring the metabolome through quantitative and qualitative profiling enables a more comprehensive examination of foliar chemical defense investment.

  13. The chemical defense ecology of marine unicellular plankton: constraints, mechanisms, and impacts.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, G V

    2000-04-01

    The activities of unicellular microbes dominate the ecology of the marine environment, but the chemical signals that determine behavioral interactions are poorly known. In particular, chemical signals between microbial predators and prey contribute to food selection or avoidance and to defense, factors that probably affect trophic structure and such large-scale features as algal blooms. Using defense as an example, I consider physical constraints on the transmission of chemical information, and strategies and mechanisms that microbes might use to send chemical signals. Chemical signals in a low Re, viscosity-dominated physical environment are transferred by molecular diffusion and laminar advection, and may be perceived at nanomolar levels or lower. Events that occur on small temporal and physical scales in the "near-field" of prey are likely to play a role in cell-cell interactions. On the basis of cost-benefit optimization and the need for rapid activation, I suggest that microbial defense system strategies might be highly dynamic. These strategies include compartmented and activated reactions, utilizing both pulsed release of dissolved signals and contact-activated signals at the cell surface. Bioluminescence and extrusome discharge are two visible manifestations of rapidly activated microbial defenses that may serve as models for other chemical reactions as yet undetected due to the technical problems of measuring transient chemical gradients around single cells. As an example, I detail an algal dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) cleavage reaction that appears to deter protozoan feeding and explore it as a possible model for a rapidly activated, short-range chemical defense system. Although the exploration of chemical interactions among planktonic microbes is in its infancy, ecological models from macroorganisms provide useful hints of the complexity likely to be found.

  14. Biogeography of Alaska paper birch (Betula neoalaskana): latitudinal patterns in chemical defense and plant architecture.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Michael T; Brown, Sarah C; Bothwell, Helen M; Bryant, John P

    2016-02-01

    The latitudinal herbivory-defense hypothesis (LHDH) predicts that plants near the equator will be more heavily defended against herbivores than are plants at higher latitudes. Although this idea is widely found in the literature, recent studies have called this biogeographic pattern into question. We sought to evaluate the LHDH in a high-latitude terrestrial ecosystem where fire and mammalian herbivores may contribute to selection for higher levels of defensive chemistry. To address this objective, we collected seeds of Alaska paper birch (Betula neoalaskana) from nine locations along two north-south transects between 55 degrees N and 62 degrees N latitudes in western, interior Canada. The birch seeds were planted in pots in a common garden in Madison, Wisconsin, USA. From the resulting seedlings, we determined levels of chemical defense by assessing the density of resin glands, which have been shown to be negatively correlated with browsing. To assess plant architectural traits such as height, mean individual leaf area, and root-to-shoot ratio, we harvested a subset of the birch seedlings. Further, we used these traits to examine growth-defense trade-offs. Contrary to the LHDH, we found a positive correlation between chemical defense and latitude. Investigating relationships with fire, we found a strong positive correlation between resin gland density and percentage of area annually burned (PAAB) around each collection location and also between PAAB and latitude. Additionally, birch seedlings originating from higher latitudes were shorter, smaller-leaved, and rootier than their lower-latitude counterparts. Growth-defense trade-offs were observed in negative correlations between resin gland density and height and leaf size. Seedlings with higher resin gland densities also allocated less biomass to shoots and more to roots. These results further call into question the LHDH and provide specific information about latitudinal trends in plant defense at high, northern

  15. A mass weighted chemical elastic network model elucidates closed form domain motions in proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Hyeok; Seo, Sangjae; Jeong, Jay Il; Kim, Bum Joon; Liu, Wing Kam; Lim, Byeong Soo; Choi, Jae Boong; Kim, Moon Ki

    2013-01-01

    An elastic network model (ENM), usually Cα coarse-grained one, has been widely used to study protein dynamics as an alternative to classical molecular dynamics simulation. This simple approach dramatically saves the computational cost, but sometimes fails to describe a feasible conformational change due to unrealistically excessive spring connections. To overcome this limitation, we propose a mass-weighted chemical elastic network model (MWCENM) in which the total mass of each residue is assumed to be concentrated on the representative alpha carbon atom and various stiffness values are precisely assigned according to the types of chemical interactions. We test MWCENM on several well-known proteins of which both closed and open conformations are available as well as three α-helix rich proteins. Their normal mode analysis reveals that MWCENM not only generates more plausible conformational changes, especially for closed forms of proteins, but also preserves protein secondary structures thus distinguishing MWCENM from traditional ENMs. In addition, MWCENM also reduces computational burden by using a more sparse stiffness matrix. PMID:23456820

  16. Chemical combinations elucidate pathway interactions and regulation relevant to Hepatitis C replication

    PubMed Central

    Owens, Christopher M; Mawhinney, Christina; Grenier, Jill M; Altmeyer, Ralf; Lee, Margaret S; Borisy, Alexis A; Lehár, Joseph; Johansen, Lisa M

    2010-01-01

    The search for effective Hepatitis C antiviral therapies has recently focused on host sterol metabolism and protein prenylation pathways that indirectly affect viral replication. However, inhibition of the sterol pathway with statin drugs has not yielded consistent results in patients. Here, we present a combination chemical genetic study to explore how the sterol and protein prenylation pathways work together to affect hepatitis C viral replication in a replicon assay. In addition to finding novel targets affecting viral replication, our data suggest that the viral replication is strongly affected by sterol pathway regulation. There is a marked transition from antagonistic to synergistic antiviral effects as the combination targets shift downstream along the sterol pathway. We also show how pathway regulation frustrates potential hepatitis C therapies based on the sterol pathway, and reveal novel synergies that selectively inhibit hepatitis C replication over host toxicity. In particular, combinations targeting the downstream sterol pathway enzymes produced robust and selective synergistic inhibition of hepatitis C replication. Our findings show how combination chemical genetics can reveal critical pathway connections relevant to viral replication, and can identify potential treatments with an increased therapeutic window. PMID:20531405

  17. Quantitative variability of direct chemical defense in primary and secondary leaves of lima bean (Phaseolus lunatus) and consequences for a natural herbivore.

    PubMed

    Ballhorn, Daniel J; Schiwy, Susann; Jensen, Manfred; Heil, Martin

    2008-10-01

    Ontogenetic variability in chemical plant defenses against herbivores is a common phenomenon, but the effects of this variability on herbivore-plant interactions are little understood. In a previous study on lima bean (Phaseolus lunatus), we found a trade-off between cyanogenesis, a direct defense, and the release of herbivore-induced volatile organic compounds (VOCs; mainly functioning as an indirect defense). Moreover, the expression of these two defenses could change during plant ontogeny. The present study aimed at elucidating whether such ontogenetic changes in plant defense can affect herbivore-plant interactions. We quantified feeding rates of a natural insect herbivore, the Mexican bean beetle (Epilachna varivestis), on primary and secondary leaves of individual lima bean plants. These insects strongly preferred low cyanogenic primary leaves over high cyanogenic secondary leaves. Although weakly defended by cyanogenesis, lima beans' primary leaves showed protein concentrations and photosynthetic activities that did not differ significantly from secondary leaves at the time of analysis. Based on our findings, we suggest that lima beans' long-lived primary leaves function as efficient source organs, even beyond the stage of seedlings. This hypothesis may explain why primary leaves express a strong indirect defense by the release of herbivore induced VOCs.

  18. Elucidating chemical and morphological changes in tetrachloroauric solutions induced by X-ray photochemical reaction.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qing; Divan, Ralu; Mancini, Derrick C; Keane, Denis T

    2008-05-22

    Chemical and morphological changes induced by an X-ray photochemical reaction in tetrachloroauric solutions leading to Au(3+)-to-Au(0) reduction are monitored in real time by X-ray absorption spectroscopy and X-ray small angle scattering. Prior to metal precipitation, the intermediate state, also observed by other techniques, is unambiguously determined for the first time to be the reduction of Au(3+) to Au(1+), whose kinetics is strictly of the zeroth order. The morphological changes occur simultaneously in the solutions, that is, the gold complexes rearrange and aggregate, as unequivocally observed by the correlated changes in the Au L(3) emission and small angle scattering intensities. The experimental evidence indicates that the eventual metal precipitation is strongly influenced by the changing solution acidity under X-ray irradiation. Detailed local structure changes are also described.

  19. Elucidation of chemical reactions by two-dimensional resonance Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molesky, Brian Paul

    It has been shown for many systems, including photosynthetic complexes, molecule-semiconductor interfaces, and bulk heterojunctions, that interaction between electronic and nuclear dynamics may heavily influence chemical mechanisms. Four-wave-mixing spectroscopies (i.e. transient absorption, two-dimensional spectroscopy) provide some insight into such non-equilibrium processes but are limited by the single "population time" available in these types of experiments. In this dissertation, two-dimensional resonance Raman spectroscopy (2DRR) is developed to obtain new information regarding chemical reactions that possess time coincident electronic and nuclear evolution. These new insights can only be acquired through higher-order techniques possessing two "population times". Specifically, the coherent reaction mechanism in triiodide photodissociation and structural heterogeneity in myoglobin are investigated. All multidimensional spectroscopies have roots in the off-resonant multidimensional Raman techniques developed from the late 1980's to the early 2000's. Throughout their development these experiments were plagued with technical challenges that eventually halted further use. In this dissertation it is shown through rigorous experimental tests that the technical challenges of the past are obviated for 2DRR, which is done under electronically resonant conditions. The key is that under electronic resonance the harmonic character of vibrational modes contributes to the signal. Under off-resonant conditions signal generation depends on much weaker effects. Upon absorption of light ranging from 250 to 500 nm triiodide photodissociates into diiodide and radical iodine on the same time scale as the period of triiodide's symmetric stretch, impulsively initiating coherence in the stretching coordinate of diiodide. In this dissertation, the sensitivity of 2DRR to coherent reaction mechanisms is shown by directly measuring, for the first time, how the nonequilibrium geometry of

  20. Mitochondrial protein interactome elucidated by chemical cross-linking mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Schweppe, Devin K; Chavez, Juan D; Lee, Chi Fung; Caudal, Arianne; Kruse, Shane E; Stuppard, Rudy; Marcinek, David J; Shadel, Gerald S; Tian, Rong; Bruce, James E

    2017-02-14

    Mitochondrial protein interactions and complexes facilitate mitochondrial function. These complexes range from simple dimers to the respirasome supercomplex consisting of oxidative phosphorylation complexes I, III, and IV. To improve understanding of mitochondrial function, we used chemical cross-linking mass spectrometry to identify 2,427 cross-linked peptide pairs from 327 mitochondrial proteins in whole, respiring murine mitochondria. In situ interactions were observed in proteins throughout the electron transport chain membrane complexes, ATP synthase, and the mitochondrial contact site and cristae organizing system (MICOS) complex. Cross-linked sites showed excellent agreement with empirical protein structures and delivered complementary constraints for in silico protein docking. These data established direct physical evidence of the assembly of the complex I-III respirasome and enabled prediction of in situ interfacial regions of the complexes. Finally, we established a database and tools to harness the cross-linked interactions we observed as molecular probes, allowing quantification of conformation-dependent protein interfaces and dynamic protein complex assembly.

  1. Elucidating triplet-sensitized photolysis mechanisms of sulfadiazine and metal ions effects by quantum chemical calculations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Se; Song, Xuedan; Hao, Ce; Gao, Zhanxian; Chen, Jingwen; Qiu, Jieshan

    2015-03-01

    Sulfadiazine (SDZ) mainly proceeds triplet-sensitized photolysis with dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the aquatic environment. However, the mechanisms underlying the triplet-sensitized photolysis of SDZ with DOM have not been fully worked out. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms of triplet-sensitized photolysis of SDZ(0) (neutral form) and SDZ(-) (anionic form) with four DOM analogues, i.e., fluorenone (FL), thioxanthone (TX), 2-acetonaphthone (2-AN), and 4-benzoylbenzoic acid (CBBP), and three metal ions (i.e., Mg(2+), Ca(2+), and Zn(2+)) effects using quantum chemical calculations. Results indicated that the triplet-sensitized photolysis mechanism of SDZ(0) with FL, TX, and 2-AN was hydrogen transfer, and with CBBP was electron transfer along with proton transfer (for complex SDZ(0)-CBBP2) and hydrogen transfer (for complex SDZ(0)-CBBP1). The triplet-sensitized photolysis mechanisms of SDZ(-) with FL, TX, and CBBP was electron transfer along with proton transfer, and with 2-AN was hydrogen transfer. The triplet-sensitized photolysis product of both SDZ(0) and SDZ(-) was a sulfur dioxide extrusion product (4-(2-iminopyrimidine-1(2H)-yl)aniline), but the formation routs of the products for SDZ(0) and SDZ(-) were different. In addition, effects of the metal ions on the triplet-sensitized photolysis of SDZ(0) and SDZ(-) were different. The metal ions promoted the triplet-sensitized photolysis of SDZ(0), but inhibited the triplet-sensitized photolysis of SDZ(-).

  2. Diatom/copepod interactions in plankton: the indirect chemical defense of unicellular algae.

    PubMed

    Pohnert, Georg

    2005-06-01

    Numerous coexisting species can be observed in the open oceans. This includes the complex community of the plankton, which comprises all free floating organisms in the sea. Traditionally, nutrient limitation, competition, predation, and abiotic factors have been assumed to shape the community structure in this environment. Only in recent years has the idea arisen that chemical signals and chemical defense can influence species interactions in the plankton as well. Key players at the base of the marine food web are diatoms (unicellular algae with silicified cell walls) and their main predators, the herbivorous copepods. It was assumed that diatoms represent a generally good food source for the grazers but recent work indicates that some species use chemical defenses. Secondary metabolites, released by these algae immediately after wounding, are targeted not against the predators themselves but rather at interfering with their reproductive success. This strategy allows diatoms to reduce the grazer population, thereby influencing the marine food web. This review addresses the chemical ecology of the defensive oxylipins formed by diatoms and the question of how these metabolites can act in such a dilute environment. Aspects of biosynthesis, bioassays, and the possible implications of such a chemical defense for the plankton community structure are also discussed.

  3. Host plant invests in growth rather than chemical defense when attacked by a specialist herbivore.

    PubMed

    Arab, Alberto; Trigo, José Roberto

    2011-05-01

    Plant defensive compounds may be a cost rather than a benefit when plants are attacked by specialist insects that may overcome chemical barriers by strategies such as sequestering plant compounds. Plants may respond to specialist herbivores by compensatory growth rather than chemical defense. To explore the use of defensive chemistry vs. compensatory growth we studied Brugmansia suaveolens (Solanaceae) and the specialist larvae of the ithomiine butterfly Placidina euryanassa, which sequester defensive tropane alkaloids (TAs) from this host plant. We investigated whether the concentration of TAs in B. suaveolens was changed by P. euryanassa damage, and whether plants invest in growth, when damaged by the specialist. Larvae feeding during 24 hr significantly decreased TAs in damaged plants, but they returned to control levels after 15 days without damage. Damaged and undamaged plants did not differ significantly in leaf area after 15 days, indicating compensatory growth. Our results suggest that B. suaveolens responds to herbivory by the specialist P. euryanassa by investing in growth rather than chemical defense.

  4. Elucidation of Mechanisms and Selectivities of Metal-Catalyzed Reactions using Quantum Chemical Methodology.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Stefano; Kalek, Marcin; Huang, Genping; Himo, Fahmi

    2016-05-17

    Quantum chemical techniques today are indispensable for the detailed mechanistic understanding of catalytic reactions. The development of modern density functional theory approaches combined with the enormous growth in computer power have made it possible to treat quite large systems at a reasonable level of accuracy. Accordingly, quantum chemistry has been applied extensively to a wide variety of catalytic systems. A huge number of problems have been solved successfully, and vast amounts of chemical insights have been gained. In this Account, we summarize some of our recent work in this field. A number of examples concerned with transition metal-catalyzed reactions are selected, with emphasis on reactions with various kinds of selectivities. The discussed cases are (1) copper-catalyzed C-H bond amidation of indoles, (2) iridium-catalyzed C(sp(3))-H borylation of chlorosilanes, (3) vanadium-catalyzed Meyer-Schuster rearrangement and its combination with aldol- and Mannich-type additions, (4) palladium-catalyzed propargylic substitution with phosphorus nucleophiles, (5) rhodium-catalyzed 1:2 coupling of aldehydes and allenes, and finally (6) copper-catalyzed coupling of nitrones and alkynes to produce β-lactams (Kinugasa reaction). First, the methodology adopted in these studies is presented briefly. The electronic structure method in the great majority of these kinds of mechanistic investigations has for the last two decades been based on density functional theory. In the cases discussed here, mainly the B3LYP functional has been employed in conjunction with Grimme's empirical dispersion correction, which has been shown to improve the calculated energies significantly. The effect of the surrounding solvent is described by implicit solvation techniques, and the thermochemical corrections are included using the rigid-rotor harmonic oscillator approximation. The reviewed examples are chosen to illustrate the usefulness and versatility of the adopted methodology in

  5. Chemical profiling of the major components in natural waxes to elucidate their role in liquid oil structuring.

    PubMed

    Doan, Chi Diem; To, Chak Ming; De Vrieze, Mike; Lynen, Frederic; Danthine, Sabine; Brown, Allison; Dewettinck, Koen; Patel, Ashok R

    2017-01-01

    Elucidating the composition of waxes is of utmost importance to explain their behavior in liquid oil structuring. The chemical components (hydrocarbons - HCs, free fatty acids - FFAs, free fatty alcohols - FALs and wax esters - WEs) of natural waxes were analyzed using HPLC-ELSD and GC-MS followed by evaluation of their oil structuring properties. The gel strength, including the average storage modulus and oscillation yield stress, displayed a negative correlation with FALs and a positive correlation with HCs, FFAs and WEs. The components dictating the gel strength are HCs, FFAs and WEs in a descending order of importance. The consistency of the oleogels increased with the increasing amount of FFAs and HCs and the decreasing amount of WEs and FALs. The presence of more WEs results in a strong but brittle gel with a high initial flow yield stress. We believe these results might be useful in selecting the right waxes to combine in certain fat-based food products.

  6. Elucidation of Pseurotin Biosynthetic Pathway Points to Trans-Acting C-Methyltransferase and Source of Chemical Diversity Generation**

    PubMed Central

    Tsunematsu, Yuta; Fukutomi, Manami; Saruwatari, Takayoshi; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Kenji; Hotta, Kinya; Tang, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Pseurotins comprise a family of structurally related Aspergillal natural products having interesting bioactivity. However, little is known about the biosynthetic steps involved in the formation of their complex chemical features. Here, we systematically deleted the pseurotin biosynthetic genes in A. fumigatus and performed in vivo and in vitro characterization of the tailoring enzymes to determine the biosynthetic intermediates and the gene products responsible for the formation of each intermediate. This allowed us to elucidate the main biosynthetic steps leading to the formation of pseurotin A from the predominant precursor, azaspirene. The study revealed the combinatorial nature of the biosynthesis of the pseurotin family of compounds and the intermediates. Most interestingly, we report the first identification of an epoxidase–C-methyltransferase bifunctional fusion protein PsoF that appears to methylate the nascent polyketide backbone carbon atom in trans. PMID:24939566

  7. Aspen defense chemicals influence midgut bacterial community composition of gypsy moth.

    PubMed

    Mason, Charles J; Rubert-Nason, Kennedy F; Lindroth, Richard L; Raffa, Kenneth F

    2015-01-01

    Microbial symbionts are becoming increasingly recognized as mediators of many aspects of plant - herbivore interactions. However, the influence of plant chemical defenses on gut associates of insect herbivores is less well understood. We used gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar L.), and differing trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) genotypes that vary in chemical defenses, to assess the influence of foliar chemistry on bacterial communities of larval midguts. We evaluated the bacterial community composition of foliage, and of midguts of larvae feeding on those leaves, using next-generation high-throughput sequencing. Plant defense chemicals did not influence the composition of foliar communities. In contrast, both phenolic glycosides and condensed tannins affected the bacterial consortia of gypsy moth midguts. The two most abundant operational taxonomic units were classified as Ralstonia and Acinetobacter. The relative abundance of Ralstonia was higher in midguts than in foliage when phenolic glycoside concentrations were low, but lower in midguts when phenolic glycosides were high. In contrast, the relative abundance of Ralstonia was lower in midguts than in foliage when condensed tannin concentrations were low, but higher in midguts when condensed tannins were high. Acinetobacter showed a different relationship with host chemistry, being relatively more abundant in midguts than with foliage when condensed tannin concentrations were low, but lower in midguts when condensed tannins were high. Acinetobacter tended to have a greater relative abundance in midguts of insects feeding on genotypes with high phenolic glycoside concentrations. These results show that plant defense chemicals influence herbivore midgut communities, which may in turn influence host utilization.

  8. Joint Program Executive Office for Chemical and Biological Defense Collaboration Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    87 14. SUBJECT TERMS Technology Transition, Collaboration, Organizational Design Components, Chemical Biological Defense 16. PRICE CODE 17...Biological Medical Systems (JPM CBMS) JPM CBMS centrally manages and employs government and commercial pharmaceutical development best practices to oversee...none have been previously done on technology transfer and collaboration. Professor Sazali Wahab et al. of Universiti Putra Malaysia examined the

  9. Space-Based Chemical Lasers in Strategic Defense

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    using <fJ*™’™ „, „,,„,,; rrÄr^ÄSXnceuea. MlRACL Chemical laser at White planned for 1995. ssssSS Sands New Mexico ^f Tit:*n s«ron»1 «>ta<J*’f...AsswnHY P«o Su<«y CS2 Secwios CaoaMitv LPE 10,412 OPE 12.323 S/C with Test Objects 12,382 Subtotal 35,117 Titan IVA Margin !32.7°.o

  10. Phylogenetic correlations among chemical and physical plant defenses change with ontogeny.

    PubMed

    Kariñho-Betancourt, Eunice; Agrawal, Anurag A; Halitschke, Rayko; Núñez-Farfán, Juan

    2015-04-01

    Theory predicts patterns of defense across taxa based on notions of tradeoffs and synergism among defensive traits when plants and herbivores coevolve. Because the expression of characters changes ontogenetically, the evolution of plant strategies may be best understood by considering multiple traits along a trajectory of plant development. Here we addressed the ontogenetic expression of chemical and physical defenses in 12 Datura species, and tested for macroevolutionary correlations between defensive traits using phylogenetic analyses. We used liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry to identify the toxic tropane alkaloids of Datura, and also estimated leaf trichome density. We report three major patterns. First, we found different ontogenetic trajectories of alkaloids and leaf trichomes, with alkaloids increasing in concentration at the reproductive stage, whereas trichomes were much more variable across species. Second, the dominant alkaloids and leaf trichomes showed correlated evolution, with positive and negative associations. Third, the correlations between defensive traits changed across ontogeny, with significant relationships only occurring during the juvenile phase. The patterns in expression of defensive traits in the genus Datura are suggestive of adaptation to complex selective environments varying in space and time.

  11. Chemical defense of an Asian snake reflects local availability of toxic prey and hatchling diet

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, D A; Savitzky, A H; Burghardt, G M; Nguyen, C; Meinwald, J; Schroeder, F C; Mori, A

    2013-01-01

    Species that sequester toxins from prey for their own defense against predators may exhibit population-level variation in their chemical arsenal that reflects the availability of chemically defended prey in their habitat. Rhabdophis tigrinus is an Asian snake that possesses defensive glands in the skin of its neck (‘nuchal glands’), which typically contain toxic bufadienolide steroids that the snakes sequester from consumed toads. In this study, we compared the chemistry of the nuchal gland fluid of R. tigrinus from toad-rich and toad-free islands in Japan and determined the effect of diet on the nuchal gland constituents. Our findings demonstrate that captive-hatched juveniles from toad-rich Ishima Island that had not been fed toads possess defensive bufadienolides in their nuchal glands, presumably due to maternal provisioning of these sequestered compounds. Wild-caught juveniles from Ishima possess large quantities of bufadienolides, which could result from a combination of maternal provisioning and sequestration of these defensive compounds from consumed toads. Interestingly, juvenile females from Ishima possess larger quantities of bufadienolides than do juvenile males, whereas a small sample of field-collected snakes suggests that adult males contain larger quantities of bufadienolides than do adult females. Captive-born hatchlings from Kinkasan Island lack bufadienolides in their nuchal glands, reflecting the absence of toads on that island, but they can sequester bufadienolides by feeding on toads (Bufo japonicus) in captivity. The presence of large quantities of bufadienolides in the nuchal glands of R. tigrinus from Ishima may reduce the risk of predation by providing an effective chemical defense, whereas snakes on Kinkasan may experience increased predation due to the lack of defensive compounds in their nuchal glands. PMID:23853424

  12. Current knowledge and future research perspectives on cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) chemical defenses: An agroecological view.

    PubMed

    Pinto-Zevallos, Delia M; Pareja, Martín; Ambrogi, Bianca G

    2016-10-01

    Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) is one of the most important staple crops worldwide. It constitutes the major source of carbohydrates for millions of low-income people living in rural areas, as well as a cash crop for smallholders in tropical and sub-tropical regions. The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations predicts that cassava plantations will increase and production systems will intensify in the future, highlighting the need for developing strategies that improve the sustainability of production. Plant chemical defenses hold the potential for developing pest management strategies, as these plant traits can influence the behavior and performance of both pests and beneficial arthropods. Cassava plants are well-defended and produce a number of compounds involved in direct defense, such as cyanogenic glycosides, flavonoid glycosides, and hydroxycoumarins. In addition, volatile organic compounds induced upon herbivory and the secretion of extrafloral nectar act as indirect defense against herbivores by recruiting natural enemies. Here, cassava chemical defenses against pest arthropods are reviewed, with the aim of identifying gaps in our knowledge and areas of research that deserve further investigation for developing sound pest control strategies to improve sustainable production of this crop, and how these defenses can be used to benefit other crops. Cyanogenic content in cassava is also highly toxic to humans, and can cause irreversible health problems even at sub-lethal doses when consumed over prolonged periods. Therefore, the promotion of chemical defense in this crop should not aggravate these problems, and must be accompanied with the education on processing methods that reduce human exposure to cyanide.

  13. Defense of benthic invertebrates against surface colonization by larvae: a chemical arms race.

    PubMed

    Krug, P J

    2006-01-01

    Sessile invertebrates evolved in a competitive milieu where space is a limiting resource, setting off an arms race between adults that must maintain clean surfaces and larvae that must locate and attach to a suitable substratum. I review the evidence that invertebrates chemically deter or kill the propagules of fouling animals and protists under natural conditions, and that chemosensory mechanisms may allow larvae to detect and avoid settling on chemically protected organisms. The fouling process is an ecologically complex web of interactions between basibionts, surface-colonizing microbes, and fouling larvae, all mediated by chemical signaling. Host-specific bacterial communities are maintained by many invertebrates, and may inhibit fouling by chemical deterrence of larvae, or by preventing biofilm formation by inductive strains. Larval settlement naturally occurs in a turbulent environment, yet the effects of waterborne versus surface-adsorbed chemical defenses have not been compared in flow, limiting our understanding of how larvae respond to toxic surfaces in the field. The importance of evaluating alternative hypotheses such as mechanical and physical defense is discussed, as is the need for ecologically relevant bioassays that quantify effects on larval behavior and identify compounds likely to play a defensive role in situ.

  14. Isolated and synergistic effects of chemical and structural defenses of two species of Tethya (Porifera: Demospongiae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, Suzi Meneses; Cassiano, Keila Mara; Cavalcanti, Diana Negrão; Teixeira, Valéria Laneuville; Pereira, Renato Crespo

    2012-02-01

    Sponges are an important source of many interesting secondary metabolites with multiple ecological roles. Sponges can also use their spicules as a means of deterring consumers. The present study investigated the importance of chemicals and spicules as defensive strategies against predation for two congeneric sponge species from the Brazilian coast, Tethya rubra and Tethya maza. Crude extract and spicules differed somewhat in their effectiveness between these sponge species, with T. maza better defended than T. rubra against predation by the hermit crab Calcinus tibicen and synergistic effects stronger in T. rubra. These results show that defensive strategies may be similar between sponge species possessing monophyletic origin, and reveal the importance of research on congeneric species to understand the ecology and evolution of defensive strategies.

  15. Review on CBW (Chemical Warfare and Biological Defense Program) Defense Research Information System Needs of the Navy Program Element Manager

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-29

    04 0o 4 SCORPORATXON FINAL REPORT ON REVIEW OF CBW DEFENSE RESEARCH INFORMATION SYSTEM NEEDS OF THE NAVY PROGRAM ELEMENT MANAGER JANUARY 29, 1983 TR... MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEM FOR THE PEM 37 A. INTRODUCTION 37 B. STRUCTURE OF THE SYSTEM 37 1. CBR Defense Technology File 38 a. Navy CBW Defense Project...allocated to CBW defense programs over the five year planning, programming and budget system (PPBS) cycle. The Navy 6.2 Program Element Manager (pEM) for CBW

  16. A algorithm benchmark data suite for chemical and biological (chem/bio) defense applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slamani, Mohamed-Adel; Fisk, Brian; Chyba, Thomas; Emge, Darren; Waugh, Steve

    2008-04-01

    A Chem/Bio Defense Algorithm Benchmark is proposed as a way to leverage algorithm expertise and apply it to high fidelity Chem/Bio challenge problems in a high fidelity simulation environment. Initially intended to provide risk mitigation to the DTRA-sponsored US Army CUGR ACTD, its intent is to enable the assessment and transition of algorithms to support P3I of future spiral updates. The key chemical sensor in the CUGR ACTD is the Joint Contaminated Surface Detector (JCSD), a short-range stand-off Raman spectroscopy sensor for tactical in-the-field applications. The significant challenges in discriminating chemical signatures in such a system include, but are not limited to, complex background clutter and low signal to noise ratios (SNR). This paper will present an overview of the Chem-Bio Defense Algorithm Benchmark, and the JCSD Challenge Problem specifically.

  17. Joint chemical defense for the rear battle: main operating bases in NATO's central region. Student report

    SciTech Connect

    Salmi, M.D.

    1988-04-01

    In 1984, the Chiefs of Staff of the US Army and the US Air Force signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) outlining a concept for the joint air defense of overseas air bases. With little previous experience in joint rear-area operations, problems were bound to occur, especially in the area of chemical warfare defense (CWD). The Army bases its CWD doctrine on the concept of maneuver while the Air Force bases its doctrine on being tied to air bases with little or no capability to avoid chemical attacks. Each Service developed its doctrine to support its operational concept. This study compared and contrasted the CWD doctrine of the Army and the Air Force. If found a great deal of commonality exists; however, there are also several problems which could lead to death, injury, and degradation of sortie generation capability.

  18. Evaluation of Chloropentafluorobenzene as an Intake Simulant for Chemical Defense Training

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    Force has been performinig research to develop safe intake siIlUlants for che iicalwarfare agents CWA) to provide accurate and quantitative real-time...internal dosenIcastures for it quantitative assess-nment of..aIfe exposure criteria for the use of CP113 in such exercises. To assure thesafety of...agents for use in CW training exercises. These intake simulants would allow quantitative assessment of troop proficiency and chemical defense gear efficacy

  19. Joint Service Chemical and Biological Defense Program FY 08-09 Overview

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-01

    interim protection , or a contaminated area could be sealed to restore military operations. • Human Performance—This effort will define optimum human...option for collective protection in built structures. The program focus was protecting military buildings from attack by chemical or biological agents...Homeland Defense (CAPO-HD) convened the National Research Council to review the program. The review analyzed existing military and civilian studies on

  20. Joint Service Chemical and Biological Defense Program: FY 06-07 Overview

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    immunoglobulin therapies for bacterial threat agents. • First significant protection shown from Ebola virus challenge observed in a primate model. • Demonstrated...facilities include the following: • U.S. Army Edgewood Chemical and Biological Center (ECBC) • U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases ...products directed against validated Biological Warfare (BW) agents to include bacteria, viruses , and toxins. Medical biological defense product development

  1. Seaweed resistance to microbial attack: A targeted chemical defense against marine fungi

    PubMed Central

    Kubanek, Julia; Jensen, Paul R.; Keifer, Paul A.; Sullards, M. Cameron; Collins, Dwight O.; Fenical, William

    2003-01-01

    Pathogenic microbes can devastate populations of marine plants and animals. Yet, many sessile organisms such as seaweeds and sponges suffer remarkably low levels of microbial infection, despite lacking cell-based immune systems. Antimicrobial defenses of marine organisms are largely uncharacterized, although from a small number of studies it appears that chemical defenses may improve host resistance. In this study, we asked whether the common seaweed Lobophora variegata is chemically defended against potentially deleterious microorganisms. Using bioassay-guided fractionation, we isolated and characterized a 22-membered cyclic lactone, lobophorolide (1), of presumed polyketide origin, with sub-μM activity against pathogenic and saprophytic marine fungi. Deterrent concentrations of 1 were found in 46 of 51 samples collected from 10 locations in the Bahamas over a 4-year period. Lobophorolide (1) is structurally unprecedented, yet parts of the molecule are related to tolytoxin, the scytophycins, and the swinholides, macrolides previously isolated from terrestrial cyanobacteria and from marine sponges and gastropods. Until now, compounds of this structural class have not been associated with marine macrophytes. Our findings suggest that seaweeds use targeted antimicrobial chemical defense strategies and that secondary metabolites important in the ecological interactions between marine macroorganisms and microorganisms could be a promising source of novel bioactive compounds. PMID:12756301

  2. Different chemical cues originating from a shared predator induce common defense responses in two prey species.

    PubMed

    Takahara, Teruhiko; Doi, Hideyuki; Kohmatsu, Yukihiro; Yamaoka, Ryohei

    2013-01-01

    In freshwater ecosystems, inducible defenses that involve behavioral or morphological changes in response to chemical cue detection are key phenomena in prey-predator interactions. Many species with different phylogenetic and ecological traits (e.g., general activity patterns and microhabitats) use chemical cues to avoid predators. We hypothesized that prey species with a shared predator, but having different ecological traits, would be adapted to detect different chemical cues from the predator. However, the proximate mechanisms by which prey use chemical cues to avoid predation remain little known. Here, we tested our hypothesis by using fractionated chemical components from predatory dragonfly nymphs (Lesser Emperor, Anax parthenope julius) to trigger anti-predator behavioral responses in two anuran tadpoles, the wrinkled frog Glandirana (Rana) rugosa and the Japanese tree frog Hyla japonica. Glandirana rugosa detected chemical cues that had either high or low hydrophobic properties, but H. japonica responded only to chemical cues with hydrophilic properties. During the normal behaviors of these tadpole species, G. rugosa remains immobile in benthic habitats, whereas H. japonica exhibits active swimming at the surface or in the middle of the water column. As we had hypothesized, these tadpole species, which have different general activity levels and microhabitats, detected different chemical cues that were exuded by their shared predator and responded by changing their activities to avoid predation. The specific chemical cues detected by each tadpole species are likely to have characteristics that optimize effective predator detection and encounter avoidance of the shared dragonfly predator.

  3. Chemical defenses of cryptic and aposematic Gastropterid molluscs feeding on their host sponge Dysidea granulosa.

    PubMed

    Becerro, Mikel A; Starmer, John A; Paul, Valerie J

    2006-07-01

    Numerous opisthobranchs are known to sequester chemical defenses from their prey and use them for their own defense. Information on feeding biology is critical for understanding the ecology and evolution of molluscs, yet information on feeding biology is still scarce for many groups. Gastropterid molluscs are often found on sponges, but there is controversy as to whether they are true sponge feeders. On Guam, we found the gastropterids Sagaminopteron nigropunctatum and S. psychedelicum on the sponge Dysidea granulosa. They seem to rely on contrasting defense strategies as S. psychedelicum has vivid colors, consistent with the warning coloration found in many chemically defended opisthobranchs, whereas S. nigropunctatum is highly cryptic on the sponge. S. nigropunctatum is avoided by the pufferfish Canthigaster solandri in aquarium assays. We analyzed the secondary metabolites of the two species and found that both share polybrominated diphenyl ethers (BDEs) with their host sponge D. granulosa. S. psychedelicum and S. nigropunctatum sequester the major BDE in the sponge and accumulate it in the mantle at approximately the same concentration as in the sponge (4.03 and 2.37%, respectively), and concentrate it in their parapodia at over twice the sponge concentration (7.97 and 10.10%, respectively). We also detected trace amounts in the mucus secretion of S. psychedelicum, and quantified significant amounts in the mucus (1.84%) and egg masses (2.22%) of S. nigropunctatum. Despite contrasting color patterns displayed by the two gastropterid species, they seem to share a similar chemical defense strategy, i.e., they feed on D. granulosa and accumulate the major BDE of the sponge in their tissues.

  4. A specialist herbivore uses chemical camouflage to overcome the defenses of an ant-plant mutualism.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, Susan R; Reid, Ellen; Sapp, Joseph; Poveda, Katja; Royer, Anne M; Posto, Amanda L; Kessler, André

    2014-01-01

    Many plants and ants engage in mutualisms where plants provide food and shelter to the ants in exchange for protection against herbivores and competitors. Although several species of herbivores thwart ant defenses and extract resources from the plants, the mechanisms that allow these herbivores to avoid attack are poorly understood. The specialist insect herbivore, Piezogaster reclusus (Hemiptera: Coreidae), feeds on Neotropical bull-horn acacias (Vachellia collinsii) despite the presence of Pseudomyrmex spinicola ants that nest in and aggressively defend the trees. We tested three hypotheses for how P. reclusus feeds on V. collinsii while avoiding ant attack: (1) chemical camouflage via cuticular surface compounds, (2) chemical deterrence via metathoracic defense glands, and (3) behavioral traits that reduce ant detection or attack. Our results showed that compounds from both P. reclusus cuticles and metathoracic glands reduce the number of ant attacks, but only cuticular compounds appear to be essential in allowing P. reclusus to feed on bull-horn acacia trees undisturbed. In addition, we found that ant attack rates to P. reclusus increased significantly when individuals were transferred between P. spinicola ant colonies. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that chemical mimicry of colony-specific ant or host plant odors plays a key role in allowing P. reclusus to circumvent ant defenses and gain access to important resources, including food and possibly enemy-free space. This interaction between ants, acacias, and their herbivores provides an excellent example of the ability of herbivores to adapt to ant defenses of plants and suggests that herbivores may play an important role in the evolution and maintenance of mutualisms.

  5. A Specialist Herbivore Uses Chemical Camouflage to Overcome the Defenses of an Ant-Plant Mutualism

    PubMed Central

    Whitehead, Susan R.; Reid, Ellen; Sapp, Joseph; Poveda, Katja; Royer, Anne M.; Posto, Amanda L.; Kessler, André

    2014-01-01

    Many plants and ants engage in mutualisms where plants provide food and shelter to the ants in exchange for protection against herbivores and competitors. Although several species of herbivores thwart ant defenses and extract resources from the plants, the mechanisms that allow these herbivores to avoid attack are poorly understood. The specialist insect herbivore, Piezogaster reclusus (Hemiptera: Coreidae), feeds on Neotropical bull-horn acacias (Vachellia collinsii) despite the presence of Pseudomyrmex spinicola ants that nest in and aggressively defend the trees. We tested three hypotheses for how P. reclusus feeds on V. collinsii while avoiding ant attack: (1) chemical camouflage via cuticular surface compounds, (2) chemical deterrence via metathoracic defense glands, and (3) behavioral traits that reduce ant detection or attack. Our results showed that compounds from both P. reclusus cuticles and metathoracic glands reduce the number of ant attacks, but only cuticular compounds appear to be essential in allowing P. reclusus to feed on bull-horn acacia trees undisturbed. In addition, we found that ant attack rates to P. reclusus increased significantly when individuals were transferred between P. spinicola ant colonies. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that chemical mimicry of colony-specific ant or host plant odors plays a key role in allowing P. reclusus to circumvent ant defenses and gain access to important resources, including food and possibly enemy-free space. This interaction between ants, acacias, and their herbivores provides an excellent example of the ability of herbivores to adapt to ant defenses of plants and suggests that herbivores may play an important role in the evolution and maintenance of mutualisms. PMID:25047551

  6. Chemical defenses (glucosinolates) of native and invasive populations of the range expanding invasive plant Rorippa austriaca.

    PubMed

    Huberty, Martine; Tielbörger, Katja; Harvey, Jeffrey A; Müller, Caroline; Macel, Mirka

    2014-04-01

    Due to global warming, species are expanding their range to higher latitudes. Some range expanding plants have become invasive in their new range. The Evolution of Increased Competitive Ability (EICA) hypothesis and the Shifting Defense Hypothesis (SDH) predict altered selection on plant defenses in the introduced range of invasive plants due to changes in herbivore pressures and communities. Here, we investigated chemical defenses (glucosinolates) of five native and seven invasive populations of the Eurasian invasive range expanding plant, Rorippa austriaca. Further, we studied feeding preferences of a generalist and a specialist herbivore among the populations. We detected eight glucosinolates in the leaves of R. austriaca. 8-Methylsulfinyloctyl glucosinolate was the most abundant glucosinolate in all plants. There were no overall differences between native and invasive plants in concentrations of glucosinolates. However, concentrations among populations within each range differed significantly. Feeding preference between the populations by a generalist herbivore was negatively correlated with glucosinolate concentrations. Feeding by a specialist did not differ between the populations and was not correlated with glucosinolates. Possibly, local differences in herbivore communities within each range may explain the differences in concentrations of glucosinolates among populations. Little support for the predictions of the EICA hypothesis or the SDH was found for the glucosinolate defenses of the studied native and invasive R. austriaca populations.

  7. Subcellular fractionation and chemical speciation of uranium to elucidate its fate in gills and hepatopancreas of crayfish Procambarus clarkii.

    PubMed

    Frelon, S; Mounicou, S; Lobinski, R; Gilbin, R; Simon, O

    2013-04-01

    Knowledge of the organ and subcellular distribution of metals in organisms is fundamental for the understanding of their uptake, storage, elimination and toxicity. Detoxification via MTLP and MRG formation and chelation by some proteins are necessary to better assess the metal toxic fraction in aquatic organisms. This work focused on uranium, natural element mainly used in nuclear industry, and its subcellular fractionation and chemical speciation to elucidate its accumulation pattern in gills and hepatopancreas of crayfish Procambarus clarkii, key organs of uptake and detoxification, respectively. Crayfish waterborne exposure was performed during 4 and 10d at 0, 30, 600 and 4000 μg UL(-1). After tissue dissection, uranium subcellular fractionation was performed by successive ultracentrifugations. SEC-ICP MS was used to study uranium speciation in cytosolic fraction. The uranium subcellular partitioning patterns varied according to the target organ studied and its biological function in the organism. The cytosolic fraction accounted for 13-30% of the total uranium amount in gills and 35-75% in hepatopancreas. The uranium fraction coeluting with MTLPs in gills and hepatopancreas cytosols showed that roughly 55% of uranium remained non-detoxified and thus potentially toxic in the cytosol. Furthermore, the sum of uranium amount in organelle fractions and in the non-detoxified part of cytosol, possibly equivalent to available fraction, accounted for 20% (gills) and 57% (hepatopancreas) of the total uranium. Finally, the SEC-ICP MS analysis provided information on potential competition of U for biomolecules similar than the ones involved in endogenous essential metal (Fe, Cu) chelation.

  8. Tasty but protected--first evidence of chemical defense in oribatid mites.

    PubMed

    Heethoff, Michael; Koerner, Lars; Norton, Roy A; Raspotnig, Günther

    2011-09-01

    Oribatid mites (Acari, Oribatida) represent one of the most abundant and speciose groups of microarthropods in the decomposer food webs of soils, but little is known of their top-down regulation by predators. Oribatids are relatively long-lived and have numerous morphological defensive adaptations, and so have been proposed to live in 'enemy-free space'. Most also possess a pair of large exocrine oil glands that produce species-specific mixtures of hydrocarbons, terpenes, aromatics, and alkaloids with presumably allomonal functions, although their adaptive value has never been tested empirically. We developed a protocol that discharges the oil glands of the model oribatid species, Archegozetes longisetosus. and offered 'disarmed' individuals as prey to polyphagous Stenus beetles (Staphylinidae), using untreated mites as controls. Stenus juno fed on disarmed mites with behavioral sequences and success rates similar to those observed when they prey on springtails, a common prey. In contrast, mites from the control group with full glands were almost completely rejected; contact with the gland region elicited a strong reaction and cleaning behavior in the beetle. This is the first evidence of an adaptive value of oribatid mite oil gland secretions for chemical defense. The protocol of discharging oil glands should facilitate future studies on top-down control of oribatid mites that aim to differentiate between morphological and chemical aspects of defensive strategies.

  9. Chemical Defense Balanced by Sequestration and De Novo Biosynthesis in a Lepidopteran Specialist

    PubMed Central

    Fürstenberg-Hägg, Joel; Zagrobelny, Mika; Jørgensen, Kirsten; Vogel, Heiko; Møller, Birger Lindberg; Bak, Søren

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of sequestration (uptake and accumulation) relative to de novo biosynthesis of chemical defense compounds is poorly understood, as is the interplay between these two strategies. The Burnet moth Zygaena filipendulae (Lepidoptera) and its food-plant Lotus corniculatus (Fabaceae) poses an exemplary case study of these questions, as Z. filipendulae belongs to the only insect family known to both de novo biosynthesize and sequester the same defense compounds directly from its food-plant. Z. filipendulae and L. corniculatus both contain the two cyanogenic glucosides linamarin and lotaustralin, which are defense compounds that can be hydrolyzed to liberate toxic hydrogen cyanide. The overall amounts and ratios of linamarin and lotaustralin in Z. filipendulae are tightly regulated, and only to a low extent reflect the ratio in the ingested food-plant. We demonstrate that Z. filipendulae adjusts the de novo biosynthesis of CNglcs by regulation at both the transcriptional and protein level depending on food plant composition. Ultimately this ensures that the larva saves energy and nitrogen while maintaining an effective defense system to fend off predators. By using in situ PCR and immunolocalization, the biosynthetic pathway was resolved to the larval fat body and integument, which infers rapid replenishment of defense compounds following an encounter with a predator. Our study supports the hypothesis that de novo biosynthesis of CNglcs in Z. filipendulae preceded the ability to sequester, and facilitated a food-plant switch to cyanogenic plants, after which sequestration could evolve. Preservation of de novo biosynthesis allows fine-tuning of the amount and composition of CNglcs in Z. filipendulae. PMID:25299618

  10. Chemical defense balanced by sequestration and de novo biosynthesis in a lepidopteran specialist.

    PubMed

    Fürstenberg-Hägg, Joel; Zagrobelny, Mika; Jørgensen, Kirsten; Vogel, Heiko; Møller, Birger Lindberg; Bak, Søren

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of sequestration (uptake and accumulation) relative to de novo biosynthesis of chemical defense compounds is poorly understood, as is the interplay between these two strategies. The Burnet moth Zygaena filipendulae (Lepidoptera) and its food-plant Lotus corniculatus (Fabaceae) poses an exemplary case study of these questions, as Z. filipendulae belongs to the only insect family known to both de novo biosynthesize and sequester the same defense compounds directly from its food-plant. Z. filipendulae and L. corniculatus both contain the two cyanogenic glucosides linamarin and lotaustralin, which are defense compounds that can be hydrolyzed to liberate toxic hydrogen cyanide. The overall amounts and ratios of linamarin and lotaustralin in Z. filipendulae are tightly regulated, and only to a low extent reflect the ratio in the ingested food-plant. We demonstrate that Z. filipendulae adjusts the de novo biosynthesis of CNglcs by regulation at both the transcriptional and protein level depending on food plant composition. Ultimately this ensures that the larva saves energy and nitrogen while maintaining an effective defense system to fend off predators. By using in situ PCR and immunolocalization, the biosynthetic pathway was resolved to the larval fat body and integument, which infers rapid replenishment of defense compounds following an encounter with a predator. Our study supports the hypothesis that de novo biosynthesis of CNglcs in Z. filipendulae preceded the ability to sequester, and facilitated a food-plant switch to cyanogenic plants, after which sequestration could evolve. Preservation of de novo biosynthesis allows fine-tuning of the amount and composition of CNglcs in Z. filipendulae.

  11. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi alter above- and below-ground chemical defense expression differentially among Asclepias species

    PubMed Central

    Vannette, Rachel L.; Hunter, Mark D.; Rasmann, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    Below-ground (BG) symbionts of plants can have substantial influence on plant growth and nutrition. Recent work demonstrates that mycorrhizal fungi can affect plant resistance to herbivory and the performance of above- (AG) and BG herbivores. Although these examples emerge from diverse systems, it is unclear if plant species that express similar defensive traits respond similarly to fungal colonization, but comparative work may inform this question. To examine the effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) on the expression of chemical resistance, we inoculated 8 species of Asclepias (milkweed)—which all produce toxic cardenolides—with a community of AMF. We quantified plant biomass, foliar and root cardenolide concentration and composition, and assessed evidence for a growth-defense tradeoff in the presence and absence of AMF. As expected, total foliar and root cardenolide concentration varied among milkweed species. Importantly, the effect of mycorrhizal fungi on total foliar cardenolide concentration also varied among milkweed species, with foliar cardenolides increasing or decreasing, depending on the plant species. We detected a phylogenetic signal to this variation; AMF fungi reduced foliar cardenolide concentrations to a greater extent in the clade including A. curassavica than in the clade including A. syriaca. Moreover, AMF inoculation shifted the composition of cardenolides in AG and BG plant tissues in a species-specific fashion. Mycorrhizal inoculation changed the relative distribution of cardenolides between root and shoot tissue in a species-specific fashion, but did not affect cardenolide diversity or polarity. Finally, a tradeoff between plant growth and defense in non-mycorrhizal plants was mitigated completely by AMF inoculation. Overall, we conclude that the effects of AMF inoculation on the expression of chemical resistance can vary among congeneric plant species, and ameliorate tradeoffs between growth and defense. PMID:24065971

  12. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi alter above- and below-ground chemical defense expression differentially among Asclepias species.

    PubMed

    Vannette, Rachel L; Hunter, Mark D; Rasmann, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    Below-ground (BG) symbionts of plants can have substantial influence on plant growth and nutrition. Recent work demonstrates that mycorrhizal fungi can affect plant resistance to herbivory and the performance of above- (AG) and BG herbivores. Although these examples emerge from diverse systems, it is unclear if plant species that express similar defensive traits respond similarly to fungal colonization, but comparative work may inform this question. To examine the effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) on the expression of chemical resistance, we inoculated 8 species of Asclepias (milkweed)-which all produce toxic cardenolides-with a community of AMF. We quantified plant biomass, foliar and root cardenolide concentration and composition, and assessed evidence for a growth-defense tradeoff in the presence and absence of AMF. As expected, total foliar and root cardenolide concentration varied among milkweed species. Importantly, the effect of mycorrhizal fungi on total foliar cardenolide concentration also varied among milkweed species, with foliar cardenolides increasing or decreasing, depending on the plant species. We detected a phylogenetic signal to this variation; AMF fungi reduced foliar cardenolide concentrations to a greater extent in the clade including A. curassavica than in the clade including A. syriaca. Moreover, AMF inoculation shifted the composition of cardenolides in AG and BG plant tissues in a species-specific fashion. Mycorrhizal inoculation changed the relative distribution of cardenolides between root and shoot tissue in a species-specific fashion, but did not affect cardenolide diversity or polarity. Finally, a tradeoff between plant growth and defense in non-mycorrhizal plants was mitigated completely by AMF inoculation. Overall, we conclude that the effects of AMF inoculation on the expression of chemical resistance can vary among congeneric plant species, and ameliorate tradeoffs between growth and defense.

  13. A proposal for regional chemical and biological defense among the Balkan countries.

    PubMed

    Karayilanoğlu, Turan; Kenar, Levent

    2004-08-01

    In terms of preventing or reducing the mass disaster caused by chemical and biological warfare agents (CBWs), establishing an efficient chemical and biological defense (CBD) system is vital. Balkan countries including Turkey, Greece, Romania, and Bulgaria are located in the "hot region," where some of the neighboring countries have had a CBW production program or do not comply with the international treaties related to the prohibition of CBWs. On the other hand, setting up the CBD is difficult and requires excessive expenditure, which causes a large economical hardship. According to the point of view of Turkish nuclear, biological, and chemical scientists, who are well experienced with CBD, the formation of a CBD system in the Balkan countries would prevent the CBW threat in this region, and in addition, would be able to make a contribution to global security.

  14. Wolbachia-Free Heteropterans Do Not Produce Defensive Chemicals or Alarm Pheromones.

    PubMed

    Becerra, Judith X; Venable, Gabriela X; Saeidi, Vahid

    2015-07-01

    The true bugs, or heteropterans, are known for their widespread production of anti-predator chemicals and alarm pheromones in scent glands, a derived trait that constitutes one of the defining characters of the suborder Heteroptera and a potential novel trait that contributed to their diversification. We investigated whether symbiotic bacteria could be involved in the formation of these chemicals using Thasus neocalifornicus, a coreid bug that produces semiochemicals frequently found in other bugs. Using DNA phylogenetic methodology and experiments using antibiotics coupled with molecular techniques, we identified Wolbachia as the microorganism infecting the scent glands of this bug. Decreasing the level of Wobachia infection using antibiotics was correlated with a diminution of heteropteran production of defensive compounds and alarm pheromones, suggesting that this symbiotic bacterium might be implicated in the formation of chemicals.

  15. Chemical defense by the native winter ant (Prenolepis imparis) against the invasive Argentine ant (Linepithema humile).

    PubMed

    Sorrells, Trevor R; Kuritzky, Leah Y; Kauhanen, Peter G; Fitzgerald, Katherine; Sturgis, Shelby J; Chen, Jimmy; Dijamco, Cheri A; Basurto, Kimberly N; Gordon, Deborah M

    2011-04-19

    The invasive Argentine ant (Linepithema humile) is established worldwide and displaces native ant species. In northern California, however, the native winter ant (Prenolepis imparis) persists in invaded areas. We found that in aggressive interactions between the two species, P. imparis employs a potent defensive secretion. Field observations were conducted at P. imparis nest sites both in the presence and absence of L. humile. These observations suggested and laboratory assays confirmed that P. imparis workers are more likely to secrete when outnumbered by L. humile. Workers of P. imparis were also more likely to secrete near their nest entrances than when foraging on trees. One-on-one laboratory trials showed that the P. imparis secretion is highly lethal to L. humile, causing 79% mortality. The nonpolar fraction of the secretion was chemically analyzed with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, and found to be composed of long-chain and cyclic hydrocarbons. Chemical analysis of dissected P. imparis workers showed that the nonpolar fraction is derived from the Dufour's gland. Based on these conclusions, we hypothesize that this chemical defense may help P. imparis to resist displacement by L. humile.

  16. Chemical Defense by the Native Winter Ant (Prenolepis imparis) against the Invasive Argentine Ant (Linepithema humile)

    PubMed Central

    Kauhanen, Peter G.; Fitzgerald, Katherine; Sturgis, Shelby J.; Chen, Jimmy; Dijamco, Cheri A.; Basurto, Kimberly N.; Gordon, Deborah M.

    2011-01-01

    The invasive Argentine ant (Linepithema humile) is established worldwide and displaces native ant species. In northern California, however, the native winter ant (Prenolepis imparis) persists in invaded areas. We found that in aggressive interactions between the two species, P. imparis employs a potent defensive secretion. Field observations were conducted at P. imparis nest sites both in the presence and absence of L. humile. These observations suggested and laboratory assays confirmed that P. imparis workers are more likely to secrete when outnumbered by L. humile. Workers of P. imparis were also more likely to secrete near their nest entrances than when foraging on trees. One-on-one laboratory trials showed that the P. imparis secretion is highly lethal to L. humile, causing 79% mortality. The nonpolar fraction of the secretion was chemically analyzed with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, and found to be composed of long-chain and cyclic hydrocarbons. Chemical analysis of dissected P. imparis workers showed that the nonpolar fraction is derived from the Dufour's gland. Based on these conclusions, we hypothesize that this chemical defense may help P. imparis to resist displacement by L. humile. PMID:21526231

  17. Chemical Ecology of Cave-Dwelling Millipedes: Defensive Secretions of the Typhloiulini (Diplopoda, Julida, Julidae).

    PubMed

    Makarov, Slobodan E; Bodner, Michaela; Reineke, Doris; Vujisić, Ljubodrag V; Todosijević, Marina M; Antić, Dragan Ž; Vagalinski, Boyan; Lučić, Luka R; Mitić, Bojan M; Mitov, Plamen; Anđelković, Boban D; Lucić, Sofija Pavković; Vajs, Vlatka; Tomić, Vladimir T; Raspotnig, Günther

    2017-04-01

    Cave animals live under highly constant ecological conditions and in permanent darkness, and many evolutionary adaptations of cave-dwellers have been triggered by their specific environment. A similar "cave effect" leading to pronounced chemical interactions under such conditions may be assumed, but the chemoecology of troglobionts is mostly unknown. We investigated the defensive chemistry of a largely cave-dwelling julid group, the controversial tribe "Typhloiulini", and we included some cave-dwelling and some endogean representatives. While chemical defense in juliform diplopods is known to be highly uniform, and mainly based on methyl- and methoxy-substituted benzoquinones, the defensive secretions of typhloiulines contained ethyl-benzoquinones and related compounds. Interestingly, ethyl-benzoquinones were found in some, but not all cave-dwelling typhloiulines, and some non-cave dwellers also contained these compounds. On the other hand, ethyl-benzoquinones were not detected in troglobiont nor in endogean typhloiuline outgroups. In order to explain the taxonomic pattern of ethyl-benzoquinone occurrence, and to unravel whether a cave-effect triggered ethyl-benzoquinone evolution, we classed the "Typhloiulini" investigated here within a phylogenetic framework of julid taxa, and traced the evolutionary history of ethyl-benzoquinones in typhloiulines in relation to cave-dwelling. The results indicated a cave-independent evolution of ethyl-substituted benzoquinones, indicating the absence of a "cave effect" on the secretions of troglobiont Typhloiulini. Ethyl-benzoquinones probably evolved early in an epi- or endogean ancestor of a clade including several, but not all Typhloiulus (basically comprising a taxonomic entity known as "Typhloiulus sensu stricto") and Serboiulus. Ethyl-benzoquinones are proposed as novel and valuable chemical characters for julid systematics.

  18. Rat α-Fetoprotein binding affinities of a large set of structurally diverse chemicals elucidated the relationships between structures and binding affinities.

