Science.gov

Sample records for emergency obstetric hysterectomy

  1. Emergency hysterectomy in obstetrics--a review of 117 cases.

    PubMed

    Al-Sibai, M H; Rahman, J; Rahman, M S; Butalack, F

    1987-08-01

    A series of 117 cases of emergency obstetric hysterectomy performed between 1976 and 1985 is reviewed. The indications included ruptured uterus (53.8%), intractable postpartum haemorrhage (20.5%), placenta accreta (7.7%), major degree of placenta praevia (7.7%), haemorrhage at Caesarean section (4.5%), couvelaire uterus (3.4%) and abdominal pregnancy (2.6%). Despite a general aversion to hysterectomy by the women in our society, these procedures were undertaken in a desperate attempt to save life. There were 6 (5.1%) maternal deaths, all due to the severity of the indication for the hysterectomy. Presence of an experienced obstetrician is important to make an early decision to operate before the patient's condition is extreme and to provide the technical skills required to minimize morbidity and mortality.

  2. Obstetric hysterectomy: trend and outcome in Ile-Ife, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Badejoko, O O; Awowole, I O; Ijarotimi, A O; Badejoko, B O; Loto, O M; Ogunniyi, S O

    2013-08-01

    Worldwide, the incidence of obstetric hysterectomy is expected to be on the decline due to improvements in obstetric care. This hospital-based 10-year review (2001-10) was performed to determine its incidence and outcome in Ile-Ife, Nigeria. The trend was determined by comparing the current incidence with that from two previous studies from the same centre. There were 58 obstetric hysterectomies and 15,194 deliveries during the review period, giving a rate of 3.8/1,000 deliveries. A rising trend was observed in the obstetric hysterectomy rate in Ile-Ife over two decades (1990-2010). Uterine rupture was the commonest indication (60%). Postoperative complications such as sepsis, vesico-vaginal fistula and renal failure affected 34.5% of the patients. Maternal and fetal case fatality rates were 18.2% and 43.6%, respectively. The obstetric hysterectomy rate in Ile-Ife is high and the trend is rising. Universal access to skilled birth attendance is advocated to reduce uterine rupture and consequently obstetric hysterectomy.

  3. Obstetric emergencies.

    PubMed

    Crochetière, Chantal

    2003-03-01

    Obstetric hemorrhage is still a significant cause of maternal morbidity and mortality. Prevention, early recognition, and prompt intervention are the keys to minimizing complications. Resuscitation can be inadequate because of under-estimation of blood loss and misleading maternal response. A young woman may maintain a normal blood pressure until sudden and catastrophic decompensation occurs. All members of the obstetric team should know how to manage hemorrhage because timing is of the essence. Good communication with the blood bank ensures timely release of appropriate blood products. A well-coordinated team is one of the most important elements in the care of a compromised fetus. If fetal anoxia is presumed, there is less than 10 minutes to permanent fetal brain damage. Antepartum anesthesia consultation should be encouraged in parturients with medical problems.

  4. Emergency preparedness in obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Haeri, Sina; Marcozzi, David

    2015-04-01

    During and after disasters, focus is directed toward meeting the immediate needs of the general population. As a result, the routine health care and the special needs of some vulnerable populations such as pregnant and postpartum women may be overlooked within a resource-limited setting. In the event of hazards such as natural disasters, manmade disasters, and terrorism, knowledge of emergency preparedness strategies is imperative for the pregnant woman and her family, obstetric providers, and hospitals. Individualized plans for the pregnant woman and her family should include knowledge of shelter in place, birth at home, and evacuation. Obstetric providers need to have a personal disaster plan in place that accounts for work responsibilities in case of an emergency and business continuity strategies to continue to provide care to their communities. Hospitals should have a comprehensive emergency preparedness program utilizing an "all hazards" approach to meet the needs of pregnant and postpartum women and other vulnerable populations during disasters. With lessons learned in recent tragedies such as Hurricane Katrina in mind, we hope this review will stimulate emergency preparedness discussions and actions among obstetric providers and attenuate adverse outcomes related to catastrophes in the future.

  5. Hysterectomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... which is called a laparoscopic vaginal hysterectomy). A robot-assisted laparoscopic hysterectomy is performed with the help ... In general, it has not been shown that robot-assisted laparoscopy results in a better outcome than ...

  6. [Shoulder dystocia: an obstetrical emergency].

    PubMed

    Marques, Joana Borges; Reynolds, Ana

    2011-01-01

    Shoulder dystocia is one of the most feared obstetric emergencies due to related maternal and neonatal complications and therefore, the growing of medico-legal litigation that it entails. Although associated with risk factors such as fetal macrossomia, gestacional diabetes and instrumented delivery, the majority of cases are unpredictable. The lack of a consensus on shoulder dystocia diagnosis causes variations on its incidence and hampers a more comprehensive analysis. Management guidelines described for its resolution include several manoeuvres but the ideal sequence of procedures is not clearly defined in more severe cases. Hands-on and team training, through simulation-based techniques applied to medicine, seems to be a promising method to learn how to deal with shoulder dystocia having in mind a reduction in related maternal or neonatal morbidity and mortality. The main goal of this paper is to provide a comprehensive revision of shoulder dystocia highlighting its relevance as an obstetric emergency. A reflection on the management is presented emphasising the importance of simulation-based training.

  7. Hysterectomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... try a surgery that involves smaller or fewer cuts than hysterectomy. The smaller cuts may help you heal faster with less scarring. ... tools into your pelvic area through very small cuts. This surgery can remove scar tissue or growths ...

  8. Developing protocols for obstetric emergencies.

    PubMed

    Roth, Cheryl K; Parfitt, Sheryl E; Hering, Sandra L; Dent, Sarah A

    2014-01-01

    There is potential for important steps to be missed in emergency situations, even in the presence of many health care team members. Developing a clear plan of response for common emergencies can ensure that no tasks are redundant or omitted, and can create a more controlled environment that promotes positive health outcomes. A multidisciplinary team was assembled in a large community hospital to create protocols that would help ensure optimum care and continuity of practice in cases of postpartum hemorrhage, shoulder dystocia, emergency cesarean surgical birth, eclamptic seizure and maternal code. Assignment of team roles and responsibilities led to the evolution of standardized protocols for each emergency situation.

  9. Building team and technical competency for obstetric emergencies: the mobile obstetric emergencies simulator (MOES) system.

    PubMed

    Deering, Shad; Rosen, Michael A; Salas, Eduardo; King, Heidi B

    2009-01-01

    The infrequent and high-stakes nature of obstetric emergencies requires staff members to respond quickly and proficiently to a complex and high-stress situation, a situation they have likely had little opportunity to experience. This situation requires a systematic approach to preparing personnel to manage these situations. Therefore, this article seeks to contribute to the growing literature on training programs for obstetric emergencies by documenting the development and implementation of the Mobile Obstetric Emergencies Simulator (MOES) system. MOES is a comprehensive package of simulation technology, standardized curriculum, and instructional features that combines traditional classroom learning activities and simulation-based training on the actual labor and delivery (L&D) ward. Specifically, the MOES system leverages the TeamSTEPPS teamwork training being implemented throughout the US military healthcare system with opportunities to practice teamwork and technical skills using mannequin-based patient simulation embedded within L&D units. The primary goals of this article are twofold. First, this article explicitly identifies the unique training needs for preparing staff for obstetric emergencies through a comprehensive review and synthesis of the literature. Second, this article documents the approach taken in MOES to meet these needs.

  10. [Simulation' benefits in obstetrical emergency: Which proof level?

    PubMed

    Raynal, P

    2016-10-01

    Simulation in obstetrical emergency is in expansion. The important economic and human cost in simulation needs a real evaluation about enhancement in technical and non-technical skills, maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality. We present a literature review of the results published on the subject in shoulder dystocia, post-partum haemorrhage, eclampsia and cord prolaps with a selection of publications with high evidence level or positive impact of training on obstetrical emergencies. There are few publications with a positive impact of training on obstetrical emergencies. Some publications from 10years by the same obstetrical team for training and shoulder dystocia reveal a 75% reduction in brachial plexus injury after 4years of training, and 100% reduction in permanent injury after a decade of training. Only one publication is in accordance with a reduction of severe post-partum haemorrhage with training. For all obstetrical emergencies, crew resource management (communication, self-confidence…) and team training are improved.

  11. Uterine Artery Embolization: Exploring New Dimensions in Obstetric Emergencies

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Seema; Singh, Abha; Raghunandan, Chitra; Gupta, Usha; Dutt, Seema

    2014-01-01

    The role of transcatheter arterial embolization in the management of obstetric emergencies is relatively new and not so commonly used. In the following series, the efficacy of this technique in situations such as scar site ectopic pregnancy, antepartum and postpartum obstetric hemorrhage, especially in the presence of coagulation derangement is presented. PMID:24936273

  12. [The emergence of obstetrical mechanism: From Lucy to Homo sapiens].

    PubMed

    Frémondière, P; Thollon, L; Marchal, F

    2017-03-01

    The evolutionary history of modern birth mechanism is now a renewed interest in obstetrical papers. The purpose of this work is to review the literature in paleo-obstetrical field. Our analysis focuses on paleo-obstetrical hypothesis, from 1960 to the present day, based on the reconstruction of fossil pelvis. Indeed, these pelvic reconstructions usually provide an opportunity to make an obstetrical assumption in our ancestors. In this analysis, we show that modern birth mechanism takes place during the emergence of our genus 2 million years ago. References are made to human specificities related to obstetrical mechanism: exclusive bipedalism, increase of brain size at birth, metabolic cost of the pregnancy and deep trophoblastic implantation.

  13. Emergency peripartum hysterectomy: experience of a major referral hospital in Ankara, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Danisman, N; Baser, E; Togrul, C; Kaymak, O; Tandogan, M; Gungor, T

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to report and discuss the incidence, clinical characteristics and outcomes of emergency peripartum hysterectomies (EPH) performed at a tertiary referral hospital in Ankara, Turkey. The labour and delivery unit database was retrospectively analysed for emergency peripartum hysterectomies (EPH) performed between January 2008 and January 2013, at the Zekai Tahir Burak Women's Health Training and Research Hospital. A total of 92,887 deliveries were accomplished within the study period. EPH was performed in 48 cases, and the incidence was 0.51 in 1,000. Abnormal placentation was the most common indication for EPH. Most common complications were blood product transfusion and postoperative fever. None of the cases resulted in maternal mortality. Serious maternal complication rates were relatively low in our study. In cases that are unresponsive to initial conservative measures, EPH should be performed without delay and a multidisciplinary team approach should be conducted whenever possible.

  14. [Pyelovenous fistula revealed by repeated thromboembolic events after emergency peripartum hysterectomy].

    PubMed

    Sauvanaud, C; Boillot, B; Sergent, F; Long, J A; Pernod, G; Rambeaud, J J

    2014-04-01

    We report the case of a 51-year old woman presenting pyelovenous fistula revealed by recurrent and serious thromboembolic events after ureteral ligation during emergency peripartum hysterectomy. Imaging reported a complete left ureteral obstruction, a fistula between the upper calix and the left renal vein and a renal function preserved. Uretero-vesical reimplantation was performed. The patient was well doing after 12 months. The authors wonder if pyelovenous fistula is responsible for prothrombotic state and maintaining renal function.

  15. Multidisciplinary Obstetric Simulated Emergency Scenarios (MOSES): Promoting Patient Safety in Obstetrics with Teamwork-Focused Interprofessional Simulations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeth, Della; Ayida, Gubby; Berridge, Emma Jane; Mackintosh, Nicola; Norris, Beverley; Sadler, Chris; Strachan, Alasdair

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: We describe an example of simulation-based interprofessional continuing education, the multidisciplinary obstetric simulated emergency scenarios (MOSES) course, which was designed to enhance nontechnical skills among obstetric teams and, hence, improve patient safety. Participants' perceptions of MOSES courses, their learning, and…

  16. Design of a Serious Game for Handling Obstetrical Emergencies

    PubMed Central

    Bot-Robin, Virginie; Libessart, Aurélien; Doucède, Guillaume; Cosson, Michel; Rubod, Chrystèle

    2016-01-01

    Background The emergence of new technologies in the obstetrical field should lead to the development of learning applications, specifically for obstetrical emergencies. Many childbirth simulations have been recently developed. However, to date none of them have been integrated into a serious game. Objective Our objective was to design a new type of immersive serious game, using virtual glasses to facilitate the learning of pregnancy and childbirth pathologies. We have elaborated a new game engine, placing the student in some maternity emergency situations and delivery room simulations. Methods A gynecologist initially wrote a scenario based on a real clinical situation. He also designed, along with an educational engineer, a tree diagram, which served as a guide for dialogues and actions. A game engine, especially developed for this case, enabled us to connect actions to the graphic universe (fully 3D modeled and based on photographic references). We used the Oculus Rift in order to immerse the player in virtual reality. Each action in the game was linked to a certain number of score points, which could either be positive or negative. Results Different pathological pregnancy situations have been targeted and are as follows: care of spontaneous miscarriage, threat of preterm birth, forceps operative delivery for fetal abnormal heart rate, and reduction of a shoulder dystocia. The first phase immerses the learner into an action scene, as a doctor. The second phase ask the student to make a diagnosis. Once the diagnosis is made, different treatments are suggested. Conclusions Our serious game offers a new perspective for obstetrical emergency management trainings and provides students with active learning by immersing them into an environment, which recreates all or part of the real obstetrical world of emergency. It is consistent with the latest recommendations, which clarify the importance of simulation in teaching and in ongoing professional development. PMID

  17. National Training Course. Emergency Medical Technician. Paramedic. Instructor's Lesson Plans. Module XI. Obstetric/Gynecologic Emergencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    This instructor's lesson plan guide on obstetric/gynecologic emergencies is one of fifteen modules designed for use in the training of emergency medical technicians (paramedics). Six units of study are presented: (1) anatomy and physiology of the female reproductive system; (2) patient assessment; (3) pathophysiology and management of gynecologic…

  18. Rural-Urban Inequity in Unmet Obstetric Needs and Functionality of Emergency Obstetric Care Services in a Zambian District

    PubMed Central

    Ng’anjo Phiri, Selia; Fylkesnes, Knut; Moland, Karen Marie; Byskov, Jens; Kiserud, Torvid

    2016-01-01

    Background Zambia has a high maternal mortality ratio, 398/100,000 live births. Few pregnant women access emergency obstetric care services to handle complications at childbirth. We aimed to assess the deficit in life-saving obstetric services in the rural and urban areas of Kapiri Mposhi district. Method A cross-sectional survey was conducted in 2011 as part of the ‘Response to Accountable priority setting for Trust in health systems’ (REACT) project. Data on all childbirths that occurred in emergency obstetric care facilities in 2010 were obtained retrospectively. Sources of information included registers from maternity ward admission, delivery and operation theatre, and case records. Data included age, parity, mode of delivery, obstetric complications, and outcome of mother and the newborn. An approach using estimated major obstetric interventions expected but not done in health facilities was used to assess deficit of life-saving interventions in urban and rural areas. Results A total of 2114 urban and 1226 rural childbirths occurring in emergency obstetric care facilities (excluding abortions) were analysed. Facility childbirth constituted 81% of expected births in urban and 16% in rural areas. Based on the reference estimate that 1.4% of childbearing women were expected to need major obstetric intervention, unmet obstetric need was 77 of 106 women, thus 73% (95% CI 71–75%) in rural areas whereas urban areas had no deficit. Major obstetric interventions for absolute maternal indications were higher in urban 2.1% (95% CI 1.60–2.71%) than in rural areas 0.4% (95% CI 0.27–0.55%), with an urban to rural rate ratio of 5.5 (95% CI 3.55–8.76). Conclusions Women in rural areas had deficient obstetric care. The likelihood of under-going a life-saving intervention was 5.5 times higher for women in urban than rural areas. Targeting rural women with life-saving services could substantially reduce this inequity and preventable deaths. PMID:26824599

  19. Emergency obstetric care: Making the impossible possible through task shifting.

    PubMed

    Schneeberger, Caroline; Mathai, Matthews

    2015-10-01

    Task shifting-moving tasks to healthcare workers with a shorter training-for emergency obstetric care (EmOC) can potentially improve access to lifesaving interventions and thereby contribute to reducing maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality. The present paper reviews studies on task shifting for the provision of EmOC. Most studies were performed in Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia and focused primarily on task shifting for the performance of cesarean deliveries. Cesarean delivery rates increased following EmOC training without significant increase in adverse outcomes. The paper discusses the advantages and disadvantages of task shifting in EmOC and the role of this approach in improving maternal and newborn health in the short and long term.

  20. Validating Obstetric Emergency Checklists using Simulation: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Bajaj, Komal; Rivera-Chiauzzi, Enid Y; Lee, Colleen; Shepard, Cynthia; Bernstein, Peter S; Moore-Murray, Tanya; Smith, Heather; Nathan, Lisa; Walker, Katie; Chazotte, Cynthia; Goffman, Dena

    2016-10-01

    Background The World Health Organization's Surgical Safety Checklist has demonstrated significant reduction in surgical morbidity. The American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists District II Safe Motherhood Initiative (SMI) safety bundles include eclampsia and postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) checklists. Objective To determine whether use of the SMI checklists during simulated obstetric emergencies improved completion of critical actions and to elicit feedback to facilitate checklist revision. Study Design During this randomized controlled trial, teams were assigned to use a checklist during one of two emergencies: eclampsia and PPH. Raters scored teams on critical step completion. Feedback was elicited through structured debriefing. Results In total, 30 teams completed 60 scenarios. For eclampsia, trends toward higher completion were noted for blood pressure and airway management. For PPH, trends toward higher completion rates were noted for PPH stage assessment and fundal massage. Feedback resulted in substantial checklist revision. Participants were enthusiastic about using checklists in a clinical emergency. Conclusion Despite trends toward higher rates of completion of critical tasks, teams using checklists did not approach 100% task completion. Teams were interested in the application of checklists and provided feedback necessary to substantially revise the checklists. Intensive implementation planning and training in use of the revised checklists will result in improved patient outcomes.

  1. Identifying obstetrical emergencies at Kintampo Municipal Hospital: a perspective from pregnant women and nursing midwives.

    PubMed

    Oiyemhonlan, Brenda; Udofia, Emilia; Punguyire, Damien

    2013-06-01

    A hospital based cross-sectional qualitative study was conducted at Kintampo Municipal Hospital in Northern Ghana, to identify obstetric emergencies and barriers to emergency care seeking; examine the perspective of midwives regarding their role in maternity care and management of obstetric emergencies, and explore women's knowledge and response to obstetric emergencies. Study subjects comprised of 2 emergency obstetric cases, 29 antenatal focus group discussants and 5 midwives at the maternity unit. Data was collected from 23rd March to 9th April, 2012 using in-depth interviews, focus group discussions and record reviews. The most common obstetric emergencies were hemorrhage, eclampsia and anemia. Potential obstetric complications were poorly understood by antenatal women and known barriers limited access to emergency obstetric care. Service challenges included insufficient staffing and well as inadequate equipment and physical space in the maternity ward. Local community efforts can address communication and service access gaps. Government intervention is required to address service provision gaps for improved maternity care in Kintampo.

  2. Delivering quality care: what can emergency gynaecology learn from acute obstetrics?

    PubMed

    Bika, O H; Edozien, L C

    2014-08-01

    Emergency obstetric care in the UK has been systematically developed over the years to high quality standards. More recently, advances have been made in the organisation and delivery of care for women presenting with acute gynaecological problems, but a lot remains to be done, and emergency gynaecology has a lot to learn from the evolution of its sister special interest area: acute obstetric care. This paper highlights areas such as consultant presence, risk management, patient flow pathways, out-of-hours care, clinical guidelines and protocols, education and training and facilities, where lessons from obstetrics are transferrable to emergency gynaecology.

  3. The cost of emergency obstetric care: concepts and issues.

    PubMed

    Desai, J

    2003-04-01

    Emergency obstetric care (EmOC), like any health intervention, requires resources, and resources are almost always limited. This forces decision makers to take into account the costs (and effectiveness) of EmOC provision and compare them with the costs (and effectiveness) of other health interventions. This is not inordinately complicated, but it does require paying attention to the fact that EmOC services require different types of inputs and are produced in facilities that also provide other health care services. This paper discusses the basic concepts underlying the costing of EmOC services, and the essential issues one must take into account while assessing the cost-effectiveness of EmOC interventions. A definition of EmOC provision cost is offered and then explained by progressively refining a simple measure of expenditures on all that is used to provide EmOC services. Thereupon the process of collecting cost data and calculating costs is outlined using a simple spreadsheet format, and issues related to the analysis of costs and cost-effectiveness are discussed.

  4. Implementation of emergency obstetric care training in Bangladesh: lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Islam, Mohammad Tajul; Haque, Yasmin Ali; Waxman, Rachel; Bhuiyan, Abdul Bayes

    2006-05-01

    The Women's Right to Life and Health project aimed to reduce maternal morbidity and mortality in Bangladesh through provision of comprehensive emergency obstetric care (EmOC) in the country's district and sub-district hospitals. Human resources development was one of the project's major activities. This paper describes the project in 2000-2004 and lessons learned. Project documents, the training database, reports and training protocols were reviewed. Medical officers, nurses, facility managers and laboratory technicians received training in the country's eight medical college hospitals, using nationally accepted curricula. A 17-week competency-based training course for teams of medical officers and nurses was introduced in 2003. At baseline in 1999, only three sub-district hospitals were providing comprehensive EmOC and 33 basic EmOC, mostly due to lack of trained staff and necessary equipment. In 2004, 105 of the 120 sub-district hospitals had become functional for EmOC, 70 with comprehensive EmOC and 35 with basic EmOC, while 53 of 59 of the district hospitals were providing comprehensive EmOC compared to 35 in 1999. The scaling up of competency-based training, innovative incentives to retain trained staff, evidence-based protocols to standardise practice and improve quality of care and the continuing involvement of key stakeholders, especially trainers, will all be needed to reach training targets in future.

  5. Effects of changes in copayment for obstetric emergency room visits on the utilization of obstetric emergency rooms.

    PubMed

    Raz, Iris; Novack, Lena; Yitshak-Sade, Maayan; Shahar, Yemima; Wiznitzer, Arnon; Sergienko, Ruslan; Warshawsky-Livne, Lora

    2015-10-01

    In view of the growing proportion of "non-urgent" admissions to obstetric emergency rooms (OERs) and recent changes in copayment policies for OER visits in Israel, we assessed factors contributing to OER overcrowding. The changes investigated were (a) exemption from copayment for women with birth contractions, (b) allowing phone referrals to the OER and (c) exemption from copayment during primary care clinic closing hours. We analyzed data of a large tertiary hospital with 37 deliveries per day. Counts of women discharged to home from the OER were an indicator of "non-urgent" visits. The annual number of non-urgent visits increased at a higher rate (3.4%) than the natural increase in deliveries (2.1%). Exemption from copayment for visits during non-working hours of primary care clinics was associated with increases in OER admissions (IRR=1.22) and in non-urgent OER visits (IRR=1.54). Younger and first-time mothers with medically unjustified complaints were more likely to be discharged to home. We showed that the changes in the policy for OER copayment meant to attract new clients to the HMO had an independent impact on OER utilization, and hence, added to the workload of medical personnel. The change in HMO policy regulating OER availability requires rigorous assessment of possible health system implications.

  6. The unmet need for Emergency Obstetric Care in Tanga Region, Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Prytherch, Helen; Massawe, Siriel; Kuelker, Rainer; Hunger, Claudia; Mtatifikolo, Ferdinand; Jahn, Albrecht

    2007-01-01

    Background Improving maternal health by reducing maternal mortality constitutes the fifth Millennium Development Goal and represents a key public health challenge in the United Republic of Tanzania. In response to the need to evaluate and monitor safe motherhood interventions, this study aims at assessing the coverage of obstetric care according to the Unmet Obstetric Need (UON) concept by obtaining information on indications for, and outcomes of, major obstetric interventions. Furthermore, we explore whether this concept can be operationalised at district level. Methods A two year study using the Unmet Obstetric Need concept was carried out in three districts in Tanga Region, Tanzania. Data was collected prospectively at all four hospitals in the region for every woman undergoing a major obstetric intervention, including indication and outcome. The concept was adapted to address differentials in access to emergency obstetric care between districts and between rural and urban areas. Based upon literature and expert consensus, a threshold of 2% of all deliveries was used to define the expected minimum requirement of major obstetric interventions performed for absolute maternal indications. Results Protocols covering 1,260 complicated deliveries were analysed. The percentage of major obstetric interventions carried out in response to an absolute maternal indication was only 71%; most major obstetric interventions (97%) were caesarean sections. The most frequent indication was cephalo-pelvic-disproportion (51%). The proportion of major obstetric interventions for absolute maternal indications performed amongst women living in urban areas was 1.8% of all deliveries, while in rural areas it was only 0.7%. The high proportion (8.3%) of negative maternal outcomes in terms of morbidity and mortality, as well as the high perinatal mortality of 9.1% (still birth 6.9%, dying within 24 hours 1.7%, dying after 24 hours 0.5%) raise concern about the quality of care being

  7. Obstetric emergencies at the United States–Mexico border crossings in El Paso, Texas

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Jill A.; Rishel, Karen; Escobedo, Miguel A.; Arellano, Danielle E.; Cunningham, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe the frequency, characteristics, and patient outcomes for women who accessed Emergency Medical Services (EMS) for obstetric emergencies at the ports of entry (POE) between El Paso, Texas, United States of America, and Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua, Mexico. Methods A descriptive study of women 12–49 years of age for whom an EMS ambulance was called to an El Paso POE location from December 2008–April 2011 was conducted. Women were identified through surveillance of EMS records. EMS and emergency department (ED) records were abstracted for all women through December 2009 and for women with an obstetric emergency through April 2011. For obstetric patients admitted to the hospital, additional prenatal and birth characteristics were collected. Frequencies and proportions were estimated for each variable; differences between residents of the United States and Mexico were tested. Results During December 2008–December 2009, 47.6% (68/143) of women receiving EMS assistance at an El Paso POE had an obstetric emergency, nearly 20 times the proportion for Texas overall. During December 2008–April 2011, 60.1% (66/109) of obstetric patients with ED records were admitted to hospital and 52 gave birth before discharge. Preterm birth (23.1%; No. = 12), low birth weight (9.6%; No. = 5), birth in transit (7.7%; No. = 4), and postpartum hemorrhage (5.8%; No. = 3) were common; fewer than one-half the women (46.2%; No. = 24) had evidence of prenatal care. Conclusions The high proportion of obstetric EMS transports and high prevalence of complications in this population suggest a need for binational risk reduction efforts. PMID:25915011

  8. Chikungunya Fever: Obstetric Considerations on an Emerging Virus.

    PubMed

    Dotters-Katz, Sarah K; Grace, Matthew R; Strauss, Robert A; Chescheir, Nancy; Kuller, Jeffrey A

    2015-07-01

    Chikungunya fever is an increasingly common viral infection transmitted to humans by species of the Aedes mosquitoes. Characterized by fevers, myalgias, arthralgias, headache, and rash, the infection is endemic to tropical areas. However, identification of disease vectors to Europe and the Americas has raised concern for possible spread of chikungunya to these areas. More recently, these concerns have become a reality; with more than 500,000 new cases in the Western hemisphere in the last 2 years, questions have arisen about the implications of infection during pregnancy and delivery. A literature review was performed using MEDLINE in order to gather information regarding the obstetric implications of this infection. It appears that although this virus can cross the placenta in the first and second trimester leading to fetal infection and miscarriage, this is a very rare occurrence. In contrast, active maternal infection within 4 days of delivery conveys a high risk of vertical transmission. Maternal infection during pregnancy does not appear to be more severe than infection on the nonpregnant female. Given the increasing incidence of chikungunya, obstetric providers should be aware of the disease and its implication for the gravid female.

  9. Program note: applying the UN process indicators for emergency obstetric care to the United States.

    PubMed

    Lobis, S; Fry, D; Paxton, A

    2005-02-01

    The United Nations Process Indicators for emergency obstetric care (EmOC) have been used extensively in countries with high maternal mortality ratios (MMR) to assess the availability, utilization and quality of EmOC services. To compare the situation in high MMR countries to that of a low MMR country, data from the United States were used to determine EmOC service availability, utilization and quality. As was expected, the United States was found to have an adequate amount of good-quality EmOC services that are used by the majority of women with life-threatening obstetric complications.

  10. Hysterectomy - vaginal - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Vaginal hysterectomy - discharge; Laparoscopically assisted vaginal hysterectomy - discharge; LAVH - discharge ... you were in the hospital, you had a vaginal hysterectomy. Your surgeon made a cut in your ...

  11. Reducing maternal mortality on a countrywide scale: The role of emergency obstetric training.

    PubMed

    Moran, Neil F; Naidoo, Mergan; Moodley, Jagidesa

    2015-11-01

    Training programmes to improve health worker skills in managing obstetric emergencies have been introduced in various countries with the aim of reducing maternal mortality through these interventions. In South Africa, based on an ongoing confidential enquiry system started in 1997, detailed information about maternal deaths is published in the form of regular 'Saving Mothers' reports. This article tracks the recommendations made in successive Saving Mothers reports with regard to emergency obstetric training, and it assesses the impact of these recommendations on reducing maternal mortality. Since 2009, South Africa has had its own training package, Essential Steps in the Management of Obstetric Emergencies (ESMOE), which the last three Saving Mothers reports have specifically recommended for all doctors and midwives working in maternity units. A special emphasis has been placed on the need for the simulation training component of ESMOE, also called obstetric 'fire drills', to be integrated into the clinical routines of all maternity units. The latest Saving Mothers report (2011-2013) suggests there has been little progress so far in improving emergency obstetric skills, indicating a need for further scale-up of ESMOE training in the country. The example of the KwaZulu-Natal province of South Africa is used to illustrate the process of scale-up and factors likely to facilitate that scale-up, including the introduction of ESMOE into the undergraduate medical training curriculum. Additional factors in the health system that are required to convert improved skills levels into improved quality of care and a reduction in maternal mortality are discussed. These include intelligent government health policies, formulated with input from clinical experts; strong clinical leadership to ensure that doctors and nurses apply the skills they have learnt appropriately, and work professionally and ethically; and a culture of clinical governance.

