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Sample records for emergency communications prior

  1. Disaster and emergency communications prior to computers/Internet: a review.

    PubMed

    Farnham, John W

    2006-02-01

    When communications are needed the most desperately and most urgently, the difficulty of effecting the desired communications increases exponentially. Recent natural disasters in different parts of the world have provided eloquent testament to this. The history of disaster or emergency communications can provide us with a foundation for understanding the problems encountered today, and can offer us insight into how we might improve the systems and processes for communications. The first applications of communication technology that allowed messages to be sent more rapidly than the fastest form of transportation were mainly military in origin. This review takes us from the days of optical or visual telegraphy, through the early development of mobile and radio communications, and up to the current sophisticated technologies. We pay particular attention to the use of amateur radio operators in times of emergency, and relate their activities to those of the most effective military communications. The germane assumption made in this discussion is that any emergency or disaster communications would necessarily be involved in response and resolution of medical aspects of those emergencies.

  2. Disaster and emergency communications prior to computers/Internet: a review

    PubMed Central

    Farnham, John W

    2006-01-01

    When communications are needed the most desperately and most urgently, the difficulty of effecting the desired communications increases exponentially. Recent natural disasters in different parts of the world have provided eloquent testament to this. The history of disaster or emergency communications can provide us with a foundation for understanding the problems encountered today, and can offer us insight into how we might improve the systems and processes for communications. The first applications of communication technology that allowed messages to be sent more rapidly than the fastest form of transportation were mainly military in origin. This review takes us from the days of optical or visual telegraphy, through the early development of mobile and radio communications, and up to the current sophisticated technologies. We pay particular attention to the use of amateur radio operators in times of emergency, and relate their activities to those of the most effective military communications. The germane assumption made in this discussion is that any emergency or disaster communications would necessarily be involved in response and resolution of medical aspects of those emergencies. PMID:16420649

  3. Integrating Emerging Topics through Online Team Design in a Hybrid Communication Networks Course: Interaction Patterns and Impact of Prior Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reisslein, Jana; Seeling, Patrick; Reisslein, Martin

    2005-01-01

    An important challenge in the introductory communication networks course in electrical and computer engineering curricula is to integrate emerging topics, such as wireless Internet access and network security, into the already content-intensive course. At the same time it is essential to provide students with experiences in online collaboration,…

  4. Emergency Communications Console

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    NASA has applied its communications equipment expertise to development of a communications console that provides, in a compact package only slightly larger than an electric typewriter, all the emergency medical services communications functions needed for a regional hospital. A prototype unit, built by Johnson Space Center, has been installed in the Odessa (Texas) Medical Center Hospital. The hospital is the medical control center for the 17-county Permian Basin Emergency Medical System in west Texas. The console project originated in response to a request to NASA from the Texas governor's office, which sought a better way of providing emergency medical care in rural areas. Because ambulance travel time is frequently long in remote areas of west Texas, it is important that treatment begin at the scene of the emergency rather than at the hospital emergency room. A radio and telephone system linking ambulance emergency technicians and hospital staff makes this possible. But earlier equipment was complex, requiring specialized operators. A highly reliable system was needed to minimize breakdowns and provide controls of utmost simplicity, so that the system could be operated by physicians and nurses rather than by communications specialists. The resulting console has both radio and telephone sections. With the radio equipment, hospital personnel can communicate with ambulance drivers and paramedics, receive incoming electrocardiagrams, consult with other hospitals, page hospital staff and set up a radio-to-telephone "patch." The telephone portion of the system includes a hotline from the Permian Basin Emergency Medical Service's resource control center, an automatic dialer for contacting special care facilities in the Permian Basin network, a hospital intercom terminal and a means of relaying cardioscope displays and other data between hospitals. The integrated system also provides links with local disaster and civil defense organizations and with emergency "Dial 911

  5. Digital communication constraints in prior space missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yassine, Nathan K.

    2004-01-01

    Digital communication is crucial for space endeavors. Jt transmits scientific and command data between earth stations and the spacecraft crew. It facilitates communications between astronauts, and provides live coverage during all phases of the mission. Digital communications provide ground stations and spacecraft crew precise data on the spacecraft position throughout the entire mission. Lessons learned from prior space missions are valuable for our new lunar and Mars missions set by our president s speech. These data will save our agency time and money, and set course our current developing technologies. Limitations on digital communications equipment pertaining mass, volume, data rate, frequency, antenna type and size, modulation, format, and power in the passed space missions are of particular interest. This activity is in support of ongoing communication architectural studies pertaining to robotic and human lunar exploration. The design capabilities and functionalities will depend on the space and power allocated for digital communication equipment. My contribution will be gathering these data, write a report, and present it to Communications Technology Division Staff. Antenna design is very carefully studied for each mission scenario. Currently, Phased array antennas are being developed for the lunar mission. Phased array antennas use little power, and electronically steer a beam instead of DC motors. There are 615 patches in the phased array antenna. These patches have to be modified to have high yield. 50 patches were created for testing. My part is to assist in the characterization of these patch antennas, and determine whether or not certain modifications to quartz micro-strip patch radiators result in a significant yield to warrant proceeding with repairs to the prototype 19 GHz ferroelectric reflect-array antenna. This work requires learning how to calibrate an automatic network, and mounting and testing antennas in coaxial fixtures. The purpose of this

  6. Digital communication constraints in prior space missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yassine, Nathan K.

    2004-01-01

    Digital communication is crucial for space endeavors. Jt transmits scientific and command data between earth stations and the spacecraft crew. It facilitates communications between astronauts, and provides live coverage during all phases of the mission. Digital communications provide ground stations and spacecraft crew precise data on the spacecraft position throughout the entire mission. Lessons learned from prior space missions are valuable for our new lunar and Mars missions set by our president s speech. These data will save our agency time and money, and set course our current developing technologies. Limitations on digital communications equipment pertaining mass, volume, data rate, frequency, antenna type and size, modulation, format, and power in the passed space missions are of particular interest. This activity is in support of ongoing communication architectural studies pertaining to robotic and human lunar exploration. The design capabilities and functionalities will depend on the space and power allocated for digital communication equipment. My contribution will be gathering these data, write a report, and present it to Communications Technology Division Staff. Antenna design is very carefully studied for each mission scenario. Currently, Phased array antennas are being developed for the lunar mission. Phased array antennas use little power, and electronically steer a beam instead of DC motors. There are 615 patches in the phased array antenna. These patches have to be modified to have high yield. 50 patches were created for testing. My part is to assist in the characterization of these patch antennas, and determine whether or not certain modifications to quartz micro-strip patch radiators result in a significant yield to warrant proceeding with repairs to the prototype 19 GHz ferroelectric reflect-array antenna. This work requires learning how to calibrate an automatic network, and mounting and testing antennas in coaxial fixtures. The purpose of this

  7. Evolutionary robotics: emergence of communication.

    PubMed

    Lipson, Hod

    2007-05-01

    The emergence of communication is considered one of the major transitions in evolution. Recent work using robot-based simulation shows that communication arises spontaneously. While deceptive communication arises in a purely competitive setting, cooperative communication arises only subject to group or kin selection.

  8. Emergency communications via airborne communications node

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niessen, Charles W.

    1997-02-01

    Natural disasters such as floods, hurricanes, and earthquakes invariably result in disruption of the commercial communications infrastructure and can severely impede the delivery of emergency services by local and federal agencies. In addition, the public's inability to communicate with commercial service providers can substantially slow the recovery process. Since wide-spread destruction of communications plant and distribution systems takes a long time to rebuild, an attractive alternative would be to provide communications connectivity through an airborne platform configured as a communication node. From a high altitude, a single aircraft could provide line of sight connectivity between users that are not within line of sight of each other, and could relay communications through ground or satellite gateways to the national PSTN. This capability could be used to substitute for multiple base stations for fire and police as well as military relief workers using their normal mobile communications gear. The airborne platform could also serve as a wide area base station to replace cellular phone towers that have been destroyed; this would enable civilian access to communications services from existing cellular phones, but could also be used by relief workers carrying low-cost commercial handsets. This paper examines the technical methods for achieving these goals, identifies the equipment needed on the airborne platform, and discusses the performance that could be expected.

  9. Rapidly deployable emergency communication system

    DOEpatents

    Gladden, Charles A.; Parelman, Martin H.

    1979-01-01

    A highly versatile, highly portable emergency communication system which permits deployment in a very short time to cover both wide areas and distant isolated areas depending upon mission requirements. The system employs a plurality of lightweight, fully self-contained repeaters which are deployed within the mission area to provide communication between field teams, and between each field team and a mobile communication control center. Each repeater contains a microcomputer controller, the program for which may be changed from the control center by the transmission of digital data within the audible range (300-3,000 Hz). Repeaters are accessed by portable/mobile transceivers, other repeaters, and the control center through the transmission and recognition of digital data code words in the subaudible range.

  10. 9 CFR 309.12 - Emergency slaughter; inspection prior to.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Emergency slaughter; inspection prior to. 309.12 Section 309.12 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT..., the animals shall be inspected immediately before slaughter, whether theretofore inspected or...

  11. 9 CFR 309.12 - Emergency slaughter; inspection prior to.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Emergency slaughter; inspection prior to. 309.12 Section 309.12 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT..., the animals shall be inspected immediately before slaughter, whether theretofore inspected or...

  12. 9 CFR 309.12 - Emergency slaughter; inspection prior to.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Emergency slaughter; inspection prior to. 309.12 Section 309.12 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT..., the animals shall be inspected immediately before slaughter, whether theretofore inspected or...

  13. 9 CFR 309.12 - Emergency slaughter; inspection prior to.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Emergency slaughter; inspection prior to. 309.12 Section 309.12 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT..., the animals shall be inspected immediately before slaughter, whether theretofore inspected or...

  14. 76 FR 41273 - National Emergency Communications Plan (NECP) Tribal Report

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-13

    ... SECURITY National Emergency Communications Plan (NECP) Tribal Report AGENCY: National Protection and... Directorate (NPPD), Office of Cybersecurity and Communications (CS&C), Office of Emergency Communications (OEC..., National Emergency Communications Plan Tribal Report. DHS previously published this ICR in the...

  15. 49 CFR 238.121 - Emergency communication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... provides a means for a train crewmember to communicate by voice to passengers of his or her train in an... voice to passengers of his or her train in an emergency situation. The PA system shall also provide a means for a train crewmember to communicate by voice in an emergency situation to persons in the...

  16. Prior image constrained image reconstruction in emerging computed tomography applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunner, Stephen T.

    Advances have been made in computed tomography (CT), especially in the past five years, by incorporating prior images into the image reconstruction process. In this dissertation, we investigate prior image constrained image reconstruction in three emerging CT applications: dual-energy CT, multi-energy photon-counting CT, and cone-beam CT in image-guided radiation therapy. First, we investigate the application of Prior Image Constrained Compressed Sensing (PICCS) in dual-energy CT, which has been called "one of the hottest research areas in CT." Phantom and animal studies are conducted using a state-of-the-art 64-slice GE Discovery 750 HD CT scanner to investigate the extent to which PICCS can enable radiation dose reduction in material density and virtual monochromatic imaging. Second, we extend the application of PICCS from dual-energy CT to multi-energy photon-counting CT, which has been called "one of the 12 topics in CT to be critical in the next decade." Numerical simulations are conducted to generate multiple energy bin images for a photon-counting CT acquisition and to investigate the extent to which PICCS can enable radiation dose efficiency improvement. Third, we investigate the performance of a newly proposed prior image constrained scatter correction technique to correct scatter-induced shading artifacts in cone-beam CT, which, when used in image-guided radiation therapy procedures, can assist in patient localization, and potentially, dose verification and adaptive radiation therapy. Phantom studies are conducted using a Varian 2100 EX system with an on-board imager to investigate the extent to which the prior image constrained scatter correction technique can mitigate scatter-induced shading artifacts in cone-beam CT. Results show that these prior image constrained image reconstruction techniques can reduce radiation dose in dual-energy CT by 50% in phantom and animal studies in material density and virtual monochromatic imaging, can lead to radiation

  17. Risk communication for public health emergencies.

    PubMed

    Glik, Deborah C

    2007-01-01

    This review defines crisis risk communication, traces its origins to a number of applied fields, and then shows how basic principles have become incorporated into emergency preparedness and risk communication for public health. Literature from four different disciplines that inform crisis risk communications are reviewed. These are (a) environmental risk communication, (b) disaster management, (c) health promotion and communication, and (d) media and communication studies. Current curricula and training materials are briefly reviewed. Although this literature review suggests much progress has been made to incorporate and disseminate crisis risk communication principles into public health practice, and case studies suggest that public health workers have gained skills and experience, this emerging field still lacks in-depth evaluation of the effectiveness of event-specific crisis risk communication efforts.

  18. Short communication: emerging transmitted HIV type 1 drug resistance mutations among patients prior to start of first-line antiretroviral therapy in middle and low prevalence sites in China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xia; He, Cui; Xing, Hui; Liao, Lingjie; Xu, Xiaoqin; He, Jianmei; Liu, Yong; Ling, Hua; Liang, Shu; Hsi, Jenny H; Ruan, Yuhua; Shao, Yiming

    2012-12-01

    It is known that transmitted drug resistance (TDR) will most likely emerge in regions where antiretroviral therapy (ART) has been widely available for years. However, after a decade of rapid scale-up of ART in China, there are few data regarding TDR among HIV-infected patients prior to initiating first-line ART in China. A prospective, observational cohort study was performed at sentinel sites in five provinces or municipalities. Study participants were recruited at the county- or city-level centers for disease control (CDCs), during routine monitoring visits following referral from diagnosing parties (e.g., hospitals). Each province or municipality recruited 140 patients through sequential sampling throughout the 2011 calendar year. A total of 627 eligible subjects were included in the analysis. the median CD4(+) cell count was 206 cells/ml at the baseline survey. The majority of patients (93.5%) had plasma HIV viral load ≥1,000 copies/ml. Of the 627 patients, 17 (2.7%) had drug resistance mutations for any type of HIV drugs. The prevalence of drug resistance mutations to nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) drugs (8/627, 1.3%) was higher than to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) drugs (5/627, 0.8%) and protease inhibitor (PI) drugs (4/627, 0.6%). A logistic regression model showed that the only predictive factor was the route of infection through homosexual intercourse, i.e., men who have sex with men (MSM) status. As HIV prevalence is rising rapidly among Chinese MSM, it is essential to continue surveying this risk group and related high-risk populations with low awareness of HIV, and to develop new public health interventions that help to reduce the spread of drug-resistant HIV.

  19. Research on artificial meteor trail emergency communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juntao, Liu; Xijun, Yan; Li, Jia

    As the particles known as meteors enter the earth's atmosphere, a small fraction of which can form ionized cloud, this ionized cloud has property useful for reflecting electromagnetic wave. Meteor burst communication is a point to point communication technology base on the above principle. Similarly, artificial meteor trail communication establishes “ionized cloud” signal channel by alkali metal ionizing at high-altitude ionosphere to reflect electromagnetic waves. Currently, Meteor burst communication is a mature communication technology with many advantages. However, as a completely uncontrollable natural phenomena, the communication time, duration time, the amount of information transmitted and antenna alignment direction are all uncontrollable. We can only figure out key parameters such as throughput and waiting time within a certain time relying on statistical regularities. Information transmission between specified sites in certain time is impossible to predict accurately. These disadvantages greatly reduce the dependability of meteor trail communication and cannot meet emergency communication’s requirements for real-time, controllable and uninterrupted. Artificial meteor trail emergency communication technology solves the above problems, it’s a reliable emergency telecommunication method. This paper focuses on the necessity and feasibility of artificial meteor trail emergency communication technology, as well as its future application.

  20. Inflatable Antennas Support Emergency Communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Glenn Research Center awarded Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts to ManTech SRS Technologies, of Newport Beach, California, to develop thin film inflatable antennas for space communication. With additional funding, SRS modified the concepts for ground-based inflatable antennas. GATR (Ground Antenna Transmit and Receive) Technologies, of Huntsville, Alabama, licensed the technology and refined it to become the world s first inflatable antenna certified by the Federal Communications Commission. Capable of providing Internet access, voice over Internet protocol, e-mail, video teleconferencing, broadcast television, and other high-bandwidth communications, the systems have provided communication during the wildfires in California, after Hurricane Katrina in Mississippi, and following the 2010 Haiti earthquake.

  1. 49 CFR 238.121 - Emergency communication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... in the following individually applied accelerations: (i) Longitudinal: 8g; (ii) Lateral: 4g; and (iii) Vertical: 4g; and (3) Powering each system to allow intermittent emergency communication for a minimum...

  2. Emerging Communication Technologies (ECT) Phase 4 Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bastin, Gary L.; Harris, William G.; Marin, Jose A.; Nelson, Richard A.

    2005-01-01

    The Emerging Communication Technology (ECT) project investigated three First Mile communication technologies in support of NASA s Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV), Advanced Range Technology Working Group (ARTWG), and the Advanced Spaceport Technology Working Group (ASTWG). These First Mile technologies have the purpose of interconnecting mobile users with existing Range Communication infrastructures on a 24/7 basis. ECT is a continuation of the Range Information System Management (RISM) task started in 2002. This is the fourth year of the project.

  3. A resource for teaching emergency care communication.

    PubMed

    Macqueen, Susy; Woodward-Kron, Robyn; Flynn, Eleanor; Reid, Katharine; Elliott, Kristine; Slade, Diana

    2016-06-01

    Communication in emergency departments (EDs), often between several health professionals and patients and relatives, is a major cause of patient complaint and error; however, communication-skills teaching for medical students largely focuses on individual clinician-patient interactions. We developed and implemented an evidence-informed online resource, Communication for Health in Emergency Contexts (CHEC; http://www.chec.meu.medicine.unimelb.edu.au/resources) to raise medical students' awareness of the challenges of communication in the ED, and to provide students with communication strategies for addressing these challenges. The foundation of the CHEC resource was the findings and data from a large research project conducted at five emergency departments in Australia over the period 2006-2009. From this, we developed ED scenarios and teaching vignettes using authentic communication data. The project included a nationwide medical curriculum scoping phase, involving interviews with medical students and educators, on ED communication curriculum needs in order to inform the educational activities. The CHEC resource provides students with the opportunity to follow real-life scenarios through all stages of the ED journey, whereas insights from ED medical and nursing staff provide learning opportunities about interprofessional communication for medical students. Evaluation suggests that students find the resource useful, and that the resource has been successfully embedded in medical and junior doctor training on communication and quality and safety. The CHEC resource enhances the capacity of busy clinical educators to raise students' awareness of the communication needs of emergency health care by focusing on communication in high-stress, time-pressured settings using a web format. The CHEC resource provides students with the opportunity to follow real-life scenarios through all stages of the ED journey. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Emergency Communications for NASA's Deep Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shambayati, Shervin; Lee, Charles H.; Morabito, David D.; Cesarone, Robert J.; Abraham, Douglas S.

    2011-01-01

    The ability to communicate with spacecraft during emergencies is a vital service that NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) provides to all deep space missions. Emergency communications is characterized by low data rates(typically is approximately10 bps) with the spacecraft using either a low-gain antenna (LGA, including omnidirectional antennas) or,in some cases, a medium-gain antenna (MGA). Because of the use of LGAs/MGAs for emergency communications, the transmitted power requirements both on the spacecraft andon the ground are substantially greater than those required for normal operations on the high-gain antenna (HGA) despite the lower data rates. In this paper, we look at currentand future emergency communications capabilities available to NASA's deep-space missions and discuss their limitations in the context of emergency mode operations requirements.These discussions include the use of the DSN 70-m diameter antennas, the use of the 34-m diameter antennas either alone or arrayed both for the uplink (Earth-to-spacecraft) and the downlink (spacecraft-to-Earth), upgrades to the ground transmitters, and spacecraft power requirements both with unitygain (0 dB) LGAs and with antennas with directivity (>0 dB gain, either LGA or MGA, depending on the gain). Also discussed are the requirements for forward-error-correctingcodes for both the uplink and the downlink. In additional, we introduce a methodology for proper selection of a directionalLGA/MGA for emergency communications.

  5. Emergency Communications for NASA's Deep Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shambayati, Shervin; Lee, Charles H.; Morabito, David D.; Cesarone, Robert J.; Abraham, Douglas S.

    2011-01-01

    The ability to communicate with spacecraft during emergencies is a vital service that NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) provides to all deep space missions. Emergency communications is characterized by low data rates(typically is approximately10 bps) with the spacecraft using either a low-gain antenna (LGA, including omnidirectional antennas) or,in some cases, a medium-gain antenna (MGA). Because of the use of LGAs/MGAs for emergency communications, the transmitted power requirements both on the spacecraft andon the ground are substantially greater than those required for normal operations on the high-gain antenna (HGA) despite the lower data rates. In this paper, we look at currentand future emergency communications capabilities available to NASA's deep-space missions and discuss their limitations in the context of emergency mode operations requirements.These discussions include the use of the DSN 70-m diameter antennas, the use of the 34-m diameter antennas either alone or arrayed both for the uplink (Earth-to-spacecraft) and the downlink (spacecraft-to-Earth), upgrades to the ground transmitters, and spacecraft power requirements both with unitygain (0 dB) LGAs and with antennas with directivity (>0 dB gain, either LGA or MGA, depending on the gain). Also discussed are the requirements for forward-error-correctingcodes for both the uplink and the downlink. In additional, we introduce a methodology for proper selection of a directionalLGA/MGA for emergency communications.

  6. Analyzing Options for Airborne Emergency Wireless Communications

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Schmitt; Juan Deaton; Curt Papke; Shane Cherry

    2008-03-01

    In the event of large-scale natural or manmade catastrophic events, access to reliable and enduring commercial communication systems is critical. Hurricane Katrina provided a recent example of the need to ensure communications during a national emergency. To ensure that communication demands are met during these critical times, Idaho National Laboratory (INL) under the guidance of United States Strategic Command has studied infrastructure issues, concerns, and vulnerabilities associated with an airborne wireless communications capability. Such a capability could provide emergency wireless communications until public/commercial nodes can be systematically restored. This report focuses on the airborne cellular restoration concept; analyzing basic infrastructure requirements; identifying related infrastructure issues, concerns, and vulnerabilities and offers recommended solutions.

  7. Emergence of Leadership in Communication.

    PubMed

    Allahverdyan, Armen E; Galstyan, Aram

    2016-01-01

    We study a neuro-inspired model that mimics a discussion (or information dissemination) process in a network of agents. During their interaction, agents redistribute activity and network weights, resulting in emergence of leader(s). The model is able to reproduce the basic scenarios of leadership known in nature and society: laissez-faire (irregular activity, weak leadership, sizable inter-follower interaction, autonomous sub-leaders); participative or democratic (strong leadership, but with feedback from followers); and autocratic (no feedback, one-way influence). Several pertinent aspects of these scenarios are found as well-e.g., hidden leadership (a hidden clique of agents driving the official autocratic leader), and successive leadership (two leaders influence followers by turns). We study how these scenarios emerge from inter-agent dynamics and how they depend on behavior rules of agents-in particular, on their inertia against state changes.

  8. Emergence of Leadership in Communication

    PubMed Central

    Allahverdyan, Armen E.; Galstyan, Aram

    2016-01-01

    We study a neuro-inspired model that mimics a discussion (or information dissemination) process in a network of agents. During their interaction, agents redistribute activity and network weights, resulting in emergence of leader(s). The model is able to reproduce the basic scenarios of leadership known in nature and society: laissez-faire (irregular activity, weak leadership, sizable inter-follower interaction, autonomous sub-leaders); participative or democratic (strong leadership, but with feedback from followers); and autocratic (no feedback, one-way influence). Several pertinent aspects of these scenarios are found as well—e.g., hidden leadership (a hidden clique of agents driving the official autocratic leader), and successive leadership (two leaders influence followers by turns). We study how these scenarios emerge from inter-agent dynamics and how they depend on behavior rules of agents—in particular, on their inertia against state changes. PMID:27532484

  9. Communication skills training for emergency medicine residents.

    PubMed

    Cinar, Orhan; Ak, Mehmet; Sutcigil, Levent; Congologlu, Emel Dovyap; Canbaz, Hayri; Kilic, Erden; Ozmenler, Kamil Nahit

    2012-02-01

    To determine the effects of a communication skills training program on emergency medicine residents and patient satisfaction. Twenty emergency medicine residents attended a 6-week psychoeducation program that was intended to improve their communication skills. The first three sessions of the psychoeducation program consisted of theoretical education on empathy and communication. Other sessions covered awareness, active communication, and empathic skills on a cognitive behavioral basis using discussion, role play, and homework within an interactive group. The effects of the program were assessed using a communication skills scale, empathy scale, and patient satisfaction survey and were reflected by the reduction in the number of undesirable events between doctors and patients in the emergency department. The mean communication skills score increased from 178.7±19 to 189.2±16 after training (P<0.02). Empathy score also increased from 29.5±9 to 30.7±8, but this difference was not statistically significant (P=0.1). The patient satisfaction survey of 576 patients demonstrated increased scores on confidence in the doctor (88.2±14.6-93.6±10.3; P<0.01); the doctor's respect, kindness, and thoughtfulness (90.3±10.8-94.1±16.5; P<0.01); individualized attention (86.7±9.4-93.9±11.1; P<0.01); devotion of adequate time to listening (88.6±12.3-90.8±14.1; P=0.04); and counseling and information delivery (90.1±11.3-92.2±11.7; P=0.02). The number of undesirable events between doctors and patients decreased 75% from 12 to three. Participation in a communication skills training program was associated with improved communication skills of emergency medicine residents, increased patient satisfaction, and decreased complaints.

  10. Improving communication between emergency department staff.

    PubMed

    Moore, Kate

    2014-05-01

    During redevelopment of the emergency department at the Royal Sussex County Hospital, Brighton, it was deemed vital that its internal communication system should be as effective as possible. An audit of staff perceptions of the existing communication system and a relevant literature review were undertaken, therefore, to inform a proposal for the development of a new online system. This article describes the development and implementation of the system.

  11. 75 FR 67807 - Pipeline Safety: Emergency Preparedness Communications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-03

    ... Communications AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA); DOT. ACTION: Notice... Hazardous Liquid and Gas Pipeline Systems. Subject: Emergency Preparedness Communications. Advisory: To... preparedness communications between pipeline operators and emergency responders. To ensure a prompt,...

  12. Experiments on the emergence of human communication.

    PubMed

    Steels, Luc

    2006-08-01

    Children learn language from their parents and then use the acquired system throughout the rest of their life with little change. At least that is commonly assumed. But a recent paper by Galantucci adds to the growing evidence that adults (and children) are able to create and negotiate complex communication systems from scratch and relatively quickly, without a prior model. This raises questions of what cognitive mechanisms are implied in this joint construction of communication systems, and what the implications are for the origins of human language.

  13. The emergence of communication in evolutionary robots.

    PubMed

    Marocco, Davide; Cangelosi, Angelo; Nolfi, Stefano

    2003-10-15

    Evolutionary robotics is a biologically inspired approach to robotics that is advantageous to studying the evolution of communication. A new model for the emergence of communication is developed and tested through various simulation experiments. In the first simulation, the emergence of simple signalling behaviour is studied. This is used to investigate the inter-relationships between communication abilities, namely linguistic production and comprehension, and other behavioural skills. The model supports the hypothesis that the ability to form categories from direct interaction with an environment constitutes the grounds for subsequent evolution of communication and language. In the second simulation, evolutionary robots are used to study the emergence of simple syntactic categories, e.g. action names (verbs). Comparisons between the two simulations indicate that the signalling lexicon emerged in the first simulation follows the evolutionary pattern of nouns, as observed in related models on the evolution of syntactic categories. Results also support the language-origin hypothesis on the fact that nouns precede verbs in both phylogenesis and ontogenesis. Further extensions of this new evolutionary robotic model for testing hypotheses on language origins are also discussed.

  14. Signalling signalhood and the emergence of communication.

    PubMed

    Scott-Phillips, Thomas C; Kirby, Simon; Ritchie, Graham R S

    2009-11-01

    A unique hallmark of human language is that it uses signals that are both learnt and symbolic. The emergence of such signals was therefore a defining event in human cognitive evolution, yet very little is known about how such a process occurs. Previous work provides some insights on how meaning can become attached to form, but a more foundational issue is presently unaddressed. How does a signal signal its own signalhood? That is, how do humans even know that communicative behaviour is indeed communicative in nature? We introduce an experimental game that has been designed to tackle this problem. We find that it is commonly resolved with a bootstrapping process, and that this process influences the final form of the communication system. Furthermore, sufficient common ground is observed to be integral to the recognition of signalhood, and the emergence of dialogue is observed to be the key step in the development of a system that can be employed to achieve shared goals.

  15. Better communication in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Burley, Duncan

    2011-05-01

    The emergency nurse practitioner (ENP) role has evolved since the 1980s, when it was introduced into emergency departments (EDs) in the UK (Tye 1997). Nowadays, ENPs see, treat and refer or discharge patients autonomously. They also document patient histories and are expected to communicate effectively with patients who have complex needs. The role has expanded for several reasons, including the need to reduce doctors' working hours, but mainly to make more flexible use of services. Meanwhile, as ED attendances increase (Thompson et aL 2010), ENPs are placed under increasing pressure and may be forced to spend less time with patients than was expected of them when the ENP role was originally devised. This can affect patient history taking and communication, and may lead to poorer patient outcomes and satisfaction. This article concerns a literature review undertaken by the author to identify and overcome the limitations to effective history taking and communication among ENPs. It also highlights good practice in the management of emergency and urgent-care patients with complex needs. There is little primary research on history taking and communication pressures in emergency care but, after a systematic literature search of the British Nursing Index, CINAHL and Medline databases, the author identified eight research articles on the subject. Three themes emerged from the review: interruptions, overload and barriers. According to the review findings, interruptions occur more often in EDs than in primary care settings, and senior doctors and senior nurses are interrupted more often than other staff. These interruptions can increase information overload, leading to medical errors and adverse clinical outcomes. The main barrier to effective history taking is a failure to understand patients who have poor command of the English language. The author's recommendations for practice include increasing the number of staff and training them in managing pressure, communicating

  16. 23 CFR 636.406 - Are communications allowed prior to establishing the competitive range?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Are communications allowed prior to establishing the competitive range? 636.406 Section 636.406 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING AND TRAFFIC OPERATIONS DESIGN-BUILD CONTRACTING Exchanges § 636.406 Are communications allowed prior to establishing the...

  17. Nanotechnology risk perceptions and communication: emerging technologies, emerging challenges.

    PubMed

    Pidgeon, Nick; Harthorn, Barbara; Satterfield, Terre

    2011-11-01

    Nanotechnology involves the fabrication, manipulation, and control of materials at the atomic level and may also bring novel uncertainties and risks. Potential parallels with other controversial technologies mean there is a need to develop a comprehensive understanding of processes of public perception of nanotechnology uncertainties, risks, and benefits, alongside related communication issues. Study of perceptions, at so early a stage in the development trajectory of a technology, is probably unique in the risk perception and communication field. As such it also brings new methodological and conceptual challenges. These include: dealing with the inherent diversity of the nanotechnology field itself; the unfamiliar and intangible nature of the concept, with few analogies to anchor mental models or risk perceptions; and the ethical and value questions underlying many nanotechnology debates. Utilizing the lens of social amplification of risk, and drawing upon the various contributions to this special issue of Risk Analysis on Nanotechnology Risk Perceptions and Communication, nanotechnology may at present be an attenuated hazard. The generic idea of "upstream public engagement" for emerging technologies such as nanotechnology is also discussed, alongside its importance for future work with emerging technologies in the risk communication field.

  18. Emerging technologies for communication satellite payloads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yüceer, Mehmet

    2012-04-01

    Recent developments in payload designs will allow more flexible and efficient use of telecommunication satellites. Important modifications in repeater designs, antenna structures and spectrum policies open up exciting opportunities for GEO satellites to support a variety of emerging applications, ranging from telemedicine to real-time data transfer between LEO satellite and ground station. This study gives information about the emerging technologies in the design of communication satellites' transceiver subsystem and demonstrates the feasibility of using fiber optic links for the local oscillator distribution in future satellite payloads together with the optical inter-satellite link.

  19. 23 CFR 636.406 - Are communications allowed prior to establishing the competitive range?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Are communications allowed prior to establishing the competitive range? 636.406 Section 636.406 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... allowed prior to establishing the competitive range? Yes, prior to establishing the competitive range,...

  20. 23 CFR 636.406 - Are communications allowed prior to establishing the competitive range?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Are communications allowed prior to establishing the competitive range? 636.406 Section 636.406 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... allowed prior to establishing the competitive range? Yes, prior to establishing the competitive range,...

  1. Interactive emergency communication involving persons in crisis.

    PubMed

    Nordby, Halvor; Nøhr, Øyvind

    2009-01-01

    We studied the dialogue between telephone operators at medical emergency communication centres in Norway and parents of children later diagnosed with sudden infant death syndrome. The aim was to understand how the parents experienced the communication with the telephone operators. The qualitative method involved semi-structured interviews. We interviewed six respondents from urban areas and five from rural areas. An important finding was that all the parents were satisfied with the resuscitation instructions they received. It was also perceived as important that the emergency operators expressed empathy and care. We believe that it is not merely the quality of the resuscitation attempts that the operators' efforts should be measured against. It is also important that the operators provide good explanations and express emotional support. Our findings indicate that this will be enormously appreciated, even if callers do not feel that they are capable of performing optimum resuscitation.

  2. Complexities of emergency communication: clinicians' perceptions of communication challenges in a trilingual emergency department.

    PubMed

    Pun, Jack Kh; Chan, Engle Angela; Murray, Kristen A; Slade, Diana; Matthiessen, Christian Mim

    2016-12-21

    To understand the challenges that clinicians face in communicating with patients and other clinicians within a Hong Kong trilingual emergency department. Effective communication has long been recognised as fundamental to the delivery of quality health care, especially in high-risk and time-constrained environments such as emergency departments. The issue of effective communication is particularly relevant in Hong Kong emergency departments, due to the high volume of patients and the linguistic complexity of this healthcare context. In Hong Kong, emergency department clinicians are native speakers of Chinese, but have received their medical training in English. The clinicians read and record virtually all of their medical documentation in English, yet they communicate verbally with patients in Cantonese and Mandarin. In addition, communication between clinicians occurs in spoken Cantonese, mixed with medical English. Thus, medical information is translated numerous times within one patient journey. This complex linguistic environment creates the potential for miscommunication. A mixed-methods design consisting of a quantitative survey with a sequential qualitative interview. Data were collected in a survey from a purposive sample of 58 clinicians and analysed through descriptive statistics. Eighteen of the clinicians were then invited to take part in semi-structured interviews, the data from which were then subjected to a manifest content analysis. Nearly half of the clinicians surveyed believed that medical information may be omitted or altered through repeated translation in a trilingual emergency department. Eighty-three per cent of clinicians stated that there are communication problems at triage. Over 40% said that they have difficulties in documenting medical information. Around 50% believed that long work hours reduced their ability to communicate effectively with patients. In addition, 34% admitted that they rarely or never listen to patients during a

  3. Commentary: Emerging and other communicable diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Heymann, D.; Dzenowagis, J.

    1998-01-01

    There is an increasing need for integrated, sustainable; and cost-effective approaches to the management of infectious diseases. For example, an emerging disease in one country may already be endemic in another country but nearing elimination in a third. A coordinated approach by WHO towards infectious diseases is therefore needed that will facilitate more effective support of on-going efforts for the prevention and control of endemic diseases, intensify efforts against those diseases targeted for eradication and elimination, and result in better preparedness and response to new and re-emerging diseases. In order to meet these challenges, WHO has created a new Programme on Communicable Diseases (CDS), which will replace the former Division of Emerging and other Communicable Diseases (EMC). The new Programme will better integrate surveillance, prevention, control, and research over the whole spectrum of communicable diseases. CDS will function as focal point for global data and information exchange on infectious diseases, and inter alia, will reinforce laboratory-based surveillance of bacterial, viral, and zoonotic diseases to ensure early detection of threats to international public health. Changes in susceptibility to infectious disease, increased opportunities for infection, and the ability of microbes to adapt rapidly will continue to challenge WHO to improve prevention and control of infectious diseases in the future by establishing strong partnerships with both the private and public sectors. PMID:10191549

  4. 23 CFR 636.406 - Are communications allowed prior to establishing the competitive range?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING AND TRAFFIC OPERATIONS DESIGN-BUILD CONTRACTING Exchanges § 636.406 Are communications... 23 Highways 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Are communications allowed prior to establishing the... may conduct communications to: (a) Enhance your understanding of proposals; (b) Allow reasonable...

  5. 23 CFR 636.406 - Are communications allowed prior to establishing the competitive range?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING AND TRAFFIC OPERATIONS DESIGN-BUILD CONTRACTING Exchanges § 636.406 Are communications... 23 Highways 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Are communications allowed prior to establishing the... may conduct communications to: (a) Enhance your understanding of proposals; (b) Allow reasonable...

  6. Subjective visual awareness emerges prior to P3.

    PubMed

    Koivisto, Mika; Salminen-Vaparanta, Niina; Grassini, Simone; Revonsuo, Antti

    2016-06-01

    Studies on the neural basis of visual awareness, the subjective experience of seeing, have found several potential neural correlates of visual awareness. Some of them may not directly correlate with awareness but with post-perceptual processes, such as reporting one's awareness of the stimulus. We dissociated potential electrophysiological correlates of visual awareness from those occurring during response selection and thus co-occurring with post-perceptual processing. The participants performed two GO-NOGO conditions. In the aware-GO condition they responded with a key press when they were aware of the stimulus and withheld responding when they were unaware of it. In the unaware-GO condition they withheld responding when they were aware and responded when they were not aware of the stimulus. Thus, event-related potentials could be measured to aware and unaware trials when responding was required and when not required. The results revealed that the N200 amplitude (180-280 ms) over the occipital and posterior temporal cortex was enhanced in aware trials as compared with trials without awareness. This effect (visual awareness negativity, VAN) did not depend on responding. The amplitude of P3 (350-450 ms) also was enhanced in aware trials as compared with unaware trials. In addition, the amplitudes in the P3 time window depended on responding: they were greater when awareness was mapped to GO-response than when not, suggesting that P3 reflects post-perceptual processing, that is, it occurs after awareness has emerged. These findings support theories of visual awareness that assume a relatively early onset of visual awareness before P3.

  7. Communication monitoring: shaping CDC's emergency risk communication efforts.

    PubMed

    Prue, Christine E; Lackey, Cheryl; Swenarski, Lisa; Gantt, Judy M

    2003-01-01

    CDC develops and delivers health messages for a variety of audiences, including the public, health care professionals, public health researchers and practitioners, and policy makers. News media outlets--because of their broad reach and potential to influence knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors--are major channels for disseminating messages to these audiences. CDC has routinely monitored news outlets to identify message/information gaps and opportunities. The 9/11 terrorist attacks and the anthrax incidents that followed required CDC to transform its media monitoring system into a broader communication monitoring system, with both listening and telling functions, to support CDC's public health emergency response.

  8. Short communication: emerging technologies for biometeorology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehdipoor, Hamed; Vanos, Jennifer K.; Zurita-Milla, Raul; Cao, Guofeng

    2017-09-01

    The first decade of the twenty-first century saw remarkable technological advancements for use in biometeorology. These emerging technologies have allowed for the collection of new data and have further emphasized the need for specific and/or changing systems for efficient data management, data processing, and advanced representations of new data through digital information management systems. This short communication provides an overview of new hardware and software technologies that support biometeorologists in representing and understanding the influence of atmospheric processes on living organisms.

  9. Short communication: emerging technologies for biometeorology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehdipoor, Hamed; Vanos, Jennifer K.; Zurita-Milla, Raul; Cao, Guofeng

    2017-07-01

    The first decade of the twenty-first century saw remarkable technological advancements for use in biometeorology. These emerging technologies have allowed for the collection of new data and have further emphasized the need for specific and/or changing systems for efficient data management, data processing, and advanced representations of new data through digital information management systems. This short communication provides an overview of new hardware and software technologies that support biometeorologists in representing and understanding the influence of atmospheric processes on living organisms.

  10. Directional Navigation Improves Opportunistic Communication for Emergencies

    PubMed Central

    Kokuti, Andras.; Gelenbe, Erol.

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel direction based shortest path search algorithm to guide evacuees during an emergency. It uses opportunistic communications (oppcomms) with low-cost wearable mobile nodes that can exchange packets at close range of a few to some tens of meters without help of an infrastructure. The algorithm seeks the shortest path to exits which are safest with regard to a hazard, and is integrated into an autonomous Emergency Support System (ESS) to guide evacuees in a built environment. The algorithm proposed that ESSs are evaluated with the DBES (Distributed Building Evacuation Simulator) by simulating a shopping centre where fire is spreading. The results show that the directional path finding algorithm can offer significant improvements for the evacuees. PMID:25140633

  11. Prior Knowledge Facilitates Mutual Gaze Convergence and Head Nodding Synchrony in Face-to-face Communication

    PubMed Central

    Thepsoonthorn, C.; Yokozuka, T.; Miura, S.; Ogawa, K.; Miyake, Y.

    2016-01-01

    As prior knowledge is claimed to be an essential key to achieve effective education, we are interested in exploring whether prior knowledge enhances communication effectiveness. To demonstrate the effects of prior knowledge, mutual gaze convergence and head nodding synchrony are observed as indicators of communication effectiveness. We conducted an experiment on lecture task between lecturer and student under 2 conditions: prior knowledge and non-prior knowledge. The students in prior knowledge condition were provided the basic information about the lecture content and were assessed their understanding by the experimenter before starting the lecture while the students in non-prior knowledge had none. The result shows that the interaction in prior knowledge condition establishes significantly higher mutual gaze convergence (t(15.03) = 6.72, p < 0.0001; α = 0.05, n = 20) and head nodding synchrony (t(16.67) = 1.83, p = 0.04; α = 0.05, n = 19) compared to non-prior knowledge condition. This study reveals that prior knowledge facilitates mutual gaze convergence and head nodding synchrony. Furthermore, the interaction with and without prior knowledge can be evaluated by measuring or observing mutual gaze convergence and head nodding synchrony. PMID:27910902

  12. Achieving Reliable Communication in Dynamic Emergency Responses

    PubMed Central

    Chipara, Octav; Plymoth, Anders N.; Liu, Fang; Huang, Ricky; Evans, Brian; Johansson, Per; Rao, Ramesh; Griswold, William G.

    2011-01-01

    Emergency responses require the coordination of first responders to assess the condition of victims, stabilize their condition, and transport them to hospitals based on the severity of their injuries. WIISARD is a system designed to facilitate the collection of medical information and its reliable dissemination during emergency responses. A key challenge in WIISARD is to deliver data with high reliability as first responders move and operate in a dynamic radio environment fraught with frequent network disconnections. The initial WIISARD system employed a client-server architecture and an ad-hoc routing protocol was used to exchange data. The system had low reliability when deployed during emergency drills. In this paper, we identify the underlying causes of unreliability and propose a novel peer-to-peer architecture that in combination with a gossip-based communication protocol achieves high reliability. Empirical studies show that compared to the initial WIISARD system, the redesigned system improves reliability by as much as 37% while reducing the number of transmitted packets by 23%. PMID:22195075

  13. A Scoping Review: Communication Between Emergency Physicians and Patients in the Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Roh, HyeRin; Park, Kyung Hye

    2016-05-01

    Understanding the basic qualities of communication between emergency physicians and patients could improve communication in the emergency department. The objectives of this scoping review are to map the literature about the gaps in communication between emergency physicians and patients in the emergency department and make recommendations for further research. A scoping review of literature published since 1980 and written in English was undertaken using the following databases: Pubmed, Scopus, and SocINDEX. The articles were searched for using two-keyword combinations of the following keywords joined by "AND": "communication," "patient," "emergency physician," "emergency department/emergency room/accident," and "emergency room." Seventeen articles were included in the final review. Five research issues were covered by the 17 papers: patient-centered communication, information sharing, bad news delivery, shared decision making, and physicians' perspectives on communication. Emergency physicians have several communication characteristics: doctor-driven decision making, focusing on efficient information gathering, immature communication techniques, and obstacles to overcoming miscommunication. Patients also have several communication characteristics: active participation in medical encounters, expectation of physician as a reliable guide, understanding physicians' difficulties, and factors that contribute to understanding. Several conclusions about emergency department communication between patients and emergency physicians were drawn. Additional research is required to consider diverse patient needs in the emergency department. Furthermore, training programs for emergency physicians to improve the quality of communication should be developed and implemented in line with our research findings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. 33 CFR 144.01-40 - Emergency communications equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Emergency communications... Emergency communications equipment. On manned platforms means of communication by radio and/or wire telephone shall be provided for contacting the shore or vessels in the vicinity for aid in the event of...

  15. Seropositive individuals willingness to communicate, self-efficacy, and assertiveness prior to HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Crowell, Tara L

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine possible communication similarities between human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positive and HIV negative individuals. Forty HIV positive heterosexuals, who were infected through heterosexual sex, completed an on-line questionnaire to assess their safer sexual communication, willingness to communicate, condom self-efficacy, and assertiveness prior to HIV infection. Results indicate that prior to infection, HIV positive heterosexuals reported having similar safer sexual communication behaviors to those not infected with the virus. Participants in this study reported high levels of willingness to engage in safer sex communication, but low levels of actual communication. Further, results reveal that participants who engaged more often in safer sex communication were more likely to use condoms. Additionally, participants reported high levels of condom self-efficacy and moderate levels of assertiveness; both variables positively correlated with condom use. Finally, participants reported that they believed they did not need to discuss using condoms because they were not at risk. Previous safer sexual communication research reveals HIV negative individuals reported engaging in the same behaviors and holding the same beliefs reported by seropositive individuals. Hence, discussion of the importance of safer sexual communication and the utility of personalization to increase the communication of HIV negative individuals is explored.

  16. Evaluating emergency risk communications: a dialogue with the experts.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Craig W; Vanderford, Marsha L; Crouse Quinn, Sandra

    2008-10-01

    Evaluating emergency risk communications is fraught with challenges since communication can be approached from both a systemic and programmatic level. Therefore, one must consider stakeholders' perspectives, effectiveness issues, standards of evidence and utility, and channels of influence (e.g., mass media and law enforcement). Evaluation issues related to timing, evaluation questions, methods, measures, and accountability are raised in this dialogue with emergency risk communication specialists. Besides the usual evaluation competencies, evaluators in this area need to understand and work collaboratively with stakeholders and be attuned to the dynamic contextual nature of emergency risk communications. Sample resources and measures are provided here to aid in this emerging and exciting field of evaluation.

  17. Helicopter emergency medical service scene communications made easy.

    PubMed

    Koval, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Narrowbanding has caused numerous communication issues. The solution is to use a mutual aid frequency like 123.025. That frequency is 155.3400, and every helicopter emergency medical service operator and emergency medical service agency should name this frequency as "EMS [Emergency Medical Services] Mutual Aid" and preset this frequency for all helicopter emergency medical service scene operations.

  18. 76 FR 2700 - National Protection and Programs Directorate; National Emergency Communications Plan (NECP) Goal...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-14

    ... points of contact (police, fire, emergency medical services, emergency managers, dispatchers, radio... SECURITY National Protection and Programs Directorate; National Emergency Communications Plan (NECP) Goal 2... Communications (CS&C)/Office of Emergency Communications (OEC) will submit the following Information...

  19. Development and Testing of Emergency Department Patient Transfer Communication Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klingner, Jill; Moscovice, Ira

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Communication problems are a major contributing factor to adverse events in hospitals. The contextual environment in small rural hospitals increases the importance of emergency department (ED) patient transfer communication quality. This study addresses the communication problems through the development and testing of ED quality…

  20. Development and Testing of Emergency Department Patient Transfer Communication Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klingner, Jill; Moscovice, Ira

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Communication problems are a major contributing factor to adverse events in hospitals. The contextual environment in small rural hospitals increases the importance of emergency department (ED) patient transfer communication quality. This study addresses the communication problems through the development and testing of ED quality…

  1. Crisis and emergency risk communication as an integrative model.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Barbara; W Seeger, Matthew

    2005-01-01

    This article describes a model of communication known as crisis and emergency risk communication (CERC). The model is outlined as a merger of many traditional notions of health and risk communication with work in crisis and disaster communication. The specific kinds of communication activities that should be called for at various stages of disaster or crisis development are outlined. Although crises are by definition uncertain, equivocal, and often chaotic situations, the CERC model is presented as a tool health communicators can use to help manage these complex events.

  2. Effective communication of public health guidance to emergency department clinicians in the setting of emerging incidents: a qualitative study and framework.

    PubMed

    Khan, Yasmin; Sanford, Sarah; Sider, Doug; Moore, Kieran; Garber, Gary; de Villa, Eileen; Schwartz, Brian

    2017-04-28

    Evidence to inform communication between emergency department clinicians and public health agencies is limited. In the context of diverse, emerging public health incidents, communication is urgent, as emergency department clinicians must implement recommendations to protect themselves and the public. The objectives of this study were to: explore current practices, barriers and facilitators at the local level for communicating public health guidance to emergency department clinicians in emerging public health incidents; and develop a framework that promotes effective communication of public health guidance to clinicians during emerging incidents. A qualitative study was conducted using semi-structured interviews with 26 key informants from emergency departments and public health agencies in Ontario, Canada. Data were analyzed inductively and the analytic approach was guided by concepts of complexity theory. Emergent themes corresponded to challenges and strategies for effective communication of public health guidance. Important challenges related to the coordination of communication across institutions and jurisdictions, and differences in work environments across sectors. Strategies for effective communication were identified as the development of partnerships and collaboration, attention to specific methods of communication used, and the importance of roles and relationship-building prior to an emerging public health incident. Following descriptive analysis, a framework was developed that consists of the following elements: 1) Anticipate; 2) Invest in building relationships and networks; 3) Establish liaison roles and redundancy; 4) Active communication; 5) Consider and respond to the target audience; 6) Leverage networks for coordination; and 7) Acknowledge and address uncertainty. The qualities inherent in local relationships cut across framework elements. This research indicates that relationships are central to effective communication between public health

  3. Risk communications and the Chemical Stockpile Emergency-Planning Program

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, B.M.; Sorensen, J.H.

    1994-09-01

    The CSEPP (Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program) was created to improve emergency planning and response capabilities at the eight sites around the country that store chemical weapons. These weapons are scheduled to be destroyed in the near future. In preparation of the Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (DPEIS) for the Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program (CSDP), it was proposed that the Army mitigate accidents through an enhanced community emergency preparedness program at the eight storage sites. In 1986, the Army initiated the development of an Emergency Response Concept Plan (ERCP) for the CSDP, one of 12 technical support studies conducted during preparation of the Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (FPEIS). The purpose of this document is to provide a fairly comprehensive source book on risk, risk management, risk communication research and recommended risk communication practices. It does not merely summarize each publication in the risk communication literature, but attempts to synthesize them along the lines of a set of organizing principles. Furthermore, it is not intended to duplicate other guidance manuals (such as Covello et al.`s manual on risk comparison). The source book was developed for the CSEPP in support of the training module on risk communications. Although the examples provided are specific to CSEPP, its use goes beyond that of CSEPP as the findings apply to a broad spectrum of risk communication topics. While the emphasis is on communication in emergency preparedness and response specific to the CSEPP, the materials cover other non-emergency communication settings. 329 refs.

  4. Enabling Communication in Emergency Response Environments

    PubMed Central

    Aldunate, Roberto G.; Schmidt, Klaus Nicholas; Herrera, Oriel

    2012-01-01

    Effective communication among first responders during response to natural and human-made large-scale catastrophes has increased tremendously during the last decade. However, most efforts to achieve a higher degree of effectiveness in communication lack synergy between the environment and the technology involved to support first responders operations. This article presents a natural and intuitive interface to support Stigmergy; or communication through the environment, based on intuitively marking and retrieving information from the environment with a pointer. A prototype of the system was built and tested in the field, however the pointing activity revealed challenges regarding accuracy due to limitations of the sensors used. The results obtained from these field tests were the basis for this research effort and will have the potential to enable communication through the environment for first responders operating in highly dynamical and inhospitable disaster relief environments. PMID:22778647

  5. 76 FR 22114 - National Emergency Communications Plan (NECP) Tribal Report

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY National Emergency Communications Plan (NECP) Tribal Report AGENCY: National Protection and Programs Directorate, DHS. ACTION: 60-Day Notice and request for comments; New Information Collection...

  6. An Experimental Study of the Emergence of Human Communication Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galantucci, Bruno

    2005-01-01

    The emergence of human communication systems is typically investigated via 2 approaches with complementary strengths and weaknesses: naturalistic studies and computer simulations. This study was conducted with a method that combines these approaches. Pairs of participants played video games requiring communication. Members of a pair were…

  7. An Experimental Study of the Emergence of Human Communication Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galantucci, Bruno

    2005-01-01

    The emergence of human communication systems is typically investigated via 2 approaches with complementary strengths and weaknesses: naturalistic studies and computer simulations. This study was conducted with a method that combines these approaches. Pairs of participants played video games requiring communication. Members of a pair were…

  8. DETECTION OF THE HORIZONTAL DIVERGENT FLOW PRIOR TO THE SOLAR FLUX EMERGENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Toriumi, S.; Yokoyama, T.; Hayashi, K.

    2012-06-01

    It is widely accepted that solar active regions including sunspots are formed by the emerging magnetic flux from the deep convection zone. In previous numerical simulations, we found that the horizontal divergent flow (HDF) occurs before the flux emergence at the photospheric height. This paper reports the HDF detection prior to the flux emergence of NOAA AR 11081, which is located away from the disk center. We use SDO/HMI data to study the temporal changes of the Doppler and magnetic patterns from those of the reference quiet Sun. As a result, the HDF appearance is found to come before the flux emergence by about 100 minutes. Also, the horizontal speed of the HDF during this time gap is estimated to be 0.6-1.5 km s{sup -1}, up to 2.3 km s{sup -1}. The HDF is caused by the plasma escaping horizontally from the rising magnetic flux. And the interval between the HDF and the flux emergence may reflect the latency during which the magnetic flux beneath the solar surface is waiting for the instability onset to the further emergence. Moreover, SMART H{alpha} images show that the chromospheric plages appear about 14 minutes later, located cospatial with the photospheric pores. This indicates that the plages are caused by plasma flowing down along the magnetic fields that connect the pores at their footpoints. One important result of observing the HDF may be the possibility of predicting the sunspot appearances that occur in several hours.

  9. Operative team communication during simulated emergencies: Too busy to respond?

    PubMed

    Davis, W Austin; Jones, Seth; Crowell-Kuhnberg, Adrianna M; O'Keeffe, Dara; Boyle, Kelly M; Klainer, Suzanne B; Smink, Douglas S; Yule, Steven

    2017-05-01

    Ineffective communication among members of a multidisciplinary team is associated with operative error and failure to rescue. We sought to measure operative team communication in a simulated emergency using an established communication framework called "closed loop communication." We hypothesized that communication directed at a specific recipient would be more likely to elicit a check back or closed loop response and that this relationship would vary with changes in patients' clinical status. We used the closed loop communication framework to code retrospectively the communication behavior of 7 operative teams (each comprising 2 surgeons, anesthesiologists, and nurses) during response to a simulated, postanesthesia care unit "code blue." We identified call outs, check backs, and closed loop episodes and applied descriptive statistics and a mixed-effects negative binomial regression to describe characteristics of communication in individuals and in different specialties. We coded a total of 662 call outs. The frequency and type of initiation and receipt of communication events varied between clinical specialties (P < .001). Surgeons and nurses initiated fewer and received more communication events than anesthesiologists. For the average participant, directed communication increased the likelihood of check back by at least 50% (P = .021) in periods preceding acute changes in the clinical setting, and exerted no significant effect in periods after acute changes in the clinical situation. Communication patterns vary by specialty during a simulated operative emergency, and the effect of directed communication in eliciting a response depends on the clinical status of the patient. Operative training programs should emphasize the importance of quality communication in the period immediately after an acute change in the clinical setting of a patient and recognize that communication patterns and needs vary between members of multidisciplinary operative teams. Copyright

  10. Cerebral coherence between communicators marks the emergence of meaning.

    PubMed

    Stolk, Arjen; Noordzij, Matthijs L; Verhagen, Lennart; Volman, Inge; Schoffelen, Jan-Mathijs; Oostenveld, Robert; Hagoort, Peter; Toni, Ivan

    2014-12-23

    How can we understand each other during communicative interactions? An influential suggestion holds that communicators are primed by each other's behaviors, with associative mechanisms automatically coordinating the production of communicative signals and the comprehension of their meanings. An alternative suggestion posits that mutual understanding requires shared conceptualizations of a signal's use, i.e., "conceptual pacts" that are abstracted away from specific experiences. Both accounts predict coherent neural dynamics across communicators, aligned either to the occurrence of a signal or to the dynamics of conceptual pacts. Using coherence spectral-density analysis of cerebral activity simultaneously measured in pairs of communicators, this study shows that establishing mutual understanding of novel signals synchronizes cerebral dynamics across communicators' right temporal lobes. This interpersonal cerebral coherence occurred only within pairs with a shared communicative history, and at temporal scales independent from signals' occurrences. These findings favor the notion that meaning emerges from shared conceptualizations of a signal's use.

  11. Communication in Hong Kong Accident and Emergency Departments

    PubMed Central

    Chandler, Eloise; Pun, Jack; Lock, Graham; Matthiessen, Christian M. I. M.; Espindola, Elaine; Ng, Carman

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we report findings from the first qualitatively driven study of patient–clinician communication in Hong Kong Accident and Emergency Departments (AEDs). In light of the Hong Kong Hospital Authority’s policy emphasis on patient-centered care and communication in the public hospitals it oversees, we analyze clinicians’ perceptions of the role and relevance of patient-centered communication strategies in emergency care. Although aware of the importance of effective communication in emergency care, participants discussed how this was frequently jeopardized by chronic understaffing, patient loads, and time pressures. This was raised in relation to the absence of spoken interdisciplinary handovers, the tendency to downgrade interpersonal communication with patients, and the decline in staff attendance at communication training courses. Participants’ frequent descriptions of patient-centered communication as dispensable from, and time-burdensome in, AEDs highlight a discrepancy between the stated Hong Kong Hospital Authority policy of patient-centered care and the reality of contemporary Hong Kong emergency practice. PMID:28462303

  12. Signalling Signalhood and the Emergence of Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott-Phillips, Thomas C.; Kirby, Simon; Ritchie, Graham R. S.

    2009-01-01

    A unique hallmark of human language is that it uses signals that are both learnt and symbolic. The emergence of such signals was therefore a defining event in human cognitive evolution, yet very little is known about how such a process occurs. Previous work provides some insights on how meaning can become attached to form, but a more foundational…

  13. Signalling Signalhood and the Emergence of Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott-Phillips, Thomas C.; Kirby, Simon; Ritchie, Graham R. S.

    2009-01-01

    A unique hallmark of human language is that it uses signals that are both learnt and symbolic. The emergence of such signals was therefore a defining event in human cognitive evolution, yet very little is known about how such a process occurs. Previous work provides some insights on how meaning can become attached to form, but a more foundational…

  14. Efficient implementation of bipartite nonlocal unitary gates using prior entanglement and classical communication

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Li; Griffiths, Robert B.; Cohen, Scott M.

    2010-06-15

    Any bipartite nonlocal unitary operation can be carried out by teleporting a quantum state from one party to the other, performing the unitary gate locally, and teleporting a state back again. This paper investigates unitaries which can be carried out using less prior entanglement and classical communication than are needed for teleportation. Large families of such unitaries are constructed using (projective) representations of finite groups. Among the tools employed are: a diagrammatic approach for representing entangled states, a theorem on the necessary absence of information at certain times and locations, and a representation of bipartite unitaries based on a group Fourier transform.

  15. An experimental study of the emergence of human communication systems.

    PubMed

    Galantucci, Bruno

    2005-09-10

    The emergence of human communication systems is typically investigated via 2 approaches with complementary strengths and weaknesses: naturalistic studies and computer simulations. This study was conducted with a method that combines these approaches. Pairs of participants played video games requiring communication. Members of a pair were physically separated but exchanged graphic signals through a medium that prevented the use of standard symbols (e.g., letters). Communication systems emerged and developed rapidly during the games, integrating the use of explicit signs with information implicitly available to players and silent behavior-coordinating procedures. The systems that emerged suggest 3 conclusions: (a) signs originate from different mappings; (b) sign systems develop parsimoniously; (c) sign forms are perceptually distinct, easy to produce, and tolerant to variations.