    PubMed

    Hong, Huixiao; Branham, William S; Dial, Stacey L; Moland, Carrie L; Fang, Hong; Shen, Jie; Perkins, Roger; Sheehan, Daniel; Tong, Weida

    2012-11-19

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals interfere with the endocrine system in animals, including humans, to exert adverse effects. One of the mechanisms of endocrine disruption is through the binding of receptors such as the estrogen receptor (ER) in target cells. The concentration of any chemical in serum is important for its entry into the target cells to bind the receptors. α-Fetoprotein (AFP) is a major transport protein in rodent serum that can bind with estrogens and thus change a chemical's availability for entrance into the target cell. Sequestration of an estrogen in the serum can alter the chemical's potential for disrupting estrogen receptor-mediated responses. To better understand endocrine disruption, we developed a competitive binding assay using rat amniotic fluid, which contains very high levels of AFP, and measured the binding to the rat AFP for 125 structurally diverse chemicals, most of which are known to bind ER. Fifty-three chemicals were able to bind the rat AFP in the assay, while 72 chemicals were determined to be nonbinders. Observations from closely examining the relationship between the binding data and structures of the tested chemicals are rationally explained in a manner consistent with proposed binding regions of rat AFP in the literature. The data reported here represent the largest data set of structurally diverse chemicals tested for rat AFP binding. The data assist in elucidating binding interactions and mechanisms between chemicals and rat AFP and, in turn, assist in the evaluation of the endocrine disrupting potential of chemicals.

  19. Convergent evolution of chemical defense in poison frogs and arthropod prey between Madagascar and the Neotropics.

    PubMed

    Clark, Valerie C; Raxworthy, Christopher J; Rakotomalala, Valérie; Sierwald, Petra; Fisher, Brian L

    2005-08-16

    With few exceptions, aposematically colored poison frogs sequester defensive alkaloids, unchanged, from dietary arthropods. In the Neotropics, myrmicine and formicine ants and the siphonotid millipede Rhinotus purpureus are dietary sources for alkaloids in dendrobatid poison frogs, yet the arthropod sources for Mantella poison frogs in Madagascar remained unknown. We report GC-MS analyses of extracts of arthropods and microsympatric Malagasy poison frogs (Mantella) collected from Ranomafana, Madagascar. Arthropod sources for 11 "poison frog" alkaloids were discovered, 7 of which were also detected in microsympatric Mantella. These arthropod sources include three endemic Malagasy ants, Tetramorium electrum, Anochetus grandidieri, and Paratrechina amblyops (subfamilies Myrmicinae, Ponerinae, and Formicinae, respectively), and the pantropical tramp millipede R. purpureus. Two of these ant species, A. grandidieri and T. electrum, were also found in Mantella stomachs, and ants represented the dominant prey type (67.3% of 609 identified stomach arthropods). To our knowledge, detection of 5,8-disubstituted (ds) indolizidine iso-217B in T. electrum represents the first izidine having a branch point in its carbon skeleton to be identified from ants, and detection of 3,5-ds pyrrolizidine 251O in A. grandidieri represents the first ponerine ant proposed as a dietary source of poison frog alkaloids. Endemic Malagasy ants with defensive alkaloids (with the exception of Paratrechina) are not closely related to any Neotropical species sharing similar chemical defenses. Our results suggest convergent evolution for the acquisition of defensive alkaloids in these dietary ants, which may have been the critical prerequisite for subsequent convergence in poison frogs between Madagascar and the Neotropics.

  20. Tight-binding quantum chemical molecular dynamics simulations for the elucidation of chemical reaction dynamics in SiC etching with SF6/O2 plasma.

    PubMed

    Ito, Hiroshi; Kuwahara, Takuya; Kawaguchi, Kentaro; Higuchi, Yuji; Ozawa, Nobuki; Kubo, Momoji

    2016-03-21

    We used our etching simulator [H. Ito et al., J. Phys. Chem. C, 2014, 118, 21580-21588] based on tight-binding quantum chemical molecular dynamics (TB-QCMD) to elucidate SiC etching mechanisms. First, the SiC surface is irradiated with SF5 radicals, which are the dominant etchant species in experiments, with the irradiation energy of 300 eV. After SF5 radicals bombard the SiC surface, Si-C bonds dissociate, generating Si-F, C-F, Si-S, and C-S bonds. Then, etching products, such as SiS, CS, SiFx, and CFx (x = 1-4) molecules, are generated and evaporated. In particular, SiFx is the main generated species, and Si atoms are more likely to vaporize than C atoms. The remaining C atoms on SiC generate C-C bonds that may decrease the etching rate. Interestingly, far fewer Si-Si bonds than C-C bonds are generated. We also simulated SiC etching with SF3 radicals. Although the chemical reaction dynamics are similar to etching with SF5 radicals, the etching rate is lower. Next, to clarify the effect of O atom addition on the etching mechanism, we also simulated SiC etching with SF5 and O radicals/atoms. After bombardment with SF5 radicals, Si-C bonds dissociate in a similar way to the etching without O atoms. In addition, O atoms generate many C-O bonds and COy (y = 1-2) molecules, inhibiting the generation of C-C bonds. This indicates that O atom addition improves the removal of C atoms from SiC. However, for a high O concentration, many C-C and Si-Si bonds are generated. When the O atoms dissociate the Si-C bonds and generate dangling bonds, the O atoms terminate only one or two dangling bonds. Moreover, at high O concentrations there are fewer S and F atoms to terminate the dangling bonds than at low O concentration. Therefore, few dangling bonds of dissociated Si and C atoms are terminated, and they form many Si-Si and C-C bonds. Furthermore, we propose that the optimal O concentration is 50-60% because both Si and C atoms generate many etching products producing fewer C

  1. pH-Controlled Oxidation of an Aromatic Ketone: Structural Elucidation of the Products of Two Green Chemical Reactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballard, C. Eric

    2010-01-01

    A laboratory experiment emphasizing the structural elucidation of organic compounds has been developed as a discovery exercise. The "unknown" compounds are the products of the pH-controlled oxidation of 4'-methoxyacetophenone with bleach. The chemoselectivity of this reaction is highly dependent on the pH of the reaction media: under basic…

  2. pH-Controlled Oxidation of an Aromatic Ketone: Structural Elucidation of the Products of Two Green Chemical Reactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballard, C. Eric

    2010-01-01

    A laboratory experiment emphasizing the structural elucidation of organic compounds has been developed as a discovery exercise. The "unknown" compounds are the products of the pH-controlled oxidation of 4'-methoxyacetophenone with bleach. The chemoselectivity of this reaction is highly dependent on the pH of the reaction media: under basic…

  3. Will chemical defenses become more effective against specialist herbivores under elevated CO2?

    PubMed

    Landosky, John M; Karowe, David N

    2014-10-01

    Elevated atmospheric CO2 is known to affect plant-insect herbivore interactions. Elevated CO2 causes leaf nitrogen to decrease, the ostensible cause of herbivore compensatory feeding. CO2 may also affect herbivore consumption by altering chemical defenses via changes in plant hormones. We considered the effects of elevated CO2, in conjunction with soil fertility and damage (simulated herbivory), on glucosinolate concentrations of mustard (Brassica nigra) and collard (B. oleracea var. acephala) and the effects of leaf nitrogen and glucosinolate groups on specialist Pieris rapae consumption. Elevated CO2 affected B. oleracea but not B. nigra glucosinolates; responses to soil fertility and damage were also species-specific. Soil fertility and damage also affected B. oleracea glucosinolates differently under elevated CO2. Glucosinolates did not affect P. rapae consumption at either CO2 concentration in B. nigra, but had CO2-specific effects on consumption in B. oleracea. At ambient CO2, leaf nitrogen had strong effects on glucosinolate concentrations and P. rapae consumption but only gluconasturtiin was a feeding stimulant. At elevated CO2, direct effects of leaf nitrogen were weaker, but glucosinolates had stronger effects on consumption. Gluconasturtiin and aliphatic glucosinolates were feeding stimulants and indole glucosinolates were feeding deterrents. These results do not support the compensatory feeding hypothesis as the sole driver of changes in P. rapae consumption under elevated CO2. Support for hormone-mediated CO2 response (HMCR) was mixed; it explained few treatment effects on constitutive or induced glucosinolates, but did explain patterns in SEMs. Further, the novel feeding deterrent effect of indole glucosinolates under elevated CO2 in B. oleracae underscores the importance of defensive chemistry in CO2 response. We speculate that P. rapae indole glucosinolate detoxification mechanisms may have been overwhelmed under elevated CO2 forcing slowed

  4. Stress, chemical defense agents, and cholinergic receptors. Midterm report, 1 November 1987-31 July 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, J.D.

    1989-11-30

    This project is assessing the affects of exposure to a chemical defense agent on anxiety and stress, by using rat models of anxiety (conditioned emotional response (CER); conditioned suppression) and unconditioned non-specific stres (exposure to footshock). The specific experiments determined the plasticity of muscarinic cholinergic binding sites in the central nervous system. The neuroanatomical locus and neuropharmacological profile of changes in binding sites were assessed in brain areas enriched in cholinergic markers. Acetylcholine turnover was measured to determine if the receptor response is compensatory or independent. The effects of acute exposure to doses of a chemical defense agent (soman--XGD) on lethality and behaviors were examined. The experiments involved training and conditioning adult rats to CER using standard operant/respondent techniques. The binding of radiolabelled ligand was studied in vitro using brain membranes and tissue sections (autoradiography). The major findings are that CER produces increases in acetylcholine turnover in brain areas involved in anxiety, and that primarily post-synaptic M1 receptors compensatorly decrease in response. These neurochemical phenomena are directly correlated with several behaviors, including onset and extinction of CER and non-specific stress. Followup experiments have been designed to test the interaction of CER, XGD and neurochemistry.

  5. Community complexity drives patterns of natural selection on a chemical defense of Brassica nigra.

    PubMed

    Lankau, Richard A; Strauss, Sharon Y

    2008-02-01

    Plants interact with many different species throughout their life cycle. Recent work has shown that the ecological effects of multispecies interactions are often not predictable from studies of the component pairwise interactions. Little is known about how multispecies interactions affect the evolution of ecologically important traits. We tested the direct and interactive effects of inter- and intraspecific competition, as well as of two abundant herbivore species (a generalist folivore and a specialist aphid), on the selective value of a defensive chemical compound in Brassica nigra. We found that investment in chemical defense was favored in interspecific competition but disfavored in intraspecific competition and that this pattern of selection was dependent on the presence of both herbivores, suggesting that selection will depend on the rarity or commonness of these species. These results show that the selective value of ecologically important traits depends on the complicated web of interactions present in diverse natural communities and that fluctuations in community composition may maintain genetic variation in such traits.

  6. The repertoire of chemical defense genes in the coral Acropora digitifera genome.

    PubMed

    Shinzato, Chuya; Hamada, Mayuko; Shoguchi, Eiichi; Kawashima, Takeshi; Satoh, Nori

    2012-08-01

    Scleractinian corals are of fundamental ecological significance in tropical and sub-tropical shallow water. This ecological success is attributed to their ability of formation of obligate endosymbioses with dinoflagellates of the genus Symbiodinium. Nevertheless, approximately one-third of reef-building coral species are critically endangered and the remainder are under threat from the effects of climate change and local impacts. Molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in stress responses and the establishment and collapse of the symbiosis are therefore an urgent subject of research. Metazoans possess large numbers of genes that participate in response to environmental stressors, and chemical defense genes included P450 and other oxidases, various conjugating enzymes, ATP-dependent efflux transporters, oxidative detoxification proteins, as well as transcription factors that regulate these genes. Here we searched those genes in recently decoded the coral Acropora digitifera genome. We found that this genome contains a set of chemical defense genes in numbers comparable with other cnidarians and metazoans and that there are some lineagespecific gene family expansions in the coral genome. These provide information for future research into molecular mechanisms involved in coral stress responses.

  7. Successful herbivore attack due to metabolic diversion of a plant chemical defense

    PubMed Central

    Wittstock, Ute; Agerbirk, Niels; Stauber, Einar J.; Olsen, Carl Erik; Hippler, Michael; Mitchell-Olds, Thomas; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Vogel, Heiko

    2004-01-01

    Plants protect themselves against herbivory with a diverse array of repellent or toxic secondary metabolites. However, many herbivorous insects have developed counteradaptations that enable them to feed on chemically defended plants without apparent negative effects. Here, we present evidence that larvae of the specialist insect, Pieris rapae (cabbage white butterfly, Lepidoptera: Pieridae), are biochemically adapted to the glucosinolate–myrosinase system, the major chemical defense of their host plants. The defensive function of the glucosinolate–myrosinase system results from the toxic isothiocyanates that are released when glucosinolates are hydrolyzed by myrosinases on tissue disruption. We show that the hydrolysis reaction is redirected toward the formation of nitriles instead of isothiocyanates if plant material is ingested by P. rapae larvae, and that the nitriles are excreted with the feces. The ability to form nitriles is due to a larval gut protein, designated nitrile-specifier protein, that by itself has no hydrolytic activity on glucosinolates and that is unrelated to any functionally characterized protein. Nitrile-specifier protein appears to be the key biochemical counteradaptation that allows P. rapae to feed with impunity on plants containing glucosinolates and myrosinases. This finding sheds light on the ecology and evolution of plant–insect interactions and suggests novel highly selective pest management strategies. PMID:15051878

  8. Successful herbivore attack due to metabolic diversion of a plant chemical defense.

    PubMed

    Wittstock, Ute; Agerbirk, Niels; Stauber, Einar J; Olsen, Carl Erik; Hippler, Michael; Mitchell-Olds, Thomas; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Vogel, Heiko

    2004-04-06

    Plants protect themselves against herbivory with a diverse array of repellent or toxic secondary metabolites. However, many herbivorous insects have developed counteradaptations that enable them to feed on chemically defended plants without apparent negative effects. Here, we present evidence that larvae of the specialist insect, Pieris rapae (cabbage white butterfly, Lepidoptera: Pieridae), are biochemically adapted to the glucosinolate-myrosinase system, the major chemical defense of their host plants. The defensive function of the glucosinolate-myrosinase system results from the toxic isothiocyanates that are released when glucosinolates are hydrolyzed by myrosinases on tissue disruption. We show that the hydrolysis reaction is redirected toward the formation of nitriles instead of isothiocyanates if plant material is ingested by P. rapae larvae, and that the nitriles are excreted with the feces. The ability to form nitriles is due to a larval gut protein, designated nitrile-specifier protein, that by itself has no hydrolytic activity on glucosinolates and that is unrelated to any functionally characterized protein. Nitrile-specifier protein appears to be the key biochemical counteradaptation that allows P. rapae to feed with impunity on plants containing glucosinolates and myrosinases. This finding sheds light on the ecology and evolution of plant-insect interactions and suggests novel highly selective pest management strategies.

  9. Cranberry Resistance to Dodder Parasitism: Induced Chemical Defenses and Behavior of a Parasitic Plant.

    PubMed

    Tjiurutue, Muvari Connie; Sandler, Hilary A; Kersch-Becker, Monica F; Theis, Nina; Adler, Lynn A

    2016-02-01

    Parasitic plants are common in many ecosystems, where they can structure community interactions and cause major economic damage. For example, parasitic dodder (Cuscuta spp.) can cause up to 80-100 % yield loss in heavily infested cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) patches. Despite their ecological and economic importance, remarkably little is known about how parasitic plants affect, or are affected by, host chemistry. To examine chemically-mediated interactions between dodder and its cranberry host, we conducted a greenhouse experiment asking whether: (1) dodder performance varies with cranberry cultivar; (2) cultivars differ in levels of phytohormones, volatiles, or phenolics, and whether such variation correlates with dodder parasitism; (3) dodder parasitism induced changes in phytohormones, volatiles, or phenolics, and whether the level of inducible response varied among cultivars. We used five cranberry cultivars to assess host attractiveness to dodder and dodder performance. Dodder performance did not differ across cultivars, but there were marginally significant differences in host attractiveness to dodder, with fewer dodder attaching to Early Black than to any other cultivar. Dodder parasitism induced higher levels of salicylic acid (SA) across cultivars. Cultivars differed in overall levels of flavonols and volatile profiles, but not phenolic acids or proanthocyanidins, and dodder attachment induced changes in several flavonols and volatiles. While cultivars differed slightly in resistance to dodder attachment, we did not find evidence of chemical defenses that mediate these interactions. However, induction of several defenses indicates that parasitism alters traits that could influence subsequent interactions with other species, thus shaping community dynamics.

  10. Evidence of maternal provisioning of alkaloid-based chemical defenses in the strawberry poison frog Oophaga pumilio.

    PubMed

    Stynoski, Jennifer L; Torres-Mendoza, Yaritbel; Sasa-Marin, Mahmood; Saporito, Ralph A

    2014-03-01

    Many organisms use chemical defenses to reduce predation risk. Aposematic dendrobatid frogs sequester alkaloid-based chemical defenses from a diet of arthropods, but research on these defenses has been limited to adults. Herein, we investigate chemical defense across development in a dendrobatid frog, Oophaga pumilio. This species displays complex parental care: at hatching, mothers transport tadpoles to phytotelmata, and then return to supply them with an obligate diet of nutritive eggs for about six weeks. We collected eggs, tadpoles, juveniles, and adults of O. pumilio, and detected alkaloids in all life stages. The quantity and number of alkaloids increased with frog and tadpole size. We did not detect alkaloids in the earliest stage of tadpoles, but alkaloids were detected as trace quantities in nutritive eggs and as small quantities in ovarian eggs. Tadpoles hand-reared with eggs of an alkaloid-free heterospecific frog did not contain alkaloids. Alkaloids that are sequestered from terrestrial arthropods were detected in both adults and phytotelm-dwelling tadpoles that feed solely on nutritive eggs, suggesting that this frog may be the first animal known to actively provision post-hatch offspring with chemical defenses. Finally, we provide experimental evidence that maternally derived alkaloids deter predation of tadpoles by a predatory arthropod.

  11. Chemical and physical defense traits in two sexual forms of Opuntia robusta in Central Eastern Mexico.

    PubMed

    Janczur, Mariusz Krzysztof; León Solano, Héctor Javier; Solache Rámos, Lupita Tzenyatze; Mendoza Reyes, Citlalli Hypatia; Oro Cerro, María del Carmen; Mariezcurrena Berasain, María Dolores; Rivas Manzano, Irma Victoria; Manjarrez, Javier; Villareal Benitez, José Luis; Czarnoleski, Marcin

    2014-01-01

    Sexually dimorphic plants provide an excellent opportunity for examining the differences in the extent of their defense against herbivores because they exhibit sex-related differences in reproductive investment. Such differences enable comparison of the sex with high reproduction expenses with the sex that expends less. The more costly sex is usually also better defended against herbivores. Generally, females are considered more valuable than hermaphrodites in terms of fitness; however, hermaphrodites are more valuable if they can produce seed by autonomous selfing, provided that the inbreeding depression is low and pollen is limited. We studied a gynodioecious population of Opuntia robusta from Central-Eastern Mexico, which has been reported to be trioecious, dioecious, or hermaphrodite, and addressed the following questions: 1) Is the hermaphrodite's reproductive output higher than the female's, and are hermaphrodites thus better defended? 2) Are plant tissues differentially defended? 3) Do trade-offs exist among different physical defense traits? and 4) among physical and chemical defense traits? We found that 1) hermaphrodites had a higher seed output and more spines per areola than females and that their spines contained less moisture. Non-reproductive hermaphrodite cladodes contained more total phenolic compounds (TPCs) than female ones. In addition, 2) hermaphrodite reproductive cladodes bore more spines than female cladodes, and 3) and 4) we found a negative relationship between spine number per areola and areola number per cladode and a positive relationship between spine number per areola per plant and TPC concentration per plant. Non-reproductive hermaphrodite cladodes contained a higher concentration of TPCs than female cladodes, and parental cladodes contained fewer TPCs than both reproductive and empty cladodes.

  12. Higher allocation to low cost chemical defenses in invasive species of Hawaii.

    PubMed

    Peñuelas, Josep; Sardans, J; Llusia, J; Owen, S M; Silva, J; Niinemets, U

    2010-11-01

    The capacity to produce carbon-based secondary compounds (CBSC), such as phenolics (including tannins) and terpenes as defensive compounds against herbivores or against neighboring competing plants can be involved in the competition between alien and native plant species. Since the Hawaiian Islands are especially vulnerable to invasions by alien species, we compared total phenolic (TP), total tannin (Tta), and total terpene (TT) leaf contents of alien and native plants on Oahu Island (Hawaii). We analyzed 35 native and 38 alien woody plant species randomly chosen among representative current Hawaiian flora. None of these CBSC exhibited phylogenetic fingerprinting. Alien species had similar leaf TP and leaf Tta contents, and 135% higher leaf TT contents compared with native species. Alien plants had 80% higher leaf TT:N leaf content ratio than native plants. The results suggest that apart from greater growth rate and greater nutrient use, alien success in Oahu also may be linked to greater contents of low cost chemical defenses, such as terpenes, as expected in faster-growing species in resource rich regions. The higher TT contents in aliens may counterbalance their lower investment in leaf structural defenses and their higher leaf nutritional quality. The higher TT provides higher effectiveness in deterring the generalist herbivores of the introduced range, where specialist herbivores are absent. In addition, higher TT contents may favor aliens conferring higher protection against abiotic and biotic stressors. The higher terpene accumulation was independent of the alien species origin, which indicates that being alien either selects for higher terpene contents post-invasion, or that species with high terpene contents are pre-adapted to invasiveness. Although less likely, an originally lower terpene accumulation in Hawaiian than in continental plants that avoids the increased attraction of specialist enemies associated to terpenes may not be discarded.

  13. The role of vanadium in the chemical defense of the solitary tunicate, Phallusia nigra.

    PubMed

    Odate, Shobu; Pawlik, Joseph R

    2007-03-01

    importance of some vanadium metabolites, but low pH appears to be the principal agent of chemical defense for P. nigra.

  14. Chemical and Physical Defense Traits in Two Sexual Forms of Opuntia robusta in Central Eastern Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Janczur, Mariusz Krzysztof; León Solano, Héctor Javier; Solache Rámos, Lupita Tzenyatze; Mendoza Reyes, Citlalli Hypatia; Oro Cerro, María del Carmen; Mariezcurrena Berasain, María Dolores; Rivas Manzano, Irma Victoria; Manjarrez, Javier; Villareal Benitez, José Luis; Czarnoleski, Marcin

    2014-01-01

    Sexually dimorphic plants provide an excellent opportunity for examining the differences in the extent of their defense against herbivores because they exhibit sex-related differences in reproductive investment. Such differences enable comparison of the sex with high reproduction expenses with the sex that expends less. The more costly sex is usually also better defended against herbivores. Generally, females are considered more valuable than hermaphrodites in terms of fitness; however, hermaphrodites are more valuable if they can produce seed by autonomous selfing, provided that the inbreeding depression is low and pollen is limited. We studied a gynodioecious population of Opuntia robusta from Central-Eastern Mexico, which has been reported to be trioecious, dioecious, or hermaphrodite, and addressed the following questions: 1) Is the hermaphrodite's reproductive output higher than the female's, and are hermaphrodites thus better defended? 2) Are plant tissues differentially defended? 3) Do trade-offs exist among different physical defense traits? and 4) among physical and chemical defense traits? We found that 1) hermaphrodites had a higher seed output and more spines per areola than females and that their spines contained less moisture. Non-reproductive hermaphrodite cladodes contained more total phenolic compounds (TPCs) than female ones. In addition, 2) hermaphrodite reproductive cladodes bore more spines than female cladodes, and 3) and 4) we found a negative relationship between spine number per areola and areola number per cladode and a positive relationship between spine number per areola per plant and TPC concentration per plant. Non-reproductive hermaphrodite cladodes contained a higher concentration of TPCs than female cladodes, and parental cladodes contained fewer TPCs than both reproductive and empty cladodes. PMID:24599143

  15. Plant chemical defense indirectly mediates aphid performance via interactions with tending ants.

    PubMed

    Züst, Tobias; Agrawal, Anurag A

    2017-03-01

    The benefits of mutualistic interactions are often highly context dependent. We studied the interaction between the milkweed aphid Aphis asclepiadis and a tending ant, Formica podzolica. Although this interaction is generally considered beneficial, variation in plant genotype may alter it from mutualistic to antagonistic. Here we link the shift in strength and relative benefit of the ant-aphid interaction to plant genotypic variation in the production of cardenolides, a class of toxic defensive chemicals. In a field experiment with highly variable genotypes of the common milkweed (Asclepias syriaca), we show that plant cardenolides, especially polar forms, are ingested by aphids and excreted in honeydew proportionally to plant concentrations without directly affecting aphid performance. Ants consume honeydew, and aphids that excreted high amounts of cardenolides received fewer ant visits, which in turn reduced aphid survival. On at least some plant genotypes, aphid numbers per plant were reduced in the presence of ants to levels lower than in corresponding ant-exclusion treatments, suggesting antagonistic ant behavior. Although cardenolides appear ineffective as direct plant defenses against aphids, the multi-trophic context reveals an ant-mediated negative indirect effect on aphid performance and population dynamics. © 2016 by the Ecological Society of America.

  16. A brief survey of chemical defense, crew rest, and heat stress/physical training issues related to Operation Desert Storm.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, J A

    1992-06-01

    A brief questionnaire was administered to 148 soldiers, over two-thirds of whom were aviators, at the conclusion of Desert Storm. Questions were asked about chemical defense, work/rest schedules, an aspect of pharmacological support, and heat stress/physical training during Operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm. Follow-up face-to-face interviews also were conducted with some respondents. Some of the most noteworthy findings concerned (1) training issues and side effects related to pyridostigmine bromide, (2) problems with chemical defense clothing, (3) suggestions for improving crew rest, and (4) facts about the ways in which heat-related difficulties were minimized.

  17. Metabolomics to Decipher the Chemical Defense of Cereals against Fusarium graminearum and Deoxynivalenol Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Gauthier, Léa; Atanasova-Penichon, Vessela; Chéreau, Sylvain; Richard-Forget, Florence

    2015-01-01

    Fusarium graminearum is the causal agent of Fusarium head blight (FHB) and Gibberella ear rot (GER), two devastating diseases of wheat, barley, and maize. Furthermore, F. graminearum species can produce type B trichothecene mycotoxins that accumulate in grains. Use of FHB and GER resistant cultivars is one of the most promising strategies to reduce damage induced by F. graminearum. Combined with genetic approaches, metabolomic ones can provide powerful opportunities for plant breeding through the identification of resistant biomarker metabolites which have the advantage of integrating the genetic background and the influence of the environment. In the past decade, several metabolomics attempts have been made to decipher the chemical defense that cereals employ to counteract F. graminearum. By covering the major classes of metabolites that have been highlighted and addressing their potential role, this review demonstrates the complex and integrated network of events that cereals can orchestrate to resist to F. graminearum. PMID:26492237

  18. Chemical-defense flight-glove ensemble evaluation. Final report, June 1986-February 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, J.; Ervin, C.

    1987-06-01

    Four chemical-defense flight-glove ensembles were evaluated for their effect on manual dexterity. Two- and three-layer combinations included in the study were: cotton liner/7-mil butyl/Nomex; cotton liner/12.5-mil epichlorohydron butyl/Nomex; Nomex/7-mil butyl (no liner); and, Nomex/12.5-mil epichlorohydron butyl (no liner). Fifteen male and 15 female subjects performed five dexterity tests bare-handed and while wearing each of the glove ensembles. Results indicated that, as expected, all gloved conditions produced significantly poorer performances that did the bare-handed condition, and two-layer combinations resulted in consistently better performances that did the three-layer combinations. Although subjects' performance were least impaired by the Nomex/butyl 7 combination, the butyl 7 gloves tended to tear. For this reason, the two-layer combinations of Nomex/epichlorohydron butyl 12.5 appears to be the most practical ensemble.

  19. Integrated defense system overlaps as a disease model: with examples for multiple chemical sensitivity.

    PubMed Central

    Rowat, S C

    1998-01-01

    The central nervous, immune, and endocrine systems communicate through multiple common messengers. Over evolutionary time, what may be termed integrated defense system(s) (IDS) have developed to coordinate these communications for specific contexts; these include the stress response, acute-phase response, nonspecific immune response, immune response to antigen, kindling, tolerance, time-dependent sensitization, neurogenic switching, and traumatic dissociation (TD). These IDSs are described and their overlap is examined. Three models of disease production are generated: damage, in which IDSs function incorrectly; inadequate/inappropriate, in which IDS response is outstripped by a changing context; and evolving/learning, in which the IDS learned response to a context is deemed pathologic. Mechanisms of multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS) are developed from several IDS disease models. Model 1A is pesticide damage to the central nervous system, overlapping with body chemical burdens, TD, and chronic zinc deficiency; model 1B is benzene disruption of interleukin-1, overlapping with childhood developmental windows and hapten-antigenic spreading; and model 1C is autoimmunity to immunoglobulin-G (IgG), overlapping with spreading to other IgG-inducers, sudden spreading of inciters, and food-contaminating chemicals. Model 2A is chemical and stress overload, including comparison with the susceptibility/sensitization/triggering/spreading model; model 2B is genetic mercury allergy, overlapping with: heavy metals/zinc displacement and childhood/gestational mercury exposures; and model 3 is MCS as evolution and learning. Remarks are offered on current MCS research. Problems with clinical measurement are suggested on the basis of IDS models. Large-sample patient self-report epidemiology is described as an alternative or addition to clinical biomarker and animal testing. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:9539008

  20. Identification of the chemical constituents of Chinese medicine Yi-Xin-Shu capsule by molecular feature orientated precursor ion selection and tandem mass spectrometry structure elucidation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-ping; Chen, Chang; Liu, Yan; Yang, Hong-Jun; Wu, Hong-Wei; Xiao, Hong-Bin

    2015-11-01

    The incomplete identification of the chemical components of traditional Chinese medicinal formula has been one of the bottlenecks in the modernization of traditional Chinese medicine. Tandem mass spectrometry has been widely used for the identification of chemical substances. Current automatic tandem mass spectrometry acquisition, where precursor ions were selected according to their signal intensity, encounters a drawback in chemical substances identification when samples contain many overlapping signals. Compounds in minor or trace amounts could not be identified because most tandem mass spectrometry information was lost. Herein, a molecular feature orientated precursor ion selection and tandem mass spectrometry structure elucidation method for complex Chinese medicine chemical constituent analysis was developed. The precursor ions were selected according to their two-dimensional characteristics of retention times and mass-to-charge ratio ranges from herbal compounds, so that all precursor ions from herbal compounds were included and more minor chemical constituents in Chinese medicine were identified. Compared to the conventional automatic tandem mass spectrometry setups, the approach is novel and can overcome the drawback for chemical substances identification. As an example, 276 compounds from the Chinese Medicine of Yi-Xin-Shu capsule were identified. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Elucidating mechanisms of toxic action of dissolved organic chemicals in oil sands process-affected water (OSPW).

    PubMed

    Morandi, Garrett D; Wiseman, Steve B; Guan, Miao; Zhang, Xiaowei W; Martin, Jonathan W; Giesy, John P

    2017-11-01

    Oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) is generated during extraction of bitumen in the surface-mining oil sands industry in Alberta, Canada, and is acutely and chronically toxic to aquatic organisms. It is known that dissolved organic compounds in OSPW are responsible for most toxic effects, but knowledge of the specific mechanism(s) of toxicity, is limited. Using bioassay-based effects-directed analysis, the dissolved organic fraction of OSPW has previously been fractionated, ultimately producing refined samples of dissolved organic chemicals in OSPW, each with distinct chemical profiles. Using the Escherichia coli K-12 strain MG1655 gene reporter live cell array, the present study investigated relationships between toxic potencies of each fraction, expression of genes and characterization of chemicals in each of five acutely toxic and one non-toxic extract of OSPW derived by use of effects-directed analysis. Effects on expressions of genes related to response to oxidative stress, protein stress and DNA damage were indicative of exposure to acutely toxic extracts of OSPW. Additionally, six genes were uniquely responsive to acutely toxic extracts of OSPW. Evidence presented supports a role for sulphur- and nitrogen-containing chemical classes in the toxicity of extracts of OSPW. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Defensive chemicals of tawny crazy ants, Nylanderia fulva and their toxicity to red imported fire ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Nylanderia fulva (Mayr) has been reported as being able to displace Solenopsis invicta Buren, one of the most aggressive invasive ants in the world. Like S. invicta, N. fulva use chemical secretions in their defense/offense, which may contribute to their observed superior competition ability. In t...

  3. A Soluble Acetylcholinesterase Provides Chemical Defense against Xenobiotics in the Pinewood Nematode

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jae Soon; Lee, Dae-Weon; Koh, Young Ho; Lee, Si Hyeock

    2011-01-01

    The pinewood nematode genome encodes at least three distinct acetylcholinesterases (AChEs). To understand physiological roles of the three pinewood nematode AChEs (BxACE-1, BxACE-2, and BxACE-3), BxACE-3 in particular, their tissue distribution and inhibition profiles were investigated. Immunohistochemistry revealed that BxACE-1 and BxACE-2 were distributed in neuronal tissues. In contrast, BxACE-3 was detected from some specific tissues and extracted without the aid of detergent, suggesting its soluble nature unlike BxACE-1 and BxACE-2. When present together, BxAChE3 significantly reduced the inhibition of BxACE-1 and BxACE-2 by cholinesterase inhibitors. Knockdown of BxACE-3 by RNA interference significantly increased the toxicity of three nematicidal compounds, supporting the protective role of BxACE-3 against chemicals. In summary, BxACE-3 appears to have a non-neuronal function of chemical defense whereas both BxACE-1 and BxACE-2 have classical neuronal function of synaptic transmission. PMID:21556353

  4. Continue development of a biomedical data base on the medical aspects of chemical defense. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Landry, L.A.

    1986-12-01

    This report documents a one-year period of activities encompassing the further development and maintenance of the automated information system known as the Chemical Agent Retrieval System (CARS) for the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Chemical Defense (USAMRICD). During the period 18 November 1985 through 17 November 1986, Associate Consultants, Inc. (ACI), creator of the prototype system, expanded the database with relevant research articles taken from USAMRICD research reports and CRDEC holdings, medical and scientific libraries within the Washington area, and on-line searches of machine-readable database containing citations from the world-wide literature. ACI began entry of the results of these searches into the citation-tracking system file (CITES). To assist with automated retrieval of the documents, ACI wrote and tested a modular posting-switching program for expansion and maintenance of the thesaurus. ACI also initiated a study of the impact upon the contract of acquiring an Army-owned/ACI located VAX.

  5. Chemical colloids versus biological colloids: a comparative study for the elucidation of the mechanism of protein fiber formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Shaohua; Wu, David; Arnsdorf, Morton; Johnson, Robert; Getz, Godfrey S.; Cabana, Veneracion G.

    2005-01-01

    Fiber formation from murine serum amyloid A1 (SAA) was compared to the linear aggregation and fiber formation of colloidal gold particles. Here we report the similarities of these processes. Upon incubation with acetic acid, SAA misfolds and adopts a new conformation, which we termed saa. saa apparently is less soluble than SAA in aqueous solution; it aggregates and forms nucleation units and then fibers. The fibers appear as a string of the nucleation units. Additionally, an external electric field promotes saa fiber formation. These properties of saa are reminiscent of colloidal gold formation from gold ions and one-dimensional aggregation of the gold colloids. Colloidal gold particles were also found to be capable of aggregating one-dimensionally under an electric field or in the presence of polylysine. These gold fibers resembled in structure that of saa fibers. In summary, protein aggregation and formation of fibers appear to follow the generalized principles derived in colloidal science for the aggregation of atoms and molecules, including polymers such as polypeptides. The analysis of colloidal gold formation and of one-dimensional aggregation provides a simple model system for the elucidation of some aspects of protein fiber formation.

  6. Chemical colloids versus biological colloids: a comparative study for the elucidation of the mechanism of protein fiber formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Shaohua; Wu, David; Arnsdorf, Morton; Johnson, Robert; Getz, Godfrey S.; Cabana, Veneracion G.

    2005-01-01

    Fiber formation from murine serum amyloid A1 (SAA) was compared to the linear aggregation and fiber formation of colloidal gold particles. Here we report the similarities of these processes. Upon incubation with acetic acid, SAA misfolds and adopts a new conformation, which we termed saa. saa apparently is less soluble than SAA in aqueous solution; it aggregates and forms nucleation units and then fibers. The fibers appear as a string of the nucleation units. Additionally, an external electric field promotes saa fiber formation. These properties of saa are reminiscent of colloidal gold formation from gold ions and one-dimensional aggregation of the gold colloids. Colloidal gold particles were also found to be capable of aggregating one-dimensionally under an electric field or in the presence of polylysine. These gold fibers resembled in structure that of saa fibers. In summary, protein aggregation and formation of fibers appear to follow the generalized principles derived in colloidal science for the aggregation of atoms and molecules, including polymers such as polypeptides. The analysis of colloidal gold formation and of one-dimensional aggregation provides a simple model system for the elucidation of some aspects of protein fiber formation.

  7. Determination of process-related impurities in N-acetylglucosamine prepared by chemical and enzymatic methods: structural elucidation and quantification.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yi Soo; Lee, Sung Joong; Choi, Jin Young; Kim, Yun-Hi; Desta, Kebede Taye; Piao, Zhe; Choi, Su-Lim; Nam, Sang-Jip; Kang, Kyung-Yun; Abd El-Aty, A M; Shin, Yong Chul; Shin, Sung Chul

    2016-07-01

    β-N-acetylglucosamine (β-AG) is a monosaccharide distributed widely in living organisms with various pivotal roles. The presence of particulates and impurities can affect the safety and efficacy of a product for its intended duration of use. Thus, the current study was carried out to identify and quantify the potentially-harmful process related impurities; namely α-N,6-diacetylglucosamine (α-DAG) and α-N-acetylglucosamine (α-AG), derived from the chemical and enzymatic synthesis of β-AG. The impurities were characterized using a high resolution mass spectrometry, a nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS). The developed method showed a good linearity (R (2) ≥ 0.998), satisfactory precision (≤6.1 % relative standard deviation), intra- and inter-day accuracy (88.20-97.50 %), extraction recovery (89.30-110.50 %), matrix effect (89.70-105.20 %), and stability (92.70-101.60 %). The method was successfully applied to determine the level of α-DAG that was 3.04 and 0.07 % of the total β-AG, following chemical and enzymatic methods, respectively. It can be concluded that the enzymatic rather than the chemical method is more efficient for the synthesis of β-AG. Characterization of impurities heeds the signal for acquiring and evaluating data that establishes biological safety.

  8. Exploiting the Complementarity between Dereplication and Computer-Assisted Structure Elucidation for the Chemical Profiling of Natural Cosmetic Ingredients: Tephrosia purpurea as a Case Study.

    PubMed

    Hubert, Jane; Chollet, Sébastien; Purson, Sylvain; Reynaud, Romain; Harakat, Dominique; Martinez, Agathe; Nuzillard, Jean-Marc; Renault, Jean-Hugues

    2015-07-24

    The aqueous-ethanolic extract of Tephrosia purpurea seeds is currently exploited in the cosmetic industry as a natural ingredient of skin lotions. The aim of this study was to chemically characterize this ingredient by combining centrifugal partition extraction (CPE) as a fractionation tool with two complementary identification approaches involving dereplication and computer-assisted structure elucidation. Following two rapid fractionations of the crude extract (2 g), seven major compounds namely, caffeic acid, quercetin-3-O-rutinoside, ethyl galactoside, ciceritol, stachyose, saccharose, and citric acid, were unambiguously identified within the CPE-generated simplified mixtures by a recently developed (13)C NMR-based dereplication method. The structures of four additional compounds, patuletin-3-O-rutinoside, kaempferol-3-O-rutinoside, guaiacylglycerol 8-vanillic acid ether, and 2-methyl-2-glucopyranosyloxypropanoic acid, were automatically elucidated by using the Logic for Structure Determination program based on the interpretation of 2D NMR (HSQC, HMBC, and COSY) connectivity data. As more than 80% of the crude extract mass was characterized without need for tedious and labor-intensive multistep purification procedures, the identification tools involved in this work constitute a promising strategy for an efficient and time-saving chemical profiling of natural extracts.

  9. Packaging of chemicals in the defensive secretory glands of the sea hare Aplysia californica.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Paul M; Kicklighter, Cynthia E; Schmidt, Manfred; Kamio, Michiya; Yang, Hsiuchin; Elkin, Dimitry; Michel, William C; Tai, Phang C; Derby, Charles D

    2006-01-01

    Sea hares protect themselves from predatory attacks with several modes of chemical defenses. One of these is inking, which is an active release of a protective fluid upon predatory attack. In many sea hares including Aplysia californica and A. dactylomela, this fluid is a mixture of two secretions from two separate glands, usually co-released: ink, a purple fluid from the ink gland; and opaline, a white viscous secretion from the opaline gland. These two secretions are mixed in the mantle cavity and directed toward the attacking predator. Some of the chemicals in these secretions and their mechanism of action have been identified. In our study, we used western blots, immunocytochemistry, amino acid analysis, and bioassays to examine the distribution of these components: (1) an L-amino acid oxidase called escapin for A. californica and dactylomelin-P for A. dactylomela, which has antimicrobial activity but we believe its main function is in defending sea hares against predators that evoke its release; and (2) escapin's major amino acid substrates--L-lysine and L-arginine. Escapin is exclusively produced in the ink gland and is not present in any other tissues or secretions. Furthermore, escapin is only sequestered in the amber vesicles of the ink glandand not in the red-purple vesicles, which contain algal-derived chromophores that give ink its distinctive purple color. The concentration of escapin and dactylomelin-P in ink, both in the gland and after its release, is as high as 2 mg ml(-1), or 30 micromol ml(-1), which is well above its antimicrobial threshold. Lysine and arginine (and other amino acids) are packaged into vesicles in the ink and opaline glands, but arginine is present in ink and opaline at <1 mmol l(-1) and lysine is present in ink at <1 mmol l(-1) but in opaline at 65 mmol l(-1). Our previous results showed that both lysine and arginine mediate escapin's bacteriostatic effects, but only lysine mediates its bactericidal effects. Given that escapin

  10. Chemical Defense of the Eastern Newt (Notophthalmus viridescens): Variation in Efficiency against Different Consumers and in Different Habitats

    PubMed Central

    Marion, Zachary H.; Hay, Mark E.

    2011-01-01

    Amphibian secondary metabolites are well known chemically, but their ecological functions are poorly understood—even for well-studied species. For example, the eastern newt (Notophthalmus viridescens) is a well known secretor of tetrodotoxin (TTX), with this compound hypothesized to facilitate this salamander's coexistence with a variety of aquatic consumers across the eastern United States. However, this assumption of chemical defense is primarily based on observational data with low replication against only a few predator types. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that N. viridescens is chemically defended against co-occurring fishes, invertebrates, and amphibian generalist predators and that this defense confers high survivorship when newts are transplanted into both fish-containing and fishless habitats. We found that adult eastern newts were unpalatable to predatory fishes (Micropterus salmoides, Lepomis macrochirus) and a crayfish (Procambarus clarkii), but were readily consumed by bullfrogs (Lithobates catesbeianus). The eggs and neonate larvae were also unpalatable to fish (L. macrochirus). Bioassay-guided fractionation confirmed that deterrence is chemical and that ecologically relevant concentrations of TTX would deter feeding. Despite predatory fishes rejecting eastern newts in laboratory assays, field experiments demonstrated that tethered newts suffered high rates of predation in fish-containing ponds. We suggest that this may be due to predation by amphibians (frogs) and reptiles (turtles) that co-occur with fishes rather than from fishes directly. Fishes suppress invertebrate consumers that prey on bullfrog larvae, leading to higher bullfrog densities in fish containing ponds and thus considerable consumption of newts due to bullfrog tolerance of newt chemical defenses. Amphibian chemical defenses, and consumer responses to them, may be more complex and indirect than previously appreciated. PMID:22164212

  11. Sponge symbioses between Xestospongia deweerdtae and Plakortis spp. are not motivated by shared chemical defense against predators

    PubMed Central

    Marty, Micah Jaarsma; Vicente, Jan; Oyler, Benjamin L.; Place, Allen

    2017-01-01

    The recently described epizoic sponge-sponge symbioses between Xestospongia deweerdtae and two species of Plakortis present an unusual series of sponge interactions. Sponges from the genus Plakortis are fierce allelopathic competitors, rich in cytotoxic secondary metabolites, and yet X. deweerdtae flourishes as an epizoic encrustation on Plakortis deweerdtaephila and Plakortis symbiotica. Our objective in this study was to evaluate the hypothesis that X. deweerdtae grows epizoic to these two species of Plakortis due to a shared chemical defense against predators. We collected free-living individuals of X. deweerdtae and symbiotic pairs from a wide geographical range to generate crude organic extracts and a series of polarity fractions from sponge extract. We tested the deterrency of these extracts against three common coral reef predators: the bluehead wrasse, Thalassoma bifasciatum, the Caribbean sharpnose puffer, Canthigaster rostrata, and the white spotwrist hermit crab, Pagurus criniticornis. While the chemical defenses of P. deweerdtaephila and P. symbiotica are more potent than those of X. deweerdtae, all of the sponge species we tested significantly deterred feeding in all three generalist predators. The free-living form of X. deweerdtae is mostly defended across the region, with a few exceptions. The associated form of X. deweerdtae is always defended, and both species of Plakortis are very strongly defended, with puffers refusing to consume extract-treated pellets until the extract was diluted to 1/256× concentration. Using diode-array high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with high-resolution mass spectrometry (LC-MS/IT-TOF), we found two secondary metabolites from P. deweerdtaephila, probably the cyclic endoperoxides plakinic acid I and plakinic acid K, in low concentrations in the associated—but not the free-living—form of X. deweerdtae, suggesting a possible translocation of defensive chemicals from the basibiont to the epibiont

  12. Groove modification of siRNA duplexes to elucidate siRNA-protein interactions using 7-bromo-7-deazaadenosine and 3-bromo-3-deazaadenosine as chemical probes.

    PubMed

    Saito-Tarashima, Noriko; Kira, Hirotaka; Wada, Tomoya; Miki, Kazuya; Ide, Shiho; Yamazaki, Naoshi; Matsuda, Akira; Minakawa, Noriaki

    2016-11-29

    Elucidation of dynamic interactions between RNA and proteins is essential for understanding the biological processes regulated by RNA, such as RNA interference (RNAi). In this study, the logical chemical probes, comprising 7-bromo-7-deazaadenosine (Br(7)C(7)A) and 3-bromo-3-deazaadenosine (Br(3)C(3)A), to investigate small interfering RNA (siRNA)-RNAi related protein interactions, were developed. The bromo substituents of Br(7)C(7)A and Br(3)C(3)A are expected to be located in the major and the minor grooves, respectively, and to act as a steric hindrance in each groove when these chemical probes are incorporated into siRNAs. A comprehensive investigation using siRNAs containing these chemical probes revealed that (i) Br(3)C(3)A(s) at the 5'-end of the passenger strand enhanced their RNAi activity, and (ii) the direction of RISC assembly is determined by the interaction between Argonaute2, which is the main component of RISC, and siRNA in the minor groove near the 5'-end of the passenger strand. Utilization of these chemical probes enables the investigation of the dynamic interactions between RNA and proteins.

  13. Contact lens wear with the USAF protective integrated hood/mask chemical defense ensemble

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis, R.J.; Miller, R.E. II; Peterson, R.D.; Jackson, W.G. Jr. )

    1992-07-01

    The Protective Integrated Hood/Mask (PIHM) chemical defense aircrew ensemble blows air from the mask's plenum across the visor at a rate of approximately 15 L/min in order to prevent fogging of the visor and to cool the aircrew member's face. This study was designed to determine the effect of the PIHM airflow on soft contact lens (SCL) dehydration, contact lens comfort, and corneal integrity. There were 26 subjects who participated in this study: 15 SCL wearers, six rigid gas-permeable (RGP) wearers, and five nonspectacle wearing controls. Contrast acuity with the three Regan charts, subjective comfort, and relative humidity (RH) and temperature readings under the PIHM mask were monitored every 0.5 h during 6-h laboratory rides. Slit-lamp examinations and SCL water content measurements with a hand-held Abbe refractometer were made before and after the rides. High RH under the mask may have accounted for the moderate SCL dehydration (8.3 percent), no decrease in contrast acuity for any group, and lack of corneal stress. Although all groups experienced some inferior, epithelial, punctate keratopathy, RGP wearers had the most significant effects. SCLs performed relatively well in the PIHM mask environment. Testing with other parameter designs is necessary before recommending RGPs with the PIHM system. 19 refs.

  14. Testing of the Defense Waste Processing Facility Cold Chemical Dissolution Method in Sludge Batch 9 Qualification

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, T.; Pareizs, J.; Coleman, C.; Young, J.; Brown, L.

    2016-05-10

    For each sludge batch that is processed in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) tests the applicability of the digestion methods used by the DWPF Laboratory for elemental analysis of Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) Receipt samples and SRAT Product process control samples. DWPF SRAT samples are typically dissolved using a method referred to as the DWPF Cold Chemical or Cold Chem Method (CC), (see DWPF Procedure SW4- 15.201). Testing indicates that the CC method produced mixed results. The CC method did not result in complete dissolution of either the SRAT Receipt or SRAT Product with some fine, dark solids remaining. However, elemental analyses did not reveal extreme biases for the major elements in the sludge when compared with analyses obtained following dissolution by hot aqua regia (AR) or sodium peroxide fusion (PF) methods. The CC elemental analyses agreed with the AR and PF methods well enough that it should be adequate for routine process control analyses in the DWPF after much more extensive side-by-side tests of the CC method and the PF method are performed on the first 10 SRAT cycles of the Sludge Batch 9 (SB9) campaign. The DWPF Laboratory should continue with their plans for further tests of the CC method during these 10 SRAT cycles.

  15. The defensive secretion of Carabus lefebvrei Dejean 1826 pupa (Coleoptera, Carabidae): gland ultrastructure and chemical identification.

    PubMed

    Giglio, Anita; Brandmayr, Pietro; Dalpozzo, Renato; Sindona, Giovanni; Tagarelli, Antonio; Talarico, Federica; Brandmayr, Tullia Zetto; Ferrero, Enrico A

    2009-05-01

    This study documents the defensive function of flavored humor secreted by the abdominal glands of Carabus lefebvrei pupae. The morphology and the ultrastructure of these glands were described and the volatile compounds of glands secretion were identified by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The ultrastructure analysis shows an acinose complex formed by about 50 clusters. Each cluster has 20 glandular units and the unit-composed of one secretory and one canal cell lying along a duct-belongs to the class 3 cell type of Quennedey (1998). In the cytoplasm, the secretory cell contains abundant rough endoplasmatic reticula, glycogen granules, numerous mitochondria, and many well-developed Golgi complexes producing electron-dense secretory granules. Mitochondria are large, elongated, and often adjoining electronlucent vesicles. The kind and the origin of secretory granules varying in size and density were discussed. The chemical analysis of the gland secretion revealed the presence of a mixture of low molecular weight terpenes, ketones, aldehydes, alcohols, esters, and carboxylic acids. Monoterpenes, especially linalool, were the major products. We supposed that ketones, aldehydes, alcohols, esters, and carboxylic acids have a deterrent function against the predators and monoterpenes provide a prophylaxis function against pathogens.

  16. Geographic variation in feeding preference of a generalist herbivore: the importance of seaweed chemical defenses.

    PubMed

    McCarty, Amanda T; Sotka, Erik E

    2013-08-01

    The ecological impacts of generalist herbivores depend on feeding preferences, which can vary across and within herbivore species. Among mesoherbivores, geographic variation in host use can occur because host plants have a more restricted geographic distribution than does the herbivore, or there is local evolution in host preference, or both. We tested the role of local evolution using the marine amphipod Ampithoe longimana by rearing multiple amphipod populations from three regions (subtropical Florida, warm-temperate North Carolina and cold-temperate New England) and assaying their feeding preferences toward ten seaweeds that occur in some but not all regions. Six of the ten seaweeds produce anti-herbivore secondary metabolites, and we detected geographic variation in feeding preference toward five (Dictyota menstrualis, Dictyota ciliolata, Fucus distichus, Chondrus crispus and Padina gymnospora, but not Caulerpa sertularioides). Amphipod populations that co-occur with a chemically-rich seaweed tended to have stronger feeding preferences for that seaweed, relative to populations that do not co-occur with the seaweed. A direct test indicated that geographic variation in feeding preference toward one seaweed (D. ciliolata) is mediated by feeding tolerance for lipophilic secondary metabolites. Among the four seaweeds that produce no known secondary metabolites (Acanthophora, Ectocarpus, Gracilaria and Hincksia/Feldmannia spp.), we detected no geographic variation in feeding preference. Thus, populations are more likely to evolve greater feeding preferences for local hosts when those hosts produce secondary metabolites. Microevolution of feeding behaviors of generalist marine consumers likely depends on the availability and identity of local hosts and the strength of their chemical defenses.

  17. Structural elucidation of chemical constituents from Benincasa hispida seeds and Carissa congesta roots by gas chromatography: Mass spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Doshi, Gaurav M.; Nalawade, Vivek V.; Mukadam, Aaditi S.; Chaskar, Pratip K.; Zine, Sandeep P.; Somani, Rakesh R.; Une, Hemant D.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Benincasa hispida (BH) and Carissa congesta (CC) are regarded as ethnopharmacological imperative plants in Asian countries. Objective: Phytochemical screening of the extracts has shown the presence of steroids, flavonoids, saponins, glycosides, tannins, phenolic compounds, fixed oils, and fats in the BH and CC extracts. The presence of lupeol has been reported previously by us using high-performance thin-layer chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography. Materials and Methods: Present research studies encompasses identification of chemical constituents in BH seeds and CC roots petroleum ether extracts by hyphenated technique such as gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (MS) which when coupled gives a clear insight of constituents. Results: The components were identified by matching mass spectra with MS libraries. There were 13 and 10 different compounds analyzed from CC and BH, respectively. The components present were Pentanoic acid, 5-hydroxy, 2,4-butylphenyl; n-Hexadecanoic acid (Palmitic acid); Sulfurous acid, 2-ethylhexylhepatdecyl ester; n-Tridecane; 6-methyltridecane; (9E, 12E)-9,12-Octadecadienyl chloride, Hexadecanoic acid, 3-(trimethylsilyl)-oxy] propyl ester; 9,12-Octadecadenoic acid, 2 hydroxy-1-(hyroxymethylethyl) ester; 9,12-Octadecadienoic acid, 2,3 dihydroxypropyl ester; n-Propyl-9,12-Octadecadienoate, Lupeol; Taraxasterol; 6a, 14a-Methanopicene, perhydro-12,4a, 61a, 9,9,12a-hepatmethyl-10-hydoxy and 9-Octadecene; 2-Isoprpenyl-5-methyl-6-hepten-1-ol; n-Hexadecanoic acid, 2-hyroxy-1-(hydroxymethyl) ethyl ether; Butyl-9,12-Octadecadieonate; Friedoolean-8-en-3-one; friedours-7-en-3-one; 13,27-Cyclosuran-3-one; Stigmaste-7,25-dien-3-ol (3β, 5α); Stigmasta-7,16-dien-3-ol; chrondrillasterol in BH seeds and CC roots extracts respectively. Conclusion: Eluted components from the extracts could provide further researchers to work with various pharmacological activities related models and studies. PMID:26130941

  18. Spectroscopic elucidation of energy transfer in hybrid inorganic–biological organisms for solar-to-chemical production

    SciTech Connect

    Kornienko, Nikolay; Sakimoto, Kelsey K.; Herlihy, David M.; Nguyen, Son C.; Alivisatos, A. Paul; Harris, Charles. B.; Schwartzberg, Adam; Yang, Peidong

    2016-10-03

    We present that the rise of inorganic–biological hybrid organisms for solar-to-chemical production has spurred mechanistic investigations into the dynamics of the biotic–abiotic interface to drive the development of next-generation systems. The model system, Moorella thermoacetica–cadmium sulfide (CdS), combines an inorganic semiconductor nanoparticle light harvester with an acetogenic bacterium to drive the photosynthetic reduction of CO2 to acetic acid with high efficiency. In this work, we report insights into this unique electrotrophic behavior and propose a charge-transfer mechanism from CdS to M. thermoacetica. Transient absorption (TA) spectroscopy revealed that photoexcited electron transfer rates increase with increasing hydrogenase (H2ase) enzyme activity. On the same time scale as the TA spectroscopy, time-resolved infrared (TRIR) spectroscopy showed spectral changes in the 1,700–1,900-cm-1 spectral region. The quantum efficiency of this system for photosynthetic acetic acid generation also increased with increasing H2ase activity and shorter carrier lifetimes when averaged over the first 24 h of photosynthesis. However, within the initial 3 h of photosynthesis, the rate followed an opposite trend: The bacteria with the lowest H2ase activity photosynthesized acetic acid the fastest. These results suggest a two-pathway mechanism: a high quantum efficiency charge-transfer pathway to H2ase generating H2 as a molecular intermediate that dominates at long time scales (24 h), and a direct energy-transducing enzymatic pathway responsible for acetic acid production at short time scales (3 h). Lastly, this work represents a promising platform to utilize conventional spectroscopic methodology to extract insights from more complex biotic–abiotic hybrid systems.

  19. Spectroscopic elucidation of energy transfer in hybrid inorganic–biological organisms for solar-to-chemical production

    DOE PAGES

    Kornienko, Nikolay; Sakimoto, Kelsey K.; Herlihy, David M.; ...

    2016-10-03

    We present that the rise of inorganic–biological hybrid organisms for solar-to-chemical production has spurred mechanistic investigations into the dynamics of the biotic–abiotic interface to drive the development of next-generation systems. The model system, Moorella thermoacetica–cadmium sulfide (CdS), combines an inorganic semiconductor nanoparticle light harvester with an acetogenic bacterium to drive the photosynthetic reduction of CO2 to acetic acid with high efficiency. In this work, we report insights into this unique electrotrophic behavior and propose a charge-transfer mechanism from CdS to M. thermoacetica. Transient absorption (TA) spectroscopy revealed that photoexcited electron transfer rates increase with increasing hydrogenase (H2ase) enzyme activity. Onmore » the same time scale as the TA spectroscopy, time-resolved infrared (TRIR) spectroscopy showed spectral changes in the 1,700–1,900-cm-1 spectral region. The quantum efficiency of this system for photosynthetic acetic acid generation also increased with increasing H2ase activity and shorter carrier lifetimes when averaged over the first 24 h of photosynthesis. However, within the initial 3 h of photosynthesis, the rate followed an opposite trend: The bacteria with the lowest H2ase activity photosynthesized acetic acid the fastest. These results suggest a two-pathway mechanism: a high quantum efficiency charge-transfer pathway to H2ase generating H2 as a molecular intermediate that dominates at long time scales (24 h), and a direct energy-transducing enzymatic pathway responsible for acetic acid production at short time scales (3 h). Lastly, this work represents a promising platform to utilize conventional spectroscopic methodology to extract insights from more complex biotic–abiotic hybrid systems.« less

  20. Spectroscopic elucidation of energy transfer in hybrid inorganic-biological organisms for solar-to-chemical production.