  12. Views of senior health personnel about quality of emergency obstetric care: A qualitative study in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Okonofua, Friday; Agholor, Kingsley; Okike, Ola; Abdus-salam, Rukayat Adeola; Gana, Mohammed; Abe, Eghe; Durodola, Adetoye; Galadanci, Hadiza

    2017-01-01

    Background Late arrival in hospital by women experiencing pregnancy complications is an important background factor leading to maternal mortality in Nigeria. The use of effective and timely emergency obstetric care determines whether women survive or die, or become near-miss cases. Healthcare managers have the responsibility to deploy resources for implementing emergency obstetric care. Objectives To determine the nature of institutional policies and frameworks for managing obstetric complications and reducing maternal deaths in Nigeria. Methods Thirty-six hospital managers, heads of obstetrics department and senior midwives were interviewed about hospital infrastructure, resources, policies and processes relating to emergency obstetric care, whilst allowing informants to discuss their thoughts and feelings. The interviews were audiotaped, transcribed and analyzed using Atlas ti 6.2software. Results Hospital managers are aware of the seriousness of maternal mortality and the steps to improve maternal healthcare. Many reported the lack of policies and specific action-plans for maternal mortality prevention, and many did not purposely disburse budgets or resources to address the problem. Although some reported that maternal/perinatal audit take place in their hospitals, there was no substantive evidence and no records of maternal/perinatal audits were made available. Respondents decried the lack of appropriate data collection system in the hospitals for accurate monitoring of maternal mortality and identification of appropriate remediating actions. Conclusion Healthcare managers are handicapped to properly manage the healthcare system for maternal mortality prevention. Relevant training of healthcare managers would be crucial to enable the development of strategic implementation plans for the prevention of maternal mortality. PMID:28346519

  13. Complicated deliveries, critical care and quality in emergency obstetric care in Northern Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Ø E; Ndeki, S; Norheim, O F

    2004-10-01

    Our objective was to determine the availability and quality of obstetric care to improve resource allocation in northern Tanzania. We surveyed all facilities providing delivery services (n=129) in six districts in northern Tanzania using the UN Guidelines for monitoring emergency obstetric care (EmOC). The three last questions in this audit outline are examined: Are the right women (those with obstetric complications) using emergency obstetric care facilities (Met Need)? Are sufficient quantities of critical services being provided (cesarean section rate (CSR))? Is the quality of the services adequate (case fatality rate (CFR))? Complications are calculated using Plan 3 of the UN Guidelines to assess the value of routine data for EmOC indicator monitoring. Nearly 60% of the expected complicated deliveries in the study population were conducted at EmOC qualified health facilities. 81.2% of the expected complicated deliveries are conducted in any facility (including facilities not qualifying as EmOC facilities). There is an inadequate level of critical services provided (CSR 4.6). Voluntary agencies provide most of these services in rural settings. All indicators show large variations with the setting (urban/rural location, level and ownership of facilities). Finally, there is large variation in the CFR with only one facility meeting the minimum accepted level. Utilization and quality of critical obstetric services at lower levels and in rural districts must be improved. The potential for improving the resource allocation within lower levels of the health care system is discussed. Given the small number of qualified facilities yet relatively high Met Need, we argue that it is neither the mothers' ignorance nor their lack of ability to get to a facility that is the main barrier to receiving quality care when needed, but rather the lack of quality care at the facility. Little can be concluded using the CFR to describe the quality of services provided.

  14. [Preeclampsia and HELLP syndrome as an obstetric emergency].

    PubMed

    Tallarek, A-C; Stepan, H

    2012-03-01

    Preeclampsia and HELLP syndrome are multisystemic hypertensive disorders in pregnancy. A causative treatment is not yet available. The obstetrician has to choose between the risk of prolongation of pregnancy for mother and fetus on the one hand and the hazard of prematurity on the other, when iatrogenic delivery is considered. As the clinical severity and progression of both diseases is very difficult to predict, an emergency situation can develop rapidly and unexpectedly. In this scenario a good interdisciplinary cooperation between obstetricians and intensive care physicians ensures an optimal outcome for the pregnant woman. This article gives an insight into both diseases and the clinical management.

  15. Hysterectomy - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... anatomy URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100029.htm Hysterectomy - Series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Go to slide 1 out of 4 Go to slide 2 ...

  16. Affordability of emergency obstetric and neonatal care at public hospitals in Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Honda, Ayako; Randaoharison, Pierana Gabriel; Matsui, Mitsuaki

    2011-05-01

    Timely access to emergency obstetric care is necessary to save the lives of women experiencing complications at delivery, and for newborn babies. Out-of-pocket costs are one of the critical factors hindering access to such services in low- and middle-income countries. This study measured out-of-pocket costs for caesarean section and neonatal care at an urban tertiary public hospital in Madagascar, assessed affordability in relation to household expenditure and investigated where families found the money to cover these costs. Data were collected for 103 women and 73 newborns at the Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Mahajanga in the Boeny region of Madagascar between September 2007 and January 2008. Out-of-pocket costs for caesarean section were catastrophic for middle and lower socio-economic households, and treatment for neonatal complications also created a big financial burden, with geographical and other financial barriers further limiting access to hospital care. This study identified 12 possible cases where the mother required an emergency caesarean section and her newborn required emergency care, placing a double burden on the household. In an effort to make emergency obstetric and neonatal care affordable and available to all, including those living in rural areas and those of medium and lower socio-economic status, well-designed financial risk protection mechanisms and a strong commitment by the government to mobilise resources to finance the country's health system are necessary.

  17. Emergency obstetric care in a rural district of Burundi: What are the surgical needs?

    PubMed Central

    Zachariah, R.; Kumar, A. M. V.; Trelles, M.; Caluwaerts, S.; van den Boogaard, W.; Manirampa, J.; Tayler-Smith, K.; Manzi, M.; Nanan-N’zeth, K.; Duchenne, B.; Ndelema, B.; Etienne, W.; Alders, P.; Veerman, R.; Van den Bergh, R.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives In a rural district hospital in Burundi offering Emergency Obstetric care-(EmOC), we assessed the a) characteristics of women at risk of, or with an obstetric complication and their types b) the number and type of obstetric surgical procedures and anaesthesia performed c) human resource cadres who performed surgery and anaesthesia and d) hospital exit outcomes. Methods A retrospective analysis of EmOC data (2011 and 2012). Results A total of 6084 women were referred for EmOC of whom 2534(42%) underwent a major surgical procedure while 1345(22%) required a minor procedure (36% women did not require any surgical procedure). All cases with uterine rupture(73) and extra-uterine pregnancy(10) and the majority with pre-uterine rupture and foetal distress required major surgery. The two most prevalent conditions requiring a minor surgical procedure were abortions (61%) and normal delivery (34%). A total of 2544 major procedures were performed on 2534 admitted individuals. Of these, 1650(65%) required spinal and 578(23%) required general anaesthesia; 2341(92%) procedures were performed by ‘general practitioners with surgical skills’ and in 2451(96%) cases, anaesthesia was provided by nurses. Of 2534 hospital admissions related to major procedures, 2467(97%) were discharged, 21(0.8%) were referred to tertiary care and 2(0.1%) died. Conclusion Overall, the obstetric surgical volume in rural Burundi is high with nearly six out of ten referrals requiring surgical intervention. Nonetheless, good quality care could be achieved by trained, non-specialist staff. The post-2015 development agenda needs to take this into consideration if it is to make progress towards reducing maternal mortality in Africa. PMID:28170398

  18. Recommendations for renovating an operating theater at an emergency obstetric care facility.

    PubMed

    Abreu, E; Potter, D

    2001-12-01

    The importance of emergency obstetric care (EmOC) in reducing maternal mortality has focused attention on both the skills of the clinicians to provide high quality care and on the health facilities in which the care is provided. Essential elements of EmOC include the capacity to perform cesarean sections for which an operating theater is needed. This article focuses on renovation of existing operating theaters to meet the necessary standards. While building, adding to, or renovating operating theaters can be expensive, this article emphasizes appropriate materials that are likely to be locally available and relatively inexpensive. The importance of proper maintenance is discussed.

  19. Emergency obstetric care availability: a critical assessment of the current indicator.

    PubMed

    Gabrysch, Sabine; Zanger, Philipp; Campbell, Oona M R

    2012-01-01

    Monitoring progress in reducing maternal and perinatal mortality requires suitable indicators. The density of emergency obstetric care (EmOC) facilities has been proposed as a potentially useful indicator, but different UN documents make inconsistent recommendations, and its current formulation is not associated with maternal mortality. We compiled recently published indicator benchmarks and distinguished three sources of inconsistency: (i) use of different denominator metrics (per birth and per population), (ii) different assumptions on need for EmOC and for EmOC facilities and (iii) failure to specify facility capacity (birth load). The UN guidelines and handbook require fewer EmOC facilities than the World Health Report 2005 and do not specify capacity for deliveries or staffing levels. We recommend (i) always using births as the denominator for EmOC facility density, (ii) clearly stating assumptions on the proportion of deliveries needing basic and comprehensive emergency obstetric care and the desired proportion of deliveries in EmOC facilities and (iii) specifying facility capacity and staffing and adapting benchmarks for settings with different population density to ensure geographical accessibility.

  20. Improving the availability of emergency obstetric care in conflict-affected settings.

    PubMed

    Krause, S K; Meyers, J L; Friedlander, E

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes an emergency obstetric care (EmOC) project implemented by the Reproductive Health Response in Conflict (RHRC) Consortium in 12 conflict-affected settings in nine countries from 2000-2005 with funding and technical support from Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health Averting Maternal Death and Disability (AMDD) programme. The overall goal of the project was to reduce maternal morbidity and mortality in select conflict-affected settings by improving the availability of EmOC. Another aim of the project was to institutionalize EmOC within RHRC Consortium agencies by modelling how to improve the availability of basic and comprehensive EmOC at clinics and hospitals. The specific project purpose was to increase the availability of EmOC in select conflict-affected settings. The project demonstrated that a great deal more can and should be done by humanitarian workers to improve the availability of basic and comprehensive emergency obstetric services in conflict-affected settings.

  1. Human resources and the quality of emergency obstetric care in developing countries: a systematic review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Dogba, Maman; Fournier, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    Background This paper reports on a systematic literature review exploring the importance of human resources in the quality of emergency obstetric care and thus in the reduction of maternal deaths. Methods A systematic search of two electronic databases (ISI Web of Science and MEDLINE) was conducted, based on the following key words "quality obstetric* care" OR "pregnancy complications OR emergency obstetric* care OR maternal mortality" AND "quality health care OR quality care" AND "developing countries. Relevant papers were analysed according to three customary components of emergency obstetric care: structure, process and results. Results This review leads to three main conclusions: (1) staff shortages are a major obstacle to providing good quality EmOC; (2) women are often dissatisfied with the care they receive during childbirth; and (3) the technical quality of EmOC has not been adequately studied. The first two conclusions provide lessons to consider when formulating EmOC policies, while the third point is an area where more knowledge is needed. PMID:19200353

  2. [Non elective cesarean section: use of a color code to optimize management of obstetric emergencies].

    PubMed

    Rudigoz, René-Charles; Huissoud, Cyril; Delecour, Lisa; Thevenet, Simone; Dupont, Corinne

    2014-06-01

    The medical team of the Croix Rousse teaching hospital maternity unit has developed, over the last ten years, a set of procedures designed to respond to various emergency situations necessitating Caesarean section. Using the Lucas classification, we have defined as precisely as possible the degree of urgency of Caesarian sections. We have established specific protocols for the implementation of urgent and very urgent Caesarean section and have chosen a simple means to convey the degree of urgency to all team members, namely a color code system (red, orange and green). We have set time goals from decision to delivery: 15 minutes for the red code and 30 minutes for the orange code. The results seem very positive: The frequency of urgent and very urgent Caesareans has fallen over time, from 6.1 % to 1.6% in 2013. The average time from decision to delivery is 11 minutes for code red Caesareans and 21 minutes for code orange Caesareans. These time goals are now achieved in 95% of cases. Organizational and anesthetic difficulties are the main causes of delays. The indications for red and orange code Caesarians are appropriate more than two times out of three. Perinatal outcomes are generally favorable, code red Caesarians being life-saving in 15% of cases. No increase in maternal complications has been observed. In sum: Each obstetric department should have its own protocols for handling urgent and very urgent Caesarean sections. Continuous monitoring of their implementation, relevance and results should be conducted Management of extreme urgency must be integrated into the management of patients with identified risks (scarred uterus and twin pregnancies for example), and also in structures without medical facilities (birthing centers). Obstetric teams must keep in mind that implementation of these protocols in no way dispenses with close monitoring of labour.

  3. Availability and use of emergency obstetric care services in four districts of West Bengal, India.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Akhil Bandhu; Das, Dilip Kumar; Misra, Raghunath; Roy, Rabindra Nath; Ghosh, Debdatta; Mitra, Kaninika

    2005-09-01

    Process indicators have been recommended for monitoring the availability and use of emergency obstetric care (EmOC) services. A health facility-based study was carried out in 2002 in four districts of West Bengal, India, to analyze these process indicators. Relevant records and registers for 2001 of all studied facilities in the districts were reviewed to collect data using a pre-designed schedule. The numbers of basic and comprehensive EmOC facilities were inadequate in all the four districts compared to the minimum acceptable level. Overall, 26.2% of estimated annual births took place in the EmOC facilities (ranged from 16.2% to 45.8% in 4 districts) against the required minimum of 15%. The rate of caesarean section calculated for all expected births in the population varied from 3.5% to 4.4% in the four districts with an overall rate of 4%, which is less than the minimum target of 5%. Only 29.9% of the estimated number of complications (which is 15% of all births) was managed in the EmOC facilities. The combined case-fatality rate in the basic/comprehensive EmOC facilities was 1.7%. Major obstetric complications contributed to 85.7% of maternal deaths, and pre-eclampsia/eclampsia was the most common cause. It can be concluded that all the process indicators, except proportion of deliveries in the EmOC facilities, were below the acceptable level. Certain priority measures, such as making facilities fully functional, effective referral and monitoring system, skill-based training, etc., are to be emphasized to improve the situation.

  4. Obstetric audit in resource-poor settings: lessons from a multi-country project auditing 'near miss' obstetrical emergencies.

    PubMed

    Filippi, Veronique; Brugha, Ruairi; Browne, Edmund; Gohou, Valerie; Bacci, Alberta; De Brouwere, Vincent; Sahel, Amina; Goufodji, Sourou; Alihonou, Eusebe; Ronsmans, Carine

    2004-01-01

    This paper outlines the practical steps involved in setting up and running multi-professional, in-depth case reviews of 'near miss' obstetrical complications. It draws on lessons learned in 12 referral hospitals in Benin, Côte d'Ivoire, Ghana and Morocco. A range of feasibility indicators are presented which measured the implementation and frequency of audit activities, the quality of participation, adherence to the planned protocol for the near-miss audits, the quality of audit discussions and the sustainability of the project. Although the principles of the audit approach were well accepted and implemented everywhere, near-miss audits appeared most successful in first referral level hospitals. Contextual factors that determine the successful implementation of near-miss audit include staff finding adequate time for audit activities, financial incentives to groups rather than individuals, involvement of senior staff and hospital managers, the ease of communication in smaller units, the employment of social workers for the incorporation of women's views at audits, and the strength of external support provided by the research team. The poor quality of information recorded in case notes was recognized everywhere as a deficiency, but did not present a major obstacle to effective case reviews. Ownership and leadership within the hospital, more easily achieved in the first-level referral hospitals, were probably the most important determinants of successful implementation. Sustainability requires a commitment to audit from policy makers and managers at higher levels of the health system and some devolution of resources for implementing recommendations.

  5. Availability and Quality of Emergency Obstetric and Newborn Care in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Wichaidit, Wit; Alam, Mahbub-Ul; Halder, Amal K; Unicomb, Leanne; Hamer, Davidson H; Ram, Pavani K

    2016-08-03

    Bangladesh's maternal mortality and neonatal mortality remain unacceptably high. We assessed the availability and quality of emergency obstetric care (EmOC) and emergency newborn care (EmNC) services at health facilities in Bangladesh. We randomly sampled 50 rural villages and 50 urban neighborhoods throughout Bangladesh and interviewed the director of eight and nine health facilities nearest to each sampled area. We categorized health facilities into different quality levels (high, moderate, low, and substandard) based on staffing, availability of a phone or ambulance, and signal functions (six categories for EmOC and four categories for EmNC). We interviewed the directors of 875 health facilities. Approximately 28% of health facilities did not have a skilled birth attendant on call 24 hours per day. The least commonly performed EmOC signal function was administration of anticonvulsants (67%). The quality of EmOC services was high in 33% and moderate in 52% of the health facilities. The least common EmNC signal function was kangaroo mother care (7%). The quality of EmNC was high in 2% and moderate in 33% of the health facilities. Approximately one-third of health facilities lack 24-hour availability of skilled birth attendants, increasing the risk of peripartum complications. Most health facilities offered moderate to high quality services for EmOC and low to substandard quality for EmNC.

  6. The emergence of a global right to health norm – the unresolved case of universal access to quality emergency obstetric care

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The global response to HIV suggests the potential of an emergent global right to health norm, embracing shared global responsibility for health, to assist policy communities in framing the obligations of the domestic state and the international community. Our research explores the extent to which this global right to health norm has influenced the global policy process around maternal health rights, with a focus on universal access to emergency obstetric care. Methods In examining the extent to which arguments stemming from a global right to health norm have been successful in advancing international policy on universal access to emergency obstetric care, we looked at the period from 1985 to 2013 period. We adopted a qualitative case study approach applying a process-tracing methodology using multiple data sources, including an extensive literature review and limited key informant interviews to analyse the international policy agenda setting process surrounding maternal health rights, focusing on emergency obstetric care. We applied John Kingdon's public policy agenda setting streams model to analyse our data. Results Kingdon’s model suggests that to succeed as a mobilising norm, the right to health could work if it can help bring the problem, policy and political streams together, as it did with access to AIDS treatment. Our analysis suggests that despite a normative grounding in the right to health, prioritisation of the specific maternal health entitlements remains fragmented. Conclusions Despite United Nations recognition of maternal mortality as a human rights issue, the relevant policy communities have not yet managed to shift the policy agenda to prioritise the global right to health norm of shared responsibility for realising access to emergency obstetric care. The experience of HIV advocates in pushing for global solutions based on right to health principles, including participation, solidarity and accountability; suggest potential avenues for

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging - A troubleshooter in obstetric emergencies: A pictorial review

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Rohini; Bajaj, Sunil Kumar; Kumar, Nishith; Chandra, Ranjan; Misra, Ritu Nair; Malik, Amita; Thukral, Brij Bhushan

    2016-01-01

    The application of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in pregnancy faced initial skepticism of physicians because of fetal safety concerns. The perceived fetal risk has been found to be unwarranted and of late, the modality has attained acceptability. Its role in diagnosing fetal anomalies is well recognized and following its safety certification in pregnancy, it is finding increasing utilization during pregnancy and puerperium. However, the use of MRI in maternal emergency obstetric conditions is relatively limited as it is still evolving. In early gestation, ectopic implantation is one of the major life-threatening conditions that are frequently encountered. Although ultrasound (USG) is the accepted mainstay modality, the diagnostic predicament persists in many cases. MRI has a role where USG is indeterminate, particularly in the extratubal ectopic pregnancy. Later in gestation, MRI can be a useful adjunct in placental disorders like previa, abruption, and adhesion. It is a good problem-solving tool in adnexal masses such as ovarian torsion and degenerated fibroid, which have a higher incidence during pregnancy. Catastrophic conditions like uterine rupture can also be preoperatively and timely diagnosed. MRI has a definite role to play in postpartum and post-abortion life-threatening conditions, e.g., retained products of conception, and gestational trophoblastic disease, especially when USG is inconclusive or inadequate. PMID:27081223

  8. Characteristics and mortality of neonates in an emergency obstetric and neonatal care facility, rural Burundi

    PubMed Central

    Van den Bergh, R.; Ndelema, B.; Bulckaert, D.; Manzi, M.; Lambert, V.; Zachariah, R.; Reid, A. J.; Harries, A. D.

    2013-01-01

    Setting: A Médecins Sans Frontières emergency obstetric and neonatal care facility specialising as a referral centre for three districts for women with complications during pregnancy or delivery in rural Burundi. Objective: To describe the characteristics and in-facility mortality rates of neonates born in 2011. Design: Descriptive study involving a retrospective review of routinely collected facility data. Results: Of 2285 women who delivered, the main complications were prolonged labour 331 (14%), arrested labour 238 (10%), previous uterine intervention 203 (9%), breech 171 (8%) and multiple gestations 150 (7%). There were 175 stillbirths and 2110 live neonates, of whom 515 (24%) were of low birth weight, 963 (46%) were delivered through caesarean section and 267 (13%) required active birth resuscitation. Overall, there were 102 (5%) neonatal deaths. A total of 453 (21%) neonates were admitted to dedicated neonatal special services for sick and low birth weight babies. A high proportion of these neonates were delivered by caesarean section and needed active birth resuscitation. Of 67 (15%) neonatal deaths in special services, 85% were due to conditions linked to low birth weight and birth asphyxia. Conclusion: Among neonates born to women with complications during pregnancy or delivery, in-facility deaths due to low birth weight and birth asphyxia were considerable. Sustained attention is needed to reduce these mortality rates. PMID:26393046

  9. What is the impact of multi-professional emergency obstetric and neonatal care training?

    PubMed

    Bergh, Anne-Marie; Baloyi, Shisana; Pattinson, Robert C

    2015-11-01

    This paper reviews evidence regarding change in health-care provider behaviour and maternal and neonatal outcomes as a result of emergency obstetric and neonatal care (EmONC) training. A refined version of the Kirkpatrick classification for programme evaluation was used to focus on change in efficiency and impact of training (levels 3 and 4). Twenty-three studies were reviewed - five randomised controlled trials, two quasi-experimental studies and 16 before-and-after observational studies. Training programmes had all been developed in high-income countries and adapted for use in low- and middle-income countries. Nine studies reported on behaviour change and 13 on process and patient outcomes. Most showed positive results. Every maternity unit should provide EmONC teamwork training, mandatory for all health-care providers. The challenges are as follows: scaling up such training to all institutions, sustaining regular in-service training, integrating training into institutional and health-system patient safety initiatives and 'thinking out of the box' in evaluation research.

  10. Status of emergency obstetric care in a local government area in south-south Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Mezie-Okoye, Margaret M; Adeniji, Foluke O; Tobin-West, Charles I; Babatunde, Seye

    2012-09-01

    This study assessed the status of the availability and performance of emergency obstetric care (EmOC) in 12 functional public health facilities out of the existing 19 in Gokana Local Government Area of Rivers State in south-south Nigeria, prior to the midwives service scheme (MSS) launch in 2009. No facility qualified as basic EmOC, while one had comprehensive EmOC status. Signal functions that required supply of medical consumables were performed by more facilities than services that required special training, equipment and maintenance. Only two facilities (16.67%) had the minimum requirement of > or =4 midwives for 24-hour EmOC service; while only 2.2% of expected births occurred at the facilities. The poor state of maternal health resources in the study area requires urgent interventions by Local and State Governments for infrastructure upgrade and deployment and training of staff towards attainment of MDG-5. A follow-up evaluation would be required since the commencement of the MSS.

  11. An examination of women experiencing obstetric complications requiring emergency care: perceptions and sociocultural consequences of caesarean sections in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Khan, Rasheda; Blum, Lauren S; Sultana, Marzia; Bilkis, Sayeda; Koblinsky, Marge

    2012-06-01

    Little is known about the physical and socioeconomic postpartum consequences of women who experience obstetric complications and require emergency obstetric care (EmOC), particularly in resource-poor countries such as Bangladesh where historically there has been a strong cultural preference for births at home. Recent increases in the use of skilled birth attendants show socioeconomic disparities in access to emergency obstetric services, highlighting the need to examine birthing preparation and perceptions of EmOC, including caesarean sections. Twenty women who delivered at a hospital and were identified by physicians as having severe obstetric complications during delivery or immediately thereafter were selected to participate in this qualitative study. Purposive sampling was used for selecting the women. The study was carried out in Matlab, Bangladesh, during March 2008-August 2009. Data-collection methods included in-depth interviews with women and, whenever possible, their family members. The results showed that the women were poorly informed before delivery about pregnancy-related complications and medical indications for emergency care. Barriers to care-seeking at emergency obstetric facilities and acceptance of lifesaving care were related to apprehensions about the physical consequences and social stigma, resulting from hospital procedures and financial concerns. The respondents held many misconceptions about caesarean sections and distrust regarding the reason for recommending the procedure by the healthcare providers. Women who had caesarean sections incurred high costs that led to economic burdens on family members, and the blame was attributed to the woman. The postpartum health consequences reported by the women were generally left untreated. The data underscore the importance of educating women and their families about pregnancy-related complications and preparing families for the possibility of caesarean section. At the same time, the health systems

  12. Alternative measures of spatial distribution and availability of health facilities for the delivery of emergency obstetric services in island communities.

    PubMed

    Oyerinde, Koyejo; Baravilala, Wame

    2014-12-01

    International guidelines and recommendations for availability and spatial distribution of emergency obstetric care services do not adequately address the challenges of providing emergency health services in island communities. The isolation and small population sizes that are typical of islands and remote populations limit the applicability of international guidelines in such communities. Universal access to emergency obstetric care services, when pregnant women encounter complications, is one of the three key strategies for reducing maternal and newborn mortality; the other two being family planning and skilled care during labor. The performance of selected lifesaving clinical interventions (signal functions) over a 3-month period is commonly used to assess and assign performance categories to health facilities but island communities might not have a large enough population to generate demand for all the signal functions over a 3-month period. Similarly, availability and spatial distribution recommendations are typically based on the size of catchment populations, but the populations of island communities tend to be sparsely distributed. With illustrations from six South Pacific Island states, we argue that the recommendation for availability of health facilities, that there should be at least five emergency obstetric care facilities (including at least one comprehensive facility) for every 500,000 population, and the recommendation for equitable distribution of health facilities, that all subnational areas meet the availability recommendation, can be substituted with a focus on access to blood transfusion and obstetric surgical care within 2 hours for all pregnant residents of islands. Island communities could replace the performance of signal functions over a 3-month period with a demonstrated capacity to perform signal functions if the need arises.

  13. Reducing maternal mortality: better monitoring, indicators and benchmarks needed to improve emergency obstetric care. Research summary for policymakers.

    PubMed

    Collender, Guy; Gabrysch, Sabine; Campbell, Oona M R

    2012-06-01

    Several limitations of emergency obstetric care (EmOC) indicators and benchmarks are analysed in this short paper, which synthesises recent research on this topic. A comparison between Sri Lanka and Zambia is used to highlight the inconsistencies and shortcomings in current methods of monitoring EmOC. Recommendations are made to improve the usefulness and accuracy of EmOC indicators and benchmarks in the future.

  14. Referrals between Public Sector Health Institutions for Women with Obstetric High Risk, Complications, or Emergencies in India - A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Singh, Samiksha; Doyle, Pat; Campbell, Oona M; Mathew, Manu; Murthy, G V S

    2016-01-01

    Emergency obstetric care (EmOC) within primary health care systems requires a linked referral system to be effective in reducing maternal death. This systematic review aimed to summarize evidence on the proportion of referrals between institutions during pregnancy and delivery, and the factors affecting referrals, in India. We searched 6 electronic databases, reviewed four regional databases and repositories, and relevant program reports from India published between 1994 and 2013. All types of study or reports (except editorials, comments and letters) which reported on institution-referrals (out-referral or in-referral) for obstetric care were included. Results were synthesized on the proportion and the reasons for referral, and factors affecting referrals. Of the 11,346 articles identified by the search, we included 232 articles in the full text review and extracted data from 16 studies that met our inclusion criteria Of the 16, one was RCT, seven intervention cohort (without controls), six cross-sectional, and three qualitative studies. Bias and quality of studies were reported. Between 25% and 52% of all pregnancies were referred from Sub-centres for antenatal high-risk, 14% to 36% from nurse run delivery or basic EmOC centres for complications or emergencies, and 2 to 7% were referred from doctor run basic EmOC centres for specialist care at comprehensive EmOC centres. Problems identified with referrals from peripheral health centres included low skills and confidence of staff, reluctance to induce labour, confusion over the clinical criteria for referral, non-uniform standards of care at referral institutions, a tendency to by-pass middle level institutions, a lack of referral communication and supervision, and poor compliance. The high proportion of referrals from peripheral health centers reflects the lack of appropriate clinical guidelines, processes, and skills for obstetric care and referral in India. This, combined with inadequate referral communication

  15. Health issues and the environment--an emerging paradigm for providers of obstetrical and gynaecological health care.

    PubMed

    Genuis, Stephen J

    2006-09-01

    Although ongoing study is required to winnow environmental ideology from scientific fact, existing evidence from recent research demonstrates a definitive link between chemical toxicants and potential health sequelae, including congenital affliction and gynaecological disorders. Amid media clamour of health risk and biological peril associated with various environmental toxicants, a spectrum of responses has emerged: some have embraced the environmental cause, some have summarily dismissed it as piffle and perhaps the majority has remained disinterested. Although journals devoted to toxicological and environmental health concerns have become prominent in academia with voluminous numbers of scientific reports being published, there has been limited exploration of the relationship between contemporary chemical exposure and reproductive medical issues in mainstream obstetrics and gynaecology literature. Providers of obstetrical and gynaecological health care need to acquire knowledge of taking an exposure history, instruction in details of precautionary avoidance, skills to provide preconception care and necessary tools to investigate and manage patients with toxicant exposure.

