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Sample records for embankments and retaining walls

  1. 2. VIEW OF WEST HEADWALL AND WING WALL, FROM EMBANKMENT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW OF WEST HEADWALL AND WING WALL, FROM EMBANKMENT TO THE SOUTHWEST, FACING NORTHEAST. - Cut Stone Bridge, Southern Pacific Railroad line spanning runoff channel at South Spruce Avenue, South San Francisco, San Mateo County, CA

  2. 132. View of Great Wall of China retaining wall and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    132. View of Great Wall of China retaining wall and unnamed viaduct on Grandfather Mountain. Viaduct completed in 1987. Looking northwest. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  3. Estimated splash and training wall height requirements for stepped chutes applied to embankment dams

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Aging embankment dams are commonly plagued with insufficient spillway capacity. To provide increased spillway capacity, stepped chutes are frequently applied as an overtopping protection system for embankment dams. Stepped chutes with sufficient length develops aerated flow. The aeration and flow...

  4. 17. RETAINING WALL CRIBBING AND ROAD VIEW, LOOKING IN SOUTHWARD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. RETAINING WALL CRIBBING AND ROAD VIEW, LOOKING IN SOUTHWARD DIRECTION OF TRAVEL BELOW DIAMOND PEAK. ROAD SIGN NOTES SWITCHBACK SEEN IN CA-270-14 TO CA-270-16. LOOKING ESE. - Lassen Park Road, Mineral, Tehama County, CA

  5. STREET FRONT AND LAVA ROCK RETAINING WALL WITH ENTRY AWNING. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    STREET FRONT AND LAVA ROCK RETAINING WALL WITH ENTRY AWNING. VIEW FACING NORTH-NORTHEAST. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Naval Housing Area Makalapa, Senior Officers' Quarters Type A, 37 Makalapa Drive, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  6. BRICK RETAINING WALL AND STEPS AT FRONT YARD OF CROATAN, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BRICK RETAINING WALL AND STEPS AT FRONT YARD OF CROATAN, VIEW TOWARD GARDEN, FACING NORTHEAST - Overhills, Fort Bragg Military Reservation, Approximately 15 miles NW of Fayetteville, Overhills, Harnett County, NC

  7. RIVER AND ROAD VIEW SHOWING METAL CRIB RETAINING WALLS AT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    RIVER AND ROAD VIEW SHOWING METAL CRIB RETAINING WALLS AT RIGHT, FACING SOUTHWEST. PHOTO IS TAKEN FROM SAME POSITION AS PHOTO NO. 84, BUT WITH LONG LENS - Generals Highway, Three Rivers, Tulare County, CA

  8. 9. VIEW TO NORTH; SOUTH RETAINING WALL AND SOUTH FACADE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. VIEW TO NORTH; SOUTH RETAINING WALL AND SOUTH FACADE OF MBE BUILDING (Asano) - Los Angeles Union Passenger Terminal, Mail, Baggage, & Express Building, 800 North Alameda Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  9. Elevation of Warrington Avenue Bridge and cut stone retaining wall ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Elevation of Warrington Avenue Bridge and cut stone retaining wall southbound on Warrington Avenue - Pittsburgh & Castle Shannon Railroad, Warrington Avenue Bridge, Overbrook Trolley Line, Crossing Warrington Avenue, Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, PA

  10. 8. VIEW OF DOWNSTREAM OUTLET CULVERT AND WING RETAINING WALLS, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. VIEW OF DOWNSTREAM OUTLET CULVERT AND WING RETAINING WALLS, LOOKING NORTHWEST - High Mountain Dams in Upalco Unit, Twin Pots Dam, Ashley National Forest, 10.1 miles North of Mountain Home, Mountain Home, Duchesne County, UT

  11. 10. Photocopy copy of historic photograph showing retaining wall and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Photocopy copy of historic photograph showing retaining wall and gabeon of lower dam. Date and photographer unknown. (original in possession of United States Department of Agriculture-Forest Service-Allegheny National Forest) VIEW NORTHEAST - Loleta Recreation Area, Lower Dam, 6 miles Southeast of interesection of State Route 24041 & State Route 66, Loleta, Elk County, PA

  12. 4. TURNOUT AND RETAINING WALL AT BASE OF TURTLEBACK DOME. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. TURNOUT AND RETAINING WALL AT BASE OF TURTLEBACK DOME. FACING EAST AT VIEW OF YOSEMITE VALLEY; EL CAPITAN ON LEFT, HALF DOME AT CENTER AND SENTINEL DOME AT LEFT REAR. POST AT LOWER LEFT MARKED 'W3' IS MARKER FOR SELF GUIDED TOUR TO PARK. - Wawona Road, Between South Entrance & Yosemite Valley, Yosemite Village, Mariposa County, CA

  13. 9. VIEW OF ROCK SLIDE AND STONE RETAINING WALL ALONG ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. VIEW OF ROCK SLIDE AND STONE RETAINING WALL ALONG THE RAILROAD GRADE ABOUT 3/4 MILE SOUTHWEST OF VIVIAN PARK, LOOKING SOUTHWEST - Heber Creeper Railroad Line, Section from Bridal Veil Falls to Vivian Park, Between Provo & Heber City, Provo, Utah County, UT

  14. Detail of staircase (stepped ramp) and retaining wall at West ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of staircase (stepped ramp) and retaining wall at West 102nd Street, soccer field at right, looking south, with London Plane trees surrounding field. - Henry Hudson Parkway, Extending 11.2 miles from West 72nd Street to Bronx-Westchester border, New York County, NY

  15. Seismic Stability Evaluation of Folsom Dam and Reservoir Project. Report 7. Upstream Retaining Wall

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-07-01

    such movements would threaten the integrity of the embankment. If excessive 5 sliding were to occur, the freeboard could be lost and the reservoir...Dam and Reservoir was transferred to the US Bureau of Reclamation for operation and maintenance. As an integral part of the Central Valley Project, the...and 9. The wall is 406 ft long and consists of 12 monoliths . The crest elevation varies between Elevation 310 and 350 ft and is controlled by the

  16. Seismic Structural Considerations for the Stem and Base of Retaining Walls Subjected to Earthquake Ground Motions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    Structure Interaction for Seismic Evaluation of Earth - Retaining Lock and Cantilever Walls " for which Dr. Robert M. Ebeling, Engineering and Informatic...yielding of stem wall and permanent displacement The seismic evaluation of earth retaining wall structures is more complex due to soil-structure...for static earth pressures. This aspect is investigated for older retaining wall systems by examining the margin of safety inherent in the old working 4

  17. Seismic Structural Considerations for the Stern and Base of Retaining Walls Subjected to Earthquake Ground Motions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    Unit 4402JC, entitled “Soil-Structure Interaction for Seismic Evaluation of Earth - Retaining Lock and Cantilever Walls ” for which Dr. Robert M. Ebeling...Introduction Figure 1.3 Earthquake-induced flexural yielding of stem wall and permanent displacement The seismic evaluation of earth retaining wall ...effects depends on the reserve capacity available in the design for static earth pressures. This aspect is investigated for older retaining wall

  18. Review: Application of coal bottom ash as aggregate replacement in highway embankment, acoustic absorbing wall and asphalt mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afiza Mohammed, Syakirah; Rehan Karim, Mohamed

    2017-06-01

    Worldwide annual production of coal bottom ash waste was increased in the last decade and is being dumped on landfill over the years. Its improper disposal has become an environmental concern and resulted in a waste of recoverable resources. There is a pressing and on-going need to develop new recycling methods for coal bottom ash. The utilization of coal bottom ash in highway engineering is one of the options to reduce the environmental problems related to the disposal of bottom ash. The present review describe the physical and chemical properties of coal bottom ash waste and its current application as highway embankment material, as acoustic absorbing material and as aggregate replacement in asphalt mixtures. The purpose of this review is to stimulate and promote the effective recycling of coal bottom ash in highway engineering industry.

  19. 26. GARAGE AND RETAINING WALLS NEAR SAR3. NOTE SEVEN OAKS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. GARAGE AND RETAINING WALLS NEAR SAR-3. NOTE SEVEN OAKS DAM ROAD CONSTRUCTION SCAR ON MOUNTAINSIDE IN DISTANCE. VIEW TO NORTHWEST. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  20. 4. CONSTRUCTION DETAIL, SW CORNER, SHOWING RETAINING WALL, BRIDGE WALL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. CONSTRUCTION DETAIL, SW CORNER, SHOWING RETAINING WALL, BRIDGE WALL AND EROSION ON ROAD SURFACE. - Bridalveil Fall Bridge No. 3, Spanning Bridalveil Creek on carriage road, Yosemite Village, Mariposa County, CA

  1. Automatic Thickness and Volume Estimation of Sprayed Concrete on Anchored Retaining Walls from Terrestrial LIDAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Sánchez, J.; Puente, I.; GonzálezJorge, H.; Riveiro, B.; Arias, P.

    2016-06-01

    When ground conditions are weak, particularly in free formed tunnel linings or retaining walls, sprayed concrete can be applied on the exposed surfaces immediately after excavation for shotcreting rock outcrops. In these situations, shotcrete is normally applied conjointly with rock bolts and mesh, thereby supporting the loose material that causes many of the small ground falls. On the other hand, contractors want to determine the thickness and volume of sprayed concrete for both technical and economic reasons: to guarantee their structural strength but also, to not deliver excess material that they will not be paid for. In this paper, we first introduce a terrestrial LiDAR-based method for the automatic detection of rock bolts, as typically used in anchored retaining walls. These ground support elements are segmented based on their geometry and they will serve as control points for the co-registration of two successive scans, before and after shotcreting. Then we compare both point clouds to estimate the sprayed concrete thickness and the expending volume on the wall. This novel methodology is demonstrated on repeated scan data from a retaining wall in the city of Vigo (Spain), resulting in a rock bolts detection rate of 91%, that permits to obtain a detailed information of the thickness and calculate a total volume of 3597 litres of concrete. These results have verified the effectiveness of the developed approach by increasing productivity and improving previous empirical proposals for real time thickness estimation.

  2. Experimental Study of Dry Granular Flow and Impact Behavior Against a Rigid Retaining Wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yuan-Jun; Towhata, Ikuo

    2013-07-01

    Shallow slope failure in mountainous regions is a common and emergent hazard in terms of its damage to important traffic routes and local communities. The impact of dry granular flows consisting of rock fragments and other particles resulting from shallow slope failures on retaining structures has yet to be systematically researched and is not covered by current design codes. As a preliminary study of the impact caused by dry granular flows, a series of dry granular impact experiments were carried out for one model of a retaining wall. It was indirectly verified that the total normal force exerted on a retaining wall consists of a drag force ( F d), a gravitational and frictional force ( F gf), and a passive earth force ( F p), and that the calculation of F d can be based on the empirical formula defined in NF EN Eurocode 1990 ( Eurocode structuraux. Base de calcul des structures, AFNOR La plaine Saint Denis, 2003). It was also indirectly verified that, for flow with Froude number from 6 to 11, the drag coefficient ( C d) can be estimated using the previously proposed empirical parameters.

  3. Dynamic response of flexible retaining walls

    SciTech Connect

    Younan, A.H.; Veletsos, A.S.; Bandyopadhyay, K.

    1997-01-01

    Making use of an extension of a recently proposed, relatively simple, approximate method of analysis, a critical evaluation is made of the response to horizontal ground shaking of flexible walls retaining a uniform, linear, viscoelastic stratum of constant thickness and semiinfinite extent in the horizontal direction. Both cantilever and top-supported walls are examined. Following a detailed description of the method and of its rate of convergence, comprehensive numerical solutions are presented that elucidate the action of the system and the effects of the various parameters involved. The parameters varied include the flexibility of the wall, the condition of top support, and the characteristics of the ground motion. The effects of both harmonic base motions and an actual earthquake record are examined. Special attention is paid to the effects of long-period, effectively static excitations. A maximum dynamic response is then expressed as the product of the corresponding static response and an appropriate amplification or deamplification factor. The response quantities examined include the displacements of the wall relative to the moving base, the dynamic wall pressures, and the total wall force, base shear and base moment.

  4. 40. RETAINING WALL CONSTRUCTION SHOWING PORTION OF COMPLETED WALL. BACKFILLING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    40. RETAINING WALL CONSTRUCTION SHOWING PORTION OF COMPLETED WALL. BACKFILLING BY POWER SHOVEL IN PROGRESS. ZION NP NEGATIVE NO. 1490. PHOTOGRAPHER: PARKER, NO DATE - Zion-Mount Carmel Highway, Springdale, Washington County, UT

  5. Inventory and Comparison of Floodplain Embankment along Large Rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Flood control is a fundamental human response to flood risk, and floodplain embankment by dike (levee) construction is among the oldest forms of societal impacts to natural systems. Large lowland alluvial valleys are some of Earth's most distinctive environments and represent high levels of geodiversity and biodiversity. Embankment of large lowland alluvial river valleys alters fundamental processes related to floodplain hydrology, sedimentation, and ecology and eventually results in a transformation of the embanked floodplain environment. Since embankment, many large lowland floodplains have been heaviliy modified for floodplain agriculture and include high population densities, increasing flood risk. While there is much discussion about the pros and cons of dike construction and the impact to floodplain environments there is no systematic inventory which documents the magnitude and intensity of floodplain embankment to lowland rivers. In this study we characterize and inventory floodplain embankment along large lowland alluvial valleys. The review includes some of Earth's largest embanked fluvial systems, and primarilly focuses on northern hemisphere rivers in the United States, Europe and Asia. Data sources includes the U.S. National Levee Database, SRTM DEM, recently obtained high resolution satellite imagery, various national topographic map series, and hydrologic data from the published literature. These data are integrated into a GIS framework to facilitate the measurement and characterisation of floodplain embankment. Spatial indices of floodplain embankment are constructed, including the intensity of embankment and how it relates to the natural floodplain and constriction of flooding.

  6. Completion of Embankment, Spillway and Outlet Works

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-08-01

    principal features of the project include (1) a rolled earthfill embankment approximately 14,980 feet long; (2) a limited service spillway consisting...approach channel, intake structure and service bridge, a 708-foot long by 13-foot diameter cut and cover conduit, stilling basin and excavated discharge...FOUNDATION. a. General. The limited service spillway is founded in weathered clay shale of the Pawpaw Formation of Lower Cretaceous age. The outlet works

  7. Detail of basaltic rock retaining walls just below top switchback. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of basaltic rock retaining walls just below top switchback. 500 ft long retaining wall at left, scale figure in distance, view south. - La Bajada Historic Trails and Roads, Approximately 1 mile East/Northeast of intersection of State Highway 16 and Indian Service Road 841, La Bajada, Santa Fe County, NM

  8. 6. CREST ROAD ON UPPER EMBANKMENT, SHOWING MASONRY UPSTREAM PARAPET ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. CREST ROAD ON UPPER EMBANKMENT, SHOWING MASONRY UPSTREAM PARAPET WALL (LEFT) AND ENTRANCE TO DEER FLAT NAMPA CANAL HEADWORKS (ALSO LEFT). VIEW TO WEST. - Boise Project, Deer Flat Embankments, Lake Lowell, Nampa, Canyon County, ID

  9. 5. DETAIL OF UPSTREAM FACE OF UPPER EMBANKMENT, SHOWING HANDPLACED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. DETAIL OF UPSTREAM FACE OF UPPER EMBANKMENT, SHOWING HAND-PLACED ROCK RIPRAP AND MASONRY PARAPET WALL. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - Boise Project, Deer Flat Embankments, Lake Lowell, Nampa, Canyon County, ID

  10. 25. DETAIL OF UPSTREAM FACE OF LOWER EMBANKMENT, SHOWING HANDPLACED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. DETAIL OF UPSTREAM FACE OF LOWER EMBANKMENT, SHOWING HANDPLACED ROCK RIPRAP AND MASONRY PARAPET WALL. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - Boise Project, Deer Flat Embankments, Lake Lowell, Nampa, Canyon County, ID

  11. UPSTREAM (WEST) VIEW SHOWING SOUTH EMBANKMENT BERM AND CONCRETE COREWALL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    UPSTREAM (WEST) VIEW SHOWING SOUTH EMBANKMENT BERM AND CONCRETE COREWALL AT CENTER, WITH COOKE DAM POND AT LEFT AND POWERHOUSE (MI-98-C) AND SPILLWAY (MI-98-B) IN BACKGROUND. VIEW TO NORTHEAST - Cooke Hydroelectric Plant, South Embankment, Cook Dam Road at Au Sable River, Oscoda, Iosco County, MI

  12. Evaluation and development of physically-based embankment breach models

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The CEATI Dam Safety Interest Group (DSIG) working group on embankment erosion and breach modelling has evaluated three physically-based numerical models used to simulate embankment erosion and breach development. The three models identified by the group were considered to be good candidates for fu...

  13. Evaluation and development of physically-based embankment breach models

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The CEATI Dam Safety Interest Group (DSIG) working group on embankment erosion and breach modelling has evaluated three physically-based numerical models used to simulate embankment erosion and breach development. The three models identified by the group were considered to be good candidates for fu...

  14. VIEW OF RETAINING WALL BEHIND FACILITY 532. VIEW FACING EAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF RETAINING WALL BEHIND FACILITY 532. VIEW FACING EAST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, Intersection of Acacia Road and Brich Circle, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  15. 25. VIEW TO EAST; SHOWS CURVE IN SOUTH RETAINING WALL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. VIEW TO EAST; SHOWS CURVE IN SOUTH RETAINING WALL AND SIDEWALK ELECTROLIER ON ALISO STREET (Asano) - Los Angeles Union Passenger Terminal, Mail, Baggage, & Express Building, 800 North Alameda Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  16. 24. VIEW TO NORTHEAST; OBLIQUE VIEW OF SOUTH RETAINING WALL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. VIEW TO NORTHEAST; OBLIQUE VIEW OF SOUTH RETAINING WALL AND PARKING STRUCTURE BELOW REA LOADING DOCK (Asano) - Los Angeles Union Passenger Terminal, Mail, Baggage, & Express Building, 800 North Alameda Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  17. Dynamic characteristics and seismic stability of expanded polystyrene geofoam embankments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amini, Zahra A.

    Expanded Polystyrene (EPS) geofoam has become a preferred material in various construction applications due to its light weight. Application of EPS accelerates the projects particularly on soft soils. The focus of this research is on the application of the EPS in embankments and its behavior mainly under harmonic vibration. The goal of this study was to investigate dynamic characteristics of freestanding vertical EPS geofoam embankment and address potential seismic issues that result from the distinguished dynamic behavior of such systems due to the layered and discrete block structure. A series of experimental studies on EPS 19 and a commercially available adhesive was conducted. Two-dimensional numerical analyses were performed to replicate the response of EPS geofoam embankment to horizontal and vertical harmonic motions. The results of the analyses have shown that for some acceleration amplitude levels interlayer sliding is expected to occur in EPS geofoam embankments almost immediately after the start of the base excitation; however, as a highly efficient energy dissipation mechanism sliding ceases rapidly. Shear keys and adhesive may be used to prevent interlayer sliding if they cover the proper extent of area of the embankment. EPS blocks placed in the corners of the embankment and at the edges of the segment prohibited from sliding may experience high stress concentrations. The embankment may show horizontal sway and rocking once sliding is prevented.

  18. Numerical and reliability analysis of gravity cantilever retaining walls backfilled with shredded tires subjected to seismic loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huggins, Eleanor Lynn

    Shredded tires have been considered as a suitable alternative to conventional sand and gravel backfill materials as they offer benefits from their significantly lower unit weight, reductions in the cost of materials and construction, and because they utilize a common and potentially hazardous waste material. This research addresses some gaps in previous research in the implementation of shredded tires in this capacity by examining variation in material properties through a reliability analysis, developing an improved design technique for retaining walls tailored to shredded tire fills, and simulating how shredded tire backfill behaves in conjunction with retaining walls when subject to seismic loads. First, an in depth literature review was performed to determine previously defined material properties of shredded tires based on a myriad of standard and specialized lab tests performed for many sizes and types of shredded tires. Review of the literature also served to identify additional design considerations that, along with geotechnical properties and LRFD methods, were used to design a retaining wall that was optimized for use with shredded tire fills. This wall was then modeled with the shredded tire fill in the finite element software, PLAXIS, under seismic loadings and considering variations in the material properties as defined by the literature as well as utilizing different damping schemes at governing equation level and constitutive model for the materials. The conclusion was that shredded tires can be a very beneficial alternative to conventional fills and further benefit can be realized by designing walls specifically for shredded tire use thus reducing wall size and changing wall dimensions for optimum shredded tire fill performance.

  19. Basic User’s Guide: Computer Program for Design and Analysis of Inverted-T Retaining Walls and Floodwalls (TWDA).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-01

    COMPUTER PROGRAM FOR DESIGN AND ANALYSIS OF INVERTED-T RETAINING WALLS AND FLOODWALLS (TWNDA) William A. Price, Robert L Hll H-. Wayne Jones, Reed L...GRANT NUMBER(.) William A./ Price Reed L./Mosher Robert L. Hall Michael Ey George IH. Wayne/Jones _______________ 9. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME AND... Reed L. Mosher, and Michael E. George, all of the CAD(C. The work was managed and coordinated by Dr. N. Radhakrishnan, Special Technical Assistant

  20. Seismic analysis for translational failure of landfills with retaining walls.

    PubMed

    Feng, Shi-Jin; Gao, Li-Ya

    2010-11-01

    In the seismic impact zone, seismic force can be a major triggering mechanism for translational failures of landfills. The scope of this paper is to develop a three-part wedge method for seismic analysis of translational failures of landfills with retaining walls. The approximate solution of the factor of safety can be calculated. Unlike previous conventional limit equilibrium methods, the new method is capable of revealing the effects of both the solid waste shear strength and the retaining wall on the translational failures of landfills during earthquake. Parameter studies of the developed method show that the factor of safety decreases with the increase of the seismic coefficient, while it increases quickly with the increase of the minimum friction angle beneath waste mass for various horizontal seismic coefficients. Increasing the minimum friction angle beneath the waste mass appears to be more effective than any other parameters for increasing the factor of safety under the considered condition. Thus, selecting liner materials with higher friction angle will considerably reduce the potential for translational failures of landfills during earthquake. The factor of safety gradually increases with the increase of the height of retaining wall for various horizontal seismic coefficients. A higher retaining wall is beneficial to the seismic stability of the landfill. Simply ignoring the retaining wall will lead to serious underestimation of the factor of safety. Besides, the approximate solution of the yield acceleration coefficient of the landfill is also presented based on the calculated method.

  1. Ecohydrology of an Embanked Lowland UK River Meadow and the Effects of Embankment Removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clilverd, H.; Thompson, J.; Sayer, C.; Heppell, K.; Axmacher, J.

    2012-12-01

    Pristine riparian and floodplain ecosystems are in a state of dynamic balance due to the regular floods that continuously reshape river channels and their banks, and transport water, sediment and nutrients onto the floodplain. However, the natural flow regime of many rivers has been altered by channelization and artificial embankments designed to protect agricultural and urban developments from flooding. This has had a lasting impact on the hydrological characteristics of floodplain ecosystems and the biological communities that inhabit them. Floodplain restoration, through embankment removal and the reconfiguration of river channels, is now being increasingly employed to re-establish river-floodplain connections and assist the recovery of lost or declining species. In order to manage a river restoration site for plant biodiversity, it is necessary to understand the physical and nutritional status of the root environment. We conducted fine scale (10 × 10 m) botanical and chemical sampling on a 3 ha embanked grassland meadow in Norfolk (Eastern England) and assessed the spatial pattern of plant communities in relation to soil physicochemical conditions. Continuous measurements of groundwater depth and river stage were collectively used to determine changes in the hydrological regime following embankment-removal. Prior to the restoration the meadow plant community was dominated by Holcus lanatus, Ranunculus repens and Agrostis stolonifera. Species richness was fairly low (mean: 8 spp. per m2), and indices of alpha-diversity suggest low heterogeneity of the plant assemblages (mean values for Shannon's Diversity and 1/Simpson's Diversity = 1.4 and 3.4, respectively). Top soils were moderately fertile, with mean respective Olsen P and plant available potassium concentrations of 9.1 mg P kg-1and 1.6 mg K+g-1. Plant available ammonium and nitrate concentrations were on average 31.7 mg NH4+-N kg-1 and 2.8 mg NO3--N kg-1, respectively. River water was enriched in nitrate

  2. 10. EXTERIOR VIEW OF STONE RETAINING WALL, AIRWAY, BALTIMORE FAN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. EXTERIOR VIEW OF STONE RETAINING WALL, AIRWAY, BALTIMORE FAN HOUSE AND HILLMAN FAN HOUSE LOOKING EAST The stone retaining wall encloses a pit which may have been the original site of the Hillman Fan House steam engine. The concrete foundations in the left foreground are more recent (c. 1930) additions which may be supports for a porch or stairway. The sloping airshaft, in the middle ground, connected the Baltimore shaft to the New Fan House (not shown) and Hillman Fan House in the background. The Hillman engine house is on the left. - Dorrance Colliery Fan Complex, South side of Susquehanna River at Route 115 & Riechard Street, Wilkes-Barre, Luzerne County, PA

  3. Chronic cutaneous chest wall fistula and gallstone empyema due to retained gallstones.

    PubMed

    Gaster, Richard S; Berger, Aaron J; Ahmadi-Kashani, Mastaneh; Shrager, Joseph B; Lee, Gordon K

    2014-08-14

    We report a case of a 72-year-old man who presented with a persistent pleural effusion and painful abscess in the right lower chest wall 6 months following a laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The patient subsequently developed a chronic cutaneous chest wall fistula requiring a large resection and complex closure. The complication was likely secondary to intraoperative spillage of gallstones. While previous reports describe gallstone spillage in the abdominal cavity as benign, this case illustrates that stones left in the abdominal cavity can potentially lead to significant morbidity. Therefore, stones should be diligently removed from the abdominal cavity when spillage occurs. In addition, it is important that operative notes reflect the occurrence of stone spillage so stones may be suspected when a patient presents with an abdominal or thoracic infection following a cholecystectomy.

  4. Tire shreds as lightweight retaining wall backfill: Active conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Tweedie, J.J.; Humphrey, D.N.; Sandford, T.C.

    1998-11-01

    A 4.88-m-high retaining wall test facility was constructed to test tire shreds as retaining wall backfill. The front wall of the facility could be rotated outward away from the fill and was instrumented to measure the horizontal stress. Measurement of movement within the backfill and settlement of the backfill surface during wall rotation allowed estimation of the pattern of movement within the fill. Tests were conducted with tire shreds from three suppliers. Moreover, horizontal stress at this rotation for tire shreds was about 35% less than the active stress expected for conventional granular backfill. Design parameters were developed using two procedures; the first used the coefficient of lateral earth pressure and the other was based on equivalent fluid pressure. The inclination of the sliding plane with respect to horizontal was estimated to range from 61{degree} to 70{degree} for the three types of shreds.

  5. 12. View of the swimming pool retaining wall, the steps, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. View of the swimming pool retaining wall, the steps, ascending to the rock garden, and the Belvedere (more distant view). The view includes the bronze sculpture "Bather at the Seine" by Maillol (Ca. 1921), and a honey locust (Gleditsia triacanthos). - Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller National Historical Park, 54 Elm Street, Woodstock, Windsor County, VT

  6. 13. View of the swimming pool retaining wall, the steps, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. View of the swimming pool retaining wall, the steps, ascending to the rock garden, and the Belvedere (less distant view). The view includes the bronze sculpture "Bather at the Seine" by Maillol (Ca. 1921), and a honey locust (Gleditsia triacanthos). - Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller National Historical Park, 54 Elm Street, Woodstock, Windsor County, VT

  7. DETAILED VIEW OF MASONRY WORK OF THE RETAINING WALL LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAILED VIEW OF MASONRY WORK OF THE RETAINING WALL LOOKING TO THE SOUTH - Grand Canyon National Park Roads, Village Loop Retaining No. 1, North side of Village Loop Drive, Grand Canyon Village, Coconino County, AZ

  8. DISTANT VIEW OF RETAINING WALL AS SEEN LOOKING TO THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DISTANT VIEW OF RETAINING WALL AS SEEN LOOKING TO THE SOUTH - Grand Canyon National Park Roads, Village Loop Retaining No. 1, North side of Village Loop Drive, Grand Canyon Village, Coconino County, AZ

  9. 14. DETAIL OF TRANSITION FROM WING WALL TO CONCRETE RETAINING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. DETAIL OF TRANSITION FROM WING WALL TO CONCRETE RETAINING WALL AT SOUTHERN END OF DAM - Upper Doughty Dam, 200 feet west of Garden State Parkway, 1.7 miles west of Absecon, Egg Harbor City, Atlantic County, NJ

  10. Development and characterization of soil material parameters for embankment breach

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Despite the widespread use of earthen dams, the processes by which earthen embankments erode and fail when overtopped during extreme events are only imperfectly understood. Aging of these dams and the associated recent focus on dam rehabilitation has increased the need for new technology and tools ...

  11. Efficacy and fate of glyphosate on Swedish railway embankments.

    PubMed

    Torstensson, Lennart; Börjesson, Elisabet; Stenström, John

    2005-09-01

    The herbicide glyphosate, N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine, as Spectra (240 g AI litre(-1) SL; Monsanto Europe AB), RoundUp (360 g AI litre(-1) SL; Monsanto) and RoundUp Bio (360 g AI litre(-1) SL; Monsanto), have been used for weed control on Swedish railway embankments since 1986. This article summarizes results from studies of the weed effect and behaviour of glyphosate for the period 1984-2003. Studies on a railway embankment with a range of application rates showed excellent weed control at 5 litre ha(-1) of RoundUp Bio. The appearance of glyphosate and its metabolite AMPA [(aminomethyl)phosphonic acid] in the embankment, eg mobility and persistence, was also studied. Mobility was low in most cases, the main proportion of both glyphosate and AMPA being found in the upper 30-cm layer although minor amounts penetrated to lower depths. The 50% disappearance time of glyphosate was generally <5 months in railway embankments but cases with longer persistence were found. Transport to the groundwater was observed for glyphosate and AMPA in groundwater pipes along tracks. Downward transport appears to be dependent on the application rate, which should not exceed 3 litre ha(-1) of RoundUp Bio to avoid groundwater contamination. A lower rate of glyphosate mixed with a low rate of another herbicide may achieve acceptable weed control and be environmentally safer. Copyright 2005 Society of Chemical Industry

  12. 12. A VIEW LOOKING EAST, FROM ATOP THE RETAINING WALL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. A VIEW LOOKING EAST, FROM ATOP THE RETAINING WALL ON THE NORTHEAST ABUTMENT PROVIDES A COMPANION VIEW TO THE PREVIOUS PHOTOGRAPH. THE CLUB HOUSE, PORTIONS OF THE BOARDWALK, A PICNIC SHELTER AND THE SWIMMING STEPS ARE VISIBLE, ALONG WITH A PORTION OF THE NINETEENTH CENTURY BUILDING ON THE NORTH BANK WHICH IS NOW HOME TO COMMERCIAL ENDEAVORS - Delphi Bridge on U.S. Route 421, Spanning Deer Creek at U.S. Route 421, Delphi, Carroll County, IN

  13. Rotational Response of Toe-Restrained Retaining Walls to Earthquake Ground Motions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    spillway chute walls, spillway discharge channel walls, approach channel walls to outlet works structures, highway and railway relocation retaining...design criteria for Corps retaining structures..................................................28 1.5 Axial load capacity of spillway invert slabs...158 5.2.3 Structural geometry input

  14. 6. TERRACED, STONE RETAINING WALLS BEHIND HOUSE No. 16. VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. TERRACED, STONE RETAINING WALLS BEHIND HOUSE No. 16. VIEW TO WEST. - Rainbow Hydroelectric Facility, On north bank of Missouri River 2 miles Northeast of Great Falls, & end of Rainbow Dam Road, Great Falls, Cascade County, MT

  15. STONE RETAINING WALL IN CEMETERY CENTER, WITH BIVOUAC OF THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    STONE RETAINING WALL IN CEMETERY CENTER, WITH BIVOUAC OF THE DEAD PLAQUE IN CENTER FOREGROUND. VIEW TO SOUTHEAST. - Fort Mackinac Post Cemetery, Mackinac State Park, Mackinac Island, Mackinac County, MI

  16. 36. VIEW TO NORTH; SOUTH RETAINING WALL AT TRACK LOCATION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    36. VIEW TO NORTH; SOUTH RETAINING WALL AT TRACK LOCATION SHOWING ELECTROLIER (Asano) - Los Angeles Union Passenger Terminal, Mail, Baggage, & Express Building, 800 North Alameda Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  17. 19. VIEW TO SOUTHEAST, NORTH SIDE RETAINING WALL; WEST FRONT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. VIEW TO SOUTHEAST, NORTH SIDE RETAINING WALL; WEST FRONT MBE BUILDING, FIRST FLOOR (Dobson) - Los Angeles Union Passenger Terminal, Mail, Baggage, & Express Building, 800 North Alameda Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  18. 37. VIEW TO SOUTHEAST; DETAIL, SOUTH RETAINING WALL ELECTROLIER (Asano) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    37. VIEW TO SOUTHEAST; DETAIL, SOUTH RETAINING WALL ELECTROLIER (Asano) - Los Angeles Union Passenger Terminal, Mail, Baggage, & Express Building, 800 North Alameda Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  19. 11. EAST VIEW OF RETAINING WALL C ON NORTH SIDE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. EAST VIEW OF RETAINING WALL C ON NORTH SIDE OF EASTBOUND TRAFFIC LANES, EAST OF HAMILTON AVENUE BRIDGE - Davison Freeway from M-10 to Oakland Avenue, Davison Freeway, M-10 to Highland Park, Highland Park, MI

  20. View of main terrace retaining wall with mature tree on ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of main terrace retaining wall with mature tree on left center, camera facing southeast - Naval Training Station, Senior Officers' Quarters District, Naval Station Treasure Island, Yerba Buena Island, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  1. 9. VIEW OF SOUTH SIDE OF BRIDGE RETAINING WALL, SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. VIEW OF SOUTH SIDE OF BRIDGE RETAINING WALL, SHOWING SMOOTH STEEL REBAR SET IN CONCRETE, LOOKING SOUTH - Box Elder Creek Arch Bridge, Spanning former channel of South fork of Box Elder Creek, Mantua, Box Elder County, UT

  2. 1. VIEW TO SOUTH (RETAINING WALL OF ORE RECEIVING PLATFORM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW TO SOUTH (RETAINING WALL OF ORE RECEIVING PLATFORM TO LEFT). - Vanadium Corporation of America (VCA) Naturita Mill, Sampling Building & Ore Receiving Platform, 3 miles Northwest of Naturita, between Highway 141 & San Miguel River, Naturita, Montrose County, CO

  3. ELEVATION FROM EAST, SHOWING INTEGRAL RETAINING WALL EXTENDING TO NORTH. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ELEVATION FROM EAST, SHOWING INTEGRAL RETAINING WALL EXTENDING TO NORTH. - Brick Arch Culvert over Master Street, Spanning dirt slope of Master Street at Thirty-third Street (U.S. Route 13), Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  4. Characteristics of Wind Velocity and Temperature Change Near an Escarpment-Shaped Road Embankment

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Moon; You, Ki-Pyo; You, Jang-Youl

    2014-01-01

    Artificial structures such as embankments built during the construction of highways influence the surrounding airflow. Various types of damage can occur due to changes in the wind velocity and temperature around highway embankments. However, no study has accurately measured micrometeorological changes (wind velocity and temperature) due to embankments. This study conducted a wind tunnel test and field measurement to identify changes in wind velocity and temperature before and after the construction of embankments around roads. Changes in wind velocity around an embankment after its construction were found to be influenced by the surrounding wind velocity, wind angle, and the level difference and distance from the embankment. When the level difference from the embankment was large and the distance was up to 3H, the degree of wind velocity declines was found to be large. In changes in reference wind velocities around the embankment, wind velocity increases were not proportional to the rate at which wind velocities declined. The construction of the embankment influenced surrounding temperatures. The degree of temperature change was large in locations with large level differences from the embankment at daybreak and during evening hours when wind velocity changes were small. PMID:25136681

  5. Characteristics of wind velocity and temperature change near an escarpment-shaped road embankment.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Moon; You, Ki-Pyo; You, Jang-Youl

    2014-01-01

    Artificial structures such as embankments built during the construction of highways influence the surrounding airflow. Various types of damage can occur due to changes in the wind velocity and temperature around highway embankments. However, no study has accurately measured micrometeorological changes (wind velocity and temperature) due to embankments. This study conducted a wind tunnel test and field measurement to identify changes in wind velocity and temperature before and after the construction of embankments around roads. Changes in wind velocity around an embankment after its construction were found to be influenced by the surrounding wind velocity, wind angle, and the level difference and distance from the embankment. When the level difference from the embankment was large and the distance was up to 3H, the degree of wind velocity declines was found to be large. In changes in reference wind velocities around the embankment, wind velocity increases were not proportional to the rate at which wind velocities declined. The construction of the embankment influenced surrounding temperatures. The degree of temperature change was large in locations with large level differences from the embankment at daybreak and during evening hours when wind velocity changes were small.

  6. VIEW SHOWING THE ENTRY THROUGH THE RETAINING WALL (FOREGROUND) TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW SHOWING THE ENTRY THROUGH THE RETAINING WALL (FOREGROUND) TO THE CONCRETE SLAB. NOTE THE 1¾" MOUNTING BOLTS FOR THE STEEL PLATE BASE OF THE 5" GUN, SET IN THE GUN BLOCK. STEEL REINFORCING RODS PROTRUDING FROM THE BROKEN TOPS OF THE RETAINING WALLS ARE ALSO VISIBLE. VIEW FACING EAST - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island 5-Inch Antiaircraft Battery, South Gun Emplacement, Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  7. Translational Response of Toe-Restrained Retaining Walls to Earthquake Ground Motions Using CorpsWallSlip (CWSlip)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    invert spillway slab (not shown). The translation of the structural wedge is assumed to occur during earthquake shaking. A drop down box entitled...e.g., navigation walls retaining earth, spillway chute walls, spill- way discharge channel walls, approach channel walls to outlet works structures...1.5 Axial load capacity of spillway invert slabs..................................................................... 27 1.6 Background and research

  8. Penetrating the Glass Wall: Creating and Retaining the Interactive Illusion in Televised Distance Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gutenko, Gregory

    Current interests in and implementations of televised distant education technology systems and programming mark what can be considered the third attempt to deliver instruction to remotely situated students. To compensate for diminished stimuli (losses in visual resolution, three dimensional space, sound perspective, etc.), adroit users of…

  9. DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION OF EMBANKMENT-GROUNDS FOR ABUTMENT CONFINED BY FILLS ON EXPRESSWAYS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Hirotake; Yokota, Seiya

    The number of abutments confined by fills constructed on expressways have increased to utilize materials generated on-site and reduce costs. An abutment confined by fill is an abutment constructed on an embankment-ground and supported by piles. In order to build abutments on embankment-grounds, the embankment-ground requires good ground resistance. But, up to now, there is no established method for its design and construction. Accordingly, it became necessary to establish a method. To do this, we have studied 107 cases of embankment-ground constructions on expressways. This report shows their deformation characteristics, settlement characteristics, and the impact of earthquakes on piles constructed in embankment-grounds, and describes how the standards for the design and construction management of embankment-grounds were established based on the findings.

  10. Reliability Coupled Sensitivity Based Design Approach for Gravity Retaining Walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guha Ray, A.; Baidya, D. K.

    2012-09-01

    Sensitivity analysis involving different random variables and different potential failure modes of a gravity retaining wall focuses on the fact that high sensitivity of a particular variable on a particular mode of failure does not necessarily imply a remarkable contribution to the overall failure probability. The present paper aims at identifying a probabilistic risk factor ( R f ) for each random variable based on the combined effects of failure probability ( P f ) of each mode of failure of a gravity retaining wall and sensitivity of each of the random variables on these failure modes. P f is calculated by Monte Carlo simulation and sensitivity analysis of each random variable is carried out by F-test analysis. The structure, redesigned by modifying the original random variables with the risk factors, is safe against all the variations of random variables. It is observed that R f for friction angle of backfill soil ( φ 1 ) increases and cohesion of foundation soil ( c 2 ) decreases with an increase of variation of φ 1 , while R f for unit weights ( γ 1 and γ 2 ) for both soil and friction angle of foundation soil ( φ 2 ) remains almost constant for variation of soil properties. The results compared well with some of the existing deterministic and probabilistic methods and found to be cost-effective. It is seen that if variation of φ 1 remains within 5 %, significant reduction in cross-sectional area can be achieved. But if the variation is more than 7-8 %, the structure needs to be modified. Finally design guidelines for different wall dimensions, based on the present approach, are proposed.

  11. Seismic Design of Gravity Retaining Walls

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-01-01

    Engineering F 0 Massachusetts Institute of Technology Lf 77 Massachusetts Avenue (%J Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 .2g 5g - .5g DTIG N ELECTE 0.5 Al3 DE .. ~O...Work Units 31173 Massachusetts Institute of Technology and 31589 Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 11. CONTROLLING OFFICE NAME AND ADDRESS 12. REPORT DATE... reviewed . A shortcoming of the sliding block analogy is discussed, and corrections obtained using a two-block model are presented. Several sources of

  12. 9. PHOTO LOOKING SOUTH FROM THE RETAINING WALL ON THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. PHOTO LOOKING SOUTH FROM THE RETAINING WALL ON THE NORTH ABUTMENT REVEALS THE SOUTHEAST ABUTMENT. DETAILS OF THE CONCRETE WORK ON THE BALUSTRADE ARE ALSO VISIBLE - Delphi Bridge on U.S. Route 421, Spanning Deer Creek at U.S. Route 421, Delphi, Carroll County, IN

  13. Seismic performance of geosynthetic-soil retaining wall structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarnani, Saman

    Vertical inclusions of expanded polystyrene (EPS) placed behind rigid retaining walls were investigated as geofoam seismic buffers to reduce earthquake-induced loads. A numerical model was developed using the program FLAC and the model validated against 1-g shaking table test results of EPS geofoam seismic buffer models. Two constitutive models for the component materials were examined: elastic-perfectly plastic with Mohr-Coulomb (M-C) failure criterion and non-linear hysteresis damping model with equivalent linear method (ELM) approach. It was judged that the M-C model was sufficiently accurate for practical purposes. The mechanical property of interest to attenuate dynamic loads using a seismic buffer was the buffer stiffness defined as K = E/t (E = buffer elastic modulus, t = buffer thickness). For the range of parameters investigated in this study, K ≤50 MN/m3 was observed to be the practical range for the optimal design of these systems. Parametric numerical analyses were performed to generate design charts that can be used for the preliminary design of these systems. A new high capacity shaking table facility was constructed at RMC that can be used to study the seismic performance of earth structures. Reduced-scale models of geosynthetic reinforced soil (GRS) walls were built on this shaking table and then subjected to simulated earthquake loading conditions. In some shaking table tests, combined use of EPS geofoam and horizontal geosynthetic reinforcement layers was investigated. Numerical models were developed using program FLAC together with ELM and M-C constitutive models. Physical and numerical results were compared against predicted values using analysis methods found in the journal literature and in current North American design guidelines. The comparison shows that current Mononobe-Okabe (M-O) based analysis methods could not consistently satisfactorily predict measured reinforcement connection load distributions at all elevations under both static

  14. The impact of road and railway embankments on runoff and soil erosion in eastern Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, P.; Gimeìnez-Morera, A.; Novara, A.; Keesstra, S.; Jordán, A.; Masto, R. E.; Brevik, E.; Azorin-Molina, C.; Cerdà, A.

    2015-12-01

    Road and railway infrastructure increased in the Mediterranean region during the last three decades. This included the building of embankments, which are assumed to be a~large source of sediments and runoff. However, little is known about soil erosion rates, the factors that control them, and the processes that contribute to detachment, transport and deposition of sediments from road and railway embankments. The objective of this study was therefore to assess the impacts of road and railway embankments as a source of sediment and water, and compare them to other land use types (citrus plantations and shrublands) representative of the Cànyoles watershed to evaluate the importance of road embankments as a~source of water and sediment under high magnitude low frequency rainfall events. Sixty rainfall experiments (1 m2 plots; 60 min duration; 78 mm h-1 rainfall intensity) were carried out on these land use types: 20 on two railway embankments (10 + 10), 20 on two road embankments (10 + 10), and 10 on citrus and 10 on shrubland. Road and railway embankments were characterized by bare soils with low organic matter and high bulk density. Erosion processes were more active in road, railway and citrus plots, and null in the shrublands. The non-sustainable soil erosion rates of 3 Mg ha-1 y-1 measured on the road embankments were due to the efficient runoff connectivity plus low infiltration rates within the plot as the runoff took less than one minute to reach the runoff outlet. Road and railway embankments are both an active source of sediments and runoff, and soil erosion control strategies must be applied. The citrus plantations also act as a~source of water and sediments (1.5 Mg ha-1 y-1), while shrublands are sediment sinks, as no overland flow was observed due to the high infiltration rates.

  15. User’s Reference Manual: Computer Program for Design and Analysis of Inverted-T Retaining Walls and Floodwalls (TWDA).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-01

    methodology. The analysis procedure considers overturn- ing, sliding, and bearing pressure, relative to the soil immediately adjacent to the wall...equilibrium methods. (e) Limiting value of the overturning stalbi lity resultant ratio . (f) Reinforced concrete design parameters. (g) Specification...combination of Values inside user-defined ranges of base width, bottom of tow elevation, base slope, and key length, for a given stem ratio or toe width

  16. Construction of an embankment with a fly and bottom ash mixture: field performance study

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, S.; Balunaini, U.; Yildirim, I.Z.; Prezzi, M.; Siddiki, N.Z.

    2009-06-15

    Fly ash and bottom ash are coal combustion by-products (CCBPs) that are generated in large quantities throughout the world. It is often economical to dispose ash as mixtures rather than separately; that notwithstanding, only a few studies have been performed to investigate the behavior of fly and bottom ash mixtures, particularly those with high contents of fly ash. Also, there is very limited data available in the literature on the field performance of structures constructed using ash mixtures. This paper describes the construction and the instrumentation of a demonstration embankment built with an ash mixture (60:40 by weight of fly ash:bottom ash) on State Road 641, Terre Haute, Ind. Monitoring of the demonstration embankment was conducted for a period of 1 year from the start of construction of the embankment. The settlement of the embankment stabilized approximately 5 months after the end of its construction. According to horizontal inclinometer readings, the differential settlement at the top of the embankment is about 5 mm. Results from field quality control tests performed during construction of the demonstration embankment and monitoring data from vertical and horizontal inclinometers and settlement plates indicate that the ash mixture investigated can be considered an acceptable embankment construction material.

  17. Thermal stability analysis under embankment with asphalt pavement and cement pavement in permafrost regions.

    PubMed

    Junwei, Zhang; Jinping, Li; Xiaojuan, Quan

    2013-01-01

    The permafrost degradation is the fundamental cause generating embankment diseases and pavement diseases in permafrost region while the permafrost degradation is related with temperature. Based on the field monitoring results of ground temperature along G214 Highway in high temperature permafrost regions, both the ground temperatures in superficial layer and the annual average temperatures under the embankment were discussed, respectively, for concrete pavements and asphalt pavements. The maximum depth of temperature field under the embankment for concrete pavements and asphalt pavements was also studied by using the finite element method. The results of numerical analysis indicate that there were remarkable seasonal differences of the ground temperatures in superficial layer between asphalt pavement and concrete pavement. The maximum influencing depth of temperature field under the permafrost embankment for every pavement was under the depth of 8 m. The thawed cores under both embankments have close relation with the maximum thawed depth, the embankment height, and the service time. The effective measurements will be proposed to keep the thermal stabilities of highway embankment by the results.