  16. Communicating the threat of emerging infections to the public.

    PubMed

    Freimuth, V; Linnan, H W; Potter, P

    2000-01-01

    Communication theory and techniques, aided by the electronic revolution, provide new opportunities and challenges for the effective transfer of laboratory, epidemiologic, surveillance, and other public health data to the public who funds them. We review the applicability of communication theory, particularly the audience-source-message-channel meta-model, to emerging infectious disease issues. Emergence of new infectious organisms, microbial resistance to therapeutic drugs, and increased emphasis on prevention have expanded the role of communication as a vital component of public health practice. In the absence of cure, as in AIDS and many other public health problems, an effectively crafted and disseminated prevention message is the key control measure. Applying communication theory to disease prevention messages can increase the effectiveness of the messages and improve public health.

  17. Communicating the threat of emerging infections to the public.

    PubMed Central

    Freimuth, V.; Linnan, H. W.; Potter, P.

    2000-01-01

    Communication theory and techniques, aided by the electronic revolution, provide new opportunities and challenges for the effective transfer of laboratory, epidemiologic, surveillance, and other public health data to the public who funds them. We review the applicability of communication theory, particularly the audience-source-message-channel meta-model, to emerging infectious disease issues. Emergence of new infectious organisms, microbial resistance to therapeutic drugs, and increased emphasis on prevention have expanded the role of communication as a vital component of public health practice. In the absence of cure, as in AIDS and many other public health problems, an effectively crafted and disseminated prevention message is the key control measure. Applying communication theory to disease prevention messages can increase the effectiveness of the messages and improve public health. PMID:10905966

  18. Evolutionary conditions for the emergence of communication in robots.

    PubMed

    Floreano, Dario; Mitri, Sara; Magnenat, Stéphane; Keller, Laurent

    2007-03-20

    Information transfer plays a central role in the biology of most organisms, particularly social species [1, 2]. Although the neurophysiological processes by which signals are produced, conducted, perceived, and interpreted are well understood, the conditions conducive to the evolution of communication and the paths by which reliable systems of communication become established remain largely unknown. This is a particularly challenging problem because efficient communication requires tight coevolution between the signal emitted and the response elicited [3]. We conducted repeated trials of experimental evolution with robots that could produce visual signals to provide information on food location. We found that communication readily evolves when colonies consist of genetically similar individuals and when selection acts at the colony level. We identified several distinct communication systems that differed in their efficiency. Once a given system of communication was well established, it constrained the evolution of more efficient communication systems. Under individual selection, the ability to produce visual signals resulted in the evolution of deceptive communication strategies in colonies of unrelated robots and a concomitant decrease in colony performance. This study generates predictions about the evolutionary conditions conducive to the emergence of communication and provides guidelines for designing artificial evolutionary systems displaying spontaneous communication.

  19. Synchronization of follicular wave emergence prior to superovulation in Bactrian camel (Camelus bactrianus).

    PubMed

    Nikjou, D; Niasari-Naslaji, A; Skidmore, J A; Mogheiseh, A; Razavi, K; Gerami, A; Ghanbari, A

    2008-03-01

    This study was conducted to synchronize follicle wave emergence prior to superovulation using either GnRH or progestogen treatments, in Bactrian camels. GnRH group camels (n=5) received 20 microg of the GnRH analogue Buserelin on Days -18 and -4 of the experiment (initiation of superovulation=Day 0). Camels in the progestogen group (n=5) received two consecutive treatments of progestogens, 7 days apart, on Days -14 and -8 of the experiment. On each occasion, each female received three norgestomet implants and 200mg progesterone (i.m.) and all implants were removed 14 days after the first progestogen treatment coinciding with Day -1 of superovulation. A combination of eCG and FSH was used to induce superovulation and the growth of all subsequent follicles and CLs were monitored daily by ultrasonography. Following the first GnRH injection, mature follicles ovulated within 1-2 days, and a new follicle wave emerged after 3+/-0.77 days. At the time of the second GnRH injection, a mature follicle (15.6+/-0.97 mm) ovulated and a new follicular wave emerged between 1 and 2 days after GnRH injection. Growing follicles at the time of the first progestogen treatment became either atretic (n=1) or persistent (n=4) and a new follicle wave (n=3) emerged 3-6 days later. At the initiation of superovulation, the diameters of the largest follicle in GnRH and progestogen groups were 7.4+/-0.59 and 20.5+/-2.26 mm, respectively but after superovulation and mating there was no significant differences in the number of unovulated follicles or CLs between groups. In conclusion, two GnRH injections, 14 days apart, may be used to synchronize follicle wave emergence in Bactrian camel.

  20. Network analysis of team communication in a busy emergency department

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Emergency Department (ED) is consistently described as a high-risk environment for patients and clinicians that demands colleagues quickly work together as a cohesive group. Communication between nurses, physicians, and other ED clinicians is complex and difficult to track. A clear understanding of communications in the ED is lacking, which has a potentially negative impact on the design and effectiveness of interventions to improve communications. We sought to use Social Network Analysis (SNA) to characterize communication between clinicians in the ED. Methods Over three-months, we surveyed to solicit the communication relationships between clinicians at one urban academic ED across all shifts. We abstracted survey responses into matrices, calculated three standard SNA measures (network density, network centralization, and in-degree centrality), and presented findings stratified by night/day shift and over time. Results We received surveys from 82% of eligible participants and identified wide variation in the magnitude of communication cohesion (density) and concentration of communication between clinicians (centralization) by day/night shift and over time. We also identified variation in in-degree centrality (a measure of power/influence) by day/night shift and over time. Conclusions We show that SNA measurement techniques provide a comprehensive view of ED communication patterns. Our use of SNA revealed that frequency of communication as a measure of interdependencies between ED clinicians varies by day/night shift and over time. PMID:23521890

  1. 76 FR 22115 - National Emergency Communications Plan (NECP) Goal 2 Performance Report

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-20

    ... points of contact (police, fire, emergency medical services, emergency managers, dispatchers, radio... SECURITY National Emergency Communications Plan (NECP) Goal 2 Performance Report AGENCY: National... Programs Directorate (NPPD), Office of Cybersecurity and Communications (CS&C), Office of...

  2. Toward Ubiquitous Communication Platform for Emergency Medical Care

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishibashi, Kenichi; Morishima, Naoto; Kanbara, Masayuki; Sunahara, Hideki; Imanishi, Masami

    Interaction between emergency medical technicians (EMTs) and doctors is essential in emergency medical care. Doctors require diverse information related to a patient to provide efficient aid. In 2005, we started the Ikoma119 project and have developed a ubiquitous communication platform for emergency medical care called Mobile ER. Our platform, which is based on wireless internet technology, has such desirable properties as low-cost, location-independent service, and ease of service introduction. We provide an overview of our platform and describe the services that we have developed. We also discuss the remaining issues to realize our platform's actual operation.

  3. The application of mobile satellite services to emergency response communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freibaum, J.

    1980-01-01

    The application of an integrated satellite/terrestrial emergency response communications system in disaster relief operations is discussed. Large area coverage communications capability, full-time availability, a high degree of mobility, plus reliability, are pointed out as criteria for an effective emergency communications system. Response time is seen as a major factor determining the possible survival and/or protection of property. These criteria, can not be met by existing communications systems and complete blackouts were experienced during the past decades caused by either interruption or destruction of existing power lines, and overload or inadequacy of remaining lines. Several emergency cases, caused by either hurricanes, tornados, or floods, during which communication via satellite was instrumental to inform rescue and relief teams, are described in detail. Seismic Risk Maps and charts of Major Tectonic Plates Earthquake Epicenters are given, and it is noted that, 35 percent of the U.S. population is living in critical areas. National and international agreements for the implementation of a satellite-aided global Search and Rescue Program is mentioned. Technological and economic breakthroughs are still needed in large multibeam antennas, switching circuits, and low cost mobile ground terminals. A pending plan of NASA to initiate a multiservice program in 1982/83, with a Land Mobile Satellite capability operating in the 806 - 890 MHz band as a major element, may help to accelerate the needed breakthroughs.

  4. Information transfer during contingency operations: Emergency air-ground communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, R. F.

    1981-01-01

    Safety related problems are reported which occur as a consequence of information transfer deficiencies that arise when air/ground communications are (or should be) used as a resource in inflight emergency situations. The system factors, the human errors, and the associated causes of these problem are defined.

  5. [Communicative process in the mobile emergency service (SAMU/192)].

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Maria Claudia; Bernardes, Andrea; Gabriel, Carmen Silvia; Evora, Yolanda Dora Martinez; Rocha, Fernanda Ludmilla Rossi

    2012-03-01

    This study aims to characterize the communication process among nursing assistants who work in vehicles of the basic life support of the mobile emergency service, in the coordination of this service, and in the unified medical regulation service in a city of the state of São Paulo, Brazil. This descriptive and qualitative research used the thematic content analysis for data analysis. Semi-structured interviews were used for the data collection, which was held in January, 2010. Results show diffculties in communication with both the medical regulation service and the coordination. Among the most highlighted aspects are failures during the radio transmission, lack of qualified radio operators, difficult access to the coordination and lack of supervision by nurses. However, it was possible to detect solutions that aim to improve the communication ana consequently, the service offered by the mobile emergency service.

  6. Communicable diseases in complex emergencies: impact and challenges.

    PubMed

    Connolly, Máire A; Gayer, Michelle; Ryan, Michael J; Salama, Peter; Spiegel, Paul; Heymann, David L

    Communicable diseases, alone or in combination with malnutrition, account for most deaths in complex emergencies. Factors promoting disease transmission interact synergistically leading to high incidence rates of diarrhoea, respiratory infection, malaria, and measles. This excess morbidity and mortality is avoidable as effective interventions are available. Adequate shelter, water, food, and sanitation linked to effective case management, immunisation, health education, and disease surveillance are crucial. However, delivery mechanisms are often compromised by loss of health staff, damage to infrastructure, insecurity, and poor co-ordination. Although progress has been made in the control of specific communicable diseases in camp settings, complex emergencies affecting large geographical areas or entire countries pose a greater challenge. Available interventions need to be implemented more systematically in complex emergencies with higher levels of coordination between governments, UN agencies, and non-governmental organisations. In addition, further research is needed to adapt and simplify interventions, and to explore novel diagnostics, vaccines, and therapies.

  7. The Effects of Source Credibility in the Presence or Absence of Prior Attitudes: Implications for the Design of Persuasive Communication Campaigns1

    PubMed Central

    Kumkale, G. Tarcan; AlbarracÍn, Dolores; Seignourel, Paul J.

    2011-01-01

    Most theories of persuasion predict that limited ability and motivation to think about communications should increase the impact of source credibility on persuasion. Furthermore, this effect is assumed to occur, regardless of whether or not the recipients have prior attitudes. In this study, the effects of source credibility, ability, and motivation (knowledge, message repetition, relevance) on persuasion were examined meta-analytically across both attitude formation and change conditions. Findings revealed that the Source Credibility × Ability/Motivation interaction emerged only when participants lacked prior attitudes and were unable to form a new attitude based on the message content. In such settings, the effects of source credibility decayed rapidly. The implications of these findings for applied communication campaigns are discussed. PMID:21625405

  8. The Effects of Source Credibility in the Presence or Absence of Prior Attitudes: Implications for the Design of Persuasive Communication Campaigns.

    PubMed

    Kumkale, G Tarcan; Albarracín, Dolores; Seignourel, Paul J

    2010-06-01

    Most theories of persuasion predict that limited ability and motivation to think about communications should increase the impact of source credibility on persuasion. Furthermore, this effect is assumed to occur, regardless of whether or not the recipients have prior attitudes. In this study, the effects of source credibility, ability, and motivation (knowledge, message repetition, relevance) on persuasion were examined meta-analytically across both attitude formation and change conditions. Findings revealed that the Source Credibility × Ability/Motivation interaction emerged only when participants lacked prior attitudes and were unable to form a new attitude based on the message content. In such settings, the effects of source credibility decayed rapidly. The implications of these findings for applied communication campaigns are discussed.

  9. Emerging Communication Technologies (ECT) Phase 2 Report. Volume 2; Appendices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bastin, Gary L.; Harris, William G.; Chiodini, Robert; Nelson, Richard A.; Huang, PoTien; Kruhm, David A.

    2003-01-01

    The Emerging Communication Technology (ECT) project investigated three First Mile communication technologies in support of NASA s Second Generation Reusable Launch Vehicle (2nd Gen RLV), Orbital Space Plane, Advanced Range Technology Working Group (ARTWG) and the Advanced Spaceport Technology Working Group (ASTWG). These First Mile technologies have the purpose of interconnecting mobile users with existing Range Communication infrastructures. ECT was a continuation of the Range Information System Management (RISM) task started in 2002. RISM identified the three advance communication technologies investigated under ECT. These were Wireless Ethernet (Wi-Fi), Free Space Optics (FSO), and Ultra Wideband (UWB). Due to the report s size, it has been broken into three volumes: 1) Main Report 2) Appendices 3) UWB

  10. Emerging Communication Technologies (ECT) Phase 3 Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bastin, Gary L.; Harris, William G.; Bates, Lakesha D.; Nelson, Richard A.

    2004-01-01

    The Emerging Communication Technology (ECT) project investigated three First Mile communication technologies in support of NASA s Second Generation Reusable Launch Vehicle (2nd Gen RLV), Orbital Space Plane, Advanced Range Technology Working Group (ARTWG) and the Advanced Spaceport Technology Working Group (ASTWG). These First Mile technologies have the purpose of interconnecting mobile users with existing Range Communication infrastructures. ECT was a continuation of the Range Information System Management (RISM) task started in 2002. RISM identified the three advance communication technologies investigated under ECT. These were Wireless Ethernet (Wi-Fi), Free Space Optics (FSO), and Ultra Wideband (UWB). Due to the report s size, it has been broken into three volumes: 1) Main Report 2) Appendices 3) UWB.

  11. A Randomized Controlled Trial of a Comprehensive Migraine Intervention Prior to Discharge From an Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Benjamin W.; Solorzano, Clemencia; Norton, Jennifer; Adewumni, Victoria; Campbell, Caron M.; Esses, David; Bijur, Polly E.; Solomon, Seymour; Lipton, Richard B.; Gallagher, E. John

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Patients who use an emergency department (ED) for acute migraine headaches have higher migraine disability scores and lower socioeconomic status and are unlikely to have used a migraine-specific medication prior to presentation to the ED. The objective was to determine if a comprehensive migraine intervention, delivered just prior to ED discharge, could improve migraine impact scores 1 month after the ED visit. Methods This was a randomized controlled trial of a comprehensive migraine intervention versus typical care among patients who presented to an ED for management of acute migraine. At the time of discharge, for patients randomized to comprehensive care, the authors’ protocol reinforced their diagnosis, shared a migraine education presentation from the National Library of Medicine, provided them with six tablets of sumatriptan 100 mg and 14 tablets of naproxen 500 mg, and if they wished, provided them with an expedited free appointment to our institution's headache clinic. Patients randomized to typical care received the care their attending emergency physicians (EPs) felt was appropriate. The primary outcome was a between-group comparison of the Headache Impact Test (HIT-6) score, a validated headache assessment instrument, 1 month after ED discharge. Secondary outcomes included an assessment of satisfaction with headache care and frequency of use of migraine-specific medication within that 1-month period. Results Over a 19-month period, 50 migraine patients were enrolled. One-month follow-up was successfully obtained in 92% of patients. Baseline characteristics were comparable. One-month HIT-6 scores in the two groups were nearly identical (59 vs. 56, 95% confidence interval [CI] for difference of 3 = –5 to 11), as was dissatisfaction with overall headache care (17% vs. 18%, 95% CI for difference of 1% = –22% to 24%). Patients randomized to the comprehensive intervention were more likely to be using triptans or migraine-specific therapy (43

  12. Impact of Prior Therapeutic Opioid Use by Emergency Department Providers on Opioid Prescribing Decisions

    PubMed Central

    Pomerleau, Adam C.; Perrone, Jeanmarie; Hoppe, Jason A.; Salzman, Matthew; Weiss, Paul S.; Nelson, Lewis S.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Our study sought to examine the opioid analgesic (OA) prescribing decisions of emergency department (ED) providers who have themselves used OA therapeutically and those who have not. A second objective was to determine if OA prescribing decisions would differ based on the patient’s relationship to the provider. Methods We distributed an electronic survey to a random sample of ED providers at participating centers in a nationwide research consortium. Question topics included provider attitudes about OA prescribing, prior personal therapeutic use of OAs (indications, dosing, and disposal of leftover medication), and hypothetical analgesic-prescribing decisions for their patients, family members, and themselves for different painful conditions. Results The total survey population was 957 individuals; 515 responded to the survey, a 54% response rate. Prior personal therapeutic OA use was reported in 63% (95% CI = [58–68]). A majority of these providers (82%; 95% CI = [77–87]) took fewer than half the number of pills prescribed. Regarding provider attitudes towards OA prescribing, 66% (95% CI = [61–71]) agreed that OA could lead to addiction even with short-term use. When providers were asked if they would prescribe OA to a patient with 10/10 pain from an ankle sprain, 21% (95% CI = [17–25]) would for an adult patient, 13% (95% CI = [10–16]) would for an adult family member, and 6% (95% CI = [4–8]) indicated they themselves would take an opioid for the same pain. When the scenario involved an ankle fracture, 86% (95% CI = [83–89]) would prescribe OA for an adult patient, 75% (95% CI = [71–79]) for an adult family member, and 52% (95% CI = [47–57]) would themselves take OA. Providers who have personally used OA to treat their pain were found to make similar prescribing decisions compared to those who had not. Conclusion No consistent differences in prescribing decisions were found between ED providers based on their prior therapeutic use

  13. Impact on patient outcome of emergency department length of stay prior to ICU admission.

    PubMed

    García-Gigorro, R; de la Cruz Vigo, F; Andrés-Esteban, E M; Chacón-Alves, S; Morales Varas, G; Sánchez-Izquierdo, J A; Montejo González, J C

    2017-05-01

    The favorable evolution of critically ill patients is often dependent on time-sensitive care intervention. The timing of transfer to the intensive care unit (ICU) therefore may be an important determinant of outcomes in critically ill patients. The aim of this study was to analyze the impact upon patient outcome of the length of stay in the Emergency Care Department. A single-center ambispective cohort study was carried out. A general ICU and Emergency Care Department (ED) of a single University Hospital. We included 269 patients consecutively transferred to the ICU from the ED over an 18-month period. Patients were first grouped into different cohorts based on ED length of stay (LOS), and were then divided into two groups: (a) ED LOS ≤5h and (b) ED LOS >5h. Demographic, diagnostic, length of stay and mortality data were compared among the groups. Median ED LOS was 277min (IQR 129-622). Patients who developed ICU complications had a longer ED LOS compared to those who did not (349min vs. 209min, p<0.01). A total of 129 patients (48%) had ED LOS >5h. The odds ratio of dying for patients with ED LOS >5h was 2.5 (95% CI 1.3-4.7). Age and sepsis diagnosis were the risk factors associated to prolongation of ED length of stay. A prolonged ED stay prior to ICU admission is related to the development of time-dependent complications and increased mortality. These findings suggest possible benefit from earlier ICU transfer and the prompt initiation of organ support. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  14. Cerebral coherence between communicators marks the emergence of meaning

    PubMed Central

    Stolk, Arjen; Noordzij, Matthijs L.; Verhagen, Lennart; Volman, Inge; Schoffelen, Jan-Mathijs; Oostenveld, Robert; Hagoort, Peter; Toni, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    How can we understand each other during communicative interactions? An influential suggestion holds that communicators are primed by each other’s behaviors, with associative mechanisms automatically coordinating the production of communicative signals and the comprehension of their meanings. An alternative suggestion posits that mutual understanding requires shared conceptualizations of a signal’s use, i.e., “conceptual pacts” that are abstracted away from specific experiences. Both accounts predict coherent neural dynamics across communicators, aligned either to the occurrence of a signal or to the dynamics of conceptual pacts. Using coherence spectral-density analysis of cerebral activity simultaneously measured in pairs of communicators, this study shows that establishing mutual understanding of novel signals synchronizes cerebral dynamics across communicators’ right temporal lobes. This interpersonal cerebral coherence occurred only within pairs with a shared communicative history, and at temporal scales independent from signals’ occurrences. These findings favor the notion that meaning emerges from shared conceptualizations of a signal’s use. PMID:25489093

  15. [Ethics in pediatric emergencies: Care access, communication, and confidentiality].

    PubMed

    Benoit, J; Berdah, L; Carlier-Gonod, A; Guillou, T; Kouche, C; Patte, M; Schneider, M; Talcone, S; Chappuy, H

    2015-05-01

    Children suffer most from today's increasing precariousness. In France, access to care is available for all children through various structures and existing measures. The support for foreign children is overseen by specific legislation often unfamiliar to caregivers. Pediatric emergencies, their location, organization, actors, and patient flow are a particular environment that is not always suitable to communication and may lead to situations of abuse. Communication should not be forgotten because of the urgency of the situation. The place of the child in the dialogue is often forgotten. Considering the triangular relationship, listening to the child and involving the parents in care are the basis for a good therapeutic alliance. Privacy and medical confidentiality in pediatric emergencies are governed by law. However, changes in treatments and medical practices along with the variety of actors involved imply both individual and collective limitations, to the detriment of medical confidentiality. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Emergency Department Visits Prior to Suicide and Homicide: Linking Statewide Surveillance Systems.

    PubMed

    Cerel, Julie; Singleton, Michael D; Brown, Margaret M; Brown, Sabrina V; Bush, Heather M; Brancado, Candice J

    2016-01-01

    Emergency departments (EDs) serve a wide range of patients who present at risk of impending suicide and homicide. Two statewide surveillance systems were probabilistically linked to understand who utilizes EDs and then dies violently within 6 weeks. Each identified case was matched with four randomly selected controls on sex, race, date of birth, resident zip code, and date of ED visit vs. date of death. Matched-pair odds ratios were estimated by conditional logistic regression to assess differences between cases and controls on reported diagnoses and expected payment sources. Of 1,599 suicides and 569 homicides in the 3-year study period, 10.7% of decedents who died by suicide (mean = 13.6 days) and 8.3% who died by homicide (mean = 16.3 days) were seen in a state ED within 6 weeks prior to death. ED attendees who died by suicide were more likely to have a diagnosis of injury/ poisoning diagnosis or mental disorder and more likely to have Medicare. Those who died by homicide were more likely to have a diagnosis of injury/poisoning and less likely to have commercial insurance. It is essential for research to further explore risk factors for imminent suicide and homicide in ED patients who present for psychiatric conditions and general injuries.

  17. Emerging Definition of Next-Generation of Aeronautical Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerczewski, Robert J.

    2006-01-01

    Aviation continues to experience rapid growth. In regions such as the United States and Europe air traffic congestion is constraining operations, leading to major new efforts to develop methodologies and infrastructures to enable continued aviation growth through transformational air traffic management systems. Such a transformation requires better communications linking airborne and ground-based elements. Technologies for next-generation communications, the required capacities, frequency spectrum of operation, network interconnectivity, and global interoperability are now receiving increased attention. A number of major planning and development efforts have taken place or are in process now to define the transformed airspace of the future. These activities include government and industry led efforts in the United States and Europe, and by international organizations. This paper will review the features, approaches, and activities of several representative planning and development efforts, and identify the emerging global consensus on requirements of next generation aeronautical communications systems for air traffic control.

  18. EM Talk: communication skills training for emergency medicine patients with serious illness.

    PubMed

    Grudzen, Corita R; Emlet, Lillian L; Kuntz, Joanne; Shreves, Ashley; Zimny, Erin; Gang, Maureen; Schaulis, Monique; Schmidt, Scott; Isaacs, Eric; Arnold, Robert

    2016-06-01

    The emergency department visit for a patient with serious illness represents a sentinel event, signalling a change in the illness trajectory. By better understanding patient and family wishes, emergency physicians can reinforce advance care plans and ensure the hospital care provided matches the patient's values. Despite their importance in care at the end of life, emergency physicians have received little training on how to talk to seriously ill patients and their families about goals of care. To expand communication skills training to emergency medicine, we developed a programme to give emergency medicine physicians the ability to empathically deliver serious news and to talk about goals of care. We have built on lessons from prior studies to design an intervention employing the most effective pedagogical techniques, including the use of simulated patients/families, role-playing and small group learning with constructive feedback from master clinicians. Here, we describe our evidence-based communication skills training course EM Talk using simulation, reflective feedback and deliberate practice. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  19. Assessing interpersonal and communication skills in emergency medicine.

    PubMed

    Chan, Teresa M; Wallner, Clare; Swoboda, Thomas K; Leone, Katrina A; Kessler, Chad

    2012-12-01

    Interpersonal and communication skills (ICS) are a key component of several competency-based schemata and key competency in the set of six Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) core competencies. With the shift toward a competency-based educational framework, the importance of robust learner assessment becomes paramount. The journal Academic Emergency Medicine (AEM) hosted a consensus conference to discuss education research in emergency medicine (EM). This article summarizes the initial preparatory research that was conducted to brief consensus conference attendees and reports the results of the consensus conference breakout session as it pertains to ICS assessment of learners. The goals of this consensus conference session were to twofold: 1) to determine the state of assessment of observable learner performance and 2) to determine a research agenda within the ICS field for medical educators. The working group identified six key recommendations for medical educators and researchers. © 2012 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  20. An emergence of coordinated communication in populations of agents.

    PubMed

    Kvasnicka, V; Pospichal, J

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to demonstrate that coordinated communication spontaneously emerges in a population composed of agents that are capable of specific cognitive activities. Internal states of agents are characterized by meaning vectors. Simple neural networks composed of one layer of hidden neurons perform cognitive activities of agents. An elementary communication act consists of the following: (a) two agents are selected, where one of them is declared the speaker and the other the listener; (b) the speaker codes a selected meaning vector onto a sequence of symbols and sends it to the listener as a message; and finally, (c) the listener decodes this message into a meaning vector and adapts his or her neural network such that the differences between speaker and listener meaning vectors are decreased. A Darwinian evolution enlarged by ideas from the Baldwin effect and Dawkins' memes is simulated by a simple version of an evolutionary algorithm without crossover. The agent fitness is determined by success of the mutual pairwise communications. It is demonstrated that agents in the course of evolution gradually do a better job of decoding received messages (they are closer to meaning vectors of speakers) and all agents gradually start to use the same vocabulary for the common communication. Moreover, if agent meaning vectors contain regularities, then these regularities are manifested also in messages created by agent speakers, that is, similar parts of meaning vectors are coded by similar symbol substrings. This observation is considered a manifestation of the emergence of a grammar system in the common coordinated communication.

  1. Escalating patterns of emergency health care prior to first admission with amphetamine psychosis: A window of opportunity?

    PubMed

    Sara, Grant; Lappin, Julia; Dobbins, Timothy; Dunlop, Adrian J; Degenhardt, Louisa

    2017-09-06

    To describe health service contact in the two years prior to a first hospital admission with amphetamine-related psychosis, and to identify possible opportunities for early intervention. Routine health data collections were used to identify 6130 persons aged 16-65 who had a first hospital admission with amphetamine-related psychosis in New South Wales (NSW), Australia, between 2005 and 2016. Health service contacts in the two years prior to first admission were identified, using public hospital, emergency department and community mental health data. Prior care was compared to 41,444 people with first psychosis admissions without amphetamine diagnoses. Two thirds of people with amphetamine-related psychosis had health service contact in the two years prior to their first psychosis admission. Of these, 45% had ED contacts and 30% had prior general hospital admissions. The likelihood of contact escalated throughout the two years prior to admission. Prior substance-related conditions, infectious diseases, injuries and accidents were common. Compared to other first psychosis admissions, people with amphetamine-related psychoses were less likely to have prior specialised mental health care (OR 0.84, 95% CI 0.78, 0.89) and more likely to have prior general health care (OR 1.40, 95% CI 1.29, 1.51). Emergency departments and units treating people with infectious diseases or injuries should consider strategies to detect amphetamine and other substance use. Early detection and referral to specialist mental health or drug and alcohol care may prevent some amphetamine-related psychoses. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Passing crisis and emergency risk communications: the effects of communication channel, information type, and repetition.

    PubMed

    Edworthy, Judy; Hellier, Elizabeth; Newbold, Lex; Titchener, Kirsteen

    2015-05-01

    Three experiments explore several factors which influence information transmission when warning messages are passed from person to person. In Experiment 1, messages were passed down chains of participants using five different modes of communication. Written communication channels resulted in more accurate message transmission than verbal. In addition, some elements of the message endured further down the chain than others. Experiment 2 largely replicated these effects and also demonstrated that simple repetition of a message eliminated differences between written and spoken communication. In a final field experiment, chains of participants passed information however they wanted to, with the proviso that half of the chains could not use telephones. Here, the lack of ability to use a telephone did not affect accuracy, but did slow down the speed of transmission from the recipient of the message to the last person in the chain. Implications of the findings for crisis and emergency risk communication are discussed.

  3. Coastal emergency managers' preferences for storm surge forecast communication.

    PubMed

    Morrow, Betty Hearn; Lazo, Jeffrey K

    2014-01-01

    Storm surge, the most deadly hazard associated with tropical and extratropical cyclones, is the basis for most evacuation decisions by authorities. One factor believed to be associated with evacuation noncompliance is a lack of understanding of storm surge. To address this problem, federal agencies responsible for cyclone forecasts are seeking more effective ways of communicating storm surge threat. To inform this process, they are engaging various partners in the forecast and warning process.This project focuses on emergency managers. Fifty-three emergency managers (EMs) from the Gulf and lower Atlantic coasts were surveyed to elicit their experience with, sources of, and preferences for storm surge information. The emergency managers-who are well seasoned in hurricane response and generally rate the surge risk in their coastal areas above average or extremely high-listed storm surge as their major concern with respect to hurricanes. They reported a general lack of public awareness about surge. Overall they support new ways to convey the potential danger to the public, including the issuance of separate storm surge watches and warnings, and the expression of surge heights using feet above ground level. These EMs would like more maps, graphics, and visual materials for use in communicating with the public. An important concern is the timing of surge forecasts-whether they receive them early enough to be useful in their evacuation decisions.

  4. Emergency department team communication with the patient: the patient's perspective.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Danielle M; Ellison, Emily P; Venkatesh, Arjun K; Engel, Kirsten G; Cameron, Kenzie A; Makoul, Gregory; Adams, James G

    2013-08-01

    Effective communication is important for the delivery of quality care. The Emergency Department (ED) environment poses significant challenges to effective communication. The objective of this study was to determine patients' perceptions of their ED team's communication skills. This was a cross-sectional study in an urban, academic ED. Patients completed the Communication Assessment Tool for Teams (CAT-T) survey upon ED exit. The CAT-T was adapted from the psychometrically validated Communication Assessment Tool (CAT) to measure patient perceptions of communication with a medical team. The 14 core CAT-T items are associated with a 5-point scale (5 = excellent); results are reported as the percent of participants who responded "excellent." Responses were analyzed for differences based on age, sex, race, and operational metrics (wait time, ED daily census). There were 346 patients identified; the final sample for analysis was 226 patients (53.5% female, 48.2% Caucasian), representing a response rate of 65.3%. The scores on CAT-T items (reported as % "excellent") ranged from 50.0% to 76.1%. The highest-scoring items were "let me talk without interruptions" (76.1%), "talked in terms I could understand" (75.2%), and "treated me with respect" (74.3%). The lowest-scoring item was "encouraged me to ask questions" (50.0%). No differences were noted based on patient sex, race, age, wait time, or daily census of the ED. The patients in this study perceived that the ED teams were respectful and allowed them to talk without interruptions; however, lower ratings were given for items related to actively engaging the patient in decision-making and asking questions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. An information management and communications system for emergency operations

    SciTech Connect

    Gladden, C.A.; Doyle, J.F.

    1995-09-01

    In the mid 1980s the US Department of Energy (DOE) recognized the need to dramatically expand its Emergency Operations Centers to deal with the large variety of emergencies for which DOE has an obligation to manage, or provide technical support. This paper describes information management, display, and communications systems that have been implemented at the DOE Headquarters Forestall Operations Center (OC), DOE Operations Offices, and critical laboratory locations. Major elements of the system at the DOE Headquarters facility include computer control, information storage and retrieval, processing, Local Area Networks (LANs), videoconferencing, video display, and audio systems. These Headquarters systems are linked by Wide Area Networks (WANs) to similar systems at the Operations Office and critical Laboratory locations.

  6. A Conceptual Framework for the Evaluation of Emergency Risk Communications.

    PubMed

    Savoia, Elena; Lin, Leesa; Gamhewage, Gaya M

    2017-09-01

    To articulate a conceptual framework in support of evaluation activities in emergency risk communications (ERC). The framework proposed is based on a systematic review of the scientific literature (2001-2016) combined with data derived from a series of semistructured interviews with experts and practitioners in ERC, and it is designed to support local, national, and international public health organizations in implementing evaluation studies in ERC. We identified a list of ERC outcomes from the full-text review of 152 articles and categorized these into 3 groups, depending upon the level at which the outcome was measured: (1) information environment, (2) population, and (3) public health system. We analyzed interviewees' data from 18 interviews to identify practices and processes related to the effectiveness of ERC and included these as key structural components and processes in the developed evaluation framework. Researchers and public health practitioners interested in the evaluation of ERC can use the conceptual framework described in this article to guide the development of evaluation studies and methods for assessing communication outcomes related to public health emergencies.

  7. A Conceptual Framework for the Evaluation of Emergency Risk Communications

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Leesa; Gamhewage, Gaya M.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives. To articulate a conceptual framework in support of evaluation activities in emergency risk communications (ERC). Methods. The framework proposed is based on a systematic review of the scientific literature (2001–2016) combined with data derived from a series of semistructured interviews with experts and practitioners in ERC, and it is designed to support local, national, and international public health organizations in implementing evaluation studies in ERC. Results. We identified a list of ERC outcomes from the full-text review of 152 articles and categorized these into 3 groups, depending upon the level at which the outcome was measured: (1) information environment, (2) population, and (3) public health system. We analyzed interviewees’ data from 18 interviews to identify practices and processes related to the effectiveness of ERC and included these as key structural components and processes in the developed evaluation framework. Conclusions. Researchers and public health practitioners interested in the evaluation of ERC can use the conceptual framework described in this article to guide the development of evaluation studies and methods for assessing communication outcomes related to public health emergencies. PMID:28892436

  8. Accurate measurement of RF exposure from emerging wireless communication systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Letertre, Thierry; Monebhurrun, Vikass; Toffano, Zeno

    2013-04-01

    Isotropic broadband probes or spectrum analyzers (SAs) may be used for the measurement of rapidly varying electromagnetic fields generated by emerging wireless communication systems. In this paper this problematic is investigated by comparing the responses measured by two different isotropic broadband probes typically used to perform electric field (E-field) evaluations. The broadband probes are submitted to signals with variable duty cycles (DC) and crest factors (CF) either with or without Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM) modulation but with the same root-mean-square (RMS) power. The two probes do not provide accurate enough results for deterministic signals such as Worldwide Interoperability for Microwave Access (WIMAX) or Long Term Evolution (LTE) as well as for non-deterministic signals such as Wireless Fidelity (WiFi). The legacy measurement protocols should be adapted to cope for the emerging wireless communication technologies based on the OFDM modulation scheme. This is not easily achieved except when the statistics of the RF emission are well known. In this case the measurement errors are shown to be systematic and a correction factor or calibration can be applied to obtain a good approximation of the total RMS power.

  9. Implementation of emergency department transfer communication measures in Minnesota critical access hospitals.

    PubMed

    Klingner, Jill; Moscovice, Ira; Casey, Michelle; McEllistrem Evenson, Alex

    2015-01-01

    Previously published findings based on field tests indicated that emergency department patient transfer communication measures are feasible and worthwhile to implement in rural hospitals. This study aims to expand those findings by focusing on the wide-scale implementation of these measures in the 79 Critical Access Hospitals (CAHs) in Minnesota from 2011 to 2013. Information was obtained from interviews with key informants involved in implementing the emergency department patient transfer communication measures in Minnesota as part of required statewide quality reporting. The first set of interviews targeted state-level organizations regarding their experiences working with providers. A second set of interviews targeted quality and administrative staff from CAHs regarding their experiences implementing measures. Implementing the measures in Minnesota CAHs proved to be successful in a number of respects, but informants also faced new challenges. Our recommendations, addressed to those seeking to successfully implement these measures in other states, take these challenges into account. Field-testing new quality measure implementations with volunteers may not be indicative of a full-scale implementation that requires facilities to participate. The implementation team's composition, communication efforts, prior relationships with facilities and providers, and experience with data collection and abstraction tools are critical factors in successfully implementing required reporting of quality measures on a wide scale. © 2014 National Rural Health Association.

  10. Erythro-Myeloid Progenitors: “definitive” hematopoiesis in the conceptus prior to the emergence of hematopoietic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Frame, Jenna M.; McGrath, Kathleen E.; Palis, James

    2013-01-01

    Erythro-myeloid progenitors (EMP) serve as a major source of hematopoiesis in the developing conceptus prior to the formation of a permanent blood system. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge regarding the emergence, fate, and potential of this hematopoietic stem cell (HSC)-independent wave of hematopoietic progenitors, focusing on the murine embryo as a model system. A better understanding of the temporal and spatial control of hematopoietic emergence in the embryo will ultimately improve our ability to derive hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells from embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells to serve therapeutic purposes. PMID:24095199

  11. National Training Course. Emergency Medical Technician. Paramedic. Instructor's Lesson Plans. Module XV. Telemetry and Communications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    This instructor's lesson plan guide on telemetry and communications is one of fifteen modules designed for use in the training of emergency medical technicians (paramedics). Two units of study are presented: (1) emergency medical services communications systems (items of equipment and such radio communications concepts as frequency allocation,…

  12. New Emerging Issues about Guidance and Counselling in an Accreditation of Prior and Experiential Learning Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanséau, Pierre-Yves; Ansart, Sandrine

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this research is to examine special features of guidance and counselling roles in a process of accreditation of prior and experiential learning (APEL). More specifically, we have two main goals: to identify any possible distinctive feature of guidance and counselling provided during a skills-oriented APEL procedure; and to highlight any…

  13. Effect of bystander CPR initiation prior to the emergency call on ROSC and 30day survival-An evaluation of 548 emergency calls.

    PubMed

    Viereck, Søren; Palsgaard Møller, Thea; Kjær Ersbøll, Annette; Folke, Fredrik; Lippert, Freddy

    2017-02-01

    This study aimed at evaluating if time for initiation of bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) - prior to the emergency call (CPRprior) versus during the emergency call following dispatcher-assisted CPR (CPRduring) - was associated with return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and 30-day survival. The secondary aim was to identify predictors of CPRprior. This observational study evaluated out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCA) occurring in the Capital Region of Denmark from 01.01.2013 to 31.12.2013. OHCAs were linked to emergency medical dispatch centre records and corresponding emergency calls were evaluated. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were applied to evaluate the association between time for initiation of bystander CPR, ROSC, and 30-day survival. Univariable logistic regression analyses were applied to identify predictors of CPRprior. The study included 548 emergency calls for OHCA patients receiving bystander CPR, 34.9% (n=191) in the CPRprior group and 65.1% (n=357) in the CPRduring group. Multivariable analyses showed no difference in ROSC (OR=0.88, 95% CI: 0.56-1.38) or 30-day survival (OR=1.14, 95% CI: 0.68-1.92) between CPRprior and CPRduring. Predictors positively associated with CPRprior included witnessed OHCA and healthcare professional bystanders. Predictors negatively associated with CPRprior included residential location, solitary bystanders, and bystanders related to the patient. The majority of bystander CPR (65%) was initiated during the emergency call, following dispatcher-assisted CPR instructions. Whether bystander CPR was initiated prior to emergency call versus during the emergency call following dispatcher-assisted CPR was not associated with ROSC or 30-day survival. Dispatcher-assisted CPR was especially beneficial for the initiation of bystander CPR in residential areas. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Emerging trend in second messenger communication and myoendothelial feedback

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Cam Ha T.; Kurjiaka, David T.; Welsh, Donald G.

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, second messenger communication has emerged as one of the intriguing topics in the field of vasomotor control. Of particular interest has been the idea of second messenger flux from smooth muscle to endothelium initiating a feedback response that attenuates constriction. Mechanistic details of the precise signaling cascade have until recently remained elusive. In this perspective, we introduce readers to how myoendothelial gap junctions could enable sufficient inositol trisphosphate flux to initiate endothelial Ca2+ events that activate Ca2+ sensitive K+ channels. The resulting hyperpolarizing current would in turn spread back through the same myoendothelial gap junctions to moderate smooth muscle depolarization and constriction. In discussing this defined feedback mechanism, this brief manuscript will stress the importance of microdomains and of discrete cellular signaling. PMID:25071588

  15. Bystander Intervention Prior to The Arrival of Emergency Medical Services: Comparing Assistance across Types of Medical Emergencies.

    PubMed

    Faul, Mark; Aikman, Shelley N; Sasser, Scott M

    2016-01-01

    To determine the situational circumstances associated with bystander interventions to render aid during a medical emergency. This study examined 16.2 million Emergency Medical Service (EMS) events contained within the National Emergency Medical Services Information System. The records of patients following a 9-1-1 call for emergency medical assistance were analyzed using logistic regression to determine what factors influenced bystander interventions. The dependent variable of the model was whether or not a bystander intervened. EMS providers recorded bystander assistance 11% of the time. The logistic regression model correctly predicted bystander intervention occurrence 71.4% of the time. Bystanders were more likely to intervene when the patient was male (aOR = 1.12, 95% CI = 1.12-1.3) and if the patient was older (progressive aOR = 1.10, 1.46 age group 20-29 through age group 60-99). Bystanders were less likely to intervene in rural areas compared to urban areas (aOR = 0.58, 95% CI = 0.58-0.59). The highest likelihood of bystander intervention occurred in a residential institution (aOR = 1.86, 95% CI = 1.85-1.86) and the lowest occurred on a street or a highway (aOR = 0.96, 95% CI = 0.95-0.96). Using death as a reference group, bystanders were most likely to intervene when the patient had cardiac distress/chest pain (aOR = 11.38, 95% CI = 10.93-11.86), followed by allergic reaction (aOR = 7.63, 95% CI = 7.30-7.99), smoke inhalation (aOR = 6.65, 95% CI = 5.98-7.39), and respiration arrest/distress (aOR = 6.43, 95% CI = 6.17-6.70). A traumatic injury was the most commonly recorded known event, and it was also associated with a relatively high level of bystander intervention (aOR = 5.81, 95% CI = 5.58-6.05). The type of injury/illness that prompted the lowest likelihood of bystander assistance was Sexual Assault/Rape (aOR = 1.57, 95% CI = 1.32-1.84) followed by behavioral/psychiatric disorder (aOR = 1.64, 95% CI = 1.57-1.71). Bystander intervention varies greatly on

  16. Emerging, Photonic Based Technologies for NASA Space Communications Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pouch, John; Nguyen, Hung; Lee, Richard; Levi, Anthony; Bos, Philip; Titus, Charles; Lavrentovich, Oleg

    2002-01-01

    An objective of NASA's Computing, Information, and Communications Technology program is to support the development of technologies that could potentially lower the cost of the Earth science and space exploration missions, and result in greater scientific returns. NASA-supported photonic activities which will impact space communications will be described. The objective of the RF microphotonic research is to develop a Ka-band receiver that will enable the microwaves detected by an antenna to modulate a 1.55- micron optical carrier. A key element is the high-Q, microphotonic modulator that employs a lithium niobate microdisk. The technical approach could lead to new receivers that utilize ultra-fast, photonic signal processing techniques, and are low cost, compact, low weight and power efficient. The progress in the liquid crystal (LC) beam steering research will also be reported. The predicted benefits of an LC-based device on board a spacecraft include non-mechanical, submicroradian laser-beam pointing, milliradian scanning ranges, and wave-front correction. The potential applications of these emerging technologies to the various NASA missions will be presented.

  17. Emerging, Photonic Based Technologies for NASA Space Communications Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pouch, John; Nguyen, Hung; Lee, Richard; Levi, Anthony; Bos, Philip; Titus, Charles; Lavrentovich, Oleg

    2002-01-01

    An objective of NASA's Computing, Information, and Communications Technology program is to support the development of technologies that could potentially lower the cost of the Earth science and space exploration missions, and result in greater scientific returns. NASA-supported photonic activities which will impact space communications will be described. The objective of the RF microphotonic research is to develop a Ka-band receiver that will enable the microwaves detected by an antenna to modulate a 1.55- micron optical carrier. A key element is the high-Q, microphotonic modulator that employs a lithium niobate microdisk. The technical approach could lead to new receivers that utilize ultra-fast, photonic signal processing techniques, and are low cost, compact, low weight and power efficient. The progress in the liquid crystal (LC) beam steering research will also be reported. The predicted benefits of an LC-based device on board a spacecraft include non-mechanical, submicroradian laser-beam pointing, milliradian scanning ranges, and wave-front correction. The potential applications of these emerging technologies to the various NASA missions will be presented.

  18. 33 CFR 149.325 - What emergency communications equipment must be on a manned deepwater port?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... in the event the primary communications system outlined in § 149.140 fails. This communication... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What emergency communications... communications equipment must be on a manned deepwater port? Each manned deepwater port must have a...

  19. Assessing provider-patient-parent communication in the pediatric emergency department.

    PubMed

    Wissow, Lawrence S; Bar-Din Kimel, Miriam

    2002-01-01

    Patient-provider communication is related to the satisfaction with and process and outcome of emergency department care. Barriers to communication include noise, anxiety, confusion about process, and differences in language and expectations. In the emergency care setting, as in nonacute ambulatory settings, children tend to be left out of discussions of their own care. Both retrospective and real-time methods are available for studying communication during emergency department visits. Well-standardized generic communication assessment tools are applicable to emergency department communication, but assessment tools specific for emergency settings have yet to be developed and standardized. Although the emergency department poses some methodologic difficulties not present in other settings, studies of communications are feasible and likely to yield useful data.

  20. Bystander Intervention Prior to The Arrival of Emergency Medical Services: Comparing Assistance across Types of Medical Emergencies

    PubMed Central

    Faul, Mark; Aikman, Shelley N.; Sasser, Scott M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the situational circumstances associated with bystander interventions to render aid during a medical emergency. Methods This study examined 16.2 million Emergency Medical Service (EMS) events contained within the National Emergency Medical Services Information System. The records of patients following a 9-1-1 call for emergency medical assistance were analyzed using logistic regression to determine what factors influenced bystander interventions. The dependent variable of the model was whether or not a bystander intervened. Results EMS providers recorded bystander assistance 11% of the time. The logistic regression model correctly predicted bystander intervention occurrence 71.4% of the time. Bystanders were more likely to intervene when the patient was male (aOR = 1.12, 95% CI = 1.12–1.3) and if the patient was older (progressive aOR = 1.10, 1.46 age group 20–29 through age group 60–99). Bystanders were less likely to intervene in rural areas compared to urban areas (aOR = 0.58, 95% CI = 0.58–0.59). The highest likelihood of bystander intervention occurred in a residential institution (aOR = 1.86, 95% CI = 1.85–1.86) and the lowest occurred on a street or a highway (aOR = 0.96, 95% CI = 0.95–0.96). Using death as a reference group, bystanders were most likely to intervene when the patient had cardiac distress/chest pain (aOR = 11.38, 95% CI = 10.93–11.86), followed by allergic reaction (aOR = 7.63, 95% CI = 7.30–7.99), smoke inhalation (aOR = 6.65, 95% CI = 5.98–7.39), and respiration arrest/distress (aOR = 6.43, 95% CI = 6.17–6.70). A traumatic injury was the most commonly recorded known event, and it was also associated with a relatively high level of bystander intervention (aOR = 5.81, 95% CI = 5.58–6.05). The type of injury/illness that prompted the lowest likelihood of bystander assistance was Sexual Assault/Rape (aOR = 1.57, 95% CI = 1.32–1.84) followed by behavioral/psychiatric disorder (aOR = 1.64, 95% CI = 1

  1. Communication and general concern criterion prior to activation of the rapid response team: a grounded theory.

    PubMed

    Martland, Jarrad; Chamberlain, Diane; Hutton, Alison; Smigielski, Michael

    2015-11-30

    Objective Patients commonly show signs and symptoms of deterioration for hours or days before cardiorespiratory arrest. Rapid response teams (RRT) were created to improve recognition and response to patient deterioration in these situations. Activation criteria include vital signs or 'general concern' by a clinician or family member. The general concern criterion for RRT activation accounts for nearly one-third of all RRT activity, and although it is well established that communication deficits between staff can contribute to poorer outcomes for patients, there is little evidence pertaining to communication and its effects on the general concern RRT activation. Thus, the aim of the present study was to develop a substantive grounded theory related to the communication process between clinicians that preceded the activation of an RRT when general concern criterion was used.Methods Qualitative grounded theory involved collection of three types of data details namely personal notes from participants in focus groups with white board notes from discussions and audio recordings of the focus groups sessions. Focus groups were conducted with participants exploring issues associated with clinician communication and how it related to the activation of an RRT using the general concern criterion.Results The three main phases of coding (i.e. open, axial and selective coding) analysis identified 322 separate open codes. The strongest theme contributed to a theory of ineffective communication and decreased psychological safety, namely that 'In the absence of effective communication there is a subsequent increase in anxiety, fear or concern that can be directly attributed to the activation of an RRT using the 'general concern' criterion'. The RRT filled cultural and process deficiencies in the compliance with an escalation protocol. Issues such as 'not for resuscitation documentation' and 'inability to establish communication with and between medical or nursing personnel' rated

  2. Communicating College Learning through Noncourse Matching: An Approach to Writing the Prior Learning Assessment Essay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambe, Jeffrey P.

    2011-01-01

    Prior Learning Assessment (PLA) brings students into active and reflective engagement with significant life experiences at the nexus of academic and nonacademic cultures. When done successfully, PLA orients students to academic ways of thinking and writing while encouraging self-exploration. Often students feel a sense of empowerment and…

  3. Optimizing local protocols for implementing bipartite nonlocal unitary gates using prior entanglement and classical communication

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Scott M.

    2010-06-15

    We present a method of optimizing recently designed protocols for implementing an arbitrary nonlocal unitary gate acting on a bipartite system. These protocols use only local operations and classical communication with the assistance of entanglement, and they are deterministic while also being 'one-shot', in that they use only one copy of an entangled resource state. The optimization minimizes the amount of entanglement needed, and also the amount of classical communication, and it is often the case that less of each of these resources is needed than with an alternative protocol using two-way teleportation.

  4. Communication about opioid versus nonopioid analgesics in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Danielle M; Cameron, Kenzie A; Courtney, D Mark; Adams, James G; Engel, Kirsten G

    2015-01-01

    The Medication Communication Index (MCI) was used to compare counseling about opioids to nonopioid analgesics in the Emergency Department (ED) setting. Secondary analysis of prospectively collected audio recordings of ED patient visits. Urban, academic medical center (>85,000 annual patient visits). Patient participants aged >18 years with one of four low acuity diagnoses: ankle sprain, back pain, head injury, and laceration. ED clinician participants included resident and attending physicians, nursing staff, and ED technicians. The MCI is a five-point index that assigns points for communicating the following: medication name (1), purpose (1), duration (1), adverse effects (1), number of tablets (0.5), and frequency of use (0.5). Recording transcripts were scored with the MCI, and total scores were compared between drug classes. The 41 patients received 56 prescriptions (27 nonopioids, 29 opioids). Nonopioid median MCI score was 3 and opioid score was 4.5 (p=0.0008). Patients were counseled equally about name (nonopioid 100 percent, opioid 96.6 percent, p=0.34) and purpose (88.9 percent, 89.7 percent, p=0.93). However, patients receiving opioids were counseled more frequently about duration of use (nonopioid 40.7 percent, opioid 69.0 percent, p=0.03) and adverse effects (18.5 percent, 93.1 percent, p<0.001). In multivariable analysis, opioids (β=0.54, p=0.04), number of medications prescribed (β=-0.49, p=0.05), and time spent in the ED (β=0.007, p=0.006) were all predictors of total MCI score. The extent of counseling about analgesic medications in the ED differs by drug class. When counseling patients about all analgesic medications, providers should address not only medication name and purpose but also the less frequently covered topics of medication dosing, timing, and adverse effects.

  5. A microRNA allele that emerged prior to apple domestication may underlie fruit size evolution.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jia-Long; Xu, Juan; Cornille, Amandine; Tomes, Sumathi; Karunairetnam, Sakuntala; Luo, Zhiwei; Bassett, Heather; Whitworth, Claire; Rees-George, Jonathan; Ranatunga, Chandra; Snirc, Alodie; Crowhurst, Ross; de Silva, Nihal; Warren, Ben; Deng, Cecilia; Kumar, Satish; Chagné, David; Bus, Vincent G M; Volz, Richard K; Rikkerink, Erik H A; Gardiner, Susan E; Giraud, Tatiana; MacDiarmid, Robin; Gleave, Andrew P

    2015-10-01

    The molecular genetic mechanisms underlying fruit size remain poorly understood in perennial crops, despite size being an important agronomic trait. Here we show that the expression level of a microRNA gene (miRNA172) influences fruit size in apple. A transposon insertional allele of miRNA172 showing reduced expression associates with large fruit in an apple breeding population, whereas over-expression of miRNA172 in transgenic apple significantly reduces fruit size. The transposon insertional allele was found to be co-located with a major fruit size quantitative trait locus, fixed in cultivated apples and their wild progenitor species with relatively large fruit. This finding supports the view that the selection for large size in apple fruit was initiated prior to apple domestication, likely by large mammals, before being subsequently strengthened by humans, and also helps to explain why signatures of genetic bottlenecks and selective sweeps are normally weaker in perennial crops than in annual crops.

  6. Initial identification and characterization of an emerging zoonotic influenza virus prior to pandemic spread.

    PubMed

    Metzgar, David; Baynes, Darcie; Myers, Christopher A; Kammerer, Peter; Unabia, Michelle; Faix, Dennis J; Blair, Patrick J

    2010-11-01

    Two cases of febrile respiratory illness associated with untypeable influenza A virus were identified in Southern California in March 2009. One was initially detected as influenza virus using an experimental diagnostic device in a clinical trial, while the other was detected at a local reference lab using a diagnostic PCR assay. In both cases, analyses yielded negative results for strain-specific tests targeting circulating strains of influenza A virus (seasonal H1 and H3). These two samples became the first reported cases of the pandemic 2009/H1N1 influenza virus. The first reportable characterization was made from the second collected specimen on 15 April 2009 at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention central lab using traditional culture and sequencing methods. The novel nature of the strain and its apparent zoonotic origins were initially characterized using the first collected specimen at the Naval Health Research Center in San Diego, CA, on 13 April using an experimental molecular analysis tool, PCR electro-spray ionization-mass spectrometry (PCR/ESI-MS), designed to amplify PCR products from any strain of influenza virus and to generate informative (phylogenetic) strain identifications through mass spectrometry of PCR amplicons. The ability of this high-throughput tool to correctly identify both well-characterized and novel influenza strains offers the possibility to integrate surveillance for emerging strains with on-site rapid diagnosis used for patient management, shortening the times between the emergence of new strains, their detection and identification, and appropriate public health response activities. Here we describe the initial characterization of the pandemic 2009/H1N1 influenza strain and discuss the possible roles of diagnostic tools with discovery potential.

  7. A time-motion study of ambulance-to-emergency department radio communications.

    PubMed

    Penner, Mark S; Cone, David C; MacMillan, Don

    2003-01-01

    A prospective time-motion study of radio communication between inbound ambulances and emergency department (ED) triage personnel was conducted to assess hospital triage staff time utilized, and how often radio reports result in actions taken in the ED to prepare for patient arrival. The study hypothesis was that reports for "priority 2" (P2, nonemergent) patients rarely provide information that is acted upon in the ED prior to the patient's arrival. The study was conducted at an academic adult ED receiving 22,000 ambulances per year. An observer in the ED monitored and timed (to the second) all radio reports as well as the activities of triage nurses and arriving emergency medical services (EMS) personnel. A convenience sample of 437 reports was collected: 83 priority 1 (P1, emergent) and 354 P2. Average report times (minutes:seconds) with ranges were 0:53 (0:07-1:57) for P1, and 0:44 (0:04-3:50) for P2. Only 16% of the P2 reports resulted in any preparatory action, and 55% of these were requests to have hospital police officers available to receive intoxicated patients, as per local protocol. An in-person report was given in the ED for 61% of the P2 cases, and in 48% of these, the in-person report was longer than the radio report. In the system studied, P2 reports rarely provide information that is acted on prior to the patient's arrival. The time spent giving a radio report is frequently duplicated in the ED. Radio reports for low-priority patients may not be an efficient or productive use of providers' or nurses' time.

  8. Paracrine intercellular communication by a Ca2+- and SNARE-independent release of GABA and glutamate prior to synapse formation.

    PubMed

    Demarque, Michael; Represa, Alfonso; Becq, Hélène; Khalilov, Ilgam; Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Aniksztejn, Laurent

    2002-12-19

    GABA and glutamate receptors are expressed in immature "silent" CA1 pyramidal neurons prior to synapse formation, but their function is unknown. We now report the presence of tonic, spontaneous, and evoked currents in embryonic and neonatal CA1 neurons mediated primarily by the activation of GABA(A) receptors. These currents are mediated by a nonconventional release of transmitters, as they persist in the presence of calcium channel blockers or botulinium toxin and are observed in Munc18-1-deficient mice in which vesicular release is abolished. This paracrine communication is modulated by glutamate but not GABA transporters, which do not operate during this period of life. Thus, a Ca(2+)- and SNARE-independent release of transmitters underlies a paracrine mode of communication before synapse formation.

  9. Communication with Best Friends about Sex-Related Topics during Emerging Adulthood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lefkowitz, Eva S.; Boone, Tanya L.; Shearer, Cindy L.

    2004-01-01

    During emerging adulthood, relationships with close friends may be particularly important and influential, yet most research on communication about sex-related topics focuses on emerging adults' communication with parents. Two hundred and five college students (61% female, mean age = 20.5) completed surveys about the frequency and quality of their…

  10. Emerging communications technologies for outer-planet exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stelzried, C.; Lesh, J.

    2001-01-01

    Communication over long free space distances is extremely difficult due to the inverse squared propagation losses associated with link distance. That makes communications particularly difficult from outer planet destinations.

  11. Factors associated with violence among Japanese patients with schizophrenia prior to psychiatric emergency hospitalization: a case-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Imai, Atsushi; Hayashi, Naoki; Shiina, Akihiro; Sakikawa, Noriko; Igarashi, Yoshito

    2014-12-01

    Numerous studies have examined a wide range of risk factors associated with violence among patients with schizophrenia. However, risk factors linked to different socio-cultural backgrounds remain unclear. The objectives were to investigate factors associated with violence among Japanese patients with schizophrenia prior to emergency hospitalizations and to compare them with factors found in studies on other populations. We recruited 420 Japanese patients with schizophrenia who had committed violent acts immediately prior to emergency admission to a psychiatric hospital in Tokyo, during the period 1986 to 2005. Cases were compared with controls (non violent hospitalized patients with schizophrenia) matched for gender, age and admission year. All medical records were reviewed retrospectively. Inter-rater reliability tests of assessment were performed. Conditional logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with violence. The symptoms of gross excitement, prior violence, auditory hallucinations, systematization of delusions, incoherence of speech, delusions of reference, TCO symptoms, living with others and long duration of illness were found to be associated with violence. In contrast, antisocial traits such as substance abuse and antisocial episodes were not recognized as significant violence-associated factors. Violence among Japanese patients with schizophrenia was strongly associated with elements of schizophrenia itself, rather than antisocial traits. This study highlighted associated factors for violence among Japanese patients with schizophrenia which differ distinctly from associated factors in other countries. This result demonstrates that future studies assessing the risk of violence among patients with schizophrenia need to consider cultural and racial differences in cohorts. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Research in Corporate Communication: An Overview of an Emerging Field.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Riel, Cees B. M.