  16. Maternal mortality and its relationship to emergency obstetric care (EmOC) in a tertiary care hospital in South India

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the trends in maternal mortality ratio over 5 years at JIPMER Hospital and to find out the proportion of maternal deaths in relation to emergency admissions. Methods: A retrospective analysis of maternal deaths from 2008 to 2012 with respect to type of admission, referral and ICU care and cause of death according to WHO classification of maternal deaths. Results: Of the 104 maternal deaths 90% were emergency admissions and 59% of them were referrals. Thirty two percent of them died within 24 hours of admission. Forty four percent could be admitted to ICU and few patients could not get ICU bed. The trend in cause of death was increasing proportion of indirect causes from 2008 to 2012. Conclusion: The trend in MMR was increasing proportion of indirect deaths. Ninety percent of maternal deaths were emergency admissions with complications requiring ICU care. Hence comprehensive EmOC facilities should incorporate Obstetric ICU care. PMID:27512460

  17. Difficulties leaving home: a cross-sectional study of delays in seeking emergency obstetric care in Herat, Afghanistan.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Atsumi; Borchert, Matthias; Niksear, Homa; Alkozai, Ahmad Shah; Cox, Jonathan; Gardiner, Julian; Osmani, Khadija Ruina; Filippi, Véronique

    2011-10-01

    This study used an analytical cross-sectional design to identify risk factors associated with delays in care-seeking among women admitted in life-threatening conditions to a maternity hospital in Herat, Afghanistan, from February 2007 to January 2008. Disease-specific criteria of 'near-miss' were used to identify women in life-threatening conditions. Among 472 eligible women and their husbands, 411 paired interviews were conducted, and information on socio-demographic factors; the woman's status and social resources; the husband's social networks; health care accessibility and utilisation; care-seeking costs; and community characteristics were obtained. Decision and departure delays were assessed quantitatively from reported timings of symptom recognition, care-seeking decision, and departure for health facilities. Censored normal regression analyses suggest that although determinants of decision delay were influenced by the nature and symptoms of complications, uptake of antenatal care (ANC) and the birth plan reduced decision delay at the time of the obstetric emergency. Access to care and social networks reduced departure delay. Programmatic efforts may be directed towards exploiting the roles of ANC and social resources in facilitating access to emergency obstetric care.

  18. Getting women to hospital is not enough: a qualitative study of access to emergency obstetric care in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Pitchforth, E; van Teijlingen, E; Graham, W; Dixon‐Woods, M; Chowdhury, M

    2006-01-01

    Objective To explore what happened to poor women in Bangladesh once they reached a hospital providing comprehensive emergency obstetric care (EmOC) and to identify support mechanisms. Design Mixed methods qualitative study. Setting Large government medical college hospital in Bangladesh. Sample Providers and users of EmOC. Methods Ethnographic observation in obstetrics unit including interviews with staff and women using the unit and their carers. Results Women had to mobilise significant financial and social resources to fund out of pocket expenses. Poorer women faced greater challenges in receiving treatment as relatives were less able to raise the necessary cash. The official financial support mechanism was bureaucratic and largely unsuitable in emergency situations. Doctors operated a less formal “poor fund” system to help the poorest women. There was no formal assessment of poverty; rather, doctors made “adjudications” of women's need for support based on severity of condition and presence of friends and relatives. Limited resources led to a “wait and see” policy that meant women's condition could deteriorate before help was provided. Conclusions Greater consideration must be given to what happens at health facilities to ensure that (1) using EmOC does not further impoverish families; and (2) the ability to pay does not influence treatment. Developing alternative finance mechanisms to reduce the burden of out of pocket expenses is crucial but challenging. Increased investment in EmOC must be accompanied by an increased focus on equity. PMID:16751473

  19. Status of Emergency Obstetric Care in Six Developing Countries Five Years before the MDG Targets for Maternal and Newborn Health

    PubMed Central

    Ameh, Charles; Msuya, Sia; Hofman, Jan; Raven, Joanna; Mathai, Matthews; van den Broek, Nynke

    2012-01-01

    Background Ensuring women have access to good quality Emergency Obstetric Care (EOC) is a key strategy to reducing maternal and newborn deaths. Minimum coverage rates are expected to be 1 Comprehensive (CEOC) and 4 Basic EOC (BEOC) facilities per 500,000 population. Methods and Findings A cross-sectional survey of 378 health facilities was conducted in Kenya, Malawi, Sierra Leone, Nigeria, Bangladesh and India between 2009 and 2011. This included 160 facilities designated to provide CEOC and 218 designated to provide BEOC. Fewer than 1 in 4 facilities aiming to provide CEOC were able to offer the nine required signal functions of CEOC (23.1%) and only 2.3% of health facilities expected to provide BEOC provided all seven signal functions. The two signal functions least likely to be provided included assisted delivery (17.5%) and manual vacuum aspiration (42.3%). Population indicators were assessed for 31 districts (total population = 15.7 million). The total number of available facilities (283) designated to provide EOC for this population exceeded the number required (158) a ratio of 1.8. However, none of the districts assessed met minimum UN coverage rates for EOC. The population based Caesarean Section rate was estimated to be <2%, the maternal Case Fatality Rate (CFR) for obstetric complications ranged from 2.0–9.3% and still birth (SB) rates ranged from 1.9–6.8%. Conclusions Availability of EOC is well below minimum UN target coverage levels. Health facilities in the surveyed countries do not currently have the capacity to adequately respond to and manage women with obstetric complications. To achieve MDG 5 by 2015, there is a need to ensure that the full range of signal functions are available in health facilities designated to provide CEOC or BEOC and improve the quality of services provided so that CFR and SB rates decline. PMID:23236357

  20. [The importance of simulation in team training on obstetric emergencies: results of the first phase of the national plan for continuous medical training].

    PubMed

    Maio Matos, Francisco; Sousa Gomes, Andrea; Costa, Fernando Jorge; Santos Silva, Isabel; Carvalhas, Joana

    2012-01-01

    Obstetric emergencies are unexpected and random. The traditional model for medical training of these acute events has included lectures combined with sporadic clinical experiences, but this educational method has inherent limitations. Given the variety of manual skills that must be learned and high-risk environment, Obstetrics is uniquely suited for simulation. New technological educational tools provide an opportunity to learn and master technical skills needed in emergent situations as well as the opportunity to rehearse and learn from mistakes without risks to patients. The goals of this study are to assess which are the factors that trainees associate to human fallibility before and after clinical simulation based training; to compare the confidence level to solve emergent obstetric situations between interns and experts with up to 5 years of experience before and after training, and to determine the value that trainees give to simulation as a teaching tool on emergent events. 31 physicians participated at this course sessions. After the course, we verified changes in the factores that trainees associate to human fallibility, an increase in confidence level to solve emergent obstetric and an increase in the value that trainees give to simulation as a teaching tool.

  1. Using simulation to teach nursing students and licensed clinicians obstetric emergencies.

    PubMed

    Alderman, Jennifer Taylor

    2012-01-01

    Improving patient safety in healthcare has reached critical mass both in the United States and worldwide. Effective communication between nurses and other members of the healthcare team is an essential component of patient safety. In obstetrics, poor communication and teamwork were causative factors in many of reviewed sentinel event cases. Simulation is a recommended teaching strategy used to improve communication and teamwork skills, and therefore patient safety, among interprofessional team members. This article offers a strategy in the form of a shoulder dystocia simulation that can be implemented in either academic or clinical settings. Simulations such as this one can be used to enhance teamwork and communication skills of healthcare professionals, both in educational institutions and in clinical practice settings, with a goal of improving patient safety.

  2. [Validity of the modern fetal monitoring methods in the decision of emergency obstetric operations].

    PubMed

    Issel, E P; Bollmann, R; Prenzlau, P

    1975-01-01

    The validity of the modern methods of fetal monitoring to decide for the indication of urgent obstetric operations. The reliability of the modern supervision of the fetus is studied in cases of doubtful fetal heart action. Up to the present day we have no method for the exact estimation of the degree of a damage to the fetus. In such a precarious situation we should use all available methods for the diagnosis of the fetal condition, because the results of only one of the methods offer insufficient evidence. By means of the literature the alterations in the ECG of the dying fetus are interpreted in comparison to artefacts. In cases of doubtful fetal heart action we recommend in addition to the clinical findings to record the fetal ECG, to controll the actual fetal pH and attempt an investigation by ultrasonic.

  3. Laparoscopic Supracervical Hysterectomy Compared to Total Hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    De Paoli, Sania; Fasolino, Luigi; Fasolino, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to compare peri-operative results of laparoscopic supracervical hysterectomy (LSH) with those of laparoscopic total hysterectomy (TLH). Methods: A retrospective cohort study was conducted at the Department of Gynecology at a teaching hospital. A group of 157 patients who underwent TLH was compared with a group of 157 patients who underwent LSH with or without bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (BSO). Both groups had similar baseline characteristics and comparable surgical indications. Results: We reviewed our 7-year experience with laparoscopic hysterectomies performed at our department between October 2000 and November 2007. The similarities between patient characteristics were tested by using Wilcoxon Rank Sum Statistics. Patient and surgery characteristics as well as surgery outcomes were analyzed with descriptive statistics showing medians and 95% CIs. Women who underwent LSH had a shorter operation time compared with women in the TLH group (100 min vs. 110 min). Major complication rates were higher in the TLH group than in the LSH group (4.5% vs. 1.3%). Minor complication rates were 13.3% in the TLH group compared with 13.4% in the LSH group. Conclusions: Our data and experience provide specific information about the perioperative performance of LSH compared with TLH. In our experience, LSH proved to be a valid alternative to TLH in the absence of specific indications for TLH. Adequate counseling concerning the risk of cyclical bleeding and reoperation is mandatory. PMID:19793479

  4. An assessment of priority setting process and its implication on availability of emergency obstetric care services in Malindi District, Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Nyandieka, Lilian Nyamusi; Kombe, Yeri; Ng'ang'a, Zipporah; Byskov, Jens; Njeru, Mercy Karimi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction In spite of the critical role of Emergency Obstetric Care in treating complications arising from pregnancy and childbirth, very few facilities are equipped in Kenya to offer this service. In Malindi, availability of EmOC services does not meet the UN recommended levels of at least one comprehensive and four basic EmOC facilities per 500,000 populations. This study was conducted to assess priority setting process and its implication on availability, access and use of EmOC services at the district level. Methods A qualitative study was conducted both at health facility and community levels. Triangulation of data sources and methods was employed, where document reviews, in-depth interviews and focus group discussions were conducted with health personnel, facility committee members, stakeholders who offer and/ or support maternal health services and programmes; and the community members as end users. Data was thematically analysed. Results Limitations in the extent to which priorities in regard to maternal health services can be set at the district level were observed. The priority setting process was greatly restricted by guidelines and limited resources from the national level. Relevant stakeholders including community members are not involved in the priority setting process, thereby denying them the opportunity to contribute in the process. Conclusion The findings illuminate that consideration of all local plans in national planning and budgeting as well as the involvement of all relevant stakeholders in the priority setting exercise is essential in order to achieve a consensus on the provision of emergency obstetric care services among other health service priorities. PMID:26889337

  5. Successes and Challenges of Interprofessional Physiologic Birth and Obstetric Emergency Simulations in a Nurse-Midwifery Education Program.

    PubMed

    Shaw-Battista, Jenna; Belew, Cynthia; Anderson, Deborah; van Schaik, Sandrijn

    2015-01-01

    This article describes childbirth simulation design and implementation within the nurse-midwifery education program at the University of California, San Francisco. Nurse-midwife and obstetrician faculty coordinators were supported by faculty from multiple professions and specialties in curriculum review and simulation development and implementation. The primary goal of the resulting technology-enhanced simulations of normal physiologic birth and obstetric emergencies was to assist learners' development of interprofessional competencies related to communication, teamwork, and patient-centered care. Trainees included nurse-midwifery students; residents in obstetrics, pediatrics, and family medicine; medical students; and advanced practice nursing students in pediatrics. The diversity of participant types and learning levels provided benefits and presented challenges to effective scenario-based simulation design among numerous other theoretical and logistical considerations. This project revealed practical solutions informed by emerging health sciences and education research literature, faculty experience, and formal course evaluations by learners. Best practices in simulation development and implementation were incorporated, including curriculum revision grounded in needs assessment, case- and event-based clinical scenarios, optimization of fidelity, and ample time for participant debriefing. Adequate preparation and attention to detail increased the immersive experience and benefits of simulation. Suggestions for fidelity enhancement are provided with examples of simulation scenarios, a timeline for preparations, and discussion topics to facilitate meaningful learning by maternity and newborn care providers and trainees in clinical and academic settings. Pre- and postsimulation measurements of knowledge, skills, and attitudes are ongoing and not reported. This article is part of a special series of articles that address midwifery innovations in clinical practice

  6. Supracervical hysterectomy - the vaginal route.

    PubMed

    Wilczyński, Miłosz; Cieślak, Jarosław; Malinowski, Andrzej

    2014-06-01

    Removal of the cervix during hysterectomy is not mandatory. There has been no irrefutable evidence so far that total hysterectomy is more beneficial to patients in terms of pelvic organ function. The procedure that leaves the cervix intact is called a subtotal hysterectomy. Traditional approaches to this surgery include laparoscopic and abdominal routes. Vaginal total hysterectomy has been proven to present many advantages over the other approaches. Therefore, it seems that this route should also be applied in the case of subtotal hysterectomy. We present 9 cases of patients who underwent subtotal hysterectomy performed through the vagina for benign gynecological diseases.

  7. Tanzanian lessons in using non-physician clinicians to scale up comprehensive emergency obstetric care in remote and rural areas

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background With 15-30% met need for comprehensive emergency obstetrical care (CEmOC) and a 3% caesarean section rate, Tanzania needs to expand the number of facilities providing these services in more remote areas. Considering severe shortage of human resources for health in the country, currently operating at 32% of the required skilled workforce, an intensive three-month course was developed to train non-physician clinicians for remote health centres. Methods Competency-based curricula for assistant medical officers' (AMOs) training in CEmOC, and for nurses, midwives and clinical officers in anaesthesia and operation theatre etiquette were developed and implemented in Ifakara, Tanzania. The required key competencies were identified, taught and objectively assessed. The training involved hands-on sessions, lectures and discussions. Participants were purposely selected in teams from remote health centres where CEmOC services were planned. Monthly supportive supervision after graduation was carried out in the upgraded health centres Results A total of 43 care providers from 12 health centres located in 11 rural districts in Tanzania and 2 from Somalia were trained from June 2009 to April 2010. Of these 14 were AMOs trained in CEmOC and 31 nurse-midwives and clinical officers trained in anaesthesia. During training, participants performed 278 major obstetric surgeries, 141 manual removal of placenta and evacuation of incomplete and septic abortions, and 1161 anaesthetic procedures under supervision. The first 8 months after introduction of CEmOC services in 3 health centres resulted in 179 caesarean sections, a remarkable increase of institutional deliveries by up to 300%, decreased fresh stillbirth rate (OR: 0.4; 95% CI: 0.1-1.7) and reduced obstetric referrals (OR: 0.2; 95% CI: 0.1-0.4)). There were two maternal deaths, both arriving in a moribund condition. Conclusions Tanzanian AMOs, clinical officers, and nurse-midwives can be trained as a team, in a three

  8. Has Chiranjeevi Yojana changed the geographic availability of free comprehensive emergency obstetric care services in Gujarat, India?

    PubMed Central

    Vora, Kranti Suresh; Yasobant, Sandul; Patel, Amit; Upadhyay, Ashish; Mavalankar, Dileep V.

    2015-01-01

    Background The high rate of maternal mortality in India is of grave concern. Poor rural Indian women are most vulnerable to preventable maternal deaths primarily because they have limited availability of affordable emergency obstetric care (EmOC) within reasonable geographic proximity. Scarcity of obstetricians in the public sector combined with financial barriers to accessing private sector obstetrician services preclude this underserved population from availing lifesaving functions of comprehensive EmOC such as C-section. In order to overcome this limitation, Government of Gujarat initiated a unique public–private partnership program called Chiranjeevi Yojana (CY) in 2005. The program envisaged leveraging private sector providers to increase availability and thereby accessibility of EmOC care for vulnerable sections of society. Under CY, private sector providers render obstetric care services to poor women at no cost to patients. This paper examines the CY's effectiveness in improving availability of CEmOC services between 2006 and 2012 in three districts of Gujarat, India. Methods Primary data on facility locations, EmOC functionality, and obstetric bed availability were collected in the years 2012 and 2013 in three study districts. Secondary data from Census 2001 and 2011 were used along with required geographic information from Topo sheets and Google Earth maps. ArcGIS version 10 was used to analyze the availability of services using two-step floating catchment area (2SFCA) method. Results Our analysis suggests that the availability of CEmOC services within reasonable travel distance has greatly improved in all three study districts as a result of CY. We also show that the declining participation of the private sector did not result in an increase in distance to the nearest facility, but the extent of availability of providers for several villages was reduced. Spatial and temporal analyses in this paper provide a comprehensive understanding of trends in the

  9. Has Chiranjeevi Yojana changed the geographic availability of free comprehensive emergency obstetric care services in Gujarat, India?

    PubMed

    Vora, Kranti Suresh; Yasobant, Sandul; Patel, Amit; Upadhyay, Ashish; Mavalankar, Dileep V

    2015-01-01

    Background The high rate of maternal mortality in India is of grave concern. Poor rural Indian women are most vulnerable to preventable maternal deaths primarily because they have limited availability of affordable emergency obstetric care (EmOC) within reasonable geographic proximity. Scarcity of obstetricians in the public sector combined with financial barriers to accessing private sector obstetrician services preclude this underserved population from availing lifesaving functions of comprehensive EmOC such as C-section. In order to overcome this limitation, Government of Gujarat initiated a unique public-private partnership program called Chiranjeevi Yojana (CY) in 2005. The program envisaged leveraging private sector providers to increase availability and thereby accessibility of EmOC care for vulnerable sections of society. Under CY, private sector providers render obstetric care services to poor women at no cost to patients. This paper examines the CY's effectiveness in improving availability of CEmOC services between 2006 and 2012 in three districts of Gujarat, India. Methods Primary data on facility locations, EmOC functionality, and obstetric bed availability were collected in the years 2012 and 2013 in three study districts. Secondary data from Census 2001 and 2011 were used along with required geographic information from Topo sheets and Google Earth maps. ArcGIS version 10 was used to analyze the availability of services using two-step floating catchment area (2SFCA) method. Results Our analysis suggests that the availability of CEmOC services within reasonable travel distance has greatly improved in all three study districts as a result of CY. We also show that the declining participation of the private sector did not result in an increase in distance to the nearest facility, but the extent of availability of providers for several villages was reduced. Spatial and temporal analyses in this paper provide a comprehensive understanding of trends in the

  10. Obstetrical Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... Index A-Z Obstetric Ultrasound Obstetric ultrasound uses sound waves to produce pictures of a baby (embryo ... pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or ...

  11. Essential basic and emergency obstetric and newborn care: from education and training to service delivery and quality of care.

    PubMed

    Otolorin, Emmanuel; Gomez, Patricia; Currie, Sheena; Thapa, Kusum; Dao, Blami

    2015-06-01

    Approximately 15% of expected births worldwide will result in life-threatening complications during pregnancy, delivery, or the postpartum period. Providers skilled in emergency obstetric and newborn care (EmONC) services are essential, particularly in countries with a high burden of maternal and newborn mortality. Jhpiego and its consortia partners have implemented three global programs to build provider capacity to provide comprehensive EmONC services to women and newborns in these resource-poor settings. Providers have been educated to deliver high-impact maternal and newborn health interventions, such as prevention and treatment of postpartum hemorrhage and pre-eclampsia/eclampsia and management of birth asphyxia, within the broader context of quality health services. This article describes Jhpiego's programming efforts within the framework of the basic and expanded signal functions that serve as indicators of high-quality basic and emergency care services. Lessons learned include the importance of health facility strengthening, competency-based provider education, global leadership, and strong government ownership and coordination as essential precursors to scale-up of high impact evidence-based maternal and newborn interventions in low-resource settings.

  12. SYMPTEK homemade foam models for client education and emergency obstetric care skills training in low-resource settings.

    PubMed

    Deganus, Sylvia A

    2009-10-01

    Clinical training for health care workers using anatomical models and simulation has become an established norm. A major requirement for this approach is the availability of lifelike training models or simulators for skills practice. Manufactured sophisticated human models such as the resuscitation neonatal dolls, the Zoë gynaecologic simulator, and other pelvic models are very expensive, and are beyond the budgets of many training programs or activities in low-resource countries. Clinical training programs in many low-resource countries suffer greatly because of this cost limitation. Yet it is also in these same poor countries that the need for skilled human resources in reproductive health is greatest. The SYMPTEK homemade models were developed in response to the need for cheaper, more readily available humanistic models for training in emergency obstetric skills and also for client education. With minimal training, a variety of cheap SYMPTEK models can easily be made, by both trainees and facilitators, from high-density latex foam material commonly used for furnishings. The models are reusable, durable, portable, and easily maintained. The uses, advantages, disadvantages, and development of the SYMPTEK foam models are described in this article.

  13. Promoting cultural humility during labor and birth: putting theory into action during PRONTO obstetric and neonatal emergency training.

    PubMed

    Fahey, Jenifer O; Cohen, Susanna R; Holme, Francesca; Buttrick, Elizabeth S; Dettinger, Julia C; Kestler, Edgar; Walker, Dilys M

    2013-01-01

    Maternal and neonatal mortality in Northern Guatemala, a region with a high percentage of indigenous people, is disproportionately high. Initiatives to improve quality of care at local health facilities equipped for births, and increasing the number of births attended at these facilities will help address this problem. PRONTO (Programa de Rescate Obstétrico y Neonatal: Tratamiento Óptimo y Oportuno) is a low-tech, high-fidelity, simulation-based, provider-to-provider training in the management of obstetric and neonatal emergencies. This program has been successfully tested and implemented in Mexico. PRONTO will now be implemented in Guatemala as part of an initiative to decrease maternal and perinatal mortality. Guatemalan health authorities have requested that the training include training on cultural humility and humanized birth. This article describes the process of curricular adaptation to satisfy this request. The PRONTO team adapted the existing program through 4 steps: (a) analysis of the problem and context through a review of qualitative data and stakeholder interviews, (b) literature review and adoption of a theoretical framework regarding cultural humility and adult learning, (c) adaptation of the curriculum and design of new activities and simulations, and (d) implementation of adapted and expanded curriculum and further refinement in response to participant response.

  14. Quality of obstetric care in public-sector facilities and constraints to implementing emergency obstetric care services: evidence from high- and low-performing districts of Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Anwar, Iqbal; Kalim, Nahid; Koblinsky, Marge

    2009-04-01

    This study explored the quality of obstetric care in public-sector facilities and the constraints to programming comprehensive essential obstetric care (EOC) services in rural areas of Khulna and Sylhet divisions, relatively high- and low-performing areas of Bangladesh respectively. Quality was explored by physically inspecting all public-sector EOC facilities and the constraints through in-depth interviews with public-sector programme managers and service providers. Distribution of the functional EOC facilities satisfied the United Nation's minimum criteria of at least one comprehensive EOC and four basic EOC facilities for every 500,000 people in Khulna but not in Sylhet region. Human-resource constraints were the major barrier for maternal health. Sanctioned posts for nurses were inadequate in rural areas of both the divisions; however, deployment and retention of trained human resources were more problematic in rural areas of Sylhet. Other problems also plagued care, including unavailability of blood in rural settings and lack of use of evidence-based techniques. The overall quality of care was better in the EOC facilities of Khulna division than in Sylhet. 'Context' of care was also different in these two areas: the population in Sylhet is less literate, more conservative, and faces more geographical and sociocultural barriers in accessing services. As a consequence of both care delivered and the context, more normal vaginal and caesarian-section deliveries were carried out in the public-sector EOC facilities in the Khulna region, with the exception of the medical college hospitals. To improve maternal healthcare, there is a need for a human-resource plan that increases the number of posts in rural areas and ensures availability. All categories of maternal healthcare providers also need training on evidence-based techniques. While the centralized push system of management has its strengths, special strategies for improving the response in the low

  15. Skilled birth attendants in Tanzania: a descriptive study of cadres and emergency obstetric care signal functions performed.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Etsuko; Adegoke, Adetoro A; Masenga, Gileard; Fimbo, Janeth; Msuya, Sia E

    2015-01-01

    Although most developing countries monitor the proportion of births attended by skilled birth attendants (SBA), they lack information on the availability and performance of emergency obstetric care (EmOC) signal functions by different cadres of health care providers (HCPs). The World Health Organisation signal functions are set of key interventions that targets direct obstetric causes of maternal deaths. Seven signal functions are required for health facilities providing basic EmOC and nine for facilities providing comprehensive EmOC. Our objectives were to describe cadres of HCPs who are considered SBAs in Tanzania, the EmOC signal functions they perform and challenges associated with performance of EmOC signal functions. We conducted a cross-sectional study of HCPs offering maternity care services at eight health facilities in Moshi Urban District in northern Tanzania. A questionnaire and health facility assessment forms were used to collect information from participants and health facilities. A total of 199 HCPs working at eight health facilities in Moshi Urban District met the inclusion criteria. Out of 199, 158 participated, giving a response rate of 79.4 %. Ten cadres of HCPs were identified as conducting deliveries regardless of the level of health facilities. Most of the participants (81 %) considered themselves SBAs, although some were not considered SBAs by the Ministry of Health and Social Welfare (MOHSW). Only two out of the eight facilities provided all of the required EmOC signal functions. While Assistant Medical Officers are expected to perform all the signal functions, only 38 % and 13 % had performed vacuum extraction or caesarean sections respectively. Very few registered and enrolled nurse-midwives had performed removal of retained products (22 %) or assisted vaginal delivery (24 and 11 %). Inadequate equipment and supplies, and lack of knowledge and skills in performing EmOC were two main challenges identified by health care providers in all

  16. Limited Effectiveness of a Skills and Drills Intervention to Improve Emergency Obstetric and Newborn Care in Karnataka, India: A Proof-of-Concept Study

    PubMed Central

    Varghese, Beena; Krishnamurthy, Jayanna; Correia, Blaze; Panigrahi, Ruchika; Washington, Maryann; Ponnuswamy, Vinotha; Mony, Prem

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: The majority of the maternal and perinatal deaths are preventable through improved emergency obstetric and newborn care at facilities. However, the quality of such care in India has significant gaps in terms of provider skills and in their preparedness to handle emergencies. We tested the feasibility, acceptability, and effectiveness of a “skills and drills” intervention, implemented between July 2013 and September 2014, to improve emergency obstetric and newborn care in the state of Karnataka, India. Methods: Emergency drills through role play, conducted every 2 months, combined with supportive supervision and a 2-day skills refresher session were delivered across 4 sub-district, secondary-level government facilities by an external team of obstetric and pediatric specialists and nurses. We evaluated the intervention through a quasi-experimental design with 4 intervention and 4 comparison facilities, using delivery case sheet reviews, pre- and post-knowledge tests among providers, objective structured clinical examinations (OSCEs), and qualitative in-depth interviews. Primary outcomes consisted of improved diagnosis and management of selected maternal and newborn complications (postpartum hemorrhage, pregnancy-induced hypertension, and birth asphyxia). Secondary outcomes included knowledge and skill levels of providers and acceptability and feasibility of the intervention. Results: Knowledge scores among providers improved significantly in the intervention facilities; in obstetrics, average scores between the pre- and post-test increased from 49% to 57% (P=.006) and in newborn care, scores increased from 48% to 56% (P=.03). Knowledge scores in the comparison facilities were similar but did not improve significantly over time. Skill levels were significantly higher among providers in intervention facilities than comparison facilities (mean objective structured clinical examination scores for obstetric skills: 55% vs. 46%, respectively; for

  17. Referrals between Public Sector Health Institutions for Women with Obstetric High Risk, Complications, or Emergencies in India – A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Samiksha; Doyle, Pat; Campbell, Oona M.; Mathew, Manu; Murthy, G. V. S.