  18. Thermal Stability Analysis under Embankment with Asphalt Pavement and Cement Pavement in Permafrost Regions

    PubMed Central

    Jinping, Li; Xiaojuan, Quan

    2013-01-01

    The permafrost degradation is the fundamental cause generating embankment diseases and pavement diseases in permafrost region while the permafrost degradation is related with temperature. Based on the field monitoring results of ground temperature along G214 Highway in high temperature permafrost regions, both the ground temperatures in superficial layer and the annual average temperatures under the embankment were discussed, respectively, for concrete pavements and asphalt pavements. The maximum depth of temperature field under the embankment for concrete pavements and asphalt pavements was also studied by using the finite element method. The results of numerical analysis indicate that there were remarkable seasonal differences of the ground temperatures in superficial layer between asphalt pavement and concrete pavement. The maximum influencing depth of temperature field under the permafrost embankment for every pavement was under the depth of 8 m. The thawed cores under both embankments have close relation with the maximum thawed depth, the embankment height, and the service time. The effective measurements will be proposed to keep the thermal stabilities of highway embankment by the results. PMID:24027444

  19. 6. "TEST STAND NO. 13, RETAINING WALLS & APRON, SECTIONS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. "TEST STAND NO. 1-3, RETAINING WALLS & APRON, SECTIONS & ELEVATIONS." Specifications No. OC11-50-10; Drawing No. 60-09-06; no sheet number within title block. D.O. SERIES 1109/20, Rev. B. Stamped: RECORD DRAWING - AS CONSTRUCTED. Below stamp: Contract DA-04-353 Eng. 177, Rev. B; Date: 26 Dec. 1951. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-3, Test Area 1-115, northwest end of Saturn Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  20. Design, Construction, and Analysis of Fabric-Reinforced Embankment Test Section at Pinto Pass, Mobile, Alabama.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-10-01

    AD-A 07 556 ARM ENGINEER WATERWAYS EXPERIMENT STATION VICKSBURG--ETC F/G 13/13 DESIGN CONSTRUCTION AND ANALYSIS OF FABRIC-REINFORCED EMBANKM--ETC(U...AND ANALYSIS OF ~FABRIC-REINFORCED EMBANKMENT TEST if SECTION AT PINTO PASS, MOBILE, ALABAMA Lr: by Jack Fowler Geoechnical Laboratory I U. S. Army...AND ANALYSIS OF FABRIC- REINFORCED EMBANKMENT TEST SECTION AT PINTO PASS, MOBILE, ALABAMA 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTHOR(e) 1. CONTRACT

  1. Seepage and settlement monitoring for earth embankment dams using fully distributed sensing along optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, P. Y.; Zhou, Y.; Thévenaz, Luc; Jiang, G. L.

    2008-12-01

    A method for seepage and settlement monitoring in earth embankment dams using fully distributed sensing along optical fibres is proposed. A model is developed for simulating and monitoring seepage and settlement systems. This model relates the strains and the temperature changes to the fiber Brillouin gain spectrum in the embankment dam embedding the optical fiber sensors. The model consists of two parts. Submodel 1 addresses the simulation of seepage inside the embankment dam. Submodel 2 relates the measurement of the fiber Brillouin gain spectrum to the changes in temperature and strain inside the embankment dam. Both the changes in temperature and strain during the process are used to reveal serious seepages and settlements occurring inside the embankment dam. The continuously decreasing temperature curve shows an abrupt dramatic increasing rate, which shows that the change is not caused by the temperature of the seepage water but the strain. In this paper, as an example, a model filled with the soil from Yellow River is built and bare optical fibers are embedded under different soil layers near the seepage path. The simulated seepage flows under various flow rates are monitored using the optical fibers and measured by a DiTeSt -STA202 distributed temperature and strain analyzer. A partial settlement within the embankment dam model is observed.

  2. The effect of construction stage on the development of retaining wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghazaly, Zuhayr Md; Rahim, Mustaqqim Abdul; Hiung, Voo Kien; Isa, Nur Fitriah; Sofri, Liyana Ahmad

    2017-04-01

    With the growing of population and density in metropolitan areas, especially for the narrow space areas, high rise buildings are the best choice to fulfil the demands for the lacking spaces for development. Hence, it seems deep excavation is necessary to construct underground spaces. Control of soil deformation is crucial for deep excavation in congested urban area to minimize its effect on adjacent structures. During excavation of the soil, retaining walls are required to retain the soil behind it. Therefore, an appropriate method or modelling is required to determine the movement of retaining wall due to lateral earth pressure acts behind it. Finite Element Method (FEM) utilizing computer program PLAXIS, was used to estimate the wall and ground deformation at each stage of excavation.

  3. Effect of axial wall modification on the retention of cement-retained, implant-supported crowns.

    PubMed

    Tan, Kian M; Masri, Radi; Driscoll, Carl F; Limkangwalmongkol, Penwadee; Romberg, Elaine

    2012-02-01

    Compromised angulation of implants may result in abutment preparation that is less than ideal. Compromised abutment preparation may affect the retention of implant-retained crowns. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of 5 implant abutment designs on the retention of cement-retained crowns by varying the number and position of the axial walls. Five prefabricated abutments were attached to an implant analog and embedded in an acrylic resin block. The first abutment was left intact without modification. Axial walls were partially removed from the remaining abutments to produce abutments with 3 walls, 2 adjacent walls, 2 opposing walls, and 1 wall. Five crowns were made for each group. The screw access channel for the first abutment was completely filled with composite resin and the rest were partially filled. The retentive surface area of each abutment was calculated. Crowns were cemented with zinc phosphate cement. Tensile force was applied to separate the castings from the abutments. Peak load to dislodgment was recorded. A 1-way ANOVA was used to test for a significant difference followed by the Tukey Honestly Significant Difference test (α=.05). The abutment with 2 opposing axial walls had significantly higher retention than that of all other groups (F=149.9, df =24, P<.001). The abutment with 3 walls exhibited the second highest retention and was significantly greater than abutments with 2 adjacent walls, 1, and 4 walls. Abutments with 2 adjacent walls and 1 wall were not significantly different from each other. The unmodified abutment with 4 walls exhibited the lowest retention despite having a large retentive surface area. The retention of cemented crowns on implant abutments is influenced by the number and position of axial walls. Copyright © 2012 The Editorial Council of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. River embankment characterization: The joint use of geophysical and geotechnical techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perri, Maria Teresa; Boaga, Jacopo; Bersan, Silvia; Cassiani, Giorgio; Cola, Simonetta; Deiana, Rita; Simonini, Paolo; Patti, Salvatore

    2014-11-01

    Recent flood events in Northern Italy (particularly in the Veneto Region) have brought river embankments into the focus of public attention. Many of these embankments are more than 100 years old and have been repeatedly repaired, so that detailed information on their current structure is generally missing. The monitoring of these structures is currently based, for the most part, on visual inspection and localized measurements of the embankment material parameters. However, this monitoring is generally insufficient to ensure an adequate safety level against floods. For these reasons there is an increasing demand for fast and accurate investigation methods, such as geophysical techniques. These techniques can provide detailed information on the subsurface structures, are non-invasive, cost-effective, and faster than traditional methods. However, they need verification in order to provide reliable results, particularly in complex and reworked man-made structures such as embankments. In this paper we present a case study in which three different geophysical techniques have been applied: electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), frequency domain electromagnetic induction (FDEM) and Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR). Two test sites have been selected, both located in the Province of Venice (NE Italy) where the Tagliamento River has large embankments. The results obtained with these techniques have been calibrated against evidence resolving from geotechnical investigations. The pros and cons of each technique, as well as their relative merit at identifying the specific features of the embankments in this area, are highlighted. The results demonstrate that geophysical techniques can provide very valuable information for embankment characterization, provided that the data interpretation is constrained via direct evidence, albeit limited in space.

  5. Flood risk of natural and embanked landscapes on the Ganges-Brahmaputra tidal delta plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auerbach, L. W.; Goodbred, S. L., Jr.; Mondal, D. R.; Wilson, C. A.; Ahmed, K. R.; Roy, K.; Steckler, M. S.; Small, C.; Gilligan, J. M.; Ackerly, B. A.

    2015-02-01

    The Ganges-Brahmaputra river delta, with 170 million people and a vast, low-lying coastal plain, is perceived to be at great risk of increased flooding and submergence from sea-level rise. However, human alteration of the landscape can create similar risks to sea-level rise. Here, we report that islands in southwest Bangladesh, enclosed by embankments in the 1960s, have lost 1.0-1.5 m of elevation, whereas the neighbouring Sundarban mangrove forest has remained comparatively stable. We attribute this elevation loss to interruption of sedimentation inside the embankments, combined with accelerated compaction, removal of forest biomass, and a regionally increased tidal range. One major consequence of this elevation loss occurred in 2009 when the embankments of several large islands failed during Cyclone Aila, leaving large areas of land tidally inundated for up to two years until embankments were repaired. Despite sustained human suffering during this time, the newly reconnected landscape received tens of centimetres of tidally deposited sediment, equivalent to decades’ worth of normal sedimentation. Although many areas still lie well below mean high water and remain at risk of severe flooding, we conclude that elevation recovery may be possible through controlled embankment breaches.

  6. Development of fragility curves for railway embankment and ballast scour due to overtopping flood flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsubaki, Ryota; Bricker, Jeremy David; Ichii, Koji; Kawahara, Yoshihisa

    2016-11-01

    Fragility curves evaluating a risk of railway embankment fill and track ballast scour were developed. To develop fragility curves, two well-documented events of single-track railway washout during floods in Japan were investigated. Type of damage to the railway was categorized into no damage, ballast scour, and embankment scour, in order of damage severity. Railway overtopping water depth for each event was estimated based on well-documented hydrologic and hydraulic analyses. Normal and log-normal fragility curves were developed based on damage probability derived from field records and the estimated overtopping water depth. A combined ballast and embankment scour model was validated by comparing the results of previous studies and the spatial distribution of railway damage type records.

  7. Case studies of geophysical imaging for road foundation design on soft soils and embankment risk assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whiteley, Robert J.; Kelly, Richard B.; Stewart, Simon B.

    2015-12-01

    Population growth along the coast of eastern Australia has increased demand for new and upgraded transport infrastructure within intervening coastal floodplains and steeper hinterland areas. This has created additional challenges for road foundation design. The floodplain areas in this region are underlain by considerable thicknesses of recently deposited alluvial and clayey marine sediments. If characterisation of these deposits is inadequate they can increase road construction costs and affect long-term road stability and serviceability. Case studies from a major coastal highway upgrade demonstrate how combining surface wave seismic and electrical geophysical imaging with conventional geotechnical testing enhances characterisation of these very soft and soft soils. The geophysical results also provide initial foundation design parameters such as void ratio and pre-consolidation pressure. A further significant risk issue for roads is potential embankment instability. This can occur during new road construction or when upgrades of existing embankments are required. Assessing the causes of instability of existing steeper embankments with drilling and probing is often difficult and costly due to access and safety problems. In these situations combinations of electrical, ground penetrating radar and P-wave seismic imaging technologies can rapidly provide information on the likely conditions below both the roadway and embankment. Case studies show the application of these technologies on two unstable road embankments. It is concluded that the application of both geophysical imaging and geotechnical testing is a cost-effective enhancement for site characterisation of soft soils and for risk assessment of potentially unstable embankments. This approach overcomes many of the current limitations of conventional methods of site investigation that provide point location data only. The incorporation of geophysics into a well crafted site investigation allows concentration on

  8. Removal of river embankments and the modelled effects on river-floodplain hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clilverd, Hannah; Thompson, Julian; Heppell, Kate; Sayer, Carl; Axmacher, Jan

    2015-04-01

    The channelization and embankment of rivers has led to major ecological degradation of aquatic habitats worldwide. River restoration, which often includes the removal of previously constructed barriers between a river and its floodplain, is now being widely used to create favourable hydrological conditions for target species or processes. However the effects of river restoration on hydraulic and hydrological processes are complex, and are often difficult to determine due to the infrequency of long-term monitoring programmes before and after restoration works. To examine the hydrological impacts of embankment removal under a variety of possible hydrological conditions, we developed coupled hydrological/hydraulic models of pre-embankment and post-embankment conditions at a wet grassland meadow in Norfolk, UK using the MIKE-SHE/MIKE 11 system. Groundwater hydrology and climate were monitored between 2007 and 2010 with river inflows being provided from an upstream gauging station. The embanked model was calibrated and validated with observed groundwater data for two consecutive 12-month periods, after which the restored topography was applied to the model and validated for a subsequent 12-month period. The restored model was then run for the same period as the embanked model (i.e. with the same river inflow, precipitation, and potential evapotranspiration data) to remove interannual climate variability and enable a direct comparison between models. Modelled groundwater levels compared well with piezometer observations and reproduced the observed rapid groundwater response to high magnitude rainfall and river flow events. Removal of the embankments resulted in frequent localised flooding at the river edge, widespread floodplain inundation at flows greater than 1.9 m3 sec-1, as well as higher groundwater levels and greater subsurface storage. Restoration had only a minor effect on flood peak attenuation (maximum 5% flood peak reduction), likely due to the small size of

  9. DETAIL SHOWING TOP OF NORTH EMBANKMENT BERM, WITH CONCRETE CORE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL SHOWING TOP OF NORTH EMBANKMENT BERM, WITH CONCRETE CORE WALL ON UPSTREAM (WEST) SIDE. VIEW TO SOUTHEAST - Cooke Hydroelectric Plant, North Embankment, Cook Dam Road at Au Sable River, Oscoda, Iosco County, MI

  10. Characteristics of dewatering induced drawdown curve under blocking effect of retaining wall in aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yong-Xia; Shen, Shui-Long; Yuan, Da-Jun

    2016-08-01

    For deep excavation pits that require the pumping of confined groundwater, a combination of a retaining wall and dewatering with large-diameter wells is usually adopted during excavation to improve safety. Since a retaining wall has a much lower hydraulic conductivity than the surrounding material in the aquifer, blocking of seepage to prolong the seepage path of the groundwater outside of the pit is effective. The retaining walls used during excavation dewatering cause hydraulic head drawdown inside the pit much faster than outside the pit. Thus, difference in hydraulic head between inside and outside of the pit increases. To investigate the mechanism of the blocking effect, numerical simulation using the finite difference method (FDM) was conducted to analyze the effects of pumping in the pit. The FDM results show that drawdown varies along the depth of the confined aquifer. The influence factors of drawdown inside and outside the pit include insertion depth of retaining walls, anisotropy of a confined aquifer and screen length of pumping wells. In addition, FDM results also show that the drawdown-time curve can be divided into four stages: in Stage I, drawdown inside the pit is very small and outside the pit it is almost zero; in Stage II, drawdown increases quickly with time; in Stage III, the drawdown curve is parallel to the Cooper-Jacob curve on semi-log axes; and in Stage IV, the drawdown becomes constant. These characteristics of the drawdown curve under the blocking effect of a retaining wall in an aquifer provide a way of estimating hydrogeological parameters according to pumping test results.

  11. Active and passive electrical and seismic time-lapse monitoring of earthen embankments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rittgers, Justin Bradley

    In this dissertation, I present research involving the application of active and passive geophysical data collection, data assimilation, and inverse modeling for the purpose of earthen embankment infrastructure assessment. Throughout the dissertation, I identify several data characteristics, and several challenges intrinsic to characterization and imaging of earthen embankments and anomalous seepage phenomena, from both a static and time-lapse geophysical monitoring perspective. I begin with the presentation of a field study conducted on a seeping earthen dam, involving static and independent inversions of active tomography data sets, and self-potential modeling of fluid flow within a confined aquifer. Additionally, I present results of active and passive time-lapse geophysical monitoring conducted during two meso-scale laboratory experiments involving the failure and self-healing of embankment filter materials via induced vertical cracking. Identified data signatures and trends, as well as 4D inversion results, are discussed as an underlying motivation for conducting subsequent research. Next, I present a new 4D acoustic emissions source localization algorithm that is applied to passive seismic monitoring data collected during a full-scale embankment failure test. Acoustic emissions localization results are then used to help spatially constrain 4D inversion of collocated self-potential monitoring data. I then turn to time-lapse joint inversion of active tomographic data sets applied to the characterization and monitoring of earthen embankments. Here, I develop a new technique for applying spatiotemporally varying structural joint inversion constraints. The new technique, referred to as Automatic Joint Constraints (AJC), is first demonstrated on a synthetic 2D joint model space, and is then applied to real geophysical monitoring data sets collected during a full-scale earthen embankment piping-failure test. Finally, I discuss some non-technical issues related to

  12. Erodibility characteristics of embankment materials

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Erosion is one of the least reliably defined elements of many hydraulic projects. Earthen embankments (i.e. dams and levees) are an example of hydraulic projects in which erosion and material erodibility have not been reliably defined in the past. Recent as well as past embankment failures have he...

  13. View of McKenzieRichey retaining wall. View from the yard facing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of McKenzie-Richey retaining wall. View from the yard facing northeast. Note the garage in the background - McKenzie Property, Retaining Wall, North Bank of Sailor Gulch, 750 feet northwest of intersection of U.S.F.S. Roads 651 & 349, Placerville, Boise County, ID

  14. View of McKenzieRichey stone retaining wall. View from the north ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of McKenzie-Richey stone retaining wall. View from the north fence facing south - McKenzie Property, Retaining Wall, North Bank of Sailor Gulch, 750 feet northwest of intersection of U.S.F.S. Roads 651 & 349, Placerville, Boise County, ID

  15. Flooding Mitigation of seawalls and river embankments to storm surges in the coastal areas of Guangdong Province, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xianwei; Wang, Xina

    2017-04-01

    The coastal areas of Guangdong Province, China are susceptible to the destructions of tropical cyclones and storm surges. The projected global warming, coastal subsidence and sea level rise together will bring about greater flooding risk to these areas. The seawall and river embankment have played a significant role in mitigating and preventing the coastal low-land areas from the impairment of storm surges flooding and wave runup. However, few risk assessment studies in this region consider the existence of seawall and river embankment and often overestimate the risk and potential economic loss and population affected due to storm surge flooding. This study utilizes a hydraulic model to simulate the overtop flooding and compare those without seawall and river embankment using several specific tropic storm events and extreme events of tropic storm surges in different return periods of 2, 10, 20, 50, 100, 200 and 500 years. Most seawalls are 4 or 5 meters plus another meter of wave levee above the local mean sea level. The river embankments are usually 4 or 5 meter higher than the local mean sea level as well and decrease from the outer estuary to the inner riverine. The modeling results considering seawall and river embankments and from real storm surges are in agreement with on-site survey and observations, while those without infusing seawall and river embankments overestimate the inundation condition and economic loss. Modeling results demonstrate that seawall and river embankment greatly reduce the flooding risk and prevent the low-land area from inundation for most tropic storm events, e.g., for extreme events less than 20 to 50 years, in the coastal areas of Guangdong Province, China. However, the seawall and river embankment may also cause catastrophic disasters once there is an engineering failure of seawalls and river embankment, especially once encountering with an extreme typhoon event, e.g., the 1969 super typhoon Viola in Shantou China and the 2005

  16. Subsurface imaging of flood embankment erosional-piping collapse using a combined MASW and ERI approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brook, Martin

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, non-destructive investigations and management of civil engineering structures is increasingly improving, and assessments are now supported by national and international standards. However, the literature on the applicability of different geophysical techniques to the problem of levee and river embankment monitoring is still limited. Accurate flood levee embankment stability assessment is critically important because embankments and earth dams are subject to water infiltration and internal erosion, which may lead to mechanical weakness and breaching. This study includes a 2D analysis of the instability of an earthen levee, using multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) and electrical resistivity imaging (ERI), along with direct observations of the site engineering geology and geomorphology. Both the modeled Vs and Ω indicate a horizontally-layered subsurface with rapid vertical transitions in both stiffness and conductivity. This conclusion is supported by a covariance analysis of Vs and Ω at varying depths and chainages along the levee. Together with a geomorphic assessment, this indicates that the structure is being destabilized by water infiltration, which is causing erosional-piping, leading to surface subsidence. While the key reason for applying various types of geophysical methods to embankment stability assessment is to undertake a safety examination of the embankment, a secondary reason is to compare and contrast the efficacy of the geophysical methods. To this end, it was found that the integration of covariance analysis of 2D geophysical datasets, alongside sedimentary and topographic data, can help the rapid location of anomalous zones in sub-levee soils between geotechnical boreholes.

  17. Residual Earth Pressure on a Retaining Wall with Sand Backfill Subjected to Forced Cyclic Lateral Displacements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirakawa, Daiki; Nojiri, Minehiro; Aizawa, Hiroyuki; Tatsuoka, Fumio; Sumiyoshi, Takashi; Uchimura, Taro

    A pair of about 11 m-high soil retaining walls of an U-shaped underground reinforced concrete (RC) structure in Tokyo exhibited a large residual inward (i.e., toward the active side) displacement with potential structural damage, which became 18 cm between the tops of the two walls about three years after its completion. Noticeable settlements of the backfill were observed behind the walls. A series of small-scale model tests was performed in the laboratory to understand this field behaviour. The results from in-situ investigation and model tests showed that this wall behaviour can be attributed to a gradual increase in the residual lateral earth pressure, resulting from cyclic lateral displacements of the walls caused by a small number of relatively large seasonal thermal cyclic displacement of the RC wall facing and bottom slab of the structure, not by a great number of relatively small daily displacement. Three factors for the mechanism of this wall behaviour (i.e., ratcheting, cyclic hardening and cyclic loading-induced residual deformation of the backfill) were identified and analyzed based the model test results. The settlement in the backfill observed in the model tests is consistent with the field behaviour.

  18. Earthen embankment breaching

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A large number of embankment structures, including dams, levees, dikes, and barriers, have been built by humans. These structures play a very important role in flood defense, while many are also used for water supply, power generation, transportation, sediment retention, etc. Since these structure...

  19. Use of MWC combined ash for highway embankment application

    SciTech Connect

    Shieh, C.S.; Kalajian, E.H.; Cosentino, P.; Egan, J.

    1998-07-01

    A field study was conducted to demonstrate the suitability of using municipal waste combustor (MWC) combined ash in high way embankment applications. The ash embankment was constructed using conventional techniques and was evaluated for the geotechnical properties and environmental acceptability. Field evaluation of the geotechnical performance of the embankment included specifically California Bearing Ratios (CBR), infiltration, pressuremeter, and cone penetrometer. Environmental analysis determined the ash embankment's leachate and runoff concentrations of As, Ba, Cd, Cr, Pb, Hg, Ag, and Se over time for comparison with drinking water and toxicity standards. Findings of the study indicated that combined ash could be sued as highway fill using conventional construction equipment and methods. The percent of the eight elemental metals in the ash lost to leachate or runoff after one year of exposure to natural rainfall was determined to be less than 0.01% and 0.005%, respectively, of their original weight in the ash. This indicates that greater then 99.99% of each of the eight elemental metals were retained in the ash. Concentrations of the eight EPA listed elemental metals in runoff and leachate from the ash embankment were below the EPA TCLP criteria and drinking water criteria. Results of the one-year monitoring study indicated that, based on the elemental metals examined, WMC combined ash is considered to be environmentally acceptable for highway fill materials applications.

  20. Recruiting and retaining medical technologists.

    PubMed

    Barcus, S; Bernice, J; Evans, J; Labbe, P; Leedy, J A; Rabbitts, D G; Riedemann, G; Therrien, R; Thiessen, C

    1992-01-01

    Personnel recruitment and retention is one of the most challenging facets of management. Despite turnover rates, identifying and retaining good employees should be foremost on any managerial agenda. An effective employee recruiting/relations program enhances the overall productivity of an operation by addressing concerns at staff level, often considered the core of activity. In this issue, we asked our respondents: What methods do you use to recruit and retain medical technologists?

  1. Railway cuttings and embankments: Experimental and numerical studies of ground vibration.

    PubMed

    Kouroussis, Georges; Connolly, David P; Olivier, Bryan; Laghrouche, Omar; Costa, Pedro Alves

    2016-07-01

    Railway track support conditions affect ground-borne vibration generation and propagation. Therefore this paper presents a combined experimental and numerical study into high speed rail vibrations for tracks on three types of support: a cutting, an embankment and an at grade section. Firstly, an experimental campaign is undertaken where vibrations and in-situ soil properties are measured at three Belgian rail sites. A finite element model is then developed to recreate the complex ground topology at each site. A validation is performed and it is found that although the at-grade and embankment cases show a correlation with the experimental results, the cutting case is more challenging to replicate. Despite this, each site is then analysed to determine the effect of earthworks profile on ground vibrations, with both the near and far fields being investigated. It is found that different earthwork profiles generate strongly differing ground-borne vibration characteristics, with the embankment profile generating lower vibration levels in comparison to the cutting and at-grade cases. Therefore it is concluded that it is important to consider earthwork profiles when undertaking vibration assessments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. 3. RETAINING WALL, NORTHEAST VIEW (1992). WrightPatterson Air Force ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. RETAINING WALL, NORTHEAST VIEW (1992). - Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Area B, Building 71, Power Plant Engine Test Torque Stands, Seventh Street between D & G Streets, Dayton, Montgomery County, OH

  3. 2. RETAINING WALL, NORTHEAST VIEW (1992). WrightPatterson Air Force ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. RETAINING WALL, NORTHEAST VIEW (1992). - Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Area B, Building 71, Power Plant Engine Test Torque Stands, Seventh Street between D & G Streets, Dayton, Montgomery County, OH

  4. 4. RETAINING WALL, NORTHEAST VIEW (1992). WrightPatterson Air Force ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. RETAINING WALL, NORTHEAST VIEW (1992). - Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Area B, Building 71, Power Plant Engine Test Torque Stands, Seventh Street between D & G Streets, Dayton, Montgomery County, OH

  5. 6. RETAINING WALLS, NORTHEAST VIEW (1992). WrightPatterson Air Force ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. RETAINING WALLS, NORTHEAST VIEW (1992). - Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Area B, Building 71, Power Plant Engine Test Torque Stands, Seventh Street between D & G Streets, Dayton, Montgomery County, OH

  6. Material Characteristics of Clinker Ash and Examination of Applicability for Embankment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakatsuki, Yoshitaka; Hyodo, Masayuki; Yoshimoto, Norimasa; Nakashita, Akifumi; Ikeda, Takashi

    2009-06-01

    The clinker ash is a coal ash generated by the coal-fired power station. It is characterized by its lightweight particle with asperity due to foaming during production process resulted in high shear stiffness and strength and high permeability. It is, therefore, increasingly used for the embankment material, the base course material, and the drainage material. Moreover, the application has started to be investigated for the vertical drain method and the compaction pile method. However, the physical characteristics and the mechanical characteristics of clinker ash have not been understood yet. It is expected that the stock yard for coal ashes will be insufficient as production of the coal ash will increase. It is necessary to use the coal ash more to maintain the global environment. The design parameter for clinker ash to apply to the embankment material was experimentally investigated in this research.

  7. Spreading Topsoil Encourages Ecological Restoration on Embankments: Soil Fertility, Microbial Activity and Vegetation Cover

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Desirée; Mejías, Violeta; Jáuregui, Berta M.; López-Archilla, Ana Isabel; Peco, Begoña

    2014-01-01

    The construction of linear transport infrastructure has severe effects on ecosystem functions and properties, and the restoration of the associated roadslopes contributes to reduce its impact. This restoration is usually approached from the perspective of plant cover regeneration, ignoring plant-soil interactions and the consequences for plant growth. The addition of a 30 cm layer of topsoil is a common practice in roadslope restoration projects to increase vegetation recovery. However topsoil is a scarce resource. This study assesses the effects of topsoil spreading and its depth (10 to 30 cm) on two surrogates of microbial activity (β-glucosidase and phosphatase enzymes activity and soil respiration), and on plant cover, plant species richness and floristic composition of embankment vegetation. The study also evaluates the differences in selected physic-chemical properties related to soil fertility between topsoil and the original embankment substrate. Topsoil was found to have higher values of organic matter (11%), nitrogen (44%), assimilable phosphorous (50%) and silt content (54%) than the original embankment substrate. The topsoil spreading treatment increased microbial activity, and its application increased β-glucosidase activity (45%), phosphatase activity (57%) and soil respiration (60%). Depth seemed to affect soil respiration, β-glucosidase and phosphatase activity. Topsoil application also enhanced the species richness of restored embankments in relation to controls. Nevertheless, the depth of the spread topsoil did not significantly affect the resulting plant cover, species richness or floristic composition, suggesting that both depths could have similar effects on short-term recovery of the vegetation cover. A significant implication of these results is that it permits the application of thinner topsoil layers, with major savings in this scarce resource during the subsequent slope restoration work, but the quality of topsoil relative to the

  8. Spreading topsoil encourages ecological restoration on embankments: soil fertility, microbial activity and vegetation cover.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Desirée; Mejías, Violeta; Jáuregui, Berta M; Costa-Tenorio, Marga; López-Archilla, Ana Isabel; Peco, Begoña

    2014-01-01

    The construction of linear transport infrastructure has severe effects on ecosystem functions and properties, and the restoration of the associated roadslopes contributes to reduce its impact. This restoration is usually approached from the perspective of plant cover regeneration, ignoring plant-soil interactions and the consequences for plant growth. The addition of a 30 cm layer of topsoil is a common practice in roadslope restoration projects to increase vegetation recovery. However topsoil is a scarce resource. This study assesses the effects of topsoil spreading and its depth (10 to 30 cm) on two surrogates of microbial activity (β-glucosidase and phosphatase enzymes activity and soil respiration), and on plant cover, plant species richness and floristic composition of embankment vegetation. The study also evaluates the differences in selected physic-chemical properties related to soil fertility between topsoil and the original embankment substrate. Topsoil was found to have higher values of organic matter (11%), nitrogen (44%), assimilable phosphorous (50%) and silt content (54%) than the original embankment substrate. The topsoil spreading treatment increased microbial activity, and its application increased β-glucosidase activity (45%), phosphatase activity (57%) and soil respiration (60%). Depth seemed to affect soil respiration, β-glucosidase and phosphatase activity. Topsoil application also enhanced the species richness of restored embankments in relation to controls. Nevertheless, the depth of the spread topsoil did not significantly affect the resulting plant cover, species richness or floristic composition, suggesting that both depths could have similar effects on short-term recovery of the vegetation cover. A significant implication of these results is that it permits the application of thinner topsoil layers, with major savings in this scarce resource during the subsequent slope restoration work, but the quality of topsoil relative to the

  9. Recruiting and Retaining Cyberwarriors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-07

    challenge is further exacerbated by a new generation , commonly referred to as Millennials , now coming into the workplace. The Millennials have...these growing recruitment and retention challenges along with the many generational differences of the Millennials in an attempt to provide some...is further exacerbated by a new generation now coming into the workplace. This new generation , commonly referred to as Millennials , has different

  10. Caesar Creek Lake, Little Miami River Basin, Ohio, Embankment Criteria and Performance Report.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-09-01

    11111_[25 .411± L MICROCO.PY RESOLUTION TESI .HTRI NOTES: 1. Slope st.0;y conmpuia#-ons Wo.re Mande Wi~, g m IB1M 360 prayon capua v"in NV-. 41-KZ-Hf293...ared of uam Sol) 1974. Impervious Core Embankmenit (7) Impervious embankment being placed along left side of con- duit, and right abutment toe of dam 17

  11. Dynamic response of a pair of walls retaining a viscoelastic solid

    SciTech Connect

    Veletsos, A.S.; Parikh, V.H.; Younan, A.H.; Bandyopadhyay, K.

    1995-01-01

    Making use of a previously reported, simple, approximate method of analysis, a critical evaluation is made of the dynamic pressures and forces induced by horizontal ground shaking on a pair of infinitely long, parallel walls retaining a uniform viscoelastic solid. The walls are presumed to be rigid but elastically constrained against rotation at their base. The effects of both harmonic and earthquake-induced excitations are examined. The accuracy of the method is assessed by comparing its predictions for the special case of fixed-based walls with those obtained by an exact method, and comprehensive numerical data are presented which elucidate the underlying response mechanisms, and the effects and relative importance of the parameters involved. The parameters examined include the characteristics of the ground motion, the ratio of the distance between walls to the height of the contained material, and the flexibility of the rotational wall constraints. In addition to valuable insights into the responses of the systems investigated, the results presented provide a convenient framework for the analysis of more complex systems as well.

  12. Intertidal landscape response time to dike breaching and stepwise re-embankment: A combined historical and geomorphological study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jongepier, Iason; Wang, Chen; Missiaen, Tine; Soens, Tim; Temmerman, Stijn

    2015-05-01

    Intertidal flats and marshes provide important ecosystem services to coastal and estuarine societies, and have therefore been subject to extensive research. Most of these studies, however, have one thing in common: intertidal landscape response has been studied from a rather short-term perspective, mostly less than 100 years. Furthermore, the impact of embankment practices on the development of the remaining intertidal area and its stability has hardly been studied at all. In this paper, a longer term perspective (sixteenth to twenty-first centuries) is used in order to (1) reconstruct intertidal landscape evolution, using both historical and soil maps and (2) assess the effect of stepwise embankment on the intertidal area, both in terms of the surface proportions of the different components of an intertidal area and the vertical and lateral sediment elevation and sedimentation rates. The reconstruction and embankment effect assessment will be applied to the Land of Saeftinghe, an intertidal area in the Western Scheldt estuary that was partially re-embanked in a stepwise manner into an embankment landscape called the Waasland polder area (Belgium/The Netherlands). Important outcomes of this study are: (1) a combination of historical-geographical methods proves to be a valuable tool for past intertidal landscape reconstruction; (2) dike breaching and partial (stepwise) re-embankment are important driving mechanisms for the evolution of the remaining intertidal landscape towards new equilibrium conditions, though the new landscape equilibria can only be reached with a certain time lag; (3) subsequent embankments with a short time interval (15 to 21 years) prevent tidal marsh surface areas from reaching an equilibrium state; and (4) between 60 and 96 years are needed for tidal marsh elevation to reach an equilibrium.

  13. Soil erosion on road and railways embankments in the Canyoles river Basin. Eastern Spain.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerdà, Artemi; Antonio, Giménez-Morera; Félix Ángel, González-Peñaloza; María, Burguet; Paulo, Pereira; José Reyes, Ruiz

    2013-04-01

    Mediterranean landscapes are man-made. Its human ecosystems are characterized by a high population density, a long history of human settlement and an intense exchange of goods and people (Cerdà et al., 2010). This was possible due to a dense road network, most of it created during the Roman Empire. Modern roads and railways increased drastically during the last 30 years in the Mediterranean. Spain is a clear example of the acceleration of the road and railway infrastructures (Bel, 2005), especially during the 1960s as the tourism started to become a big issue in this part of the World. The increase in road and railways during the last 30 years resulted in a new transport system in Spain, which is based on high-speed railways and motorways. The characteristic of these infrastructures is that they were built by means of embankments, and little is now about the erosional response of those embankments to rainfall. The objective of this research is to assess the soil losses measured in road and railway embankments. The Canyoles River watershed was selected as an example of a region with a dense and recently developed modern network of roads, motorways and railway. The Canyoles river watershed is the natural path between the Mediterranean coast and Central Spain, the capital of the country and the touristic regions. Two motorways and two railways were built or re-built during the last two years and this paper assesses their impact on soil and water losses. As soil erosion rates are dependent on the high intensity - low frequency rainfall events, rainfall simulation experiments (40 experiments) were conducted (1 m2 plots; 60 minutes duration; 78 mm h-1 intensity) were carried out over plots on 2 railway (n=10 + 10) and motorway (n=10 + 10) research sites in August 2011, under very dry conditions. Soil moisture was below 5 % in the top 2 cm soil layer. The vegetation cover was very low in the two road and two railway embankments as the average cover was 4.2 % ranging from

  14. Recruiting and Retaining Summer Staff.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crossen, Brian; Yerkes, Rita

    1998-01-01

    Recruiting of camp staff is challenged by economic and workplace restructuring, including business downsizing, part-time and temporary employment patterns, and generational attitude changes. Strategies for hiring and retaining staff include knowing what college-age workers want, marketing benefits, adopting new business strategies, and empowering…

  15. Recruiting and Retaining Adult Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hadfield, Janice

    2003-01-01

    Adult learners, long the stepchildren of colleges and universities, have nearly become the norm, and they spend billions of dollars each year on education. This chapter takes a customer-oriented approach to recruiting and retaining adult students in higher education. (GCP)

  16. Particle Clogging in Filter Media of Embankment Dams: A Numerical and Experimental Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoun, T.; Kanarska, Y.; Ezzedine, S. M.; Lomov, I.; Glascoe, L. G.; Smith, J.; Hall, R. L.; Woodson, S. C.

    2013-12-01

    The safety of dam structures requires the characterization of the granular filter ability to capture fine-soil particles and prevent erosion failure in the event of an interfacial dislocation. Granular filters are one of the most important protective design elements of large embankment dams. In case of cracking and erosion, if the filter is capable of retaining the eroded fine particles, then the crack will seal and the dam safety will be ensured. Here we develop and apply a numerical tool to thoroughly investigate the migration of fines in granular filters at the grain scale. The numerical code solves the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations and uses a Lagrange multiplier technique which enforces the correct in-domain computational boundary conditions inside and on the boundary of the particles. The numerical code is validated to experiments conducted at the US Army Corps of Engineering and Research Development Center (ERDC). These laboratory experiments on soil transport and trapping in granular media are performed in constant-head flow chamber filled with the filter media. Numerical solutions are compared to experimentally measured flow rates, pressure changes and base particle distributions in the filter layer and show good qualitative and quantitative agreement. To further the understanding of the soil transport in granular filters, we investigated the sensitivity of the particle clogging mechanism to various parameters such as particle size ratio, the magnitude of hydraulic gradient, particle concentration, and grain-to-grain contact properties. We found that for intermediate particle size ratios, the high flow rates and low friction lead to deeper intrusion (or erosion) depths. We also found that the damage tends to be shallower and less severe with decreasing flow rate, increasing friction and concentration of suspended particles. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under

  17. A note on the seismic response of rigid cantilever retaining walls.

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Y; Yeh, C. S.

    2011-03-01

    The elasticity based dynamic response of retaining walls, attached to a semi-infinite elastic backfill stratum, has yet to be solved exactly. There are three analytical approximation approaches in the literature to simplify the equations of motion. The solutions based on these approaches can be numerically implemented. However, the frequency range for which these solutions may provide accurate results has not yet been established. In this paper, the exact frequency equation and frequency spectra for the problem under free vibration are presented first, and the three simplified equations of motion are then reviewed. Next, the exact frequency spectra are then used to assess the frequency range of applicability of the three approximation approaches. It is concluded that for all practical values of Poisson's ratio, all three approaches provide a reasonable approximation to the exact solution in the low frequency range of the first mode. The first mode response of the horizontal and rocking impedance functions, for the rigid retaining wall are then derived, based on the simplified equations of motion, and the numerical data are presented for the low frequency range identified.

  18. Clarence J. Brown Reservoir, Greater Miami River Basin, Ohio, Embankment Criteria and Performance Report.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-09-01

    Box 59 LOUISVILLE, KENTUCKY 40201 ORLED-G 9 December 1982 SUBJECT: Embankment Criteria and Performance Report C. J. Brown Reservoir, Ohio SEE ...at the dam site. ( See Plate 3, for alluvial and glacial deposits of a portion of Clark County.) Topography in the project area varies from hummocky...CHUTECULL U8 S,~ ARMY .. ,op~er ’-ir can’r’rwa.#Cr Ot~t~ - - S ewn ~ O L-a ,d s h e e /3 0 f e b o * co sKll Jil See ~o.15 she 3 4 ~C-thacfion -It

  19. Unit 5, STA. 50+00+RB, retaining wall at Orner Building & ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Unit 5, STA. 50+00+RB, retaining wall at Orner Building & First U.M. Church Rectory-detail - Johnstown Local Flood Protection Project, Beginning on Conemaugh River approx 3.8 miles downstream from confluence of Little Conemaugh & Stony Creek Rivers at Johnstown, Johnstown, Cambria County, PA

  20. Unit 5, STA. 50+00+RB, retaining wall at First U.M. Churchdetail ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Unit 5, STA. 50+00+RB, retaining wall at First U.M. Church-detail - Johnstown Local Flood Protection Project, Beginning on Conemaugh River approx 3.8 miles downstream from confluence of Little Conemaugh & Stony Creek Rivers at Johnstown, Johnstown, Cambria County, PA

  1. Flow and Transport of Fines in Dams and Embankments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glascoe, L. G.; Ezzedine, S. M.; Kanarska, Y.; Lomov, I.; Antoun, T.; Woodson, S. C.; Hall, R. L.; Smith, J.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the flow of fines in porous media and fractured media is significant for industrial, environmental, geotechnical and petroleum technologies to name a few. Several models have been proposed to simulate the flow and transport of fines using single or two-phase flow approaches while other models rely on mobile and immobile transport approaches. However, to the authors' best knowledge, all the proposed modeling approaches have not been compared to each other in order to define their limitations and domain of validation. In the present study, several models describing the transport of fines in heterogeneous porous and fractured media will be presented and compared to each other. Furthermore, we will evaluate their performance on the same published experimental sets of published data. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 and was sponsored by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), Science and Technology Directorate, Homeland Security Advanced Research Projects Agency (HSARPA).

  2. 4. OVERVIEW TO EAST, FROM WEST END OF EARTHEN EMBANKMENT, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. OVERVIEW TO EAST, FROM WEST END OF EARTHEN EMBANKMENT, SHOWING DOWNSTREAM FACE OF DAM, AND SPILLWAY FACE IN DISTANCE AT UPPER RIGHT. - Prado Dam, Embankment, Santa Ana River near junction of State Highways 71 & 91, Corona, Riverside County, CA

  3. Workshop on Monitoring and Failure Detection in Earthen Embankments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-15

    technology fields : The number of undergraduates funded by your agreement who graduated during this period and will continue to pursue a graduate or Ph.D...degree in science, mathematics, engineering, or technology fields : Number of graduating undergraduates who achieved a 3.5 GPA to 4.0 (4.0 max scale...engineering or technology fields : 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... Student Metrics This section only applies to

  4. Losses of surface runoff, total solids, and nitrogen during bermudagrass establishment on levee embankments.

    PubMed

    Burwell, Robert W; Beasley, Jeffrey S; Gaston, Lewis A; Borst, Steven M; Sheffield, Ron E; Strahan, Ron E; Munshaw, Gregg C

    2011-01-01

    Nutrient and sediment runoff from newly constructed levee embankments pose a threat to water quality during soft armor vegetation establishment. Research was initiated in 2008 and 2009 to evaluate the effect of bermudagrass ( L.) coverage and N source on nutrient and sediment runoff from levee embankments during establishment. Bermudagrass plots were seeded at 195.3 kg pure live seed ha and fertilized at 50 kg N ha using a water-soluble N source, urea or NH-NO, or slow-release N source, S-coated urea (SCU) or urea formaldehyde (UF), with controls unfertilized. Vegetative cover percentage, time until the onset of runoff, runoff volume, and total solids (TS), NO-N, and NH-N concentrations were measured from simulated and natural rainfall events for 70 d in 2008 and 56 d in 2009. Bermudagrass at 90% grass cover delayed the onset of runoff an additional 441 to 538 s and reduced runoff volumes 74 to 84% of that exhibited at 10% grass cover. Nitrogen fertilizers did not accelerate bermudagrass growth sufficiently, however, to reduce TS loading compared with unfertilized bermudagrass in either year of the study. The application of urea and SCU resulted in cumulative N losses of 2.45 and 3.13 kg ha compared with 1.59 kg ha from the unfertilized bermudagrass in 2008, and 1.73 kg ha from NH-NO vs. 0.24 kg ha from controls in 2009. Only UF increased bermudagrass establishment without increasing cumulative N losses compared with unfertilized bermudagrass. Therefore, the benefit of greater erosion and runoff resistance expected from N-accelerated vegetative growth did not occur but had the unintended consequence of higher N losses when water-soluble N and SCU fertilizers were applied. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  5. Monitoring Coastal Embankment Subsidence and Relative Sea Level Rise in Coastal Bangladesh Using Satellite Geodetic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Q.; Shum, C. K.; Jia, Y.; Yi, Y.; Zhu, K.; Kuo, C. Y.; Liibusk, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Bangladesh Delta is located at the confluence of the mega Ganges, Brahmaputra and Meghan Rivers in the Bay of Bengal. It is home to over 160 million people and is one of the most densely populated countries in the world. It is prone to seasonal transboundary monsoonal flooding, potentially aggravated by more frequent and intensified cyclones resulting from anthropogenic climate change. Sea level rise, along with tectonic, sediment compaction/load and groundwater extraction induced land uplift/subsidence, have significantly exacerbated these risks and Bangladesh's coastal vulnerability. Bangladesh has built 123 coastal embankments or polders since the 1960's, to protect the coastal regions from cyclone/tidal flooding and to reduce salinity incursions. Since then, many coastal polders have suffered severe erosion and anthropogenic damage, and require repairs or rebuilding. However, the physical and anthropogenic processes governing the historic relative sea level rise and its future projection towards its quantification remain poorly understood or known, and at present not accurate enough or with an adequately fine local spatial scale for practical mitigation of coastal vulnerability or coastal resilience studies. This study reports on our work in progress to use satellite geodetic and remote sensing observations, including satellite radar altimetry/backscatter measurements over land and in coastal oceans, optical/infrared imageries, and SAR backscatter/InSAR data, to study the feasibility of coastal embankment/polder erosion monitoring, quantify seasonal polder water intrusions, observing polder subsidence, and finally, towards the goal of improving the relative sea level rise hazards assessment at the local scale in coastal Bangladesh.

  6. The protective and attractive covering of a vegetated embankment using coir geotextiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishnudas, S.; Savenije, H. H. G.; van der Zaag, P.; Anil, K. R.; Balan, K.

    2006-08-01

    This paper presents the results of a field experiment conducted in Kerala, South India, to test the effectiveness of coir geotextiles for embankment protection. The results reveal that treatment with geotextile in combination with grass is an effective eco-hydrological measure to protect steep slopes from erosion. In the context of sustainable watershed management, coir is a cheap and locally available material that can be used to strengthen traditional earthen bunds or protect the banks of village ponds from erosion. Particularly in developing countries, where coir is abundantly available and textiles can be produced by small-scale industry, this is an attractive alternative for conventional methods. This paper analyses the performance of coir geotextile in different treatments with respect to soil moisture content, protection against erosion and biomass production.

  7. Effect of inter-particle rolling resistance on passive earth pressure against a translating rigid retaining wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Mingjing; He, Jie; Liu, Fang; Wang, Huaning

    2013-06-01

    The presence of the inter-particle rolling resistance of soil grains results in higher bulk shear strength in the soil, which relates to the earth pressure calculation based on the classic theory. This paper focuses on the effect of the inter-particle rolling resistance on the earth pressure against a rigid retaining wall. A particle contact model considering the inter-particle rolling resistance was implemented into the distinct element code PFC2D, which was then used to simulate a rigid wall retaining a sandy backfill. The passive earth pressure against the wall subjected to a translational displacement was analyzed and compared with results without considering the inter-particle rolling resistance. The influence of the inter-particle rolling resistance was examined from the microscopic scale (e.g., averaged micro-pure rotation-rate) as well as the macroscopic scale (e.g., the magnitude and action point of resultant earth pressures). The results show that the inter-particle rolling resistance of the backfill strongly affects the value of passive thrust behind the wall, but it has no significant effect on the action position of the thrust. The distribution of micro-pure rotation-rate (APR) in the backfill provides an insight into the connection between inter-particle rolling resistance to the energy dissipation in the shear zone behind the wall.

  8. Investigation of the Seismic Performance of Reinforced Highway Embankments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toksoy, Y. S.; Edinçliler, A.

    2014-12-01

    Despite the fact that highway embankments are highly prone to earthquake induced damage, there are not enough studies in the literature concentrated on improving the seismic performance of highway embankments. Embankments which are quite stable under static load conditions can simply collapse during earthquakes due to the destructive seismic loading. This situation poses a high sequence thread to the structural integrity of the embankment, service quality and serviceability. The objective of this study is to determine the effect of the geosynthetic reinforcement on the seismic performance of the highway embankments and evaluate the seismic performance of the geotextile reinforced embankment under different earthquake motions. A 1:50 scale highway embankment model is designed and reinforced with geosynthetics in order to increase the seismic performance of the embankment model. A series of shaking table tests were performed for the identical unreinforced and reinforced embankment models using earthquake excitations with different characteristics. The experimental results were evaluated comparing the unreinforced and reinforced cases. Results revealed that reinforced embankment models perform better seismic performance especially under specificied ground excitations used in this study. Also, the prototype embankment was numerically modelled. It is seen that similar seismic behavior trend is obtained in the finite element simulations.