    1997-01-01

    Provides an overview of research in corporate communication, focusing on achievements found in the international academic literature in both communication and business school disciplines. Gives three key concepts in such research: corporate identity, corporate reputation, and orchestration of communication. Advocates an interdisciplinary approach…

  13. Self-Reported Usual Care for Self-Directed Violence during the Six Months Prior to Emergency Department Admission

    PubMed Central

    Comtois, Katherine Anne; Kerbrat, Amanda H.; Atkins, David C.; Roy-Byrne, Peter; Katon, Wayne J.

    2014-01-01

    Background The literature describing the health services individuals receive prior to and following self-directed violence is limited. Objectives This study examines services received for the six months preceding admission to an urban county medical center emergency department for self-directed violence. We predicted that individuals with at least one prior act of self-directed violence in the past six months would have received more services than those for whom the index admission was their only recent act. Method Participants were recruited from emergency department admissions during shifts selected to maximize representativeness. Participants (n=202) were interviewed using the Suicide Attempt Self-Injury Interview, Suicide Attempt Self-Injury Count, Treatment History Interview, MINI, Brief Symptom Index, and SF-12. Results The majority of index acts of self-directed violence (79%) were suicide attempts. The participants were characterized by low socio-economic status, substantial symptomatology, low physical and mental health functioning, and multiple psychiatric diagnoses. In the preceding six months, 34% were admitted to a hospital and 56% received crisis services (including 44% in the ED). While three quarters (76%) had seen an outpatient medical provider and most (70%) received psychotropic medications, less than half of the sample received psychiatric services (40%) or outpatient psychosocial treatment (48%). As predicted, utilization for most types of usual care was higher for those engaging in self-directed violence in the six months preceding the index admission. Conclusions Individuals admitted to this emergency department for self-directed violence received inadequate outpatient psychosocial and psychiatric services despite severe illness and disability. PMID:25494233

  14. Applying artificial neural networks to predict communication risks in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Bagnasco, Annamaria; Siri, Anna; Aleo, Giuseppe; Rocco, Gennaro; Sasso, Loredana

    2015-10-01

    To describe the utility of artificial neural networks in predicting communication risks. In health care, effective communication reduces the risk of error. Therefore, it is important to identify the predictive factors of effective communication. Non-technical skills are needed to achieve effective communication. This study explores how artificial neural networks can be applied to predict the risk of communication failures in emergency departments. A multicentre observational study. Data were collected between March-May 2011 by observing the communication interactions of 840 nurses with their patients during their routine activities in emergency departments. The tools used for our observation were a questionnaire to collect personal and descriptive data, level of training and experience and Guilbert's observation grid, applying the Situation-Background-Assessment-Recommendation technique to communication in emergency departments. A total of 840 observations were made on the nurses working in the emergency departments. Based on Guilbert's observation grid, the output variables is likely to influence the risk of communication failure were 'terminology'; 'listening'; 'attention' and 'clarity', whereas nurses' personal characteristics were used as input variables in the artificial neural network model. A model based on the multilayer perceptron topology was developed and trained. The receiver operator characteristic analysis confirmed that the artificial neural network model correctly predicted the performance of more than 80% of the communication failures. The application of the artificial neural network model could offer a valid tool to forecast and prevent harmful communication errors in the emergency department. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. How parents and practitioners experience research without prior consent (deferred consent) for emergency research involving children with life threatening conditions: a mixed method study

    PubMed Central

    Woolfall, Kerry; Frith, Lucy; Gamble, Carrol; Gilbert, Ruth; Mok, Quen; Young, Bridget

    2015-01-01

    Objective Alternatives to prospective informed consent to enable children with life-threatening conditions to be entered into trials of emergency treatments are needed. Across Europe, a process called deferred consent has been developed as an alternative. Little is known about the views and experiences of those with first-hand experience of this controversial consent process. To inform how consent is sought for future paediatric critical care trials, we explored the views and experiences of parents and practitioners involved in the CATheter infections in CHildren (CATCH) trial, which allowed for deferred consent in certain circumstances. Design Mixed method survey, interview and focus group study. Participants 275 parents completed a questionnaire; 20 families participated in an interview (18 mothers, 5 fathers). 17 CATCH practitioners participated in one of four focus groups (10 nurses, 3 doctors and 4 clinical trial unit staff). Setting 12 UK children's hospitals. Results Some parents were momentarily shocked or angered to discover that their child had or could have been entered into CATCH without their prior consent. Although these feelings resolved after the reasons why consent needed to be deferred were explained and that the CATCH interventions were already used in clinical care. Prior to seeking deferred consent for the first few times, CATCH practitioners were apprehensive, although their feelings abated with experience of talking to parents about CATCH. Parents reported that their decisions about their child's participation in the trial had been voluntary. However, mistiming the deferred consent discussion had caused distress for some. Practitioners and parents supported the use of deferred consent in CATCH and in future trials of interventions already used in clinical care. Conclusions Our study provides evidence to support the use of deferred consent in paediatric emergency medicine; it also indicates the crucial importance of practitioner communication

  16. The Opportunities of Crises and Emergency Risk Communication in Activities of Serbian Public Health Workforce in Emergencies

    PubMed Central

    Radović, V; Ćurčić, L

    2012-01-01

    Background: The aim of the study was a recommendation and establishment the concept of the appropriate communication between public health, other competent services and population in emergency as the corner stone which guarantee that all goals which are important for community life will be achieved. Methods: We used methodology appropriate for social science: analyses of documents, historical approach and comparative analysis. Results: The finding shows the urgent need for accepting of crises and emergency risk communication principles, or some similar concepts, in Serbia, and implementing effective two way communication especially in multiethnic region. The pragmatic value of the paper lays in information about the recent improvement of health workforce and emergency services in emergencies using new concept of communication and as source of numerous useful documents published in USA and few recent Serbian examples. Conclusion: Health workforce has significant role in the process of protection of population in emergencies. Policy makers should work on finding a way to improve their coordination and communication, creating new academic programs, providing of adequate training, and financial means in order to give them different role in society and provide visibility. From other side health workforce should build back to the citizen trust in what they are doing for society welfare using all their skills and abilities. PMID:23308348

  17. The opportunities of crises and emergency risk communication in activities of serbian public health workforce in emergencies.

    PubMed

    Radović, V; Curčić, L

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was a recommendation and establishment the concept of the appropriate communication between public health, other competent services and population in emergency as the corner stone which guarantee that all goals which are important for community life will be achieved. WE USED METHODOLOGY APPROPRIATE FOR SOCIAL SCIENCE: analyses of documents, historical approach and comparative analysis. The finding shows the urgent need for accepting of crises and emergency risk communication principles, or some similar concepts, in Serbia, and implementing effective two way communication especially in multiethnic region. The pragmatic value of the paper lays in information about the recent improvement of health workforce and emergency services in emergencies using new concept of communication and as source of numerous useful documents published in USA and few recent Serbian examples. Health workforce has significant role in the process of protection of population in emergencies. Policy makers should work on finding a way to improve their coordination and communication, creating new academic programs, providing of adequate training, and financial means in order to give them different role in society and provide visibility. From other side health workforce should build back to the citizen trust in what they are doing for society welfare using all their skills and abilities.

  18. Non-communicable diseases in emergencies: a call to action.

    PubMed

    Demaio, Alessandro; Jamieson, Jennifer; Horn, Rebecca; de Courten, Maximilian; Tellier, Siri

    2013-09-06

    Recent years have demonstrated the devastating health consequences of complex emergencies and natural disasters and thereby highlighted the importance of comprehensive and collaborative approaches to humanitarian responses and risk reduction. Simultaneously, noncommunicable diseases are now recognised as a real and growing threat to population health and development; a threat that is magnified by and during emergencies. Noncommunicable diseases, however, continue to receive little attention from humanitarian organisations in the acute phase of disaster and emergency response. This paper calls on all sectors to recognise and address the specific health challenges posed by noncommunicable diseases in emergencies and disaster situations. This publication aims to highlight the need for: • Increased research on morbidity and mortality patterns due to noncommunicable diseases during and following emergencies; • Raised awareness through greater advocacy for the issue and challenges of noncommunicable diseases during and following emergencies; • Incorporation of noncommunicable diseases into existing emergency-related policies, standards, and resources; • Development of technical guidelines on the clinical management of noncommunicable diseases in emergencies; • Greater integration and coordination in health service provision during and following emergencies; • Integrating noncommunicable diseases into practical and academic training of emergency workers and emergency-response coordinators.

  19. Non-Communicable Diseases in Emergencies: A Call to Action

    PubMed Central

    Demaio, Alessandro; Jamieson, Jennifer; Horn, Rebecca; de Courten, Maximilian; Tellier, Siri

    2013-01-01

    Recent years have demonstrated the devastating health consequences of complex emergencies and natural disasters and thereby highlighted the importance of comprehensive and collaborative approaches to humanitarian responses and risk reduction. Simultaneously, noncommunicable diseases are now recognised as a real and growing threat to population health and development; a threat that is magnified by and during emergencies. Noncommunicable diseases, however, continue to receive little attention from humanitarian organisations in the acute phase of disaster and emergency response. This paper calls on all sectors to recognise and address the specific health challenges posed by noncommunicable diseases in emergencies and disaster situations. This publication aims to highlight the need for: • Increased research on morbidity and mortality patterns due to noncommunicable diseases during and following emergencies; • Raised awareness through greater advocacy for the issue and challenges of noncommunicable diseases during and following emergencies; • Incorporation of noncommunicable diseases into existing emergency-related policies, standards, and resources; • Development of technical guidelines on the clinical management of noncommunicable diseases in emergencies; • Greater integration and coordination in health service provision during and following emergencies; • Integrating noncommunicable diseases into practical and academic training of emergency workers and emergency-response coordinators. PMID:24056956

  20. Therapeutic communication part 2: strategies that can enhance the quality of the emergency care consultation.

    PubMed

    O'gara, Paula E; Fairhurst, Wendy

    2004-10-01

    Therapeutic, patient-centred communication as well as being desirable in its own right may also have the potential to improve satisfaction, health outcomes and change health behaviours in Emergency Care. This paper, the second of two, identifies from a substantive literature review five specific communication strategies that, when employed in an Emergency Care consultation, could significantly enhance its therapeutic potential. The five strategies: questioning, listening and noticing, communicating empathy, establishing and incorporating the patient's cares and concerns and concluding the consultation have been derived from the purposeful selection and analysis of communication research between 1990 and 2002.

  1. Improving parent-provider communication in the pediatric emergency department: results from the clear and concise communication campaign.

    PubMed

    Porter, Stephen C; Johnston, Patrick; Parry, Gareth; Damian, Fran; Hoppa, Eric C; Stack, Anne M

    2011-02-01

    We implemented and evaluated a quality improvement initiative targeting parents' communication with clinicians in a pediatric emergency department (ED). A quality improvement initiative ("Clear and Concise Communication" or "3C") targeting parent-provider communication was implemented in an urban tertiary care pediatric ED. A 1-page form that solicited parent worries, questions, and expectations for care was developed. Parent-provider communication was measured using an 8-item subset of questions from an ongoing satisfaction survey adopted for pediatric emergency care. The primary outcome was the communication score for a given ED visit scaled from 0 to 100 and was calculated as the simple average of answers where the best possible response was given a value of 1 and all others were scored as 0. A multivariate model adjusting for time-related factors, ED volume, and system-level events was developed to examine the influence of the communication initiative. A total of 29,005 patients received care during implementation of 3C; a total of 100,810 patients received care during the 2-year period of interest. Data from 1233 satisfaction surveys were used to create the communication scores. Communication scores ranged from 0 to 100, with a mean of 88 and SD of 17.7. In a linear model adjusting for day, weekend, volume, system-level introduction of electronic charting for nurses, and electronic-order entry for physicians, the 3C initiative demonstrated a positive and statistically significant effect-increasing the communication score by 2.8 points/100 d (95% confidence interval, 0.1-5.5). The 3C initiative succeeded in improving parents' communication experience with emergency providers during the intervention period.

  2. Risk communication, radiation, and radiological emergencies: strategies, tools, and techniques.

    PubMed

    Covello, Vincent T

    2011-11-01

    Risk communication is the two-way exchange of information about risks, including risks associated with radiation and radiological events. The risk communication literature contains a broad range of strategies for overcoming the psychological, sociological, and cultural factors that create public misperceptions and misunderstandings about risks. These strategies help radiation risk communicators overcome the challenges posed by three basic observations about people under stress: (1) people under stress typically want to know that you care before they care about what you know; (2) people under stress typically have difficulty hearing, understanding, and remembering information; (3) people under stress typically focus more on negative information than positive information.

  3. Business E-Mail Communication: Some Emerging Tendencies in Register.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gimenez, Julio C.

    2000-01-01

    Investigates whether the spoken nature of electronic mail messages has already started to affect business written communication. Examines register and context of the language as well as the style used in commercial electronic mail. (Author/VWL)

  4. Amateur Radio Emergency Communications Enhancement Act of 2009

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Rep. Jackson-Lee, Sheila [D-TX-18

    2009-04-29

    House - 05/01/2009 Referred to the Subcommittee on Communications, Technology, and the Internet. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  5. Brief communication: Emergence chronology of permanent teeth in Nigerian children.

    PubMed

    Oziegbe, Elizabeth O; Esan, Temitope A; Oyedele, Titus A

    2014-03-01

    This study measured the mean age, duration, and sequence of the emergence of permanent dentition in Nigerian children and compared the findings with other population groups. The cross-sectional study involved 1,078 Nigerian children, aged 4-16 years old, from selected primary and secondary schools in the Ife Central local government area in Ile-Ife, Osun State. In general, compared to boys, girls had an earlier mean age of emergence of all the permanent teeth. Children from high socioeconomic class had an earlier mean age of emergence for the maxillary incisors (6.43 and 7.58 years) and mandibular incisors (5.28 and 6.44 years) compared to children from middle and low socioeconomic classes, although socioeconomic effects were more mixed for premolars and molars. Compared to their counterparts in the USA, Australia, Belgium, and Iran, Nigerian children showed an earlier mean age of emergence of all the permanent teeth studied except for Pakistani boys, who had an earlier mean age of emergence of the maxillary premolars and second molar. Poorer economic status has been associated with delayed dental development; however, when compared to other populations, the Nigerian children in this study have earlier mean emergence ages than children from wealthier countries such as the USA and Australia.

  6. Communication and Influencing for ED Professionals: A training programme developed in the emergency department for the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Rixon, Andrew; Rixon, Sascha; Addae-Bosomprah, Hansel; Ding, Mingshuang; Bell, Anthony

    2016-08-01

    The objective of the present study is to develop and pilot a communication and influencing skills training programme that meets ED health professionals' needs at an urban district hospital. Qualitative methods within a participatory action research framework were utilised. An interdisciplinary team guided the programme's design and development. A training needs analysis saw team meetings, interviews, focus groups and observations conducted across the ED. Thematic analysis of the data identified health professionals' communication and influencing challenges. The training needs analysis informed the training programme curriculum's development. The pilot programme involved an interdisciplinary group of seven health professionals across 5 × 2 h sessions over 3 months, followed by a post-training survey. Five themes of communication and influencing challenges were identified: participating in effective handovers, involving patients in bedside handovers, effectively communicating with interdepartmental colleagues, asking ED colleagues to do tasks and understanding ED colleagues' roles, expectations and assumptions. Based on these challenges, the formulated RESPECT model (which stands for Relationships, Expectations, Styles, Partnerships, Enquiry, Coaching and Teamwork) informed the training curriculum. The peer coaching model used in the training programme was highly regarded by participants. Communication and Influencing for ED Professionals™ (Babel Fish Group Pty Ltd, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia) addresses a gap for communication programmes developed in the ED for the ED. Future research will evaluate the programme's impact in this ED. © 2016 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  7. Tumultuous Atmosphere (Physical, Mental), the Main Barrier to Emergency Department Inter-Professional Communication

    PubMed Central

    Varjoshani, Nasrin Jafari; Hosseini, Mohammad Ali; Khankeh, Hamid Reza; Ahmadi, Fazlollah

    2015-01-01

    Background: A highly important factor in enhancing quality of patient care and job satisfaction of health care staff is inter-professional communication. Due to the critical nature of the work environment, the large number of staff and units, and complexity of professional tasks and interventions, inter-professional communication in an emergency department is particularly and exceptionally important. Despite its importance, inter-professional communication in emergency department seems unfavorable. Thus, this study was designed to explain barriers to inter-professional communication in an emergency department. Methodology & Methods: This was a qualitative study with content analysis approach, based on interviews conducted with 26 participants selected purposively, with diversity of occupation, position, age, gender, history, and place of work. Interviews were in-depth and semi-structured, and data were analyzed using the inductive content analysis approach. Results: In total, 251 initial codes were extracted from 30 interviews (some of the participants re-interviewed) and in the reducing trend of final results, 5 categories were extracted including overcrowded emergency, stressful emergency environment, not discerning emergency conditions, ineffective management, and inefficient communication channels. Tumultuous atmosphere (physical, mental) was the common theme between categories, and was decided to be the main barrier to effective inter-professional communication. Conclusion: Tumultuous atmosphere (physical-mental) was found to be the most important barrier to inter-professional communication. This study provided a better understanding of these barriers in emergency department, often neglected in most studies. It is held that by reducing environmental turmoil (physical-mental), inter-professional communication can be improved, thereby improving patient care outcomes and personnel job satisfaction. PMID:25560351

  8. Tumultuous atmosphere (physical, mental), the main barrier to emergency department inter-professional communication.

    PubMed

    Jafari Varjoshani, Nasrin; Hosseini, Mohammad Ali; Khankeh, Hamid Reza; Ahmadi, Fazlollah

    2014-08-22

    A highly important factor in enhancing quality of patient care and job satisfaction of health care staff is inter-professional communication. Due to the critical nature of the work environment, the large number of staff and units, and complexity of professional tasks and interventions, inter-professional communication in an emergency department is particularly and exceptionally important. Despite its importance, inter-professional communication in emergency department seems unfavorable. Thus, this study was designed to explain barriers to inter-professional communication in an emergency department. This was a qualitative study with content analysis approach, based on interviews conducted with 26 participants selected purposively, with diversity of occupation, position, age, gender, history, and place of work. Interviews were in-depth and semi-structured, and data were analyzed using the inductive content analysis approach. In total, 251 initial codes were extracted from 30 interviews (some of the participants re-interviewed) and in the reducing trend of final results, 5 categories were extracted including overcrowded emergency, stressful emergency environment, not discerning emergency conditions, ineffective management, and inefficient communication channels. Tumultuous atmosphere (physical, mental) was the common theme between categories, and was decided to be the main barrier to effective inter-professional communication. Tumultuous atmosphere (physical-mental) was found to be the most important barrier to inter-professional communication. This study provided a better understanding of these barriers in emergency department, often neglected in most studies. It is held that by reducing environmental turmoil (physical-mental), inter-professional communication can be improved, thereby improving patient care outcomes and personnel job satisfaction.

  9. Communicating bad news: a model for emergency mental health helpers.

    PubMed

    Nardi, Thomas J; Keefe-Cooperman, Kathleen

    2006-01-01

    This article addresses the concerns of the messenger/helper who must convey tragic news to individuals and families. It offers a model to be used as a guide to ease the stress on both the deliverer and receiver of bad news. The model uses the mnemonic, PEWTER (Prepare, Evaluate, Warn, Tell, Emotional Response, Regroup), to represent the six components of the communication process.

  10. Enhancing patient safety in the pediatric emergency department: teams, communication, and lessons from crew resource management.

    PubMed

    Pruitt, Christopher M; Liebelt, Erica L

    2010-12-01

    The fast-paced and multifaceted nature of patient care in the emergency department makes our discipline especially prone to errors and adverse events. In recent years, strategies such as formal communication and medical team training have been proposed as potential means to enhance patient safety. In many ways, practice dynamics particular to the emergency department make this setting almost ideal for implementation of these strategies. This article reviews concepts of communication and team training in medicine, including those learned from the aviation industry (known as crew resource management). Recent literature pertaining to teams and communication in medicine is reviewed.

  11. U.S. DOE's Emergency Communications Network Site Atlas Project

    SciTech Connect

    Coffey, J.R.

    1999-07-27

    Bechtel Nevada supports the US Department of Energy's Emergency Operations Center by providing Geographic Information System support in the areas of database maintenance, user interface, and daily emergency preparedness operations. This support includes preparation of a set of standardized atlases for many of the sites run by the Department of Energy. The atlases are created from one suite of ARC Macro Language programs that handles problems with producing consistent output for many maps in many different scales from data obtained from multiple sources and created at various scales. Flexibility and ease of change/update are the key benefits of this system.

  12. Small forces that differ with prior motor experience can communicate movement goals during human-human physical interaction.

    PubMed

    Sawers, Andrew; Bhattacharjee, Tapomayukh; McKay, J Lucas; Hackney, Madeleine E; Kemp, Charles C; Ting, Lena H

    2017-01-31

    Physical interactions between two people are ubiquitous in our daily lives, and an integral part of many forms of rehabilitation. However, few studies have investigated forces arising from physical interactions between humans during a cooperative motor task, particularly during overground movements. As such, the direction and magnitude of interaction forces between two human partners, how those forces are used to communicate movement goals, and whether they change with motor experience remains unknown. A better understanding of how cooperative physical interactions are achieved in healthy individuals of different skill levels is a first step toward understanding principles of physical interactions that could be applied to robotic devices for motor assistance and rehabilitation. Interaction forces between expert and novice partner dancers were recorded while performing a forward-backward partnered stepping task with assigned "leader" and "follower" roles. Their position was recorded using motion capture. The magnitude and direction of the interaction forces were analyzed and compared across groups (i.e. expert-expert, expert-novice, and novice-novice) and across movement phases (i.e. forward, backward, change of direction). All dyads were able to perform the partnered stepping task with some level of proficiency. Relatively small interaction forces (10-30N) were observed across all dyads, but were significantly larger among expert-expert dyads. Interaction forces were also found to be significantly different across movement phases. However, interaction force magnitude did not change as whole-body synchronization between partners improved across trials. Relatively small interaction forces may communicate movement goals (i.e. "what to do and when to do it") between human partners during cooperative physical interactions. Moreover, these small interactions forces vary with prior motor experience, and may act primarily as guiding cues that convey information about

  13. Communication and interpretation of emotional distress within the friendships of young Irish men prior to suicide: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Lorna; Owens, Christabel; Malone, Kevin

    2015-03-01

    The potential for young men in crisis to be supported by their lay networks is an important issue for suicide prevention, due to the under-utilisation of healthcare services by this population. Central to the provision of lay support is the capability of social networks to recognise and respond effectively to young men's psychological distress and suicide risk. The aim of this qualitative study was to explore young men's narratives of peer suicide, in order to identify how they interpreted and responded to behavioural changes and indications of distress from their friend before suicide. In-depth qualitative interviews were conducted during 2009/10 with 15 Irish males (aged 19-30 years) who had experienced the death by suicide of a male friend in the preceding 5 years. The data were analysed using a thematic approach. Through the analysis of the participants' stories and experiences, we identified several features of young male friendships and social interactions that could be addressed to strengthen the support available to young men in crisis. These included the reluctance of young men to discuss emotional or personal issues within male friendships; the tendency to reveal worries and emotion only within the context of alcohol consumption; the tendency of friends to respond in a dismissive or disapproving way to communication of suicidal thoughts; the difficulty of knowing how to interpret a friend's inconsistent or ambiguous behaviour prior to suicide; and beliefs about the sort of person who takes their own life. Community-based suicide prevention initiatives must enhance the potential of young male social networks to support young men in crisis, through specific provisions for developing openness in communication and responsiveness, and improved education about suicide risk. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Incorporating the Campus Radio Station into Your Emergency Communications Plan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Thomas C.

    2008-01-01

    Radio stations have been a mainstay of American life since the 1920s. Broadcasting primarily over AM and FM frequencies, American radio stations have been used to provide entertainment, news, weather, and advertising to the public. Beginning in 1963 and continuing until 1997, local radio stations were part of the Emergency Broadcast System (EBS)…

  15. Incorporating the Campus Radio Station into Your Emergency Communications Plan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Thomas C.

    2008-01-01

    Radio stations have been a mainstay of American life since the 1920s. Broadcasting primarily over AM and FM frequencies, American radio stations have been used to provide entertainment, news, weather, and advertising to the public. Beginning in 1963 and continuing until 1997, local radio stations were part of the Emergency Broadcast System (EBS)…

  16. Three Types of Memory in Emergency Medical Services Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angeli, Elizabeth L.

    2015-01-01

    This article examines memory and distributed cognition involved in the writing practices of emergency medical services (EMS) professionals. Results from a 16-month study indicate that EMS professionals rely on distributed cognition and three kinds of memory: individual, collaborative, and professional. Distributed cognition and the three types of…

  17. The Multi-Dimensional Nature of Emergency Communications Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staman, E. Michael; Katsouros, Mark; Hach, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Within an incredibly short period--perhaps less than twenty-four months--the need for emergency preparedness has risen to a higher level of urgency than at any other time in the history of academe. Large or small, public or private, higher education institutions are seriously considering the dual problems of notification and communications…

  18. Three Types of Memory in Emergency Medical Services Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angeli, Elizabeth L.

    2015-01-01

    This article examines memory and distributed cognition involved in the writing practices of emergency medical services (EMS) professionals. Results from a 16-month study indicate that EMS professionals rely on distributed cognition and three kinds of memory: individual, collaborative, and professional. Distributed cognition and the three types of…

  19. The Multi-Dimensional Nature of Emergency Communications Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staman, E. Michael; Katsouros, Mark; Hach, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Within an incredibly short period--perhaps less than twenty-four months--the need for emergency preparedness has risen to a higher level of urgency than at any other time in the history of academe. Large or small, public or private, higher education institutions are seriously considering the dual problems of notification and communications…

  20. FORUM: Instructional Communication and Millennial Students: Teaching Communication to Emerging Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tompkins, Paula S.

    2016-01-01

    The new developmental stage of emerging adulthood (age 18-25) offers a framework for thinking about younger millennials in our classrooms. Smith, Christoffersen, Davidson, and Herzog's (2011) profile of emerging adults, based on longitudinal study of over 3200 emerging adults and culminating in 230 in-depth interviews, parallels research of the…

  1. FORUM: Instructional Communication and Millennial Students: Teaching Communication to Emerging Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tompkins, Paula S.

    2016-01-01

    The new developmental stage of emerging adulthood (age 18-25) offers a framework for thinking about younger millennials in our classrooms. Smith, Christoffersen, Davidson, and Herzog's (2011) profile of emerging adults, based on longitudinal study of over 3200 emerging adults and culminating in 230 in-depth interviews, parallels research of the…

  2. Smartphones let surgeons know WhatsApp: an analysis of communication in emergency surgical teams.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Maximilian J; King, Dominic; Arora, Sonal; Behar, Nebil; Athanasiou, Thanos; Sevdalis, Nick; Darzi, Ara

    2015-01-01

    Outdated communication technologies in healthcare can place patient safety at risk. This study aimed to evaluate implementation of the WhatsApp messaging service within emergency surgical teams. A prospective mixed-methods study was conducted in a London hospital. All emergency surgery team members (n = 40) used WhatsApp for communication for 19 weeks. The initiator and receiver of communication were compared for response times and communication types. Safety events were reported using direct quotations. More than 1,100 hours of communication pertaining to 636 patients were recorded, generating 1,495 communication events. The attending initiated the most instruction-giving communication, whereas interns asked the most clinical questions (P < .001). The resident was the speediest responder to communication compared to the intern and attending (P < .001). The participants felt that WhatsApp helped flatten the hierarchy within the team. WhatsApp represents a safe, efficient communication technology. This study lays the foundations for quality improvement innovations delivered over smartphones. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Software-Defined Ultra-wideband Radio Communications: A New RF Technology for Emergency Response Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Nekoogar, F; Dowla, F

    2009-10-19

    Reliable wireless communication links for local-area (short-range) and regional (long-range) reach capabilities are crucial for emergency response to disasters. Lack of a dependable communication system can result in disruptions in the situational awareness between the local responders in the field and the emergency command and control centers. To date, all wireless communications systems such as cell phones and walkie-talkies use narrowband radio frequency (RF) signaling for data communication. However, the hostile radio propagation environment caused by collapsed structures and rubble in various disaster sites results in significant degradation and attenuation of narrowband RF signals, which ends up in frequent communication breakdowns. To address the challenges of reliable radio communication in disaster fields, we propose an approach to use ultra-wideband (UWB) or wideband RF waveforms for implementation on Software Defined Radio (SDR) platforms. Ultra-wideband communications has been proven by many research groups to be effective in addressing many of the limitations faced by conventional narrowband radio technologies. In addition, LLNL's radio and wireless team have shown significant success in field deployment of various UWB communications system for harsh environments based on LLNL's patented UWB modulation and equalization techniques. Furthermore, using software defined radio platform for UWB communications offers a great deal of flexibility in operational parameters and helps the radio system to dynamically adapt itself to its environment for optimal performance.

  4. Situation, Background, Assessment, and Recommendation-Guided Huddles Improve Communication and Teamwork in the Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Martin, Heather A; Ciurzynski, Susan M

    2015-11-01

    Thousands of people die annually in hospitals because of poor communication and teamwork between health care team members. Standardized tools and strategies help increase the amount and quality of communication. Two structured communication methods include implementing huddles and the use of the situation, background, assessment, and recommendation (SBAR) communication framework. To improve communication among nurse practitioners and registered nurses within a pediatric emergency department, a performance-improvement project with the structured processes of a joint patient evaluation and huddle was implemented. Data were gathered from 32 nurses and 2 nurse practitioners using structured observation and pre- and post-implementation surveys. The following outcomes were measured: presence or absence of joint patient evaluation and SBAR-guided huddle, verbalization of treatment plan, communication, teamwork, and nurse satisfaction. Eighty-three percent of patient encounters included a joint evaluation. A huddle structured with SBAR was conducted 86% of the time. Registered nurses and nurse practitioners verbalized patients' treatment plans in 89% of cases and 97% of cases, respectively. Improved teamwork, communication, and nursing satisfaction scores were demonstrated among the nurse practitioners and registered nurses. This project showed the feasibility of a simple and inexpensive joint nurse practitioner-registered nurse patient evaluation followed by a structured huddle, which improved communication, teamwork, and nurse satisfaction scores. This performance-improvement project has the potential to enhance efficiency by reducing redundancy, as well as to improve patient safety through the use of structured communication techniques. Copyright © 2015 Emergency Nurses Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Gut feelings: the emerging biology of gut–brain communication

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Emeran A.

    2013-01-01

    The concept that the gut and the brain are closely connected, and that this interaction plays an important part not only in gastrointestinal function but also in certain feeling states and in intuitive decision making, is deeply rooted in our language. Recent neurobiological insights into this gut–brain crosstalk have revealed a complex, bidirectional communication system that not only ensures the proper maintenance of gastrointestinal homeostasis and digestion but is likely to have multiple effects on affect, motivation and higher cognitive functions, including intuitive decision making. Moreover, disturbances of this system have been implicated in a wide range of disorders, including functional and inflammatory gastrointestinal disorders, obesity and eating disorders. PMID:21750565

  6. Real-time multimedia communications in medical emergency - the CONCERTO project solution.

    PubMed

    Martini, Maria G; Iacobelli, Lorenzo; Bergeron, Cyril; Hewage, Chaminda T; Panza, Gianmarco; Piri, Esa; Vehkapera, Janne; Amon, Peter; Mazzotti, Matteo; Savino, Ketty; Bokor, Laszlo

    2015-01-01

    The management of medical emergency, in particular cardiac emergency, requests prompt intervention and the possibility to communicate in real time from the emergency area / ambulance to the hospital as much diagnostic information as possible about the patient. This would enable a prompt emergency diagnosis and operation and the possibility to prepare the appropriate actions in the suitable hospital department. To address this scenario, the CONCERTO European project proposed a wireless communication system based on a novel cross-layer architecture, including the integration of building blocks for medical media content fusion, delivery and access. This paper describes the proposed system architecture, outlining the developed components and mechanisms, and the evaluation of the proposed system, carried out in a hospital with the support of medical staff. The technical results and the feedback received highlight the impact of the CONCERTO approach in the healthcare domain, in particular in enabling a prompt and reliable diagnosis in challenging medical emergency scenarios.

  7. There is no Difference in the Incidence of Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting (PONV) When Ondansetron (ZOFRAN) is Administered Prior to Induction or Emergence from General Anesthesia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if ondansetron is more effective in the prevention of PONV when administered prior to induction versus... ondansetron at induction (n = 75) and Group II received ondansetron at emergence (n = 75). A general anesthesia protocol was followed and data was...of mostly of female patients. When ondansetron 4 mg IV is administered at induction or emergence from general endotracheal anesthesia, patients

  8. Prior individual training and self-organized queuing during group emergency escape of mice from water pool.

    PubMed

    Saloma, Caesar; Perez, Gay Jane; Gavile, Catherine Ann; Ick-Joson, Jacqueline Judith; Palmes-Saloma, Cynthia

    2015-01-01

    We study the impact of prior individual training during group emergency evacuation using mice that escape from an enclosed water pool to a dry platform via any of two possible exits. Experimenting with mice avoids serious ethical and legal issues that arise when dealing with unwitting human participants while minimizing concerns regarding the reliability of results obtained from simulated experiments using 'actors'. First, mice were trained separately and their individual escape times measured over several trials. Mice learned quickly to swim towards an exit-they achieved their fastest escape times within the first four trials. The trained mice were then placed together in the pool and allowed to escape. No two mice were permitted in the pool beforehand and only one could pass through an exit opening at any given time. At first trial, groups of trained mice escaped seven and five times faster than their corresponding control groups of untrained mice at pool occupancy rate ρ of 11.9% and 4%, respectively. Faster evacuation happened because trained mice: (a) had better recognition of the available pool space and took shorter escape routes to an exit, (b) were less likely to form arches that blocked an exit opening, and (c) utilized the two exits efficiently without preference. Trained groups achieved continuous egress without an apparent leader-coordinator (self-organized queuing)-a collective behavior not experienced during individual training. Queuing was unobserved in untrained groups where mice were prone to wall seeking, aimless swimming and/or blind copying that produced circuitous escape routes, biased exit use and clogging. The experiments also reveal that faster and less costly group training at ρ = 4%, yielded an average individual escape time that is comparable with individualized training. However, group training in a more crowded pool (ρ = 11.9%) produced a longer average individual escape time.

  9. Prior Individual Training and Self-Organized Queuing during Group Emergency Escape of Mice from Water Pool

    PubMed Central

    Saloma, Caesar; Perez, Gay Jane; Gavile, Catherine Ann; Ick-Joson, Jacqueline Judith; Palmes-Saloma, Cynthia

    2015-01-01

    We study the impact of prior individual training during group emergency evacuation using mice that escape from an enclosed water pool to a dry platform via any of two possible exits. Experimenting with mice avoids serious ethical and legal issues that arise when dealing with unwitting human participants while minimizing concerns regarding the reliability of results obtained from simulated experiments using ‘actors’. First, mice were trained separately and their individual escape times measured over several trials. Mice learned quickly to swim towards an exit–they achieved their fastest escape times within the first four trials. The trained mice were then placed together in the pool and allowed to escape. No two mice were permitted in the pool beforehand and only one could pass through an exit opening at any given time. At first trial, groups of trained mice escaped seven and five times faster than their corresponding control groups of untrained mice at pool occupancy rate ρ of 11.9% and 4%, respectively. Faster evacuation happened because trained mice: (a) had better recognition of the available pool space and took shorter escape routes to an exit, (b) were less likely to form arches that blocked an exit opening, and (c) utilized the two exits efficiently without preference. Trained groups achieved continuous egress without an apparent leader-coordinator (self-organized queuing)—a collective behavior not experienced during individual training. Queuing was unobserved in untrained groups where mice were prone to wall seeking, aimless swimming and/or blind copying that produced circuitous escape routes, biased exit use and clogging. The experiments also reveal that faster and less costly group training at ρ = 4%, yielded an average individual escape time that is comparable with individualized training. However, group training in a more crowded pool (ρ = 11.9%) produced a longer average individual escape time. PMID:25693170

  10. Interprofessional communication supporting clinical handover in emergency departments: An observation study.

    PubMed

    Redley, Bernice; Botti, Mari; Wood, Beverley; Bucknall, Tracey

    2017-08-01

    Poor interprofessional communication poses a risk to patient safety at change-of-shift in emergency departments (EDs). The purpose of this study was to identify and describe patterns and processes of interprofessional communication impacting quality of ED change-of-shift handovers. Observation of 66 change-of-shift handovers at two acute hospital EDs in Victoria, Australia. Focus groups with 34 nurse participants complemented the observations. Qualitative data analysis involved content and thematic methods. Four structural components of ED handover processes emerged represented by (ABCD): (1) Antecedents; (2) Behaviours and interactions; (3) Content; and (4) Delegation of ongoing care. Infrequent and ad hoc interprofessional communication and discipline-specific handover content and processes emerged as specific risks to patient safety at change-of-shift handovers. Three themes related to risky and effective practices to support interprofessional communications across the four stages of ED handovers emerged: 1) standard processes and practices, 2) teamwork and interactions and 3) communication activities and practices. Unreliable interprofessional communication can impact the quality of change-of-shift handovers in EDs and poses risk to patient safety. Structured reflective analysis of existing practices can identify opportunities for standardisation, enhanced team practices and effective communication across four stages of the handover process to support clinicians to enhance local handover practices. Future research should test and refine models to support analysis of practice, and identify and test strategies to enhance ED interprofessional communication to support clinical handovers. Copyright © 2017 College of Emergency Nursing Australasia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Emerging applications of high temperature superconductors for space communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinen, Vernon O.; Bhasin, Kul B.; Long, Kenwyn J.

    1990-01-01

    Proposed space missions require longevity of communications system components, high input power levels, and high speed digital logic devices. The complexity of these missions calls for a high data bandwidth capacity. Incorporation of high temperature superconducting (HTS) thin films into some of these communications system components may provide a means of meeting these requirements. Space applications of superconducting technology has previously been limited by the requirement of cooling to near liquid helium temperatures. Development of HTS materials with transition temperatures above 77 K along with the natural cooling ability of space suggest that space applications may lead the way in the applications of high temperature superconductivity. In order for HTS materials to be incorporated into microwave and millimeter wave devices, the material properties such as electrical conductivity, current density, surface resistivity and others as a function of temperature and frequency must be well characterized and understood. The millimeter wave conductivity and surface resistivity were well characterized, and at 77 K are better than copper. Basic microwave circuits such as ring resonators were used to determine transmission line losses. Higher Q values than those of gold resonator circuits were observed below the transition temperature. Several key HTS circuits including filters, oscillators, phase shifters and phased array antenna feeds are feasible in the near future. For technology to improve further, good quality, large area films must be reproducibly grown on low dielectric constant, low loss microwave substrates.

  12. Risk-communication capability for public health emergencies varies by community diversity

    PubMed Central

    Savoia, Elena; Stoto, Michael A; Biddinger, Paul D; Campbell, Paul; Viswanath, Kasisomayajula; Koh, Howard

    2008-01-01

    Background Public health emergencies heighten several challenges in risk-communication: providing trustworthy sources of information, reaching marginalized populations, and minimizing fear and public confusion. In emergencies, however, information may not diffuse equally among all social groups, and gaps in knowledge may increase. Such knowledge gaps vary by social structure and the size, socioeconomic status, and diversity of the population. This study explores the relationship between risk-communication capabilities, as perceived by public officials participating in emergency tabletop exercises, and community size and diversity. Findings For each of the three communication functions tested, risk-communication capabilities are perceived to be greater in communities with fewer then 10% of the population speaking a language other than English at home, decreasing as the percentage grows to 20% (ANOVA P ≤ 0.02). With respect to community size, however, we found an N-shaped relationship between perceived risk communication capabilities and population size. Capabilities are perceived highest in the largest communities and lowest in the smallest, but lower in communities with 20,000–49,999 inhabitants compared to those with 2,500–19,999. Conclusion The results of this study suggest the need to factor population diversity into risk communication plans and the need for improved state or regional risk-communication capabilities, especially for communities with limited local capacity. PMID:18710541

  13. Theory-based approaches to understanding public emergency preparedness: implications for effective health and risk communication.

    PubMed

    Paek, Hye-Jin; Hilyard, Karen; Freimuth, Vicki; Barge, J Kevin; Mindlin, Michele

    2010-06-01

    Recent natural and human-caused disasters have awakened public health officials to the importance of emergency preparedness. Guided by health behavior and media effects theories, the analysis of a statewide survey in Georgia reveals that self-efficacy, subjective norm, and emergency news exposure are positively associated with the respondents' possession of emergency items and their stages of emergency preparedness. Practical implications suggest less focus on demographics as the sole predictor of emergency preparedness and more comprehensive measures of preparedness, including both a person's cognitive stage of preparedness and checklists of emergency items on hand. We highlight the utility of theory-based approaches for understanding and predicting public emergency preparedness as a way to enable more effective health and risk communication.

  14. An evaluation of pre-hospital communication between ambulances and an accident and emergency department.

    PubMed

    Rowlands, Andrew

    2003-01-01

    We studied pre-hospital notification and the quality of data received from ambulance crews transporting seriously ill or injured patients to an accident and emergency department. During a two-month study period, pre-hospital notification was received for 54 patients. However, the department was notified about only 25 of 62 patients (40%) who, on arrival by ambulance, were triaged as emergencies. Despite developing a data protocol for emergency pre-hospital communication and being equipped to receive emergency ambulance calls directly, many such patients still arrived either unannounced or described in insufficient detail to allow appropriate preparations to be made for them.

  15. Emerging markets for satellite data communications in the public service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, J. G.

    1978-01-01

    The paper discusses some of the current and potential markets for satellite data communications as projected by the Public Service Satellite Consortium (PSSC). Organizations in the public service sector are divided into three categories, depending on their expected benefits and organizational changes due to increased satellite telecommunications use: A - modest institutional adjustments are necessary and significant productivity gains are likely; B - institutional requirements picture is promising, but more information is needed to assess benefits and risk; and C - major institutional adjustments are needed, risks are high but possible benefits are high. These criteria are applied to the U.S. health care system, continuing education, equipment maintenance, libraries, environmental monitoring, and other potential markets. The potential revenues are seen to be significant, but what is needed is a cooperative effort by common carriers and major public service institutions to aggregate the market.

  16. Emerging markets for satellite data communications in the public service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, J. G.

    1978-01-01

    The paper discusses some of the current and potential markets for satellite data communications as projected by the Public Service Satellite Consortium (PSSC). Organizations in the public service sector are divided into three categories, depending on their expected benefits and organizational changes due to increased satellite telecommunications use: A - modest institutional adjustments are necessary and significant productivity gains are likely; B - institutional requirements picture is promising, but more information is needed to assess benefits and risk; and C - major institutional adjustments are needed, risks are high but possible benefits are high. These criteria are applied to the U.S. health care system, continuing education, equipment maintenance, libraries, environmental monitoring, and other potential markets. The potential revenues are seen to be significant, but what is needed is a cooperative effort by common carriers and major public service institutions to aggregate the market.

  17. Factors affecting communication in emergency departments: doctors and nurses' perceptions of communication in a trilingual ED in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Pun, Jack K H; Matthiessen, Christian M I M; Murray, Kristen A; Slade, Diana

    2015-12-01

    This study investigates clinicians' views of clinician-patient and clinician-clinician communication, including key factors that prevent clinicians from achieving successful communication in a large, high-pressured trilingual Emergency Department (ED) in Hong Kong. Researchers interviewed 28 doctors and nurses in the ED. The research employed a qualitative ethnographic approach. The interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed, translated into English and coded using the Nvivo software. The researchers examined issues in both clinician-patient and clinician-clinician communication. Through thematic analyses, they identified the factors that impede communication most significantly, as well as the relationship between these factors. This research highlights the significant communication issues and patterns in Hong Kong EDs. The clinician interviews revealed that communication in EDs is complex, nuanced and fragile. The data revealed three types of communication issues: (1) the experiential parameter (i.e. processes and procedures), (2) the interpersonal parameter (i.e. clinicians' engagements with patients and other clinicians) and (3) contextual factors (i.e. time pressures, etc.). Within each of these areas, the specific problems were the following: compromises in knowledge transfer at key points of transition (e.g. triage, handover), inconsistencies in medical record keeping, serious pressures on clinicians (e.g. poor clinician-patient ratio and long working hours for clinicians) and a lack of focus on interpersonal skills. These communication problems (experiential, interpersonal and contextual) are intertwined, creating a complex yet weak communication structure that compromises patient safety, as well as patient and clinician satisfaction. The researchers argue that hospitals should develop and implement best-practice policies and educational programmes for clinicians that focus on the following: (1) understanding the primary causes of communication problems in

  18. When all else fails: 21st century Amateur Radio as an emergency communications medium.

    PubMed

    Nollet, Kenneth E; Ohto, Hitoshi

    2013-12-01

    Twenty-first century demand for radio spectrum continues to increase with the explosive growth of wireless devices, but authorities reserve slices of the spectrum for licensed Amateur Radio operators, recognizing their value to the public, particularly with respect to providing emergency communications. Blood banking and transfusion medicine are among the specialties that should also recognize the value of Amateur Radio as an emergency communications medium, because blood collection, testing, processing, storage, and transfusion are life-saving activities that in modern times can be separated by considerable distance. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Packaging Patients and Handing Them Over: Communication Context and Persuasion in the Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Nugus, Peter; McCarthy, Sally; Holdgate, Anna; Braithwaite, Jeffrey; Schoenmakers, Anne; Wagner, Cordula

    2017-02-01

    Communication is commonly understood by health professional researchers to consist of relatively isolated exchanges of information. The social and organizational context is given limited credit. This article examines the significance of the environmental complexity of the emergency department (ED) in influencing communication strategies and makes the case for adopting a richer understanding of organizational communication. This study draws on approximately 12 months (1,600 hours) of ethnographic observations, yielding approximately 4,500 interactions across 260 clinicians and staff in the EDs of 2 metropolitan public teaching hospitals in Sydney, Australia. The study identifies 5 communication competencies of increasing complexity that emergency clinicians need to accomplish. Furthermore, it identifies several factors-hierarchy, formally imposed organizational boundaries and roles, power, and education-that contribute to the collective function of ensuring smooth patient transfer through and out of the ED. These factors are expressed by and shape external communication with clinicians from other hospital departments. This study shows that handoff of patients from the ED to other hospital departments is a complex communication process that involves more than a series of "checklistable" information exchanges. Clinicians must learn to use both negotiation and persuasion to achieve objectives. Copyright © 2016 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The role of teamwork and communication in the emergency department: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Kilner, Emily; Sheppard, Lorraine A

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a systematic review using international research to describe the role of teamwork and communication in the emergency department, and its relevance to physiotherapy practice in the emergency department. Searches were conducted of CINAHL, Academic Search Premier, Scopus, Cochrane, PEDro, Medline, Embase, Amed and PubMed. Selection criteria included full-text English language research papers related to teamwork and/or communication based directly in the emergency department, involvement of any profession in the emergency department, publication in peer-reviewed journals, and related to adult emergency services. Studies were appraised using a validated critical appraisal tool. Fourteen eligible studies, all of mid-range quality, were identified. They demonstrated high levels of staff satisfaction with teamwork training interventions and positive staff attitudes towards the importance of teamwork and communication. There is moderate evidence that the introduction of multidisciplinary teams to the ED may be successful in reducing access block, and physiotherapists may play a role in this. The need for teamwork and communication in the ED is paramount, and their roles are closely linked, with the common significant purposes of improving patient safety, reducing clinical errors, and reducing waiting times. 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Locating and communicating with at-risk populations about emergency preparedness: the vulnerable populations outreach model.

    PubMed

    Klaiman, Tamar; Knorr, Deborah; Fitzgerald, Shannon; Demara, Philip; Thomas, Chad; Heake, George; Hausman, Alice

    2010-10-01

    Vulnerable populations tend to have the worst health outcomes during and after disasters; however, these populations are rarely included in the emergency planning process. In Philadelphia, the Department of Public Health and the Office of Emergency Management have reached out to community-based organizations that serve vulnerable populations to include these key stakeholders in emergency planning. In this article, we outline strategies for locating, engaging, and communicating with vulnerable populations about both organizational and personal emergency preparedness. Such strategies include creating a method for bidirectional communication via a free quarterly health newsletter that is distributed to community-based organizations serving vulnerable populations. We also note successes and next steps from engaging vulnerable populations in the planning process in Philadelphia.

  2. Assessing written communication during interhospital transfers of emergency general surgery patients.

    PubMed

    Harl, Felicity N R; Saucke, Megan C; Greenberg, Caprice C; Ingraham, Angela M

    2017-06-15

    Poor communication causes fragmented care. Studies of transitions of care within a hospital and on discharge suggest significant communication deficits. Communication during transfers between hospitals has not been well studied. We assessed the written communication provided during interhospital transfers of emergency general surgery patients. We hypothesized that patients are transferred with incomplete documentation from referring facilities. We performed a retrospective review of written communication provided during interhospital transfers to our emergency department (ED) from referring EDs for emergency general surgical evaluation between January 1, 2014 and January 1, 2016. Elements of written communication were abstracted from referring facility documents scanned into the medical record using a standardized abstraction protocol. Descriptive statistics summarized the information communicated. A total of 129 patients met inclusion criteria. 87.6% (n = 113) of charts contained referring hospital documents. 42.5% (n = 48) were missing history and physicals. Diagnoses were missing in 9.7% (n = 11). Ninety-one computed tomography scans were performed; among 70 with reads, final reads were absent for 70.0% (n = 49). 45 ultrasounds and x-rays were performed; among 27 with reads, final reads were missing for 80.0% (n = 36). Reasons for transfer were missing in 18.6% (n = 21). Referring hospital physicians outside the ED were consulted in 32.7% (n = 37); consultants' notes were absent in 89.2% (n = 33). In 12.4% (n = 14), referring documents arrived after the patient's ED arrival and were not part of the original documentation provided. This study documents that information important to patient care is often missing in the written communication provided during interhospital transfers. This gap affords a foundation for standardizing provider communication during interhospital transfers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Assessing written communication during interhospital transfers of emergency general surgery patients

    PubMed Central

    Harl, Felicity N.R.; Saucke, Megan C.; Greenberg, Caprice C.; Ingraham, Angela M.

    2017-01-01

    Background Poor communication causes fragmented care. Studies of transitions of care within a hospital and on discharge suggest significant communication deficits. Communication during transfers between hospitals has not been well studied. We assessed the written communication provided during interhospital transfers of emergency general surgery patients. We hypothesized that patients are transferred with incomplete documentation from referring facilities. Methods We performed a retrospective review of written communication provided during interhospital transfers to our emergency department (ED) from referring EDs for emergency general surgical evaluation between January 1, 2014 and January 1, 2016. Elements of written communication were abstracted from referring facility documents scanned into the medical record using a standardized abstraction protocol. Descriptive statistics summarized the information communicated. Results A total of 129 patients met inclusion criteria. 87.6% (n = 113) of charts contained referring hospital documents. 42.5% (n = 48) were missing history and physicals. Diagnoses were missing in 9.7% (n = 11). Ninety-one computed tomography scans were performed; a mong 70 with reads, final reads were absent for 70.0% (n = 49). 45 ultrasounds and x-rays were performed; among 27 with reads, final reads were missing for 80.0% (n = 36). Reasons for transfer were missing in 18.6% (n = 21). Referring hospital physicians outside the ED were consulted in 32.7% (n = 37); consultants’ notes were absent in 89.2% (n = 33). In 12.4% (n = 14), referring documents arrived after the patient’s ED arrival and were not part of the original documentation provided. Conclusions This study documents that information important to patient care is often missing in the written communication provided during interhospital transfers. This gap affords a foundation for standardizing provider communication during interhospital transfers. PMID:28624064

  4. Federal and State Responses to the Emergency Response Communications Program. Draft Report, March 1979.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-06-01

    comentarios relacionados con el informe titulado "Emergency Response Communications Program". Le agradecer6 estudie este informe y favor de enviarle...sus comentarios respecto al mismo directamente al Contraalmirante Venzke. Anexo I State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations EXECUTiVE 04AMBER...unconvinced that user requirements have really been developed. No real distinction is made between the way an emergency creates undue demands on the

  5. Physicians' perspectives of managing tensions around dimensions of effective communication in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Dean, Marleah; Oetzel, John G

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore emergency department (ED) physicians' perspectives of guidelines for effective communication. More specifically, the ways in which physicians manage the tensions among effective communication dimensions framed by relational dialectics theory are examined. This study used in-depth interviews with 17 ED physicians and 70 hours of observations to identify five dimensions of effective communication: efficiency, clarity/accuracy, relevance, comprehension, and rapport. Two communication tensions resulted from these dimensions: efficiency versus rapport and efficiency versus comprehension. In almost all instances, physicians chose efficient communication at the expense of comprehension or rapport. In addition, there was a tension between patient and physician perspectives of clarity and relevance that physicians tended to resolve by emphasizing what was relevant and clear from their own perspective. Implications for managing tensions in terms of efficiency and a physician-centered approach are discussed.

  6. Emerging zoonoses: responsible communication with the media--lessons learned and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Tabbaa, D

    2010-11-01

    Emerging zoonotic disease outbreaks are inevitable and often unpredictable events. The environment surrounding an outbreak is unique in public health, and outbreaks are frequently marked by uncertainty, confusion and a sense of urgency. Good communication at this time, generally through the media, is essential, but examples unfortunately abound of communication failures that have delayed outbreak control, undermined public trust and compliance, and unnecessarily prolonged economic, social and political turmoil. With this paper we hope to disseminate the idea that communication expertise has become as essential to outbreak control as epidemiological training and laboratory analysis. The paper presents the best practices for communicating with the public and discusses future aspects of communicating through the mass media during an outbreak. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  7. A simulation-based training program improves emergency department staff communication.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Lynn A; Warren, Otis; Gardner, Liz; Rojek, Adam; Lindquist, David G

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effectiveness of Project CLEAR!, a novel simulation-based training program designed to instill Crew Resource Management (CRM) as the communication standard and to create a service-focused environment in the emergency department (ED) by standardizing the patient encounter. A survey-based study compared physicians' and nurses' perceptions of the quality of communication before and after the training program. Surveys were developed to measure ED staff perceptions of the quality of communication between staff members and with patients. Pretraining and posttraining survey results were compared. After the training program, survey scores improved significantly on questions that asked participants to rate the overall communication between staff members and between staff and patients. A simulation-based training program focusing on CRM and standardizing the patient encounter improves communication in the ED, both between staff members and between staff members and patients.

  8. Structured communication for patient safety in emergency medical services: a legal case report.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, Mark J; Heninger, Jacob R

    2010-01-01

    Providers of emergency medical services (EMS) must communicate vital information during critical phases of operations. Errors in communications, for example, the failure to hear a directive, will compromise safe and effective patient care. This article presents a case that resulted in litigation because of communication failures during the interfacility transfer of a trauma patient who subsequently died in the ambulance. The communication failure involved members of a ground ambulance crew, their dispatcher, and a supervisor. The failure of the emergency medical technician (EMT) who was driving to hear from the treating EMT and her dispatcher vital information pertaining to changes in their destination and of plans to intercept another ambulance, or alternatively, the driver's ignoring this information, led to a delay in care and may have contributed to the patient's death. Factors contributing to the cause of this communication failure may have been related to the nature of the EMS setting: the physical separation between crew members (the driver, and the care provider in the back of the ambulance); the noise of the ground ambulance transport environment, most notably, the siren; and the stress of treating a patient in critical condition. The case highlights the importance of using structured forms of communication, specifically the read-back tool and the critical assertion strategy, to limit failures in communication during EMS operations and in operations in other high-risk medical settings.

  9. The Nature and Impact of Gendered Patterns of Peer Sexual Communications among Heterosexual Emerging Adults

    PubMed Central

    Trinh, Sarah L.; Ward, L. Monique

    2015-01-01

    Although previous research demonstrates that peers serve as top sexual informants and advisers, little is known about how peer sexual communications may be a gendered phenomenon. Do communications about sex and romantic relationships vary according to who is speaking to whom? The current study examined 517 college students' reports of male and female peers' communications of four sexual scripts and the associations between reports of such communications and participants' sexual attitudes and levels of sexual and dating experience. Results suggest that peer messages about sex and relationships vary by the gender of the recipient and the gender of the communicator. Women reported more frequent communications of all sexual scripts from female peers than did men. In terms of male peers' sexual communications, only one gender difference emerged: men reported receiving significantly fewer messages about the relational script than women. Compared to same-sex peer communications, there were more associations between other-sex peer communications and undergraduates' sexual attitudes and levels of sexual and dating experience. Implications for the role of same- and other-sex peers in sexual socialization are discussed. PMID:26241126

  10. Assessing knowledge and application of emergency risk communication principles among public health workers in China.

    PubMed

    Cope, James R; Frost, Melinda; Richun, Li; Xie, Ruiqian

    2014-06-01

    Since 2003, the Chinese National Health and Family Planning Commission (formerly the Ministry of Health) has implemented changes to more effectively communicate risk during public health emergencies. In spite of ongoing improvements, provincial and sub-provincial leaders face barriers, such as established modes of operation, lack of training, shortage of trained risk communicators, and limited understanding and willingness of recipients to mitigate risks. We assessed the current status of and barriers to risk communication knowledge and practice among public health practitioners in China. We designed the survey questionnaire to capture information related to the risk communication core capacities required by international health regulations and common risk communication principles. Our findings showed that risk communication training has successfully developed an awareness of risk communication principles and the ability to implement those principles in practice in China. Future efforts should focus on areas such as a dedicated risk communication workforce, requirements that public health agencies develop a risk communication plan, and additional training for public health practitioners and their partners. It is critical that the infectious diseases prevention and control law be amended to grant provincial and local public health agencies more autonomy to release information.

  11. Emergency Communications: The Emergency Alert System (EAS) and All-Hazard Warnings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-13

    stations. It was created as CONELRAD (Control of Electromagnetic Radiation) in 1951, as part of America’s response to the threat of nuclear attack. In...accessible formats for people with special needs — such as those with disabilities, the elderly , and those who do not understand English — many of...different communication devices that operate over various media ( microwave , fiber optics, and wireline). The U.S. Army installs and operates the system and

  12. Barriers and opportunities in assessing calls to emergency medical communication centre--a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Lindström, Veronica; Heikkilä, Kristiina; Bohm, Katarina; Castrèn, Maaret; Falk, Ann-Charlotte

    2014-11-11

    Previous studies have described the difficulties and the complexity of assessing an emergency call, and assessment protocols intended to support the emergency medical dispatcher's (EMD) assessment have been developed and evaluated in recent years. At present, the EMD identifies about 50-70 % of patients suffering from cardiac arrest, acute myocardial infarction or stroke. The previous research has primarily been focused on specific conditions, and it is still unclear whether there are any overall factors that may influence the assessment of the call to the emergency medical communication centre (EMCC). The aim of the study was to identify overall factors influencing the registered nurses' (RNs) assessment of calls to the EMCC. A qualitative study design was used; a purposeful selection of calls to the EMCC was analysed by content analysis. One hundred calls to the EMCC were analysed. Barriers and opportunities related to the RN or the caller were identified as the main factors influencing the RN's assessment of calls to the EMCC. The opportunities appeared in the callers' symptom description and the communication strategies used by the RN. The barriers appeared in callers' descriptions of unclear symptoms, paradoxes and the RN's lack of communication strategies during the call. Barriers in assessing the call to the EMCC were associated with contradictory information, the absence of a primary problem, or the structure of the call. Opportunities were associated with a clear symptom description that was also repeated, and the RN's use of different communication strategies such as closed loop communication.