    2016-01-01

    Emergency obstetric care (EmOC) within primary health care systems requires a linked referral system to be effective in reducing maternal death. This systematic review aimed to summarize evidence on the proportion of referrals between institutions during pregnancy and delivery, and the factors affecting referrals, in India. We searched 6 electronic databases, reviewed four regional databases and repositories, and relevant program reports from India published between 1994 and 2013. All types of study or reports (except editorials, comments and letters) which reported on institution-referrals (out-referral or in-referral) for obstetric care were included. Results were synthesized on the proportion and the reasons for referral, and factors affecting referrals. Of the 11,346 articles identified by the search, we included 232 articles in the full text review and extracted data from 16 studies that met our inclusion criteria Of the 16, one was RCT, seven intervention cohort (without controls), six cross-sectional, and three qualitative studies. Bias and quality of studies were reported. Between 25% and 52% of all pregnancies were referred from Sub-centres for antenatal high-risk, 14% to 36% from nurse run delivery or basic EmOC centres for complications or emergencies, and 2 to 7% were referred from doctor run basic EmOC centres for specialist care at comprehensive EmOC centres. Problems identified with referrals from peripheral health centres included low skills and confidence of staff, reluctance to induce labour, confusion over the clinical criteria for referral, non-uniform standards of care at referral institutions, a tendency to by-pass middle level institutions, a lack of referral communication and supervision, and poor compliance. The high proportion of referrals from peripheral health centers reflects the lack of appropriate clinical guidelines, processes, and skills for obstetric care and referral in India. This, combined with inadequate referral communication

  18. Types of radical hysterectomies

    PubMed Central

    Marin, F; Plesca, M; Bordea, CI; Moga, MA; Blidaru, A

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The treatment for cervical cancer is a complex, multidisciplinary issue, which applies according to the stage of the disease. The surgical elective treatment of cervical cancer is represented by the radical abdominal hysterectomy. In time, many surgeons perfected this surgical technique; the ones who stood up for this idea were Thoma Ionescu and Ernst Wertheim. There are many varieties of radical hysterectomies performed by using the abdominal method and some of them through vaginal and mixed way. Each method employed has advantages and disadvantages. At present, there are three classifications of radical hysterectomies which are used for the simplification of the surgical protocols: Piver-Rutledge-Smith classification which is the oldest, GCG-EORTC classification and Querlow and Morrow classification. The last is the most evolved and recent classification; its techniques can be adapted for conservative operations and for different types of surgical approaches: abdominal, vaginal, laparoscopic or robotic. Abbreviations: GCG-EORTC = Gynecologic Cancer Group of the European Organization of Research and Treatment of Cancer; LEEP = loop electrosurgical excision procedure; I.O.B. = Institute of Oncology Bucharest; PRS = Piver-Rutledge-Smith PMID:25408722

  19. Availability and use of emergency obstetric care services in public hospitals in Laos PDR: a systems analysis.

    PubMed

    Douangphachanh, Xaysomphou; Ali, Moazzam; Outavong, Phathammavong; Alongkon, Phengsavanh; Sing, Menorath; Chushi, Kuroiwa

    2010-12-01

    The maternal mortality ratio in Laos in 2005 was 660 per 100,000 lives birth which was the third highest in Asia-Pacific Region. The objective was to determine the availability and use of emergency obstetric care (EmOC) in provincial and district hospitals in Borikhamxay, Khammouane, and Savannakhet provinces using UN guidelines. A hospital-based cross sectional survey was conducted from January to March 2008. All district (30) and provincial hospitals (3) from three provinces were included. Analysis was based on hospital records reflecting 12 months of facility data. Data indicates that only 14 hospitals (42.4%) were providing EmOC services, i.e., 9 basic, 5 comprehensive services. The proportion of births in EmOC facilities was only 11.2%, the met need was a very low 14.5%, and the cesarean section rate was only 0.9%. The case fatality rate in Borikhanxay province was 2.8%; in Khammouane and in Savannakhet provinces it was less than 1%. Record keeping at hospitals was poor. Signal functions provided in the last three months showed only 48.5% of the facilities performed assisted vaginal delivery. This is the first study in Lao PDR to assess EmOC services. Almost all the indicators were below the UN recommendations. Health planners must take evidence-based decisions to rectify and improve the situation in the hospitals regarding EmOC services. These data can therefore help government to assign and allocate budgets appropriately, and help policymakers and planners to identify systemic bottlenecks and prioritize solutions and will help in improving maternal health.

  20. Competence of health workers in emergency obstetric care: an assessment using clinical vignettes in Brong Ahafo region, Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Lohela, Terhi Johanna; Nesbitt, Robin Clark; Manu, Alexander; Vesel, Linda; Okyere, Eunice; Kirkwood, Betty; Gabrysch, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To assess health worker competence in emergency obstetric care using clinical vignettes, to link competence to availability of infrastructure in facilities, and to average annual delivery workload in facilities. Design Cross-sectional Health Facility Assessment linked to population-based surveillance data. Setting 7 districts in Brong Ahafo region, Ghana. Participants Most experienced delivery care providers in all 64 delivery facilities in the 7 districts. Primary outcome measures Health worker competence in clinical vignette actions by cadre of delivery care provider and by type of facility. Competence was also compared with availability of relevant drugs and equipment, and to average annual workload per skilled birth attendant. Results Vignette scores were moderate overall, and differed significantly by respondent cadre ranging from a median of 70% correct among doctors, via 55% among midwives, to 25% among other cadres such as health assistants and health extension workers (p<0.001). Competence varied significantly by facility type: hospital respondents, who were mainly doctors and midwives, achieved highest scores (70% correct) and clinic respondents scored lowest (45% correct). There was a lack of inexpensive key drugs and equipment to carry out vignette actions, and more often, lack of competence to use available items in clinical situations. The average annual workload was very unevenly distributed among facilities, ranging from 0 to 184 deliveries per skilled birth attendant, with higher workload associated with higher vignette scores. Conclusions Lack of competence might limit clinical practice even more than lack of relevant drugs and equipment. Cadres other than midwives and doctors might not be able to diagnose and manage delivery complications. Checking clinical competence through vignettes in addition to checklist items could contribute to a more comprehensive approach to evaluate quality of care. Trial registration number NCT00623337

  1. Obstetric life support.

    PubMed

    Puck, Andrea Lorraine; Oakeson, Ann Marie; Morales-Clark, Ana; Druzin, Maurice

    2012-01-01

    The death of a woman during pregnancy is devastating. Although the incidence of maternal cardiac arrest is increasing, it continues to be a comparatively rare event. Obstetric healthcare providers may go through their entire career without participating in a maternal cardiac resuscitation. Concern has been raised that when an arrest does occur in the obstetric unit, providers who are trained in life support skills at 2-year intervals are ill equipped to provide the best possible care. The quality of resuscitation skills provided during cardiopulmonary arrest of inpatients often may be poor, and knowledge of critical steps to be followed during resuscitation may not be retained after life support training. The Obstetric Life Support (ObLS) training program is a method of obstetric nursing and medical staff training that is relevant, comprehensive, and cost-effective. It takes into consideration both the care needs of the obstetric patient and the adult learning needs of providers. The ObLS program brings obstetric nurses, obstetricians, and anesthesiologists together in multidisciplinary team training that is crucial to developing efficient emergency response.

  2. The End of the Hysterectomy Epidemic and Endometrial Cancer Incidence: What Are the Unintended Consequences of Declining Hysterectomy Rates?

    PubMed Central

    Temkin, Sarah M.; Minasian, Lori; Noone, Anne-Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Population-level cancer incidence rates are one measure to estimate the cancer burden. The goal is to provide information on trends to measure progress against cancer at the population level and identify emerging patterns signifying increased risk for additional research and intervention. Endometrial cancer is the most common of the gynecologic malignancies but capturing the incidence of disease among women at risk (i.e., women with a uterus) is challenging and not routinely published. Decreasing rates of hysterectomy increase the number of women at risk for disease, which should be reflected in the denominator of the incidence rate calculation. Furthermore, hysterectomy rates vary within the United States by multiple factors including geographic location, race, and ethnicity. Changing rates of hysterectomy are important to consider when looking at endometrial cancer trends. By correcting for hysterectomy when calculating incidence rates of cancers of the uterine corpus, many of the disparities that have been assumed for this disease are diminished. PMID:27148481

  3. Potentially Avoidable Peripartum Hysterectomies in Denmark: A Population Based Clinical Audit

    PubMed Central

    Krebs, Lone; Langhoff-Roos, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Objective To audit the clinical management preceding peripartum hysterectomy and evaluate if peripartum hysterectomies are potentially avoidable and by which means. Material and Methods We developed a structured audit form based on explicit criteria for the minimal mandatory management of the specific types of pregnancy and delivery complications leading to peripartum hysterectomy. We evaluated medical records of the 50 Danish women with peripartum hysterectomy identified in the Nordic Obstetric Surveillance Study 2009–2012 and made short narratives of all cases. Results The most frequent indication for hysterectomy was hemorrhage. The two main initial causes were abnormally invasive placenta (26%) and lacerations (26%). Primary atony was third and occurred in 20%. Before hysterectomy another 26% had secondary atony following complications such as lacerations, retained placental tissue or coagulation defects. Of the 50 cases, 24% were assessed to be avoidable and 30% potentially avoidable. Hysterectomy following primary and secondary atony was assessed to be avoidable in 4/10 and 4/13 cases, respectively. Early sufficient suturing of lacerations and uterine ruptures, as well as a more widespread use of intrauterine balloons alone or in combination with uterine compression sutures (the sandwich model), could presumably have prevented about one fourth of the peripartum hysterectomies. Conclusion More than 50% of peripartum hysterectomies seem to be avoidable by simple measures. In order to minimize the number of unnecessary peripartum hysterectomies, obstetricians and anesthesiologists should investigate individual cases by structured clinical audit, and disseminate and discuss the results for educational purposes. An international collaboration is warranted to strengthen our recommendations and reveal if they are generally applicable. PMID:27560802

  4. Post-hysterectomy dyspareunia.

    PubMed

    Siedhoff, Matthew T; Carey, Erin T; Findley, Austin D; Hobbs, Kumari A; Moulder, Janelle K; Steege, John F

    2014-01-01

    When appropriately performed, hysterectomy most often contributes substantially to quality of life. Postoperative morbidity is minimal, in particular after minimally invasive surgery. In a minority of women, pain during intercourse is one of the more long-lasting sequelae of the procedure. Complete evaluation and treatment of this complication requires a thorough understanding of the status and function of neighboring organ systems and structures (urinary system, gastrointestinal tract, and pelvic and hip muscle groups). Successful resolution of dyspareunia often may be facilitated with review of the patient's previous degree of comfort during sex and the nature of her relationship with her partner. Repeat surgery is needed in a small minority of patients.

  5. Depression, anxiety, hostility and hysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Ewalds-Kvist, S Béatrice M; Hirvonen, Toivo; Kvist, Mårten; Lertola, Kaarlo; Niemelä, Pirkko

    2005-09-01

    Sixty-five women (aged 32 - 54 yrs) were assessed at 2 months before to 8 months after total abdominal hysterectomy on four separate occasions. Beck's Depression Inventory (BDI), Taylor's Manifest Anxiety Scale (TMAS), the Buss-Durkee Hostility Inventory (BDHI), Measurement of Masculinity-Femininity (MF), Likert scales and semantic differentials for psychological, somatic and sexual factors varied as assessment tools. High-dysphoric and low-dysphoric women were compared with regard to hysterectomy outcomes. Married nulliparae suffered from enhanced depression post-surgery. Pre-surgery anxiety, back pain and lack of dyspareunia contributed to post-surgery anxiety. Pre-surgery anxiety was related to life crises. Pre- and post-surgery hostility occurred in conjunction with poor sexual gratification. Post-hysterectomy health improved, but quality of sexual relationship was impaired. Partner support and knowledge counteracted hysterectomy aftermath. Post-hysterectomy symptoms constituted a continuum to pre-surgery signs of depression, anxiety or hostility.

  6. Safe total intrafascial laparoscopic (TAIL™) hysterectomy: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Hohl, Michael K.

    2010-01-01

    This study directly compares total intrafascial laparoscopic (TAIL™) hysterectomy with vaginal (VH) and abdominal (AH) hysterectomy with regard to safety, operating time and time of convalescence. The study is a prospective cohort study (Canadian Task Force classification II-2), including data from patients of a single university-affiliated teaching institution, admitted between 1997 and 2008 for hysterectomy due to benign uterus pathology. Patient data were collected pre-, intra- and postoperatively and complications documented using a standardised data sheet of a Swiss obstetric and gynaecological study group (Arbeitsgemeinschaft Schweizerische Frauenkliniken, Amlikon/Switzerland). Classification of complications (major complications and minor complications) for all three operation techniques, evaluation of surgeons and comparison of operation times and days of hospitalisation were analysed. 3066 patients were included in this study. 993 patients underwent AH, 642 VH and 1,431 total intrafascial hysterectomy. No statistically significant difference for the operation times comparing the three groups can be demonstrated. The mean hospital stay in the TAIL™ hysterectomy, VH and AH groups is 5.8 ± 2.4, 8.8 ± 4.0 and 10.4 ± 3.9 days, respectively. The postoperative minor complications including infection rates are low in the TAIL™ hysterectomy group (3.8%) when compared with either the AH group (15.3%) or the VH group (11.2%), respectively. The total of minor complications is statistically significant lower for TAIL™ hysterectomy as for AH (O.R. 4.52, CI 3.25–6.31) or VH (O.R. 3.16, CI 2.16–4.62). Major haemorrhage with consecutive reoperation is observed statistically significantly more frequent in the AH group when compared to the TAIL™ hysterectomy group, with an O.R. of 6.13 (CI 3.05–12.62). Overall, major intra- and postoperative complications occur significant more frequently in the AH group (8.6%) when compared to the VH group (3

  7. Elective cesarean hysterectomy for treatment of cervical neoplasia. An update.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, M S; Roberts, W S; Fiorica, J V; Angel, J L; Finan, M A; Cavanagh, D

    1993-03-01

    From January 1, 1979, to March 31, 1991, 37 patients underwent elective cesarean hysterectomy for early cervical neoplasia. Thirty-four patients had cervical intraepithelial neoplasia III, and three patients had stage IA-1 squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix. Twenty-eight were primary cesarean sections; nine had obstetric indications. The mean operative time was 128 minutes; mean estimated blood loss was 1,400 mL. One patient experienced an intraoperative hemorrhage (3,500 mL). There were no other recognized intraoperative complications. Four significant postoperative complications included a vaginal cuff abscess, a wound dehiscence and pelvic abscess, one patient with febrile morbidity and an ileus and ligation with partial transection of a ureter. Patients were discharged on a mean of postoperative day 5.7. Although significant complications occurred, we believe that the noncompliant nature of our patient population justifies elective cesarean hysterectomy for treatment of cervical neoplasia.

  8. Factors Contributing to Massive Blood Loss on Peripartum Hysterectomy for Abnormally Invasive Placenta: Who Bleeds More?

    PubMed Central

    Usui, Rie; Suzuki, Hirotada; Baba, Yosuke

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. To identify factors that determine blood loss during peripartum hysterectomy for abnormally invasive placenta (AIP-hysterectomy). Methods. We reviewed all of the medical charts of 11,919 deliveries in a single tertiary perinatal center. We examined characteristics of AIP-hysterectomy patients, with a single experienced obstetrician attending all AIP-hysterectomies and using the same technique. Results. AIP-hysterectomy was performed in 18 patients (0.15%: 18/11,919). Of the 18, 14 (78%) had a prior cesarean section (CS) history and the other 4 (22%) were primiparous women. Planned AIP-hysterectomy was performed in 12/18 (67%), with the remaining 6 (33%) undergoing emergent AIP-hysterectomy. Of the 6, 4 (4/6: 67%) patients were primiparous women. An intra-arterial balloon was inserted in 9/18 (50%). Women with the following three factors significantly bled less in AIP-hysterectomy than its counterpart: the employment of an intra-arterial balloon (4,448 ± 1,948 versus 8,861 ± 3,988 mL), planned hysterectomy (5,003 ± 2,057 versus 9,957 ± 4,485 mL), and prior CS (5,706 ± 2,727 versus 9,975 ± 5,532 mL). Patients with prior CS (−) bled more: this may be because these patients tended to undergo emergent surgery or attempted placental separation. Conclusion. Patients with intra-arterial balloon catheter insertion bled less on AIP-hysterectomy. Massive bleeding occurred in emergent AIP-hysterectomy without prior CS. PMID:27630716

  9. Preoperative teaching and hysterectomy outcomes.

    PubMed

    Oetker-Black, Sharon L; Jones, Susan; Estok, Patricia; Ryan, Marian; Gale, Nancy; Parker, Carla

    2003-06-01

    This study used a theoretical model to determine whether an efficacy-enhancing teaching protocol was effective in improving immediate postoperative behaviors and selected short- and long-term health outcomes in women who underwent abdominal hysterectomies. The model used was the self-efficacy theory of Albert Bandura, PhD. One hundred eight patients in a 486-bed teaching hospital in the Midwest who underwent hysterectomies participated. The participation rate was 85%, and the attrition rate was 17% during the six-month study. The major finding was that participants in the efficacy-enhancing teaching group ambulated significantly longer than participants in the usual care group. This is an important finding because the most prevalent postoperative complications after hysterectomy are atelectasis, pneumonia, paralytic ileus, and deep vein thrombosis, and postoperative ambulation has been shown to decrease or prevent all of these complications. This finding could affect the overall health status of women undergoing hysterectomies.

  10. Knowledge and Skills of Healthcare Providers in Sub-Saharan Africa and Asia before and after Competency-Based Training in Emergency Obstetric and Early Newborn Care

    PubMed Central

    Ameh, Charles A.; Kerr, Robert; Madaj, Barbara; Mdegela, Mselenge; Kana, Terry; Jones, Susan; Lambert, Jaki; Dickinson, Fiona; White, Sarah; van den Broek, Nynke

    2016-01-01

    Background Healthcare provider training in Emergency Obstetric and Newborn Care (EmOC&NC) is a component of 65% of intervention programs aimed at reducing maternal and newborn mortality and morbidity. It is important to evaluate the effectiveness of this. Methods We evaluated knowledge and skills among 5,939 healthcare providers before and after 3–5 days ‘skills and drills’ training in emergency obstetric and newborn care (EmOC&NC) conducted in 7 sub-Saharan Africa countries (Ghana, Kenya, Malawi, Nigeria, Sierra Leone, Tanzania, Zimbabwe) and 2 Asian countries (Bangladesh, Pakistan). Standardised assessments using multiple choice questions and objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) were used to measure change in knowledge and skills and the Improvement Ratio (IR) by cadre and by country. Linear regression was performed to identify variables associated with pre-training score and IR. Results 99.7% of healthcare providers improved their overall score with a median (IQR) increase of 10.0% (5.0% - 15.0%) for knowledge and 28.8% (23.1% - 35.1%) for skill. There were significant improvements in knowledge and skills for each cadre of healthcare provider and for each country (p<0.05). The mean IR was 56% for doctors, 50% for mid-level staff and nurse-midwives and 38% for nursing-aides. A teaching job, previous in-service training, and higher percentage of work-time spent providing maternity care were each associated with a higher pre-training score. Those with more than 11 years of experience in obstetrics had the lowest scores prior to training, with mean IRs 1.4% lower than for those with no more than 2 years of experience. The largest IR was for recognition and management of obstetric haemorrhage (49–70%) and the smallest for recognition and management of obstructed labour and use of the partograph (6–15%). Conclusions Short in-service EmOC&NC training was associated with improved knowledge and skills for all cadres of healthcare providers working

  11. Turkish hysterectomy and mastectomy patients - depression, body image, sexual problems and spouse relationships.

    PubMed

    Keskin, Gulseren; Gumus, Aysun Babacan

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare hysterectomy and mastectomy patients in terms of depression, body image, sexual problems and spouse relations. The study group comprised 94 patients being treated in Ege University Radiation Oncology Clinic, Tulay Aktas Oncology Hospital, Izmir Aegean Obstetrics and Gynecology Training and Research Hospital for breast and gynecological cancer (42 patients underwent mastectomy, 52 patient underwent hysterectomy). Five scales were used in the study: Sociodemographic Data Form, Beck Depression Scale, Body Image Scale, Dyadic Adjustment Scale, Golombok Rust Sexual Functions Scale. Mastectomy patients were more depressive than hysterectomy patients (t = 2.78, p < 0.01). Body image levels of the patients were bad but there was no significant difference between the two patient groups (p > 0.05). Hysterectomy patients had more problems in terms of vaginismus (t = 2.32, p < 0.05), avoidance of sexual intercourse (t = 2.31, p < 0.05), communication (t = 2.06, p < 0.05), and frequency of sexual intercourse than mastectomy patients (t = 2.10, p < 0.05). As compared with compliance levels between patients and spouses; hysterectomy patients had more problems related to expression of emotions than mastectomy patients (t = 2.12, p < 0.05). In conclusion, body image was negative, mastectomy was associated with more depression and hysterectomy with greater sexual problems and difficulties with spouse relationships.

  12. Concurrent puerperal hysterectomy with Ascaris lumbricoides infestation: coincidence or consequence?

    PubMed

    Zapardiel, Ignacio; Peiretti, Michele; Godoy-Tundidor, Sonia

    2010-04-01

    The most common etiology of postpartum hemorrhage is uterine atony, although hematologic disorders may be present. A 36-year-old nulliparous woman underwent puerperal hysterectomy caused by uncontrolled postpartum hemorrhage. One day after discharge, she vomited in the emergency room a 24-cm long Ascaris lumbricoides. Infestation during gestation may cause hematologic disorders that could complicate pregnancy outcome.

  13. Transthoracic echocardiography in obstetric anaesthesia and obstetric critical illness.

    PubMed

    Dennis, A T

    2011-04-01

    Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) is a powerful non-invasive diagnostic, monitoring and measurement device in medicine. In addition to cardiologists, many other specialised groups, including emergency and critical care physicians and cardiac anaesthetists, have recognised its ability to provide high quality information and utilise TTE in the care of their patients. In obstetric anaesthesia and management of obstetric critical illness, the favourable characteristics of pregnant women facilitate TTE examination. These include anterior and left lateral displacement of the heart, frequent employment of the left lateral tilted position to avoid aortocaval compression, spontaneous ventilation and wide acceptance of ultrasound technology by women. Of relevance to obstetric anaesthetists is that maternal morbidity and mortality due to cardiovascular disease is significant worldwide. This makes TTE an appropriate, important and applicable device in pregnant women. Clinician-performed TTE enables differentiation between the life-threatening causes of hypotension. In the critically ill woman this improves diagnostic accuracy and allows treatment interventions to be instituted and monitored at the point of patient care. This article outlines the application of TTE in the specialty of obstetric anaesthesia and in the management of obstetric critical illness. It describes the importance of TTE education, quality assurance and outcome recording. It also discusses how barriers to the routine implementation of TTE in obstetric anaesthesia and management of obstetric critical illness can be overcome.

  14. Pap Smear: Still Necessary After Hysterectomy?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pap tests still needed after removal of the uterus (hysterectomy)? Answers from Sandhya Pruthi, M.D. It ... If you had a partial hysterectomy — when the uterus is removed but the lower end of the ...

  15. Indications and Route of Hysterectomy for Benign Diseases. Guideline of the DGGG, OEGGG and SGGG (S3 Level, AWMF Registry No. 015/070, April 2015)

    PubMed Central

    Neis, K. J.; Zubke, W.; Römer, T.; Schwerdtfeger, K.; Schollmeyer, T.; Rimbach, S.; Holthaus, B.; Solomayer, E.; Bojahr, B.; Neis, F.; Reisenauer, C.; Gabriel, B.; Dieterich, H.; Runnenbaum, I. B.; Kleine, W.; Strauss, A.; Menton, M.; Mylonas, I.; David, M.; Horn, L-C.; Schmidt, D.; Gaß, P.; Teichmann, A. T.; Brandner, P.; Stummvoll, W.; Kuhn, A.; Müller, M.; Fehr, M.; Tamussino, K.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Official guideline “indications and methods of hysterectomy” to assign indications for the different methods published and coordinated by the German Society of Gynecology and Obstetrics (DGGG), the Austrian Society of Gynecology and Obstetrics (OEGGG) and the Swiss Society of Gynecology and Obstetrics (SGGG). Besides vaginal and abdominal hysterectomy, three additional techniques have been implemented due to the introduction of laparoscopy. Organ-sparing alternatives were also integrated. Methods: The guideline group consisted of 26 experts from Germany, Austria and Switzerland. Recommendations were developed using a structured consensus process and independent moderation. A systematic literature search and quality appraisal of benefits and harms of the therapeutic alternatives for symptomatic fibroids, dysfunctional bleeding and adenomyosis was done through MEDLINE up to 6/2014 focusing on systematic reviews and meta-analysis. Results: All types of hysterectomy led in studies to high rates of patient satisfaction. If possible, vaginal instead of abdominal hysterectomy should preferably be done. If a vaginal hysterectomy is not feasible, the possibility of a laparoscopic hysterectomy should be considered. An abdominal hysterectomy should only be done with a special indication. Organ-sparing interventions also led to high patient satisfaction rates, but contain the risk of symptom recurrence. Conclusion: As an aim, patients should be enabled to choose that therapeutic intervention for their benign disease of the uterus that convenes best to them and their personal life situation. PMID:27667852

  16. Women-focused development intervention reduces delays in accessing emergency obstetric care in urban slums in Bangladesh: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Recognizing the burden of maternal mortality in urban slums, in 2007 BRAC (formally known as Bangladesh Rural Advancement Committee) has established a woman-focused development intervention, Manoshi (the Bangla abbreviation of mother, neonate and child), in urban slums of Bangladesh. The intervention emphasizes strengthening the continuum of maternal, newborn and child care through community, delivery centre (DC) and timely referral of the obstetric complications to the emergency obstetric care (EmOC) facilities. This study aimed to assess whether Manoshi DCs reduces delays in accessing EmOC. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted during October 2008 to January 2009 in the slums of Dhaka city among 450 obstetric complicated cases referred either from DCs of Manoshi or from their home to the EmOC facilities. Trained female interviewers interviewed at their homestead with structured questionnaire. Pearson's chi-square test, t-test and Mann-Whitney test were performed. Results The median time for making the decision to seek care was significantly longer among women who were referred from home than referred from DCs (9.7 hours vs. 5.0 hours, p < 0.001). The median time to reach a facility and to receive treatment was found to be similar in both groups. Time taken to decide to seek care was significantly shorter in the case of life-threatening complications among those who were referred from DC than home (0.9 hours vs.2.3 hours, p = 0.002). Financial assistance from Manoshi significantly reduced the first delay in accessing EmOC services for life-threatening complications referred from DC (p = 0.006). Reasons for first delay include fear of medical intervention, inability to judge maternal condition, traditional beliefs and financial constraints. Role of gender was found to be an important issue in decision making. First delay was significantly higher among elderly women, multiparity, non life-threatening complications and who were not involved in

  17. Impact of a low-technology simulation-based obstetric and newborn care training scheme on non-emergency delivery practices in Guatemala

    PubMed Central

    Walton, Anna; Kestler, Edgar; Dettinger, Julia C.; Zelek, Sarah; Holme, Francesca; Walker, Dilys

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the effect of a low-technology simulation-based training scheme for obstetric and perinatal emergency management (PRONTO; Programa de Rescate Obstétrico y Neonatal: Tratamiento Óptimo y Oportuno) on non-emergency delivery practices at primary level clinics in Guatemala. Methods A paired cross-sectional birth observation study was conducted with a convenience sample of 18 clinics (nine pairs of intervention and control clinics) from June 28 to August 7, 2013. Outcomes included implementation of practices known to decrease maternal and/or neonatal mortality and improve patient care. Results Overall, 25 and 17 births occurred in intervention and control clinics, respectively. Active management of the third stage of labor was appropriately performed by 20 (83%) of 24 intervention teams versus 7 (50%) of 14 control teams (P = 0.015). Intervention teams implemented more practices to decrease neonatal mortality than did control teams (P < 0.001). Intervention teams ensured patient privacy in 23 (92%) of 25 births versus 11 (65%) of 17 births for control teams (P = 0.014). All 15 applicable intervention teams kept patients informed versus 6 (55%) of 11 control teams (P = 0.001). Differences were also noted in teamwork; in particular, skill-based tools were used more often at intervention sites than control sites (P = 0.012). Conclusion Use of PRONTO enhanced non-emergency delivery care by increasing evidence-based practice, patient-centered care, and teamwork. PMID:26797198

  18. Massive obstetric hemorrhage: Current approach to management.

    PubMed

    Guasch, E; Gilsanz, F

    2016-01-01

    Massive obstetric hemorrhage is a major cause of maternal mortality and morbidity worldwide. It is defined (among others) as the loss of>2,500ml of blood, and is associated to a need for admission to critical care and/or hysterectomy. The relative hemodilution and high cardiac output found in normal pregnancy allows substantial bleeding before a drop in hemoglobin and/or hematocrit can be identified. Some comorbidities associated with pregnancy can contribute to the occurrence of catastrophic bleeding with consumption coagulopathy, which makes the situation even worse. Optimization, preparation, rational use of resources and protocolization of actions are often useful to improve outcomes in patients with postpartum hemorrhage. Using massive obstetric hemorrhage protocols is useful for facilitating rapid transfusion if needed, and can also be cost-effective. If hypofibrinogenemia during the bleeding episode is identified, early fibrinogen administration can be very useful. Other coagulation factors in addition to fibrinogen may be necessary during postpartum hemorrhage replacement measures in order to effectively correct coagulopathy. A hysterectomy is recommended if the medical and surgical measures prove ineffective.

  19. Assessing emergency obstetric care provision in low- and middle-income countries: a systematic review of the application of global guidelines.