    PubMed

    Kornienko, Nikolay; Sakimoto, Kelsey K; Herlihy, David M; Nguyen, Son C; Alivisatos, A Paul; Harris, Charles B; Schwartzberg, Adam; Yang, Peidong

    2016-10-18

    The rise of inorganic-biological hybrid organisms for solar-to-chemical production has spurred mechanistic investigations into the dynamics of the biotic-abiotic interface to drive the development of next-generation systems. The model system, Moorella thermoacetica-cadmium sulfide (CdS), combines an inorganic semiconductor nanoparticle light harvester with an acetogenic bacterium to drive the photosynthetic reduction of CO2 to acetic acid with high efficiency. In this work, we report insights into this unique electrotrophic behavior and propose a charge-transfer mechanism from CdS to M. thermoacetica Transient absorption (TA) spectroscopy revealed that photoexcited electron transfer rates increase with increasing hydrogenase (H2ase) enzyme activity. On the same time scale as the TA spectroscopy, time-resolved infrared (TRIR) spectroscopy showed spectral changes in the 1,700-1,900-cm(-1) spectral region. The quantum efficiency of this system for photosynthetic acetic acid generation also increased with increasing H2ase activity and shorter carrier lifetimes when averaged over the first 24 h of photosynthesis. However, within the initial 3 h of photosynthesis, the rate followed an opposite trend: The bacteria with the lowest H2ase activity photosynthesized acetic acid the fastest. These results suggest a two-pathway mechanism: a high quantum efficiency charge-transfer pathway to H2ase generating H2 as a molecular intermediate that dominates at long time scales (24 h), and a direct energy-transducing enzymatic pathway responsible for acetic acid production at short time scales (3 h). This work represents a promising platform to utilize conventional spectroscopic methodology to extract insights from more complex biotic-abiotic hybrid systems.

  1. Spectroscopic elucidation of energy transfer in hybrid inorganic–biological organisms for solar-to-chemical production

    SciTech Connect

    Kornienko, Nikolay; Sakimoto, Kelsey K.; Herlihy, David M.; Nguyen, Son C.; Alivisatos, A. Paul; Harris, Charles. B.; Schwartzberg, Adam; Yang, Peidong

    2016-10-03

    We present that the rise of inorganic–biological hybrid organisms for solar-to-chemical production has spurred mechanistic investigations into the dynamics of the biotic–abiotic interface to drive the development of next-generation systems. The model system, Moorella thermoacetica–cadmium sulfide (CdS), combines an inorganic semiconductor nanoparticle light harvester with an acetogenic bacterium to drive the photosynthetic reduction of CO2 to acetic acid with high efficiency. In this work, we report insights into this unique electrotrophic behavior and propose a charge-transfer mechanism from CdS to M. thermoacetica. Transient absorption (TA) spectroscopy revealed that photoexcited electron transfer rates increase with increasing hydrogenase (H2ase) enzyme activity. On the same time scale as the TA spectroscopy, time-resolved infrared (TRIR) spectroscopy showed spectral changes in the 1,700–1,900-cm-1 spectral region. The quantum efficiency of this system for photosynthetic acetic acid generation also increased with increasing H2ase activity and shorter carrier lifetimes when averaged over the first 24 h of photosynthesis. However, within the initial 3 h of photosynthesis, the rate followed an opposite trend: The bacteria with the lowest H2ase activity photosynthesized acetic acid the fastest. These results suggest a two-pathway mechanism: a high quantum efficiency charge-transfer pathway to H2ase generating H2 as a molecular intermediate that dominates at long time scales (24 h), and a direct energy-transducing enzymatic pathway responsible for acetic acid production at short time scales (3 h). Lastly, this work represents a promising platform to utilize conventional spectroscopic methodology to extract insights from more complex biotic–abiotic hybrid systems.

  2. Seasonal fluctuations in chemical defenses against macrofouling in Fucus vesiculosus and Fucus serratus from the Baltic Sea.

    PubMed

    Rickert, Esther; Karsten, Ulf; Pohnert, Georg; Wahl, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Macroalgae, especially perennial species, are exposed to a seasonally variable fouling pressure. It was hypothesized that macroalgae regulate their antifouling defense to fouling pressure. Over one year, the macrofouling pressure and the chemical anti-macrofouling defense strength of the brown algae Fucus vesiculosus and Fucus serratus were assessed with monthly evaluation. The anti-macrofouling defense was assessed by means of surface-extracted Fucus metabolites tested at near-natural concentrations in a novel in situ bioassay. Additionally, the mannitol content of both Fucus species was determined to assess resource availability for defense production. The surface chemistry of both Fucus species exhibited seasonal variability in attractiveness to Amphibalanus improvisus and Mytilus edulis. Of this variability, 50-60% is explained by a sinusoidal model. Only F. vesiculosus extracts originating from the spring and summer significantly deterred settlement of A. improvisus. The strength of macroalgal antifouling defense did not correlate either with in situ macrofouling pressure or with measured mannitol content, which, however, were never depleted.

  3. Chemical profile and defensive function of the latex of Euphorbia peplus.

    PubMed

    Hua, Juan; Liu, Yan; Xiao, Chao-Jiang; Jing, Shu-Xi; Luo, Shi-Hong; Li, Sheng-Hong

    2017-04-01

    Plant latex is an endogenous fluid secreted from highly specialized laticifer cells and has been suggested to act as a plant defense system. The chemical profile of the latex of Euphorbia peplus was investigated. A total of 13 terpenoids including two previously unknown diterpenoids, (2S*,3S*,4R*,5R*,6R*,8R*,l1R*,13S*,14S*,15R*, 16R*)-5,8,15-triacetoxy-3-benzoyloxy-11,16-dihydroxy-9-oxopepluane and (2R*,3R*, 4S*,5R*,7S*,8S*,9S*,l3S*,14S*,15R*)-2,5,8,9,14-pentaacetoxy-3-benzoyloxy-15-hydroxy-7-isobutyroyloxyjatropha-6(17),11E-diene), ten known diterpenoids, and a known acyclic triterpene alcohol peplusol, were identified, using HPLC and UPLC-MS/MS analyses and through comparison with the authentic compounds isolated from the whole plant. The diterpenoids exhibited significant antifeedant activity against a generalist plant-feeding insect, the cotton bollworm (Helicoverpa armigera), with EC50 values ranging from 0.36 to 4.60 μg/cm(2). In particular, (2R*,3R*,4S*,5R*,7S*,8S*,9S*,l3S*,14S*,15R*)-2,5,9,14-tetraacetoxy-3-benzoyloxy-8,15-dihydroxy-7-isobutyroyloxyjatropha-6(17),11E-diene and (2R*,3R*, 4S*,5R*,7S*,8S*,9S*,l3S*,14S*,15R*)-2,5,14-triacetoxy-3-benzoyloxy-8,15-dihydroxy-7-isobutyroyloxy-9-nicotinoyloxyjatropha-6(17),11E-diene had EC50 values of 0.36 and 0.43 μg/cm(2), respectively, which were approximately 7-fold more potent than commercial neem oil (EC50 = 2.62 μg/cm(2)). In addition, the major peplusol showed obvious antifungal activity against three strains of agricultural phytopathogenic fungi, Rhizoctonia solani, Colletotrichum litchi and Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. niveum. The results indicated that terpenoids in the latex of E. peplus are rich and highly diversified, and might function as constitutive defense metabolites against insect herbivores and pathogens for the plant. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Administrative and Technical Support for the U.S. Army Medical Research and Development Command Joint Working Group on Medical Chemical Defense

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-08-01

    Development Command Joint Working I PR 3M463807D % Group on Medical Chemical Defense (U) TA 993BO Ai UTHRioS) WU 045 -Mr. Marvin L. Fitts VUDA3O4920...performance from medical treatment and pretreatment drugs used to counter chemical warfare agents. Me ters Industries, Inc. provided administritive and...for the U. S. Army Medical Research and Development Command Joint Working Group on Medical Chemical Defense. FINAL REPORT Marvin L Fitts, MS Cynthia L

  5. Elucidating Mechanisms of Toxicity Using Phenotypic Data from Primary Human Cell Systems—A Chemical Biology Approach for Thrombosis-Related Side Effects

    PubMed Central

    Berg, Ellen L.; Polokoff, Mark A.; O’Mahony, Alison; Nguyen, Dat; Li, Xitong

    2015-01-01

    Here we describe a chemical biology approach for elucidating potential toxicity mechanisms for thrombosis-related side effects. This work takes advantage of a large chemical biology data set comprising the effects of known, well-characterized reference agents on the cell surface levels of tissue factor (TF) in a primary human endothelial cell-based model of vascular inflammation, the BioMAP® 3C system. In previous work with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for the ToxCast™ program, aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonists and estrogen receptor (ER) antagonists were found to share an usual activity, that of increasing TF levels in this system. Since human exposure to compounds in both chemical classes is associated with increased incidence of thrombosis-related side effects, we expanded this analysis with a large number of well-characterized reference compounds in order to better understand the underlying mechanisms. As a result, mechanisms for increasing (AhR, histamine H1 receptor, histone deacetylase or HDAC, hsp90, nuclear factor kappa B or NFκB, MEK, oncostatin M receptor, Jak kinase, and p38 MAPK) and decreasing (vacuolar ATPase or V-ATPase) and mTOR) TF expression levels were uncovered. These data identify the nutrient, lipid, bacterial, and hypoxia sensing functions of autophagy as potential key regulatory points controlling cell surface TF levels in endothelial cells and support the mechanistic hypothesis that these functions are associated with thrombosis-related side effects in vivo. PMID:25569083

  6. Structural elucidation of dioxa-cage compounds from tetrahydroisobenzofuran-1(3H)-one: analysis of NMR data and GIAO chemical shifts calculations.

    PubMed

    da Costa Resende, Gabriela; Alvarenga, Elson Santiago

    2016-12-01

    The polycyclic compounds, especially the dioxa-cages, have attracted considerable attention in recent years. In our work, a series of 9β-substituted 3-oxo-4,11-dioxatetracyclo[5.2.1.1(5,8) .0(2,6) ]undecane compounds were unexpectedly isolated during bromination, chlorination and epoxidation reactions of the 3-hydroxy-3a,4,7,7a-tetrahydro-4,7-methanoisobenzofuran-1(3H)-one. After careful analysis of the NMR data, the chemical shifts of the isolated and the expected products were predicted by theoretical calculations using density functional theory and gauge including atomic orbitals. The best correlation between calculated and experimental data was evaluated by comparing mean absolute errors and applying DP4 probability methodology. Results from both approaches indicated a correct structural elucidation. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Defense Waste Processing Facility Simulant Chemical Processing Cell Studies for Sludge Batch 9

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Tara E.; Newell, J. David; Woodham, Wesley H.

    2016-08-10

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) received a technical task request from Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) and Saltstone Engineering to perform simulant tests to support the qualification of Sludge Batch 9 (SB9) and to develop the flowsheet for SB9 in the DWPF. These efforts pertained to the DWPF Chemical Process Cell (CPC). CPC experiments were performed using SB9 simulant (SB9A) to qualify SB9 for sludge-only and coupled processing using the nitric-formic flowsheet in the DWPF. Two simulant batches were prepared, one representing SB8 Tank 40H and another representing SB9 Tank 51H. The simulant used for SB9 qualification testing was prepared by blending the SB8 Tank 40H and SB9 Tank 51H simulants. The blended simulant is referred to as SB9A. Eleven CPC experiments were run with an acid stoichiometry ranging between 105% and 145% of the Koopman minimum acid equation (KMA), which is equivalent to 109.7% and 151.5% of the Hsu minimum acid factor. Three runs were performed in the 1L laboratory scale setup, whereas the remainder were in the 4L laboratory scale setup. Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycles were performed on nine of the eleven. The other two were SRAT cycles only. One coupled flowsheet and one extended run were performed for SRAT and SME processing. Samples of the condensate, sludge, and off-gas were taken to monitor the chemistry of the CPC experiments.

  8. Chemical defense in Elodea nuttallii reduces feeding and growth of aquatic herbivorous Lepidoptera.

    PubMed

    Erhard, Daniela; Pohnert, Georg; Gross, Elisabeth M

    2007-08-01

    The submersed macrophyte Elodea nuttallii (Hydrocharitaceae) is invasive in Europe and frequently found in aquatic plant communities. Many invertebrate herbivores, such as larvae of the generalist aquatic moth, Acentria ephemerella (Lepidoptera, Pyralidae), avoid feeding on E. nuttallii and preferably consume native species. First instar larvae exhibited a high mortality on E. nuttallii compared to the native macrophyte Potamogeton perfoliatus. Mortality of older larvae was also high when fed E. nuttallii exposed to high light intensities. Growth of older larvae was strongly reduced on E. nuttallii compared to pondweeds (Potamogeton lucens). Neither differences in nitrogen nor phosphorus content explained the different performance on these submerged macrophytes, but plants differed in their flavonoid content. To investigate whether plant-derived allelochemicals from E. nuttallii affect larval performance in the same way as live plants, we developed a functional bioassay, in which Acentria larvae were reared on artificial diets. We offered larvae Potamogeton leaf disks coated with crude Elodea extracts and partially purified flavonoids. Elodea extracts deterred larvae from feeding on otherwise preferred Potamogeton leaves, and yet, unknown compounds in the extracts reduced growth and survival of Acentria. The flavonoid fraction containing luteolin-7-O-diglucuronide, apigenin-7-O-diglucuronide, and chrysoeriol-7-O-diglucuronide strongly reduced feeding of larvae, but did not increase mortality. The concentrations of these compounds in our assays were 0.01-0.09% of plant dry mass, which is in the lower range of concentrations found in the field (0.02-1.2%). Chemical defense in E. nuttallii thus plays an ecologically relevant role in this aquatic plant-herbivore system.

  9. Chemical defenses and resource trade-offs structure sponge communities on Caribbean coral reefs

    PubMed Central

    Loh, Tse-Lynn; Pawlik, Joseph R.

    2014-01-01

    Ecological studies have rarely been performed at the community level across a large biogeographic region. Sponges are now the primary habitat-forming organisms on Caribbean coral reefs. Recent species-level investigations have demonstrated that predatory fishes (angelfishes and some parrotfishes) differentially graze sponges that lack chemical defenses, while co-occurring, palatable species heal, grow, reproduce, or recruit at faster rates than defended species. Our prediction, based on resource allocation theory, was that predator removal would result in a greater proportion of palatable species in the sponge community on overfished reefs. We tested this prediction by performing surveys of sponge and fish community composition on reefs having different levels of fishing intensity across the Caribbean. A total of 109 sponge species was recorded from 69 sites, with the 10 most common species comprising 51.0% of sponge cover (3.6–7.7% per species). Nonmetric multidimensional scaling indicated that the species composition of sponge communities depended more on the abundance of sponge-eating fishes than geographic location. Across all sites, multiple-regression analyses revealed that spongivore abundance explained 32.8% of the variation in the proportion of palatable sponges, but when data were limited to geographically adjacent locations with strongly contrasting levels of fishing pressure (Cayman Islands and Jamaica; Curaçao, Bonaire, and Martinique), the adjusted R2 values were much higher (76.5% and 94.6%, respectively). Overfishing of Caribbean coral reefs, particularly by fish trapping, removes sponge predators and is likely to result in greater competition for space between faster-growing palatable sponges and endangered reef-building corals. PMID:24567392

  10. Interaction of chemical defense clothing and high terrestrial altitudes on lift/carry and marksmanship performance.

    PubMed

    Muza, S R; Jackson, R; Rock, P B; Roach, J; Lyons, T; Cymerman, A

    2000-07-01

    The increased metabolic energy requirement imposed by a chemical defense uniform (CDU) and the lower maximal aerobic capacity associated with increased altitude should produce greater demands on the cardiopulmonary system during the performance of a given work task at increasing altitudes. We hypothesized that: a) relative to sea level, the decrements in physical work performance caused by ascending to high terrestrial altitudes would be greater in a CDU compared with a standard fatigue uniform (U.S. Army, BDU); b) the aversive subjective reactions to the CDU would be accentuated with increasing altitude; and c) that staging at moderate altitude, to induce acclimatization, would restore work performance at higher altitudes to sea level norms. The physiological and subjective responses of 8 male soldiers to work (10-min lift-and-carry task and rifle marksmanship) were measured. Subjects wore the BDU and a CDU ensemble (U.S. Army, BDO) at sea level, intermediate (2743 m) and high (4,300 m) altitudes following rapid and staged (3 d at 1,830 m) ascents to the higher altitudes. Lift/carry task performance tended to be lower (p = 0.076) in the CDU vs. the BDU at altitude. The cardiopulmonary responses to the lift/carry task increased at altitude and were greater in the CDU. The subjects' perception of their ability to perform the lift/carry task at altitude was adversely impacted more in the CDU than the BDU. Rapid ascent to intermediate altitude degraded marksmanship in both uniforms. Following staged ascent, lift/carry task and marksmanship performance was restored to sea level norms. Personnel wearing CDU or equivalent protective clothing at intermediate to high terrestrial elevations should anticipate proportionally larger CDU-induced decrements of work performance and lower tolerance to working in a CDU than experienced near sea level. Staging at moderate altitude is an effective strategy for restoring work performance to sea level norms at higher altitudes.

  11. Chemical defenses and resource trade-offs structure sponge communities on Caribbean coral reefs.

    PubMed

    Loh, Tse-Lynn; Pawlik, Joseph R

    2014-03-18

    Ecological studies have rarely been performed at the community level across a large biogeographic region. Sponges are now the primary habitat-forming organisms on Caribbean coral reefs. Recent species-level investigations have demonstrated that predatory fishes (angelfishes and some parrotfishes) differentially graze sponges that lack chemical defenses, while co-occurring, palatable species heal, grow, reproduce, or recruit at faster rates than defended species. Our prediction, based on resource allocation theory, was that predator removal would result in a greater proportion of palatable species in the sponge community on overfished reefs. We tested this prediction by performing surveys of sponge and fish community composition on reefs having different levels of fishing intensity across the Caribbean. A total of 109 sponge species was recorded from 69 sites, with the 10 most common species comprising 51.0% of sponge cover (3.6-7.7% per species). Nonmetric multidimensional scaling indicated that the species composition of sponge communities depended more on the abundance of sponge-eating fishes than geographic location. Across all sites, multiple-regression analyses revealed that spongivore abundance explained 32.8% of the variation in the proportion of palatable sponges, but when data were limited to geographically adjacent locations with strongly contrasting levels of fishing pressure (Cayman Islands and Jamaica; Curaçao, Bonaire, and Martinique), the adjusted R(2) values were much higher (76.5% and 94.6%, respectively). Overfishing of Caribbean coral reefs, particularly by fish trapping, removes sponge predators and is likely to result in greater competition for space between faster-growing palatable sponges and endangered reef-building corals.

  12. Interspecific variation in persistence of buried weed seeds follows trade-offs among physiological, chemical, and physical seed defenses.

    PubMed

    Davis, Adam S; Fu, Xianhui; Schutte, Brian J; Berhow, Mark A; Dalling, James W

    2016-10-01

    Soil seedbanks drive infestations of annual weeds, yet weed management focuses largely on seedling mortality. As weed seedbanks increasingly become reservoirs of herbicide resistance, species-specific seedbank management approaches will be essential to weed control. However, the development of seedbank management strategies can only develop from an understanding of how seed traits affect persistence.We quantified interspecific trade-offs among physiological, chemical, and physical traits of weed seeds and their persistence in the soil seedbank in a common garden study. Seeds of 11 annual weed species were buried in Savoy, IL, from 2007 through 2012. Seedling recruitment was measured weekly and seed viability measured annually. Seed physiological (dormancy), chemical (phenolic compound diversity and concentration; invertebrate toxicity), and physical traits (seed coat mass, thickness, and rupture resistance) were measured.Seed half-life in the soil (t0.5) showed strong interspecific variation (F10,30 = 15, p < .0001), ranging from 0.25 years (Bassia scoparia) to 2.22 years (Abutilon theophrasti). Modeling covariances among seed traits and seedbank persistence quantified support for two putative defense syndromes (physiological-chemical and physical-chemical) and highlighted the central role of seed dormancy in controlling seed persistence.A quantitative comparison between our results and other published work indicated that weed seed dormancy and seedbank persistence are linked across diverse environments and agroecosystems. Moreover, among seedbank-forming early successional plant species, relative investment in chemical and physical seed defense varies with seedbank persistence. Synthesis and applications. Strong covariance among weed seed traits and persistence in the soil seedbank indicates potential for seedbank management practices tailored to specific weed species. In particular, species with high t0.5 values tend to invest less in chemical defenses

  13. High accuracy NMR chemical shift corrected for bulk magnetization as a tool for structural elucidation of microemulsions. Part 2 - Anionic and nonionic dilutable microemulsions.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Roy E; Darmon, Eliezer; Aserin, Abraham; Garti, Nissim

    2016-02-01

    In our previous report we suggested a new analytical tool, high accuracy NMR chemical shift corrected for bulk magnetization as a supplementary tool to study structural transitions and droplet size and shape of dilutable microemulsions. The aim of this study was to show the generality of this technique and to demonstrate that in almost any type of microemulsion this technique provides additional valuable structural information. The analysis made by the technique adds to the elucidation of some structural aspects that could not be clearly determined by other classical techniques. Therefore, in this part we are extending the study to three additional systems differing in the type of oil phase (toluene and cyclohexane), the nature of the surfactants (anionic and nonionic), and other microemulsion characteristics. We studied sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-based anionic microemulsions with different oils and a nonionic microemulsion based on Tween 20 as the surfactant and toluene as the oil phase. All the microemulsions were fully dilutable with water. We found that the change in the slope of chemical shift against dilution reflects phase transition points of the microemulsion (O/W, bicontinuous, W/O). Chemical shift changes were clearly observed with the transition between spherical and non-spherical (wormlike, etc.) droplet shapes. We compared the interaction of cyclohexane and toluene and used the anisotropic effect of toluene's ring current to determine its preferred orientation relative to SDS. Chemical shifts of the microemulsion components are therefore a useful addition to the arsenal of techniques for characterizing microemulsions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Elucidating the modes of action for bioactive compounds in a cell-specific manner by large-scale chemically-induced transcriptomics

    PubMed Central

    Iwata, Michio; Sawada, Ryusuke; Iwata, Hiroaki; Kotera, Masaaki; Yamanishi, Yoshihiro

    2017-01-01

    The identification of the modes of action of bioactive compounds is a major challenge in chemical systems biology of diseases. Genome-wide expression profiling of transcriptional responses to compound treatment for human cell lines is a promising unbiased approach for the mode-of-action analysis. Here we developed a novel approach to elucidate the modes of action of bioactive compounds in a cell-specific manner using large-scale chemically-induced transcriptome data acquired from the Library of Integrated Network-based Cellular Signatures (LINCS), and analyzed 16,268 compounds and 68 human cell lines. First, we performed pathway enrichment analyses of regulated genes to reveal active pathways among 163 biological pathways. Next, we explored potential target proteins (including primary targets and off-targets) with cell-specific transcriptional similarity using chemical–protein interactome. Finally, we predicted new therapeutic indications for 461 diseases based on the target proteins. We showed the usefulness of the proposed approach in terms of prediction coverage, interpretation, and large-scale applicability, and validated the new prediction results experimentally by an in vitro cellular assay. The approach has a high potential for advancing drug discovery and repositioning. PMID:28071740

  15. Ferulic Acid Orchestrates Anti-Oxidative Properties of Danggui Buxue Tang, an Ancient Herbal Decoction: Elucidation by Chemical Knock-Out Approach

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Amy G. W.; Huang, Vincent Y.; Wang, Huai Y.; Lin, Huang Q.; Dong, Tina T. X.; Tsim, Karl W. K.

    2016-01-01

    Ferulic acid, a phenolic acid derived mainly from a Chinese herb Angelica Sinensis Radix (ASR), was reported to reduce the formation of free radicals. Danggui Buxue Tang (DBT), a herbal decoction composing of Astragali Radix (AR) and ASR, has been utilized for more than 800 years in China having known anti-oxidative property. Ferulic acid is a major active ingredient in DBT; however, the role of ferulic acid within the herbal mixture has not been resolved. In order to elucidate the function of ferulic acid within this herbal decoction, a ferulic acid-depleted herbal decoction was created and named as DBTΔfa. The anti-oxidative properties of chemically modified DBT decoction were systemically compared in cultured H9C2 rat cardiomyoblast cell line. The application of DBT and DBTΔfa into the cultures showed functions in (i) decreasing the reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, detected by laser confocal; (ii) increasing of the activation of Akt; (iii) increasing the transcriptional activity of anti-oxidant response element (ARE); and (iv) increasing the expressions of anti-oxidant enzymes, i.e. NQO1 and GCLM. In all scenario, the aforementioned anti-oxidative properties of DBTΔfa in H9C2 cells were significantly reduced, as compared to authentic DBT. Thus, ferulic acid could be an indispensable chemical in DBT to orchestrate multi-components of DBT as to achieve maximal anti-oxidative functions. PMID:27824860

  16. Glandular β-glucosidases in juvenile Chrysomelina leaf beetles support the evolution of a host-plant-dependent chemical defense.

    PubMed

    Rahfeld, Peter; Haeger, Wiebke; Kirsch, Roy; Pauls, Gerhard; Becker, Tobias; Schulze, Eva; Wielsch, Natalie; Wang, Ding; Groth, Marco; Brandt, Wolfgang; Boland, Wilhelm; Burse, Antje

    2015-03-01

    Plant-feeding insects are spread across the entire plant kingdom. Because they chew externally on leaves, leaf beetle of the subtribe Chrysomelina sensu stricto are constantly exposed to life-threatening predators and parasitoids. To counter these pressures, the juveniles repel their enemies by displaying glandular secretions that contain defensive compounds. These repellents can be produced either de novo (iridoids) or by using plant-derived precursors. The autonomous production of iridoids pre-dates the evolution of phytochemical-based defense strategies. Both strategies include hydrolysis of the secreted non-toxic glycosides in the defensive exudates. By combining in vitro as well as in vivo experiments, we show that iridoid de novo producing as well as sequestering species rely on secreted β-glucosidases to cleave the pre-toxins. Our phylogenetic analyses support a common origin of chrysomeline β-glucosidases. The kinetic parameters of these β-glucosidases demonstrated substrate selectivity which reflects the adaptation of Chrysomelina sensu stricto to the chemistry of their hosts during the course of evolution. However, the functional studies also showed that the broad substrate selectivity allows building a chemical defense, which is dependent on the host plant, but does not lead to an "evolutionary dead end". Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Two brominated cyclic dipeptides released by the coldwater marine sponge Geodia barretti act in synergy as chemical defense.

    PubMed

    Sjögren, Martin; Jonsson, Per R; Dahlström, Mia; Lundälv, Tomas; Burman, Robert; Göransson, Ulf; Bohlin, Lars

    2011-03-25

    The current work shows that two structurally similar cyclodipeptides, barettin (1) and 8,9-dihydrobarettin (2), produced by the coldwater marine sponge Geodia barretti Bowerbank act in synergy to deter larvae of surface settlers and may also be involved in defense against grazers. Previously, 1 and 2 were demonstrated to bind specifically to serotonergic 5-HT receptors. It may be suggested that chemical defense in G. barretti involves a synergistic action where one of the molecular targets is a 5-HT receptor. A mixture of 1 and 2 lowered the EC(50) of larval settlement as compared to the calculated theoretical additive effect of the two compounds. Moreover, an in situ sampling at 120 m depth using a remotely operated vehicle revealed that the sponge releases these two compounds to the ambient water. Thus, it is suggested that the synergistic action of 1 and 2 may benefit the sponge by reducing the expenditure of continuous production and release of its chemical defense substances. Furthermore, a synergistic action between structurally closely related compounds produced by the same bioenzymatic machinery ought to be the most energy effective for the organism and, thus, is more common than synergy between structurally indistinct compounds.

  18. Defensive secretions of the carabid beetle Chlaenius cordicollis: chemical components and their geographic patterns of variation.

    PubMed

    Holliday, A E; Holliday, N J; Mattingly, T M; Naccarato, K M

    2012-03-01

    The defensive secretion of the ground beetle Chlaenius cordicollis is predominantly 3-methylphenol. Adult C. cordicollis were collected in Pennsylvania and Manitoba and induced to discharge defensive secretion in a vial. The headspace was sampled by solid phase microextraction, and samples were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Five alkylphenolic compounds were detected: all beetles secreted 3-methlyphenol, 2,5-dimethylphenol, and 3-ethylphenol, and most beetles from each locality secreted detectable amounts of 2,3-dimethlyphenol and 3,4-dimethylphenol. In about 80% of beetles, we detected small amounts of the alkoxyphenolic compounds 2-methoxy-4-methylphenol and 2-methoxy-5-methylphenol. Multivariate compositional analysis of relative peak areas of alkylphenolic compounds revealed geographic variation and sexual dimorphism in defensive secretions. Compared with samples from Manitoba, relative peak areas of samples from Pennsylvania were lower for 2,3-dimethylphenol and higher for 3-methylphenol. Sexual dimorphism was detected only in Manitoba where, compared with samples from males, relative peak areas for samples from females were higher for 2,5-dimethylphenol and lower for 3-ethylphenol. This is the first report of geographic variation in defensive secretions of carabid beetles, and it demonstrates the need for knowledge of patterns of variation before characterizing the defensive secretions of a species as a whole.

  19. Physiological price of an induced chemical defense: photosynthesis, respiration, biosynthesis, and growth.

    PubMed

    Zangerl, A R; Arntz, A Michele; Berenbaum, May R

    1997-02-01

    A recurring theme in defense allocation theories is that defenses are costly. Most studies that attempt to quantify a cost of defense seek to establish a trade-off between a component of plant fitness and the level of a constitutive defense. Such estimates are ambiguous because they cannot discount the cost of traits that are correlated with defense but are not themselves defensive. We examined the effects of damage-induced synthesis of furanocoumarins, known defense compounds, on the growth of wild parsnip. Plants that had 2% of their leaf area removed accumulated 8.6% less total biomass and 14% less root biomass than intact plants over a 4-week period. We also found that this small amount of leaf damage significantly reduced net photosynthetic rates 0.5 h after damage; the effect was temporary, as photosynthetic rates were no longer significantly different after 48 h. Lastly, we found that increases in respiration rates associated with damage coincided spatially and temporally with increases in furanocoumarin production, and that respiration increases were phenotypically correlated with furanocoumarin production. When damage-induced changes in furanocoumarin content and respiration rates were expressed in glucose equivalents and compared, the energetic cost of furanocoumarin production (12.6 μg glucose cm(-2)) accounted for all of the increase in respiration (12.0 μg glucose cm(-2)). A comparison of other secondary compounds in damaged and intact leaflets revealed that myristicin, a furanocoumarin synergist, is the only other compound aside from furanocoumarins that is inducible. The inducible defense system of wild parsnip thus appears to involve a small subset of secondary compounds. Synthesis of these compounds is tightly linked to damage-induced rates of respiration. Because the negative impact that damage had on the rate of net photosynthesis was short-lived, the impact of damage on growth observed in this study was likely due to the cost of

  20. 3-Dimensional atomic scale structure of the ionic liquid-graphite interface elucidated by AM-AFM and quantum chemical simulations.

    PubMed

    Page, Alister J; Elbourne, Aaron; Stefanovic, Ryan; Addicoat, Matthew A; Warr, Gregory G; Voïtchovsky, Kislon; Atkin, Rob

    2014-07-21

    In situ amplitude modulated atomic force microscopy (AM-AFM) and quantum chemical simulations are used to resolve the structure of the highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG)-bulk propylammonium nitrate (PAN) interface with resolution comparable with that achieved for frozen ionic liquid (IL) monolayers using STM. This is the first time that (a) molecular resolution images of bulk IL-solid interfaces have been achieved, (b) the lateral structure of the IL graphite interface has been imaged for any IL, (c) AM-AFM has elucidated molecular level structure immersed in a viscous liquid and (d) it has been demonstrated that the IL structure at solid surfaces is a consequence of both thermodynamic and kinetic effects. The lateral structure of the PAN-graphite interface is highly ordered and consists of remarkably well-defined domains of a rhomboidal superstructure composed of propylammonium cations preferentially aligned along two of the three directions in the underlying graphite lattice. The nanostructure is primarily determined by the cation. Van der Waals interactions between the propylammonium chains and the surface mean that the cation is enriched in the surface layer, and is much less mobile than the anion. The presence of a heterogeneous lateral structure at an ionic liquid-solid interface has wide ranging ramifications for ionic liquid applications, including lubrication, capacitive charge storage and electrodeposition.

  1. Structural elucidation of monoterpene oxidation products by ion trap fragmentation using on-line atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation mass spectrometry in the negative ion mode.

    PubMed

    Warscheid, B; Hoffmann, T

    2001-01-01

    Based on ion trap mass spectrometry, an on-line method is described which provides valuable information on the molecular composition of structurally complex organic aerosols. The investigated aerosols were generated from the gas-phase ozonolysis of various C(10)H(16)-terpenes (alpha-pinene, beta-pinene, 3-carene, sabinene, limonene), and directly introduced into the ion source of the mass spectrometer. Negative ion chemical ionisation at atmospheric pressure (APCI(-)) enabled the detection of multifunctional carboxylic acid products by combining inherent sensitivity and molecular weight information. Sequential low-energy collision-induced product ion fragmentation experiments (MS(n)) were performed in order to elucidate characteristic decomposition pathways of the compounds. Dicarboxylic acids, oxocarboxylic acids and hydroxyketocarboxylic acid products could be clearly distinguished by multistage on-line MS. Furthermore, sabinonic acid and two C(9)-ether compounds were tentatively identified for the first time by applying on-line APCI(-)-MS(n). Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Variability in chemical defense across a shallow to mesophotic depth gradient in the Caribbean sponge Plakortis angulospiculatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slattery, Marc; Gochfeld, Deborah J.; Diaz, M. Cristina; Thacker, Robert W.; Lesser, Michael P.

    2016-03-01

    The transition between shallow and mesophotic coral reef communities in the tropics is characterized by a significant gradient in abiotic and biotic conditions that could result in potential trade-offs in energy allocation. The mesophotic reefs in the Bahamas and the Cayman Islands have a rich sponge fauna with significantly greater percent cover of sponges than in their respective shallow reef communities, but relatively low numbers of spongivores. Plakortis angulospiculatus, a common sponge species that spans the depth gradient from shallow to mesophotic reefs in the Caribbean, regenerates faster following predation and invests more energy in protein synthesis at mesophotic depths compared to shallow reef conspecifics. However, since P. angulospiculatus from mesophotic reefs typically contain lower concentrations of chemical feeding deterrents, they are not able to defend new tissue from predation as efficiently as conspecifics from shallow reefs. Nonetheless, following exposure to predators on shallow reefs, transplanted P. angulospiculatus from mesophotic depths developed chemical deterrence to predatory fishes. A survey of bioactive extracts indicated that a specific defensive metabolite, plakortide F, varied in concentration with depth, producing altered deterrence between shallow and mesophotic reef P. angulospiculatus. Different selective pressures in shallow and mesophotic habitats have resulted in phenotypic plasticity within this sponge species that is manifested in variable chemical defense and tissue regeneration at wound sites.

  3. Leaf habit does not determine the investment in both physical and chemical defences and pair-wise correlations between these defensive traits.

    PubMed

    Moreira, X; Pearse, I S

    2016-12-23

    Plant life-history strategies associated with resource acquisition and economics (e.g. leaf habit) are thought to be fundamental determinants of the traits and mechanisms that drive herbivore pressure, resource allocation to plant defensive traits, and the simultaneous expression (positive correlations) or trade-offs (negative correlations) between these defensive traits. In particular, it is expected that evergreen species - which usually grow slower and support constant herbivore pressure in comparison with deciduous species - will exhibit higher levels of both physical and chemical defences and a higher predisposition to the simultaneous expression of physical and chemical defensive traits. Here, by using a dataset which included 56 oak species (Quercus genus), we investigated whether leaf habit of plant species governs the investment in both physical and chemical defences and pair-wise correlations between these defensive traits. Our results showed that leaf habit does not determine the production of most leaf physical and chemical defences. Although evergreen oak species had higher levels of leaf toughness and specific leaf mass (physical defences) than deciduous oak species, both traits are essentially prerequisites for evergreenness. Similarly, our results also showed that leaf habit does not determine pair-wise correlations between defensive traits because most physical and chemical defensive traits were simultaneously expressed in both evergreen and deciduous oak species. Our findings indicate that leaf habit does not substantially contribute to oak species differences in plant defence investment.

  4. Structural and chemical insect defenses in calcium oxalate defective mutants of Medicago truncatula

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Plant structures can act as defense against herbivorous insects, causing them to avoid feeding on a given plant or tissue. Mineral crystals of calcium oxalate in leaves of Medicago truncatula Gaertn. are effective deterrents of lepidopteran feeding, and they inhibit conversion of leaves into insect ...

  5. Induced defenses change the chemical composition of pine seedlings and influence meal properties of the pine weevil Hylobius abietis.

    PubMed

    Lundborg, Lina; Fedderwitz, Frauke; Björklund, Niklas; Nordlander, Göran; Borg-Karlson, Anna-Karin

    2016-10-01

    The defense of conifers against phytophagous insects relies to a large extent on induced chemical defenses. However, it is not clear how induced changes in chemical composition influence the meal properties of phytophagous insects (and thus damage rates). The defense can be induced experimentally with methyl jasmonate (MeJA), which is a substance that is produced naturally when a plant is attacked. Here we used MeJA to investigate how the volatile contents of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) tissues influence the meal properties of the pine weevil (Hylobius abietis (L.)). Phloem and needles (both weevil target tissues) from MeJA-treated and control seedlings were extracted by n-hexane and analyzed by two-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (2D GC-MS). The feeding of pine weevils on MeJA-treated and control seedlings were video-recorded to determine meal properties. Multivariate statistical analyses showed that phloem and needle contents of MeJA-treated seedlings had different volatile compositions compared to control seedlings. Levels of the pine weevil attractant (+)-α-pinene were particularly high in phloem of control seedlings with feeding damage. The antifeedant substance 2-phenylethanol occurred at higher levels in the phloem of MeJA-treated than in control seedlings. Accordingly, pine weevils fed slower and had shorter meals on MeJA-seedlings. The chemical compositions of phloem and needle tissues were clearly different in control seedlings but not in the MeJA-treated seedlings. Consequently, meal durations of mixed meals, i.e. both needles and phloem, were longer than phloem meals on control seedlings, while meal durations on MeJA seedlings did not differ between these meal contents. The meal duration influences the risk of girdling and plant death. Thus our results suggest a mechanism by which MeJA treatment may protect conifer seedlings against pine weevils.

  6. Plant chemical defense allocation constrains evolution of tolerance to community change across a range boundary

    PubMed Central

    Siemens, David H; Haugen, Riston

    2013-01-01

    Because transplant experiments show that performance usually decreases across species range boundaries, some range limits might develop from factors and processes that prevent adaptation to stressful environments. Here, we determined whether an ecological cost of plant defense involving stress associated with changes in the local plant community may contribute to range limit development in the upland mustard species Boechera stricta. In a common garden experiment of 499 B. stricta plants, performance decreased and a multivariate axis of community structure increased across the boundary, indicating increased stress associated with the community change. There was also significant genetic variation (evolutionary potential) among marker-inferred inbred lines of B. stricta for tolerance to the stress; however, lines with high basal levels of glucosinolate toxins had lower tolerance to the change in community structure. We suggest that defense allocation, which is also needed across the range, may impede adaptation to the stress associated with the community change and thus contribute to range limit development. PMID:24340176

  7. Plant chemical defense allocation constrains evolution of tolerance to community change across a range boundary.

    PubMed

    Siemens, David H; Haugen, Riston

    2013-11-01

    Because transplant experiments show that performance usually decreases across species range boundaries, some range limits might develop from factors and processes that prevent adaptation to stressful environments. Here, we determined whether an ecological cost of plant defense involving stress associated with changes in the local plant community may contribute to range limit development in the upland mustard species Boechera stricta. In a common garden experiment of 499 B. stricta plants, performance decreased and a multivariate axis of community structure increased across the boundary, indicating increased stress associated with the community change. There was also significant genetic variation (evolutionary potential) among marker-inferred inbred lines of B. stricta for tolerance to the stress; however, lines with high basal levels of glucosinolate toxins had lower tolerance to the change in community structure. We suggest that defense allocation, which is also needed across the range, may impede adaptation to the stress associated with the community change and thus contribute to range limit development.

  8. Defensive secretion of Therea petiveriana: chemical identification and evidence of an alarm function.

    PubMed

    Farine, Jean-Pierre; Semon, Etienne; Everaerts, Claude; Abed, Dehbia; Grandcolas, Philippe; Brossut, Remy

    2002-08-01

    The volatile constituents of the supposed defensive secretions of the glandular pouches of the adults of both sexes of the cockroach Therea petiveriana have been shown to contain N-3-methylbutylacetamide (MBA) and N-3-methylbutylpropanamide (MBP), which represented 60% of the volatile fraction. The other 40% included acidic, aromatic, and aldehydic compounds. Behavioral experiments demonstrated that the secretion acts as an alarm pheromone for adults.

  9. Avoid Protect Recover Joint Service Chemical and Biological Defense Program FY 2000 - 2002 Overview

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    Developed in vivo transgenic animal models for rise as test beds for evaluating scavengers. Expanded the evaluation of human protein catalytic... transgenic or knockout species. "* Demonstrate the efficacy of aTSP candidate formulations using two animal species. Complete aTSP fonnulation studies...Flquipment ECP Engineering Change Proposal JFTJoint Field Trial CROP CI remical Biological Defense Prograrn ECU Environmnental Control Unit JILSP Joint

  10. Selection Mosaic Exerted by Specialist and Generalist Herbivores on Chemical and Physical Defense of Datura stramonium

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, Guillermo; Cruz, Laura L.; Tapia-López, Rosalinda; Olmedo-Vicente, Eika; Carmona, Diego; Anaya-Lang, Ana Luisa; Fornoni, Juan; Andraca-Gómez, Guadalupe; Valverde, Pedro L.; Núñez-Farfán, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Selection exerted by herbivores is a major force driving the evolution of plant defensive characters such as leaf trichomes or secondary metabolites. However, plant defense expression is highly variable among populations and identifying the sources of this variation remains a major challenge. Plant populations are often distributed across broad geographic ranges and are exposed to different herbivore communities, ranging from generalists (that feed on diverse plant species) to specialists (that feed on a restricted group of plants). We studied eight populations of the plant Datura stramonium usually eaten by specialist or generalist herbivores, in order to examine whether the pattern of phenotypic selection on secondary compounds (atropine and scopolamine) and a physical defense (trichome density) can explain geographic variation in these traits. Following co-evolutionary theory, we evaluated whether a more derived alkaloid (scopolamine) confers higher fitness benefits than its precursor (atropine), and whether this effect differs between specialist and generalist herbivores. Our results showed consistent directional selection in almost all populations and herbivores to reduce the concentration of atropine. The most derived alkaloid (scopolamine) was favored in only one of the populations, which is dominated by a generalist herbivore. In general, the patterns of selection support the existence of a selection mosaic and accounts for the positive correlation observed between atropine concentration and plant damage by herbivores recorded in previous studies. PMID:25051169

  11. [Systematically induced effects of Tetranychus cinnabarinus infestation on chemical defense in Zea mays inbred lines].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yu-xi; Yang, Qun-fang; Huang, Yu-bi; Li, Qing

    2015-09-01

    In the present study, we investigated the systematically induced production of defense-related compounds, including DIMBOA, total phenol, trypsin inhibitors (TI) and chymotrypsin inhibitor (CI), by Tetranychus cinnabarinus infestation in Zea mays. The first leaves of two corn in-bred line seedlings, the mite-tolerant line ' H1014168' and the mite-sensitive line 'H1014591', were sucked by T. cinnabarinus adult female for seven days, and then the contents of DIMBOA, total phenol, TI and CI were measured in the second leaf and in the roots, respectively. Results showed that as compared to the unsucked control, all contents of DIMBOA, total phenol, TI and CI induced by T. cinnabarinus sucking were significantly higher in the second leaf of both inbred lines as well as in the roots of the mite-tolerant 'H1014168'. However, in the roots of 'H1014591', these defense compounds had different trends, where there was a higher induction of TI and a lower level of total phenol than that of the healthy control, while had almost no difference in DIMBOA and CI. These findings suggested that the infestation of T. cinnabarinus could systematically induce accumulation of defense-related compounds, and this effect was stronger in the mite-tolerant inbred line than in the mite-sensitive inbred line.

  12. Selection mosaic exerted by specialist and generalist herbivores on chemical and physical defense of Datura stramonium.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Guillermo; Cruz, Laura L; Tapia-López, Rosalinda; Olmedo-Vicente, Erika; Olmedo-Vicente, Eika; Carmona, Diego; Anaya-Lang, Ana Luisa; Fornoni, Juan; Andraca-Gómez, Guadalupe; Valverde, Pedro L; Núñez-Farfán, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Selection exerted by herbivores is a major force driving the evolution of plant defensive characters such as leaf trichomes or secondary metabolites. However, plant defense expression is highly variable among populations and identifying the sources of this variation remains a major challenge. Plant populations are often distributed across broad geographic ranges and are exposed to different herbivore communities, ranging from generalists (that feed on diverse plant species) to specialists (that feed on a restricted group of plants). We studied eight populations of the plant Datura stramonium usually eaten by specialist or generalist herbivores, in order to examine whether the pattern of phenotypic selection on secondary compounds (atropine and scopolamine) and a physical defense (trichome density) can explain geographic variation in these traits. Following co-evolutionary theory, we evaluated whether a more derived alkaloid (scopolamine) confers higher fitness benefits than its precursor (atropine), and whether this effect differs between specialist and generalist herbivores. Our results showed consistent directional selection in almost all populations and herbivores to reduce the concentration of atropine. The most derived alkaloid (scopolamine) was favored in only one of the populations, which is dominated by a generalist herbivore. In general, the patterns of selection support the existence of a selection mosaic and accounts for the positive correlation observed between atropine concentration and plant damage by herbivores recorded in previous studies.

  13. Selective chemical inhibition of agr quorum sensing in Staphylococcus aureus promotes host defense with minimal impact on resistance.

    PubMed

    Sully, Erin K; Malachowa, Natalia; Elmore, Bradley O; Alexander, Susan M; Femling, Jon K; Gray, Brian M; DeLeo, Frank R; Otto, Michael; Cheung, Ambrose L; Edwards, Bruce S; Sklar, Larry A; Horswill, Alexander R; Hall, Pamela R; Gresham, Hattie D

    2014-06-01

    Bacterial signaling systems are prime drug targets for combating the global health threat of antibiotic resistant bacterial infections including those caused by Staphylococcus aureus. S. aureus is the primary cause of acute bacterial skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) and the quorum sensing operon agr is causally associated with these. Whether efficacious chemical inhibitors of agr signaling can be developed that promote host defense against SSTIs while sparing the normal microbiota of the skin is unknown. In a high throughput screen, we identified a small molecule inhibitor (SMI), savirin (S. aureus virulence inhibitor) that disrupted agr-mediated quorum sensing in this pathogen but not in the important skin commensal Staphylococcus epidermidis. Mechanistic studies employing electrophoretic mobility shift assays and a novel AgrA activation reporter strain revealed the transcriptional regulator AgrA as the target of inhibition within the pathogen, preventing virulence gene upregulation. Consistent with its minimal impact on exponential phase growth, including skin microbiota members, savirin did not provoke stress responses or membrane dysfunction induced by conventional antibiotics as determined by transcriptional profiling and membrane potential and integrity studies. Importantly, savirin was efficacious in two murine skin infection models, abating tissue injury and selectively promoting clearance of agr+ but not Δagr bacteria when administered at the time of infection or delayed until maximal abscess development. The mechanism of enhanced host defense involved in part enhanced intracellular killing of agr+ but not Δagr in macrophages and by low pH. Notably, resistance or tolerance to savirin inhibition of agr was not observed after multiple passages either in vivo or in vitro where under the same conditions resistance to growth inhibition was induced after passage with conventional antibiotics. Therefore, chemical inhibitors can selectively target AgrA in

  14. Selective Chemical Inhibition of agr Quorum Sensing in Staphylococcus aureus Promotes Host Defense with Minimal Impact on Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Sully, Erin K.; Malachowa, Natalia; Elmore, Bradley O.; Alexander, Susan M.; Femling, Jon K.; Gray, Brian M.; DeLeo, Frank R.; Otto, Michael; Cheung, Ambrose L.; Edwards, Bruce S.; Sklar, Larry A.; Horswill, Alexander R.; Hall, Pamela R.; Gresham, Hattie D.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial signaling systems are prime drug targets for combating the global health threat of antibiotic resistant bacterial infections including those caused by Staphylococcus aureus. S. aureus is the primary cause of acute bacterial skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) and the quorum sensing operon agr is causally associated with these. Whether efficacious chemical inhibitors of agr signaling can be developed that promote host defense against SSTIs while sparing the normal microbiota of the skin is unknown. In a high throughput screen, we identified a small molecule inhibitor (SMI), savirin (S. aureus virulence inhibitor) that disrupted agr-mediated quorum sensing in this pathogen but not in the important skin commensal Staphylococcus epidermidis. Mechanistic studies employing electrophoretic mobility shift assays and a novel AgrA activation reporter strain revealed the transcriptional regulator AgrA as the target of inhibition within the pathogen, preventing virulence gene upregulation. Consistent with its minimal impact on exponential phase growth, including skin microbiota members, savirin did not provoke stress responses or membrane dysfunction induced by conventional antibiotics as determined by transcriptional profiling and membrane potential and integrity studies. Importantly, savirin was efficacious in two murine skin infection models, abating tissue injury and selectively promoting clearance of agr+ but not Δagr bacteria when administered at the time of infection or delayed until maximal abscess development. The mechanism of enhanced host defense involved in part enhanced intracellular killing of agr+ but not Δagr in macrophages and by low pH. Notably, resistance or tolerance to savirin inhibition of agr was not observed after multiple passages either in vivo or in vitro where under the same conditions resistance to growth inhibition was induced after passage with conventional antibiotics. Therefore, chemical inhibitors can selectively target AgrA in

  15. Chemical polymorphism in defense secretions during ontogenetic development of the millipede Niponia nodulosa.

    PubMed

    Kuwahara, Yasumasa; Ichiki, Yayoi; Morita, Masashi; Tanabe, Tsutomu; Asano, Yasuhisa

    2015-01-01

    A mixture of defense compounds (benzaldehyde, benzoyl cyanide, benzoic acid, mandelonitrile, and mandelonitrile benzoate), found commonly in cyanogenic polydesmid millipedes, was identified in the non-cyanogenic millipede Niponia nodulosa. These compounds were major components in 1st-4th instars, but were absent in older instars and adults. Extracts of older instars and adults contained 1-octen-3-ol, 2-methyl-2-bornene, E-2-octen-1-ol, 2-methyl-isoborneol, and geosmin; these compounds were minor components in 1st-4th instars. This ontogenetic allomone shift may be explained by the high cost of biosynthesis of polydesmid compounds from L-phenylalanine being offset by their potency in protecting the insect during fragile and sensitive growth stages. However, as the cuticle hardens in older juveniles (5th, 6th, 7th instars) and adults, this allows for a switch in defense to using less effective and less costly volatile organic compounds (presumably microbial in origin) that are ubiquitous in the millipede's habitat or are produced by symbiotic microbes and may be readily available through food intake or aspiration.

  16. Inducibility of chemical defenses in Norway spruce bark is correlated with unsuccessful mass attacks by the spruce bark beetle.

    PubMed

    Schiebe, Christian; Hammerbacher, Almuth; Birgersson, Göran; Witzell, Johanna; Brodelius, Peter E; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Hansson, Bill S; Krokene, Paal; Schlyter, Fredrik

    2012-09-01

    Secondary attraction to aggregation pheromones plays a central role in the host colonization behavior of the European spruce bark beetle Ips typographus. However, it is largely unknown how the beetles pioneering an attack locate suitable host trees, and eventually accept or reject them. To find possible biomarkers for host choice by I. typographus, we analyzed the chemistry of 58 Norway spruce (Picea abies) trees that were subsequently either (1) successfully attacked and killed, (2) unsuccessfully attacked, or (3) left unattacked. The trees were sampled before the main beetle flight in a natural Norway spruce-dominated forest. No pheromones were used to attract beetles to the experimental trees. To test the trees' defense potential, each tree was treated in a local area with the defense hormone methyl jasmonate (MeJ), and treated and untreated bark were analyzed for 66 different compounds, including terpenes, phenolics and alkaloids. The chemistry of MeJ-treated bark correlated strongly with the success of I. typographus attack, revealing major chemical differences between killed trees and unsuccessfully attacked trees. Surviving trees produced significantly higher amounts of most of the 39 analyzed mono-, sesqui-, and diterpenes and of 4 of 20 phenolics. Alkaloids showed no clear pattern. Differences in untreated bark were less pronounced, where only 1,8-cineole and (-)-limonene were significantly higher in unsuccessfully attacked trees. Our results show that the potential of individual P. abies trees for inducing defense compounds upon I. typographus attack may partly determine tree resistance to this bark beetle by inhibiting its mass attack.

  17. Medical defense against blistering chemical warfare agents. (Reannouncement with new availability information)

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, W.J.; Dunn, M.A.

    1991-08-01

    First used in World War I, chemical blistering agents present a serious medical threat that has stimulated renewed interest in the light of extensive use in recent conflicts. Current medical management cannot yet prevent or minimize injury from the principal agent of concern--sulfur mustard. Research directed at this goal depends on defining effective intervention in the metabolic alterations induced by exposure to sulfur mustard. Chemicals capable of inducing blisters, known as blistering or vesicating agents, have been widely known for more than 150 years. They were extensively used in chemical warfare during World War I, well before the development of the more deadly nerve agents 25 years later.

  18. Elucidating electronic transitions from σ orbitals of liquid n- and branched alkanes by far-ultraviolet spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations.

    PubMed

    Morisawa, Yusuke; Tachibana, Shin; Ehara, Masahiro; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2012-12-06

    Attenuated total reflection far-ultraviolet (ATR-FUV) spectra containing Rydberg states of n-alkanes (C(m)H(2m+2); m varies in the range 5-9) and branched alkanes observed in the liquid phase were investigated by quantum chemical calculations with the aim of elucidating electronic transitions from σ orbitals of liquid n- and branched alkanes. New assignments are proposed based on the time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) and symmetry-adapted cluster configuration interaction (SAC-CI) calculations, and the differences in these spectra are analyzed in detail. The FUV spectra of n-alkanes show a broad asymmetric feature near 8.3 eV. The strong band at ∼8.3 eV shows a red shift with a significant increase in intensity as the carbon chain length increases, which is attributed to the overlapping transitions from the third (or fourth) highest occupied molecular orbitals HOMO-2 (or HOMO-3) and HOMO-1 to Rydberg 3p(y) by the TD-DFT and SAC-CI calculations. This band was previously assigned to the overlap of two peaks arising from the transition from the HOMO to 3p and from the HOMO-1 to 3s based on their term values. Although the most intense transition, T1, is from HOMO-2 for m = 5 and 6 and HOMO-3 for m varying in the range of 7-9, the shape of Kohn-Sham molecular orbital for T1 is similar among the all-alkanes investigated. The theoretical result also has demonstrated that the red shift originates in both stabilization of the Rydberg 3p(y) and destabilization of the occupied orbitals. The intensity of the shoulder at 7.7 eV drastically increases in the spectra of the branched alkanes, especially for those with quaternary carbon atoms such as 2,2-dimethyl butane. This increase in intensity is caused by a reduction in symmetry in the branched alkanes, which leads the forbidden transitions to Rydberg 3s to allowed transitions. In this way, the present study has provided new insight into the existence of their Rydberg transitions and the shape of the relevant

  19. Influence of Genotype, Environment, and Gypsy Moth Herbivory on Local and Systemic Chemical Defenses in Trembling Aspen (Populus tremuloides).

    PubMed

    Rubert-Nason, Kennedy F; Couture, John J; Major, Ian T; Constabel, C Peter; Lindroth, Richard L

    2015-07-01

    Numerous studies have explored the impacts of intraspecific genetic variation and environment on the induction of plant chemical defenses by herbivory. Relatively few, however, have considered how those factors affect within-plant distribution of induced defenses. This work examined the impacts of plant genotype and soil nutrients on the local and systemic phytochemical responses of trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides) to defoliation by gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar). We deployed larvae onto foliage on individual tree branches for 15 days and then measured chemistry in leaves from: 1) branches receiving damage, 2) undamaged branches of insect-damaged trees, and 3) branches of undamaged control trees. The relationship between post-herbivory phytochemical variation and insect performance also was examined. Plant genotype, soil nutrients, and damage all influenced phytochemistry, with genotype and soil nutrients being stronger determinants than damage. Generally, insect damage decreased foliar nitrogen, increased levels of salicinoids and condensed tannins, but had little effect on levels of a Kunitz trypsin inhibitor, TI3. The largest damage-mediated tannin increases occurred in leaves on branches receiving damage, whereas the largest salicinoid increases occurred in leaves of adjacent, undamaged branches. Foliar nitrogen and the salicinoid tremulacin had the strongest positive and negative relationships, respectively, with insect growth. Overall, plant genetics and environment concomitantly influenced both local and systemic phytochemical responses to herbivory. These findings suggest that herbivory can contribute to phytochemical heterogeneity in aspen foliage, which may in turn influence future patterns of herbivory and nutrient cycling over larger spatial scales.

  20. Chemical defense across three trophic levels: Catalpa bignonioides, the caterpillar Ceratomia catalpae, and its endoparasitoid Cotesia congregata.

    PubMed

    Lampert, Evan C; Dyer, Lee A; Bowers, M Deane

    2011-10-01

    Plant secondary chemistry can vary among plant tissues, individuals, and populations, and this variation has population-level consequences for upper trophic levels. In this study, we examined the multi-trophic consequences of variation in iridoid glycosides, which are a component of plant defense against generalist herbivores and also contribute to the unpalatability of sequestering herbivores to both vertebrate and invertebrate predators. Several populations of Catalpa bignonioides were located and examined for the presence of the Catalpa Sphinx, Ceratomia catalpae, a specialist herbivore of Catalpa. We quantified iridoid glycoside content in Catalpa Sphinx caterpillars and in damaged and undamaged C. bignonioides leaves. Overall, leaves of C. bignonioides that were damaged by Catalpa Sphinx caterpillars contained lower concentrations of two major iridoid glycosides, catalpol and catalposide, than leaves of undamaged trees from naturally occurring populations. Catalpa Sphinx caterpillars sequester only catalpol, and increasing catalpol and catalposide concentrations in leaves were associated with increased catalpol sequestration by caterpillars. The parasitoid Cotesia congregata develops successfully inside catalpol-sequestering Catalpa Sphinx caterpillars, and we examined parasitoid larvae for the presence of catalpol. Parasitoid larvae dissected from caterpillars contained catalpol, but at lower concentrations than their host caterpillars. The variation in chemical defense documented here has rarely been documented over multiple trophic levels, but such resolved systems are ideal for examining competing hypotheses about the effects of plant secondary metabolites on higher trophic levels.