  13. Constructing a Collaborative, Emergent Syllabus of Communicative Performances in a Nursing English Course in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stocker, Joel F.; Reddad, Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    Curriculum development research on nursing English in Taiwan has tended to end at needs analysis, offering little guidance on how to design and implement a course. Our objective was to examine how a course on workplace communication in English for nursing students in Taiwan would emerge in the classroom if teachers and students collaboratively…

  14. Information and Communications Technology (ICT) in Nigeria Educational Assessment System--Emerging Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aworanti, Olatunde Awotokun

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines Information and Communications Technology (ICT) in Nigeria educational assessment system with its emerging challenges. This is inevitable following the globalisation trend which has brought drastic changes in the world of technology. The essence of the paper is to describe the present status of ICT in the Nigeria educational…

  15. 78 FR 69310 - Hazardous Materials Table, Special Provisions, Hazardous Materials Communications, Emergency...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-19

    ... Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration 49 CFR Part 172 Hazardous Materials Table, Special Provisions, Hazardous Materials Communications, Emergency Response Information, Training Requirements, and... of October 1, 2012, on page 242, in Sec. 172.101, in the Hazardous Materials Table, in the entry...

  16. Situational Awareness in Mass Emergency: A Behavioral and Linguistic Analysis of Microblogged Communications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vieweg, Sarah Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    In times of mass emergency, users of Twitter (a popular microblogging service) often communicate information about the event, some of which contributes to situational awareness. Situational awareness refers to a state of understanding the "big picture" in time- and safety-critical situations. The more situational awareness people have,…

  17. The Semiotic Landscape and 3-Year-Olds' Emerging Understanding of Multimodal Communication Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yamada-Rice, Dylan

    2014-01-01

    This article considers the impact of the increasing use of the visual mode in texts found in urban landscapes on two 3-year-olds' understanding of communication practices. The data discussed are taken from a study into a group of 3- to 6-year-olds' interaction with and emerging comprehension of the visual mode and its connection to writing in…

  18. Situational Awareness in Mass Emergency: A Behavioral and Linguistic Analysis of Microblogged Communications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vieweg, Sarah Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    In times of mass emergency, users of Twitter (a popular microblogging service) often communicate information about the event, some of which contributes to situational awareness. Situational awareness refers to a state of understanding the "big picture" in time- and safety-critical situations. The more situational awareness people have,…

  19. Dynamic Emergence of Situational Willingness to Communicate in a Second Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kang, Su-Ja

    2005-01-01

    This article reports on a qualitative study that shows how situational willingness to communicate (WTC) in a second language (L2) can dynamically emerge and fluctuate during a conversation situation. From inductive analysis of data from interviews, videotaped conversations, and stimulated recalls, it was found that situational WTC in L2 emerged…

  20. Dynamic Emergence of Situational Willingness to Communicate in a Second Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kang, Su-Ja

    2005-01-01

    This article reports on a qualitative study that shows how situational willingness to communicate (WTC) in a second language (L2) can dynamically emerge and fluctuate during a conversation situation. From inductive analysis of data from interviews, videotaped conversations, and stimulated recalls, it was found that situational WTC in L2 emerged…

  1. Potential applications of cable television (CATV) to the FEMA (Federal Emergency Management Agency) communications mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilligan, D. D.; Abtahi, H.; Becker, J. R., Jr.; Frantz, S. W.

    1983-07-01

    The history, technology, economics, regulation and vulnerability to electromagnetic pulse (EMP) effects of cable television are examined. Recommendations are made concerning FEMA integration of cable television systems into the FEMA emergency communications system and the protection of cable television systems for EMP effects.

  2. Constructing a Collaborative, Emergent Syllabus of Communicative Performances in a Nursing English Course in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stocker, Joel F.; Reddad, Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    Curriculum development research on nursing English in Taiwan has tended to end at needs analysis, offering little guidance on how to design and implement a course. Our objective was to examine how a course on workplace communication in English for nursing students in Taiwan would emerge in the classroom if teachers and students collaboratively…

  3. An Emergency Department Intervention to Increase Parent-Child Tobacco Communication: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahabee-Gittens, E. Melinda; Huang, Bin; Slap, Gail B.; Gordon, Judith S.

    2008-01-01

    We conducted a randomized trial of parents and their 9- to 16-year-old children to pilot test an emergency department (ED)-based intervention designed to increase parent-child tobacco communication. Intervention group (IG) parents received verbal/written instructions on how to relay anti-tobacco messages to their children; control group (CG)…

  4. The Semiotic Landscape and 3-Year-Olds' Emerging Understanding of Multimodal Communication Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yamada-Rice, Dylan

    2014-01-01

    This article considers the impact of the increasing use of the visual mode in texts found in urban landscapes on two 3-year-olds' understanding of communication practices. The data discussed are taken from a study into a group of 3- to 6-year-olds' interaction with and emerging comprehension of the visual mode and its connection to writing in…

  5. Communications in Public Health Emergency Preparedness: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Savoia, Elena; Viswanath, Kasisomayajula

    2013-01-01

    During a public health crisis, public health agencies engage in a variety of public communication efforts to inform the population, encourage the adoption of preventive behaviors, and limit the impact of adverse events. Given the importance of communication to the public in public health emergency preparedness, it is critical to examine the extent to which this field of study has received attention from the scientific community. We conducted a systematic literature review to describe current research in the area of communication to the public in public health emergency preparedness, focusing on the association between sociodemographic and behavioral factors and communication as well as preparedness outcomes. Articles were searched in PubMed and Embase and reviewed by 2 independent reviewers. A total of 131 articles were included for final review. Fifty-three percent of the articles were empirical, of which 74% were population-based studies, and 26% used information environment analysis techniques. None had an experimental study design. Population-based studies were rarely supported by theoretical models and mostly relied on a cross-sectional study design. Consistent results were reported on the association between population socioeconomic factors and public health emergency preparedness communication and preparedness outcomes. Our findings show the need for empirical research to determine what type of communication messages can be effective in achieving preparedness outcomes across various population groups. They suggest that a real-time analysis of the information environment is valuable in knowing what is being communicated to the public and could be used for course correction of public health messages during a crisis. PMID:24041193

  6. Emerging Communication Technologies (ECT) Phase 2 Report. Volume 1; Main Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bastin, Gary L.; Harris, William G.; Chiodini, Robert; Nelson, Richard A.; Huang, PoTien; Kruhm, David A.

    2003-01-01

    The Emerging Communication Technology (ECT) project investigated three First Mile communication technologies in support of NASA s Second Generation Reusable Launch Vehicle (2nd Gen RLV), Orbital Space Plane, Advanced Range Technology Working Group (ARTWG) and the Advanced Spaceport Technology Working Group (ASTWG). These First Mile technologies have the purpose of interconnecting mobile users with existing Range Communication infrastructures. ECT was a continuation of the Range Information System Management (RISM) task started in 2002. RISM identified the three advance communication technologies investigated under ECT. These were Wireless Ethernet (Wi-Fi), Free Space Optics (FSO), and Ultra Wideband (UWB). Due to the report s size, it has been broken into three volumes: 1) Main Report 2) Appendices 3) UWB.

  7. Emerging Communication Technologies (ECT) Phase 2 Report. Volume 3; Ultra Wideband (UWB) Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bastin, Gary L.; Harris, William G.; Chiodini, Robert; Nelson, Richard A.; Huang, PoTien; Kruhm, David A.

    2003-01-01

    The Emerging Communication Technology (ECT) project investigated three First Mile communication technologies in support of NASA s Second Generation Reusable Launch Vehicle (2nd Gen RLV), Orbital Space Plane, Advanced Range Technology Working Group (ARTWG) and the Advanced Spaceport Technology Working Group (ASTWG). These First Mile technologies have the purpose of interconnecting mobile users with existing Range Communication infrastructures. ECT was a continuation of the Range Information System Management (RISM) task started in 2002. RISM identified the three advance communication technologies investigated under ECT. These were Wireless Ethernet (Wi-Fi), Free Space Optics (FSO), and Ultra Wideband (UWB). Due to the report s size, it has been broken into three volumes: 1) Main Report 2) Appendices 3) UWB

  8. Effectiveness of educational communication interventions for health professionals to improve quality of care in emergency departments: a systematic review protocol.

    PubMed

    Ding, Mingshuang; Bell, Anthony; Rixon, Sascha; Rixon, Andrew; Addae-Bosomprah, Hansel; Simon, Jane

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this review is to evaluate the effectiveness of educational communication interventions for health professionals in emergency departments. The end result is to identify the specific types of communication based educational strategies utilized by emergency department health care professionals to enhance the quality of care for patients.

  9. Communication of Vital Signs at Emergency Department Handoff: Opportunities for Improvement.

    PubMed

    Venkatesh, Arjun K; Curley, David; Chang, Yuchiao; Liu, Shan W

    2015-08-01

    We describe the prevalence of vital sign communication errors during emergency department (ED) handoffs. Our secondary objective is to evaluate the association between handoff behaviors and ED crowding on vital sign handoff errors. This was a prospective observational study of ED handoffs conducted at an urban academic hospital. We observed a prespecified convenience sample of ED shift rounds and included all patients whose care was subject to a handoff during ED shift change. The primary outcome was vital sign communication errors, defined as the failure to communicate an episode of medical-record-documented hypotension or hypoxia during ED shift rounds. Trained research assistants used a standardized data collection tool to collect data through direct observation and electronic health record abstraction. We report descriptive statistics and results of a logistic regression model constructed with generalized estimating equations to describe the association between handoff and rounds-level characteristics and handoff errors. We observed 1,163 patient handoffs during 130 ED shift rounds. Of 117 patients with episodes of hypotension and 156 patients with hypoxia, 66 (42%) and 116 (74%) were not communicated at rounds, respectively. One hundred sixty-six handoffs (14%) included a vital sign communication error of omission. In multivariate analysis, no handoff or rounds characteristic, including the ED occupancy rate, was associated with omission errors of vital sign communication. Providers omitted communication of patient hypotension or hypoxia in nearly 1 in 7 ED handoffs. These communication errors do not appear to be related to ED crowding or care interruptions. Copyright © 2015 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Federal interagency communication strategies for addressing radiation emergencies and other public health crises.

    PubMed

    Miller, Charles W; McCurley, M Carol

    2011-11-01

    Federal agencies have a variety of roles and responsibilities related to communicating with the public before, during, and after a radiological emergency. To better understand the various efforts currently underway, the Radiation Studies Branch of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention convened a roundtable of representatives from federal agencies with responsibility for communicating with the public about radiation emergencies. Roundtable participants shared valuable information about efforts underway to develop information and messages for a variety of audiences and agreed that continued interagency coordination and dialogue about communication before, during, and after an event are needed. The group suggested several strategies for future collaborative efforts and indicated a desire to continue working together to develop and assess messages for radiological emergency preparedness and response. The group also recommended that more work be done to determine whether messages need to be packaged or tailored for specific special populations and suggested that more research be conducted to answer questions about specific audience/cultural needs around communicating radiation risks. Since this roundtable, attendees have continued to work together to develop and test messages for the public.

  11. Communication in nuclear emergency preparedness: a closer look at information reception.

    PubMed

    Perko, Tanja; van Gorp, Baldwin; Turcanu, Catrinel; Thijssen, Peter; Carle, Benny

    2013-11-01

    Preparedness of the general population plays a key role in the effective implementation of protective actions in case of a nuclear emergency (e.g., evacuation or intake of iodine tablets). In this context, a good communication of emergency management actors with the public along the entire cycle of preparedness-response-recovery is of paramount importance. This article aims at providing a better understanding of the way people process communicated messages and the factors that may influence how they do this. In particular, it investigates information reception as part of the information processing in precrisis communication. As a case study, the precrisis communication context was chosen, as it has been tackled to a lesser extent in the literature. The empirical data used for this study originated from a large-scale opinion survey in Belgium. One topic in this survey addressed the information campaign for the distribution of iodine tablets, in the context of preparedness for nuclear emergencies. The findings of this study demonstrate that systematic predictors have a stronger influence on information reception, as compared to heuristic predictors. The latter are only to a minor extent involved in the reception of emergency preparedness information. The hypothesized pattern--that more specific knowledge about the field relates to a higher reception of information--was confirmed for precrisis communication. Contrary to expectations, results showed that people with a high perception of radiation risks were less attentive to information about protective actions. People with little confidence in authorities were also more likely to have a low reception of information.

  12. Toll free mobile communication: overcoming barriers in maternal and neonatal emergencies in Rural Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Toll free mobile telephone intervention to support mothers in pregnancy and delivery period was tested in one sub district of Bangladesh. Qualitative research was conducted to measure the changes of mobile phone use in increasing communication for maternal and neonatal complications. Methods In-depth interviews were conducted among twelve Community Skilled Birth Attendants and fourteen mothers along with their husbands prior to intervention. At intervention end, six Community Skilled Birth Attendants were purposively selected for in-depth interview. Semi structured interviews were conducted among all 27 Community Skilled Birth Attendants engaged in the intervention. One Focus Group Discussion was conducted with 10 recently delivered mothers. Thematic analysis and triangulation of different responses were conducted. Results Prior to intervention, Community Skilled Birth Attendants reported that mobile communication was not a norm. It was also revealed that poor mothers had poor accessibility to mobile services. Mothers, who communicated through mobile phone with providers noted irritability from Community Skilled Birth Attendants and sometimes found phones switched off. At the end of the project, 85% of mothers who had attended orientation sessions of the intervention communicated with Community Skilled Birth Attendants through mobile phones during maternal health complications. Once a complication is reported or anticipated over phone, Community Skilled Birth Attendants either made a prompt visit to mothers or advised for direct referral. More than 80% Community Skilled Birth Attendants communicated with Solution Linked Group for guidance on maternal health management. Prior to intervention, Solution Linked Group was not used to receive phone call from Community Skilled Birth Attendants. Community Skilled Birth Attendants were valued by the mothers. Mothers viewed that Community Skilled Birth Attendants are becoming confident in managing complication due

  13. Toll free mobile communication: overcoming barriers in maternal and neonatal emergencies in Rural Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Huq, Nafisa Lira; Azmi, Asrafi Jahan; Quaiyum, M A; Hossain, Shahed

    2014-07-12

    Toll free mobile telephone intervention to support mothers in pregnancy and delivery period was tested in one sub district of Bangladesh. Qualitative research was conducted to measure the changes of mobile phone use in increasing communication for maternal and neonatal complications. In-depth interviews were conducted among twelve Community Skilled Birth Attendants and fourteen mothers along with their husbands prior to intervention. At intervention end, six Community Skilled Birth Attendants were purposively selected for in-depth interview. Semi structured interviews were conducted among all 27 Community Skilled Birth Attendants engaged in the intervention. One Focus Group Discussion was conducted with 10 recently delivered mothers. Thematic analysis and triangulation of different responses were conducted. Prior to intervention, Community Skilled Birth Attendants reported that mobile communication was not a norm. It was also revealed that poor mothers had poor accessibility to mobile services. Mothers, who communicated through mobile phone with providers noted irritability from Community Skilled Birth Attendants and sometimes found phones switched off. At the end of the project, 85% of mothers who had attended orientation sessions of the intervention communicated with Community Skilled Birth Attendants through mobile phones during maternal health complications. Once a complication is reported or anticipated over phone, Community Skilled Birth Attendants either made a prompt visit to mothers or advised for direct referral. More than 80% Community Skilled Birth Attendants communicated with Solution Linked Group for guidance on maternal health management. Prior to intervention, Solution Linked Group was not used to receive phone call from Community Skilled Birth Attendants. Community Skilled Birth Attendants were valued by the mothers. Mothers viewed that Community Skilled Birth Attendants are becoming confident in managing complication due to communication with

  14. Emergency situations and deaf people in Israel: Communication obstacles and recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Tannenbaum-Baruchi, Carolina; Feder-Bubis, Paula; Adini, Bruria; Aharonson-Daniel, Limor

    2014-01-01

    The absence of the ability to hear sounds in deaf people is an obstacle to optimal communication in a predominantly hearing world. Emergency situations harbor sufficient challenge for the hearing person and pose even greater barriers for the deaf and hard of hearing. During disasters and emergency situations, deaf people have great difficulty in obtaining and sharing information, increasing their dependence on others. This article focuses on the experience of deaf people during a period of security threat, when missiles from the Gaza strip were aimed at the civilian population in Southern Israel, in 2009. The aim of this article is to illustrate the complexities that deaf citizens experienced, and describe their coping mechanisms. A qualitative study including 15 heterogeneous-background Deaf participants interviewed by a researcher that belongs to the deaf community using a multiple-method facilitated questionnaire. Data was analyzed using grounded theory methodology principles. Main categories that arose from data analysis were communication problems during emergencies, the pager as a questionable warning device about emergencies (due to timing and content/context issues of its use), and the implications of the location of deaf people at time of emergency. Various channels for conveying information should be examined and created in order to maximize the heterogeneous deaf community's ability to receive vital information during an emergency. Professional sign language interpreters are necessary during emergencies, helping to reduce both dependence on informal sources (such as family members, including minors, friends, neighbors, by-standers) and risk. The development of new technologies may bear potential help for deaf persons during emergencies. Being a socio-linguistic minority, it is recommended to ensure these technologies will be accessible to the whole deaf community. PMID:28229005

  15. Emergency situations and deaf people in Israel: Communication obstacles and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Tannenbaum-Baruchi, Carolina; Feder-Bubis, Paula; Adini, Bruria; Aharonson-Daniel, Limor

    2014-01-01

    The absence of the ability to hear sounds in deaf people is an obstacle to optimal communication in a predominantly hearing world. Emergency situations harbor sufficient challenge for the hearing person and pose even greater barriers for the deaf and hard of hearing. During disasters and emergency situations, deaf people have great difficulty in obtaining and sharing information, increasing their dependence on others. This article focuses on the experience of deaf people during a period of security threat, when missiles from the Gaza strip were aimed at the civilian population in Southern Israel, in 2009. The aim of this article is to illustrate the complexities that deaf citizens experienced, and describe their coping mechanisms. A qualitative study including 15 heterogeneous-background Deaf participants interviewed by a researcher that belongs to the deaf community using a multiple-method facilitated questionnaire. Data was analyzed using grounded theory methodology principles. Main categories that arose from data analysis were communication problems during emergencies, the pager as a questionable warning device about emergencies (due to timing and content/context issues of its use), and the implications of the location of deaf people at time of emergency. Various channels for conveying information should be examined and created in order to maximize the heterogeneous deaf community's ability to receive vital information during an emergency. Professional sign language interpreters are necessary during emergencies, helping to reduce both dependence on informal sources (such as family members, including minors, friends, neighbors, by-standers) and risk. The development of new technologies may bear potential help for deaf persons during emergencies. Being a socio-linguistic minority, it is recommended to ensure these technologies will be accessible to the whole deaf community.

  16. Team communication patterns in emergency resuscitation: a mixed methods qualitative analysis.

    PubMed

    Calder, Lisa Anne; Mastoras, George; Rahimpour, Mitra; Sohmer, Benjamin; Weitzman, Brian; Cwinn, A Adam; Hobin, Tara; Parush, Avi

    2017-12-01

    In order to enhance patient safety during resuscitation of critically ill patients, we need to optimize team communication and enhance team situational awareness but little is known about resuscitation team communication patterns. The objective of this study is to understand how teams communicate during resuscitation; specifically to assess for a shared mental model (organized understanding of a team's relationships) and information needs. We triangulated 3 methods to evaluate resuscitation team communication at a tertiary care academic trauma center: (1) interviews; (2) simulated resuscitation observations; (3) live resuscitation observations. We interviewed 18 resuscitation team members about shared mental models, roles and goals of team members and procedural expectations. We observed 30 simulated resuscitation video recordings and documented the timing, source and destination of communication and the information category. We observed 12 live resuscitations in the emergency department and recorded baseline characteristics of the type of resuscitations, nature of teams present and type and content of information exchanges. The data were analyzed using a qualitative communication analysis method. We found that resuscitation team members described a shared mental model. Respondents understood the roles and goals of each team member in order to provide rapid, efficient and life-saving care with an overall need for situational awareness. The information flow described in the interviews was reflected during the simulated and live resuscitations with the most responsible physician and charting nurse being central to team communication. We consolidated communicated information into six categories: (1) time; (2) patient status; (3) patient history; (4) interventions; (5) assistance and consultations; 6) team members present. Resuscitation team members expressed a shared mental model and prioritized situational awareness. Our findings support a need for cognitive aids to

  17. Understanding discharge communication behaviours in a pediatric emergency care context: a mixed methods observation study protocol.

    PubMed

    Curran, Janet A; Bishop, Andrea; Plint, Amy; MacPhee, Shannon; Zemek, Roger; Chorney, Jill; Jabbour, Mona; Porter, Stephen; Sawyer, Scott

    2017-04-17

    One of the most important transitions in the continuum of care for children is discharge to home. Optimal discharge communication between healthcare providers and caregivers (e.g., parents or other guardians) who present to the emergency department (ED) with their children is not well understood. The lack of policies and considerable variation in practice regarding discharge communication in pediatric EDs pose a quality and safety risk for children and their parents. The aim of this mixed methods study is to better understand the process and structure of discharge communication in a pediatric ED context to contribute to the design and development of discharge communication interventions. We will use surveys, administrative data and real-time video observation to characterize discharge communication for six common illness presentations in a pediatric ED: (1) asthma, (2) bronchiolitis, (3) abdominal pain, (4) fever, (5) diarrhea and vomiting, and (6) minor head injury. Participants will be recruited from one of two urban pediatric EDs in Canada. Video recordings will be analyzed using Observer XT. We will use logistic regression to identify potential demographic and visit characteristic cofounders and multivariate logistic regression to examine association between verbal and non-verbal behaviours and parent recall and comprehension. Video recording of discharge communication will provide an opportunity to capture important data such as temporality, sequence and non-verbal behaviours that might influence the communication process. Given the importance of better characterizing discharge communication to identify potential barriers and enablers, we anticipate that the findings from this study will contribute to the development of more effective discharge communication policies and interventions.

  18. Modifying the Interagency Emergency Health Kit to include treatment for non-communicable diseases in natural disasters and complex emergencies

    PubMed Central

    Tonelli, Marcello; Nadler, Brian; Darzi, Ara; Rasheed, Shahnawaz

    2016-01-01

    The Interagency Emergency Health Kit (IEHK) provides a standard package of medicines and simple medical devices for aid agencies to use in emergencies such as disasters and armed conflicts. Despite the increasing burden of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) in such settings, the IEHK includes few drugs and devices for management of NCDs. Using published data to model the population burden of acute and chronic presentations of NCDs in emergency-prone regions, we estimated the quantity of medications and devices that should be included in the IEHK. NCDs considered were cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, hypertension and chronic respiratory disease. In scenario 1 (the primary scenario), we assumed that resources in the IEHK would only include those needed to manage acute life-threatening conditions. In scenario 2, we included resources required to manage both acute and chronic presentations of NCDs. Drugs and devices that might be required included amlodipine, aspirin, atenolol, beclomethasone, dextrose 50%, enalapril, furosemide, glibenclamide, glyceryl trinitrate, heparin, hydralazine, hydrochlorothiazide, insulin, metformin, prednisone, salbutamol and simvastatin. For scenario 1, the number of units required ranged from 12 (phials of hydralazine) to ∼15 000 (tablets of enalapril). Space and weight requirements were modest and total cost for all drugs and devices was approximately US$2078. As expected, resources required for scenario 2 were much greater. Space and cost requirements increased proportionately: estimated total cost of scenario 2 was $22 208. The resources required to treat acute NCD presentations appear modest, and their inclusion in the IEHK seems feasible. PMID:28588970

  19. Communication Skills of Young Children Implanted Prior to Four Years of Age Compared to Typically Hearing Matched Peers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Losh, Judith Anne Lakawicz

    2010-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to compare the conversational language skills and interactions of four children who are d/hh and who received cochlear implants (CI) prior to the age of four years with four typically hearing peers matched for age, gender, teacher perceived language ability and race. This exploratory, descriptive study was…

  20. Health information and communication system for emergency management in a developing country, Iran.

    PubMed

    Seyedin, Seyed Hesam; Jamali, Hamid R

    2011-08-01

    Disasters are fortunately rare occurrences. However, accurate and timely information and communication are vital to adequately prepare individual health organizations for such events. The current article investigates the health related communication and information systems for emergency management in Iran. A mixed qualitative and quantitative methodology was used in this study. A sample of 230 health service managers was surveyed using a questionnaire and 65 semi-structured interviews were also conducted with public health and therapeutic affairs managers who were responsible for emergency management. A range of problems were identified including fragmentation of information, lack of local databases, lack of clear information strategy and lack of a formal system for logging disaster related information at regional or local level. Recommendations were made for improving the national emergency management information and communication system. The findings have implications for health organizations in developing and developed countries especially in the Middle East. Creating disaster related information databases, creating protocols and standards, setting an information strategy, training staff and hosting a center for information system in the Ministry of Health to centrally manage and share the data could improve the current information system.

  1. Emergent properties of extracellular vesicles: a holistic approach to decode the complexity of intercellular communication networks.

    PubMed

    Gho, Yong Song; Lee, Changjin

    2017-06-27

    Shedding of nano-sized bilayered extracellular vesicles and extracellular vesicle-mediated intercellular communication are evolutionarily conserved biological processes. Communication between cells and the environment is an essential process in living organisms and dysregulation of intercellular communication leads to various diseases. Thus, systematic studies on extracellular vesicles, also known as exosomes, microvesicles, and outer membrane vesicles, are critical for a deeper understanding of intercellular communication networks that are crucial for decoding the exact causes of various difficult-to-cure diseases. Recent progress in this emerging field reveals that extracellular vesicles are endogenous carriers of specific subsets of proteins, mRNAs, miRNAs, and other bioactive materials, as well as play diverse pathophysiological roles. However, certain issues regarding diverse subtypes and the complex pathophysiological roles of extracellular vesicles are not yet clearly elucidated. In this review, we first briefly introduce the complexity of extracellular vesicles in terms of their vesicular cargos and protein-protein interaction networks, their diverse subtypes, and multifaceted pathophysiological functions. Then, we introduce the limitation of reductionist approaches in understanding the complexity of extracellular vesicles. We finally suggest that molecular systems biology approaches based on the concept of emergent properties are essential for a comprehensive understanding of the complex pathophysiological functions of heterogeneous extracellular vesicles, either at the single vesicle level or at a systems level as a whole.

  2. "Why Is This Patient Being Sent Here?": Communication from Urgent Care to the Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Rebekah; Choo, Esther K; Gravenstein, Stefan; Baier, Rosa R

    2016-03-01

    Despite patients' increasing use of urgent care centers (UCC), little is known about how urgent care clinicians communicate with the emergency department (ED). To assess ED clinicians' perceptions of the quality and consistency of communication when patients are referred from UCCs to EDs. Emergency medicine department chairs distributed a brief, electronic survey to a statewide sample of ED clinicians via e-mail. The survey included multiple-choice and free-text questions focused on types of communication desired and received from UCCs, types of test results available on transfer, and suggestions for improvement. Of 199 ED clinicians, 102 (51.3%) responded. More than four out of five respondents "somewhat" or "strongly agreed" that each of the following would be helpful: a telephone call, the reason for referral, specific concern, a copy of the chart, and UCC contact information. However, ED clinicians reported not consistently receiving these: only a fifth (21.6%) of clinicians reported receiving the specific concern for their last 5 patients transferred from a UCC, and 34.3% recalled receiving a copy of the chart. Overall, 54.9% reported receiving laboratory test results "often or almost always," 49.0% electrocardiograms, and 44.1% imaging reports. Qualitative analysis revealed several themes: incomplete data when patients are referred; barriers to discussion between ED and urgent care clinicians; and possible solutions to improve communication. Our findings highlight variation in communication from UCCs to EDs, indicating a need to improve communication standards and practices. We identify several potential ways to improve this clinical information hand-off. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Class I β-1,3-Glucanase and Chitinase Are Expressed in the Micropylar Endosperm of Tomato Seeds Prior to Radicle Emergence1

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chun-Ta; Leubner-Metzger, Gerhard; Meins, Frederick; Bradford, Kent J.

    2001-01-01

    β-1,3-Glucanase (EC 3.2.1.39) and chitinase (EC 3.2.1.14) mRNAs, proteins, and enzyme activities were expressed specifically in the micropylar tissues of imbibed tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) seeds prior to radicle emergence. RNA hybridization and immunoblotting demonstrated that both enzymes were class I basic isoforms. β-1,3-Glucanase was expressed exclusively in the endosperm cap tissue, whereas chitinase localized to both endosperm cap and radicle tip tissues. β-1,3-Glucanase and chitinase appeared in the micropylar tissues of gibberellin-deficient gib-1 tomato seeds only when supplied with gibberellin. Accumulation of β-1,3-glucanase mRNA, protein and enzyme activity was reduced by 100 μM abscisic acid, which delayed or prevented radicle emergence but not endosperm cap weakening. In contrast, expression of chitinase mRNA, protein, and enzyme activity was not affected by abscisic acid. Neither of these enzymes significantly hydrolyzed isolated tomato endosperm cap cell walls. Although both β-1,3-glucanase and chitinase were expressed in tomato endosperm cap tissue prior to radicle emergence, we found no evidence that they were directly involved in cell wall modification or tissue weakening. Possible functions of these hydrolases during tomato seed germination are discussed. PMID:11457981

  4. STS-42 Pilot Oswald dons CCA prior to egress exercises in JSC's WETF pool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    STS-42 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Pilot Stephen S. Oswald, wearing a launch and entry suit (LES), dons his communications carrier assembly (CCA) prior to launch emergency egress (bailout) exercises in JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29.

  5. Does Routine Midazolam Administration Prior to Nasogastric Tube Insertion in the Emergency Department Decrease Patients' Pain? (A Pilot Study).

    PubMed

    Manning, Chelsea Taylor; Buinewicz, Jacob Dillon; Sewatsky, Thomas Patrick; Zgonis, Evangelia; Gutierrez, Kathy; O'Keefe, Michael F; Freeman, Kalev

    2016-07-01

    Patients report pain and discomfort with nasogastric tube (NGT) intubation. We tested the hypothesis that premedication with midazolam alleviates pain during NGT placement in the emergency department (ED) by > 13 on a 100-mm visual analog scale (VAS). We performed a double-blind randomized controlled pilot study, assigning ED patients requiring NGT placement to midazolam or placebo. All patients received intranasal cophenylcaine; additionally, they received an intravenous (IV) dose of the study drug, either 2 mg of IV midazolam or saline control. Nurses placed NGTs while observed by research staff, who then interviewed subjects to determine the primary outcome of pain using a VAS. Additional data collected from patients and their nurses included discomfort during the procedure, difficulty of tube insertion, and complications. We enrolled 23 eligible patients and obtained complete data in all: 10 midazolam and 13 controls. We found a significant reduction in mean pain VAS score of -31 (95% confidence interval = -53 to -9 mm) with 2 mg of midazolam (mean ± SD = 52 ± 30 mm), compared to placebo (mean ± SD = 21 ± 18 mm), more than double the effect size considered clinically relevant. Treatment did not impact ease of placement and there were no serious adverse effects. Premedication with 2 mg of IV midazolam reduces pain of NGT insertion in ED patients without the need for full procedural sedation. © 2016 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  6. Transition Readiness in Adolescents and Emerging Adults with Diabetes: The Role of Patient-Provider Communication

    PubMed Central

    Hilliard, Marisa; Sweenie, Rachel; Riekert, Kristin

    2013-01-01

    Transition from pediatric to adult care represents a high risk period for adolescents and emerging adults with diabetes. Fundamental differences between pediatric and adult care delivery models may contribute to increased risk for poor health outcomes. This review provides a brief overview of models of care in pediatric and adult settings and focuses on patient-provider communication content and quality as potential points of intervention to improve transition-related outcomes. This review also highlights disparities in transition and communication for adolescents and emerging adults from racial/ethnic minority groups and discusses recent changes in health care legislation that have significant implications for the transition process. Intervention opportunities include programs to enhance developmentally-appropriate patient-provider interactions and increased attention to promoting transition readiness skills. Improving patient-provider communication may hasten the development of vital self-advocacy skills needed in adult health care systems and, thus, help establish a lasting pattern of positive diabetes self-care. PMID:24014075

  7. Key performance indicators' assessment to develop best practices in an Emergency Medical Communication Centre.

    PubMed

    Penverne, Yann; Leclere, Brice; Labady, Julien; Berthier, Frederic; Jenvrin, Joel; Javaudin, Francois; Batard, Eric; Montassier, Emmanuel

    2017-05-17

    Emergency Medical Communication Centre (EMCC) represents a pivotal link in the chain of survival for those requiring rapid response for out-of-hospital medical emergencies. Assessing and grading the performance of EMCCs are warranted as it can affect the health and safety of the served population. The aim of our work was to describe the activity on an EMCC and to explore the associations between different key performance indicators. We carried out our prospective observational study in the EMCC of Nantes, France, from 6 June 2011 to 6 June 2015. The EMCC performance was assessed with the following key performance indicators: answered calls, Quality of Service 20 s (QS20), occupation rate and average call duration. A total of 35 073 h of dispatch activity were analysed. 1 488 998 emergency calls were answered. The emergency call incidence varied slightly from 274 to 284 calls/1000 citizens/year between 2011 and 2015. The median occupation rate was 35% (25-44). QS20 was correlated negatively with the occupation rate (Spearman's ρ: -0.78). The structural equation model confirmed that the occupation rate was highly correlated with the QS20 (standardized coefficient: -0.89). For an occupation rate of 26%, the target value estimated by our polynomial model, the probability of achieving a QS20 superior or equal to 95% varied between 56 and 84%. The occupation rate appeared to be the most important factor contributing towards the QS20. Our data will be useful to develop best practices and guidelines in the field of emergency medicine communication centres.

  8. [Opinion survey on information, communication and treatment in an Emergency Department].

    PubMed

    García-García, A; Arévalo-Velasco, A; García-Iglesias, M A; Sánchez-Barba, M; Delgado-Vicente, M A; Bajo-Bajo, A; Diego-Robledo, F

    2015-01-01

    To gather specific details about the information, communication, and treatment as regards users of hospital emergency services using a telephone survey, in order to implement improvement measures, if necessary. A prospective study was conducted in two emergency departments in Salamanca. A total of 400 patients were included in the study (mean age 56.4±20.5years, 58.4% women). A telephone survey was performed with 19 items, of which 12 required responses on a Likert-type scale, with scores of 1 (very bad) to 5 (very good). The remainder of the questions allowed to answer "yes" or "no". The treatment received by the professionals in general was evaluated positively by 86% of the patients; with 92% reporting they were respectful, 87% were treated by doctors and 71% received treatment from nurses. More than one-quarter (27.5%) did not recall receiving information from blue point staff (personnel specially trained to provide information. Statistical significance (P=.045) was found in relation to the kindness and respect shown by nurses. Most patients that were admitted to the observation area of the emergency department were not informed about the visiting hours (P=.003). Perception of care received by patients is good, while in relation to information and communication it is evidently improvable, and could be assessed using the survey that is proposed in order to detect and use the weaknesses in these aspects of health care as implementation initiatives. Copyright © 2014 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  9. A Multimedia Medical Communication Link Between A Radiology Department And An Emergency Department

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, Morris; Robertson, John G.; Belanger, Garry; Georganas, Nicolas D.; Mastronardi, Jim; Cohn-Sfetcu, Sorin; Dillon, Richard F.; Tombaugh, Jo W.

    1989-05-01

    The most critical aspect of a radiologist's work is the communication of his findings to the attending physician responsible for the patient's care. This is also the part of the process that is least well organized and the most subject to failure. At the University of Ottawa Medical Communications Research Centre we are investigating technical means to improve communications between radiologists and attending physicians. We first introduce the radiology communication service problem and show why it is essentially a multimedia communication problem. We then briefly describe a multimedia communication system designed and implemented by our research team. The multimedia system consists of several workstations linked by the Hospital's LAN. Each physician workstation comprises a Compaq 386/20 Mhertz microcomputer with 16 Mbytes of RAM, a 500 Mbyte image disk, an image memory which drives a 1000 line monochrome monitor. The images are digitized using a Konica laser-based film digitizer (2430 by 2000 10-bit pixels for a standard chest radiograph). The multimedia file server manager station is built around a PC-AT compatible with a Northern Telecom MERIDIAN SL-1ST digital PBX and a Meridian Mail digital voice messaging system. This last device is used to store voice data and is linked via the PBX to the workstations' digital telephones. A SYTEK 6000 local area network (LAN) links all workstations to the file server. All data, image and graphic information is transmitted via this network, while the twisted pair connections linking the digital PBX to the telephone sets are used for transmitting voice data. Finally, we provide details of an in-hospital trial linking the Department of Radiological Sciences and the Emergency Department at the Ottawa Civic Hospital, a 950 bed tertiary care teaching hospital.

  10. Environmental constraints shaping constituent order in emerging communication systems: Structural iconicity, interactive alignment and conventionalization.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Peer; Fusaroli, Riccardo; Tylén, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    Where does linguistic structure come from? Recent gesture elicitation studies have indicated that constituent order (corresponding to for instance subject-verb-object, or SVO in English) may be heavily influenced by human cognitive biases constraining gesture production and transmission. Here we explore the alternative hypothesis that syntactic patterns are motivated by multiple environmental and social-interactional constraints that are external to the cognitive domain. In three experiments, we systematically investigate different motivations for structure in the gestural communication of simple transitive events. The first experiment indicates that, if participants communicate about different types of events, manipulation events (e.g. someone throwing a cake) and construction events (e.g. someone baking a cake), they spontaneously and systematically produce different constituent orders, SOV and SVO respectively, thus following the principle of structural iconicity. The second experiment shows that participants' choice of constituent order is also reliably influenced by social-interactional forces of interactive alignment, that is, the tendency to re-use an interlocutor's previous choice of constituent order, thus potentially overriding affordances for iconicity. Lastly, the third experiment finds that the relative frequency distribution of referent event types motivates the stabilization and conventionalization of a single constituent order for the communication of different types of events. Together, our results demonstrate that constituent order in emerging gestural communication systems is shaped and stabilized in response to multiple external environmental and social factors: structural iconicity, interactive alignment and distributional frequency. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Prosody Signals the Emergence of Intentional Communication in the First Year of Life: Evidence from Catalan-Babbling Infants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esteve-Gibert, Nuria; Prieto, Pilar

    2013-01-01

    There is considerable debate about whether early vocalizations mimic the target language and whether prosody signals emergent intentional communication. A longitudinal corpus of four Catalan-babbling infants was analyzed to investigate whether children use different prosodic patterns to distinguish communicative from investigative vocalizations…

  12. Emergence of scale-free networks from local connectivity and communication trade-offs.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Valmir C; Donangelo, Raul; Souza, Sergio R

    2006-07-01

    We suggest a mechanism of connectivity evolution in networks to account for the emergence of scale-free behavior. The mechanism works on a fixed set of nodes and promotes growth from a minimally connected initial topology by the addition of edges. A new edge is added between two nodes depending on the trade-off between a gain and a cost function of local connectivity and communication properties. We report on simulation results that indicate the appearance of power-law distributions of node degrees for selected parameter combinations.

  13. Emergence of scale-free networks from local connectivity and communication trade-offs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa, Valmir C.; Donangelo, Raul; Souza, Sergio R.

    2006-07-01

    We suggest a mechanism of connectivity evolution in networks to account for the emergence of scale-free behavior. The mechanism works on a fixed set of nodes and promotes growth from a minimally connected initial topology by the addition of edges. A new edge is added between two nodes depending on the trade-off between a gain and a cost function of local connectivity and communication properties. We report on simulation results that indicate the appearance of power-law distributions of node degrees for selected parameter combinations.

  14. An Adaptive QoS Routing Solution for MANET Based Multimedia Communications in Emergency Cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramrekha, Tipu Arvind; Politis, Christos

    The Mobile Ad hoc Networks (MANET) is a wireless network deprived of any fixed central authoritative routing entity. It relies entirely on collaborating nodes forwarding packets from source to destination. This paper describes the design, implementation and performance evaluation of CHAMELEON, an adaptive Quality of Service (QoS) routing solution, with improved delay and jitter performances, enabling multimedia communication for MANETs in extreme emergency situations such as forest fire and terrorist attacks as defined in the PEACE project. CHAMELEON is designed to adapt its routing behaviour according to the size of a MANET. The reactive Ad Hoc on-Demand Distance Vector Routing (AODV) and proactive Optimized Link State Routing (OLSR) protocols are deemed appropriate for CHAMELEON through their performance evaluation in terms of delay and jitter for different MANET sizes in a building fire emergency scenario. CHAMELEON is then implemented in NS-2 and evaluated similarly. The paper concludes with a summary of findings so far and intended future work.

  15. Efficacy of patient discharge instructions: A pointer toward caregiver friendly communication methods from pediatric emergency personnel

    PubMed Central

    Al-Harthy, Nesrin; Sudersanadas, Kavita M.; Al-Mutairi, Mohammed; Vasudevan, Senthilvel; Bin Saleh, Ghada; Al-Mutairi, Malak; Hussain, Lenna W.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Discharge instructions are vital in postemergency patient care to help the caregiver understand the diagnosis and identify symptoms which require prompt readmission. In general, oral or written instructions are provided on discharge. However, there is a dearth of information on the efficacy of discharge instructions provided by physicians in KSA. Objectives: To evaluate the efficacy of discharge instructions for postpediatrics emergency visit. Materials and Methods: This observational cross-sectional survey conducted in the Department of Paediatric Emergency at King Abdul Aziz Medical City, Riyadh, KSA, included 173 literate adult caregivers who had given their consent. Those who had been on admission earlier and been discharged from the emergency department were excluded. Demographic data and variables like knowledge of medicine and treatment follow-up were collected using a structured questionnaire and analyzed using SPSS version 16. Results: Verbal only, written only, or both verbal and written discharge instructions were provided. Written and verbal instructions, when provided together, were the most effective modes of communication with caregivers. The majority of the respondents were unaware of the follow-up plan (64.16%), unable to identify problems that would necessitate a follow-up (58.96%), and unable to identify the signs and symptoms that would require a revisit (62.43%) irrespective of the mode of instruction. However, more attention is necessary because of the 34.68% of the subjects who left the hospital without discharge instructions. Conclusions: Instructions given both verbally and in writing were observed to be more effective than verbal only or written only. The effectiveness of discharge instructions was highly influenced by the level of education of the caregivers. Improved caregiver friendly methods of communication from the pediatric emergency health-care team are necessary for the delivery of discharge instructions. PMID:27625582

  16. Relationships among communication competence, self-efficacy, and job satisfaction in Korean nurses working in the emergency medical center setting.

    PubMed

    Park, Min Sook; Jeoung, Yeonok; Lee, Hye Kyung; Sok, Sohyune R

    2015-06-01

    The communication competence of nurses working in emergency medical center settings is essential to establish a therapeutic nurse-patient relationship. Education and strategic development are required to improve the communication competence of emergency room (ER) nurses. This study was conducted to determine the relationships among individual communication competence, self-efficacy, and job satisfaction in Korean nurses in the emergency medical center setting. A cross-sectional descriptive design was adopted. The study sample included 214 nurses at 11 emergency medical centers in Seoul and Kyunggi-Do, Korea. Measures used included the Global Interpersonal Communication Competence, self-efficacy scale, and job satisfaction scale. The collected data were analyzed using the SPSS version 18.0 statistical software program and included descriptive statistics (frequency, percentage, mean, standard deviation, independent t test, analysis of variance, and Pearson's correlation coefficient). The degrees of communication competence and self-efficacy of ER nurses were good, with higher scores than the median values. However, the degree of job satisfaction was poor, indicating a lower score than the median value. Religious affiliation and previous participation in communication education each had a significant impact on communication competence. Religious affiliation and time of worse duty each had a significant impact on self-efficacy. Length of career (year) in the emergency medical center and type of hospital each had a significant impact on job satisfaction. Positive correlations were identified among communication competence, self-efficacy, and job satisfaction. This study supported the presence of significant correlations among communication competence, self-efficacy, and job satisfaction. Thus, it is necessary to develop training programs that are customized to individual characteristics such as self-efficacy and job satisfaction to improve the communicative competence

  17. Relationships Among Communication Competence, Self-Efficacy, and Job Satisfaction in Korean Nurses Working in the Emergency Medical Center Setting.

    PubMed

    Park, Min Sook; Jeoung, Yeonok; Lee, Hye Kyung; Sok, Sohyune R

    2015-01-19

    The communication competence of nurses working in emergency medical center settings is essential to establish a therapeutic nurse-patient relationship. Education and strategic development are required to improve the communication competence of emergency room (ER) nurses. This study was conducted to determine the relationships among individual communication competence, self-efficacy, and job satisfaction in Korean nurses in the emergency medical center setting. A cross-sectional descriptive design was adopted. The study sample included 214 nurses at 11 emergency medical centers in Seoul and Kyunggi-Do, Korea. Measures used included the Global Interpersonal Communication Competence, self-efficacy scale, and job satisfaction scale. The collected data were analyzed using the SPSS version 18.0 statistical software program and included descriptive statistics (frequency, percentage, mean, standard deviation, independent t test, analysis of variance, and Pearson's correlation coefficient). The degrees of communication competence and self-efficacy of ER nurses were good, with higher scores than the median values. However, the degree of job satisfaction was poor, indicating a lower score than the median value. Religious affiliation and previous participation in communication education each had a significant impact on communication competence. Religious affiliation and time of worse duty each had a significant impact on self-efficacy. Length of career (year) in the emergency medical center and type of hospital each had a significant impact on job satisfaction. Positive correlations were identified among communication competence, self-efficacy, and job satisfaction. This study supported the presence of significant correlations among communication competence, self-efficacy, and job satisfaction. Thus, it is necessary to develop training programs that are customized to individual characteristics such as self-efficacy and job satisfaction to improve the communicative competence

  18. Examination of why some community pharmacists do not provide 72-hour emergency prescription drugs to Medicaid patients when prior authorization is not available.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, Marvin D

    2013-09-01

    Existing federal law requires that a 72-hour emergency supply of a prescription drug be dispensed to Medicaid patients when prior authorization (PA) is not available and the medication is needed without delay. The pharmacist's role is to contact prescribers and inform them that PA is needed. If the prescriber cannot be reached, the pharmacist can dispense a 72-hour emergency supply. To determine (a) the reasons why some community pharmacy owners/managers, staff pharmacists, and technicians are not compliant with the law; (b) how often the decision is made; and (c) estimate how often pharmacies do not dispense the 72-hour emergency supply when PA is not available. A questionnaire was mailed to selected Texas community pharmacies. The instrument was developed by the researcher and reviewed by the Texas Medicaid Vendor Drug Program staff. The University of Texas, Office of Survey Research collected the data in September and October of 2011 by mail and online. The data were forwarded to the researcher for analyses. A total of 788 identified community pharmacies were mailed a packet containing 3 questionnaires to be completed by the pharmacist-in-charge, a staff pharmacist, and a pharmacy technician. There were 2 mailings of the questionnaire packet and follow-up telephone calls to nonrespondents. A total of 653 questionnaires were completed and returned from 288 community pharmacies (36.7%) out of 788 pharmacies that were mailed the questionnaire packets. A total of 368 (57.5%) completed questionnaires came from chain store pharmacy respondents and 272 (42.5%) questionnaires from independent pharmacy respondents. A total of 21.3% (n = 134) of the respondents indicated that they were not aware of the federal and state requirement to dispense a 72-hour emergency supply of a prescription drug to Medicaid patients when prior authorization (PA) is not available. A greater proportion of the chain store respondents (26.6%) were unaware of the requirement compared with the

  19. Implementing standardized, inter-unit communication in an international setting: handoff of patients from emergency medicine to internal medicine.

    PubMed

    Balhara, Kamna S; Peterson, Susan M; Elabd, Mohamed Moheb; Regan, Linda; Anton, Xavier; Al-Natour, Basil Ali; Hsieh, Yu-Hsiang; Scheulen, James; Stewart de Ramirez, Sarah A

    2017-02-03

    Standardized handoffs may reduce communication errors, but research on handoff in community and international settings is lacking. Our study at a community hospital in the United Arab Emirates characterizes existing handoff practices for admitted patients from emergency medicine (EM) to internal medicine (IM), develops a standardized handoff tool, and assesses its impact on communication and physician perceptions. EM physicians completed a survey regarding handoff practices and expectations. Trained observers utilized a checklist based on the Systems Engineering Initiative for Patient Safety model to observe 40 handoffs. EM and IM physicians collaboratively developed a written tool encouraging bedside handoff of admitted patients. After the intervention, surveys of EM physicians and 40 observations were subsequently repeated. 77.5% of initial observed handoffs occurred face-to-face, with 42.5% at bedside, and in four different languages. Most survey respondents considered face-to-face handoff ideal. Respondents noted 9-13 patients suffering harm due to handoff in the prior month. After handoff tool implementation, 97.5% of observed handoffs occurred face-to-face (versus 77.5%, p = 0.014), with 82.5% at bedside (versus 42.5%, p < 0.001), and all in English. Handoff was streamlined from 7 possible pathways to 3. Most post-intervention survey respondents reported improved workflow (77.8%) and safety (83.3%); none reported patient harm. Respondents and observers noted reduced inefficiency (p < 0.05). Our standardized tool increased face-to-face and bedside handoff, positively impacted workflow, and increased perceptions of safety by EM physicians in an international, non-academic setting. Our three-step approach can be applied towards developing standardized, context-specific inter-specialty handoff in a variety of settings.

  20. An Analysis of WhatsApp Usage for Communication Between Consulting and Emergency Physicians.

    PubMed

    Gulacti, Umut; Lok, Ugur; Hatipoglu, Sinan; Polat, Haci

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate WhatsApp messenger usage for communication between consulting and emergency physicians. A retrospective, observational study was conducted in the emergency department (ED) of a tertiary care university hospital between January 2014 and June 2014. A total of 614 consultations requested by using the WhatsApp application were evaluated, and 519 eligible consultations were included in the study. The WhatsApp messages that were transferred to consultant physicians consisted of 510 (98.3%) photographic images, 517 (99.6%) text messages, 59 (11.3%) videos, and 10 (1.9%) voice messages. Consultation was most frequently requested from the orthopedics clinic (n = 160, 30.8%). The majority of requested consultations were terminated only by evaluation via WhatsApp messages. (n = 311, 59.9%). Most of the consulting physicians were outside of the hospital or were mobile at the time of the consultation (n = 292, 56.3%). The outside consultation request rate was significantly higher for night shifts than for day shifts (p = .004), and the majority of outside consultation request were concluded by only WhatsApp application (p < .001). WhatsApp is useful a communication tool between physicians, especially for ED consultants who are outside the hospital, because of the ability to transfer large amounts of clinical and radiological data during a short period of time.

  1. Communicating the risks of a new, emerging pathogen: the case of Cryptococcus gattii.

    PubMed

    Nicol, Anne-Marie; Hurrell, Christie; McDowall, Will; Bartlett, Karen; Elmieh, Negar

    2008-04-01

    The news media are an important channel for communicating public health messages, providing important information about geographic extent, symptoms, and precautionary measures. This function may be particularly important in the case of new and emerging infectious diseases, which are unfamiliar to both the public and health professionals. We conducted a content analysis of the coverage in six Canadian newspapers of two emerging infectious pathogens in British Columbia (BC), West Nile virus and Cryptococcus gattii (C. gattii), between 2001 and 2006. C. gattii was first identified in the Canadian Pacific Northwest in 1999, having previously been restricted to tropical and subtropical areas. By summer 2006, C. gattii had killed at least eight people and was responsible for over 150 hospitalizations in the province of BC, as well as significant morbidity and mortality among companion animals. West Nile virus reached Canada in 2001 and has since caused significant morbidity and mortality. It has not, to date, reached BC. Despite the much higher incidence of disease and death caused by C. gattii in BC, West Nile virus received five times more news coverage in the British Columbian and national newspapers examined. Surprisingly, the local newspaper closest to the center of the British Columbia C. gattii outbreak had a much lower proportion of coverage of the disease than other papers in the province. The article discusses possible explanations for these findings, and the implications for public health communication.

  2. Communicating geohazard information for emergency responders, a case study from the UK.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Vanessa; Cooper, Anthony

    2016-04-01

    SSS11.4/ESSI4.6/HS11.39/NH9.13 Communication of uncertain information in earth sciences: data, models and visualization Communicating geohazard information for emergency responders, a case study from the UK. Cooper, A. H.1, Banks, V.J.1, Cowup, P.2, Curness, J.3, Davis, R.4, Dawson, L3. and Gazzard, L.4 1 British Geological Survey, Keyworth, NG12 5GG, UK 2 London Fire Brigade, 169 Union Street, London, SE1 0LL, UK 3.Coventry University, Priory Street, Coventry, CV1 5FB, UK 4.Avon Fire and Rescue, Temple Back, Bristol, BS1 6EU, UK. In February 2013 a sinkhole opened beneath a Florida Home resulting in the loss of a life and demolition of the affected home. The resulting void was in the order of 15 m deep. Neighbouring homes also had to be demolished. Television footage of this unfortunate incident resonated with an Assistant Commissioner of the London Fire Brigade who questioned whether or not such a feature would be recognised in the UK and if so, how the emergency response would be managed. Stemming from this, the British Geological Survey was invited to work with the Chief Fire Officers Association Urban Search and Rescue working group on geohazards. The aim of this group was to develop national tactical operational guidance on geohazards that would form the basis for regional guidance and training. The project was addressed collaboratively providing opportunities for two students from the Coventry University Disaster Management course, that were on placements with Avon Fire and Rescue, to work with the BGS to develop the guidance. Key to the success of the project was an iterative approach to knowledge exchange with respect to firstly, the characterization of the geohazards, and the processes and uncertainties associated with them and secondly, with respect to emergency responders' needs and priorities. Effective communication was achieved through challenging and rationalising the geoscience language for the end user and through a series of customised

  3. Recommendations for Best Communication Practices to Facilitate Goal-concordant Care for Seriously Ill Older Patients With Emergency Surgical Conditions.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Zara; Koritsanszky, Luca A; Cauley, Christy E; Frydman, Julia L; Bernacki, Rachelle E; Mosenthal, Anne C; Gawande, Atul A; Block, Susan D

    2016-01-01

    To address the need for improved communication practices to facilitate goal-concordant care in seriously ill, older patients with surgical emergencies. Improved communication is increasingly recognized as a central element in providing goal-concordant care and reducing health care utilization and costs among seriously ill older patients. Given high rates of surgery in the last weeks of life, high risk of poor outcomes after emergency operations in these patients, and barriers to quality communication in the acute setting, we sought to create a framework to support surgeons in communicating with seriously ill, older patients with surgical emergencies. An interdisciplinary panel of 23 national leaders was convened for a 1-day conference at Harvard Medical School to provide input on concept, content, format, and usability of a communication framework. A prototype framework was created. Participants supported the concept of a structured approach to communication in these scenarios, and delineated 9 key elements of a framework: (1) formulating prognosis, (2) creating a personal connection, (3) disclosing information regarding the acute problem in the context of the underlying illness, (4) establishing a shared understanding of the patient's condition, (5) allowing silence and dealing with emotion, (6) describing surgical and palliative treatment options, (7) eliciting patient's goals and priorities, (8) making a treatment recommendation, and (9) affirming ongoing support for the patient and family. Communication with seriously ill patients in the acute setting is difficult. The proposed communication framework may assist surgeons in delivering goal-concordant care for high-risk patients.

  4. Palliative and end of life care communication as emerging priorities in postgraduate medical education

    PubMed Central

    Roze des Ordons, Amanda; Ajjawi, Rola; Macdonald, John; Sarti, Aimee; Lockyer, Jocelyn; Hartwick, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background Reliance on surveys and qualitative studies of trainees to guide postgraduate education about palliative and end of life (EOL) communication may lead to gaps in the curriculum. We aimed to develop a deeper understanding of internal medicine trainees’ educational needs for a palliative and EOL communication curriculum and how these needs could be met. Methods Mixed methods, including a survey and focus groups with trainees, and interviews with clinical faculty and medical educators, were applied to develop a broader perspective on current experiences and needs for further education. Quantitative descriptive and thematic analyses were conducted. Results Surveyed trainees were least confident and least satisfied with teaching in counseling about the emotional impact of emergencies and discussing organ donation. Direct observation with feedback, small group discussion, and viewing videos of personal consultations were perceived as effective, yet infrequently identified as instructional methods. Focus groups and interviews identified goals of care conversations as the highest educational priority, with education adapted to learner needs and accompanied by feedback and concurrent clinical and organizational support. Conclusions Our work expands on previous research describing needs for postgraduate education in palliative and EOL communication to include the importance of support, culture change, and faculty development, and provides insight into why such needs exist. PMID:27103952

  5. Emergency communication and information issues in terrorist events involving radioactive materials.

    PubMed

    Becker, Steven M

    2004-01-01

    With the threat posed by terrorism involving radioactive materials now high on the nation's agenda, local, state, and federal agencies are moving to enhance preparedness and response capabilities. Crucial to these efforts is the development of effective risk communication strategies. This article reports findings from an ongoing study of risk communication issues in nuclear/radiological terrorism situations. It is part of a larger CDC-funded effort that aims to better understand communication challenges associated with weapons of mass destruction terrorism incidents. Presented here are formative research findings from 16 focus groups (n = 163) in which a multi-part, hypothetical radioactive materials terrorism situation was discussed. Twelve of the focus groups were carried out with members of the general public (drawn from a variety of ethnic backgrounds and geographic locations), and four groups were composed of first responders, hospital emergency department personnel, and public health professionals. One aim of the focus groups was to elicit detailed information on people's knowledge, views, perceptions, reactions, and concerns related to a nuclear/radiological terrorism event, and to better understand people's specific information needs and preferred information sources. A second aim was to pretest draft informational materials prepared by CDC and NIOSH. Key findings for the public and professional groups are presented, and the implications of the research for developing messages in radiological/nuclear terrorism situations are explored.