    PubMed

    Banke-Thomas, Aduragbemi; Wright, Kikelomo; Sonoiki, Olatunji; Banke-Thomas, Oluwasola; Ajayi, Babatunde; Ilozumba, Onaedo; Akinola, Oluwarotimi

    2016-01-01

    Background Lack of timely and quality emergency obstetric care (EmOC) has contributed significantly to maternal morbidity and mortality, particularly in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Since 2009, the global guideline, referred to as the 'handbook', has been used to monitor availability, utilization, and quality of EmOC. Objective To assess application and explore experiences of researchers in LMICs in assessing EmOC. Design Multiple databases of peer-reviewed literature were systematically reviewed on EmOC assessments in LMICs, since 2009. Following set criteria, we included articles, assessed for quality based on a newly developed checklist, and extracted data using a pre-designed extraction tool. We used thematic summaries to condense our findings and mapped patterns that we observed. To analyze experiences and recommendations for improved EmOC assessments, we took a deductive approach for the framework synthesis. Results Twenty-seven studies met our inclusion criteria, with 17 judged as high quality. The highest publication frequency was observed in 2015. Most assessments were conducted in Nigeria and Tanzania (four studies each) and Bangladesh and Ghana (three each). Most studies (17) were done at subnational levels with 23 studies using the 'handbook' alone, whereas the others combined the 'handbook' with other frameworks. Seventeen studies conducted facility-based surveys, whereas others used mixed methods. For different reasons, intrapartum and very early neonatal death rate and proportion of deaths due to indirect causes in EmOC facilities were the least reported indicators. Key emerging themes indicate that data quality for EmOC assessments can be improved, indicators should be refined, a holistic approach is required for EmOC assessments, and assessments should be conducted as routine processes. Conclusions There is clear justification to review how EmOC assessments are being conducted. Synergy between researchers, EmOC program managers, and

  20. Predictors and outcome of obstetric admissions to intensive care unit: A comparative study.

    PubMed

    Jain, Shruti; Guleria, Kiran; Vaid, Neelam B; Suneja, Amita; Ahuja, Sharmila

    2016-01-01

    This descriptive observational study was carried out in Guru Teg Bahadur Hospital to identify predictors and outcome of obstetric admission to Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Ninety consecutive pregnant patients or those up to 42 days of termination of pregnancy admitted to ICU from October 2010 to December 2011 were enrolled as study subjects with selection of a suitable comparison group. Qualitative statistics of both groups were compared using Pearson's Chi-square test and Fisher's exact test. Odds ratio was calculated for significant factors. Low socioeconomic status, duration of complaints more than 12 h, delay at intermediary facility, and peripartum hysterectomy increased probability of admission to ICU. High incidence of obstetric admissions to ICU as compared to other countries stresses on need for separate obstetric ICU. Availability of high dependency unit can decrease preload to ICU by 5%. Patients with hemorrhagic disorders and those undergoing peripartum hysterectomy need more intensive care.

  1. The Role of Interventional Radiology in Obstetric Hemorrhage

    SciTech Connect

    Gonsalves, M. Belli, A.

    2010-10-15

    Obstetric hemorrhage remains a major cause of maternal morbidity and mortality worldwide. Traditionally, in cases of obstetric hemorrhage refractory to conservative treatment, obstetricians have resorted to major surgery with the associated risks of general anesthesia, laparotomy, and, in the case of hysterectomy, loss of fertility. Over the past two decades, the role of pelvic arterial embolization has evolved from a novel treatment option to playing a key role in the management of obstetric hemorrhage. To date, interventional radiology offers a minimally invasive, fertility-preserving alternative to conventional surgical treatment. We review current literature regarding the role of interventional radiology in postpartum hemorrhage, abnormal placentation, abortion, and cervical ectopic pregnancy. We discuss techniques, success rates, and complications.

  2. Improved accessibility of emergency obstetrics and newborn care(EmONC) services for maternal and newborn health: a community based project

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Every year an estimated three million neonates die globally and two hundred thousand of these deaths occur in Pakistan. Majority of these neonates die in rural areas of underdeveloped countries from preventable causes (infections, complications related to low birth weight and prematurity). Similarly about three hundred thousand mother died in 2010 and Pakistan is among ten countries where sixty percent burden of these deaths is concentrated. Maternal and neonatal mortality remain to be unacceptably high in Pakistan especially in rural areas where more than half of births occur. Method/Design This community based cluster randomized controlled trial will evaluate the impact of an Emergency Obstetric and Newborn Care (EmONC) package in the intervention arm compared to standard of care in control arm. Perinatal and neonatal mortality are primary outcome measure for this trial. The trial will be implemented in 20 clusters (Union councils) of District Rahimyar Khan, Pakistan. The EmONC package consists of provision of maternal and neonatal health pack (clean delivery kit, emollient, chlorhexidine) for safe motherhood and newborn wellbeing and training of community level and facility based health care providers with emphasis on referral of complicated cases to nearest public health facilities and community mobilization. Discussion Even though there is substantial evidence in support of effectiveness of various health interventions for improving maternal, neonatal and child health. Reduction in perinatal and neonatal mortality remains a big challenge in resource constrained and diverse countries like Pakistan and achieving MDG 4 and 5 appears to be a distant reality. A comprehensive package of community based low cost interventions along the continuum of care tailored according to the socio cultural environment coupled with existing health force capacity building may result in improving the maternal and neonatal outcomes. The findings of this proposed community

  3. Biosocial determinants of hysterectomy in New Zealand.

    PubMed Central

    Dharmalingam, A; Pool, I; Dickson, J

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study examined the prevalence and biosocial correlates of hysterectomy. METHODS: Data were from a 1995 national survey of women aged 20 to 59 years. We applied piecewise nonparametric exponential hazards models to a subsample aged 25 to 59 to estimate the effects of biosocial correlates on hysterectomy likelihood. RESULTS: Risks of hysterectomy for 1991 through 1995 were lower than those before 1981. University-educated and professional women were less likely to undergo hysterectomy. Higher parity and intrauterine device side effects increased the risk. CONCLUSIONS: This study confirms international results, especially those on education and occupation, but also points to ethnicity's mediating role. Education and occupation covary independently with hysterectomy. Analysis of time variance and periodicity showed declines in likelihood from 1981. PMID:10983207

  4. Assessing emergency obstetric care provision in low- and middle-income countries: a systematic review of the application of global guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Banke-Thomas, Aduragbemi; Wright, Kikelomo; Sonoiki, Olatunji; Banke-Thomas, Oluwasola; Ajayi, Babatunde; Ilozumba, Onaedo; Akinola, Oluwarotimi

    2016-01-01

    Background Lack of timely and quality emergency obstetric care (EmOC) has contributed significantly to maternal morbidity and mortality, particularly in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Since 2009, the global guideline, referred to as the ‘handbook’, has been used to monitor availability, utilization, and quality of EmOC. Objective To assess application and explore experiences of researchers in LMICs in assessing EmOC. Design Multiple databases of peer-reviewed literature were systematically reviewed on EmOC assessments in LMICs, since 2009. Following set criteria, we included articles, assessed for quality based on a newly developed checklist, and extracted data using a pre-designed extraction tool. We used thematic summaries to condense our findings and mapped patterns that we observed. To analyze experiences and recommendations for improved EmOC assessments, we took a deductive approach for the framework synthesis. Results Twenty-seven studies met our inclusion criteria, with 17 judged as high quality. The highest publication frequency was observed in 2015. Most assessments were conducted in Nigeria and Tanzania (four studies each) and Bangladesh and Ghana (three each). Most studies (17) were done at subnational levels with 23 studies using the ‘handbook’ alone, whereas the others combined the ‘handbook’ with other frameworks. Seventeen studies conducted facility-based surveys, whereas others used mixed methods. For different reasons, intrapartum and very early neonatal death rate and proportion of deaths due to indirect causes in EmOC facilities were the least reported indicators. Key emerging themes indicate that data quality for EmOC assessments can be improved, indicators should be refined, a holistic approach is required for EmOC assessments, and assessments should be conducted as routine processes. Conclusions There is clear justification to review how EmOC assessments are being conducted. Synergy between researchers, EmOC program

  5. Elective cesarean hysterectomy vs elective cesarean section followed by remote hysterectomy: reassessing the risks.

    PubMed

    Bost; Rising; Bost

    1998-07-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to compare the risks of elective cesarean hysterectomy with the risks of elective cesarean section followed by remote hysterectomy.Methods: A census of elective cesarean hysterectomies (n = 31) and a random sample of 200 cesarean sections and 200 hysterectomies performed by the authors between 1987 and 1996 were evaluated. Only elective repeat and primary cesarean section patients without labor were selected for study (n = 86). Total abdominal hysterectomies were drawn from the sample (n = 60), excluding cancer cases, patients over 50 years old, and those with ancillary procedures other than adnexectomy and lysis of adhesions. General probability theory was used to calculate a predicted complication rate of cesarean section followed by TAH from the complication rates of the component procedures done independently. This predicted combined complication rate was then compared to the observed rate of complications from cesarean hysterectomy to evaluate the risks of the two alternative treatment regimens.Results: Elective cesarean section and total abdominal hysterectomy had complication rates of 12.8% and 13.4%, respectively. The predicted combined complication rate for elective cesarean section followed by TAH was 24.5%. The observed rate of complications for elective cesarean hysterectomy was much lower (16.1%). Although bleeding complications were similar for the two regimens, the rate of transfusion was higher for cesarean hysterectomy (13.0%) than for cesarean section (0%) and TAH (3.4%) alone. Eighty percent of the cesarean hysterectomy patients would have been candidates for autologous blood donation, had it been available.Conclusions: Elective cesarean hysterectomy has a lower risk of complications than elective cesarean section followed by remote abdominal hysterectomy and should be preferred. Transfusion risks are higher for cesarean hysterectomy but can be decreased by the use of autologous blood.

  6. Hysterectomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... cuts in the belly, in order to perform robotic surgery You and your doctor will decide which type ... through the vagina using a laparoscope or after robotic surgery. When a larger surgical cut (incision) in the ...

  7. Depression Following Hysterectomy and the Influencing Factors

    PubMed Central

    Bahri, Narjes; Tohidinik, Hamid Reza; Fathi Najafi, Tahereh; Larki, Mona; Amini, Thoraya; Askari Sartavosi, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Background Hysterectomy is one of the most common gynecological surgeries performed worldwide. However, women undergoing this surgery often experience negative emotional reactions. Objectives This study was done with the aim of investigating the relationship between hysterectomy and postoperative depression, three months after the procedure. Materials and Methods This longitudinal study was conducted in the province of Khorasan-Razavi in Iran, using multistage sampling. At first, three cities were selected from the province by cluster sampling; then, five hospitals were randomly selected from these cities. The participants included 53 women who were hysterectomy candidates in one of the five selected hospitals. The participants’ demographics and hysterectomy procedure information were entered into two separate questionnaires, and the Beck depression inventory (BDI) was employed to measure their severity of depression before and three months after the surgery. The statistical package for the social sciences (SPSS) version 16 was used for the statistical analysis, and a P value of < 0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. Results The means and standard deviations of the participants’ depression scores before and three months after their hysterectomies were 13.01 ± 10.1 and 11.02 ± 10.3, respectively. Although the mean score of depression decreased three months after the hysterectomy, the difference was not statistically significant. However, a significant relationship was found between the satisfaction with the outcome of the hysterectomy and the postoperative depression score (P = 0.04). Conclusions In this study, undergoing a hysterectomy did not show a relationship with postoperative depression three months after the surgery. Moreover, the only factor related to depression following a hysterectomy was satisfaction with the surgery. PMID:27066267

  8. Tocolytic Drugs for Use in Veterinary Obstetrics

    PubMed Central

    Ménard, L.

    1984-01-01

    The author presents a literature review of two tocolytic agents used in veterinary obstetrics: isoxsuprine and clenbuterol. The medical background from which these drugs emerged for human use and to which is linked their application in animal medicine is described. Each drug is reviewed according to its pharmacology, basic considerations for its clinical use and the reports on its application in the treatment and management of obstetrical disorders in veterinary medicine. PMID:17422462

  9. Competence of birth attendants at providing emergency obstetric care under India’s JSY conditional cash transfer program for institutional delivery: an assessment using case vignettes in Madhya Pradesh province

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Access to emergency obstetric care by competent staff can reduce maternal mortality. India has launched the Janani Suraksha Yojana (JSY) conditional cash transfer program to promote institutional births. During implementation of the JSY, India witnessed a steep increase in the proportion of institutional deliveries-from 40% in 2004 to 73% in 2012. However, maternal mortality reduction follows a secular trend. Competent management of complications, when women deliver in facilities under the JSY, is essential for reduction in maternal mortality and therefore to a successful program outcome. We investigate, using clinical vignettes, whether birth attendants at institutions under the program are competent at providing appropriate care for obstetric complications. Methods A facility based cross-sectional study was conducted in three districts of Madhya Pradesh (MP) province. Written case vignettes for two obstetric complications, hemorrhage and eclampsia, were administered to 233 birth attendant nurses at 73 JSY facilities. Their competence at (a) initial assessment, (b) diagnosis, and (c) making decisions on appropriate first-line care for these complications was scored. Results The mean emergency obstetric care (EmOC) competence score was 5.4 (median = 5) on a total score of 20, and 75% of participants scored below 35% of the maximum score. The overall score, although poor, was marginally higher in respondents with Skilled Birth Attendant (SBA) training, those with general nursing and midwifery qualifications, those at higher facility levels, and those conducting >30 deliveries a month. In all, 14% of respondents were competent at assessment, 58% were competent at making a correct clinical diagnosis, and 20% were competent at providing first-line care. Conclusions Birth attendants in the JSY facilities have low competence at EmOC provision. Hence, births in the JSY program cannot be considered to have access to competent EmOC. Urgent efforts are

  10. Barriers in the Delivery of Emergency Obstetric and Neonatal Care in Post-Conflict Africa: Qualitative Case Studies of Burundi and Northern Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Primus Che; Bulage, Patience; Urdal, Henrik; Sundby, Johanne

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Maternal and neonatal mortality and morbidity rates are particularly grim in conflict, post-conflict and other crisis settings, a situation partly blamed on non-availability and/or poor quality of emergency obstetric and neonatal care (EmONC) services. The aim of this study was to explore the barriers to effective delivery of EmONC services in post-conflict Burundi and Northern Uganda, in order to provide policy makers and other relevant stakeholders context-relevant data on improving the delivery of these lifesaving services. Methods This was a qualitative comparative case study that used 42 face-to-face semi-structured in-depth interviews and 4 focus group discussions for data collection. Participants were 32 local health providers and 37 staff of NGOs working in the area of maternal health. Data was analysed using the framework approach. Results The availability, quality and distribution of EmONC services were major challenges across the sites. The barriers in the delivery of quality EmONC services were categorised into two major themes; human resources-related challenges, and systemic and institutional failures. While some of the barriers were similar, others were unique to specific sites. The common barriers included shortage of qualified staff; lack of essential installations, supplies and medications; increasing workload, burn-out and turnover; and poor data collection and monitoring systems. Barriers unique to Northern Uganda were demoralised personnel and lack of recognition; poor referral system; inefficient drug supply system; staff absenteeism in rural areas; and poor coordination among key personnel. In Burundi, weak curriculum; poor harmonisation and coordination of training; and inefficient allocation of resources were the unique challenges. To improve the situation across the sites, efforts are ongoing to improve the training and recruitment of more staff; harmonise and strengthen the curriculum and training; increase the number of Em

  11. Hysterectomy - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Arabic) استئصال الرحم - العربية Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Chinese - Simplified (简体中文) Hysterectomy 子宫切除术 - 简体中文 (Chinese - Simplified) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Chinese - Traditional (繁體中文) Hysterectomy 子宮切除術 - 繁體中文 (Chinese - Traditional) ...

  12. A Comparison Between Non-Descent Vaginal Hysterectomy and Total Abdominal Hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Dibyajyoti, Gharphalia

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Hysterectomy is one of the most common gyneacological surgeries performed worldwide. The vaginal technique has been introduced and performed centuries back, but has been less successful due to lack of experience and enthusiasm among Gynaecologists, due to a misconception that the abdominal route is safer and easier. Aim To evaluate the most efficient route of hysterectomy in women with mobile nonprolapsed uteri of 12 weeks or lesser by comparing the intra and postoperative complications of vaginal and abdominal hysterectomies. Materials and Methods A prospective, randomized controlled trial was performed wherein, 300 consecutive patients requiring hysterectomy for benign diseases were analysed over a period of 2 years (December 2012–November 2014). Group A (n = 150) underwent vaginal hysterectomy (non descent vaginal hysterectomy, NDVH) which was compared with group B (n = 150) who had abdominal hysterectomy. The primary outcome measures were operative time, intraoperative blood loss, postoperative analgesia, hospital stay, postoperative mobility, blood transfusion, wound infection, febrile morbidity and postoperative systemic infections. Secondary outcome measures were conversion of vaginal to abdominal route and re-laparotomy. Results Baseline characteristics were similar between the two groups. There were no intraoperative complications in either group. Regarding operation duration, intraoperative blood loss, postoperative pain, postoperative blood transfusion, mobilization in post operative ward, postoperative wound infection, febrile morbidity, duration of hospital stay, p-value was significant in vaginal hysterectomy compared to abdominal hysterectomy. Regarding postoperative systemic infections, p-value was not significant. None of the cases in the vaginal group were converted to abdominal route and none of the cases in the whole study group underwent re-laparotomy. Conclusion The present study concludes that patients requiring hysterectomy

  13. Obstetric antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Esteve-Valverde, E; Ferrer-Oliveras, R; Alijotas-Reig, J

    2016-04-01

    Obstetric antiphospholipid syndrome is an acquired autoimmune disorder that is associated with various obstetric complications and, in the absence of prior history of thrombosis, with the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies directed against other phospholipids, proteins called cofactors or PL-cofactor complexes. Although the obstetric complications have been related to the procoagulant properties of antiphospholipid antibodies, pathological studies of human placenta have shown the proinflammatory capacity of antiphospholipid antibodies via the complement system and proinflammatory cytokines. There is no general agreement on which antiphospholipid antibodies profile (laboratory) confers the greatest obstetric risk, but the best candidates are categories I and IIa. Combined treatment with low doses of aspirin and heparin achieves good obstetric and maternal outcomes. In this study, we also review the therapeutic possibilities in refractory cases, although the likelihood of progressing to other autoimmune diseases is low. We briefly comment on incomplete obstetric antiphospholipid syndrome, also known as antiphospholipid antibody-mediated pregnancy morbidity syndrome.

  14. Total Laparoscopic Hysterectomy for Large Uterus

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Rakesh; Sundaram, Meenakshi; Lakhotia, Smita; Mahajan, Chaitali; Manaktala, Gayatri; Shah, Parul

    2009-01-01

    Aim: In this review, we assessed the feasibility of total laparoscopic hysterectomy (TLH) in cases of very large uteri weighing more than 500 grams. We have analyzed whether it is possible for an experienced laparoscopic surgeon to perform efficient total laparoscopic hysterectomy for large myomatous uteri regardless of the size, number and location of the myomas. Design: Retrospective review (Canadian Task Force Classification II-1) Setting: Dedicated high volume Gynecological laparoscopy centre. Patients: 173 women with symptomatic myomas who underwent total laparoscopic hysterectomy at our center. There were no exclusion criteria based on the size number or location of myomas. Intervention: TLH and modifications of performing the surgery by ligating the uterine arteries prior, myomectomy followed by hysterectomy, direct morcellation after uterine artery ligation. Results: 72% of patients had previous normal vaginal delivery and 28% had previous cesarean section. Average clinical size of the uterus was 18 weeks (10, 32). The average weight of the specimen was 700 grams (500, 2240). The average duration of surgery was 107 min (40, 300) and the average blood loss was 228 ml (10, 3200). Conclusion: Total laparoscopic hysterectomy is a technically feasible procedure. It can be performed by experienced surgeons for large uteri regardless of the size, number or location of the myomas. PMID:22442509

  15. The impact of a simulation-based training lab on outcomes of hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Asoğlu, Mehmet Reşit; Achjian, Tamar; Akbilgiç, Oğuz; Borahay, Mostafa A.; Kılıç, Gökhan S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the impact of a simulation-based training lab on surgical outcomes of different hysterectomy approaches in a resident teaching tertiary care center. Material and Methods This retrospective cohort study was conducted at The University of Texas, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology. In total, 1397 patients who had undergone total abdominal hysterectomy (TAH), vaginal hysterectomy (VH), total laparoscopy-assisted hysterectomy (TLH), or robot-assisted hysterectomy (RAH) for benign gynecologic conditions between 2009 and 2014 were included in the study. The comparison was made according to the year when the surgeries were performed: 2009 (before simulation training) and the combination of 2010–2014 (after simulation training) for each technique (TAH, VH, and LAH). Since a simulation lab for robotic surgery was introduced in 2010 at our institute, the comparison for robotic surgery was made between the combination of 2009–2010 as the control and the combination of 2010–2014 as the study group. Results The average estimated blood loss before and after simulation-based training was significantly different in TAH and RAH groups (317±170 mL versus 257±146 mL, p=0.003 and 154±107 mL versus 102±88 mL, p=0.004, respectively), but no difference was found for TLH and VH. The mean of length of hospital stay was significantly different before and after simulation-based training for each technique: 3.7±2.3 versus 2.9±2.2 days for TAH, 2.0±1.2 versus 1.3±0.9 days for VH, 2.4±1.3 versus 1.9±2.5 days for TLH, and 2.0±1.3 versus 1.4±1.7 days for RAH (p<0.01). Conclusion Based on our data, simulator-based training may play an integrative role in developing the residents’ surgical skills and thus improving the surgical outcomes of hysterectomy. PMID:27403070

  16. Endoluminal release of ureteral ligature after hysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chih-Jen; Lin, Victor Chia-Hsiang; Huang, Ching-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Iatrogenic ureteral injury is a well-recognized complication of abdominal total hysterectomy. We report a case of a 57-year-old female who underwent abdominal total hysterectomy for a uterine myoma and experienced severe right flank pain postoperatively. The imaging study displayed an obstruction of the right distal ureter. Under ureteroscopy, an extraluminal ligature was released with a holmium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser. The stenotic segment was immediately relieved. Two months later, the intravenous urogram illustrated patency of the distal ureter with regression of right hydronephrosis. There was no recurrent hydronephrosis during 1 year of follow-up.

  17. Telemedicine in obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Odibo, Imelda N; Wendel, Paul J; Magann, Everett F

    2013-09-01

    Telemedicine lends itself to several obstetric applications and is of growing interest in developed and developing nations worldwide. In this article we review current trends and applications within obstetrics practice. We searched electronic databases, March 2010 to September 2012, for telemedicine use studies related to obstetrics. Thirty-four of 101 identified studies are the main focus of review. Other relevant studies published before March 2010 are included. Telemedicine plays an important role as an adjunct to delivery of health care to remote patients with inadequate medical access in this era of limited resources and emphasis on efficient use of those available resources.

  18. Is antacid treatment necessary in obstetric anesthesia?

    PubMed

    Al Mazrooa, A A; Alyafi, W A; Marzouki, S A

    1995-10-01

    All the obstetric units in Jeddah were surveyed regarding the use of antacid prophylaxis and the methods of anesthesia used for emergency and elective cesarian section. The results were compared with the Western practice where marked variation was found but this apparently did not influence mortality from acid aspiration.

  19. Obstetrics and Ernest Hemingway.

    PubMed

    King, C R

    1989-07-01

    Ernest Hemingway is one of the most popular and important American writers of the 20th century. His fiction, ranging from the short story to the novel, is well known, but his medical knowledge, and in particular his knowledge of obstetrics, often is not recognized. To achieve the realistic depiction of the childbirth scenes in A Farewell to Arms required that Hemingway acquire special knowledge of obstetrics practice.

  20. What is an Obstetrics/Gynecology Hospitalist?

    PubMed

    McCue, Brigid

    2015-09-01

    The obstetrics/gynecology (OB/GYN) hospitalist is the latest subspecialist to evolve from obstetrics and gynecology. Starting in 2002, academic leaders recognized the impact of such coalescing forces as the pressure to reduce maternal morbidity and mortality, stagnant reimbursements and the increasing cost of private practice, the decrease in applications for OB/GYN residencies, and the demand among practicing OB/GYNs for work/life balance. Initially coined laborist, the concept of the OB/GYN hospitalist emerged. Thinking of becoming an OB/GYN hospitalist? Here is what you need to know.

  1. Obstetric anaesthesia in low-resource settings.

    PubMed

    Dyer, Robert A; Reed, Anthony R; James, Michael F

    2010-06-01

    Close co-operation between obstetricians and obstetric anaesthesia providers is crucial for the safety and comfort of parturients, particularly in low-resource environments. Maternal and foetal mortality is unacceptably high, and the practice of obstetric anaesthesia has an important influence on outcome. Well-conducted national audits have identified the contributing factors to anaesthesia-related deaths. Spinal anaesthesia for caesarean section is the method of choice in the absence of contraindications, but is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Minimum requirements for safe practice are adequate skills, anaesthesia monitors, disposables and drugs and relevant management protocols for each level of care. The importance of current outreach initiatives is emphasised, and educational resources and the available financial sources discussed. The difficulties of efficient procurement of equipment and drugs are outlined. Guiding principles for the practice of analgesia for labour, anaesthesia for caesarean section and the management of obstetric emergencies, where the anaesthetist also has a central role, are suggested.

  2. A comparison of abdominal and vaginal hysterectomies in Benghazi, Libya.

    PubMed

    Agnaeber, K; Bodalal, Z

    2013-08-01

    We performed a comparative study between abdominal and vaginal hysterectomies using clinical data from Al-Jamhouria hospital (one of the largest maternity hospitals in Eastern Libya). Various parameters were taken into consideration: the rates of each type (and their subtypes); average age of patients; indications; causes; postoperative complications; and duration of stay in the hospital afterwards. Conclusions and recommendations were drawn from the results of this study. In light of the aforementioned parameters, it was found that: (1) abdominal hysterectomies were more common than vaginal hysterectomies (p < 0.001); (2) patients admitted for abdominal hysterectomies are younger than those admitted for vaginal hysterectomies (p < 0.001); (3) the most common indication for an abdominal hysterectomy was menstrual disturbances, while for vaginal hysterectomies it was vaginal prolapse; (4) the histopathological cause for abdominal and vaginal hysterectomies were observed and the most common were found to be leiomyomas and atrophic endometrium; (5) there was no significant difference between the two routes in terms of postoperative complications; (6) patients who were admitted for abdominal hysterectomies spent a longer amount of time in the hospital (p < 0.01). It was concluded that efforts should be made to further pursue vaginal and laparoscopic hysterectomies as a viable option to the more conventional abdominal route.

  3. Robotic-assisted hysterectomy: patient selection and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Smorgick, Noam

    2017-01-01

    Minimally invasive hysterectomy via the laparoscopic or vaginal approach is beneficial to patients when compared with laparotomy, but has not been offered in the past to all women because of the technical difficulties and the long learning curve required for laparoscopic hysterectomy. Robotic-assisted hysterectomy for benign indications may allow for a shorter learning curve but does not offer clear advantages over conventional laparoscopic hysterectomy in terms of surgical outcomes. In addition, robotic hysterectomy is invariably associated with increased costs. Nevertheless, this surgical approach has been widely adopted by gynecologic surgeons. The aim of this review is to describe specific indications and patients who may benefit from robotic-assisted hysterectomy. These include hysterectomy for benign conditions in cases with high surgical complexity (such as pelvic adhesive disease and endometriosis), hysterectomy and lymphadenectomy for treatment of endometrial carcinoma, and obese patients. In the future, additional evidence regarding the benefits of single-site robotic hysterectomy may further modify the indications for robotic-assisted hysterectomy. PMID:28356774

  4. Comparative Effectiveness of Minimally Invasive Hysterectomy for Endometrial Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Burke, William M.; Tergas, Ana I.; Hou, June Y.; Huang, Yongmei; Hu, Jim C.; Hillyer, Grace Clarke; Ananth, Cande V.; Neugut, Alfred I.; Hershman, Dawn L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Despite the potential benefits of minimally invasive hysterectomy for uterine cancer, population-level data describing the procedure’s safety in unselected patients are lacking. We examined the use of minimally invasive surgery and the association between the route of the procedure and long-term survival. Methods We used the SEER-Medicare database to identify women with stage I-III uterine cancer who underwent hysterectomy from 2006 to 2011. Patients who underwent abdominal hysterectomy were compared with those who had minimally invasive hysterectomy (laparoscopic and robot-assisted). Perioperative morbidity, use of adjuvant therapy, and long-term survival were examined after propensity score balancing. Results We identified 6,304 patients, including 4,139 (65.7%) who underwent abdominal hysterectomy and 2,165 (34.3%) who underwent minimally invasive hysterectomy; performance of minimally invasive hysterectomy increased from 9.3% in 2006 to 61.7% in 2011. Robot-assisted procedures accounted for 62.3% of the minimally invasive operations. Compared with women who underwent abdominal hysterectomy, minimally invasive hysterectomy was associated with a lower overall complication rate (22.7% v 39.7%; P < .001), and lower perioperative mortality (0.6% v 1.1%), but these women were more likely to receive adjuvant pelvic radiotherapy (34.3% v 31.3%) and brachytherapy (33.6% v 31.0%; P < .05). The complication rate was higher after robot-assisted hysterectomy compared with laparoscopic hysterectomy (23.7% v 19.5%; P = .03). There was no association between the use of minimally invasive hysterectomy and either overall (HR, 0.89; 95% CI, 0.75 to 1.04) or cancer-specific (HR, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.59 to 1.16) mortality. Conclusion Minimally invasive hysterectomy does not appear to compromise long-term survival for women with endometrial cancer. PMID:26834057

  5. Interval Between Hysterectomy and Start of Radiation Treatment Is Predictive of Recurrence in Patients With Endometrial Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Cattaneo, Richard; Hanna, Rabbie K.; Jacobsen, Gordon; Elshaikh, Mohamed A.