  1. Chemical and Mechanical Defenses Vary among Maternal Lines and Leaf Ages in Verbascum thapsus L. (Scrophulariaceae) and Reduce Palatability to a Generalist Insect

    PubMed Central

    Alba, Christina; Bowers, M. Deane; Blumenthal, Dana; Hufbauer, Ruth A.

    2014-01-01

    Intra-specific variation in host-plant quality affects herbivore foraging decisions and, in turn, herbivore foraging decisions mediate plant fitness. In particular, variation in defenses against herbivores, both among and within plants, shapes herbivore behavior. If variation in defenses is genetically based, it can respond to natural selection by herbivores. We quantified intra-specific variation in iridoid glycosides, trichome length, and leaf strength in common mullein (Verbascum thapsus L, Scrophulariaceae) among maternal lines within a population and among leaves within plants, and related this variation to feeding preferences of a generalist herbivore, Trichopulsia ni Hübner. We found significant variation in all three defenses among maternal lines, with T. ni preferring plants with lower investment in chemical, but not mechanical, defense. Within plants, old leaves had lower levels of all defenses than young leaves, and were strongly preferred by T. ni. Caterpillars also preferred leaves with trichomes removed to leaves with trichomes intact. Differences among maternal lines indicate that phenotypic variation in defenses likely has a genetic basis. Furthermore, these results reveal that the feeding behaviors of T. ni map onto variation in plant defense in a predictable way. This work highlights the importance of variation in host-plant quality in driving interactions between plants and their herbivores. PMID:25127229

  2. Joint Service Chemical and Biological Defense Program. FY 02-03 Overview

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    and track objectives or targets. The ----% pivotal characteristic of precision engagement is the linking of sensors, delivery systems, and effects ...efficacy of recombinant protein vaccines in animal models using intranasal/inhalation and transdermal delivery methods. JVAP-Advanced Development "* Acquire...JSCBIS) Skin Decontamination and Protection, Performance Effects of Protectant Drugs , and http://jscbis.rdaisaarmy.mil Chemical Casualty Management

  3. Joint Service Chemical and Biological Defense Program. FY00-02 Overview

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-09-01

    operations at high levels of effectiveness . Combat power is restored as soon as possible by decontamination and medical treatment. The synergistic ...targets. The pivotal characteristic of precision engagement is the link- ing of sensors, delivery systems, and effects . Challenge: Chemical and biological...optimal midazolam – anticholinergic drug combination and order of administration to obtain maximal anticonvulsant effect against seizures in a non

  4. Chemical cues induce consumer-specific defenses in a bloom-forming marine phytoplankton

    PubMed Central

    Long, Jeremy D.; Smalley, Gabriela W.; Barsby, Todd; Anderson, Jon T.; Hay, Mark E.

    2007-01-01

    Blooms of the phytoplankton Phaeocystis can comprise 85% of total production and generate major biogeochemical signals across broad oceanic regions. The success of Phaeocystis may result from its ability to change size by many orders of magnitude when it shifts from small cells of 4–6 μm to large colonies of up to 30,000 μm in diameter. Single cells are consumed by ciliates but not copepods, whereas colonies are consumed by copepods but not ciliates. We demonstrate that chemical cues associated with each of these grazers induce consumer-specific, but opposing, morphological transformations in the bloom-forming species Phaeocystis globosa. Chemical cues from grazing copepods suppress colony formation by a significant 60–90%, a response that should be adaptive because copepods feed four times more on colonies versus solitary cells. In contrast, chemical cues from grazing ciliates enhance colony formation by >25%, a response that should be adaptive because ciliates grow three times faster when fed solitary cells versus colonies. Because size-selective predation fundamentally alters community structure and ecosystem function, this chemically cued shift may redirect energy and nutrients from food webs supporting fisheries to those fueling detrital pathways, thus potentially altering ecosystem-level processes such as productivity, carbon storage, and nutrient release. PMID:17563379

  5. Growth and chemical defense in relation to resource availability: tradeoffs or common responses to environmental stress?

    PubMed

    Almeida-Cortez, J S; Shipley, B; Arnason, J T

    2004-05-01

    One aspect of plant defense is the production of constitutive secondary compounds that confer toxicity on herbivores and pathogens. The purpose of this study was to compare patterns of plant tissue toxicity across gradients of irradiance and nutrient content. We measured the potential toxicity (1/LC50) of extracts of six species of herbaceous Asteraceae grown under controlled conditions of temperature (25 degrees C), humidity (80%), photoperiod (16 h/day), in a range of concentrations of a modified Hoagland hydroponic solution (full-strength, 1/5 dilute, 1/10 dilute, and 1/50 dilute) and under two different light intensities (250 and 125 micromol/m2/s). The plants grew from seed for 42 days post-germination, and randomly chosen plants were harvested each 7 days. We did a general measure of potential phytochemical toxicity using an alcohol extraction of secondary compounds followed by brine shrimp (Artemia sp.) bioassay. Contrary to the carbon/nutrient balance hypothesis, tissue toxicity generally increased with decreasing irradiance and nutrient levels, so that plants whose growth was most restricted had tissues that were most toxic, although there were species-specific differences in this trend.

  6. Up-regulation of lipoxygenase, phospholipase, and oxylipin-production in the induced chemical defense of the red alga Gracilaria chilensis against epiphytes.

    PubMed

    Weinberger, Florian; Lion, Ulrich; Delage, Ludovic; Kloareg, Bernard; Potin, Philippe; Beltrán, Jessica; Flores, Verónica; Faugeron, Sylvain; Correa, Juan; Pohnert, Georg

    2011-07-01

    The red alga Gracilaria chilensis is commercially farmed for the production of agar hydrocolloids, but some susceptible algae in farms suffer from intense epiphyte growth. We investigated the induced chemical defense response of G. chilensis against epiphytes and demonstrated that an extract of an epiphyte-challenged alga can trigger a defense response. The hormonally active metabolites were purified by RP-HPLC. Treatment with the extract or the purified fraction changed the chemical profile of the alga and increased resistance against epiphyte spores. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR and enzyme assays demonstrated that this metabolic response occurs after an increase in lipoxygenase and phospholipase A2 activity. Although this suggests the involvement of regulatory oxylipins, neither jasmonic acid nor the algal metabolite prostaglandin E2 triggers comparable defense responses.

  7. Expanding the 'enemy-free space' for oribatid mites: evidence for chemical defense of juvenile Archegozetes longisetosus against the rove beetle Stenus juno.

    PubMed

    Heethoff, Michael; Raspotnig, Günther

    2012-02-01

    Adult oribatid mites are thought to live functionally in 'enemy-free space' due to numerous morphological and chemical defensive strategies. Most juvenile oribatid mites, however, lack hardened cuticles and are thus thought to be under stronger predation pressure. On the other hand, the majority of oribatids have exocrine oil glands in all developmental stages, possibly rendering chemical defense the crucial survival strategy in juvenile Oribatida. We manipulated tritonymphs of the model oribatid mite Archegozetes longisetosus to completely discharge their oil glands and offered these chemically disarmed specimens to the polyphagous rove beetle Stenus juno. Disarmed specimens were easily consumed. By contrast, specimens with filled oil glands were significantly protected, being rejected by the beetles. This is the first direct evidence that oil gland secretions provide soft-bodied juvenile oribatids with chemical protection against large arthropod predators.

  8. United States National Strategy and Defense Policy Objectives After Chemical Disarmament

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-19

    Port Agency, tried on charges arising house at 41A Chaillot Street in Pans. from a 1973 cholera outbreak . 1980, August Iraq cleaned out the Syrian...Ethiopia, Egypt vs. Yemen , Vietnam vs. Laos-Cambodia, Iraq vs. Iran, early in the war, Iraq vs. Kurds, and Cubans vs. Angolan rebels. Some also reason...Tribesmen in Yemen in 1963-67.2 - Began chemical weapons production in the early 60’s and acquired a rudimentary biological warfare capability in the

  9. Chemical and Biological Defense: DOD Needs to Clarify Expectations for Medical Readiness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-01

    for planning and current operations—lacks treatment protocols, casualty rates , and bed requirements necessary to model specialty mix for CB warfare...Joint Staff has approved for medical planning. The MAT uses casualty rates , patient types, and specific treatment protocols to project medical...The U.S. strategy against chemical and biological (CB) weapons is based largely on deterrence. In the event deterrence fails, medical response planning

  10. Regulation of a chemical defense against herbivory produced by symbiotic fungi in grass plants.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dong-Xiu; Nagabhyru, Padmaja; Schardl, Christopher L

    2009-06-01

    Neotyphodium uncinatum and Neotyphodium siegelii are fungal symbionts (endophytes) of meadow fescue (MF; Lolium pratense), which they protect from insects by producing loline alkaloids. High levels of lolines are produced following insect damage or mock herbivory (clipping). Although loline alkaloid levels were greatly elevated in regrowth after clipping, loline-alkaloid biosynthesis (LOL) gene expression in regrowth and basal tissues was similar to unclipped controls. The dramatic increase of lolines in regrowth reflected the much higher concentrations in young (center) versus older (outer) leaf blades, so LOL gene expression was compared in these tissues. In MF-N. siegelii, LOL gene expression was similar in younger and older leaf blades, whereas expression of N. uncinatum LOL genes and some associated biosynthesis genes was higher in younger than older leaf blades. Because lolines are derived from amino acids that are mobilized to new growth, we tested the amino acid levels in center and outer leaf blades. Younger leaf blades of aposymbiotic plants (no endophyte present) had significantly higher levels of asparagine and sometimes glutamine compared to older leaf blades. The amino acid levels were much lower in MF-N. siegelii and MF-N. uncinatum compared to aposymbiotic plants and MF with Epichloë festucae (a closely related symbiont), which lacked lolines. We conclude that loline alkaloid production in young tissue depleted these amino acid pools and was apparently regulated by availability of the amino acid substrates. As a result, lolines maximally protect young host tissues in a fashion similar to endogenous plant metabolites that conform to optimal defense theory.

  11. 2011 Joint Program Executive Office for Chemical and Biological Defense Advance Planning Briefing for Industry (APBI) Held in Baltimore, Maryland on September 7-9, 2011

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-09

    risk the lives of hundreds of thousands of people . The unmitigated consequences of such an event could overwhelm our public health capabilities...To invest in transformational ideas, innovative people , and actionable technology development for Chemical Biological Defense solutions...appropriate set of technologies to be integrated into a full system, and demonstrate Critical Technology Elements ( CTEs ) on prototypes - CP contracts to be

  12. Continue Development of a Biomedical Database on the Medical Aspects of Chemical Defense

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-12-01

    Scisearch 3 Agricola 79 Psycinfo Chem Ind Notes Federal Index Claims/U.S. Patent Claims/U.S. Patent A Scisearcn 84 Dissertation Abstracts Enviroline...Life Sciences Collection Conf Papers Index PTS A/DM&T Scisearch 81-81 USPSD Scisearch 78-80 CIS Agricola 70-78 National Newspaper Claims/US PAT ABS...Progress De Haan Drug Data Soviet Science CA Search 67-71 CA Search 72-76 CA Search SO-81 4 CA Search 82 Chemical Business World Patents Index World

  13. Levothyroxine sodium revisited: A wholistic structural elucidation approach of new impurities via HPLC-HRMS/MS, on-line H/D exchange, NMR spectroscopy and chemical synthesis.

    PubMed

    Ruggenthaler, M; Grass, J; Schuh, W; Huber, C G; Reischl, R J

    2017-02-20

    The structural elucidation of unknown pharmaceutical impurities plays an important role in the quality control of newly developed and well-established active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs). The United States Pharmacopeia (USP) monograph for the API Levothyroxine Sodium, a synthetic thyroid hormone, features two high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) methods using UV-VIS absorption detection to determine organic impurities in the drug substance. The impurity profile of the first USP method ("Procedure 1") has already been extensively studied, however for the second method ("Procedure 2"), which exhibits a significantly different impurity profile, no wholistic structural elucidation of impurities has been performed yet. Applying minor modifications to the chromatographic parameters of USP "Procedure 2" and using various comprehensive structural elucidation methods such as high resolution tandem mass spectrometry with on-line hydrogen-deuterium (H/D) exchange or two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) we gained new insights about the complex impurity profile of the synthetic thyroid hormone. This resulted in the characterization of 24 compounds previously unknown to literature and the introduction of two new classes of Levothyroxine Sodium impurities. Five novel compounds were unambiguously identified via isolation or synthesis of reference substances and subsequent NMR spectroscopic investigation. Additionally, Collision-Induced Dissociation (CID)-type fragmentation of identified major impurities as well as neutral loss fragmentation patterns of many characterized impurities were discussed.

  14. Secondary Defense Chemicals in Milkweed Reduce Parasite Infection in Monarch Butterflies, Danaus plexippus.

    PubMed

    Gowler, Camden D; Leon, Kristoffer E; Hunter, Mark D; de Roode, Jacobus C

    2015-06-01

    In tri-trophic systems, herbivores may benefit from their host plants in fighting parasitic infections. Plants can provide parasite resistance in two contrasting ways: either directly, by interfering with the parasite, or indirectly, by increasing herbivore immunity or health. In monarch butterflies, the larval diet of milkweed strongly influences the fitness of a common protozoan parasite. Toxic secondary plant chemicals known as cardenolides correlate strongly with parasite resistance of the host, with greater cardenolide concentrations in the larval diet leading to lower parasite growth. However, milkweed cardenolides may covary with other indices of plant quality including nutrients, and a direct experimental link between cardenolides and parasite performance has not been established. To determine if the anti-parasitic activity of milkweeds is indeed due to secondary chemicals, as opposed to nutrition, we supplemented the diet of infected and uninfected monarch larvae with milkweed latex, which contains cardenolides but no nutrients. Across three experiments, increased dietary cardenolide concentrations reduced parasite growth in infected monarchs, which consequently had longer lifespans. However, uninfected monarchs showed no differences in lifespan across treatments, confirming that cardenolide-containing latex does not increase general health. Our results suggest that cardenolides are a driving force behind plant-derived resistance in this system.

  15. Seasonal and spatial variations of alkaloids in Merendera montana in relation to chemical defense and phenology.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Daniel; Azorín, José; Bastida, Jaume; Viladomat, Francesc; Codina, Carles

    2003-05-01

    Merendera montana (Liliaceae) is an endemic plant broadly, but exclusively, occurring in the Iberian Peninsula where it is one of the most abundant species in rangelands grazed by sheep and on the routes used by migrating sheep herds. In spite of showing a peculiar phenology adapted to Mediterranean regions (leaves remain green from fall to spring and are absent in summer), this species has also successfully colonized high altitude environments (up to 2300 m), and abundant populations can be found in montane and subalpine pasturcs. Chemical analysis has shown a high forage quality as well as the presence of tropolone alkaloids (similar to other species of the genus Merendera), mainly colchicine, 3-demethylcolchicine, and colchicoside. In general terms, the alkaloid content was significantly lower in the subterranean corms than in the leaves. No remarkable seasonal variations in total alkaloids was found, although an increase of colchicoside in the corms and a decrease of colchicine was noted in summer. Both chemical deterrents and phenology could be the cause of the widespread ecological adaptation of Merendera montana. The alkaloid content would prevent intake by wild herbivores during winter, while the absence of aerial organs in summer, coinciding exactly with the highest domestic herbivore pressure, would permit this species to colonize rich soil habitats where there is low plant competition.

  16. Palatability and chemical defense of Phragmites australis to the marsh periwinkle snail Littoraria irrorata.

    PubMed

    Hendricks, Lindsey G; Mossop, Hannah E; Kicklighter, Cynthia E

    2011-08-01

    Coastal marsh habitats are impacted by many disturbances, including habitat destruction, pollution, and the introduction of invasive species. The common reed, Phragmites australis, has been particularly invasive in the mesohaline regions of the Chesapeake Bay, but few studies have investigated its role in trophic interactions with North American marsh consumers. The marsh periwinkle snail Littoraria irrorata is a common grazer in marshes and grazes on the native grass Spartina alterniflora. Whether this snail grazes on Phragmites has not been addressed. We found Spartina leaves to be tougher than those of Phragmites, but despite this, snails consumed significantly more Spartina than Phragmites. Subsequent experiments demonstrated that Phragmites is chemically deterrent to snails by an unknown, moderately polar, compound. Further studies are required to more fully understand the interactions between Phragmites, herbivores, and Spartina, and how they may impact marsh ecosystems.

  17. Assessing homeland chemical hazards outside the military gates: industrial hazard threat assessments for department of defense installations.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, Jeffrey S; Howard, Jacqueline M; Reed, David A

    2002-04-08

    As part of comprehensive joint medical surveillance measures outlined by the Department of Defense, the US Army Center for Health Promotion and Preventive Medicine (USACHPPM) is beginning to assess environmental health threats to continental US military installations. A common theme in comprehensive joint medical surveillance, in support of Force Health Protection, is the identification and assessment of potential environmental health hazards, and the evaluation and documentation of actual exposures in both a continental US and outside a continental US setting. For the continental US assessments, the USACHPPM has utilized the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) database for risk management plans in accordance with Public Law 106-40, and the toxic release inventory database, in a state-of the art geographic information systems based program, termed the Consequence Assessment and Management Tool Set, or CATS, for assessing homeland industrial chemical hazards outside the military gates. As an example, the US EPA toxic release inventory and risk management plans databases are queried to determine the types and locations of industries surrounding a continental US military installation. Contaminants of concern are then ranked with respect to known toxicological and physical hazards, where they are then subject to applicable downwind hazard simulations using applicable meteorological and climatological data sets. The composite downwind hazard areas are mapped in relation to emergency response planning guidelines (ERPG), which were developed by the American Industrial Hygiene Association to assist emergency response personnel planning for catastrophic chemical releases. In addition, other geographic referenced data such as transportation routes, satellite imagery and population data are included in the operational, equipment, and morale risk assessment and management process. These techniques have been developed to assist military medical planners and operations

  18. Plant genotypes affect aboveground and belowground herbivore interactions by changing chemical defense.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoqiong; Guo, Wenfeng; Siemann, Evan; Wen, Yuanguang; Huang, Wei; Ding, Jianqing

    2016-12-01

    Spatially separated aboveground (AG) and belowground (BG) herbivores are closely linked through shared host plants, and both patterns of AG-BG interactions and plant responses may vary among plant genotypes. We subjected invasive (USA) and native (China) genotypes of tallow tree (Triadica sebifera) to herbivory by the AG specialist leaf-rolling weevil Heterapoderopsis bicallosicollis and/or the root-feeding larvae of flea beetle Bikasha collaris. We measured leaf damage and leaves rolled by weevils, quantified beetle survival, and analyzed flavonoid and tannin concentrations in leaves and roots. AG and BG herbivores formed negative feedbacks on both native and invasive genotypes. Leaf damage by weevils and the number of beetle larvae emerging as adults were higher on invasive genotypes. Beetles reduced weevil damage and weevils reduced beetle larval emergence more strongly for invasive genotypes. Invasive genotypes had lower leaf and root tannins than native genotypes. BG beetles decreased leaf tannins of native genotypes but increased root tannins of invasive genotypes. AG herbivory increased root flavonoids of invasive genotypes while BG herbivory decreased leaf flavonoids. Invasive genotypes had lower AG and BG herbivore resistance, and negative AG-BG herbivore feedbacks were much stronger for invasive genotypes. Lower tannin concentrations explained overall better AG and BG herbivore performances on invasive genotypes. However, changes in tannins and flavonoids affected AG and BG herbivores differently. These results suggest that divergent selection on chemical production in invasive plants may be critical in regulating herbivore performances and novel AG and BG herbivore communities in new environments.

  19. Disposal of defense spent fuel and HLW from the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Ermold, L.F.; Loo, H.H.; Klingler, R.D.; Herzog, J.D.; Knecht, D.A.

    1992-12-01

    Acid high-level radioactive waste (HLW) resulting from fuel reprocessing at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) for the US Department of Energy (DOE) has been solidified to a calcine since 1963 and stored in stainless steel bins enclosed by concrete vaults. Several different types of unprocessed irradiated DOE-owned fuels are also in storage ate the ICPP. In April, 1992, DOE announced that spent fuel would no longer be reprocessed to recover enriched uranium and called for a shutdown of the reprocessing facilities at the ICPP. A new Spent Fuel and HLW Technology Development program was subsequently initiated to develop technologies for immobilizing ICPP spent fuels and HLW for disposal, in accordance with the Nuclear Waste Policy Act. The Program elements include Systems Analysis, Graphite Fuel Disposal, Other Spent Fuel Disposal, Sodium-Bearing Liquid Waste Processing, Calcine Immobilization, and Metal Recycle/Waste Minimization. This paper presents an overview of the ICPP radioactive wastes and current spent fuels, with an emphasis on the description of HLW and spent fuels requiring repository disposal.

  20. Neural network pattern recognition of thermal-signature spectra for chemical defense

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrieri, Arthur H.; Lim, Pascal I.

    1995-05-01

    We treat infrared patterns of absorption or emission by nerve and blister agent compounds (and simulants of this chemical group) as features for the training of neural networks to detect the compounds' liquid layers on the ground or their vapor plumes during evaporation by external heating. Training of a four-layer network architecture is composed of a backward-error-propagation algorithm and a gradient-descent paradigm. We conduct testing by feed-forwarding preprocessed spectra through the network in a scaled format consistent with the structure of the training-data-set representation. The best-performance weight matrix (spectral filter) evolved from final network training and testing with software simulation trials is electronically transferred to a set of eight artificial intelligence integrated circuits (ICs') in specific modular form (splitting of weight matrices). This form makes full use of all input-output IC nodes. This neural network computer serves an important real-time detection function when it is integrated into pre-and postprocessing data-handling units of a tactical prototype thermoluminescence sensor now under development at the Edgewood Research, Development, and Engineering Center.

  1. Hyperaccumulation of vanadium in the Antarctic polychaete Perkinsiana littoralis as a natural chemical defense against predation.

    PubMed

    Fattorini, Daniele; Notti, Alessandra; Nigro, Marco; Regoli, Francesco

    2010-01-01

    Exceptionally high levels of trace metals have been reported in specific tissues of certain polychaetes. In the present study, the Antarctic fan worm Perkinsiana littoralis was shown to hyperaccumulate vanadium in the branchial tissues, and the hypothesis of an antipredatory strategy has been investigated. Trace metals (Ag, Al, As, Ba, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb, Se, V, Zn) were measured by atomic absorption spectrophotometry in tissues of P. littoralis and, only for V, in two Antarctic bivalves and in various Mediterranean polychaetes. Subcellular distribution of vanadium was investigated in P. littoralis after differential centrifugations; feeding trials with the Antarctic rock cod Trematomus berancchii were performed to test the palatability of P. littoralis. Analyses of trace metals in tissues of P. littoralis confirmed the naturally high bioavailability of cadmium due to upwelling phenomena in the investigated area and revealed extremely high concentrations of vanadium up to 10,000 microg/g, in the branchial crowns; much lower concentrations were measured in the body portions and even less in the Antarctic bivalves and in Mediterranean polychaetes. The subcellular distribution indicated that this metal was associated in branchial crowns with both heavy components and vanadium binding proteins; the latter predominated in body tissues, although with a different pattern of molecular weight. Feeding trials suggested that the elevated levels of vanadium in branchial crown of P. littoralis act as chemical deterrents against predation in more exposed tissues. The hyperaccumulation of toxic metals might represent a common antipredatory strategy for unpalatable branchial crowns of sabellid polychaetes, as recently hypothesized also for the high concentrations of arsenic in the Mediterranean Sabella spallanzanii. The evolution of such adaptation and the reasons behind the possibility for different species to accumulate different metals represent a stimulating

  2. Disruption of web structure and predatory behavior of a spider by plant-derived chemical defenses of an aposematic aphid.

    PubMed

    Malcolm, S B

    1989-06-01

    Two toxic and bitter-tasting cardenolides (cardiac-active steroids) were sequestered by the brightly colored oleander aphid,Aphis nerii B. de F., from the neotropical milkweed host plantAsclepias curassavica L. After feeding on milkweed-reared aphids, the orb-web spiderZygiella x-notata (Clerck) built severely disrupted webs and attacked fewer nontoxic, control aphids, whereas the webs of spiders fed only nontoxic aphids remained intact. The regularity and size of the prey-trapping area of webs were reduced significantly in proportion to the amount of toxic aphids eaten. The effects of toxic aphids on spider web structure were mimicked by feeding spiders the bitter-tasting cardenolide digitoxin, a cardenolide with similar steroidal structure and pharmacological activity to the two aphid cardenolides. These results show that the well-known effects of psychoactive drugs on spider web structure are more than interesting behavioral assays of drag activity. Similar effects, produced by plant-derived chemicals in the spider's aphid prey, are relevant to the ecology and evolution of interactions between prey defense and predator foraging.

  3. Leaf surface lipophilic compounds as one of the factors of silver birch chemical defense against larvae of gypsy moth.

    PubMed

    Martemyanov, Vyacheslav V; Pavlushin, Sergey V; Dubovskiy, Ivan M; Belousova, Irina A; Yushkova, Yuliya V; Morosov, Sergey V; Chernyak, Elena I; Glupov, Victor V

    2015-01-01

    Plant chemical defense against herbivores is a complex process which involves a number of secondary compounds. It is known that the concentration of leaf surface lipophilic compounds (SLCs), particularly those of flavonoid aglycones are increased with the defoliation treatment of silver birch Betula pendula. In this study we investigated how the alteration of SLCs concentration in the food affects the fitness and innate immunity of the gypsy moth Lymantria dispar. We found that a low SLCs concentrations in consumed leaves led to a rapid larval development and increased females' pupae weight (= fecundity) compared to larvae fed with leaves with high SLCs content. Inversely, increasing the compounds concentration in an artificial diet produced the reverse effects: decreases in both larval weight and larval survival. Low SLCs concentrations in tree leaves differently affected larval innate immunity parameters. For both sexes, total hemocytes count in the hemolymph increased, while the activity of plasma phenoloxidase decreased when larvae consume leaves with reduced content of SLCs. Our results clearly demonstrate that the concentration of SLCs in silver birch leaves affects not only gypsy moth fitness but also their innate immune status which might alter the potential resistance of insects against infections and/or parasitoids.

  4. Leaf Surface Lipophilic Compounds as One of the Factors of Silver Birch Chemical Defense against Larvae of Gypsy Moth

    PubMed Central

    Martemyanov, Vyacheslav V.; Pavlushin, Sergey V.; Dubovskiy, Ivan M.; Belousova, Irina A.; Yushkova, Yuliya V.; Morosov, Sergey V.; Chernyak, Elena I.; Glupov, Victor V.

    2015-01-01

    Plant chemical defense against herbivores is a complex process which involves a number of secondary compounds. It is known that the concentration of leaf surface lipophilic compounds (SLCs), particularly those of flavonoid aglycones are increased with the defoliation treatment of silver birch Betula pendula. In this study we investigated how the alteration of SLCs concentration in the food affects the fitness and innate immunity of the gypsy moth Lymantria dispar. We found that a low SLCs concentrations in consumed leaves led to a rapid larval development and increased females’ pupae weight (= fecundity) compared to larvae fed with leaves with high SLCs content. Inversely, increasing the compounds concentration in an artificial diet produced the reverse effects: decreases in both larval weight and larval survival. Low SLCs concentrations in tree leaves differently affected larval innate immunity parameters. For both sexes, total hemocytes count in the hemolymph increased, while the activity of plasma phenoloxidase decreased when larvae consume leaves with reduced content of SLCs. Our results clearly demonstrate that the concentration of SLCs in silver birch leaves affects not only gypsy moth fitness but also their innate immune status which might alter the potential resistance of insects against infections and/or parasitoids. PMID:25816371

  5. Domestic and International Law, and Transnational Terrorism: Can "Reasonable Apprehension of Physical Harm" and "Probable Cause" Elucidate Issues Concerning Imminence and Anticipatory Self-Defense

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    Chris Bordelon, “The Illegality of the U.S. Policy of Preemptive Self- Defense Under International Law,” 9 Chap. L. Rev. 111 (Fall 2005). 41 Cohen...This two- pronged test examines the quantum and nature of evidence that informs the finding of probable cause, and was applied in Spinelli v...sources are reliable. In Spinelli , Justice Harlan, writing for the majority, stated that reliability requires more than mere “casual rumor” or “an

  6. Review of Catalytic Hydrogen Generation in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Chemical Processing Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, D. C.

    2004-12-31

    This report was prepared to fulfill the Phase I deliverable for HLW/DWPF/TTR-98-0018, Rev. 2, ''Hydrogen Generation in the DWPF Chemical Processing Cell'', 6/4/2001. The primary objective for the preliminary phase of the hydrogen generation study was to complete a review of past data on hydrogen generation and to prepare a summary of the findings. The understanding was that the focus should be on catalytic hydrogen generation, not on hydrogen generation by radiolysis. The secondary objective was to develop scope for follow-up experimental and analytical work. The majority of this report provides a summary of past hydrogen generation work with radioactive and simulated Savannah River Site (SRS) waste sludges. The report also includes some work done with Hanford waste sludges and simulants. The review extends to idealized systems containing no sludge, such as solutions of sodium formate and formic acid doped with a noble metal catalyst. This includes general information from the literature, as well as the focused study done by the University of Georgia for the SRS. The various studies had a number of points of universal agreement. For example, noble metals, such as Pd, Rh, and Ru, catalyze hydrogen generation from formic acid and formate ions, and more acid leads to more hydrogen generation. There were also some points of disagreement between different sources on a few topics such as the impact of mercury on the noble metal catalysts and the identity of the most active catalyst species. Finally, there were some issues of potential interest to SRS that apparently have not been systematically studied, e.g. the role of nitrite ion in catalyst activation and reactivity. The review includes studies covering the period from about 1924-2002, or from before the discovery of hydrogen generation during simulant sludge processing in 1988 through the Shielded Cells qualification testing for Sludge Batch 2. The review of prior studies is followed by a discussion of proposed

  7. Elucidating collision induced dissociation products and reaction mechanisms of protonated uracil by coupling chemical dynamics simulations with tandem mass spectrometry experiments.

    PubMed

    Molina, Estefanía Rossich; Ortiz, Daniel; Salpin, Jean-Yves; Spezia, Riccardo

    2015-12-01

    In this study we have coupled mixed quantum-classical (quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics) direct chemical dynamics simulations with electrospray ionization/tandem mass spectrometry experiments in order to achieve a deeper understanding of the fragmentation mechanisms occurring during the collision induced dissociation of gaseous protonated uracil. Using this approach, we were able to successfully characterize the fragmentation pathways corresponding to ammonia loss (m/z 96), water loss (m/z 95) and cyanic or isocyanic acid loss (m/z 70). Furthermore, we also performed experiments with isotopic labeling completing the fragmentation picture. Remarkably, fragmentation mechanisms obtained from chemical dynamics simulations are consistent with those deduced from isotopic labeling.

  8. Elucidation of the resting state of a rhodium NNN-pincer hydrogenation catalyst that features a remarkably upfield hydride (1)H NMR chemical shift.

    PubMed

    Hänninen, Mikko M; Zamora, Matthew T; MacNeil, Connor S; Knott, Jackson P; Hayes, Paul G

    2016-01-11

    Rhodium(I) alkene complexes of an NNN-pincer ligand catalyze the hydrogenation of alkenes, including ethylene. The terminal or resting state of the catalyst, which exhibits an unprecedentedly upfield Rh-hydride (1)H NMR chemical shift, has been isolated and a synthetic cycle for regenerating the catalytically active species has been established.

  9. Anthropometric Cockpit Compatibility Assessment of US Army Aircraft for Large and Small Personnel Wearing A Cold Weather, Armored Vest, Chemical Defense Protective Clothing Configuration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-07-01

    identify by block number) Anthropometry, Aircraft, Cockpit-Compatibility, Chemical Defense, Cold Weather Clothing, Helicopters, Fixed- Wing Aircraft...5th percentiles of the Army male population were placed in the cockpits of all current US ArmY helicopters (except AAH-64) and fixed- wing aircraft, and...Fixed Wing Aircraft .... 0........................ 24 References.o........*..e.......o......o............ 29 LIST OF FIGURES FIGURES 1 . Up pe r B o dy

  10. ION COMPOSITION ELUCIDATION (ICE)

    EPA Science Inventory



    Ion Composition Elucidation (ICE) utilizes selected ion recording with a double focusing mass spectrometer to simultaneously determine exact masses and relative isotopic abundances from mass peak profiles. These can be determined more accurately and at higher sensitivity ...

  11. Feeding on Host Plants with Different Concentrations and Structures of Pyrrolizidine Alkaloids Impacts the Chemical-Defense Effectiveness of a Specialist Herbivore.

    PubMed

    Martins, Carlos H Z; Cunha, Beatriz P; Solferini, Vera N; Trigo, José R

    2015-01-01

    Sequestration of chemical defenses from host plants is a strategy widely used by herbivorous insects to avoid predation. Larvae of the arctiine moth Utetheisa ornatrix feeding on unripe seeds and leaves of many species of Crotalaria (Leguminosae) sequester N-oxides of pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) from these host plants, and transfer them to adults through the pupal stage. PAs confer protection against predation on all life stages of U. ornatrix. As U. ornatrix also uses other Crotalaria species as host plants, we evaluated whether the PA chemical defense against predation is independent of host plant use. We fed larvae from hatching to pupation with either leaves or seeds of one of eight Crotalaria species (C. incana, C. juncea, C. micans, C. ochroleuca, C. pallida, C. paulina, C. spectabilis, and C. vitellina), and tested if adults were preyed upon or released by the orb-weaving spider Nephila clavipes. We found that the protection against the spider was more effective in adults whose larvae fed on seeds, which had a higher PA concentration than leaves. The exceptions were adults from larvae fed on C. paulina, C. spectabilis and C. vitellina leaves, which showed high PA concentrations. With respect to the PA profile, we describe for the first time insect-PAs in U. ornatrix. These PAs, biosynthesized from the necine base retronecine of plant origin, or monocrotaline- and senecionine-type PAs sequestered from host plants, were equally active in moth chemical defense, in a dose-dependent manner. These results are also partially explained by host plant phylogeny, since PAs of the host plants do have a phylogenetic signal (clades with high and low PA concentrations in leaves) which is reflected in the adult defense.

  12. Feeding on Host Plants with Different Concentrations and Structures of Pyrrolizidine Alkaloids Impacts the Chemical-Defense Effectiveness of a Specialist Herbivore

    PubMed Central

    Cunha, Beatriz P.; Solferini, Vera N.

    2015-01-01

    Sequestration of chemical defenses from host plants is a strategy widely used by herbivorous insects to avoid predation. Larvae of the arctiine moth Utetheisa ornatrix feeding on unripe seeds and leaves of many species of Crotalaria (Leguminosae) sequester N-oxides of pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) from these host plants, and transfer them to adults through the pupal stage. PAs confer protection against predation on all life stages of U. ornatrix. As U. ornatrix also uses other Crotalaria species as host plants, we evaluated whether the PA chemical defense against predation is independent of host plant use. We fed larvae from hatching to pupation with either leaves or seeds of one of eight Crotalaria species (C. incana, C. juncea, C. micans, C. ochroleuca, C. pallida, C. paulina, C. spectabilis, and C. vitellina), and tested if adults were preyed upon or released by the orb-weaving spider Nephila clavipes. We found that the protection against the spider was more effective in adults whose larvae fed on seeds, which had a higher PA concentration than leaves. The exceptions were adults from larvae fed on C. paulina, C. spectabilis and C. vitellina leaves, which showed high PA concentrations. With respect to the PA profile, we describe for the first time insect-PAs in U. ornatrix. These PAs, biosynthesized from the necine base retronecine of plant origin, or monocrotaline- and senecionine-type PAs sequestered from host plants, were equally active in moth chemical defense, in a dose-dependent manner. These results are also partially explained by host plant phylogeny, since PAs of the host plants do have a phylogenetic signal (clades with high and low PA concentrations in leaves) which is reflected in the adult defense. PMID:26517873

  13. Elucidation of the chemical and morphological structure of double-network (DN) hydrogels by high-resolution magic angle spinning (HRMAS) NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Shestakova, Pavletta; Willem, Rudolph; Vassileva, Elena

    2011-12-23

    (1)H HRMAS NMR spectroscopy is applied to gain insight into the chemical and morphological structure of double-network (DN) hydrogels, prepared from poly(2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulfonic acid) (PAMPS) and poly(acrylamide) (PAAm). The method enables one to obtain detailed information at the molecular level about the formation of covalent bonds between the two polymer networks through non-reacted double bonds of the cross-linker N,N'-methylene bis(acrylamide) (MBAA). Evidence to the existence of strong hydrogen-bond interactions based on the N-H group of the PAMPS as a hydrogen-bond donor and the C=O group of the PAAm as a hydrogen-bond acceptor is also provided. These findings clarify the origin of the toughening mechanism and the exceptionally strong mechanical properties of DN gels, further supported by microhardness data. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Novel alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, CKD-711 and CKD-711a produced by Streptomyces sp. CK-4416. III. Physico-chemical properties and structure elucidation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hung-Bae; Kim, Sun-Ho; Kwon, Young-In; Choung, Dong-Ho; Choi, Won-Kyu; Kang, Tae Won; Lee, Sungsook; Kim, Jong-Gwan; Chun, Hyoung-Sik; Ahn, Soon Kil; Hong, Chung Il; Han, Kyou-Hoon

    2002-05-01

    We have isolated two novel a-glucosidase inhibitors, O-[4-deoxy-4-(2,3-epoxy-3-hydroxymethyl-4,5,6-trihydroxycyclohexane-1-yl-amino)-alpha-D-glucopyranosyl]-(1-->4)-O-alpha-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->4)-alpha-D-glucopyranose (named CKD-711) and its hexameric analog CKD-711a, from the fermentation broth of Streptomyces sp. CK-4416. HRFAB-MS and NMR analyses reveal that molecular formulae of CKD-711 and CKD-711a are C25H43NO20 and C37H63NO30, respectively with the latter containing two more glucose moieties than the former. Detailed chemical structures of both compounds have been characterized by high-resolution two-dimensional NMR methods.

  15. Elucidation of the composition of bovine milk fat triacylglycerols using high-performance liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mottram, H R; Evershed, R P

    2001-08-17

    Bovine milk fat triacylglycerols (TAGs) have been characterised using high-performance liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation mass spectrometry (HPLC-APCI-MS) and high-temperature gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The complex nature of the fat meant that prefractionation was necessary to provide simpler fractions for more detailed molecular analyses. Silica thin-layer chromatography gave rise to two fractions, one of which contained predominantly butyric acid containing TAGs. Gel permeation chromatography (GPC) gave rise to 16 fractions, which were subsequently analysed using HPLC-APCI-MS. Twelve of the GPC fractions were also analysed by high-temperature GC-MS using a capillary column coated with a polarisable stationary phase. TAGs present in the fractions were correlated with those in the chromatogram of the whole milk fat through retention time comparison and the use of mass chromatograms. In total, 120 TAGs were identified.

  16. Elucidating the Physical and Chemical Structural Changes of Proteins on Clay Mineral Surfaces using Large-scale Molecular Dynamics Simulations in Tandem with NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, A.; Govind, N.; Washton, N.; Reardon, P.; Chacon, S. S.; Burton, S.; Lipton, A.; Kleber, M.; Qafoku, N. P.

    2014-12-01

    Carbon cycling among the three major Earth's pools, i.e., atmosphere, terrestrial systems and oceans, has received increased attention because the concentration of CO2 in the atmosphere has increased significantly in recent years reaching concentrations greater than 400 ppm that have never been recorded before, warming the planet and changing the climate. Within the terrestrial system, soil organic matter (SOM) represents an important sub-pool of carbon. The associations of SOM with soil mineral interfaces and particles, creating micro-aggregates, are believed to regulate the bioavailability of the associated organic carbon by protecting it from transformations and mineralization to carbon dioxide. Nevertheless, the molecular scale interactions of different types of SOM with a variety of soil minerals and the controls on the extent and rate of SOM transformation and mineralization are not well documented in the current literature. Given the importance of SOM fate and persistence in soils and the current knowledge gaps, the application of atomistic scale simulations to study SOM/mineral associations in abiotic model systems offers rich territory for original and impactful science. Molecular modeling and simulation of SOM is a burgeoning and challenging avenue for aiding the characterization of these complex compounds and chemical systems and for studying their interactions in self-assembled aggregates composed of different organic matter compounds and with mineral surfaces of different types and common in soils, which are thought to contribute to their reactive properties including recalcitrance potential and resistance to mineralization. Here, we will discuss our large-scale molecular dynamics simulation efforts to explore the interaction of proteins with clay minerals (i.e., phyllosilicates such as kaolinite, smectite and micas), including the potential physical and chemical structural changes of proteins, protein adsorption by polar and permanently charged

  17. Stress perceptions of soldiers participating in training at the Chemical Defense Training Facility: The mediating effects of motivation, experience, and confidence level. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Fatkin, L.T.; Hudgens, G.A.

    1994-01-01

    An investigation was conducted by the U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL) and funded by the Physiological and Psychological Effects of the Nuclear, Biological, and Chemical (NBC) Environment and Sustained Operations on Systems in Combat (P2NBC2) program to assess the psychological reactions of soldiers in mission-oriented protective posture (MOPP) IV participating in training in a simulated chemical agent environment and in a toxic agent environment. A total of 155 soldiers who participated in the basic course (junior enlisted) and the advanced courses (officer and noncommissioned officer NCO groups) as part of their military occupational specialty (MOS) training volunteered for the study. The junior enlisted group reported significant increases in anxiety during four sessions as they approached the toxic agent portion of the training. The more experienced groups showed a small, but significant increase in anxiety during sessions. Their level of hostility, a component of stress that usually relates to levels of personal frustration, decreased significantly from the time of their initial testing to just before the training began. Since the initial session occurred 1 to 2 weeks before the U.S. Army Chemical Defense Training Facility (CDTF) training, the elevated frustration level may be a reflection of their overall experiences within the intensive chemical defense training program. A significant drop in reported fatigue between the pre- and post-training sessions may indicate a certain level of vigilance gained by participating in the training.

  18. Structure-activity relationships of pyrrolizidine alkaloids in insect chemical defense against the orb-weaving spider Nephila clavipes.

    PubMed

    Silva, Karina Lucas; Trigo, José Roberto

    2002-04-01

    Pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) are known to protect Arctiidae moths and Danainae and Ithomiinae butterflies against the orb-weaving spider Nephila clavipes (Araneae, Araneidae, Tetragnathinae), which liberates adults of these insects unharmed from its web. We tested against this spider the role of eight PAs and one derived structure [an 89:11 mixture of the 12-membered macrocyclic diester free base integerrimine and senecionine and the respective N-oxide; two hydrolysis products from this mixture (the necine base retronecine, its respective N-oxide, and a mixture of integerriminic and senecionic necic acids); the 12-membered macrocyclic senkirkine; the 9-O-monoester free base senecioylretronecine and its respective N-oxide; and the 9-O-monoester free base callimorphine (a PA biosynthesized only by insects from retronecine)]. The mixture integerrimine-senecionine N-oxide seems to be more active than the respective free base [LibD50 (liberation dose 50) = 0.042 and 0.153 microg/dry weight of prey, respectively], but the difference in activity between the N-oxide and free base of the 9-O-monoester senecioylretronecine was slight (LibD50 = 0.167 and 0.104, respectively). Senkirkine, an otonecine base PA that does not form N-oxide and is not found in insects, was the less active, showing the highest LibD50 (0.354). The difference in antipredator activity between N-oxides and free bases from macrocyclic diesters and monoesters may be correlated with physicochemical properties of these molecules in interaction with the Nephila receptors. For the active structures, there was a significant correlation between dosage and antipredator activity. Both forms of retronecine and a necic acid mixture were inactive, supporting the hypothesis that PAs biosynthesized by insects from retronecine were originally produced and stored in order to optimize chemical defense. Comparison of dose/activity data with reported amounts of PAs in butterflies suggested that, in general, PA

  19. The use of 13C solid state NMR to elucidate physico-chemical association in Eudragit RS100 microencapsulated acyl esters of salicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Vachon, M G; Nairn, J G

    1998-01-01

    A series of homogeneous Eudragit RS100 matrix microspheres containing molecularly dispersed acylated esterified homologues of salicylic acid, (acetylsalicylic acid, valerylsalicylic acid, or caprylsalicylic acid) were prepared in order to investigate the effect of encapsulation on solid-state orientation of the encapsulated molecule. Electrostatic association of the drug with the charged quaternary residues in the polymer may be responsible for the previously observed stability of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) in aqueous swollen ASA-loaded Eudragit RS100 microspheres. Evaluation of the 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectra for evidence of structural association of the incorporated probe molecules indicated that alteration of the microenvironment of the incorporated solutes had occurred. For instance, increasing the aliphatic character of the acyl side chain resulted in an increase in the upfield shift of the acyl bearing aromatic ring carbon, (C2), in the incorporated probe molecule as compared to the unincorporated probe molecule. Similarly, a downfield perturbation in the chemical shift of the free acid bearing aromatic ring carbon, (C1), was also observed. This microenvironment electrostatic shielding in the proximity of the ester carbonyl is attributed to an increase in the association of the probe molecule with the polymer subunits. Thereby, it is postulated that the matrix incorporated probe molecule is essentially shielded from hydrolytic attack until it is liberated into the external aqueous environment.

  20. First-Principles Elucidation of Atomic Size Effects Using DFT-Chemical Pressure Analysis: Origins of Ca36Sn23's Long-Period Superstructure.

    PubMed

    Engelkemier, Joshua; Berns, Veronica M; Fredrickson, Daniel C

    2013-07-09

    The space requirements of atoms are empirically known to play key roles in determining structure and reactivity across compounds ranging from simple molecules to extended solid state phases. Despite the importance of this concept, the effects of atomic size on stability remain difficult to extract from quantum mechanical calculations. Recently, we outlined a quantitative yet visual and intuitive approach to the theoretical analysis of atomic size in periodic structures: the DFT-Chemical Pressure (DFT-CP) analysis. In this Article, we describe the methodological details of this DFT-CP procedure, with a particular emphasis on refinements of the method to make it useful for a wider variety of systems. A central improvement is a new integration scheme with broader applicability than our earlier Voronoi cell method: contact volume space-partitioning. In this approach, we make explicit our assumption that the pressure at each voxel is most strongly influenced by its two closest atoms. The unit cell is divided into regions corresponding to individual interatomic contacts, with each region containing all points that share the same two closest atoms. The voxel pressures within each contact region are then averaged, resulting in effective interatomic pressures. The method is illustrated through the verification of the role of Ca-Ca repulsion (deduced earlier from empirical considerations by Corbett and co-workers) in the long-period superstructure of the W5Si3 type exhibited by Ca36Sn23.

  1. Rapidly induced chemical defenses in maize stems and their effects on short-term growth of Ostrinia nubilalis.

    PubMed

    Dafoe, Nicole J; Huffaker, Alisa; Vaughan, Martha M; Duehl, Adrian J; Teal, Peter E; Schmelz, Eric A

    2011-09-01

    Plants damaged by insect herbivory often respond by inducing a suite of defenses that can negatively affect an insect's growth and fecundity. Ostrinia nubilalis (European corn borer, ECB) is one of the most devastating insect pests of maize, and in the current study, we examined the early biochemical changes that occur in maize stems in response to ECB herbivory and how these rapidly induced defenses influence the growth of ECB. We measured the quantities of known maize defense compounds, benzoxazinoids and the kauralexin class of diterpenoid phytoalexins. ECB herbivory resulted in decreased levels of the benzoxazinoid, 2,4-dihydroxy-7-methoxy-1,4-benzoxazin-3-one)-β-D-glucopyranose (DIMBOA-Glc), and a corresponding increase in 2-(2-hydroxy-4,7-dimethoxy-1,4-benzoxazin-3-one)-β-D-glucopyranose (HDMBOA-Glc). Total quantities of benzoxazinoids and kauralexins were increased as early as 24 h after the initiation of ECB feeding. The plant hormones, jasmonic acid (JA) and ethylene (ET), and the transcripts encoding their key biosynthetic enzymes also accumulated in response to ECB herbivory, consistent with a role in defense regulation. The combined pharmacological application of JA and the ET precursor, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid to stem internode tissue likewise resulted in changes in benzoxazinoids similar to that observed with ECB damage. Despite the fact that maize actively mounts a defense response to ECB stem feeding, no differences in percent weight gain were observed between ECB larvae that fed upon non-wounded control tissues compared to tissues obtained from plants previously subjected to 24 h ECB stem herbivory. These rapid defense responses in maize stems do not appear to negatively impact ECB growth, thus suggesting that ECB have adapted to these induced biochemical changes.

  2. Elucidation of the internal physical and chemical microstructure of pharmaceutical granules using X-ray micro-computed tomography, Raman microscopy and infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Crean, Barry; Parker, Andrew; Roux, Delphine Le; Perkins, Mark; Luk, Shen Y; Banks, Simon R; Melia, Colin D; Roberts, Clive J

    2010-11-01

    X-ray micro-computed tomography (XMCT) was used in conjunction with confocal Raman mapping to measure the intra-granular pore size, binder volumes and to provide spatial and chemical maps of internal granular components in α-lactose monohydrate granules formulated with different molecular weights of polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP). Infrared spectroscopy was used to understand the molecular association of binder domains. Granules were prepared by high-shear aqueous granulation from α-lactose monohydrate and PVP K29/32 or K90. XMCT was used to visualise the granule microstructure, intra-granular binder distribution and measure intra-granular porosity, which was subsequently related to intrusion porosimetry measurements. Confocal Raman microscopy and infrared microscopy were employed to investigate the distribution of components within the granule and explore the nature of binder substrate interactions. XMCT data sets of internal granule microstructure provided values of residual porosity in the lactose:PVP K29/32 and lactose:PVP K90 granules of 32.41 ± 4.60% and 22.40 ± 0.03%, respectively. The binder volumes of the lactose:PVP K29/32 and lactose:PVP K90 granules were 2.98 ± 0.10% and 3.38 ± 0.07%, respectively, and were attributed to PVP-rich binder domains within the granule. Confocal Raman microscopy revealed anisotropic domains of PVP between 2 μm and 20 μm in size surrounded by larger particles of lactose, in both granule types. Raman data showed that PVP domains contained various amounts of lactose, whilst IR microscopy determined that the PVP was molecularly associated with lactose, rather than residual water. The work shows that XMCT can be applied to investigate granular microstructure and resolve the porosity and the excipient and binder volumes. Combining this technique with vibrational techniques provides further structural information and aids the interpretations of the XMCT images. When used complementarily, these techniques highlighted that

  3. Development of a (13)C NMR Chemical Shift Prediction Procedure Using B3LYP/cc-pVDZ and Empirically Derived Systematic Error Correction Terms: A Computational Small Molecule Structure Elucidation Method.

    PubMed

    Xin, Dongyue; Sader, C Avery; Chaudhary, Om; Jones, Paul-James; Wagner, Klaus; Tautermann, Christofer S; Yang, Zheng; Busacca, Carl A; Saraceno, Reginaldo A; Fandrick, Keith R; Gonnella, Nina C; Horspool, Keith; Hansen, Gordon; Senanayake, Chris H

    2017-05-19

    An accurate and efficient procedure was developed for performing (13)C NMR chemical shift calculations employing density functional theory with the gauge invariant atomic orbitals (DFT-GIAO). Benchmarking analysis was carried out, incorporating several density functionals and basis sets commonly used for prediction of (13)C NMR chemical shifts, from which the B3LYP/cc-pVDZ level of theory was found to provide accurate results at low computational cost. Statistical analyses from a large data set of (13)C NMR chemical shifts in DMSO are presented with TMS as the calculated reference and with empirical scaling parameters obtained from a linear regression analysis. Systematic errors were observed locally for key functional groups and carbon types, and correction factors were determined. The application of this process and associated correction factors enabled assignment of the correct structures of therapeutically relevant compounds in cases where experimental data yielded inconclusive or ambiguous results. Overall, the use of B3LYP/cc-pVDZ with linear scaling and correction terms affords a powerful and efficient tool for structure elucidation.

  4. Conserved and species-specific oxylipin pathways in the wound-activated chemical defense of the noninvasive red alga Gracilaria chilensis and the invasive Gracilaria vermiculophylla

    PubMed Central

    Rempt, Martin; Weinberger, Florian; Grosser, Katharina

    2012-01-01

    Summary Chemical defense of the invasive red alga Gracilaria vermiculophylla has been studied and compared to that of the noninvasive but related Gracilaria chilensis. Both species rely on a wound-activated chemical defense that makes them less attractive to the herbivorous sea snail Echinolittorina peruviana. The chemical stress response of both species was monitored by LC–ESIMS-based metabolic profiling and revealed commonalities and differences. Both algae rely on a rapid lipoxygenase mediated transformation of arachidonic acid to known and novel oxylipins. Common products are 7,8-dihydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid and a novel eicosanoid with an unusual γ-lactone moiety. Several prostaglandins were predominantly formed by the invasive species. The role of some of these metabolites was investigated by surveying the attachment of E. peruviana on artificial food containing the respective oxylipins. Both algae species are defended against this general herbivore by 7,8-dihydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid, whereas the prostaglandins and the novel oxylipins were inactive at naturally occurring concentrations. The role of different oxylipins in the invasive potential of Gracilaria spp. is discussed. PMID:22423296

  5. Evolution of growth but not structural or chemical defense in Verbascum thapsus (common mullein) following introduction to North America

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Post-introduction evolution of increased growth or reproduction has been observed in many species of invasive plants; however, it is not consistently associated with a loss of defense, as predicted by the influential evolution of increased competitive ability (EICA) hypothesis. Inconsistent support ...

  6. Rapidly induced chemical defenses in maize stems and their effects on short-term growth of Ostrinia nubilalis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Plants damaged by insect herbivory often respond by inducing a suite of defenses that can negatively affect an insect’s growth and fecundity. Ostrinia nubilalis (European corn borer, ECB) is one of the most devastating insect pests of maize and in the current study, we examined the early biochemical...

  7. Defensive chemicals of tawny crazy ants, Nylanderia fulva (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) and their toxicity to red imported fire ants, Solenopsis invicta (Hymenoptera: Formicidae).

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian; Rashid, Tahir; Feng, Guolei; Zhao, Liming; Oi, David; Drees, Bastiaan Bart M

    2013-12-15

    Nylanderia fulva (Mayr) has been reported as being able to displace Solenopsis invicta Buren, one of the most aggressive invasive ants in the world. Like S. invicta, N. fulva use chemical secretions in their defense/offense, which may contribute to their observed superior competition ability. In this study, the defensive chemicals of N. fulva workers and their toxicity against S. invicta workers were investigated. Like other formicine ants, N. fulva workers produce formic acid in their poison glands and 2-ketones and alkanes in Dufour glands. Of these, undecane and 2-tridecanone are two principal compounds in the Dufour gland. Topical LD50 values of 2-tridecanone and undecane against S. invicta workers ranged from 18.51 to 24.67 μg/ant and 40.39 to 84.82 μg/ant, respectively. Undecane and 2-tridecanone had significantly higher contact toxicity than formic acid, whereas formic acid had significantly higher fumigation toxicity than undecane and 2-tridecanone. The combination of 2-tridecanone as a contact toxin and formic acid as a fumigant significantly decreased KT50 values when compared to those of individual compounds. N. fulva does not seem unique in terms of the chemistry of its defensive secretion as compared to other formicine ants. However, this ant contained more than two orders of magnitude of formic acid (wt/wt) than other formicine ants and one order of magnitude of 2-tridecanone than the common crazy ant, Paratrechina longicornis (Latreille). The quantity, rather than quality, of the chemical secretion may contribute to the superior competition ability of N. fulva.

  8. Environmental evaluation of alternatives for long-term management of Defense high-level radioactive wastes at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is considering the selection of a strategy for the long-term management of the defense high-level wastes at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). This report describes the environmental impacts of alternative strategies. These alternative strategies include leaving the calcine in its present form at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), or retrieving and modifying the calcine to a more durable waste form and disposing of it either at the INEL or in an offsite repository. This report addresses only the alternatives for a program to manage the high-level waste generated at the ICPP. 24 figures, 60 tables.

  9. Plant defense syndromes.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Anurag A; Fishbein, Mark

    2006-07-01

    Given that a plant's defensive strategy against herbivory is never likely to be a single trait, we develop the concept of plant defense syndromes, where association with specific ecological interactions can result in convergence on suites of covarying defensive traits. Defense syndromes can be studied within communities of diverse plant species as well as within clades of closely related species. In either case, theory predicts that plant defense traits can consistently covary across species, due to shared evolutionary ancestry or due to adaptive convergence. We examined potential defense syndromes in 24 species of milkweeds (Asclepias spp.) in a field experiment. Employing phylogenetically independent contrasts, we found few correlations between seven defensive traits, no bivariate trade-offs, and notable positive correlations between trichome density and latex production, and between C:N ratio and leaf toughness. We then used a hierarchical cluster analysis to produce a phenogram of defense trait similarity among the 24 species. This analysis revealed three distinct clusters of species. The defense syndromes of these species clusters are associated with either low nutritional quality or a balance of higher nutritional quality coupled with physical or chemical defenses. The phenogram based on defense traits was not congruent, however, with a molecular phylogeny of the group, suggesting convergence on defense syndromes. Finally, we examined the performance of monarch butterfly caterpillars on the 24 milkweed species in the field; monarch growth and survival did not differ on plants in the three syndromes, although multiple regression revealed that leaf trichomes and toughness significantly reduced caterpillar growth. The discovery of convergent plant defense syndromes can be used as a framework to ask questions about how abiotic environments, communities of herbivores, and biogeography are associated with particular defense strategies of plants.