  9. Seismic response monitoring of the Arno river masonry embankment during the conservation works after the Lungarno Torrigiani riverbank landslide (Florence - May 25, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotti, Alessia; Pazzi, Veronica; Chiara, Paolo; Lombardi, Luca; Nocentini, Massimiliano; Casagli, Nicola

    2017-04-01

    Geohazards are the most relevant processes that can damage or increase the risk of human beings, properties, critical and transport infrastructures, and environment itself. They also could involve the interruption of human activities. The concepts of disaster risk reduction and disaster risk management involve the development, improvement, and application of policies, strategies, and practices to minimize disaster risks throughout society. Since 1972 (UNESCO Convention) the identification, protection, and preservation of cultural and natural heritage has been recognized to be of outstanding value to humanity, and a key resource to build resilient societies. Nevertheless, world architectural wealth is accumulating damages and heavy losses because of both materials deterioration and exceptional natural or man-made events. The "health" of buildings/structures/infrastructures may be evaluate by its deterioration or damage level. Thus, structure dynamic characterization and microtremor analysis are considered powerful techniques, even thought seismic noise techniques in densely populated area are hardly to carry out because of the background noise due to the human activities. A wide bibliography about buildings/structures/infrastructures seismic dynamic characterization is counterposed to a missing one about their seismic response during conservation/safety works, even thought the seismic vibration monitoring (SVM) is widely used. On May 25, 2016 a riverbank landslide seriously damaged a portion roughly 100 m long of the Lungarno Torrigiani historical masonry embankment wall (left river bank of the Florence urban stretch of the Arno river, between Ponte alle Grazie e Ponte Vecchio). The street next to the embankment wall collapsed, and the earth fill material was fully retained by the embankment wall that did not collapse but seriously deformed towards the Arno river, fracturing itself in three main areas (a cusp roughly in the middle of the damaged wall, where is also

  10. Embankment Criteria and Performance Report. Salt Creek and Tributaries, Nebraska, Site 18, Branched Oak Dam and Lake.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-05-01

    Closure, seeding , completion of the embankment, and remaining work was completed during the second construction season. Additional improvements to the...Item 4, complete all remaining work, except seeding . The contract price and completion time for all other work remained unchanged. (Mod. #4...December 1967. This modification extended the completion date of Item 5 ( Seeding ) in the Completion Schedule 10 calendar days. The extension was necessary

  11. 9. DETAIL OF DECORATIVE MORTAR AND COBBLESTONE WORK ON TYPICAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. DETAIL OF DECORATIVE MORTAR AND COBBLESTONE WORK ON TYPICAL POST ON UPSTREAM PARAPET WALL OF UPPER EMBANKMENT. VIEW TO SOUTH. - Boise Project, Deer Flat Embankments, Lake Lowell, Nampa, Canyon County, ID

  12. Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Reeves, T.L.; Turner, J.P.; Hasfurther, V.R.; Skinner, Q.D.

    1992-06-01

    The scope of this program is to study interacting hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical factors affecting the behavior and disposal of combusted processed oil shale. The research combines bench-scale testing with large scale research sufficient to describe commercial scale embankment behavior. The large scale approach was accomplished by establishing five lysimeters, each 7.3 {times} 3.0 {times} 3.0 m deep, filled with processed oil shale that has been retorted and combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas (Lurgi) process. Approximately 400 tons of Lurgi processed oil shale waste was provided by RBOSC to carry out this study. Research objectives were designed to evaluate hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical properties and conditions which would affect the design and performance of large-scale embankments. The objectives of this research are: assess the unsaturated movement and redistribution of water and the development of potential saturated zones and drainage in disposed processed oil shale under natural and simulated climatic conditions; assess the unsaturated movement of solubles and major chemical constituents in disposed processed oil shale under natural and simulated climatic conditions; assess the physical and constitutive properties of the processed oil shale and determine potential changes in these properties caused by disposal and weathering by natural and simulated climatic conditions; assess the use of previously developed computer model(s) to describe the infiltration, unsaturated movement, redistribution, and drainage of water in disposed processed oil shale; evaluate the stability of field scale processed oil shale solid waste embankments using computer models.

  13. Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Reeves, T.L.; Turner, J.P.; Hasfurther, V.R.; Skinner, Q.D.

    1992-06-01

    The scope of this program is to study interacting hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical factors affecting the behavior and disposal of combusted processed oil shale. The research combines bench-scale testing with large scale research sufficient to describe commercial scale embankment behavior. The large scale approach was accomplished by establishing five lysimeters, each 7.3 [times] 3.0 [times] 3.0 m deep, filled with processed oil shale that has been retorted and combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas (Lurgi) process. Approximately 400 tons of Lurgi processed oil shale waste was provided by RBOSC to carry out this study. Research objectives were designed to evaluate hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical properties and conditions which would affect the design and performance of large-scale embankments. The objectives of this research are: assess the unsaturated movement and redistribution of water and the development of potential saturated zones and drainage in disposed processed oil shale under natural and simulated climatic conditions; assess the unsaturated movement of solubles and major chemical constituents in disposed processed oil shale under natural and simulated climatic conditions; assess the physical and constitutive properties of the processed oil shale and determine potential changes in these properties caused by disposal and weathering by natural and simulated climatic conditions; assess the use of previously developed computer model(s) to describe the infiltration, unsaturated movement, redistribution, and drainage of water in disposed processed oil shale; evaluate the stability of field scale processed oil shale solid waste embankments using computer models.

  14. Stabilization Columns for Embankment Support - Investigation, Verification and Further Development of Analytical Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankrath, H.; Kaya, H.; Thiele, R.

    2015-09-01

    As a technical and economical alternative to foundations on piles, but also to shallow foundations on improved soil, in recent decades a high number of soil improvement methods have been developed and established. Many of these methods use non-reinforced, cylindrical load bearing elements. A very common application of stabilizing columns is the improvement of a few meters thick soft soils below dams and embankments. But especially for this application, many failure cases are documented worldwide. In the contribution the substantial content and results are presented for investigation, testing and further development of methods for evaluating the slope stability. After a description of the problem and consequential tasks the contribution contains main results of the investigations of international sources with the stepwise development of analytical solutions. Next to the in practice well- known approaches for gravel columns, less common approaches from Scandinavia are explained. The contribution is completed with a presentation and discussion of an illustrative example, taking into account a number of different failure modes of the columns and the surrounding soil. The example was compared and validated with a 3D Model using the Finite Element Method.

  15. Attracting and retaining nurses in HIV care.

    PubMed

    Puplampu, Gideon L; Olson, Karin; Ogilvie, Linda; Mayan, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Attracting and retaining nurses in HIV care is essential to treatment success, preventing the spread of HIV, slowing its progression, and improving the quality of life of people living with HIV. Despite the wealth of studies examining HIV care, few have focused on the factors that influenced nurses' choices to specialize in HIV care. We examined the factors that attracted and retained eight nurses currently working in HIV care in two large Canadian cities. Participants were primarily women between the ages of 20 and 60 years. Interviews were conducted between November 2010 and September 2011 using interpretive description, a qualitative design. Factors that influenced participants to focus their careers in HIV care included both attracting factors and retaining factors. Although more research is needed, this exploration of attracting and retaining factors may motivate others to specialize in HIV nursing, and thus help to promote adequate support for individuals suffering from the disease.

  16. Clarence Cannon Dam and Mark Twain Lake Foundation and Embankment Completion Report. Part 2. Main Dam, Phase II Construction and Related Contracts. Volume 3. Photographs, pages 137 thru 209.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-12-01

    RD-A168 528 CLARENCE CANNON DAM AND MARK TWAIN LAKE FOUNDATION AND i/i EMBANKMENT COMPLET (U) ARMY ENGINEER DISTRICT ST LOUIS UNCLASSIFIED F/G 13/13...CLARENCE CANNON DAM & MARK TWAIN LAKE AD-A 160 528 FOUNDATION AND EMBANKMENT COMPLETION REPORT PART II MAIN DAM PHASE II CONSTRUCTION AND RELATED

  17. Clarence Cannon Dam and Mark Twain Lake Foundation and Embankment Completion Report. Part 2. Main Dam, Phase II Construction and Related Contracts. Volume 3. Photographs, pages 60 thru 136.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-12-01

    L D-168 527 CLARENCE CANNON DAN AND MARK TWAIN LAKE FOUNDATION AND 1/1 EMBANKMENT COMPLET (U) ARMY ENGINEER DISTRICT ST LOUIS UNCLASSIFIED F/G 13/13... MARK TWAIN LAKE AD-A 160 527 FOUNDATION AND EMBANKMENT COMPLETION REPORT PART II MAIN DAM PHASE II CONSTRUCTION AND RELATED CONTRACTS VOLUME III

  18. Supporting and Retaining Novice Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huling, Leslie; Resta, Virginia; Yeargain, Pat

    2012-01-01

    Novice teacher attrition has long been a concern among educators and policy makers who have responded with various types of induction and mentoring programs and increased efforts to recruit more teachers. Yet, these efforts have not created the stable work force needed to implement school reform efforts. The school staffing challenge is further…

  19. Relearn Faster and Retain Longer.

    PubMed

    Mazza, Stéphanie; Gerbier, Emilie; Gustin, Marie-Paule; Kasikci, Zumrut; Koenig, Olivier; Toppino, Thomas C; Magnin, Michel

    2016-10-01

    Both repeated practice and sleep improve long-term retention of information. The assumed common mechanism underlying these effects is memory reactivation, either on-line and effortful or off-line and effortless. In the study reported here, we investigated whether sleep-dependent memory consolidation could help to save practice time during relearning. During two sessions occurring 12 hr apart, 40 participants practiced foreign vocabulary until they reached a perfect level of performance. Half of them learned in the morning and relearned in the evening of a single day. The other half learned in the evening of one day, slept, and then relearned in the morning of the next day. Their retention was assessed 1 week later and 6 months later. We found that interleaving sleep between learning sessions not only reduced the amount of practice needed by half but also ensured much better long-term retention. Sleeping after learning is definitely a good strategy, but sleeping between two learning sessions is a better strategy.

  20. Geometric and frequency EMI sounding of estuarine earthen flood defence embankments in Ireland using 1D inversion models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viganotti, Matteo; Jackson, Ruth; Krahn, Hartmut; Dyer, Mark

    2013-05-01

    Earthen flood defence embankments are linear structures, raised above the flood plain, that are commonly used as flood defences in rural settings; these are often relatively old structures constructed using locally garnered material and of which little is known in terms of design and construction. Alarmingly, it is generally reported that a number of urban developments have expanded to previously rural areas; hence, acquiring knowledge about the flood defences protecting these areas has risen significantly in the agendas of basin and asset managers. This paper focusses, by reporting two case studies, on electromagnetic induction (EMI) methods that would efficiently complement routine visual inspections and would represent a first step to more detailed investigations. Evaluation of the results is presented by comparison with ERT profiles and intrusive investigation data. The EM data, acquired using a GEM-2 apparatus for frequency sounding and an EM-31 apparatus for geometrical sounding, has been handled using the prototype eGMS software tool, being developed by the eGMS international research consortium; the depth sounding data interpretation was assisted by 1D inversions obtained with the EM1DFM software developed by the University of British Columbia. Although both sounding methods showed some limitations, the models obtained were consistent with ERT models and the techniques were useful screening methods for the identification of areas of interest, such as material interfaces or potential seepage areas, within the embankment structure: 1D modelling improved the rapid assessment of earthen flood defence embankments in an estuarine environment; evidence that EMI sounding could play an important role as a monitoring tool or as a first step towards more detailed investigations.

  1. Embankment Criteria and Performance Report, Missouri River, Fort Peck Lake, Montana. Volume I. Text Appendix A, Appendix B.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-09-01

    lt I i I I . .. . . . , . . . . . . TABULATION AND I ,. L RF DR =2. MLE LM P R 1MMAIOM IM=IGATIONS P0R F0N PECK DAM - Contd Peld . ;% Role Book ’ook...I EllIhlllIhl!Il EIIIIIIIIIiil IIIIIIIEEIIIIE IIIIIIIE--EEI 11111j8 13 2 L11L11 2.2IIIIII 1111.25 IlI41. 6IIIII l llt IIl’ MICROCOPY RESOLUTION...AM, MNTAN EMBANKENT CITERI AND PEFORMACE REORT PAT1 son& I IS L ’It K,4 FORT T0 -, DA.MOTN WflAtiK*f NT* CRTE IAN t-i RMNEREOTPLT -- - - --- FORT PECK

  2. Embankment erosion process model

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The USDA, Agricultural Research Service (ARS) Hydraulic Engineering Research Unit (HERU) laboratory’s conducts research in support of the USDA NRCS Small Watershed Program by addressing dam safety issues. This presentation describes research on improving methods for predicting earthen embankment er...

  3. Retained laser fibre: insights and management.

    PubMed

    Lekich, C; Hannah, P

    2014-06-01

    To describe a case of retained endovenous laser fibre. To review the literature and Food and Drug Administration device failure reports. To suggest protocols for avoiding this complication and a method of removal. A case of retained fibre removal is described. Fibre removal techniques in vivo and ex vivo in a bovine model on the laboratory bench are presented. Successful in vivo and ex vivo fibre removal was performed using duplex ultrasound scan guided phlebectomy techniques. Unexplained measured fibre-length discrepancies due to misleading manufacturer's packaging was discovered. Simple ultrasound-guided micro-phlebectomy techniques can be used to remove retained laser fibres in the office environment. Laser fibre length measurements before and after treatment are recommended. Some preventive guidelines are described to avoid, or at least diagnose immediately, this complication, such as the 'Laser Eclipse Sign'. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  4. Borate-Rhamnogalacturonan II Bonding Reinforced by Ca2+ Retains Pectic Polysaccharides in Higher-Plant Cell Walls1

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Masaru; Nakagawa, Hironobu; Asaka, Tomoyuki; Matoh, Toru

    1999-01-01

    The extent of in vitro formation of the borate-dimeric-rhamnogalacturonan II (RG-II) complex was stimulated by Ca2+. The complex formed in the presence of Ca2+ was more stable than that without Ca2+. A naturally occurring boron (B)-RG-II complex isolated from radish (Raphanus sativus L. cv Aokubi-daikon) root contained equimolar amounts of Ca2+ and B. Removal of the Ca2+ by trans-1,2-diaminocyclohexane-N,N,N′,N′-tetraacetic acid induced cleavage of the complex into monomeric RG-II. These data suggest that Ca2+ is a normal component of the B-RG-II complex. Washing the crude cell walls of radish roots with a 1.5% (w/v) sodium dodecyl sulfate solution, pH 6.5, released 98% of the tissue Ca2+ but only 13% of the B and 22% of the pectic polysaccharides. The remaining Ca2+ was associated with RG-II. Extraction of the sodium dodecyl sulfate-washed cell walls with 50 mm trans-1,2-diaminocyclohexane-N,N,N′,N′-tetraacetic acid, pH 6.5, removed the remaining Ca2+, 78% of B, and 49% of pectic polysaccharides. These results suggest that not only Ca2+ but also borate and Ca2+ cross-linking in the RG-II region retain so-called chelator-soluble pectic polysaccharides in cell walls. PMID:9880361

  5. Placemaking: Attracting and Retaining Today's Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Brent

    2016-01-01

    Research suggests that the appearance of a college campus--both inside and out--is a significant criterion in college selection. As community colleges are finding it increasingly important to attract and retain students, placemaking is becoming an effective and efficient platform to support recruitment and retention. Placemaking is imagining and…

  6. Placemaking: Attracting and Retaining Today's Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Brent

    2016-01-01

    Research suggests that the appearance of a college campus--both inside and out--is a significant criterion in college selection. As community colleges are finding it increasingly important to attract and retain students, placemaking is becoming an effective and efficient platform to support recruitment and retention. Placemaking is imagining and…

  7. Stragegies for Attracting and Retaining Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bland, Paul; Church, Edwin; Luo, Mingchu

    2014-01-01

    Attracting and retaining high quality teachers is a challenge for many school districts. This is especially true in a time of increased accountability and limited resources. This report details best practice in the training, hiring, improvement, and retention of high quality teaching staff. The authors explain how school leaders can attract…

  8. Recruiting, hiring, and retaining good employees.

    PubMed

    McHenry Martin, Caren

    2014-08-01

    More pharmacists and other health care professionals often feel unprepared when engaged in the hiring process. This can occur both when looking for a new job and when participating as part of the hiring team. In this article, experts in strategies for recruiting, hiring, and retaining employees provide insight into successful strategies for today's changing workplace.

  9. Recruiting and Retaining Rural Community College Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, John P.

    2007-01-01

    Much is being written about a potential shortage of qualified community college faculty. Rural community colleges may be at the greatest disadvantage in attracting and retaining new faculty because they cannot offer the financial, cultural, and social advantages that more urban institutions can. This chapter describes the factors rural community…

  10. BIVOUAC OF DEAD TABLET, “YOUR OWN PROUD LAND’S,” AND RETAINING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BIVOUAC OF DEAD TABLET, “YOUR OWN PROUD LAND’S,” AND RETAINING WALLS, SECTION 3. VIEW TO EAST. - Hot Springs National Cemetery, Virginia Medical Center 500 North Fifth Street, Hot Springs, Fall River County, SD

  11. Retained Gas Sampler Calibration and Simulant Tests

    SciTech Connect

    CRAWFORD, B.A.

    2000-01-05

    This test plan provides a method for calibration of the retained gas sampler (RGS) for ammonia gas analysis. Simulant solutions of ammonium hydroxide at known concentrations will be diluted with isotopically labeled 0.04 M ammonium hydroxide solution. Sea sand solids will also be mixed with ammonium hydroxide solution and diluent to determine the accuracy of the system for ammonia gas analysis.

  12. WinDAM C earthen embankment internal erosion analysis software

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Two primary causes of dam failure are overtopping and internal erosion. For the purpose of evaluating dam safety for existing earthen embankment dams and proposed earthen embankment dams, Windows Dam Analysis Modules C (WinDAM C) software will simulate either internal erosion or erosion resulting f...

  13. Development of CCHE2D embankment break model

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Flooding due to breaching of earth embankments often results in detrimental impact on the people and their properties in the flooding zone. The embankment breaching process is often caused by overtopping of excessive water in a reservoir or a river. This study is to develop a practical numerical m...

  14. Development of CCHE2D embankment break model

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Earthen embankment breach often results in detrimental impact on downstream residents and infrastructure, especially those located in the flooding zone. Embankment failures are most commonly caused by overtopping or internal erosion. This study is to develop a practical numerical model for simulat...

  15. Discussion of "Aeration, flow instabilities, and residual energy on pooled stepped spillways of embankment dams" by Stephen Felder and Hubert Chanson

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Stepped spillways applied to embankment dams provide overtopping protection and address a common deficiency in aging dams by providing increased spillway capacity. Pooled-stepped spillways offer a design alternative to the traditional flat-stepped spillways. Researchers from the University of Quee...

  16. Real-scale investigation of the kinematic response of a rockfall protection embankment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, S.; Heymann, A.; Gotteland, P.; Nicot, F.

    2014-01-01

    This paper addresses the response of rockfall protection embankments when exposed to a rock impact. For this purpose, real-scale impact experiments were conducted with impact energies ranging from 200 to 2200 kJ. The structure was composed of a 4 m-high cellular wall leaned against a levee. The wall was a double-layer sandwich made from gabion cages filled with either stones or a sand-scrapped tyre mixture. For the first time, sensors were placed in different locations within the structure to measure real-time accelerations and displacements. The test conditions, measurement methods and results are presented in detail. The structure's response is discussed in a descriptive and phenomenological approach and compared with previous real-scale experiments on other types of embankments.

  17. Real-scale investigation of the kinematic response of a rockfall protection embankment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, S.; Heymann, A.; Gotteland, P.; Nicot, F.

    2014-05-01

    This paper addresses the response of rockfall protection embankments when exposed to a rock impact. For this purpose, real-scale impact experiments were conducted with impact energies ranging from 200 to 2200 kJ. The structure was composed of a 4 m high cellular wall leaned against a levee. The wall was a double-layer sandwich made from gabion cages filled with either stones or a sand-schredded-tyre mixture. For the first time, sensors were placed in different locations within the structure to measure real-time accelerations and displacements. The test conditions, measurement methods and results are presented in detail. The structure's response is discussed in a descriptive and phenomenological approach and compared with previous real-scale experiments on other types of embankments.

  18. Retaining African Americans in Higher Education: Challenging Paradigms for Retaining Students, Faculty and Administrators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Lee, Ed.

    This collection discusses some of the issues surrounding the retention of African Americans in higher education, and it challenges traditional paradigms for retaining African American students, administrators, and faculty at predominantly White colleges. The chapters of part 1, "Retaining African-American Students," are: (1) "Creating an Affirming…

  19. Retaining African Americans in Higher Education: Challenging Paradigms for Retaining Students, Faculty and Administrators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Lee, Ed.

    This collection discusses some of the issues surrounding the retention of African Americans in higher education, and it challenges traditional paradigms for retaining African American students, administrators, and faculty at predominantly White colleges. The chapters of part 1, "Retaining African-American Students," are: (1) "Creating an Affirming…

  20. Geophysical techniques in detection to river embankments - A case study: To locate sites of potential leaks using surface-wave and electrical methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, C.; Liu, J.; Xu, S.; Xia, J.; ,

    2004-01-01

    Geophysical technologies are very effective in environmental, engineering and groundwater applications. Parameters of delineating nature of near-surface materials such as compressional-wave velocity, shear-wave velocity can be obtained using shallow seismic methods. Electric methods are primary approaches for investigating groundwater and detecting leakage. Both of methods are applied to detect embankment in hope of obtaining evidences of the strength and moisture inside the body. A technological experiment has done for detecting and discovering the hidden troubles in the embankment of Yangtze River, Songzi, Hubei, China in 2003. Surface-wave and DC multi-channel array resistivity sounding techniques were used to detect hidden trouble inside and under dike like pipe-seeps. This paper discusses the exploration strategy and the effect of geological characteristics. A practical approach of combining seismic and electric resistivity measurements was applied to locate potential pipe-seeps in embankment in the experiment. The method presents a potential leak factor based on the shear-wave velocity and the resistivity of the medium to evaluate anomalies. An anomaly found in a segment of embankment detected was verified, where occurred a pipe-seep during the 98' flooding.

  1. Clarence Cannon Dam and Mark Twain Lake Foundation and Embankment Completion Report. Part 2. Main Dam, Phase II Construction and Related Contracts. Volume 3. Photographs, pages 292 thru 383.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-12-01

    RD-A68 538 CLARENCE CANNON DAM AND MARK TWAIN LAKE FOUNDATION AND i/o EMBANKMENT COMPLET (U) ARMY ENGINEER DISTRICT ST LOUISI MO DEC 84 UNCLASSIFIED...DAM & MARK TWAIN LAKE AD-A 160 530 FOUNDATION AND EMBANKMENT COMPLETION REPORT PART II MAIN DAM PHASE II CONSTRUCTION AND RELATED CONTRACTS VOLUME III...10 16 14; -8.5 10 16 145 CLARENCE CANNON DAM & MARK TWAIN LAKE AD-A160 530 FOUNDATION AND EMBANKMENT COMPLETION REPORT PART 11 MAIN DAM PHASE II

  2. Attracting and retaining nurses in primary care.

    PubMed

    Drennan, Vari; Andrews, Sarah; Sidhu, Rajinder; Peacock, Richard

    2006-06-01

    There is increasing demand for nurses to work in primary care. This is driven in part by the need to retain current levels but also by the modernisation plans for primary care services, which require new roles for nurses, new ways of working and more nurses in primary care settings. While campaigns for increased recruitment of hospital nurses and doctors has been largely successful in recent years, primary care has still to see the impact. This article reports on a Department of Health (England) funded project that aimed to identify strategies and exemplars to assist primary care trusts (PCTs) and the workforce development confederations (WDCs) in strategic health authorities in attracting and retaining nurses to primary care at registered nurse level. It reports on the range of initiatives identified, the perceived benefits and challenges. It concludes by proposing a strategic model for planning for the recruitment and retention of primary care nurses.

  3. 38. A photograph taken from the U.S. 24 embankment looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    38. A photograph taken from the U.S. 24 embankment looking south, showing a unit dug to prove the length of the southwestern breast wall (in the right middle ground, beyond the cribs) and the irregular configuration of some of the ties within the cribs. - Wabash & Erie Canal, Lock No. 2, 8 miles east of Fort Wayne, adjacent to U.S. Route 24, New Haven, Allen County, IN

  4. Apparatus and Process for Controlled Nanomanufacturing Using Catalyst Retaining Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Cattien (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An apparatus and method for the controlled fabrication of nanostructures using catalyst retaining structures is disclosed. The apparatus includes one or more modified force microscopes having a nanotube attached to the tip portion of the microscopes. An electric current is passed from the nanotube to a catalyst layer of a substrate, thereby causing a localized chemical reaction to occur in a resist layer adjacent the catalyst layer. The region of the resist layer where the chemical reaction occurred is etched, thereby exposing a catalyst particle or particles in the catalyst layer surrounded by a wall of unetched resist material. Subsequent chemical vapor deposition causes growth of a nanostructure to occur upward through the wall of unetched resist material having controlled characteristics of height and diameter and, for parallel systems, number density.

  5. Impacts of Embankment System on Natural Wetlands and Sustainable Water Resources Development in the Northwest Region of Bangladesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pervin, M.; Rahman, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    In the Northwest region of Bangladesh, the Chalan Beel is one of the largest Beel ("Beel" refers to natural wetland) in Bangladesh. Polder C (an area surrounded by embankment) of Chalan Beel area consists of 50% natural wetland of the region. Historically, the area was rich with fish, flora and fauna, and agricultural resources. Both flood and drainage congestion have been identified as major problems existing in the project area. Farmers are badly affected by the sudden onrush of floodwater through the embankment breaches, public cuts and incomplete hydraulic structures during the rainy season. The floodwater damages B. Aman and late Boro paddy by 10% and washes away housing settlements. Sometimes water gets scarce in polder C in dry season that is unfavorable for the crop. Loss of crops and fishery affects the economy strongly. The polder was not according to master plan and with lack of operation and maintenance. Instead of improving the livelihood in the study area the embankment arises detrimental effect on the people. This paper focuses mainly the impact of the embankments on hydrology, fishery, agriculture and socio-economic condition in polder C at Chalan Beel area. Present conditions are compared with the natural conditions existed in the last decades. Finally, the paper gives some recommendations for further sustainable water resources management. It is estimated that the natural wetland loss is about 10%. The analysis shows that the river or channel cross-sections are reduced by ca. 2 m and water level is increasing with time in the rivers along the polder due to confinement effect and siltation. It appears from the study that due to this confinement effect and siltation effect, flood and drainage problems are increasing and consequently, the area is affected in every year to a great extent. At present, cross sections of natural canals are not working properly and back water flow from Hurasagar River creates drainage congestion. About 20% of fish

  6. Contrasting Pristine and Human-Modified Deltaic Environments: Severe Consequences from Long-Term Coastal Embankments in Southwest Bangladesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace Auerbach, L.; Goodbred, S. L.; Mondal, D.; Roy, K.; Ahmed, K.; Gilligan, J. M.; Ackerly, B.

    2012-12-01

    River deltas are defined by a balance of net aggradational processes that construct the delta platform, and marine processes and human modifications that redistribute sediments and facilitate platform evolution. The lower Ganges-Brahmaputra delta plain in southwest Bangladesh is isolated from fluvial processes but receives up to 1 cm of sediment accretion annually as sediments discharged at the river mouth are reworked by tides and re-deposited onto the lower delta plain via a dendritic network of tidal channels. Sediment flux and dispersal from tidal channels onto the landscape is one of the principal processes that determines the lower delta plain response to environmental changes, including sea level rise. We investigate the processes and conditions that define the relationship between tides, sea level, and sediment accretion in human-modified and pristine areas of the coastal delta plain. In the pristine deltaic environment, tidal fluctuations and sea level rise in the tidal channel are capable of maintaining a dynamic equilibrium with the subsiding and compacting landscape via sediment dispersal and accretion. Human modification of the landscape by embankment construction in 1961 has locally inhibited sediment delivery to the landscape, decoupling these interacting systems. The sediment-starved landscape has continued to subside and compact, but in the absence of sediment accretion, the elevation of the interior landscape has become offset relative to the tidally inundated river bank terraces, and the land surface is situated 1.0-2.0 m below mean high water. In 2009, a cyclonic storm surge breached embankments, causing catastrophic flooding, re-establishment of tidal sediment delivery, and rapid sedimentation on the human-modified landscape. The pristine environment adjacent to the embanked landscape exhibits no signs of catastrophic inundation, likely because the continuous sediment delivery allowed the landscape to remain in dynamic equilibrium with mean

  7. HIV: seek, test, treat, and retain.

    PubMed

    Normand, Jacques; Montaner, Julio; Fang, Chi-Tai; Wu, Zunyou; Chen, Yi-Ming

    2013-12-01

    The "HIV: Seek, Test, Treat, and Retain" session was chaired by Dr. Jacques Normand, the Director of AIDS Research at the U.S. National Institute on Drug Abuse. Dr. Yi-Ming Chen served as the discussant. The three presenters (and their presentation topics) were: Dr. Julio Montaner (Treatment as Prevention-The Key to an AIDS-free Generation), Dr. Chi-Tai Fang (Population-level Effect of Free Access to HAART on Reducing HIV Transmission in Taiwan), and Dr. Zunyou Wu (Challenges in Promoting HIV Test & Treat Strategy in China).

  8. Embankment Criteria and Performance Report, Fall River Basin, Cold Brook Lake, South Dakota.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-11-01

    include in ascending order, the Minnelusa formation (Pennsylvanian), Opeche formation (Permian); Minnekahta formation (Permian); and Spearfish...partings. 2.2.2.2.3. Minnekahta formation. This formation which forms the steep upper walls of the valley at the dam site, consists of about 48 feet of...tightly cemented together and the outcropping ledges present a massive appearance. The Minnekahta limestone forms the cap rock of the valley rim on

  9. Retained surgical sponges, needles and instruments

    PubMed Central

    Hariharan, D

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Retained sponges and instruments (RSI) due to surgery are a recognised medical ‘never event’ and have catastrophic implications for patients, healthcare professionals and medical care providers. The aim of this review was to elucidate the extent of the problem of RSI and to identify preventative strategies. Methods A comprehensive literature search was performed on MEDLINE®, Embase™, the Science Citation Index and Google™ Scholar for articles published in English between January 2000 and June 2012. Studies outlining the incidence, risk, management and attempts to prevent RSI following surgical intervention were retrieved. Results The overall incidence of RSI is low although its incidence is substantially higher in operations performed on open cavities. Sponges are the most commonly retained item when compared with needles and instruments. Clinical presentation is varied, leading to avoidable morbidity, and the error is indefensible medicolegally. Risk factors include emergency operations, operations involving unexpected change in procedure, raised body mass index, and a failure to perform accurate sponge and instrument counts. The existing strategy for prevention is manual counting of sponges and instruments undertaken by surgical personnel. This, however, is fallible. Computer assisted counting of sponges using barcodes and gauze sponges tagged with a radiofrequency identification device aiding manual counting have been trialled recently, with success. Conclusions Vigilance among operating theatre personnel is paramount if RSI is to be prevented. Prospective multicentre trials to assess efficacy of new technologies aiding manual counting should be undertaken if this medical error is to be eliminated completely. PMID:23484986

  10. Retained surgical sponges, needles and instruments.

    PubMed

    Hariharan, D; Lobo, D N

    2013-03-01

    Retained sponges and instruments (RSI) due to surgery are a recognised medical 'never event' and have catastrophic implications for patients, healthcare professionals and medical care providers. The aim of this review was to elucidate the extent of the problem of RSI and to identify preventative strategies. A comprehensive literature search was performed on MEDLINE(®), Embase™, the Science Citation Index and Google™ Scholar for articles published in English between January 2000 and June 2012. Studies outlining the incidence, risk, management and attempts to prevent RSI following surgical intervention were retrieved. The overall incidence of RSI is low although its incidence is substantially higher in operations performed on open cavities. Sponges are the most commonly retained item when compared with needles and instruments. Clinical presentation is varied, leading to avoidable morbidity, and the error is indefensible medicolegally. Risk factors include emergency operations, operations involving unexpected change in procedure, raised body mass index, and a failure to perform accurate sponge and instrument counts. The existing strategy for prevention is manual counting of sponges and instruments undertaken by surgical personnel. This, however, is fallible. Computer assisted counting of sponges using barcodes and gauze sponges tagged with a radiofrequency identification device aiding manual counting have been trialled recently, with success. Vigilance among operating theatre personnel is paramount if RSI is to be prevented. Prospective multicentre trials to assess efficacy of new technologies aiding manual counting should be undertaken if this medical error is to be eliminated completely.

  11. Inundation risk for embanked rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strupczewski, W. G.; Kochanek, K.; Bogdanowicz, E.; Markiewicz, I.

    2013-03-01

    The Flood Frequency Analysis (FFA) concentrates on probability distribution of peak flows of flood hydrographs. However, examination of floods that haunted and devastated the large parts of Poland lead us to revision of the views on the assessment of flood risk of Polish rivers. It turned out that flooding is caused not only by overflow of the levees' crest but mostly due to the prolonged exposure to high water on levees structure causing dangerous leaks and breaches that threaten their total destruction. This is because, the levees are weakened by long-lasting water pressure and as a matter of fact their damage usually occurs after the culmination has passed the affected location. The probability of inundation is the total of probabilities of exceeding embankment crest by flood peak and the probability of washout of levees. Therefore, in addition to the maximum flow one should consider also the duration of high waters in a river channel. In the paper the new two-component model of flood dynamics: "Duration of high waters-Discharge Threshold-Probability of non-exceedance" (DqF), with the methodology of its parameters estimation was proposed as a completion to the classical FFA methods. Such model can estimate the duration of stages (flows) of an assumed magnitude with a given probability of exceedance. The model combined with the technical evaluation of probability of levees breach due to the d-days duration of flow above alarm stage gives the annual probability of inundation caused by the embankment breaking. The results of theoretical investigation were illustrated by a practical example of the model implementation to the series of daily flow of the Vistula River at Szczucin. Regardless promising results, the method of risk assessment due to prolonged exposure of levees to high water is still in its infancy despite its great cognitive potential and practical importance. Therefore, we would like to point out the need for and usefulness of the DqF model as

  12. Inundation risk for embanked rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strupczewski, W. G.; Kochanek, K.; Bogdanowicz, E.; Markiewicz, I.

    2013-08-01

    The Flood Frequency Analysis (FFA) concentrates on probability distribution of peak flows of flood hydrographs. However, examination of floods that haunted and devastated the large parts of Poland lead us to revision of the views on the assessment of flood risk of Polish rivers. It turned out that flooding is caused not only by the overflow of the levee crest but also due to the prolonged exposure to high water on levees structure causing dangerous leaks and breaches that threaten their total destruction. This is because the levees are weakened by long-lasting water pressure and as a matter of fact their damage usually occurs after the culmination has passed the affected location. The probability of inundation is the total of probabilities of exceeding embankment crest by flood peak and the probability of washout of levees. Therefore, in addition to the maximum flow one should also consider the duration of high waters in a river channel. In the paper the new two-component model of flood dynamics: "Duration of high waters-Discharge Threshold-Probability of non-exceedance" (DqF), with the methodology of its parameter estimation was proposed as a completion to the classical FFA methods. Such a model can estimate the duration of stages (flows) of an assumed magnitude with a given probability of exceedance. The model combined with the technical evaluation of the probability of levee breaches due to the duration (d) of flow above alarm stage gives the annual probability of inundation caused by the embankment breaking. The results of theoretical investigation were illustrated by a practical example of the model implementation to the series of daily flow of the Vistula River at Szczucin. Regardless of promising results, the method of risk assessment due to prolonged exposure of levees to high water is still in its infancy despite its great cognitive potential and practical importance. Therefore, we would like to point out the need for and usefulness of the DqF model as

  13. Recruiting and retaining indigenous farmworker participants

    PubMed Central

    Farquhar, Stephanie; de Jesus Gonzalez, Carmen; Hall, Jennifer; Samples, Julie; Ventura, Santiago; Sanchez, Valentin; Shadbeh, Nargess

    2013-01-01

    There is limited information on the specific practices used to successfully recruit and retain indigenous and Latino farmworkers in research studies. This article describes the strategies used in a community-based participatory research project with indigenous agricultural workers. Participants were recruited through consulting with indigenous relatives and friends, identifying and meeting with indigenous leaders from hometown associations in countries of origin, and asking current participants to recruit fellow farmworkers. Adjustments were initiated to the second year protocol to enhance recruitment and retention. The difference in attrition rates between years one and two was statistically significant, a difference partially attributed to modifications to recruitment and retention protocol. Findings confirmed that active recruitment techniques and word-of-mouth recruitment were more effective than passive methods. Trust among academic, organization, and community partners, and shared language and culture between those doing the recruitment and the participants, contributed to sustained farmworker participation. PMID:23733354

  14. 31 CFR 203.16 - Retainer and investor depositaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Retainer and investor depositaries... TREASURY TAX AND LOAN PROGRAM PATAX § 203.16 Retainer and investor depositaries. (a) Credit to TIP main account balance. On the business day that the TSC receives an AOC from a retainer or investor...

  15. 31 CFR 203.16 - Retainer and investor depositaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Retainer and investor depositaries... TREASURY TAX AND LOAN PROGRAM PATAX § 203.16 Retainer and investor depositaries. (a) Credit to TIP main account balance. On the business day that the TSC receives an AOC from a retainer or investor...

  16. 31 CFR 203.16 - Retainer and investor depositaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Retainer and investor depositaries... TREASURY TAX AND LOAN PROGRAM PATAX § 203.16 Retainer and investor depositaries. (a) Credit to TIP main account balance. On the business day that the TSC receives an AOC from a retainer or investor...

  17. 31 CFR 203.16 - Retainer and investor depositaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Retainer and investor depositaries... TREASURY TAX AND LOAN PROGRAM PATAX § 203.16 Retainer and investor depositaries. (a) Credit to TIP main account balance. On the business day that the TSC receives an AOC from a retainer or investor...

  18. 31 CFR 203.16 - Retainer and investor depositaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Retainer and investor depositaries... TREASURY TAX AND LOAN PROGRAM PATAX § 203.16 Retainer and investor depositaries. (a) Credit to TIP main account balance. On the business day that the TSC receives an AOC from a retainer or investor...

  19. The VLF-EM imaging of potential collapse on the LUSI embankment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sungkono; Husein, Alwi; Prasetyo, Hardi; Bahri, Ayi S.; Monteiro Santos, Fernando A.; Santosa, Bagus J.

    2014-10-01

    Collapse and overtopping repeatedly occur in LUSI Embankment. Discontinuities (crack or fracture) in the embankment are major reasons for embankment failures or collapses. Very-low frequency electromagnetic (VLF-EM) measurement is essentially a non-destructive technique which displays subsurface 2-D cross section of resistivity. The cross section result has the possibility of detecting discontinuities and liquid saturation in embankment before it collapsed by observing which part of it in the cross section has low resistivity. This paper presents results of a survey conducted at the LUSI embankment in Eastern Java, Indonesia in a part of potential collapse. VLF-EM profiles measured along the embankment crest provided an overview of the whole embankment and served to detect anomalous zones. The noise assisted multivariate empirical mode decomposition (NA-MEMD) is applied to reject unwanted VLF-EM noise and Inv2DVLF software is applied to obtain result of 2-D resistivity models. In the selected area, the drill log and the standard penetration test (SPT) value gave detailed information about subsurface layer below embankment. This information is valuable for supporting 2-D resistivity image obtained from VLF-EM data inversion. Furthermore, the low resistivity in embankment layer is associated to discontinuities (fracture, crack or fault) along the embankment which caused its collapse.

  20. Assessment of metal retention in newly constructed highway embankments.

    PubMed

    Werkenthin, Moritz; Kluge, Björn; Wessolek, Gerd

    2016-12-01

    Newly constructed embankments should provide both a specific bearing capacity to enable trafficability in emergency cases and a sufficient pollutant retention capacity to protect the groundwater. A number of lysimeters were installed along the A115 highway to determine total and dissolved metal concentrations in road runoff and in the soil solution of newly constructed embankments. Dissolved concentrations in soil solution of the embankments did not exceed the trigger values of the German legislation. Depending on the metal, total concentrations in soil solution were more than twice as high as dissolved concentrations. The high infiltration rates lead to increased groundwater recharge beneath the embankments (up to 4100 mm a(-1)). Although metal concentrations were not problematic from the legislators' point of view, the elevated infiltration rates beside the road facilitated the transfer of high metal loads into deeper soil layers and potentially into the groundwater as well.

  1. Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, J.P.; Hasfurther, V.

    1992-05-04

    The scope of the research program and the continuation is to study interacting hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical factors affecting the behavior and disposal of combusted processed oil shale. The research combines bench-scale testing with large scale research sufficient to describe commercial scale embankment behavior. The large scale approach was accomplished by establishing five lysimeters, each 7.3 [times] 3.0 [times] 3.0 m deep, filled with processed oil shale that has been retorted and combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas (Lurgi) process. Approximately 400 tons of Lurgi processed oil shale waste was provided by Rio Blanco Oil Shale Co., Inc. (RBOSC) through a separate cooperative agreement with the University of Wyoming (UW) to carry out this study. Three of the lysimeters were established at the RBOSC Tract C-a in the Piceance Basin of Colorado. Two lysimeters were established in the Environmental Simulation Laboratory (ESL) at UW. The ESL was specifically designed and constructed so that a large range of climatic conditions could be physically applied to the processed oil shale which was filled in the lysimeter cells.

  2. Discussion of "Simple design criterion for residual energy on embankment dam stepped spillways" by Stefan Felder and Hubert Chanson

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Researchers from the University of Queensland of New South Wales provided guidance to designers regarding the hydraulic performance of embankment dam stepped spillways. Their research compares a number of high-quality physical model data sets from multiple laboratories, emphasizing the variability ...

  3. Discharge characteristics of embankment-shaped weirs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kindsvater, Carl E.

    1964-01-01

    An embankment-shaped weir is an embankment overtopped by flood waters. Among the engineering problems frequently resulting from. this occurrence is the need to compute the peak discharge from postflood yield observations. The research described in this. report was concerned with the theoretical and experimental bases for the computation procedure. The research had two main objectives. One was to determine the relationship between embankment form and roughness and some of the more important discharge characteristics. The second was to define, theoretically and experimentally, the relationship between free-flow discharge and the boundary layer on the roadway. The first objective was accomplished with the experimental determination of coefficients of discharge and other significant flow characteristics for a variety of boundary and flow conditions. The second objective was accomplished with the development and experimental verification of a discharge equation which involved the boundary layer displacement thickness. This phase of the research included a general investigation of boundary layer growth on the roadway. It is included that both free- and submerged-flow discharge are virtually independent of the influence of embankment shape and relative height. The influence of boundary resistance is appreciable only for smaller heads. The most practical solution for discharge is one which is based on. the simple weir equation and experimentally determined coefficients. A completely analytical equation of discharge is impractical. The report contains the results of 936 experiments on the discharge characteristics of 17 different models; plus 106 boundary-layer velocity traverses on 4 different models. The data are summarized in both graphical and tabular form.

  4. Acquisition and Retaining Granular Samples via a Rotating Coring Bit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Badescu, Mircea; Sherrit, Stewart

    2013-01-01

    This device takes advantage of the centrifugal forces that are generated when a coring bit is rotated, and a granular sample is entered into the bit while it is spinning, making it adhere to the internal wall of the bit, where it compacts itself into the wall of the bit. The bit can be specially designed to increase the effectiveness of regolith capturing while turning and penetrating the subsurface. The bit teeth can be oriented such that they direct the regolith toward the bit axis during the rotation of the bit. The bit can be designed with an internal flute that directs the regolith upward inside the bit. The use of both the teeth and flute can be implemented in the same bit. The bit can also be designed with an internal spiral into which the various particles wedge. In another implementation, the bit can be designed to collect regolith primarily from a specific depth. For that implementation, the bit can be designed such that when turning one way, the teeth guide the regolith outward of the bit and when turning in the opposite direction, the teeth will guide the regolith inward into the bit internal section. This mechanism can be implemented with or without an internal flute. The device is based on the use of a spinning coring bit (hollow interior) as a means of retaining granular sample, and the acquisition is done by inserting the bit into the subsurface of a regolith, soil, or powder. To demonstrate the concept, a commercial drill and a coring bit were used. The bit was turned and inserted into the soil that was contained in a bucket. While spinning the bit (at speeds of 600 to 700 RPM), the drill was lifted and the soil was retained inside the bit. To prove this point, the drill was turned horizontally, and the acquired soil was still inside the bit. The basic theory behind the process of retaining unconsolidated mass that can be acquired by the centrifugal forces of the bit is determined by noting that in order to stay inside the interior of the bit, the

  5. 75. SECONDARY MILL AND CLASSIFIER FROM NORTHEAST. NOTE STONE/CONCRETE RETAINING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    75. SECONDARY MILL AND CLASSIFIER FROM NORTHEAST. NOTE STONE/CONCRETE RETAINING WALL TRANSITION AT RIGHT, BARREN SOLUTION PIPE FROM BARREN SOLUTION TANK, TOP CENTER, AND JOISTS FOR PRIMARY THICKENER No. 1, UPPER RIGHT. - Bald Mountain Gold Mill, Nevada Gulch at head of False Bottom Creek, Lead, Lawrence County, SD

  6. Operative correction of abdominal rectus diastasis (ARD) reduces pain and improves abdominal wall muscle strength: A randomized, prospective trial comparing retromuscular mesh repair to double-row, self-retaining sutures.

    PubMed

    Emanuelsson, Peter; Gunnarsson, Ulf; Dahlstrand, Ursula; Strigård, Karin; Stark, Birgit

    2016-11-01

    The primary aim of this prospective, randomized, clinical, 2-armed trial was to evaluate the risk for recurrence using 2 different operative techniques for repair of abdominal rectus diastasis. Secondary aims were comparison of pain, abdominal muscle strength, and quality of life and to compare those outcomes to a control group receiving physical training only. Eighty-six patients were enrolled. Twenty-nine patients were allocated to retromuscular polypropylene mesh and 27 to double-row plication with Quill technology. Thirty-two patients participated in a 3-month training program. Diastasis was evaluated with computed tomography scan and clinically. Pain was assessed using the ventral hernia pain questionnaire, a quality-of-life survey, SF-36, and abdominal muscle strength using the Biodex System-4. One early recurrence occurred in the Quill group, 2 encapsulated seromas in the mesh group, and 3 in the suture group. Significant improvements in perceived pain, the ventral hernia pain questionnaire, and quality of life appeared at the 1-year follow-up with no difference between the 2 operative groups. Significant muscular improvement was obtained in all groups (Biodex System-4). Patient perceived gain in muscle strength assessed with a visual analog scale improved similarly in both operative groups. This improvement was significantly greater than that seen in the training group. Patients in the training group still experienced bodily pain at follow-up. There was no difference between the Quill technique and retromuscular mesh in the effect on abdominal wall stability, with a similar complication rate 1 year after operation. An operation improves functional ability and quality of life. Training strengthens the abdominal muscles, but patients still experience discomfort and pain. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Clarence Cannon Dam and Mark Twain Lake Foundation and Embankment Completion Report. Part 2. Main Dam, Phase II Construction and Related Contracts. Volume 3. Photographs, pages 210 thru 291.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-12-01

    AD-RI60 529 CLARENCE CANNON DAN AND MARK TWAIN LAKE FOUNDATION AND i/i EMBANKMENT COMPLET (U) ARMY ENGINEER DISTRICT ST LOUIS UNCLRSSIFIED F/G 13/il...1 . MICROCOPY RESOLUTION TEST CHART NATIONAL BUREAU OF STANOARDS-1963-A ’L .. ....." . .. ."" " " " " ".’."" - - .. CLARENCE CANNON DAM & MARK ... TWAIN LAKE AD-A160 529 FOUNDATION AND EMBANKMENT COMPLETION REPORT PART 11 MAIN DAM PHASE II CONSTRUCTION AND RELATED CONTRACTS VOLUME III - PHOTOGRAPHS

  8. Tools for Success in Recruiting and Retaining Hispanic Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilroy, Marilyn

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about strategies for success in recruiting and retaining Hispanic students. One strategy suggested by Raul Lorenzo, account director for Bauza & Associates, a Hispanic marketing agency that helps colleges and universities recruit and retain Hispanic students, is that institutions need to speak to the heart as well…

  9. Tools for Success in Recruiting and Retaining Hispanic Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilroy, Marilyn

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about strategies for success in recruiting and retaining Hispanic students. One strategy suggested by Raul Lorenzo, account director for Bauza & Associates, a Hispanic marketing agency that helps colleges and universities recruit and retain Hispanic students, is that institutions need to speak to the heart as well…

  10. Designing Roads and Retaining Structures for Nangarhar Province, Afghanistan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    terrain analysis (East View Cartographic, Inc. 2003). Temperature and precipitation (i.e., rain and snow) data recorded at various stations in... rain erosion. Roofing is made by erecting a timber structure atop the walls and covering it with mud. Stack wall or Paskha wall buildings are made...additional mud to make a wider top so that rain falls directly to the ground rather than running down the wall, a layer of thin stones topped with an

  11. Depuration of highway runoff water into grass-covered embankments.

    PubMed

    Boivin, P; Saadé, M; Pfeiffer, H R; Hammecker, C; Degoumois, Y

    2008-06-01

    The management of polluted road runoff water is an important issue in environmental protection. A strategy could be to perform local depuration by infiltration into the soils of the embankment, but knowledge for designing such systems is lacking. This study aims at discussing the relevant soil properties, by estimating the long-term depuration of road runoff water infiltrating into the sandy soil embankment of the A9 highway in Wallis, Switzerland. This was done by estimating the heavy metals (HM) mass balance of two sites 23 and 12 years old, respectively. The accumulated HM were estimated by soil and GB analyses. The HM input was estimated by average water quality and traffic. The results were discussed using two-dimensional simulation of infiltration and a 14 months in situ monitoring of the runoff from the pavement to the embankment and at the bottom of the embankment. The soil properties were appropriate for both small particle adsorption and filtration. A good match between input and stored pollutant charges was found, and the HM profiles accorded well with infiltration simulation and monitoring results, which showed that 80-100% of the runoff water infiltrated into the embankment. Replacement of the cracked concrete gutters by an infiltration channel made of similar soil is recommended. These results oppose the Swiss guidelines for road-polluted water infiltration, as much more clayey soils are recommended. These later soils are difficult to find in Switzerland, and may allow for preferential flow through macro pores, in contrast to the studied site.