  6. Implementation of a new emergency medical communication centre organization in Finland - an evaluation, with performance indicators

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background There is a great variety in how emergency medical communication centers (EMCC) are organized in different countries and sometimes, even within countries. Organizational changes in the EMCC have often occurred because of outside world changes, limited resources and the need to control costs, but historically there is often a lack of structured evaluation of these organization changes. The aim of this study was to evaluate if the performance in emergency medical dispatching changed in a smaller community outside Helsinki after the emergency medical call centre organization reform in Finland. Methods A retrospective observational study was conducted in the EMCC in southern Finland. The data from the former system, which had municipality-based centers, covered the years 2002-2005 and was collected from several databases. From the new EMCC, data was collected from January 1 to May 31, 2006. Identified performance indicators were used to evaluate and compare the old and new EMCC organizations. Results A total of 67 610 emergency calls were analyzed. Of these, 54 026 were from the municipality-based centers and 13 584 were from the new EMCC. Compared to the old municipality-based centers the new EMCC dispatched the highest priority to 7.4 percent of the calls compared to 3.6 percent in the old system. The high priority cases not detected by dispatchers increased significantly (p < 0.001) in the new EMCC organization, and the identification rate of unexpected deaths in the dispatched ambulance assignments was not significantly (p = 0.270) lower compared to the old municipality-based center data. Conclusion After implementation of a new EMCC organization in Finland the percentage and number of high priority calls increased. There was a trend, but no statistically significant increase in the emergency medical dispatchers' ability to detect patients with life-threatening conditions despite structured education, regular evaluation and standardization of protocols in

  7. User Acceptance of Picture Archiving and Communication System in the Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Goodarzi, Hassan; Khatami, Seyed-Masoud; Javadzadeh, Hammidreza; Mahmoudi, Sadrollah; Khajehpour, Hojjatollah; Heidari, Soleiman; Khodaparast, Morteza; Ebrahimi, Ali; Rasouli, Hamidreza; Ghane, Mohammadreza; Faraji, Mehrdad; Hassanpour, Kasra

    2016-01-01

    Background Picture archiving and communication system (PACS) has allowed the medical images to be transmitted, stored, retrieved, and displayed in different locations of a hospital or health system. Using PACS in the emergency department will eventually result in improved efficiency and patient care. In spite of the abundant benefits of employing PACS, there are some challenges in implementing this technology like users’ resistance to accept the technology, which has a critical role in PACS success. Objectives In this study, we will assess and compare user acceptance of PACS in the emergency departments of three different hospitals and investigate the effect of socio-demographic factors on this acceptance. Materials and Methods A variant of technology acceptance model (TAM) has been used in order to measure the acceptance level of PACS in the emergency department of three educational hospitals in Iran. A previously used questionnaire was validated and utilized to collect the study data. A stepwise multiple regression model was used to predict factors influencing acceptance score as the dependent variable. Results Mean age of participants was 32.9 years (standard deviation [SD] = 6.08). Participants with the specialty degree got a higher acceptance score than the three other groups (Mean ± SD = 4.17 ± 0.20). Age, gender, degree of PACS usage and participant’s occupation (profession) did not influence the acceptance score. In our multiple regression model, all three variables of perceived usefulness (PU), perceived ease of use (PEU) and the effect of PACS (change) had a significant effect in the prediction of acceptance. The most influencing factor was change with the beta of 0.22 (P value < 0.001). Conclusion PACS is highly accepted in all three emergency departments especially among specialists. PU, PEU and change are factors influencing PACS acceptance. Our study can be used as an evidence of PACS acceptance in emergency wards. PMID:27679692

  8. Short-term Effects of Ambient Air Pollution on Emergency Department Visits for Asthma: An Assessment of Effect Modification by Prior Allergic Disease History

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Jungwoo; Cho, Jaelim; Cho, Seong-Kyung; Choi, Yoon Jung; Shin, Dong Chun

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The goal of this study was to investigate the short-term effect of ambient air pollution on emergency department (ED) visits in Seoul for asthma according to patients’ prior history of allergic diseases. Methods Data on ED visits from 2005 to 2009 were obtained from the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service. To evaluate the risk of ED visits for asthma related to ambient air pollutants (carbon monoxide [CO], nitrogen dioxide [NO2], ozone [O3], sulfur dioxide [SO2], and particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter <10 μm [PM10]), a generalized additive model with a Poisson distribution was used; a single-lag model and a cumulative-effect model (average concentration over the previous 1-7 days) were also explored. The percent increase and 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated for each interquartile range (IQR) increment in the concentration of each air pollutant. Subgroup analyses were done by age, gender, the presence of allergic disease, and season. Results A total of 33 751 asthma attack cases were observed during the study period. The strongest association was a 9.6% increase (95% CI, 6.9% to 12.3%) in the risk of ED visits for asthma per IQR increase in O3 concentration. IQR changes in NO2 and PM10 concentrations were also significantly associated with ED visits in the cumulative lag 7 model. Among patients with a prior history of allergic rhinitis or atopic dermatitis, the risk of ED visits for asthma per IQR increase in PM10 concentration was higher (3.9%; 95% CI, 1.2% to 6.7%) than in patients with no such history. Conclusions Ambient air pollutants were positively associated with ED visits for asthma, especially among subjects with a prior history of allergic rhinitis or atopic dermatitis. PMID:27744674

  9. Short-term Effects of Ambient Air Pollution on Emergency Department Visits for Asthma: An Assessment of Effect Modification by Prior Allergic Disease History.

    PubMed

    Noh, Juhwan; Sohn, Jungwoo; Cho, Jaelim; Cho, Seong-Kyung; Choi, Yoon Jung; Kim, Changsoo; Shin, Dong Chun

    2016-09-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the short-term effect of ambient air pollution on emergency department (ED) visits in Seoul for asthma according to patients' prior history of allergic diseases. Data on ED visits from 2005 to 2009 were obtained from the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service. To evaluate the risk of ED visits for asthma related to ambient air pollutants (carbon monoxide [CO], nitrogen dioxide [NO2], ozone [O3], sulfur dioxide [SO2], and particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter <10 μm [PM10]), a generalized additive model with a Poisson distribution was used; a single-lag model and a cumulative-effect model (average concentration over the previous 1-7 days) were also explored. The percent increase and 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated for each interquartile range (IQR) increment in the concentration of each air pollutant. Subgroup analyses were done by age, gender, the presence of allergic disease, and season. A total of 33 751 asthma attack cases were observed during the study period. The strongest association was a 9.6% increase (95% CI, 6.9% to 12.3%) in the risk of ED visits for asthma per IQR increase in O3 concentration. IQR changes in NO2 and PM10 concentrations were also significantly associated with ED visits in the cumulative lag 7 model. Among patients with a prior history of allergic rhinitis or atopic dermatitis, the risk of ED visits for asthma per IQR increase in PM10 concentration was higher (3.9%; 95% CI, 1.2% to 6.7%) than in patients with no such history. Ambient air pollutants were positively associated with ED visits for asthma, especially among subjects with a prior history of allergic rhinitis or atopic dermatitis.

  10. Communications between local health departments and the public during emergencies: the importance of standardized web sites.

    PubMed

    Fallon, L Fleming; Schmalzried, Hans D; Hasan, Nausheen

    2011-01-01

    Of the 2790 local health departments (LHDs) in the United States, Internet homepages were located for 1986. We reviewed each homepage to document the presence of 9 elements deemed to be critical for effective communications during emergency or disaster situations. LHD Web site homepages had a mean of 4.1 (±1.4) elements. Among the findings, this review revealed that 4 of 5 (80.5%) of the LHDs included the agency phone number, half (49.4%) provided links to emergency information, and about 1 in 5 (19.6%) listed an agency e-mail address. Fewer than 1 in 20 (4.3%) of the LHD homepages reviewed allowed visitors to sign up for automatic alerts or notifications. We suggest that these results be used as a starting point in developing a standardized template containing the 9 homepage elements. Such a template complements National Incident Management System protocols and can provide a recognizable source of consistent and reliable information for people during a public health emergency or disaster.

  11. Structured communication: teaching delivery of difficult news with simulated resuscitations in an emergency medicine clerkship.

    PubMed

    Lamba, Sangeeta; Nagurka, Roxanne; Offin, Michael; Scott, Sandra R

    2015-03-01

    The objective is to describe the implementation and outcomes of a structured communication module used to supplement case-based simulated resuscitation training in an emergency medicine (EM) clerkship. We supplemented two case-based simulated resuscitation scenarios (cardiac arrest and blunt trauma) with role-play in order to teach medical students how to deliver news of death and poor prognosis to family of the critically ill or injured simulated patient. Quantitative outcomes were assessed with pre and post-clerkship surveys. Secondarily, students completed a written self-reflection (things that went well and why; things that did not go well and why) to further explore learner experiences with communication around resuscitation. Qualitative analysis identified themes from written self-reflections. A total of 120 medical students completed the pre and post-clerkship surveys. Majority of respondents reported that they had witnessed or role-played the delivery of difficult news, but only few had real-life experience of delivering news of death (20/120, 17%) and poor prognosis (34/120, 29%). This communication module led to statistically significant increased scores for comfort, confidence, and knowledge with communicating difficult news of death and poor prognosis. Pre-post scores increased for those agreeing with statements (somewhat/very much) for delivery of news of poor prognosis: comfort 69% to 81%, confidence 66% to 81% and knowledge 76% to 90% as well as for statements regarding delivery of news of death: comfort 52% to 68%, confidence 57% to 76% and knowledge 76% to 90%. Respondents report that patient resuscitations (simulated and/or real) generated a variety of strong emotional responses such as anxiety, stress, grief and feelings of loss and failure. A structured communication module supplements simulated resuscitation training in an EM clerkship and leads to a self-reported increase in knowledge, comfort, and competence in communicating difficult news of

  12. Physics collaboration and communication through emerging media: *odcasts, blogs and wikis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Charles W.; Williams, Jamie

    2006-05-01

    The entertainment and news industries are being transformed by the emergence of innovative, internet-based media tools. Audio and video downloads are beginning to compete with traditional entertainment distribution channels, and the blogosphere has become an alternative press with demonstrated news-making power of its own. The scientific community, and physics in particular, is just beginning to experiment with these tools. We believe that they have great potential for enhancing the quality and effectiveness of collaboration and communication, and that the coming generation of physicists will expect them to be used creatively. We will report on our experience in producing seminar podcasts (google ``QIBEC'' or search ``quantum'' on Apple iTunes), and on operating a distributed research institute using a group-based blog.

  13. The Emerging Interdependence of the Electric Power Grid & Information and Communication Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Taft, Jeffrey D.; Becker-Dippmann, Angela S.

    2015-08-01

    This paper examines the implications of emerging interdependencies between the electric power grid and Information and Communication Technology (ICT). Over the past two decades, electricity and ICT infrastructure have become increasingly interdependent, driven by a combination of factors including advances in sensor, network and software technologies and progress in their deployment, the need to provide increasing levels of wide-area situational awareness regarding grid conditions, and the promise of enhanced operational efficiencies. Grid operators’ ability to utilize new and closer-to-real-time data generated by sensors throughout the system is providing early returns, particularly with respect to management of the transmission system for purposes of reliability, coordination, congestion management, and integration of variable electricity resources such as wind generation.

  14. Internet access and electronic communication among families in an urban pediatric emergency department.

    PubMed

    Saidinejad, Mohsen; Teach, Stephen J; Chamberlain, James M

    2012-06-01

    The Internet may represent an opportunity for health care providers in the emergency department (ED) to deliver discharge instructions and after-care educational materials electronically to patients and their caregivers. The objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence of Internet access and use among caregivers of children who visit the ED and to evaluate their interest in receiving after-care communication and educational material electronically. We distributed a self-administered survey to a convenience sample of English-speaking caregivers of children who presented to the ED of an urban, academic, pediatric hospital during November and December 2009. The survey was distributed to and completed by 509 English-speaking respondents. Of the participants, 423 (83.1%) of 509 identified themselves as black/African American, and 397 (77.9%) of 509 were publicly insured. Of the participants, 503 of 509 (98.9%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 97.9%-99.8%) reported that they have access to the Internet. Of the participants with Internet access, 312 of 503 (62.0%; 95% CI, 57.8%-66.3%) have access at home, 166 of 503 (33.0%; 95% CI, 28.9%-33.1%) have access at work, and 112 of 503 (22.3%; 95% CI, 18.6%-25.9%) have access by mobile phone. When asked about electronic communication and social networking, 483 of 503 (96.0%; 95% CI, 94.3%-97.7%) have an e-mail account, and 304 of 503 (60.4%; 95% CI, 56.2%-64.7%) have a Facebook account. Furthermore, 353 of 503 (70.1%; 95% CI, 66.2%-74.2%) reported accessing the Internet daily, whereas 128 of 503 (25.4%; 95% CI, 21.6%-29.3%) access the Internet at least 2 to 6 times per week. Among all respondents, interest in receiving communication from the ED only electronically was expressed by 259 of 509 participants (50.9%; 95% CI, 46.5%-55.2%). Approximately one third of the participants (173/509 [34%; 95% CI, 29.9%-38.1%]) expressed interest in an electronic channel for communication between the ED and their child's patient

  15. An emergency medical communications system by low altitude platform at the early stages of a natural disaster in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Qiantori, Andri; Sutiono, Agung Budi; Hariyanto, Hadi; Suwa, Hirohiko; Ohta, Toshizumi

    2012-02-01

    A natural disaster is a consequence of a natural hazard, such as a tsunami, earthquake or volcanic eruption, affecting humans. In order to support emergency medical communication services in natural disaster areas where the telecommunications facility has been seriously damaged, an ad hoc communication network backbone should be build to support emergency medical services. Combinations of requirements need to be considered before deciding on the best option. In the present study we have proposed a Low Altitude Platform consisting of tethered balloons combined with Wireless Fidelity (WiFi) 802.11 technology. To confirm that the suggested network would satisfy the emergency medical service requirements, a communications experiment, including performance service measurement, was carried out.

  16. The 5Cs of Consultation: Training Medical Students to Communicate Effectively in the Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Kessler, Chad S; Tadisina, Kashyap Komarraju; Saks, Mark; Franzen, Doug; Woods, Rob; Banh, Kenny V; Bounds, Richard; Smith, Michael; Deiorio, Nicole; Schwartz, Alan

    2015-11-01

    Effective communication is critical for health care professionals, particularly in the Emergency Department (ED). However, currently, there is no standardized consultation model that is consistently practiced by physicians or used for training medical graduates. Recently, the 5Cs of Consultation model (Contact, Communicate, Core Question, Collaborate, and Close the Loop) has been studied in Emergency Medicine residents using simulated consultation scenarios. Using an experimental design, we aimed to evaluate the efficacy of the 5Cs consultation model in a novel learner population (medical students) and in a "real time and real world" clinical setting. A prospective, randomized, controlled study was conducted at eight large, academic, urban, tertiary-care medical centers (U.S. and Canada). Intervention involved two experimental groups (asynchronous and live training) compared to a baseline control group. All participants placed up to four consult phone calls. A senior physician observed and assessed each call using a preapproved 5Cs checklist and a Global Rating Scale (GRS). Participants who received training (asynchronous or live) scored significantly higher on the 5Cs checklist total and GRS than the control group. Both training methods (asynchronous and live) were equally effective. Importantly, learning gains were sustained as students' 5Cs checklist total and GRS scores remained consistently higher at their second, third, and fourth consult (relative to their first consult). At posttest, all participants reported feeling more confident and competent in relaying patient information. Medical students can be trained to use the 5Cs model in a timely, inexpensive, and convenient manner and increase effectiveness of physician consultations originating from the ED. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strauss, Andre

    The following essays on communication are presented: communication as a condition of survival, communication for special purposes, the means of transmission of communication, communication within social and economic structures, the teaching of communication through the press, the teaching of modern languages, communication as a point of departure,…

  18. The Public Sphere in Emerging Infectious Disease Communication: Recipient or Active and Vocal Partner?

    PubMed

    Gesser-Edelsburg, Anat; Shir-Raz, Yaffa; Walter, Nathan; Mordini, Emilio; Dimitriou, Dimitris; James, James J; Green, Manfred S

    2015-08-01

    Recent years have seen advances in theories and models of risk and crisis communication, with a focus on emerging epidemic infection. Nevertheless, information flow remains unilateral in many countries and does not take into account the public's polyvocality and the fact that its opinions and knowledge often "compete" with those of health authorities. This article addresses the challenges organizations face in communicating with the public sphere. Our theoretical approach is conceptualized through a framework that focuses on the public sphere and that builds upon existing guidelines and studies in the context of health and pandemics. We examine how health organizations cope with the public's transformation from recipients to an active and vocal entity, ie, how and to what extent health organizations address the public's anxiety and concerns arising in the social media during outbreaks. Although international organizations have aspired to relate to the public as a partner, this article identifies notable gaps. Organizations must involve the public throughout the crisis and conduct dialogues free of prejudices, paternalism, and preconceptions. Thereby, they can impart precise and updated information reflecting uncertainty and considering cultural differences to build trust and facilitate cooperation with the public sphere.

  19. Use of an emergency medical pictorial communication book during simulated disaster conditions.

    PubMed

    Behar, Solomon; Benson Ii, Richard; Kurzweil, Ami; Azen, Colleen; Nager, Alan L

    2013-10-01

    During disasters, the needs of victims outstrip available resources. Rapid assessment of patients must be performed; however, language barriers can be an impediment to efficient patient assessment, especially if interpreter resources are limited. Dependency on interpretive services requiring technology such a telephones, cell phones, and video conferencing may be inefficient, as they may be unavailable during disaster conditions. A low-tech, portable tool that aids in communication with non-English speakers would be beneficial. The medical emergency communication (MEC) book, developed at Children's Hospital Los Angeles, has the potential to be a useful tool in this capacity. The goal of this pilot study was to compare the accuracy of a newly developed disaster-focused medical history obtained from Spanish-speaking patients or caregivers using the MEC book, compared to a control group with whom no book was used. Our hypothesis was that use of the MEC book improves accuracy of medical history taking between English-only speaking health care workers and Spanish-speaking patients better than a monolingual clinician trying to take a medical history without it. We anticipated a higher overall score in the group of subjects whose histories were taken using the MEC book than in the control group. Patient satisfaction with the MEC book also was measured.

  20. Emergency and operational low and medium frequency band radio communications system for underground mines

    SciTech Connect

    Stolarczyk, L.G. )

    1991-07-01

    This paper reports on a minewide low- and medium-frequency radio system has been developed and installed in coal and metalliferous mines. The radio system established reliable emergency communications between mine personnel on the surface, in working areas, or traveling in designated escapeway. The system also provides operational communications to improve coordination among working groups in the underground mining complex. The radio system utilizes two robust radio signal transmission modes to establish underground radio coverage areas. The seam transmission mode occurs when layers of coal, trona, potash, quartzite, or gilsonite are surrounded by more electrically conductive sediment layers. The layering forms a natural waveguide for transmission of medium-frequency (MF) band (300 to 23 000 kHz) radio signals. The conductor transmission line mode waveguide occurs when electrical conductors, such as ac power distribution cable, conveyor belt structures, steel pipe, and rail are in place in mine passageways. The conductor transmission waveguide attenuation rate is lowest in the low-frequency and (30 to 300 kHz). Safety is inherent in the system design since robust radio signal transmission modes are likely to survive events such as rock falls, fire, or explosion. Since the conductor utilities are necessary parts of the underground mine infrastructure, transmission line installation and maintenance cost can be avoided in the radio system.

  1. Emerging Roles of Combat Communication Squadrons in Cyber Warfare as Related to Computer Network Attack, Defense and Exploitation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    EMERGING ROLES OF COMBAT COMMUNICATION SQUADRONS IN CYBER WARFARE AS RELATED TO COMPUTER NETWORK ATTACK, DEFENSE AND EXPLOITATION GRADUATE RESEARCH...Communication Squadrons in Cyber Warfare as Related to Computer Network Attack, Defense and Exploitation GRADUATE RESEARCH PROJECT Presented to the Faculty...Education and Training Command In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Master of Cyber Warfare Michael J. Myers Major, USAF June 2011

  2. German critical incident reporting system database of prehospital emergency medicine: Analysis of reported communication and medication errors between 2005–2015

    PubMed Central

    Hohenstein, Christian; Fleischmann, Thomas; Rupp, Peter; Hempel, Dorothea; Wilk, Sophia; Winning, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Communication failure in prehospital emergency medicine can affect patient safety as it does in other areas of medicine as well. We analyzed the database of the critical incident reporting system for prehospital emergency medicine in Germany retrospectively regarding communication errors. METHODS: Experts of prehospital emergency medicine and risk management screened the database for verbal communication failure, non-verbal communication failure and missing communication at all. RESULTS: Between 2005 and 2015, 845 reports were analyzed, of which 247 reports were considered to be related to communication failure. An arbitrary classification resulted in six different kinds: 1) no acknowledgement of a suggestion; 2) medication error; 3) miscommunication with dispatcher; 4) utterance heard/understood improperly; 5) missing information transfer between two persons; and 6) other communication failure. CONCLUSION: Communication deficits can lead to critical incidents in prehospital emergency medicine and are a very important aspect in patient safety. PMID:27313802

  3. Communication of emergency public warnings: A social science perspective and state-of-the-art assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Mileti, D.S. ); Sorensen, J.H. )

    1990-08-01

    More than 200 studies of warning systems and warning response were reviewed for this social science perspective and state-of-the-art assessment of communication of emergency public warnings. The major findings are as follows. First, variations in the nature and content of warnings have a large impact on whether or not the public heeds the warning. Relevant factors include the warning source; warning channel; the consistency, credibility, accuracy, and understandability of the message; and the warning frequency. Second, characteristics of the population receiving the warning affect warning response. These include social characteristics such as gender, ethnicity and age, social setting characteristics such as stage of life or family context, psychological characteristics such as fatalism or risk perception, and knowledge characteristics such as experience or training. Third, many current myths about public response to emergency warning are at odds with knowledge derived from field investigations. Some of these myths include the keep it simple'' notion, the cry wolf'' syndrome, public panic and hysteria, and those concerning public willingness to respond to warnings. Finally, different methods of warning the public are not equally effective at providing an alert and notification in different physical and social settings. Most systems can provide a warning given three or more hours of available warning time. Special systems such as tone-alert radios are needed to provide rapid warning. 235 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Emergence of long-range correlations and bursty activity patterns in online communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panzarasa, Pietro; Bonaventura, Moreno

    2015-12-01

    Research has suggested that the activity occurring in a variety of social, economic, and technological systems exhibits long-range fluctuations in time. Pronounced levels of rapidly occurring events are typically observed over short periods of time, followed by long periods of inactivity. Relatively few studies, however, have shed light on the degree to which inhomogeneous temporal processes can be detected at, and emerge from, different levels of analysis. Here we investigate patterns of human activity within an online forum in which communication can be assessed at three intertwined levels: the micro level of the individual users; the meso level of discussion groups and continuous sessions; and the macro level of the whole system. To uncover the relation between different levels, we conduct a number of numerical simulations of a zero-crossing model in which users' behavior is constrained by progressively richer and more realistic rules of social interaction. Results indicate that, when users are solipsistic, their bursty behavior is not sufficient for generating heavy-tailed interevent time distributions at a higher level. However, when users are socially interdependent, the power spectra and interevent time distributions of the simulated and real forums are remarkably similar at all levels of analysis. Social interaction is responsible for the aggregation of multiple bursty activities at the micro level into an emergent bursty activity pattern at a higher level. We discuss the implications of the findings for an emergentist account of burstiness in complex systems.

  5. Evidence-based communications strategies: NWPERLC response to training on effectively reaching limited English-speaking (LEP) populations in emergencies.

    PubMed

    DʼAmbrosio, Luann; Huang, Claire E; Sheng Kwan-Gett, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Identifying and overcoming barriers to effective emergency preparedness and response is one of the objectives for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's network of 14 Preparedness and Emergency Response Learning Centers (PERLCs) and 9 Preparedness and Response Research Centers (PERRCs). This report describes how a PERLC and a PERRC colocated at the Northwest Center for Public Health Practice responded to Los Angeles County Department of Public Health's (DPH's) request to improve emergency communications with limited English-proficient (LEP) populations. Activities included an assessment of training needs of the DPH preparedness workforce, a training series on social media and community engagement, and a toolkit of evidence-based findings to improve LEP populations' emergency communications and community resilience. Most respondents to the training needs assessment considered themselves essential personnel during an emergency and stated that they have received proper training. Respondents would like to receive further emergency preparedness training, including additional clarity on their role during an emergency. The majority of participants rated the training series as excellent/very good and agreed that they will be able to apply the course content to their work. The percentage of participants who reported confidence in their knowledge and skills related to each course learning objective increased from the precourse survey to the postcourse survey. This article discusses how the colocation of PERRC and PERLC offers efficiencies and expertise to accomplish multicomponent evidence-based requests. The ability to translate research findings quickly into evidence-based training and best practice resources is a strategic benefit to public health practice agencies working on emergency preparedness. LA County DPH was able to use knowledge and lessons learned gained from this work to design and prioritize education and training offerings to improve the capacity

  6. The Pediatric Asthma Control and Communication Instrument for the Emergency Department (PACCI-ED) improves physician assessment of asthma morbidity in pediatric emergency department patients.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Elizabeth M; Laskowski-Kos, Ursula; Wu, Dominic; Gutierrez, Julia; Bilderback, Andrew; Okelo, Sande O; Garro, Aris

    2014-03-01

    To determine whether the Pediatric Asthma Control and Communication Instrument for the Emergency Department (PACCI-ED), a 12-item questionnaire, can help ED attendings accurately assess a patient's asthma control and morbidity. This was a randomized-controlled trial performed at an urban pediatric ED of children aged 1-17 years presenting with an asthma exacerbation. Parents answered PACCI-ED questions about their children's asthma. Attendings were randomized to view responses to the PACCI-ED (intervention group) or to be blinded to the completed PACCI-ED (control group). The two groups were compared on their empirical clinical assessment of: (1) chronic asthma control categories, (2) asthma trajectory (stable, worsening or improving), (3) patient adherence to controller medications, and (4) burden of disease for the patient's family. The validated PACCI algorithm was used as the criterion standard for these four outcomes. Accuracy of clinical assessment was compared between intervention and control groups using chi-squared tests and an intention-to-treat approach. Seventeen ED attendings were enrolled in the study and 77 children visits were included in the analysis. There were no significant differences between the intervention and the control groups for child's gender, age, race, and asthma characteristics. Intervention group attendings were more accurate than control group attendings in assessing the category of chronic asthma control (43% versus 19%; p = 0.03), disease trajectory (72% versus 45%; p = 0.02), and the disease burden for families (74% versus 35%; p = 0.001) over the past 12 months. There was a trend towards more accuracy of intervention versus control attendings for estimating patient adherence to controller medications (72% versus 48%; p = 0.06). The PACCI-ED improves the assessment of asthma control, trajectory, and burden by ED attendings, and may help assessment of asthma medication adherence and prior asthma exacerbations. The

  7. Exploring the Relation between Memory, Gestural Communication, and the Emergence of Language in Infancy: A Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heimann, Mikael; Strid, Karin; Smith, Lars; Tjus, Tomas; Ulvund, Stein Erik; Meltzoff, Andrew N.

    2006-01-01

    The relationship between recall memory, visual recognition memory, social communication, and the emergence of language skills was measured in a longitudinal study. Thirty typically developing Swedish children were tested at 6, 9 and 14 months. The result showed that, in combination, visual recognition memory at 6 months, deferred imitation at 9…

  8. Mexican Immigrant Mothers' Perceptions of Their Children's Communication Disabilities, Emergent Literacy Development, and Speech-Language Therapy Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kummerer, Sharon E.; Lopez-Reyna, Norma A.; Hughes, Marie Tejero

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This qualitative study explored mothers' perceptions of their children's communication disabilities, emergent literacy development, and speech-language therapy programs. Method: Participants were 14 Mexican immigrant mothers and their children (age 17-47 months) who were receiving center-based services from an early childhood intervention…

  9. The semantic specificity of gestures when verbal communication is not possible: the case of emergency evacuation.

    PubMed

    Prati, Gabriele; Pietrantoni, Luca

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the comprehension of gesture in a situation in which the communicator cannot (or can only with difficulty) use verbal communication. Based on theoretical considerations, we expected to obtain higher semantic comprehension for emblems (gestures with a direct verbal definition or translation that is well known by all members of a group, or culture) compared to illustrators (gestures regarded as spontaneous and idiosyncratic and that do not have a conventional definition). Based on the extant literature, we predicted higher semantic specificity associated with arbitrarily coded and iconically coded emblems compared to intrinsically coded illustrators. Using a scenario of emergency evacuation, we tested the difference in semantic specificity between different categories of gestures. 138 participants saw 10 videos each illustrating a gesture performed by a firefighter. They were requested to imagine themselves in a dangerous situation and to report the meaning associated with each gesture. The results showed that intrinsically coded illustrators were more successfully understood than arbitrarily coded emblems, probably because the meaning of intrinsically coded illustrators is immediately comprehensible without recourse to symbolic interpretation. Furthermore, there was no significant difference between the comprehension of iconically coded emblems and that of both arbitrarily coded emblems and intrinsically coded illustrators. It seems that the difference between the latter two types of gestures was supported by their difference in semantic specificity, although in a direction opposite to that predicted. These results are in line with those of Hadar and Pinchas-Zamir (2004), which showed that iconic gestures have higher semantic specificity than conventional gestures.

  10. Emergency health risk communication during the 2007 San Diego wildfires: comprehension, compliance, and recall.

    PubMed

    Sugerman, David E; Keir, Jane M; Dee, Deborah L; Lipman, Harvey; Waterman, Stephen H; Ginsberg, Michele; Fishbein, Daniel B

    2012-01-01

    In October 2007, wildfires burned nearly 300,000 acres in San Diego County, California. Emergency risk communication messages were broadcast to reduce community exposure to air pollution caused by the fires. The objective of this investigation was to determine residents' exposure to, understanding of, and compliance with these messages. From March to June 2008, the authors surveyed San Diego County residents using a 40-question instrument and random digit dialing. The 1,802 respondents sampled were predominantly 35-64 years old (65.9%), White (65.5%), and educated past high school (79.0%). Most (82.5%) lived more than 1 mile away from the fires, although many were exposed to smoky air for 5-7 days (60.7%) inside and outside their homes. Most persons surveyed reported hearing fire-related health messages (87.9%) and nearly all (97.9%) understood the messages they heard. Respondents complied with most to all of the nontechnical health messages, including staying inside the home (58.7%), avoiding outdoor exercise (88.4%), keeping windows and doors closed (75.8%), and wetting ash before cleanup (75.6%). In contrast, few (<5%) recalled hearing technical messages to place air conditioners on recirculate, use High-Efficiency Particulate Air filters, or use N-95 respirators during ash cleanup, and less than 10% of all respondents followed these specific recommendations. The authors found that nontechnical message recall, understanding, and compliance were high during the wildfires, and reported recall and compliance with technical messages were much lower. Future disaster health communication should further explore barriers to recall and compliance with technical recommendations.

  11. Communicating risk and promoting disease mitigation measures in epidemics and emerging disease settings.

    PubMed

    Schiavo, Renata; May Leung, May; Brown, Mason

    2014-03-01

    This review aims to identify and assess evidence on interventions to communicate risk and promote disease mitigation measures in epidemics and emerging disease outbreak settings. The study focuses on data that are relevant to low and middle-income country (LMIC) settings. We conducted a comprehensive literature search using five major electronic databases (Pubmed Medline, Biomed Central, EMBASE, Science of Citation Index, and Cochrane Library) and other sources to identify relevant studies published from January 2002 to July 2013. The review was guided by the socio-ecological model/perspective of public health and the ideation theory and focused on interventions at the community, healthcare, and multi-sectoral settings, which also reflect key intervention levels of the Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion. Eligible quantitative studies were selected according to specific study criteria and assessed using the Critical Appraisal Skills Program (CASP) framework. Conversely, qualitative studies, reviews, case studies, and editorials were not included. Studies were selected by two independent reviewers. Twenty-nine relevant studies from 16 countries were included. Most studies focused on a single intervention or intervention level, rather than multi-sectoral interventions. The majority of the evidence relates to programs aimed at behavioral and social results (or relevant intermediate steps) within a specific population group. Two studies included implications for improvements in health service delivery, two studies examined the intervention's impact on health systems-related outcomes, and three had also implications for environmental health outcomes. Cost- and health equity-related implications for select evidence were also discussed. The paucity of well-designed quantitative evaluations of interventions to communicate health risk and promote disease control measures in LMICs does not allow for any definitive conclusions. Yet, the review identified several promising

  12. Communicating risk and promoting disease mitigation measures in epidemics and emerging disease settings

    PubMed Central

    Schiavo, Renata; Leung, May May; Brown, Mason

    2014-01-01

    Objective This review aims to identify and assess evidence on interventions to communicate risk and promote disease mitigation measures in epidemics and emerging disease outbreak settings. The study focuses on data that are relevant to low and middle-income country (LMIC) settings. Methods We conducted a comprehensive literature search using five major electronic databases (Pubmed Medline, Biomed Central, EMBASE, Science of Citation Index, and Cochrane Library) and other sources to identify relevant studies published from January 2002 to July 2013. The review was guided by the socio-ecological model/perspective of public health and the ideation theory and focused on interventions at the community, healthcare, and multi-sectoral settings, which also reflect key intervention levels of the Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion. Eligible quantitative studies were selected according to specific study criteria and assessed using the Critical Appraisal Skills Program (CASP) framework. Conversely, qualitative studies, reviews, case studies, and editorials were not included. Studies were selected by two independent reviewers. Results Twenty-nine relevant studies from 16 countries were included. Most studies focused on a single intervention or intervention level, rather than multi-sectoral interventions. The majority of the evidence relates to programs aimed at behavioral and social results (or relevant intermediate steps) within a specific population group. Two studies included implications for improvements in health service delivery, two studies examined the intervention’s impact on health systems-related outcomes, and three had also implications for environmental health outcomes. Cost- and health equity-related implications for select evidence were also discussed. Conclusions The paucity of well-designed quantitative evaluations of interventions to communicate health risk and promote disease control measures in LMICs does not allow for any definitive conclusions. Yet, the

  13. Communicating With the Public About Emerging Health Threats: Lessons From the Pre-Event Message Development Project

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Steven M.; Henderson, Neil; Glik, Deborah; Jupka, Keri; Middleton, Sarah; Henderson, Carson; Drury, Allison; Mitchell, Elizabeth W.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives. We sought to better understand the challenges of communicating with the public about emerging health threats, particularly threats involving toxic chemicals, biological agents, and radioactive materials. Methods. At the request of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, we formed an interdisciplinary consortium of investigative teams from 4 schools of public health. Over 2 years, the investigative teams conducted 79 focus group interviews with 884 participants and individual cognitive response interviews with 129 respondents, for a total sample of 1013 individuals. The investigative teams systematically compared their results with other published research in public health, risk communication, and emergency preparedness. Results. We found limited public understanding of emerging biological, chemical, and radioactive materials threats and of the differences between them; demand for concrete, accurate, and consistent information about actions needed for protection of self and family; active information seeking from media, local authorities, and selected national sources; and areas in which current emergency messaging can be improved. Conclusions. The public will respond to a threat situation by seeking protective information and taking self-protective action, underlining the critical role of effective communication in public health emergencies. PMID:18382011

  14. Predictors of emergency room visits or acute hospital admissions prior to death among hospice palliative care clients in Ontario: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Hospice palliative care (HPC) is a philosophy of care that aims to relieve suffering and improve the quality of life for clients with life-threatening illnesses or end of life issues. The goals of HPC are not only to ameliorate clients’ symptoms but also to reduce unneeded or unwanted medical interventions such as emergency room visits or hospitalizations (ERVH). Hospitals are considered a setting ill-prepared for end of life issues; therefore, use of such acute care services has to be considered an indicator of poor quality end of life care. This study examines predictors of ERVH prior to death among HPC home care clients. Methods A retrospective cohort study of a sample of 764 HPC home care clients who received services from a community care access centre (CCAC) in southern Ontario, Canada. All clients were assessed using the Resident Assessment Instrument for Palliative Care (interRAI PC) as part of normal clinical practice between April 2008 and July 2010. The Andersen-Newman framework for health service utilization was used as a conceptual model for the basis of this study. Logistic regression and Cox regression analyses were carried out to identify predictors of ERVH. Results Half of the HPC clients had at least one or more ERVH (n = 399, 52.2%). Wish to die at home (OR = 0.54) and advanced care directives (OR = 0.39) were protective against ERVH. Unstable health (OR = 0.70) was also associated with reduced probability, while infections such as prior urinary tract infections (OR = 2.54) increased the likelihood of ERVH. Clients with increased use of formal services had reduced probability of ERVH (OR = 0.55). Conclusions Findings of this study suggest that predisposing characteristics are nearly as important as need variables in determining ERVH among HPC clients, which challenges the assumption that need variables are the most important determinants of ERVH. Ongoing assessment of HPC clients is essential in reducing ERVH

  15. Constructing priors in synesthesia.

    PubMed

    van Leeuwen, Tessa M

    2014-01-01

    A new theoretical framework (PPSMC) applicable to synesthesia has been proposed, in which the discrepancy between the perceptual reality of (some) synesthetic concurrents and their subjective non-veridicality is being explained. The PPSMC framework stresses the relevance of the phenomenology of synesthesia for synesthesia research-and beyond. When describing the emergence and persistence of synesthetic concurrents under PPSMC, it is proposed that precise, high-confidence priors are crucial in synesthesia. I discuss the construction of priors in synesthesia.

  16. Acute chest pain - A prospective population based study of contacts to Norwegian emergency medical communication centres

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Acute chest pain is a frequently occurring symptom in patients with medical emergencies and imposes potentially life threatening situations outside hospitals. Little is known about the epidemiology of patients with acute chest pain in a primary care setting in Norway, and we aimed to obtain more representative data on such patients using data from emergency medical communication centres (EMCCs). Methods Data were collected prospectively during three months in 2007 from three EMCCs, covering 816 000 inhabitants. The EMCCs gathered information on every situation that was triaged as a red response (defined as an "acute" response, with the highest priority), according to the Norwegian Index of Medical Emergencies. Records from ambulances and primary care doctors were subsequently collected. International Classification of Primary Care - 2 symptom codes and The National Committee on Aeronautics (NACA) System scores were assigned retrospectively. Only chest pain patients were included in the study. Results 5 180 patients were involved in red response situations, of which 21% had chest pain. Estimated rate was 5.4 chest pain cases per 1000 inhabitants per year. NACA-scores indicated that 26% of the patients were in a life-threatening medical situation. Median prehospital response time was 13 minutes; an ambulance reached the patient in less than 10 minutes in 30% of the cases. Seventy-six per cent of the patients with chest pain were admitted to a hospital for further investigation, 14% received final treatment at a casualty clinic, while 10% had no further investigation by a doctor ("left at the scene"). Conclusions The majority of patients with acute chest pain were admitted to a hospital for further investigation, but only a quarter of the patients were assessed prehospitally to have a severe illness. This sheds light on the challenges for the EMCCs in deciding the appropriate level of response in patients with acute chest pain. Overtriage is to some extent

  17. Double-blind Randomized Controlled Trial of Intranasal Dexmedetomidine Versus Intranasal Midazolam as Anxiolysis Prior to Pediatric Laceration Repair in the Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Neville, Desiree N W; Hayes, Katharina R; Ivan, Yaron; McDowell, Erin R; Pitetti, Raymond D

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to compare anxiolysis with intranasal dexmedetomidine, an alpha-2 agonist, versus intranasal midazolam for pediatric laceration repairs. We performed a double-blind, randomized controlled trial of 40 patients 1-5 years with lacerations requiring suture repair in an academic pediatric emergency department (ED). Patients were randomized to receive either intranasal dexmedetomidine or intranasal midazolam. Our primary outcome measure was the anxiety score at the time of patient positioning for the laceration repair. We chose this time point to isolate the anxiolysis from the medications prior to intervention. Patient encounters were videotaped and scored for anxiety at multiple time points using the modified Yale Preoperative Anxiety Scale. The scale is 23.3-100 with higher scores indicating higher anxiety. We also evaluated these scores as a secondary outcome by dichotomizing them into anxious versus not anxious with a previously validated score cutoff. Of the 40 patients enrolled, 20 in the dexmedetomidine group and 18 in the midazolam group completed the study and were included in the analysis. The median age was 3.3 years (range = 1.0-5.4 years). The median baseline anxiety score was 48.3. The anxiety score at position for procedure for patients receiving dexmedetomidine was 9.2 points lower than those receiving midazolam (median difference = 9.2, 95% confidence interval = 5 to 13.3; median score for dexmedetomidine = 23.3, median score for midazolam = 36.3). The proportion of patients who were classified as not anxious at the position for procedure was significantly higher in the dexmedetomidine group (70%) versus the midazolam group (11%). The number needed to treat with dexmedetomidine instead of midazolam to obtain the result of a not anxious patient at this time point was 1.7 patients. There were also significantly more patients who were classified as not anxious at the time of wound washout in the dexmedetomidine

  18. Computerized Attendance Accounting and Emergency Assistance Communications: Viable Tools in Secondary School Administration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Vasel W.

    1971-01-01

    In the late 1968, the Space Technology Application Office at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) initiated a pilot study to determine whether technological aids could be developed that would help secondary school administrators cope with the volatile and chaotic situations that often accompany student activism, disorders, and riots. The study was conducted in cooperation with the Sacramento City Unified School District (SCUSD) and at the John F. Kennedy Senior High School (JFK) in Sacramento, California. The problems at JFK and in the SCUSD were identified and described to the JPL team by members of the Kennedy staff and personnel at various levels and departments within the school district. The JPL team of engineers restricted their scope to problems that appeared solvable, or at least partially solvable, through the use of technological systems. Thus far, two hardware systems have been developed for use in the school. The first, a personal emergency assistance communication system, has already been tested operationally at JFK and has met the objectives established for it. The second technological aid developed was a computerized attendance accounting system. This system has been fabricated, tested, and installed at JFK. Full-scale operational testing began in April 1971. While studies and hardware tests were in progress at JFK, contacts were made with several other schools in order that, insofar as practicable, hardware designs could allow for possible adaptation to schools other than JFK.

  19. Computerized Attendance Accounting and Emergency Assistance Communications: Viable Tools in Secondary School Administration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Vasel W.

    1971-01-01

    In the late 1968, the Space Technology Application Office at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) initiated a pilot study to determine whether technological aids could be developed that would help secondary school administrators cope with the volatile and chaotic situations that often accompany student activism, disorders, and riots. The study was conducted in cooperation with the Sacramento City Unified School District (SCUSD) and at the John F. Kennedy Senior High School (JFK) in Sacramento, California. The problems at JFK and in the SCUSD were identified and described to the JPL team by members of the Kennedy staff and personnel at various levels and departments within the school district. The JPL team of engineers restricted their scope to problems that appeared solvable, or at least partially solvable, through the use of technological systems. Thus far, two hardware systems have been developed for use in the school. The first, a personal emergency assistance communication system, has already been tested operationally at JFK and has met the objectives established for it. The second technological aid developed was a computerized attendance accounting system. This system has been fabricated, tested, and installed at JFK. Full-scale operational testing began in April 1971. While studies and hardware tests were in progress at JFK, contacts were made with several other schools in order that, insofar as practicable, hardware designs could allow for possible adaptation to schools other than JFK.

  20. Risk Communication Emergency Response Preparedness: Contextual Assessment of the Protective Action Decision Model.

    PubMed

    Heath, Robert L; Lee, Jaesub; Palenchar, Michael J; Lemon, Laura L

    2017-06-14

    Studies are continuously performed to improve risk communication campaign designs to better prepare residents to act in the safest manner during an emergency. To that end, this article investigates the predictive ability of the protective action decision model (PADM), which links environmental and social cues, predecision processes (attention, exposure, and comprehension), and risk decision perceptions (threat, alternative protective actions, and stakeholder norms) with protective action decision making. This current quasi-longitudinal study of residents (N = 400 for each year) in a high-risk (chemical release) petrochemical manufacturing community investigated whether PADM core risk perceptions predict protective action decision making. Telephone survey data collected at four intervals (1995, 1998, 2002, 2012) reveal that perceptions of protective actions and stakeholder norms, but not of threat, currently predict protective action decision making (intention to shelter in place). Of significance, rather than threat perceptions, perception of Wally Wise Guy (a spokes-character who advocates shelter in place) correlates with perceptions of protective action, stakeholder norms, and protective action decision making. Wally's response-efficacy advice predicts residents' behavioral intentions to shelter in place, thereby offering contextually sensitive support and refinement for PADM. © 2017 Society for Risk Analysis.

  1. Evaluation and improvement of doctor–patient communication competence for emergency neurosurgeons: a standardized family model

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xi; Wang, Zhinong; Hong, Bo; Shen, Shengjuan; Guo, Yan; Huang, Qinghai; Liu, Jianmin

    2014-01-01

    Disease treatments have been significantly influenced by the communications between patients, their families, and doctors the lack of which may lead to malpractice allegations and complaints. In particular, inadequate communication may delay diagnosis and treatment. Therefore, for doctors communication and interpersonal skills, are as important as clinical skills and medical knowledge. In this study we intended to develop two detailed communication content checklists and a modified interpersonal skills inventory, aiming to evaluate their integrity in the midst of communication skills assessments, to provide feedback for some participants, and to observe their communication competence in both aspects PMID:25018623

  2. Effective communication during an influenza pandemic: the value of using a crisis and emergency risk communication framework.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Barbara; Quinn Crouse, Sandra

    2008-10-01

    During a crisis, an open and empathetic style of communication that engenders the public's trust is the most effective when officials are attempting to galvanize the population to take a positive action or refrain from a harmful act. Although trust is imperative in a crisis, public suspicions of scientific experts and government are increasing for a variety of reasons, including access to more sources of conflicting information, a reduction in the use of scientific reasoning in decision making, and political infighting. Trust and credibility--which are demonstrated through empathy and caring, competence and expertise, honesty and openness, and dedication and commitment--are essential elements of persuasive communication.

  3. Adoptees' contact with birth parents in emerging adulthood: the role of adoption communication and attachment to adoptive parents.

    PubMed

    Farr, Rachel H; Grant-Marsney, Holly A; Grotevant, Harold D

    2014-12-01

    As adoptees transition to adulthood, their roles in the family may shift, providing them with opportunities to have increasing autonomy in their decisions about contact and initiating conversations about adoption. Research has often focused more on adoptees as children, yet in emerging adulthood, there are important shifts in the life roles and relationships of adoptees during which adoptive parents continue to be meaningful. This study examined associations among attachment and communication within the adoptive family during adulthood with emerging adult adoptees' experience of birth family contact (frequency of and satisfaction with birth family contact), in a sample of 167 emerging adults with varied contact with birth family (from no contact to frequent contact). Results suggest that perceptions of secure parent-child attachment relationships, as well as sensitive and open communication with adoptive parents about adoption, continue to be important for emerging adult adoptees and lead to greater satisfaction for adoptees with birth parent contact-regardless of whether adoptees actually have birth family contact. In particular, positive family communication about adoption during adulthood was predictive of satisfaction with birth parent contact. Limitations and implications are discussed.

  4. Safety of Rural Nursing Home-to-Emergency Department Transfers: Improving Communication and Patient Information Sharing Across Settings.

    PubMed

    Tupper, Judith B; Gray, Carolyn E; Pearson, Karen B; Coburn, Andrew F

    2015-01-01

    The "siloed" approach to healthcare delivery contributes to communication challenges and to potential patient harm when patients transfer between settings. This article reports on the evaluation of a demonstration in 10 rural communities to improve the safety of nursing facility (NF) transfers to hospital emergency departments by forming interprofessional teams of hospital, emergency medical service, and NF staff to develop and implement tools and protocols for standardizing critical interfacility communication pathways and information sharing. We worked with each of the 10 teams to document current communication processes and information sharing tools and to design, implement, and evaluate strategies/tools to increase effective communication and sharing of patient information across settings. A mixed methods approach was used to evaluate changes from baseline in documentation of patient information shared across settings during the transfer process. Study findings showed significant improvement in key areas across the three settings, including infection status and baseline mental functioning. Improvement strategies and performance varied across settings; however, accurate and consistent information sharing of advance directives and medication lists remains a challenge. Study results demonstrate that with neutral facilitation and technical support, collaborative interfacility teams can assess and effectively address communication and information sharing problems that threaten patient safety.

  5. Emergence of Organizational Change and Organizational Learning through Development of a Communications Plan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Beverly D.; Ledford, Alice T.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this action research study was to create an organizational communications plan to enhance a Department of Defense (DOD) adult education institution's capability to communicate with its course writers and others internal and external to the organization. It sought to answer the question: how will an organizational communications plan…

  6. Being Blunt About Marijuana: Parent Communication About Marijuana with Their Emerging Adult Children.

    PubMed

    Napper, Lucy E; Froidevaux, Nicole M; LaBrie, Joseph W

    2016-10-01

    While research suggests that parents continue to influence students' marijuana use after matriculation to college, there is limited data examining how parents communicate about marijuana use and what impact parent marijuana communication has on college student outcomes. The aim of the current study is to investigate the types of parent marijuana messages that college students receive and the relationship between parent communication and students' marijuana attitudes and behaviors. Students (N = 506) completed a survey assessing marijuana approval, use, negative consequences, and parent communication. A factor analysis of parent communication items yielded three factors: risk communication, permissive communication, and marijuana use communication. Risk communication was the most common form of communication. In multivariate models, risk communication was associated with increased odds of a student remaining abstinent but not with frequency of marijuana use or negative consequences. Greater permissive communication was associated with more approving student attitudes, greater odds of non-abstinence, more frequent use in the past year, and more negative consequences. These findings highlight the need to consider the different types of messages parents deliver when designing interventions aimed at engaging parents in marijuana prevention efforts.

  7. Emerging Tuberculosis Pathogen Hijacks Social Communication Behavior in the Group-Living Banded Mongoose (Mungos mungo)

    PubMed Central

    Sanderson, Claire E.; Larsen, Michelle H.; Robbe-Austerman, Suelee; Williams, Mark C.; Palmer, Mitchell V.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT An emerging Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) pathogen, M. mungi, infects wild banded mongooses (Mungos mungo) in Northern Botswana, causing significant mortality. This MTC pathogen did not appear to be transmitted through a primary aerosol or oral route. We utilized histopathology, spoligotyping, mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number of tandem repeats (MIRU-VNTR), quantitative PCR (qPCR), and molecular markers (regions of difference [RDs] from various MTC members, including region of difference 1 [RD1] from M. bovis BCG [RD1BCG], M. microti [RD1mic], and M. pinnipedii [RD1seal], genes Rv1510 [RD4], Rv1970 [RD7], Rv3877/8 [RD1], and Rv3120 [RD12], insertion element IS1561, the 16S RNA gene, and gene Rv0577 [cfp32]), including the newly characterized mongoose-specific deletion in RD1 (RD1mon), in order to demonstrate the presence of M. mungi DNA in infected mongooses and investigate pathogen invasion and exposure mechanisms. M. mungi DNA was identified in 29% of nasal planum samples (n = 52), 56% of nasal rinses and swabs (n = 9), 53% of oral swabs (n = 19), 22% of urine samples (n = 23), 33% of anal gland tissue (n = 18), and 39% of anal gland secretions (n = 44). The occurrence of extremely low cycle threshold values obtained with qPCR in anal gland and nasal planum samples indicates that high levels of M. mungi can be found in these tissue types. Histological data were consistent with these results, suggesting that pathogen invasion occurs through breaks in the nasal planum and/or skin of the mongoose host, which are in frequent contact with anal gland secretions and urine during olfactory communication behavior. Lesions in the lung, when present, occurred only with disseminated disease. No environmental sources of M. mungi DNA could be found. We report primary environmental transmission of an MTC pathogen that occurs in association with social communication behavior. PMID:27165798

  8. Nutrition transition in South Asia: the emergence of non-communicable chronic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bishwajit, Ghose

    2015-01-01

    Overview: South Asian countries have experienced a remarkable economic growth during last two decades along with subsequent transformation in social, economic and food systems. Rising disposable income levels continue to drive the nutrition transition characterized by a shift from a traditional high-carbohydrate, low-fat diets towards diets with a lower carbohydrate and higher proportion of saturated fat, sugar and salt. Steered by various transitions in demographic, economic and nutritional terms, South Asian population are experiencing a rapidly changing disease profile. While the healthcare systems have long been striving to disentangle from the vicious cycle of poverty and undernutrition, South Asian countries are now confronted with an emerging epidemic of obesity and a constellation of other non-communicable diseases (NCDs). This dual burden is bringing about a serious health and economic conundrum and is generating enormous pressure on the already overstretched healthcare system of South Asian countries. Objectives: The Nutrition transition has been a very popular topic in the field of human nutrition during last few decades and many countries and broad geographic regions have been studied. However there is no review on this topic in the context of South Asia  as yet. The main purpose of this review is to highlight the factors accounting for the onset of nutrition transition and its subsequent impact on epidemiological transition in five major South Asian countries including Bangladesh, India, Nepal, Pakistan and Sri Lanka. Special emphasis was given on India and Bangladesh as they together account for 94% of the regional population and about half world’s malnourished population. Methods: This study is literature based. Main data sources were published research articles obtained through an electronic medical databases search. PMID:26834976

  9. Emerging Tuberculosis Pathogen Hijacks Social Communication Behavior in the Group-Living Banded Mongoose (Mungos mungo).

    PubMed

    Alexander, Kathleen A; Sanderson, Claire E; Larsen, Michelle H; Robbe-Austerman, Suelee; Williams, Mark C; Palmer, Mitchell V

    2016-05-10

    An emerging Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) pathogen, M. mungi, infects wild banded mongooses (Mungos mungo) in Northern Botswana, causing significant mortality. This MTC pathogen did not appear to be transmitted through a primary aerosol or oral route. We utilized histopathology, spoligotyping, mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number of tandem repeats (MIRU-VNTR), quantitative PCR (qPCR), and molecular markers (regions of difference [RDs] from various MTC members, including region of difference 1 [RD1] from M. bovis BCG [RD1(BCG)], M. microti [RD1(mic)], and M. pinnipedii [RD1(seal)], genes Rv1510 [RD4], Rv1970 [RD7], Rv3877/8 [RD1], and Rv3120 [RD12], insertion element IS1561, the 16S RNA gene, and gene Rv0577 [cfp32]), including the newly characterized mongoose-specific deletion in RD1 (RD1(mon)), in order to demonstrate the presence of M. mungi DNA in infected mongooses and investigate pathogen invasion and exposure mechanisms. M. mungi DNA was identified in 29% of nasal planum samples (n = 52), 56% of nasal rinses and swabs (n = 9), 53% of oral swabs (n = 19), 22% of urine samples (n = 23), 33% of anal gland tissue (n = 18), and 39% of anal gland secretions (n = 44). The occurrence of extremely low cycle threshold values obtained with qPCR in anal gland and nasal planum samples indicates that high levels of M. mungi can be found in these tissue types. Histological data were consistent with these results, suggesting that pathogen invasion occurs through breaks in the nasal planum and/or skin of the mongoose host, which are in frequent contact with anal gland secretions and urine during olfactory communication behavior. Lesions in the lung, when present, occurred only with disseminated disease. No environmental sources of M. mungi DNA could be found. We report primary environmental transmission of an MTC pathogen that occurs in association with social communication behavior. Organisms causing infectious disease evolve modes of

  10. An internet-based communication network for information transfer during patient transitions from skilled nursing facility to the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Hustey, Fredric M; Palmer, Robert M

    2010-06-01

    To determine whether the implementation of an Internet-based communication system improves the amount of essential information conveyed between a skilled nursing facility (SNF) and the emergency department (ED) during patient care transitions. Interventional; before and after. ED of an urban teaching hospital with approximately 55,000 visits per year and a 55-bed subacute free-standing rehabilitation facility (the SNF). All patients transferred from the SNF to the ED over 16 months. An Internet-based communication network with SNF-ED transfer form for communication during patient care transitions. Nine elements of patient information assessed before and after intervention through chart review. changes in efficiency of information transfer and staff satisfaction. Two hundred thirty-four of 237 preintervention and all 276 postintervention care transitions were reviewed. The Internet communication network was used in 78 (26%) of all care transitions, peaking at 40% by the end of the study. There was more critical patient information (1.85 vs 4.29 of 9 elements; P<.001) contained within fewer pages of transfer documents (24.47 vs 5.15; P<.001) after the intervention. Staff satisfaction with communication was higher among ED physicians after the intervention. The use of an Internet-based system increased the amount of information communicated during SNF-ED care transitions and significantly reduced the number of pages in which this information was contained.

  11. Crisis and emergency risk communication in a pandemic: a model for building capacity and resilience of minority communities.

    PubMed

    Crouse Quinn, Sandra

    2008-10-01

    As public health agencies prepare for pandemic influenza, it is evident from our experience with Hurricane Katrina that these events will occur in the same social, historical, and cultural milieu in which marked distrust of government and health disparities already exist. This article grapples with the challenges of crisis and emergency risk communication with special populations during a pandemic. Recognizing that targeting messages to specific groups poses significant difficulties at that time, this article proposes a model of community engagement, disaster risk education, and crisis and emergency risk communication to prepare minority communities and government agencies to work effectively in a pandemic, build the capacity of each to respond, and strengthen the trust that is critical at such moments. Examples of such engagement and potential strategies to enhance trust include tools familiar to many health educators.

  12. Communicating with the Workforce During Emergencies: Developing an Employee Text Messaging Program in a Local Public Health Setting

    PubMed Central

    Bogan, Sharon; Bosslet, Lindsay

    2014-01-01

    Short message service (SMS) text messaging can be useful for communicating information to public health employees and improving workforce situational awareness during emergencies. We sought to understand how the 1,500 employees at Public Health – Seattle & King County, Washington, perceived barriers to and benefits of participation in a voluntary, employer-based SMS program. Based on employee feedback, we developed the system, marketed it, and invited employees to opt in. The system was tested during an ice storm in January 2012. Employee concerns about opting into an SMS program included possible work encroachment during non-work time and receiving excessive irrelevant messages. Employees who received messages during the weather event reported high levels of satisfaction and perceived utility from the program. We conclude that text messaging is a feasible form of communication with employees during emergencies. Care should be taken to design and deploy a program that maximizes employee satisfaction. PMID:25355976

  13. Difficulties experienced by veterinarians when communicating about emerging zoonotic risks with animal owners: the case of Hendra virus.

    PubMed

    Mendez, Diana H; Büttner, Petra; Kelly, Jenny; Nowak, Madeleine; Speare Posthumously, Rick

    2017-02-18

    Communication skills are essential for veterinarians who need to discuss animal health related matters with their clients. When dealing with an emerging zoonosis, such as Hendra virus (HeV), veterinarians also have a legal responsibility to inform their clients about the associated risks to human health. Here we report on part of a mixed methods study that examined the preparedness of, and difficulties experienced by, veterinarians communicating about HeV-related risks with their clients. Phase 1 was an exploratory, qualitative study that consisted of a series of face-to-face, semi-structured interviews with veterinary personnel from Queensland, Australia (2009-10) to identify the barriers to HeV management in equine practices. Phase 2a was a quantitative study that surveyed veterinarians from the same region (2011) and explored the veterinarians' preparedness and willingness to communicate about HeV-related risks, and the reactions of their clients that they experienced. The second study included both multiple choice and open-ended questions. The majority of the participants from Phase 2a (83.1%) declared they had access to a HeV management plan and over half (58.6%) had ready-to-use HeV information available for clients within their practice. Most (87%) reported "always or sometimes" informing clients about HeV-related risks when a horse appeared sick. When HeV was suspected, 58.1% of participants reported their clients were receptive to their safety directives and 24.9% of clients were either initially unreceptive, overwhelmed by fear, or in denial of the associated risks. The thematic analysis of the qualitative data from Phases 1 and 2a uncovered similar themes in relation to HeV-related communication issues experienced by veterinarians: "clients' intent to adhere"; "adherence deemed redundant"; "misunderstanding or denial of risk"; "cost"; "rural culture"; "fear for reputation". The theme of "emotional state of clients" was only identified during Phase 1

  14. Barriers to Real-Time Medical Direction via Cellular Communication for Prehospital Emergency Care Providers in Gujarat, India

    PubMed Central

    Strehlow, Matthew C; Rao, G.V. Ramana; Newberry, Jennifer A

    2016-01-01

    Background: Many low- and middle-income countries depend on emergency medical technicians (EMTs), nurses, midwives, and layperson community health workers with limited training to provide a majority of emergency medical, trauma, and obstetric care in the prehospital setting. To improve timely patient care and expand provider scope of practice, nations leverage cellular phones and call centers for real-time online medical direction. However, there exist several barriers to adequate communication that impact the provision of emergency care. We sought to identify obstacles in the cellular communication process among GVK Emergency Management and Research Institute (GVK EMRI) EMTs in Gujarat, India. Methods: A convenience sample of practicing EMTs in Gujarat, India were surveyed regarding the barriers to call initiation and completion. Results: 108 EMTs completed the survey. Overall, ninety-seven (89.8%) EMTs responded that the most common reason they did not initiate a call with the call center physician was insufficient time. Forty-six (42%) EMTs reported that they were unable to call the physician one or more times during a typical workweek (approximately 5-6 twelve-hour shifts/week) due to their hands being occupied performing direct patient care. Fifty-eight (54%) EMTs reported that they were unable to reach the call center physician, despite attempts, at least once a week. Conclusion: This study identified multiple barriers to communication, including insufficient time to call for advice and inability to reach call center physicians. Identification of simple interventions and best practices may improve communication and ensure timely and appropriate prehospital care.  PMID:27551654

  15. The Business Emergency Operations Center (BEOC) - A Model for Inter-Agency and Inter-Sector Communication and Collaboration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    an effort be undertaken that encourages business sustainability during emergency and catastrophic events under a business to business ( B2B ...that the Internet will always be available and many systems and technologies are designed for it. However, radio communication to include line of...preparedness dimension of EM. However it is certainly relevant within response as well. Modeling and Simulation suggests different things to

  16. Propagation issues for emerging mobile and portable communications: A systems perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golshan, Nasser

    1993-01-01

    The viewpoint of a system engineer regarding the format of propagation information and models suitable for the design of mobile and portable satellite communications systems for the following services: audio broadcast, two way voice, and packet data is presented. Topics covered include: propagation impairments for portable indoor reception in satellite communications systems; propagation impairments and mitigation techniques for mobile satellite communications systems; characterization of mobile satellite communications channels in the presence of roadside blockage when interleaving and FEC coding are implemented; characterization of short-term mobile satellite signal variations; and characterization of long-term signal variations.