  10. What happens in the pith stays in the pith: tissue-localized defense responses facilitate chemical niche differentiation between two spatially separated herbivores.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gisuk; Joo, Youngsung; Kim, Sang-Gyu; Baldwin, Ian T

    2017-08-14

    Herbivore attack is known to elicit systemic defense responses that spread throughout the host plant and influence the performance of other herbivores. While these plant-mediated indirect competitive interactions are well described, and the co-existence of herbivores from different feeding guilds is common, the mechanisms of co-existence are poorly understood. In both field and glasshouse experiments with a native tobacco, Nicotiana attenuata, we found no evidence of negative interactions when plants were simultaneously attacked by two spatially separated herbivores: a leaf chewer Manduca sexta and a stem borer Trichobaris mucorea. T. mucorea attack elicited jasmonic acid (JA) and jasmonoyl-l-isoleucine bursts in the pith of attacked stems similar to those that occur in leaves when M. sexta attacks N. attenuata leaves. Pith chlorogenic acid (CGA) levels increased 1000-fold to levels 6-fold higher than leaf levels after T. mucorea attack; these increases in pith CGA levels, which did not occur in M. sexta-attacked leaves, required JA signaling. With plants silenced in CGA biosynthesis (irHQT plants), CGA, as well as other caffeic acid conjugates, was demonstrated in both glasshouse and field experiments to function as a direct defense protecting piths against T. mucorea attack, but not against leaf chewers or sucking insects. T. mucorea attack does not systemically activate JA signaling in leaves, while M. sexta leaf-attack transiently induces detectable but minor pith JA levels that are dwarfed by local responses. We conclude that tissue-localized defense responses allow tissue-specialized herbivores to share the same host and occupy different chemical defense niches in the same hostplant. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Ink from longfin inshore squid, Doryteuthis pealeii, as a chemical and visual defense against two predatory fishes, summer flounder, Paralichthys dentatus, and sea catfish, Ariopsis felis.

    PubMed

    Derby, Charles D; Tottempudi, Mihika; Love-Chezem, Tiffany; Wolfe, Lanna S

    2013-12-01

    Chemical and visual defenses are used by many organisms to avoid being approached or eaten by predators. An example is inking molluscs-including gastropods such as sea hares and cephalopods such as squid, cuttlefish, and octopus-which release a colored ink upon approach or attack. Previous work showed that ink can protect molluscs through a combination of chemical, visual, and other effects. In this study, we examined the effects of ink from longfin inshore squid, Doryteuthis pealeii, on the behavior of two species of predatory fishes, summer flounder, Paralichthys dentatus, and sea catfish, Ariopsis felis. Using a cloud assay, we found that ink from longfin inshore squid affected the approach phase of predation by summer flounder, primarily through its visual effects. Using a food assay, we found that the ink affected the consummatory and ingestive phase of predation of both sea catfish and summer flounder, through the ink's chemical properties. Fractionation of ink showed that most of its deterrent chemical activity is associated with melanin granules, suggesting that either compounds adhering to these granules or melanin itself are the most biologically active. This work provides the basis for a comparative approach to identify deterrent molecules from inking cephalopods and to examine neural mechanisms whereby these chemicals affect behavior of fish, using the sea catfish as a chemosensory model.

  12. Efficiency of photodynamic therapy on WM35 melanoma with synthetic porphyrins: Role of chemical structure, intracellular targeting and antioxidant defense.

    PubMed

    Baldea, Ioana; Olteanu, Diana Elena; Bolfa, Pompei; Ion, Rodica Mariana; Decea, Nicoleta; Cenariu, Mihai; Banciu, Manuela; Sesarman, Alina Viorica; Filip, Adriana Gabriela

    2015-10-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) could be an adjuvant therapy in melanoma, an aggressive cancer that arises from melanocytes. Several reports showed encouraging results of the efficacy of PDT in melanoma on experimental models and in clinical trials. Therefore, we studied the efficacy of two derivatives of tetraphenylporphyrin (TPP): meso-5,10,15,20-tetrakis (4-hydroxyphenyl) porphyrin (THOPP) and meso-5-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-10,15,20-tris (4-methoxyphenyl) porphyrin (THOMPP) as photosensitizers for PDT, compared to FDA approved delta aminolevulinic acid (ALA) against a lightly pigmented, melanoma cell line, WM35, in vitro. Both porphyrins were more efficient as photosensitizers, compared to ALA, without dark toxicity. The efficiency depended on the intracellular localization and the molecule structure. THOPP, the most efficient porphyrin localized mainly in mitochondria, while THOMPP accumulated in lysosomes; both showed melanosomal localization. The symmetric THOPP molecule was able to generate increased oxidative stress damage and apoptosis. THOPP also induced a low effect on the defense mechanisms like antioxidant enzyme SOD (superoxide dismutase), NF-kB (nuclear transcription factor kB) activation and MITF (microphthalmia transcription factor). The lower efficiency of the asymmetric molecule, THOMPP was probably due to a diminished photoactivation, which led to a lower ROS induced damage, combined with higher activation of the defense mechanisms.

  13. Structure Elucidation of a Natural Product.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Letcher, Roy M.

    1983-01-01

    Describes an experiment simulating a real-life structure elucidation problem through isolation, characterization, and chemical transformation of an "unknown," naturally occurring monoterpene, with extensive use being made of spectroscopy and aided by biogenetic considerations. Information given to students, procedures, results, and discussion of…

  14. Structure Elucidation of a Natural Product.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Letcher, Roy M.

    1983-01-01

    Describes an experiment simulating a real-life structure elucidation problem through isolation, characterization, and chemical transformation of an "unknown," naturally occurring monoterpene, with extensive use being made of spectroscopy and aided by biogenetic considerations. Information given to students, procedures, results, and discussion of…

  15. Proceedings of the Symposium on Nuclear, Biological and Chemical Contamination Survivability (NBCCS). Developing Contamination-Survivable Defense Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-10-01

    it was cobootd by the U.S. Army Research LAboatory (ARL) and the U.S. Army Chemical and Biologica Defens Command (CBDCoM). The objective of the...AMSRL-SL-CM (301) 679-4476 x Aberdeen Proving Or MD 21010-5423 (410) 671-3960 x Mr. Edudrdo D. Soliven Mr. Jerry W. Steelman US ArmA Nuclear & Chemical

  16. Seedling herbivory by slugs in a willow hybrid system: developmental changes in damage, chemical defense, and plant performance.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Robert S; Hochwender, Cris G; Lewkiewicz, Debra A; Bothwell, Sara; Orians, Colin M

    2001-09-01

    We evaluated feeding preference and damage by the slug, Arion subfuscus, on seedlings of two willow species, Salix sericea and S. eriocephala, and their F1 interspecific hybrids. Trays of seedlings were placed in the field and excised leaves were presented to slugs in choice tests. Slugs preferred feeding on and caused the most damage to S. eriocephala seedlings. S. sericea seedlings were least preferred and least damaged. F1 hybrid seedlings were intermediate in preference and damage. Slug preference of and damage to these seedlings decreased over time, suggesting developmental changes in resistance. Seedlings were sampled for phenolic glycoside and tannin chemistry weekly to coincide with the field and laboratory experiments. Concentrations of phenolic glycosides and tannins increased linearly with seedling age, coincident with changes in slug preference and damage, indicating a developmental change in defense. Slug deterrence was not detected at low concentrations of salicortin when painted on leaves or discs, but both salicortin and condensed tannins deterred slug feeding at concentrations between 50 and 100 mg/g, levels found in adult willows. Seedling performance was related to damage inflicted by slugs. Due to lower levels of damage when exposed to slugs in the field, S. sericea plants had significantly greater biomass than S. eriocephala plants. Biomass of F1 hybrids was equal to S. sericea when damaged. However, undamaged S. eriocephala and F1 hybrid plants had the greatest biomass. Because F1 hybrid seedlings performed as well as the most fit parent in all cases, slugs could be an important selective factor favoring introgression of defensive traits between these willow species.

  17. Chemical and Biological Defense: Management Actions Are Needed to Close the Gap between Army Chemical Unit Preparedness and Stated National Priorities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    U.S. Army Reserve Command, the National Guard Bureau, and officials from a nonprobability sample of Army chemical companies. We selected companies...from each Army component and from each type of chemical company. Results from nonprobability samples cannot be used to make inferences about a...Biological detection units provide monitoring, sampling , detection, and identification of biological agents through the use of a detector suite in a

  18. Thermal stress imposed by prototype bilayer and current ground crew chemical defense ensembles: a limited laboratory comparison. Final report, 30 June 1986-1 January 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Krock, L.P.; Navalta, R.; Myhre, L.G.

    1988-07-01

    An open bilayer ground-crew chemical defense ensemble (CDE) was proposed to reduce the thermal burden during vapor-only exposure periods. This study compared the thermal-stress profile of the proposed ensemble to that produced by the currently employed closed CDE. Four subjects, alternating ensembles on separate days, walked on a treadmill in an environmental chamber at 5.3 km/h (3.3 mph) and 2% grade (an energy expenditure of 350 kcal/h) for alternating work/rest to achieve significant recovery. Mean total sweat production was lower (1.38 vs. 2.50 liters) and percent sweat evaporation greater (65.7% vs. 30.0%) in the prototype ensemble than in the CDE. The prototype ensemble provided greater heat dissipation and allowed more-efficient sweat evaporation which had the double benefit of reducing heat storage and limiting dehydration.

  19. Using Knowledge of Chemical and Structural Defenses of Seaweeds to Develop a Standardized Measure of Herbivory in Tropical and Subtropical Habitats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, V. J.

    2016-02-01

    Herbivory is an important process determining the structure and function of marine ecosystems, and this is especially true on coral reefs and in associated tropical and subtropical habitats where grazing by fishes can be intense. As reef degradation is occurring on a global scale, and overfishing can contribute to this problem, rates of herbivory can be an important indicator of reef function and resilience. Our goal was to develop a standardized herbivory assay that can be deployed globally to measure the impact of herbivorous fishes across multiple habitat types. Many tropical and subtropical seaweeds contain chemical and structural defenses that can protect them from herbivores, and this information was key to selecting a range of marine plants that are differentially palatable to herbivorous fishes for these assays. We present method development and experimental results from extensive deployment of these herbivory assays at Carrie Bow Cay, Belize.

  20. Analysis of Wartime Consumption Rates for Chemical Defensive Equipment. Volume 2. Appendices A, B, and C, Documentation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-05-01

    Required Operational Capability Document (ROC), XMI7 LDS B-28.:’ M256 Chemical Agent Detector Kit (6665-01-016-8399) INITIAL ISSUE: I per squad in...surveys. The Cotps ki allocated a recon company of 3 platoons. There is I recon squad per platoon. One platoon supports a brigade size area, 3 platoons...per company. Each recorn squad will do I suivey pet day when in a chemical envirnment. A survey will consist of 10 points The squad will drive jeeps w

  1. Dispersion calculations for non-radiological hazardous chemical emissions from the Defense Waste Processing Facility and related activities

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, C.H.

    1990-10-22

    The Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Industrial Source Complex -- Short Term (ISCST) air dispersion model was used to examine potential atmospheric impacts of routine benzene and mercury emissions from the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), In-Tank Precipitation (ITP) facilities, and the Saltstone Facility. The highest model estimated 8-hour average ground-level benzene concentrations were found to occur in the immediate vicinity of the ITP filter/stripper building (241-96H). Subsequent model calculations were used to determine minimum stack release heights that would be necessary to achieve compliance with this workplace exposure standard for currently anticipated emission levels. The highest 24-hour average site boundary concentrations of benzene and mercury generally occurred to the north of S and H areas. Concentrations were well below the ambient concentration standards that have been identified for these substances in an air toxics policy proposed by the State of South Carolina. Estimates of annual average benzene concentrations for offsite locations were used to estimate the excess lifetime cancer risk. Assuming continuous 70-year exposure to the estimated annual benzene concentrations, the excess cancer risk to the maximum exposed individual was estimated to be 3 {times} 10{sup {minus}7}. Similar lifetime exposure summed over the surrounding population resulted in an estimated average of 6 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} excess cancers per year. 14 refs., 1 fig., 7 tabs.

  2. Diversity and chemical defense role of culturable non-actinobacterial bacteria isolated from the South China Sea gorgonians.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jiang; Zhang, Xiaoyong; Xu, Xinya; He, Fei; Qi, Shuhua

    2013-04-01

    The diversity of culturable non-actinobacterial (NA) bacteria associated with four species of South China Sea gorgonians was investigated using culture-dependent methods followed by analysis of the bacterial 16S rDNA sequence. A total of 76 bacterial isolates were recovered and identified, which belonged to 21 species of 7 genera, and Bacillus was the most diverse genus. Fifty-one percent of the 76 isolates displayed antibacterial activities, and most of them belonged to the Bacillus genus. From the culture broth of gorgonian-associated Bacillus methylotrophicus SCSGAB0092 isolated from gorgonian Melitodes squamata, 11 antimicrobial lipopeptides including seven surfactins and four iturins were obtained. These results imply that Bacillus strains associated with gorgonians play roles in coral defense mechanisms through producing antimicrobial substances. This study, for the first time, compares the diversity of culturable NA bacterial communities among four species of South China Sea gorgonians and investigates the secondary metabolites of gorgonian-associated B. methylotrophicus SCSGAB0092.

  3. Disentangling Detoxification: Gene Expression Analysis of Feeding Mountain Pine Beetle Illuminates Molecular-Level Host Chemical Defense Detoxification Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Robert, Jeanne A.; Pitt, Caitlin; Bonnett, Tiffany R.; Yuen, Macaire M. S.; Keeling, Christopher I.; Bohlmann, Jörg; Huber, Dezene P. W.

    2013-01-01

    The mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae, is a native species of bark beetle (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) that caused unprecedented damage to the pine forests of British Columbia and other parts of western North America and is currently expanding its range into the boreal forests of central and eastern Canada and the USA. We conducted a large-scale gene expression analysis (RNA-seq) of mountain pine beetle male and female adults either starved or fed in male-female pairs for 24 hours on lodgepole pine host tree tissues. Our aim was to uncover transcripts involved in coniferophagous mountain pine beetle detoxification systems during early host colonization. Transcripts of members from several gene families significantly increased in insects fed on host tissue including: cytochromes P450, glucosyl transferases and glutathione S-transferases, esterases, and one ABC transporter. Other significantly increasing transcripts with potential roles in detoxification of host defenses included alcohol dehydrogenases and a group of unexpected transcripts whose products may play an, as yet, undiscovered role in host colonization by mountain pine beetle. PMID:24223726

  4. Disentangling detoxification: gene expression analysis of feeding mountain pine beetle illuminates molecular-level host chemical defense detoxification mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Robert, Jeanne A; Pitt, Caitlin; Bonnett, Tiffany R; Yuen, Macaire M S; Keeling, Christopher I; Bohlmann, Jörg; Huber, Dezene P W

    2013-01-01

    The mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae, is a native species of bark beetle (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) that caused unprecedented damage to the pine forests of British Columbia and other parts of western North America and is currently expanding its range into the boreal forests of central and eastern Canada and the USA. We conducted a large-scale gene expression analysis (RNA-seq) of mountain pine beetle male and female adults either starved or fed in male-female pairs for 24 hours on lodgepole pine host tree tissues. Our aim was to uncover transcripts involved in coniferophagous mountain pine beetle detoxification systems during early host colonization. Transcripts of members from several gene families significantly increased in insects fed on host tissue including: cytochromes P450, glucosyl transferases and glutathione S-transferases, esterases, and one ABC transporter. Other significantly increasing transcripts with potential roles in detoxification of host defenses included alcohol dehydrogenases and a group of unexpected transcripts whose products may play an, as yet, undiscovered role in host colonization by mountain pine beetle.

  5. Spectral analysis, structural elucidation, and evaluation of both nonlinear optical properties and chemical reactivity of a newly synthesized ethyl-3,5-dimethyl-4-[(toluenesulfonyl)-hydrazonomethyl]-1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylate through experimental studies and quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, R. N.; Rawat, Poonam

    2013-12-01

    As part of study of hydrazide-hydrazones, we have synthesized ethyl-3,5-dimethyl-4-[(toluenesulfonyl)-hydrazonomethyl]-1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylate (EDTHMPC) and characterized by elemental analysis, FT-IR, UV-Vis, 1H, 13C NMR and Mass spectroscopy. The structure, spectral and thermodynamic parameters of EDTHMPC were quantum chemically calculated performing density functional level theory (DFT) with B3LYP functional and 6-31G (d,p) basis set. Electrophilic charge transfer (ECT) values of interacting molecules indicate that charge flows from p-toluene sulphonyl-hydrazide to ethyl-3,5-dimethyl-4-formyl-1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylate confirming the formation of product by nucleophilic attack. The calculated and experimental wavenumbers analysis confirms the formation of dimer. The calculated changes in thermodynamic quantities during dimer formation in gaseous phase have the negative values for ΔH, ΔG (kcal/mol) and ΔS (cal/mol-K) indicating that the dimer formation is exothermic and will proceed only at low temperature. The strength and nature of hydrogen bonding and weak interactions in dimer have been analyzed by 'Quantum theory of atoms in molecules' (QTAIM) and found to be five types of interactions in which three types are (C⋯N, CH⋯O and CH⋯HC) intramolecular and two types are (CO⋯HN and CH⋯OC) intermolecular. The calculated binding energy of dimer using DFT and QTAIM theory are 14.32 and 15.41 kcal/mol, respectively. The β0 value for monomer is calculated as 11.54 x 10-30 esu indicating microscopic nonlinear optical (NLO) behavior with non-zero values.

  6. Regulation of a Chemical Defense against Herbivory Produced by Symbiotic Fungi in Grass Plants12[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dong-Xiu; Nagabhyru, Padmaja; Schardl, Christopher L.

    2009-01-01

    Neotyphodium uncinatum and Neotyphodium siegelii are fungal symbionts (endophytes) of meadow fescue (MF; Lolium pratense), which they protect from insects by producing loline alkaloids. High levels of lolines are produced following insect damage or mock herbivory (clipping). Although loline alkaloid levels were greatly elevated in regrowth after clipping, loline-alkaloid biosynthesis (LOL) gene expression in regrowth and basal tissues was similar to unclipped controls. The dramatic increase of lolines in regrowth reflected the much higher concentrations in young (center) versus older (outer) leaf blades, so LOL gene expression was compared in these tissues. In MF-N. siegelii, LOL gene expression was similar in younger and older leaf blades, whereas expression of N. uncinatum LOL genes and some associated biosynthesis genes was higher in younger than older leaf blades. Because lolines are derived from amino acids that are mobilized to new growth, we tested the amino acid levels in center and outer leaf blades. Younger leaf blades of aposymbiotic plants (no endophyte present) had significantly higher levels of asparagine and sometimes glutamine compared to older leaf blades. The amino acid levels were much lower in MF-N. siegelii and MF-N. uncinatum compared to aposymbiotic plants and MF with Epichloë festucae (a closely related symbiont), which lacked lolines. We conclude that loline alkaloid production in young tissue depleted these amino acid pools and was apparently regulated by availability of the amino acid substrates. As a result, lolines maximally protect young host tissues in a fashion similar to endogenous plant metabolites that conform to optimal defense theory. PMID:19403726

  7. Solar UV-B radiation modulates chemical defenses against Anticarsia gemmatalis larvae in leaves of field-grown soybean.

    PubMed

    Dillon, Francisco M; Chludil, Hugo D; Zavala, Jorge A

    2017-09-01

    Although it is well known that solar ultraviolet B (UV-B) radiation enhances plant defenses, there is less knowledge about traits that define insect resistance in field-grown soybean. Here we study the effects of solar UV-B radiation on: a) the induction of phenolic compounds and trypsin proteinase inhibitors (TPI) in soybean undamaged leaves or damaged by Anticarsia gemmatalis neonates during six days, and b) the survival and mass gain of A. gemmatalis larvae that fed on soybean foliage. Two soybean cultivars (cv.), Charata and Williams, were grown under plastic with different transmittance to solar UV-B radiation, which generated two treatments: ambient UV-B (UVB+) and reduced UV-B (UVB-) radiation. Solar UV-B radiation decreased survivorship by 30% and mass gain by 45% of larvae that fed on cv. Charata, but no effect was found in those larvae that fed on cv. Williams. TPI activity and malonyl genistin were induced by A. gemmatalis damage in both cultivars, but solar UV-B radiation and damage only synergistically increased the induction of these compounds in cv. Williams. Although TPI activity and genistein derivatives were induced by herbivory, these results did not explain the differences found in survivorship and mass gain of larvae that fed on cv. Charata. However, we found a positive association between lower larval performance and the presence of two quercetin triglycosides and a kaempferol triglycoside in foliage of cv. Charata, which were identified by HPLC-DAD/MS(2). We conclude that exclusion of solar UV-B radiation reduce resistance to A. gemmatalis, due to a reduction in flavonol concentration in a cultivar that has low levels of genistein derivatives like cv. Charata. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Effectiveness of ice-vest cooling in prolonging work tolerance time during heavy exercise in the heat for personnel wearing Canadian forces chemical defense ensembles

    SciTech Connect

    Bain, B.

    1991-01-01

    Effectiveness of a portable, ice-pack cooling vest (Steelevest) in prolonging work tolerance time in chemical defense clothing in the heat (33 C dry bulb, 33% relative humidity or 25 C WBGT) was evaluated while subjects exercised at a metabolic rate of approx. 700 watts. Subjects were six male volunteers. The protocol consisted of a 20 minute treadmill walk at 1.33 m/s. and 7.5% grade, followed by 15 minutes of a lifting task, 5 minutes rest, then another 20 minutes of lifting task for a total of one hour. The lifting task consisted of lifting of 20 kg box, carrying it 3 meters and setting it down. This was followed by a 6 m walk (3m back to the start point and 3 m back to the box) 15 sec after which the lifting cycle began again. The work was classified as heavy as previously defined. This protocol was repeated until the subjects were unable to continue or they reached a physiological endpoint. Time to voluntary cessation or physiological endpoint was called the work tolerance time. Physiological endpoints were rectal temperature of 39 C, heart rate exceeding 95% of maximum for two consecutive minutes or visible loss of motor control or nausea. The cooling vest had no effect on work tolerance time, rate of rise of rectal temperature or sweat loss. It was concluded that the Steelvest ice-vest is ineffective in prolonging work tolerance time and preventing increases in rectal temperature while wearing chemical protective clothing.

  9. Chemical Defence in a Millipede: Evaluation and Characterization of Antimicrobial Activity of the Defensive Secretion from Pachyiulus hungaricus (Karsch, 1881) (Diplopoda, Julida, Julidae)

    PubMed Central

    Stanković, Slaviša; Dimkić, Ivica; Vujisić, Ljubodrag; Pavković-Lučić, Sofija; Jovanović, Zvezdana; Stević, Tatjana; Sofrenić, Ivana; Mitić, Bojan; Tomić, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    The chemical defence of the millipede Pachyiulus hungaricus is reported in the present paper, in which a chemical characterization is given and antimicrobial activity is determined. In total, independently of sex, 44 compounds were identified. All compounds belong to two groups: quinones and pentyl and hexyl esters of long-chain fatty acids. The relative abundances of quinones and non-quinones were 94.7% vs. 5.3% (males) and 87.3% vs. 12.7% (females), respectively. The two dominant quinones in both sexes were 2-methyl-1,4,-benzoquinone and 2-methoxy-3-methyl-1,4-benzoquinone. Antibacterial and antifungal activity of the defensive secretion was evaluated in vitro against seven bacterial strains and eight fungal species. With the aid of a dilution technique, the antimicrobial potential of the secretion and high sensitivity of all tested strains were confirmed. The lowest minimum concentrations of these compounds (0.20–0.25 mg/mL) were sufficient for inhibition of Aeromonas hydrophila, Listeria monocytogenes and Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The growth of eight tested fungal species was inhibited by slightly lower concentrations of the secretion, with Fusarium equiseti as the most sensitive fungus and Aspergillus flavus as the most resistant. Values of MIC and MFC in the employed microdilution assay ranged from 0.10 to above 0.35 mg/mL. The given extract contains antimicrobial components potentially useful as therapeutic agents in the pharmaceutical and agricultural industries. PMID:27907048

  10. Development of a biomedical data base on the medical aspects of chemical defense. Annual report, 19 November 1987-31 October 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Landry, L.A.

    1988-12-01

    This report documents a one-year period of activities encompassing the further development and maintenance of the automated information system known as the Chemical Agent Retrieval System (CARS) for the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Chemical Defense (USAMRICD). During the period 19 November 1987 through 31 December 1988, Associate Consultants, Inc. (ACI), creator of the prototype system, expanded the database with relevant research articles taken from USAMRICD research reports and CRDEC holdings, medical and scientific libraries within the Washington area, and on-line searches of machine-readable databases containing citations from the worldwide literature. Within the 12-month period, ACI also succeeded in modifying the CARS Thesaurus by making key revisions. The CARS Thesaurus now includes a faceted structure using general biomedical index terms and tree structures. Significant automation with the Automated Citation Tracking System (CITES) and the CARS Update Tracking System (CUTS) significantly increased the efficiency and level of production while providing reduced costs to the government.

  11. Chemical Defence in a Millipede: Evaluation and Characterization of Antimicrobial Activity of the Defensive Secretion from Pachyiulus hungaricus (Karsch, 1881) (Diplopoda, Julida, Julidae).

    PubMed

    Stanković, Slaviša; Dimkić, Ivica; Vujisić, Ljubodrag; Pavković-Lučić, Sofija; Jovanović, Zvezdana; Stević, Tatjana; Sofrenić, Ivana; Mitić, Bojan; Tomić, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    The chemical defence of the millipede Pachyiulus hungaricus is reported in the present paper, in which a chemical characterization is given and antimicrobial activity is determined. In total, independently of sex, 44 compounds were identified. All compounds belong to two groups: quinones and pentyl and hexyl esters of long-chain fatty acids. The relative abundances of quinones and non-quinones were 94.7% vs. 5.3% (males) and 87.3% vs. 12.7% (females), respectively. The two dominant quinones in both sexes were 2-methyl-1,4,-benzoquinone and 2-methoxy-3-methyl-1,4-benzoquinone. Antibacterial and antifungal activity of the defensive secretion was evaluated in vitro against seven bacterial strains and eight fungal species. With the aid of a dilution technique, the antimicrobial potential of the secretion and high sensitivity of all tested strains were confirmed. The lowest minimum concentrations of these compounds (0.20-0.25 mg/mL) were sufficient for inhibition of Aeromonas hydrophila, Listeria monocytogenes and Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The growth of eight tested fungal species was inhibited by slightly lower concentrations of the secretion, with Fusarium equiseti as the most sensitive fungus and Aspergillus flavus as the most resistant. Values of MIC and MFC in the employed microdilution assay ranged from 0.10 to above 0.35 mg/mL. The given extract contains antimicrobial components potentially useful as therapeutic agents in the pharmaceutical and agricultural industries.

  12. Antipredator defenses predict diversification rates

    PubMed Central

    Arbuckle, Kevin; Speed, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    The “escape-and-radiate” hypothesis predicts that antipredator defenses facilitate adaptive radiations by enabling escape from constraints of predation, diversified habitat use, and subsequently speciation. Animals have evolved diverse strategies to reduce the direct costs of predation, including cryptic coloration and behavior, chemical defenses, mimicry, and advertisement of unprofitability (conspicuous warning coloration). Whereas the survival consequences of these alternative defenses for individuals are well-studied, little attention has been given to the macroevolutionary consequences of alternative forms of defense. Here we show, using amphibians as the first, to our knowledge, large-scale empirical test in animals, that there are important macroevolutionary consequences of alternative defenses. However, the escape-and-radiate hypothesis does not adequately describe them, due to its exclusive focus on speciation. We examined how rates of speciation and extinction vary across defensive traits throughout amphibians. Lineages that use chemical defenses show higher rates of speciation as predicted by escape-and-radiate but also show higher rates of extinction compared with those without chemical defense. The effect of chemical defense is a net reduction in diversification compared with lineages without chemical defense. In contrast, acquisition of conspicuous coloration (often used as warning signals or in mimicry) is associated with heightened speciation rates but unchanged extinction rates. We conclude that predictions based on the escape-and-radiate hypothesis must incorporate the effect of traits on both speciation and extinction, which is rarely considered in such studies. Our results also suggest that knowledge of defensive traits could have a bearing on the predictability of extinction, perhaps especially important in globally threatened taxa such as amphibians. PMID:26483488

  13. Report of the oversight assessment of the operational readiness review of the Savannah River Site Defense Waste Processing Facility Cold Chemical Runs

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, B.

    1993-03-01

    This report presents the results of an oversight assessment (OA) conducted by the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH) of the operational readiness review (ORR) activities for the Cold Chemical Runs (CCRs) at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) located at Savannah River Site (SRS). The EH OA of this facility took place concurrently with an ORR performed by the DOE Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM). The EM ORR was conducted from September 28, 1992, through October 9, 1992, although portions of the EM ORR were extended beyond this period. The EH OA evaluated the comprehensiveness and effectiveness of the EM ORR. The EH OA was designed to ascertain whether the EM ORR was thorough and demonstrated sufficient inquisitiveness to verify that the implementation of programs and procedures is adequate to assure the protection of worker safety and health. The EH OA was carried out in accordance with the protocol and procedures of the EH Program for Oversight Assessment of Operational Readiness Evaluations for Startups and Restarts,'' dated September 15, 1992. Based on its OA and verification of the resolution of EH OA findings, the EH OA Team believes that the startup of the CCRs may be safely begun, pending satisfactory completion and verification of the prestart findings identified by the EM ORR. The EH OA was based primarily on an evaluation of the comprehensiveness and effectiveness of the EM ORR and addressed the following areas: industrial safety, industrial hygiene, and respiratory protection; fire protection; and chemical safety. The EH OA conducted independent vertical-slice'' reviews to confirm EM ORR results in the areas of confined-space entry, respiratory protection, fire protection, and chemical safety.

  14. Report of the oversight assessment of the operational readiness review of the Savannah River Site Defense Waste Processing Facility Cold Chemical Runs

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, B.

    1993-03-01

    This report presents the results of an oversight assessment (OA) conducted by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH) of the operational readiness review (ORR) activities for the Cold Chemical Runs (CCRs) at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) located at Savannah River Site (SRS). The EH OA of this facility took place concurrently with an ORR performed by the DOE Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM). The EM ORR was conducted from September 28, 1992, through October 9, 1992, although portions of the EM ORR were extended beyond this period. The EH OA evaluated the comprehensiveness and effectiveness of the EM ORR. The EH OA was designed to ascertain whether the EM ORR was thorough and demonstrated sufficient inquisitiveness to verify that the implementation of programs and procedures is adequate to assure the protection of worker safety and health. The EH OA was carried out in accordance with the protocol and procedures of the ``EH Program for Oversight Assessment of Operational Readiness Evaluations for Startups and Restarts,`` dated September 15, 1992. Based on its OA and verification of the resolution of EH OA findings, the EH OA Team believes that the startup of the CCRs may be safely begun, pending satisfactory completion and verification of the prestart findings identified by the EM ORR. The EH OA was based primarily on an evaluation of the comprehensiveness and effectiveness of the EM ORR and addressed the following areas: industrial safety, industrial hygiene, and respiratory protection; fire protection; and chemical safety. The EH OA conducted independent ``vertical-slice`` reviews to confirm EM ORR results in the areas of confined-space entry, respiratory protection, fire protection, and chemical safety.

  15. Effects of the chemical-defense antidote atropine sulfate on helicopter-pilot performance: A simulator study. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, F.R.; Caldwell, J.A.; Stephens, R.L.; Stone, L.W.; Carter, D.J.

    1989-07-01

    Atropine is fielded as an antidote for organophosphate poisoning where chemical nerve agents are used. However, inappropriate self-injection may lead to anticholinergic side effects detrimental to aviators in flight. To determine the scope and magnitude of these possible side effects, 12 male Army helicopter pilots in good health flew several missions in a helicopter simulator after being injected (I.M.) with either a placebo or 2mg or 4mg of atropine sulfate. Physiological effects essentially followed the classical model. The 2 mg dose of atropine caused small degradations on some of laboratory-collected measures, but often did not produce effects, which differed significantly from those produced by a placebo dose. A 4mg dose of atropine, however, exerted a variety of statistically significant effects upon flight performance, contrast sensitivity, cognitive performance, tracking accuracy, and cortical evoked responses. The flight performance evaluations (both subjective and objective) showed statistically significant changes in the subject's abilities to fly the simulator. Results obtained from other tasks in the study suggest, further, the decrements in flight performance resulted from a slowing of both information processing and psychomotor performance. Atropine effects were not of sufficient magnitude to preclude further research under actual flight conditions.

  16. Phenylpropanoid enzymes, phenolic polymers and metabolites as chemical defenses to infection of Pratylenchus coffeae in roots of resistant and susceptible bananas (Musa spp.).

    PubMed

    Vaganan, M Mayil; Ravi, I; Nandakumar, A; Sarumathi, S; Sundararaju, P; Mustaffa, M M

    2014-03-01

    Activity differences of the first (phenylalanine ammonia lyase, PAL) and the last (cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase, CAD) enzymes of phenylpropanoid pathway in the roots of resistant (Yangambi Km5 and Anaikomban) and susceptible (Nendran and Robusta) banana cultivars caused by root lesion nematode, Pratylenchus coffeae, were investigated. Also, the accumulation of phenolics and deposition of lignin polymers in cell walls in relation to resistance of the banana cultivars to the nematode were analyzed. Compared to the susceptible cultivars, the resistant cultivars had constitutively significantly higher PAL activity and total soluble and cell wall-bound phenolics than in susceptible cultivars. The resistant cultivars responded strongly to the infection of the nematode by induction of several-time higher PAL and CAD enzymes activities, soluble and wall-bound phenolics and enrichment of lignin polymers in cell wall and these biochemical parameters reached maximum at 7th day postinoculation. In addition, profiles of phenolic acid metabolites in roots of Yangambi Km5 and Nendran were analyzed by HPLC to ascertain the underlying biochemical mechanism of bananas resistance to the nematode. Identification and quantification of soluble and cell wall-bound phenolic acids showed six metabolites and only quantitative, no qualitative, differences occurred between the resistant and susceptible cvs. and between constitutive and induced contents. A very prominent increase of p-coumaric, ferulic and sinapic acids, which are precursors of monolignols of lignin, in resistant cv. was found. These constitutive and induced biochemical alterations are definitely the chemical defenses of resistant cvs. to the nematode infection.

  17. Implementation of flowsheet change to minimize hydrogen and ammonia generation during chemical processing of high level waste in the Defense Waste Processing Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, Dan P.; Woodham, Wesley H.; Williams, Matthew S.; Newell, J. David; Luther, Michelle C.; Brandenburg, Clayton H.

    2016-09-27

    Testing was completed to develop a chemical processing flowsheet for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), designed to vitrify and stabilize high level radioactive waste. DWPF processing uses a reducing acid (formic acid) and an oxidizing acid (nitric acid) to rheologically thin the slurry and complete the necessary acid base and reduction reactions (primarily mercury and manganese). Formic acid reduces mercuric oxide to elemental mercury, allowing the mercury to be removed during the boiling phase of processing through steam stripping. In runs with active catalysts, formic acid can decompose to hydrogen and nitrate can be reduced to ammonia, both flammable gases, due to rhodium and ruthenium catalysis. Replacement of formic acid with glycolic acid eliminates the generation of rhodium- and ruthenium-catalyzed hydrogen and ammonia. In addition, mercury reduction is still effective with glycolic acid. Hydrogen, ammonia and mercury are discussed in the body of the report. Ten abbreviated tests were completed to develop the operating window for implementation of the flowsheet and determine the impact of changes in acid stoichiometry and the blend of nitric and glycolic acid as it impacts various processing variables over a wide processing region. Three full-length 4-L lab-scale simulations demonstrated the viability of the flowsheet under planned operating conditions. The flowsheet is planned for implementation in early 2017.

  18. Using Genomics for Natural Product Structure Elucidation.

    PubMed

    Tietz, Jonathan I; Mitchell, Douglas A

    2016-01-01

    Natural products (NPs) are the most historically bountiful source of chemical matter for drug development-especially for anti-infectives. With insights gleaned from genome mining, interest in natural product discovery has been reinvigorated. An essential stage in NP discovery is structural elucidation, which sheds light not only on the chemical composition of a molecule but also its novelty, properties, and derivatization potential. The history of structure elucidation is replete with techniquebased revolutions: combustion analysis, crystallography, UV, IR, MS, and NMR have each provided game-changing advances; the latest such advance is genomics. All natural products have a genetic basis, and the ability to obtain and interpret genomic information for structure elucidation is increasingly available at low cost to non-specialists. In this review, we describe the value of genomics as a structural elucidation technique, especially from the perspective of the natural product chemist approaching an unknown metabolite. Herein we first introduce the databases and programs of interest to the natural products chemist, with an emphasis on those currently most suited for general usability. We describe strategies for linking observed natural product-linked phenotypes to their corresponding gene clusters. We then discuss techniques for extracting structural information from genes, illustrated with numerous case examples. We also provide an analysis of the biases and limitations of the field with recommendations for future development. Our overview is not only aimed at biologically-oriented researchers already at ease with bioinformatic techniques, but also, in particular, at natural product, organic, and/or medicinal chemists not previously familiar with genomic techniques.

  19. Transforming Defense

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    or agency each week?” 47 By way of just one example, Madrid’s La Razon reported on September 13 , 2004, that Spain would lose U.S. bases to Portugal...public release, distribution unlimited 13 . SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF...DEFENSE 7 responsibilities. The homeland security JOC envisions a layered and comprehensive defense requiring geographical and functional integra- tion. 13

  20. A Medical Research and Evaluation Facility and Studies Supporting the Medical Chemical Defense Program. Task 92-29: Efficacy Assessment of Topical Skin Protectants against Sulfur Mustard Vapors in Hairless Guinea Pigs.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-09-01

    hairless guinea pigs ( HGPs ) and the incidence of microblisters observed histologically. The dose-response curve was compared to results of similar work...performed at the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Chemical Defense (USAMRICD). The effects of ketamine hydrochloride anesthesia on HGP skin...reflectance were also examined. The exposure time needed to produce a 50 percent incidence of microblisters in HGP skin exposed to saturated HD vapors was

  1. Effects of chemical stimulation of the lateral wings of the dorsal raphe nucleus on panic-like defensive behaviors and Fos protein expression in rats.

    PubMed

    Matthiesen, Melina; Spiacci, Ailton; Zangrossi, Hélio

    2017-03-06

    The lateral wings subnucleus of the dorsal raphe nucleus (lwDR) has been implicated in the modulation of panic-like behaviors, such as escape. Infusion of non- excitotoxic doses of the excitatory amino acid kainic acid into this subnucleus promptly evokes a vigorous escape response. In addition, rats exposed to panic-inducing situations show an increase in Fos protein expression in neurons within the lwDR. In the present study, we first investigated whether key structures associated with the mediation of escape behavior are recruited after chemical stimulation of the lwDR with kainic acid. We next investigated whether the infusion of the GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline into the lwDR also evoked escape responses measured both in a circular arena and in the rat elevated T-maze. The effects of bicuculline in the circular arena were compared to those caused by the infusion of this antagonist into the ventrolateral periaqueductal gray (vlPAG), an area in close vicinity to the lwDR. The results showed that kainic acid infusion into the lwDR increased Fos protein immunostaining in brain structures deeply involved in panic-like defensive behaviors, such as the periaqueductal gray and hypothalamus, but not the amygdala. As observed with kainic acid, bicuculline evoked a pronounced escape response in the circular arena when microinjected in the lwDR, but not in the vlPAG. The escape-promoting effect of bicuculline in the lwDR was also evidenced in the elevated T-maze. These findings strength the view that dysfunction in mechanisms controlling escape in the lwDR is critically implicated in the pathophysiology of panic disorder.

  2. ION COMPOSITION ELUCIDATION (ICE): AN INVESTIGATIVE ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Ion Composition Elucidation (ICE) often leads to identification of compounds and provides high quality evidence for tracking compounds to their sources. Mass spectra for most organic compounds are not found in mass spectral libraries used to tentatively identify analytes. In addition, multiple matches are common. Ion Composition Elucidation provides the numbers of atoms of each element in the ions in the mass spectrum, greatly limiting the number of possible compounds that could produce the mass spectrum. Review of chemical and commercial literature then limits the number of possible compounds to one or a few that can be purchased to confirm tentative compound identifications by comparison of mass spectra and chromatographic retention times. Ion Composition Elucidation is conceptually simple relative to other analytical techniques and more easily explained to a judge or jury. It is based on sums of the exact masses of atoms and their isotopic abundances. Several applications of ICE are demonstrated for ultra-trace-level compounds in an extract of the effluent from a tertiary sewage treatment plant including: (i) measurement of five values to determine an ion's composition and to generate evidence for the compound's identity, (ii) rejection of incorrect library matches, (iii) rapid screening for a target compound in an extract, and (iv) a strategy for tracking unidentified compounds to their sources. The research focused on in the subtasks is the development and

  3. Conifer defenses and xylophagous insects

    Treesearch

    Alexandr S. Rozhkov; Galina I. Massel

    1991-01-01

    The resistance of woody plants to phytophage damage consists of a universal system of mechanisms: 1) repellent chemicals, 2) defensive reactions both mechanical and chemical, 3) retention of viability under disturbed metabolism and low biomass accumulation, and 4) recuperative capacity. Siberian coniferous tree species, with the exception of Larix,...

  4. Intra-plant differences in seaweed nutritional quality and chemical defenses: Importance for the feeding behavior of the intertidal amphipod Orchestoidea tuberculata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, Cristian; Acuña, Karin; Navarro, Jorge M.; Gómez, Iván

    2011-10-01

    As a result of their morphological complexity, large macroalgae show intra-thallus variations in their nutritional composition and secondary metabolite content, which influences the trophic ecology of herbivorous invertebrates, and ultimately their fitness. In this study, we evaluated for the first time the variability in nutritional quality (protein content, carbohydrates, lipids, and total organic matter), secondary metabolites (phlorotannins), and structure (shape and toughness) between blades and stipes of the macroalgae Durvillaea Antarctica. Specifically, we looked at their effect on feeding preference, rate of consumption, absorption efficiency, and growth rate of the amphipod Orchestoidea tuberculata, one of the most abundant organisms on Chilean sandy beaches. Proteins, carbohydrates, total organic matter and phlorotannin contents were significantly higher in blades than in stipes. Preference experiments revealed that the amphipods preferred blades when fresh pieces of blades and stipes were offered at the same time. Similar results were found when artificial food (in which structures of both parts of the alga were standardized) was offered, suggesting that shape and toughness of the two different parts of the alga did not influence preference patterns of O. tuberculata. Absorption efficiency of O. tuberculata was higher on blades compared to stipes. When the amphipods were kept with each of the algal parts separately (i.e. no choice), they consumed a significantly higher amount of stipe, which suggests that O. tuberculata used food quantity to compensate for the lower nutritional quality of stipes. The higher nutritional values of blades compared to stipes appears to explain observed preference patterns by O. tuberculata. Phlorotannin content did not appear to inhibit blade consumption, suggesting that the nutritional quality of the food could be more important than chemical defense in determining food choice in O. tuberculata. Growth did not differ

  5. The development of new molecular tools containing a chemically synthesized carbohydrate ligand for the elucidation of carbohydrate roles via photoaffinity labeling: carbohydrate-protein interactions are affected by the structures of the glycosidic bonds and the reducing-end sugar.

    PubMed

    Ohtsuka, Isao; Sadakane, Yutaka; Hada, Noriyasu; Higuchi, Mari; Atsumi, Toshiyuki; Kakiuchi, Nobuko

    2014-08-01

    Photoaffinity labeling technology is a highly efficient method for cloning carbohydrate-binding proteins. When the carbohydrate probes are synthesized according to conventional methods, however, the reducing terminus of the sugar is opened to provide an acyclic structure. Our continued efforts to solve this problem led to the development of new molecular tools with an oligosaccharide structure that contains a phenyldiazirine group for the elucidation of carbohydrate-protein interactions. We investigated whether carbohydrate-lectin interactions are affected by differences in the glycosidic formation and synthesized three types of molecular tools containing Galp-GlcpNAc disaccharide ligands and a photoreactive group (1, 2, 3). Photoaffinity labeling validated the recognition of the new ligand by different glycosidic bonds. Photoaffinity labeling also demonstrated that both the reducing end sugar and non-reducing end sugar recognized the Erythrina cristagalli agglutinin.

  6. Metabolomics in chemical ecology.

    PubMed

    Kuhlisch, Constanze; Pohnert, Georg

    2015-07-01

    Chemical ecology elucidates the nature and role of natural products as mediators of organismal interactions. The emerging techniques that can be summarized under the concept of metabolomics provide new opportunities to study such environmentally relevant signaling molecules. Especially comparative tools in metabolomics enable the identification of compounds that are regulated during interaction situations and that might play a role as e.g. pheromones, allelochemicals or in induced and activated defenses. This approach helps overcoming limitations of traditional bioassay-guided structure elucidation approaches. But the power of metabolomics is not limited to the comparison of metabolic profiles of interacting partners. Especially the link to other -omics techniques helps to unravel not only the compounds in question but the entire biosynthetic and genetic re-wiring, required for an ecological response. This review comprehensively highlights successful applications of metabolomics in chemical ecology and discusses existing limitations of these novel techniques. It focuses on recent developments in comparative metabolomics and discusses the use of metabolomics in the systems biology of organismal interactions. It also outlines the potential of large metabolomics initiatives for model organisms in the field of chemical ecology.

  7. Inducibility of chemical defences by two chewing insect herbivores in pine trees is specific to targeted plant tissue, particular herbivore and defensive trait.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Xoaquín; Lundborg, Lina; Zas, Rafael; Carrillo-Gavilán, Amparo; Borg-Karlson, Anna-Karin; Sampedro, Luis

    2013-10-01

    There is increasing evidence that plants can react to biotic aggressions with highly specific responses. However, few studies have attempted to jointly investigate whether the induction of plant defences is specific to a targeted plant tissue, plant species, herbivore identity, and defensive trait. Here we studied those factors contributing to the specificity of induced defensive responses in two economically important pine species against two chewing insect pest herbivores. Juvenile trees of Pinus pinaster and P. radiata were exposed to herbivory by two major pest threats, the large pine weevil Hylobius abietis (a bark-feeder) and the pine processionary caterpillar Thaumetopoea pityocampa (a folivore). We quantified in two tissues (stem and needles) the constitutive (control plants) and herbivore-induced concentrations of total polyphenolics, volatile and non-volatile resin, as well as the profile of mono- and sesquiterpenes. Stem chewing by the pine weevil increased concentrations of non-volatile resin, volatile monoterpenes, and (marginally) polyphenolics in stem tissues. Weevil feeding also increased the concentration of non-volatile resin and decreased polyphenolics in the needle tissues. Folivory by the caterpillar had no major effects on needle defensive chemistry, but a strong increase in the concentration of polyphenolics in the stem. Interestingly, we found similar patterns for all these above-reported effects in both pine species. These results offer convincing evidence that induced defences are highly specific and may vary depending on the targeted plant tissue, the insect herbivore causing the damage and the considered defensive compound.

  8. Genetic variation of lodgepole pine physical and chemical defenses associated with each step in host selection behavior sequence by mountain pine beetle

    Treesearch

    Kimberly F. Wallin; Daniel S. Ott; Alvin D. Yanchuk

    2012-01-01

    Abiotic and biotic stressors exert selective pressures on plants, and over evolutionary time lead to the development of specialized adaptations and specific responses to stresses (Safranyik and Carroll 2006, Wallin and Raffa 2002). In this way, the environment in which plants evolve shapes their life cycles, range, growth, reproduction, and defenses. Insects and...

  9. Chemical and mechanical defenses vary among maternal lines and leaf ages in Verbascum thapsus L. (Scrophulariaceae) and reduce palatability to a generalist insect

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Intra-specific variation in host-plant quality affects herbivore foraging decisions and, because of this, can feed back to shape plant fitness. In particular, among- and within plant variation in defense shapes herbivore behavior, and if genetically based, may respond to natural selection by herbivo...

  10. Chemical warfare

    PubMed Central

    Samuels, Richard Ian; Mattoso, Thalles Cardoso; Moreira, Denise D.O.

    2013-01-01

    Leaf-cutting ants are well known for their highly complex social organization, which provides them with a strong defense against parasites invading their colonies. Besides this attribute, these insects have morphological, physiological and structural characteristics further reinforcing the defense of their colonies. With the discovery of symbiotic bacteria present on the integument of leaf-cutting ants, a new line of defense was proposed and considered to be specific for the control of a specialized fungal parasite of the ants’ fungus gardens (Escovopsis). However, recent studies have questioned the specificity of the integumental bacteria, as they were also found to inhibit a range of fungi, including entomopathogens. The microbiota associated with the leaf-cutting ant gardens has also been proposed as another level of chemical defense, protecting the garden from parasite invasion. Here we review the chemical defense weaponry deployed by leaf-cutting ants against parasites of their fungus gardens and of the ants themselves. PMID:23795235

  11. Blind trials of computer-assisted structure elucidation software

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background One of the largest challenges in chemistry today remains that of efficiently mining through vast amounts of data in order to elucidate the chemical structure for an unknown compound. The elucidated candidate compound must be fully consistent with the data and any other competing candidates efficiently eliminated without doubt by using additional data if necessary. It has become increasingly necessary to incorporate an in silico structure generation and verification tool to facilitate this elucidation process. An effective structure elucidation software technology aims to mimic the skills of a human in interpreting the complex nature of spectral data while producing a solution within a reasonable amount of time. This type of software is known as computer-assisted structure elucidation or CASE software. A systematic trial of the ACD/Structure Elucidator CASE software was conducted over an extended period of time by analysing a set of single and double-blind trials submitted by a global audience of scientists. The purpose of the blind trials was to reduce subjective bias. Double-blind trials comprised of data where the candidate compound was unknown to both the submitting scientist and the analyst. The level of expertise of the submitting scientist ranged from novice to expert structure elucidation specialists with experience in pharmaceutical, industrial, government and academic environments. Results Beginning in 2003, and for the following nine years, the algorithms and software technology contained within ACD/Structure Elucidator have been tested against 112 data sets; many of these were unique challenges. Of these challenges 9% were double-blind trials. The results of eighteen of the single-blind trials were investigated in detail and included problems of a diverse nature with many of the specific challenges associated with algorithmic structure elucidation such as deficiency in protons, structure symmetry, a large number of heteroatoms and poor quality

  12. The two facies of pyrrolizidine alkaloids: the role of the tertiary amine and its N-oxide in chemical defense of insects with acquired plant alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Lindigkeit, R; Biller, A; Buch, M; Schiebel, H M; Boppré, M; Hartmann, T

    1997-05-01

    enzyme was partially purified from two other arctiids. The three SNOs show the same general substrate specificity but differ in their affinities towards the main structural types of pyrrolizidine alkaloids. The enzymes from the two generalists (Creatonotos transiens and Arctia caja) display a broader substrate affinity than the enzyme from the specialist (Tyria jacobaeae). The two molecular forms of pyrrolizidine alkaloids, the lipophilic protoxic tertiary amine and its hydrophilic nontoxic N-oxide are discussed in respect to their bioactivation and detoxification in mammals and their role as defensive chemicals in specialized insects. Pyrrolizidine-alkaloid-sequestering insects store the alkaloids as nontoxic N-oxides which are reduced in the guts of any potential insectivore. The lipophilic tertiary alkaloid is absorbed passively and then bioactivated by cytochrome P-450 oxidase.

  13. Elucidating reaction mechanisms on quantum computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiher, Markus; Wiebe, Nathan; Svore, Krysta M.; Wecker, Dave; Troyer, Matthias

    2017-07-01

    With rapid recent advances in quantum technology, we are close to the threshold of quantum devices whose computational powers can exceed those of classical supercomputers. Here, we show that a quantum computer can be used to elucidate reaction mechanisms in complex chemical systems, using the open problem of biological nitrogen fixation in nitrogenase as an example. We discuss how quantum computers can augment classical computer simulations used to probe these reaction mechanisms, to significantly increase their accuracy and enable hitherto intractable simulations. Our resource estimates show that, even when taking into account the substantial overhead of quantum error correction, and the need to compile into discrete gate sets, the necessary computations can be performed in reasonable time on small quantum computers. Our results demonstrate that quantum computers will be able to tackle important problems in chemistry without requiring exorbitant resources.

  14. Elucidating reaction mechanisms on quantum computers.

    PubMed

    Reiher, Markus; Wiebe, Nathan; Svore, Krysta M; Wecker, Dave; Troyer, Matthias

    2017-07-18

    With rapid recent advances in quantum technology, we are close to the threshold of quantum devices whose computational powers can exceed those of classical supercomputers. Here, we show that a quantum computer can be used to elucidate reaction mechanisms in complex chemical systems, using the open problem of biological nitrogen fixation in nitrogenase as an example. We discuss how quantum computers can augment classical computer simulations used to probe these reaction mechanisms, to significantly increase their accuracy and enable hitherto intractable simulations. Our resource estimates show that, even when taking into account the substantial overhead of quantum error correction, and the need to compile into discrete gate sets, the necessary computations can be performed in reasonable time on small quantum computers. Our results demonstrate that quantum computers will be able to tackle important problems in chemistry without requiring exorbitant resources.

  15. Cross-Talk in Viral Defense Signaling in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Ju Y.; Park, Jeong M.

    2016-01-01

    Viruses are obligate intracellular parasites that have small genomes with limited coding capacity; therefore, they extensively use host intracellular machinery for their replication and infection in host cells. In recent years, it was elucidated that plants have evolved intricate defense mechanisms to prevent or limit damage from such pathogens. Plants employ two major strategies to counteract virus infections: resistance (R) gene-mediated and RNA silencing-based defenses. In this review, plant defenses and viral counter defenses are described, as are recent studies examining the cross-talk between different plant defense mechanisms. PMID:28066385

  16. DEFENSIVE SPIROKETALS FROM Asceles glaber (PHASMATODEA): ABSOLUTE CONFIGURATION AND EFFECTS ON ANTS AND MOSQUITOES

    PubMed Central

    DOSSEY, AARON T.; WHITAKER, JOHN M.; DANCEL, MARIA CRISTINA A.; VANDER MEER, ROBERT K.; BERNIER, ULRICH R.; GOTTARDO, MARCO; ROUSH, WILLIAM R.

    2012-01-01

    Insects are the largest and most diverse group of organisms on earth, with over 1,000,000 species identified to date. Stick insects (“walkingsticks” or “phasmids”, Order Phasmatodea) are well known for and name derived from their uncanny stereotypical use of camouflage as a primary line of defense from predation. However, many species also possess a potent chemical defense spray. Recently we discovered that the defensive spray of Asceles glaber contains spiroketals (confirmed major component: (2S,6R)-(−)(E)-2-methyl-1,7-dioxaspiro[5.5]undecane and tentative minor component: 2-ethyl-1,6-dioxaspiro[4.5]decane) and glucose. In this paper we 1) illustrate the identification of spiroketals and glucose in the defense spray of A. glaber using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS), and comparison with a synthetic reference sample, 2) provide the elucidation of the absolute configuration of the major spiroketal in that defense spray and 3) demonstrate the effect of this compound and its enantiomer on both fire ants (Solenopsis invicta) and mosquitoes (Aedes aegypti). PMID:22976590

  17. Genomics: Applications in Mechanism Elucidation

    PubMed Central

    Gresham, Venita; McLeod, Howard L.

    2009-01-01

    The inability to predict the pharmacology and toxicology of drug candidates in preclinical studies has led to the decline in the number of new drugs which make it to market and the rise in cost associated with drug development. Identifying molecular interactions associated with therapeutic and toxic drug effects early in development is a top priority. Traditional mechanism elucidation strategies are narrow, often focusing on the identification of solely the molecular target. Methods which can offer additional insight into wide-ranging molecular interactions required for drug effect and the biochemical consequences of these interactions are in demand. Genomic strategies have made impressive advances in defining a more global view of drug action are expected to increasingly be used a complimentary tool in drug discovery and development. PMID:19166886

  18. Use of liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and a chemical cleavage reaction for the structure elucidation of a new sildenafil analogue detected as an adulterant in an herbal dietary supplement.

    PubMed

    Reepmeyer, John C; Woodruff, Jeffrey T

    2007-08-15

    An herbal dietary supplement, marketed as a natural product for the enhancement of sexual function, was analyzed by HPLC with photodiode array and mass spectral detection and found to contain a compound related to the synthetic phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE-5) inhibitors. Based on UV spectra, mass spectra and direct infusion MS(n), the structure of the compound was tentatively identified as a sildenafil analogue in which the sulfonyl group had been replaced with an acetyl group. This new analogue is similar to acetildenafil, a previously reported sildenafil analogue, but differs in that it contains an N-methyl group where acetildenafil contains an N-ethyl group. The structure of the unknown was unequivocally established by chemical cleavage of the phenacylamine group of the molecule to generate N-methylpiperazine; other cleavage products matched those generated from acetildenafil. Since the new compound has one less CH(2) group than acetildenafil, it was named nor-acetildenafil.

  19. Nanomaterials for Defense Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turaga, Uday; Singh, Vinitkumar; Lalagiri, Muralidhar; Kiekens, Paul; Ramkumar, Seshadri S.

    Nanotechnology has found a number of applications in electronics and healthcare. Within the textile field, applications of nanotechnology have been limited to filters, protective liners for chemical and biological clothing and nanocoatings. This chapter presents an overview of the applications of nanomaterials such as nanofibers and nanoparticles that are of use to military and industrial sectors. An effort has been made to categorize nanofibers based on the method of production. This chapter particularly focuses on a few latest developments that have taken place with regard to the application of nanomaterials such as metal oxides in the defense arena.