  12. Cruciate retaining and cruciate substituting ultra-congruent insert

    PubMed Central

    Deledda, Davide; Rosso, Federica; Ratto, Nicola; Bruzzone, Matteo; Bonasia, Davide Edoardo; Rossi, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    The posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) conservation and the polyethylene insert constraint in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) are still debated. The PCL is one of the primary stabilizers of the joint, but cruciate retaining (CR) implants have the disadvantage of a difficult balancing of the PCL. Postero-stabilized (PS) implants were introduced to reduce this problem. However, also the PS implants have some disadvantages, due to the cam-mechanism, such as high risk of cam-mechanism polyethylene wear. To minimize the polyethylene wear of the cam-mechanism and the bone sacrifice due to the intercondylar box, different types of inserts were developed, trying to increase the implant conformity and to reduce stresses on the bone-implant interface. In this scenario ultra-congruent (UC) inserts were developed. Those inserts are characterized by a high anterior wall and a deep-dished plate. This conformation should guarantee a good stability without the posterior cam. Few studies on both kinematic and clinical outcomes of UC inserts are available. Clinical and radiological outcomes, as well as kinematic data are similar between UC mobile bearing (MB) and standard PS MB inserts at short to mid-term follow-up. In this manuscript biomechanics and clinical outcomes of UC inserts will be described, and they will be compared to standard PS or CR inserts. PMID:26855938

  13. Time series models for prediction the total and dissolved heavy metals concentration in road runoff and soil solution of roadside embankments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aljoumani, Basem; Kluge, Björn; sanchez, Josep; Wessolek, Gerd

    2017-04-01

    Highways and main roads are potential sources of contamination for the surrounding environment. High traffic rates result in elevated heavy metal concentrations in road runoff, soil and water seepage, which has attracted much attention in the recent past. Prediction of heavy metals transfer near the roadside into deeper soil layers are very important to prevent the groundwater pollution. This study was carried out on data of a number of lysimeters which were installed along the A115 highway (Germany) with a mean daily traffic of 90.000 vehicles per day. Three polyethylene (PE) lysimeters were installed at the A115 highway. They have the following dimensions: length 150 cm, width 100 cm, height 60 cm. The lysimeters were filled with different soil materials, which were recently used for embankment construction in Germany. With the obtained data, we will develop a time series analysis model to predict total and dissolved metal concentration in road runoff and in soil solution of the roadside embankments. The time series consisted of monthly measurements of heavy metals and was transformed to a stationary situation. Subsequently, the transformed data will be used to conduct analyses in the time domain in order to obtain the parameters of a seasonal autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) model. Four phase approaches for identifying and fitting ARIMA models will be used: identification, parameter estimation, diagnostic checking, and forecasting. An automatic selection criterion, such as the Akaike information criterion, will use to enhance this flexible approach to model building

  14. Stepped chute training wall height requirements

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Stepped chutes are commonly used for overtopping protection for embankment dams. Aerated flow is commonly associated with stepped chutes if the chute has sufficient length. The aeration and turbulence of the flow can create a significant amount of splash over the training wall if not appropriately...

  15. Abiquiu Dam and Reservoir, Rio Grande Basin, Rio Chama, New Mexico. Embankment Criteria and Performance Report.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-04-01

    complexity or approaching obsolescence make it desirable to have such reports. Abiquiu Dam is a project which has had significant post construction...primary formation is quite complex with the more competent siltstones and sandstones and the weaker clays and shales being discontinuous and variable...1o 1 a." 30. u4 9-- UM C0 C.. a-210 $n6" 02 4.0 cl.;. os Qe-rn n tia . 2 . 71i 2. ft.. a.. 1 66 32 2-a 0.0h . I a401 0 9- bs *a G..n 0-4 r 9..s. 0

  16. Clarence Cannon Dam and Mark Twain Lake Foundation and Embankment Completion Report. Part 2. Main Dam, Phase II Construction and Related Contracts. Volume 3. Photographs, pages 1 thru 59.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-12-01

    RD-AI68 526 CLARENCE CANNON DAM AND MARK TWAIN LAKE FOUNDATION AND i/i EMIBANKMENT COMPLET (U) RV ENGINEER DISTRICT 5T LOUIS UNCLASSIFIED F/G 1T/13...8217 .;., .,,. _i .. i. 𔃼 , i ,,...,. , . . : . . ... , .,,,,,... .<.. . CLARENCE CANNON DAM & MARK TWAIN LAKE AD-A 160 526 FOUNDATION AND EMBANKMENT COMPLETION

  17. Waco Lake, Bosque River, Texas, Brazos River and Tributaries, Texas. Embankment Criteria, Performance and Foundation Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    Cloy. Corsicana Mart. Nucotoch Sand. and Neylondville Morl. -- --~ -UNCONFORMITY _________Taylor Group includes Pecan Gap Chalk Member and Watte City...DISTRICT, FORT WORTH MAY 1968 PLATE 40 eL ~ 1J- . 6 29 i P -5 I~1 pie P-6-3 r- ol ’ZIPIE 6O~rVA~ikJ ~OL U 4~& F󈨁 -1OE 0 plew ETC- ou~~rI56HOUO Ar I1

  18. Embankment Dams on Permafrost. Design and Performance Summary, Bibliography and an Annotated Bibliography.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-07-01

    regime of the stone-earth dam of the Kolyma Hydroelectric Power Plant , with a permeable clayey loam core (in Russian). Nauchno-tekhnicheskaia...Laboratory, Translation 554. *Kamenskii, R.M. (1973) Thermal regime of bearing ground and of the body of the Vilyuy Hydroelectric Power Plant (in...temperature field of the dam of the Vilyuy Hydroelectric Power Plant (in Russian). Nauka Novosibirsk. ’ Orel, O.P. and G.I. Kuznetsov (1974) Frozen

  19. Lasting impression of violence: Retained bullets and depressive symptoms.

    PubMed

    Smith, Randi N; Seamon, Mark J; Kumar, Vinayak; Robinson, Andrew; Shults, Justine; Reilly, Patrick M; Richmond, Therese S

    2017-09-04

    Over 70,000 nonfatal firearm injuries occur in the US annually, frequently leaving victims injured with retained bullets. The long-term psychological risks associated with retained bullets remains unstudied. By serving as a constant reminder of injury, we hypothesized that the presence of retained bullets after firearm injury is associated with increased PTSD and depression symptom severity. We conducted a prospective cohort study (2013-2015) of Black male survivors of firearm injury at an urban Level I trauma center. Interviews, questionnaires and validated survey tools for PTSD (PCL-5) and depression (QIDS-SR16) to assess severity of symptoms were administered 3 months post-injury. Clinical characteristics and symptom severity scores were compared with respect to retained bullets using Wilcoxon Rank Sum tests and linear regression. Of 139 participants, 101(73%) had retained bullets. The cohort was young (mean age 26 years), educated (82% high school or greater) yet unemployed (53%) and with multiple injuries (median [IQR] no. of GSWs 2 [1-3]). There was no difference in age, education, employment status, number of gunshot wounds, operative procedures, pain, hospital or ICU LOS between groups (p>0.05). Patients with retained bullets less often rated their health as "very good" or "excellent" (10% vs 29%, p=0.046). Of those working prior to injury (n=47), 61% with retained bullets had not returned to work compared to 33% without retained bullets (p=0.027). No difference in PCL-5 scores [30.9 (SD 18.9) vs 27.9 (SD 18.6), p=0.470] was observed, but patients with retained bullets had greater mean QIDS-SR16 scores [10.7 (SD 6.2) vs 7.8 (SD 6.1), p=0.038] than those without. After controlling for injury severity, number of wounds, marital status and education level, multiple linear regression analysis determined that retained bullets (β=3.52; p=0.017) were associated with more severe depressive symptoms. Retained bullets are associated with adverse psychological

  20. Influences of sand accumulation on crushed-rock embankment along the Qinghai-Tibet Railway, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zu, Ruiping; He, Zhilin; Zong, Yumei; Zhang, Kecun; Qu, Jianjun

    2016-04-01

    The crushed-rock embankment, which is widely used in the Qinghai-Tibet Railway (QTR), has been proven to have active cooling effects and can effectively protect the stability of embankment in permafrost regions. However, with the increasing of desertification in Tibetan Plateau, the crushed-rock embankments along the QTR have suffered from sand filling or burial seriously, and the influences of sand accumulation on the crushed-rock embankment have not been effectively resolved so far. Therefore, this paper simulated the ground temperature variation in the case of the crushed-rock embankment filled and buried by sand through the indoor experiment. The results show that the bare crushed-rock has good cooling effect on its underlying embankment, but after filled or buried by sand, its cooling effect will significantly reduce or even disappear, and the thicker the sand layer, the higher the ground temperature of frozen soil. In the long term, the sand accumulation could be a serious and potential threat to embankment of the QTR. In order to ensure the stability of the crushed-rock embankment and safe operation of the QTR, it is necessary to set up comprehensive sand-protecting system along the railway as soon as possible.

  1. NORTH EMBANKMENT IN FOREGROUND, WITH (LR) SUBSTATION (MI98D), POWERHOUSE (MI98C), ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    NORTH EMBANKMENT IN FOREGROUND, WITH (L-R) SUBSTATION (MI-98-D), POWERHOUSE (MI-98-C), AND COOKE DAM POND IN BACKGROUND. VIEW TO SOUTH - Cooke Hydroelectric Plant, North Embankment, Cook Dam Road at Au Sable River, Oscoda, Iosco County, MI

  2. Great wall...and lesser wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    What nature has covered up, humans have again exposed. Using images from the Spaceborne Imaging Radar C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR), researchers have found remnants of two generations of the Great Wall of China buried beneath desert sands, 700 km west of Beijing. Erosion and wind storms had shielded parts of both walls from view, but the foundation now has been laid bare by remote sensors.

  3. Recruiting and Retaining Teachers for Richmond Public Schools: Partnership Efforts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Jill; Alder, Nora; Fitrer, Harold; McLeod, Alan

    2002-01-01

    Describes partnership efforts between the Richmond Public Schools, Virginia, and Virginia Commonwealth University that have focused on the needs of urban schools. Describes challenges that remain with regard to preparing teachers, mentoring beginning teachers, and retaining experienced teachers. (SLD)

  4. Final report of coordination and cooperation with the European Union on embankment failure analysis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    There has been an emphasis in the European Union (EU) community on the investigation of extreme flood processes and the uncertainties related to these processes. Over a 3-year period, the EU and the U.S. dam safety community (1) coordinated their efforts and collected information needed to integrate...

  5. Stability of Low Embankments on Soft Clay. Part 3. Centrifuge Tests and Numerical Analysis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-11-01

    findings of these two workers and others (notably Naylor, 1975), Zytynski(1976) developed CRISTINA (Critical State Numerical Algorithm). Basset et al (1981...Preliminary tests, October 1981 - March 1982 - Report to the Department of Environment, University of Cambridge. Magnan, J.P., Humbert , P., Belkeziz, A. and...strain Models, Proc. IV Int. Conf. on Num. Met. in Geomechanics, Edmonton, Canada, June 1982, pp.327-336. Magnan, J.P., Humbert , P. and Mouratidis, A

  6. Completion of Embankment Outlet Works and Spillway, Cooper Lake, Sulphur River, Texas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-01

    for construction of the Cooper Lake and Channels is contained in Public Law 218 (Chapter 501), 84th Congiess, approved August 3, 1955. C. Purposes of...Company (operation of a concrete batch plant): Lattimore Materials Company of Mckinney, Texas. Subcontractor to Martin K. Eby Company (subsequent to...borings of all types were drilled by the Fort Worth District between 1984 and 1986. The reader is referred to the publication Design Memorandum No. 3

  7. Completion of Embankment and Spillway, Joe Pool Lake, Mountain Creek, Texas.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-02-01

    the spillway were drilled through the 4-inch protective concrete slab and 12-inch sand filter blanket to a total depth of 15 feet into the Eagle Ford...Shale using the pneumatic drill. Holes in the drop structure penetrated the protective slab directly into the shale - no filter was present. In the...tended to dissipate vertically. Soon after exposure, the bedrock began to show signs of deterioration such as lightened color, hair-line cracks, and

  8. Embankment Criteria and Performance Report. Missouri River, Fort Randall Dam - Lake Francis Case.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-03-01

    Formation occurs sharply at about Elev. 1,320. The formation is susceptible to landsliding , and It may be generally described as a noncalcareous to highly...4* ~ , 2. ~A t vo 243 3 Is ’ s V3 * /P. A. 21 At NT 5$as ’I,) OSO O rGI#.RS.U A TM OMf!~ 45 28 EMANNDN PLBANKMOF W-0 ,.UBSURFACE EXPLORATIONS -. J.rt

  9. Embankment Criteria and Performance Report, Missouri River, Fort Peck Lake, Montana. Volume II. Drawings.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-09-01

    AND APARTMENT AE (~ REVISE RESRVOH TOIkt imoqooo 044 ’-" 14 ad~fw~w ~AAU ~4i~ * RAVEL TOE L Yoe ; AX. DEPTIRW $few -NE TYPICAL CROSS/ ~~-SECT ION OF DAM...CIli N N N LJ I> UU () u ~I - 6 0 0 -+ o4’ C. - z 00 > -~2 1~~~~ VCW *- oil-- La 4I (i~~bs S.oj *1iu i 9 I VIH 9-sn c ..-.. w ~ LkJo~ 0L 0 B )0

  10. Recruiting and Retaining a Diverse Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Rhonda

    2002-01-01

    Performed a literature search and surveyed universities about recruitment and retention of diverse faculty. Found (in addition to details of institutions' efforts) that despite some progress in diversifying faculty, women and minority faculty members still face severe problems, including underrepresentation and a "chilly climate." Includes…

  11. Recruiting and Retaining Culturally Diverse Special Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valle-Riestra, Diana Martinez; Shealey, Monika Williams; Cramer, Elizabeth D.

    2011-01-01

    In light of the current challenges in addressing the achievement gap between minority and non-minority students, the persistent problems of disproportionality in special education, and the dismal post-school outcomes for culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) students and those living in poverty, it is critical that successful models of…

  12. Portable, Folding Tray Retainer and Stand (Multipurpose).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The invention relates generally to the field of service tray supports and, in particular, to an improved combined portable tray support and stand especially adaptable for use with a litter-borne patient.

  13. Strategies for Recruiting and Retaining Hispanic Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devall, Esther L.; Vail, Ann; Resendez, Jeanne

    2005-01-01

    Hispanic Americans are the largest- and fastest growing minority group in the U.S., yet their higher education enrollment and graduation rates lag behind those of other ethnic groups. In the Department of Family and Consumer Sciences at New Mexico State University, 42% of students are Hispanic. Of the students who graduate each year, 40% are…

  14. Continuously variable transmission and torque retaining differential

    SciTech Connect

    Johnshoy, E.W.

    1988-11-15

    This patent describes a variable ratio transmission comprising: first and second gear clusters; means to rotatably mount the gear cluster about separate, parallel mounting axis for independent rotation relative to each other; each of the gear clusters comprising a plurality of rotatable gears including an input gear rotatable about an axis coincident with its respective mounting axis, an output shaft, output gear means for driving the output shaft, and control gear means to effect a driving connection between the input gear and the output shaft through the output gear means; means for simultaneously driving the input gears of both gear clusters and means for selectively and simultaneously controlling rotation of both of the gear clusters to simultaneously vary the effective ratio of rotation between the input gear and output shafts of both clusters through the output gear means of the clusters.

  15. Attracting, Retaining, and Engaging Early Career Scientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Alan; Heal, Kate; Pringle, Daniel

    2007-12-01

    Young Scientists Event, IUGG XXIV General Assembly; Perugia, Italy, 10 July 2007 This young scientists event was organized to engage younger scientists with the International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics (IUGG) and to provide a specific forum to express their views at the General Assembly. It comprised a panel discussion chaired by Kate Heal and with three young geosciences panelists (Masaki Hayashi, University of Calgary, Canada; Kalachand Sain, National Geophysical Research Institute, Hyderabad, India; and Simona Stefanescu, National Meteorological Administration, Bucharest). The group, which had identified several topics relevant to young geoscientists, presented their views in open discussion session. Thirty IUGG conference attendees were present.

  16. Recruiting and Retaining Male Special Education Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Craig J.; Goessling, Deborah Peters

    2005-01-01

    The percentage of male students who complete an undergraduate degree in the field of special education continues to be much lower than that of female graduates. Low status, low salaries, the perception of teaching as women's work, potential complaints of child abuse and sexual harassment, and a lack of male peer groups factor into this low…

  17. Employee Engagement: Motivating and Retaining Tomorrow's Workforce

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shuck, Michael Bradley; Wollard, Karen Kelly

    2008-01-01

    Tomorrow's workforce is seeking more than a paycheck; they want their work to meet their needs for affiliation, meaning, and self-development. Companies willing to meet these demands will capture the enormous profit potential of a workforce of fully engaged workers. This piece explores what engagement is, why it matters, and how human resource…

  18. Attracting and Retaining Learning Disability Student Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owen, Sara; Standen, Penny

    2007-01-01

    Recruitment onto pre-registration learning disability nursing courses has decreased considerably over the last decade. This paper reports the findings of the first stage of a longitudinal study that investigated the factors that influence students to train as learning disability nurses, and those that influence their decision to continue or leave…

  19. Teachers Wanted: Attracting and Retaining Good Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heller, Daniel A.

    2004-01-01

    Just as the pool of qualified teacher applicants is shrinking and attrition rates are soaring, new standards are making entry into the teaching profession more difficult. Teachers can make sure their school system doesn't get caught in the crunch by implementing the approach from this visionary guide. Daniel A. Heller describes a top-to-bottom…

  20. Hiring and Retaining Great Independent School Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balossi, Matt; Hernández, Natalie R.

    2016-01-01

    While numerous studies measure teacher effectiveness in public schools, there is little research on teacher quality among independent schools. In fact, the topic of teacher quality in public schools receives widespread media coverage, funding, and special interest. In order to better understand how independent schools describe high-quality…

  1. Reengineering marketing to retain and win customers

    SciTech Connect

    Hobson, J.

    1995-12-31

    According to the Oxford Dictionary, to engineer is to plan or accomplish something artfully by applying skill or contrivance. Reengineering implies starting again. Thus, it is no great surprise that business reengineering is the process of going back to the beginning and devising a better way of accomplishing the desired result. Michael Hammer, the originator of the concept of business reengineering, gives this definition: {open_quotes}Reengineering is the fundamental rethinking and radical redesign of business processes to achieve dramatic improvements in critical, contemporary measures of performance, such as cost, quality, service, and speed{close_quotes}. Not every process requires reengineering. If the process is narrow and has little impact on overall corporate performance, it is not a candidate for reengineering. More importantly the appropriate measure of reengineering success is found on the bottom line-not in improvements in individual processes. Thus, since the goal is to produce extensive, enduring profit improvement, the reengineering project must be broad and it must penetrate deep to the companys core. Identifying the activities that are critical for value creation in the whole business unit is not easy. For example, while it may be of interest to redesign the accounts-payable process, the result will probably be about a 1-2% cost reduction as a percent of the business unit. Likewise, redesign of a cross-functional process such as new product development, will result in a meager 3-5% cost reduction. Compare this to projects that reengineered processes that involve the critical activities of the business unit - those processes that propel competitive advantage - these projects result in a 15-20% reduction in business-unit costs.

  2. Apparatus for retaining and releasing a payload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carrier, Alain (Inventor); Cobb, Bruce (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus for latching an object, such as a payload for a space vehicle, includes an expandible latch which is shifted between a relaxed open condition and a flexed closed condition by actuation of a pair of temperature-responsive members, such as shaped memory alloy (SMA) coil springs. One of the two temperature-responsive members biases an actuator into a first position that allows the expandible latch to open. The other SMA member biases the actuator in the opposite position to close the expandible latch. Heating the appropriate SMA member causes the actuator to move from one position to the other position. In the preferred embodiment, no power is required to maintain the actuator in either position once the position has been established. For example, the actuator may have a rest position that allows the expandible latch to remain open when the two SMA members are cooled and allowed to reach an equilibrium condition with respect to applied force to the actuator. A detent-and-ball arrangement may be used to maintain the position of the actuator after the expandible latch has been closed.

  3. Investigation of channel morphology in a restored river/floodplain interconnection at the embanked Danube between Neuburg and Ingolstadt (Germany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Peter; Haas, Florian; Heckmann, Tobias; Stammel, Barbara; Cyffka, Bernd

    2010-05-01

    The Upper part of the Danube was straightened and embanked since the mid of the 19th century and flows between dikes without any contact to its floodplain. Additionally, since the 1970ies hydropower stations are influencing the river continuity and the ground water level of the floodplain negatively. The presented investigations are part of a floodplain restoration project that aims to bring back new dynamics to the floodplain, like water, groundwater and morphological features, as the key processes for floodplain habitats and species.They give a drive to enliven the natural processes in the riparian areas. This project ("Remediation of riparian areas on the Danube floodplain between Neuburg and Ingolstadt", Germany) takes place in a project area of 2.100 hectares of riparian forests. The project consists of two major parts - A permanent flow of water (up to 5 m3/s) bypassing the dam of the power station. The new river will develop on the floodplain partly following old oxbows, but partly eroding its way naturally in the new modelled channel. - Controlled flooding (up to 30 m3/s) of parts of the floodplain during peak discharge of the Danube (600-1.100 m3/s; statistically one to three times a year) The project, conducted by the Bavarian Water Authority, will start at the beginning of February 2010. The Floodplain Institute Neuburg and the Department of Physical Geography of the Catholic University of Eichstaett together with some other Institutes established a comprehensive monitoring program including vegetation, fauna, hydrological and morphological data. This monitoring program is founded by the BfN (Federal Agency for Nature Conservation). From the beginning of the flooding a new morphological activity will start which might be self sustaining or self cumulative. For example the new river banks are prone to lateral erosion and new undercut slopes will develop. The transport, erosion and deposit of sediment will depend on the outflow which is man-controlled and

  4. Identification of a Lipoteichoic Acid Glycosyltransferase Enzyme Reveals that GW-Domain-Containing Proteins Can Be Retained in the Cell Wall of Listeria monocytogenes in the Absence of Lipoteichoic Acid or Its Modifications.

    PubMed

    Percy, Matthew G; Karinou, Eleni; Webb, Alexander J; Gründling, Angelika

    2016-08-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne Gram-positive bacterial pathogen, and many of its virulence factors are either secreted proteins or proteins covalently or noncovalently attached to the cell wall. Previous work has indicated that noncovalently attached proteins with GW (glycine-tryptophan) domains are retained in the cell wall by binding to the cell wall polymer lipoteichoic acid (LTA). LTA is a glycerol phosphate polymer, which is modified in L. monocytogenes with galactose and d-alanine residues. We identified Lmo0933 as the cytoplasmic glycosyltransferase required for the LTA glycosylation process and renamed the protein GtlA, for glycosyltransferase LTA A Using L. monocytogenes mutants lacking galactose or d-alanine modifications or the complete LTA polymer, we show that GW domain proteins are retained within the cell wall, indicating that other cell wall polymers are involved in the retention of GW domain proteins. Further experiments revealed peptidoglycan as the binding receptor as a purified GW domain fusion protein can bind to L. monocytogenes cells lacking wall teichoic acid (WTA) as well as purified peptidoglycan derived from a wild-type or WTA-negative strain. With this, we not only identify the first enzyme involved in the LTA glycosylation process, but we also provide new insight into the binding mechanism of noncovalently attached cell wall proteins. Over the past 20 years, a large number of bacterial genome sequences have become available. Computational approaches are used for the genome annotation and identification of genes and encoded proteins. However, the function of many proteins is still unknown and often cannot be predicted bioinformatically. Here, we show that the previously uncharacterized Listeria monocytogenes gene lmo0933 likely codes for a glycosyltransferase required for the decoration of the cell wall polymer lipoteichoic acid (LTA) with galactose residues. Using L. monocytogenes mutants lacking LTA modifications or the complete

  5. Identification of a Lipoteichoic Acid Glycosyltransferase Enzyme Reveals that GW-Domain-Containing Proteins Can Be Retained in the Cell Wall of Listeria monocytogenes in the Absence of Lipoteichoic Acid or Its Modifications

    PubMed Central

    Percy, Matthew G.; Karinou, Eleni; Webb, Alexander J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne Gram-positive bacterial pathogen, and many of its virulence factors are either secreted proteins or proteins covalently or noncovalently attached to the cell wall. Previous work has indicated that noncovalently attached proteins with GW (glycine-tryptophan) domains are retained in the cell wall by binding to the cell wall polymer lipoteichoic acid (LTA). LTA is a glycerol phosphate polymer, which is modified in L. monocytogenes with galactose and d-alanine residues. We identified Lmo0933 as the cytoplasmic glycosyltransferase required for the LTA glycosylation process and renamed the protein GtlA, for glycosyltransferase LTA A. Using L. monocytogenes mutants lacking galactose or d-alanine modifications or the complete LTA polymer, we show that GW domain proteins are retained within the cell wall, indicating that other cell wall polymers are involved in the retention of GW domain proteins. Further experiments revealed peptidoglycan as the binding receptor as a purified GW domain fusion protein can bind to L. monocytogenes cells lacking wall teichoic acid (WTA) as well as purified peptidoglycan derived from a wild-type or WTA-negative strain. With this, we not only identify the first enzyme involved in the LTA glycosylation process, but we also provide new insight into the binding mechanism of noncovalently attached cell wall proteins. IMPORTANCE Over the past 20 years, a large number of bacterial genome sequences have become available. Computational approaches are used for the genome annotation and identification of genes and encoded proteins. However, the function of many proteins is still unknown and often cannot be predicted bioinformatically. Here, we show that the previously uncharacterized Listeria monocytogenes gene lmo0933 likely codes for a glycosyltransferase required for the decoration of the cell wall polymer lipoteichoic acid (LTA) with galactose residues. Using L. monocytogenes mutants lacking LTA

  6. Bovine retained placenta: aetiology, pathogenesis and economic loss.

    PubMed

    Laven, R A; Peters, A R

    1996-11-09

    The literature on the effects and causes of retained placenta in the cow is reviewed. On a herd basis the condition can adversely affect milk yield and fertility, but on an individual cow basis the effects are unpredictable. The aetiology of retained placenta has been extensively studied and many causal factors have been implicated, but little is known of how many of them cause the condition. As a result its prevention and prediction is uncertain, primarily because of the lack of knowledge of the normal process of placental release. Vascular changes and uterine contractions play a role in placental release, but current opinion suggests that the primary cause of retained placenta is the retention of the feto-maternal union. Release only occurs after a process of maturation, which involves hormonal and structural changes. The factors which are thought to influence these changes, and thus cause the condition, are discussed.

  7. Clean-coal technology by-products used in a highway embankment stabilization demonstration project. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Nodjomian, S.M.

    1994-01-01

    Clean-coal technology by-products are used in a highway embankment demonstration project. This research chronicles the procedures used in the process and analyzes the stability of a repaired highway embankment. The reconstructed slope is analyzed using an Intelligent Discussion Support System that was developed from a slope stability program. Water quality studies are performed and an instrumentation plan is suggested. The calculated factors of safety and the observed embankment performance give indications that the field demonstration project was a success. Long-term monitoring will be the best barometer for determining embankment gross movement and the future of FGD by-products as a stabilizing material.

  8. Is manure an alternative to topsoil in road embankment restoration?

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Desirée; García-Palacios, Pablo; Jauregui, Berta M.

    2017-01-01

    One of the main steps in road and railway embankment restoration is the spreading of previously removed topsoil, which provides an input of seeds, organic matter and microorganisms and encourages the establishment of a vegetation cover, essential to stabilise the embankment and blend it with the landscape. However, topsoil is a scarce resource, prompting the search for economic alternatives with similar results. The present study compares the results of spreading topsoil with an organic amendment (manure) for the soil's physico-chemical properties, erosion resistance and microbial activity, floristic richness and composition, and bare soil cover. For this purpose, experimental plots with three treatments (Control, Topsoil and Manure) were maintained on a recently built embankment in Central Spain for 20 months. Manure was found to be an effective alternative to topsoil for the improvement of soil fertility (organic matter content and total nitrogen). The two types of organic amendment produced similar reductions in bare soil cover and erosion rates. However, plots with topsoil showed greater soil respiration and species richness and a different floristic composition in comparison to those treated with manure, which was closer to control plots. These results suggest that manure can be used to replace topsoil to enhance embankment stability during the early stages of restoration. However, if the aim of the restoration process is to promote plant diversity, topsoil is recommended. PMID:28346511

  9. Is manure an alternative to topsoil in road embankment restoration?

    PubMed

    Peco, Begoña; Rivera, Desirée; García-Palacios, Pablo; Jauregui, Berta M

    2017-01-01

    One of the main steps in road and railway embankment restoration is the spreading of previously removed topsoil, which provides an input of seeds, organic matter and microorganisms and encourages the establishment of a vegetation cover, essential to stabilise the embankment and blend it with the landscape. However, topsoil is a scarce resource, prompting the search for economic alternatives with similar results. The present study compares the results of spreading topsoil with an organic amendment (manure) for the soil's physico-chemical properties, erosion resistance and microbial activity, floristic richness and composition, and bare soil cover. For this purpose, experimental plots with three treatments (Control, Topsoil and Manure) were maintained on a recently built embankment in Central Spain for 20 months. Manure was found to be an effective alternative to topsoil for the improvement of soil fertility (organic matter content and total nitrogen). The two types of organic amendment produced similar reductions in bare soil cover and erosion rates. However, plots with topsoil showed greater soil respiration and species richness and a different floristic composition in comparison to those treated with manure, which was closer to control plots. These results suggest that manure can be used to replace topsoil to enhance embankment stability during the early stages of restoration. However, if the aim of the restoration process is to promote plant diversity, topsoil is recommended.

  10. Simulating effects of highway embankments on estuarine circulation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Jonathan K.; Schaffranek, Raymond W.; Baltzer, Robert A.

    1994-01-01

    A two-dimensional depth-averaged, finite-difference, numerical model was used to simulate tidal circulation and mass transport in the Port Royal Sound. South Carolina, estuarine system. The purpose of the study was to demonstrate the utility of the Surface-Water. Integrated. Flow and Transport model (SWIFT2D) for evaluating changes in circulation patterns and mass transport caused by highway-crossing embankments. A model of subregion of Port Royal Sound including the highway crossings and having a grid size of 61 m (200ft) was derived from a 183-m (600-ft) model of the entire Port Royal Sound estuarine system. The 183-m model was used to compute boundary-value data for the 61-m submodel, which was then used to simulate flow conditions with and without the highway embankments in place. The numerical simulations show that, with the highway embankment in place, mass transport between the Broad River and Battery Creek is reduced and mass transport between the Beaufort River and Battery Creek is increased. The net result is that mass transport into and out of upper Battery Creek is reduced. The presence of the embankments also alters circulation patterns within Battery Creek.

  11. Simplified physically based model of earthen embankment breaching

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A simplified physically based model has been developed to simulate the breaching processes of homogenous and composite earthen embankments owing to overtopping and piping. The breach caused by overtopping flow is approximated as a flat broad-crested weir with a trapezoidal cross section, downstream ...

  12. Economic and reproductive consequences of retained placenta in dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Joosten, I; Stelwagen, J; Dijkhuizen, A A

    1988-07-09

    The financial losses due to retained placenta in Dutch dairy cattle were estimated by using two different methods of calculation. A data-set containing the birth records of 160,188 Meuse-Rhine-Yssel cows provided data on the reproductive performance of cows with and without retained placenta. The fertility of cows after retention of the placenta appeared to be affected. An economic calculation made by adding the losses due to increased calving interval, increased culling rate, loss of milk production and the costs of veterinary treatment and drugs revealed that the total loss due to retained placenta was 471 pounds per year for a 100-cow farm with an average incidence of the condition (6.6 per cent). For a 'problem' farm with a 30 per cent rate, the loss was 2139 pounds per year. A computer farm simulation model, based on a stochastic determination of events, was used to make calculations for circumstances closely resembling those on farms. A 6.6 per cent rate of retained placenta caused a small but significant decrease in net return on labour and management; however, a 30 per cent rate caused highly significant changes. The economic effects of retained placenta were similar in magnitude in herds of high or low productivity and high or low fertility. Sensitivity analysis showed that the greatest financial losses were caused by loss of milk production, followed by the number of animals suffering from complications. The financial losses in herds with an average rate of retained placenta were thus of limited economic importance and therapeutic measures alone should be adequate.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. WinDAM B earthern embankment overtopping analysis software

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Windows Dam Analysis Modules (WinDAM) is a modular software application being developed for the analysis of overtopped earth embankments and internal erosion. The development is being carried out in stages. The initial computational model development addressed routing of the flood through the rese...

  14. Construction of a test embankment using a sand-tire shred mixture as fill material.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Sungmin; Prezzi, Monica; Siddiki, Nayyar Zia; Kim, Bumjoo

    2006-01-01

    Use of tire shreds in construction projects, such as highway embankments, is becoming an accepted way of beneficially recycling scrap tires. However, in the last decade there was a decline in the use of pure tire shreds as fill materials in embankment construction, as they are susceptible to fire hazards due to the development of exothermic reactions. Tire shred-sand mixtures, on the other hand, were found to be effective in inhibiting exothermic reactions. When compared with pure tire shreds, tire shred-sand mixtures are less compressible and have higher shear strength. However, the literature contains limited information on the use of tire shred-soil mixtures as a fill material. The objectives of this paper are to discuss and evaluate the feasibility of using tire shred-sand mixtures as a fill material in embankment construction. A test embankment constructed using a 50/50 mixture, by volume, of tire shreds and sand was instrumented and monitored to: (a) determine total and differential settlements; (b) evaluate the environmental impact of the embankment construction on the groundwater quality due to leaching of fill material; and (c) study the temperature variation inside the embankment. The findings in this research indicate that mixtures of tire shreds and sand are viable materials for embankment construction.

  15. Six Types of Teachers: Recruiting, Retaining and Mentoring the Best

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fiore, Douglas J.; Whitaker, Todd

    2004-01-01

    This book helps principals and all others who hire and retain teachers to sharpen their ability to hire better teachers for their schools, improve the ones who are already there, and keep their best and brightest on board. It demonstrates that the quality of the people on staff will ultimately determine the quality of the school and the success of…

  16. Six Types of Teachers: Recruiting, Retaining and Mentoring the Best

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fiore, Douglas J.; Whitaker, Todd

    2004-01-01

    This book helps principals and all others who hire and retain teachers to sharpen their ability to hire better teachers for their schools, improve the ones who are already there, and keep their best and brightest on board. It demonstrates that the quality of the people on staff will ultimately determine the quality of the school and the success of…

  17. Development of a Test Cell to Evaluate Embankment Infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Orton, T. L.

    2002-02-25

    Envirocare of Utah, Inc. (Envirocare) has developed and constructed a test pad to evaluate potential infiltration through the designed cover system over the low-level radioactive waste disposal embankments incorporated at the facility. The general design of the test pad follows the recommendations set forth in the Alternative Cover Assessment Program (ACAP) that is currently funded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to assess potential alternatives to conventional landfill cover designs. The bulk of the test pad is below grade with dimensions approximately 16 feet wide by 28 feet long. The base of the test pad is a lysimeter built to the same dimensions as compliance lysimeters within the disposal embankments at Envirocare. The lysimeter collects all liquids to a single low point and directs the liquids through monitoring instruments within a manhole outside the test pad. The lysimeter is constructed to simulate the ''top of waste'' condition in Envirocare's embankments; consequently, the top of the lysimeter is sloped at an angle of approximately 2.8 percent, the design top slope of the embankment. A replica of the embankment cover is constructed directly above the lysimeter. This cover is constructed exactly the same as final cover is constructed upon the waste disposal embankments, utilizing the same QA/QC measures. Permanent monitoring equipment has been placed during construction at specific intervals throughout the test pad. Monitoring equipment consists of water content reflectometers (WCRs), matric water potential sensors (heat dissipation units; HDUs), and temperature probes. The monitoring equipment provides cross-sectional data of the moisture content and temperatures throughout the constructed cover. Additionally, surface water runoff is collected through a drainage trough and measured in order to perform a water balance over the entire test pad. To aid in the assessment, data collected from the site meteorological stat ion will be used

  18. Hospital and procedure incidence of pediatric retained surgical items.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Tashiro, Jun; Perez, Eduardo A; Lasko, David S; Sola, Juan E

    2015-10-01

    Prevention of retained surgical items (RSIs) is the main objective of the World Health Organization "Guidelines for Safe Surgery" (WHO/GSS) 2008 to improve patient safety. We analyzed Kids' Inpatient Database 1997-2009 for RSI in patients aged <18 y. Incidence of RSI was calculated by per 100,000 admissions and per 100,000 procedures. The incidence was analyzed based on hospital bedsize, teaching status, region, and ownership and rural versus metropolitan location based on per 100,000 admissions. Overall, 713 cases were identified with a mean (standard deviation) age of 8.31 y (6.62), length of stay of 13 d (20), and total charges of $91,321 (155,054). RSI occurred at a rate of 2.22 per 100,000 admissions and 1.93 per 100,000 procedures; both rates decreased post-WHO/GSS implementation versus pre-WHO/GSS, P < 0.005. On average, public or children's hospitals reported the highest RSI rates (8.89 and 6.07/100,000 admissions, respectively). Small and medium bedsize hospitals had lower rates of RSI post-WHO/GSS, P < 0.05. Nonteaching, non-children's, or public hospitals reported lower rates post-WHO/GSS, P < 0.003. Private (nonprofit) hospitals reported higher rates post-WHO/GSS, P < 0.001. Facilities in the southern United States or in metropolitan areas reported lower rates post-WHO/GSS, P < 0.02. A subanalysis of 107 cases requiring surgical removal demonstrated that fundoplications had the highest rate of RSI, followed by gastric procedures, laparotomy, bile duct procedures, lysis of adhesions, and abdominal wall repair. RSI rates have decreased overall after the introduction of the WHO/GSS. The largest reductions have occurred in public or nonteaching hospitals. Only private (nonprofit) hospitals reported increases in RSI since 2008. Higher rates of RSI are associated with fundoplications and other gastric procedures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Railway Embankments as New Habitat for Pollinators in an Agricultural Landscape

    PubMed Central

    Moroń, Dawid; Skórka, Piotr; Lenda, Magdalena; Rożej-Pabijan, Elżbieta; Wantuch, Marta; Kajzer-Bonk, Joanna; Celary, Waldemar; Mielczarek, Łukasz Emil; Tryjanowski, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    Pollinating insect populations, essential for maintaining wild plant diversity and agricultural productivity, rely on (semi)natural habitats. An increasing human population is encroaching upon and deteriorating pollinator habitats. Thus the population persistence of pollinating insects and their associated ecosystem services may depend upon on man-made novel habitats; however, their importance for ecosystem services is barely understood. We tested if man-made infrastructure (railway embankments) in an agricultural landscape establishes novel habitats that support large populations of pollinators (bees, butterflies, hoverflies) when compared to typical habitats for these insects, i.e., semi-natural grasslands. We also identified key environmental factors affecting the species richness and abundance of pollinators on embankments. Species richness and abundance of bees and butterflies were higher for railway embankments than for grasslands. The occurrence of bare (non-vegetated) ground on embankments positively affected bee species richness and abundance, but negatively affected butterfly populations. Species richness and abundance of butterflies positively depended on species richness of native plants on embankments, whereas bee species richness was positively affected by species richness of non-native flowering plants. The density of shrubs on embankments negatively affected the number of bee species and their abundance. Bee and hoverfly species richness were positively related to wood cover in a landscape surrounding embankments. This is the first study showing that railway embankments constitute valuable habitat for the conservation of pollinators in farmland. Specific conservation strategies involving embankments should focus on preventing habitat deterioration due to encroachment of dense shrubs and maintaining grassland vegetation with patches of bare ground. PMID:25054427

  20. Cultural Strategies for Retaining Fisheries, Forestries and Land.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paul, Cletus Maanu

    1987-01-01

    Outlines culturally based political and legal strategies used by the indigenous peoples of New Zealand to retain or regain control of fisheries, forests, and land. Emphasizes the need to integrate tribal culture and history into the general education system of New Zealand, thereby underpinning customary tribal rights. (SV)

  1. Recruiting and Retaining Rural School Administrators. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howley, Aimee; Pendarvis, Edwina

    School districts nationwide, but especially rural districts, are finding it hard to recruit and retain administrators. In the past 25 years, administrators have had to address increasing demands for special programs, collaborative decision making, and accountability. In addition, potential for conflict with school boards and various constituencies…

  2. Clarence Cannon Dam and Mark Twain Lake Foundation and Embankment Completion Report. Part 2. Main Dam, Phase II Construction and Related Contracts. Volume 1. Narrative, sections 1 thru 9.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-12-01

    Clays, Sands and Gravels) A, 2. Rock Excavation (a) Introduction (b) Right Non-Overflow Area (1) Limestone Excavation (2) Shale Excavation (c) Right...Abutment lV:lH Slope (1) Limestone Excavation (2) Shale Excavation (d) Concrete Structure (1) Shale Excavation (2) Limestone Excavation 3 / PART II MAIN...anchored to the Hannibal Shale with No. 18 reinforcing steel anchor bars. Concrete retaining walls are provided on the right of the spillway and the left

  3. Recruiting and Retaining Physicians in Very Rural Areas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pepper, Carolyn M.; Sandefer, Ryan H.; Gray, Matt J.

    2010-01-01

    Context: Recruiting and retaining physicians is a challenge in rural areas. Growing up in a rural area and completing medical training in a rural area have been shown to predict decisions to practice in rural areas. Little is known, though, about factors that contribute to physicians' decisions to locate in very sparsely populated areas. Purpose:…

  4. Attracting and Retaining Teachers: A Question of Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muller, Karin; Alliata, Roberta; Benninghoff, Fabienne

    2009-01-01

    Attracting and retaining competent teachers is a key concern when it comes to managing the supply and demand for teachers. This article examines the motivation that prompts people to enter or leave the teaching profession with the aim of identifying a decision framework for defining teacher policies. The results are based on the teacher workforce…

  5. Attracting and Retaining High-Quality Professionals in Science Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weld, Jeffrey

    1998-01-01

    To attract and retain high-quality teachers, the education system must address science teachers' sense of professional isolation, administrators' lack of receptivity to thoughtful teachers' ideas, egalitarian salary compensation schemes, and lack of professional recognition. An outstanding chemistry teacher-turned-pharmaceutical saleswoman is…

  6. Attracting and Retaining Teachers: A Question of Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muller, Karin; Alliata, Roberta; Benninghoff, Fabienne

    2009-01-01

    Attracting and retaining competent teachers is a key concern when it comes to managing the supply and demand for teachers. This article examines the motivation that prompts people to enter or leave the teaching profession with the aim of identifying a decision framework for defining teacher policies. The results are based on the teacher workforce…

  7. An Integrated Approach to Recruiting and Retaining Appalachian Engineering Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winn, Gary; Hensel, Robin; Curtis, Reagan; Taylor, Lydotta M.; Cilento, Gene

    2012-01-01

    Recruiting and retaining Appalachian engineering students is difficult for a variety of ecological and cultural reasons. At West Virginia University an NSF STEP grant has allowed the development of specific interventions to evolve from an ecological model we describe here. The interventions include web-based, realistic engineering design exercises…

  8. Rural Education: Attracting and Retaining Teachers in Small Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowe, Jerry M.

    2006-01-01

    For many small rural school districts across America, the effort to attract and retain quality teachers continues to be a major concern. Schools located in what are considered to be "hard to staff" areas experience the most difficult. While not all communities face the problems of inadequate teacher supply, many small and rural school…

  9. Find, Attract, and Retain Workers with Affordable Benefits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Battersby, Mark E.

    2005-01-01

    Providing benefits to the employees are well-proven motivators. Many child care center owners and directors have discovered that employee benefits can eliminate the need for incentive compensation. This article discusses the importance of fringe benefits to find, attract, and retain workers in a company. It also discusses benefits that employees…

  10. Attracting and Retaining High-Quality Professionals in Science Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weld, Jeffrey

    1998-01-01

    To attract and retain high-quality teachers, the education system must address science teachers' sense of professional isolation, administrators' lack of receptivity to thoughtful teachers' ideas, egalitarian salary compensation schemes, and lack of professional recognition. An outstanding chemistry teacher-turned-pharmaceutical saleswoman is…

  11. Management of Retained Genital Piercings: A Case Report and Review

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The prevalence of genital piercing among women is increasing. As the popularity increases, the number of complications from infection, injury, and retained jewelry is likely to rise. Techniques to remove embedded jewelry are not well described in the literature. The purpose of this report was to describe a case of a patient with a retained clitoral glans piercing, discuss a simple technique for outpatient removal, and review current evidence regarding associated risks of clitoral piercings. A 24-year-old female presented to the emergency department with an embedded clitoral glans piercing. Local anesthetic was injected into the periclitoral skin and a small superficial vertical incision was made to remove the ball of the retained barbell safely. In conclusion, among patients with retained genital piercing, outpatient removal of embedded jewelry is feasible. While the practice of female genital piercing is not regulated, piercing of the glans of the clitoris is associated with increased injury to the nerves and blood supply of the clitoris structures leading to future fibrosis and diminished function compared to piercing of the clitoral hood. PMID:28299217

  12. Good Laboratory Practice. Part 2. Recording and Retaining Raw Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wedlich, Richard C.; Libera, Agata E.; Pires, Amanda; Tellarini, Cassandra

    2013-01-01

    A clear understanding of how "raw data" is defined, recorded, and retained in the laboratory record is essential to the chemist employed in the laboratory compliant with the Good Laboratory Practices regulations. This article is intended to provide an understanding by drawing upon examples taken from the modern pharmaceutical analysis…

  13. Good Laboratory Practice. Part 2. Recording and Retaining Raw Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wedlich, Richard C.; Libera, Agata E.; Pires, Amanda; Tellarini, Cassandra

    2013-01-01

    A clear understanding of how "raw data" is defined, recorded, and retained in the laboratory record is essential to the chemist employed in the laboratory compliant with the Good Laboratory Practices regulations. This article is intended to provide an understanding by drawing upon examples taken from the modern pharmaceutical analysis…

  14. Effects of twinning on gestation length, retained placenta, and dystocia.

    PubMed

    Echternkamp, S E; Gregory, K E

    1999-01-01

    Constraints to maximal productivity from twinning in beef cattle include increased incidence of dystocia and retained placenta, longer postpartum interval, and lower conception rate. Incidence and cause(s) of the shorter gestation length and of the increased retained placenta and dystocia associated with twinning were evaluated for 3,370 single and 1,014 twin births produced in a population of cattle selected for natural twin births. Gestation length was shorter for twin than for single pregnancies (275.6 vs. 281.3 d, P<.01) and likely contributed to the higher incidence of retained placenta associated with twin births (27.9 vs. 1.9%; P<.01). Incidence of retained placenta was also higher in the spring (March-April) than in the fall (August-September) calving season (18.3 vs. 11.4%; P<.01). The higher incidence of dystocia with twins than with singles (46.9 vs. 20.6%, P<.01) was primarily due to abnormal presentation (37.0 vs. 4.5%, respectively) of one or both twin calves at parturition. First- (40.5%) and second- (22.7%) parity dams with a single birth had more (P<.01) dystocia than older dams (13.4%), whereas dystocia was not affected (P>.10) by parity with twin births. Because of the shorter gestation length and the increased incidence of retained placenta and(or) dystocia, achievement of increased productivity with twinning in cattle necessitates intensive management of twin-producing dams and their calves during the calving season. Management of the increased dystocia can be facilitated by preparturient diagnosis of twin pregnancies, enabling timely administration of obstetrical assistance to facilitate delivery of twin calves and to increase their neonatal survival.