  17. Personal communication in primary and secondary cancer prevention: evolving discussions, emerging challenges.

    PubMed

    Hay, Jennifer; Harris, Julie N; Waters, Erika A; Clayton, Margaret F; Ellington, Lee; Abernethy, Alexis D; Prayor-Patterson, Heather

    2009-01-01

    Over the past several years, the science of cancer communication has been recognized as integral to the dissemination of cancer prevention and control strategies in both the general population as well as higher-risk groups. In this article we draw upon current literature and small group discussion in the 2008 Society for Behavioral Medicine Cancer Special Interest Group Pre-Conference Workshop on Cancer Communication to identify current findings, critical challenges, and future opportunities regarding personal communication of primary and secondary prevention of cancer. We organize our article with six critical questions: (1) What are the most important directions of research in this area? (2) Does personal cancer communication work through rational processes, or are affective and nonrational processes also involved? (3) Are our efforts adequate to reach underserved populations? (4) Are naturalistic communicative contexts given adequate consideration? (5) Has the field been adequately informed by social psychological and communication theories? (6) What are the best outcomes to document communication effectiveness? Our goals are to initiate thought and collaborative efforts among communication, public health, and behavioral science experts, as well as to establish research priorities at the interface of communication and cancer prevention and control sciences.

  18. Online social communication patterns among emerging adult women with histories of childhood attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Mikami, Amori Yee; Szwedo, David E; Ahmad, Shaikh I; Samuels, Andrea Stier; Hinshaw, Stephen P

    2015-08-01

    Little is known about adult women with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD); however, available evidence suggests that they experience social impairment. Online social networking websites such as Facebook have become endemic outlets through which emerging adults communicate with peers. No study has examined the peer interactions of emerging adults with childhood histories of ADHD in this developmentally relevant online domain. Participants in the current study were an ethnically diverse sample of 228 women, 140 of whom met diagnostic criteria for ADHD in childhood and 88 who composed a matched comparison sample. These women were assessed at 3 time points spanning 10 years (mean age = 9.6 at Wave 1, 14.1 at Wave 2, 19.6 at Wave 3). After statistical control of demographic covariates and comorbidities, childhood ADHD diagnosis predicted, by emerging adulthood, a greater stated preference for online social communication and a greater tendency to have used online methods to interact with strangers. A childhood diagnosis of ADHD also predicted observations of fewer Facebook friends and less closeness and support from Facebook friends in emerging adulthood. These associations were mediated by a composite of face-to-face peer relationship impairment during childhood and adolescence. Intriguingly, women with persistent diagnoses of ADHD from childhood to emerging adulthood differed from women with consistent comparison status in their online social communication; women with intermittent diagnoses of ADHD had scores intermediate between the other 2 groups. Results are discussed within the context of understanding the social relationships of women with childhood histories of ADHD. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  19. Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stouffer, Donald D.

    1990-01-01

    Communication in its many forms is a critical component for an effective Space Grant Program. Good communication is needed within individual Space Grant College/Consortia, for example between consortium affiliates and the consortium program office. Effective communication between the several programs, NASA Headquarters, and NASA field centers also is required. Further, communication among the above program elements, industry, local and state government, and the public also are necessary for meeting program objectives.

  20. Emergent Potential Communicative Behaviors in Adults with the Most Severe Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogletree, Billy T.; Bartholomew, Patrick; Wagaman, John C.; Genz, Suzannah; Reisinger, Katie

    2012-01-01

    Partner-perceived communication behaviors are catalogued from four institutionalized adults with severe intellectual disabilities who are not intentional communicators. These behaviors have been observed in typically developing infants and are speculated to comprise the earliest end of a developmental continuum culminating in conventional…

  1. Celebrating the "Intellectual Heart": Emergent Meanings from a Post-Earthquake Organizational Communication Culture Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNamara, Catherine V.; And Others

    The Organizational Communication Culture (OCC) method, designed by Charles A. Bantz (1993) was utilized as the primary method for analyzing messages coming from the administration of California State University, Northridge, after the earthquake. Bantz feels that communication interactions in an organization bring meanings and expectations to that…

  2. National Security/Emergency Preparedness and Disaster Recovery Communications Via ACTS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pasqualino, Christopher R.; Abbe, Brian S.; Dixon, Frank

    1996-01-01

    During the period from early 1993 through 1994, the U.S. National Communication System, a government agency, sponsored the development and execution of several fixed and mobile experiments using the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS)...The results of these experiments are described in this paper.

  3. National Security/Emergency Preparedness and Disaster Recovery Communications Via ACTS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pasqualino, Christopher R.; Abbe, Brian S.; Dixon, Frank

    1996-01-01

    During the period from early 1993 through 1994, the U.S. National Communication System, a government agency, sponsored the development and execution of several fixed and mobile experiments using the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS)...The results of these experiments are described in this paper.

  4. Silence Speaks Volumes: Parental Sexual Communication among Asian American Emerging Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Janna L.; Ward, L. Monique

    2007-01-01

    Although parents greatly influence children's early understandings of sexuality, little is known about how sexual communication transpires in Asian American families. Accordingly, the authors examined the amount and type of parental sexual communication recalled by 165 Asian American college students. Parents were perceived as providing very…

  5. Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hancock, Alan

    An informal introduction to the study of communication deals with the major topics in the field. It presents basic theories of communication and language, reviews how language takes on meaning, explains the stimulus-response and Piaget theories of learning, and presents major theories dealing with communications and society. These theories include…

  6. Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hancock, Alan

    An informal introduction to the study of communication deals with the major topics in the field. It presents basic theories of communication and language, reviews how language takes on meaning, explains the stimulus-response and Piaget theories of learning, and presents major theories dealing with communications and society. These theories include…

  7. Emerging issues and future directions of the field of health communication.

    PubMed

    Hannawa, Annegret F; Kreps, Gary L; Paek, Hye-Jin; Schulz, Peter J; Smith, Sandi; Street, Richard L

    2014-01-01

    The interdisciplinary intersections between communication science and health-related fields are pervasive, with numerous differences in regard to epistemology, career planning, funding perspectives, educational goals, and cultural orientations. This article identifies and elaborates on these challenges with illustrative examples. Furthermore, concrete suggestions for future scholarship are recommended to facilitate compatible, coherent, and interdisciplinary health communication inquiry. The authors hope that this article helps current and future generations of health communication scholars to make more informed decisions when facing some of the challenges discussed in this article so that they will be able to seize the interdisciplinary and international potential of this unique and important field of study.

  8. Emergency Support Function 15: Communication Synchronization during Defense Support of Civil Authorities Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-12

    reconnaissance; detection and monitoring; communications support; aerial reconnaissance; marijuana eradication; linguist support; air and ground...post 9/11.34 The public health information management structure, Medical Electronic Disease Surveillance and Intelligence System (MEDSIS), divides

  9. Hypertext: An Emerging and Important Medium of Business and Technical Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Douglas C.; Nelson, Sandra J.

    1994-01-01

    Provides an overview of hypertext for instructors of business and technical communication. Discusses hypertext's definition, uses, advantages, terminology, theoretical bases, essential structure, and associated problems. Notes instructor behaviors that encourage use of hypertext. (SR)

  10. Solving Wireless Communications Interoperability Problems Among Emergency First Responders Depends on Greater National Guard Involvement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-17

    National Guard Joint Force Headquarters, in each state, (JFHQ-State) create a Communications Interoperability Situational Awareness ( CISA ) cell. The...the cell would develop and maintain a current interoperability-centric, situational awareness for the state. The CISA cell would support not...proposed primary objectives of the CISA cell are: Develop and maintain a central communications reference tool that outlines the first responder

  11. Organizational Communication in Emergencies: Using Multiple Channels and Sources to Combat Noise and Capture Attention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Keri K.; Barrett, Ashley K.; Mahometa, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    This study relies on information theory, social presence, and source credibility to uncover what best helps people grasp the urgency of an emergency. We surveyed a random sample of 1,318 organizational members who received multiple notifications about a large-scale emergency. We found that people who received 3 redundant messages coming through at…

  12. Organizational Communication in Emergencies: Using Multiple Channels and Sources to Combat Noise and Capture Attention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Keri K.; Barrett, Ashley K.; Mahometa, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    This study relies on information theory, social presence, and source credibility to uncover what best helps people grasp the urgency of an emergency. We surveyed a random sample of 1,318 organizational members who received multiple notifications about a large-scale emergency. We found that people who received 3 redundant messages coming through at…

  13. Genetic and Antigenic Characterization of H1 Influenza Viruses from United States Swine Prior to the Emergence of the 2009 Pandemic H1N1

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Swine play a role for the evolution of influenza A viruses. Prior to the introduction of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus from humans into pigs, four phylogenetic clusters of the hemagglutinin (HA) gene from H1 influenza viruses could be found in U.S. swine. Viruses from the classical H1N1 swine lineage...

  14. Maintaining continuity of care: a look at the quality of communication between Ontario emergency departments and community physicians.

    PubMed

    Stiell, Andrew P; Forster, Alan J; Stiell, Ian G; van Walraven, Carl

    2005-05-01

    To maintain continuity of care when a patient's care is transferred between physicians, continuity of patient information is required. This survey determined how, and how well, Ontario emergency departments (EDs) communicate patient information to physicians in the community. We surveyed Ontario ED chiefs to determine the most common media and methods used for disseminating information. We measured the perceived quality of their system, which was regressed against the hospital teaching status and community size using generalized logits modelling. Finally, we elicited the components of an ideal communication system for the ED. One hundred and forty-three (85.6%) Ontario ED chiefs participated. The ED record of treatment was the most commonly used medium (95%). Postal service was the most common (55%) method of disseminating information. Thirty-three chiefs (23%) perceived the quality of communicating patient information from their ED as unsatisfactory or inadequate. This perception was significantly more prevalent in larger communities (excellent v. unsatisfactory [odds ratio (OR) 44.9, 95% confidence interval (CI) 13.9-140] and satisfactory v. unsatisfactory [OR 2.9, 95% CI 1.6-5.1]) and in teaching hospitals (satisfactory v. unsatisfactory [OR 9.7, 95% CI 4.7-20.3]). Seventy-eight percent of responding chiefs felt that patient information should be disseminated using electronic means, either through email or server access. To communicate patient information to community physicians, Ontario ED chiefs report that a copy of the ED record of treatment is sent by postal service. More than one-fifth of ED chiefs perceived communication from their department as unsatisfactory or inadequate. Studies that assess the completeness and accuracy of the record of treatment are required as a first step for measuring the quality of patient information communication in the Ontario ED system.

  15. Early identification of children at risk for critical care: standardizing communication for inter-emergency department transfers.

    PubMed

    Sahyoun, Cyril; Fleegler, Eric; Kleinman, Monica; Monuteaux, Michael C; Bachur, Richard

    2013-04-01

    Interfacility transfers occur frequently and often involve critically ill patients. Clear communication at the time of patient referral is essential for patient safety. The objective of this work was to study whether a standardized inter-emergency department (ED) transfer communication template for pediatric patients with respiratory complaints identifies patients that require intensive care unit (ICU) admission. We created a template to structure the communication between referring and receiving providers involved in inter-ED transfers of children with respiratory complaints. The template was designed for use by nonphysicians to prompt specific questions that would trigger notification of the ED attending based on signs of critical illness. The template was retrospectively applied to determine whether it would have properly triggered attending physician notification of a child ultimately requiring ICU admission. Of 285 transferred children, 61 (21%) were admitted to an ICU from the receiving ED. The sensitivity of the communication template in predicting the need for ICU admission was 84% (95% confidence interval [CI], 72%-92%), negative predictive value of 95% (95% CI, 90%-97%), specificity of 77% (95% CI, 71%-82%), positive predictive value of 50% (95% CI, 40%-60%). Of the 10 patients admitted to an ICU who were not identified by the tool, none were critically ill upon arrival. Of the individual communication elements, the sensitivity and negative predictive value ranged from 3% to 38% and from 79% to 86%, respectively. A standardized communication template for inter-ED transfers can identify children with respiratory complaints who require ICU admission. Next steps include real-time application to judge screening performance compared with current nonstandardized intake protocols.

  16. "Bill is now singing": joint engagement and the emergence of social communication of three young children with autism.

    PubMed

    Vaiouli, Potheini; Grimmet, Kharon; Ruich, Lawrence J

    2015-01-01

    Young children with autism spectrum disorder meet significant challenges in joint attention skills and in social communication. A child-centered, improvisational, music therapy intervention model was implemented to promote engagement in three young children with autism in a kindergarten classroom. A multiple baseline design compared the children's performance through three phases of intervention: focus on faces, response to joint attention, and initiation of joint attention. A complimentary qualitative analysis of teacher and parent experiences allowed for an in-depth understanding of the role of social environment in supporting emerging social communication skills among three children. As all children showed improvement in joint attention and actions of social engagement, this study bears evidence on the potential of music therapy as a promising intervention for promoting social skills of young children with autism spectrum disorder.

  17. Artificial cell-cell communication as an emerging tool in synthetic biology applications.

    PubMed

    Hennig, Stefan; Rödel, Gerhard; Ostermann, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Cell-cell communication is a widespread phenomenon in nature, ranging from bacterial quorum sensing and fungal pheromone communication to cellular crosstalk in multicellular eukaryotes. These communication modes offer the possibility to control the behavior of an entire community by modifying the performance of individual cells in specific ways. Synthetic biology, i.e., the implementation of artificial functions within biological systems, is a promising approach towards the engineering of sophisticated, autonomous devices based on specifically functionalized cells. With the growing complexity of the functions performed by such systems, both the risk of circuit crosstalk and the metabolic burden resulting from the expression of numerous foreign genes are increasing. Therefore, systems based on a single type of cells are no longer feasible. Synthetic biology approaches with multiple subpopulations of specifically functionalized cells, wired by artificial cell-cell communication systems, provide an attractive and powerful alternative. Here we review recent applications of synthetic cell-cell communication systems with a specific focus on recent advances with fungal hosts.

  18. Communicating life-threatening diagnoses to patients in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Takayesu, James Kimo; Hutson, H Range

    2004-06-01

    Disclosing a new, life-threatening diagnosis to a patient is difficult for the physician, the patient, and the family. The disclosure provokes a wide range of reactions from both the patient and family, to which the emergency physician must respond. This interaction is further complicated by the limited time the emergency physician can spend with the patient, the strained resources of a busy emergency department (ED), and, oftentimes, the inability to make a definitive diagnosis based on the ED workup and evaluation. We present a case seen recently in the ED in which a new, life-threatening illness requires disclosure. We offer guidelines for the emergency physician that emphasize patient- and family-centered disclosure of the worrisome diagnostic findings. Additionally, we discuss the essential roles of other allied health professionals in addressing the patient's nonmedical concerns (eg, health insurance, social issues) and in creating a smooth transition for the patient from the ED to further inpatient or outpatient care.

  19. Communicate!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chase, Stuart

    This ten chapter book is designed to provide high school students with an understanding of basic communication processes. The first five chapters include discussions of language development, function, and acquisition in relation to both human and non-human communication. The sixth chapter contains specimen linguistic analyses of speech and…

  20. Communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griner, James

    2010-01-01

    NASA s communication work for the UAS Command and Control area will build upon work currently being conducted under NASA Recovery Act funds. Communication portions of UAS NextGen ConOps, Stateof- the-Art assessment, and Gap Analysis. Preliminary simulations for UAS CNPC link scalability assessment. Surrogate UAS aircraft upgrades. This work will also leverage FY10 in-guide funding for communication link model development. UAS are currently managed through exceptions and are operating using DoD frequencies for line-of-sight (LOS) and satellite-based communications links, low-power LOS links in amateur bands, or unlicensed Instrument/Scientific/Medical (ISM) frequencies. None of these frequency bands are designated for Safety and Regularity of Flight. No radio-frequency (RF) spectrum has been allocated by the International Telecommunications Union (ITU) specifically for UAS command and control links, for either LOS or Beyond LOS (BLOS) communication.

  1. Examining Parent-Teacher Communication in School Systems through the Use of Emergent Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trevino, Rodrigo

    2012-01-01

    Technology has become a part of the fabric of the lives of people, whether it be communicating with a loved one on the other side of the world or paying a utility bill via the Internet. Most people have experienced some level of technology integration into their life. An inescapable rite of passage for most people in developed countries is the…

  2. Parents' Perceptions of Their Preschoolers' Experiences with Information Communication Technologies and Emergent Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Pauline

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships between parents' perception of preschool children's early Information Communication Technologies (ICT) experiences in the home on the dimensions of parent attitude toward the benefits of ICT use, frequency of ICT use, parent attitude toward ICT use, quality of interaction with ICT, and…

  3. Radio Interoperability: Addressing the Real Reasons We Don’t Communicate Well During Emergencies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    This is an issue we cannot simply “ buy ” our way out of by merely deploying more equipment. 4 Newsday...platforms, thus enabling agency-specific communications to continue?) First responders will tend to revert to daily habits in times of crisis, instead of...recognition of the need for improved human interoperability 16 Y2K refers to millennial change of

  4. The Emergence of Marketing and Communications Strategy in South African Further Education and Training Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGrath, Simon; Akoojee, Salim

    2007-01-01

    South African further education and training (FET) colleges have been enjoined to become more responsive to their external environment, in keeping with international trends in public vocational education and training (VET) reform. One mechanism for achieving this goal is to market colleges and communicate more effectively to future students,…

  5. Parents' Perceptions of Their Preschoolers' Experiences with Information Communication Technologies and Emergent Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Pauline

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships between parents' perception of preschool children's early Information Communication Technologies (ICT) experiences in the home on the dimensions of parent attitude toward the benefits of ICT use, frequency of ICT use, parent attitude toward ICT use, quality of interaction with ICT, and…

  6. Females' Perspectives on Emergence to Adulthood: The Role of Information Communication Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindsay, Megan

    2016-01-01

    Young women ages 18-29 are the highest users of Information Communication Technology (ICT) in the United States. As a group, they curate and create more online content than any other adult user group (Duggan, 2014). Throughout the research literature, scholars claim that the high rate of technology use among young people is related to their…

  7. Effects of communication on the performance of nursing students during the simulation of an emergency situation.

    PubMed

    Chapelain, Pascal; Morineau, Thierry; Gautier, Claudie

    2015-11-01

    To explore how nursing performance is impacted by different forms of team communication including a message transmitted through an earpiece which triggers reflective thinking in the simulation of a deteriorating patient situation. Communication can either support team performance or produce interruptions potentially leading to error. Today, technology offers the opportunity to use devices that can permit communication. An experimental protocol was used with quantitative and qualitative analyses. Pairs of nursing students (N = 26) were dispatched to either an experimental group having to wear an earpiece priming reflective thinking, or to a control group. The study was conducted between October 2013-April 2014. The number of spontaneous information exchanges between pairs of participants was positively correlated with overall performance (actions performed and physician call) and with actions performed at the right moment. The number of questions in the team was positively correlated with overall action performance. No quantitative effect of the earpiece message on the performance indicators was found. But, a qualitative observation showed that this message can allow for error avoidance. Subjective evaluation of the earpiece as an aid was negatively correlated with overall action performance. Its evaluation as a disturbance was also negatively correlated with the measurement of actions performed at the right moment. The ability to exchange information and to ask questions seems to contribute to performance in care delivery. The use of communication devices to trigger reflective thinking must be studied in more depth to assess their capacity to improve performance. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Examining Parent-Teacher Communication in School Systems through the Use of Emergent Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trevino, Rodrigo

    2012-01-01

    Technology has become a part of the fabric of the lives of people, whether it be communicating with a loved one on the other side of the world or paying a utility bill via the Internet. Most people have experienced some level of technology integration into their life. An inescapable rite of passage for most people in developed countries is the…

  9. The School Leader Communication Model: An Emerging Method for Bridging School Leader Preparation and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dotger, Benjamin H.

    2011-01-01

    School leaders make countless decisions but do not receive adequate preparation for communicating their decisions to parents, students, and teachers. Building on the need to prepare school leaders for a variety of complex professional situations, this article introduces the medical education pedagogy of standardized patients to the field of school…

  10. The Conversational Unit: An Investigation of Communicative Competence in Emerging Language.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Ellen

    The development of the Conversational Unit (CU) was investigated in a semilongitudinal study of three mother/son dyads in nonstructured spontaneous communication. The children were 19 to 23 months old at the start of the investigation. Sound films were recorded monthly during bathing and feeding times. After four months, verbal and nonverbal…

  11. Females' Perspectives on Emergence to Adulthood: The Role of Information Communication Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindsay, Megan

    2016-01-01

    Young women ages 18-29 are the highest users of Information Communication Technology (ICT) in the United States. As a group, they curate and create more online content than any other adult user group (Duggan, 2014). Throughout the research literature, scholars claim that the high rate of technology use among young people is related to their…

  12. The Emergence of Marketing and Communications Strategy in South African Further Education and Training Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGrath, Simon; Akoojee, Salim

    2007-01-01

    South African further education and training (FET) colleges have been enjoined to become more responsive to their external environment, in keeping with international trends in public vocational education and training (VET) reform. One mechanism for achieving this goal is to market colleges and communicate more effectively to future students,…

  13. Emergence of Virtual Communities as Means of Communication: A Case Study on Virtual Health Care Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Argan, Mehpare Tokay; Argan, Metin; Suher, Idil K.

    2011-01-01

    Like in all areas, virtual communities make their presence felt in the area of healthcare too. Virtual communities play an important role in healthcare in terms of gathering information on healthcare, sharing of personal interests and providing social support. Virtual communities provide a way for a group of peers to communicate with each other.…

  14. Impact of smartphone digital photography, email, and media communication on emergency room visits post-hypospadias repair.

    PubMed

    Chua, Michael E; Saunders, Megan A; Bowlin, Paul R; Ming, Jessica M; Lopes, Roberto Iglesias; Farhat, Walid A; Dos Santos, Joana

    2017-01-01

    Advances in communication technology are shaping our medical practice. To date, there is no clear evidence that this mode of communication will have any effect on unnecessary postoperative emergency room (ER) visits. We aim to evaluate the effect of email and media communication with application of smartphone digital photography on post-hypospadias repair ER visit rates. This prospective cohort study included all patients who underwent hypospadias repair performed by a single surgeon from October 2014 to November 2015. Patients were categorized into two groups: Group A consented for smartphone photography and email communication and Group B declined. Reason for ER visits within 30 days postoperatively was assessed by another physician, who was blinded of patient group assignment. The reasons were categorized as: unnecessary ER visit, indicated ER visit, or visit unrelated to hypospadias surgery. Chi-square test and T-test were used for statistical analysis. Relative risk (RR) and corresponding 95% confidence interval (CI) were also calculated. Statistical significance was set at p<0.05. Over a 14-month period, 96 patients underwent hypospadias repair (81 in Group A, 15 in Group B 5). No significant difference was noted between groups for overall ER return rate (RR 0.46, 95% CI 0.21, 1.0). However, the number of ER visits for wound check not requiring intervention was significantly lower in Group A than in Group B (RR 0.14, 95% CI 0.035, 0.56); likewise, a higher number of ER visits requiring intervention was noted in Group A compared with Group B, although statistically this was not significant (RR 1.67, 95% CI 0.23, 12.21). Email communication with the use of smartphone digital photography significantly reduced the number of unnecessary ER visits for post-hypospadias wound checks.

  15. When seconds count: A study of communication variables in the opening segment of emergency calls.

    PubMed

    Penn, Claire; Koole, Tom; Nattrass, Rhona

    2016-02-09

    The opening sequence of an emergency call influences the efficiency of the ambulance dispatch time. The greeting sequences in 105 calls to a South African emergency service were analysed. Initial results suggested the advantage of a specific two-part opening sequence. An on-site experiment aimed at improving call efficiency was conducted during one shift (1100 calls). Results indicated reduced conversational repairs and a significant reduction of 4 seconds in mean call length. Implications for systems and training are derived.

  16. Communicating radiation risk to patients and referring physicians in the emergency department setting.

    PubMed

    Shyu, Jeffrey Y; Sodickson, Aaron D

    2016-01-01

    Heightened awareness about the radiation risks associated with CT imaging has increased patients' wishes to be informed of these risks, and has motivated efforts to reduce radiation dose and eliminate unnecessary imaging. However, many ordering providers, including emergency physicians, are ill prepared to have an informed discussion with patients about the cancer risks related to medical imaging. Radiologists, who generally have greater training in radiation biology and the risks of radiation, often do not have a face-to-face relationship with the patients who are being imaged. A collaborative approach between emergency physicians and radiologists is suggested to help explain these risks to patients who may have concerns about getting medical imaging.

  17. Mexican immigrant mothers' perceptions of their children's communication disabilities, emergent literacy development, and speech-language therapy program.

    PubMed

    Kummerer, Sharon E; Lopez-Reyna, Norma A; Hughes, Marie Tejero

    2007-08-01

    This qualitative study explored mothers' perceptions of their children's communication disabilities, emergent literacy development, and speech-language therapy programs. Participants were 14 Mexican immigrant mothers and their children (age 17-47 months) who were receiving center-based services from an early childhood intervention program, located in a large urban city in the Midwestern United States. Mother interviews composed the primary source of data. A secondary source of data included children's therapy files and log notes. Following the analysis of interviews through the constant comparative method, grounded theory was generated. The majority of mothers perceived their children as exhibiting a communication delay. Causal attributions were diverse and generally medical in nature (i.e., ear infections, seizures) or due to familial factors (i.e., family history and heredity, lack of extended family). Overall, mothers seemed more focused on their children's speech intelligibility and/or expressive language in comparison to emergent literacy abilities. To promote culturally responsive intervention, mothers recommended that professionals speak Spanish, provide information about the therapy process, and use existing techniques with Mexican immigrant families.

  18. A Strategy of Dialogue for Communicating Hazard and Risk Information Between the Science and Emergency Management Sectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisner, R. K.

    2015-12-01

    This presentation will describe a collaborative dialogue process between earth scientists and emergency management officials that focused on translation of science into policy, building long term trust based relationships between sectors and unified presentation of hazards, risks and consequence management to public officials and the general public. The author will describe the structure and process of the California Earthquake Prediction Evaluation Council (CEPEC) in assessing the credibility of long and short term earthquake predictions, assessment of risk, and the formulation of public communication strategies and preparatory actions by government agencies. For nearly 4 decades, earth scientists, politically appointed state officials and emergency managers have engaged in ongoing discussions of the policy implications of research on potential seismic risk. Some discussions were scheduled and occurred over months, and others were ad hoc and occurred in the minutes between potential precursory incidents and possible large events. The effectiveness of this process was dependent on building respect for ones counterparts expertise, bias and responsibilities, clear communication of data, uncertainty and knowledge of the physical models assumed, history and probabilities; and the physical and political consequences of possible events; and the costs and economic and social disruption of alternative preparedness actions. But, the dialogue included political and social scientists, representatives of the print and broadcast media, political and management officials from federal, state and local governments. The presentation will provide an assessment of the effectiveness of the collaborative dialogue process and lessons on sustaining a long term partnership among the participating federal, state and local officials.

  19. Emergence of amae crying in early infancy as a possible social communication tool between infants and mothers.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Hiroko

    2015-08-01

    Amae is defined as "wishing to be loved (Scheidlinger (1999). The Journal of the American Academy of Psychoanalysis, 27(1), p. 91)". Amae crying is known as crying of infants when seeking intimate emotional communication with caregivers. The objective of this study was to delineate when and how amae crying emerges in early infancy. Crying episodes of four infants were observed bimonthly, in the natural context of their homes, from birth to 6 months of age, for approximately 60min per session. Crying episodes (total=275) as determined by two coders were analyzed with respect to several behavioral measures. Results indicated that amae crying emerged at the age of 2 months, and consistently accounted for 30-40% of the total crying episodes after the ages of 3 months. Amae crying could be accurately identified when infants were not in acute discomfort and had already got the attention of their mothers. At such times, infants did not shed tears, cried with a fussy voice, and frequently looked at their mothers. Mothers responded to amae crying more promptly than they did to other types of crying behaviors. It is concluded that 3 months of age, when infants probably begin to use crying as a social communication tool is a major turning point for crying behavior from the perspective of its biological and social roles. It is suggested that amae crying might play an important role in strengthening and encouraging mother-infant interactions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Expert Game experiment predicts emergence of trust in professional communication networks.

    PubMed

    Bendtsen, Kristian Moss; Uekermann, Florian; Haerter, Jan O

    2016-10-25

    Strong social capital is increasingly recognized as an organizational advantage. Better knowledge sharing and reduced transaction costs increase work efficiency. To mimic the formation of the associated communication network, we propose the Expert Game, where each individual must find a specific expert and receive her help. Participants act in an impersonal environment and under time constraints that provide short-term incentives for noncooperative behavior. Despite these constraints, we observe cooperation between individuals and the self-organization of a sustained trust network, which facilitates efficient communication channels with increased information flow. We build a behavioral model that explains the experimental dynamics. Analysis of the model reveals an exploitation protection mechanism and measurable social capital, which quantitatively describe the economic utility of trust.

  1. Star on the Horizon: The Emergence of the Direct Broadcast Satellite in American Mass Communications.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-12-21

    communications Satellites, regulation ass media , regulation C 20. AmSrRACI s (myEtue er ’ fl if m a Identify by block number) W. C- we’"The purpose of this thesis...domestic broadcasting industry and media regulation. It is hoped that this thesis will help future scholars who .Benno Signitzer, Regulation of Direct... cultural or political intrusion by other countries. Satellite signals crossing national boundaries either 16 V% _ Z . . .. .. Z .. . .Z. Z! . DBS would be

  2. Emerging tuberculosis pathogen hijacks social communication behavior in the group-living banded mongoose (Mungos mungo)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mycobacterium mungi, a novel M. tuberculosis complex pathogen (MtbC), has emerged in wild banded mongoose (Mungos mungo) in Northern Botswana, causing significant mortality. Unlike other members of the MtbC, M. mungi is not transmitted through a primary aerosol route. Rather, pathogen invasion occur...

  3. Handbook of Research on Emerging Priorities and Trends in Distance Education: Communication, Pedagogy, and Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuzer, T. Volkan, Ed.; Eby, Gulsun, Ed.

    2014-01-01

    With the rise of distance education in the post-modern world, progressive research on the best methods, tools, and technologies in the field is necessary to continue to take advantage of the pedagogical opportunities and improvements offered through remote learning platforms. The "Handbook of Research on Emerging Priorities and Trends in…

  4. Handbook of Research on Emerging Priorities and Trends in Distance Education: Communication, Pedagogy, and Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuzer, T. Volkan, Ed.; Eby, Gulsun, Ed.

    2014-01-01

    With the rise of distance education in the post-modern world, progressive research on the best methods, tools, and technologies in the field is necessary to continue to take advantage of the pedagogical opportunities and improvements offered through remote learning platforms. The "Handbook of Research on Emerging Priorities and Trends in…

  5. Mind the (knowledge) gap: the effect of a communication instrument on emergency department patients' comprehension of and satisfaction with care.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Stefanie; Sharp, Brian; Fowler, Jennifer; Fowkes, Hope; Paz-Arabo, Patricia; Dilt-Skaggs, Mary Kate; Singal, Bonita; Carter, Thomas

    2015-02-01

    We developed a communication instrument to be used in the Emergency Department (ED) and hypothesized that use of this guide would increase patient comprehension of and satisfaction with care. This multi-site trial enrolled 643 patients in treatment and control groups. Comprehension of care was assessed by chart review and satisfaction measured via validated survey. Use of the instrument was not associated with improvements in patient knowledge about their care, with a mean of 4.6 (95% CI: 4.8-5.8) comprehension defects in the control group and 4.4 (95% CI: 3.9-4.9) in the treatment group. There was no significant effect on patient satisfaction 76.4% versus 76.9%, p=0.34. Elderly patients in both groups were found to have 1.1 (p<0.01) more knowledge gaps than younger patients. Patients frequently misunderstand medical care in the ED. Comprehension decreases with increasing age. An isolated communication instrument does not improve satisfaction with or understanding of the care received. Providing a structured place for providers and patients to record details of care does not seem to improve satisfaction with or comprehension of care. Interventions that focus on communication skills and face time with patients may prove more effective. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. National action plan for non-communicable diseases prevention and control in Iran; a response to emerging epidemic.

    PubMed

    Peykari, Niloofar; Hashemi, Hassan; Dinarvand, Rasoul; Haji-Aghajani, Mohammad; Malekzadeh, Reza; Sadrolsadat, Ali; Sayyari, Ali Akbar; Asadi-Lari, Mohsen; Delavari, Alireza; Farzadfar, Farshad; Haghdoost, Aliakbar; Heshmat, Ramin; Jamshidi, Hamidreza; Kalantari, Naser; Koosha, Ahmad; Takian, Amirhossein; Larijani, Bagher

    2017-01-01

    Emerging Non-communicable diseases burden move United Nation to call for 25% reduction by 2025 in premature mortality from non-communicable diseases (NCDs). The World Health Organization (WHO) developed global action plan for prevention and control NCDs, but the countries' contexts, priorities, and health care system might be different. Therefore, WHO expects from countries to meet national commitments to achieve the 25 by 25 goal through adapted targets and action plan. In this regards, sustainable high-level political statement plays a key role in rules and regulation support, and multi-sectoral collaborations to NCDs' prevention and control by considering the sustainable development goals and universal health coverage factors. Therefore, Iran established the national authority's structure as Iranian Non Communicable Diseases Committee (INCDC) and developed NCDs' national action plan through multi-sectoral approach and collaboration researchers and policy makers. Translation Iran's expertise could be benefit to mobilizing leadership in other countries for practical action to save the millions of peoples.

  7. Effects of communication media choice on the quality and efficacy of emergency calls assisted by a mobile nursing protocol tool.

    PubMed

    Castro, Luis A; Favela, Jesus; Garcia-Peña, Carmen

    2014-11-01

    The transition from paper to electronic-based records in the healthcare industry has posed several challenges to conventional medical practices. The introduction of technology in day-to-day medical and nursing practices deserves careful consideration. In this work, we report the results of a controlled experiment to compare nurses' consultation in emergency calls in six different conditions. We studied the effect that the type of communication media (face-to-face, telephone, videoconference) and type of nursing protocol media (paper-based, electronic-based) can have on consultation time, mistakes made, pauses during consultation, eye contact, and efficacy of the consultation. We found that the type of communication media has an effect on consultation time; on average, fewer mistakes were made during telephone-based consultations; for eye contact, there were significantly fewer eye contacts during face-to-face than during videoconference consultations; finally, the type of communication media or protocol media did not have any effect in the efficacy of the consultation.

  8. Communication and empathy in an emergency setting involving persons in crisis

    PubMed Central

    Nordby, Halvor; Nøhr, Øyvind

    2008-01-01

    The article presents a study of the interaction between paramedics and parents in cases of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). We have sought to understand how the parents perceived the paramedics ability to communicate as well as empathise and deal with practical aspects of the situation. We have also sought to understand how the paramedics view their role as professional health workers, and how they think they should interact with persons in crisis. The method used in this study is qualitative and involves semi-structured interview schemes. We conducted twelve interviews – six with parents and six with paramedics. One of our primary findings is that many of the parents interviewed were not satisfied with the paramedics' communication, empathy and ability to take care of the practical aspects of the situation. The interviews have also revealed that there is significant disagreement among paramedics about the interpersonal role of health workers in situations involving people in crisis. The final part of this article includes a discussion of these and other findings. We argue that guidelines that specify threshold conditions for communication and care should be implemented in education and training. The aim of such guidelines should be to make sure that parents of lifeless children are secured a minimum of relevant explanations, information and care. PMID:18957067

  9. Development of a mobile emergency patient information and imaging communication system based on CDMA-1X EVDO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Keon Ho; Jung, Haijo; Kang, Won-Suk; Jang, Bong Mun; Kim, Joong Il; Han, Dong Hoon; Yoo, Sun-Kook; Yoo, Hyung-Sik; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2006-03-01

    The wireless mobile service with a high bit rate using CDMA-1X EVDO is now widely used in Korea. Mobile devices are also increasingly being used as the conventional communication mechanism. We have developed a web-based mobile system that communicates patient information and images, using CDMA-1X EVDO for emergency diagnosis. It is composed of a Mobile web application system using the Microsoft Windows 2003 server and an internet information service. Also, a mobile web PACS used for a database managing patient information and images was developed by using Microsoft access 2003. A wireless mobile emergency patient information and imaging communication system is developed by using Microsoft Visual Studio.NET, and JPEG 2000 ActiveX control for PDA phone was developed by using the Microsoft Embedded Visual C++. Also, the CDMA-1X EVDO is used for connections between mobile web servers and the PDA phone. This system allows fast access to the patient information database, storing both medical images and patient information anytime and anywhere. Especially, images were compressed into a JPEG2000 format and transmitted from a mobile web PACS inside the hospital to the radiologist using a PDA phone located outside the hospital. Also, this system shows radiological images as well as physiological signal data, including blood pressure, vital signs and so on, in the web browser of the PDA phone so radiologists can diagnose more effectively. Also, we acquired good results using an RW-6100 PDA phone used in the university hospital system of the Sinchon Severance Hospital in Korea.

  10. Mobile Health Technology to Communicate Discharge and Follow-Up Information to Adolescents From the Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Ray, Margaret; Dayan, Peter S; Pahalyants, Vartan; Chernick, Lauren S

    2016-12-01

    Adolescents are the largest users of mobile technology; yet, there are little data regarding their receptivity to the use of mobile health technology (mHealth) from the emergency department (ED). The objective of this study was to determine adolescents' preferences for receiving ED discharge and follow-up information via mHealth and factors associated with those preferences. We administered an anonymous self-reporting survey to patients aged 14 to 19 years discharged from an urban pediatric ED. We conducted exploratory bivariate analyses to evaluate differences in communication preferences based on patient characteristics. We used multivariable logistic regression to determine whether preference for health information via mHealth is associated with frequent information technology (IT) use, adjusting for age, sex, ethnicity, and insurance status. Four hundred thirty-nine adolescents completed the survey. Most were female (n = 279, 64%), 14 to 17 years old (n = 247, 57%), Hispanic (n = 359, 86%), and insured (n = 388, 88%). Adolescents used IT often, texting more than 30 times a day (58%) and emailing more than once a day (61%). Most (n = 335, 78%) were interested in electronic communication from the ED. Teens expressed particular interest in using email for discharge instructions (n = 196, 47%), physician referrals (n = 197, 48%), and test results (n = 201, 48%) and using texting for medication (n = 155, 38%) and appointment reminders (n = 170, 41%). Individuals tended to prefer communication with IT modes that they typically used, although only email was independently associated with preference for this mode (adjusted odds ratio, 2.8; 95% confidence interval, 1.5-5.3). Adolescent patients are interested in receiving health information from the ED, mainly via email and texting. Future ED interventions should evaluate the effectiveness of these modalities to communicate with patients after discharge.

  11. [Communication in special situations: a training programme with standardized patients for emergency medical physicians].

    PubMed

    Sopka, Sasa; Brokmann, Jörg Ch; Rossaint, Rolf; Pirkl, Andrea; Beckers, Stefan K

    2009-02-01

    Regulations for the post-graduate education of physicians deployed in the emergency medical system in Germany are existing, but unfortunately not standardised nationwide. Within the compulsory certification course "soft skills" are not incorporated resp. psychological disorders are not considered to an adequate extent. In respect of increasing emergency calls with psycho-social indications it seemed necessary to invent a specialised course concerning these issues. Integrating under-graduate experiences of classes with standardized patients, objectives were defined; a pilot course was composed using scenarios as acute psychosis, suicidal tendency and bringing bad news including structured video-feedback. Evaluation data approved the tested approach concerning content as well as feasibility, pointed out areas for improvement, but encouraged further implementation of the program to greater extend.

  12. Personal Emergency Response Systems--Communication Technology Aids Elderly and Their Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dibner, Andrew S.

    Personal response systems (PRS) bring immediate help to aged and disabled persons at home at the touch of a button. The PRS user wears a tiny radio transmitter as a pendant or a bracelet and can send a telephone signal from any part of the home to a 24-hour emergency center when help is needed. This study examined research on the Lifeline system,…

  13. Developing an Intelligent Phone-based Emergency Triage Communication and Support System

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Fang-Ying; Kuo, Yu-Yin; Chang, Polun

    2006-01-01

    In this study, the emergency triage support system was taken as an example. We develop new call flow style and combine traditional passive call flow. The system is designed by voice menu and users can command services actively. The telephone connect computer server to enter call flow module with ASR and TTS. Then the recognition term come from voice term database. Voice management center is an ER triage decision system. PMID:17238573

  14. Potential Applications of Cable Television (CATV) to the FEMA (Federal Emergency Management Agency) Communications Mission.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-07-01

    8217D-RI31 326 POTENTIAL APPLICATIONS OF CABLE TELEVISION (CATY) TO i2 THE FEMA (FEDERAL EM.. (U) CONTROL ENERGY CORP BOSTON MR D D GILLIGAN ET AL. JUL...9. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME AND ADDRESS 10. PROGRAM ELEMENT. PROJECT, TASK AREA & WORK UNIT NUMBERS Control Energy Corporation 470 Atlantic...Avenue Boston, MA 02210 ______________ 11. CONTROLLING OFFICE NAME AND ADDRESS 12. REPORT DATE Federal Emergency Management Agency July, 1983 OAM

  15. Detection of a Hobi-like virus in archival samples suggests circulation of this emerging pestivirus species in Europe prior to 2007.

    PubMed

    Decaro, Nicola; Mari, Viviana; Lucente, Maria Stella; Sciarretta, Rossana; Elia, Gabriella; Ridpath, Julia F; Buonavoglia, Canio

    2013-12-27

    The first reported incidence of Hobi-like viruses in Europe dates to a 2010 outbreak of respiratory disease in cattle in Italy. In this study, a Hobi-like virus was detected in archival samples, collected in 2007 in Italy from a cattle herd displaying respiratory disease, during the validation of a nested PCR protocol for rapid characterization of bovine pestiviruses. Phylogeny conducted with full-length pestivirus genomes and three informative genomic sequences, placed the strain detected in the samples, Italy-129/07, into the Hobi-like virus branch. Italy-129/07, similar to other Hobi-like viruses isolated in Italy, was more closely related to viruses of South American origin, than Hobi-like viruses of Southeast Asian origin. This suggests a possible introduction of this emerging group of pestiviruses into Italy as a consequence of using contaminated biological products such as fetal bovine serum originating in South America. This report of a Hobi-like virus associated with respiratory disease along with the full-genomic characterization of the virus detected provides new data that contributes to the body of knowledge regarding the epidemiology, pathobiology and genetic diversity of this emerging group of pestiviruses. Importantly, it dates the circulation of Hobi-like viruses in Italy to 2007, at least three years before previous reports.

  16. An Emergency Packet Forwarding Scheme for V2V Communication Networks

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes an effective warning message forwarding scheme for cooperative collision avoidance. In an emergency situation, an emergency-detecting vehicle warns the neighbor vehicles via an emergency warning message. Since the transmission range is limited, the warning message is broadcast in a multihop manner. Broadcast packets lead two challenges to forward the warning message in the vehicular network: redundancy of warning messages and competition with nonemergency transmissions. In this paper, we study and address the two major challenges to achieve low latency in delivery of the warning message. To reduce the intervehicle latency and end-to-end latency, which cause chain collisions, we propose a two-way intelligent broadcasting method with an adaptable distance-dependent backoff algorithm. Considering locations of vehicles, the proposed algorithm controls the broadcast of a warning message to reduce redundant EWM messages and adaptively chooses the contention window to compete with nonemergency transmission. Via simulations, we show that our proposed algorithm reduces the probability of rear-end crashes by 70% compared to previous algorithms by reducing the intervehicle delay. We also show that the end-to-end propagation delay of the warning message is reduced by 55%. PMID:25054181

  17. Optically controlled microwave devices and circuits: Emerging applications in space communications systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhasin, Kul B.; Simons, Rainee N.

    1987-01-01

    Optical control of microwave devices and circuits by an optical fiber has the potential to simplify signal distribution networks in high frequency communications systems. The optical response of two terminal and three terminal (GaAs MESFET, HEMT, PBT) microwave devices are compared and several schemes for controlling such devices by modulated optical signals examined. Monolithic integration of optical and microwave functions on a single semiconductor substrate is considered to provide low power, low loss, and reliable digital and analog optical links for signal distribution.

  18. Airborne Platforms for Emergency Communications and Reconnaissance in Domestic Disaster Response

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    Launch of a StarFighter communications relay balloon .…………………………...…16 Figure 8: Artist’s Conception of DARPA’s ISIS high- altitude airship...traditional heavier than air RPAs, manned lighter than air (LTA) platforms, tethered aerostats, and free-floating balloons . Each of these technologies will be...AY10 13 and low altitude of these airships, coupled with the ability to capture high-resolution video, make these platforms ideal for

  19. Emergence of consensus as a modular-to-nested transition in communication dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Borge-Holthoefer, Javier; Baños, Raquel A.; Gracia-Lázaro, Carlos; Moreno, Yamir

    2017-01-01

    Online social networks have transformed the way in which humans communicate and interact, leading to a new information ecosystem where people send and receive information through multiple channels, including traditional communication media. Despite many attempts to characterize the structure and dynamics of these techno-social systems, little is known about fundamental aspects such as how collective attention arises and what determines the information life-cycle. Current approaches to these problems either focus on human temporal dynamics or on semiotic dynamics. In addition, as recently shown, information ecosystems are highly competitive, with humans and memes striving for scarce resources –visibility and attention, respectively. Inspired by similar problems in ecology, here we develop a methodology that allows to cast all the previous aspects into a compact framework and to characterize, using microblogging data, information-driven systems as mutualistic networks. Our results show that collective attention around a topic is reached when the user-meme network self-adapts from a modular to a nested structure, which ultimately allows minimizing competition and attaining consensus. Beyond a sociological interpretation, we explore such resemblance to natural mutualistic communities via well-known dynamics of ecological systems. PMID:28134358

  20. Emergence of consensus as a modular-to-nested transition in communication dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borge-Holthoefer, Javier; Baños, Raquel A.; Gracia-Lázaro, Carlos; Moreno, Yamir

    2017-01-01

    Online social networks have transformed the way in which humans communicate and interact, leading to a new information ecosystem where people send and receive information through multiple channels, including traditional communication media. Despite many attempts to characterize the structure and dynamics of these techno-social systems, little is known about fundamental aspects such as how collective attention arises and what determines the information life-cycle. Current approaches to these problems either focus on human temporal dynamics or on semiotic dynamics. In addition, as recently shown, information ecosystems are highly competitive, with humans and memes striving for scarce resources -visibility and attention, respectively. Inspired by similar problems in ecology, here we develop a methodology that allows to cast all the previous aspects into a compact framework and to characterize, using microblogging data, information-driven systems as mutualistic networks. Our results show that collective attention around a topic is reached when the user-meme network self-adapts from a modular to a nested structure, which ultimately allows minimizing competition and attaining consensus. Beyond a sociological interpretation, we explore such resemblance to natural mutualistic communities via well-known dynamics of ecological systems.

  1. Emergence of consensus as a modular-to-nested transition in communication dynamics.

    PubMed

    Borge-Holthoefer, Javier; Baños, Raquel A; Gracia-Lázaro, Carlos; Moreno, Yamir

    2017-01-30

    Online social networks have transformed the way in which humans communicate and interact, leading to a new information ecosystem where people send and receive information through multiple channels, including traditional communication media. Despite many attempts to characterize the structure and dynamics of these techno-social systems, little is known about fundamental aspects such as how collective attention arises and what determines the information life-cycle. Current approaches to these problems either focus on human temporal dynamics or on semiotic dynamics. In addition, as recently shown, information ecosystems are highly competitive, with humans and memes striving for scarce resources -visibility and attention, respectively. Inspired by similar problems in ecology, here we develop a methodology that allows to cast all the previous aspects into a compact framework and to characterize, using microblogging data, information-driven systems as mutualistic networks. Our results show that collective attention around a topic is reached when the user-meme network self-adapts from a modular to a nested structure, which ultimately allows minimizing competition and attaining consensus. Beyond a sociological interpretation, we explore such resemblance to natural mutualistic communities via well-known dynamics of ecological systems.

  2. Communicating Emerging Issues in Ocean Hypoxia (or Suffocating in Your Own Home)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitney, F. A.; Tunnicliffe, V.; Diaz, R. J.

    2009-12-01

    Some large regions of our interior oceans are losing oxygen both from the impacts of human uses of coastal margins and the impacts that climate change is having on ocean circulation. As oxygen minimum zones expand, impacts are especially noticed along the edges of continents. Ecosystems are being affected in ways that result in habitat compression or forced migrations. Looking into the future, we foresee large scale disruptions to habitat that, in some cases, will dramatically impact fish productivity. As waters become more hypoxic, energy fixed by marine plants will be less available to support higher trophic levels (e.g. fish and marine mammals). Communicating concern about hypoxia has its challenges: the word itself is poorly know to those on land who live in an oxygen-rich world. Thus, crucial factors in effective communication include illustrating: i) how many ocean animals live “on the edge”, ii) how ocean organisms respond to hypoxia iii) the long-term effects on ocean ecosystems and iv) causes and mitigation. For media that respond to visual stimulation, good graphics, evocative analogies and focussed examples are important.

  3. Microvesicles as mediators of intercellular communication in cancer--the emerging science of cellular 'debris'.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tae Hoon; D'Asti, Esterina; Magnus, Nathalie; Al-Nedawi, Khalid; Meehan, Brian; Rak, Janusz

    2011-09-01

    Cancer cells emit a heterogeneous mixture of vesicular, organelle-like structures (microvesicles, MVs) into their surroundings including blood and body fluids. MVs are generated via diverse biological mechanisms triggered by pathways involved in oncogenic transformation, microenvironmental stimulation, cellular activation, stress, or death. Vesiculation events occur either at the plasma membrane (ectosomes, shed vesicles) or within endosomal structures (exosomes). MVs are increasingly recognized as mediators of intercellular communication due to their capacity to merge with and transfer a repertoire of bioactive molecular content (cargo) to recipient cells. Such processes may occur both locally and systemically, contributing to the formation of microenvironmental fields and niches. The bioactive cargo of MVs may include growth factors and their receptors, proteases, adhesion molecules, signalling molecules, as well as DNA, mRNA, and microRNA (miRs) sequences. Tumour cells emit large quantities of MVs containing procoagulant, growth regulatory and oncogenic cargo (oncosomes), which can be transferred throughout the cancer cell population and to non-transformed stromal cells, endothelial cells and possibly to the inflammatory infiltrates (oncogenic field effect). These events likely impact tumour invasion, angiogenesis, metastasis, drug resistance, and cancer stem cell hierarchy. Ongoing studies explore the molecular mechanisms and mediators of MV-based intercellular communication (cancer vesiculome) with the hope of using this information as a possible source of therapeutic targets and disease biomarkers in cancer.

  4. The National Right to Life Committee: its founding, its history, and the emergence of the pro-life movement prior to Roe v. Wade.

    PubMed

    Karrer, Robert N

    2011-01-01

    During the mid-1960s a few Catholic journals and individuals advised that a more active role should be taken in defeating abortion reform. In 1967 the National Conference of Catholic Bishops selected James Thomas McHugh, administrator of the United States Catholic Conference’s Family Life Bureau, to guide its National Right to Life Committee (NRLC). Several pro-life organizations, including Minnesota Citizens Concerned for Life, emerged and affiliated with the NRLC national office. To appeal to a more broad-based, nonsectarian movement, key Minnesota leaders proposed an organizational model that would separate the NRLC from its founder. In early 1973 McHugh and his executive assistant, Michael Taylor, proposed a different plan, facilitating the NRLC’s move to independence.

  5. Post-Adoption Contact, Adoption Communicative Openness, and Satisfaction with Contact as Predictors of Externalizing Behavior in Adolescence and Emerging Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Grotevant, Harold D.; Rueter, Martha; Von Korff, Lynn; Gonzalez, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    Background This study examined the relation between three variables related to adoptive family relationships (post-adoption contact between adoptive and birth family members, adoption communicative openness, and satisfaction with contact) and adoptee externalizing behavior in adolescence and emerging adulthood. Method The study included 190 families of infant-placed, domestic adoptees during childhood, adolescence, and emerging adulthood. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to analyze predictors of externalizing behavior from contact (adoptive parents and adolescent reports), adoption communicative openness (adoptive mothers), and satisfaction with contact (adoptive parents and adolescent). Results Externalizing behavior showed moderate stability across childhood, adolescence, and emerging adulthood. Contact and adoption communicative openness were related to each other, but not to externalizing behaviors in adolescence or emerging adulthood. Controlling for the effect of Childhood Externalizing, adoptive families most satisfied with contact reported relative declines in adoptee externalizing behavior during adolescence compared to those in less satisfied families. Satisfaction was also indirectly associated with Emerging Adult Externalizing, through its effect on Adolescent Externalizing. Conclusions Although contact and adoption communicative openness were highly correlated with each other, neither was related to adoptees’ externalizing behavior in adolescence or emerging adulthood. Family level satisfaction with contact was more predictive of externalizing outcomes. PMID:20955207

  6. Post-adoption contact, adoption communicative openness, and satisfaction with contact as predictors of externalizing behavior in adolescence and emerging adulthood.

    PubMed

    Grotevant, Harold D; Rueter, Martha; Von Korff, Lynn; Gonzalez, Christopher

    2011-05-01

    This study examined the relation between three variables related to adoptive family relationships (post-adoption contact between adoptive and birth family members, adoption communicative openness, and satisfaction with contact) and adoptee externalizing behavior in adolescence and emerging adulthood. The study included 190 families of infant-placed, domestic adoptees during childhood, adolescence, and emerging adulthood. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to analyze predictors of externalizing behavior from contact (adoptive parents and adolescent reports), adoption communicative openness (adoptive mothers), and satisfaction with contact (adoptive parents and adolescent). Externalizing behavior showed moderate stability across childhood, adolescence, and emerging adulthood. Contact and adoption communicative openness were related to each other, but not to externalizing behaviors in adolescence or emerging adulthood. Controlling for the effect of Childhood Externalizing, adoptive families most satisfied with contact reported relative declines in adoptee externalizing behavior during adolescence compared to those in less satisfied families. Satisfaction was also indirectly associated with Emerging Adult Externalizing, through its effect on Adolescent Externalizing. Although contact and adoption communicative openness were highly correlated with each other, neither was related to adoptees' externalizing behavior in adolescence or emerging adulthood. Family-level satisfaction with contact was more predictive of externalizing outcomes. © 2010 The Authors. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry © 2010 Association for Child and Adolescent Mental Health.

  7. Communications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailenson, Jeremy; Buzzanell, Patrice; Deetz, Stanley; Tewksbury, David; Thompson, Robert J.; Turow, Joseph; Bichelmeyer, Barbara; Bishop, M. J.; Gayeski, Diane

    2013-01-01

    Scholars representing the field of communications were asked to identify what they considered to be the most exciting and imaginative work currently being done in their field, as well as how that work might change our understanding. The scholars included Jeremy Bailenson, Patrice Buzzanell, Stanley Deetz, David Tewksbury, Robert J. Thompson, and…

  8. Communications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailenson, Jeremy; Buzzanell, Patrice; Deetz, Stanley; Tewksbury, David; Thompson, Robert J.; Turow, Joseph; Bichelmeyer, Barbara; Bishop, M. J.; Gayeski, Diane

    2013-01-01

    Scholars representing the field of communications were asked to identify what they considered to be the most exciting and imaginative work currently being done in their field, as well as how that work might change our understanding. The scholars included Jeremy Bailenson, Patrice Buzzanell, Stanley Deetz, David Tewksbury, Robert J. Thompson, and…

  9. Communication: broken-ergodicity and the emergence of solid behaviour in amorphous materials.

    PubMed

    Williams, Stephen R

    2011-10-07

    Using a combination of theory and molecular dynamics simulations, we show how solid behaviour emerges in amorphous materials from microscopic considerations. The effect on the systems response to a sudden change in strain, upon entering the history dependent glass state, is focused on. An important symmetry that is always present in a fluid state, is shown to be broken for a simulated history dependent amorphous solid. Details of how this applies to a single sample and an ensemble of independent samples are discussed, along with the dependence on the time scale the system is monitored on. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  10. Mobile phone-based biosensing: An emerging "diagnostic and communication" technology.

    PubMed

    Quesada-González, Daniel; Merkoçi, Arben

    2017-06-15

    In this review we discuss recent developments on the use of mobile phones and similar devices for biosensing applications in which diagnostics and communications are coupled. Owing to the capabilities of mobile phones (their cameras, connectivity, portability, etc.) and to advances in biosensing, the coupling of these two technologies is enabling portable and user-friendly analytical devices. Any user can now perform quick, robust and easy (bio)assays anywhere and at any time. Among the most widely reported of such devices are paper-based platforms. Herein we provide an overview of a broad range of biosensing possibilities, from optical to electrochemical measurements; explore the various reported designs for adapters; and consider future opportunities for this technology in fields such as health diagnostics, safety & security, and environment monitoring.

  11. Emotional and Interactional Prosody across Animal Communication Systems: A Comparative Approach to the Emergence of Language

    PubMed Central

    Filippi, Piera

    2016-01-01

    Across a wide range of animal taxa, prosodic modulation of the voice can express emotional information and is used to coordinate vocal interactions between multiple individuals. Within a comparative approach to animal communication systems, I hypothesize that the ability for emotional and interactional prosody (EIP) paved the way for the evolution of linguistic prosody – and perhaps also of music, continuing to play a vital role in the acquisition of language. In support of this hypothesis, I review three research fields: (i) empirical studies on the adaptive value of EIP in non-human primates, mammals, songbirds, anurans, and insects; (ii) the beneficial effects of EIP in scaffolding language learning and social development in human infants; (iii) the cognitive relationship between linguistic prosody and the ability for music, which has often been identified as the evolutionary precursor of language. PMID:27733835

  12. Emotional and Interactional Prosody across Animal Communication Systems: A Comparative Approach to the Emergence of Language.

    PubMed

    Filippi, Piera

    2016-01-01

    Across a wide range of animal taxa, prosodic modulation of the voice can express emotional information and is used to coordinate vocal interactions between multiple individuals. Within a comparative approach to animal communication systems, I hypothesize that the ability for emotional and interactional prosody (EIP) paved the way for the evolution of linguistic prosody - and perhaps also of music, continuing to play a vital role in the acquisition of language. In support of this hypothesis, I review three research fields: (i) empirical studies on the adaptive value of EIP in non-human primates, mammals, songbirds, anurans, and insects; (ii) the beneficial effects of EIP in scaffolding language learning and social development in human infants; (iii) the cognitive relationship between linguistic prosody and the ability for music, which has often been identified as the evolutionary precursor of language.

  13. Ethics of emergent information and communication technology applications in humanitarian medical assistance.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Matthew; Pringle, John; Christen, Markus; Eckenwiler, Lisa; Schwartz, Lisa; Davé, Anushree

    2016-07-01

    New applications of information and communication technology (ICT) are shaping the way we understand and provide humanitarian medical assistance in situations of disaster, disease outbreak or conflict. Each new crisis appears to be accompanied by advancements in humanitarian technology, leading to significant improvements in the humanitarian aid sector. However, ICTs raise ethical questions that warrant attention. Focusing on the context of humanitarian medical assistance, we review key domains of ICT innovation. We then discuss ethical challenges and uncertainties associated with the development and application of new ICTs in humanitarian medical assistance, including avoiding harm, ensuring privacy and security, responding to inequalities, demonstrating respect, protecting relationships, and addressing expectations. In doing so, we emphasize the centrality of ethics in humanitarian ICT design, application and evaluation. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Star on the horizon: The emergence of the direct broadcast satellite in American mass communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, J. H.

    1984-12-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to describe the concept of broadcasting from satellites directly to the viewer equipped with a small, inexpensive receiving antenna, and the evolution of this technology as a means of commercial broadcast. Emphasis is placed on the problems of developing a regulatory framework for DBS by the Federal Communications Commission. The opposition of the existing broadcasters to the unregulated development of direct broadcast satellite (DBS) is explored in light of the possible effect that DBS may have on the economic base, audience, and advertising revenue of existing broadcasters. The information for this study was obtained from government documents, legal journals, books and the popular press. Two basic conclusions are drawn from this study: First, that the existing broadcasters have opposed the marketplace development of DBS, and second, that DBS does not pose as great a threat, at least in the near term, as the broadcasters fear.