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: Adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) has been shown to improve local control in patients with endometrial carcinoma. We analyzed the impact of the time interval between hysterectomy and RT initiation in patients with endometrial carcinoma. Methods and Materials: In this institutional review board-approved study, we identified 308 patients with endometrial carcinoma who received adjuvant RT after hysterectomy. All patients had undergone hysterectomy, oophorectomy, and pelvic and para-aortic lymph node evaluation from 1988 to 2010. Patients' demographics, pathologic features, and treatments were compared. The time interval between hysterectomy and the start of RT was calculated. The effects of time interval on recurrence-free (RFS), disease-specific (DSS), and overall survival (OS) were calculated. Following univariate analysis, multivariate modeling was performed. Results: The median age and follow-up for the study cohort was 65 years and 72 months, respectively. Eighty-five percent of the patients had endometrioid carcinoma. RT was delivered with high-dose-rate brachytherapy alone (29%), pelvic RT alone (20%), or both (51%). Median time interval to start RT was 42 days (range, 21-130 days). A total of 269 patients (74%) started their RT <9 weeks after undergoing hysterectomy (group 1) and 26% started ≥9 weeks after surgery (group 2). There were a total of 43 recurrences. Tumor recurrence was significantly associated with treatment delay of ≥9 weeks, with 5-year RFS of 90% for group 1 compared to only 39% for group 2 (P<.001). On multivariate analysis, RT delay of ≥9 weeks (P<.001), presence of lymphovascular space involvement (P=.001), and higher International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics grade (P=.012) were independent predictors of recurrence. In addition, RT delay of ≥9 weeks was an independent significant predictor for worse DSS and OS (P=.001 and P=.01, respectively). Conclusions: Delay in administering adjuvant RT after hysterectomy was

  6. Laparoscopic Hysterectomy with Automatic Stapling Devices

    PubMed Central

    Tabb, Reese

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate outcomes including operating time, blood loss, length of stay (LOS), return to work and complications of laparoscopic hysterectomy performed with automatic stapling devices. Methods: Between 6/11/91 and 11/23/95, 127 laparoscopic hysterectomies were performed with automatic stapling devices. On an average, 6 firings with the stapler were done per case. Postoperative telephone survey and retrospective review of records were done. Results: Data averages for operating time, blood loss, LOS and return to work, respectively, were 90 minutes, 190 cc's, 1.1 day and 2 weeks. Significant complications included delayed postoperative bleeding in 4 patients, all of which occurred within the first 35 cases. One was controlled laparoscopically and 3 others required exploratory laparotomies. Since certain precautionary measures as described were taken, hemorrhagic complications were eliminated. Conclusions: Laparoscopic hysterectomy can be performed safely and effectively with automatic stapling devices in properly selected patients. A potential hazard inherent with this technique includes intraoperative and postoperative bleeding from the staple lines, the incidence of which can be minimized by taking certain precautionary measures such as the use of white cartridges only and bipolar desiccation of staple lines when indicated. PMID:9876650

  7. 257 Incidental Appendectomies During Total Laparoscopic Hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Deidre T.; O'Holleran, Michael S.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: This retrospective observational report analyzes the demographics, blood loss, length of surgical duration, number of days in the hospital, and complications for 821 consecutive patients undergoing total laparoscopic hysterectomy over a 11-year period stratified by incidental appendectomy. Methods: A retrospective chart abstraction was performed. ANOVA and chi-square tests were performed with significance preset at P<0.05. Results: Of 821 consecutive patients undergoing total laparoscopic hysterectomy, 257 underwent elective appendectomy with the ultrasonic scalpel, either as part of their staging, treatment for pelvic pain, or prophylaxis against appendicitis. Comparing the 2 groups, no difference existed in mean age of 50±10 years or mean BMI of 27.6±6.7. Both groups had a similar mean blood loss of 130 mL. Surgery took less time (137 vs 118 minutes, P<0.0012) and the hospital stay was shorter in the appendectomy group (1.5 vs 1.2, P<0.0001) possibly because it was performed incidentally in most cases. No complications were attributable to the appendectomy, and complication types and rates in both groups were similar. Though all appendicies appeared normal, pathology was documented in 9%, including 3 carcinoid tumors. Conclusions: Incidental appendectomy during total laparoscopic hysterectomy is not associated with significant risk and can be routinely offered to patients planning elective gynecologic laparoscopic procedures, as is standard for open procedures. PMID:18237505

  8. Correlates of hysterectomy among African-American women.

    PubMed

    Palmer, J R; Rao, R S; Adams-Campbell, L L; Rosenberg, L

    1999-12-15

    Hysterectomy is the second most common surgery performed on US women. Baseline data from a large study of African-American women were used to examine correlates of premenopausal hysterectomy. Analyses were conducted on participants aged 30-49 years; 5,163 had had a hysterectomy and 29,787 were still menstruating. Multiple logistic regression was used to compute prevalence odds ratios for the association of hysterectomy with various factors. Hysterectomy was associated with region of residence: Odds ratios for living in the South, Midwest, and West relative to the Northeast were 2.63 (95% confidence interval (CI): 2.38, 2.91), 2.02 (95% CI: 1.81, 2.25), and 1.89 (95% CI: 1.68, 2.12), respectively. Hysterectomy was inversely associated with years of education and age at first birth: Odds ratios were 1.96 (95% CI: 1.74, 2.21) for < or =12 years of education relative to >16 years and 4.33 (95% CI: 3.60, 5.22) for first birth before age 20 relative to age 30 or older. Differences in the prevalence of major indications for hysterectomy did not explain the associations. This study indicates that the correlates of hysterectomy among African-American women are similar to those for White US women. The associations with geographic region and educational attainment suggest that there may be modifiable factors which could lead to reduced hysterectomy rates.

  9. Case report of ovarian torsion mimicking ovarian cancer as an uncommon late complication of laparoscopic supracervical hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Baran, Arkadiusz; Słabuszewska-Jóźwiak, Aneta; Jakiel, Grzegorz

    2017-01-01

    Laparoscopic supracervical hysterectomy (LSH) is an example of a partial hysterectomy, performed due to benign gynaecological complaints. Better endoscopic instruments and operational techniques have led to a great reduction in the number of abdominal hysterectomies. It is believed that LSH is a safe and minimally invasive hysterectomy technique. The Cochrane Database meta-analysis proves the benefits of minimally invasive surgery compared with abdominal gynaecological surgery, including decreased pain, surgical-site infections and hospital stay, quicker return to activity, and fewer postoperative adhesions. According to recent publications, the overall complication rate of all hysterectomy methods is about 1-4.5%. Adnexal torsion is a correlated complication. About 3-5% of patients undergoing emergency surgery due to pelvic pain are diagnosed with this condition. It may be the cause of acute abdomen and correlated symptoms such as vomiting, nausea, or severe pain. To the best of our knowledge a case of asymptomatic, delayed ovarian torsion mimicking ovarian tumour has not been reported so far. In the presented case, torsion successfully imitated neoplastic process as both ROMA score and IOTA ‘simple rules’ indicated a malignancy with high degree of probability. This case demonstrates that, if ovarian tumour is detected in the postoperative period, a torsion of ovarian pedicle should be taken into consideration as it may mimic malignant neoplasm. PMID:28250728

  10. Prevention in Obstetrics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children in the Tropics, 1984

    1984-01-01

    The aim of this issue of "Children in the Tropics" is to describe work that may be done by a motivated health team having only the strict minimum of material resources. While not a handbook of obstetrics, this text serves as a reminder of basic information and procedures workers must be able to perform. Following a review of the…

  11. CHALLENGES OF OBSTETRIC ANESTHESIA: DIFFICULT LARYNGEAL VISUALIZATION.

    PubMed

    Alanoğlu, Zekeriyya; Erkoç, Süheyla Karadağ; Güçlü, Çiğdem Yildirim; Meço, Başak Ceyda Orbey; Baytaş, Volkan; Can, Özlem Selvi; Alkiş, Neslihan

    2016-03-01

    Obstetric anesthesia is one of the high risk subspecialties of anesthesia practice. Anesthesia related complications are the sixth leading cause of maternal mortality. Difficult or failed intubation following induction of general anesthesia for CS remains the major contributory factor to anesthesia-related maternal complications. The airway management of obstetric patients is a challenging issue for several reasons. Anatomic and physiologic changes related to pregnancy may increase the difficult and failed intubation rates compared to the general surgical population. Proper evaluation of the airway anatomy and airway structures is vital to prevent airway management related catastrophes. In addition to basic airway and intubation equipment, each anesthesia department must have difficult intubation equipment cart including fiber optic laryngoscope, video laryngoscopes, and different types of laryngeal masks. It is essential that all anesthesiologists have a preconceived and well thought-out algorithm and emergency airway equipment to deal with airway emergencies during difficult or failed intubation of a parturient.

  12. Hysterectomy and kidney cancer risk: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Karami, Sara; Daugherty, Sarah E; Purdue, Mark P

    2014-01-15

    Recent cohort findings suggest that women who underwent a hysterectomy have an elevated relative risk of kidney cancer, although evidence from past studies has been inconsistent. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of published cohort and case-control studies to summarize the epidemiologic evidence investigating hysterectomy and kidney cancer. Studies published from 1950 through 2012 were identified through a search of PubMed and of references from relevant publications. Meta-analyses were conducted using random-effects models to estimate summary relative risks (SRRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for hysterectomy, age at hysterectomy (<45, 45+ years) and time since hysterectomy (<10, 10+ years). The SRR for hysterectomy and kidney cancer for all published studies (seven cohort, six case-control) was 1.29 (95% CI, 1.16-1.43), with no evidence of between-study heterogeneity or publication bias. The summary effect was slightly weaker, although still significant, for cohorts (SRR, 1.26; 95% CI, 1.11-1.42) compared with case-control findings (1.37; 95% CI, 1.09-1.73) and was observed irrespective of age at hysterectomy, time since the procedure and model adjustment for body mass index, smoking status and hypertension. Women undergoing a hysterectomy have an approximate 30% increased relative risk of subsequent kidney cancer. Additional research is needed to elucidate the biological mechanisms underlying this association.

  13. Single-incision total laparoscopic hysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Rakesh; Sundaram, Meenakshi; Mahajan, Chaitali; Raje, Shweta; Kadam, Pratima; Rao, Gayatri; Shitut, Prachi

    2011-01-01

    Single-incision laparoscopic surgery is an alternative to conventional multiport laparoscopy. Single-access laparoscopy using a transumbilical port affords maximum cosmetic benefits because the surgical incision is hidden in the umbilicus. The advantages of single-access laparoscopic surgery may include less bleeding, infection, and hernia formation and better cosmetic outcome and less pain. The disadvantages and limitations include longer surgery time, difficulty in learning the technique, and the need for specialized instruments. Ongoing refinement of the surgical technique and instrumentation is likely to expand its role in gynecologic surgery in the future. We perform single-incision total laparoscopic hysterectomy using three ports in the single transumbilical incision.

  14. Single-incision total laparoscopic hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Rakesh; Sundaram, Meenakshi; Mahajan, Chaitali; Raje, Shweta; Kadam, Pratima; Rao, Gayatri; Shitut, Prachi

    2011-01-01

    Single-incision laparoscopic surgery is an alternative to conventional multiport laparoscopy. Single-access laparoscopy using a transumbilical port affords maximum cosmetic benefits because the surgical incision is hidden in the umbilicus. The advantages of single-access laparoscopic surgery may include less bleeding, infection, and hernia formation and better cosmetic outcome and less pain. The disadvantages and limitations include longer surgery time, difficulty in learning the technique, and the need for specialized instruments. Ongoing refinement of the surgical technique and instrumentation is likely to expand its role in gynecologic surgery in the future. We perform single-incision total laparoscopic hysterectomy using three ports in the single transumbilical incision. PMID:21197248

  15. Are hysterectomies necessary? Racial-ethnic differences in women's attitudes.

    PubMed

    Dillaway, Heather E

    2016-01-01

    There is a dearth of comparative information about how women from diverse social locations think about, talk about, and experience the various types of reproductive aging. In this article I analyze racial-ethnic differences in attitudes toward surgically induced menopause (hysterectomy) utilizing data from an interview study of 130 menopausal women. African American women in this study were more suspect of doctors' initial offers of hysterectomies than European American women, with the former group of interviewees still fearing a legacy of racial-ethnic discrimination within medical institutions. Only after seeking a second opinion or finding a trustworthy doctor did African American women feel comfortable accepting a hysterectomy. European American interviewees were not as wary as their African American counterparts and sometimes reported wishing for a hysterectomy. I argue that attitudes toward hysterectomy must be contextualized within women's experiences of racial-ethnic oppression and privilege to be fully understood.

  16. Obstetric antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Galarza-Maldonado, Claudio; Kourilovitch, Maria R; Pérez-Fernández, Oscar M; Gaybor, Mariana; Cordero, Christian; Cabrera, Sonia; Soroka, Nikolai F

    2012-02-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) in pregnancy has a serious impact on maternal and fetal morbidity. It causes recurrent pregnancy miscarriage and it is associated with other adverse obstetric findings like preterm delivery, intrauterine growth restriction, preeclampsia, HELLP syndrome and others. The 2006 revised criteria, which is still valid, is used for APS classification. Epidemiology of obstetric APS varies from one population group to another largely due to different inclusion criteria and lack of standardization of antibody detection methods. Treatment is still controversial. This topic should include a multidisciplinary team and should be individualized. Success here is based on strict control and monitoring throughout pregnancy and even in the preconception and postpartum periods. Further research in this field and unification of criteria are required to yield better therapeutic strategies in the future.

  17. Variations in hysterectomy rates in Ontario: does the indication matter?

    PubMed Central

    Hall, R E; Cohen, M M

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To examine variations in rates of hysterectomy for the five main indications for the procedure in regions of Ontario. DESIGN: Cross-sectional population-based analysis of hospital discharge abstracts. SETTING: All acute care facilities in Ontario. PARTICIPANTS: All 65,599 women whose hospital record contained a procedure code indicating that a hysterectomy was performed between Apr. 1, 1988, and Mar. 31, 1991. Duplicate cases, records of cancelled procedures and nonresidents were excluded. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Crude and age-adjusted rates of hysterectomy, by indication, for each region of Ontario. RESULTS: Five indications accounted for more than 80% of hysterectomies performed. The median age-adjusted rate of hysterectomy for Ontario regions during the study period was 6.25 per 1000 women, with a 2.7-fold variation among regions. The regions with rates of hysterectomy in the highest quartile tended to be rural, and those with rates in the lowest quartile tended to be urban areas with teaching hospitals. When rates of hysterectomy for specific indications were examined, they showed substantial variations among regions in the rate of the procedure for menstrual hemorrhage (18-fold variation), uterine prolapse (9.3-fold) and endometriosis (6.3-fold). A smaller but still significant variation was shown in the rate of hysterectomy for leiomyoma (2.3-fold). Regional variation in the rate of hysterectomy for cancer (2.5-fold) was not statistically significant. CONCLUSIONS: There are large interregional variations in rates of hysterectomy, especially for indications that are more discretionary than others (i.e., menstrual hemorrhage, uterine prolapse and endometriosis) and less variation in rates when treatment options and diagnosis are clear-cut. This result suggests the need for more definitive practice guidelines on treatment of the indications for which the rate is more variable. PMID:7994690

  18. Blood transfusion in obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Nigam, A; Prakash, A; Saxena, P

    2013-01-01

    Transfusion of blood and blood components is a common practice in obstetric wards but it is not without risk. The incidence of transfusion reactions varies from 4 in every hundred transfusions for non-haemolytic reactions to one in every 40,000 for haemolytic transfusion reactions. The physiological basis of blood transfusion is outlined in this article. Most of the donated blood is processed into components: packed red cells (PRBCs), platelets, and fresh frozen plasma (FFP) or cryoprecipitate. Various alternatives to blood transfusion exist and include autotransfusion, pre-autologous blood storage, use of oxygen carrying blood substitutes and intraoperative cell salvage. Despite the risks associated with transfusions, obstetricians are frequently too aggressive in transfusing blood and blood products to their patients. Acute blood loss in obstetrics is usually due to placenta praevia, postpartum blood loss and surgery related. An early involvement of a consultant obstetrician, anaesthetist, haematologist and the blood bank is essential. There are no established criteria for initiating red cell transfusions and the decision is purely based on clinical and haematological parameters, which have been discussed along with the general principles of blood transfusion in obstetrics and some practical guidelines.

  19. Bilateral Carpal Spasm Under Spinal Anaesthesia During Abdominal Hysterectomy: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Naithani, Udita; Betkekar, Sneha Arun; Verma, Devendra; Dindor, Basant Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Acute hypocalcaemia is a medical emergency that can have catastrophic implications like tetany, seizures, cardiac arrythmias or laryngospasm if left untreated. We are presenting a case of a 30-year-old female patient undergoing total abdominal hysterectomy with bilateral salpingoopherectomy under spinal anaesthesia. She developed unexpected bilateral carpal spasm intraoperatively which was promptly diagnosed and successfully managed with intravenous calcium administration. We conclude that the anaesthetist should be aware of the clinical presentation of acute hypocalcaemia, its causes and emergency management in the perioperative period to prevent any adverse outcomes. PMID:26894157

  20. The history of imaging in obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Benson, Carol B; Doubilet, Peter M

    2014-11-01

    During the past century, imaging of the pregnant patient has been performed with radiography, scintigraphy, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and ultrasonography (US). US imaging has emerged as the primary imaging modality, because it provides real-time images at relatively low cost without the use of ionizing radiation. This review begins with a discussion of the history and current status of imaging modalities other than US for the pregnant patient. The discussion then turns to an in-depth description of how US technology advanced to become such a valuable diagnostic tool in the obstetric patient. Finally, the broad range of diagnostic uses of US in these patients is presented, including its uses for distinguishing an intrauterine pregnancy from a failed or ectopic pregnancy in the first trimester; assigning gestational age and assessing fetal weight; evaluating the fetus for anomalies and aneuploidy; examining the uterus, cervix, placenta, and amniotic fluid; and guiding obstetric interventional procedures.

  1. Can training non-physician clinicians/associate clinicians (NPCs/ACs) in emergency obstetric, neonatal care and clinical leadership make a difference to practice and help towards reductions in maternal and neonatal mortality in rural Tanzania? The ETATMBA project

    PubMed Central

    Ellard, David R; Shemdoe, Aloisia; Mazuguni, Festo; Mbaruku, Godfrey; Davies, David; Kihaile, Paul; Pemba, Senga; Bergström, Staffan; Nyamtema, Angelo; Mohamed, Hamed-Mahfoudh; O'Hare, Joseph Paul

    2016-01-01

    Objectives During late 2010, 36 trainees including 19 assistant medical officers (AMOs) 1 senior clinical officer (CO) and 16 nurse midwives/nurses were recruited from districts across rural Tanzania and invited to join the Enhancing Human Resources and Use of Appropriate Technologies for Maternal and Perinatal Survival in the sub-Saharan Africa (ETATMBA) training programme. The ETATMBA project was training associate clinicians (ACs) as advanced clinical leaders in emergency obstetric care. The trainees returned to health facilities across the country with the hope of being able to apply their new skills and knowledge. The main aim of this study was to explore the impact of the ETATMBA training on health outcomes including maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality in their facilities. Secondly, to explore the challenges faced in working in these health facilities. Design The study is a pre-examination/postexamination of maternal and neonatal health indicators and a survey of health facilities in rural Tanzania. The facilities surveyed were those in which ETATMBA trainees were placed post-training. The maternal and neonatal indicators were collected for 2011 and 2013 and the survey of the facilities was in early 2014. Results 16 of 17 facilities were surveyed. Maternal deaths show a non-significant downward trend over the 2 years (282–232 cases/100 000 live births). There were no significant differences in maternal, neonatal and birth complication variables across the time-points. The survey of facilities revealed shortages in key areas and some are a serious concern. Conclusions This study represents a snapshot of rural health facilities providing maternal and neonatal care in Tanzania. Enhancing knowledge, practical skills, and clinical leadership of ACs may have a positive impact on health outcomes. However, any impact may be confounded by the significant challenges in delivering a service in terms of resources. Thus, training may be beneficial, but it

  2. A Favorability Score for Vaginal Hysterectomy in a Statewide Collaborative.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Bethany D; Kamdar, Neil S; Mahnert, Nichole; Lim, Courtney S; Mullard, Andrew J; Campbell, Darrell A; As-Sanie, Sawsan; Morgan, Daniel M

    STUDY OBJECTIVE: Because it is associated with fewer complications and more rapid recovery, the vaginal approach is preferred for benign hysterectomy. Patient characteristics that traditionally favor a vaginal approach include adequate vaginal access, small uterine size, and low suspicion for extrauterine disease. However, the low proportion of hysterectomies performed vaginally in the United States suggests that these data are not routinely applied in clinical practice. We sought to analyze the association of parity, prior pelvic surgery, and uterine weight with the use of the vaginal, laparoscopic, robotic, and abdominal approaches to hysterectomy.

  3. Sequelae of tubal ligation: an analysis of 75 consecutive hysterectomies.

    PubMed

    Stock, R J

    1984-10-01

    Seventy-five consecutive patients undergoing hysterectomy subsequent to elective sterilization were studied regarding the occurrence of the post-tubal-ligation syndrome of pelvic pain and/or menorrhagia. Twenty patients were clinically considered to have the syndrome. In none of the patients operated on specifically for menstrual abnormalities could the findings be remotely attributed to the sterilization procedure. Five of the 20 patients had pelvic varicosities and one had pelvic adhesions that may have been a consequence of previous sterilization and conceivably the cause for the pelvic pain for which the patients were undergoing hysterectomy. I question the legitimacy of the post-tubal-ligation syndrome as a reason for hysterectomy.

  4. Robotic radical hysterectomy in the management of gynecologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Pareja, Rene; Ramirez, Pedro T

    2008-01-01

    Robotic surgery is being used with increasing frequency in gynecologic oncology. To date, 44 cases were reported in the literature of radical hysterectomy performed with robotic surgery. When comparing robotic surgery with laparoscopy or laparotomy in performing a radical hysterectomy, the literature shows that robotic surgery offers an advantage over the other 2 surgical approaches with regard to operative time, blood loss, and length of hospitalization. Future studies are needed to further elucidate the equivalence or superiority of robotic surgery to laparoscopy or laparotomy in performing a radical hysterectomy.

  5. A spatial analysis to study access to emergency obstetric transport services under the public private “Janani Express Yojana” program in two districts of Madhya Pradesh, India

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The government in Madhya Pradesh (MP), India in 2006, launched “Janani Express Yojana” (JE), a decentralized, 24X7, free emergency transport service for all pregnant women under a public-private partnership. JE supports India’s large conditional cash transfer program, the “Janani Suraksha Yojana” (JSY) in the province and transports on average 60,000 parturients to hospital every month. The model is a relatively low cost one that potentially could be adopted in other parts of India and South Asia. This paper describes the uptake, time taken and geographic equity in access to the service to transport women to a facility in two districts of MP. Methods This was a facility based cross sectional study. We interviewed parturients (n = 468) who delivered during a five day study period at facilities with >10 deliveries/month (n = 61) in two study districts. The women were asked details of transportation used to arrive at the facility, time taken and their residential addresses. These details were plotted onto a Geographic Information System (GIS) to estimate travelled distances and identify statistically significant clusters of mothers (hot spots) reporting delays >2 hours. Results JE vehicles were well dispersed across the districts and used by 236 (50.03%) mothers of which 111(47.03%) took >2 hours to reach a facility. Inability of JE vehicle to reach a mother in time was the main reason for delays. There was no correlation between the duration of delay and distance travelled. Maps of the travel paths and travel duration of the women are presented. The study identified hot spots of mothers with delays >2 hours and explored the possible reasons for longer delays. Conclusions The JE service was accessible in all parts of the districts. Relatively high utilization rates of JE indicate that it ably supported JSY program to draw more women for institutional deliveries. However, half of the JE users experienced long (>2 hour) delays. The delayed mothers

  6. Antiphospohlipid syndrome in obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Danza, Alvaro; Ruiz-Irastorza, Guillermo; Khamashta, Munther

    2012-02-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome is characterised by a variety of clinical and immunological manifestations. The clinical hallmarks of this syndrome are thrombosis and poor obstetric outcomes, including miscarriages, fetal loss and severe pre-eclampsia. The main antiphospholipid antibodies include lupus anticoagulant, anticardiolipin and anti-β2-glycoprotein I. The combination of aspirin and heparin is considered the standard of care for women with antiphospholipid syndrome and embryo-fetal losses; however, aspirin in monotherapy may have a place in women with recurrent early miscarriage. A good benefit-risk ratio of low-molecular-weight heparin in pregnancy thrombosis treatment has been reported. Warfarin must be avoided if possible throughout the first trimester of pregnancy. Adequate pregnancy management of women with antiphospholipid syndrome should include co-ordinated medical-obstetrical care, a close follow-up protocol and a good neonatal unit. Close blood pressure control and early detection of proteinuria, together with Doppler studies of the utero-placental circulation should be included in the management protocol.

  7. Obstetrical brachial plexus palsy.

    PubMed

    Romaña, M C; Rogier, A

    2013-01-01

    Obstetrical brachial plexus palsy is considered to be the result of a trauma during the delivery, even if there remains some controversy surrounding the causes. Although most babies recover spontaneously in the first 3 months of life, a small number remains with poor recovery which requires surgical brachial plexus exploration. Surgical indications depend on the type of lesion (producing total or partial palsy) and particularly the nonrecovery of biceps function by the age of 3 months. In a global palsy, microsurgery will be mandatory and the strategy for restoration will focus first on hand reinnervation and secondarily on providing elbow flexion and shoulder stability. Further procedures may be necessary during growth in order to avoid fixed contractured deformities or to give or increase strength of important muscle functions like elbow flexion or wrist extension. The author reviews the history of obstetrical brachial plexus injury, epidemiology, and the specifics of descriptive and functional anatomy in babies and children. Clinical manifestations at birth are directly correlated with the anatomical lesion. Finally, operative procedures are considered, including strategies of reconstruction with nerve grafting in infants and secondary surgery to increase functional capacity at later ages. However, normal function is usually not recovered, particularly in total brachial plexus palsy.

  8. Radical hysterectomy with adjuvant radiotherapy versus radical radiotherapy for FIGO stage IIB cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The goal of this study was to compare treatment outcomes for Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage IIB cervical carcinoma patients receiving radical surgery followed by adjuvant postoperative radiotherapy versus radical radiotherapy. Methods Medical records of FIGO stage IIB cervical cancer patients treated between July 2008 and December 2011 were retrospectively reviewed. A total of 148 patients underwent radical hysterectomy with pelvic lymph node dissection followed by adjuvant radiotherapy (surgery-based group). These patients were compared with 290 patients that received radical radiotherapy alone (RT-based group). Recurrence rates, progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), local control rates, and treatment-related complications were compared for these two groups. Results Similar rates of recurrence (16.89% vs. 12.41%, p = 0.200), PFS (log-rank, p = 0.211), OS (log-rank, p = 0.347), and local control rates (log-rank, p = 0.668) were observed for the surgery-based group and the RT-based group, respectively. Moreover, the incidence of acute grade 3–4 gastrointestinal reactions and late grade 3–4 lower limb lymphedema were significantly higher for the surgery-based group versus the RT-based group. Cox multivariate analyses found no significant difference in survival outcome between the two groups, and tumor diameter and histopathology were identified as significant prognostic factors for OS. Conclusions Radical radiotherapy was associated with fewer treatment-related complications and achieved comparable survival outcomes for patients with FIGO stage IIB cervical cancer compared to radical hysterectomy followed by postoperative radiotherapy. PMID:24495453

  9. Robotic single site versus robotic multiport hysterectomy in early endometrial cancer: a case control study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare surgical outcomes and cost of robotic single-site hysterectomy (RSSH) versus robotic multiport hysterectomy (RMPH) in early stage endometrial cancer. Methods This is a retrospective case-control study, comparing perioperative outcomes and costs of RSSH and RMPH in early stage endometrial cancer patients. RSSH were matched 1:2 according to age, body mass index, comorbidity, the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetric (FIGO) stage, type of radical surgery, histologic type, and grading. Mean hospital cost per discharge was calculated summarizing the cost of daily hospital room charges, operating room, cost of supplies and length of hospital stay. Results A total of 23 women who underwent RSSH were matched with 46 historic controls treated by RMPH in the same institute, with the same surgical team. No significant differences were found in terms of age, histologic type, stage, and grading. Operative time was similar: 102.5 minutes in RMPH and 110 in RSSH (p=0.889). Blood loss was lower in RSSH than in RMPH (respectively, 50 mL vs. 100 mL, p=0.001). Hospital stay was 3 days in RMPH and 2 days in RSSH (p=0.001). No intraoperative complications occurred in both groups. Early postoperative complications were 2.2% in RMPH and 4.3% in RSSH. Overall cost was higher in RMPH than in RSSH (respectively, $7,772.15 vs. $5,181.06). Conclusion Our retrospective study suggests the safety and feasibility of RSSH for staging early endometrial cancer without major differences from the RMPH in terms of surgical outcomes, but with lower hospital costs. Certainly, further studies are eagerly warranted to confirm our findings. PMID:27171672

  10. Obstetric analgesia - update 2016.

    PubMed

    Heesen, Michael; Klimek, Markus

    2016-07-07

    Neuraxial labor analgesia can be initiated via combined spinal-epidural (CSE) or stand-alone epidural. Pros and cons of these techniques are outlined in this review. In recent years computer-integrated patient-controlled epidural analgesia (CI-PCEA) and programed intermittent epidural boluses (PIEB) have been developed, adding to continuous infusion and PCEA for the maintenance of neuraxial analgesia. Postdural puncture headache (PDPH) and fever can occur secondary to labor epidural that both have clinical relevance for the care givers. Insights into the mechanism of epidural fever and treatment strategies for PDPH are outlined. Due to the increase in obesity the specific considerations for this patient group are discussed. New data have been presented for remifentanil, an ultra-shortly acting opioid, that is used in obstetric analgesia. Without breaking new data, the use of nitrous oxide especially by midwives has a kind of renaissance, and this will be discussed, too.