  15. Differentiating the role of lithium and oxygen in retaining deuterium on lithiated plasma-facing components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Chase

    2013-10-01

    Lithium wall conditioning has been implemented in nearly a dozen fusion devices, resulting in significantly improved plasma performance. Improvements are manifest as a reduction and eventual elimination of edge localized modes, reduced edge neutral density, reduced deuterium recycling, and some reduction in impurities. Initially, researchers assumed that lithium, via a direct lithium-deuterium bond, was directly responsible for these improvements. Our experiments and atomistic simulations have revealed that lithium coatings play a much more indirect role in improving plasma performance. The presence of oxygen in tokamaks is ubiquitously viewed as unfavorable. However, recent results show that lithium reduces oxygen impurities and surprisingly uses the oxygen to retain deuterium. Experiments using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy identify that oxygen immediately begins to accumulate on lithium conditioned surfaces. Tight-binding density functional theory simulations tested various carbon matrices with and without lithium, oxygen, and hydrogen, and identified that oxygen plays the key role in retaining deuterium. In fact, a simulated PFC with 20% oxygen in carbon retains more deuterium than does 20% lithium in carbon. Recent experiments implanted oxygen in graphite to match simulations; however, we were unable to achieve the simulated results because all implanted oxygen was released upon deuterium bombardment. We therefore conclude that while oxygen retains deuterium, lithium plays an indispensible role in this process. Lithium attracts and retains oxygen, and then oxygen binds and retains deuterium. Work supported by USDOE Contracts DE-FG02-08ER54990 and DOE ID Field Office contract DE-AC07-05ID14517.

  16. [Efficacy of retained rectal posterior mucosa in procedure for prolapse and hemorrhoids].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Chenguo; Jin, Chun; Lian, Shaoxiong; Jin, Dingguo

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and necessity of retained rectal posterior mucosa in procedure for prolapse and hemorrhoids (PPH). Clinical data of 260 cases with severe hemorrhoids in our hospital from January 2010 to May 2012 were analyzed retrospectively. A total of 132 cases with severe hemorrhoids excluding in rectal posterior wall were enrolled in retained rectal posterior mucosa in PPH (improvement group), other 128 cases of severe hemorrhoids were assigned to PPH (conventional group). Operative parameters, efficacy and complication after operation were compared. Two groups of patients received successful operations. Postoperative pain duration, frequency of analgesic drugs and postoperative hospital stay in improvement group were significantly reduced [(1.3 ± 0.5) d vs. (4.8 ± 0.7) d, 1.1 ± 0.3 vs. 5.9 ± 0.6, (5.2 ± 0.8) d vs. (5.8 ± 0.5) d, all P<0.01]. Incidence of anastomotic stenosis, heavy feeling in the anus and delayed bleeding in improvement group were significantly lower than those in conventional group (0 vs. 7.8%, 0.8% vs. 14.1%, 0 vs.7.8%, all P<0.01). The application of retained rectal posterior mucosa in PPH to patients with severe hemorrhoids excluding in rectal posterior wall can significantly reduce postoperative complications. But long-term efficacy needs further observation.

  17. Equine retained placenta: technique for and tolerance to umbilical artery injections of collagenase.

    PubMed

    Haffner, J C; Fecteau, K A; Held, J P; Eiler, H

    1998-03-01

    Under laboratory conditions and in clinical experiments, bacterial collagenase has proven to be effective in hydrolyzing placenta and detaching cotyledon from caruncle in the bovine species. Laboratory studies in which placental samples were incubated with collagenase have also demonstrated that collagenase is 3.7 times more effective in hydrolyzing equine placenta than bovine placenta. This led to the hypothesis that collagenase may be a potential treatment for mares with retained placenta. However, that collagenase may hydrolyze the uterine wall and perforate the uterus was a concern. It was the purpose of this study thus to determine any adverse effects of collagenase on the equine uterus and to develop a method for intraplacental injection of collagenase. Three normally expelled intact placentas from Arabian mares, 10 cyclic mixed-breed mares, and 4 mares of various breeds with retained placenta were used. Fluoroscein dye and latex were used to study the placental vasculature and to determine a suitable dose of collagenase; placentas were hydrolyzed by collagenase solution in vitro. Bacterial collagenase solution (40,000 units, 200 ml) was infused into the uterine lumen of each cyclic mare. Uterine biopsies were obtained from the mares before collagenase infusion and again at 16 h and 26 d after infusion. In the mares with retained placenta, each placenta was infused via its umbilical cord vessels with 200,000 units of bacterial collagenase in 1 L of saline. Results showed that none of the uteri from cyclic mares were damaged by collagenase treatment. During a 4-wk period of monitoring (including endoscopy) mares with retained placenta did not show any abnormalities. Retained placentas were expelled in less than 6 h after collagenase treatment. It was concluded that intraplacental injections of collagenase are a safe and potentially effective treatment for retained placenta in mares.

  18. Computation of the seismic stability of earth retaining structures

    SciTech Connect

    1998-07-30

    The purpose of this CRADA project was to evaluate the seismic stability of block retaining wall systems. Retaining wall systems are used extensively in private and commercial developments. This study was designed to develop and demonstrate a computer modeling technology to be used to predict the seismic stability of any block wall system design. The nonlinear finite element computer programs developed at LLNL and employed in the Computational Earthquake Initiative were utilized in this small business CRADA to analyze the seismic stability of the block retaining walls. The unique capability of the LLNL programs to rigorously model frictional contact in a dynamic analysis problem were used in a computer simulation of the dynamic interaction the block wall/soil systems under seismic excitation. Another important application, and the focus of the proposal, was the use of block retaining walls in highway transportation systems to provide a vertical wall to hold back a mass of soil near highway bridges, and at on-ramps and off-ramps. Block retaining walls offered the potential of highway retaining wall construction which was both more flexible and more economical than existing poured-in-place and tilt-up highway retaining wall construction. However, block retaining wall technology was not embraced and utilized in the State of California as a result of seismic stability concerns expressed by Caltrans. Caltrans had an interest in utilizing block wall systems as soil retaining systems for major highway structures in California, but they stated to the block wall manufacturers and the manufacturer's engineering consultants that block retaining walls could not be employed until Caltrans was convinced of the earthquake stability of such systems.

  19. Effect of Abutment Modification and Cement Type on Retention of Cement-Retained Implant Supported Crowns

    PubMed Central

    Farzin, Mitra; Torabi, Kianoosh; Ahangari, Ahmad Hasan; Derafshi, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Provisional cements are commonly used to facilitate retrievability of cement-retained fixed implant restorations; but compromised abutment preparation may affect the retention of implant-retained crowns.The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of abutment design and type of luting agent on the retentive strength of cement-retained implant restorations. Materials and Method: Two prefabricated abutments were attached to their corresponding analogs and embedded in an acrylic resin block. The first abutment (control group) was left intact without any modifications. The screw access channel for the first abutment was completely filled with composite resin. In the second abutment, (test group) the axial wall was partially removed to form an abutment with 3 walls. Wax models were made by CAD/CAM. Ten cast copings were fabricated for each abutment. The prepared copings were cemented on the abutments by Temp Bond luting agent under standardized conditions (n=20). The assemblies were stored in 100% humidity for one day at 37°C prior to testing. The cast crown was removed from the abutment using an Instron machine, and the peak removal force was recorded. Coping/abutment specimens were cleaned after testing, and the testing procedure was repeated for Dycal luting agent (n=20). Data were analyzed with two- way ANOVA (α=0.05). Results: There was no significant difference in the mean transformed retention (Ln-R) between intact abutments (4.90±0.37) and the abutments with 3 walls (4.83±0.25) using Dycal luting agent. However, in TempBond group, the mean transformed retention (Ln-R) was significantly lower in the intact abutment (3.9±0.23) compared to the abutment with 3 walls (4.13±0.33, P=0.027). Conclusion: The retention of cement-retained implant restoration can be improved by the type of temporary cement used. The retention of cast crowns cemented to implant abutments with TempBond is influenced by the wall removal. PMID:25628660

  20. Effect of abutment modification and cement type on retention of cement-retained implant supported crowns.

    PubMed

    Farzin, Mitra; Torabi, Kianoosh; Ahangari, Ahmad Hasan; Derafshi, Reza

    2014-05-01

    Provisional cements are commonly used to facilitate retrievability of cement-retained fixed implant restorations; but compromised abutment preparation may affect the retention of implant-retained crowns.The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of abutment design and type of luting agent on the retentive strength of cement-retained implant restorations. Two prefabricated abutments were attached to their corresponding analogs and embedded in an acrylic resin block. The first abutment (control group) was left intact without any modifications. The screw access channel for the first abutment was completely filled with composite resin. In the second abutment, (test group) the axial wall was partially removed to form an abutment with 3 walls. Wax models were made by CAD/CAM. Ten cast copings were fabricated for each abutment. The prepared copings were cemented on the abutments by Temp Bond luting agent under standardized conditions (n=20). The assemblies were stored in 100% humidity for one day at 37°C prior to testing. The cast crown was removed from the abutment using an Instron machine, and the peak removal force was recorded. Coping/abutment specimens were cleaned after testing, and the testing procedure was repeated for Dycal luting agent (n=20). Data were analyzed with two- way ANOVA (α=0.05). There was no significant difference in the mean transformed retention (Ln-R) between intact abutments (4.90±0.37) and the abutments with 3 walls (4.83±0.25) using Dycal luting agent. However, in TempBond group, the mean transformed retention (Ln-R) was significantly lower in the intact abutment (3.9±0.23) compared to the abutment with 3 walls (4.13±0.33, P=0.027). The retention of cement-retained implant restoration can be improved by the type of temporary cement used. The retention of cast crowns cemented to implant abutments with TempBond is influenced by the wall removal.

  1. Autolysis and extension of isolated walls from growing cucumber hypocotyls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosgrove, D. J.; Durachko, D. M.

    1994-01-01

    Walls isolated from cucumber hypocotyls retain autolytic activities and the ability to extend when placed under the appropriate conditions. To test whether autolysis and extension are related, we treated the walls in various ways to enhance or inhibit long-term wall extension ('creep') and measured autolysis as release of various saccharides from the wall. Except for some non-specific inhibitors of enzymatic activity, we found no correlation between wall extension and wall autolysis. Most notably, autolysis and extension differed strongly in their pH dependence. We also found that exogenous cellulases and pectinases enhanced extension in native walls, but when applied to walls previously inactivated with heat or protease these enzymes caused breakage without sustained extension. In contrast, pretreatment of walls with pectinase or cellulase, followed by boiling in methanol to inactivate the enzymes, resulted in walls with much stronger expansin-mediated extension responses. Crude protein preparations from the digestive tracts of snails enhanced extension of both native and inactivated walls, and these preparations contained expansin-like proteins (assessed by Western blotting). Our results indicate that the extension of isolated cucumber walls does not depend directly on the activity of endogenous wall-bound autolytic enzymes. The results with exogenous enzymes suggest that the hydrolysis of matrix polysaccharides may not induce wall creep by itself, but may act synergistically with expansins to enhance wall extension.

  2. Autolysis and extension of isolated walls from growing cucumber hypocotyls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosgrove, D. J.; Durachko, D. M.

    1994-01-01

    Walls isolated from cucumber hypocotyls retain autolytic activities and the ability to extend when placed under the appropriate conditions. To test whether autolysis and extension are related, we treated the walls in various ways to enhance or inhibit long-term wall extension ('creep') and measured autolysis as release of various saccharides from the wall. Except for some non-specific inhibitors of enzymatic activity, we found no correlation between wall extension and wall autolysis. Most notably, autolysis and extension differed strongly in their pH dependence. We also found that exogenous cellulases and pectinases enhanced extension in native walls, but when applied to walls previously inactivated with heat or protease these enzymes caused breakage without sustained extension. In contrast, pretreatment of walls with pectinase or cellulase, followed by boiling in methanol to inactivate the enzymes, resulted in walls with much stronger expansin-mediated extension responses. Crude protein preparations from the digestive tracts of snails enhanced extension of both native and inactivated walls, and these preparations contained expansin-like proteins (assessed by Western blotting). Our results indicate that the extension of isolated cucumber walls does not depend directly on the activity of endogenous wall-bound autolytic enzymes. The results with exogenous enzymes suggest that the hydrolysis of matrix polysaccharides may not induce wall creep by itself, but may act synergistically with expansins to enhance wall extension.

  3. Complexities in attracting and retaining direct support professionals.

    PubMed

    Wolf-Branigin, Michael; Wolf-Branigin, Karen; Israel, Nathaniel

    2007-01-01

    Recruiting and retaining direct support professionals (DSPs) remains essential to the full inclusion for persons with disabilities. Using a mixed-evaluation model, we measured DSPs' views versus those of their supervisors. DSPs expressed lower perceptions concerning their supervisors, satisfaction with their work situation, and environmental and safety factors. Focus groups provided insights into resolving issues related to compensation, work environment, and recruiting and retaining future DSPs. Motivating factors included wanting to be part of a helping community where all are valued. To improve their performance, DSPs stated their desire to understand the roles of managers and of the consumer. DSPs indicated that having career paths that provided advancement opportunities and direct contact with persons with disabilities were primary motivators.

  4. Spectroscopic investigation confirms retaining the pristine nature of single-walled carbon nanotubes on dissolution in aniline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singha, Somdutta; Ghosh, Swapankumar

    2017-09-01

    Carbon nanotubes in all forms are very much insoluble in both organic and inorganic solvents due to its high agglomeration and entangled morphology. General methods for dissolution of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are mostly associated with complexation or polymerization or addition of macromolecules which change the physical or chemical properties of SWNTs and the pristine nature of SWNTs is lost. Dissolution of SWNTs in a solvent like aniline is practiced here which is a very simple reaction method. Here aniline is capable to form a SWNT-aniline charge transfer complex without attachment of macromolecules or polymer which is also soluble in other organic solvents. Solvation of SWNTs by this method is also capable of maintaining the similarity between the structure of SWNTs before and after the dissolution, which means that the pristine nature of SWNTs is preserved. Formation of charge transfer complex in this reaction has been proven by UV-Vis/NIR absorption and photoluminescence spectroscopy. Raman spectroscopy and electron microscopy (FESEM and TEM) are the evidences for protection of the pristine nature of SWNTs even after high-temperature complexation reaction with aniline and also after solubilization in organic solvents.

  5. Retained Stingray Barb and the Importance of Imaging.

    PubMed

    O'Malley, Gerald F; O'Malley, Rika N; Pham, Oahn; Randolph, Frederick

    2015-09-01

    Stingray envenomation is a common occurrence. X-ray evaluation of stingray wounds is an unnecessarily misunderstood diagnostic concept. We present the case of a patient stung by a stingray with a prolonged and complicated course and permanent disability due to a retained barb. The patient had undergone multiple medical evaluations before an X-ray was obtained. Copyright © 2015 Wilderness Medical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Summary report on the design of the retained gas sampler system (retained gas sampler, extruder and extractor)

    SciTech Connect

    Wootan, D.W.; Bolden, R.C.; Bridges, A.E.; Cannon, N.S.; Chastain, S.A.; Hey, B.E.; Knight, R.C.; Linschooten, C.G.; Pitner, A.L.; Webb, B.J.

    1994-09-29

    This document summarizes work performs in Fiscal Year 1994 to develop the three main components of Retained Gas Sampler System (RGSS). These primary components are the Retained Gas Sampler (RGS), the Retained Gas Extruder (RGE), and the Retained Gas Extractor (RGEx). The RGS is based on the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) Universal Sampler design, and includes modifications to reduce gas leakage. The primary data priorities for the RGSS are to measure the void fraction and the flammable gas concentration in the waste sample. Significant progress has been made in developing the RGSS. The RGSS is being developed by WHC to extract a representative waste sample from a Flammable Gas Watch List Tanks and to measure both the amount and composition of free and {open_quotes}bound{close_quotes} gases. Sudden releases of flammable gas mixtures are a safety concern for normal waste storage operations and eventual waste retrieval. Flow visualization testing was used to identify important fluid dynamic issues related to the sampling process. The primary data priorities for the RGSS are to measure the void fraction and the flammable gas concentration in the waste sample. The safety analysis for the RGSS is being performed by Los Alamos National Laboratory and is more than sixty percent (60%) complete.

  7. Nanomechanical characterization of exfoliated and retained deciduous incisors.

    PubMed

    Zafar, Muhammad Sohail; Ahmed, Naseer

    2014-01-01

    The anisotropic natures of dental tissues result in variable properties from one point to the other within the same tooth. The aim of this study was to analyze deciduous incisors enamel and dentin for elastic modulus and hardness. In addition, retained deciduous incisors were assessed to compare properties with exfoliated teeth. Deciduous mandibular incisors either exfoliated at physiological age or retained were included in this study. Samples were prepared by dissecting teeth in transverse sections and surfaces under investigation were prepared and polished for nanoindentation. Nanoindentation was performed at multiple sites using Hysitron [TI 725 Ubi] testing instrument. Data analysis was performed using SPSS software (version 20) to calculate absolute hardness and elastic modulus. The statistical significance was calculated using the t-test. The hardness of human deciduous incisor varies between 0.01-7 GPa. The highest value of hardness was observed for the incisal edge (5.09 ± 0.64 GPa) followed by mid-surface enamel and cervical enamel. The hardness of mantle dentin was (0.56 ± 0.19 GPa) and the inner dentin was (0.34 ± 0.12 GPa). The average hardness of primary teeth enamel is lower than permanent teeth enamel. The hardness of retained teeth enamel is greater than exfoliated teeth however lower than permanent teeth enamel of the equivalent region.

  8. Three-dimensional dynamic analyses of track-embankment-ground system subjected to high speed train loads.

    PubMed

    Fu, Qiang; Zheng, Changjie

    2014-01-01

    A three-dimensional finite element model was developed to investigate dynamic response of track-embankment-ground system subjected to moving loads caused by high speed trains. The track-embankment-ground systems such as the sleepers, the ballast, the embankment, and the ground are represented by 8-noded solid elements. The infinite elements are used to represent the infinite boundary condition to absorb vibration waves induced by the passing of train load at the boundary. The loads were applied on the rails directly to simulate the real moving loads of trains. The effects of train speed on dynamic response of the system are considered. The effect of material parameters, especially the modulus changes of ballast and embankment, is taken into account to demonstrate the effectiveness of strengthening the ballast, embankment, and ground for mitigating system vibration in detail. The numerical results show that the model is reliable for predicting the amplitude of vibrations produced in the track-embankment-ground system by high-speed trains. Stiffening of fill under the embankment can reduce the vibration level, on the other hand, it can be realized by installing a concrete slab under the embankment. The influence of axle load on the vibration of the system is obviously lower than that of train speed.

  9. Three-Dimensional Dynamic Analyses of Track-Embankment-Ground System Subjected to High Speed Train Loads

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A three-dimensional finite element model was developed to investigate dynamic response of track-embankment-ground system subjected to moving loads caused by high speed trains. The track-embankment-ground systems such as the sleepers, the ballast, the embankment, and the ground are represented by 8-noded solid elements. The infinite elements are used to represent the infinite boundary condition to absorb vibration waves induced by the passing of train load at the boundary. The loads were applied on the rails directly to simulate the real moving loads of trains. The effects of train speed on dynamic response of the system are considered. The effect of material parameters, especially the modulus changes of ballast and embankment, is taken into account to demonstrate the effectiveness of strengthening the ballast, embankment, and ground for mitigating system vibration in detail. The numerical results show that the model is reliable for predicting the amplitude of vibrations produced in the track-embankment-ground system by high-speed trains. Stiffening of fill under the embankment can reduce the vibration level, on the other hand, it can be realized by installing a concrete slab under the embankment. The influence of axle load on the vibration of the system is obviously lower than that of train speed. PMID:24723838

  10. Wall thickness measuring method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Salzer, Leander J.; Bergren, Donald A.

    1989-01-01

    An apparatus for measuring the wall thickness of a nonmagnetic article having a housing supporting a magnet and a contiguous supporting surface. The tubular article and the housing are releasably secured to the supporting surface and a support member of an optical comparator, respectively. To determine the wall thickness of the article at a selected point, a magnetically responsive ball is positioned within the tubular article over said point and retained therein by means of a magnetic field produced by the magnet. Thereafter, an optical comparator is employed to project a magnified image of the ball on a screen and the wall thickness at the selected point is calculated by using a ball surface measurement taken with the comparator in conjunction with a previously determined base line measurement.

  11. Skeletal Sarcoma on the Site of Retained War Bullet Fragments and a Literature Review on Long-Term Complications of Retained War Shells

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimzadeh, Mohammad H; Vahedi, Ehsan; Ganji, Rashid; Bozorgnia, Shahram

    2013-01-01

    Long-term complications of retained war fragments in the body are not completely known. Also, bullet migration and slow resorption of metals and distortion in some imaging modalities are frequent and well recognized complications but, now we are concerned about neoplastic changes near the retained war fragments. We reviewed the literature on complication of retained war fragments and report our 2 cases of malignant changes around old retained war fragments in the limbs. PMID:25207300

  12. Thermal-moisture dynamics of embankments with asphalt pavement in permafrost regions of central Tibetan Plateau

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, Zhi; Zhang, Mingli; Ma, Wei; Wu, Qingbai; Niu, Fujun; Yu, Qihao; Fan, Zhaosheng; Sun, Zhizhong

    2015-04-21

    Subsurface moisture content is one of the critical factors that control the thermal dynamics of embankments. However, information on the subsurface moisture movement and distribution in embankments is still limited. To better understand the coupled water and heat transport within embankments, subsurface temperature and moisture of an asphalt pavement highway were extensively measured from 2009 to 2011. Collected data indicate that pure heat conduction is the overall main mechanism of heat transport in the embankment and heat convection plays a relatively unimportant role in heat transport. The results also indicate that subsurface moisture and temperature dynamics in the asphalt layer is strongly related to the rainfall events, while the subsurface moisture content below the road base course maintains relatively constant. Rainfall in summer leads to rapid cooling of the subsurface soil. Our results suggest that frequent and small rainfall events favour the thermal stability of the embankment due to the loss of latent heat of water evaporation. Moisture migration during freezing still occurred in the gravel fill and the water infiltrated into the active layer during thawing period. Freezing-induced water migration may result in the increase in water content of the embankment and the decrease in compactness of gravel fill.

  13. Estimation on the influence of uncertain parameters on stochastic thermal regime of embankment in permafrost regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tao; Zhou, Guoqing; Wang, Jianzhou; Zhao, Xiaodong; Chen, Xing

    2017-03-01

    For embankments in permafrost regions, the soil properties and the upper boundary conditions are stochastic because of complex geological processes and changeable atmospheric environment. These stochastic parameters lead to the fact that conventional deterministic temperature field of embankment become stochastic. In order to estimate the influence of stochastic parameters on random temperature field for embankment in permafrost regions, a series of simulated tests are conducted in this study. We consider the soil properties as random fields and the upper boundary conditions as stochastic processes. Taking the variability of each stochastic parameter into account individually or concurrently, the corresponding random temperature fields are investigated by Neumann stochastic finite element method. The results show that both of the standard deviation under the embankment and the boundary increase with time when considering the stochastic effect of soil properties and boundary conditions. Stochastic boundary conditions and soil properties play a different role in random temperature field of embankment at different times. Each stochastic parameter has a different effect on random temperature field. These results can improve our understanding of the influence of stochastic parameters on random temperature field for embankment in permafrost regions.

  14. Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions. Final report, November 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    A study is described on the hydrological and geotechnical behavior of an oil shale solid waste. The objective was to obtain information which can be used to assess the environmental impacts of oil shale solid waste disposal in the Green River Basin. The spent shale used in this study was combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas process by Rio Blanco Oil Shale Company, Inc. Laboratory bench-scale testing included index properties, such as grain size distribution and Atterberg limits, and tests for engineering properties including hydraulic conductivity and shear strength. Large-scale tests were conducted on model spent shale waste embankments to evaluate hydrological response, including infiltration, runoff, and seepage. Large-scale tests were conducted at a field site in western Colorado and in the Environmental Simulation Laboratory (ESL)at the University of Wyoming. The ESL tests allowed the investigators to control rainfall and temperature, providing information on the hydrological response of spent shale under simulated severe climatic conditions. All experimental methods, materials, facilities, and instrumentation are described in detail, and results are given and discussed. 34 refs.

  15. Crystallography of lath martensite and stabilization of retained austenite

    SciTech Connect

    Sarikaya. M.

    1982-10-01

    TEM was used to study the morphology and crystallography of lath martensite in low and medium carbon steels in the as-quenched and 200/sup 0/C tempered conditions. The steels have microduplex structures of dislocated lath martensite and continuous thin films of retained austenite at the lath interfaces. Stacks of laths form the packets which are derived from different (111) variants of the same austenite grain. The residual parent austenite enables microdiffraction experiments with small electron beam spot sizes for the orientation relationships (OR) between austenite and martensite. All three most commonly observed ORs, namely Kurdjumov-Sachs, Nishiyama-Wassermann, and Greninger-Troiano, operate within the same sample.

  16. Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions. Annual report, October 1991--September 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, J.P.; Reeves, T.L.; Skinner, Q.D.; Hasfurther, V.

    1992-11-01

    The scope of the original research program and of its continuation is to study interacting hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical factors affecting the behavior and disposal of combusted processed oil shale. The research combines bench-scale testing with large-scale testing sufficient to describe commercial-scale embankment behavior. The large-scale testing was accomplished by constructing five lysimeters, each 7.3{times}3.0{times}3.0 m deep, filled with processed oil shale that has been retorted and combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas (Lurgi) process (Schmalfield 1975). Approximately 400 tons of Lurgi processed oil shale waste was provided by Rio Blanco Oil Shale Co., Inc. to carry out this study. Three of the lysimeters were established at the RBOSC Tract C-a in the Piceance Basin near Rifle, Colorado. Two lysimeters were established in the Environmental Simulation Laboratory (ESL) at UW. The ESL was specifically designed and constructed so that a large range of climatic conditions could be physically applied to the processed oil shale which was placed in the lysimeter cells. This report discusses and summarizes results from scientific efforts conducted between October 1991 and September 1992 for Fiscal Year 1992.

  17. Non-destructive monitoring of river embankments using GPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Prinzio, Monica; Bittelli, Marco; Castellarin, Attilio; Rossi Pisa, Paola

    2010-05-01

    Non-destructive investigations and controls of civil structures are improving day by day, however the scientific literature reports only a few documented cases of Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) applications to the detection of voids and discontinuities in hydraulic defense structures such as river embankments and levee systems. GPR can assist decision making in a number of fields by enhancing our knowledge of subsurface features. We applied successfully GPR to the monitoring of river levees for the detectioning of animal burrows in river levees, which may trigger levee failures by piping. The manageability and the non-invasivity of GPR have resulted to be particularly suitable for this application. First because GPR is an extensive investigation method that enables one to rapidly cover a wide area, locating voids that are difficult and costly to locate using other intrusive methods. Second, GPR returns detailed information about the possible presence of voids and discontinuities within river embankments.

  18. Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions. Third quarterly report, April 1993--June 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Reeves, T.L.; Turner, J.P.; Rangarajan, S.; Skinner, Q.D.; Hasfurther, V.

    1993-08-11

    This report presents research objectives, discusses activities, and presents technical progress for the period April 1, 1993 through June 31, 1993 on Contract No. DE-FC21-86LC11084 with the Department of Energy, Laramie Project Office. The scope of the research program and the continuation is to study interacting hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical factors affecting the behavior and disposal of combusted processed oil shale. The research combines bench-scale testing with large scale research sufficient to describe commercial scale embankment behavior. The large scale approach was accomplished by establishing five lysimeters, each 7.3 {times} 3.0 {times} 3.0 m deep, filled with processed oil shale that has been retorted and combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas (Lurgi) process. Approximately 400 tons of Lurgi processed oil shale waste was provided by Rio Blanco Oil Shale Co., Inc. (RBOSC) through a separate cooperative agreement with the University of Wyoming (UW) to carry out this study. Three of the lysimeters were established at the RBOSC Tract C-a in the Piceance Basin of Colorado. Two lysimeters were established in the Environmental Simulation Laboratory (ESL) at UW. The ESL was specifically designed and constructed so that a large range of climatic conditions could be physically applied to the processed oil shale which was filled in the lysimeter cells.

  19. Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions. Second quarterly report, January 1, 1992--March 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, J.P.; Hasfurther, V.

    1992-05-04

    The scope of the research program and the continuation is to study interacting hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical factors affecting the behavior and disposal of combusted processed oil shale. The research combines bench-scale testing with large scale research sufficient to describe commercial scale embankment behavior. The large scale approach was accomplished by establishing five lysimeters, each 7.3 {times} 3.0 {times} 3.0 m deep, filled with processed oil shale that has been retorted and combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas (Lurgi) process. Approximately 400 tons of Lurgi processed oil shale waste was provided by Rio Blanco Oil Shale Co., Inc. (RBOSC) through a separate cooperative agreement with the University of Wyoming (UW) to carry out this study. Three of the lysimeters were established at the RBOSC Tract C-a in the Piceance Basin of Colorado. Two lysimeters were established in the Environmental Simulation Laboratory (ESL) at UW. The ESL was specifically designed and constructed so that a large range of climatic conditions could be physically applied to the processed oil shale which was filled in the lysimeter cells.

  20. Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions. Fourth quarterly report, July--September 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, J.P.; Hasfurther, V.

    1993-10-08

    The scope of the research program and the continuation is to study interacting hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical factors affecting the behavior and disposal of combusted processed oil shale. The research combines bench-scale testing with large scale research sufficient to describe commercial scale embankment behavior. The large scale approach was accomplished by establishing five lysimeters, each 7.3 {times} 3.0 {times} 3.0 m deep, filled with processed oil shale that has been retorted and combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas (Lurgi) process. Approximately 400 tons of Lurgi processed oil shale waste was provided by Rio Blanco Oil Shale Co., Inc. (RBOSC) through a separate cooperative agreement with the University of Wyoming (UW) to carry out this study. Three of the lysimeters were established at the RBOSC Tract C-a in the Piceance Basin of Colorado. Two lysimeters were established in the Environmental Simulation Laboratory (ESL) at UW. The ESL was specifically designed and constructed so that a large range of climatic conditions could be physically applied to the processed oil shale which was filled in the lysimeter cells.

  1. Against the odds: orienting and retaining rural nurses.

    PubMed

    Keahey, Sheri

    2008-01-01

    Recruiting and retaining nurses in rural communities present a unique challenge for hospitals. Standardized orientation or residency programs do not begin to meet the needs of the new nurses and may directly contribute to the low retention rate experienced by many rural hospitals. Inherent to rural nursing is the demand for the nurses to possess a high level of self-confidence and competence. It is because of these expectations and the stressors placed on the new graduate nurse that the orientation is critical to retention.

  2. Colonic perforation by a transmural and transvalvular migrated retained sponge: multi-detector computed tomography findings.

    PubMed

    Camera, Luigi; Sagnelli, Marco; Guadagno, Paolo; Mainenti, Pier Paolo; Marra, Teresa; Scotto di Santolo, Maria; Fei, Landino; Salvatore, Marco

    2014-04-21

    Transmural migrated retained sponges usually impact at the level of the ileo-cecal valve leading to a small bowel obstruction. Once passed through the ileo-cecal valve, a retained sponge can be propelled forward by peristaltic activity and eliminated with feces. We report the case of a 52-year-old female with a past surgical history and recurrent episodes of abdominal pain and constipation. On physical examination, a generalized resistance was observed with tenderness in the right flank. Contrast-enhanced multi-detector computed tomography findings were consistent with a perforated right colonic diverticulitis with several out-pouchings at the level of the ascending colon and evidence of free air in the right parieto-colic gutter along with an air-fluid collection within the mesentery. In addition, a ring-shaped hyperdense intraluminal material was also noted. At surgery, the ascending colon appeared irregularly thickened and folded with a focal wall interruption and a peri-visceral abscess at the level of the hepatic flexure, but no diverticula were found. A right hemi-colectomy was performed and on dissection of the surgical specimen a retained laparotomy sponge was found in the bowel lumen.

  3. 42. AERIAL VIEW OF LOWER EMBANKMENT. VIEW TO SOUTHEAST. Photocopy ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    42. AERIAL VIEW OF LOWER EMBANKMENT. VIEW TO SOUTHEAST. Photocopy of photograph by Glade Walker, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, Pacific Northwest Region, n.d. - Boise Project, Deer Flat Embankments, Lake Lowell, Nampa, Canyon County, ID

  4. 43. AERIAL VIEW OF LOWER EMBANKMENT. VIEW TO SOUTH. Photocopy ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    43. AERIAL VIEW OF LOWER EMBANKMENT. VIEW TO SOUTH. Photocopy of photograph by Glade Walker, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, Pacific Northwest Region, n.d. - Boise Project, Deer Flat Embankments, Lake Lowell, Nampa, Canyon County, ID

  5. 41. AERIAL VIEW OF UPPER EMBANKMENT. VIEW TO SOUTH. Photocopy ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    41. AERIAL VIEW OF UPPER EMBANKMENT. VIEW TO SOUTH. Photocopy of photograph by Glade Walker, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, Pacific Northwest Region, July 12, 1980. - Boise Project, Deer Flat Embankments, Lake Lowell, Nampa, Canyon County, ID

  6. 44. AERIAL VIEW OF LOWER EMBANKMENT. VIEW TO SOUTHWEST. Photocopy ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    44. AERIAL VIEW OF LOWER EMBANKMENT. VIEW TO SOUTHWEST. Photocopy of photograph by Glade Walker, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, Pacific Northwest Region, September 15, 1977. - Boise Project, Deer Flat Embankments, Lake Lowell, Nampa, Canyon County, ID

  7. Identification and behavior of label-retaining cells in epithelia

    SciTech Connect

    Bickenbach, J.R.

    1982-01-01

    A subpopulation of stem cells has been demonstrated in several renewing tissues. Such cells have a slow cell cycle and provide differentiating cells during normal turnover and during regeneration of the tissue following damage. The presence of slowly-cycling cells in epithelia from regions of skin and oral mucosa was examined by labeling 10-day-old mice and 5-day-old hamsters with tritiated thymidine (/sup 3/H-TdR) and observing the rate at which label was diluted from the basal cells. Label was rapidly diluted by cell division in most cells but a small percentage of basal cells (label-retaining cells, LRCS) was found to retain label for up to ninety days. Electron microscopic autoradiography and ..beta..-glucuronidase histochemistry with autoradiography were used to distinguish slowly-cycling keratinocytes from Langerhans cells. Such findings of slowly-cycling keratinocytes in epithelia with the ability to proliferate in culture and with a direct relationship to patterns of tissue architecture suggest that LRCs in epithelia correspond to stem cells described in other continuously renewing tissues.

  8. Chronic Pelvic Pain and Infertility Resulting from Unrecognized Retained Laminaria

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    Background In 2013, the abortion rate in the United States was found to be 200 abortions per 1,000 live births. Of these, the CDC estimates that nearly 49% were performed using unsafe measures. Even when these procedures are safely performed, patients are at risk for immediate or delayed complications. In second-trimester terminations, mechanical dilation with an osmotic dilator is common to allow for delivery of the fetus. The Japanese seaweed Laminaria japonica is used to achieve this purpose. Case A 28-year-old primigravida presented with chronic pelvic pain and infertility. She had irregular menstrual cycles and reported scant yellow discharge. A transvaginal ultrasound revealed an abnormally appearing endometrium with an elongated structure suspicious for a foreign body. The patient reported a voluntary termination of pregnancy twelve years earlier, for which laminaria were placed prior to the dilation and extraction. She underwent an operative hysteroscopy confirming our suspicion for retained laminaria. The pathology report demonstrated chronic severe endometritis and plant based material. Conclusion Retained laminaria are associated with chronic pelvic pain and chronic infertility. Since they can be difficult to detect on conventional imaging, proper counting prior to insertion and after removal is an essential physician responsibility. PMID:28932611

  9. Trapping and characterization of covalent intermediates of mutant retaining glycosyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Soya, Naoto; Fang, Ying; Palcic, Monica M; Klassen, John S

    2011-05-01

    The enzymatic mechanism by which retaining glycosyltransferases (GTs) transfer monosaccharides with net retention of the anomeric configuration has, so far, resisted elucidation. Here, direct detection of covalent glycosyl-enzyme intermediates for mutants of two model retaining GTs, the human blood group synthesizing α-(1 → 3)-N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase (GTA) and α-(1 → 3)-galactosyltransferase (GTB) mutants, by mass spectrometry (MS) is reported. Incubation of mutants of GTA or GTB, in which the putative catalytic nucleophile Glu(303) was replaced with Cys (i.e. GTA(E303C) and GTB(E303C)), with their respective donor substrate results in a covalent intermediate. Tandem MS analysis using collision-induced dissociation confirmed Cys(303) as the site of glycosylation. Exposure of the glycosyl-enzyme intermediates to a disaccharide acceptor results in the formation of the corresponding enzymatic trisaccharide products. These findings suggest that the GTA(E303C) and GTB(E303C) mutants may operate by a double-displacement mechanism.

  10. Earth melter with rubble walls and method of use

    DOEpatents

    Chapman, Chris C.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is an improvement to the earth melter described and claimed in U.S. Pat. No. 5,443,618. The improvement is the use of rubble for retaining walls. More specifically, the retaining walls rest on ground level and extend above ground level piling rubble around a melt zone. A portion of the melter may be below grade wherein sidewalls are formed by the relatively undisturbed native soil or rock, and the rubble may be used as a backfill liner for the below grade sidewalls.

  11. Typical Window, Interior Wall Paint Sequence, Wall Section, and Foundation ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Typical Window, Interior Wall Paint Sequence, Wall Section, and Foundation Sections - Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) Camp NP-5-C, Barracks No. 5, CCC Camp Historic District at Chapin Mesa, Cortez, Montezuma County, CO

  12. 1. SOUTHEAST REAR WALL AND NORTHEAST SIDE WALL OF CABINS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. SOUTHEAST REAR WALL AND NORTHEAST SIDE WALL OF CABINS FORGEMAN'S HOUSE NO. 1 AT RIGHT - Mount Etna Iron Works, Forgeman's House No. 1, Legislative Route 07020 between junctions of T.R. 461 & 463, Williamsburg, Blair County, PA

  13. Reaching (and retaining) Broader Audiences in Citizen Science.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavalier, D.

    2015-12-01

    Individuals come to citizen science from different perspectives and preferences, and engage in a wide range of projects from data collection to public policy (Irwin 1995, Bonney et al. 2009a). Many participate exclusively online in crowdsourcing projects such as Galaxy Zoo, Fold-It, and Eyewire. Hundreds of thousands gather data on-the-ground for academic andcommunity research projects led by scientists at universities, government agencies/NGOs, and nonprofits. Untold others initiate their own projects in response to local environmental and health issues. All types of citizen science endeavors face challenges around data access and management, around relationships with scientists and project managers, and around making their scientific accomplishments visible as they accumulate over time. Among the most universal and ongoing challenges for all types of citizen science, however, "is attracting and retaining enough participants to make achievement of project goals possible." (Crowston and Prestopnik One known reason for this issue is the reality that individual projects and project types exist in "silos" - as self-segregated groups with particular shared interests (Dickinson et al. 2010). What efforts can be made in digital infrastructures and community building efforts to enable the unprecedented ability to support and retain diverse types of citizen science participation and data exchange between communities? How do we support participation in, and management of, multiple projects; continuity in, and sharing of, a broad and accessible citizen science community; and related social components? This presentation will provide a brief overview of the known barriers to this "utopia" and a snapshot of efforts underway to address many of these barriers.

  14. Strategies to recruit and retain college smokers in cessation trials.

    PubMed

    Davidson, M Meghan; Cronk, Nikole J; Harris, Kari Jo; Harrar, Solomon; Catley, Delwyn; Good, Glenn E

    2010-04-01

    Techniques to recruit and retain college fraternity and sorority members who reported past 30-day smoking into a cessation trial are described. Recruitment efforts included relationship-building, raffles, and screening survey administration during existing meetings. Surveys were administered to 76% (n = 3,276) of members in 30 chapters, 79% of eligible members agreed to participate, and 76% of those completed assessments and were enrolled in the trial (n = 452). The retention rate was 73%. Retention efforts included cash incentives, flexible scheduling, multiple reminders, chapter incentives, and use of chapter members as study personnel. Retention was not related to demographic, behavioral, or group characteristics. The strategies of partnership, convenience, and flexibility appear effective and may prove useful to investigators recruiting similar samples.

  15. Strategies to Recruit and Retain College Smokers in Cessation Trials

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, M. Meghan; Cronk, Nikole J.; Harris, Kari Jo; Harrar, Solomon; Catley, Delwyn; Good, Glenn E.

    2011-01-01

    Techniques to recruit and retain college fraternity and sorority members who reported past 30-day smoking into a cessation trial are described. Recruitment efforts included relationship-building, raffles, and screening survey administration during existing meetings. Surveys were administered to 76% (n = 3,276) of members in 30 chapters, 79% of eligible members agreed to participate, and 76% of those completed assessments and were enrolled in the trial (n = 452). The retention rate was 73%. Retention efforts included cash incentives, flexible scheduling, multiple reminders, chapter incentives, and use of chapter members as study personnel. Retention was not related to demographic, behavioral, or group characteristics. The strategies of partnership, convenience, and flexibility appear effective and may prove useful to investigators recruiting similar samples. PMID:20196093

  16. Hader bar and clip attachment retained mandibular complete denture

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Kunwarjeet; Gupta, Nidhi; Kapoor, Vikram; Gupta, Ridhimaa

    2013-01-01

    Bar and clip attachments significantly improve the level of satisfaction of denture-wearing patients by enhancing the retention and stability of the prosthesis. These attachments have been most commonly used for connecting the prosthesis to implants, but they can be effectively used to retain tooth-supported prosthesis as well. The primary functions of bar attachments are splinting the abutments together, even distribution of forces to the abutments and supporting areas, guiding the prosthesis into place, improving the retention, stability, support and comfort of the patient. The primary requirement for the use of bar attachments is the availability of sufficient vertical and buccolingual space for the proper placement of the bar, sleeves, teeth arrangement and sufficient thickness of acrylic denture base to minimise incidence of denture fracture in the area of bar assembly. PMID:24145505

  17. Best Practices for Recruiting and Retaining Women in Physics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murnane, Margaret

    2007-04-01

    Universities make a tremendous investment in faculty, often recruiting and hiring them at great expense. These faculty have highly specialized talents that are needlessly wasted when faculty spend time struggling in a bad environment, or leaving the university. Therefore, there is a great incentive to improve the working environment for female faculty. This talk will highlight specific strategies that departments can use to recruit and retain the best faculty, including female faculty. These strategies have been developed over several years of site visits by the APS Committee on the Status of Women in Physics to physics departments around the US. The mark of a successful departmental climate for women is one in which the enthusiasm and ambition of the women undergraduates is transformed smoothly into successful and ambitious women graduate students, with dynamic, forging-ahead female postdocs, energetic junior women faculty, and productive, happy, senior women faculty who all serve as positive role models.

  18. Recruiting and retaining high-quality teachers in rural areas.

    PubMed

    Monk, David H

    2007-01-01

    In examining recruitment and retention of teachers in rural areas, David Monk begins by noting the numerous possible characteristics of rural communities--small size, sparse settlement, distance from population concentrations, and an economic reliance on agricultural industries that are increasingly using seasonal and immigrant workers to minimize labor costs. Many, though not all, rural areas, he says, are seriously impoverished. Classes in rural schools are relatively small, and teachers tend to report satisfaction with their work environments and relatively few problems with discipline. But teacher turnover is often high, and hiring can be difficult. Monk observes that rural schools have a below-average share of highly trained teachers. Compensation in rural schools tends to be low, perhaps because of a lower fiscal capacity in rural areas, thus complicating efforts to attract and retain teachers. Several student characteristics, including relatively large shares of students with special needs and with limited English skills and lower shares of students attending college, can also make it difficult to recruit and retain high-quality teachers. Other challenges include meeting the needs of highly mobile children of low-income migrant farm workers. With respect to public policy, Monk asserts a need to focus on a subcategory of what might be called hard-to-staff rural schools rather than to develop a blanket set of policies for all rural schools. In particular, he recommends a focus on such indicators as low teacher qualifications, teaching in fields far removed from the area of training, difficulty in hiring, high turnover, a lack of diversity among teachers in the school, and the presence of migrant farm workers' children. Successful efforts to stimulate economic growth in these areas would be highly beneficial. He also calls attention to the potential for modern telecommunication and computing technologies to offset some of the drawbacks associated with teaching

  19. Recruiting and Retaining Arab Muslim Mothers and Children for Research

    PubMed Central

    Aroian, Karen J.; Katz, Anne; Kulwicki, Anahid

    2006-01-01

    Purpose To describe successful and not-so-successful strategies for recruiting and retaining Arab Muslim immigrant women and their adolescent children for research. Design and Methods A longitudinal study of mother-child adjustment of Arab immigrants to the US is used for illustration. A panel of experts was assembled and provided culturally specific advice about gatekeepers, advertising, data collectors, data collection, and how to track and encourage participation at subsequent time points in the study. Findings Most of the strategies recommended by the panel were overwhelmingly positive, including advice about data collectors, how to collect data, financial incentives, avoiding offending families, and personal contacts. Hiring data collectors who were able to establish personal and culturally appropriate relationships with study participants was the single most successful recruitment and retention strategy. Advice from cultural experts about which gatekeepers to engage and how to advertise for study participants was not productive. Conclusions Researchers should not only assemble a panel of cultural experts to provide advice about group specific strategies to build trust and maintain cultural sensitivity, but also to budget generously for time for data collectors to build and maintain rapport with study populations who, like Arab immigrant women, highly value personal relationships. PMID:17044343

  20. Retaining Device For One-Piece Battery

    DOEpatents

    Gilabert, Claude; Leturque, Michel; Verhoog, Roclof

    2000-08-01

    The present invention consists of a device for retaining a one-piece battery with a prismatic casing having two longitudinal walls and two transverse walls. The device contains two plates applied to respective transverse walls and at least one cinching mechanism for the plates consisting of at least one flat strip closed on itself surrounding the longitudinal walls and the transverse walls are provided with the plates. The device is characterized in that at least one of the plates contains at least one recessed housing and the strip closely follows the shape of the housing.

  1. Webinar: Stepped chute design for embankment dams

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Changing demographics in the vicinity of dams have led to hazard creep in a number of dams worldwide. Many of these dams now have insufficient spillway capacity as a result of these changes in hazard classification from low to significant or high hazard. Stepped chutes applied to the embankment da...