  15. Content Characteristics Driving the Diffusion of Antismoking Messages: Implications for Cancer Prevention in the Emerging Public Communication Environment

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This study examined how content characteristics of antitobacco messages affect smokers’ selective exposure to and social sharing of those messages. Results from an experiment revealed that content features predicting smokers’ selection of antismoking messages are different from those predicting whether those messages are shared. Antismoking messages smokers tend to select are characterized by strong arguments (odds ratio = 2.02, P = .02) and positive sentiments (odds ratio = 3.08, P = .03). Once selected, the messages more likely to be retransmitted by smokers were those with novel arguments (B = .83, P = .002) and positive sentiments (B = 1.65, P = .005). This research adds to the literature about the content characteristics driving the social diffusion of antitobacco messages and contributes to our understanding of the role of persuasive messages about smoking cessation in the emerging public communication environment. PMID:24395989

  16. Content characteristics driving the diffusion of antismoking messages: implications for cancer prevention in the emerging public communication environment.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Suk; Lee, Sungkyoung; Cappella, Joseph N; Vera, Lisa; Emery, Sherry

    2013-12-01

    This study examined how content characteristics of antitobacco messages affect smokers' selective exposure to and social sharing of those messages. Results from an experiment revealed that content features predicting smokers' selection of antismoking messages are different from those predicting whether those messages are shared. Antismoking messages smokers tend to select are characterized by strong arguments (odds ratio = 2.02, P = .02) and positive sentiments (odds ratio = 3.08, P = .03). Once selected, the messages more likely to be retransmitted by smokers were those with novel arguments (B = .83, P = .002) and positive sentiments (B = 1.65, P = .005). This research adds to the literature about the content characteristics driving the social diffusion of antitobacco messages and contributes to our understanding of the role of persuasive messages about smoking cessation in the emerging public communication environment.

  17. Evaluation in an emergency department of rapid separator tubes containing thrombin for serum preparation prior to hs-cTnT and CK-MB analyses.

    PubMed

    Budak, Yasemin U; Huysal, Kagan; Bulut, Mehtap; Polat, Murat

    2013-01-01

    In our emergency department, we collect blood in Rapid Serum Tubes (RSTs; Becton Dickinson, Franklin Lakes, NJ), in which clotting times are reduced. We investigated the influence of RST use on cardiac troponin T (hs-cTnT) and creatine kinase-MB (CK-MB) test results, in comparison with the use of tubes featuring a separator gel containing a clotting activator (SSTs; Green-vac, Yongin, Korea). Samples from 60 patients were divided into equal aliquots and placed into RSTs and SSTs; hs-cTnT and CK-MB concentrations were determined using an autoanalyzer (Elecsys 2010) running commercial assays (Roche Diagnostics, Penzberg, Germany). Between-tube differences in CK-MB and hs-cTnT values were compared using the paired t-test, and correlations among variables were evaluated by calculation of Spearman correlation coefficients (r values). Deming regression analysis was performed and Bland-Altman plots were constructed. The hs-cTnT and CK-MB test results obtained from samples placed into RSTs and SSTs did not differ (p > 0.1). The correlations between the concentrations of hs-cTnT and CK-MB in samples placed into RSTs and SSTs were good; both r values were unity (p < 0.001). Deming regression analysis yielded the equation: RST [hs-cTnT] = 0.98 SST [hs-cTnT] + 0.69 pg/ml; and RST [CK-MB] = 0.95 SST [CK-MB]-0.09 ng/ml. The biases of 1.4 pg/ml (95% CI: minus 8.1-10.7 pg/ml) for hs-cTnT levels and 0.249 ng/ml (95% CI: minus 0.682-1.681 ng/ml) for CK-MB levels assayed using either tube was acceptable. The hs-cTnT and CK-MB test results did not significantly differ when either tube was used. RST tube use was associated with a short clotting time; this was an advantage in an emergency laboratory setting.

  18. Linguistic and Cultural Challenges in Communication and Translation in US-Sponsored HIV Prevention Research in Emerging Economies.

    PubMed

    Hanrahan, Donna; Sexton, Patrina; Hui, Katrina; Teitcher, Jennifer; Sugarman, Jeremy; London, Alex John; Barnes, Mark; Purpura, James; Klitzman, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Linguistic and cultural differences can impede comprehension among potential research participants during the informed consent process, but how researchers and IRBs respond to these challenges in practice is unclear. We conducted in-depth interviews with 15 researchers, research ethics committee (REC) chairs and members from 8 different countries with emerging economies, involved in HIV-related research sponsored by HIV Prevention Trials Network (HPTN), regarding the ethical and regulatory challenges they face in this regard. In the interviews, problems with translating study materials often arose as major concerns. Four sets of challenges were identified concerning linguistic and cultural translations of informed consent documents and other study materials, related to the: (1) context, (2) process, (3) content and (4) translation of these documents. Host country contextual issues included low literacy rates, education (e.g., documents may need to be written below 5th grade reading level), and experiences with research, and different views of written documentation. Certain terms and concepts may not exist in other languages, or have additional connotations that back translations do not always reveal. Challenges arise because of not only the content of word-for-word, literal translation, but the linguistic form of the language, such as tone (e.g., appropriate forms of politeness vs. legalese, seen as harsh), syntax, manner of questions posed, and the concept of the consent); and the contexts of use affect meaning. Problems also emerged in bilateral communications--US IRBs may misunderstand local practices, or communicate insufficiently the reasons for their decisions to foreign RECs. In sum, these data highlight several challenges that have received little, if any, attention in past literature on translation of informed consent and study materials, and have crucial implications for improving practice, education, research and policy, suggesting several strategies

  19. Linguistic and Cultural Challenges in Communication and Translation in US-Sponsored HIV Prevention Research in Emerging Economies

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Linguistic and cultural differences can impede comprehension among potential research participants during the informed consent process, but how researchers and IRBs respond to these challenges in practice is unclear. We conducted in-depth interviews with 15 researchers, research ethics committee (REC) chairs and members from 8 different countries with emerging economies, involved in HIV-related research sponsored by HIV Prevention Trials Network (HPTN), regarding the ethical and regulatory challenges they face in this regard. In the interviews, problems with translating study materials often arose as major concerns. Four sets of challenges were identified concerning linguistic and cultural translations of informed consent documents and other study materials, related to the: (1) context, (2) process, (3) content and (4) translation of these documents. Host country contextual issues included low literacy rates, education (e.g., documents may need to be written below 5th grade reading level), and experiences with research, and different views of written documentation. Certain terms and concepts may not exist in other languages, or have additional connotations that back translations do not always reveal. Challenges arise because of not only the content of word-for-word, literal translation, but the linguistic form of the language, such as tone (e.g., appropriate forms of politeness vs. legalese, seen as harsh), syntax, manner of questions posed, and the concept of the consent); and the contexts of use affect meaning. Problems also emerged in bilateral communications – US IRBs may misunderstand local practices, or communicate insufficiently the reasons for their decisions to foreign RECs. In sum, these data highlight several challenges that have received little, if any, attention in past literature on translation of informed consent and study materials, and have crucial implications for improving practice, education, research and policy, suggesting several strategies

  20. A system for the model based emergency detection and communication for the telerehabilitation training of cardiopulmonary patients.

    PubMed

    Helmer, Axel; Kretschmer, Friedrich; Deparade, Riana; Song, Bianying; Meis, Markus; Hein, Andreas; Marschollek, Michael; Tegtbur, Uwe

    2012-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary diseases affect millions of people and cause high costs in health care systems worldwide. Patients should perform regular endurance exercises to stabilize their health state and prevent further impairment. However, patients are often uncertain about the level of intensity they should exercise in their current condition. The cost of continuous monitoring for these training sessions in clinics is high and additionally requires the patient to travel to a clinic for each single session. Performing the rehabilitation training at home can raise compliance and reduce costs. To ensure safe telerehabilitation training and to enable patients to control their performance and health state, detection of abnormal events during training is a critical prerequisite. Therefore, we created a model that predicts the heart rate of cardiopulmonary patients and that can be used to detect and avoid abnormal health states. To enable external feedback and an immediate reaction in case of a critical situation, the patient should have the possibility to configure the system to communicate warnings and emergency events to clinical and non-clinical actors. To fulfill this task, we coupled a personal health record (PHR) with a new component that extends the classic home emergency systems. The PHR is also used for a training schedule definition that makes use of the predictive HR model. We used statistical methods to evaluate the prediction model and found that our prediction error of 3.2 heart beats per minute is precise enough to enable a detection of critical states. The concept for the communication of alerts was evaluated through focus group interviews with domain experts who judged that it fulfills the needs of potential users.

  1. Training the powerful: issues that emerged during the evaluation of a communication skills training programme for senior cancer care professionals.

    PubMed

    Bibila, S; Rabiee, F

    2014-07-01

    'Connected' is the name of the national advanced communication skills training programme developed in 2008 for cancer care professionals in the NHS. A 3-day training course combining didactic and experiential learning elements is run by two facilitators with course participants expected to engage fully in simulated consultations with trained actors. In 2011, and as a result of participant feedback on the length of the course and increasing pressures on budgets and clinical time, the Connected team developed and piloted an alternative 2-day training course. Before its roll-out in 2012, Birmingham City University was commissioned to evaluate the effectiveness and quality of the 2-day course vis-à-vis the 'traditional' 3-day one. This article is written by the two evaluators and it discusses some of the issues that emerged during the evaluation. We broadly grouped these issues into two overlapping categories: the mandatory nature of the course and the different professional background and seniority of participants. In our discussion we consider the implications these issues have for communication skills training policy and practice and put forward suggestions for further research. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Adolescents' perceptions of interpersonal communication, respect, and concern for privacy in an urban tertiary-care pediatric emergency department.

    PubMed

    Rutherford, Kim A; Pitetti, Raymond D; Zuckerbraun, Noel S; Smola, Susan; Gold, Melanie A

    2010-04-01

    To measure adolescents' perceived overall satisfaction with health care in a pediatric emergency department (PED), identify key factors that contributed to satisfaction, and determine how these factors interacted with length of stay (LOS) and triage acuity. Prospective observational design with a convenience sample of 100 adolescents 13 to 21 years old recruited from the PED between February and June 2007. Participants completed a self-administered 27-item written survey with closed and open-ended items. Survey response rate was 99%. Respondents completed the survey in a mean time of 6.6 minutes (range, 3-12 minutes; SD, 2.0 minutes). Most (95%) reported being satisfied with their overall PED experience, and 91% would recommend the PED to other adolescents. Interpersonal communication and respect correlated significantly with respondents' overall satisfaction. There were no statistically significant differences in overall satisfaction rates by sex, age, socioeconomic status, or ethnicity, or by LOS, triage acuity score, or hospital admission. Most (94%) answered a qualitative survey item that asked how their PED care could be improved with 4 distinct responses: no changes necessary, enhance interpersonal communication, improve comfort of stay, and shorten LOS. Adolescents expressed high levels of satisfaction with their overall PED experience at our institution. Interpersonal communication and respect highly correlated with overall satisfaction. A multicenter study using a similar self-administered survey would further support the relationship between key factors and PED adolescent satisfaction. Utilization of a self-administered survey for adolescent research is feasible in the PED and could be used to improve quality control measures for adolescent care.

  3. Short Communication: Emergence of Novel A/G Recombinant HIV-1 Strains in Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, María F.; Golemba, Marcelo D.; Terrones, Carmen; Paradiso, Patricia; Nassif, Juan C.; Bologna, Rosa; Mangano, Andrea; Sen, Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The predominant circulating HIV-1 strains in South America are subtype B and B/F recombinants with different distributions among countries. However, the emergence of other subtypes is a matter of concern and needs continuous monitoring. We identified three different A/G recombinants in Argentina, two of them in vertically infected children from unlinked mothers and one in an adult female. HIV-1 pol sequences from the children showed novel A/G recombination patterns and no phylogenetic relationship with previously reported South American A/G sequences. The third A/G recombinant was a CRF06_cpx with African origin. The detection of new or unusual subtypes is important to avoid false-negative PCR HIV-1 early diagnosis due to detection failures and for future vaccine development. PMID:25417788

  4. Assessment of RF exposures from emerging wireless communication technologies in different environments.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Wout; Verloock, Leen; Goeminne, Francis; Vermeeren, Gönter; Martens, Luc

    2012-02-01

    In situ electromagnetic (EM) radio frequency (RF) exposure to base stations of emerging wireless technologies is assessed at 311 locations, 68 indoor and 243 outdoor, spread over 35 areas in three European countries (Belgium, The Netherlands, and Sweden) by performing narrowband spectrum analyzer measurements. The locations are selected to characterize six different environmental categories (rural, residential, urban, suburban, office, and industrial). The maximal total field value was measured in a residential environment and equal to 3.9 V m(-1), mainly due to GSM900 signals. Exposure ratios for maximal electric field values, with respect to ICNIRP reference levels, range from 0.5% (WiMAX) to 9.3% (GSM900) for the 311 measurement locations. Exposure ratios for total field values vary from 3.1% for rural environments to 9.4% for residential environments. Exposures are lognormally distributed and are the lowest in rural environments and the highest in urban environments. Highest median exposures were obtained in urban environments (0.74 V m(-1)), followed by office (0.51 V m(-1)), industrial (0.49 V m(-1)), suburban (0.46 V m(-1)), residential (0.40 V m(-1)), and rural (0.09 V m(-1)) environments. The average contribution to the total electric field is more than 60% for GSM. Except for the rural environment, average contributions of UMTS-HSPA are more than 3%. Contributions of the emerging technologies LTE and WiMAX are on average less than 1%. The dominating outdoor source is GSM900 (95 percentile of 1.9 V m(-1)), indoor DECT dominates (95 percentile of 1.5 V m(-1)).

  5. MASS MEDIA COMMUNICATION OF EMERGENCY ISSUES AND COUNTERMEASURES IN A NUCLEAR ACCIDENT: FUKUSHIMA REPORTING IN EUROPEAN NEWSPAPERS.

    PubMed

    Gallego, Eduardo; Cantone, Marie Claire; Oughton, Deborah H; Perko, Tanja; Prezelj, Iztok; Tomkiv, Yevgeniya

    2017-04-01

    This paper presents the results of a large study of 1340 articles published by two major newspapers in six European countries (Belgium, Italy, Norway, Slovenia, Spain and Russia) in the first 2 months after the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster. The focus of the analysis is on the application and overall impact of protective actions, both during the emergency phase and later, how the newspapers describe those actions, which differences were apparent between countries and what recommendations can be extracted in order to improve general communication about these issues. A clear lesson is that, even under uncertainty and recognising limitations, responsible authorities need to provide transparent, clear and understandable information to the public and the mass media right from the beginning of the early phase of any nuclear emergency. Clear, concise messages should be given. Mass media could play a key role in reassuring the public if the countermeasures are clearly explained. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Implementation of a new emergency medical communication centre organization in Finland--an evaluation, with performance indicators.

    PubMed

    Lindström, Veronica; Pappinen, Jukka; Falk, Ann-Charlotte; Castrén, Maaret

    2011-03-31

    There is a great variety in how emergency medical communication centers (EMCC) are organized in different countries and sometimes, even within countries. Organizational changes in the EMCC have often occurred because of outside world changes, limited resources and the need to control costs, but historically there is often a lack of structured evaluation of these organization changes. The aim of this study was to evaluate if the performance in emergency medical dispatching changed in a smaller community outside Helsinki after the emergency medical call centre organization reform in Finland. A retrospective observational study was conducted in the EMCC in southern Finland. The data from the former system, which had municipality-based centers, covered the years 2002-2005 and was collected from several databases. From the new EMCC, data was collected from January 1 to May 31, 2006. Identified performance indicators were used to evaluate and compare the old and new EMCC organizations. A total of 67,610 emergency calls were analyzed. Of these, 54,026 were from the municipality-based centers and 13,584 were from the new EMCC. Compared to the old municipality-based centers the new EMCC dispatched the highest priority to 7.4 percent of the calls compared to 3.6 percent in the old system. The high priority cases not detected by dispatchers increased significantly (p<0.001) in the new EMCC organization, and the identification rate of unexpected deaths in the dispatched ambulance assignments was not significantly (p=0.270) lower compared to the old municipality-based center data. After implementation of a new EMCC organization in Finland the percentage and number of high priority calls increased. There was a trend, but no statistically significant increase in the emergency medical dispatchers' ability to detect patients with life-threatening conditions despite structured education, regular evaluation and standardization of protocols in the new EMCC organization. © 2011

  7. Variations in contact patterns and dispatch guideline adherence between Norwegian emergency medical communication centres - a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The 19 Norwegian Emergency medical communication centres (EMCCs) use Norwegian Index for medical emergency assistance (Index) as dispatch guidelines. Little is known about the use of Index, nor its validity. We aimed to document the epidemiology of contacts made to the public emergency medical phone number and the operators’ self-reported use of Index as a first step towards a validation study. Methods We registered all medical emergency calls to the EMCCs during a 72 h period in a national cross sectional study. We subsequently sent a questionnaire to all EMCC operators in Norway, asking how they use Index. A combined outcome variable “use of Index” was computed through a Likert scale, range 1–5. Regression models were used to examine factors influencing use. Results 2 298 contacts were included. National contact rate was 56/1 000 inhabitants per year, range between EMCCs 34 – 119. Acute contact (life-threatening situations) rate was 21/1 000 per year, range between EMCCs 5 – 31. Index criteria 6 – ’Unresolved problem’ accounts for 20% of the 113 contacts, range between EMCCs 10 – 42%. The mean use of Index was 3.95 (SD 0.39), corresponding to “more than 75% of emergency calls”. There were differences in use of Index on EMCC level, range 3.7 – 4.4, and a multi regression model explained 23.4% of the variation in use. Operators working rotation with ground ambulance services reported reduced use of Index compared to operators not working in rotation, while distinct EMCC focus on Index increased use of Index compared to EMCCs with no focus on Index. Use of electronic records and operators experience were the main reasons given for not using Index. Conclusions There is a large variation between the EMCCs with regard to both contact patterns and use of Index. There is a relatively high overall self-reported use of Index by the operators, with variations on both individual and EMCC level. PMID:24398290

  8. Brief Communication: On the rapid and efficient monitoring results dissemination in landslide emergency scenarios: the Mont de La Saxe case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordan, D.; Manconi, A.; Allasia, P.; Bertolo, D.

    2015-09-01

    Straightforward communication of monitoring results is of major importance in emergency scenarios relevant to large slope instabilities. Here we describe the communication strategy developed for the Mont de La Saxe rockslide threatening La Palud and Entrèves hamlets in the Courmayeur municipality (Aosta Valley, Italy). Starting from the definition of actions and needs of the landslide management team, including scientists, technicians, civil protection operators, decision makers, and politicians, we show that sharing and disseminating ad hoc information simplifies the understanding of the landslide evolution, as well as the correct communication of the level of criticality.

  9. Brief Communication: On the rapid and efficient monitoring results dissemination in landslide emergency scenarios: the Mont de La Saxe case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordan, D.; Manconi, A.; Allasia, P.; Bertolo, D.

    2015-04-01

    Straightforward communication of monitoring results is of major importance in emergency scenarios relevant to large slope instabilities. Here we describe the communication strategy developed for the Mont de La Saxe case study, a large rockslide threatening La Palud and Entrèves hamlets in the Courmayeur municipality (Aosta Valley, Italy). Starting from the definition of actions and needs of the Landslide Management Team, including scientists, technicians, civil protection operators, decision makers, and politicians, we show that sharing and disseminating ad hoc information simplifies the understanding of the landslide evolution, as well as the correct communication of the level of criticality.

  10. Communication and the Emergence of Collective Behavior in Living Organisms: A Quantum Approach

    PubMed Central

    Bischof, Marco; Del Giudice, Emilio

    2013-01-01

    Intermolecular interactions within living organisms have been found to occur not as individual independent events but as a part of a collective array of interconnected events. The problem of the emergence of this collective dynamics and of the correlated biocommunication therefore arises. In the present paper we review the proposals given within the paradigm of modern molecular biology and those given by some holistic approaches to biology. In recent times, the collective behavior of ensembles of microscopic units (atoms/molecules) has been addressed in the conceptual framework of Quantum Field Theory. The possibility of producing physical states where all the components of the ensemble move in unison has been recognized. In such cases, electromagnetic fields trapped within the ensemble appear. In the present paper we present a scheme based on Quantum Field Theory where molecules are able to move in phase-correlated unison among them and with a self-produced electromagnetic field. Experimental corroboration of this scheme is presented. Some consequences for future biological developments are discussed. PMID:24288611

  11. Factors Influencing Postsecondary STEM Students' Views of the Public Communication of an Emergent Technology: a Cross-National Study from Five Universities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Grant E.; Jones, M. Gail; Albe, Virginie; Blonder, Ron; Laherto, Antti; Macher, Daniel; Paechter, Manuela

    2016-10-01

    Recent efforts in the science education community have highlighted the need to integrate research and theory from science communication research into more general science education scholarship. These synthesized research perspectives are relatively novel but serve an important need to better understand the impacts that the advent of rapidly emerging technologies will have on a new generation of scientists and engineers including their formal communication with engaged citizenry. This cross-national study examined postsecondary science and engineering students' (n = 254 from five countries: Austria, Finland, France, Israel, and USA) perspectives on the role of science communication in their own formal science and engineering education. More broadly, we examined participants' understanding of their perceived responsibilities of communicating science and engineering to the general public when an issue contains complex social and ethical implications (SEI). The study is contextualized in the emergent technology of nanotechnology for which SEI are of particular concern and for which the general public often perceives conflicting risks and benefits. Findings indicate that student participants' hold similar views on the need for their own training in communication as future scientists and engineers. When asked about the role that ethics and risk perception plays in research, development, and public communication of nanotechnology, participants demonstrate similar trajectories of perspectives that are, however, often anchored in very different levels of beginning concern. Results are discussed in the context of considerations for science communication training within formal science education curricula globally.

  12. Factors Influencing Postsecondary STEM Students' Views of the Public Communication of an Emergent Technology: a Cross-National Study from Five Universities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Grant E.; Jones, M. Gail; Albe, Virginie; Blonder, Ron; Laherto, Antti; Macher, Daniel; Paechter, Manuela

    2017-10-01

    Recent efforts in the science education community have highlighted the need to integrate research and theory from science communication research into more general science education scholarship. These synthesized research perspectives are relatively novel but serve an important need to better understand the impacts that the advent of rapidly emerging technologies will have on a new generation of scientists and engineers including their formal communication with engaged citizenry. This cross-national study examined postsecondary science and engineering students' ( n = 254 from five countries: Austria, Finland, France, Israel, and USA) perspectives on the role of science communication in their own formal science and engineering education. More broadly, we examined participants' understanding of their perceived responsibilities of communicating science and engineering to the general public when an issue contains complex social and ethical implications (SEI). The study is contextualized in the emergent technology of nanotechnology for which SEI are of particular concern and for which the general public often perceives conflicting risks and benefits. Findings indicate that student participants' hold similar views on the need for their own training in communication as future scientists and engineers. When asked about the role that ethics and risk perception plays in research, development, and public communication of nanotechnology, participants demonstrate similar trajectories of perspectives that are, however, often anchored in very different levels of beginning concern. Results are discussed in the context of considerations for science communication training within formal science education curricula globally.

  13. Emergent Application on Smart Phone for Deaf, Language Dysfunction and Foreigners: -  Communication method to perform swift rescue report by refined icons with GPS technology.

    PubMed

    Hosono, Naotsune; Inoue, Hiromitsu; Nakanishi, Miwa; Tomita, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the efficiency of the Emergent Application on Smart Phones (EASP). In an initial survey, hearing impaired people are asked to explain their difficulties in an emergency situation. With this survey as background, an application with five steps is implemented on Smart Phone touch panels using outcome icons and pictograms to communicate to a call centre in the fire brigade. The evaluation results with EASP application by deaf people found that it was about five times quicker to report an emergency using this tool, than it by using text message input.

  14. Technology-Aided Leisure and Communication Opportunities for Two Post-Coma Persons Emerged from a Minimally Conscious State and Affected by Multiple Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancioni, Giulio E.; O'Reilly, Mark F.; Singh, Nirbhay N.; Sigafoos, Jeff; Buonocunto, Francesca; Sacco, Valentina; Navarro, Jorge; Lanzilotti, Crocifissa; De Tommaso, Marina; Megna, Marisa; Oliva, Doretta

    2013-01-01

    This study assessed technology-aided programs for helping two post-coma persons, who had emerged from a minimally conscious state and were affected by multiple disabilities, to (a) engage with leisure stimuli and request caregiver's procedures, (b) send out and listen to text messages for communication with distant partners, and (c) combine…

  15. Evaluating and Measuring the Return on Investment of an Emergency Center Health Care Professional Picture Archiving and Communication Systems Training Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roelandt, James P.

    2012-01-01

    Picture archiving and communication system (PACS) workflow directly affects the quality of emergency patient care through radiology exam turn-around times and the speed of delivery of diagnostic radiology results. This study was a mixed methods training and performance improvement study that evaluated the effectiveness and value of a hospital…

  16. Post-Adoption Contact, Adoption Communicative Openness, and Satisfaction with Contact as Predictors of Externalizing Behavior in Adolescence and Emerging Adulthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grotevant, Harold D.; Rueter, Martha; Von Korff, Lynn; Gonzalez, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Background: This study examined the relation between three variables related to adoptive family relationships (post-adoption contact between adoptive and birth family members, adoption communicative openness, and satisfaction with contact) and adoptee externalizing behavior in adolescence and emerging adulthood. Method: The study included 190…

  17. Evaluating and Measuring the Return on Investment of an Emergency Center Health Care Professional Picture Archiving and Communication Systems Training Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roelandt, James P.

    2012-01-01

    Picture archiving and communication system (PACS) workflow directly affects the quality of emergency patient care through radiology exam turn-around times and the speed of delivery of diagnostic radiology results. This study was a mixed methods training and performance improvement study that evaluated the effectiveness and value of a hospital…

  18. Technology-Aided Leisure and Communication Opportunities for Two Post-Coma Persons Emerged from a Minimally Conscious State and Affected by Multiple Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancioni, Giulio E.; O'Reilly, Mark F.; Singh, Nirbhay N.; Sigafoos, Jeff; Buonocunto, Francesca; Sacco, Valentina; Navarro, Jorge; Lanzilotti, Crocifissa; De Tommaso, Marina; Megna, Marisa; Oliva, Doretta

    2013-01-01

    This study assessed technology-aided programs for helping two post-coma persons, who had emerged from a minimally conscious state and were affected by multiple disabilities, to (a) engage with leisure stimuli and request caregiver's procedures, (b) send out and listen to text messages for communication with distant partners, and (c) combine…

  19. Post-Adoption Contact, Adoption Communicative Openness, and Satisfaction with Contact as Predictors of Externalizing Behavior in Adolescence and Emerging Adulthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grotevant, Harold D.; Rueter, Martha; Von Korff, Lynn; Gonzalez, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Background: This study examined the relation between three variables related to adoptive family relationships (post-adoption contact between adoptive and birth family members, adoption communicative openness, and satisfaction with contact) and adoptee externalizing behavior in adolescence and emerging adulthood. Method: The study included 190…

  20. An alumni-based evaluation of graduate training in health communication: results of a survey on careers, salaries, competencies, and emerging trends.

    PubMed

    Edgar, Timothy; Hyde, James N

    2005-01-01

    Published information about career options and the core competencies necessary for health communication professionals (HCPs) is limited. Although the number of graduate programs in health communication continues to grow, no formal assessment of the success of this type of training has been conducted. The current study presents the results of an evaluation of the Master's Program in Health Communication offered collaboratively by Emerson College and the Tufts University School of Medicine. The program was one of the first of its kind and has graduated more health communication students than any other in the United States. To conduct the assessment of the program, the two schools collaborated on the development of an on-line survey for the alumni. Of the 131 graduates eligible to participate, 106 completed the survey. The survey yielded detailed information on the following: (1) career options for individuals with master's degrees in health communication; (2) value of graduate coursework for developing competencies in health communication; (3) salary expectations for individuals with graduate degrees in health communication; and (4) emerging trends in the field. These findings have important implications for the development of new programs and the refinement of existing ones in health communication.

  1. Pitfalls in communication that lead to nonbeneficial emergency surgery in elderly patients with serious illness: description of the problem and elements of a solution.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Zara; Courtwright, Andrew; Karlage, Ami; Gawande, Atul; Block, Susan

    2014-12-01

    To provide a description of communication breakdowns and to identify interventions to improve surgical decision making for elderly patients with serious illness and acute, life-threatening surgical conditions. Communication between surgeons, patients, and surrogates about goals of treatment plays an important and understudied role in determining the surgical interventions elderly patients with serious illness receive. Communication breakdowns may lead to nonbeneficial procedures in acute events near the end of life. We review the available literature on factors that lead to communication challenges and nonbeneficial surgery at the end of life. We use this review to identify solutions for navigating surgical decision making for seriously ill elderly patients with acute surgical conditions. Surgeon, patient, surrogate, and systemic factors-including time constraints, inadequate provider communication skills and training, uncertainty about prognosis, patient and surrogate anxiety and fear of inaction, and limitations in advance care planning-contribute to communication challenges and nonbeneficial surgery at the end of life. Surgeons could accomplish more effective communication with seriously ill elderly patients if they had a structured, standardized approach to exploring patients' preferences and to integrating those preferences into surgical decisions in the acute setting. Improved communication among surgeons, patients, and surrogates is necessary to ensure that patients receive the care that they want and to avoid nonbeneficial treatment. Further research is needed to learn how to best structure these conversations in the emergency surgical setting.

  2. Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonelle, G. J.

    1984-01-01

    Communications in any system is one of the last technologies to be considered, and sometimes it is considered too late to impact the system. This was somewhat the impression on reviewing the NASA budget for two mission scenarios for the space station. However, that budget fortunately was well spent, and the money was spent to get the most benefit per dollar. Another thing that is very often forgotten is that technology is not produced in a vacuum. In fact, in conducting independent research and development (IR&D), the first phase is to define the requirements which must be time phased, becuase very often the conditions will change during the life of the system. From the requirements, a set of architectures that are at least representative of that era are produced. If the exact requirements were not established, at least boundaries are set on the requirements for that architecture. When this is completed, then the technology that is really needed is defined. The major criticism of the work that was presented to the panel is the lack of a firm set of requirements.

  3. Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonelle, G. J.

    1984-01-01

    Communications in any system is one of the last technologies to be considered, and sometimes it is considered too late to impact the system. This was somewhat the impression on reviewing the NASA budget for two mission scenarios for the space station. However, that budget fortunately was well spent, and the money was spent to get the most benefit per dollar. Another thing that is very often forgotten is that technology is not produced in a vacuum. In fact, in conducting independent research and development (IR&D), the first phase is to define the requirements which must be time phased, becuase very often the conditions will change during the life of the system. From the requirements, a set of architectures that are at least representative of that era are produced. If the exact requirements were not established, at least boundaries are set on the requirements for that architecture. When this is completed, then the technology that is really needed is defined. The major criticism of the work that was presented to the panel is the lack of a firm set of requirements.

  4. Assistive technology-based programs to promote communication and leisure activities by three children emerged from a minimal conscious state.

    PubMed

    Stasolla, Fabrizio; Caffò, Alessandro O; Damiani, Rita; Perilli, Viviana; Di Leone, Antonia; Albano, Vincenza

    2015-02-01

    This study proposed the use of assistive technology (AT) to promote communication and leisure opportunities by three children with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Furthermore, it assessed the effects of such technology on the indices of positive participation and provided a social validation procedure. Three children emerged from a minimal conscious state and presenting extensive motor disabilities were involved. The intervention program allowed the participants to request and to choice preferred items independently and to perform literacy through a keyboard emulator. A multiple probe design across behaviors with post-intervention check was employed. Outcome measures were correct requests, understandable words, intervals with positive participation, and scores of social validation assessment. Request and choice behaviors and literacy improved significantly during intervention phases. During post-intervention check, all participants consolidated their performance. Moreover, indices of positive participation increased during intervention phases. Scores of social validation assessment showed that the combination of both behaviors was preferable to the same considered separately. AT program showed to be suitable for promoting constructive engagement and literacy behaviors by children with TBI. Future research is needed to generalize this data to a larger sample and to develop new technology for people with different levels of disabilities due to TBI.

  5. Use of a transitional minimum data set (TMDS) to improve communication between nursing home and emergency department providers.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Nancy A; Mahoney, Diane F; Bonner, Alice; O'Malley, Terrence

    2012-01-01

    To study the adoption of a transitional minimum data set (TMDS) and its effectiveness in conveying essential clinical data elements between skilled nursing facility (SNF) and emergency department (ED) staff. Retrospective medical record review of patients transferred from one SNF to one ED over a 14-month period before and after the implementation of the TMDS, to determine whether it improved data transfer compared with prior practice. One urban 140-bed SNF, averaging 17 ED transfers per month, and their affiliated ED at a major tertiary care hospital in Boston, MA. The medical records of 74 residents transferred from the SNF to the ED comprised the study data. A Transition of Care Minimum Data Set necessary for ED care was developed based on a literature review and expert panel consensus. From this, a TMDS tool was derived. The nursing facility staff was trained on the use of the TMDS tool (Resident Transfer Form and transfer packet), which was sent with each patient at the time of transfer from the SNF to the ED. Effectiveness of data transfer was determined by the proportion of TMDS items received by the ED following implementation of the TMDS in comparison with prior care. Adoption rate of the TMDS tool was determined by the proportion of hospital medical records that contained a paper copy of the resident transfer form. Following the implementation of the TMDS there was statistically significant improvement in data transfer of 15 of 30 TMDS items. Among these items were the following: patient's family notified of transfer, contact information for the MD/NP at the SNF, contact information for obtaining more patient information from the SNF, resuscitation status, baseline cognitive and functional status, isolation precautions and risk alerts, and whether the SNF could accept the patient back after treatment in the ED. The Resident Transfer Form was found in the hospital medical record of 73% of patients. There were anecdotal reports of hospital provider

  6. Connecting with patients and instilling realism in an era of emerging communication possibilities: a review on palliative care communication heading to telecare practice.

    PubMed

    van Gurp, Jelle; Hasselaar, Jeroen; van Leeuwen, Evert; Hoek, Patrick; Vissers, Kris; van Selm, Martine

    2013-12-01

    Appropriate palliative care communication is pivotal to optimizing the quality of life in dying patients and their families. This review aims at describing communication patterns in palliative care and discussing potential relations between communication patterns and upcoming telecare in the practice of palliative care. This review builds on a systematic five-step qualitative analysis of the selected articles: 1. Development of a 'descriptive table of studies reviewed' based on the concept of genre, 2. Open coding of table content and first broad clustering of codes, 3. Intracluster categorization of inductive codes into substantive categories, 4. Constant inter- and intracluster comparison results in identification of genres, and 5. Labeling of genres. This review includes 71 articles. In the analysis, two communication genres in palliative care proved to be dominant: the conversation to connect, about creating and maintaining a professional-patient/family relationship, and the conversation to instill realism, about telling a clinical truth without diminishing hope. The abovementioned two genres clarify a logical intertwinement between communicative purposes, the socio-ethical background underlying palliative care practice and elements of form. Our study supports understanding of current communication in palliative care and anticipates future communicative actions in an era of new communication technologies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Emergency Response Communications Program.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-06-01

    Dependence on weather and geography, On October 9, 1976, an average of 7.5 inches of rain fell on the State of Maryland. However, one isolated cell...Provision of directions to civilian population Forest fires Real-time assessment of phenomena apt to strongly affect the situation, e.g. winds, rains ...Pacific ter- ritorles & possessions Seiches WB Great Lakes Storm surges WB Coastal parts of North Atlantic & North Pacific Icebergs and sheet tCS & Nav

  8. National Emergency Communications Plan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-07-01

    25 The National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) and members of the Interdepartment Radio Advisory Committee ( IRAC ...Radio Advisory Committee ( IRAC ) to assist the Secretary in exercising the delegated presidential authority. Department of Commerce Organization...Intergovernmental Agreement IMSID Incident Management Systems Integration Division IP Internet Protocol IR Incident Response IRAC Interdepartment

  9. Reducing rural maternal mortality and the equity gap in northern Nigeria: the public health evidence for the Community Communication Emergency Referral strategy.

    PubMed

    Aradeon, Susan B; Doctor, Henry V

    2016-01-01

    The Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) maternal mortality target risks being underachieved like its Millennium Development Goal (MDG) predecessor. The MDG skilled birth attendant (SBA) strategy proved inadequate to end preventable maternal deaths for the millions of rural women living in resource-constrained settings. This equity gap has been successfully addressed by integrating a community-based emergency obstetric care strategy into the intrapartum care SBA delivery strategy in a large scale, northern Nigerian health systems strengthening project. The Community Communication Emergency Referral (CCER) strategy catalyzes community capacity for timely evacuations to emergency obstetric care facilities instead of promoting SBA deliveries in environments where SBA availability and accessibility will remain inadequate for the near and medium term. Community Communication is an innovative, efficient, equitable, and culturally appropriate community mobilization approach that empowers low- and nonliterate community members to become the communicators. For the CCER strategy, this community mobilization approach was used to establish and maintain emergency maternal care support structures. Public health evidence demonstrates the success of integrating the CCER strategy into the SBA strategy and the practicability of this combined strategy at scale. In intervention sites, the maternal mortality ratio reduced by 16.8% from extremely high levels within 4 years. Significantly, the CCER strategy contributed to saving one-third of the lives saved in the project sites, thereby maximizing the effectiveness of the SBAs and upgraded emergency obstetric care facilities. Pre- and postimplementation Knowledge, Attitude, and Practice Survey results and qualitative assessments support the CCER theory of change. This theory of change rests on a set of implementation steps that rely on three innovative components: Community Communication, Rapid Imitation Practice, and CCER support

  10. Reducing rural maternal mortality and the equity gap in northern Nigeria: the public health evidence for the Community Communication Emergency Referral strategy

    PubMed Central

    Aradeon, Susan B; Doctor, Henry V

    2016-01-01

    The Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) maternal mortality target risks being underachieved like its Millennium Development Goal (MDG) predecessor. The MDG skilled birth attendant (SBA) strategy proved inadequate to end preventable maternal deaths for the millions of rural women living in resource-constrained settings. This equity gap has been successfully addressed by integrating a community-based emergency obstetric care strategy into the intrapartum care SBA delivery strategy in a large scale, northern Nigerian health systems strengthening project. The Community Communication Emergency Referral (CCER) strategy catalyzes community capacity for timely evacuations to emergency obstetric care facilities instead of promoting SBA deliveries in environments where SBA availability and accessibility will remain inadequate for the near and medium term. Community Communication is an innovative, efficient, equitable, and culturally appropriate community mobilization approach that empowers low- and nonliterate community members to become the communicators. For the CCER strategy, this community mobilization approach was used to establish and maintain emergency maternal care support structures. Public health evidence demonstrates the success of integrating the CCER strategy into the SBA strategy and the practicability of this combined strategy at scale. In intervention sites, the maternal mortality ratio reduced by 16.8% from extremely high levels within 4 years. Significantly, the CCER strategy contributed to saving one-third of the lives saved in the project sites, thereby maximizing the effectiveness of the SBAs and upgraded emergency obstetric care facilities. Pre- and postimplementation Knowledge, Attitude, and Practice Survey results and qualitative assessments support the CCER theory of change. This theory of change rests on a set of implementation steps that rely on three innovative components: Community Communication, Rapid Imitation Practice, and CCER support

  11. A model for emergency department end-of-life communications after acute devastating events--part I: decision-making capacity, surrogates, and advance directives.

    PubMed

    Limehouse, Walter E; Feeser, V Ramana; Bookman, Kelly J; Derse, Arthur

    2012-09-01

    Making decisions for a patient affected by sudden devastating illness or injury traumatizes a patient's family and loved ones. Even in the absence of an emergency, surrogates making end-of-life treatment decisions may experience negative emotional effects. Helping surrogates with these end-of-life decisions under emergent conditions requires the emergency physician (EP) to be clear, making medical recommendations with sensitivity. This model for emergency department (ED) end-of-life communications after acute devastating events comprises the following steps: 1) determine the patient's decision-making capacity; 2) identify the legal surrogate; 3) elicit patient values as expressed in completed advance directives; 4) determine patient/surrogate understanding of the life-limiting event and expectant treatment goals; 5) convey physician understanding of the event, including prognosis, treatment options, and recommendation; 6) share decisions regarding withdrawing or withholding of resuscitative efforts, using available resources and considering options for organ donation; and 7) revise treatment goals as needed. Emergency physicians should break bad news compassionately, yet sufficiently, so that surrogate and family understand both the gravity of the situation and the lack of long-term benefit of continued life-sustaining interventions. EPs should also help the surrogate and family understand that palliative care addresses comfort needs of the patient including adequate treatment for pain, dyspnea, or anxiety. Part I of this communications model reviews determination of decision-making capacity, surrogacy laws, and advance directives, including legal definitions and application of these steps; Part II (which will appear in a future issue of AEM) covers communication moving from resuscitative to end-of-life and palliative treatment. EPs should recognize acute devastating illness or injuries, when appropriate, as opportunities to initiate end-of-life discussions and to

  12. A content analysis of parents' written communication of needs and expectations for emergency care of their children.

    PubMed

    Hoppa, Eric Christopher; Porter, Stephen C

    2011-06-01

    We investigated the potential value of information shared by parents on a written form designed to capture needs and expectations for care to an emergency department (ED) system that values patient-centeredness. We conducted a retrospective content analysis of parent-completed written forms collected during an improvement project focused on parent-provider communication in a pediatric ED. The primary outcome was potential value of the completed forms to a patient-centered ED system, defined as a form that was legible, included observations that mapped to medical problems, and included reasonable parental requests. We analyzed variation in potential value and other form attributes across a priori-defined visit type and acuity. Visit type was validated by a separate, blinded medical record review. A random stratified sample of 1008 forms was established from 6937 parent-completed forms collected during the 6-month improvement project; 995 of 1008 forms had matching medical records; 922 (92.7%) of 995 forms demonstrated potential value; 990 (99.5%) of 995 forms were legible; 948 (95.3%) of 995 forms included observations that mapped to a medical problem, and 599 (93.3%) of 642 forms contained reasonable parental requests. There was good agreement between the form and medical record for visit type (κ = 0.62). The potential value of forms did not vary significantly across visit type (88.2%-92.8%) or acuity (88.9%-93.4%). Information shared by parents on written forms designed to capture needs and expectations provides potential value to a patient-centered ED system. The high level of informational value is consistent across patient type and acuity level.

  13. Wilderness communications.

    PubMed

    Worley, Gordon H

    2011-09-01

    When an emergency situation arises in a remote location, the ability to communicate with outside sources of assistance can prove very valuable. This article reviews the different types of communications technologies available to individuals in remote locations, including satellite telephones, personal locator beacons, satellite messengers, cellular telephones, and the different licensed and non-licensed 2-way radio services available for personal use. It also discusses basic radio communications techniques, emergency communication, requesting ground or air casualty evacuation, and selecting communications devices for different applications.

  14. The role of infections in the emergence of non-communicable diseases (NCDs): Compelling needs for novel strategies in the developing world.

    PubMed

    Ogoina, Dimie; Onyemelukwe, Geofrey C

    2009-01-01

    The emergence of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) follows multiple aetiological pathways requiring recognition for effective control and prevention. Infections are proving to be conventional, emerging and re-emerging aetiological factors for many NCDs. This review explores the possible mechanisms by which infections induce NCDs citing examples of studies in Africa and elsewhere where NCDs and infections are proposed or confirmed to be causally linked and also discusses the implications and challenges of these observations for science and medicine. The need to re-evaluate and expand early community and individual preventive and control strategies that will lead to reduction and even elimination of NCDs especially in Africa and other developing countries where infections are prevalent is highlighted.

  15. Development of a novel information and communication technology system to compensate for a sudden shortage of emergency department physicians.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kumiko; Nakada, Taka-Aki; Fukuma, Hiroshi; Nakao, Shota; Masunaga, Naohisa; Tomita, Keisuke; Matsumura, Yosuke; Mizushima, Yasuaki; Matsuoka, Tetsuya

    2017-01-23

    A sudden shortage of physician resources due to overwhelming patient needs can affect the quality of care in the emergency department (ED). Developing effective response strategies remains a challenging research area. We created a novel system using information and communication technology (ICT) to respond to a sudden shortage, and tested the system to determine whether it would compensate for a shortage. Patients (n = 4890) transferred to a level I trauma center in Japan during 2012-2015 were studied. We assessed whether the system secured the necessary physicians without using other means such as phone or pager, and calculated fulfillment rate by the system as a primary outcome variable. We tested for the difference in probability of multiple casualties among total casualties transferred to the ED as an indicator of ability to respond to excessive patient needs, in a secondary analysis before and after system introduction. The system was activated 24 times (stand-by request [n = 12], attendance request [n = 12]) in 24 months, and secured the necessary physicians without using other means; fulfillment rate was 100%. There was no significant difference in the probability of multiple casualties during daytime weekdays hours before and after system introduction, while the probability of multiple casualties during night or weekend hours after system introduction significantly increased compared to before system introduction (4.8% vs. 12.9%, P < 0.0001). On the whole, the probability of multiple casualties increased more than 2 times after system introduction 6.2% vs. 13.6%, P < 0.0001). After introducing the system, probability of multiple casualties increased. Thus the system may contribute to improvement in the ability to respond to sudden excessive patient needs in multiple causalities. A novel system using ICT successfully secured immediate responses from needed physicians outside the hospital without increasing user workload, and increased

  16. Visualising emergency department capacity in an 'Emergency Department Capacity Clock': A novel tool to assess and communicate overcrowding and access block.

    PubMed

    Dar, Ohad; Loubser, Jacques

    2017-10-01

    Hospital-wide engagement is required to alleviate the problem of ED crowding and its associated adverse effects. To this end, the article describes a novel visualisation termed 'the ED Capacity Clock', which can be formatted using business intelligence software. This radial diagram represents ED capacity and its consumption in a format that can be understood intuitively and at a glance. The ED Capacity Clock is designed to promote common understanding and discussion between relevant hospital services and also acts as an auditing tool to monitor processes implemented to alleviate ED crowding. © 2017 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  17. Emergency Victim Care. A Training Manual for Emergency Medical Technicians. Module 1. Personnel, EMS Vehicles, EMS Communications, Records and Reports. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This student manual, the first in a set of 14 modules, is designed to train emergency medical technicians (EMTs) in Ohio. This introductory module contains five sections. The first section introduces the series of modules, listing the contents of each one, and discusses the student-instructor relationship, how to study, and principles of learning.…

  18. Emergency Victim Care. A Training Manual for Emergency Medical Technicians. Module 1. Personnel, EMS Vehicles, EMS Communications, Records and Reports. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This student manual, the first in a set of 14 modules, is designed to train emergency medical technicians (EMTs) in Ohio. This introductory module contains five sections. The first section introduces the series of modules, listing the contents of each one, and discusses the student-instructor relationship, how to study, and principles of learning.…

  19. Mobile videoconferencing for enhanced emergency medical communication - a shot in the dark or a walk in the park? ‒‒ A simulation study.

    PubMed

    Melbye, Sigurd; Hotvedt, Martin; Bolle, Stein Roald

    2014-06-02

    Videoconferencing on mobile phones may enhance communication, but knowledge on its quality in various situations is needed before it can be used in medical emergencies. Mobile phones automatically activate loudspeaker functionality during videoconferencing, making calls particularly vulnerable to background noise. The aim of this study was to investigate if videoconferencing can be used between lay bystanders and Emergency Medical Dispatch (EMD) operators for initial emergency calls during medical emergencies, under suboptimal sound and light conditions. Videoconferencing was tested between 90 volunteers and an emergency medical dispatcher in a standardized scenario of a medical emergency. Three different environments were used for the trials: indoors with moderate background noise, outdoors with daylight and much background noise, and outdoors during nighttime with little background noise. Thirty participants were recruited for each of the three locations. After informed consent, each participant was asked to use a video mobile phone to communicate with an EMD operator. During the video call the EMD operator gave instructions for tasks to be performed by the participant. The video quality from the caller to the EMD was evaluated by the EMD operator and rated on a five step scale ranging from "not able to see" to "good video quality". Sound quality between participants and EMD operators was assessed by a method developed for this trial. Kruskal - Wallis and Chi-square tests were used for statistical analysis. Video quality was significantly different between the groups (p <0.001), and the nighttime group had lower video quality. For most sessions in the nighttime group it was still possible to see actions done at the simulated emergency site. All participants were able to perform their tasks according to the instructions given by dispatchers, although with a need for more repetitions during sessions with much background noise. No calls were rated by dispatchers as

  20. Mobile videoconferencing for enhanced emergency medical communication - a shot in the dark or a walk in the park? ‒‒ A simulation study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Videoconferencing on mobile phones may enhance communication, but knowledge on its quality in various situations is needed before it can be used in medical emergencies. Mobile phones automatically activate loudspeaker functionality during videoconferencing, making calls particularly vulnerable to background noise. The aim of this study was to investigate if videoconferencing can be used between lay bystanders and Emergency Medical Dispatch (EMD) operators for initial emergency calls during medical emergencies, under suboptimal sound and light conditions. Methods Videoconferencing was tested between 90 volunteers and an emergency medical dispatcher in a standardized scenario of a medical emergency. Three different environments were used for the trials: indoors with moderate background noise, outdoors with daylight and much background noise, and outdoors during nighttime with little background noise. Thirty participants were recruited for each of the three locations. After informed consent, each participant was asked to use a video mobile phone to communicate with an EMD operator. During the video call the EMD operator gave instructions for tasks to be performed by the participant. The video quality from the caller to the EMD was evaluated by the EMD operator and rated on a five step scale ranging from "not able to see" to "good video quality". Sound quality between participants and EMD operators was assessed by a method developed for this trial. Kruskal – Wallis and Chi-square tests were used for statistical analysis. Results Video quality was significantly different between the groups (p <0.001), and the nighttime group had lower video quality. For most sessions in the nighttime group it was still possible to see actions done at the simulated emergency site. All participants were able to perform their tasks according to the instructions given by dispatchers, although with a need for more repetitions during sessions with much background noise. No calls

  1. Assessing physician-parent communication during emergency medical procedures in children: an observational study in a low-literacy Latino patient population.

    PubMed

    Dahl, Aaron; Sinha, Madhumita; Rosenberg, David I; Tran, Melissa; Valdez, André

    2015-05-01

    Effective physician-patient communication is critical to the clinical decision-making process. We studied parental recall of information provided during an informed consent discussion process before performance of emergency medical procedures in a pediatric emergency department of an inner-city hospital with a large bilingual population. Fifty-five parent/child dyads undergoing emergency medical procedures were surveyed prospectively in English/Spanish postprocedure for recall of informed consent information. Exact logistic regression was used to predict the ability to name a risk, benefit, and alternative to the procedure based on a parent's language, education, and acculturation. Among English-speaking parents, there tended to be higher proportions that could name a risk, benefit, or alternative. Our regression models showed overall that the parents with more than a high school education tended to have nearly 5 times higher odds of being able to name a risk. A gap in communication may exist between physicians and patients (or parents of patients) during the consent-taking process, and this gap may be impacted by socio-demographic factors such as language and education level.

  2. Perceived clinician-patient communication in the emergency department and subsequent posttraumatic stress symptoms in patients evaluated for acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Bernard P.; Sumner, Jennifer A.; Haerizadeh, Myrta; Carter, Eileen; Edmondson, Donald

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Evaluation for a potentially life-threatening cardiac event in the emergency department (ED) is a stressful experience that can result in symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder, which are associated with increased risk of morbidity and mortality in patients. No study has tested whether good clinician-patient communication in the ED is associated with better psychological outcomes in these individuals and whether it can mitigate other risk factors for posttraumatic stress symptoms (PSS) such as perception of life threat and vulnerability in the ED. Methods Data were analyzed from 474 participants in the REactions to Acute Care and Hospitalization (REACH) study, an observational cohort study of ED predictors of medical and psychological outcomes after evaluation for suspected ACS. Participants were recruited from November 2013 to January 2015 at a single site academic medical center (New York-Presbyterian-Columbia University Medical Center). Participants reported threat perceptions in the ED and provided information on their perceptions of clinician-patient communication using the Interpersonal Process of Care Survey. PSS were assessed using the Acute Stress Disorder Scale during follow-up. Results 474 subjects were enrolled in the study. Median length of follow-up was 3 days after ED presentation, range 0–30 days, 80% within 8 days. Perceptions of good clinician-patient communication in the ED was associated with lower PSS whereas increased threat perception was associated with higher PSS. A significant interaction between clinician-patient communication and threat perception on PSS suggested that patients with higher threat perception benefited most from good clinician-patient communication. Conclusion Our study found an association between good clinician-patient communication in the ED during evaluation for potentially life-threatening cardiac events and decreased subsequent posttraumatic stress reactions. This association is particularly marked

  3. Implementing an Internet-based communication network for use during skilled nursing facility to emergency department care transitions: challenges and opportunities for improvement.

    PubMed

    Hustey, Fredric M; Palmer, Robert M

    2012-03-01

    To explore the feasibility of implementing an Internet-based communication network for communication of health care information during skilled nursing facility (SNF)-to-ED care transitions, and to identify potential barriers to system implementation. Qualitative. The largest SNF affiliated with the ED of an urban tertiary care center. Consecutive sample of all patients transferred from SNF to ED over 8 months between June 2007 and January 2008; ED and SNF care providers. The development and implementation of an Internet-based communication network for use during SNF-to-ED care transitions. This network was developed by adapting a preexisting Internet-based system that is widely used to facilitate placement of hospitalized patients into SNFs. Internet-based SNF and ED surveys were used to help identify barriers to implementation. There were 276/276 care transitions reviewed. The Internet-based communication network was used in 76 (28%) care transitions, with usage peaking at 40% near the end of the study. Barriers to success that were identified included lack of an electronic medical record (EMR) at the SNF; pervasive negative attitudes between ED and SNF personnel; time necessary for network use during care transitions; frustration by emergency physicians at low system usage rates by SNF personnel; and additional login requirements by ED personnel. Although implementing an Internet-based network for nursing home to ED communication may be feasible, significant barriers were identified in this study that are likely generalizable to other health care settings. Understanding such barriers is an essential first step toward building successful electronic communication networks in the future. Copyright © 2012 American Medical Directors Association, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Media use and communication inequalities in a public health emergency: a case study of 2009-2010 pandemic influenza A virus subtype H1N1.

    PubMed

    Lin, Leesa; Jung, Minsoo; McCloud, Rachel F; Viswanath, Kasisomayajula

    2014-01-01

    Studies have shown that differences among individuals and social groups in accessing and using information on health and specific threats have an impact on their knowledge and behaviors. These differences, characterized as communication inequalities, may hamper the strength of a society's response to a public health emergency. Such inequalities not only make vulnerable populations subject to a disproportionate burden of adversity, but also compromise the public health system's efforts to prevent and respond to pandemic influenza outbreaks. We investigated the effect of socioeconomic status (SES) and health communication behaviors (including barriers) on people's knowledge and misconceptions about pandemic influenza A(H1N1) (pH1N1) and adoption of prevention behaviors. The data for this study came from a survey of 1,569 respondents drawn from a nationally representative sample of American adults during pH1N1. We conducted logistic regression analyses when appropriate. We found that (1) SES has a significant association with barriers to information access and processing, levels of pH1N1-related knowledge, and misconceptions; (2) levels of pH1N1-related knowledge are associated positively with the adoption of recommended prevention measures and negatively with the adoption of incorrect protective behaviors; and (3) people with higher SES, higher news exposure, and higher levels of pH1N1-related knowledge, as well as those who actively seek information, are less likely than their counterparts to adopt incorrect prevention behaviors. Strategic public health communication efforts in public health preparedness and during emergencies should take into account potential communication inequalities and develop campaigns that reach across different social groups.

  5. Constrained noninformative priors

    SciTech Connect

    Atwood, C.L.

    1994-10-01

    The Jeffreys noninformative prior distribution for a single unknown parameter is the distribution corresponding to a uniform distribution in the transformed model where the unknown parameter is approximately a location parameter. To obtain a prior distribution with a specified mean but with diffusion reflecting great uncertainty, a natural generalization of the noninformative prior is the distribution corresponding to the constrained maximum entropy distribution in the transformed model. Examples are given.

  6. Communicating and managing change during extreme weather events: promising practices for responding to urgent and emergent climate threats.

    PubMed

    Tinker, Tim L

    2013-01-01

    Large-scale weather events in the USA such as hurricanes Sandy, Isaac and Katrina challenge traditional approaches to change communication and management (CCM) before during and after crises. A major challenge (as well as opportunity) is addressing change from the 'whole-community' perspective affecting a spectrum of people, policies, processes, behaviours and outcomes. When CCM is used effectively, one of its fundamental advantages is creating a sense of urgency. This paper looks at optimising communication during extreme weather events, engaging stakeholders, harnessing the power of social media and change, and correlating organisational and individual behaviours and actions. The strategic blend of change management and crisis communication strategies and tactics in CCM is a central feature in the response to the full range of extreme weather scenarios.

  7. Predicting a prior for Planck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertog, Thomas

    2014-02-01

    The quantum state of the universe combined with the structure of the landscape potential implies a prior that specifies predictions for observations. We compute the prior for CMB related observables given by the no-boundary wave function (NBWF) in a landscape model that includes a range of inflationary patches representative of relatively simple single-field models. In this landscape the NBWF predicts our classical cosmological background emerges from a region of eternal inflation associated with a plateau-like potential. The spectra of primordial fluctuations on observable scales are characteristic of concave potentials, in excellent agreement with the Planck data. By contrast, alternative theories of initial conditions that strongly favor inflation at high values of the potential are disfavored by observations in this landscape.

  8. Teaching on the Foam of Discourse: Genealogical Perspectives on the Emergence of Speech and Communication as Academic Disciplines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macke, Frank J.

    This essay examines and explicates the nature and pattern of epistemic transformations undergone by the United States academic discipline known as "speech communication." The system of examination and explication employed in the paper follows Michel Foucault's genealogical method of inquiry and, as such, offers a postmodern critical…

  9. Over the Horizon: Potential Impact of Emerging Trends in Information and Communication Technology on Disability Policy and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanderheiden, Gregg

    2006-01-01

    This policy paper explores key trends in information and communication technology, highlights the potential opportunities and problems these trends present for people with disabilities, and suggests some strategies to maximize opportunities and avoid potential problems and barriers. Specifically, this paper discusses technology trends that present…

  10. "Bill Is Now Singing": Joint Engagement and the Emergence of Social Communication of Three Young Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaiouli, Potheini; Grimmet, Kharon; Ruich, Lawrence J.

    2015-01-01

    Young children with autism spectrum disorder meet significant challenges in joint attention skills and in social communication. A child-centered, improvisational, music therapy intervention model was implemented to promote engagement in three young children with autism in a kindergarten classroom. A multiple baseline design compared the children's…

  11. "Bill Is Now Singing": Joint Engagement and the Emergence of Social Communication of Three Young Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaiouli, Potheini; Grimmet, Kharon; Ruich, Lawrence J.

    2015-01-01

    Young children with autism spectrum disorder meet significant challenges in joint attention skills and in social communication. A child-centered, improvisational, music therapy intervention model was implemented to promote engagement in three young children with autism in a kindergarten classroom. A multiple baseline design compared the children's…

  12. Interest and Prior Knowledge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tobias, Sigmund

    This paper selectively reviews research on the relationship between topic interest and prior knowledge, and discusses the optimal association between these variables. The paper points out that interest has a facilitating impact on learning, and at least part of this effect must be ascribed to prior knowledge. While the interest-knowledge…

  13. Academic College of Emergency Experts in India's INDO-US Joint Working Group (JWG) White Paper on the Integrated Emergency Communication Response Service in India: Much more than just a number!