  20. ION COMPOSITION ELUCIDATION (ICE): A HIGH ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    When tentatively identifying compounds in complex mixtures using mass spectral libraries, multiple matches or no plausible matches due to a high level of chemical noise or interferences can occur. Worse yet, most analytes are not in the libraries. In each case, Ion Composition Elucidation (ICE) provides a means for identifying compounds. This poster illustrates an example of each problem and its solution. Three Compound Identification Problems Multiple Plausible Library Matches The mass spectrum in Figure la is a background-subtracted mass spectrum for a compound in an extract of 12 L of effluent from a tertiary waste water treatment plant. Figures lb-g are NIST library matches over the same mass range. The isomers in parenthesis in Figure I also had similar NIST mass spectra. The compound that provided the mass spectrum was present in the extract at an ultra-trace level. Chemical noise, coelution of compounds in the complex extract, and septum and column bleed components generally result in background-subtracted mass spectra containing extraneous ions or lacking low-abundance ions expected from the analyte. Hence, none of the NIST library matches can be ruled out without additional data. The research focused on in the subtasks is the development and application of state-of the-art technologies to meet the needs of the public, Office of Water, and ORD in the area of Water Quality. Located In the subtasks are the various research projects being performed in supp

  1. Department of Defense Expenditure Plans

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-20

    NJ Replace Field Maint Shop Lighting 99 E 1180 Somerset NJ Renovate Bathrooms 63 Q 1181 Teaneck NJ Replace Vacuum Boiler Feed 121 E 1182 Teaneck NJ...Naval Hospital Guam GU Modernize Urology/Orthopedics Suite 456 M 34 Naval Hospital Guam GU Modernize Wing B2 Space Endoscopy Suite 173 M 35 Schofield...Building E3081 - Institute for Chemical Defense 315 E 59 Aberdeen Proving Ground MD Replace Vacuum Pumps Building E3081 - Institute for Chemical

  2. Elucidating protein inter- and intramolecular interacting domains using chemical cross-linking and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight/time of flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pottiez, Gwënaël; Ciborowski, Pawel

    2012-02-15

    Among many methods used to investigate protein/protein interactions, chemical cross-linking combined with mass spectrometry remains a vital experimental approach. Mapping peptides modified by cross-linker provides clues about proteins' interacting domains. One complication is that such modification may result from intra- but not intermolecular interactions. Therefore, for overall data interpretation, a combination of results from various platforms is necessary. It is postulated that the secretory isoform of gelsolin regulates several biological processes through interactions with proteins such as actin, fibronectin, vitamin D-binding protein, and unidentified receptors on the surface of eukaryotes; it also has been shown to self-assemble eventually leading to the formation of homo-multimers. As such, it is an excellent model for this study. We used four cross-linkers with arm length ranging from 7.7 to 21.7Å and MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry as the analytical platform. Results of this study show that MALDI-based mass spectrometry generates high quality data to show lysine residues modified by cross-linkers and combined with existing data based on crystallography (Protein Data Bank, PDB) can be used to discriminate between inter- and intramolecular linking.

  3. Elucidating Mechanisms of Extensive Chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egolf, David A.; Melnikov, Ilarion V.; Pesch, Werner; Ecke, Robert E.

    2001-06-01

    We report studies of the mechanism for the generation of chaotic disorder in a phenomenon found in nature, Rayleigh-Bénard convection (RBC), in a regime exhaustively studied experimentally. Through large-scale, parallel-computational studies of the detailed space-time evolution of the dynamical degrees of freedom, we find that the Spiral Defect Chaos (SDC) state of RBC is spatially- and temporally- localized to defect creation/annihilation events (D.A. Egolf, I.V. Melnikov, W. Pesch, and R.E. Ecke, Nature, 404:733--736, 2000), and we elucidate how these divergent, but very brief, events lead to eventual macroscopic differences between initially similar flow patterns. We also demonstrate that SDC is extensively chaotic, in that the number of dynamical degrees of freedom (the fractal dimension) is proportional to the system size, suggesting the possibility for a hydrodynamic-like description of the long-wavelength properties of SDC. The computational technique employed shows promise for analyzing a wide variety of extended dynamical systems.

  4. Develop a biomedical data base on the medical aspects of chemical defense. Annual report No. 4, 25 July 1983-24 July 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Landry, L.A.; Schaefer, D.P.

    1985-01-10

    Fourth year progress in the development of the computerized Chemical Agent Retrieval System (CARS) data base on selected chemical warfare agents is reported. A prototype data base on soman (GD) was completed, followed by expansion to remaining G-agents, VX, mustard compounds, and lewisite. Development of a thesaurus, and emphasis upon software systems refinement, debugging, and documentation were continued.

  5. Defensive secretion of rice bug,Leptocorisa oratorius fabricius, (Hemiptera: Coreidae): A unique chemical combination and its toxic, repellent, and alarm properties.

    PubMed

    Gunawardena, N E; Bandumathie, M K

    1993-04-01

    Defensive secretion produced by adult males and females ofLeptocorisa oratorius, Fabricius (Hemiptera: Coreidae) living on the host plant,Oriza sativa, was analyzed by a combined gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy technique. Both male and female secretions consisted of two major components: (E)-2-octenal andn-octyl acetate, 76% and 16% (w/w), respectively. The remaining 8% were trace compounds, some of which were identified as hexyl acetate, 3-octenal, 1-octanol, and (Z)-3-octenyl acetate. In a survey among 38 coreid defensive secretions, (E)-2-octenal andn-octyl acetate were found to occur rarely in addition to coreid-specific compounds, while their combination as primary constituents was found to be unique. Toxicity and repellency of this secretion were evaluated using two household pests,Anoplolepis longipes andSitotroga cerealella, as test insects, and lethal concentration (LC50) values of 0.24 ppm and 0.14 ppm, respectively, and repellencies of 63% and 58%, respectively, were obtained. Comparing the above values with those of a pentatomid bug,Coridius janus, evaluated under the same conditions, it was apparent that this secretion has potential as a repellent to enemies ofL. oratorius but not as a toxicant to attack them. Bioassay on the alarm activity of this secretion revealed that it elicits alarm responses, alerting and dispersing aggregated male and femaleL. oratorius: this is followed by "self-coating" activities. In addition, some unique behaviors were also noted among alarmedL. oratorius.

  6. Label-free proteomics assisted by affinity enrichment for elucidating the chemical reactivity of the liver mitochondrial proteome toward adduction by the lipid electrophile 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, Claudia

    2016-03-01

    The analysis of oxidative stress-induced post-translational modifications remains challenging due to the chemical diversity of these modifications, the possibility of the presence of positional isomers and the low stoichiometry of the modified proteins present in a cell or tissue proteome. Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is a multifactorial disease in which mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress have been identified as being critically involved in the progression of the disease from steatosis to cirrhosis. Ethanol metabolism leads to increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), glutathione depletion and lipid peroxidation. Posttranslational modification of proteins by electrophilic products of lipid peroxidation has been associated with governing redox-associated signaling mechanisms, but also as contributing to protein dysfunction leading to organelle and liver injury. In particular the prototypical α,β-unsaturated aldehyde, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE), has been extensively studied as marker of increased oxidative stress in hepatocytes. In this study, we combined a LC-MS label-free quantification method and affinity enrichment to assess the dose-dependent insult by HNE on the proteome of rat liver mitochondria. We used a carbonyl-selective probe, the ARP probe, to label HNE-protein adducts and to perform affinity capture at the protein level. Using LC-MS to obtain protein abundance estimates, a list of protein targets was obtained with increasing concentration of HNE used in the exposure studies. In parallel, we performed affinity capture at the peptide level to acquire site-specific information. Examining the concentration-dependence of the protein modifications, we observed distinct reactivity profiles for HNE-protein adduction. Pathway analysis indicated that proteins associated with metabolic processes, including amino acid, fatty acid and glyoxylate and dicarboxylate metabolism, bile acid synthesis and TCA cycle, showed enhanced reactivity to HNE

  7. Label-Free Proteomics Assisted by Affinity Enrichment for Elucidating the Chemical Reactivity of the Liver Mitochondrial Proteome toward Adduction by the Lipid Electrophile 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE).

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Shin-Cheng; Maier, Claudia S

    2016-01-01

    The analysis of oxidative stress-induced post-translational modifications remains challenging due to the chemical diversity of these modifications, the possibility of the presence of positional isomers and the low stoichiometry of the modified proteins present in a cell or tissue proteome. Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is a multifactorial disease in which mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress have been identified as being critically involved in the progression of the disease from steatosis to cirrhosis. Ethanol metabolism leads to increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), glutathione depletion and lipid peroxidation. Posttranslational modification of proteins by electrophilic products of lipid peroxidation has been associated with governing redox-associated signaling mechanisms, but also as contributing to protein dysfunction leading to organelle and liver injury. In particular the prototypical α,β-unsaturated aldehyde, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE), has been extensively studied as marker of increased oxidative stress in hepatocytes. In this study, we combined a LC-MS label-free quantification method and affinity enrichment to assess the dose-dependent insult by HNE on the proteome of rat liver mitochondria. We used a carbonyl-selective probe, the ARP probe, to label HNE-protein adducts and to perform affinity capture at the protein level. Using LC-MS to obtain protein abundance estimates, a list of protein targets was obtained with increasing concentration of HNE used in the exposure studies. In parallel, we performed affinity capture at the peptide level to acquire site-specific information. Examining the concentration-dependence of the protein modifications, we observed distinct reactivity profiles for HNE-protein adduction. Pathway analysis indicated that proteins associated with metabolic processes, including amino acid, fatty acid, and glyoxylate and dicarboxylate metabolism, bile acid synthesis and TCA cycle, showed enhanced reactivity to HNE

  8. Label-Free Proteomics Assisted by Affinity Enrichment for Elucidating the Chemical Reactivity of the Liver Mitochondrial Proteome toward Adduction by the Lipid Electrophile 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE)

    PubMed Central

    Tzeng, Shin-Cheng; Maier, Claudia S.

    2016-01-01

    The analysis of oxidative stress-induced post-translational modifications remains challenging due to the chemical diversity of these modifications, the possibility of the presence of positional isomers and the low stoichiometry of the modified proteins present in a cell or tissue proteome. Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is a multifactorial disease in which mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress have been identified as being critically involved in the progression of the disease from steatosis to cirrhosis. Ethanol metabolism leads to increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), glutathione depletion and lipid peroxidation. Posttranslational modification of proteins by electrophilic products of lipid peroxidation has been associated with governing redox-associated signaling mechanisms, but also as contributing to protein dysfunction leading to organelle and liver injury. In particular the prototypical α,β-unsaturated aldehyde, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE), has been extensively studied as marker of increased oxidative stress in hepatocytes. In this study, we combined a LC-MS label-free quantification method and affinity enrichment to assess the dose-dependent insult by HNE on the proteome of rat liver mitochondria. We used a carbonyl-selective probe, the ARP probe, to label HNE-protein adducts and to perform affinity capture at the protein level. Using LC-MS to obtain protein abundance estimates, a list of protein targets was obtained with increasing concentration of HNE used in the exposure studies. In parallel, we performed affinity capture at the peptide level to acquire site-specific information. Examining the concentration-dependence of the protein modifications, we observed distinct reactivity profiles for HNE-protein adduction. Pathway analysis indicated that proteins associated with metabolic processes, including amino acid, fatty acid, and glyoxylate and dicarboxylate metabolism, bile acid synthesis and TCA cycle, showed enhanced reactivity to HNE

  9. Synthetic plant defense elicitors.

    PubMed

    Bektas, Yasemin; Eulgem, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    To defend themselves against invading pathogens plants utilize a complex regulatory network that coordinates extensive transcriptional and metabolic reprogramming. Although many of the key players of this immunity-associated network are known, the details of its topology and dynamics are still poorly understood. As an alternative to forward and reverse genetic studies, chemical genetics-related approaches based on bioactive small molecules have gained substantial popularity in the analysis of biological pathways and networks. Use of such molecular probes can allow researchers to access biological space that was previously inaccessible to genetic analyses due to gene redundancy or lethality of mutations. Synthetic elicitors are small drug-like molecules that induce plant defense responses, but are distinct from known natural elicitors of plant immunity. While the discovery of some synthetic elicitors had already been reported in the 1970s, recent breakthroughs in combinatorial chemical synthesis now allow for inexpensive high-throughput screens for bioactive plant defense-inducing compounds. Along with powerful reverse genetics tools and resources available for model plants and crop systems, comprehensive collections of new synthetic elicitors will likely allow plant scientists to study the intricacies of plant defense signaling pathways and networks in an unparalleled fashion. As synthetic elicitors can protect crops from diseases, without the need to be directly toxic for pathogenic organisms, they may also serve as promising alternatives to conventional biocidal pesticides, which often are harmful for the environment, farmers and consumers. Here we are discussing various types of synthetic elicitors that have been used for studies on the plant immune system, their modes-of-action as well as their application in crop protection.

  10. Synthetic plant defense elicitors

    PubMed Central

    Bektas, Yasemin; Eulgem, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    To defend themselves against invading pathogens plants utilize a complex regulatory network that coordinates extensive transcriptional and metabolic reprogramming. Although many of the key players of this immunity-associated network are known, the details of its topology and dynamics are still poorly understood. As an alternative to forward and reverse genetic studies, chemical genetics-related approaches based on bioactive small molecules have gained substantial popularity in the analysis of biological pathways and networks. Use of such molecular probes can allow researchers to access biological space that was previously inaccessible to genetic analyses due to gene redundancy or lethality of mutations. Synthetic elicitors are small drug-like molecules that induce plant defense responses, but are distinct from known natural elicitors of plant immunity. While the discovery of some synthetic elicitors had already been reported in the 1970s, recent breakthroughs in combinatorial chemical synthesis now allow for inexpensive high-throughput screens for bioactive plant defense-inducing compounds. Along with powerful reverse genetics tools and resources available for model plants and crop systems, comprehensive collections of new synthetic elicitors will likely allow plant scientists to study the intricacies of plant defense signaling pathways and networks in an unparalleled fashion. As synthetic elicitors can protect crops from diseases, without the need to be directly toxic for pathogenic organisms, they may also serve as promising alternatives to conventional biocidal pesticides, which often are harmful for the environment, farmers and consumers. Here we are discussing various types of synthetic elicitors that have been used for studies on the plant immune system, their modes-of-action as well as their application in crop protection. PMID:25674095

  11. The secret of successful defense.

    PubMed

    Gillett, E

    1994-01-01

    The demise of stimulus-response behaviorism has brought radical changes in the way psychologists conceptualize classical Pavlovian conditioning, as described by Rescorla (1988). The new emphasis on learned expectations sheds light on Freud's 1926 theory of intrapsychic conflict which explains neurotic anxiety by the same principles that account for realistic anxiety. Learned expectations also figure prominently in the recent writings of a number of psychoanalytic theorists. This paper uses these principles to explain "successful defense," which is customarily defined as the activation of defense in the absence of conscious anxiety. These same principles elucidate an important difference between the therapeutic mechanisms of supportive versus expressive psychotherapy. This distinction parallels the difference between conditioned inhibition versus extinction in Pavlovian conditioning.

  12. Infrared point sensors for homeland defense applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Ross C.; Carter, Michael T.; Homrighausen, Craig L.

    2004-03-01

    We report recent progress toward the development of infrared point sensors for the detection of chemical warfare agents and explosive related chemicals, which pose a significant threat to both health and environment. Technical objectives have focused on the development of polymer sorbents to enhance the infrared response of these hazardous organic compounds. For example, infrared point sensors which part-per-billion detection limits have been developed that rapidlypartition chemical warfare agents and explosive related chemicals into polymer thin films with desirable chemical and physical properties. These chemical sensors demonstrate novel routes to reversible sensing of hazardous organic compounds. The development of small, low-power, sensitive, and selective instruments employing these chemical sensors would enhance the capabilities of federal, state, and local emergency response to incidents involving chemical terrorism. Specific applications include chemical defense systems for military personnel and homeland defense, environmental monitors for remediation and demilitarization, and point source detectors for emergency and maintenance response teams.

  13. Desktop NMR for structure elucidation and identification of strychnine adulteration.

    PubMed

    Singh, Kawarpal; Blümich, Bernhard

    2017-03-27

    Elucidating the structure of complex molecules is difficult at low magnetic fields due to the overlap of different peak multiplets and second-order coupling effects. This is even more challenging for rigid molecules with small chemical shift differences and with prochiral centers. Since low-field NMR spectroscopy is sometimes presumed as restricted to the analysis of only small and simple molecules, this paper aims at countering this misconception: it demonstrates the use of low-field NMR spectroscopy in chemical forensics for identifying strychnine and its counterions by exploring the chemical shift as a signature in different 1D (1)H and (13)C experiments. Hereby the applied methodologies combine various 1D and 2D experiments such as 1D (1)H, (13)C, DEPT, and 2D COSY, HETCOR, HSQC, HMBC and J-resolved spectroscopy to elucidate the molecular structure and skeleton of strychnine at 1 Tesla. Strychnine is exemplified here, because it is a basic precursor in the chemistry of natural products and is employed as a chemical weapon and as a doping agent in sports including the Olympics. In our study, the molecular structure of the compound could be identified either with a 1D experiment at high magnetic field or with HMBC and HSQC experiments at 1 T. In conclusion, low-field NMR spectroscopy enables the chemical elucidation of the strychnine structure through a simple click with a computer mouse. In situations where a high-field NMR spectrometer is unavailable, compact NMR spectrometers can nevertheless generate knowledge of the structure, important for identifying the different chemical reaction mechanisms associated with the molecule. Desktop NMR is a cost-effective viable option in chemical forensics. It can prove adulteration and identify the origin of different strychnine salts, in particular, the strychnine free base, strychnine hemisulphate and strychnine hydrochloride. The chemical shift signatures report the chemical structure of the molecules due to the impact

  14. Structural elucidation of gemifloxacin mesylate degradation product.

    PubMed

    Paim, Clésio Soldateli; Führ, Fernanda; Martins, Magda Targa; Gnoatto, Simone; Bajerski, Lisiane; Garcia, Cássia Virginia; Steppe, Martin; Schapoval, Elfrides Eva Scherman

    2016-03-01

    Gemifloxacin mesylate (GFM), chemically (R,S)-7-[(4Z)-3-(aminomethyl)-4-(methoxyimino)-1-pyrrolidinyl]-1-cyclopropyl-6-fluoro-1,4-dihydro-4-oxo-1,8-naphthyridine-3-carboxylic acid methanesulfonate, is a synthetic broad-spectrum antibacterial agent. Although many papers have been published in the literature describing the stability of fluorquinolones, little is known about the degradation products of GFM. Forced degradation studies of GFM were performed using radiation (UV-A), acid (1 mol L(-1) HCl) and alkaline conditions (0.2 mol L(-1) NaOH). The main degradation product, formed under alkaline conditions, was isolated using semi-preparative LC and structurally elucidated by nuclear magnetic resonance (proton - (1) H; carbon - (13) C; correlate spectroscopy - COSY; heteronuclear single quantum coherence - HSQC; heteronuclear multiple-bond correlation - HMBC; spectroscopy - infrared, atomic emission and mass spectrometry techniques). The degradation product isolated was characterized as sodium 7-amino-1-pyrrolidinyl-1-cyclopropyl-6-fluoro-1,4-dihydro-4-oxo-1,8-naphthyridine-3-carboxylate, which was formed by loss of the 3-(aminomethyl)-4-(methoxyimino)-1-pyrrolidinyl ring and formation of the sodium carboxylate. The structural characterization of the degradation product was very important to understand the degradation mechanism of the GFM under alkaline conditions. In addition, the results highlight the importance of appropriate protection against hydrolysis and UV radiation during the drug-development process, storage, handling and quality control. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. ION COMPOSITION ELUCIDATION (ICE) FOR ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    There is no abstract available for this product. If further information is requested, please refer to the bibliographic citation and contact the person listed under Contact field. The research focused on in the subtasks is the development and application of state-of the-art technologies to meet the needs of the public, Office of Water, and ORD in the area of Water Quality. Located In the subtasks are the various research projects being performed in support of this Task and more in-depth coverage of each project. Briefly, each project's objective is stated below.Subtask 1: To integrate state-of-the-art technologies (polar organic chemical integrative samplers, advanced solid-phase extraction methodologies with liquid chromatography/electrospray/mass spectrometry) and apply them to studying the sources and fate of a select list of PPCPs. Application and improvement of analytical methodologies that can detect non-volatile, polar, water-soluble pharmaceuticals in source waters at levels that could be environmentally significant (at concentrations less than parts per billion, ppb). IAG with USGS ends in FY05. APM 20 due in FY05.Subtask 2: Coordination of interagency research and public outreach activities for PPCPs. Participate on NSTC Health and Environment subcommittee working group on PPCPs. Web site maintenance and expansion, invited technical presentations, invited articles for peer-reviewed journals, interviews for media, responding to public inquiries. S

  16. Structural elucidation of organic contaminants by chemical ionisation mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moldovan, Zaharie

    2009-08-01

    The PI-CI mass spectra formation for a new family of aromatic amines, with general formula: R1-Ph-NH-Ph-R2 is discussed in correlation with the R1 and R2 structure. The compounds where isolated from some environmental samples by GC/MS technique. The characteristic ions are produced by rearrangement processes involving olefin and alkane neutral molecule elimination from [M+H]+ and sole olefin molecule elimination from [M+ C2H5]+.

  17. Develop a biomedical data base on the medical aspects of chemical defense. Annual report, 25 July 1982-24 July 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Landry, L.A.; Schaefer, D.P.

    1984-03-18

    Third-year progress in the development of a computerized data base on selected chemical warfare agents is reported. A prototype data base on agent GD (soman) was completed, followed by expansion to all G-agents and VX, with limited attention to lewisite and mustard compounds. Development of a software thesaurus was begun, with emphasis upon systems refinement, debugging, and documentation.

  18. Hydroxycinnamic Acid Degradation, a Broadly Conserved Trait, Protects Ralstonia solanacearum from Chemical Plant Defenses and Contributes to Root Colonization and Virulence.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Tiffany M; Ailloud, Florent; Allen, Caitilyn

    2015-03-01

    Plants produce hydroxycinnamic acid (HCA) defense compounds to combat pathogens, such as the bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum. We showed that an HCA degradation pathway is genetically and functionally conserved across diverse R. solanacearum strains. Further, a feruloyl-CoA synthetase (Δfcs) mutant that cannot degrade HCA was less virulent on tomato plants. To understand the role of HCA degradation in bacterial wilt disease, we tested the following hypotheses: HCA degradation helps the pathogen i) grow, as a carbon source; ii) spread, by reducing HCA-derived physical barriers; and iii) survive plant antimicrobial compounds. Although HCA degradation enabled R. solanacearum growth on HCA in vitro, HCA degradation was dispensable for growth in xylem sap and root exudate, suggesting that HCA are not significant carbon sources in planta. Acetyl-bromide quantification of lignin demonstrated that R. solanacearum infections did not affect the gross quantity or distribution of stem lignin. However, the Δfcs mutant was significantly more susceptible to inhibition by two HCA, namely, caffeate and p-coumarate. Finally, plant colonization assays suggested that HCA degradation facilitates early stages of infection and root colonization. Together, these results indicated that ability to degrade HCA contributes to bacterial wilt virulence by facilitating root entry and by protecting the pathogen from HCA toxicity.

  19. Genetic variation of lodgepole pine, Pinus contorta var. latifolia, chemical and physical defenses that affect mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae, attack and tree mortality.

    PubMed

    Ott, Daniel S; Yanchuk, Alvin D; Huber, Dezene P W; Wallin, Kimberly F

    2011-09-01

    Plant secondary chemistry is determined by both genetic and environmental factors, and while large intraspecific variation in secondary chemistry has been reported frequently, the levels of genetic variation of many secondary metabolites in forest trees in the context of potential resistance against pests have been rarely investigated. We examined the effect of tree genotype and environment/site on the variation in defensive secondary chemistry of lodgepole pine, Pinus contorta var. latifolia, against the fungus, Grosmannia clavigera (formerly known as Ophiostoma clavigerum), associated with the mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae. Terpenoids were analyzed in phloem samples from 887, 20-yr-old trees originating from 45 half-sibling families planted at two sites. Samples were collected both pre- and post-inoculation with G. clavigera. Significant variation in constitutive and induced terpenoid compounds was attributed to differences among families. The response to the challenge inoculation with G. clavigera was strong for some individual compounds, but primarily for monoterpenoids. Environment (site) also had a significant effect on the accumulation of some compounds, whereas for others, no significant environmental effect occurred. However, for a few compounds significant family x environment interactions were found. These results suggest that P. c. latifolia secondary chemistry is under strong genetic control, but the effects depend on the individual compounds and whether or not they are expressed constitutively or following induction.

  20. Hydroxycinnamic acid degradation, a broadly conserved trait, protects Ralstonia solanacearum from chemical plant defenses and contributes to root colonization and virulence

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, Tiffany M.; Ailloud, Florent; Allen, Caitilyn

    2014-01-01

    Plants produce hydroxycinnamic acid defense compounds (HCAs) to combat pathogens, such as the bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum. We showed that an HCA degradation pathway is genetically and functionally conserved across diverse R. solanacearum strains. Further, a Δfcs (feruloyl-CoA synthetase) mutant that cannot degrade HCAs was less virulent on tomato plants. To understand the role of HCA degradation in bacterial wilt disease, we tested the following hypotheses: HCA degradation helps the pathogen (1) grow, as a carbon source; (2) spread, by reducing physical barriers HCA-derived; and (3) survive plant antimicrobial compounds. Although HCA degradation enabled R. solanacearum growth on HCAs in vitro, HCA degradation was dispensable for growth in xylem sap and root exudate, suggesting that HCAs are not significant carbon sources in planta. Acetyl-bromide quantification of lignin demonstrated that R. solanacearum infections did not affect the gross quantity or distribution of stem lignin. However, the Δfcs mutant was significantly more susceptible to inhibition by two HCAs: caffeate and p-coumarate. Finally, plant colonization assays suggested that HCA degradation facilitates early stages of infection and root colonization. Together, these results indicated that ability to degrade HCAs contributes to bacterial wilt virulence by facilitating root entry and by protecting the pathogen from HCA toxicity. PMID:25423265

  1. Chemical defense of common antarctic shallow-water nudibranchTritoniella belli eliot (Mollusca: Tritonidae) and its prey,Clavularia frankliniana rouel (Cnidaria: Octocorallia).

    PubMed

    McClintock, J B; Baker, B J; Slattery, M; Heine, J N; Bryan, P J; Yoshida, W; Davies-Coleman, M T; Faulkner, D J

    1994-12-01

    Extracts of the dorid nudibranchTritoniella belli and stoloniferan coralClavularia frankliniana were chromatographed and analyzed by(1)H NMR and thin-layer chromatography. Three glycerol ethers were detected inT. belli, primarily 1-O-hexadecyl glycerol (chimyl alcohol). Chimyl alcohol was also detected after gradient flash chromatography and reverse-phase HPLC purification in the tissues ofC. frankliniana. The common omnivorous predatory Antarctic sea starOdontaster validus, a likely predator of benthic invertebrates, showed feeding deterrence to small cubes ofT. belli mantle tissue placed on the tube feet along the ambulacral feeding groove, while always extruding the cardiac stomach when presented with cubes of shrimp tissue of similar size. Filter-paper disks soaked in an aqueous shrimp solution and then dried were found to elicit a broad range of feeding behaviors inO. validus, including movement of the shrimp disk to the mouth, extrusion of the cardiac stomach, and the assumption of a humped feeding posture. Chimyl alcohol-treated shrimp disks caused significant feeding deterrence in sea stars when compared with control disks (solvent plus shrimp treated disks alone).T. belli andC. frankliniana appear to employ a defensive compound that has been found in a variety of temperate and tropical mollusks, where it has been demonstrated to deter fish predators. We provide evidence for further deterrent capabilities of chimyl alcohol and of its trophic relationship in the polar ecosystem of McMurdo Sound, Antarctica.

  2. Chromosome-level genome map provides insights into diverse defense mechanisms in the medicinal fungus Ganoderma sinense.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yingjie; Xu, Jiang; Sun, Chao; Zhou, Shiguo; Xu, Haibin; Nelson, David R; Qian, Jun; Song, Jingyuan; Luo, Hongmei; Xiang, Li; Li, Ying; Xu, Zhichao; Ji, Aijia; Wang, Lizhi; Lu, Shanfa; Hayward, Alice; Sun, Wei; Li, Xiwen; Schwartz, David C; Wang, Yitao; Chen, Shilin

    2015-06-05

    Fungi have evolved powerful genomic and chemical defense systems to protect themselves against genetic destabilization and other organisms. However, the precise molecular basis involved in fungal defense remain largely unknown in Basidiomycetes. Here the complete genome sequence, as well as DNA methylation patterns and small RNA transcriptomes, was analyzed to provide a holistic overview of secondary metabolism and defense processes in the model medicinal fungus, Ganoderma sinense. We reported the 48.96 Mb genome sequence of G. sinense, consisting of 12 chromosomes and encoding 15,688 genes. More than thirty gene clusters involved in the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites, as well as a large array of genes responsible for their transport and regulation were highlighted. In addition, components of genome defense mechanisms, namely repeat-induced point mutation (RIP), DNA methylation and small RNA-mediated gene silencing, were revealed in G. sinense. Systematic bioinformatic investigation of the genome and methylome suggested that RIP and DNA methylation combinatorially maintain G. sinense genome stability by inactivating invasive genetic material and transposable elements. The elucidation of the G. sinense genome and epigenome provides an unparalleled opportunity to advance our understanding of secondary metabolism and fungal defense mechanisms.

  3. Chromosome-level genome map provides insights into diverse defense mechanisms in the medicinal fungus Ganoderma sinense

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yingjie; Xu, Jiang; Sun, Chao; Zhou, Shiguo; Xu, Haibin; Nelson, David R.; Qian, Jun; Song, Jingyuan; Luo, Hongmei; Xiang, Li; Li, Ying; Xu, Zhichao; Ji, Aijia; Wang, Lizhi; Lu, Shanfa; Hayward, Alice; Sun, Wei; Li, Xiwen; Schwartz, David C.; Wang, Yitao; Chen, Shilin

    2015-01-01

    Fungi have evolved powerful genomic and chemical defense systems to protect themselves against genetic destabilization and other organisms. However, the precise molecular basis involved in fungal defense remain largely unknown in Basidiomycetes. Here the complete genome sequence, as well as DNA methylation patterns and small RNA transcriptomes, was analyzed to provide a holistic overview of secondary metabolism and defense processes in the model medicinal fungus, Ganoderma sinense. We reported the 48.96 Mb genome sequence of G. sinense, consisting of 12 chromosomes and encoding 15,688 genes. More than thirty gene clusters involved in the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites, as well as a large array of genes responsible for their transport and regulation were highlighted. In addition, components of genome defense mechanisms, namely repeat-induced point mutation (RIP), DNA methylation and small RNA-mediated gene silencing, were revealed in G. sinense. Systematic bioinformatic investigation of the genome and methylome suggested that RIP and DNA methylation combinatorially maintain G. sinense genome stability by inactivating invasive genetic material and transposable elements. The elucidation of the G. sinense genome and epigenome provides an unparalleled opportunity to advance our understanding of secondary metabolism and fungal defense mechanisms. PMID:26046933

  4. Evidence for a Trade-Off Strategy in Stone Oak (Lithocarpus) Seeds between Physical and Chemical Defense Highlights Fiber as an Important Antifeedant

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xi; Cannon, Charles H.; Conklin-Brittan, Nancy Lou

    2012-01-01

    Trees in the beech or oak family (Fagaceae) have a mutualistic relationship with scatter-hoarding rodents. Rodents obtain nutrients and energy by consuming seeds, while providing seed dispersal for the tree by allowing some cached seeds to germinate. Seed predation and caching behavior of rodents is primarily affected by seed size, mechanical protection, macronutrient content, and chemical antifeedants. To enhance seed dispersal, trees must optimize trade-offs in investment between macronutrients and antifeedants. Here, we examine this important chemical balance in the seeds of tropical stone oak species with two substantially different fruit morphologies. These two distinct fruit morphologies in Lithocarpus differ in the degree of mechanical protection of the seed. For ‘acorn’ fruit, a thin exocarp forms a shell around the seed while for ‘enclosed receptacle’ (ER) fruit, the seed is embedded in a woody receptacle. We compared the chemical composition of numerous macronutrient and antifeedant in seeds from several Lithocarpus species, focusing on two pairs of sympatric species with different fruit morphologies. We found that macronutrients, particularly total non-structural carbohydrate, was more concentrated in seeds of ER fruits while antifeedants, primarily fibers, were more concentrated in seeds of acorn fruits. The trade-off in these two major chemical components was more evident between the two sympatric lowland species than between two highland species. Surprisingly, no significant difference in overall tannin concentrations in the seeds was observed between the two fruit morphologies. Instead, the major trade-off between macronutrients and antifeedants involved indigestible fibers. Future studies of this complex mutualism should carefully consider the role of indigestible fibers in the foraging behavior of scatter-hoarding rodents. PMID:22457722

  5. Defense Civil Support: DOD Has Made Progress Incorporating the Homeland Response Force into the Chemical, Biological, Radiological, and Nuclear Response Enterprise

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-01

    Response Element A/B • Department of Homeland Security • Federal Emergency Management Agency • Department of Energy • National Nuclear Security Agency...Biological, Radiological, and Nuclear Response Enterprise Report to the Committee on Armed Services, House of Representatives June 2016 GAO-16-599...Response Force into the Chemical, Biological, Radiological, and Nuclear Response Enterprise Why GAO Did This Study DOD is expected to play a prominent

  6. Multiple animal studies for medical chemical defense program in soldier/patient decontamination and drug development. Final report, 1 June 1987-9 September 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Joiner, R.L.; Dill, S.; Hobson, W.; Keys, W.B.

    1989-11-01

    A task was initiated using a rabbit model to compare the effectiveness against chemical surety materiels (CSM) applied dermally, of candidate topical protectants against a reference. The reference was a mixture of polyethylene glycols and the CSM used were thickened soman, VX, and sulfur mustard. The purpose of the comparison was to eliminate those candidates that were not as effective as the reference. A total of 16 tests were performed to evaluate 6 candidate protectants.

  7. SEDIMENT-ASSOCIATED REACTIONS OF AROMATIC AMINES: 1. ELUCIDATION OF SORPTION MECHANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sorption of aromatic amines to sediments and soils can occur by both reversible physical processes and irreversible chemical processes. To elucidate the significance of these sorption pathways, the sorption kinetics of aniline and pyridine were studied in resaturated pond sedimen...

  8. A hundred years in the elucidation of the structures of natural products.

    PubMed

    Hanson, James R

    2017-03-01

    The development in the strategies for elucidating the structures of natural products from 1916 to 2016 are reviewed revealing the transition from chemical to spectroscopic methods and using examples drawn from the chemistry of terpenoids and steroids.

  9. SEDIMENT-ASSOCIATED REACTIONS OF AROMATIC AMINES: 1. ELUCIDATION OF SORPTION MECHANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sorption of aromatic amines to sediments and soils can occur by both reversible physical processes and irreversible chemical processes. To elucidate the significance of these sorption pathways, the sorption kinetics of aniline and pyridine were studied in resaturated pond sedimen...

  10. Thermal stress in seven types of chemical defense ensembles during moderate exercise in hot environments. Final report, May 1991-July 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Bomalaski, S.H.; Hengst, R.; Constable, S.H.

    1993-08-01

    United States Air Force -(USAF) personnel must perform their duties in many operational environments, including those with the potential for contamination with toxic chemical warfare (CW) agents. This study evaluated the physiological response to thermal stress in subjects performing moderate work in current and prototype chemical protective garments including the Battle Dress Overgarment (BDO)+BDU, BDO without BDU, United Kingdom (UK) undercoverall+BDU, Gore-Tex rainsuit+PJ-7 undercoverall, Marine Light Fighter Suit (MLFS), CWU77P, PJ-7 alone, and the BDU alone. Experimental conditions were dry bulb temperature of 40 deg C (104 deg F), a wet bulb temperature of 270C (80.6 deg F), and a black globe temperature of 450C (113 deg F). Eleven subjects walked on a treadmill at 3 mph with a 5% grade incline until rectal temperature (Tre) rose 1.5 deg C (2.7 deg F) above the starting value. Heart rate, rectal and mean skin temperature, and body heat storage were monitored continuously. Sweat evaporation and production were determined from the differences between pre- and postexperiment clothed and nude weights. Significantly longer work times, lower heart rates, lower Tmsk, and lower heat storage, were seen in the group comprised of the BDU, MLFS, CWU-77P, and PJ-7 compared to the Gore-Tex with PJ-7, UK plus BD BDO+BDU, and BDO no BDU ensembles. Suits which resulted in shorter tolerance times also caused rates of sweat production and lower % sweat evaporation than the less physiologically burdensome suits. Chemical protective ensembles, Thermal stress, Clothing, Exercise.

  11. Elucidation of constant current density molecular plating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vascon, A.; Santi, S.; Isse, A. A.; Reich, T.; Drebert, J.; Christ, H.; Düllmann, Ch. E.; Eberhardt, K.

    2012-12-01

    The production of thin layers by means of constant current or constant voltage electrolysis in organic media is commonly known as molecular plating. Despite the fact that this method has been applied for decades and is known to be among the most efficient ones for obtaining quantitative deposition, a full elucidation of the molecular plating is still lacking. In order to get a general understanding of the process and hence set the basis for further improvements of the method, constant current density electrolysis experiments were carried out in a mixture of isopropanol and isobutanol containing millimolar amounts of HNO3 together with [Nd(NO3)3·6H2O] used as a model electrolyte. The process was investigated by considering the influence of different parameters, namely the electrolyte concentrations (i.e., Nd(NO3)3·6H2O: 0.11, 0.22, 0.44 mM, and HNO3: 0.3, 0.4 mM), the applied current (i.e., 2 mA and 6 mA), and the surface roughness of the deposition substrates (i.e., a few tens to several hundreds of nm). The response of the process to changes of these parameters was monitored recording cell potential curves, which showed to be strongly influenced by the investigated conditions. The produced layers were characterized using γ-ray spectroscopy for the evaluation of Nd deposition yields, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy for chemical analysis of the surfaces, and atomic force microscopy for surface roughness evaluation. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results clearly indicate that Nd is present only as Nd3+ on the cathodic surface after molecular plating. The results obtained from this characterization and some basic features inferred from the study of the cell potential curves were used to interpret the different behaviours of the deposition processes as a consequence of the applied variables.

  12. Understanding Defense Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Phebe

    2015-12-01

    Understanding defense mechanisms is an important part of psychotherapy. In this article, we trace the history of the concept of defense, from its origin with Freud to current views. The issue of defense as an unconscious mechanism is examined. The question of whether defenses are pathological, as well as their relation to pathology, is discussed. The effect of psychotherapy on the use of defenses, and their relation to a therapeutic alliance is explored. A series of empirical research studies that demonstrate the functioning of defense mechanisms and that support the theory is presented. Research also shows that as part of normal development, different defenses emerge at different developmental periods, and that gender differences in defense use occur.

  13. Defense Spending and Reform

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-02

    Background paper on SIPRI military expenditure data Public Notice, “ Spending and Defending Defense spending has become a highly......Budget; Finance Reform; Military Spending ; Defense Spending ; Budget Cuts 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF

  14. Radiological Defense. Textbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Civil Preparedness Agency (DOD), Washington, DC.

    This textbook has been prepared under the direction of the Defense Civil Preparedness Agency (DCPA) Staff College for use as a student reference manual in radiological defense (RADEF) courses. It provides much of the basic technical information necessary for a proper understanding of radiological defense and summarizes RADEF planning and expected…

  15. Recognizing Plant Defense Priming.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Medina, Ainhoa; Flors, Victor; Heil, Martin; Mauch-Mani, Brigitte; Pieterse, Corné M J; Pozo, Maria J; Ton, Jurriaan; van Dam, Nicole M; Conrath, Uwe

    2016-10-01

    Defense priming conditions diverse plant species for the superinduction of defense, often resulting in enhanced pest and disease resistance and abiotic stress tolerance. Here, we propose a guideline that might assist the plant research community in a consistent assessment of defense priming in plants.

  16. Defense Institution Building (DIB)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-27

    6 2.2. Assistant Secretary of Defense for Strategy, Plans, and Capabilities ( ASD (SPC)). ........ 6 2.3. Assistant...Secretaries of Defense for International Security Affairs ( ASD (ISA)) and Asian and Pacific Security Affairs ( ASD (APSA...security cooperation activities and programs. 2.2. ASSISTANT SECRETARY OF DEFENSE FOR STRATEGY, PLANS, AND CAPABILITIES ( ASD (SPC)). Under the

  17. Homeland Defense: Are We There Yet?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-04-01

    Tokyo subway nerve gas attack, the former Soviet Union‘s bioweapons program, Iraq‘s efforts to produce and weaponize biological agents highlight the...greatly increased probability of chemical or biological terrorism. � The inclusion of homeland defense in U.S. national security strategy, as well...as recent executive and legislative responses to chemical and biological terrorism, are improving our ability to respond to chemical or biological

  18. Chemical genomic screening of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae genomewide mutant collection reveals genes required for defense against four antimicrobial peptides derived from proteins found in human saliva.

    PubMed

    Lis, Maciej; Bhatt, Sanjay; Schoenly, Nathan E; Lee, Anna Y; Nislow, Corey; Bobek, Libuse A

    2013-02-01

    To compare the effects of four antimicrobial peptides (MUC7 12-mer, histatin 12-mer, cathelicidin KR20, and a peptide containing lactoferricin amino acids 1 to 11) on the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we employed a genomewide fitness screen of combined collections of mutants with homozygous deletions of nonessential genes and heterozygous deletions of essential genes. When an arbitrary fitness score cutoffs of 1 (indicating a fitness defect, or hypersensitivity) and -1 (indicating a fitness gain, or resistance) was used, 425 of the 5,902 mutants tested exhibited altered fitness when treated with at least one peptide. Functional analysis of the 425 strains revealed enrichment among the identified deletions in gene groups associated with the Gene Ontology (GO) terms "ribosomal subunit," "ribosome biogenesis," "protein glycosylation," "vacuolar transport," "Golgi vesicle transport," "negative regulation of transcription," and others. Fitness profiles of all four tested peptides were highly similar, particularly among mutant strains exhibiting the greatest fitness defects. The latter group included deletions in several genes involved in induction of the RIM101 signaling pathway, including several components of the ESCRT sorting machinery. The RIM101 signaling regulates response of yeasts to alkaline and neutral pH and high salts, and our data indicate that this pathway also plays a prominent role in regulating protective measures against all four tested peptides. In summary, the results of the chemical genomic screens of S. cerevisiae mutant collection suggest that the four antimicrobial peptides, despite their differences in structure and physical properties, share many interactions with S. cerevisiae cells and consequently a high degree of similarity between their modes of action.

  19. Inducible defenses against herbivory and fouling in seaweeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Renato Crespo; Costa, Erica da Silva; Sudatti, Daniela Bueno; da Gama, Bernardo Antonio Perez

    2017-04-01

    Secondary metabolites play an important ecological role as a defense mechanism in seaweeds. Chemical defenses are well known to change in response to herbivory, but other driving factors, either biotic or abiotic, are often neglected. Epibiosis may not only reduce seaweed fitness, but also increase attractiveness to consumers, and thus defense production should also be triggered by epibionts. In this study, three Southwestern Atlantic seaweeds, Gracilaria cearensis, Pterocladiella capillacea (Rhodophyceae) and Codium decorticatum (Chlorophyceae) were investigated in laboratory bioassays designed to test whether the action of herbivory or simulated epibiosis influences chemical defenses. Crossed induction experiments were also performed in order to assess whether herbivore induction influences antifouling chemical defense, as well as whether epibiont induction would affect defense against herbivores. The effect of laboratory conditions on seaweeds in the absence of field stimuli was also investigated by comparing consumption of artificial food with extracts from acclimatized and non-acclimatized seaweeds (i.e., natural defense levels). Only the green seaweed C. decorticatum exhibited inducible antifouling defenses triggered by simulated epibiosis, but not by herbivores. In the other seaweeds there was no induction either by herbivory or simulated epibiosis. Acclimatization did not affect C. decorticatum defenses. However, non-acclimatized G. cearensis artificial foods were preferred over acclimatized ones, while extracts from acclimatized P. capillacea increased herbivore consumption, highlighting the need to acclimatize seaweeds before the main induction experiments. This is the first report of inducible defenses due to simulated fouling in seaweeds.

  20. Medical Research and Evaluation Facility (MREF) and studies supporting the Medical Chemical Defense Program on Task 89-01: Screening of candidate pretreatment and therapeutic compounds in in vivo models. Final report Jul 89-Sep 91

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, C.T.; Kiser, R.C.; Dill, G.S.

    1992-02-01

    This task was a continuation of Task 86-29 initiated for Contract D. It provided in vivo screens for evaluating the efficacy of candidate pretreatment and treatment compounds submitted by the Drug Assessment Division of U.S. Army Medical Research of Chemical Defense against soman, tabun, and/or cyanide. A total of 578 compounds were received for testing and their maximum solubility in-vehicles comparable with in vivo testing in mice was determined. Range-finding and median lethal dose determinations following IM and/or oral administrations were conducted for 436 compounds submitted for nerve agent screening and range finding and median lethal dose determinations following IP administration were conducted for up to 142 compounds submitted for cyanide screening. Of 332 compounds evaluated, 154 passed the GD treatment efficacy evaluation, and 90 of 156 compounds submitted passed the GA treatment efficacy evaluation. For pretreatment studies against a GD challenge, 224 of 379 compounds submitted passed the IM efficacy evaluation and 96 of 143 compounds submitted passed the oral efficacy evaluation. Only 12 of 133 compounds evaluated as cyanide pretreatment compounds passed the efficacy evaluations. The mission of Task 89-01 was combined under Task 91-20 for the duration of Contract DAMD17-89-C-9050.

  1. Payment as perverse defense.

    PubMed

    Katz, Wendy Wiener

    2009-07-01

    A case is discussed in which the patient's management of aspects of the payment process is seen as a focal point in a perverse defensive structure operating in the treatment. Detailed process material is examined with attention to transference and countertransference components of this defensive process. Recent literature on perverse thought and defense is reviewed in order to understand this case in the context of current thinking, to generate new ideas about the nature of perverse defenses, and to consider the potentially special role that money may play in the operation of such defenses in psychoanalysis.

  2. Countertransference in defense enactments.

    PubMed

    Busch, Fred

    2006-01-01

    A clinical term is introduced to capture a defense that develops with the patient's deepening but fleeting awareness of painful transference feelings. The analyst's attention to countertransference in such situations is central to the analysis of these defenses. An attempt is made to distinguish defense enactments from other types of defenses, and to differentiate the analyst's countertransference reaction to this type of defense from countertransference reactions that might appear similar. The reasons for this dynamic in the interpersonal space are explored, and a clinical example that describes this phenomenon in the analytic moment is given.

  3. Plant defense using toxic inorganic ions: conceptual models of the defensive enhancement and joint effects hypotheses.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Robert S

    2012-10-01

    The concept of plant defense using toxic mineral elements originated as an explanation for extremely elevated concentrations of some elements (termed hyperaccumulation) in some plant tissues. The Defensive Enhancement Hypothesis suggests that hyperaccumulation evolved because, after an initial defensive benefit accrued from a relatively low initial concentration, increased concentration of an element provided increased plant fitness and drove evolution of higher element concentrations until hyperaccumulation was achieved. The Joint Effects Hypothesis postulates that additive or synergistic effects between element-based defenses, or between toxic element and organic chemical defenses, may have contributed to the evolution of hyperaccumulation. By lessening the concentration of an element necessary to provide an initial defensive benefit to a plant, joint effects could decrease the level of an element that provides an initial defensive benefit, allowing additive or synergistic defensive enhancement to take effect. Recent experimental tests have demonstrated defense at relatively low element concentrations, and tests of metal/metal and metal/organic compound combinations have shown joint effects. These hypotheses suggest how hyperaccumulator plants may have evolved in response to plant-herbivore interactions, and suggest that toxic element levels below those used to define hyperaccumulation may be ecologically effective. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Defensive symbioses of animals with prokaryotic and eukaryotic microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Flórez, Laura V; Biedermann, Peter H W; Engl, Tobias; Kaltenpoth, Martin

    2015-07-01

    Many organisms team up with microbes for defense against predators, parasites, parasitoids, or pathogens. Here we review the described protective symbioses between animals (including marine invertebrates, nematodes, insects, and vertebrates) and bacteria, fungi, and dinoflagellates. We focus on associations where the microbial natural products mediating the protective activity have been elucidated or at least strong evidence for the role of symbiotic microbes in defense is available. In addition to providing an overview of the known defensive animal-microbe symbioses, we aim to derive general patterns on the chemistry, ecology, and evolution of such associations.

  5. An Evolutionarily Conserved PLC-PKD-TFEB Pathway for Host Defense.

    PubMed

    Najibi, Mehran; Labed, Sid Ahmed; Visvikis, Orane; Irazoqui, Javier Elbio

    2016-05-24

    The mechanisms that tightly control the transcription of host defense genes have not been fully elucidated. We previously identified TFEB as a transcription factor important for host defense, but the mechanisms that regulate TFEB during infection remained unknown. Here, we used C. elegans to discover a pathway that activates TFEB during infection. Gene dkf-1, which encodes a homolog of protein kinase D (PKD), was required for TFEB activation in nematodes infected with Staphylococcus aureus. Conversely, pharmacological activation of PKD was sufficient to activate TFEB. Furthermore, phospholipase C (PLC) gene plc-1 was also required for TFEB activation, downstream of Gαq homolog egl-30 and upstream of dkf-1. Using reverse and chemical genetics, we discovered a similar PLC-PKD-TFEB axis in Salmonella-infected mouse macrophages. In addition, PKCα was required in macrophages. These observations reveal a previously unknown host defense signaling pathway, which has been conserved across one billion years of evolution.

  6. The chemistry of defense: theory and practice.

    PubMed Central

    Berenbaum, M R

    1995-01-01

    Defensive chemicals used by organisms for protection against potential consumers are generally products of secondary metabolism. Such chemicals are characteristic of free-living organisms with a limited range of movement or limited control over their movements. Despite the fact that chemical defense is widespread among animals as well as plants, the vast majority of theories advanced to account for patterns of allocation of energy and materials to defensive chemistry derive exclusively from studies of plant-herbivore interactions. Many such theories place an undue emphasis on primary physiological processes that are unique to plants (e.g., photosynthesis), rendering such theories limited in their utility or predictive power. The general failure of any single all-encompassing theory to gain acceptance to date may indicate that such a theory might not be a biologically realistic expectation. In lieu of refining theory, focusing attention on the genetic and biochemical mechanisms that underlie chemical defense allocation is likely to provide greater insights into understanding patterns across taxa. In particular, generalizations derived from understanding such mechanisms in natural systems have immediate applications in altering patterns of human use of natural and synthetic chemicals for pest control. PMID:7816816

  7. Department of Defense annual report, Fiscal Year 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-02-01

    Contents include: foundations of defense policy; threats to US security objectives; US defense strategy; conventional capabilities required to implement our military strategy; role of nuclear weapons in US strategy; the defense budget; management; manpower; industrial responsiveness; land forces; naval forces; tactical air force; North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) programs; rapid deployment forces; mobility forces; nuclear forces; deterrence of chemical warfare; command, control, communications, and intelligence (c3i); mobilization; research, development, test, and evaluation; materiel readiness, sustainability, and other logistics; and security assistance.

  8. Case series on defense mechanisms in patients for reconstructive hand transplantation: consideration on transplant defense concept.

    PubMed

    Kumnig, Martin; Jowsey, Sheila G; Moreno, Elisa; Brandacher, Gerald; Azari, Kodi; Rumpold, Gerhard

    2014-05-16

    The technical demands of reconstructive hand transplantation (RHT) and need for complex multidisciplinary care have led to intense research efforts to improve patient care and outcomes. However, RHT is an extraordinary life event which carries the potential for long-term consequences including psychological distress, which invokes coping and defense mechanisms. Little is known about the relationship between psychological defense mechanisms and health outcomes in RHT patients. In an effort to elucidate this relationship, we studied seven RHT patients who underwent standardized psychological assessment either pre- or post transplantation. No single defense concept was identified as common to all patients, which we suspect was due in part to the varied mechanisms of hand loss. All seven patients demonstrated diverse psychological reactions to RHT. The self-reported defense styles were associated with psychological adjustment. The patients who reported defenses that distorted reality described less adaptive functioning and psychological well-being. These preliminary findings reveal the varied psychological mechanisms invoked in RHT patients. An assessment of defense mechanisms should be part of multicenter evaluation protocols that address unique psychosocial aspects of RHT in large samples, in order to better guide psychological management.

  9. Macroevolutionary patterns of glucosinolate defense and tests of defense-escalation and resource availability hypotheses.

    PubMed

    Cacho, N Ivalú; Kliebenstein, Daniel J; Strauss, Sharon Y

    2015-11-01

    We explored macroevolutionary patterns of plant chemical defense in Streptanthus (Brassicaceae), tested for evolutionary escalation of defense, as predicted by Ehrlich and Raven's plant-herbivore coevolutionary arms-race hypothesis, and tested whether species inhabiting low-resource or harsh environments invest more in defense, as predicted by the resource availability hypothesis (RAH). We conducted phylogenetically explicit analyses using glucosinolate profiles, soil nutrient analyses, and microhabitat bareness estimates across 30 species of Streptanthus inhabiting varied environments and soils. We found weak to moderate phylogenetic signal in glucosinolate classes and no signal in total glucosinolate production; a trend toward evolutionary de-escalation in the numbers and diversity of glucosinolates, accompanied by an evolutionary increase in the proportion of aliphatic glucosinolates; some support for the RAH relative to soil macronutrients, but not relative to serpentine soil use; and that the number of glucosinolates increases with microhabitat bareness, which is associated with increased herbivory and drought. Weak phylogenetic signal in chemical defense has been observed in other plant systems. A more holistic approach incorporating other forms of defense might be necessary to confidently reject escalation of defense. That defense increases with microhabitat bareness supports the hypothesis that habitat bareness is an underappreciated selective force on plants in harsh environments. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  10. Quadrennial Defense Review Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-01

    Roles of Military Power 9  U.S. Defense Objectives 11  REBALANCING THE FORCE 17  Defend the United States and Support Civil Authorities at Home 18...the need to plan for the broadest possible range of operations—from homeland defense and defense support to civil authorities, to deterrence and...Defend the United States and support civil authorities at home: The rapid proliferation of destructive technologies, combined with potent

  11. Does Pictorial Elucidation Foster Recollection of Idioms?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boers, Frank; Piquer Piriz, Ana Maria; Stengers, Helene; Eyckmans, June

    2009-01-01

    Experimental evidence suggests that pictorial elucidation helps learners comprehend and remember the meaning of second language (L2) idioms. In this article we address the question whether it also helps retention of the form of idioms, i.e. their precise lexical composition. In a small-scale experiment, the meaning of English idioms was clarified…

  12. Does Pictorial Elucidation Foster Recollection of Idioms?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boers, Frank; Piquer Piriz, Ana Maria; Stengers, Helene; Eyckmans, June

    2009-01-01

    Experimental evidence suggests that pictorial elucidation helps learners comprehend and remember the meaning of second language (L2) idioms. In this article we address the question whether it also helps retention of the form of idioms, i.e. their precise lexical composition. In a small-scale experiment, the meaning of English idioms was clarified…

  13. Elucidation of wear mechanisms by ferrographic analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The use of ferrographic analysis in conjunction with light and scanning electron microscopy is described for the elucidation of wear mechanisms taking place in operating equipment. Example of adhesive wear, abrasive wear, corrosive wear, rolling element fatigue, lubricant breakdown, and other wear modes are illustrated. In addition, the use of magnetic solutions to precipitate nonmagnetic debris from aqueous and nonaqueous fluids is described.

  14. Elucidating the molecular responses of apple rootstock resistant to ARD pathogens: challenges and opportunities for development of genomics-assisted breeding tools.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yanmin; Fazio, Gennaro; Mazzola, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Apple replant disease (ARD) is a major limitation to the establishment of economically viable orchards on replant sites due to the buildup and long-term survival of pathogen inoculum. Several soilborne necrotrophic fungi and oomycetes are primarily responsible for ARD, and symptoms range from serious inhibition of growth to the death of young trees. Chemical fumigation has been the primary method used for control of ARD, and manipulating soil microbial ecology to reduce pathogen density and aggressiveness is being investigated. To date, innate resistance of apple rootstocks as a means to control this disease has not been carefully explored, partly due to the complex etiology and the difficulty in phenotyping the disease resistance. Molecular defense responses of plant roots to soilborne necrotrophic pathogens are largely elusive, although considerable progress has been achieved using foliar disease systems. Plant defense responses to necrotrophic pathogens consist of several interacting modules and operate as a network. Upon pathogen detection by plants, cellular signals such as the oscillation of Ca(2+) concentration, reactive oxygen species (ROS) burst and protein kinase activity, lead to plant hormone biosynthesis and signaling. Jasmonic acid (JA) and ethylene (ET) are known to be fundamental to the induction and regulation of defense mechanisms toward invading necrotrophic pathogens. Complicated hormone crosstalk modulates the fine-tuning of transcriptional reprogramming and metabolic redirection, resulting in production of antimicrobial metabolites, enzyme inhibitors and cell wall refortification to restrict further pathogenesis. Transcriptome profiling of apple roots in response to inoculation with Pythium ultimum demonstrated that there is a high degree of conservation regarding the molecular framework of defense responses compared with those observed with foliar tissues. It is conceivable that the timing and intensity of genotype-specific defense responses

  15. Elucidating the molecular responses of apple rootstock resistant to ARD pathogens: challenges and opportunities for development of genomics-assisted breeding tools

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yanmin; Fazio, Gennaro; Mazzola, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Apple replant disease (ARD) is a major limitation to the establishment of economically viable orchards on replant sites due to the buildup and long-term survival of pathogen inoculum. Several soilborne necrotrophic fungi and oomycetes are primarily responsible for ARD, and symptoms range from serious inhibition of growth to the death of young trees. Chemical fumigation has been the primary method used for control of ARD, and manipulating soil microbial ecology to reduce pathogen density and aggressiveness is being investigated. To date, innate resistance of apple rootstocks as a means to control this disease has not been carefully explored, partly due to the complex etiology and the difficulty in phenotyping the disease resistance. Molecular defense responses of plant roots to soilborne necrotrophic pathogens are largely elusive, although considerable progress has been achieved using foliar disease systems. Plant defense responses to necrotrophic pathogens consist of several interacting modules and operate as a network. Upon pathogen detection by plants, cellular signals such as the oscillation of Ca2+ concentration, reactive oxygen species (ROS) burst and protein kinase activity, lead to plant hormone biosynthesis and signaling. Jasmonic acid (JA) and ethylene (ET) are known to be fundamental to the induction and regulation of defense mechanisms toward invading necrotrophic pathogens. Complicated hormone crosstalk modulates the fine-tuning of transcriptional reprogramming and metabolic redirection, resulting in production of antimicrobial metabolites, enzyme inhibitors and cell wall refortification to restrict further pathogenesis. Transcriptome profiling of apple roots in response to inoculation with Pythium ultimum demonstrated that there is a high degree of conservation regarding the molecular framework of defense responses compared with those observed with foliar tissues. It is conceivable that the timing and intensity of genotype-specific defense responses

  16. 22 CFR 130.4 - Defense articles and defense services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Defense articles and defense services. 130.4 Section 130.4 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS POLITICAL CONTRIBUTIONS, FEES AND COMMISSIONS § 130.4 Defense articles and defense services. Defense articles and...

  17. 22 CFR 130.4 - Defense articles and defense services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Defense articles and defense services. 130.4 Section 130.4 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS POLITICAL CONTRIBUTIONS, FEES AND COMMISSIONS § 130.4 Defense articles and defense services. Defense articles and...