  2. Inception point for embankment dam stepped spillways

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Stepped spillways applied to embankment dams have become a common design practice with the rehabilitation of aging watershed dams, especially those experiencing a hazard classification change from low to high hazard. Previous research on stepped spillways focused on gravity dams where aerated flow ...

  3. Embankment Criteria and Performance Report. Cheyenne River Basin, South Dakota, Red Dale Gulch Area, Cedar Canyon Dam, Rapid City, South Dakota.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-01

    yards 3. SPILLWAY. Type Uncontrolled-excavated in Minnekahta Limestone Bedrock Location Right abutment of dam Crest Elevation 3554.0 feet m.s.l. Width...embankment in the valley consists of 4 to 10 feet of red clay overburden underlain by Minnekahta lime- stone bedrock. This overburden soil contains a...Protection. Both faces of the dam are protected by rock slope protection to elevation 3554.0 (Crest of Dam). The rock used was excavated Minnekahta limestone

  4. Inspection of earthen embankment dams using time lapse electrical resistivity tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Case, Jared S.

    According to the National Inventory of Dams (NID), the number of dams across the United States is approximately 85,000. Many of these dams are more than 50 years old and need vast attention to ensure their safety. It is difficult to obtain a full assessment of the dam just by visual inspections alone. This is because many problems associated with dam failure occur internally, which makes it difficult to be observed by the dam inspectors. Examples of these flaws are piping and seepage (flow of water through or around dam walls). It is in this area where geophysical methods can aid in obtaining a more confident evaluation of a dam's integrity. Electrical resistivity is one geophysical technique that would be useful in detecting internal flaws associated with seepage and piping because it is sensitive to moisture changes. A study is being conducted to examine the feasibility of electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) to map and monitor internal compromised zones within earthen embankment dams. Two quarter-scaled earthen embankment dams were built at the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Agriculture Research Service (ARS) Hydraulics and Engineering Research Unit (HERU) in Stillwater, Oklahoma. These two dams were constructed with known internal compromised zones that are susceptible to seepage and piping. Electrical resistivity surveys were conducted on the completed dams using a 56 electrode dipole-dipole array. The collected data was then processed using electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) imaging software and evidence of these two compromised zones was easily visible. Also, additional surveys were conducted in order to monitor the changes in electrical signatures associated with changes in these zones due to filling of the reservoir and environmental/climate changes.

  5. A Geomorphic Analysis of Floodplain Lakes along the Embanked Lower Mississippi River for Managing Hydrologic Connectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, Paul; Boot, Dax; Sounny-Slitinne, M. Anwar; Kristensen, Kristiaan

    2015-04-01

    A Geomorphic Analysis of Floodplain Lakes along the Embanked Lower Mississippi River for Managing Hydrologic Connectivity Floodplain lakes are vital to the environmental integrity of lowland rivers. Embankment by levees (dikes) for flood control greatly reduces the size of lowland floodplains and is detrimental to the quality and functioning of floodplain water bodies, presenting a challenge to government agencies charged with environmental management. The embanked floodplain of the Lower Mississippi River is an enormous surface which includes a variety of lake types formed by geomorphic and anthropogenic processes. While much is known about the channel and hydrologic regime, very little is known about the physical structure and functioning of the embanked floodplain of the lower Mississippi. Importantly, management agencies do not have an inventory of the basic characteristics (e.g., type, frequency, location, size, shape) of water bodies within the lower Mississippi embanked floodplain. An analysis of lakes along the Lower Mississippi River embanked floodplain is performed by utilizing the National Hydrographic Dataset (NHD) from the U.S. Geological Survey, a LiDAR digital elevation model (DEM), as well as streamflow data from the USGS. The vector NHD data includes every official mapped water body (blue line polygons) on USGS topographic maps at scales of 1:100,000 and 1:24,000. Collectively, we identify thousands of discreet water bodies within the embanked floodplain. Utilizing planimetric properties the water bodies were classified into the following lake types: cutoffs (neck and chute), sloughs, crevasse (scour), local drainage (topographic), and borrow pits. The data is then statistically analyzed to examine significant differences in the spatial variability in lake types along the entire lower Mississippi embanked floodplain in association with geomorphic divisions and hydrologic regime. The total embanked floodplain area of the LMR is 7,303 km2,. The total

  6. Retaining physicians in Lithuania: integrating research and health policy.

    PubMed

    Starkiene, Liudvika; Macijauskiene, Jurate; Riklikiene, Olga; Stricka, Marius; Padaiga, Zilvinas

    2013-04-01

    Many of the strategic planning studies worldwide have made recommendations to the policy makers on the steps to be taken in eliminating the perceived shortages of physician workforce or in improving their distribution and retention. Policy makers have also considered various policy interventions to ensure adequate numbers of physicians. This study reviewed the research evidence and health policy decisions taken from 2000 to 2010 in Lithuania and evaluated the chronological links over time between scientific recommendations and policy decisions. From the analysis it would seem that Lithuania's success in retaining physicians between 2000 and 2010 was influenced by the timely implementation of particular research recommendations, such as increased salaries and increased enrolment to physician training programmes. In addition were the health policy interventions such as health sector reform, change in the legal status of medical residents and establishment of professional re-entry programmes. Based on this evidence it is recommended that policy makers in Lithuania as well as in other countries should consider comprehensive and systematic health policy approaches that combine and address various aspects of physician training, retention, geographic mal-distribution and emigration. Implementation of such an inclusive policy however is impossible without the integration of research into strategic decision making in workforce planning and effective health policy interventions.

  7. Grass plants bind, retain, uptake and transport infectious prions

    PubMed Central

    Pritzkow, Sandra; Morales, Rodrigo; Moda, Fabio; Khan, Uffaf; Telling, Glenn C.; Hoover, Edward; Soto, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Prions are the protein-based infectious agents responsible for prion diseases. Environmental prion contamination has been implicated in disease transmission. Here we analyzed the binding and retention of infectious prion protein (PrPSc) to plants. Small quantities of PrPSc contained in diluted brain homogenate or in excretory materials (urine and feces) can bind to wheat grass roots and leaves. Wild type hamsters were efficiently infected by ingestion of prion-contaminated plants. The prion-plant interaction occurs with prions from diverse origins, including chronic wasting disease. Furthermore, leaves contaminated by spraying with a prion-containing preparation retained PrPSc for several weeks in the living plant. Finally, plants can uptake prions from contaminated soil and transport them to aerial parts of the plant (stem and leaves). These findings demonstrate that plants can efficiently bind infectious prions and act as carriers of infectivity, suggesting a possible role of environmental prion contamination in the horizontal transmission of the disease. PMID:25981035

  8. Grass plants bind, retain, uptake, and transport infectious prions.

    PubMed

    Pritzkow, Sandra; Morales, Rodrigo; Moda, Fabio; Khan, Uffaf; Telling, Glenn C; Hoover, Edward; Soto, Claudio

    2015-05-26

    Prions are the protein-based infectious agents responsible for prion diseases. Environmental prion contamination has been implicated in disease transmission. Here, we analyzed the binding and retention of infectious prion protein (PrP(Sc)) to plants. Small quantities of PrP(Sc) contained in diluted brain homogenate or in excretory materials (urine and feces) can bind to wheat grass roots and leaves. Wild-type hamsters were efficiently infected by ingestion of prion-contaminated plants. The prion-plant interaction occurs with prions from diverse origins, including chronic wasting disease. Furthermore, leaves contaminated by spraying with a prion-containing preparation retained PrP(Sc) for several weeks in the living plant. Finally, plants can uptake prions from contaminated soil and transport them to aerial parts of the plant (stem and leaves). These findings demonstrate that plants can efficiently bind infectious prions and act as carriers of infectivity, suggesting a possible role of environmental prion contamination in the horizontal transmission of the disease. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Leading a multigenerational workforce: strategies for attracting and retaining millennials.

    PubMed

    Cahill, Terrence F; Sedrak, Mona

    2012-01-01

    Over the past several years, leaders in healthcare have noticed an increase in generational tension among employees, most often focused on the attitudes and behaviors of the arriving millennials (generation Y). While these employee relations issues were a nuisance, they rarely rose to the level of a priority demanding leadership intervention. Some leaders, in fact, hoped that the issues would resolve themselves as these young employees settled in and learned that they had to demonstrate new behaviors to be successful in the workplace. Most organizations adopted this wait-and-see attitude. Not so today. As the boomer generation has begun its exodus from the workplace, organizations are increasingly looking at the millennials as not a problem but a solution to the workplace manpower transition that is under way. Our problem is that we don't yet know how best to lead such a diverse, multigenerational workforce. This article examines the generational topic and provides advice concerning a variety of changes that leaders may implement to advance their organization's ability to attract and to retain the millennials.

  10. Organizational configuration of hospitals succeeding in attracting and retaining nurses.

    PubMed

    Stordeur, Sabine; D'Hoore, William

    2007-01-01

    This paper contrasts structural and managerial characteristics of low- and high-turnover hospitals, and describes the organizational configuration of attractive hospitals. In countries facing nurse shortages and turnover, some hospitals succeed in recruiting and retaining nurses. In Magnet Hospitals, managerial practices and environmental characteristics increase nurses' job satisfaction and their commitment to the organization, which in turn decreases nurse turnover. Such an approach suggests that organizations are best understood as clusters of interconnected structures and practices, i.e. organizational configurations rather than entities whose components can be understood in isolation. From a sample of 12 hospitals whose nurse turnover was studied for 1 year, structural and organizational features of hospitals in the first and fourth quartiles, i.e. attractive (turnover <3.1%) vs. conventional (turnover >11.8%) were contrasted. A questionnaire, including perceptions of health-related factors, job demands, stressors, work schedules, organizational climate, and work adjustments antecedent to turnover, was received from 401 nurses working in attractive hospitals (response rate = 53.8%) and 774 nurses in conventional hospitals (response rate = 54.5%). Structural characteristics did not differentiate attractive and conventional hospitals, but employee perceptions towards the organization differed strikingly. Differences were observed for risk exposure, emotional demands, role ambiguity and conflicts, work-family conflicts, effort-reward imbalance and the meaning of work, all in favour of attractive hospitals (P < 0.001). Relationships with nursing management, work ability and satisfaction with working time, handover shifts and schedules were also better in attractive hospitals (P < 0.001). Job satisfaction and commitment were higher in attractive hospitals, whereas burnout and intention to leave were lower (P < 0.001). Organizational characteristics are key factors

  11. Embankment Criteria and Performance Report. Salt Creek and Tributaries, Nebraska. Site 13. Twin Lakes Dam and Lake.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-08-01

    rebar extending from the center of the post from which vertical and horizontal surveys are taken. Plan locations and recorded observations of the...1350 U. I. AIRMY STNIM11EEU bIM §OThi OMiAHA UMANA, 1611ASA 1340 t, SALT CREEN AND ITS TAWAARTAItt.WaASO mo~ ~ DAM AND RESERVOIR, SITE 13 - 133

  12. Design principles for engaging and retaining virtual citizen scientists.

    PubMed

    Wald, Dara M; Longo, Justin; Dobell, A R

    2016-06-01

    Citizen science initiatives encourage volunteer participants to collect and interpret data and contribute to formal scientific projects. The growth of virtual citizen science (VCS), facilitated through websites and mobile applications since the mid-2000s, has been driven by a combination of software innovations and mobile technologies, growing scientific data flows without commensurate increases in resources to handle them, and the desire of internet-connected participants to contribute to collective outputs. However, the increasing availability of internet-based activities requires individual VCS projects to compete for the attention of volunteers and promote their long-term retention. We examined program and platform design principles that might allow VCS initiatives to compete more effectively for volunteers, increase productivity of project participants, and retain contributors over time. We surveyed key personnel engaged in managing a sample of VCS projects to identify the principles and practices they pursued for these purposes and led a team in a heuristic evaluation of volunteer engagement, website or application usability, and participant retention. We received 40 completed survey responses (33% response rate) and completed a heuristic evaluation of 20 VCS program sites. The majority of the VCS programs focused on scientific outcomes, whereas the educational and social benefits of program participation, variables that are consistently ranked as important for volunteer engagement and retention, were incidental. Evaluators indicated usability, across most of the VCS program sites, was higher and less variable than the ratings for participant engagement and retention. In the context of growing competition for the attention of internet volunteers, increased attention to the motivations of virtual citizen scientists may help VCS programs sustain the necessary engagement and retention of their volunteers.

  13. Recruiting and Retaining Physics Majors at Brigham Young University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turley, R. Steven

    2001-04-01

    The Department of Physics and Astronomy at Brigham Young University has had a steadily increasing number of graduates over the past ten years during a period of national decline in undergraduate physics majors. I will discuss what we do in our department to attract and retain majors. In particular I will highlight orientation activities, advisement, promoting student-student interactions, faculty mentoring, undergraduate research, teaching emphasis, and department culture. We have assessed the effectiveness of our recruiting and retention efforts by looking at profiles of our students and surveys of current and former students. The majors come to us well prepared, with high school GPA's (3.6) and natural science ACT scores (30) that have remained fairly constant over a recent five year period. Most say they chose physics because it was interesting or they thought it would fulfill a desire to understand the world or universe better. About half of the students decided to major in physics in primary or secondary school. One fifth selected physics as their major during their first year of college. The principle reasons current students gave for remaining in physics included a continuing interest in the subject, relationships with faculty, a satisfaction with meeting the challenge, and achieving personal goals. Alumni report positive or very positive experiences in the classroom (88%), in discussions and associations with faculty (81%), and in discussions and associations with other students (87%). About half the students plan to go into graduate physics programs after graduation. The rest are principally planning on graduate school in other disciplines, industrial or government employment, physics teaching, or professional schools.

  14. Air pollution and retained particles in the lung.

    PubMed Central

    Brauer, M; Avila-Casado, C; Fortoul, T I; Vedal, S; Stevens, B; Churg, A

    2001-01-01

    Epidemiologic evidence associates particulate air pollution with cardiopulmonary morbidity and mortality. The biological mechanisms underlying these associations and the relationship between ambient levels and retained particles in the lung remain uncertain. We examined the parenchymal particle content of 11 autopsy lungs from never-smoking female residents of Mexico City, a region with high ambient particle levels [3-year mean PM(10) (particulate matter < or = 10 microm in aerodynamic diameter)= 66 microg/m(3)], and 11 control residents of Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, a region with relatively low levels (3-year mean PM(10) = 14 microg/m(3). Autopsy lungs were dissolved in bleach and particles were identified and counted by analytical electron microscopy. Total particle concentrations in the Mexico City lungs were significantly higher [geometric mean = 2,055 (geometric SD = 3.9) x 10(6) particles/g dry lung vs. 279 (1.8) x 10(6) particles/g dry lung] than in lungs from Vancouver residents. Lungs from Mexico City contained numerous chain-aggregated masses of ultrafine carbonaceous spheres, some of which contained sulfur, and aggregates of ultrafine aluminum silicate. These aggregates made up an average of 25% of the total particles by count in the lungs from Mexico City, but were only rarely seen in lungs from Vancouver. These observations indicate for the first time that residence in a region with high levels of ambient particles results in pulmonary retention of large quantities of fine and ultrafine particle aggregates, some of which appear to be combustion products. PMID:11675269

  15. The fate of imazapyr in a Swedish railway embankment.

    PubMed

    Börjesson, Elisabet; Torstensson, Lennart; Stenström, John

    2004-06-01

    The long-term fate of the herbicide imazapyr [2-(4-isopropyl-4-methyl-5-oxo-2-imidazolin-2-yl)nicotinic acid] applied to a Swedish railway embankment was studied. Imazapyr was applied at 750 and 1500 g ha(-1) by a spraying train used for full-scale herbicide treatment operations. Soil and groundwater were sampled twice a year for 8 years after application of the herbicide, and the dissipation of imazapyr was studied by HPLC analysis of the residues in soil and groundwater. A clean-up procedure including solid-phase extraction was performed prior to detection by HPLC. Recoveries of imazapyr from soil and water samples were 76-98% and 61-90%, respectively, and detection levels were 0.003 mg kg(-1) and 0.05 microg litre(-1), respectively. Sorption, desorption and microbial amount and activity were also measured at the two locations. The organic matter content correlated positively and the pH negatively to the adsorption of imazapyr on soil, and increasing organic matter contents decreased desorption. Apart from the 0-10-cm top layers of both sites, the microbial amount and activity were small. The main proportion of imazapyr was found in the upper 30 cm of the soil, and degraded with a half-life in the range 67-144 days. Small amounts were transported to lower soil layers and to the groundwater in proportion to the amounts applied. Traces of imazapyr were detected in the groundwater even 8years after application. It was concluded that environmental risks from the use of herbicides on railway embankments could be reduced by including adsorption layers in the embankment during their construction and by reducing the dose of the herbicide used.

  16. Evaluation of Embankment and Foundation Liquefaction Potential. Papillion Creek and Tributaries Lakes, Nebraska, Damsites 11 and 16. Seismic Evaluation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-05-01

    Cornell and Merz Coefficients for Eastern U.S. A-2 Cornell’s (1966) Equations for Calculating Maximum Intensities at a Site from a Line Source A-3 Numerical ...SMPLIK - LAORATORY TES awl .- bomLEAN air (SML CAMPCATISN Of MID 4$ UIPY) DWHO NUMBER ON WMC IDAWNG NUMER ONWICHSAE 1 ND1 U SI~~I~t~:N~l~aA LI *tTO...6 10 * ,I CL A Vi VSAMO ’ SA VD Y CL A Y 6 LAFCY 010 -4 3k0 so 70 EST?0 RELATIVE DENSO LEAN CL.Ak 100 SAVD V CLAY S--THINIL VALUt D 71 71- EL. 10905

  17. Retainer for laboratory animals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, R. W.

    1979-01-01

    Bio-retainer holds laboratory animals in fixed position for research and clinical experiments. Retainer allows full access to animals and can be rapidly opened and closed to admit and release specimens.

  18. Retainer for laboratory animals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, R. W.

    1979-01-01

    Bio-retainer holds laboratory animals in fixed position for research and clinical experiments. Retainer allows full access to animals and can be rapidly opened and closed to admit and release specimens.

  19. Method for residual stress relief and retained austenite destabilization

    DOEpatents

    Ludtka, Gerard M.

    2004-08-10

    A method using of a magnetic field to affect residual stress relief or phase transformations in a metallic material is disclosed. In a first aspect of the method, residual stress relief of a material is achieved at ambient temperatures by placing the material in a magnetic field. In a second aspect of the method, retained austenite stabilization is reversed in a ferrous alloy by applying a magnetic field to the alloy at ambient temperatures.

  20. Embankment Criteria and Performance Report: Adobe Dam Gila River Basin, New River and Phoenix City Streams, Arizona.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-01

    direction, and generally is steeply dipping. Igneous rocks in the area consist of granite, rhyolite, andesite , dacite, vesicular basalt flows, tuff...from the mid-Tertiary (late Oligeocene and early Miocene) orogency, which produced great quantities of rhyolite to andesitic tuffs, breccias, and flows...which vary in thickness from a thin veneer to many feet. The flows are composed of dark-gray vesicular olivine basalt, andesite , flow breccia

  1. Defilade, Stationary Target and Moving Target Embankment, Low Water Crossing, and Course Road Designs for Soil Loss Prevention

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    18 Figure 9. Blast mat options: recycled tire, cabled concrete and tank tread......................................19 Figure 10...Design Alternative-1, Tire Blast Mat with 100 % Rock Defilade.......................................28 Figure 11. Design Alternative-2, Tire Blast Mat ...with 50% Rock Defilade..........................................29 Figure 12. Design Alternative-3, Tire Blast Mat with 25% Rock Defilade with Geoweb

  2. Diplopia and orbital wall fractures.

    PubMed

    Boffano, Paolo; Roccia, Fabio; Gallesio, Cesare; Karagozoglu, K Hakki; Forouzanfar, Tymour

    2014-01-01

    Diplopia is a symptom that is frequently associated with orbital wall fractures. The aim of this article was to present the incidence and patterns of diplopia after orbital wall blow-out fractures in 2 European centers, Turin and Amsterdam, and to identify any correlation between this symptom and such fractures. This study is based on 2 databases that have continuously recorded data of patients hospitalized with maxillofacial fractures between 2001 and 2010. On the whole, 447 patients (334 males, 113 females) with pure blow-out orbital wall fractures were included. The most frequently involved orbital site was the floor (359 fractures), followed by medial wall (41 fractures) and lateral wall (5 fractures). At presentation, 227 patients (50.7%) had evidence of diplopia. In particular, in most patients, a diplopia in all directions was referred (78 patients). Statistically significant associations were found between diplopia on eye elevation and orbital floor fractures (P < 0.05) and between horizontal diplopia and medial wall fractures (P < 0.000005). In patients under evaluation for orbital trauma, the observation of diplopia on eye elevation and horizontal diplopia at presentation could be useful clinical indicators orbital floor and medial wall fractures, respectively.

  3. Granger Lake, Embankment-Outlet Works-Spillway. Volume 2.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-08-01

    conditiLOns (during the construction phase), Problems encountered and nethlods/solutiOris to resolve foundation problems during actual construction of Granger...only 44 Slab Drainage System Section D-D II Spillway sec- tions only 45 Logs of Borings, Drawing Index Index to borings 6DC-60 through 8A-599 (Plat 46...TYPICAL SECTION F ~(EMBANKMENT OVER" BUILD ) NOT To SCALE 5TA 0 +00 TO STA 12 +10 t !red ’co- 5 ee 5he f fL e-- E 3 .mrper-vL1iounc * El 51,3

  4. Optimization of reinforced soil embankments by genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponterosso, P.; Fox, D. St. J.

    2000-04-01

    A Genetic Algorithm (GA) is described, which produces solutions to the cost optimization problem of reinforcement layout for reinforced soil slopes. These solutions incorporate different types of reinforcement within a single slope. The GA described is implemented with the aim of optimizing the cost of materials for the preliminary layout of reinforced soil embankments. The slope design method chosen is the U.K. Department of Transport HA 68/94 Design Methods for the Reinforcement of Highway Slopes by Reinforced Soil and Soil Nailing Techniques. The results confirm that there is a role for the GA in optimization of reinforced soil design.

  5. 13. LONG WEST WALL (LEFT) AND SHORT SOUTH WALL (RIGHT) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. LONG WEST WALL (LEFT) AND SHORT SOUTH WALL (RIGHT) OF AR-9, ALSO SHOWING MORE RECENT CONTROL ROOM BUILDING AT RIGHT. VIEW IS TO THE NORTHEAST. - Edwards Air Force Base, South Base, Rammed Earth Aircraft Dispersal Revetments, Western Shore of Rogers Dry Lake, Boron, Kern County, CA

  6. Denitrification Walls: Successes and Limitations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schipper, L. A.; Barkle, G. F.; Burgess, C. P.; Vojvodic-Vukovic, M.

    2001-05-01

    There is a need to develop practical and inexpensive approaches for removing nitrate from ground water because of its potential adverse effect on receiving aquatic environments. Denitrification walls may be one such approach for removing nitrate from shallow groundwater. In January 1996, we constructed a denitrification wall by digging a trench that intercepted groundwater and mixed the excavated soil with sawdust before the mix was returned to the trench. Sawdust provides a source of energy for denitrifying bacteria, which convert nitrate in groundwater entering the wall to nitrogen gas. For the past 5 years, nitrate concentrations in groundwater entering this wall have ranged from 5 to 16 mg N L-1 but have always been reduced to less than 2 mg N L-1 in the wall indicating nearly complete removal of nitrate from the groundwater. We showed that this nitrate removal could be accounted for by denitrification rates which ranged from 0.6 to 18.1 mg N m-3 h-1. More recently we have encountered problems with denitrification walls constructed into coarsely textured soils (such as sands) where the addition of sawdust decreased hydraulic conductivity. As a consequence groundwater flowed under rather than through the wall. We are attempting to circumvent this problem using coarser grades of carbon amendments. Particulate carbon (such as sawdust) is likely to support lower rates of nitrate removal, but for longer, than soluble carbon sources because solid carbon sources degrade more slowly.

  7. [Prediction of retained heterosis and evaluation on breeding effects of composite livestock populations].

    PubMed

    Liu, Wen-Zhong

    2009-08-01

    A composite population is a breed made up of two or more component breeds and designed to benefit from hybrid vigor without crossing with other breeds, and is thus regarded as an alternative method for heterosis utilization. The breeding effects depend on retained heterosis in livestock composites. This paper reviews prediction methods of retained heterosis, relative production efficiency and production performance, and evaluation methods of breeding effects of composite populations. A composite population contains all three types of heterosis. If inbreeding can be avoided, it can retain heterosis to a certain extent. The retained heterosis depends on the number of contributing breeds and their proportions in the composite. The production performance rests both on average breeding values of contributing breeds and on retained heterosis of the composite itself. Breeding effects of composite population can be evaluated by theoretical prediction, actual estimation of retained heterosis, examination of genetic variation and/or comparison with other relevant breeds.

  8. Determination of strength behaviour of slope supported by vegetated crib walls using centrifuge model testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudan Acharya, Madhu

    2010-05-01

    The crib retaining structures made of wooden/bamboo logs with live plants inside are called vegetative crib walls which are now becoming popular due to their advantages over conventional civil engineering walls. Conventionally, wooden crib walls were dimensioned based on past experiences. At present, there are several guidelines and design standards for machine finished wooden crib walls, but only few guidelines for the design and construction of vegetative log crib walls are available which are generally not sufficient for an economic engineering design of such walls. Analytical methods are generally used to determine the strength of vegetated crib retaining walls. The crib construction is analysed statically by satisfying the condition of static equilibrium with acceptable level of safety. The crib wall system is checked for internal and external stability using conventional monolithic and silo theories. Due to limitations of available theories, the exact calculation of the strength of vegetated wooden/bamboo crib wall cannot be made in static calculation. Therefore, experimental measurements are generally done to verify the static analysis. In this work, a model crib construction (1:20) made of bamboo elements is tested in the centrifuge machine to determine the strength behaviour of the slope supported by vegetated crib retaining wall. A geotechnical centrifuge is used to conduct model tests to study geotechnical problems such as the strength, stiffness and bearing capacity of different structures, settlement of embankments, stability of slopes, earth retaining structures etc. Centrifuge model testing is particularly well suited to modelling geotechnical events because the increase in gravitational force creates stresses in the model that are equivalent to the much larger prototype and hence ensures that the mechanisms of ground movements observed in the tests are realistic. Centrifuge model testing provides data to improve our understanding of basic mechanisms

  9. Impact of Geotechnical Factors on the Safety of Low Embankment Dams From the Perspective of Technical and Safety Supervision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasana, Andrej; Minárik, Marian; Nikolaj, Maroš

    2015-03-01

    Our research deals with a broad spectrum of problems concerning the variability of geotechnical factors and their influence on the safety of the biggest group of dam constructions in Slovakia, i.e., low earthfill dams. Its specific aim is the observation of their risk factors by using our experience and knowledge gained while working in the sector of technical and safety supervision. To achieve the aims of a research thesis, we analyzed 39 low earthfill dams. We performed observations and documented their conditions with the aim of clarifying the risk factors. After an analysis of the information materials that characterize dams and after a statistical analysis of the measurement results in situ, including measurements from technical and safety supervision databases, we performed an analysis by using mathematical modeling to evaluate the safety of the dam constructions. Out of the total number of 39 dam constructions, an analysis of the stability of the dam slopes was performed on 37 dams, and deformation problems were analyzed on 28 of the dams. Filtration problems were analyzed at 26 dams, and a complete evaluation of the intensity of filtration movements was performed on 19 of the constructions. On the basis of a detailed analysis of the 39 dam constructions, we specified their problems and the concomitant consequences of the problems. Geotechnical risk factors and specific risks that determine the safety of water constructions were characterized. The analysis confirmed the importance of an engineer-geological and geotechnical checkup in the process of preparation and building (alternatively, during reconstructions and sanitation work) of such water constructions and also the importance of monitoring in the process of dam usage. Technical and safety checkups were also shown to be important when analyzing risk factors. The conclusions of the knowledge gained and the recommendations for the practice deal with recommendations to change the flow policy, develop a

  10. Oil exchange between ball bearings and cotton-phenolic ball-bearing retainers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertrand, P. A.; Carre, D. J.; Bauer, R.

    1994-09-01

    Experiments have been performed that determine for the first time the transfer of oil between cotton-phenolic ball-bearing retainers and operating ball bearings. A full retainer exchanges oil with the metal parts of the bearing, probably by diffusional mixing. There is no net delivery of oil from the retainer to the metal parts of the bearing. A partially filled retainer (such as one that has been incompletely impregnated) absorbs oil from the bearing even during operation, thus drying the bearing. A fully-impregnated retainer does not deliver any significant amount of additional oil to the metal parts of a poorly lubricated bearing. The retainer will not prevent lubricant degradation and premature bearing failure under the conditions of these experiments.

  11. Systems and methods for retaining and removing irradiation targets in a nuclear reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Runkle, Gary A.; Matsumoto, Jack T.; Dayal, Yogeshwar; Heinold, Mark R.

    2015-12-08

    A retainer is placed on a conduit to control movement of objects within the conduit in access-restricted areas. Retainers can prevent or allow movement in the conduit in a discriminatory fashion. A fork with variable-spacing between prongs can be a retainer and be extended or collapsed with respect to the conduit to change the size of the conduit. Different objects of different sizes may thus react to the fork differently, some passing and some being blocked. Retainers can be installed in inaccessible areas and allow selective movement in remote portions of conduit where users cannot directly interface, including below nuclear reactors. Position detectors can monitor the movement of objects through the conduit remotely as well, permitting engagement of a desired level of restriction and object movement. Retainers are useable in a variety of nuclear power plants and with irradiation target delivery, harvesting, driving, and other remote handling or robotic systems.

  12. Translational and rotational knee joint stability in anterior and posterior cruciate-retaining knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Lo, JiaHsuan; Müller, Otto; Dilger, Torsten; Wülker, Nikolaus; Wünschel, Markus

    2011-12-01

    This study investigated passive translational and rotational stability properties of the intact knee joint, after bicruciate-retaining bi-compartmental knee arthroplasty (BKA) and after posterior cruciate retaining total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Fourteen human cadaveric knee specimens were used in this study, and a robotic manipulator with six-axis force/torque sensor was used to test the joint laxity in anterior-posterior translation, valgus-varus, and internal-external rotation. The results show the knee joint stability after bicruciate-retaining BKA is similar to that of the native knee. On the other hand, the PCL-retaining TKA results in inferior joint stability in valgus, varus, external rotation, anterior and, surprisingly, posterior directions. Our findings suggest that, provided functional ligamentous structures, bicruciate-retaining BKA is a biomechanically attractive treatment for joint degenerative disease. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Multiple-Purpose Project, Little Blue River Basin, Little Blue River, Missouri: Longview Lake Operation and Maintenance Manual. Appendix 5. Embankment Criteria and Performance Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-11-01

    Each z Rol 1 7d4 o? F’-, . U.S. ARMIY ENGINE ALR NSTTRCI ) CORPS OF RNGINEERS "- 7 KANSAS4 17 LI. L BILSURI ER ISO I C FI WA L’ EMBANKMENT CRITERIA...001+0 SECTION STATIONI 86+46 I)OWNSTREAI, 9004 ’. ’’olvsepoo/l-c 9 C ___ * 80 0 -- - 500 3 PPF 8731------ ++00 i+00 2+00 1+00 0+00 1+00 2+00 3+00...TEST ~,-~ STAGE I 30 tz ItT!2 I >0 40:~ ~ "’ S 0 - 4 0 ~ CIIY 5 NORMA 04 AMPLES ,’U ".,01TE POIT ¢cOmrp 0. TIO *,u RVIOuS Z I 0 ! ktO15% STRAr u

  14. Application of GPR to the monitoring of river embankments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Prinzio, Monica; Bittelli, Marco; Castellarin, Attilio; Pisa, Paola Rossi

    2010-06-01

    Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) can assist decision making in a number of fields by enhancing our knowledge of subsurface features. Non-destructive investigations and controls of civil structures are improving day by day, however the scientific literature reports only a few documented cases of GPR applications to the detection of voids and discontinuities in hydraulic defense structures such as river embankments and levee systems. We applied GPR to the monitoring of river levees for detecting animal burrows, which may trigger levee failures by piping. The manageability and the non-invasiveness of GPR have resulted to be particularly suitable for this application. First because GPR is an extensive investigation method that enables one to rapidly cover a wide area, locating voids that are difficult and costly to locate using other intrusive methods. Second, GPR returns detailed information about the possible presence of voids and discontinuities within river embankments. We document a series of successful GPR applications to detect animal burrows in river levees.

  15. 9. Raven's roost overlook detail of the rusticated stone retaining ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Raven's roost overlook detail of the rusticated stone retaining wall/railing and stone curbing. Facing west. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  16. Two-year survival analysis of twisted wire fixed retainer versus spiral wire and fiber-reinforced composite retainers: a preliminary explorative single-blind randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Sobouti, Farhad; Rakhshan, Vahid; Saravi, Mahdi Gholamrezaei; Zamanian, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Objective Traditional retainers (both metal and fiber-reinforced composite [FRC]) have limitations, and a retainer made from more flexible ligature wires might be advantageous. We aimed to compare an experimental design with two traditional retainers. Methods In this prospective preliminary clinical trial, 150 post-treatment patients were enrolled and randomly divided into three groups of 50 patients each to receive mandibular canine-to-canine retainers made of FRC, flexible spiral wire (FSW), and twisted wire (TW). The patients were monitored monthly. The time at which the first signs of breakage/debonding were detected was recorded. The success rates of the retainers were compared using chi-squared, Kaplan-Meier, and Cox proportional-hazard regression analyses (α = 0.05). Results In total, 42 patients in the FRC group, 41 in the FSW group, and 45 in the TW group completed the study. The 2-year failure rates were 35.7% in the FRC group, 26.8% in the FSW group, and 17.8% in the TW group. These rates differed insignificantly (chi-squared p = 0.167). According to the Kaplan-Meier analysis, failure occurred at 19.95 months in the FRC group, 21.37 months in the FSW group, and 22.36 months in the TW group. The differences between the survival rates in the three groups were not significant (Cox regression p = 0.146). Conclusions Although the failure rate of the experimental retainer was two times lower than that of the FRC retainer, the difference was not statistically significant. The experimental TW retainer was successful, and larger studies are warranted to verify these results. PMID:27019825

  17. Wall Shear Stress, Wall Pressure and Near Wall Velocity Field Relationships in a Whirling Annular Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Gerald L.; Winslow, Robert B.; Thames, H. Davis, III

    1996-01-01

    The mean and phase averaged pressure and wall shear stress distributions were measured on the stator wall of a 50% eccentric annular seal which was whirling in a circular orbit at the same speed as the shaft rotation. The shear stresses were measured using flush mounted hot-film probes. Four different operating conditions were considered consisting of Reynolds numbers of 12,000 and 24,000 and Taylor numbers of 3,300 and 6,600. At each of the operating conditions the axial distribution (from Z/L = -0.2 to 1.2) of the mean pressure, shear stress magnitude, and shear stress direction on the stator wall were measured. Also measured were the phase averaged pressure and shear stress. These data were combined to calculate the force distributions along the seal length. Integration of the force distributions result in the net forces and moments generated by the pressure and shear stresses. The flow field inside the seal operating at a Reynolds number of 24,000 and a Taylor number of 6,600 has been measured using a 3-D laser Doppler anemometer system. Phase averaged wall pressure and wall shear stress are presented along with phase averaged mean velocity and turbulence kinetic energy distributions located 0.16c from the stator wall where c is the seal clearance. The relationships between the velocity, turbulence, wall pressure and wall shear stress are very complex and do not follow simple bulk flow predictions.

  18. Wall Shear Stress, Wall Pressure and Near Wall Velocity Field Relationships in a Whirling Annular Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Gerald L.; Winslow, Robert B.; Thames, H. Davis, III

    1996-01-01

    The mean and phase averaged pressure and wall shear stress distributions were measured on the stator wall of a 50% eccentric annular seal which was whirling in a circular orbit at the same speed as the shaft rotation. The shear stresses were measured using flush mounted hot-film probes. Four different operating conditions were considered consisting of Reynolds numbers of 12,000 and 24,000 and Taylor numbers of 3,300 and 6,600. At each of the operating conditions the axial distribution (from Z/L = -0.2 to 1.2) of the mean pressure, shear stress magnitude, and shear stress direction on the stator wall were measured. Also measured were the phase averaged pressure and shear stress. These data were combined to calculate the force distributions along the seal length. Integration of the force distributions result in the net forces and moments generated by the pressure and shear stresses. The flow field inside the seal operating at a Reynolds number of 24,000 and a Taylor number of 6,600 has been measured using a 3-D laser Doppler anemometer system. Phase averaged wall pressure and wall shear stress are presented along with phase averaged mean velocity and turbulence kinetic energy distributions located 0.16c from the stator wall where c is the seal clearance. The relationships between the velocity, turbulence, wall pressure and wall shear stress are very complex and do not follow simple bulk flow predictions.

  19. Effects of the Upper Taum Sauk Reservoir Embankment Breach on the Surface-Water Quality and Sediments of the East Fork Black River and the Black River, Southeastern Missouri - 2006-07

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barr, Miya N.

    2009-01-01

    On December 14, 2005, a 680-foot wide section of the upper reservoir embankment of the Taum Sauk pump-storage hydroelectric powerplant located in Reynolds County, Missouri, suddenly failed. This catastrophic event sent approximately 1.5 billion gallons of water into the Johnson's Shut-Ins State Park and into the East Fork Black River, and deposited enormous quantities of rock, soil, and vegetation in the flooded areas. Water-quality data were collected within and below the impacted area to study and document the changes to the riverene system. Data collection included routine, event-based, and continuous surface-water quality monitoring as well as suspended- and streambed-sediment sampling. Surface water-quality samples were collected and analyzed for a suite of physical and chemical constituents including: turbidity; nutrients; major ions such as calcium, magnesium, and potassium; total suspended solids; total dissolved solids; trace metals such as aluminum, iron, and lead; and suspended-sediment concentrations. Suspended-sediment concentrations were used to calculate daily sediment discharge. A peculiar blue-green coloration on the water surface of the East Fork Black River and Black River was evident downstream from the lower reservoir during the first year of the study. It is possible that this phenomenon was the result of 'rock flour' occurring when the upper reservoir embankment was breached, scouring the mountainside and producing extremely fine sediment particles, or from the alum-based flocculent used to reduce turbidity in the lower reservoir. It also was determined that no long-term effects of the reservoir embankment breach are expected as the turbidity and concentrations of trace metals such as total recoverable aluminum, dissolved aluminum, dissolved iron, and suspended-sediment concentration graphically decreased over time. Larger concentrations of these constituents during the beginning of the study also could be a direct result of the alum

  20. 27. "TEST STAND; STRUCTURAL; SIDEWALL, NORTH WALL AND SOUTH WALL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. "TEST STAND; STRUCTURAL; SIDEWALL, NORTH WALL AND SOUTH WALL FRAMING ELEVATIONS." Specifications No. ENG-04353-55-72; Drawing No. 60-09-12; sheet 27 of 148; file no. 1320/78. Stamped: RECORD DRAWING - AS CONSTRUCTED. Below stamp: Contract no. 4338, Rev. B; date: 15 April 1957. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-A, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  1. 40 CFR 35.925-17 - Retained amounts for reconstruction and expansion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... expansion. 35.925-17 Section 35.925-17 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND... Water Act § 35.925-17 Retained amounts for reconstruction and expansion. That the allowable project... retains for future reconstruction and expansion under § 35.928-2(a)(2)(ii), together with interest earned. ...

  2. 40 CFR 35.925-17 - Retained amounts for reconstruction and expansion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... expansion. 35.925-17 Section 35.925-17 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND... Water Act § 35.925-17 Retained amounts for reconstruction and expansion. That the allowable project... retains for future reconstruction and expansion under § 35.928-2(a)(2)(ii), together with interest earned. ...

  3. 40 CFR 35.925-17 - Retained amounts for reconstruction and expansion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... expansion. 35.925-17 Section 35.925-17 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND... Water Act § 35.925-17 Retained amounts for reconstruction and expansion. That the allowable project... retains for future reconstruction and expansion under § 35.928-2(a)(2)(ii), together with interest earned. ...

  4. 40 CFR 35.925-17 - Retained amounts for reconstruction and expansion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... expansion. 35.925-17 Section 35.925-17 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND... Water Act § 35.925-17 Retained amounts for reconstruction and expansion. That the allowable project... retains for future reconstruction and expansion under § 35.928-2(a)(2)(ii), together with interest earned. ...

  5. 40 CFR 35.925-17 - Retained amounts for reconstruction and expansion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... expansion. 35.925-17 Section 35.925-17 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND... Water Act § 35.925-17 Retained amounts for reconstruction and expansion. That the allowable project... retains for future reconstruction and expansion under § 35.928-2(a)(2)(ii), together with interest earned. ...

  6. Recruiting and Retaining Top Fund-Raisers at University-Affiliated Foundations. Occasional Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Jerry

    2002-01-01

    University-affiliated foundations have difficulty locating and retaining good fund-raisers. A recent survey found that demand for fund-raisers is greater than supply; only one in five is looking for a new job. This paper explains issues and lists strategies that can help affiliated foundations recruit and retain chief advancement officers and…

  7. Recruiting and Retaining Top Fund-Raisers at University-Affiliated Foundations. Occasional Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Jerry

    2002-01-01

    University-affiliated foundations have difficulty locating and retaining good fund-raisers. A recent survey found that demand for fund-raisers is greater than supply; only one in five is looking for a new job. This paper explains issues and lists strategies that can help affiliated foundations recruit and retain chief advancement officers and…

  8. The Impacts of Grade Retention: Benefits and Challenges Perceived by Retained Middle School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rand, Lauren E.

    2013-01-01

    No Child Left Behind legislation and high stakes testing have increased the pressure for public schools to ensure academic achievement for all students. Each year, a large number of students do not demonstrate adequate achievement and are retained to repeat the grade level. The large number of students retained is an indication that the system…

  9. Circle of Strength: Tribal Colleges Aim to Recruit and Retain Native Male Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pember, Mary Annette

    2011-01-01

    As tribal colleges aim to retain Native male students, they're finding that talking, drumming, construction, and spirituality may keep men in school. Lac Courte Oreilles Ojibwe Community College (LCOOCC, Hayward, Wisconsin) is just one of the tribal colleges across the country looking for innovative ways to attract and retain more men.…

  10. Circle of Strength: Tribal Colleges Aim to Recruit and Retain Native Male Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pember, Mary Annette

    2011-01-01

    As tribal colleges aim to retain Native male students, they're finding that talking, drumming, construction, and spirituality may keep men in school. Lac Courte Oreilles Ojibwe Community College (LCOOCC, Hayward, Wisconsin) is just one of the tribal colleges across the country looking for innovative ways to attract and retain more men.…

  11. MHD Electrode and wall constructions

    DOEpatents

    Way, Stewart; Lempert, Joseph

    1984-01-01

    Electrode and wall constructions for the walls of a channel transmitting the hot plasma in a magnetohydrodynamic generator. The electrodes and walls are made of a plurality of similar modules which are spaced from one another along the channel. The electrodes can be metallic or ceramic, and each module includes one or more electrodes which are exposed to the plasma and a metallic cooling bar which is spaced from the plasma and which has passages through which a cooling fluid flows to remove heat transmitted from the electrode to the cooling bar. Each electrode module is spaced from and electrically insulated from each adjacent module while interconnected by the cooling fluid which serially flows among selected modules. A wall module includes an electrically insulating ceramic body exposed to the plasma and affixed, preferably by mechanical clips or by brazing, to a metallic cooling bar spaced from the plasma and having cooling fluid passages. Each wall module is, similar to the electrode modules, electrically insulated from the adjacent modules and serially interconnected to other modules by the cooling fluid.

  12. The suitability evaluation of dredged soil from reservoirs as embankment material.

    PubMed

    Park, Jaesung; Son, Younghwan; Noh, Sookack; Bong, Taeho

    2016-12-01

    We assessed the suitability of soil dredged from reservoirs as embankment material and investigated its physical and geochemical properties and strength parameters, as well as its environmental stability. The dredged soil samples were taken from the Ansung, Jechon, and Mulwang Reservoirs in Korea. To evaluate their environmental stability and geochemical properties, we examined their levels of heavy metal contamination, pH, and electrical conductivity. We also conducted X-ray fluorescence and X-ray diffraction analyses. Furthermore, we determined the geotechnical characteristics, such as the compaction characteristics, and permeability coefficient, and we performed consolidated undrained triaxial compression tests to evaluate the recycling potential of dredged soil as embankment material. The concentrations of heavy metals in the sediment samples were lower than those of the standard samples. The pH value of the soil samples ranged from 4.25 to 5.39, and the electrical conductivity ranged between 83.3 and 265.0 μS/cm, indicating suitability for use as construction material with steel and concrete. Based on the values of the mechanical properties of the dredged soil, analysis of slope stability was performed for various cases and water level conditions. Our results indicate that the dredged soil has sufficient stability for substitution of embankment material and also as new embankment material for expansion. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Earthen embankment overtopping analysis using the WinDAM B software

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Over 11,000 earthen embankment dams nationwide were constructed with Federal involvement during the last seventy years. Many dams were constructed in rural areas and originally classified as low hazard. With increased development near the dams and changing dam safety criteria the hazard classifica...

  14. RECRUITING, RETAINING, AND REPORTING EXPOSURE STUDY RESULTS TO PARTICIPANTS AND THE PUBLIC

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA's National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) is developing techniques and capabilities to recruit and retain participants in exposure measurement studies and to effectively report study results to participants and the public. These techniques are being applied in three N...

  15. RECRUITING, RETAINING, AND REPORTING EXPOSURE STUDY RESULTS TO PARTICIPANTS AND THE PUBLIC

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA's National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) is developing techniques and capabilities to recruit and retain participants in exposure measurement studies and to effectively report study results to participants and the public. These techniques are being applied in three N...

  16. Residual stresses and retained austenite distribution and evolution in SAE 52100 steel under rolling contact loading

    SciTech Connect

    Dommarco, R.C.; Kozaczek, K.J.; Hahn, G.T.

    1996-07-01

    Residual stresses are introduced and modified during manufacturing and also by normal use. In this paper the changes in magnitude and distribution of residual stresses, attending the strain induced transformation of retained austenite are examined. Tests were conducted on SAE 52100 bearing steel with different amounts of retained austenite in a 5-ball-rod rolling contact fatigue machine. The tests were accelerated by applying well-controlled micro- indentations on the wear track and using rough balls. The magnitude and distribution of residual stresses and retained austenite were measured using x-ray diffraction techniques. The contribution of the residual stresses and amount of retained austenite to the rolling contact fatigue life is analyzed.

  17. Plasma Wall Interaction and Its Control by Wall Conditioning

    SciTech Connect

    Philipps, V

    2004-03-15

    The surrounding material walls in fusion devices must fulfil three important tasks:provide high vacuum conditions necessary to provide clean fusion plasmas absorb the power produced by the {alpha}-particles in the fusion processes and injected by auxiliary heating enable the exhaust of the helium ash by thermalisation of the helium plasma ions on material surfaces in the vicinity of helium pumps.The interaction of the plasma with the surrounding wall surfaces (PSI: plasma surface interaction) is therefore a necessary condition for fusion devices and not to avoid. In the plasma wall interaction a variety of bulk material and surface processes are involved on one side together with various special processes in the near surface plasma region on the other side. They can modify the properties of the boundary and main plasma in a feed back like behaviour. A prominent example is the release of impurities from the walls by plasma particle impact which increases the energy loss of the plasma by radiation and reduces thereby the particle fluxes to and impurity release from the walls.