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Anuja; Rajhans, Prasad; Galwankar, Sagar; Arquilla, Bonnie; Swaroop, Mamta; Stawicki, Stanislaw; Das, Bidhan; Aggarwal, Praveen; Bhoi, Sanjeev; Kalra, OP

    2013-01-01

    The proposal for an integrated national emergency number for India is garnering a lot of enthusiasm and stimulating debate. This ambitious project has a two-part paradigm shift to set in; the first being the integration into a single number and the infrastructure required for setting up and operating this number such that a call can be received and identified. The second is the submerged part of the iceberg: That of the ability to respond to a call and deliver the appropriate emergency service. The first part is more technical and has potential precedents like the 911 phone hotline, for example, to emulate. The main premise of this paper is that the second part is a rather subjective exercise largely determined by the realities of existing public infrastructure in a specific geographical area with respect to emergency services management, especially medical care. Consequently, we highlight the key areas of both precall preparedness and postcall execution that need to be reviewed prior to going live with an integrated number on a national scale. PMID:23960382

  14. Making the Most of Alert Notification Systems: Eleven Tips for Using Emergency Communication Solutions in Your District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riley, Sheila

    2007-01-01

    Districts are finding that alert notification systems that deliver automated phone messages are an effective way to reach parents and employees. Implementing the technology is one thing and getting the most out of it is another. This article presents the Districts' goal to get in touch with parents and employees in emergency situations. Andy…

  15. EPPM and willingness to respond: the role of risk and efficacy communication in strengthening public health emergency response systems.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Daniel J; Thompson, Carol B; Semon, Natalie L; Errett, Nicole A; Harrison, Krista L; Anderson, Marilyn K; Ferrell, Justin L; Freiheit, Jennifer M; Hudson, Robert; McKee, Mary; Mejia-Echeverry, Alvaro; Spitzer, James; Balicer, Ran D; Links, Jonathan M; Storey, J Douglas

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the attitudinal impact of an Extended Parallel Process Model (EPPM)-based training curriculum on local public health department (LHD) workers' willingness to respond to representative public health emergency scenarios. Data are from 71 U.S. LHDs in urban and rural settings across nine states. The study explores changes in response willingness and EPPM threat and efficacy appraisals between randomly assigned control versus intervention health departments, at baseline and 1 week post curriculum, through an EPPM-based survey/resurvey design. Levels of response willingness and emergency response-related attitudes/beliefs are measured. Analyses focus on two scenario categories that have appeared on a U.S. government list of scenarios of significant concern: a weather-related emergency and a radiological "dirty" bomb event (U.S. Department of Homeland Security, 2007). The greatest impact from the training intervention on response willingness was observed among LHD workers who had low levels of EPPM-related threat and efficacy perceptions at baseline. Self-efficacy and response efficacy and response willingness increased in intervention LHDs for both scenarios, with greater response willingness increases observed for the radiological "dirty" bomb terrorism scenario. Findings indicate the importance of building efficacy versus enhancing threat perceptions as a path toward greater response willingness, and suggest the potential applicability of such curricular interventions for boosting emergency response willingness among other cadres of health providers.

  16. Making the Most of Alert Notification Systems: Eleven Tips for Using Emergency Communication Solutions in Your District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riley, Sheila

    2007-01-01

    Districts are finding that alert notification systems that deliver automated phone messages are an effective way to reach parents and employees. Implementing the technology is one thing and getting the most out of it is another. This article presents the Districts' goal to get in touch with parents and employees in emergency situations. Andy…

  17. Early response to the emergence of influenza A(H7N9) virus in humans in China: the central role of prompt information sharing and public communication.

    PubMed

    Vong, Sirenda; O'Leary, Michael; Feng, Zijian

    2014-04-01

    In 2003, China's handling of the early stages of the epidemic of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) was heavily criticized and generally considered to be suboptimal. Following the SARS outbreak, China made huge investments to improve surveillance, emergency preparedness and response capacity and strengthen public health institutions. In 2013, the return on these investments was evaluated by investigating China's early response to the emergence of avian influenza A(H7N9) virus in humans. Clusters of human infection with a novel influenza virus were detected in China - by national surveillance of pneumonia of unknown etiology - on 26 February 2013. On 31 March 2013, China notified the World Health Organization (WHO) of the first recorded human infections with A(H7N9) virus. Poultry markets - which were rapidly identified as a major source of transmission of A(H7N9) to humans - were closed down in the affected areas. Surveillance in humans and poultry was heightened and technical guidelines were quickly updated and disseminated. The health authorities collaborated with WHO in risk assessments and risk communication. New cases were reported promptly and publicly. The relevant infrastructures, surveillance systems and response capacity need to be strengthened in preparation for future emergencies caused by emerging or existing disease threats. Results of risk assessments and other data should be released promptly and publicly and such release should not jeopardize future publication of the data in scientific journals. Coordination between public health and veterinary services would be stronger during an emergency if these services had already undertaken joint preparedness planning.

  18. Making priors a priority

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segall, Matthew; Chadwick, Andrew

    2010-12-01

    When we build a predictive model of a drug property we rigorously assess its predictive accuracy, but we are rarely able to address the most important question, "How useful will the model be in making a decision in a practical context?" To answer this requires an understanding of the prior probability distribution ("the prior") and hence prevalence of negative outcomes due to the property being assessed. In this perspective, we illustrate the importance of the prior to assess the utility of a model in different contexts: to select or eliminate compounds, to prioritise compounds for further investigation using more expensive screens, or to combine models for different properties to select compounds with a balance of properties. In all three contexts, a better understanding of the prior probabilities of adverse events due to key factors will improve our ability to make good decisions in drug discovery, finding higher quality molecules more efficiently.

  19. Prior Knowledge Assessment Guide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    facts automatically requires knowledge of the fact itself. You will have to determine what levels are important for your purposes. As an example...will see the cell positions for “array 1” automatically record in your function. GUIDE FOR DEVELOPING AND USING PRIOR KNOWLEDGE ASSESSMENTS TO...TAILOR TRAINING 50 6. Type a comma ( , ) and “array2” will automatically show in bold type. GUIDE FOR DEVELOPING AND USING PRIOR

  20. Measuring risk/benefit perceptions of emerging technologies and their potential impact on communication of public opinion toward science.

    PubMed

    Binder, Andrew R; Cacciatore, Michael A; Scheufele, Dietram A; Shaw, Bret R; Corley, Elizabeth A

    2012-10-01

    This study presents a systematic comparison of two alternative measures of citizens' perceptions of risks and benefits of emerging technologies. By focusing on two specific issues (nanotechnology and biofuels), we derive several insights for the measurement of public views of science. Most importantly, our analyses reveal that relying on global, single-item measures may lead to invalid inferences regarding external influences on public perceptions, particularly those related to cognitive schema and media use. Beyond these methodological implications, this analysis suggests several reasons why researchers in the area of public attitudes toward science must revisit notions of measurement in order to accurately inform the general public, policymakers, scientists, and journalists about trends in public opinion toward emerging technologies.

  1. Perceived clinician-patient communication in the emergency department and subsequent post-traumatic stress symptoms in patients evaluated for acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chang, Bernard P; Sumner, Jennifer A; Haerizadeh, Myrta; Carter, Eileen; Edmondson, Donald

    2016-09-01

    Evaluation for a potentially life-threatening cardiac event in the emergency department (ED) is a stressful experience that can result in symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder, which are associated with increased risk of morbidity and mortality in patients. No study has tested whether good clinician-patient communication in the ED is associated with better psychological outcomes in these individuals and whether it can mitigate other risk factors for post-traumatic stress symptoms (PSS) such as perception of life threat and vulnerability in the ED. Data were analysed from 474 participants in the Reactions to Acute Care and Hospitalization (REACH) study, an observational cohort study of ED predictors of medical and psychological outcomes after evaluation for suspected acute coronary syndrome. Participants were recruited from November 2013 to January 2015 at a single-site academic medical centre (New York-Presbyterian-Columbia University Medical Center). Participants reported threat perceptions in the ED and provided information on their perceptions of clinician-patient communication using the Interpersonal Process of Care Survey. PSS were assessed using the Acute Stress Disorder Scale during follow-up. 474 subjects were enrolled in the study. Median length of follow-up was 3 days after ED presentation, range 0-30 days, 80% within 8 days. Perceptions of good clinician-patient communication in the ED were associated with lower PSS, whereas increased threat perception was associated with higher PSS. A significant interaction between clinician-patient communication and threat perception on PSS suggested that patients with higher threat perception benefited most from good clinician-patient communication. Our study found an association between good clinician-patient communication in the ED during evaluation of potentially life-threatening cardiac events and decreased subsequent post-traumatic stress reactions. This association is particularly marked for patients

  2. Ubiquitous Emergency Medical Service System Based on Wireless Biosensors, Traffic Information, and Wireless Communication Technologies: Development and Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Tan-Hsu; Gochoo, Munkhjargal; Chen, Yung-Fu; Hu, Jin-Jia; Chiang, John Y.; Chang, Ching-Su; Lee, Ming-Huei; Hsu, Yung-Nian; Hsu, Jiin-Chyr

    2017-01-01

    This study presents a new ubiquitous emergency medical service system (UEMS) that consists of a ubiquitous tele-diagnosis interface and a traffic guiding subsystem. The UEMS addresses unresolved issues of emergency medical services by managing the sensor wires for eliminating inconvenience for both patients and paramedics in an ambulance, providing ubiquitous accessibility of patients’ biosignals in remote areas where the ambulance cannot arrive directly, and offering availability of real-time traffic information which can make the ambulance reach the destination within the shortest time. In the proposed system, patient’s biosignals and real-time video, acquired by wireless biosensors and a webcam, can be simultaneously transmitted to an emergency room for pre-hospital treatment via WiMax/3.5 G networks. Performances of WiMax and 3.5 G, in terms of initialization time, data rate, and average end-to-end delay are evaluated and compared. A driver can choose the route of the shortest time among the suggested routes by Google Maps after inspecting the current traffic conditions based on real-time CCTV camera streams and traffic information. The destination address can be inputted vocally for easiness and safety in driving. A series of field test results validates the feasibility of the proposed system for application in real-life scenarios. PMID:28117724

  3. Ubiquitous Emergency Medical Service System Based on Wireless Biosensors, Traffic Information, and Wireless Communication Technologies: Development and Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Tan, Tan-Hsu; Gochoo, Munkhjargal; Chen, Yung-Fu; Hu, Jin-Jia; Chiang, John Y; Chang, Ching-Su; Lee, Ming-Huei; Hsu, Yung-Nian; Hsu, Jiin-Chyr

    2017-01-21

    This study presents a new ubiquitous emergency medical service system (UEMS) that consists of a ubiquitous tele-diagnosis interface and a traffic guiding subsystem. The UEMS addresses unresolved issues of emergency medical services by managing the sensor wires for eliminating inconvenience for both patients and paramedics in an ambulance, providing ubiquitous accessibility of patients' biosignals in remote areas where the ambulance cannot arrive directly, and offering availability of real-time traffic information which can make the ambulance reach the destination within the shortest time. In the proposed system, patient's biosignals and real-time video, acquired by wireless biosensors and a webcam, can be simultaneously transmitted to an emergency room for pre-hospital treatment via WiMax/3.5 G networks. Performances of WiMax and 3.5 G, in terms of initialization time, data rate, and average end-to-end delay are evaluated and compared. A driver can choose the route of the shortest time among the suggested routes by Google Maps after inspecting the current traffic conditions based on real-time CCTV camera streams and traffic information. The destination address can be inputted vocally for easiness and safety in driving. A series of field test results validates the feasibility of the proposed system for application in real-life scenarios.

  4. [Impact of new information and communication technologies (NTIC) on hospital administration and patient management. Care Network for Diagnosing and Treating Neurologic Emergencies].

    PubMed

    Moulin, T; Retel, O; Chavot, D

    2003-04-01

    The combination of specialised in-patient management, the development of diagnostic and therapeutic tools, the standardisation of procedures and organisation of the dies will allow for improving the prognosis of neurological patients seen in emergency situations. In order to achieve this objective, the Networks for Diagnosing and Treating Neurological Emergencies (RAIDS-UN) in Franche-Comté (FC) aim to better the quality of in-patient management for emergency on-set neurological pathologies such as traumatic brain injuries and strokes, the preparation and structuring of the dies for diagnosis and treatment, and assistance in neurology decision making. Based upon the needs of networks which approach the problem from two different directions--the RAIDS-UN/FC network (for neurological emergencies) and the RAIDS-UN/AVC network (for prevention and treatment of strokes)--they should both be able to benefit from new information and communication technologies (ICTs) in order to promote and support innovations in practice and contribute to the improvement in quality and health promotion effectiveness. In light of these developments, one may better understand the significance of the School of Medicine's role in training experts, advisors and supervisors as well as in providing a high level of quality and effective continuing education. Since 2001, the expansion of the RAIDS-UN networks has emphasised the need for the development of new professional specialties arising on the border between technology and medicine. The operation of these networks requires a strong partnership with health professionals and strategically relies upon a regional dynamic interaction which includes the hospitals, the city, the institutions and the university. It is in this manner that the RAIDS-UN networks will support other initiatives such as the Towards Unity for Health project.

  5. Older Adults and Emerging Digital Service Delivery: A Mixed Methods Study on Information and Communications Technology Use, Skills, and Attitudes.

    PubMed

    Siren, Anu; Knudsen, Sine Grønborg

    2017-01-01

    Based on data from a survey (n = 3291) and 14 qualitative interviews among Danish older adults, this study investigated the use of, and attitudes toward, information communications technology (ICT) and the digital delivery of public services. While age, gender, and socioeconomic status were associated with use of ICT, these determinants lost their explanatory power when we controlled for attitudes and experiences. We identified three segments that differed in their use of ICT and attitudes toward digital service delivery. As nonuse of ICT often results from the lack of willingness to use it rather than from material or cognitive deficiencies, policy measures for bridging the digital divide should focus on skills and confidence rather than on access or ability.

  6. The Effect of Direct Communication between Emergency Physicians and Interventional Cardiologists on Door to Balloon Times in STEMI

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Min-Ji; Rhee, Joong Eui; Shin, Jung Ho; Suh, Gil Joon; Jo, Young-Seok; Youn, Tae-Jin; Chung, Woo-Young; Chae, In-Ho; Choi, Dong-Ju; Lee, Christopher C.; Singer, Adam J.

    2008-01-01

    We developed an institutional protocol mandating emergency physicians to contact the interventional cardiologist directly in all cases of ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and hypothesized that this would reduce door-to-balloon-times (DTBT). From January 2004 to July 2006, 208 patients with STEMI were treated with primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). A total of 144 patients were treated before implementing the new protocol ("before") and 64 patients were treated after the implementation ("after"). The DTBT was significantly reduced from 148±101 min to 108±56 min (p<0.05). While only 25% of the "before" patients received PCI within 90 min after arrival, 50% of the "after" patients received PCI within 90 min (p<0.05). There were no significant differences between two groups in other outcomes (postprocedural TIMI flow, mortality, subsequent stroke, heart failure, shock, reinfarction, length of stay in intensive care unit, and the total hospital length of stay). In conclusion, mandating emergency physicians to directly notify interventional cardiologists of all STEMI patients reduces DTBT. PMID:18756061

  7. Emerging therapeutic targets for the treatment of human acute myeloid leukemia (part 1) - gene transcription, cell cycle regulation, metabolism and intercellular communication.

    PubMed

    Reikvam, Håkon; Hauge, Michelle; Brenner, Annette K; Hatfield, Kimberley Joanne; Bruserud, Øystein

    2015-06-01

    Human acute myeloid leukemia is a heterogeneous disease and the effect of therapeutic targeting of specific molecular mechanisms will probably vary between patient subsets. Cell cycle regulators are among the emerging targets (e.g., aurora and polo-like kinases, cyclin-dependent kinases). Inhibition of communication between acute myeloid leukemia and stromal cells is also considered; among the most promising of these strategies are inhibition of hedgehog-initiated, CXCR4-CXCL12 and Axl-Gas6 signaling. Finally, targeting of energy and protein metabolism is considered, the most promising strategy being inhibition of isocitrate dehydrogenase in patients with IDH mutations. Thus, several strategies are now considered, and a major common challenge for all of them is to clarify how they should be combined with each other or with conventional chemotherapy, and whether their use should be limited to certain subsets of patients.

  8. Harnessing complex emergent metaphors for effective communication in palliative care: a multimodal perceptual analysis of hospice patients' reports of transcendence experiences.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Bruce L; Lloyd, Linda S

    2014-05-01

    Terminally ill patients can have unexpected, enigmatic, and profound cognitive shifts that significantly alter their perception of themselves, thereby eliminating their fear of death and dying. However, there are no systematic studies into these remarkable yet ineffable transcendence experiences. They therefore remain easily overlooked or viewed as isolated anomalies and therefore excluded from quality-of-life patient considerations. We use a multimodal methodology for identifying the prevalence and thematic properties of complex emergent metaphors patients use to report these experiences. Although previous research has pioneered the importance of understanding conventional or primary metaphors at the end of life, our findings indicate the considerable potential of more complex metaphors for reducing barriers to effective communication in palliative care.

  9. Understanding communication between emergency and consulting physicians: a qualitative study that describes and defines the essential elements of the emergency department consultation-referral process for the junior learner.

    PubMed

    Chan, Teresa; Orlich, Donika; Kulasegaram, Kulamakan; Sherbino, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    To define the important elements of an emergency department (ED) consultation request and to develop a simple model of the process. From March to September 2010, 61 physicians (21 emergency medicine [EM], 20 general surgery [GS], 20 internal medicine [IM]; 31 residents, 30 attending staff) were questioned about how junior learners should be taught about ED consultation. Two investigators independently reviewed focus group and interview transcripts using grounded theory to generate an index of themes until saturation was reached. Disagreements were resolved by consensus, yielding an inventory of themes and subthemes. All transcripts were coded using this index of themes; 30% of transcripts were coded in duplicate to determine the agreement. A total of 245 themes and subthemes were identified. The agreement between reviewers was 77%. Important themes in the process were as follows: initial preparation and review of investigations by EM physician (overall endorsement 87% [range 70-100% in different groups]); identification of involved parties (patient and involved physicians) (100%); hypothesis of patient's diagnosis (75% [range 62-83%]) or question for the consulting physician (70% [range 55-95%]); urgency (100%) and stability (74% [range 62-80%]); questions from the consultant (100%); discussion/communication (98% [range 95-100%]); and feedback (98% [range 95-100%]). These components were reorganized into a simple framework (PIQUED). Each clinical specialty significantly contributed to the model (χ2  =  7.9; p value  =  0.019). Each group contributed uniquely to the final list of important elements (percent contributions: EM, 57%; GS, 41%; IM, 64%). We define important elements of an ED consultation with input from emergency and consulting physicians. We propose a model that organizes these elements into a simple framework (PIQUED) that may be valuable for junior learners.

  10. Technology-aided leisure and communication opportunities for two post-coma persons emerged from a minimally conscious state and affected by multiple disabilities.

    PubMed

    Lancioni, Giulio E; O'Reilly, Mark F; Singh, Nirbhay N; Sigafoos, Jeff; Buonocunto, Francesca; Sacco, Valentina; Navarro, Jorge; Lanzilotti, Crocifissa; De Tommaso, Marina; Megna, Marisa; Oliva, Doretta

    2013-02-01

    This study assessed technology-aided programs for helping two post-coma persons, who had emerged from a minimally conscious state and were affected by multiple disabilities, to (a) engage with leisure stimuli and request caregiver's procedures, (b) send out and listen to text messages for communication with distant partners, and (c) combine leisure engagement and procedure requests with text messaging within the same sessions. The program for leisure engagement and procedure requests relied on the use of a portable computer with commercial software, and a microswitch for the participants' response. The program for text messaging communication involved the use of a portable computer, a GSM modem, a microswitch for the participants' response, and specifically developed software. Results indicated that the participants were successful at each of the three stages of the study, thus providing relevant evidence concerning performance achievements only minimally documented. The implications of the findings in terms of technology and practical opportunities for post-coma persons with multiple disabilities are discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Inter-organisational communication in civil-military cooperation during complex emergencies: a case study in Afghanistan.

    PubMed

    Rietjens, Sebastiaan J H; Verlaan, Kirsten; Zaalberg, Thijs W Brocades; de Boer, Sirp J

    2009-07-01

    This paper seeks to contribute to an improved information management and exchange between humanitarian organisations and military agents in complex emergencies. To do so, a theoretical information management process model was developed and applied to the case of information management between International Security Assistance Force troops and humanitarian organisations such as Cordaid, DACAAR and the International Office for Migration in Kabul, Afghanistan. Based on this analysis the main shortcomings and problems in each stage of the information management process were identified. These include a lack of structured information databases, the absence of identification of information needs, and an over-classification of documents by the military. Using a logical framework analysis, six major improvement tactics were developed, including the creation of more overlap in rotations of personnel, the specification of aims and tasks regarding information management, the improvement of skills and competences of personnel involved, and the introduction of regular joint civil-military evaluations.

  12. A Qualitative Exploration of Oral Communication Apprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrne, Marann; Flood, Barbara; Shanahan, Dan

    2012-01-01

    Prior research has identified communication apprehension (CA), or fear of communicating, as a major factor which inhibits an individual's willingness to communicate and his/her capability to develop effective communication skills. While many prior studies have measured oral communication apprehension of students, there has been little qualitative…

  13. A Qualitative Exploration of Oral Communication Apprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrne, Marann; Flood, Barbara; Shanahan, Dan

    2012-01-01

    Prior research has identified communication apprehension (CA), or fear of communicating, as a major factor which inhibits an individual's willingness to communicate and his/her capability to develop effective communication skills. While many prior studies have measured oral communication apprehension of students, there has been little qualitative…

  14. Linking Diet to Colorectal Cancer: The Emerging Role of MicroRNA in the Communication between Plant and Animal Kingdoms.

    PubMed

    Del Cornò, Manuela; Donninelli, Gloria; Conti, Lucia; Gessani, Sandra

    2017-01-01

    Environmental and lifestyle factors, including diet and nutritional habits have been strongly linked to colorectal cancer (CRC). Of note, unhealthy dietary habits leading to adiposity represent a main risk factor for CRC and are associated with a chronic low-grade inflammatory status. Inflammation is a hallmark of almost every type of cancer and can be modulated by several food compounds exhibiting either protective or promoting effects. However, in spite of an extensive research, the underlying mechanisms by which dietary patterns or bioactive food components may influence tumor onset and outcome have not been fully clarified yet. Growing evidence indicates that diet, combining beneficial substances and potentially harmful ingredients, has an impact on the expression of key regulators of gene expression such as the non-coding RNA (ncRNA). Since the expression of these molecules is deranged in chronic inflammation and cancer, modulating their expression may strongly influence the cancer phenotype and outcomes. In addition, the recently acquired knowledge on the existence of intricate inter-kingdom communication networks, is opening new avenues for a deeper understanding of the intimate relationships linking diet to CRC. In this novel scenario, diet-modulated ncRNA may represent key actors in the interaction between plant and animal kingdoms, capable of influencing disease onset and outcome. In this review, we will summarize the studies demonstrating a link between bioactive food components, including food-derived, microbiota-processed, secondary metabolites, and host ncRNA. We will focus on microRNA, highlighting how this plant/animal inter-kingdom cross-talk may have an impact on CRC establishment and progression.

  15. Linking Diet to Colorectal Cancer: The Emerging Role of MicroRNA in the Communication between Plant and Animal Kingdoms

    PubMed Central

    Del Cornò, Manuela; Donninelli, Gloria; Conti, Lucia; Gessani, Sandra

    2017-01-01

    Environmental and lifestyle factors, including diet and nutritional habits have been strongly linked to colorectal cancer (CRC). Of note, unhealthy dietary habits leading to adiposity represent a main risk factor for CRC and are associated with a chronic low-grade inflammatory status. Inflammation is a hallmark of almost every type of cancer and can be modulated by several food compounds exhibiting either protective or promoting effects. However, in spite of an extensive research, the underlying mechanisms by which dietary patterns or bioactive food components may influence tumor onset and outcome have not been fully clarified yet. Growing evidence indicates that diet, combining beneficial substances and potentially harmful ingredients, has an impact on the expression of key regulators of gene expression such as the non-coding RNA (ncRNA). Since the expression of these molecules is deranged in chronic inflammation and cancer, modulating their expression may strongly influence the cancer phenotype and outcomes. In addition, the recently acquired knowledge on the existence of intricate inter-kingdom communication networks, is opening new avenues for a deeper understanding of the intimate relationships linking diet to CRC. In this novel scenario, diet-modulated ncRNA may represent key actors in the interaction between plant and animal kingdoms, capable of influencing disease onset and outcome. In this review, we will summarize the studies demonstrating a link between bioactive food components, including food-derived, microbiota-processed, secondary metabolites, and host ncRNA. We will focus on microRNA, highlighting how this plant/animal inter-kingdom cross-talk may have an impact on CRC establishment and progression. PMID:28424679

  16. A prospective study comparing PlasmaKnife with bipolar dissection tonsillectomy: a preliminary communication of an emerging technology.

    PubMed

    Singh, A; Stephens, J; Ghufoor, K; Sandhu, G

    2008-06-01

    To clinically evaluate and compare the PlasmaKnife to bipolar electrocautery in paediatric tonsillectomy. Prospective comparative non-randomised study. Central London teaching hospital with tertiary referrals. Forty-three patients aged 3-12 years with recurrent tonsillitis or obstructive adenotonsillar hypertrophy awaiting a tonsillectomy were recruited into the study. Primary outcome was throat, ear and swallowing pain scores over 2 weeks. Secondary measures included: return to normal diet, return to normal activity, analgesic requirements, operation time and intraoperative blood loss. Surgical dissection was similar between the two groups with minimal blood loss and comparable overall operative times. Median throat pain scores suggest PlasmaKnife to be less painful in the early postoperative period (at 8 h, P < 0.005) but, overall, did not quite reach statistical significance (Mann-Whitney U-test). PlasmaKnife was similar to bipolar in all other measured categories. During the study, three secondary bleeds occurred in the PlasmaKnife group and all were managed conservatively. PlasmaKnife is a safe new technology with similar outcome to the established bipolar technique. This preliminary study finds PlasmaKnife to be an interesting instrument and warrants a larger randomised study to truly evaluate the potential advantages of lowered pain and early recovery attributed to this emerging technology.

  17. 24 hours prior to curtain.

    PubMed

    Mishra, S; Rosen, C A; Murry, T

    2000-03-01

    A retrospective review was conducted of 40 singers presenting with acute voice problems prior to performance. The purpose of this study was to determine the reasons for seeking emergent voice treatment, the types of acute voice disorders, and the performance outcome. The patients were assessed by age, singing style, years of experience, chief complaint, laryngovideostroboscopic findings, and treatment regimens. The outcomes were classified as full, restricted, or no performance. The majority of patients were classical singers. Laryngovideostroboscopy frequently revealed a pattern of early glottic contact at the mid-portion of the membranous vocal fold in patients with acute laryngitis. Experienced singers uniformly sought treatment many days before their performance compared with inexperienced singers who presented closer in time to performance. Six patients initially withheld information, which had a bearing on their acute management. The results of this study suggest that there is a need to accurately diagnose and treat the singer's emergent problem and educate singers regarding early evaluation of medical problems. With modern evaluation techniques and multi-modality treatment, 85% of the singers proceeded to full performance without negative sequelae.

  18. S. 335, the Emerging Telecommunications Technologies Act of 1993. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Communications of the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation. United States Senate, One Hundred Third Congress, First Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation.

    A hearing was held on Senate Bill 335, the Emerging Telecommunications Technologies Act of 1993, a bill that requires the federal government to transfer 200 megahertz of spectrum to the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) for new technologies. Integral to this measure, a bipartisan effort, is a provision that will allow the FCC to use…

  19. Challenges of the New Zealand healthcare disaster preparedness prior to the Canterbury earthquakes: a qualitative analysis.

    PubMed

    Al-Shaqsi, Sultan; Gauld, Robin; Lovell, Sarah; McBride, David; Al-Kashmiri, Ammar; Al-Harthy, Abdullah

    2013-03-15

    Disasters are a growing global phenomenon. New Zealand has suffered several major disasters in recent times. The state of healthcare disaster preparedness in New Zealand prior to the Canterbury earthquakes is not well documented. To investigate the challenges of the New Zealand healthcare disaster preparedness prior to the Canterbury earthquakes. Semi-structured interviews with emergency planners in all the District Health Boards (DHBs) in New Zealand in the period between January and March 2010. The interview protocol revolved around the domains of emergency planning adopted by the World Health Organization. Seventeen interviews were conducted. The main themes included disinterest of clinical personnel in emergency planning, the need for communication backup, the integration of private services in disaster preparedness, the value of volunteers, the requirement for regular disaster training, and the need to enhance surge capability of the New Zealand healthcare system to respond to disasters. Prior to the Canterbury earthquakes, healthcare disaster preparedness faced multiple challenges. Despite these challenges, New Zealand's healthcare response was adequate. Future preparedness has to consider the lessons learnt from the 2011 earthquakes to improve healthcare disaster planning in New Zealand.

  20. Wireless Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    A technology utilization project led to the commercial adaptation of a Space Shuttle Orbiter wireless infrared voice communications system. The technology was adapted to a LAN system by Wilton Industries, one of the participants. Because the system is cable-free, installation charges are saved, and it can be used where cable is impractical. Resultant products include the IRplex 6000. Transceivers can be located anywhere and can include mobile receivers. The system provides wireless LAN coverage up to 44,000 square feet. applications include stock exchange communications, trade shows, emergency communications, etc.

  1. Perceptions of the effect of information and communication technology on the quality of care delivered in emergency departments: a cross-site qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Callen, Joanne; Paoloni, Richard; Li, Julie; Stewart, Michael; Gibson, Kathryn; Georgiou, Andrew; Braithwaite, Jeffrey; Westbrook, Johanna

    2013-02-01

    We identify and describe emergency physicians' and nurses' perceptions of the effect of an integrated emergency department (ED) information system on the quality of care delivered in the ED. A qualitative study was conducted in 4 urban EDs, with each site using the same ED information system. Participants (n=97) were physicians and nurses with data collected by 69 detailed interviews, 5 focus groups (28 participants), and 26 hours of structured observations. Results revealed new perspectives on how an integrated ED information system was perceived to affect incentives for use, awareness of colleagues' activities, and workflow. A key incentive was related to the positive effect of the ED information system on clinical decisionmaking because of improved and quicker access to patient-specific and knowledge-base information compared with the previous stand-alone ED information system. Synchronous access to patient data was perceived to lead to enhanced awareness by individual physicians and nurses of what others were doing within and outside the ED, which participants claimed contributed to improved care coordination, communication, clinical documentation, and the consultation process. There was difficulty incorporating the use of the ED information system with clinicians' work, particularly in relation to increased task complexity; duplicate documentation, and computer issues related to system usability, hardware, and individuals' computer skills and knowledge. Physicians and nurses perceived that the integrated ED information system contributed to improvements in the delivery of patient care, enabling faster and better-informed decisionmaking and specialty consultations. The challenge of electronic clinical documentation and balancing data entry demands with system benefits necessitates that new methods of data capture, suited to busy clinical environments, be developed. Copyright © 2012. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  2. "EMERGING" POLLUTANTS, AND COMMUNICATING THE ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This paper weaves a rnulti-dimensioned perspective of mass spectrometry as a career against the backdrop of mass spectrometry's key role in the past and future of environmental chemistry. Along the way, some insights are offered for better focusing the spotlight on the discipline of mass spectrometry. A Foundation for Environmental Science-Mass Spectrometry Historically fundamental to our understanding of environmental processes and chemical pollution is mass spectrometry. This branch of analytical chemistry is the workhorse which supplies much of the definitive data to environmental scientists and engineers for identifying the molecular compositions, and ultimately the structures, of chemicals. This is not to ignore the complementary and critical roles played by the adjunct practices of sample enrichment (e.g., to lower method detection limits via any of various means of selective extraction) and analyte separation (e.g., to lessen contaminant interferences via the myriad forms of chromatography and electrophoresis). While the power of mass spectrometry has long been highly visible to the practicing environmental chemist, it borders on continued obscurity to the lay public and most non-chemists. Even though mass spectrometry has played a long, historic and Largely invisible role in establishing or undergirding our existing knowledge about environmental processes and pollution, what recognition it does enjoy is usually relegated to that of a tool. It is usually

  3. Impact of prior seasonal H3N2 influenza vaccination or infection on protection and transmission of emerging variants of influenza A(H3N2)v virus in ferrets.

    PubMed

    Houser, Katherine V; Pearce, Melissa B; Katz, Jacqueline M; Tumpey, Terrence M

    2013-12-01

    Influenza H3N2 A viruses continue to circulate in swine and occasionally infect humans, resulting in outbreaks of variant influenza H3N2 [A(H3N2)v] virus. It has been previously demonstrated in ferrets that A(H3N2)v viruses transmit as efficiently as seasonal influenza viruses, raising concern over the pandemic potential of these viruses. However, A(H3N2)v viruses have not acquired the ability to transmit efficiently among humans, which may be due in part to existing cross-reactive immunity to A(H3N2)v viruses. Although current seasonal H3N2 and A(H3N2)v viruses are antigenically distinct from one another, historical H3N2 viruses have some antigenic similarity to A(H3N2)v viruses and previous exposure to these viruses may provide a measure of immune protection sufficient to dampen A(H3N2)v virus transmission. Here, we evaluated whether prior seasonal H3N2 influenza virus vaccination or infection affects virus replication and transmission of A(H3N2)v virus in the ferret animal model. We found that the seasonal trivalent inactivated influenza virus vaccine (TIV) or a monovalent vaccine prepared from an antigenically related 1992 seasonal influenza H3N2 (A/Beijing/32/1992) virus failed to substantially reduce A(H3N2)v (A/Indiana/08/2011) virus shedding and subsequent transmission to naive hosts. Conversely, ferrets primed by seasonal H3N2 virus infection displayed reduced A(H3N2)v virus shedding following challenge, which blunted transmission to naive ferrets. A higher level of specific IgG and IgA antibody titers detected among infected versus vaccinated ferrets was associated with the degree of protection offered by seasonal H3N2 virus infection. The data demonstrate in ferrets that the efficiency of A(H3N2)v transmission is disrupted by preexisting immunity induced by seasonal H3N2 virus infection.

  4. Impact of Prior Seasonal H3N2 Influenza Vaccination or Infection on Protection and Transmission of Emerging Variants of Influenza A(H3N2)v Virus in Ferrets

    PubMed Central

    Houser, Katherine V.; Pearce, Melissa B.; Katz, Jacqueline M.

    2013-01-01

    Influenza H3N2 A viruses continue to circulate in swine and occasionally infect humans, resulting in outbreaks of variant influenza H3N2 [A(H3N2)v] virus. It has been previously demonstrated in ferrets that A(H3N2)v viruses transmit as efficiently as seasonal influenza viruses, raising concern over the pandemic potential of these viruses. However, A(H3N2)v viruses have not acquired the ability to transmit efficiently among humans, which may be due in part to existing cross-reactive immunity to A(H3N2)v viruses. Although current seasonal H3N2 and A(H3N2)v viruses are antigenically distinct from one another, historical H3N2 viruses have some antigenic similarity to A(H3N2)v viruses and previous exposure to these viruses may provide a measure of immune protection sufficient to dampen A(H3N2)v virus transmission. Here, we evaluated whether prior seasonal H3N2 influenza virus vaccination or infection affects virus replication and transmission of A(H3N2)v virus in the ferret animal model. We found that the seasonal trivalent inactivated influenza virus vaccine (TIV) or a monovalent vaccine prepared from an antigenically related 1992 seasonal influenza H3N2 (A/Beijing/32/1992) virus failed to substantially reduce A(H3N2)v (A/Indiana/08/2011) virus shedding and subsequent transmission to naive hosts. Conversely, ferrets primed by seasonal H3N2 virus infection displayed reduced A(H3N2)v virus shedding following challenge, which blunted transmission to naive ferrets. A higher level of specific IgG and IgA antibody titers detected among infected versus vaccinated ferrets was associated with the degree of protection offered by seasonal H3N2 virus infection. The data demonstrate in ferrets that the efficiency of A(H3N2)v transmission is disrupted by preexisting immunity induced by seasonal H3N2 virus infection. PMID:24089569

  5. Relationship between implementing interpersonal communication and mass education campaigns in emergency settings and use of reproductive healthcare services: evidence from Darfur, Sudan.

    PubMed

    Adam, Izzeldin Fadl; Nakamura, Keiko; Kizuki, Masashi; Al Rifai, Rami; Vanching, Urnaa

    2015-09-15

    (1) To examine changes in women's awareness and utilisation of reproductive healthcare services in emergency settings following provision of interpersonal communication (IPC) and mass education campaigns, and (2) to describe factors associated with reproductive healthcare service use in internally displaced person (IDP) camps. Three camps containing 88 984 IDPs in Darfur, Sudan. 640 women aged 15-49 who had experienced pregnancy in the camp during the previous 2 years were enrolled in each of two independent cross-sectional surveys 26 months apart. IPC and mass education campaigns where community health workers disseminated information by home/shelter visits, clinic sessions, public meetings and other means to raise awareness and promote reproductive healthcare service use. Awareness of the existence of antenatal care (ANC) and tetanus toxoid (TT) vaccination services, reception of ANC and TT vaccination, place of delivery and use of postnatal care (PNC). The percentage of women who received home visits, and attended in-clinic sessions and public meetings increased from 61.6% to 86.7%, from 43.0% to 68.8%, and from 3.8% to 39.8%, respectively, between the initial and follow-up surveys. More women were aware of ANC (OR 18.6, 95% CI 13.1 to 26.5) and TT vaccination (OR 3.2, 95% CI 2.4 to 4.4) in the follow-up than the initial survey, after multivariable adjustment. More women received ≥3 ANC visits (OR 8.8, 95% CI 6.4 to 12.0) and ≥3 doses of TT (OR 2.5, 95% CI 1.9 to 3.3), delivered at a healthcare facility (OR 5.4, 95% CI 4.0 to 7.4) and received a PNC visit (OR 5.5, 95% CI 4.0 to 7.7) in the follow-up than in the initial survey, after multivariable adjustment. Awareness about and utilisation of reproductive healthcare services were higher in the follow-up survey. An integrated IPC and mass education campaign is effective for improving women's reproductive health in emergency settings. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use

  6. Infodemiology and infoveillance: framework for an emerging set of public health informatics methods to analyze search, communication and publication behavior on the Internet.

    PubMed

    Eysenbach, Gunther

    2009-03-27

    Infodemiology can be defined as the science of distribution and determinants of information in an electronic medium, specifically the Internet, or in a population, with the ultimate aim to inform public health and public policy. Infodemiology data can be collected and analyzed in near real time. Examples for infodemiology applications include the analysis of queries from Internet search engines to predict disease outbreaks (eg. influenza), monitoring peoples' status updates on microblogs such as Twitter for syndromic surveillance, detecting and quantifying disparities in health information availability, identifying and monitoring of public health relevant publications on the Internet (eg. anti-vaccination sites, but also news articles or expert-curated outbreak reports), automated tools to measure information diffusion and knowledge translation, and tracking the effectiveness of health marketing campaigns. Moreover, analyzing how people search and navigate the Internet for health-related information, as well as how they communicate and share this information, can provide valuable insights into health-related behavior of populations. Seven years after the infodemiology concept was first introduced, this paper revisits the emerging fields of infodemiology and infoveillance and proposes an expanded framework, introducing some basic metrics such as information prevalence, concept occurrence ratios, and information incidence. The framework distinguishes supply-based applications (analyzing what is being published on the Internet, eg. on Web sites, newsgroups, blogs, microblogs and social media) from demand-based methods (search and navigation behavior), and further distinguishes passive from active infoveillance methods. Infodemiology metrics follow population health relevant events or predict them. Thus, these metrics and methods are potentially useful for public health practice and research, and should be further developed and standardized.

  7. Infodemiology and Infoveillance: Framework for an Emerging Set of Public Health Informatics Methods to Analyze Search, Communication and Publication Behavior on the Internet

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Infodemiology can be defined as the science of distribution and determinants of information in an electronic medium, specifically the Internet, or in a population, with the ultimate aim to inform public health and public policy. Infodemiology data can be collected and analyzed in near real time. Examples for infodemiology applications include: the analysis of queries from Internet search engines to predict disease outbreaks (eg. influenza); monitoring peoples' status updates on microblogs such as Twitter for syndromic surveillance; detecting and quantifying disparities in health information availability; identifying and monitoring of public health relevant publications on the Internet (eg. anti-vaccination sites, but also news articles or expert-curated outbreak reports); automated tools to measure information diffusion and knowledge translation, and tracking the effectiveness of health marketing campaigns. Moreover, analyzing how people search and navigate the Internet for health-related information, as well as how they communicate and share this information, can provide valuable insights into health-related behavior of populations. Seven years after the infodemiology concept was first introduced, this paper revisits the emerging fields of infodemiology and infoveillance and proposes an expanded framework, introducing some basic metrics such as information prevalence, concept occurrence ratios, and information incidence. The framework distinguishes supply-based applications (analyzing what is being published on the Internet, eg. on Web sites, newsgroups, blogs, microblogs and social media) from demand-based methods (search and navigation behavior), and further distinguishes passive from active infoveillance methods. Infodemiology metrics follow population health relevant events or predict them. Thus, these metrics and methods are potentially useful for public health practice and research, and should be further developed and standardized. PMID:19329408

  8. Communicating health.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, A

    1995-01-01

    Routine production of communication materials without paying attention to utilization, field test, and impact analysis is ineffective. The concept of information, education, and communication (IEC) should encompass voluntary activity of health education in a tradition of innovation. One seminal factor may be the communication technologies developed by the National Technology Missions. The missions were participatory by seeking solutions among communities and analyzing health issues from the perspective of those directly involved, rather than from the top down. The prime focus of the national drinking water mission was convenience, hence messages concentrating on health advantages were ignored. At this juncture, influencing health behavior required decentralization reflecting local cultures. Thus community-based partners became the foundation of a strategy of communicating safe water. As national strategies emerged in each of the technology missions, communication addressed advocacy of the need for political will, dissemination of technical information, and influencing patterns of behavior. Despite learning a new understanding, the danger exists that IEC remains just another label of mass communication with posters, advertisements, brochures, radio, and television. Decisions on contraceptive choice and use requires more than just accurate information; it requires the power to make such a decision. A new approach demands a priority for communication skills taking into account people's aspirations. The HIV-AIDS crisis underlines the urgency with which communication has to respond to health challenges. A series of experiments facilitated by the World Conservation Union helped build communication capabilities among environmental groups working in Latin America, Africa, and India. The International Reference Center on Water and Sanitation initiated pilot communication projects in West Africa for community health.

  9. 47 CFR 22.307 - Operation during emergency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... natural disaster, civil unrest, widespread vandalism, national emergencies or emergencies declared by Executive Order of the President, use their stations to temporarily provide emergency communications...

  10. 47 CFR 22.307 - Operation during emergency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... natural disaster, civil unrest, widespread vandalism, national emergencies or emergencies declared by Executive Order of the President, use their stations to temporarily provide emergency communications...

  11. 47 CFR 22.307 - Operation during emergency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... natural disaster, civil unrest, widespread vandalism, national emergencies or emergencies declared by Executive Order of the President, use their stations to temporarily provide emergency communications...

  12. 45 CFR 1626.8 - Emergencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... TO ALIENS § 1626.8 Emergencies. In an emergency, legal services may be provided prior to compliance... representation required by the emergency, and the applicant provides oral information to establish eligibility...

  13. 45 CFR 1626.8 - Emergencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... TO ALIENS § 1626.8 Emergencies. In an emergency, legal services may be provided prior to compliance... by the emergency, and the applicant provides oral information to establish eligibility which the...

  14. Briefcase Communicator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    In the photo at bottom right, a U.S. Park Police officer is demonstrating a battery-powered communications system, sufficiently compact to be packed in a briefcase-size container, which can send and receive signals over great distances by means of satellite relay. Key to the system's efficacy is the high-powered transmitting and receiving equipment aboard such NASA satellites as the Applications Technology Satellite6 (ATS-6) and the joint U.S.-Canadian Communications Technology Satellite (CTS); this enables the briefcase communicator to pick up satellite-relayed signals by means of the small hook-on antenna shown instead of the more elaborate-ground equipment customarily needed. Developed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, the communicator is intended for use in emergency situations. It has utility, for example, in disasters, such as floods and hurricanes, where power failure disrupts conventional communications; for on-the-spot transmissions from major accident sites; or in remote areas where no other means of communication exists

  15. The Importance of Prior Knowledge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleary, Linda Miller

    1989-01-01

    Recounts a college English teacher's experience of reading and rereading Noam Chomsky, building up a greater store of prior knowledge. Argues that Frank Smith provides a theory for the importance of prior knowledge and Chomsky's work provided a personal example with which to interpret and integrate that theory. (RS)

  16. The Importance of Prior Knowledge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleary, Linda Miller

    1989-01-01

    Recounts a college English teacher's experience of reading and rereading Noam Chomsky, building up a greater store of prior knowledge. Argues that Frank Smith provides a theory for the importance of prior knowledge and Chomsky's work provided a personal example with which to interpret and integrate that theory. (RS)

  17. Speak no evil: The promotional heritage of nuclear risk communication

    SciTech Connect

    Gwin, L.

    1990-01-01

    Louis Gwin addresses the critically important problem of nuclear risk communication. His research suggests that while an orderly evacuation of the population actually at risk may be workable in theory, the more likely occurrence is widespread panic and gridlock. Gwin's research suggests that existing programs of nuclear risk communication actually make this problem worse. He found that those who had received no prior information on what to do in an emergency were significantly more likely to do the right thing (e.g., await further instructions) than those who had received instructions. With utilities themselves retaining the ultimate responsibility for developing communication programs, it is not surprising that they have been reluctant; to issue instructions on what to do in the event of a nuclear accident is to acknowledge that such accidents can and do occur. Gwin makes no attempt to protray the nuclear industry as purposefully dishonest or evil. The bottom line is that programs that combine the communication of emergency plans with a latent desire to reassure the public fail in their primary purpose. As Gwin observes the key issue is one of trust. People see such communications as little more than propaganda put out by industry for its own purposes and do not trust the utilities to tell them what to do in the event of an accident. It will be every man for himself, with potentially disastrous consequences. How do we restore trust in nuclear risk communications Gwin offers a number of valuable suggestions such as placing communication responsibility in state or local agencies or in FEMA, and to ensure some form of public participation in the development and communication of emergency plans. This is an excellent study of an important and timely subject. It provides a much needed picture of just how badly our plans are likely to work in the next nuclear emergency. Gwin's warning should be heeded by policymakers now, while there is still time.

  18. Emergency Preparedness Policy and Practice in Massachusetts Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Taschner, Mary A; Nannini, Angela; Laccetti, Margaret; Greene, Martin

    2017-03-01

    Hospital emergency preparedness has evolved in response to and been challenged by threats of terrorism, meteorological disasters, and public health emergencies. In this case study, the authors examined emergency preparedness policy and practice in Massachusetts hospitals following 9/11/2001, identifying areas of success and opportunities for improvement. Using a qualitative descriptive approach, data analysis included the examination of documents and public health policy. Snowball technique was used to recruit nurses, public health policy makers, and other first responder leaders with historical and present knowledge of emergency preparedness policy and practice. Content analysis identified emerging themes and lessons learned. Key findings included the importance of standardized training, the value of interprofessional collaboration and communication across organizations, and the impact of decreased funding and prior incidents. The lessons learned from this case study contribute to the evolving body of knowledge about emergency preparedness for all hospitals and public health facilities, and their community health partners. Emergency preparedness is a dynamic process, and as it continues to evolve, additional research will be needed to standardize training, encourage collaboration, and facilitate communication so that incident response by hospital professionals, including occupational health nurses, and their public health and community partners is more effective.

  19. 77 FR 75404 - Accessible Emergency Information, and Apparatus Requirements for Emergency Information and Video...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 79 Accessible Emergency Information, and Apparatus Requirements for Emergency Information and Video Description: Implementation of the Twenty-First Century Communications and...

  20. Language-based Communication Zones in International Business Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babcock, Richard D.; Du-Babcock, Bertha

    2001-01-01

    Expands prior descriptions of expatriate-local personnel communication patterns by reconfiguring and adding new zones. Presents eight new communication zones in a comprehensive framework that represents the dynamic, bi-directional, multiply influenced, and transformational translation process integral to international business communication.…

  1. Interpersonal Sensitivity, Communication Encounters, Communicative Responsiveness, and Gender.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughey, Jim D.

    A study examined the extent of the role communication encounters play in helping people make accurate predictions about others, and what types of communicators (in terms of communicative reponsiveness and gender) seem to profit most from interaction with the subject of prediction prior to making predictions. Subjects, 118 college students,…

  2. Emergency Simulation Drill

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-12-04

    ISS038-E-011708 (4 Dec. 2013) --- In the International Space Station?s Zvezda Service Module, Russian cosmonaut Sergey Ryazanskiy, Expedition 38 flight engineer, reads a procedures checklist during an emergency simulation drill with participation from flight controllers on the ground. During the exercise, the crew practiced emergency communication and procedures in response to a predetermined scenario such as pressure leak.

  3. Why Communicate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Illingworth, Samuel

    2015-04-01

    "Half the world is composed of people who have something to say and can't, and the other half who have nothing to say and keep on saying it." - Robert Frost In this age of digital soap boxes and half-truths, the importance of geoscientists as communicators cannot be underestimated, nor has there been a more important time for researchers to stand up and demand to be heard. So why is there still such an overwhelming public perception that scientists are poor communicators, and what can we do to change this? In this work I will present an overview of a number of successful initiatives that have been developed at Manchester Metropolitan University, and beyond, to ensure that science is communicated to a large variety of people, from policy makers to members of the local community. I will also present an overview of the emerging field of Science Communication, how it has changed in the past few decades from a one-way diatribe to a two-way discussion, and how this represents a possible new direction and career path for geoscientists. Anne Roe, the noted American psychologist, told us, "nothing in science has any value to society if it is not communicated." As geoscientists, we have a professional and moral obligation to ensure that we not only research the facts, but that we also present them in an informative and engaging manner, so that the rest of humanity can benefit from the fruits of our labour.

  4. Lung Emergencies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Emergencies Cardiac Emergencies Eye Emergencies Lung Emergencies Surgeries Lung Emergencies People with Marfan syndrome can be at ... should be considered an emergency. Symptoms of sudden lung collapse (pneumothorax) Symptoms of a sudden lung collapse ...

  5. Emergencies in motoneuron disease.

    PubMed

    Finsterer, Josef; Stöllberger, Claudia

    2017-03-09

    Genetic and acquired motor-neuron-disorders (MNDs) may undergo acute deterioration resulting in various emergency situations. This literature review aims at summarising and discussing current knowledge about emergencies in MNDs. Emergencies that have been reported in MND patients include: respiratory, bulbar, cardiac, septic, epileptic, psychiatric, pain-related, and traumatic emergencies. Emergencies due to respiratory insufficiency have the strongest impact on morbidity and mortality in MNDs. To optimise the management of emergencies in MNDs, it is recommended to discuss these topics with the patient prior to their occurrence. After informed consent, patients may indicate their decision by signing an advance directive as to how such emergencies should be managed in case they arise. Generally, treatment of emergencies in MNDs is not at variance from treatment of similar emergencies due to other causes, but some peculiarities need to be pointed out. It is concluded that patients with MNDs may experience various emergencies during the disease course. Management of these conditions should be discussed with the patient prior to their appearance. Management of these emergencies follows general guidelines, which widely vary between countries, and depend on the availability of a patient's advance directive.

  6. Emergency Medical Service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Lewis Research Center helped design the complex EMS Communication System, originating from space operated telemetry, including the telemetry link between ambulances and hospitals for advanced life support services. In emergency medical use telemetry links ambulances and hospitals for advanced life support services and allows transmission of physiological data -- an electrocardiogram from an ambulance to a hospital emergency room where a physician reads the telemetered message and prescribes emergency procedures to ambulance attendants.

  7. State of emergency preparedness for US health insurance plans.

    PubMed

    Merchant, Raina M; Finne, Kristen; Lardy, Barbara; Veselovskiy, German; Korba, Caey; Margolis, Gregg S; Lurie, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Health insurance plans serve a critical role in public health emergencies, yet little has been published about their collective emergency preparedness practices and policies. We evaluated, on a national scale, the state of health insurance plans' emergency preparedness and policies. A survey of health insurance plans. We queried members of America's Health Insurance Plans, the national trade association representing the health insurance industry, about issues related to emergency preparedness issues: infrastructure, adaptability, connectedness, and best practices. Of 137 health insurance plans queried, 63% responded, representing 190.6 million members and 81% of US plan enrollment. All respondents had emergency plans for business continuity, and most (85%) had infrastructure for emergency teams. Some health plans also have established benchmarks for preparedness (eg, response time). Regarding adaptability, 85% had protocols to extend claim filing time and 71% could temporarily suspend prior medical authorization rules. Regarding connectedness, many plans shared their contingency plans with health officials, but often cited challenges in identifying regulatory agency contacts. Some health insurance plans had specific policies for assisting individuals dependent on durable medical equipment or home healthcare. Many plans (60%) expressed interest in sharing best practices. Health insurance plans are prioritizing emergency preparedness. We identified 6 policy modifications that health insurance plans could undertake to potentially improve healthcare system preparedness: establishing metrics and benchmarks for emergency preparedness; identifying disaster-specific policy modifications, enhancing stakeholder connectedness, considering digital strategies to enhance communication, improving support and access for special-needs individuals, and developing regular forums for knowledge exchange about emergency preparedness.

  8. The Frontlines of Medicine Project: a proposal for the standardized communication of emergency department data for public health uses including syndromic surveillance for biological and chemical terrorism.

    PubMed

    Barthell, Edward N; Cordell, William H; Moorhead, John C; Handler, Jonathan; Feied, Craig; Smith, Mark S; Cochrane, Dennis G; Felton, Christopher W; Collins, Michael A

    2002-04-01

    The Frontlines of Medicine Project is a collaborative effort of emergency medicine (including emergency medical services and clinical toxicology), public health, emergency government, law enforcement, and informatics. This collaboration proposes to develop a nonproprietary, "open systems" approach for reporting emergency department patient data. The common element is a standard approach to sending messages from individual EDs to regional oversight entities that could then analyze the data received. ED encounter data could be used for various public health initiatives, including syndromic surveillance for chemical and biological terrorism. The interlinking of these regional systems could also permit public health surveillance at a national level based on ED patient encounter data. Advancements in the Internet and Web-based technologies could allow the deployment of these standardized tools in a rapid time frame.

  9. Communicating the risks of bioterrorism and other emergencies in a diverse society: a case study of special populations in North Dakota.

    PubMed

    McGough, Marty; Frank, Loreeta Leer; Tipton, Stacia; Tinker, Tim L; Vaughan, Elaine

    2005-01-01

    In the event that terrorists use air, water, or food to deliver destructive agents to civilian populations, some groups and populations may be disproportionately at risk and have unique communications needs. Bioterrorism represents an even greater national public health threat if the nation's preparedness and readiness plans do not address the needs and perspectives of, for example, low-income residents, racially and ethnically diverse communities, and other "special populations". The objective of this study was to develop communications strategies to reach special populations in North Dakota before, during, and after a bioterrorism attack or other crisis. To achieve the study objectives, the investigators used telephone interviews and telephone focus groups with organizations that represented special populations. Areas of inquiry included attitudes and concerns about crises, sources of information used and those identified as most credible, methods to reach people during a crisis event, and awareness of and attitudes about the agencies and organizations that affect risk communications.

  10. Recruiting for Prior Service Market

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-01

    perceptions, expectations and issues for re-enlistment • Develop potential marketing and advertising tactics and strategies targeted to the defined...01 JUN 2008 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Recruiting for Prior Service Market 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT...Command First Handshake to First Unit of Assignment An Army of One Proud to Be e e to Serve Recruiting for Prior Service Market MAJ Eric Givens / MAJ Brian

  11. Recognising Health Care Assistants' Prior Learning through a Caring Ideology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandberg, Fredrik

    2010-01-01

    This article critically appraises a process of recognising prior learning (RPL) using analytical tools from Habermas' theory of communicative action. The RPL process is part of an in-service training program for health care assistants where the goal is to become a licensed practical nurse. Data about the RPL process were collected using interviews…

  12. Recognising Health Care Assistants' Prior Learning through a Caring Ideology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandberg, Fredrik

    2010-01-01

    This article critically appraises a process of recognising prior learning (RPL) using analytical tools from Habermas' theory of communicative action. The RPL process is part of an in-service training program for health care assistants where the goal is to become a licensed practical nurse. Data about the RPL process were collected using interviews…

  13. Using Students' Prior Knowledge to Teach Social Penetration Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chornet-Roses, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Bransford, Brown, and Cocking argue that acknowledging students' prior ideas and beliefs about a subject and incorporating them into the classroom enhances student learning. This article presents an activity which serves to hone three student learning outcomes: analysis of communication, inductive reasoning, and self-reflection. The goal of this…

  14. Factors Influencing Postsecondary STEM Students' Views of the Public Communication of an Emergent Technology: A Cross-National Study from Five Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Grant E.; Jones, M. Gail; Albe, Virginie; Blonder, Ron; Laherto, Antti; Macher, Daniel; Paechter, Manuela

    2017-01-01

    Recent efforts in the science education community have highlighted the need to integrate research and theory from science communication research into more general science education scholarship. These synthesized research perspectives are relatively novel but serve an important need to better understand the impacts that the advent of rapidly…

  15. Scaffolding Complex Learning: Integrating 21st Century Thinking, Emerging Technologies, and Dynamic Design and Assessment to Expand Learning and Communication Opportunities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, Eileen; McDonald, Frank; Ruggiero, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Enhanced ways of thinking about learners, learning, and communication in the 21st century across content areas coupled with technologies that can extend the outreach beyond text, time, and geography can accelerate learning and retention in higher education, professional organizations, and learning environments. However, many assumptions about…

  16. Transformative Learning-Based Mentoring for Professional Development of Teacher Educators in Information and Communication Technologies: An Approach for an Emerging Country

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kabakci, Isil; Odabasi, H. Ferhan; Kilicer, Kerem

    2010-01-01

    Teacher educators need professional development in effective use of information and communication technologies (ICT) in order to keep up with the changes and developments in ICT and to pose as a model for teacher candidates. For the purpose of meeting teacher educators' professional development needs in ICT, it is necessary to take…

  17. Millimeter Wave Communication through Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bastin, Gary L.

    2008-01-01

    Millimeter wave communication through plasma at frequencies of 35 GHz or higher shows promise in maintaining communications connectivity during rocket launch and re-entry, critical events which are typically plagued with communication dropouts. Extensive prior research into plasmas has characterized the plasma frequency at these events, and research at the Kennedy Space Center is investigating the feasibility of millimeter communication through these plasma frequencies.

  18. 78 FR 50075 - Statewide Communication Interoperability Plan Template and Annual Progress Report

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-16

    ... Programs Directorate (NPPD), Office of Cybersecurity and Communications (CS&C), Office of Emergency... Protection and Programs Directorate, Office of Cybersecurity and Communications, Office of Emergency...

  19. Diabetic Emergencies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sheet Health & Safety Tips Campaigns SUBSCRIBE Emergencies A-Z Share this! Home » Emergency 101 Diabetic Emergencies It ... seek immediate medical assistance. READ IN EMERGENCIES A-Z Mental Health Emergencies - Waits for Care Grow Dramatically ...

  20. Prior Knowledge and Exemplar Frequency

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Harlan D.; Murphy, Gregory L.; Rehder, Bob

    2008-01-01

    New concepts can be learned by statistical associations as well as by relevant existing knowledge. We examined the interaction of these two processes by manipulating exemplar frequency and thematic knowledge and considering their interaction through computational modeling. Exemplar frequency affects category learning, with high frequency items learned faster than low frequency items, and prior knowledge usually speeds category learning. In two experiments that manipulated both of these factors, we found that the effects of frequency are greatly reduced when stimulus features are linked by thematic prior knowledge, and that frequency effects on single stimulus features can actually be reversed by knowledge. We account for these results with the Knowledge Resonance (KRES) model of category learning (Rehder & Murphy, 2003) and conclude that prior knowledge may change representations so that empirical effects such as those caused by frequency manipulations are modulated. PMID:18927047