  11. Prophylactic antibiotics in obstetrics-gynecology: a current asset, a future liability?

    PubMed

    Ledger, William J

    2006-12-01

    Currently, prophylactic antibiotics have proven effective in lowering the postoperative and postprocedure infection rate following vaginal hysterectomy, emergency cesarean section for the patient in labor, radical hysterectomy, abdominal hysterectomy, pregnancy termination, hysterosalpingogram and intrauterine device insertion. Guidelines for the most effective and safe use are presented. Concerns are raised regarding the widespread prolonged use of prophylactic antibiotics on women in labor to prevent Group B streptococcal infections in newborn children and women with prolonged preterm membrane rupture. There is also an awareness needed of a growing incidence of infections seen in the hospital from community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Clostridium difficile. These problems have not been addressed by the current prophylactic antibiotic strategies.

  12. Business and Organizational Models of Obstetric and Gynecologic Hospitalist Groups.

    PubMed

    Garite, Thomas J; Levine, Lisa; Olson, Rob

    2015-09-01

    The growth of obstetric and gynecologic (OB/GYN) hospitalists throughout the United States has led to different organizational approaches, depending on the perception of what an OB/GYN hospitalist is. There are advantages of OB/GYN hospitalist practices; however, practitioners who do this as just 1 piece of their practice are not fulfilling the promise of what this new specialty can deliver. Because those with office practices have their own business models, this article is devoted to the organizational and business models of OB/GYN hospitalists for physicians whose practice is devoted to inpatient obstetrics with or without emergency room and/or inpatient gynecology coverage.

  13. Analgesia in Obstetrics

    PubMed Central

    Heesen, M.; Veeser, M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: An effective relief of labour pain has become an important part of obstetric medicine. Therefore regional nerve blocks, systemic analgesic and non-pharmacologic techniques are commonly used. This review article gives a summary of pathophysiology and anatomy of labour pain as well as advantages, disadvantages, risks and adverse reactions of analgesic techniques in newborns and parturients. Methods: We performed a selective literature search in Medline via PubMed using the search-terms “Analgesia” and “Obstetrics”. We also included the current guidelines of the German Society for Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine. Results: PDA and CSE are safe techniques for the relief of labour pain if contraindications are excluded. The risk for instrumental delivery but not for caesarean section is increased under neuraxial analgesia. PDA and CSE should be performed in an early stage of labour using low doses of local anaesthetics if possible. It is not necessary to wait for a defined cervical dilatation before starting neuraxial analgesia. Anesthesiologists and obstetricians should inform patients as soon as possible before the situation of stress during labour. Systemic opioid analgesia is a possible alternative for neuraxial techniques. Because of possible side effects systemic remifentanil analgesia should only be performed under continuous monitoring. Several nonpharmacologic methods can also relieve labour pain, but results of studies about their effectiveness are inconsistent. PMID:25264376

  14. Adjuvant chemotherapy for endometrial cancer after hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Nick; Bryant, Andrew; Miles, Tracie; Hogberg, Thomas; Cornes, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Background Endometrial adenocarcinoma (womb cancer) is a malignant growth of the lining (endometrium) of the womb (uterus). It is distinct from sarcomas (tumours of the uterine muscle). Survival depends the risk of microscopic metastases after surgery. Adjuvant (postoperative) chemotherapy improves survival from some other adenocarcinomas, and there is evidence that endometrial cancer is sensitive to cytotoxic therapy. This systematic review examines the effect of chemotherapy on survival after hysterectomy for endometrial cancer. Objectives To assess efficacy of adjuvant (postoperative) chemotherapy for endometrial cancer. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library 2010, Issue 3), MEDLINE and EMBASE up to August 2010, registers of clinical trials, abstracts of scientific meetings, reference lists of included studies and contacted experts in the field. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing adjuvant chemotherapy with any other adjuvant treatment or no other treatment. Data collection and analysis We used a random-effects meta-analysis to assess hazard ratios (HR) for overall and progression-free survival and risk ratios (RR) to compare death rates and site of initial relapse. Main results Five RCTs compared no additional treatment with additional chemotherapy after hysterectomy and radiotherapy. Four trials compared platinum based combination chemotherapy directly with radiotherapy. Indiscriminate pooling of survival data from 2197 women shows a significant overall survival advantage from adjuvant chemotherapy (RR (95% CI) = 0.88 (0.79 to 0.99)). Sensitivity analysis focused on trials of modern platinum based chemotherapy regimens and found the relative risk of death to be 0.85 ((0.76 to 0.96); number needed to treat for an additional beneficial outcome (NNT) = 25; absolute risk reduction = 4% (1% to 8%)). The HR for overall survival is 0.74 (0.64 to 0.89), significantly

  15. Quality of Care and Disparities in Obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Howell, Elizabeth A; Zeitlin, Jennifer

    2017-03-01

    Growing attention is being paid to obstetric quality of care as patients are pressing the health care system to measure and improve quality. There is also an increasing recognition of persistent racial and ethnic disparities prevalent in obstetric outcomes. Yet few studies have linked obstetric quality of care with racial and ethnic disparities. This article reviews definitions of quality of care, health disparities, and health equity as they relate to obstetric care and outcomes; describes current efforts and challenges in obstetric quality measurement; and proposes 3 steps in an effort to develop, track, and improve quality and reduce disparities in obstetrics.

  16. Psychological meaning of a woman with a hysterectomy among Mexican physicians and women.

    PubMed

    Marván, Maria Luisa; Catillo-López, Rosa Lilia; Ehrenzweig, Yamilet; Palacios, Pedro

    2012-01-01

    The psychological meaning of women who have had a hysterectomy, and attitudes toward them, were explored in 121 Mexican gynecologists, 155 women who had undergone a hysterectomy, and 115 women who had not had a hysterectomy. The surveys were completed between January and May 2011. Both groups of women defined a woman who had had a hysterectomy using words with positive meanings (healthy, happy, reassured, and complete), as well as words with negative meanings (sad, incomplete, and irritable). However, the participants who had not had a hysterectomy defined a woman who had had a hysterectomy using more negative words and showed more negative attitudes toward such a woman with a hysterectomy than those women who had undergone a hysterectomy. Among participants who had undergone a hysterectomy, those who were premenopausal prior to the surgery and those who had undergone bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy defined a woman who had had a hysterectomy in a more negative manner and showed the most negative attitudes. The gynecologists did not use words with emotional content regarding women who had had a hysterectomy and showed more neutral attitudes toward such a woman than did both groups of women. These findings could be helpful in designing support programs for women facing a hysterectomy.

  17. Risk model in stage IB1-IIB cervical cancer with positive node after radical hysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhilan; Huang, Kecheng; Lu, Zhiyong; Deng, Song; Xiong, Jiaqiang; Huang, Jia; Li, Xiong; Tang, Fangxu; Wang, Zhihao; Sun, Haiying; Wang, Lin; Zhou, Shasha; Wang, Xiaoli; Jia, Yao; Hu, Ting; Gui, Juan; Wan, Dongyi; Ma, Ding; Li, Shuang; Wang, Shixuan

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify risk factors in patients with surgically treated node-positive IB1-IIB cervical cancer and to establish a risk model for disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). A total of 170 patients who underwent radical hysterectomy and bilateral pelvic lymphadenectomy as primary treatment for node-positive International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage IB1-IIB cervical cancer from January 2002 to December 2008 were retrospectively analyzed. Five published risk models were evaluated in this population. The variables, including common iliac lymph node metastasis and parametrial invasion, were independent predictors of outcome in a multivariate analysis using a Cox regression model. Three distinct prognostic groups (low, intermediate, and high risk) were defined using these variables. Five-year DFS rates for the low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups were 73.7%, 60.0%, and 25.0%, respectively (P<0.001), and 5-year OS rates were 81.9%, 42.8%, and 25.0%, respectively (P<0.001). The risk model derived in this study provides a novel means for assessing prognosis of patients with node-positive stage IB1-IIB cervical cancer. Future study will focus on external validation of the model and refinement of the risk scoring systems by adding new biologic markers.

  18. Minimally Invasive Hysterectomy for Uteri Greater Than One Kilogram

    PubMed Central

    Vargas, Maria V.; Moawad, Gaby N.; Opoku-Anane, Jessica; Shu, Michael K. M.; Marfori, Cherie Q.; Robinson, James K.

    2017-01-01

    Background and Objectives: To assess the feasibility and safety of minimally invasive hysterectomy for uteri >1 kg. Methods: Clinical and surgical characteristics were collected for patients in an academic tertiary care hospital. Included were patients who underwent minimally invasive hysterectomy by 1 of 3 fellowship-trained gynecologists from January 1, 2009, to July 1, 2015 and subsequently had confirmed uterine weights of 1 kg or greater on pathology report. Both robotic and conventional laparoscopic procedures were included. Results: During the study period, 95 patients underwent minimally invasive hysterectomy with confirmed uterine weight over 1 kg. Eighty-eight percent were performed with conventional laparoscopy and 12.6% with robot-assisted laparoscopy. The median weight (range) was 1326 g (range, 1000–4800). The median estimated blood loss was 200 mL (range, 50–2000), and median operating time was 191 minutes (range, 75–478). Five cases were converted to laparotomy (5.2%). Four cases were converted secondary to hemorrhage and one secondary to extensive adhesions. There were no conversions after 2011. Intraoperative transfusion was given in 6.3% of cases and postoperative transfusion in 6.3% of cases. However, after 2013, the rate of intraoperative transfusion decreased to 1.0% and postoperative transfusion to 2.1%. Of the 95 cases, there were no cases with malignancy. Conclusions: This provides the largest case series of hysterectomy over 1 kg completed by a minimally invasive approach. Our complication rate improved with experience and was comparable to other studies of minimally invasive hysterectomy for large uteri. When performed by experienced surgeons, minimally invasive hysterectomy for uteri >1 kg can be considered feasible and safe. PMID:28352147

  19. [Laparoscopic hysterectomy in the management of endometrial cancer].

    PubMed

    Seracchioli, R; Fabbri, E; Guerrini, M; Mignemi, G; Venturoli, S

    2006-10-01

    Endometrial carcinoma is the most commonly reported gynaecologic malignancy in industrialized countries. Traditionally the surgical treatment of endometrial cancer is total abdominal hysterectomy, bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, and peritoneal washing cytology. Alternative surgical procedures have been proposed compared to abdominal hysterectomy: increased number of issues about laparoscopy shows the common trend to use this technique. Literature largely described advantages of the laparoscopic procedure compared to abdominal and vaginal surgery. Long-term follow-up series are not available; further investigation into survival and recurrence rates is indicated.

  20. Composite redesign of obstetrical forceps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, Seth W.; Smeltzer, Stan S.

    1994-01-01

    Due to the increase in the number of children being born recently, medical technology has struggled to keep pace in certain areas. In these areas, particular needs have arisen to which the subject of this paper is directed. In the area of obstetrics, the forceps design and function has remained relatively unchanged for a number of years. In an effort to advance the technology, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center has been asked by the obstetrical community to help in a redesign of the obstetric forceps. Traditionally the forceps design has been of tubular stainless steel, constructed in two halves which interlock and hinge to provide the gripping force necessary to aid in the delivery of an infant. The stainless steel material was used to provide for ease of cleaning and sterilization. However, one of the drawbacks of the non-flexible steel design is that excessive force can be placed upon an infants head which could result in damage or injury to the infant. The redesign of this particular obstetric tool involves applying NASA's knowledge of advanced materials and state of the art instrumentation to create a tool which can be used freely throughout the obstetrics community without the fear of injury to an infant being delivered.

  1. Recovery 3 and 12 months after hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Theunissen, Maurice; Peters, Madelon L.; Schepers, Jan; Maas, Jacques W.M.; Tournois, Fleur; van Suijlekom, Hans A.; Gramke, Hans-Fritz; Marcus, Marco A.E.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Chronic postsurgical pain (CPSP) is 1 important aspect of surgical recovery. To improve perioperative care and postoperative recovery knowledge on predictors of impaired recovery is essential. The aim of this study is to assess predictors and epidemiological data of CPSP, physical functioning (SF-36PF, 0–100), and global surgical recovery (global surgical recovery index, 0–100%) 3 and 12 months after hysterectomy for benign indication. A prospective multicenter cohort study was performed. Sociodemographic, somatic, and psychosocial data were assessed in the week before surgery, postoperatively up to day 4, and at 3- and 12-month follow-up. Generalized linear model (CPSP) and linear-mixed model analyses (SF-36PF and global surgical recovery index) were used. Baseline data of 468 patients were collected, 412 (88%) patients provided data for 3-month evaluation and 376 (80%) patients for 12-month evaluation. After 3 and 12 months, prevalence of CPSP (numeric rating scale ≥ 4, scale 0–10) was 10.2% and 9.0%, respectively, SF-36PF means (SD) were 83.5 (20.0) and 85.9 (20.2), global surgical recovery index 88.1% (15.6) and 93.3% (13.4). Neuropathic pain was reported by 20 (5.0%) patients at 3 months and 14 (3.9%) patients at 12 months. Preoperative pain, surgery-related worries, acute postsurgical pain on day 4, and surgery-related infection were significant predictors of CPSP. Baseline level, participating center, general psychological robustness, indication, acute postsurgical pain, and surgery-related infection were significant predictors of SF-36PF. Predictors of global surgical recovery were baseline expectations, surgery-related worries, American Society of Anesthesiologists classification, type of anesthesia, acute postsurgical pain, and surgery-related infection. Several predictors were identified for CPSP, physical functioning, and global surgical recovery. Some of the identified factors are modifiable and optimization of patients’ preoperative

  2. [Sheehan's syndrome after obstetric hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Ramos-López, L; Pons-Canosa, V; Juncal-Díaz, J L; Núñez-Centeno, M B

    2014-12-01

    Sheehan's syndrome is described as panhypopituitarism secondary to a pituitary hypoperfusion during or just after obstetric hemorrhage. Advances in obstetric care make this syndrome quite unusual, but some cases are reported in underdeveloped countries. Clinical presentation may change depending on the severity of the hormone deficiencies. The diagnosis is clinical, but abnormalities are observed in the magnetic resonance in up to 70% of patients. We present a case of a woman with hypotension, hypothermia and edemas in relation to a previous massive postpartum hemorrhage. Failure in lactation was the clue to the diagnosis. A review of its main features, its diagnosis and treatment in the current literature is also presented.

  3. Definitions of Obstetric and Gynecologic Hospitalists.

    PubMed

    McCue, Brigid; Fagnant, Robert; Townsend, Arthur; Morgan, Meredith; Gandhi-List, Shefali; Colegrove, Tanner; Stosur, Harriet; Olson, Rob; Meyer, Karenmarie; Lin, Andrew; Tessmer-Tuck, Jennifer

    2016-02-01

    The obstetric hospitalist and the obstetric and gynecologic hospitalist evolved in response to diverse forces in medicine, including the need for leadership on labor and delivery units, an increasing emphasis on quality and safety in obstetrics and gynecology, the changing demographics of the obstetric and gynecologic workforce, and rising liability costs. Current (although limited) research suggests that obstetric and obstetric and gynecologic hospitalists may improve the quality and safety of obstetric care, including lower cesarean delivery rates and higher vaginal birth after cesarean delivery rates as well as lower liability costs and fewer liability events. This research is currently hampered by the use of varied terminology. The leadership of the Society of Obstetric and Gynecologic Hospitalists proposes standardized definitions of an obstetric hospitalist, an obstetric and gynecologic hospitalist, and obstetric and gynecologic hospital medicine practices to standardize communication and facilitate program implementation and research. Clinical investigations regarding obstetric and gynecologic practices (including hospitalist practices) should define inpatient coverage arrangements using these standardized definitions to allow for fair conclusions and comparisons between practices.

  4. Hysterectomy through minilaparotomy for benign gynaecological conditions: a valid option

    PubMed Central

    Mahendru, Rajiv; Malik, Savita; Rana, Ss; Gupta, Seema

    2009-01-01

    Objective Efforts are continuously being made for surgery to be less invasive with a minimal access approach. This article reports our experience with minilaparotomy hysterectomy in patients with benign gynecological disease or preinvasive pathology. Material and Methods A prospective study to analyse the outcome and per-operative and post-operative complications was conducted in 69 patients undergoing hysterectomy by the minilaparotomy approach through 4–5cm Pfannenstiel incision. Results The mean operating time and postoperative hospital stay were 41.3 min and 3.1 days, respectively. Composite morbidity was encountered in 12 women (17.4%) with no major complications or mortality. None of the patients had an estimated blood loss over 500ml. Conclusion Minilaparotomy hysterectomy in benign gynecological disease provides an appealing, effective, expeditious, minimal access and cost-effective option/alternative to the traditional abdominal hysterectomy. It obviates the need for any additional expensive equipment and above all improves upon the per-operative and post-operative outcomes without compromising, whatsoever, the quality of surgery. PMID:24591874

  5. 42 CFR 50.207 - Sterilization by hysterectomy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... GENERAL APPLICABILITY Sterilization of Persons in Federally Assisted Family Planning Projects § 50.207 Sterilization by hysterectomy. (a) Programs or projects to which this subpart applies shall not perform or... reproducing. (b) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, programs or projects to which...

  6. 42 CFR 50.207 - Sterilization by hysterectomy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... GENERAL APPLICABILITY Sterilization of Persons in Federally Assisted Family Planning Projects § 50.207 Sterilization by hysterectomy. (a) Programs or projects to which this subpart applies shall not perform or... reproducing. (b) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, programs or projects to which...

  7. Ectopic tubal pregnancy after hysterectomy and tubal ligation.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Marilin; Mohammadi, Amir; Monteiro, Carmela

    2009-01-01

    Posthysterectomy ectopic pregnancy is an unusual condition that may present soon after hysterectomy or several years later. Similarly, although tubal ligation is a widespread method of contraception, tubal pregnancy after tubal ligation is not common either. If any of these conditions are rare, having an ectopic pregnancy after hysterectomy and tubal ligation is even more infrequent and only one of such cases was found in our review of the literature. We describe the case of a 35-year-old patient, with history of bilateral tubal ligation and vaginal hysterectomy that looked for medical attention due to abdominal pain. A pregnancy test was positive and a transvaginal ultrasound demonstrated the presence of a gestational sac at the vaginal cuff, adjacent to the ovary. An exploratory laparotomy showed a ruptured ectopic pregnancy located in the distal portion of the left fallopian tube. The occurrence of an ectopic pregnancy several years following tubal ligation and vaginal hysterectomy is a rare phenomenon that appears to be secondary to a fistulous connection into the peritoneal cavity.

  8. The Impact of Individual Surgeon Volume on Hysterectomy Costs

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, Jonathan P.; Kantartzis, Kelly L.; Lee, Ted; Bonidie, Michael J.

    2017-01-01

    Background and Objective: Hysterectomy is one of the most common surgical procedures women will undergo in their lifetime. Several factors affect surgical outcomes. It has been suggested that high-volume surgeons favorably affect outcomes and hospital cost. The objective is to determine the impact of individual surgeon volume on total hospital costs for hysterectomy. Methods: This is a retrospective cohort of women undergoing hysterectomy for benign indications from 2011 to 2013 at 10 hospitals within the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center System. Cases that included concomitant procedures were excluded. Costs by surgeon volume were analyzed by tertile group and with linear regression. Results: We studied 5,961 hysterectomies performed by 257 surgeons: 41.5% laparoscopic, 27.9% abdominal, 18.3% vaginal, and 12.3% robotic. Surgeons performed 1–542 cases (median = 4, IQR = 1–24). Surgeons were separated into equal tertiles by case volume: low (1–2 cases; median total cost, $4,349.02; 95% confidence interval [CI] [$3,903.54–$4,845.34]), medium (3–15 cases; median total cost, $2,807.90; 95% CI [$2,693.71–$2,926.93]) and high (>15 cases, median total cost $2,935.12, 95% CI [$2,916.31–$2,981.91]). ANOVA analysis showed a significant decrease (P < .001) in cost from low-to-medium– and low-to-high–volume surgeons. Linear regression showed a significant linear relationship (P < .001), with a $1.15 cost reduction per case with each additional hysterectomy. Thus, if a surgeon performed 100 cases, costs were $115 less per case (100 × $1.15), for a total savings of $11,500.00 (100 × $115). Conclusion: Overall, in our models, costs decreased as surgeon volume increased. Low-volume surgeons had significantly higher costs than both medium- and high-volume surgeons.

  9. Emergent Management of Postpartum Hemorrhage for the General and Acute Care Surgeon

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    who would try medical measures on their own, or call another obstetrical practitioner. Resuscitation Once significant postpartum hemorrhage has been...Research Clinical Obstetrics and Gynaecology 2002, 16(1):81-98. 12. Roberts WE: Emergent Obstetric Management of Postpar- tum Hemorrhage . Obstetrics and...Spring, MD, USA and 4Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, DC, USA Email: Allison B Weisbrod

  10. Liability in triage: management of EMTALA regulations and common obstetric risks.

    PubMed

    Angelini, Diane J; Mahlmeister, Laura R

    2005-01-01

    The Emergency Medical Treatment and Active Labor Act (EMTALA) affects all clinicians who provide triage care for pregnant women. EMTALA has specific regulations for hospitals relative to women in active labor. Violations can carry stiff penalties. It is critical for clinicians performing obstetric triage to understand the duties and obligations of this law. This article discusses EMTALA and reviews common liability risks in obstetric triage as well as strategies to modify those risks.

  11. Obstetric analgesia. Clinical pharmacokinetic considerations.

    PubMed

    Kanto, J

    1986-01-01

    All drugs used in obstetric analgesia are more or less lipophilic, their site of action is in the central nervous system, and they have good membrane penetrability in the fetomaternal unit. Thus the dose and method of administration as well as the duration of treatment are important clinical determinants of drug effects in the fetus and newborn. In the past, too much emphasis has been placed on fetomaternal blood concentration ratios of different agents; it is now appreciated that the extent of fetal tissue distribution and the neonatal elimination rate are pharmacokinetically much more important. Extensive fetal tissue distribution is reflected in a low fetomaternal drug concentration ratio, which may be followed by prolonged neonatal elimination of the drug. Currently, the most effective and safest method for obstetric analgesia is regional epidural administration of bupivacaine or lignocaine (lidocaine); only low doses are needed and the newborn is able to handle these agents efficiently. On the basis of pharmacokinetic and neurobehavioural assessments, inhalational anaesthetic agents appear to be more attractive than pethidine (meperidine) or benzodiazepines. Intermittent administration and fast pulmonary elimination of inhalational agents ensure that long-lasting residual effects are unlikely to occur. The kinetics of epidural and intrathecal opiates explain the problems associated with their use in obstetrics. Among the newer drugs used in obstetric analgesia, the properties of meptazinol and isoflurane appear interesting and these agents warrant further study. All drugs used in obstetric analgesia have a potentially detrimental effect on the neonate and, therefore, knowledge of fetal and neonatal pharmacokinetics is of importance to the clinician.

  12. Focused review: simulation in obstetric anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Stephen D

    2012-01-01

    Simulation can be used to teach technical skills, to evaluate clinician performance, to help assess the safety of the environment of care, and to improve teamwork. Each of these has been successfully demonstrated in obstetric anesthesia simulation. Task simulators for epidural placement, failed intubation, and blood loss estimation seem to improve performance. Resident performance in an emergency cesarean delivery can be measured and assessed against his/her peers. Running simulated crises on a labor and delivery unit (in situ drills) can help to identify and correct potential safety concerns (latent errors) without exposing patients to the risks associated with these concerns. Finally, simulation can effectively assess and teach teamwork tools and behaviors. It is unclear, however, how well the lessons learned in the simulated environment translate into improved behaviors or better care in the clinical setting, or whether simulation improves patient outcomes. More research is needed to help answer these questions.

  13. The ongoing challenges of regional and general anaesthesia in obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Sia, Alex T H; Fun, Wendy L; Tan, Terry U

    2010-06-01

    The increasing trend of caesarean section in the setting of increasing maternal age, obesity and other concomitant diseases will continue to challenge the obstetric anaesthetist in his/her task of providing regional and general anaesthesia. The challenges of providing anaesthesia for an emergency caesarean section, particularly the risks of general anaesthesia, will be debated. The need for involvement of a multidisciplinary team, good communication and challenges surrounding the provision of anaesthesia to such patients are discussed.

  14. Regional Expansion of Minimally Invasive Surgery for Hysterectomy: Implementation and Methodology in a Large Multispecialty Group

    PubMed Central

    Andryjowicz, Esteban; Wray, Teresa

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Approximately 600,000 hysterectomies are performed in the US each year, making hysterectomy the second most common major operation performed in women. Several methods can be used to perform this procedure. In 2009, a Cochrane Review concluded “that vaginal hysterectomy should be performed in preference to abdominal hysterectomy, where possible. Where vaginal hysterectomy is not possible, a laparoscopic approach may avoid the need for an abdominal hysterectomy. Risks and benefits of different approaches may however be influenced by the surgeon's experience. More research is needed, particularly to examine the long-term effects of the different types of surgery.” This article reviews the steps that a large multispecialty group used to teach non-open hysterectomy methods to improve the quality of care for their patients and to decrease the number of inpatient procedures and therefore costs. The percentages of each type of hysterectomy performed yearly between 2005 and 2010 were calculated, as well as the length of stay (LOS) for each method. Methods: A structured educational intervention with both didactic and hands-on exercises was created and rolled out to 12 medical centers. All patients undergoing hysterectomy for benign conditions through the Southern California Permanente Medical Group (a large multispecialty group that provides medical care to Kaiser Permanente patients in Southern California) between 2005 and 2010 were included. This amounted to 26,055 hysterectomies for benign conditions being performed by more than 350 obstetrician/gynecologists (Ob/Gyns). Results: More than 300 Ob/Gyns took the course across 12 medical centers. On the basis of hospital discharge data, the total number of hysterectomies, types of hysterectomies, and LOS for each type were identified for each year. Between 2005 and 2010, the rate of non-open hysterectomies has increased 120% (from 38% to 78%) and the average LOS has decreased 31%. PMID:22319415

  15. Obstetric Sphincter Injury Interacts with Diarrhea and Urgency to Increase the Risk of Fecal Incontinence in Women with IBS

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Barbara L.; Matthews, Catherine A.; Palsson, Olafur S; Geller, Elizabeth; Turner, Marsha; Parnell, Brent; Crane, Andrea; Jannelli, Mary; Wells, Ellen; Connolly, AnnaMarie; Lin, Feng-Chang; Whitehead, William E.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To confirm that fecal urgency and diarrhea are independent risk factors for fecal incontinence (FI), to identify obstetrical risk factors associated with FI in women with IBS (irritable bowel syndrome), and to determine whether obstetric anal sphincter injuries interact with diarrhea or urgency to explain the occurrence of FI. Methods The study is a supplement to a diary study of bowel symptoms in 164 female patients with IBS. Subjects completed daily bowel symptom diaries for 90 consecutive days and rated each bowel movement (BM) for stool consistency and presence of urgency, pain, and FI. All female participants from the parent study were invited to complete a telephone-administered 33-item bowel symptom and obstetric history questionnaire which included the Fecal Incontinence Severity Index (FISI). Results Out of 164 women in the parent study, 115 (70.1%) completed the interview. Seventy-four (45.1%) reported FI on their diary including 34 (29.6%) who reported at least one episode per month, 112 (97.4%) reported episodes of urgency, and 106 (92.2%) reported episodes of diarrhea. The mean FISI score was 13.9±9.7. Upon multivariable analysis, FI was significantly associated with parity (p=0.007), operative vaginal delivery (p=0.049), obstetrical sphincter lacerations (p=0.007), fecal urgency (p=0.005), diarrhea (p=0.008), and hysterectomy (p=0.004), but was not associated with episiotomy, pelvic organ prolapse, or urinary incontinence. The synergistic interactions of obstetric anal sphincter laceration with urgency (p=0.002) and diarrhea (p=0.004) were significant risk factors for FI. Conclusion Fecal urgency and diarrhea are independent risk factors for FI, and they interact with obstetric anal sphincter laceration to amplify the risk of FI. PMID:23321658

  16. Community awareness about risk factors, presentation and prevention and obstetric fistula in Nabitovu village, Iganga district, Uganda

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Obstetric fistula is a worldwide problem that is devastating for women in developing countries. The cardinal cause of obstetric fistula is prolonged obstructed labour and delay in seeking emergency obstetric care. Awareness about obstetric fistula is still low in developing countries. The objective was to assess the awareness about risk factors of obstetric fistulae in rural communities of Nabitovu village, Iganga district, Eastern Uganda. Methods A qualitative study using focus group discussion for males and females aged 18-49 years, to explore and gain deeper understanding of their awareness of existence, causes, clinical presentation and preventive measures for obstetric fistula. Data was analyzed by thematic analysis. Results The majority of the women and a few men were aware about obstetric fistula, though many had misconceptions regarding its causes, clinical presentation and prevention. Some wrongly attributed fistula to misuse of family planning, having sex during the menstruation period, curses by relatives, sexually transmitted infections, rape and gender-based violence. However, others attributed the fistula to delays to access medical care, induced abortions, conception at an early age, utilization of traditional birth attendants at delivery, and some complications that could occur during surgical operations for difficult deliveries. Conclusion Most of the community members interviewed were aware of the risk factors of obstetric fistula. Some respondents, predominantly men, had misconceptions/myths about risk factors of obstetric fistula as being caused by having sex during menstrual periods, poor usage of family planning, being a curse. PMID:24321441

  17. Teamwork in obstetric critical care.

    PubMed

    Guise, Jeanne-Marie; Segel, Sally

    2008-10-01

    Whether seeing a patient in the ambulatory clinic environment, performing a delivery or managing a critically ill patient, obstetric care is a team activity. Failures in teamwork and communication are among the leading causes of adverse obstetric events, accounting for over 70% of sentinel events according to the Joint Commission. Effective, efficient and safe care requires good teamwork. Although nurses, doctors and healthcare staff who work in critical care environments are extremely well trained and competent medically, they have not traditionally been trained in how to work well as part of a team. Given the complexity and acuity of critical care medicine, which often relies on more than one medical team, teamwork skills are essential. This chapter discusses the history and importance of teamwork in high-reliability fields, reviews key concepts and skills in teamwork, and discusses approaches to training and working in teams.