  18. 22 CFR 130.4 - Defense articles and defense services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Defense articles and defense services. 130.4 Section 130.4 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS POLITICAL CONTRIBUTIONS, FEES AND COMMISSIONS § 130.4 Defense articles and defense services. Defense articles and...

  19. 22 CFR 130.4 - Defense articles and defense services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Defense articles and defense services. 130.4 Section 130.4 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS POLITICAL CONTRIBUTIONS, FEES AND COMMISSIONS § 130.4 Defense articles and defense services. Defense articles and...

  20. 22 CFR 130.4 - Defense articles and defense services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Defense articles and defense services. 130.4 Section 130.4 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS POLITICAL CONTRIBUTIONS, FEES AND COMMISSIONS § 130.4 Defense articles and defense services. Defense articles and...

  1. Technologies for Distributed Defense

    SciTech Connect

    Seiders, Barbara AB; Rybka, Anthony J.

    2002-07-01

    For Americans, the nature of warfare changed on September 11, 2001. Our national security henceforth will require distributed defense. One extreme of distributed defense is represented by fully deployed military troops responding to a threat from a hostile nation state. At the other extreme is a country of "citizen soldiers," with families and communities securing their common defense through heightened awareness, engagement as good neighbors, and local support of and cooperation with local law enforcement, emergency and health care providers. Technologies - for information exploitation, biological agent detection, health care surveillance, and security - will be critical to ensuring success in distributed defense.

  2. Technologies for distributed defense

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seiders, Barbara; Rybka, Anthony

    2002-07-01

    For Americans, the nature of warfare changed on September 11, 2001. Our national security henceforth will require distributed defense. One extreme of distributed defense is represented by fully deployed military troops responding to a threat from a hostile nation state. At the other extreme is a country of 'citizen soldiers', with families and communities securing their common defense through heightened awareness, engagement as good neighbors, and local support of and cooperation with local law enforcement, emergency and health care providers. Technologies - for information exploitation, biological agent detection, health care surveillance, and security - will be critical to ensuring success in distributed defense.

  3. Dynamic defense workshop :

    SciTech Connect

    Crosby, Sean Michael; Doak, Justin E.; Haas, Jason Juedes.; Helinski, Ryan; Lamb, Christopher C.

    2013-02-01

    On September 5th and 6th, 2012, the Dynamic Defense Workshop: From Research to Practice brought together researchers from academia, industry, and Sandia with the goals of increasing collaboration between Sandia National Laboratories and external organizations, de ning and un- derstanding dynamic, or moving target, defense concepts and directions, and gaining a greater understanding of the state of the art for dynamic defense. Through the workshop, we broadened and re ned our de nition and understanding, identi ed new approaches to inherent challenges, and de ned principles of dynamic defense. Half of the workshop was devoted to presentations of current state-of-the-art work. Presentation topics included areas such as the failure of current defenses, threats, techniques, goals of dynamic defense, theory, foundations of dynamic defense, future directions and open research questions related to dynamic defense. The remainder of the workshop was discussion, which was broken down into sessions on de ning challenges, applications to host or mobile environments, applications to enterprise network environments, exploring research and operational taxonomies, and determining how to apply scienti c rigor to and investigating the eld of dynamic defense.

  4. Silicon-inducible defenses of Zinnia elegans against Myzus persicae

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Several examples exist of silicon (Si) amendment inducing plant chemical defenses against plant pathogens, but few studies have focused on Si-induced defenses against phloem-feeding herbivores. The current study examined Si treatment of Zinnia elegans Jacq. cv. Oklahoma White (Compositae) on the pe...

  5. Dexterity Testing of Chemical Defense Gloves.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-05-01

    Ij.’" ing the Nomex overglove, probably due in large part to a decrease in mobility caused by wearing three layers of gloves. Of the three remaining...upper ranges of * ’ the size distribution, which probably explains why no large gloves were selected. Since this study was concerned with differences...Crotch 3 Nelgh: ____ ____ Digit 4 Girt base _____ ____ Crotch 4. Haigh : ____ ____ Digit 4 Cirt hlr _____ ____ Digit I Leogt, ____ __ Digit 5 Girc base

  6. Stress, Chemical Defense Agents and Cholinergic Receptors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-07-31

    Binding: Binding of [3H]-QNB, [3 H]-N-methylscopolamine (NMS), [3H]-oxotre- modne-M (OX), [3H]- pirenzepine (PZ), was conducted using techniques similar...Relative binding densities were progressively rated on a scale of 0 to +++, based on the respective binding of 2 nM [3 H]- pirenzepine (Mi) or 2 nM [3 H

  7. Stress, Chemical Defense Agents and Cholinergic Receptors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-11-30

    permitted to avoid a comparable 1 -mA scrambled footshock in the chamber by reaching the safe platform within 10 sec of being placed in the apparatus. For...rate constant h was compared for the incorporation into and decline in specl.ic 3ctlvities of choline and ACh (see Smith et al., 1984a; tac’gni et al...to detect cholinergic function was assessed (Table 2). When compared with controls (no CS presentation), rats which had been exposed to the CS

  8. Nature's chemicals and synthetic chemicals: comparative toxicology.

    PubMed Central

    Ames, B N; Profet, M; Gold, L S

    1990-01-01

    The toxicology of synthetic chemicals is compared to that of natural chemicals, which represent the vast bulk of the chemicals to which humans are exposed. It is argued that animals have a broad array of inducible general defenses to combat the changing array of toxic chemicals in plant food (nature's pesticides) and that these defenses are effective against both natural and synthetic toxins. Synthetic toxins such as dioxin are compared to natural chemicals, such as indole carbinol (in broccoli) and ethanol. Trade-offs between synthetic and natural pesticides are discussed. The finding that in high-dose tests, a high proportion of both natural and synthetic chemicals are carcinogens, mutagens, teratogens, and clastogens (30-50% for each group) undermines current regulatory efforts to protect public health from synthetic chemicals based on these tests. PMID:2217211

  9. Nature's chemicals and synthetic chemicals: Comparative toxicology

    SciTech Connect

    Ames, B.N.; Profet, M.; Gold, L.S. )

    1990-10-01

    The toxicology of synthetic chemicals is compared to that of natural chemicals, which represent the vast bulk of the chemicals to which humans are exposed. It is argued that animals have a broad array of inducible general defenses to combat the changing array of toxic chemicals in plant food (nature's pesticides) and that these defenses are effective against both natural and synthetic toxins. Synthetic toxins such as dioxin are compared to natural chemicals, such as indole carbinol (in broccoli) and ethanol. Trade-offs between synthetic and natural pesticides are discussed. The finding that in high-dose tests, a high proportion of both natural and synthetic chemicals are carcinogens, mutagens, teratogens, and clastogens (30-50{percent} for each group) undermines current regulatory efforts to protect public health from synthetic chemicals based on these tests.

  10. Defense Mechanisms: A Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedrini, D. T.; Pedrini, Bonnie C.

    This bibliography includes studies of defense mechanisms, in general, and studies of multiple mechanisms. Defense mechanisms, briefly and simply defined, are the unconscious ego defendants against unpleasure, threat, or anxiety. Sigmund Freud deserves the clinical credit for studying many mechanisms and introducing them in professional literature.…

  11. Schools and Civil Defense.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Civil Defense (DOD), Washington, DC.

    Civil defense is a planned, coordinated action to protect the population during any emergency whether arising from thermonuclear attack or natural disaster. The Federal Government has assumed four responsibilities--(1) to keep track of the nature of the threat which the civil defense program must meet, (2) to prepare and disseminate information…

  12. Forgiveness and Defense Style

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maltby, John; Day, Liz

    2004-01-01

    Within the literature on the psychology of forgiveness, researchers have hypothesized that the 1st stage in the process of being able to forgive is the role of psychological defense. To examine such a hypothesis, the authors explored the relationship between forgiveness and defense style. The 304 respondents (151 men, 153 women) completed measures…

  13. Mechanisms of plant defense against insect herbivores

    PubMed Central

    War, Abdul Rashid; Paulraj, Michael Gabriel; Ahmad, Tariq; Buhroo, Abdul Ahad; Hussain, Barkat; Ignacimuthu, Savarimuthu; Sharma, Hari Chand

    2012-01-01

    Plants respond to herbivory through various morphological, biochemicals, and molecular mechanisms to counter/offset the effects of herbivore attack. The biochemical mechanisms of defense against the herbivores are wide-ranging, highly dynamic, and are mediated both by direct and indirect defenses. The defensive compounds are either produced constitutively or in response to plant damage, and affect feeding, growth, and survival of herbivores. In addition, plants also release volatile organic compounds that attract the natural enemies of the herbivores. These strategies either act independently or in conjunction with each other. However, our understanding of these defensive mechanisms is still limited. Induced resistance could be exploited as an important tool for the pest management to minimize the amounts of insecticides used for pest control. Host plant resistance to insects, particularly, induced resistance, can also be manipulated with the use of chemical elicitors of secondary metabolites, which confer resistance to insects. By understanding the mechanisms of induced resistance, we can predict the herbivores that are likely to be affected by induced responses. The elicitors of induced responses can be sprayed on crop plants to build up the natural defense system against damage caused by herbivores. The induced responses can also be engineered genetically, so that the defensive compounds are constitutively produced in plants against are challenged by the herbivory. Induced resistance can be exploited for developing crop cultivars, which readily produce the inducible response upon mild infestation, and can act as one of components of integrated pest management for sustainable crop production. PMID:22895106

  14. The biocontrol agent Pseudomonas chlororaphis PA23 primes Brassica napus defenses through distinct gene networks.

    PubMed

    Duke, Kelly A; Becker, Michael G; Girard, Ian J; Millar, Jenna L; Dilantha Fernando, W G; Belmonte, Mark F; de Kievit, Teresa R

    2017-06-19

    The biological control agent Pseudomonas chlororaphis PA23 is capable of protecting Brassica napus (canola) from the necrotrophic fungus Sclerotinia sclerotiorum via direct antagonism. While we have elucidated bacterial genes and gene products responsible biocontrol, little is known about how the host plant responds to bacterial priming on the leaf surface, including global changes in gene activity in the presence and absence of S. sclerotiorum. Application of PA23 to the aerial surfaces of canola plants reduced the number of S. sclerotiorum lesion-forming petals by 91.1%. RNA sequencing of the host pathogen interface showed that pretreatment with PA23 reduced the number of genes upregulated in response to S. sclerotiorum by 16-fold. By itself, PA23 activated unique defense networks indicative of defense priming. Genes encoding MAMP-triggered immunity receptors detecting flagellin and peptidoglycan were downregulated in PA23 only-treated plants, consistent with post-stimulus desensitization. Downstream, we observed reactive oxygen species (ROS) production involving low levels of H2O2 and overexpression of genes associated with glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P)-mediated systemic acquired resistance (SAR). Leaf chloroplasts exhibited increased thylakoid membrane structures and chlorophyll content, while lipid metabolic processes were upregulated. In addition to directly antagonizing S. sclerotiorum, PA23 primes the plant defense response through induction of unique local and systemic defense networks. This study provides novel insight into the effects of biocontrol agents applied to the plant phyllosphere. Understanding these interactions will aid in the development of biocontrol systems as an alternative to chemical pesticides for protection of important crop systems.

  15. 48 CFR 18.202 - Defense or recovery from certain attacks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Defense or recovery from... 18.202 Defense or recovery from certain attacks. (a) Micro-purchase threshold. The threshold... defense against or recovery from nuclear, biological, chemical, or radiological attack. (See 2.101.)...

  16. 48 CFR 18.202 - Defense or recovery from certain attacks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Defense or recovery from... 18.202 Defense or recovery from certain attacks. (a) Micro-purchase threshold. The threshold... defense against or recovery from nuclear, biological, chemical, or radiological attack. (See 2.101.) (b...

  17. Isolation and structural elucidation of acidic terpenoid phytoalexins in maize and their interactions with Aspergillus flavus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Plants use a variety of physical and chemical defenses in response to herbivory and pathogen attack. Infection of maize by the fungal pathogen Aspergillus flavus results in the accumulation of aflatoxins, which are among the most detrimental biogenic substances known to man. The majority of maize de...

  18. Defense and the Economy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    AD A 66 28 o’py 9of 27 copiesII AD-A266 288-co, .o,,,, I IDA PAPER P-28 10I * DEFENSE AND THE ECONOMY David R. Graham An-Jen Tai Barbara A...TYPE AND DATES COVERED January 1993 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE S. FUNDING NUMBERS Defense and the Economy C-MDA 903 89C 0003i...Fomr 298 (Rev 2-4g) 3Preserked by ANSI Sid, Z39- 2I0 I I I IDA PAPER P-2810() 3 DEFENSE AND THE ECONOMY I I David R. Graham An-Jen Tai Barbara A

  19. The 1987 defense budget

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, J.M.

    1986-01-01

    The Brookings annual analysis of the defense budget is designed to identify critical national security issues facing the country, to clarify choices that must be made in allocating resources, and to encourage informed public debate. This volume examines the Reagan administration's 1987 budget and associated multi-year plan for defense. It is also part of a long-range effort at Brookings to use dynamic campaign analysis to address more explicitly and in greater detail the full scope of force planning and defense budgeting issues.

  20. The 1988 defense budget

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    The Brookings annual analysis of the defense budget is designed to identify critical national security issues facing the country, to clarify choices that must be made in allocating resources, and to encourage informed public debate. Like its predecessors, this volume critically examines the Reagan administration's 1988 budget and associated multi-year plan for defense. It is part of a long-range effort at Brookings to use dynamic campaign analysis to address more explicitly and in greater detail the full scope of force planning and defense budgeting issues.

  1. Missile defense and strategic stability: Terminal High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) in South Korea

    DOE PAGES

    Sankaran, Jaganath; Fearey, Bryan L.

    2017-02-06

    South Korea is threatened by its troubled relationship with North Korea. North Korea possesses a large cache of missiles as well as chemical and biological weapons, and the future potential to mount nuclear weapons on its missiles. The United States is also challenged because of its defense commitments to Seoul. As a countermeasure, the United States and South Korea decided to deploy Terminal High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) missile defenses in South Korea. However, China has objected. Chinese scholars believe the THAAD radar would be able to track Chinese inter-continental ballistic missiles, thereby weakening their deterrent. A technical analysis doesmore » not support this assertion. But, it is vital for South Korea, given its proximity and economic interdependence, to reassure China. The United States Forces Korea will deploy THAD and that is not a commitment by Seoul to become part of U.S.-led missile defenses in the Asia-Pacific.« less

  2. An empirical study of defensive avoidance in paranoia.

    PubMed

    Moutoussis, Michael; El-Deredy, Wael; Bentall, Richard P

    2015-03-01

    There is controversy as to whether psychological defensive avoidance is associated with paranoia. To elucidate whether "Poor-me" paranoid patients, who believe that the persecution they perceive is undeserved, show more prominent avoidance of negative thoughts about themselves than healthy and clinical controls. The act of avoidance of aversive mental contents was assessed in 27 healthy controls and 48 patients with poor-me, bad-me (perceived to be deserved) or no paranoia. Defensive avoidance was assessed via established questionnaires, a novel task based on self-discrepancy theory and research-clinician ratings. Participants in all groups showed substantial levels of verbal defensive avoidance. Paranoia was associated with reduced self-reported tolerance of negative mental contents (high Experiential Avoidance, EA). Contrary to our hypotheses, poor-me and bad-me patients showed similar EA. All participant groups showed similar levels of verbal defensive avoidance. The findings do not support an association of psychological avoidance with paranoia.

  3. Elucidation of SESANS correlation functions through model

    SciTech Connect

    Shew, Chwen-Yang; Chen, Wei-Ren

    2012-01-01

    Several single-modal Debye correlation functions are closely examined to elucidate the behavior of their corresponding SESANS (Spin Echo Small Angle Neutron Scattering) correlation functions. We nd that the upper bound of a Debye correlation function and of its SESANS correlation func- tion is identical. For discrete Debye correlation functions, the peak of SESANS correlation function emerges at their rst discrete point, whereas for continuous Debye correlation functions with greater width, the peak position shifts to a greater value. In both cases, the intensity and shape of the peak of the SESANS correlation function are determined by the width of the normalized Debye correlation functions. In the application, we mimic the intramolecular and intermolecular Debye correlation functions of liquids composed of interacting particles by using the simple models to elucidate their competition in the SESANS correlation function. Our calculations show that the position of the rst minimum of SESANS correlation function shifts to a smaller value as inter- molecular attraction or correlation is enhanced. The minimum value can be positive or negative, and the positive values are observed for the cases equivalent to stronger intermolecular attraction, consistent with literature results based on more sophisticated liquid state theory and simulations.

  4. Elucidating novel disease mechanisms in severe asthma

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Richard Y; Rae, Brittany; Neal, Rachel; Donovan, Chantal; Pinkerton, James; Balachandran, Lohis; Starkey, Malcolm R; Knight, Darryl A; Horvat, Jay C; Hansbro, Philip M

    2016-01-01

    Corticosteroids are broadly active and potent anti-inflammatory agents that, despite the introduction of biologics, remain as the mainstay therapy for many chronic inflammatory diseases, including inflammatory bowel diseases, nephrotic syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma. Significantly, there are cohorts of these patients with poor sensitivity to steroid treatment even with high doses, which can lead to many iatrogenic side effects. The dose-limiting toxicity of corticosteroids, and the lack of effective therapeutic alternatives, leads to substantial excess morbidity and healthcare expenditure. We have developed novel murine models of respiratory infection-induced, severe, steroid-resistant asthma that recapitulate the hallmark features of the human disease. These models can be used to elucidate novel disease mechanisms and identify new therapeutic targets in severe asthma. Hypothesis-driven studies can elucidate the roles of specific factors and pathways. Alternatively, 'Omics approaches can be used to rapidly generate new targets. Similar approaches can be used in other diseases. PMID:27525064

  5. Joint Defense Capabilities Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-12-01

    program does not best meet Joint needs, or provide the best value for the nation’s defense investment. Capabilities-Based Process The Study Team...planning function integrates the highly related logistics support functions of supply, maintenance, and transportation . In addition, current logistics...strengthens the role of the Defense Logistics Executive (DLE) as the single Logistics Global Supply Chain Manager with oversight and decision authority

  6. Cyber Defense Management

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    increase averaging more than 30 percent from the previous year.2 This mayreduce “ papering over” the security problem.Within DoD, the standup of United...acrossthe services, especially the Navy.3 The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) CyberGrand Challenge has created a number of...role in developing these models. Some promising research in the DSB TASK FORCE ON CYBER DEFENSE EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 17 Office of the Deputy Assistant

  7. DEFENSE INDUSTRY PROFIT REVIEW

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The Department of Defense (DoD) must employ contracting policies and methods that create an environment for profit opportunities. Just where the... profit range should fall is a matter of judgment and a point on which there probably will always be disagreement. This report is intended to serve as a...partial basis for DoD management’s assessment of the adequacy of defense business profits , as part of their continuing evaluation of contracting policies and methods.

  8. 76 FR 28757 - Defense Logistics Agency Revised Regulation 1000.22, Environmental Considerations in Defense...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-18

    ... of the Secretary Defense Logistics Agency Revised Regulation 1000.22, Environmental Considerations in Defense Logistics Agency Actions AGENCY: Defense Logistics Agency, Department of Defense. ACTION: Notice of Availability (NOA) of Revised Defense Logistics Agency Regulation. SUMMARY: The Defense Logistics...

  9. 76 FR 28960 - Defense Intelligence Agency National Defense Intelligence College Board of Visitors Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-19

    ... of the Secretary Defense Intelligence Agency National Defense Intelligence College Board of Visitors Closed Meeting AGENCY: National Defense Intelligence College, Defense Intelligence Agency, Department of... a closed meeting of the Defense Intelligence Agency National Defense Intelligence College Board of...

  10. 75 FR 76423 - Defense Intelligence Agency National Defense Intelligence College Board of Visitors Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-08

    ... of the Secretary Defense Intelligence Agency National Defense Intelligence College Board of Visitors Closed Meeting AGENCY: National Defense Intelligence College, Defense Intelligence Agency, Department of... a closed meeting of the Defense Intelligence Agency National Defense Intelligence College Board of...

  11. Low Level Chemical Toxicity: Relevance to Chemical Agent Defense

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-01

    patients with Prader - Willi syndrome or Wolfram’s syndrome (Gabreels et al. 1994, 1998, Swaab et al. 1995). In this study, genetically modified mice...pro-vasopressin, then why are they not processed in humans with Prader - Willi syndrome or Wolfram’s syndrome? The most plausible explanation is substrate...or PC2 in mice based on structural specificity is strongly supported by the data presented here compared with the findings for Prader - Willi syndrome

  12. Defense Against Chemical Warfare Agents and Toxic Industrial Chemicals (TICS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-06-01

    therapeutics for neural dysfunction environment (multiple binding subsites and ligand disorders such as myasthenia gravis (MG), and various conformational...effort has been GOLD program °10 . A genetic algorithm was used in expended in delineating the precise interactions within the searching the binding...34Development and Validation of a Genetic Algorithm forexperimentally an Vaiato.. nti experimentally. Flexible Docking." J. Mol. Biol., 267, 1997, pp. 727

  13. National Missile Defense Contingency Deployment.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-01-01

    Defense Organization PMCS IDEA PAPER TITLE: National Missile Defense, Contingency Deployment Planning PMCS CLASS: 95C AUTHOR: Clifford E. Reeves... NATIONAL MISSILE DEFENSE CONTINGENCY DEPLOYMENT INTRODUCTION The author feels it is vital to start strategic planning for the development of operational...PROFESSIONAL MILITARY COMPTROLLER SCHOOL IDEA PAPER TITLE NATIONAL MISSILE DEFENSE CONTINGENCY DEPLOYMENT AUTHOR CLIFFORD E. REEVES GS-15, OSD

  14. Macroevolution of leaf defenses and secondary metabolites across the genus Helianthus.

    PubMed

    Mason, Chase M; Bowsher, Alan W; Crowell, Breanna L; Celoy, Rhodesia M; Tsai, Chung-Jui; Donovan, Lisa A

    2016-03-01

    Leaf defenses are widely recognized as key adaptations and drivers of plant evolution. Across environmentally diverse habitats, the macroevolution of leaf defenses can be predicted by the univariate trade-off model, which predicts that defenses are functionally redundant and thus trade off, and the resource availability hypothesis, which predicts that defense investment is determined by inherent growth rate and that higher defense will evolve in lower resource environments. Here, we examined the evolution of leaf physical and chemical defenses and secondary metabolites in relation to environmental characteristics and leaf economic strategy across 28 species of Helianthus (the sunflowers). Using a phylogenetic comparative approach, we found few evolutionary trade-offs among defenses and no evidence for defense syndromes. We also found that leaf defenses are strongly related to leaf economic strategy, with higher defense in more resource-conservative species, although there is little support for the evolution of higher defense in low-resource habitats. A wide variety of physical and chemical defenses predict resistance to different insect herbivores, fungal pathogens, and a parasitic plant, suggesting that most sunflower defenses are not redundant in function and that wild Helianthus represents a rich source of variation for the improvement of crop sunflower.

  15. Elucidating the pathway for arsenic methylation.

    PubMed

    Thomas, David J; Waters, Stephen B; Styblo, Miroslav

    2004-08-01

    Although biomethylation of arsenic has been studied for more than a century, unequivocal demonstration of the methylation of inorganic arsenic by humans occurred only about 30 years ago. Because methylation of inorganic arsenic activates it to more reactive and toxic forms, elucidating the pathway for the methylation of this metalloid is a topic of considerable importance. Understanding arsenic metabolism is of public health concern as millions of people chronically consume drinking water that contains high concentrations of inorganic arsenic. Hence, the focus of our research has been to elucidate the molecular basis of the steps in the pathway that leads from inorganic arsenic to methylated and dimethylated arsenicals. Here we describe a new S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet)-dependent methyltransferase from rat liver cytosol that catalyzes the conversion of arsenite to methylated and dimethylated species. This 42-kDa protein has sequence motifs common to many non-nucleic acid methyltransferases and is closely related to methyltransferases of previously unknown function that have been identified by conceptual translations of cyt19 genes of mouse and human genomes. Hence, we designate rat liver arsenic methyltransferase as cyt19 and suggest that orthologous cyt19 genes encode an arsenic methyltransferase in the mouse and human genomes. Our studies with recombinant rat cyt19 find that, in the presence of an exogenous or a physiological reductant, this protein can catalyze the entire sequence of reactions that convert arsenite to methylated metabolites. A scheme linking cyt19 and thioredoxin-thioredoxin reductase in the methylation and reduction of arsenicals is proposed.

  16. Moscow's defense intellectuals

    SciTech Connect

    Lambeth, B.S.

    1990-01-01

    This essay was originally written two decades ago as a seminar paper. A substantial portion of it addresses what were then only the first steps toward the establishment of a community of professional civilian defense analysts in the Soviet Union. Throughout most of the intervening period, that community found itself mired in immobilism as jurisdiction over such key Soviet national security inputs as military doctrine, force requirements, resource needs, and to a considerable degree, arms negotiating positions remained an exclusive prerogative of the Defense Ministry and the General Staff. Today, this former military monopoly has come to be challenged with increasing success by a host of newcomers to the Soviet defense scene, including the Foreign Ministry, the Supreme Soviet, and an ambitious cadre of civilian analysts attached to the social science research institutes of the Academy of Sciences. These individuals are making a determined bid for greater influence over Soviet defense policy, with the express encouragement of President Gorbachev and his supporters. The result has been an unprecedented infusion of pluralism into Soviet defense politics and a significant change in the content and goals of Soviet military policy.

  17. Sleep function: Toward elucidating an enigma.

    PubMed

    Krueger, James M; Frank, Marcos G; Wisor, Jonathan P; Roy, Sandip

    2016-08-01

    Sleep function remains controversial. Individual perspectives frame the issue of sleep function differently. We briefly illustrate how sleep measurement and the evolution, tissue organization levels, molecular mechanisms, and regulation of sleep could influence one's view of sleep function. Then we discuss six viable theories of sleep function. Sleep serves host-defense mechanisms and conserves caloric expenditures, but these functions likely are opportunistic functions evolving later in evolution. That sleep replenishes brain energy stores and that sleep serves a glymphatic function by removing toxic byproducts of waking activity are attractive ideas, but lack extensive supporting experimental evidence. That sleep restores performance is experimentally demonstrated and has obvious evolutionary value. However, this hypothesis lacks experimentally verified mechanisms although ideas relating to this issue are presented. Finally, the ideas surrounding the broad hypothesis that sleep serves a connectivity/plasticity function are many and attractive. There is experimental evidence that connectivity changes with sleep, sleep loss, and with changing afferent input, and that those changes are linked to sleep regulatory mechanisms. In our view, this is the leading contender for the primordial function of sleep. However, much refinement of ideas and innovative experimental approaches are needed to clarify the sleep-connectivity relationship. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Defense against ballistic missiles

    SciTech Connect

    Mark, H. )

    1992-01-01

    A development history and development status evaluation is presented for weapons technologies capable of serving as defenses against nuclear-tipped ballistic missiles. The decisive turning-point in this history was the March 23, 1983 announcement by President Reagan of the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI). Due to President Reagan's emphasis on population protection, 'global' defense systems have tended to dominate SDI design efforts. The most important SDI technical achievements to date encompass (1) miniature homig devices, (2) the upgrade of the Patriot SAM for missile-interception capabilities, (3) light exoatmospheric projectiles, such as 'Brilliant Pebbles', (4) successful laser-communications experiments, and (5) the warhead/decoy-discriminating Firepond lidar system. 7 refs.

  19. Mitogenome sequence accuracy using different elucidation methods

    PubMed Central

    Velozo Timbó, Renata; Coiti Togawa, Roberto; M. C. Costa, Marcos; A. Andow, David

    2017-01-01

    Mitogenome sequences are highly desired because they are used in several biological disciplines. Their elucidation has been facilitated through the development of massive parallel sequencing, accelerating their deposition in public databases. However, sequencing, assembly and annotation methods might induce variability in their quality, raising concerns about the accuracy of the sequences that have been deposited in public databases. In this work we show that different sequencing methods (number of species pooled in a library, insert size and platform) and assembly and annotation methods generated variable completeness and similarity of the resulting mitogenome sequences, using three species of predaceous ladybird beetles as models. The identity of the sequences varied considerably depending on the method used and ranged from 38.19 to 90.1% for Cycloneda sanguinea, 72.85 to 91.06% for Harmonia axyridis and 41.15 to 93.60% for Hippodamia convergens. Dissimilarities were frequently found in the non-coding A+T rich region, but were also common in coding regions, and were not associated with low coverage. Mitogenome completeness and sequence identity were affected by the sequencing and assembly/annotation methods, and high within-species variation was also found for other mitogenome depositions in GenBank. This indicates a need for methods to confirm sequence accuracy, and guidelines for verifying mitogenomes should be discussed and developed by the scientific community. PMID:28662089

  20. Structural elucidation of rabeprazole sodium photodegradation products.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Cássia V; Nudelman, Norma S; Steppe, Martin; Schapoval, Elfrides E S

    2008-01-07

    Rabeprazole sodium is a proton pump inhibitor, used in acid-related disorders, like peptic ulcers and gastroesophageal reflux. It is known to be an acid-labile drug, however, few data about its stability under other factors are available. The aim of this work was to study the photodegradation of rabeprazole, to determine its kinetics and to elucidate the structures of the main degradation products. UVC-254 nm and metal-halide lamps were used. The analysis of the samples was carried out by HPLC. When the drug was in methanol solution, one main degradation product was formed; the degradation rate followed zero-order kinetics. The (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopic determinations revealed the product was the benzimidazolone. Another isolated product was identified as benzimidazole. The latter was confirmed against an authentic sample. A third photodegradation product was identified as the [4-(3-methoxy-propoxy)-3-methyl-pyridin-2-yl]methanol, by (1)H and (13)C NMR of the reaction mixture in chloroform-d. When powdered commercial tablets were exposed to UVC irradiation, they showed the same degradation products along with other unidentified, which appeared as traces; the degradation rate was slower than in solution. The intact tablets were stable after 50 days of exposition to the same light source.

  1. Costs and benefits of priming for defense in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    van Hulten, Marieke; Pelser, Maaike; van Loon, L C; Pieterse, Corné M J; Ton, Jurriaan

    2006-04-04

    Induced resistance protects plants against a wide spectrum of diseases; however, it can also entail costs due to the allocation of resources or toxicity of defensive products. The cellular defense responses involved in induced resistance are either activated directly or primed for augmented expression upon pathogen attack. Priming for defense may combine the advantages of enhanced disease protection and low costs. In this study, we have compared the costs and benefits of priming to those of induced direct defense in Arabidopsis. In the absence of pathogen infection, chemical priming by low doses of beta-aminobutyric acid caused minor reductions in relative growth rate and had no effect on seed production, whereas induction of direct defense by high doses of beta-aminobutyric acid or benzothiadiazole strongly affected both fitness parameters. These costs were defense-related, because the salicylic acid-insensitive defense mutant npr1-1 remained unaffected by these treatments. Furthermore, the constitutive priming mutant edr1-1 displayed only slightly lower levels of fitness than wild-type plants and performed considerably better than the constitutively activated defense mutant cpr1-1. Hence, priming involves less fitness costs than induced direct defense. Upon infection by Pseudomonas syringae or Hyaloperonospora parasitica, priming conferred levels of disease protection that almost equaled the protection in benzothiadiazole-treated wild-type plants and cpr1 plants. Under these conditions, primed plants displayed significantly higher levels of fitness than noninduced plants and plants expressing chemically or cpr1-induced direct defense. Collectively, our results indicate that the benefits of priming-mediated resistance outweigh the costs in environments in which disease occurs.

  2. 9. BASRELIEF DECORATION, 'DEFENSE', MURAL COMMEMORATING THE DEFENSE OF FORT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. BAS-RELIEF DECORATION, 'DEFENSE', MURAL COMMEMORATING THE DEFENSE OF FORT DEARBORN - Chicago River Bascule Bridge, Michigan Avenue, Spanning Chicago River at North Michigan Avenue, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  3. Defensive Traits in Young Pine Trees Cluster into Two Divergent Syndromes Related to Early Growth Rate.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Xoaquín; Sampedro, Luis; Zas, Rafael; Pearse, Ian S

    2016-01-01

    The combination of defensive traits leads to the evolution of 'plant defense syndromes' which should provide better protection against herbivores than individual traits on their own. Defense syndromes can be generally driven by plant phylogeny and/or biotic and abiotic factors. However, we lack a solid understanding of (i) the relative importance of shared evolution vs. convergence due to similar ecological conditions and (ii) the role of induced defense strategies in shaping defense syndromes. We investigate the relative roles of evolutionary and ecological factors shaping the deployment of pine defense syndromes including multiple constitutive and induced chemical defense traits. We performed a greenhouse experiment with seedlings of eighteen species of Pinaceae family, and measured plant growth rate, constitutive chemical defenses and their inducibility. Plant growth rate, but not phylogenetic relatedness, determined the deployment of two divergent syndromes. Slow-growing pine species living in harsh environments where tissue replacement is costly allocated more to constitutive defenses (energetically more costly to produce than induced). In contrast, fast-growing species living in resource-rich habitats had greater inducibility of their defenses, consistent with the theory of constitutive-induced defense trade-offs. This study contributes to a better understanding of evolutionary and ecological factors driving the deployment of defense syndromes.

  4. Defensive Traits in Young Pine Trees Cluster into Two Divergent Syndromes Related to Early Growth Rate

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, Xoaquín; Sampedro, Luis; Zas, Rafael; Pearse, Ian S.

    2016-01-01

    The combination of defensive traits leads to the evolution of ‘plant defense syndromes’ which should provide better protection against herbivores than individual traits on their own. Defense syndromes can be generally driven by plant phylogeny and/or biotic and abiotic factors. However, we lack a solid understanding of (i) the relative importance of shared evolution vs. convergence due to similar ecological conditions and (ii) the role of induced defense strategies in shaping defense syndromes. We investigate the relative roles of evolutionary and ecological factors shaping the deployment of pine defense syndromes including multiple constitutive and induced chemical defense traits. We performed a greenhouse experiment with seedlings of eighteen species of Pinaceae family, and measured plant growth rate, constitutive chemical defenses and their inducibility. Plant growth rate, but not phylogenetic relatedness, determined the deployment of two divergent syndromes. Slow-growing pine species living in harsh environments where tissue replacement is costly allocated more to constitutive defenses (energetically more costly to produce than induced). In contrast, fast-growing species living in resource-rich habitats had greater inducibility of their defenses, consistent with the theory of constitutive-induced defense trade-offs. This study contributes to a better understanding of evolutionary and ecological factors driving the deployment of defense syndromes. PMID:27028433

  5. Countering the Proliferation of Chemical Weapons

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    Preparedfor the Under Secretary of Defense for Policy Accesloni For NTIS CRA&i ADTIC TAB Unannounced 0 Justification. - _ BY Natil Defense Researh Institute...chemical-weapon capability served it well. The threat of chemical-weapon use by Iraq had severe psychological implications for its intended victims. But

  6. Defense Research Enterprise Assessment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-01-01

    COMMANDER, U.S. TRANSPORTATION COMMAND DIRECTOR, COST ASSESSMENT AND PROGRAM EVALUATION DIRECTOR, OPERA TI ON AL TEST AND EVALUATION ASSISTANT...environment in which the Labs operate. The Task Force concluded that in order to maintain and enhance the value proposition of the defense research...28 Enhanced Use Lease ...................................................................................................... 29

  7. Radiological Defense Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Civil Preparedness Agency (DOD), Washington, DC.

    Originally prepared for use as a student textbook in Radiological Defense (RADEF) courses, this manual provides the basic technical information necessary for an understanding of RADEF. It also briefly discusses the need for RADEF planning and expected postattack emergency operations. There are 14 chapters covering these major topics: introduction…

  8. Coeducational Self-Defense

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGrath, Alice; Tegner, Bruce

    1977-01-01

    Self-defense is a useful method for correcting stereotyped feelings of submissiveness and dominance for all age groups and both sexes, yet teachers must take into consideration the forms and strengths of these stereotypes at each age level in order to teach effectively. (MB)

  9. Defensive Federal Litigation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-08-20

    activities. Finally, a chapter concerning the personal liability of government official is included. 14. SUBJECT TERMS 15 . NUMBER OF PAGES Defensive Federal...4- 15 (1) Federal Tort Claim s A ct...4- 15 (2) Tucker A ct ................................................................................. 4- 15 (a) Scope of Tucker Act -- Absence

  10. Defense Language Institute.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Language Inst., Washington, DC.

    Discussed in this Defense Language Institute (DLI) brochure are its intensive language programs' history, and its four schools, which are located in Monterey, California, Washington, D.C., Lackland Air Force Base, and Fort Bliss, Texas. Proficiency levels determined by the DLI and utilization of the audiolingual method are also described.…

  11. Strategic Defense Initiative program

    SciTech Connect

    Conachan, F.C.

    1991-05-01

    This paper discusses the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI) program. It summarizes the major programmatic and technological lessons learned from the SDI program over the past 7 years. It provides information on: past uses of SDI funds, persistent optimism in planning and starting projects, evolution of SDI architecture, and accuracy of cost estimates.

  12. Robust Preallocated Preferential Defense.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-08-01

    Frye , W.H. and Ullman, L.L., Methodology for Calculating Minuteman Defense Effectiveness, SRD-EGI4, Stanford Research Institute, October 1973. 4. Hogg...Corporation 1500 Wilson Boulevard Arlington, VA 22209 ATTN: Dr. Tucker Battle Dr. James Skouras Dr. Iram Weinstein Northrop Corporation 8900 E. Washington

  13. Inter- and intraspecific comparisons of antiherbivore defenses in three species of rainforest understory shrubs.

    PubMed

    Fincher, R M; Dyer, L A; Dodson, C D; Richards, J L; Tobler, M A; Searcy, J; Mather, J E; Reid, A J; Rolig, J S; Pidcock, W

    2008-04-01

    Plants defend themselves against herbivores and pathogens with a suite of morphological, phenological, biochemical, and biotic defenses, each of which is presumably costly. The best studied are allocation costs that involve trade-offs in investment of resources to defense versus other plant functions. Decreases in growth or reproductive effort are the costs most often associated with antiherbivore defenses, but trade-offs among different defenses may also occur within a single plant species. We examined trade-offs among defenses in closely related tropical rain forest shrubs (Piper cenocladum, P. imperiale, and P. melanocladum) that possess different combinations of three types of defense: ant mutualists, secondary compounds, and leaf toughness. We also examined the effectiveness of different defenses and suites of defenses against the most abundant generalist and specialist Piper herbivores. For all species examined, leaf toughness was the most effective defense, with the toughest species, P. melanocladum, receiving the lowest incidence of total herbivory, and the least tough species, P. imperiale, receiving the highest incidence. Although variation in toughness within each species was substantial, there were no intraspecific relationships between toughness and herbivory. In other Piper studies, chemical and biotic defenses had strong intraspecific negative correlations with herbivory. A wide variety of defensive mechanisms was quantified in the three Piper species studied, ranging from low concentrations of chemical defenses in P. imperiale to a complex suite of defenses in P. cenocladum that includes ant mutualists, secondary metabolites, and moderate toughness. Ecological costs were evident for the array of defensive mechanisms within these Piper species, and the differences in defensive strategies among species may represent evolutionary trade-offs between costly defenses.

  14. 2007 Chemical Biological Information Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-11

    Keynote – Mr. Jean Reed, Special Assistant to the Secretary of Defense for Chemical and Biological Defense Programs 9:45AM – 10:30AM BREAK (Exhibit Area...a-SiO2 are important adsorbents – many other materials are based on a silicate or aluminosilicate chemical composition 2. Pinto and Elliott, Phys...2007 Tom Harris, C. Dougherty, J. Sontowski, SAIC (harrist@saic.com) Jacques Moussafir, Julien Commanay, ARIA Technologies (jmoussafir@aria.fr

  15. Elucidating the neurotoxicity of the star fruit.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Cairasco, Norberto; Moyses-Neto, Miguel; Del Vecchio, Flavio; Oliveira, José A C; dos Santos, Francisco L; Castro, Olagide W; Arisi, Gabriel M; Dantas, Márcio; Carolino, Ruither O G; Coutinho-Netto, Joaquim; Dagostin, Andre L A; Rodrigues, Marcelo C A; Leão, Ricardo M; Quintiliano, Samir A P; Silva, Luiz F; Gobbo-Neto, Leonardo; Lopes, Norberto P

    2013-12-02

    Caramboxin: Patients suffering from chronic kidney disease are frequently intoxicated after ingesting star fruit. The main symptoms of this intoxication are named in the picture. Bioguided chemical procedures resulted in the discovery of caramboxin, which is a phenylalanine-like molecule that is responsible for intoxication. Functional experiments in vivo and in vitro point towards the glutamatergic ionotropic molecular actions of caramboxin, which explains its convulsant and neurodegenerative properties. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Exploring plant defense theory in tall goldenrod, Solidago altissima.

    PubMed

    Heath, Jeremy J; Kessler, André; Woebbe, Eric; Cipollini, Don; Stireman, John O

    2014-06-01

    Understanding the evolutionary reasons for patterns of chemical defense in plants is an ongoing theoretical and empirical challenge. The goal is to develop a model that can reliably predict how defenses are distributed within the plant over space and time. This is difficult given that evolutionary, ecological, and physiological processes and tradeoffs can operate over different spatial and temporal scales. We evaluated the major predictions of two leading defense theories, the growth-differentiation balance hypothesis (GDBH) and optimal defense theory (ODT). To achieve this, enemies, fitness components, terpenoids, and protease inhibitors were measured in Solidago altissima and used to construct conventional univariate and structural equation models (SEMs). Leaf-tissue value indices extracted from an SEM revealed a strong correlation between tissue value and terpenoid defense that supports ODT. A tradeoff between serine protease inhibition and growth as well as an indirect tradeoff between growth and terpenoids manifested through galling insects supported the GDBH. Interestingly, there was a strong direct effect of terpenoids on rhizome mass, suggesting service to both storage and defense. The results support established theories but unknown genotypic traits explained much of the variation in defense, confirming the need to integrate emerging theories such as pollination constraints, defense syndromes, tolerance, mutualisms, and facilitation. © 2014 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2014 New Phytologist Trust.

  17. Defense Spending and the Economy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-12-07

    DEFENSE SPENDING AND THE ECONOMY Rudolph G. Penner Director Congressional Budget Office Before the Task Force on Economic Policy and Growth...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Defense Spending and the Economy 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER...Administration budgets have proposed even more defense spending and less nondefense spending than provided in the resolution. Additional emphasis on defense

  18. ION COMPOSITION ELUCIDATION (ICE): A HIGH ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Unidentified Organic Compounds. For target analytes, standards are purchased, extraction and clean-up procedures are optimized, and mass spectra and retention times for the chromatographic separation are obtained for comparison to the target compounds in environmental sample extracts. This is an efficient approach and selective extraction and clean-up can decrease detection limits for the target compounds relative to analyzing a raw extract containing compounds that yield mass interferences. But selection of a class of compounds for study ignores many potentially toxic compounds. All compounds should be considered, because even trace amounts of compounds found to be endocrine disrupting chemicals might influence embryonic development. Before the toxicology of the hundreds of compounds found in sewage treatment effluents and water reservoirs can be studied alone and in mixtures, they must first be identified. A given compound might be one of the 3800 high production volume chemicals used commercially, a human or microorganism metabolite of such a compound, a photochemical degradation, hydrolysis, or thermal decomposition product, a chlorination or ozonolysis byproduct for drinking water samples, or a naturally occurring compound. Numerous researchers targeting assorted classes of analytes could easily overlook or be unable to identify many of these compounds. Most non-targeted compounds will not be in mass spectral libraries and can seldom be tentatively identifi

  19. Sustaining The Defense Industrial Base

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-15

    responsive Defense Industrial Base for the next decade. The success of the Gulf War may erroneously suggest a capability to fight a protracted war or to...addresses the Defense Industrial Base . This study will present the objectives desired from the defense industrial base , the courses of action the Army

  20. Defense Industrial Base Policy: Revisited

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    In an era of decreasing defense budgets and enemy threats, problems associated with maintaining a healthy defense industrial base have become...and politicians have put forth a number of options to address the defense industrial base problem. The commercialization options include investments

  1. Defense on the Move: Ant-Based Cyber Defense

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, Glenn A.; Haack, Jereme N.; McKinnon, Archibald D.; Fulp, Errin W.

    2014-04-15

    Many common cyber defenses (like firewalls and IDS) are as static as trench warfare allowing the attacker freedom to probe them at will. The concept of Moving Target Defense (MTD) adds dynamism to the defender side, but puts the systems to be defended themselves in motion, potentially at great cost to the defender. An alternative approach is a mobile resilient defense that removes attackers’ ability to rely on prior experience without requiring motion in the protected infrastructure itself. The defensive technology absorbs most of the cost of motion, is resilient to attack, and is unpredictable to attackers. The Ant-Based Cyber Defense (ABCD) is a mobile resilient defense providing a set of roaming, bio-inspired, digital-ant agents working with stationary agents in a hierarchy headed by a human supervisor. The ABCD approach provides a resilient, extensible, and flexible defense that can scale to large, multi-enterprise infrastructures like the smart electric grid.

  2. Using Sensors and Generators of H2O2 to Elucidate the Toxicity Mechanism of Piperlongumine and Phenethyl Isothiocyanate.

    PubMed

    Huang, Beijing K; Langford, Troy F; Sikes, Hadley D

    2016-06-01

    Chemotherapeutics target vital functions that ensure survival of cancer cells, including their increased reliance on defense mechanisms against oxidative stress compared to normal cells. Many chemotherapeutics exploit this vulnerability to oxidative stress by elevating the levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). A quantitative understanding of the oxidants generated and how they induce toxicity will be important for effective implementation and design of future chemotherapeutics. Molecular tools that facilitate measurement and manipulation of individual chemical species within the context of the larger intracellular redox network present a means to develop this understanding. In this work, we demonstrate the use of such tools to elucidate the roles of H2O2 and glutathione (GSH) in the toxicity mechanism of two ROS-based chemotherapeutics, piperlongumine and phenethyl isothiocyanate. Depletion of GSH as a result of treatment with these compounds is not an important part of the toxicity mechanisms of these drugs and does not lead to an increase in the intracellular H2O2 level. Measuring peroxiredoxin-2 (Prx-2) oxidation as evidence of increased H2O2, only piperlongumine treatment shows elevation and it is GSH independent. Using a combination of a sensor (HyPer) along with a generator (D-amino acid oxidase) to monitor and mimic the drug-induced H2O2 production, it is determined that H2O2 produced during piperlongumine treatment acts synergistically with the compound to cause enhanced cysteine oxidation and subsequent toxicity. The importance of H2O2 elevation in the mechanism of piperlongumine promotes a hypothesis of why certain cells, such as A549, are more resistant to the drug than others. The approach described herein sheds new light on the previously proposed mechanism of these two ROS-based chemotherapeutics and advocates for the use of both sensors and generators of specific oxidants to isolate their effects. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 24, 924-938.

  3. New technologies for elucidating opioid receptor function

    PubMed Central

    Bruchas, Michael R.; Roth, Bryan L.

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in technology, including high resolution crystal structures of opioid receptors, novel chemical tools, and new genetic approaches have provided an unparalleled pallette of tools for deconstructing opioid receptor actions in vitro and in vivo. Here we provide a brief description of our understanding of opioid receptor function from both molecular and atomic perspectives, as well as their role in neural circuits in vivo. We then show how insights into the molecular details of opioid actions can facilitate the creation of functionally-selective (biased) and photoswitchable opioid ligands. Finally, we describe how newly engineered opioid receptor-based chemo- and optogenetic tools, and new mouse lines are expanding and transforming our understanding of opioid function and, perhaps, paving the way for new therapeutics. PMID:26833118

  4. Natural host defense mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Heggers, J P

    1979-10-01

    Severe injury, whether the result of a major accident, a large burn, or a complicated surgical operation, often results in sepsis. Under such conditions both specific and nonspecific host defense systems are affected. The individual facets of major concern are chemotaxis, phagocytosis, intracellular killing, complement depletion, and depression of humoral and cellular mediated immunity. The most profound changes occur in cell-mediated immunity. Within a few hours o injury, the number of circulating T cells becomes depleted, concomitantly thoracic duct lymphocytes are markedly reduced. This change is not only quantitative but functional. The clinical impact of these deficient host defense mechanisms lies in the fact that low virulent organisms may become a lethal threat to the injured patient. Currently, investigators are attempting to reverse thse deficiencies through the use of immunotherapy.

  5. Avian host defense peptides.

    PubMed

    Cuperus, Tryntsje; Coorens, Maarten; van Dijk, Albert; Haagsman, Henk P

    2013-11-01

    Host defense peptides (HDPs) are important effector molecules of the innate immune system of vertebrates. These antimicrobial peptides are also present in invertebrates, plants and fungi. HDPs display broad-spectrum antimicrobial activities and fulfill an important role in the first line of defense of many organisms. It is becoming increasingly clear that in the animal kingdom the functions of HDPs are not confined to direct antimicrobial actions. Research in mammals has indicated that HDPs have many immunomodulatory functions and are also involved in other physiological processes ranging from development to wound healing. During the past five years our knowledge about avian HDPs has increased considerably. This review addresses our current knowledge on the evolution, regulation and biological functions of HDPs of birds.

  6. Natural history-driven, plant-mediated RNAi-based study reveals CYP6B46’s role in a nicotine-mediated antipredator herbivore defense

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Pavan; Pandit, Sagar S.; Steppuhn, Anke; Baldwin, Ian T.

    2014-01-01

    Manduca sexta (Ms) larvae are known to efficiently excrete ingested nicotine when feeding on their nicotine-producing native hostplant, Nicotiana attenuata. Here we describe how ingested nicotine is co-opted for larval defense by a unique mechanism. Plant-mediated RNAi was used to silence a midgut-expressed, nicotine-induced cytochrome P450 6B46 (CYP6B46) in larvae consuming transgenic N. attenuata plants producing MsCYP6B46 dsRNA. These and transgenic nicotine-deficient plants were planted into native habitats to study the phenotypes of larvae feeding on these plants and the behavior of their predators. The attack-behavior of a native wolf spider (Camptocosa parallela), a major nocturnal predator, provided the key to understanding MsCYP6B46’s function: spiders clearly preferred CYP6B46-silenced larvae, just as they had preferred larvae fed nicotine-deficient plants. MsCYP6B46 redirects a small amount (0.65%) of ingested nicotine from the midgut into hemolymph, from which nicotine is exhaled through the spiracles as an antispider signal. CYP6B46-silenced larvae were more susceptible to spider-attack because they exhaled less nicotine because of lower hemolymph nicotine concentrations. CYP6B46-silenced larvae were impaired in distributing ingested nicotine from midgut to hemolymph, but not in the clearing of hemolymph nicotine or in the exhalation of nicotine from hemolymph. MsCYP6B46 could be a component of a previously hypothesized pump that converts nicotine to a short-lived, transportable, metabolite. Other predators, big-eyed bugs, and antlion larvae were insensitive to this defense. Thus, chemical defenses, too toxic to sequester, can be repurposed for defensive functions through respiration as a form of defensive halitosis, and predators can assist the functional elucidation of herbivore genes. PMID:24379363

  7. Short-term inhalation exposure to mild steel welding fume had no effect on lung inflammation and injury but did alter defense responses to bacteria in rats.

    PubMed

    Antonini, James M; Roberts, Jenny R; Stone, Sam; Chen, Bean T; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Frazer, David G

    2009-02-01

    Many workers worldwide are continually exposed to complex aerosols generated from welding processes. The objective was to assess the effect of inhalation exposure to mild steel (MS) welding fume on lung injury, inflammation, and defense responses. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to MS fume at a concentration of 40 mg/m(3) x 3 h/day x 3 or 10 days using a robotic welding fume generator. Controls were exposed to filtered air. To assess lung defense responses, a group of animals were intratracheally inoculated with 5 x 10(4) Listeria monocytogenes 1 day after the last daily exposure. Welding particles were collected during exposure, and chemical composition and particle size were determined. After exposure, lung injury, inflammation, and host defense (bacterial clearance) were measured. The particles were composed of iron (80.6 %) and manganese (14.7 %) with a mass median aerodynamic diameter of 0.31 microm. No significant difference was observed in lung injury or inflammation after MS fume inhalation at 1, 4, and 11 days after the last exposure. However, there were significantly more bacteria at 3 days after infection in the lungs of the animals exposed to MS fume compared to air controls. Acute exposure of rats to MS fume had no effect on injury and inflammation, but suppressed lung defense responses after infection. More chronic inhalation studies are needed to further examine the immune effects and to elucidate the possible mechanisms of the suppressed lung defense response to infection associated with the inhalation of MS welding fume.

  8. Natural history-driven, plant-mediated RNAi-based study reveals CYP6B46's role in a nicotine-mediated antipredator herbivore defense.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pavan; Pandit, Sagar S; Steppuhn, Anke; Baldwin, Ian T

    2014-01-28

    Manduca sexta (Ms) larvae are known to efficiently excrete ingested nicotine when feeding on their nicotine-producing native hostplant, Nicotiana attenuata. Here we describe how ingested nicotine is co-opted for larval defense by a unique mechanism. Plant-mediated RNAi was used to silence a midgut-expressed, nicotine-induced cytochrome P450 6B46 (CYP6B46) in larvae consuming transgenic N. attenuata plants producing MsCYP6B46 dsRNA. These and transgenic nicotine-deficient plants were planted into native habitats to study the phenotypes of larvae feeding on these plants and the behavior of their predators. The attack-behavior of a native wolf spider (Camptocosa parallela), a major nocturnal predator, provided the key to understanding MsCYP6B46's function: spiders clearly preferred CYP6B46-silenced larvae, just as they had preferred larvae fed nicotine-deficient plants. MsCYP6B46 redirects a small amount (0.65%) of ingested nicotine from the midgut into hemolymph, from which nicotine is exhaled through the spiracles as an antispider signal. CYP6B46-silenced larvae were more susceptible to spider-attack because they exhaled less nicotine because of lower hemolymph nicotine concentrations. CYP6B46-silenced larvae were impaired in distributing ingested nicotine from midgut to hemolymph, but not in the clearing of hemolymph nicotine or in the exhalation of nicotine from hemolymph. MsCYP6B46 could be a component of a previously hypothesized pump that converts nicotine to a short-lived, transportable, metabolite. Other predators, big-eyed bugs, and antlion larvae were insensitive to this defense. Thus, chemical defenses, too toxic to sequester, can be repurposed for defensive functions through respiration as a form of defensive halitosis, and predators can assist the functional elucidation of herbivore genes.

  9. Getting Defense Acquisition Right

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-01-01

    Technology, and Logis­ tics. In that position , he has been responsible to the Secretary of De­ fense for all matters pertaining to acquisition... position of Director of Tacti­ cal Warfare Programs in the Office of the Secretary of Defense and the position of Assistant Deputy Under Secretary of...Point and holding research and devel­ opment positions . Over the course of his public-service career, Mr. Kendall was awarded the following federal

  10. AFRL Defensive IO Programs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-04-22

    NUMBER Air Force Research Laboratory 525 Brooks Road, Rome NY 13441 11. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 12a. DISTRIBUTION / AVAILABILITY STATEMENT Approved for...entire NOSC crew Air Force Enterprise Defense Moving from Data-Centric to Mission-Centric Operations 16 Summary • The AFRL /IF program includes all...William E.; Simpson, Lt. Col Richard 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER Air Force

  11. A Defense Budget Primer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-12-09

    budget practices. See Appendix D for the actual timetable of congressional action on the FY1999 budget.65 See James V . Saturno , The Appropriations...details, see James V . Saturno , The Appropriations Process and the Congressional69 Budget Act, CRS Report 97-947. Table 6. Milestone Votes on the Defense...James V . Saturno , The74 Appropriations Process and the Congressional Budget Act, CRS Report 97-947. The Budget Enforcement Act of 1990 and subsequent

  12. Defense Primer: Procurement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-02-10

    within the defense community procurement refers to the appropriations title by that name. Procurement is the DOD appropriations title that...hardware, such as aircraft, ships and armored vehicles, but also other major equipment (e.g., radios and satellites );  upgrades to existing equipment...funding level of the account. It has principally been used to procure certain ships and satellites . Table 1. Top 10 Procurement Appropriation Subtitles

  13. Defense Laboratory Enterprise

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-01

    modification , recapitalization, retrofit, testing and modernization of helicopters, engines and components for all service and foreign military...foot building for office space, a laboratory area, operations and control center and a 4,000 square-foot building used for equipment modification to...Space Weather • Sensing for SSA • Knowledge Tools/Fusion • Satellite Control • Space Communications Defensive Space Control • Remediation

  14. Plant defense against insect herbivores.

    PubMed

    Fürstenberg-Hägg, Joel; Zagrobelny, Mika; Bak, Søren

    2013-05-16

    Plants have been interacting with insects for several hundred million years, leading to complex defense approaches against various insect feeding strategies. Some defenses are constitutive while others are induced, although the insecticidal defense compound or protein classes are often similar. Insect herbivory induce several internal signals from the wounded tissues, including calcium ion fluxes, phosphorylation cascades and systemic- and jasmonate signaling. These are perceived in undamaged tissues, which thereafter reinforce their defense by producing different, mostly low molecular weight, defense compounds. These bioactive specialized plant defense compounds may repel or intoxicate insects, while defense proteins often interfere with their digestion. Volatiles are released upon herbivory to repel herbivores, attract predators or for communication between leaves or plants, and to induce defense responses. Plants also apply morphological features like waxes, trichomes and latices to make the feeding more difficult for the insects. Extrafloral nectar, food bodies and nesting or refuge sites are produced to accommodate and feed the predators of the herbivores. Meanwhile, herbivorous insects have adapted to resist plant defenses, and in some cases even sequester the compounds and reuse them in their own defense. Both plant defense and insect adaptation involve metabolic costs, so most plant-insect interactions reach a stand-off, where both host and herbivore survive although their development is suboptimal.