  18. Frequency and clinical impact of retained implantable cardioverter defibrillator lead materials in heart transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jun; Hwang, Jongmin; Choi, Jin Hee; Choi, Hyo-In; Kim, Min-Seok; Jung, Sung-Ho; Nam, Gi-Byoung; Choi, Kee-Joon; Lee, Jae Won; Kim, You-Ho; Kim, Jae-Joong

    2017-01-01

    End-stage heart failure patients with implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) with/without cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT-D) often require heart transplantation (HTPL) as a last-resort treatment. We aimed to assess the frequency and clinical impact of retained ICD lead materials in HTPL patients. In this retrospective single center study, we examined the clinical records and chest radiographs of patients with ICD and CRT-D who underwent HTPL between January 1992 and July 2014. Of 40 patients with ICD and CRT-D at HTPL, 19 (47.5%) patients had retained ICD lead materials within the central venous system. Retained ICD lead materials following HTPL were more frequently noted in patients with longer implantation durations until HTPL. None of the patients underwent extraction procedures after HTPL. All patients were asymptomatic and did not exhibit significant complications or death related to the retained ICD lead materials. Seven (7/40, 17.5%) patients without any retained ICD lead materials underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) during the follow-up period (median, 29.5 months); none of the patients with retained lead materials were given MRI. Considering the common use of MRI in HTPL patients, further studies on the prophylactic extraction of retained ICD lead materials and safety of MRI in these patients are needed.

  19. Retention practices and factors affecting retainer choice among orthodontists in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Al-Jewair, Thikriat S.; Hamidaddin, Mohammad A.; Alotaibi, Hamdan M.; Alqahtani, Nasser D.; Albarakati, Sahar F.; Alkofide, Eman A.; Al-Moammar, Khalid A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To identify the retention protocols practiced by orthodontists in Saudi Arabia, and the factors affecting retainer choice. Methods: This cross-sectional study took place between February and March of 2015 at the College of Dentistry, University of Dammam, Dammam, Saudi Arabia. A previously tested electronic survey of 34 items was sent to all 1,200 orthodontic members of the Saudi Orthodontic Society. The questionnaire elicited data on the subjects’ demographics, orthodontic treatment practices, retention, and post-retention protocols. Results: One hundred and sixty-seven (13.9%) responses were received during the study period. The results showed predominant use of Hawley in the maxillary arch (61.3%), and fixed lingual in the mandibular arch (58.5%). Approximately 90.3% recommended full-time maxillary removable retainer wear. Overall, orthodontists who performed fewer extractions tended to use fixed retainers, and those who performed more extractions used removable retainers (p=0.018). Interproximal enamel reduction was used by 28% of the respondents as an adjunct procedure to enhance retention. Approximately 64% practiced a post-retention phase of retainer wear. Participants who used removable retainers most commonly prescribed lifetime retention. Conclusion: Hawley in the maxilla, and fixed lingual in the mandible were the most common retention protocols prescribed. Lifetime retention was the most common choice for participants who used removable retainers, especially when extractions were carried out. PMID:27464868

  20. The Differences between Retained and Promoted Children in Educational Services Received

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Lisa S.; Hughes, Jan N.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether students retained in first grade, relative to similarly low achieving students who were promoted, differed in the number of remedial educational services received by students in the year pre- retention year and in the repeat year. Study participants were 769 relatively low achieving first grade students, of whom 165 were retained in first grade and 604 were promoted. Controlling for students’ conditional probability of being retained, based on propensity scores calculated prior to retention, retained students received the same number of services as promoted students during the pre-retention year. The following year, when retained students were in first grade and promoted students were in second grade, retained students received fewer services than promoted students. Furthermore, retained children had a larger decrease in services from year 1 to year 2. These data support the notion that grade retention is being employed as the primary intervention instead of a component of a more comprehensive remediation plan. PMID:21331347

  1. Hydraulics of embankment-dam breaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walder, J. S.; Iverson, R. M.; Logan, M.; Godt, J. W.; Solovitz, S.

    2012-12-01

    the hydrograph in another way: the broader the initial dam crest, the longer the time before critical flow control is established. Flood duration is thus increased but peak discharge is decreased. Visual inspection and overhead videography reveal little turbidity in water pouring over the weir, implying that sediment there moves dominantly as bedload. Furthermore, underwater videography gives the overall impression that along the upstream dam face, erosion occurs without redeposition. Thus it would be a mistake to use empiricisms for equilibrium bedload transport to model erosion of the embankment. In mathematical terms, erosion rate cannot be backed out by calculating the divergence of transport rate; rather, transport rate should be regarded as the spatial integral of erosion rate. We use photogrammetry and motion of the colored markers to determine the erosion rate of the weir, and then infer shear stress at the weir by applying the van Rijn sediment-pickup function. Shear stress determined in this fashion is much less than what one calculates from the gradient of the energy head (an approach appropriate to steady flow). Shear stress inferred from the pickup-function calculation can serve as a constraint on computational fluid-dynamics models. Another constraint on such models, revealed by the underwater videography, is the upstream limit of sand movement, where bed shear stress equals the critical value for sand entrainment.

  2. Retaining Mathematics and Science Teachers in Rural and Remote Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Handal, Boris; Watson, Kevin; Petocz, Peter; Maher, Marguerite

    2013-01-01

    Why teachers in remote and rural schools do not remain longer in their posts is a central concern in Australian education. In particular, the lack of mathematics and science teachers in regional areas has reached critical levels endangering the adequate delivery of the curriculum to thousands of school students. While many teachers' personal…

  3. Recruiting and Retaining Geology Majors at CSUSB: Successes and Barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, A. L.; McGill, S. F.; Fryxell, J. E.; Leatham, W. B.; Melchiorre, E.; Brunkhorst, B.

    2003-12-01

    Our efforts to build a strong geology department at CSUSB have focused on two main areas (1) increasing the number of geology majors, and (2) involving our majors more directly in the department through their involvement in scientific research and outreach activities. To increase the number of majors we have undertaken a three pronged approach: (a) by actively working with middle and high school teachers to better prepare them to teach Earth Sciences in their schools, by providing them with the necessary tools to accomplish this, and by developing a new course on Earth Sciences with emphasis on the California Earth Science Standards to be taken by students in the multi-subject credential program; (b) by showing middle school, high school, and college students that geology is interesting and exciting by involving them in geological activities such as field trips, hands on geological exercises, and in directed research projects; and (c) by conducting a public relations campaign to inform both potential students and the general public about activities being undertaken by the department. The latter has been accomplished by the use of a glossy color brochure designed to illustrate what geology is, and what kinds of careers are possible; by flyers sent to approximately 120 local schools outlining opportunities for field trips and for teachers to bring their students to our campus for various activities; by developing an outreach web site; and by various newspaper articles on departmental activities. We are also looking into the use of TV spots on geological subjects to be aired on public access television. Since the start of our efforts two years ago we have seen a positive response by local teachers, and an increase in the number of applications to study geology at CSUSB, including a significant increase in the number of minority applicants. A major barrier to recruitment has been the misconceived idea in local schools that a course in Earth Sciences does not count

  4. Evaluation of cement-retained versus screw-retained implant-supported restorations for marginal bone loss: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Lemos, Cleidiel Aparecido Araujo; de Souza Batista, Victor Eduardo; Almeida, Daniel Augusto de Faria; Santiago Júnior, Joel Ferreira; Verri, Fellippo Ramos; Pellizzer, Eduardo Piza

    2016-04-01

    No consensus has been reached on which retention system, cement- or screw-retained, is best to avoid bone loss around the implant of a fixed implant-supported restoration. The purpose of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to compare cement- and screw-retained retention systems in fixed implant-supported restorations in terms of marginal bone loss, implant survival, and prosthetic complications. A comprehensive search of studies published from January 1995 to March 2015 and listed in the PubMed/MEDLINE, Embase, Scopus and the Cochrane Library databases was performed in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement. The meta-analysis was based on the Mantel-Haenszel and inverse variance methods. Marginal bone loss was the continuous outcome measure evaluated by mean difference (MD), and implant survival and prosthetic complications were the dichotomous outcome measures evaluated by risk ratio (RR), both with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI). The 20 studies selected for review evaluated 2139 participants, whose mean age was 47.14 years and who had received 8989 dental implants. The mean follow-up was 65.4 months (range: 12-180 months). Results of the MD for marginal bone loss showed statistically significant differences in favor of the cement-retained prosthesis (P =.04; MD: -0.19; CI: -0.37 to -0.01). The implant survival rate was higher for the cement-retained prosthesis (P =.01; RR: 0.49; CI: 0.28 to 0.85), and the prosthetic complication rate was higher for the screw-retained prosthesis (P =.04; RR: 0.52; CI: 0.28 to 0.98). Additional analysis of the mean plaque index did not show differences between retention systems (P=.58; MD: 0.13; CI: -0.32 to 0.57). The current meta-analysis indicated that cement-retained, fixed implant-supported restorations showed less marginal bone loss than screw-retained, fixed implant-supported restorations during the follow-up period, which ranged from 12

  5. Retaining Large and Adjustable Elastic Strains of Kilogram-Scale Nb Nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, Shijie; Cui, Lishan; Wang, Hua; Jiang, Daqiang; Liu, Yinong; Yan, Jiaqiang; Ren, Yang; Han, Xiaodong; Brown, Dennis E.; Li, Ju

    2016-02-10

    Individual metallic nanowires can sustain ultra-large elastic strains of 4-7%. However, achieving and retaining elastic strains of such magnitude in kilogram-scale nanowires are challenging. Here, we find that under active load, ~5.6% elastic strain can be achieved in Nb nanowires embedded in a metallic matrix deforming by detwinning. Moreover, large tensile (2.8%) and compressive (-2.4%) elastic strains can be retained in kilogram-scale Nb nanowires when the external load was fully removed, and adjustable in magnitude by processing control. It is then demonstrated that the retained tensile elastic strains of Nb nanowires can increase their superconducting transition temperature and critical magnetic field, in comparison with the unstrained original material. This study opens new avenues for retaining large and tunable elastic strains in great quantities of nanowires and elastic-strain-engineering at industrial scale.

  6. Retaining Large and Adjustable Elastic Strains of Kilogram-Scale Nb Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Hao, Shijie; Cui, Lishan; Wang, Hua; Jiang, Daqiang; Liu, Yinong; Yan, Jiaqiang; Ren, Yang; Han, Xiaodong; Brown, Dennis E; Li, Ju

    2016-02-10

    Individual metallic nanowires can sustain ultralarge elastic strains of 4-7%. However, achieving and retaining elastic strains of such magnitude in kilogram-scale nanowires are challenging. Here, we find that under active load, ∼ 5.6% elastic strain can be achieved in Nb nanowires embedded in a metallic matrix deforming by detwinning. Moreover, large tensile (2.8%) and compressive (-2.4%) elastic strains can be retained in kilogram-scale Nb nanowires when the external load was fully removed, and adjustable in magnitude by processing control. It is then demonstrated that the retained tensile elastic strains of Nb nanowires can increase their superconducting transition temperature and critical magnetic field, in comparison with the unstrained original material. This study opens new avenues for retaining large and tunable elastic strains in great quantities of nanowires and elastic-strain-engineering at industrial scale.

  7. Effects of the flexibility of the arterial wall on the wall shear stresses and wall tension in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salsac, Anne-Virginie; Fernandez, Miguel; Chomaz, Jean-Marc

    2005-11-01

    As an abdominal aortic aneurysm develops, large changes occur in the composition and structure of the arterial wall, which result in its stiffening. So far, most studies, whether experimental or numerical, have been conducted assuming the walls to be rigid. A numerical simulation of the fluid structure interactions is performed in different models of aneurysms in order to analyze the effects that the wall compliance might have on the flow topology. Both symmetric and non-symmetric models of aneurysms are considered, all idealistic in shape. The wall mechanical properties are varied in order to simulate the progressive stiffening of the walls. The spatial and temporal distributions of wall tension are calculated for the different values of the wall elasticity and compared to the results for the rigid walls. In the case of rigid walls, the calculation of the wall shear stresses and pressure compare very well with experimental results.

  8. Optofluidic realization and retaining of cell-cell contact using an abrupt tapered optical fibre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Hongbao; Zhang, Yao; Lei, Hongxiang; Li, Yayi; Zhang, Huixian; Li, Baojun

    2013-06-01

    Studies reveal that there exists much interaction and communication between bacterial cells, with parts of these social behaviors depending on cell-cell contacts. The cell-cell contact has proved to be crucial for determining various biochemical processes. However, for cell culture with relatively low cell concentration, it is difficult to precisely control and retain the contact of a small group of cells. Particularly, the retaining of cell-cell contact is difficult when flows occur in the medium. Here, we report an optofluidic method for realization and retaining of Escherichia coli cell-cell contact in a microfluidic channel using an abrupt tapered optical fibre. The contact process is based on launching a 980-nm wavelength laser into the fibre, E. coli cells were trapped onto the fibre tip one after another, retaining cell-cell contact and forming a highly organized cell chain. The formed chains further show the ability as bio-optical waveguides.

  9. Optofluidic realization and retaining of cell–cell contact using an abrupt tapered optical fibre

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Hongbao; Zhang, Yao; Lei, Hongxiang; Li, Yayi; Zhang, Huixian; Li, Baojun

    2013-01-01

    Studies reveal that there exists much interaction and communication between bacterial cells, with parts of these social behaviors depending on cell–cell contacts. The cell–cell contact has proved to be crucial for determining various biochemical processes. However, for cell culture with relatively low cell concentration, it is difficult to precisely control and retain the contact of a small group of cells. Particularly, the retaining of cell–cell contact is difficult when flows occur in the medium. Here, we report an optofluidic method for realization and retaining of Escherichia coli cell–cell contact in a microfluidic channel using an abrupt tapered optical fibre. The contact process is based on launching a 980-nm wavelength laser into the fibre, E. coli cells were trapped onto the fibre tip one after another, retaining cell–cell contact and forming a highly organized cell chain. The formed chains further show the ability as bio-optical waveguides. PMID:23771190

  10. Crater Wall and Floor

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-02-18

    The impact crater observed in this NASA Mars Odyssey image taken in Terra Cimmeria suggests sediments have filled the crater due to the flat and smooth nature of the floor compared to rougher surfaces at higher elevations.

  11. Crater Wall and Floor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    3D Projection onto MOLA data [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The impact crater observed in this THEMIS image taken in Terra Cimmeria suggests sediments have filled the crater due to the flat and smooth nature of the floor compared to rougher surfaces at higher elevations. The abundance of several smaller impact craters on the floor of the larger crater indicate however that the flat surface has been exposed for an extended period of time. The smooth surface of the crater floor and rougher surfaces at higher elevations are observed in the 3-D THEMIS image that is draped over MOLA topography (2X vertical exaggeration).

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -22.9, Longitude 155.7 East (204.3 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

  12. Macroscopic and histological characteristics of retained placenta: A prospectively collected case-control study.

    PubMed

    Endler, Margit; Saltvedt, Sissel; Papadogiannakis, Nikos

    2016-05-01

    Retained placenta is a potentially fatal obstetric disorder due to postpartum hemorrhage, its pathophysiology is however unknown. We aimed to assess if retained placenta was associated with increased macroscopic and histological signs of placental maternal underperfusion, a pattern otherwise seen in preeclampsia and other disorders of defective placentation. This was a case-control study of retained (n = 49) and non-retained (n = 47) placentas, collected from full-term singleton and otherwise healthy pregnancies, carried out at a tertiary level obstetric department. Macroscopic and histological analysis was performed. Signs of maternal placental underperfusion and signs of placental inflammation, fetal vascular thrombo-occlusive disease and increased placental attachment were recorded in a primary and secondary analysis respectively. Variables were compared groupwise using unconditional logistic regression or comparison of median or mean values. Compared to non-retained placentas retained placentas had a significantly smaller surface area (p = 0.05), were more oblong in shape (OR 5.24 95% CI:1.34-20.21) and showed overall more signs of maternal underperfusion (OR 2.52 95% CI: 1.07-5.87). There was no significant difference in signs of placental inflammation, fetal vascular thrombo-occlusive disease or placenta accreta but basal plate myometrial fibers were more common among retained placentas. In regard to shape, surface area and histological signs of maternal placental underperfusion, retained placentas showed a histological pattern similar to that seen in preeclamptic placentas. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Inlay-retained zirconia fixed dental prosthesis: clinical and laboratory procedures.

    PubMed

    Monaco, Carlo; Cardelli, Paolo; Bolognesi, Michele; Scotti, Roberto; Ozcan, Mutlu

    2012-01-01

    Many treatment options are currently available for single tooth replacement, such as metal-ceramic, all-ceramic, direct or indirect fiber-reinforced composite fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) or implants. Inlay-retained FDPs could be indicated especially when adjacent teeth have preexisting restorations and where implant placement is not possible or not indicated. In such cases, indication of both metal-ceramic and fiber-reinforced composite FDPs has certain disadvantages. This paper describes the use of all-ceramic inlay-retained FDPs with zirconia frameworks, veneered with a press-on technique. The retainer margins were made of pressed ceramic to make adhesive luting possible. In deep cavities, a full contour press-on ceramic all around the retainers increased the available surface area for the adhesive approach.

  14. Non-covalent interaction between procyanidins and apple cell wall material. Part II: Quantification and impact of cell wall drying.

    PubMed

    Le Bourvellec, C; Renard, C M G C

    2005-08-30

    The adsorption of condensed tannins (procyanidins) on solid cell wall material was quantified using the Langmuir isotherms formulation. Six tannins fractions differing by their size (number average degree of polymerisation between 2.5 and 65) and composition (presence of galloyl groups from to 0 to 22%, proportions of (+)-catechin to (-)-epicatechin from traces to one CAT for three EPI) were used. Two cell walls differing only by their physical characteristics were obtained by mild or harsh drying, with surface areas of 2.15 and 0.52 m(2)/g, respectively. The total amounts of procyanidins retained on the cell wall materials increased with their concentrations while the proportions of retained decreased, and a plateau was reached at high concentrations. The apparent affinity of procyanidins for CWM isolated from apples increased with their molecular weight. Decrease of the CWM porosity by harsh drying slightly decreased the apparent affinity and increased the apparent saturation levels when constants were expressed relative to cell wall weight, but strongly increased both apparent affinity and apparent saturation levels per surface units.

  15. Assessment of Factors Affecting Adolescent Patients’ Compliance with Hawley and Vacuum Formed Retainers

    PubMed Central

    Mirzakouchaki, Behnam; Sharghi, Reza; Shirazi, Samaneh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Success of orthodontic retention with removable retainers almost entirely depends on patients’ compliance. Aim This study was carried out to investigate the relationship between adolescent orthodontic patients’ compliance and various clinical and social factors. Materials and Methods The data were collected from 77 orthodontic patients aged 7-11 years old who had finished the full fixed appliance therapy. Hawley’s retainers were used in 34 patients and 43 patients used Vacuum Formed Retainers (VFRs). The subjects completed a questionnaire including several identifiers allowing the respondents to be classified into subgroups. They were also asked to indicate how long they wore their retainers during the day, by writing the number of hours in the report-card for the next three months. Comparison of the results was performed by one-way ANOVA and independent sample-t tests. Results No significant differences were found between males and females. Type of the retainer, patients’ grade of study, mothers’ occupation, clinicians’ and parents’ attitudes and filling the report cards had significant effect on mean wear hours per day. When compliance of the patients was assessed according to treatment location, Living place, parents’ educational degrees and ethnicity, no significant differences could be found. Conclusion The adolescent patients’ compliance was greater with VFRs than with Hawley’s retainers. Parental attitude and doctor-patient relationship had a great impact on adolescent patients’ compliance. PMID:27504404

  16. Assessment of Factors Affecting Adolescent Patients' Compliance with Hawley and Vacuum Formed Retainers.

    PubMed

    Mirzakouchaki, Behnam; Shirazi, Sajjad; Sharghi, Reza; Shirazi, Samaneh

    2016-06-01

    Success of orthodontic retention with removable retainers almost entirely depends on patients' compliance. This study was carried out to investigate the relationship between adolescent orthodontic patients' compliance and various clinical and social factors. The data were collected from 77 orthodontic patients aged 7-11 years old who had finished the full fixed appliance therapy. Hawley's retainers were used in 34 patients and 43 patients used Vacuum Formed Retainers (VFRs). The subjects completed a questionnaire including several identifiers allowing the respondents to be classified into subgroups. They were also asked to indicate how long they wore their retainers during the day, by writing the number of hours in the report-card for the next three months. Comparison of the results was performed by one-way ANOVA and independent sample-t tests. No significant differences were found between males and females. Type of the retainer, patients' grade of study, mothers' occupation, clinicians' and parents' attitudes and filling the report cards had significant effect on mean wear hours per day. When compliance of the patients was assessed according to treatment location, Living place, parents' educational degrees and ethnicity, no significant differences could be found. The adolescent patients' compliance was greater with VFRs than with Hawley's retainers. Parental attitude and doctor-patient relationship had a great impact on adolescent patients' compliance.

  17. Comparison of prefabricated and custom-made bars used for implant-retained mandibular complete overdentures.

    PubMed

    Abd El-Dayem, Mohamed A; Assad, Ahmed S; Eldin Sanad, Mohamed Essam; Mahmoud Mogahed, Sayed Abd Al-Hady

    2009-12-01

    To compare prefabricated and custom-made bars used for implant-retained mandibular complete overdentures. Ten completely edentulous patients were selected for replacement with dental implants. Each patient received 2 (press-fit) dental implants, 1 implant on each side in the canine regions of the mandible. The implants were left submerged (unloaded) for a healing osseointegration period of 4 months. The patients were divided into 2 groups, 5 patients in each. Group I patients received maxillary conventional dentures and a mandibular overdenture retained by a cast bar. Group II patients received a maxillary conventional denture and a mandibular overdenture retained by a prefabricated bar. All patients were evaluated clinically and radiographically immediately after overdenture delivery and after 6, 12, and 18 months. There was more pronounced bone resorption in cast bar group more than the prefabricated bar group and minimal marginal bone loss in the group treated with prefabricated bar. The prefabricated bar overdentures showed less bone resorption distal to the implants in comparison with the cast bar implant-retained overdentures, Both the gingival index and the plaque index score were significantly higher in the group treated with the cast bar retained overdenture. The prefabricated bar implant-retained overdenture showed low significant reduction in the bone height after 1 year, and a very highly significant reduction after 18 months.

  18. The incidence and risk factors for retained placenta after vaginal delivery - a single center experience.

    PubMed

    Ashwal, Eran; Melamed, Nir; Hiersch, Liran; Wiznitzer, Arnon; Yogev, Yariv; Peled, Yoav

    2014-12-01

    We aimed to determine the incidence and risk factors for retained placenta immediately after vaginal delivery in a single, university-affiliated tertiary center. A case-control study. Women who delivered vaginally and diagnosed with suspected retained placenta were compared to control group of women with spontaneous vaginal delivery with spontaneous non-complicated placental separation between the years 2007 and 2012. Eligibility was limited to singleton fetuses in vertex presentation with no history of more than one cesarean section, stillbirth or major fetal anomaly. Overall, 33,925 women delivered vaginally, of them, 491 (1.4%) underwent revision of uterine cavity due to suspected retained placenta. Women with retained placenta were characterized by a higher rate of previous cesarean section (OR 1.71, 95% CI 1.23-2.36), previous abortions, lower parity (OR 0.79, 95% CI 0.68-0.91), lower gestational age at delivery. Hypertensive disorders, oligohydramnios and labor and delivery interventions as induction of labor (OR 1.84, 95% CI 1.30-2.59), neuro-axial analgesia (OR 1.60, 95% CI 1.27-2.00) and vacuum delivery (OR 1.89, 95% CI 1.48-2.41) were independently associated with uterine revision for retained placenta. Risk factors for manual revision due to retained placenta can be recognized. This data should be taken into consideration in the assessment of women immediately after delivery.

  19. View of embankment showing Locomotive No. 12 looking south, train ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of embankment showing Locomotive No. 12 looking south, train going north - East Broad Top Railroad & Coal Company, State Route 994, West of U.S. Route 522, Rockhill Furnace, Huntingdon County, PA

  20. Parental Origin of the Retained X Chromosome in Monosomy X Miscarriages and Ongoing Pregnancies.

    PubMed

    Grande, Maribel; Stergiotou, Iosifina; Pauta, Montse; Marquès, Borja; Badenas, Cèlia; Soler, Anna; Yaron, Yuval; Borrell, Antoni

    2017-10-05

    To assess the distribution of the parental origin of the retained X chromosome in monosomy X, either in miscarriages or in ongoing pregnancies. The parental origin of the X chromosome was determined in monosomy X pregnancies, either miscarriages or ongoing pregnancies. Microsatellite marker patterns were compared between maternal and fetal samples by quantitative fluorescence polymerase chain reaction. Distributions of maternally and paternally derived X chromosome were assessed in miscarriages and in ongoing pregnancies using two-tailed Fisher exact test. Forty monosomy X pregnancies were included in the study: 26 miscarried at 5-16 weeks, and 14 ongoing pregnancies were diagnosed at 11-20 weeks. The retained X chromosome was maternally derived in 67% of the cases. In miscarriages, maternal and paternal X chromosome were retained in a similar proportion (54% [95% CI: 35-73%] vs. 46% [95% CI: 27-65%]), while in ongoing pregnancies, the maternal rate was 13 times higher (93% [95% CI: 79-100%)] vs. 7% [95% CI: 0-20%]). The retained X chromosome in individuals with monosomy X should theoretically be maternally derived in 2/3 of the cases. Our study suggests a preferential early miscarriage in pregnancies with a retained paternally derived X chromosome. This may explain the observation that 75-90% of individuals with monosomy X retain the maternal X chromosome. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Colleges Design New Housing to Engage and Retain Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterkin, Caitlin

    2013-01-01

    With goals of fostering an intellectual atmosphere, building relationships, and increasing students' involvement on campus--and, ultimately, their rates of retention--universities around the country, including Elon, Michigan State, and Southern Methodist, are looking to residence life. House systems, residential neighborhoods, and living-learning…

  2. Colleges Design New Housing to Engage and Retain Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterkin, Caitlin

    2013-01-01

    With goals of fostering an intellectual atmosphere, building relationships, and increasing students' involvement on campus--and, ultimately, their rates of retention--universities around the country, including Elon, Michigan State, and Southern Methodist, are looking to residence life. House systems, residential neighborhoods, and living-learning…

  3. Fulfill Promises and Avoid Breaches to Retain Satisfied, Committed Nurses.

    PubMed

    Rodwell, John; Ellershaw, Julia

    2016-07-01

    This study examines two commonly proposed mechanisms, violation and trust, to see if they mediate the relationships between the components of the psychological contract (i.e., promises, fulfillment, and breach) and their impact on the work-related outcomes of job satisfaction, intent to quit, and organizational commitment. Online surveys were completed by 459 Australian nurses. Structural equation modeling revealed that breach and fulfillment have direct and mediated effects on the outcomes, whereas promises had no impact. Violation partially mediated the relationship between breach and job satisfaction and intent to quit, while trust partially mediated the relationships between fulfillment and organizational commitment, and breach and organizational commitment. Negative experiences (i.e., breaches) were related to both increased feelings of violation and decreased feelings of trust. In contrast, positive experiences (i.e., fulfillment) increased trust but did not significantly reduce feelings of violation. Nurse and organizational managers can use these findings to improve communication with nurses so as to minimize the negative effects of breach and maximize the positive effects of fulfillment and thus improve attitudes. Nurse managers need to be careful to make promises regarding their nurses' employment that they can fulfill and to particularly avoid breaking the psychological contract. The potentially disproportionate negative effect of breach means that a breach can undo a lot of efforts to fulfill employment-related promises. © 2016 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  4. Lactating Rats Retain Nursing Behavior and Maternal Care in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daly, Megan E.; Ronca, April E.; Dalton, Bonnie (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In 1997, suckling mammals were flown in space for the first time as part of the NIH.R3 experiment sponsored jointly by NIH (National Institutes of Health) and NASA. Six rat dams and litters (Rattus norvegicus) were launched on an eight-day Space Shuttle mission at each of three postnatal ages (P5, P8, and P15). Dams and litters (N = 10 pups/litter) were housed within modified Animal Enclosure Modules (AEMs). Comparisons were made to ground controls. Dams and litters were videotaped daily in flight. The P8 and P15 flight litters showed excellent survival (99%) and weight gain relative to AEM ground controls, whereas P5 litters showed reduced survival (0% and 60%, respectively) and weight gain (less than 40% AEM). To examine the possibility that failures of maternal care contributed to P5 results, we analyzed the dams' in-flight nursing, licking and retrieving from four video segments ranging from twelve to fifteen minutes in length with control data derived from multiple ground segments. Video analyses revealed clear evidence of maternal care in flight. For P5 dams, frequency and duration of nursing and licking bouts fell within or above one standard deviation of control values. Retrieving was noted in the P5 and P8 groups only. The observed results suggest that factors other than maternal care contributed to the low survival rates and body weight gains of the P5 flight offspring.

  5. Recruiting and retaining plasmapheresis donors: A critical belief analysis.

    PubMed

    Bagot, Kathleen L; Masser, Barbara M; White, Katherine M; Starfelt, Louise C

    2015-06-01

    This paper identifies critical beliefs underpinning intentions to commence and continue plasmapheresis donation. Whole blood (n = 624) and first-time plasmapheresis (n = 460) donors completed a cross-sectional survey assessing the belief-base of the theory of planned behaviour and rated their plasmapheresis donation intentions. While the idea of red blood cells being returned was a key deterrent for all donors, critical beliefs underlying commencement and continuation in the plasmapheresis donor panel differed and varied as a function of blood donation history. Findings will assist the development of targeted persuasion messages to optimise recruitment and retention of plasmapheresis donors in a non-remunerated context.

  6. Recruiting and Retaining High-Quality Teachers in Rural Areas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monk, David H.

    2007-01-01

    In examining recruitment and retention of teachers in rural areas, David Monk begins by noting the numerous possible characteristics of rural communities--small size, sparse settlement, distance from population concentrations, and an economic reliance on agricultural industries that are increasingly using seasonal and immigrant workers to minimize…

  7. On-Line Course Development: Engaging and Retaining Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruster, Benita G.

    2015-01-01

    As the number of on-line classes and the demand for on-line education continues to sky-rocket, it is critical that course developers and university faculty have the skills to effectively design curricula, to develop engaging learning opportunities, and to create responsive courses that meet individual student needs. This paper details three…

  8. Retaining Public and Political Trust: Teacher Education in Scotland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Donald; Weir, Douglas

    2014-01-01

    This paper traces the key periods, players and events which have contributed to the shaping of the current landscape of teacher education in Scotland. Starting with the Wheatley Report and the formation of the General Teaching Council (Scotland) in the 1960s through to the most recent Donaldson Review of Teacher Education, we examine ebb and flow…

  9. Recruiting and Retaining New Generations of Community College Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mouchayleh, Theresa Stewart

    2009-01-01

    Much generational research has been conducted in the last decade, prompted most likely by the drastic social and technological changes of the late 20th century, the increase in enrollments in higher education, the increase in families with two working parents, and the meteoric rise in the widespread use and acceptance of emerging technologies.…

  10. Retaining Public and Political Trust: Teacher Education in Scotland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Donald; Weir, Douglas

    2014-01-01

    This paper traces the key periods, players and events which have contributed to the shaping of the current landscape of teacher education in Scotland. Starting with the Wheatley Report and the formation of the General Teaching Council (Scotland) in the 1960s through to the most recent Donaldson Review of Teacher Education, we examine ebb and flow…

  11. Recruiting and Retaining New Generations of Community College Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mouchayleh, Theresa Stewart

    2009-01-01

    Much generational research has been conducted in the last decade, prompted most likely by the drastic social and technological changes of the late 20th century, the increase in enrollments in higher education, the increase in families with two working parents, and the meteoric rise in the widespread use and acceptance of emerging technologies.…

  12. Recruiting and Retaining Information Technology Staff in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educause Quarterly, 2000

    2000-01-01

    Recruitment and retention of higher education information technology (IT) professionals is a campuswide problem. This paper presents information from meetings of a working group of IT professionals, human resources (HR) professionals, and business officers that examined recruitment, retention, retraining, and restructuring, highlighting:…

  13. Stemming the Tide: Retaining and Supporting Science Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pirkle, Sheila F.

    2011-01-01

    Chronically high rates of new and experienced science teacher attrition and the findings of new large-scale mentoring programs indicate that administrators should adopt new approaches. A science teacher's role encompasses demanding responsibilities, such as observing laboratory safety and OSHA mandates, as well as management of a business-like,…

  14. Oral and maxillofacial surgery: should a district service be retained?

    PubMed Central

    Wood, G D; Herion, S

    1991-01-01

    The adult new patient attendances at a District General Hospital for 1988 and 1989 have been analysed and the patients with oral and maxillofacial injuries identified. The injuries were classified using the International Classification of Diseases. The time spent undertaking emergency surgery out of hours by each firm using the operating facility has been analysed. An argument for a national district service in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery is developed and advanced drawing on the results obtained from the study. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:1685320

  15. Retaining F-22A Tooling: Options and Costs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    production of the F-22A air vehicle and of the F119 engine. Based on our discussions with avionics experts associated with the F-22A, we consider...of the Precision Drilling Center, whose large machine tools drill holes in the com- posite wing skins and wing structure . Three precision drilling...Connecticut P&W fabricates parts for, assembles the five modules of, performs final assembly of, and tests the F119 engine at its two sites in

  16. Recruiting and Retaining Army Nurses: An Annotated Bibliography, 1990

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-12-01

    limitations of these findings are discussed. Blegen , M., and Mueller, C.W. "Nurses’ Job Satisfaction: A Longitudinal Analysis." Research in Nursing and Health...statistically significant relationships in seven of the twelve hypotheses tested. A probability of . 05 or less was used as the level of statistical...analysis. Student t-tests, with the Bonferroni correction, revealed significant differences (p < . 05 ) between the behavioral and normative beliefs of

  17. Recruiting and Retaining Native Americans in Teacher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shonerd, Henry

    This paper identifies problems in Native American teacher training and suggests solutions to improve the training. In New Mexico, ideal candidates for teacher licensure are a group of Native American teacher assistants who work with Native American students. Most lack the general education requirements for a bachelor's degree and must take…

  18. Recruiting and Retaining Adult Students: An Organizational Theory Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cookson, Peter S.

    1989-01-01

    Describes the recruitment and retention of adult students in light of two varieties of organizational theory. Compliance theory was formulated to classify relationships between organizational representatives and "lower participants" in large organizations. Open systems theory emphasizes the nature of the interaction between an…

  19. Water-retaining barrier and method of construction

    DOEpatents

    Adams, Melvin R.; Field, Jim G.

    1996-01-01

    An agricultural barrier providing a medium for supporting plant life in an arid or semi-arid land region having a ground surface, the barrier being disposed on native soil of the region, the barrier including: a first layer composed of pieces of basalt, the first layer being porous and being in contact with the native soil; a porous second layer of at least one material selected from at least one of sand and gravel, the second layer being less porous than, and overlying, the first layer; and a porous third layer containing soil which favors plant growth, the third layer being less porous than, and overlying, the second layer and having an exposed upper surface, wherein the porosities of the second and third layers differ from one another by an amount which impedes transport of soil from the first layer into the second layer. Soil for the third layer may be provided by washing salinated or contaminated soil with water and using the washed soil for the third layer.

  20. Evaluating Programs for Recruiting and Retaining Community Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Single, Peg Boyle; Jaffe, Arnold; Schwartz, Robert

    1999-01-01

    Surveyed community physicians affiliated with a teaching hospital to assess factors influencing their decisions to serve as preceptors and the relative value of incentives. Found that student influence on patient care was a driving factor, that preceptors preferred nonmonetary compensation, such as continuing medical education credit, and that…

  1. Attracting and Retaining Teachers in Rural Areas. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Timothy

    This digest examines the rural teacher shortage from a policy perspective and suggests strategies to address the problem. The rural teacher recruitment and retention problem varies across states. An adequate number of teachers are trained each year nationwide, but the problem is with distribution. Recent research on rural teacher recruitment and…

  2. Recruiting, Training, and Retaining High-Performance Development Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elder, Stephen D.

    2010-01-01

    This chapter offers thoughts on some key elements of a high-performing development environment. The author describes how good development officers love to be part of something big, something that transforms a place and its people, and that thinking big is a powerful concept for development officers. He reminds development officers to be clear…

  3. Factors in Recruiting and Retaining Health Professionals for Rural Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniels, Zina M.; VanLeit, Betsy J.; Skipper, Betty J.; Sanders, Margaret L.; Rhyne, Robert L.

    2007-01-01

    Context: Rural communities, often with complex health care issues, have difficulty creating and sustaining an adequate health professional workforce. Purpose: To identify factors associated with rural recruitment and retention of graduates from a variety of health professional programs in the southwestern United States. Methods: A survey…

  4. Recruiting, Training, and Retaining High-Performance Development Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elder, Stephen D.

    2010-01-01

    This chapter offers thoughts on some key elements of a high-performing development environment. The author describes how good development officers love to be part of something big, something that transforms a place and its people, and that thinking big is a powerful concept for development officers. He reminds development officers to be clear…

  5. Factors in Recruiting and Retaining Health Professionals for Rural Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniels, Zina M.; VanLeit, Betsy J.; Skipper, Betty J.; Sanders, Margaret L.; Rhyne, Robert L.

    2007-01-01

    Context: Rural communities, often with complex health care issues, have difficulty creating and sustaining an adequate health professional workforce. Purpose: To identify factors associated with rural recruitment and retention of graduates from a variety of health professional programs in the southwestern United States. Methods: A survey…

  6. Motivating and Retaining Adult Volunteer 4-H Leaders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culp, Ken, III

    1997-01-01

    Adult volunteer 4-H leaders (494 current, 40 former) identified their primary motivations as follows: youth (issue/cause motive), 4-H (affiliation motive), and perceived need (personal motive). Lack of adult assistance and time influenced resignation from the program. (SK)

  7. Retaining Latino Students: Culturally Responsive Instruction in Colleges and Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pappamihiel, N. Eleni; Moreno, Marcio

    2011-01-01

    In this article the authors define and describe culturally responsive teaching (CRT) in college and university courses. Whereas, the Latino population in our K-12 schools has grown rapidly, we have not seen such growth in the population of Latino students in our postsecondary schools. It is the authors' position that CRT can be a tool in helping…

  8. Retaining Latino Students: Culturally Responsive Instruction in Colleges and Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pappamihiel, N. Eleni; Moreno, Marcio

    2011-01-01

    In this article the authors define and describe culturally responsive teaching (CRT) in college and university courses. Whereas, the Latino population in our K-12 schools has grown rapidly, we have not seen such growth in the population of Latino students in our postsecondary schools. It is the authors' position that CRT can be a tool in helping…

  9. Recruiting and Retaining Army Nurses: An Annotated Bibliography

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-01

    rather than active duty). Also, identify ways in which nursing organizations could assist DOD in recruiting, develop videos of current nursing... nursing organizations . Slewitzke, Connie L., Vail, James D., and McMarlin, Susan A., US Army Reserve and National Guard Survey: An Analysis of Factors

  10. Innovation: Attracting and Retaining the Best of the Private Sector

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    and will continue to have, a deleterious impact . In practice, the emphasis of LPTA contracting has been on the “LP” component, i.e., lower prices...cost of failure, and no impact on mission. There is a great deal of work that has these characteristics, for which staff augmentation contracting is...hidden cost is the impact on labor. One attractive feature for DoD users of IDIQ contracts is that it can “turn on” and “turn off” contractors as tasks

  11. Freidreich's ataxia with retained reflexes: a phenotype and genotype correlation.

    PubMed

    Verma, Rajesh; Gupta, Mani

    2012-12-14

    An 18-year-old lady had presented to us with insidious onset progressive gait ataxia of 5-year duration. Her sister had similar complaints and type 1 diabetes mellitus. Examination revealed, gait ataxia, impaired tandem gait, babinski sign and severe swaying on testing for Romberg's sign. All deep tendon reflexes were exaggerated. On investigations, there was no evidence for diabetes mellitus or nutritional deficiencies. Electrocardiogram and echocardiogram were normal. Magnetic spine resonance showed marked atrophy of cervical cord with normal cerebellum. The genetic testing disclosed expanded GAA repeat length on both alleles of FXN gene. The GAA repeat length on both alleles was much less than mean length observed in Friedreich's ataxia. This case highlights how strongly the genotype influences the neurological and systemic manifestations as well as severity of disease in Friedreich's ataxia.

  12. ORGANIZING, TRAINING, AND RETAINING INTELLIGENCE PROFESSIONALS FOR CYBER OPERATIONS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-02-13

    delegated [Signals Intelligence] SIGINT authorities and leverage the national cryptologic platform is a critical capability… Signals intelligence...NSA/CSS) falls under the DoD and is a Combat Support Agency (CSA).19 The NSA is a component of the intelligence community that employs cryptology ...Military services provide manpower to NSA/CSS via their Service Cryptologic Components.23 Twenty-Fifth Air Force, subordinate to Air Combat Command

  13. Water-retaining barrier and method of construction

    DOEpatents

    Adams, M.R.; Field, J.G.

    1996-02-20

    An agricultural barrier is disclosed which provides a medium for supporting plant life in an arid or semi-arid land region having a ground surface. The barrier is disposed on native soil of the region. The barrier includes a first porous layer composed of pieces of basalt, and is in contact with the native soil. There is a less porous second layer of at least one material selected from at least one of sand and gravel. The second layer overlies the first layer. A third layer, less porous than the second layer, contains soil which favors plant growth. The third layer overlies the second layer and has an exposed upper surface. The porosities of the second and third layers differ from one another by an amount which impedes transport of soil from the first layer into the second layer. Soil for the third layer may be provided by washing salinated or contaminated soil with water and using the washed soil for the third layer. 2 figs.

  14. Insoluble and soluble roasted walnut proteins retain antibody reactivity.

    PubMed

    Downs, Melanie L; Simpson, Angela; Custovic, Adnan; Semic-Jusufagic, Aida; Bartra, Joan; Fernandez-Rivas, Montserrat; Taylor, Steve L; Baumert, Joseph L; Mills, E N Clare

    2016-03-01

    Thermal processing techniques commonly used during food production have the potential to impact food allergens by inducing physical and/or chemical changes to the proteins. English walnuts (Juglans regia) are among the most commonly allergenic tree nuts, but little information is available regarding how walnut allergens respond to thermal processing. This study evaluated the effects of dry roasting (132 or 180°C for 5, 10, or 20min) on the solubility and immunoreactivity of walnut proteins. A dramatic decrease in walnut protein solubility was observed following dry roasting at 180°C for 20min. However, both the soluble and insoluble protein fractions from roasted walnuts maintained substantial amounts of IgG immunoreactivity (using anti-raw and anti-roasted walnut antisera), with similar patterns of reactivity observed for human IgE from walnut-allergic individuals. Thus, walnut proteins are relatively stable under certain thermal processing conditions, and IgE reactivity remains present even when insoluble aggregates are formed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Preparing, Recruiting, and Retaining Special Education Personnel in Rural Areas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitworth, Jerry

    Nationwide, the shortage of special education teachers is expected to grow, fueled by expanding demand and high teacher attrition rates. The situation in Texas mirrors that of the nation. A needs assessment conducted by Abilene Christian University (ACU) in west central Texas found: a continuing need for special education teachers in the area;…

  16. Recruiting, Preparing and Retaining Teachers for Urban Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howey, Kenneth R., Ed.; Post, Linda M., Ed.; Zimpher, Nancy L., Ed.

    2006-01-01

    How can the "revolving door" at the nation's high-poverty schools be slowed down? How can diversity be taught in teacher preparation that relates to teaching and learning? How can teachers learn to use the diverse urban classroom as a rich asset? By focusing on reconceptualizing general education studies, addressing key urban understanding and…

  17. Retaining Students in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Majors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, Jessica; Mazur, Eric

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present results relating undergraduate student retention in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) majors to the use of Peer Instruction (PI) in an introductory physics course at a highly selective research institution. We compare the percentages of students who switch out of a STEM major after taking a physics…

  18. Protean Organizations: Reshaping Work and Careers to Retain Female Talent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cabrera, Elizabeth F.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to understand women's careers better in order to help organizations make changes to increase female retention. Two specific questions are addressed: Are women adopting a protean career orientation by becoming career self-agents?; and Are women's career decisions guided by the kaleidoscope values of challenge, balance, and…

  19. Recruiting and Retaining Minority Teachers: A National Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorman, Arthur; And Others

    1990-01-01

    This Policy Brief consists of a report on the status of minority teachers in the United States, with emphasis on the states served by the North Central Regional Educational Laboratory. The first article examines the causes of the decline of minority group teachers and the impact of this shortage on minority students. It lists some of the…

  20. Recruiting, Reviewing, and Retaining High-Risk Older Adult Populations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosen, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The Institute on Aging and Social Work (IASW) provides social work faculty with advanced training in aging research with the goal of mentoring individuals to develop National Institutes of Health (NIH) research proposals. The program offers an excellent opportunity for top-level training with nationally recognized experts in research methodology…

  1. Recruiting, Reviewing, and Retaining High-Risk Older Adult Populations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosen, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The Institute on Aging and Social Work (IASW) provides social work faculty with advanced training in aging research with the goal of mentoring individuals to develop National Institutes of Health (NIH) research proposals. The program offers an excellent opportunity for top-level training with nationally recognized experts in research methodology…

  2. Retaining Students in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Majors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, Jessica; Mazur, Eric

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present results relating undergraduate student retention in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) majors to the use of Peer Instruction (PI) in an introductory physics course at a highly selective research institution. We compare the percentages of students who switch out of a STEM major after taking a physics…

  3. Protean Organizations: Reshaping Work and Careers to Retain Female Talent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cabrera, Elizabeth F.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to understand women's careers better in order to help organizations make changes to increase female retention. Two specific questions are addressed: Are women adopting a protean career orientation by becoming career self-agents?; and Are women's career decisions guided by the kaleidoscope values of challenge, balance, and…

  4. [Effects of ground cover and water-retaining agent on winter wheat growth and precipitation utilization].

    PubMed

    Wu, Ji-Cheng; Guan, Xiu-Juan; Yang, Yong-Hui

    2011-01-01

    An investigation was made at a hilly upland in western Henan Province to understand the effects of water-retaining agent (0, 45, and 60 kg x hm(-2)), straw mulching (3000 and 6000 kg x hm(-2)), and plastic mulching (thickness < 0.005 mm) on winter wheat growth, soil moisture and nutrition conditions, and precipitation use. All the three measures promoted winter wheat growth, enhanced grain yield and precipitation use efficiency, and improved soil moisture and nutritional regimes. These positive effects were more obvious when the straw- or plastic mulching was combined with the use of water-retaining agent. Comparing with the control, all the measures increased the soil moisture content at different growth stages by 0.1%-6.5%. Plastic film mulching had the best water-retention effect before jointing stage, whereas water-retaining agent showed its best effect after jointing stage. Soil moisture content was the lowest at flowering and grain-filling stages. Land cover increased the grain yield by 2.6%-20.1%. The yield increment was the greatest (14.2%-20.1%) by the combined use of straw mulching and water-retaining agent, followed by plastic mulching combined with water-retaining agent (11.9% on average). Land cover also improved the precipitation use efficiency (0.4-3.2 kg x mm(-1) x hm(-2)) in a similar trend as the grain yield. This study showed that land cover and water-retaining agent improved soil moisture and nutrition conditions and precipitation utilization, which in turn, promoted the tillering of winter wheat, and increased the grain number per ear and the 1000-grain mass.

  5. Device Acquires and Retains Rock or Ice Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giersch, Louis R.; Backes, Paul G.

    2009-01-01

    The Rock Baller is a sample acquisition tool that improves sample retention. The basic elements of the Rock Baller are the tool rotation axis, the hub, the two jaws, and the cutting blades, which are located on each of the jaws. The entire device rotates about the tool rotation axis, which is aligned parallel to the nominal normal direction of the parent rock surface. Both jaws also rotate about the jaw axis, which is perpendicular to the tool rotation axis, at a rate much slower than the rotation about the tool rotation axis. This movement gradually closes the jaws into a nearly continuous hemispherical shell that encloses the sample as it is cut from the parent rock. When required the jaws are opened to release the sample. The hemispherical cutting method eliminates the sample retention problems associated with existing sample acquisition methods that employ conventional cylindrical cutting. The resulting samples are hemispherical, or nearly hemispherical, and as a result the aspect ratio (sample depth relative to sample radius) is essentially fixed. This fixed sample aspect ratio may be considered a drawback of the Rock Baller method, as samples with a higher aspect ratio (more depth, less width) may be considered more scientifically valuable because such samples would allow for a broader inspection of the geological record. This aspect ratio issue can be ameliorated if the Rock Baller is paired with a device similar to the Rock Abrasion Tool (RAT) used on the Mars Exploration Rovers. The RAT could be used to first grind into the surface of the parent rock, after which the Rock Baller would extract a sample from a depth inside the rock that would not have been possible without first using the RAT. Other potential applications for this technology include medical applications such as the removal of tissue samples or tumors from the body, particularly during endoscopic, laparoscopic, or thoracoscopic surgeries.