  15. Plant Defense against Insect Herbivores

    PubMed Central

    Fürstenberg-Hägg, Joel; Zagrobelny, Mika; Bak, Søren

    2013-01-01

    Plants have been interacting with insects for several hundred million years, leading to complex defense approaches against various insect feeding strategies. Some defenses are constitutive while others are induced, although the insecticidal defense compound or protein classes are often similar. Insect herbivory induce several internal signals from the wounded tissues, including calcium ion fluxes, phosphorylation cascades and systemic- and jasmonate signaling. These are perceived in undamaged tissues, which thereafter reinforce their defense by producing different, mostly low molecular weight, defense compounds. These bioactive specialized plant defense compounds may repel or intoxicate insects, while defense proteins often interfere with their digestion. Volatiles are released upon herbivory to repel herbivores, attract predators or for communication between leaves or plants, and to induce defense responses. Plants also apply morphological features like waxes, trichomes and latices to make the feeding more difficult for the insects. Extrafloral nectar, food bodies and nesting or refuge sites are produced to accommodate and feed the predators of the herbivores. Meanwhile, herbivorous insects have adapted to resist plant defenses, and in some cases even sequester the compounds and reuse them in their own defense. Both plant defense and insect adaptation involve metabolic costs, so most plant-insect interactions reach a stand-off, where both host and herbivore survive although their development is suboptimal. PMID:23681010

  16. Soviet strategic defense technology

    SciTech Connect

    Stubbs, E.

    1987-04-01

    The present status of the Soviet program suggests several observations that have a bearing on predicting the future of the Soviet strategic defense program and its implications for the US: 1. The Soviet Union appears to have a continuing interest in ABM defenses, although ASATs seem to be a much lower priority. 2. The Soviet technology fielded to date was well within the American grasp 10 years ago. Where advanced and as yet undeployed technologies are concerned, the difference seems to be smaller; perhaps as little as five or seven years, with approximate parity in particle-beam research. 3. The Soviet Union, possibly more sensitive to prestige considerations, appears to be much more inclined than the US to demonstrate and deploy a technology before it is actually fully operational, and to undertake field modifications later. They also are much more reluctant to retire aging and obsolete technologies. As a result, they presently possess the world's only deployed ASAT and ABM systems, however, doubtful their actual operational effectiveness might be. 4. Soviet strategic defenses tend to be more fragmentary in design, reflecting their difficulties with the supporting and integrative technologies such as sensing, signal processing, heavy-lift boosters, and computing hardware and software. 5. The Soviets should also be expected to explore alternative avenues of near-term response to SDI, for example by expanding their strategic nuclear arsenal. 28 references, 1 figure, 2 tables.

  17. Elucidating severe urban haze formation in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Song; Hu, Min; Zamora, Misti L.; Peng, Jianfei; Shang, Dongjie; Zheng, Jing; Du, Zhuofei; Wu, Zhijun; Shao, Min; Zeng, Limin; Molina, Mario J.; Zhang, Renyi

    2014-12-01

    As the world's second largest economy, China has experienced severe haze pollution, with fine particulate matter (PM) recently reaching unprecedentedly high levels across many cities, and an understanding of the PM formation mechanism is critical in the development of efficient mediation policies to minimize its regional to global impacts. We demonstrate a periodic cycle of PM episodes in Beijing that is governed by meteorological conditions and characterized by two distinct aerosol formation processes of nucleation and growth, but with a small contribution from primary emissions and regional transport of particles. Nucleation consistently precedes a polluted period, producing a high number concentration of nano-sized particles under clean conditions. Accumulation of the particle mass concentration exceeding several hundred micrograms per cubic meter is accompanied by a continuous size growth from the nucleation-mode particles over multiple days to yield numerous larger particles, distinctive from the aerosol formation typically observed in other regions worldwide. The particle compositions in Beijing, on the other hand, exhibit a similarity to those commonly measured in many global areas, consistent with the chemical constituents dominated by secondary aerosol formation. Our results highlight that regulatory controls of gaseous emissions for volatile organic compounds and nitrogen oxides from local transportation and sulfur dioxide from regional industrial sources represent the key steps to reduce the urban PM level in China.

  18. ION COMPOSITION ELUCIDATION (ICE): A HIGH ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Identifying compounds found in the environment without knowledge of their origin is a very difficult analytical problem. Comparison of the low resolution mass spectrum of a compound with those in the NIST or Wiley mass spectral libraries can provide a tentative identification when the mass spectrum is free of interferences, at least several prominent ions are observed in the mass spectrum, the mass spectrum is in the library, and only one plausible match is found. Because these libraries contain only 226,334 distinct compounds (1) compared to the 16 million compounds that have been synthesized or isolated from natural sources (2), most compounds are not found in the libraries. In addition, most compounds are ionic, too polar, too thermolabile, or too high in mass to traverse a GC column or to volatilize from a probe. For these compounds, liquid sample introduction with electrospray ionization (ESI) or atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) provides few fragment ions for pattern matching, and adduct ions complicate the mass spectra. Commercial ESI and APCI mass spectral libraries are not available. Consequently, low resolution mass spectrometry cannot identify most compounds-. The research focused on in the subtasks is the development and application of state-of the-art technologies to meet the needs of the public, Office of Water, and ORD in the area of Water Quality. Located In the subtasks are the various research projects being performed in support

  19. ION COMPOSITION ELUCIDATION (ICE) OF IONS FROM ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    There is no abstract available for this product. If further information is requested, please refer to the bibliographic citation and contact the person listed under Contact field. The research focused on in the subtasks is the development and application of state-of the-art technologies to meet the needs of the public, Office of Water, and ORD in the area of Water Quality. Located In the subtasks are the various research projects being performed in support of this Task and more in-depth coverage of each project. Briefly, each project's objective is stated below.Subtask 1: To integrate state-of-the-art technologies (polar organic chemical integrative samplers, advanced solid-phase extraction methodologies with liquid chromatography/electrospray/mass spectrometry) and apply them to studying the sources and fate of a select list of PPCPs. Application and improvement of analytical methodologies that can detect non-volatile, polar, water-soluble pharmaceuticals in source waters at levels that could be environmentally significant (at concentrations less than parts per billion, ppb). IAG with USGS ends in FY05. APM 20 due in FY05.Subtask 2: Coordination of interagency research and public outreach activities for PPCPs. Participate on NSTC Health and Environment subcommittee working group on PPCPs. Web site maintenance and expansion, invited technical presentations, invited articles for peer-reviewed journals, interviews for media, responding to public inquiries. S

  20. Elucidating severe urban haze formation in China

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Song; Hu, Min; Zamora, Misti L.; Peng, Jianfei; Shang, Dongjie; Zheng, Jing; Du, Zhuofei; Wu, Zhijun; Shao, Min; Zeng, Limin; Molina, Mario J.; Zhang, Renyi

    2014-01-01

    As the world’s second largest economy, China has experienced severe haze pollution, with fine particulate matter (PM) recently reaching unprecedentedly high levels across many cities, and an understanding of the PM formation mechanism is critical in the development of efficient mediation policies to minimize its regional to global impacts. We demonstrate a periodic cycle of PM episodes in Beijing that is governed by meteorological conditions and characterized by two distinct aerosol formation processes of nucleation and growth, but with a small contribution from primary emissions and regional transport of particles. Nucleation consistently precedes a polluted period, producing a high number concentration of nano-sized particles under clean conditions. Accumulation of the particle mass concentration exceeding several hundred micrograms per cubic meter is accompanied by a continuous size growth from the nucleation-mode particles over multiple days to yield numerous larger particles, distinctive from the aerosol formation typically observed in other regions worldwide. The particle compositions in Beijing, on the other hand, exhibit a similarity to those commonly measured in many global areas, consistent with the chemical constituents dominated by secondary aerosol formation. Our results highlight that regulatory controls of gaseous emissions for volatile organic compounds and nitrogen oxides from local transportation and sulfur dioxide from regional industrial sources represent the key steps to reduce the urban PM level in China. PMID:25422462

  1. Isolation and Structure Elucidation of Three New Dolastanes from the Brown Alga Dilophus spiralis

    PubMed Central

    Ioannou, Efstathia; Vagias, Constantinos; Roussis, Vassilios

    2013-01-01

    Three new dolastane diterpenes (1–3) and five previously reported perhydroazulenes were isolated from the organic extracts of the brown alga Dilophus spiralis. The structure elucidation and the assignment of the relative configurations of the isolated natural products were based on extensive analyses of their spectroscopic data, whereas the absolute configuration of metabolite 2 was determined through its chemical conversion to a previously isolated compound of known configuration. PMID:23549282

  2. Structure elucidation and complete NMR spectral assignments of four new diterpenoids from Smallantus sonchifolius.

    PubMed

    Dou, De-Qiang; Tian, Fang; Qiu, Ying-Kun; Kang, Ting-Guo; Dong, Feng

    2008-08-01

    Four new diterpenoids, named smaditerpenic acid A-D, together with five known compounds, were isolated from the H(2)O extract of the leaves of Smallantus sonchifolius (yacon) cultivated in Liaoning, China and their structures were elucidated on the basis of one- and two-dimensional NMR (including (1)H, (13)C-NMR, (1)H-(1)H COSY, HSQC, TOCSY, HMBC, and ROESY), electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), and chemical methods.

  3. Allergic Host Defenses

    PubMed Central

    Palm, Noah W.; Rosenstein, Rachel K.

    2012-01-01

    Allergies are generally thought to be a detrimental outcome of a mistargeted immune response that evolved to provide immunity to macro-parasites. Here we present arguments to suggest that allergic immunity plays an important role in host defense against noxious environmental substances, including venoms, hematophagous fluids, environmental xenobiotics and irritants. We argue that appropriately targeted allergic reactions are beneficial, although they can become detrimental when excessive. Furthermore, we suggest that allergic hypersensitivity evolved to elicit anticipatory responses and to promote avoidance of suboptimal environments. PMID:22538607

  4. Defense Meteorological Satellite Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, William D.; Mandt, Gregory A.; Gagliardo, John

    The Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) is described, with particular attention given to the DMSP space segment; the command, control, and communications segment; and the user segment. DMSP performs its mission with space-based remote and in situ sensors, reliable spacecraft, and ground systems, which contribute to the efficient use of increasingly scarce military resources. Presently, the DMSP space segment consists of two Block 5D-2 satellites in 833 kilometer circular sun-synchronous polar orbits. In the future, DMSP will develop smaller, more easily deployable tactical terminals to complement the larger Mark IV class terminals.

  5. Quadrennial Defense Review 2014

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    rehabilitation, we will continue to provide the best possible care. And the Department of Defense will continue working with the Departments of Veterans ...C H A P T E R I I : T H E D E F E N S E S T R A T E G Y 25 Student veteran , Lucas Bultema (right), is part of the Energy Systems Technology...Evaluation Program, an innovative Office of Naval Research program that helps student veterans find high-level, meaningful opportunities in energy

  6. Does strategic defense breed offense

    SciTech Connect

    York, H.

    1987-01-01

    The author examines the question of whether strategic defense activity, in any form, stimulates a related offensive activity. The author studies four post-World II efforts of the superpowers to develop and deploy strategic defenses. The author then derives lessons from those cases that he applies to his analysis of President Reagan's Strategic Defense Initiative. Commentaries on the author's analysis are provided by four scholars.

  7. Empowering self-defense training.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Martha E

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of self-defense training is to expand people's options, yet it is often framed as a solely physical, and limiting, response to violence. I draw on my own experience as a self-defense instructor and that of others in the self-defense movement to argue that an empowerment approach to self-defense training contributes to the anti-violence movement in multiple ways: providing a pathway to increase women's and girls' safety and their potential for becoming powerful and effective social change agents right now, providing an informed and embodied understanding of violence, and offering comprehensive options to recognize, prevent, and interrupt violence.

  8. Perverse defenses in neurotic patients.

    PubMed

    Coen, S J

    1998-01-01

    Distinguishing perverse defenses from the concept of obligatory perversion allows perverse defenses to be examined in neurotic patients. Perverse defenses against reality, one's conflicts, and relationships with others are connected with affect intolerance, difficulty with analytic collaboration, and analytic impasse. Perverse defenses, including the cultivation of states of distraction, excitement, and pomposity, as well as perverse sadomasochistic relations with others, protect against the unbearable: intense affects, painful ideas, and loving, committed need of a valued, distinct person. Patients' perverse, vindictive refusal to be reasonable provokes perverse countertransference reactions whereby the analyst stands in judgmentally and critically for the seemingly absent demands of reason, morality, and analytic progress.

  9. Control Processes and Defense Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    HOROWITZ, MARDI; COOPER, STEVEN; FRIDHANDLER, BRAM; PERRY, J. CHRISTOPHER; BOND, MICHAEL; VAILLANT, GEORGE

    1992-01-01

    Defense-mechanism theory and control-process theory are related psychodynamic approaches to explaining and classifying how people ward off emotional upsets. Although both theories explain defensive maneuvers in the same motivational terms, each defines categories different1y. Classic categories define defense mechanisms at a relatively macroscopic level, whereas control-process theory aims at relatively microgenetic analysis of how cognitive maneuvers—involving what is thought, how it is thought, and how it is organized—may generate defensive states. The theories are not contradictory, but they are focused on different levels of observation; it is useful to compare how these classifications are applied to specific case material. PMID:22700114

  10. Adaptations of quaking aspen for defense against damage by herbivores and related environmental agents

    Treesearch

    Richard L. Lindroth

    2001-01-01

    Quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides) employs two major systems of defense against damage by environmental agents: chemical defense and tolerance. Aspen accumulates appreciable quantities of phenolic glycosides (salicylates) and condensed tannins in most tissues and accumulates coniferyl benzoate in flower buds. Phenolic glycosides are toxic and/or deterrent to pathogens...

  11. In silico functional elucidation of uncharacterized proteins of Chlamydia abortus strain LLG

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Gagandeep; Sharma, Dixit; Singh, Vikram; Rani, Jyoti; Marotta, Francessco; Kumar, Manoj; Mal, Gorakh; Singh, Birbal

    2017-01-01

    Aim: This study reports structural modeling, molecular dynamics profiling of hypothetical proteins in Chlamydia abortus genome database. Methodology: The hypothetical protein sequences were extracted from C. abortus LLG Genome Database for functional elucidation using in silico methods. Results: Fifty-one proteins with their roles in defense, binding and transporting other biomolecules were unraveled. Forty-five proteins were found to be nonhomologous to proteins present in hosts infected by C. abortus. Of these, 31 proteins were related to virulence. The structural modeling of two proteins, first, WP_006344020.1 (phosphorylase) and second, WP_006344325.1 (chlamydial protease/proteasome-like activity factor) were accomplished. The conserved active sites necessary for the catalytic function were analyzed. Conclusion: The finally concluded proteins are envisioned as possible targets for developing drugs to curtail chlamydial infections, however, and should be validated by molecular biological methods. PMID:28344832

  12. RL-SAGE and microarray analysis of the rice defense transcriptome after Rhizoctonia solani infection

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sheath blight caused by the fungal pathogen Rhizoctonia solani is an emerging problem in rice production worldwide. To elucidate the molecular basis of rice defense to the pathogen, RNA isolated from R. solani-infected leaves of Jasmine 85 was used for both RL-SAGE library construction and microarra...

  13. Epigenetic responses to stress: triple defense?

    PubMed

    Gutzat, Ruben; Mittelsten Scheid, Ortrun

    2012-11-01

    Stressful conditions for plants can originate from numerous physical, chemical and biological factors, and plants have developed a plethora of survival strategies including developmental and morphological adaptations, specific signaling and defense pathways as well as innate and acquired immunity. While it has become clear in recent years that many stress responses involve epigenetic components, we are far from understanding the mechanisms and molecular interactions. Extending our knowledge is fundamental, not least for plant breeding and conservation biology. This review will highlight recent insights into epigenetic stress responses at the level of signaling, chromatin modification, and potentially heritable consequences.

  14. Implications of defenses against tactical ballistic missiles

    SciTech Connect

    Flax, A.

    1994-05-01

    The growing number of short- to medium-range ballistic missiles (SMBMs) in the inventories of many smaller states that have had recent or less recent armed conflicts with one another has been a source of concern to many countries. Inevitably this concern over ballistic missiles had been linked to their use as delivery vehicles for {open_quotes}weapons of mass destruction{close_quotes}, a category that now includes nuclear, chemical and biological weapons. But it can be argued that this categorization is not particularly useful as a point of departure for discussions of ballistic missile defense (BMD) against SMBMs.

  15. Elucidating Microbial Adaptation Dynamics via Autonomous Exposure and Sampling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grace, Joseph M.; Verseux, Cyprien; Gentry, Diana; Moffet, Amy; Thayabaran, Ramanen; Wong, Nathan; Rothschild, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    The adaptation of micro-organisms to their environments is a complex process of interaction between the pressures of the environment and of competition. Reducing this multifactorial process to environmental exposure in the laboratory is a common tool for elucidating individual mechanisms of evolution, such as mutation rates. Although such studies inform fundamental questions about the way adaptation and even speciation occur, they are often limited by labor-intensive manual techniques. Current methods for controlled study of microbial adaptation limit the length of time, the depth of collected data, and the breadth of applied environmental conditions. Small idiosyncrasies in manual techniques can have large effects on outcomes; for example, there are significant variations in induced radiation resistances following similar repeated exposure protocols. We describe here a project under development to allow rapid cycling of multiple types of microbial environmental exposure. The system allows continuous autonomous monitoring and data collection of both single species and sampled communities, independently and concurrently providing multiple types of controlled environmental pressure (temperature, radiation, chemical presence or absence, and so on) to a microbial community in dynamic response to the ecosystem's current status. When combined with DNA sequencing and extraction, such a controlled environment can cast light on microbial functional development, population dynamics, inter- and intra-species competition, and microbe-environment interaction. The project's goal is to allow rapid, repeatable iteration of studies of both natural and artificial microbial adaptation. As an example, the same system can be used both to increase the pH of a wet soil aliquot over time while periodically sampling it for genetic activity analysis, or to repeatedly expose a culture of bacteria to the presence of a toxic metal, automatically adjusting the level of toxicity based on the

  16. Cotton Defense Induction Patterns Under Spatially, Temporally and Quantitatively Varying Herbivory Levels.

    PubMed

    Eisenring, Michael; Meissle, Michael; Hagenbucher, Steffen; Naranjo, Steven E; Wettstein, Felix; Romeis, Jörg

    2017-01-01

    In its defense against herbivores, cotton (Gossypium sp.) relies in part on the production of a set of inducible, non-volatile terpenoids. Under uniform damage levels, in planta allocation of induced cotton terpenoids has been found to be highest in youngest leaves, supporting assumptions of the optimal defense theory (ODT) which predicts that plants allocate defense compounds to tissues depending on their value and the likelihood of herbivore attack. However, our knowledge is limited on how varying, and thus more realistic, damage levels might affect cotton defense organization. We hypothesized that the allocation of terpenoids and densities of terpenoid-storing glands in leaves aligns with assumptions of the ODT, even when plants are subjected to temporally, spatially and quantitatively varying caterpillar (Heliothis virescens) damage. As expected, cotton plants allocated most of their defenses to their youngest leaves regardless of damage location. However, defense induction in older leaves varied with damage location. For at least 14 days after damage treatments ended, plants reallocated defense resources from previously young leaves to newly developed leaves. Furthermore, we observed a positive hyperbolic relationship between leaf damage area and both terpenoid concentrations and gland densities, indicating that cotton plants can fine-tune defense allocation. Although it appears that factors like vascular constraints and chemical properties of individual defense compounds can affect defense levels, our results overall demonstrate that induced defense organization of cotton subjected to varying damage treatments is in alignment with key assumptions of the ODT.

  17. Cotton Defense Induction Patterns Under Spatially, Temporally and Quantitatively Varying Herbivory Levels

    PubMed Central

    Eisenring, Michael; Meissle, Michael; Hagenbucher, Steffen; Naranjo, Steven E.; Wettstein, Felix; Romeis, Jörg

    2017-01-01

    In its defense against herbivores, cotton (Gossypium sp.) relies in part on the production of a set of inducible, non-volatile terpenoids. Under uniform damage levels, in planta allocation of induced cotton terpenoids has been found to be highest in youngest leaves, supporting assumptions of the optimal defense theory (ODT) which predicts that plants allocate defense compounds to tissues depending on their value and the likelihood of herbivore attack. However, our knowledge is limited on how varying, and thus more realistic, damage levels might affect cotton defense organization. We hypothesized that the allocation of terpenoids and densities of terpenoid-storing glands in leaves aligns with assumptions of the ODT, even when plants are subjected to temporally, spatially and quantitatively varying caterpillar (Heliothis virescens) damage. As expected, cotton plants allocated most of their defenses to their youngest leaves regardless of damage location. However, defense induction in older leaves varied with damage location. For at least 14 days after damage treatments ended, plants reallocated defense resources from previously young leaves to newly developed leaves. Furthermore, we observed a positive hyperbolic relationship between leaf damage area and both terpenoid concentrations and gland densities, indicating that cotton plants can fine-tune defense allocation. Although it appears that factors like vascular constraints and chemical properties of individual defense compounds can affect defense levels, our results overall demonstrate that induced defense organization of cotton subjected to varying damage treatments is in alignment with key assumptions of the ODT. PMID:28270830

  18. The Relationship between Inflation and Defense Expenditures.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-01

    All Federal Expenditures .. ......... . 22 2. Defense Expenditures .... ........... 24 3. Suggested Research on the Impact of DoD Spending ...only major study specifically simulating changes in military spending implied that defense and non- defense expenditures have identical impacts upon...analyzed in Chapter I is that defense expenditures are not assigned a central role in generating inflation. Even when defense spending is incorporated

  19. Do Oil Exports Fuel Defense Spending?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-01

    defense spending , and there were years when defense expenditures actually increased. Additionally, in countries that did... spending , especially defense expenditures , but such is not always the case. One can study the impact of oil revenues on defense spending by using a...oil revenue levels and levels of military expenditures , however, appear weak, meaning that attempts to limit defense spending by tinkering with

  20. 78 FR 78163 - Eligibility of the Gulf Cooperation Council To Receive Defense Articles and Defense Services...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-24

    ... Cooperation Council To Receive Defense Articles and Defense Services Under the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961... that the furnishing of defense articles and defense services to the Gulf Cooperation Council will...

  1. The doctor's defense.

    PubMed

    Tur, Richard H S

    2002-10-01

    The paper takes as its point of departure a relatively recent case which attracted publicity in Britain, concerning a doctor charged with (but acquitted of) the murder of his terminally ill patient, and critically examines the criminal law of England and Wales relating to homicide in the context of medical practice. While similar issues obviously arise in many other countries, no comparative study is attempted in the paper. However, the arguments which have been presented are of more than local interest. From an analysis of this case and others, it appears that there is in common law something which can be called the doctor s defense. It holds that a doctor may, when caring for a patient who is suffering great pain, lawfully administer pain-killing drugs, despite the fact that, as the doctor well knows, one certain or highly probable consequence will be to shorten the patient s life. Current justifications for this defense are either incoherent or too weak. Some require that different conceptions of intention be deployed, depending on whether the agent is a doctor or not. Others rely on the philosophically controversial doctrine of double effect. Still others invoke an implausible notion of minimal causation. All these justifications apply readily enough to morally and factually easy cases, but fail in hard cases where the need for some justification is most pressing. These justifications seem incapable of providing adequate guidance to prosecutors or trial judges. Absent principled and transparent justification, the English criminal justice system exhibits different outcomes on what appear to be broadly similar facts. It is disturbing that the law is uncertain and incapable of giving adequate guidance. A doctor, compelled by conscience to intervene to end a person s life, should certainly be ready and willing to face rigorous legal scrutiny, but the law applied should not be arbitrary and random, nor should the outcome turn solely or chiefly on prosecutorial

  2. 75 FR 18041 - Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement; Minimizing Use of Hexavalent Chromium (DFARS...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-08

    ... requirements for minimizing the use of hexavalent chromium in defense weapon systems, subsystems, components... INFORMATION: A. Background Hexavalent chromium is a significant chemical in numerous DoD weapon systems...

  3. Defense Institution Building: An Assessment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-01

    Guyana X Haiti X X Honduras X X Jamaica X Nicaragua X 80 Defense Institution Building The next step was to decide index values that were potentially...the defense ministries and univer- sities in Honduras, Mexico, Jamaica , Panama, Peru, and Columbia. CHDS has coordinated its DIB activities to align

  4. Self-Defense for Teens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Givler, Jill I.

    2005-01-01

    Resources for self-defense training programs have become more popular and available over the last few years. Introducing a self-defense unit as part of a school physical education program is a wonderful way to address a number of psychosocial issues that prevail among teenagers today. The physical skills learned in this type of program allow…

  5. Defense Styles in Suicide Attempters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scholz, James A.

    1973-01-01

    Thirty-five serious suicide attempters, paired to neuropsychiatric controls on relevant variables, were tested within two weeks of their attempt with the Defense Mechanisms Inventory. Attempters revealed more turning-against-self defenses as hypothesized but showed no differences from controls in use of fantasized hostility. Implications for…

  6. Self-Defense for Teens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Givler, Jill I.

    2005-01-01

    Resources for self-defense training programs have become more popular and available over the last few years. Introducing a self-defense unit as part of a school physical education program is a wonderful way to address a number of psychosocial issues that prevail among teenagers today. The physical skills learned in this type of program allow…

  7. Defense Acquisition Performance Assessment Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    DAPA Project Officer” BeCKeR, gRACe CHuNg , Associate Deputy General Counsel, Office of the Secretary of Defense – “Legal view of the Processes...FiguRes Jordan, Dr. Leland G. “Systemic Fiscal Optimism in Defense Planning.” Acquisition Review Quarterly Winter 2000: 47-62. Joyce, Michael and Bettina

  8. Cognitive Factors in Consultee Defensiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Roy P.

    Defensiveness is the most frequently utilized concept to explain inadequate change on the part of consultees. Defensiveness, in this context, indicates a motive to protect a central component of the self-concept, or a motive to present oneself favorably. Another source of consultee resistance to change results from the limitations of the human…

  9. The Department of Defense Commitment to the Destruction and Remediation of Non-Stockpile Chemical Materiel: Can Present Policy and Approaches Effectively Meet the Challenges to Eliminate the Threat to the Public?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    the destruction of Recovered Chemical Warfare Material. Current projections are that 42 states are impacted by the possible presence of RCWM...the Army. LUCs can impact property values and flexibility for various uses, many communities want remedies that require no restrictions on land use...Huntsville, Al: Headquarters 4 th District USACOE, January 2002. Department of the Army, Army Environmental Command. Army Enviromental Cleanup

  10. 22 CFR 120.44 - Foreign defense article or defense service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Foreign defense article or defense service. 120... PURPOSE AND DEFINITIONS § 120.44 Foreign defense article or defense service. Foreign defense article or defense service means any article or service described on the U.S. Munitions List of non-U.S....

  11. Use of experimental airborne infections for monitoring altered host defenses.

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, D E

    1982-01-01

    The success or failure of the respiratory system to defend itself against airborne infectious agents largely depends upon the efficiency of the pulmonary defenses to maintain sterility and to dispose of unwanted substances. Both specific and nonspecific host defenses cooperate in the removal and inactivation of such agents. Several studies have shown that these defenses are vulnerable to a wide range of environmental agents and that there is a good relationship between exposure to pollutant and the impaired resistance to pulmonary disease. There are numerous immunological, biochemical and physiological techniques that are routinely used to identify and to characterize individual impairments of these defenses. Based on these effects, various hypotheses are proposed as to what health consequences could be expected from these effects. The ultimate test is whether the host, with its compromised defense mechanisms, is still capable of sustaining the total injury and continuing to defend itself against opportunistic pathogens. This paper describes the use of an experimental airborne infectious disease model capable of predicting subtle changes in host defenses at concentrations below which there are any other overt toxicological effects. Such sensitivity is possible because the model measure not just a single "health" parameter, but instead is capable of reflecting the total responses caused by the test chemical. Images FIGURE 3. PMID:7060549

  12. SDI (Strategic Defense Initiative): Myth or reality

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1988-06-01

    This report reviews previous attempts to develop strategic defenses, the technologies currently under consideration by the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI), their main unknowns, and the likely performance of strategic defense concepts against evolving threats. 47 refs.

  13. Isolation and Structural Elucidation of Euryjanicins B–D, Proline-Containing Cycloheptapeptides from the Caribbean Marine Sponge Prosuberites laughlini†

    PubMed Central

    Vera, Brunilda; Vicente, Jan; Rodríguez, Abimael D.

    2016-01-01

    Three new cyclic peptides, euryjanicins B (2), C (3), and D (4), have been isolated from the Puerto Rican marine sponge Prosuberites laughlini, and the structures were elucidated by chemical degradation, ESIMS/MS, and extensive 2D NMR methods. When tested against the National Cancer Institute 60 tumor cell line panel, all of the purified isolates displayed weak cytotoxicity. PMID:19743810

  14. Curdlan β-1,3-Glucooligosaccharides Induce the Defense Responses against Phytophthora infestans Infection of Potato (Solanum tuberosum L. cv. McCain G1) Leaf Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Zhu, Li; Lu, Guangxing; Zhan, Xiao-Bei; Lin, Chi-Chung; Zheng, Zhi-Yong

    2014-01-01

    Activation of the innate immune system before the invasion of pathogens is a promising way to improve the resistance of plant against infection while reducing the use of agricultural chemicals. Although several elicitors were used to induce the resistance of potato plant to microbial pathogen infection, the role of curdlan oligosaccharide (CurdO) has not been established. In the current study, the defense responses were investigated at biochemical and proteomic levels to elucidate the elicitation effect of CurdOs in foliar tissues of potato (Solanum tuberosum L. cv. McCain G1). The results indicate that the CurdOs exhibit activation effect on the early- and late-defense responses in potato leaves. In addition, glucopentaose was proved to be the shortest active curdlan molecule based on the accumulation of H2O2 and salicylic acid and the activities of phenylalanine amino-lyase, β-1,3-glucanase and chitinase. The 2D-PAGE analysis reveals that CurdOs activate the integrated response reactions in potato cells, as a number of proteins with various functions are up-regulated including disease/defense, metabolism, transcription, and cell structure. The pathogenesis assay shows that the ratio of lesion area of potato leaf decreased from 15.82%±5.44% to 7.79%±3.03% when the plants were treated with CurdOs 1 day before the infection of Phytophthora infestans. Furthermore, the results on potato yield and induction reactions indicate that the defense responses induced by CurdOs lasted for short period of time but disappeared gradually. PMID:24816730

  15. Curdlan β-1,3-glucooligosaccharides induce the defense responses against Phytophthora infestans infection of potato (Solanum tuberosum L. cv. McCain G1) leaf cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Zhu, Li; Lu, Guangxing; Zhan, Xiao-Bei; Lin, Chi-Chung; Zheng, Zhi-Yong

    2014-01-01

    Activation of the innate immune system before the invasion of pathogens is a promising way to improve the resistance of plant against infection while reducing the use of agricultural chemicals. Although several elicitors were used to induce the resistance of potato plant to microbial pathogen infection, the role of curdlan oligosaccharide (CurdO) has not been established. In the current study, the defense responses were investigated at biochemical and proteomic levels to elucidate the elicitation effect of CurdOs in foliar tissues of potato (Solanum tuberosum L. cv. McCain G1). The results indicate that the CurdOs exhibit activation effect on the early- and late-defense responses in potato leaves. In addition, glucopentaose was proved to be the shortest active curdlan molecule based on the accumulation of H₂O₂ and salicylic acid and the activities of phenylalanine amino-lyase, β-1,3-glucanase and chitinase. The 2D-PAGE analysis reveals that CurdOs activate the integrated response reactions in potato cells, as a number of proteins with various functions are up-regulated including disease/defense, metabolism, transcription, and cell structure. The pathogenesis assay shows that the ratio of lesion area of potato leaf decreased from 15.82%±5.44% to 7.79%±3.03% when the plants were treated with CurdOs 1 day before the infection of Phytophthora infestans. Furthermore, the results on potato yield and induction reactions indicate that the defense responses induced by CurdOs lasted for short period of time but disappeared gradually.

  16. Optimal defense theory explains deviations from latitudinal herbivory defense hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Kooyers, Nicholas J; Blackman, Benjamin K; Holeski, Liza M

    2017-04-01

    The latitudinal herbivory defense hypothesis (LHDH) postulates that the prevalence of species interactions, including herbivory, is greater at lower latitudes, leading to selection for increased levels of plant defense. While latitudinal defense clines may be caused by spatial variation in herbivore pressure, optimal defense theory predicts that clines could also be caused by ecogeographic variation in the cost of defense. For instance, allocation of resources to defense may not increase plant fitness when growing seasons are short and plants must reproduce quickly. Here we use a common garden experiment to survey genetic variation for constitutive and induced phenylpropanoid glycoside (PPG) concentrations across 35 Mimulus guttatus populations over a ~13° latitudinal transect. Our sampling regime is unique among studies of the LHDH in that it allows us to disentangle the effects of growing season length from those of latitude, temperature, and elevation. For five of the seven PPGs surveyed, we find associations between latitude and plant defense that are robust to population structure. However, contrary to the LHDH, only two PPGs were found at higher levels in low latitude populations, and total PPG concentrations were higher at higher latitudes. PPG levels are strongly correlated with growing season length, with higher levels of PPGs in plants from areas with longer growing seasons. Further, flowering time is positively correlated with the concentration of nearly all PPGs, suggesting that there may be a strong trade-off between development time and defense production. Our results reveal that ecogeographic patterns in plant defense may reflect variation in the cost of producing defense compounds in addition to variation in herbivore pressure. Thus, the biogeographic pattern predicted by the LHDH may not be accurate because the underlying factors driving variation in defense, in this case, growing season length, are not always associated with latitude in the same

  17. Costs of jasmonic acid induced defense in aboveground and belowground parts of corn (Zea mays L.).

    PubMed

    Feng, Yuanjiao; Wang, Jianwu; Luo, Shiming; Fan, Huizhi; Jin, Qiong

    2012-08-01

    Costs of jasmonic acid (JA) induced plant defense have gained increasing attention. In this study, JA was applied continuously to the aboveground (AG) or belowground (BG) parts, or AG plus BG parts of corn (Zea mays L.) to investigate whether JA exposure in one part of the plant would affect defense responses in another part, and whether or not JA induced defense would incur allocation costs. The results indicated that continuous JA application to AG parts systemically affected the quantities of defense chemicals in the roots, and vice versa. Quantities of DIMBOA and total amounts of phenolic compounds in leaves or roots generally increased 2 or 4 wk after the JA treatment to different plant parts. In the first 2 wk after application, the increase of defense chemicals in leaves and roots was accompanied by a significant decrease of root length, root surface area, and root biomass. Four weeks after the JA application, however, no such costs for the increase of defense chemicals in leaves and roots were detected. Instead, shoot biomass and root biomass increased. The results suggest that JA as a defense signal can be transferred from AG parts to BG parts of corn, and vice versa. Costs for induced defense elicited by continuous JA application were found in the early 2 wk, while distinct benefits were observed later, i.e., 4 wk after JA treatment.

  18. Current Status of Proteomic Studies on Defense Responses in Rice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xifeng; Bhadauria, Vijai; Ma, Bojun

    2016-01-01

    Biotic stresses are constraints to plant growth and development negatively impacting crop production. To counter such stresses, plants have developed stress-specific adaptations as well as simultaneous responses. The efficacy and magnitude of inducible adaptive responses are dependent on activation of signaling pathways and intracellular networks by modulating expression, or abundance, and/or post-translational modification of proteins associated with defense mechanisms. Proteomics plays an important role in elucidating plant defense mechanisms by mining the differential regulation of proteins to various biotic stresses. Rice, one of the most widely cultivated food crops in world, is constantly challenged by a variety of biotic stresses, and high-throughput proteomics approaches have been employed to unravel the molecular mechanism of the biotic stresses-response in rice. In this review, we summarize the latest advances of proteomic studies on defense responses and discuss the potential relevance of the proteins identified by proteomic means in rice defense mechanism. Furthermore, we provide perspective for proteomics in unraveling the molecular mechanism of rice immunity.

  19. How to induce defense responses in wild plant populations? Using bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus) as example.

    PubMed

    Seldal, Tarald; Hegland, Stein Joar; Rydgren, Knut; Rodriguez-Saona, Cesar; Töpper, Joachim Paul

    2017-03-01

    Inducible plant defense is a beneficial strategy for plants, which imply that plants should allocate resources from growth and reproduction to defense when herbivores attack. Plant ecologist has often studied defense responses in wild populations by biomass clipping experiments, whereas laboratory and greenhouse experiments in addition apply chemical elicitors to induce defense responses. To investigate whether field ecologists could benefit from methods used in laboratory and greenhouse studies, we established a randomized block-design in a pine-bilberry forest in Western Norway. We tested whether we could activate defense responses in bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus) by nine different treatments using clipping (leaf tissue or branch removal) with or without chemical treatment by methyljasmonate (MeJA). We subsequently measured consequences of induced defenses through vegetative growth and insect herbivory during one growing season. Our results showed that only MeJA-treated plants showed consistent defense responses through suppressed vegetative growth and reduced herbivory by leaf-chewing insects, suggesting an allocation of resources from growth to defense. Leaf tissue removal reduced insect herbivory equal to the effect of the MeJa treatments, but had no negative impact on growth. Branch removal did not reduce insect herbivory or vegetative growth. MeJa treatment and clipping combined did not give an additional defense response. In this study, we investigated how to induce defense responses in wild plant populations under natural field conditions. Our results show that using the chemical elicitor MeJA, with or without biomass clipping, may be a better method to induce defense response in field experiments than clipping of leaves or branches that often has been used in ecological field studies.

  20. Changes in cytokinins are sufficient to alter developmental patterns of defense metabolites in Nicotiana attenuata.

    PubMed

    Brütting, Christoph; Schäfer, Martin; Vanková, Radomíra; Gase, Klaus; Baldwin, Ian T; Meldau, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Plant defense metabolites are well known to be regulated developmentally. The optimal defense (OD) theory posits that a tssue's fitness values and probability of attack should determine defense metabolite allocations. Young leaves are expected to provide a larger fitness value to the plant, and therefore their defense allocations should be higher when compared with older leaves. The mechanisms that coordinate development with defense remain unknown and frequently confound tests of the OD theory predictions. Here we demonstrate that cytokinins (CKs) modulate ontogeny-dependent defenses in Nicotiana attenuata. We found that leaf CK levels highly correlate with inducible defense expressions with high levels in young and low levels in older leaves. We genetically manipulated the developmental patterns of two different CK classes by using senescence- and chemically inducible expression of CK biosynthesis genes. Genetically modifying the levels of different CKs in leaves was sufficient to alter ontogenic patterns of defense metabolites. We conclude that the developmental regulation of growth hormones that include CKs plays central roles in connecting development with defense and therefore in establishing optimal patterns of defense allocation in plants. © 2016 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Industrial Base: Vital to Defense

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    industrial base is one of the most pressing issues facing the Department of Defense today, but it is not a new problem. In a 1980 report on industrial responsiveness, the Defense Science Board first raised the red flag. One year ago, the board published another study on the defense industrial base . It concluded that our industrial and technology base has further deteriorated and that a coordinated response by government and industry is needed before this decline diminishes the credibility of our deterrent capability. Last year, a second advisory group

  2. Public-Private Partnerships in Defense Acquisition Programs-Defensible?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-01

    Ministry of Defence (Singapore) MOD Ministry of Defence (UK) xii MRO maintenance, repair and overhaul NAO National Accounting Office (UK) NPV net...in 2002). Similarly, in Australia—one of the early trend setters for PPPs—the implementation of defense PPPs by the Defense Material Organisation...wide range of systems and equipment, and material and services for those systems and equipment...The systems and equipment include vehicles, ships

  3. Climate Change, CO2, and Defense: The Metabolic, Redox, and Signaling Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Noctor, Graham; Mhamdi, Amna

    2017-10-01

    Ongoing human-induced changes in the composition of the atmosphere continue to stimulate interest in the effects of high CO2 on plants, but its potential impact on inducible plant defense pathways remains poorly defined. Recently, several studies have reported that growth at elevated CO2 is sufficient to induce defenses such as the salicylic acid pathway, thereby increasing plant resistance to pathogens. These reports contrast with evidence that defense pathways can be promoted by photorespiration, which is inhibited at high CO2. Here, we review signaling, metabolic, and redox processes modulated by CO2 levels and discuss issues to be resolved in elucidating the relationships between primary metabolism, inducible defense, and biotic stress resistance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Gastroduodenal Mucosal Defense Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Said, Hyder; Kaji, Izumi; Kaunitz, Jonathan D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of Review To highlight recent developments in the field of gastroduodenal mucosal defense with emphasis on lumen-gut interactions. Recent Findings There has been a growing interest in the physiological functions of luminal chemosensors present from tongue to colon that detect organic molecules in the luminal content associated with nutrient ingestion, usually associated with specialized cells, in particular the enteroendocrine cells. These receptors transduce the release of peptide hormones, in particular proglucagon-derived products such as the glucagon-like-peptides (GLPs), which have profound effects on gut function and on metabolism. Luminal chemosensors transduce GLP release in response to changes in the cellular environment, as part of the mechanism of nutrient chemosensing. GLP-2 has important trophic effects on the intestinal mucosa, including increasing the proliferation rate of stem cells and reducing transmucosal permeability to ions and small molecules, in addition to increasing the rate of duodenal bicarbonate secretion. GLP-1, although traditionally considered an incretin that enhances the effect of insulin on peripheral tissues, also has trophic effects on the intestinal epithelium. Summary A better understanding of the mechanisms that mediate GLP release can further illuminate the importance of nutrient chemosensing as an important component of the mechanism that mediates the trophic effects of luminal nutrients. GLP-1 and -2 are already in clinical use for the treatment of diabetes and intestinal failure. Improved understanding of the control of their release and their end-organ effects will identify new clinical indications and interventions that enhance their release. PMID:26376476

  5. Strategic defense initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, J.P.

    1985-01-01

    The Engineering Technology Division has a leading role, including that of program management, in a major new programmatic thrust of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory that is in support of the national Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI). It is appropriate for the Laboratory to become significantly involved in the program because several of the most promising SDI technologies are in areas for which ORNL (together with Y-12 and K-25) have strong capabilities and significant resources. The initial ORNL work in support of the SDI program is focused on three technologies in which ORNL has extensive experience and traditionally strong research and development programs: (1) space nuclear power, (2) flywheel energy storage, and (3) neutral particle beams. The space nuclear program will utilize our capabilities in areas such as refractory materials, high-temperature alkali metal systems, shielding, and instrumentation. Space nuclear reactors capable of supplying multimegawatt levels of electrical power on a continuous and long-term basis are envisioned to be required for a variety of SDI surveillance satellites and space-borne weapons platforms. The feasibility of an alkali metal Rankine power conversion cycle, which has promise of providing high power with a very low system mass, is planned for study.

  6. Defense pattern of Chinese cork oak across latitudinal gradients: influences of ontogeny, herbivory, climate and soil nutrients

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao-Fei; Liu, Jian-Feng; Gao, Wen-Qiang; Deng, Yun-Peng; Ni, Yan-Yan; Xiao, Yi-Hua; Kang, Feng-Feng; Wang, Qi; Lei, Jing-Pin; Jiang, Ze-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of latitudinal patterns in plant defense and herbivory is crucial for understanding the mechanisms that govern ecosystem functioning and for predicting their responses to climate change. Using a widely distributed species in East Asia, Quercus variabilis, we aim to reveal defense patterns of trees with respect to ontogeny along latitudinal gradients. Six leaf chemical (total phenolics and total condensed tannin concentrations) and physical (cellulose, hemicellulose, lignin and dry mass concentration) defensive traits as well as leaf herbivory (% leaf area loss) were investigated in natural Chinese cork oak (Q. variabilis) forests across two ontogenetic stages (juvenile and mature trees) along a ~14°-latitudinal gradient. Our results showed that juveniles had higher herbivory values and a higher concentration of leaf chemical defense substances compared with mature trees across the latitudinal gradient. In addition, chemical defense and herbivory in both ontogenetic stages decreased with increasing latitude, which supports the latitudinal herbivory-defense hypothesis and optimal defense theory. The identified trade-offs between chemical and physical defense were primarily determined by environmental variation associated with the latitudinal gradient, with the climatic factors (annual precipitation, minimum temperature of the coldest month) largely contributing to the latitudinal defense pattern in both juvenile and mature oak trees. PMID:27252112

  7. Defense pattern of Chinese cork oak across latitudinal gradients: influences of ontogeny, herbivory, climate and soil nutrients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao-Fei; Liu, Jian-Feng; Gao, Wen-Qiang; Deng, Yun-Peng; Ni, Yan-Yan; Xiao, Yi-Hua; Kang, Feng-Feng; Wang, Qi; Lei, Jing-Pin; Jiang, Ze-Ping

    2016-06-01

    Knowledge of latitudinal patterns in plant defense and herbivory is crucial for understanding the mechanisms that govern ecosystem functioning and for predicting their responses to climate change. Using a widely distributed species in East Asia, Quercus variabilis, we aim to reveal defense patterns of trees with respect to ontogeny along latitudinal gradients. Six leaf chemical (total phenolics and total condensed tannin concentrations) and physical (cellulose, hemicellulose, lignin and dry mass concentration) defensive traits as well as leaf herbivory (% leaf area loss) were investigated in natural Chinese cork oak (Q. variabilis) forests across two ontogenetic stages (juvenile and mature trees) along a ~14°-latitudinal gradient. Our results showed that juveniles had higher herbivory values and a higher concentration of leaf chemical defense substances compared with mature trees across the latitudinal gradient. In addition, chemical defense and herbivory in both ontogenetic stages decreased with increasing latitude, which supports the latitudinal herbivory-defense hypothesis and optimal defense theory. The identified trade-offs between chemical and physical defense were primarily determined by environmental variation associated with the latitudinal gradient, with the climatic factors (annual precipitation, minimum temperature of the coldest month) largely contributing to the latitudinal defense pattern in both juvenile and mature oak trees.

  8. Defense pattern of Chinese cork oak across latitudinal gradients: influences of ontogeny, herbivory, climate and soil nutrients.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Fei; Liu, Jian-Feng; Gao, Wen-Qiang; Deng, Yun-Peng; Ni, Yan-Yan; Xiao, Yi-Hua; Kang, Feng-Feng; Wang, Qi; Lei, Jing-Pin; Jiang, Ze-Ping

    2016-06-02

    Knowledge of latitudinal patterns in plant defense and herbivory is crucial for understanding the mechanisms that govern ecosystem functioning and for predicting their responses to climate change. Using a widely distributed species in East Asia, Quercus variabilis, we aim to reveal defense patterns of trees with respect to ontogeny along latitudinal gradients. Six leaf chemical (total phenolics and total condensed tannin concentrations) and physical (cellulose, hemicellulose, lignin and dry mass concentration) defensive traits as well as leaf herbivory (% leaf area loss) were investigated in natural Chinese cork oak (Q. variabilis) forests across two ontogenetic stages (juvenile and mature trees) along a ~14°-latitudinal gradient. Our results showed that juveniles had higher herbivory values and a higher concentration of leaf chemical defense substances compared with mature trees across the latitudinal gradient. In addition, chemical defense and herbivory in both ontogenetic stages decreased with increasing latitude, which supports the latitudinal herbivory-defense hypothesis and optimal defense theory. The identified trade-offs between chemical and physical defense were primarily determined by environmental variation associated with the latitudinal gradient, with the climatic factors (annual precipitation, minimum temperature of the coldest month) largely contributing to the latitudinal defense pattern in both juvenile and mature oak trees.

  9. Elucidating Microbial Adaptation Dynamics via Autonomous Exposure and Sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grace, J. M.; Verseux, C.; Gentry, D.; Moffet, A.; Thayabaran, R.; Wong, N.; Rothschild, L.

    2013-12-01

    The adaptation of micro-organisms to their environments is a complex process of interaction between the pressures of the environment and of competition. Reducing this multifactorial process to environmental exposure in the laboratory is a common tool for elucidating individual mechanisms of evolution, such as mutation rates[Wielgoss et al., 2013]. Although such studies inform fundamental questions about the way adaptation and even speciation occur, they are often limited by labor-intensive manual techniques[Wassmann et al., 2010]. Current methods for controlled study of microbial adaptation limit the length of time, the depth of collected data, and the breadth of applied environmental conditions. Small idiosyncrasies in manual techniques can have large effects on outcomes; for example, there are significant variations in induced radiation resistances following similar repeated exposure protocols[Alcántara-Díaz et al., 2004; Goldman and Travisano, 2011]. We describe here a project under development to allow rapid cycling of multiple types of microbial environmental exposure. The system allows continuous autonomous monitoring and data collection of both single species and sampled communities, independently and concurrently providing multiple types of controlled environmental pressure (temperature, radiation, chemical presence or absence, and so on) to a microbial community in dynamic response to the ecosystem's current status. When combined with DNA sequencing and extraction, such a controlled environment can cast light on microbial functional development, population dynamics, inter- and intra-species competition, and microbe-environment interaction. The project's goal is to allow rapid, repeatable iteration of studies of both natural and artificial microbial adaptation. As an example, the same system can be used both to increase the pH of a wet soil aliquot over time while periodically sampling it for genetic activity analysis, or to repeatedly expose a culture of

  10. Defense Energy Information System. Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Carnes, J.

    1990-02-01

    The Manual provides clear, reliable, timely, accurate, and objective energy information; prescribes instructions for the preparation and submission of energy data to support the Defense Energy Information System (DEIS); and furnishes information regarding the use of the DEIS.

  11. Strategic Defense Initiative - an overview

    SciTech Connect

    Abrahamson, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    A general framework for developing the concept and implementing options for strategic ballistic missile defense systems is emerging. The objective of the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI) program is to conduct research on those technologies for defensive system which could intercept ballistic missiles after they have been launched and prevent them from hitting their targets. Its goal is to acquire the technical knowledge as a basis for a later decision on deployment, not a program for deployment or star wars. Abrahamson reviews the basic technological questions facing researchers, outlines the multi-layered defense possibilities and summarizes the status of technology to date. He argues for a continuity of resources to conduct the program. 4 figures.

  12. How to Overcome Defensive Communications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Gary P.

    1978-01-01

    After discussing the defensive response in interpersonal communications in organizations, the article presents eight communication techniques for improving organizational communication skills and thereby creating a more supportive organizational climate. (MF)

  13. Theater Missile Defense Integration Issues

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-06-01

    high endoatmospheric defense interceptor (HEDI) proposed t earlier. EADTB. Extended Air Defense Test Bed. A computer-based analysis center for...for attacking deeper elements of an aggressors’s ground forces. Known in NATO as Follow-on Force Attack ( FOFA ). JSTARS. Joint surveillance target...AFIA/INKS ATTN. INKS AFIS/INT ATTN: INT AIR hORCE CTR FOR STUDIES & ANALYSIS ATTN: AFSAA/SAKI 9 Dist-1 w^mmmm mmmm^-mmmemH

  14. Ballistic Missile Defense System (BMDS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    Intelligence & Security MD30 BMD Information Management Systems MD31 Modeling & Simulation MD32 Quality, Safety, and Mission Assurance...Surveillance Model 2 (AN/TPY-2) Radars, 12 Launchers, 8 Missile Round Pallets, 7 Multifunctional Information Distribution System (MIDS) Terminals, 4...Selected Acquisition Report (SAR) RCS: DD-A&T(Q&A)823-362 Ballistic Missile Defense System (BMDS) As of FY 2017 President’s Budget Defense

  15. Large-scale elucidation of drug response pathways in humans.

    PubMed

    Silberberg, Yael; Gottlieb, Assaf; Kupiec, Martin; Ruppin, Eytan; Sharan, Roded

    2012-02-01

    Elucidating signaling pathways is a fundamental step in understanding cellular processes and developing new therapeutic strategies. Here we introduce a method for the large-scale elucidation of signaling pathways involved in cellular response to drugs. Combining drug targets, drug response expression profiles, and the human physical interaction network, we infer 99 human drug response pathways and study their properties. Based on the newly inferred pathways, we develop a pathway-based drug-drug similarity measure and compare it to two common, gold standard drug-drug similarity measures. Remarkably, our measure provides better correspondence to these gold standards than similarity measures that are based on associations between drugs and known pathways, or on drug-specific gene expression profiles. It further improves the prediction of drug side effects and indications, elucidating specific response pathways that may be associated with these drug properties. Supplementary Material for this article is available at www.liebertonline.com/cmb.

  16. Ancient Anxiety Pathways Influence Drosophila Defense Behaviors.

    PubMed

    Mohammad, Farhan; Aryal, Sameer; Ho, Joses; Stewart, James Charles; Norman, Nurul Ayuni; Tan, Teng Li; Eisaka, Agnese; Claridge-Chang, Adam

    2016-04-04

    Anxiety helps us anticipate and assess potential danger in ambiguous situations [1-3]; however, the anxiety disorders are the most prevalent class of psychiatric illness [4-6]. Emotional states are shared between humans and other animals [7], as observed by behavioral manifestations [8], physiological responses [9], and gene conservation [10]. Anxiety research makes wide use of three rodent behavioral assays-elevated plus maze, open field, and light/dark box-that present a choice between sheltered and exposed regions [11]. Exposure avoidance in anxiety-related defense behaviors was confirmed to be a correlate of rodent anxiety by treatment with known anxiety-altering agents [12-14] and is now used to characterize anxiety systems. Modeling anxiety with a small neurogenetic animal would further aid the elucidation of its neuronal and molecular bases. Drosophila neurogenetics research has elucidated the mechanisms of fundamental behaviors and implicated genes that are often orthologous across species. In an enclosed arena, flies stay close to the walls during spontaneous locomotion [15, 16], a behavior proposed to be related to anxiety [17]. We tested this hypothesis with manipulations of the GABA receptor, serotonin signaling, and stress. The effects of these interventions were strikingly concordant with rodent anxiety, verifying that these behaviors report on an anxiety-like state. Application of this method was able to identify several new fly anxiety genes. The presence of conserved neurogenetic pathways in the insect brain identifies Drosophila as an attractive genetic model for the study of anxiety and anxiety-related disorders, complementing existing rodent systems.

  17. Ancient Anxiety Pathways Influence Drosophila Defense Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Mohammad, Farhan; Aryal, Sameer; Ho, Joses; Stewart, James Charles; Norman, Nurul Ayuni; Tan, Teng Li; Eisaka, Agnese; Claridge-Chang, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Summary Anxiety helps us anticipate and assess potential danger in ambiguous situations [1, 2, 3]; however, the anxiety disorders are the most prevalent class of psychiatric illness [4, 5, 6]. Emotional states are shared between humans and other animals [7], as observed by behavioral manifestations [8], physiological responses [9], and gene conservation [10]. Anxiety research makes wide use of three rodent behavioral assays—elevated plus maze, open field, and light/dark box—that present a choice between sheltered and exposed regions [11]. Exposure avoidance in anxiety-related defense behaviors was confirmed to be a correlate of rodent anxiety by treatment with known anxiety-altering agents [12, 13, 14] and is now used to characterize anxiety systems. Modeling anxiety with a small neurogenetic animal would further aid the elucidation of its neuronal and molecular bases. Drosophila neurogenetics research has elucidated the mechanisms of fundamental behaviors and implicated genes that are often orthologous across species. In an enclosed arena, flies stay close to the walls during spontaneous locomotion [15, 16], a behavior proposed to be related to anxiety [17]. We tested this hypothesis with manipulations of the GABA receptor, serotonin signaling, and stress. The effects of these interventions were strikingly concordant with rodent anxiety, verifying that these behaviors report on an anxiety-like state. Application of this method was able to identify several new fly anxiety genes. The presence of conserved neurogenetic pathways in the insect brain identifies Drosophila as an attractive genetic model for the study of anxiety and anxiety-related disorders, complementing existing rodent systems. PMID:27020741

  18. Mechanical defenses of plant extrafloral nectaries against herbivory

    PubMed Central

    Gish, Moshe; Mescher, Mark C.; De Moraes, Consuelo M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Extrafloral nectaries play an important role in plant defense against herbivores by providing nectar rewards that attract ants and other carnivorous insects. However, extrafloral nectaries can themselves be targets of herbivory, in addition to being exploited by nectar-robbing insects that do not provide defensive services. We recently found that the extrafloral nectaries of Vicia faba plants, as well as immediately adjacent tissues, exhibit high concentrations of chemical toxins, apparently as a defense against herbivory. Here we report that the nectary tissues of this plant also exhibit high levels of structural stiffness compared to surrounding tissues, likely due to cell wall lignification and the concentration of calcium oxalate crystals in nectary tissues, which may provide an additional deterrent to herbivore feeding on nectary tissues. PMID:27489584

  19. Mechanical defenses of plant extrafloral nectaries against herbivory.

    PubMed

    Gish, Moshe; Mescher, Mark C; De Moraes, Consuelo M

    2016-01-01

    Extrafloral nectaries play an important role in plant defense against herbivores by providing nectar rewards that attract ants and other carnivorous insects. However, extrafloral nectaries can themselves be targets of herbivory, in addition to being exploited by nectar-robbing insects that do not provide defensive services. We recently found that the extrafloral nectaries of Vicia faba plants, as well as immediately adjacent tissues, exhibit high concentrations of chemical toxins, apparently as a defense against herbivory. Here we report that the nectary tissues of this plant also exhibit high levels of structural stiffness compared to surrounding tissues, likely due to cell wall lignification and the concentration of calcium oxalate crystals in nectary tissues, which may provide an additional deterrent to herbivore feeding on nectary tissues.

  20. Directed energy planetary defense

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubin, Philip; Hughes, Gary B.; Bible, Johanna; Bublitz, Jesse; Arriola, Josh; Motta, Caio; Suen, Jon; Johansson, Isabella; Riley, Jordan; Sarvian, Nilou; Clayton-Warwick, Deborah; Wu, Jane; Milich, Andrew; Oleson, Mitch; Pryor, Mark; Krogen, Peter; Kangas, Miikka

    2013-09-01

    Asteroids and comets that cross Earth's orbit pose a credible risk of impact, with potentially severe disturbances to Earth and society. Numerous risk mitigation strategies have been described, most involving dedicated missions to a threatening object. We propose an orbital planetary defense system capable of heating the surface of potentially hazardous objects to the vaporization point as a feasible approach to impact risk mitigation. We call the system DE-STAR for Directed Energy System for Targeting of Asteroids and exploRation. DE-STAR is a modular phased array of kilowatt class lasers powered by photovoltaic's. Modular design allows for incremental development, test, and initial deployment, lowering cost, minimizing risk, and allowing for technological co-development, leading eventually to an orbiting structure that would be developed in stages with both technological and target milestones. The main objective of DE-STAR is to use the focused directed energy to raise the surface spot temperature to ~3,000K, allowing direct vaporization of all known substances. In the process of heating the surface ejecting evaporated material a large reaction force would alter the asteroid's orbit. The baseline system is a DE-STAR 3 or 4 (1-10km array) depending on the degree of protection desired. A DE-STAR 4 allows for asteroid engagement starting beyond 1AU with a spot temperature sufficient to completely evaporate up to 500-m diameter asteroids in one year. Small asteroids and comets can be diverted/evaporated with a DESTAR 2 (100m) while space debris is vaporized with a DE-STAR 1 (10m).