  6. The Seismic Design of Waterfront Retaining Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-11-01

    160 6.3.2 Analysis of Earthquake Induced Displacements for a Wall Retaining Dry Backfill...164 6.3.4 Analysis of Earthquake Induced Displacements for a Wall Retaining Submerged Backfill - No Excess Pore Water Pressures...Distribution of horizontal stresses corresponding to APAE . ... C20 C.6 Seismic design problem for a continuous anchor blast ...... .. C24 C.7

  7. First Wall and Operational Diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Lasnier, C; Allen, S; Boedo, J; Groth, M; Brooks, N; McLean, A; LaBombard, B; Sharpe, J; Skinner, C; Whyte, D; Rudakov, D; West, W; Wong, C

    2006-06-19

    In this chapter we review numerous diagnostics capable of measurements at or near the first wall, many of which contribute information useful for safe operation of a tokamak. There are sections discussing infrared cameras, visible and VUV cameras, pressure gauges and RGAs, Langmuir probes, thermocouples, and erosion and deposition measurements by insertable probes and quartz microbalance. Also discussed are dust measurements by electrostatic detectors, laser scattering, visible and IR cameras, and manual collection of samples after machine opening. In each case the diagnostic is discussed with a view toward application to a burning plasma machine such as ITER.

  8. Wall interference assessment and corrections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, P. A.; Kemp, W. B., Jr.; Garriz, J. A.

    1989-01-01

    Wind tunnel wall interference assessment and correction (WIAC) concepts, applications, and typical results are discussed in terms of several nonlinear transonic codes and one panel method code developed for and being implemented at NASA-Langley. Contrasts between 2-D and 3-D transonic testing factors which affect WIAC procedures are illustrated using airfoil data from the 0.3 m Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel and Pathfinder 1 data from the National Transonic Facility. Initial results from the 3-D WIAC codes are encouraging; research on and implementation of WIAC concepts continue.

  9. Cryogenic-Compatible Winchester Connector Mount and Retaining System for Composite Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pontius, James; McGuffey, Douglas

    2011-01-01

    A connector retainer and mounting system has been designed to replace screw-mounting of Winchester connectors. Countersunk screws are normally used to secure connectors to structures, and to keep them from coming apart. These screws are normally put into threaded or through-holes in metallic structures. This unique retainer is designed such that integral posts keep the connector halves retained, and a groove permits a cable tie to be fastened around the retainer and composite tube, thus securing the connector to the structure. The system is compatible for use on cryogenic (and conventional) bonded composite tube assemblies. Screws and tapped/through-holes needed to retain and mount Winchester connectors cannot be used on blind-access composite tubes. This system allows for rapid installation, removal, low-molecular-outgassing materials, and particulate-free installation and removal. Installation and/or changes late in the integration, and test flow with limited access in a cleanroom environment are possible. No sanding or bonding is needed.

  10. Implant-retained mandibular overdentures versus conventional dentures: 10 years of care and aftercare.

    PubMed

    Visser, Anita; Meijer, Henny J A; Raghoebar, Gerry M; Vissink, Arjan

    2006-01-01

    This 10-year prospective, randomized, clinical trial investigated the treatment outcome of edentulous patients treated with mandibular overdentures retained by 2 endosseous implants compared with conventional dentures in patients with or without vestibuloplasty. One hundred fifty-one edentulous patients (5 groups) with a symphyseal mandibular bone height between 8 and 25 mm participated. Sixty-two patients were treated with an overdenture retained by 2 implants (groups 1 and 3), 59 patients were treated with a conventional denture (groups 2 and 5), and 30 patients were treated with a conventional denture after preprosthetic vestibuloplasty (group 4). Patients who received conventional dentures but preferred implants later on could undergo implant surgery after 1 year of their initial treatment, but were analyzed in their original group. The prosthetic and surgical care and aftercare were scored during a 10-year evaluation period. One hundred thirty-three patients completed the 10-year follow-up evaluations. Forty-four percent of patients treated with conventional dentures switched within 10 years to implant-retained overdentures, versus 16% of the patients who were treated with conventional dentures after vestibuloplasty. On average, a greater time investment and more treatment sessions were needed in patients treated with implant-retained overdentures compared to patients treated with conventional dentures. Patients treated with an implant-retained overdenture need more treatment interventions and treatment time than patients treated with conventional dentures.

  11. Strategies to Recruit and Retain Students in Physical Science and Mathematics on a Diverse College Campus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Jen-Mei; Kwon, Chuhee; Stevens, Lora; Buonora, Paul

    2016-01-01

    This article presents implementation details and findings of a National Science Foundation Scholarship in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Program (S-STEM) consisting of many high-impact practices to recruit and retain students in the physical sciences and mathematics programs, particularly first-generation and underrepresented…

  12. Strategies to Recruit and Retain Students in Physical Science and Mathematics on a Diverse College Campus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Jen-Mei; Kwon, Chuhee; Stevens, Lora; Buonora, Paul

    2016-01-01

    This article presents implementation details and findings of a National Science Foundation Scholarship in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Program (S-STEM) consisting of many high-impact practices to recruit and retain students in the physical sciences and mathematics programs, particularly first-generation and underrepresented…

  13. Fungal cell wall organization and biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Free, Stephen J

    2013-01-01

    The composition and organization of the cell walls from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Candida albicans, Aspergillus fumigatus, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Neurospora crassa, and Cryptococcus neoformans are compared and contrasted. These cell walls contain chitin, chitosan, β-1,3-glucan, β-1,6-glucan, mixed β-1,3-/β-1,4-glucan, α-1,3-glucan, melanin, and glycoproteins as major constituents. A comparison of these cell walls shows that there is a great deal of variability in fungal cell wall composition and organization. However, in all cases, the cell wall components are cross-linked together to generate a cell wall matrix. The biosynthesis and properties of each of the major cell wall components are discussed. The chitin and glucans are synthesized and extruded into the cell wall space by plasma membrane-associated chitin synthases and glucan synthases. The glycoproteins are synthesized by ER-associated ribosomes and pass through the canonical secretory pathway. Over half of the major cell wall proteins are modified by the addition of a glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor. The cell wall glycoproteins are also modified by the addition of O-linked oligosaccharides, and their N-linked oligosaccharides are extensively modified during their passage through the secretory pathway. These cell wall glycoprotein posttranslational modifications are essential for cross-linking the proteins into the cell wall matrix. Cross-linking the cell wall components together is essential for cell wall integrity. The activities of four groups of cross-linking enzymes are discussed. Cell wall proteins function as cross-linking enzymes, structural elements, adhesins, and environmental stress sensors and protect the cell from environmental changes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Retained Austenite in SAE 52100 Steel Post Magnetic Processing and Heat Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Pappas, Nathaniel R; Watkins, Thomas R; Cavin, Odis Burl; Jaramillo, Roger A; Ludtka, Gerard Michael

    2007-01-01

    Steel is an iron-carbon alloy that contains up to 2% carbon by weight. Understanding which phases of iron and carbon form as a function of temperature and percent carbon is important in order to process/manufacture steel with desired properties. Austenite is the face center cubic (fcc) phase of iron that exists between 912 and 1394 C. When hot steel is rapidly quenched in a medium (typically oil or water), austenite transforms into martensite. The goal of the study is to determine the effect of applying a magnetic field on the amount of retained austenite present at room temperature after quenching. Samples of SAE 52100 steel were heat treated then subjected to a magnetic field of varying strength and time, while samples of SAE 1045 steel were heat treated then subjected to a magnetic field of varying strength for a fixed time while being tempered. X-ray diffraction was used to collect quantitative data corresponding to the amount of each phase present post processing. The percentage of retained austenite was then calculated using the American Society of Testing and Materials standard for determining the amount of retained austenite for randomly oriented samples and was plotted as a function of magnetic field intensity, magnetic field apply time, and magnetic field wait time after quenching to determine what relationships exist with the amount of retained austenite present. In the SAE 52100 steel samples, stronger field strengths resulted in lower percentages of retained austenite for fixed apply times. The results were inconclusive when applying a fixed magnetic field strength for varying amounts of time. When applying a magnetic field after waiting a specific amount of time after quenching, the analyses indicate that shorter wait times result in less retained austenite. The SAE 1045 results were inconclusive. The samples showed no retained austenite regardless of magnetic field strength, indicating that tempering removed the retained austenite. It is apparent

  15. Attracting and Retaining Rural Teachers in Ghana: The Premise and Promise of a District Sponsorship Scheme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobbold, Cosmas

    2006-01-01

    Recruiting and retaining qualified teachers for schools in rural communities is both an issue and a problem in many countries. The very nature of rural communities and perceptions of teaching in such environments tend to discourage qualified experienced and new teachers from taking appointments there. Education jurisdictions, therefore, use…

  16. Attracting and Retaining Rural Teachers in Ghana: The Premise and Promise of a District Sponsorship Scheme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobbold, Cosmas

    2006-01-01

    Recruiting and retaining qualified teachers for schools in rural communities is both an issue and a problem in many countries. The very nature of rural communities and perceptions of teaching in such environments tend to discourage qualified experienced and new teachers from taking appointments there. Education jurisdictions, therefore, use…

  17. Veterans Health Administration: Actions Needed to Better Recruit and Retain Clinical and Administrative Staff

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-03-22

    resources (HR) employees along with weak HR-related internal control practices are undermining the Department of Veterans Affairs’ (VA) Veterans...with the largest staffing shortages, including physicians, registered nurses, and psychologists, increased from about 5,900 employees in fiscal...Department of Veterans Affairs’ (VA) Veterans Health Administration (VHA) to recruit and retain high-quality clinical and administrative employees . VHA

  18. Staffing an Empty Schoolhouse: Attracting and Retaining Teachers in Rural, Remote and Isolated Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Phil

    2004-01-01

    Attracting and retaining staff in rural and remote schools has been a perennial problem n Australia virtually since federation in 1901. In this report the author uses a mixed method approach of an on-line survey, unstructured interviews and policy analysis to develop a comprehensive overview of approaches to overcome these staffing problems…

  19. Retaining ligaments of the face: review of anatomy and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Alghoul, Mohammed; Codner, Mark A

    2013-08-01

    The retaining ligaments of the face are important in understanding concepts of facial aging and rejuvenation. They are located in constant anatomic locations where they separate facial spaces and compartments. Their superficial extensions form subcutaneous septa that separate facial fat compartments. Their main significance relates to their surgical release in order to achieve the desired aesthetic outcome. Furthermore, they have a sentinel role in their anatomic relationship to facial nerve branches. When performing facial aesthetic surgery, plastic surgeons should select a plane of dissection, release the appropriate ligaments depending on the desired aesthetic goals, and avoid nerve injury by using the ligaments as anatomic landmarks. Descriptions of the retaining ligaments are variable in the literature; due to different interpretations of anatomy, several classifications, locations, and nomenclature systems have been proposed. This article will review and clarify the anatomy of the retaining ligaments of the face, including the cheek, mandible, temporal, and periorbital areas.

  20. 75 FR 32857 - Academic Competitiveness Grant (ACG) and National Science and Mathematics Access To Retain Talent...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 34 CFR Part 691 Academic Competitiveness Grant (ACG) and National Science and Mathematics Access To Retain Talent Grant (National Smart Grant) Programs CFR Correction In Title 34 of the Code of...

  1. Environmental degradation and life time prediction of generator retaining rings subject to stress corrosion cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Speidel, M.O.; Magdowski, R.

    1995-12-31

    Retaining rings are among the most highly stressed components of generator rotors. There is a history of service failures of such retaining rings in both fossil fired and in nuclear power systems. The predominant failure mode is intergranular stress corrosion cracking. For a complete life time prediction it is necessary to know the effect of materials, stresses, and environments on nucleation, re-initiation, and growth of stress corrosion cracks. The present paper contributes information on the above topics. This includes time to failure measurements of stressed cylindrical tensile specimens in water and re-initiation measurements on components containing stress corrosion cracks which had been stopped by a more benign environment. Also included are fracture mechanics stress corrosion crack growth rate measurements in two different commercial retaining ring materials as a function of stress intensity. Conclusions are drawn with respect to materials choice, operating conditions, and inspection intervals.

  2. Systemic Lead Toxicity Secondary to Retained Intraosseous Bullet A Case Report and Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Begly, John P; Lajam, Claudette M

    2016-09-01

    A 35-year-old female presented to orthopaedic clinic with a chief complaint of chronic left hip pain, beginning 17 years prior when she had sustained a gunshot wound to her left buttock. Imaging demonstrated significant left hip arthritis with a retained projectile in the femoral head. Lead levels were also found to be significantly elevated. The patient underwent successful left total hip arthroplasty, with subsequent postoperative pain relief and consistent decrease in serum lead level. This report presents a rare case that emphasizes lead intoxication as a potentially dangerous complication of gunshot wounds and retained projectiles in the orthopaedic patient. Recognition of lead intoxication as a potential complication of retained gunshot projectiles allows for efficient diagnosis and treatment, which may prevent associated future morbidity.

  3. Recruiting and retaining mobile young injection drug users in a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Lankenau, Stephen E; Sanders, Bill; Hathazi, Dodi; Bloom, Jennifer Jackson

    2010-04-01

    Longitudinal studies that research homeless persons or transient drug users face particular challenges in retaining subjects. Between 2005 and 2006, 101 mobile young injection drug users were recruited in Los Angeles into a 2-year longitudinal study. Several features of ethnographic methodology, including fieldwork and qualitative interviews, and modifications to the original design, such as toll-free calls routed directly to ethnographer cell phones and wiring incentive payments, resulted in retention of 78% of subjects for the first follow-up interview. Longitudinal studies that are flexible and based upon qualitative methodologies are more likely to retain mobile subjects while also uncovering emergent research findings.

  4. [Experimental study on removal of micro-organic pollutants for special ecosystem using ecological embankments].

    PubMed

    Wu, Yi-feng; Lu, Xi-wu

    2009-10-15

    An experimental model was made on the improvement of sources water quality in the Huangpu River through the construction of a special aquatic ecosystem using ecological embankments. A 6 d retention time (RT) gave the highest removal rate capacity and benefit of micro-organic pollutants. Under these conditions, the removal rates were 70.5% atrazine, 57.7% dimethyl phthalate, 72.4% phthalic acid bis (2-ethylhexyl) ester, 62.4% diethyl phthalate, and 45.1% dibutyl phthalate. The varieties of micro-organic pollutants reduced from 51 to 28. In contrast, in the control pool with hard embankment, the removal rates only reached 40.2% atrazine, 42.9% dimethyl phthalate, 54.8% phthalic acid bis (2-ethylhexyl) ester, 52.0% diethyl phthalate, and 16.2% dibutyl phthalate. Through coordination of all constituent elements of special aquatic ecosystem, significant amounts of micro-organic pollutants were removed.

  5. A rare and unexpected case of retained foetal bone after an unsafe abortion.

    PubMed

    Demirtas, Omer; Terzi, Hasan; Kale, Ahmet; Sanibrahim, Bahar; Guler, Omer Tolga

    2015-10-01

    Unsafe abortion is one of the most neglected healthcare problems in developing countries. One of the rare complications of unsafe abortion is retained foetal bone. Prevalence of disease is around 0.15% among patients undergoing diagnostic hysteroscopy. Patients have no specific symptoms. Case reports have focused on subfertility, abnormal uterine bleeding, lower abdominal pain, abnormal vaginal discharge, dyspareunia, dysmenorrhoea and spontaneous passage of bony fragments. Retained foetal bone fragments may cause acute pelvic inflammatory disease in rare cases regardless of the time interval after abortion. This condition can also present as recurrent vagitinis or endometritis refractory to ampirical antimicrobial treatment. In such cases, foreign body in uterine cavity should be kept in mind. Such patients should primarily be evaluated by ultrasonography which has substantial clinical importance in differential diagnosis of these cases. We present a case of misdiagnosed retained foetal bone complicated with recurrent vaginal discharge and acute pelvic inflammatory disease.

  6. Compression retaining piston

    SciTech Connect

    Quaglino, A.V. Jr.

    1987-06-16

    A piston apparatus is described for maintaining compression between the piston wall and the cylinder wall, that comprises the following: a generally cylindrical piston body, including: a head portion defining the forward end of the body; and a continuous side wall portion extending rearward from the head portion; a means for lubricating and preventing compression loss between the side wall portion and the cylinder wall, including an annular recessed area in the continuous side wall portion for receiving a quantity of fluid lubricant in fluid engagement between the wall of the recessed and the wall of the cylinder; a first and second resilient, elastomeric, heat resistant rings positioned in grooves along the wall of the continuous side wall portion, above and below the annular recessed area. Each ring engages the cylinder wall to reduce loss of lubricant within the recessed area during operation of the piston; a first pump means for providing fluid lubricant to engine components other than the pistons; and a second pump means provides fluid lubricant to the recessed area in the continuous side wall portion of the piston. The first and second pump means obtains lubricant from a common source, and the second pump means including a flow line supplies oil from a predetermined level above the level of oil provided to the first pump means. This is so that should the oil level to the second pump means fall below the predetermined level, the loss of oil to the recessed area in the continuous side wall portion of the piston would result in loss of compression and shut down of the engine.

  7. Prevention of retained surgical items.

    PubMed

    Feldman, David L

    2011-01-01

    Reduction in retained surgical items is an important part of any operating room patient-safety effort. Any item used in an operation can result in a retained surgical item, but sponges are the most frequent and the abdomen is the most common location. Retained sponges can cause significant morbidity, and the costs associated with both prevention and treatment of retained surgical items, including legal costs, can be considerable. This review will examine counting, teamwork, radiography, and new technology as methods used to prevent retained surgical items. Even though none of these techniques individually is likely to completely prevent retained surgical items, when used together the numbers can be reduced.

  8. Evaluation of the cytotoxicity of fiber reinforced composite bonded retainers and flexible spiral wires retainers in simulated high and low cariogenic environments

    PubMed Central

    Jahanbin, Arezoo; Shahabi, Mostafa; Ahrari, Farzaneh; Bozorgnia, Yasaman; Shajiei, Arezoo; Shafaee, Hooman; Afshari, Jalil Tavakkol

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the cytotoxic effects of fiber reinforced composite bonded retainers in comparison with flexible spiral wires (FSWs) under high and low cariogenic-simulated environments using human oral fibroblasts. Materials and Methods: Four types of bonded retainers were evaluated: (1) reinforced with glass fibers: Interlig (Angelus), (2) reinforced with polyethylene fibers: Connect (Kerr), (3) reinforced with quartz fibers: Quartz Splint UD (RTD), and (4) FSW. Twenty specimens of each sample group were prepared with the same surface area and halved. Next, half of them were placed in a high cariogenic environment 60 min in 10% lactic acid 3 times a day and remained in Fusayama Meyer artificial saliva for the rest of the day) and the other half were placed in a low cariogenic environment 20 min in 10% lactic acid 3 times a day and remained in Fusayama Meyer artificial saliva for the rest of the day) for 1, 7 and 30 days. Cell viability was assessed by MTT assay. Data were analyzed using SPSS software (α =0.05). Results: During the 1st month, cytotoxicity reduced gradually. In the low cariogenic-simulated environment, the cytotoxicity of all of the groups were reported to be mild at day 30 and the difference between them was significant (P = 0.016). In the same period in the high cariogenic-simulated environment, the cytotoxicity of Connect and Quartz Splint was mild, and they had lower cytotoxicity than the other groups. Meanwhile, Interlig had moderate (52%) and FSW had severe cytotoxicity (22%) and the difference between the groups was also significant (P = 0.000). Conclusions: FSW retainers are not recommended in those at high-risk for dental caries. However, in those at low-risk, there is no difference from the standpoint of cytotoxicity. PMID:25657987

  9. Studies in pharmacokinetics and tolerance of substances temporarily retained in the liver by microsphere embolization.

    PubMed Central

    Lindell, B; Aronsen, K F; Nosslin, B; Rothman, U

    1978-01-01

    Earlier investigation has shown that a temporary arrest of arterial blood flow can be achieved by embolization with degradable microspheres. This study was made to investigate the change in pharmacokinetics, and drug tolerance which takes place when a substance is retained in the liver by a microsphere embolization. 14C-labelled inulin and 5-fluorouracil were studied. The administration of these substances with microspheres led to a delay in their systemic distribution. Furthermore there was an increased tolerance to 5-fluoro-uracil, probably due to a prolonged first pass effect when the substance was temporarily retained in the liver by a microsphere embolization. PMID:619805

  10. An alternative means of retaining ocular structure and improving immunoreactivity for light microscopy studies

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ning; Shibata, Brad; Hess, John F.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Several properties of ocular tissue make fixation for light microscopy problematic. Because the eye is spherical, immersion fixation necessarily results in a temporal gradient of fixation, with surfaces fixing more rapidly and thoroughly than interior structures. The problem is compounded by the fact that the layers of the eye wall are compositionally quite different, resulting in different degrees of fixation-induced shrinkage and distortion. Collectively, these result in non-uniform preservation, as well as buckling and/or retinal detachment. This gradient problem is most acute for the lens, where the density of proteins can delay fixation of the central lens for days, and where the fixation gradient parallels the age gradient of lens cells, which complicates data interpretation. Our goal was to identify a simple method for minimizing some of the problems arising from immersion fixation, which avoided covalent modification of antigens, retained high quality structure, and maintained tissue in a state that is amenable to common cytochemical techniques. Methods A simple and inexpensive derivative of the freeze-substitution approach was developed and compared to fixation by immersion in formalin. Preservation of structure, immunoreactivity, GFP and tdTomato fluorescence, lectin reactivity, outer segment auto fluorescence, Click-iT chemistry, compatibility with in situ hybdrdization, and the ability to rehydrate eyes after fixation by freeze substitution for subsequent cryo sectioning were assessed. Results An inexpensive and simple variant of the freeze substitution approach provides excellent structural preservation for light microscopy, and essentially eliminates ocular buckling, retinal detachment, and outer segment auto-fluorescence, without covalent modification of tissue antigens. The approach shows a notable improvement in preservation of immunoreactivity. TdTomato intrinsic fluorescence is also preserved, as is compatibility with in situ

  11. Direct calculation of wall interferences and wall adaptation for two-dimensional flow in wind tunnels with closed walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amecke, Juergen

    1986-01-01

    A method for the direct calculation of the wall induced interference velocity in two dimensional flow based on Cauchy's integral formula was derived. This one-step method allows the calculation of the residual corrections and the required wall adaptation for interference-free flow starting from the wall pressure distribution without any model representation. Demonstrated applications are given.

  12. Attracting, Retaining, and Developing Quality Teachers in Small Schools. Small Schools Network Information Exchange No. 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regional Laboratory for Educational Improvement of the Northeast & Islands, Andover, MA.

    This collection of articles gathers reprinted materials on teacher attraction and retention for small and rural school districts. The material is organized in two sections: (1) Attracting and Retaining Quality Teachers and (2) Challenging and Enriching Current Staff. Reprints from a number of publications present strategies for addressing the…

  13. The S.M.A.R.T. Strategy to Recruiting and Retaining High School Coaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lubisco, Robyn; Birren, Genevieve F. E.

    2017-01-01

    This article discusses the S.M.A.R.T. strategy for recruiting and retaining quality high school coaches. S.M.A.R.T. stands for Scouting, Mentoring and Coaching, Appreciation, Rating, and Time. Scouting addresses how one goes about locating and hiring quality coaches. Mentoring and Coaching addresses how to develop the coach within the specific…

  14. Incentives for Attracting and Retaining K-12 Teachers: Lessons for Early Education. Policy Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laurence, Wendy; Hass, Bob; Burr, Elizabeth; Fuller, Bruce; Gardner, Mary; Hayward, Gerald; Kuboyama, Emlei

    This policy brief examines programs from California and elsewhere in the United States for attracting and retaining quality preschool and child-care staff and places these programs within the broader context of K-12 reforms. While this brief is specifically aimed at early-childhood-education planners and policymakers, it contains information for…

  15. The S.M.A.R.T. Strategy to Recruiting and Retaining High School Coaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lubisco, Robyn; Birren, Genevieve F. E.

    2017-01-01

    This article discusses the S.M.A.R.T. strategy for recruiting and retaining quality high school coaches. S.M.A.R.T. stands for Scouting, Mentoring and Coaching, Appreciation, Rating, and Time. Scouting addresses how one goes about locating and hiring quality coaches. Mentoring and Coaching addresses how to develop the coach within the specific…

  16. National Board Certification for Principals: A New Way to Develop, Recognize and Retain Top School Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Board for Professional Teaching Standards, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Effective principals are critical to the success of students, teachers and entire schools. A successful principal creates a culture of learning that: (1) Advances student learning and engagement; (2) Recruits and retains the best teachers; and (3) Improves teacher and school performance. To create a consistently reliable process to develop,…

  17. Moss cell walls: structure and biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Alison W.; Roberts, Eric M.; Haigler, Candace H.

    2012-01-01

    The genome sequence of the moss Physcomitrella patens has stimulated new research examining the cell wall polysaccharides of mosses and the glycosyl transferases that synthesize them as a means to understand fundamental processes of cell wall biosynthesis and plant cell wall evolution. The cell walls of mosses and vascular plants are composed of the same classes of polysaccharides, but with differences in side chain composition and structure. Similarly, the genomes of P. patens and angiosperms encode the same families of cell wall glycosyl transferases, yet, in many cases these families have diversified independently in each lineage. Our understanding of land plant evolution could be enhanced by more complete knowledge of the relationships among glycosyl transferase functional diversification, cell wall structural and biochemical specialization, and the roles of cell walls in plant adaptation. As a foundation for these studies, we review the features of P. patens as an experimental system, analyses of cell wall composition in various moss species, recent studies that elucidate the structure and biosynthesis of cell wall polysaccharides in P. patens, and phylogenetic analysis of P. patens genes potentially involved in cell wall biosynthesis. PMID:22833752

  18. [Relationship between craniofacial architecture and retained lower third molar. Its' symptomatology].

    PubMed

    Bozzatello, Juana R

    2006-01-01

    In a high percentage of subjects between 17 and 25 years of age, retained lower third molars produce various lesions and complications accompanied by symptoms which may be sometimes confused with other pathologies. Based on the frequency of dental consultations in our community (City of Córdoba, Argentina), we conducted a statistical study in order to find out how retained lower third molars affect our population, and to compare our findings with similar studies carried out in other communities. The type of third molar retention was related to age, gender, craniofacial index, and clinical symptoms presented. Orthopantograms, profile teleradiographs, and cephalometric radiographs were done on 162 patients ranging in age from 17 to 81 years (92 females and 70 males, 270 retained lower third molars), Our findings show that in the city of Cordoba, Argentina, the presence of retained lower third molars is more frequent in brachycephalic males , with horizontal and mesioangular locations. Vertical and distoangular retentions occur more frequently among females. There is a high percentage of Class I retention, position A (following Pell and Gregory classification ), in dolicochephalies. The most common symptoms are pain, pericoronitis, and caries in the second molar. These symptoms appear between 20 and 24 years old, occur more frequently in females and tend to disappear with age. Based on our observations we believe it is advisable to do radiographic studies in subjects between the age of 14 and 25 to evaluate the risk-benefit situation and to decide on the prophilactic extraction of the tooth..

  19. 41 CFR 102-42.25 - Who retains custody of gifts and decorations pending disposal?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Who retains custody of... Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION PERSONAL PROPERTY 42-UTILIZATION, DONATION, AND DISPOSAL OF FOREIGN GIFTS AND DECORATIONS General Provisions...

  20. 41 CFR 102-42.25 - Who retains custody of gifts and decorations pending disposal?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Who retains custody of... Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION PERSONAL PROPERTY 42-UTILIZATION, DONATION, AND DISPOSAL OF FOREIGN GIFTS AND DECORATIONS General Provisions...

  1. 41 CFR 102-42.25 - Who retains custody of gifts and decorations pending disposal?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Who retains custody of... Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION PERSONAL PROPERTY 42-UTILIZATION, DONATION, AND DISPOSAL OF FOREIGN GIFTS AND DECORATIONS General Provisions...

  2. 41 CFR 102-42.25 - Who retains custody of gifts and decorations pending disposal?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Who retains custody of... Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION PERSONAL PROPERTY 42-UTILIZATION, DONATION, AND DISPOSAL OF FOREIGN GIFTS AND DECORATIONS General Provisions...

  3. An Approach to Training and Retaining Primary Care Physicians in Rural Appalachia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Allan; And Others

    1993-01-01

    The West Virginia School of Osteopathic Medicine's success in educating and retaining primary care physicians for practice in rural Appalachia is ascribed to its focused mission; a multistate student exchange program; careful recruitment, admission, and placement; early clinical training in rural sites; and status as a state-supported institution.…

  4. A Good Sub Is Hard To Find: Recruiting and Retaining Temporary Staff for Child Care Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bellm, Dan; Whitebook, Marcy

    Addressed to teachers, administrators, resource and referral workers, and substitutes, this booklet offers advice about finding and retaining good substitute child care workers. Sections concern (1) causes of the "crisis" in substitute care, including the expansion of child care, provider turnover, shortage of elementary school teachers, low pay,…

  5. Attracting, Retaining and Rewarding Teachers. What Research Says about Series Number 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Education Association, Washington, DC. Research Div.

    This report on attracting and retaining teachers presents highlights of two major categories of research studies on the topic. The first are the findings of Schlechy, Vance, and Weaver on the characteristics of the teacher workforce. The research findings are abstracted and policy recommendations are included. The second group is comprised of…

  6. Recruiting, Retaining, and Preparing Quality Urban Teachers: The Urban Learning Program (ULRN)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Ann L.; Lewis, James L.

    2011-01-01

    This study's goals were to describe an urban, blended undergraduate/teacher preparation program and to assess its effectiveness in recruiting, retaining, and preparing diverse teachers to teach in urban schools. Methods used included a 43-item, on-line survey and semi-structured interviews. One hundred nine undergraduates (68%) responded to the…

  7. Attracting, Developing and Retaining Effective Teachers: Background Report for the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Kate; Wilcox, Danielle; Palmaffy, Tyce; Tracy, Christopher; Yiamouyiannis, Zeus; Ostermeier, Amy; Garcia, Lenore Yaffee

    2004-01-01

    This report presents a balanced picture of the debate on teacher quality in the U.S. and focuses on the aspects of teacher policy dealing with attracting, recruiting, developing and retaining effective teachers by synthesizing relevant research, identifying innovative and successful policy practices, facilitating exchanges of lessons among…

  8. Rubber and alumina gaskets retain vacuum seal in high temperature EMF cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesson, J. C.

    1966-01-01

    Silicone rubber gasket and an alumina gasket retain a vacuum inside a high temperature EMF cell in which higher and lower density liquid metal electrodes are separated by an intermediate density fused salt electrolyte. This innovation is in use on a sodium bismuth regenerable EMF cell in which the fused salts and metals are at about 500 deg to 600 deg C.

  9. A Good Sub Is Hard To Find: Recruiting and Retaining Temporary Staff for Child Care Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bellm, Dan; Whitebook, Marcy

    Addressed to teachers, administrators, resource and referral workers, and substitutes, this booklet offers advice about finding and retaining good substitute child care workers. Sections concern (1) causes of the "crisis" in substitute care, including the expansion of child care, provider turnover, shortage of elementary school teachers, low pay,…

  10. Attracting, Retaining and Rewarding Teachers. What Research Says about Series Number 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Education Association, Washington, DC. Research Div.

    This report on attracting and retaining teachers presents highlights of two major categories of research studies on the topic. The first are the findings of Schlechy, Vance, and Weaver on the characteristics of the teacher workforce. The research findings are abstracted and policy recommendations are included. The second group is comprised of…

  11. Recruiting and Retaining Learners in Workplace Literacy Programs in New Zealand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benseman, John

    2013-01-01

    Successful workplace literacy and numeracy programs are dependent on effective strategies to recruit and then retain course participants. This article reports on the recruitment strategies used in a large workplace literacy and numeracy project involving 535 workers in 18 courses. It provides an analysis of the strategies used, their rates of…

  12. Netting an Elusive Breed: How to Attract and Retain Better Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warner, Mark R.

    2004-01-01

    The most important asset of any enterprise is the talent and enthusiasm of its workforce. In operating a successful business, there is no greater challenge than to attract and retain the best-qualified, hardest-working employees. And perhaps the most important factors in keeping the best people are providing workers with the tools to succeed at…

  13. Effects of Hardness on Pintle Rod Performance in the Universal and Retained Gas Samplers

    SciTech Connect

    BOGER, R.M.

    1999-11-18

    Interaction between hardness of the pintle rods and the retainer rings used in the core samplers is investigated. It is found that ordinary Rockwell C measurements are not sufficient and superficial hardness instruments are recommended to verify hardness since in-production hardness of pintle rods is found to vary widely and probably leads to some premature release of pistons in samplers.

  14. What businesses are doing to attract and retain employees--becoming an employer of choice.

    PubMed

    Clarke, K F

    2001-03-01

    This article explains why the new economy has made many businesses anxious to become employers of choice. The author uses a case study to show how one firm achieved this goal and explains the role that innovative benefits practices and other HR policies can play in attracting and retaining qualified employees.

  15. A simulation-optimization model for Stone column-supported embankment stability considering rainfall effect

    SciTech Connect

    Deb, Kousik; Dhar, Anirban; Purohit, Sandip

    2016-02-01

    Landslide due to rainfall has been and continues to be one of the most important concerns of geotechnical engineering. The paper presents the variation of factor of safety of stone column-supported embankment constructed over soft soil due to change in water level for an incessant period of rainfall. A combined simulation-optimization based methodology has been proposed to predict the critical surface of failure of the embankment and to optimize the corresponding factor of safety under rainfall conditions using an evolutionary genetic algorithm NSGA-II (Non-Dominated Sorted Genetic Algorithm-II). It has been observed that the position of water table can be reliably estimated with varying periods of infiltration using developed numerical method. The parametric study is presented to study the optimum factor of safety of the embankment and its corresponding critical failure surface under the steady-state infiltration condition. Results show that in case of floating stone columns, period of infiltration has no effect on factor of safety. Even critical failure surfaces for a particular floating column length remain same irrespective of rainfall duration.

  16. A simulation-optimization model for Stone column-supported embankment stability considering rainfall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deb, Kousik; Dhar, Anirban; Purohit, Sandip

    2016-02-01

    Landslide due to rainfall has been and continues to be one of the most important concerns of geotechnical engineering. The paper presents the variation of factor of safety of stone column-supported embankment constructed over soft soil due to change in water level for an incessant period of rainfall. A combined simulation-optimization based methodology has been proposed to predict the critical surface of failure of the embankment and to optimize the corresponding factor of safety under rainfall conditions using an evolutionary genetic algorithm NSGA-II (Non-Dominated Sorted Genetic Algorithm-II). It has been observed that the position of water table can be reliably estimated with varying periods of infiltration using developed numerical method. The parametric study is presented to study the optimum factor of safety of the embankment and its corresponding critical failure surface under the steady-state infiltration condition. Results show that in case of floating stone columns, period of infiltration has no effect on factor of safety. Even critical failure surfaces for a particular floating column length remain same irrespective of rainfall duration.

  17. Using New Social Media to Recruit and Retain Qualified Special Education Personnel. Practice Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muller, Eve

    2011-01-01

    As communication technologies continue to evolve at an ever-expanding rate, some states and localities are turning to new social media tools as a means of recruiting and retaining qualified education personnel. Based on examples from around the country drawn from early intervention (EI) programs, state education agencies (SEAs), local education…

  18. Recruiting and Retaining "Highly Qualified Teachers" for Hard-to-Staff Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Barnett

    2004-01-01

    What is known about recruiting and retaining teachers for hard-to-staff-schools runs counter to many of the assumptions undergirding the teacher quality provisions of No Child Left Behind. Evidence regarding incentives, recruitment pathways, new teacher induction programs, and alternative routes shed considerable light on what needs to be done to…

  19. Recruiting and Retaining an Ethnically Diverse Sample of Older Adults in a Longitudinal Intervention Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin-Wells, Vonnette; McDougall, Graham J.; Becker, Heather

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes strategies developed to recruit and retain an ethnically diverse sample in a longitudinal intervention of 246 participants in the SeniorWISE study. The ethnic and socioeconomic differences of these participants necessitated the use of different methods of effectively communicating with this population. Recruitment benefited…

  20. Recruiting and Retaining Teachers in Rural Schools. Far West Laboratory Knowledge Brief. Number Four.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Deanne

    Rural schools are having difficulty recruiting and retaining teachers. The national teacher turnover rate is 6% annually, but in rural areas reaches 30% to 50%. Rural teachers often leave due to social, cultural, geographic, and professional isolation. They are often unprepared for rural realities that demand knowledge in multiple subjects and…

  1. K-12 Education Nonprofit Employees' Perceptions of Strategies for Recruiting and Retaining Employees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrne, Tara Marie

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative study explored the key reasons individuals who work in K-12 education nonprofit organizations enter the field of K-12 nonprofit education and their motivations for doing so. The purpose of this study was to find new strategies for recruiting and retaining K-12 education nonprofit employees by examining the obstacles that exist to…

  2. Standing in the Gap: Research that Informs Strategies for Motivating and Retaining Rural High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardre, Patricia L.

    2012-01-01

    Rural schools face the challenges of motivating and retaining students, often in the face of severe resource constraints. This paper synthesizes fifteen years of the author's rural research on secondary students' school-related motivation, distilling it into strategic principles for rural teachers and administrators. Effective motivational…

  3. Recruiting and Retaining Teachers in a Rural School District: A Phenomenological Study of Rural Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Laura U.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative, phenomenological research study was to explore the effectiveness of programs and strategies used to recruit and retain highly qualified teachers in accordance with the No Child Left Behind Act (2001) from the perspective of highly qualified teachers in a rural school district in Central Virginia. The data…

  4. Using New Social Media to Recruit and Retain Qualified Special Education Personnel. Practice Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muller, Eve

    2011-01-01

    As communication technologies continue to evolve at an ever-expanding rate, some states and localities are turning to new social media tools as a means of recruiting and retaining qualified education personnel. Based on examples from around the country drawn from early intervention (EI) programs, state education agencies (SEAs), local education…

  5. K-12 Education Nonprofit Employees' Perceptions of Strategies for Recruiting and Retaining Employees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrne, Tara Marie

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative study explored the key reasons individuals who work in K-12 education nonprofit organizations enter the field of K-12 nonprofit education and their motivations for doing so. The purpose of this study was to find new strategies for recruiting and retaining K-12 education nonprofit employees by examining the obstacles that exist to…

  6. FOCUS: A State-Wide Initiative to Select and Retain Transition Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobia, Debra C.; Stephens, Cynthia E.; Sherer, Gail

    2015-01-01

    Through Focus on Change in Understanding Staff and Staffing Systems in Georgia Public Schools (FOCUS), over 500 teachers of record were recruited, selected, and placed in Georgia's high-need schools. Teachers in the first three cohorts were retained at very high levels as well as achieving full certification. Project outcomes also included the…

  7. Attracting and Retaining Adult Learners. Summary Report of a Nationwide Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levitz, Randi S.; Noel, Lee

    Results of a national survey, "Attracting and Retaining Adult Learners" (ARAL), by the American College Testing Program are summarized. Attention is focused on programs and services that have been successful with adult learners. ARAL respondents were from three types of institutions: (1) those for whom adult learners represent a primary thrust of…

  8. Recruiting and Retaining Teachers in a Rural School District: A Phenomenological Study of Rural Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Laura U.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative, phenomenological research study was to explore the effectiveness of programs and strategies used to recruit and retain highly qualified teachers in accordance with the No Child Left Behind Act (2001) from the perspective of highly qualified teachers in a rural school district in Central Virginia. The data…

  9. Shear bond strength of different retainer wires and bonding adhesives in consideration of the pretreatment process.

    PubMed

    Reicheneder, Claudia; Hofrichter, Bernd; Faltermeier, Andreas; Proff, Peter; Lippold, Carsten; Kirschneck, Christian

    2014-11-28

    We aimed to compare the shear bond strength (SBS) of three different retainer wires and three different bonding adhesives in consideration of the pretreatment process of enamel surface sandblasting. 400 extracted bovine incisors were divided into 10 groups of 20 paired specimens each. 10 specimens of each group were pretreated by enamel sandblasting. The retainer wires Bond-A-Braid™, GAC-Wildcat®-Twistflex and everStick®ORTHO were bonded to the teeth with the adhesives Transbond™-LR, Tetric-EvoFlow™ and Stick®FLOW and then debonded measuring the SBS. While sandblasting generally increased SBS for all tested combinations, the retainer wires bonded with Transbond™-LR showed the highest SBS both with and without prior sandblasting. Significantly lower SBS were found for Tetric-EvoFlow™ that were comparable to those for everStick®ORTHO. Pretreatment of enamel surfaces by sandblasting increased the SBS of all retainer-wires. Transbond™-LR showed the best results compared to Tetric-EvoFlow™ and everStick®ORTHO, while all combinations used provided sufficient bonding strengths for clinical use.

  10. Labeled leukocyte scans for detection of retained polyurethane foam

    SciTech Connect

    Ellenberger, P.; Graham, W.P. 3d.; Manders, E.K.; Basarab, R.M.

    1986-01-01

    Complete removal of an infected polyurethane-covered breast prosthesis is difficult, and retained tissue-embedded foam can form a nidus for persistent infection. Scanning the chest wall after administration of indium-111 oxine-labeled autogenous leukocytes will locate areas of infection around retained fragments of foam, thereby facilitating their removal and allowing eventual successful reconstruction. This technique may deserve wider application for locating infected foreign bodies in a variety of patient problems.

  11. Why Some Hope Scholarship Recipients Retain the Scholarship and Others Lose It

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trant, Eleanore C.; Crabtree, Katelyn E.; Ciancio, Dennis J.; Hart, Leslie A.; Watson, Tiffany B.; Williams, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    The study we report here examined parental, pre-course, and in-course predictors of students' probability of retaining (n = 136) or losing the HOPE scholarship (n = 41). The study was conducted in a multi-section, entry-level course (n = 203) for the Teacher-Education Program at a large state university in the southeastern U.S. Logistic regression…

  12. Reflections on Recruiting, Supporting, Retaining, Graduating, and Obtaining Employment for Doctoral Students from Diverse Backgrounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dieker, Lisa; Wienke, Wilfred; Straub, Carrie; Finnegan, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the authors provide a summary of the current techniques being used to recruit, retain, and support a diverse range of scholars, including students with disabilities, in a doctoral program. The manuscript provides a summary of the current need for leadership personnel who are scholars with knowledge in special education, general…

  13. Tapping the Potential: Retaining and Developing High-Quality New Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2010

    2010-01-01

    There is growing consensus that the single most important factor in determining student performance is the quality of the teacher. Therefore, if the national goal of providing an equitable education to children across this nation is to be met, it is critical that efforts be concentrated on developing and retaining high-quality teachers in every…

  14. E-Mentoring as a Means to Develop and Retain Expatriate Managers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Evan D.

    2007-01-01

    As globalization increases, many corporations are faced with sending managers to foreign countries. With the increase in expatriate managers, a critical issue must be addressed--the high failure rate of expatriates. The literature shows mentoring to be a critical component in developing and retaining expatriate managers. The growing discipline of…

  15. The Contradictory Roles of Institutional Status in Retaining Underrepresented Minorities in Biomedical and Behavioral Science Majors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Mitchell J.; Cerna, Oscar; Han, June; Saenz, Victor

    2008-01-01

    This study examines factors that contribute to the chances of retaining underrepresented minority (URM) students in an undergraduate biomedical or behavioral science major. Of particular interest is the extent to which institutional status, as related to undergraduate selectivity, student perceptions, and other institutional characteristics,…

  16. The Contradictory Roles of Institutional Status in Retaining Underrepresented Minorities in Biomedical and Behavioral Science Majors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Mitchell J.; Cerna, Oscar; Han, June; Saenz, Victor

    2008-01-01

    This study examines factors that contribute to the chances of retaining underrepresented minority (URM) students in an undergraduate biomedical or behavioral science major. Of particular interest is the extent to which institutional status, as related to undergraduate selectivity, student perceptions, and other institutional characteristics,…

  17. Why Some Hope Scholarship Recipients Retain the Scholarship and Others Lose It

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trant, Eleanore C.; Crabtree, Katelyn E.; Ciancio, Dennis J.; Hart, Leslie A.; Watson, Tiffany B.; Williams, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    The study we report here examined parental, pre-course, and in-course predictors of students' probability of retaining (n = 136) or losing the HOPE scholarship (n = 41). The study was conducted in a multi-section, entry-level course (n = 203) for the Teacher-Education Program at a large state university in the southeastern U.S. Logistic regression…

  18. Process Matters: Successes and Challenges of Recruiting and Retaining Participants for Nursing Education Research.

    PubMed

    Raymond, Christy; Profetto-McGrath, Joanne; Myrick, Florence; Strean, William B

    2017-07-15

    Researchers who study nursing education encounter difficulty when trying to recruit and retain nurse educator participants. Researchers would benefit from knowing more about effective and ineffective sampling strategies and methods to increase the efficiency of the research process. This article outlines the struggles and successes encountered with a mixed methods study that examined nurse educators' critical thinking. Specific examples are interwoven with current literature to uncover some important insights and future recommendations for researchers in nursing education.

  19. Anatomic study of the retaining ligaments of the face and applications for facial rejuvenation.

    PubMed

    Rossell-Perry, Percy; Paredes-Leandro, Percy

    2013-06-01

    The retaining ligaments of the face support the facial soft tissue in a normal anatomic position, thereby resisting gravitational change. In this study, a technique utilizing surgical plication of the superficial musculoaponeurotic system (SMAS) to the retaining ligaments of the face and finger-assisted malar elevation (FAME) dissection of the midface is presented. The anatomy of the facial retaining ligaments was studied in 20 half-faces of ten fresh cadavers, and the localization of the ligaments was examined macroscopically. Surgical correction of facial aging with plication of the SMAS to the retaining ligaments and FAME dissection of the midface has been performed in 74 face-lift patients since 2006. Outcomes were determined by case notes, clinical review, and a patient questionnaire. The studied ligaments (zygomatic and masseteric) were present in all cadaver dissections. The zygomatic ligament was located 4.3-5.5 cm from the tragus and originates near the inferior border of the anterior zygomatic arch. The masseteric ligament was located 3.7-5.2 cm from the tragus below the junction of the zygomatic arch and masseter muscle. All the patients answered a satisfaction questionnaire and reported high levels of satisfaction at least 1 year after treatment. We have identified the facial retaining ligaments in all cadaver dissections and their relationship with other structures of the face are described here. This study demonstrates that our face-lift technique is safe and produces highly predictable and natural results. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266 .

  20. Retained surgical sponges: findings from incident reports and a cost-benefit analysis of radiofrequency technology.

    PubMed

    Williams, Tamara L; Tung, Derrick K; Steelman, Victoria M; Chang, Phillip K; Szekendi, Marilyn K

    2014-09-01

    Retained surgical items (RSIs) are serious events with a high potential to harm patients. It is estimated that as many as 1 in 5,500 operations result in an RSI, and sponges are most commonly involved. The adverse outcomes, additional medical care needed, and medico-legal costs associated with these events are substantial. The objective of this analysis was to advance our understanding of the occurrence of RSIs, the methods of prevention, and the costs involved. Incident reports entered into the University HealthSystem Consortium (UHC) Safety Intelligence database on incorrect surgical counts and RSIs were analyzed. Reported cases of retained surgical sponges at organizations that use radiofrequency (RF) technology and those that do not were compared. A cost-benefit analysis on adopting RF technology was conducted. Five organizations that implemented RF technology between 2008 and 2012 collectively demonstrated a 93% reduction in the rate of reported retained surgical sponges. By comparison, there was a 77% reduction in the rate of retained sponges at 5 organizations that do not use RF technology. The UHC cost-benefit analysis showed that the savings in x-rays and time spent in the operating room and in the medical and legal costs that were avoided outweighed the expenses involved in using RF technology. Current standards for manual counting of sponges and the use of radiographs are not sufficient to prevent the occurrence of retained surgical sponges; our data support the use of adjunct technology. We recommend that hospitals evaluate and consider the use of an adjunct technology. Copyright © 2014 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.