  18. Teamwork in obstetric critical care

    PubMed Central

    Guise, Jeanne-Marie; Segel, Sally

    2016-01-01

    Whether seeing a patient in the ambulatory clinic environment, performing a delivery or managing a critically ill patient, obstetric care is a team activity. Failures in teamwork and communication are among the leading causes of adverse obstetric events, accounting for over 70% of sentinel events according to the Joint Commission. Effective, efficient and safe care requires good teamwork. Although nurses, doctors and healthcare staff who work in critical care environments are extremely well trained and competent medically, they have not traditionally been trained in how to work well as part of a team. Given the complexity and acuity of critical care medicine, which often relies on more than one medical team, teamwork skills are essential. This chapter discusses the history and importance of teamwork in high-reliability fields, reviews key concepts and skills in teamwork, and discusses approaches to training and working in teams. PMID:18701352

  19. [En block hysterectomy. Institutional experience of 6 years].

    PubMed

    Bonfante Ramírez, E; Bolaños Ancona, R; Ambas Argüelles, M; Juárez García, L; Castelazo Morales, E

    1997-06-01

    On block hysterectomy is defined as the removal of the gravid uterus with its gestational content in situ. The described indications for the realization of this procedure are neoplastic process as the most frequent cause; septic process, persistent trophoblastic diseases, and hemorrhage due to anomalous placentation. This is a retrospective, descriptive study of twelve cases of on block hysterectomy collected from January 1989 to December 1994 at Instituto Nacional de Perinatología. An average age of 33.4 years was found. The number of pregnancies for this patients in average was found to be 4.1. The gestational age was established between 9 to 29 weeks. Four patients with a 4 or more previous miscarriage background. There were two reported cases having a multiple gestation. Among the complications found, there were three cases of hipovolemic shock and one with abcess of vaginal cupula. The average days of hospitalization was 5.3 days. We found no mortality at all in this study, and the histopathologic correlation accorded in 100% of the cases. In this five year review, 12 cases of on block hysterectomy were found, being the most frequent reason for it's realization the persistent trophoblastic diseases; severe hemorrhage in second place, and serious infection process in third. The observed complications were derived from the hemodynamic compromise of each patient. Even though on block hysterectomy is one rarely seen procedure, it most be in mind as an alternative therapeutical instance it most be carried out in third level institutions, with technology and human resources capable of solving any complication derived from this kind of surgery.

  20. Nerve-sparing robotic radical hysterectomy: our technique.

    PubMed

    Puntambekar, Shailesh P; Lawande, Akhil; Desai, Riddhi; Kenawadekar, Rahul; Joshi, Saurabh; Joshi, Geetanjali Agarwal

    2014-03-01

    Robotic surgery is now becoming accepted for treatment of gynaecological malignancies. Nerve preservation during radical hysterectomy is increasingly being offered due to improved post-operative bladder and sexual function. We aimed to demonstrate the feasibility of performing a nerve-sparing radical hysterectomy robotically and to assess the oncological and functional outcomes associated with this surgery. Between August 2011 and January 2013, a total of 12 non-consecutive patients underwent robotic surgery for early stage cervical cancer at our institution. Patients comprising FIGO stage IA2 to IB1 were treated with nerve-sparing robotic radical hysterectomy using a C1 (Querleu-Morrow classification) type technique. The feasibility, operative time, blood loss, oncological outcome and post-operative bladder function were assessed. All the procedures were completed robotically without conversion to laparoscopy or laparotomy. The mean age of the patients was 56 years (range 44-76) and their mean body mass index was 22.6 kg/m(2) (range 18.1-26.4). The mean operative time was 156 min (range 120-250); the mean blood loss was 120 ml (50-250). The Foley catheter was removed on the third post-operative day, with full recovery of bladder function in all patients except one who required prolonged catheterisation for 3 weeks. Residual urine was 40 ml (range 30-80). Parametrial margins of 2.5-3 cm, distal vaginal margins of 2-2.5 cm and a mean nodal harvest of 24 (range 18-30) were achieved. The mean hospital stay was 3 days (range 2-6). The median follow-up is 12 months. There is no loco-regional recurrence. All the patients are sexually active. Robotic nerve-sparing radical hysterectomy is technically feasible to perform, and is oncologically safe for early stage cervical carcinoma.

  1. Changing Trends In Family Practice Obstetrics

    PubMed Central

    Ranson, Peter J.

    1978-01-01

    Since trends in some countries show less involvement of the family doctor in obstetrics, and even more reliance on the obstetrician/gynecologist as the primary care physician for women, this study was designed to find out if obstetrics could be adequately practiced in a small rural hospital by family physicians with occasional surgical help. Also, a questionnaire was sent to 200 family physicians, 100 in Ottawa and 100 in Vancouver, to ascertain their involvement in obstetrics.

  2. In Search for the Best Minimally Invasive Hysterectomy Approach for the Large Uterus: A Review.

    PubMed

    Kho, Rosanne M; Abrão, Mauricio S

    2017-03-17

    Review of literature is conducted to determine the best minimally invasive hysterectomy (MIH) route for large uterus, identify preoperative considerations and describe alternative techniques to power morcellation. Studies after 2010 revealed multiple MIH approaches. Vaginal hysterectomy is preferred over laparoscopic and laparoscopic assistance with less operative time and hospital cost. In morbidly obese patients with large uteri, total laparoscopic hysterectomy is superior to vaginal hysterectomy with lesser odds of blood transfusion and lower length of hospital stay. Although MIH for the large uterus is feasible, many questions remain unanswered. Well-designed multicenter prospective trial incorporating clinical pathways to compare outcomes is needed.

  3. The Effect of Hysterectomy on Women’s Sexual Function: a Narrative Review

    PubMed Central

    Danesh, Mahmonier; Hamzehgardeshi, Zeinab; Moosazadeh, Mahmood; Shabani-Asrami, Fereshteh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Regarding the contradictions about positive and negative effects of hysterectomy on women’s sexual functioning, this study was conducted to review the studies on the effect of hysterectomy on postoperative women’s sexual function. Method: This study was a narrative review and performed in 5 steps: a) Determining the research questions, b) Search methods for identification of relevant studies, c) Choosing the studies, d) Classifying, sorting out, and summarizing the data, and e) reporting the results. Findings: The review of the studies yielded 5 main categories of results as follows: The effect of hysterectomy on Sexual desire, the effect of hysterectomy on sexual arousal, the effect of hysterectomy on orgasm, the effect of hysterectomy on dyspareunia, and the effect of hysterectomy on sexual satisfaction. Conclusion: According to the studies reviewed in this study, most of the sexual disorders improve after hysterectomy for uterine benign diseases, and most of the patients who were sexually active before the surgery experienced the same or better sexual functioning after the surgery. An important solution for making these women ready to face with postoperative sexual complications is to train them on the basis of needs assessment in order that the patients undergoing hysterectomy be ready and capable of coping with the complications, and their sexual functioning improves after the surgery. PMID:26843731

  4. Factors associated with hysterectomy among older women from Latin America and the Caribbean.

    PubMed

    Escobar, Daniel A; Botero, Ana M; Cash, Miranda G; Reyes-Ortiz, Carlos A

    2016-07-01

    To identify factors associated with hysterectomy, data collected from 1999-2000 were assessed from seven cities of the Health, Well-Being and Aging in Latin America and the Caribbean Study on 6,549 women, aged 60 years and older. Hysterectomy prevalence ranged from 12.8% in Buenos Aires (Argentina) to 30.4% in Bridgetown (Barbados). The median age for having had a hysterectomy ranged from 45 to 50 years across the cities and was 47 years in the pooled sample. Ethnic differences in hysterectomy rates were partially explained by differences across cities. Factors significantly associated with lower odds for hysterectomy included older age, household crowding conditions, and having public/military or no health insurance, compared to having private health insurance. Women who had three or more children were less likely to have had a hysterectomy, a finding that differs from most previous studies. Socioeconomic position related to rates of hysterectomy in late life rather than hysterectomies earlier in life. However, the nature of these differences varied across birth cohorts. The findings suggested that adverse socioeconomic factors were most likely related to hysterectomy risk by affecting access to health care, whereas parity was most likely acting through an effect on decision-making processes.

  5. Implementing safe obstetric anesthesia in Eastern Europe.

    PubMed

    Kuczkowski, Krzysztof M; Kuczkowski, Krzysztof M

    2009-08-01

    The position of woman in any civilization is an index of the advancement of that civilization; the position of woman is gauged best by the care given her at the birth of her child. Obstetric anesthesia, by definition, is a subspecialty of anesthesia devoted to peripartum, perioperative, pain and anesthetic management of women during pregnancy and the puerperium. Today, obstetric anesthesia has become a recognized subspecialty of anesthesiology and an integral part of practice of most anesthesiologists. Perhaps, no other subspecialty of anesthesiology provides more personal gratification than the practice of obstetric anesthesia. This article reviews the challenges associated with implementing safe obstetric anesthesia practice in Eastern Europe.

  6. Obstetric fistula: what about gender power?

    PubMed

    Roush, Karen; Kurth, Ann; Hutchinson, M Katherine; Van Devanter, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    Despite over 40 years of research there has been little progress in the prevention of obstetric fistula and women continue to suffer in unacceptable numbers. Gender power imbalance has consistently been shown to have serious implications for women's reproductive health and is known to persist in regions where obstetric fistula occurs. Yet, there is limited research about the role gender power imbalance plays in childbirth practices that put women at risk for obstetric fistula. This information is vital for developing effective maternal health interventions in regions affected by obstetric fistula.

  7. Training and assessment in obstetrics: the role of simulation.

    PubMed

    Ennen, Christopher S; Satin, Andrew J

    2010-12-01

    Simulation is becoming an integral part of the training and assessment of obstetricians. Given the variety of manual skills that must be learned, awake patients and high-risk environment, obstetrics is uniquely suited for simulation. Simulation provides opportunities to rehearse and learn from mistakes without risks to patients. The use of simulation can help overcome some limitations of the current medical education and practice environment, including work-hour limitations and concerns for patient safety. Both low- and high-fidelity simulation models can be used to accomplish educational goals. Basic and advanced skills as well as the management of obstetric emergencies are amenable to simulation. For a simulation programme to be successful, one must identify the learner and the skills that are to be learned. In the future, simulation will be more available and realistic and will be used not only for education, but also for ongoing assessment of providers.

  8. Comparison of cost and operative outcomes of robotic hysterectomy compared to laparoscopic hysterectomy across different uterine weights.

    PubMed

    Moawad, Gaby N; Abi Khalil, Elias D; Tyan, Paul; Shu, Michael K; Samuel, David; Amdur, Richard; Scheib, Stacey A; Marfori, Cherie Q

    2017-01-31

    Operative cost and outcomes between robotic and laparoscopic hysterectomy across different uterine weights. Retrospective cohort study including patients undergoing robotic and laparoscopic hysterectomy for benign disease at an Academic university hospital. One hundred and ninety six hysterectomies were identified (101 robotic versus 95 laparoscopic). Demographic and surgical characteristics were statistically equivalent. Robotic group had a higher body mass index (±SD) (32.9 ± 6.5 versus 30.4 ± 7.1, p 0.012) and more frequent history of adnexal surgery (12.9 versus 4.2%, p 0.031). Laparoscopic group had a higher number of concurrent salpingectomy (81 versus 66.3%, p 0.02). Estimated blood loss did not differ between procedures. Compared to robotic hysterectomies, laparoscopic procedures added 47 min (CI: 31-63 min; p < 0.001) of operative time, costed $1648 more (CI: 500-2797; p = 0. 005) and had triple the odds of having an overnight admission (OR = 2.94 CI: 1.34-6.44; p = 0.007). After stratification of cases by uterine weight, the mean operative time difference between the two groups in uteri between 750 and 1000 g and in uteri >1000 g was 81.3 min (CI: 51.3-111.3, p < 0.0001) and 70 min (CI: 26-114, p < 0.005), respectively, in favor of the robotic group. Mean direct cost difference in uteri between 750 and 1000 g and uteri >1000 g was 1859$ (CI: 629-3090, p < 0.006) and 4509$ (CI: 377-8641, p < 0.004), respectively, also in favor of the robotic group. In expert hands, robotic hysterectomy for uteri weighing more than 750 g may be associated with shorter operative time and improved cost profile.

  9. An update on obstetric anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Beilin, Yaakov

    2010-03-01

    Many women in the United States receive analgesia for labor and delivery. The ideal labor analgesic technique would confer complete pain relief without side effects. The analgesic technique would not cause any lower extremity motor blockade nor interfere with the progress or course of labor and would be sufficiently flexible to produce anesthesia for instrumental or cesarean deliveries. Furthermore, the baby would be vigorous at birth. Modern obstetric analgesia techniques and medications achieve these goals. This article reviews current labor analgesia techniques and medications used during labor and delivery.

  10. Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospitalist Fellowships.

    PubMed

    Vintzileos, Anthony M

    2015-09-01

    This article establishes the rationale and development of an obstetrics and gynecology (OB/GYN) hospitalist fellowship program. The pool of OB/GYN hospitalists needs to be drastically expanded to accommodate the country's needs. Fellowship programs should provide extra training and confidence for recent resident graduates who want to pursue a hospitalist career. Fellowships should train physicians in a way that aligns their interests with those of the hospital with respect to patient care, teaching, and research. Research in the core measures should be a necessary component of the fellowship so as to provide long-term benefits for all stakeholders, including hospitals and patients.

  11. Obstetrics Hospitalists: Risk Management Implications.

    PubMed

    Veltman, Larry

    2015-09-01

    The concept of having an in-house obstetrician (serving as an obstetrics [OB] hospitalist) available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week provides a safety net for OB events that many need immediate intervention for a successful outcome. A key precept of risk management, that of loss prevention, fits perfectly with the addition of an OB hospitalist role in the perinatal department. Inherent in the role of OB hospitalists are the patient safety and risk management principles of improved communication, enhanced readiness, and immediate availability.

  12. Retroperitoneal Approach in Single-Port Laparoscopic Hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Hyun; Kim, Chul Jung; Lee, Yoo-Young; Choi, Chel Hun; Lee, Jeong-Won; Bae, Duk-Soo; Kim, Byoung-Gie

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: In single-port laparoscopic hysterectomy(SP-LH), ligation of the uterine artery is a fundamental step. We analyzed the effectiveness and safety of 2 different surgical approaches to ligate the uterine artery in SP-LH for women with uterine myomas or adenomyosis. Methods: A single surgeon (TJ Kim) performed 36 retroperitoneal single-port laparoscopic hysterectomies (SP-rH) from September 1st 2012 to April 30th 2013. We compared these cases with 36 cases of conventional single-port laparoscopic abdominal hysterectomy (SP-aH) performed by the same surgeon from November 1st 2011 to July 31th 2012 (historic control). In the SP-rH cases, the retroperitoneal space was developed to identify the uterine artery; then, it was ligated where it originates from the internal iliac artery. Results: Estimated blood loss (EBL) was decreased in the SP-rH group compared with the SP-aH group (100 mL vs 200 mL; P = .023). The median total operative time was shorter in the SP-rH group (75 minutes vs 93 minutes; P < .05). The operative time of the Scope I phase, including ligation of the utero-ovarian (or infundibulopelvic) ligament, round ligament, uterine artery, and detachment of the bladder, was longer in the SP-rH group compared with that in the SP-aH group (26.0 minutes vs 24 minutes; P = .043). However, the operative time of the Scope II phase, including detachment of the uterosacral-cardinal ligament, vaginal cutting, and uterus removal, was shorter in the SP-rH group (19.5 minutes vs 30 minutes; P < .05). Operative complications were not significantly different between the groups (P = .374). Conclusion: Although SP-rH may be considered technically difficult, it can be performed safely and efficiently with surgical outcomes comparable to those of SP-aH. PMID:27186067

  13. A Qualitative Study of Women's Decisions Not to Have a Hysterectomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fredericks, Erin

    2013-01-01

    In focusing on individual and physician demographics and system characteristics that lead to hysterectomy rate variations, researchers overlook the impact of culturally mediated meanings women assign to their bodies, hysterectomy, and other treatments. In this study I sought to provide a fuller description of this decision-making process by…

  14. Incidental Intravascular Lipoleiomyomatosis in A Hysterectomy Specimen: How To Manage?

    PubMed Central

    Aslanova, Rakhshanda; Can, Nuray; Okten, Sabri Berkem; Aslan, Mehmet Musa

    2015-01-01

    Leiomyomas are common benign tumors in female gynaecologic surgery. They are originated from smooth muscle cells of the uterus and/or sometimes of the uterine vessels. Intravascular lipoleiomyomatosis is a very rare form of leiomyomas which grow within veins and can extend up to vena cava inferior and right heart chamber with cardiac symptoms and is diagnosed by cardiovascular surgeons. We report a case of incidental intravascular lipoleiomyomatosis which was confined to the uterus being diagnosed after a total abdominal hysterectomy by pathology and its management strategy. PMID:25738043

  15. [Is a hysterectomy justifiable to prevent post-tubal ligation syndrome?].

    PubMed

    Maheux, R; Fugère, P

    1980-12-01

    Among 2057 tubal ligations performed between 1971-75 in "Hopital Saint-Luc" in Montreal, 78 patients had to be readmitted for hysterectomy. The main indication for hysterectomy among these patients was for menstrual disorders (65%). These menstrual disorders were present at the moment of the tubal ligation in about half of the patients. Among the patients who had to be reoperated for hysterectomy for menstrual disorders and who were asymptomatic at the momemt of their tubal ligation, 88% were using oral contraceptives for a mean period of 5.8 years. The low incidence of hysterectomy post-tubal ligation (3.8%) does not seem to justify a total hysterectomy to prevent what has been described as the "post tubal ligation syndrome" in the patients who are asymptomatic and desire a permanent sterilization. (Author's modified)

  16. Obstetric fistula in low and middle income countries.

    PubMed

    Capes, Tracy; Ascher-Walsh, Charles; Abdoulaye, Idrissa; Brodman, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Vesicovaginal fistula secondary to obstructed labor continues to be an all-too-common occurrence in underdeveloped nations throughout Africa and Asia. Vesicovaginal fistula remains largely an overlooked problem in developing nations as it affects the most marginalized members of society: young, poor, illiterate women who live in remote areas. The formation of obstetric fistula is a result of complex interactions of social, biologic, and economic influences. The key underlying causes of fistula are the combination of a lack of functional emergency obstetric care, poverty, illiteracy, and low status of women. In order to prevent fistula, some strategies include creation of governmental policy aimed toward reducing maternal mortality/morbidity and increasing availability of skilled obstetric care, as well as attempts to increase awareness about its prevention and treatment among policymakers, service providers, and communities. Whereas prevention will require the widespread development of infrastructure within these developing countries, treatment of fistula is an act which can be done "in the now." Treatment and subsequent reintegration of fistula patients requires a team of specialists including surgeons, nurses, midwives, and social workers, which is largely unavailable in developing countries. However, there is increasing support for training of fistula surgeons through standardized programs as well as establishment of rehabilitation centers in many nations. The eradication of fistula is dependent upon building programs that target both prevention and treatment.

  17. The cost-effectiveness of total laparoscopic hysterectomy compared to total abdominal hysterectomy for the treatment of early stage endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Graves, Nicholas; Janda, Monika; Merollini, Katharina; Gebski, Val; Obermair, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Objective To summarise how costs and health benefits will change with the adoption of total laparoscopic hysterectomy compared to total abdominal hysterectomy for the treatment of early stage endometrial cancer. Design Cost-effectiveness modelling using the information from a randomised controlled trial. Participants Two hypothetical modelled cohorts of 1000 individuals undergoing total laparoscopic hysterectomy and total abdominal hysterectomy. Outcome measures Surgery costs; hospital bed days used; total healthcare costs; quality-adjusted life years; and net monetary benefits. Results For 1000 individuals receiving total laparoscopic hysterectomy surgery, the costs were $509 575 higher, 3548 hospital fewer bed days were used and total health services costs were reduced by $3 746 221. There were 39.13 more quality-adjusted life years for a 5 year period following surgery. Conclusions The adoption of total laparoscopic hysterectomy is almost certainly a good decision for health services policy makers. There is 100% probability that it will be cost saving to health services, a 86.8% probability that it will increase health benefits and a 99.5% chance that it returns net monetary benefits greater than zero. PMID:23604345

  18. Hysterectomy and predictors for opioid prescription in a chronic pain clinic sample

    PubMed Central

    Darnall, Beth; Li, Hong

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To describe the prevalence of hysterectomy for women aged 18-45 seeking treatment at a chronic pain clinic, to describe patient characteristics (pain intensity, age, smoking status, hormone replacement status, and psychosocial factors) based on opioid and hysterectomy status, and to determine whether hysterectomy status predicted receipt of opioid prescription. Design Retrospective cross-sectional chart review. Participants Total 323 new female patients aged 18-45 who completed the Brief Pain Inventory-Short Form at initial evaluation at a chronic pain clinic during a 12-month period (July 2008- June 2009). Measures Data were collected from the Brief Pain Inventory and medical charts. Variables included opioid prescription, average pain intensity, pain type, age, hysterectomy status, smoking status, and pain-related dysfunction across domains measured by the Brief Pain Inventory. The association of opioid prescription with hysterectomy and other factors were determined by logistic regression. Results Prevalence of hysterectomy was 28.8%. Average pain intensity was not associated with either hysterectomy or opioid prescription status. However, hysterectomy and high levels of pain-related dysfunction were significantly and independently associated with opioid prescription after adjusting for age and pain intensity. More than 85% of women with hysterectomy and high pain-related dysfunction had opioid prescription. Conclusions Hysterectomy may confer risk for pain-related dysfunction and opioid prescription in women 45 and younger. More research is needed to understand (1) how patient characteristics influence prescribing patterns; and (2) the specific medical risks and consequences of chronic opioid therapy in this population. PMID:21223499

  19. A qualitative study of the experience of obstetric fistula survivors in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Gebresilase, Yenenesh Tadesse

    2014-01-01

    Research on obstetric fistula has paid limited attention to the lived experiences of survivors. This qualitative study explored the evolution of survivors' perceptions of their social relationships and health since developing this obstetric complication. In-depth interviews were conducted with eight survivors who were selected based on purposive and snowball sampling techniques. Thematic categorization and content analysis was used to analyze the data. The resultant themes included participants' understanding of factors predisposing to fistula, challenges they encounter, their coping responses, and the meaning of their experiences. First, the participants had a common understanding of the factors that predisposed them to obstetric fistula. They mentioned poor knowledge about pregnancy, early marriage, cultural practices, and a delay in or lack of access to emergency obstetric care. Second, the participants suffered from powerlessness experienced during their childhood and married lives. They also faced prolonged obstructed labor, physical injury, emotional breakdown, depression, erosion of social capital, and loss of healthy years. Third, to control their negative emotions, participants reported isolating themselves, having suicidal thoughts, positive interpretation about the future, and avoidance. To obtain relief from their disease, the women used their family support, sold their properties, and oriented to reality. Fourth, the participants were struggling to keep going, to accept their changed reality, and to change their perspectives on life. In conclusion, obstetric fistula has significant physical, psychosocial, and emotional consequences. The study participants were not passive victims but rather active survivors of these challenges. Adequate support was not provided by their formal or informal support systems. To prevent and manage obstetric fistula successfully, there should be family-based interventions that improve access to and provision of emergency

  20. A qualitative study of the experience of obstetric fistula survivors in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Gebresilase, Yenenesh Tadesse

    2014-01-01

    Research on obstetric fistula has paid limited attention to the lived experiences of survivors. This qualitative study explored the evolution of survivors’ perceptions of their social relationships and health since developing this obstetric complication. In-depth interviews were conducted with eight survivors who were selected based on purposive and snowball sampling techniques. Thematic categorization and content analysis was used to analyze the data. The resultant themes included participants’ understanding of factors predisposing to fistula, challenges they encounter, their coping responses, and the meaning of their experiences. First, the participants had a common understanding of the factors that predisposed them to obstetric fistula. They mentioned poor knowledge about pregnancy, early marriage, cultural practices, and a delay in or lack of access to emergency obstetric care. Second, the participants suffered from powerlessness experienced during their childhood and married lives. They also faced prolonged obstructed labor, physical injury, emotional breakdown, depression, erosion of social capital, and loss of healthy years. Third, to control their negative emotions, participants reported isolating themselves, having suicidal thoughts, positive interpretation about the future, and avoidance. To obtain relief from their disease, the women used their family support, sold their properties, and oriented to reality. Fourth, the participants were struggling to keep going, to accept their changed reality, and to change their perspectives on life. In conclusion, obstetric fistula has significant physical, psychosocial, and emotional consequences. The study participants were not passive victims but rather active survivors of these challenges. Adequate support was not provided by their formal or informal support systems. To prevent and manage obstetric fistula successfully, there should be family-based interventions that improve access to and provision of

  1. Intensive care unit admission of obstetric cases: a single centre experience with contemporary update.

    PubMed

    Ng, Vivian K S; Lo, T K; Tsang, H H; Lau, W L; Leung, W C

    2014-02-01

    OBJECTIVES. To review the characteristics of a series of obstetric patients admitted to the intensive care unit in a regional hospital in 2006-2010, to compare them with those of a similar series reported from the same hospital in 1989-1995 and a series reported from another regional hospital in 1998-2007. DESIGN. Retrospective case series. SETTING. A regional hospital in Hong Kong. PATIENTS. Obstetric patients admitted to the Intensive Care Unit of Kwong Wah Hospital from 1 January 2006 to 31 December 2010. RESULTS. From 2006 to 2010, there were 67 such patients admitted to the intensive care unit (0.23% of total maternities and 2.34% of total intensive care unit admission), which was a higher incidence than reported in two other local studies. As in the latter studies, the majority were admitted postpartum (n=65, 97%), with postpartum haemorrhage (n=39, 58%) being the commonest cause followed by pre-eclampsia/eclampsia (n=17, 25%). In the current study, significantly more patients had had elective caesarean sections for placenta praevia but fewer had had a hysterectomy. The duration of intensive care unit stay was shorter (mean, 1.8 days) with fewer invasive procedures performed than in the two previous studies, but maternal and neonatal mortality was similar (3% and 6%, respectively). CONCLUSION. Postpartum haemorrhage and pregnancy-induced hypertension were still the most common reasons for intensive care unit admission. There was an increasing trend of intensive care unit admissions following elective caesarean section for placenta praevia and for early aggressive intervention of pre-eclampsia. Maternal mortality remained low but had not decreased. The intensive care unit admission rate by itself might not be a helpful indicator of obstetric performance.

  2. Total Microlaparoscopic Radical Hysterectomy in Early Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gallotta, Valerio; Fagotti, Anna; Rossitto, Cristiano; Piovano, Elisa; Scambia, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objective: In less than 2 decades, laparoscopy has contributed to modification in the management of early cervical cancer patients, and all comparisons between open and laparoscopic-based radical operations showed an identical oncological outcome. The aim of this study is to describe surgical instrumentations and technique to perform total microlaparoscopy radical hysterectomy in early cervical cancer patients and report our preliminary results in terms of operative time and perioperative outcomes. Methods: Between January 1, 2012, and March 25, 2012, 4 consecutive early cervical cancer patients were enrolled in this study. Results: We performed 3 type B2 and 1 type C1-B2 total microlaparoscopy radical hysterectomy, and in all cases concomitant bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy were carried out. Median operative time was 165 minutes (range: 155 to 215) (mean: 186), and median estimated blood loss was 30 mL (range: 20 to 50). Median number of pelvic lymph nodes removed was 12 (range: 11 to 15). All procedures were completed without 5-mm port insertion and without conversion. No intraoperative or early postoperative complications were reported. Conclusions: This report suggests a role of microlaparoscopy in the surgical management of early cervical cancer with adequate oncological results, superimposable operative time, and perioperative outcomes with respect to standard laparoscopy. PMID:23743381

  3. Short-term antibiotic prophylaxis of mixed infections during hysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Moroni, M; Baccolo, M; Cavalli, G; Belloni, C; Ferrari, N; Sartor, V

    1979-01-01

    Surgical procedures on contaminated tissues, such as hysterectomy with opened vagina, are frequently followed by local or systemic infections. It seems that a prolonged antibiotic prophylaxis is not justified because of possible induction of resistant mutants or dysmicrobisms. The administration of antibiotics only in a short pre- and postsurgical period appears to be more rational. We have carried out a controlled clinical trial with the aim of evaluating the efficacy of this prophylactic practice. One hundred forty-five patients submitted to vaginal and two hundred seventy-five to abdominal hysterectomy entered this study (started September 1977). All patients received local nitrofurantoin treatment and were then subdivided into four randomized groups: control group, groups treated with thiamphenicol, cephazolin, thiamphenicol plus cephazolin, respectively. Each antibiotic was administered in the dose of 1 gm one hour before and five and 12 hours after surgery. Antibiotics were chosen taking into consideration the usual vaginal microbial flora, notoriously mixed (aerobic and anaerobic). The three treated groups presented a significant decrease in the incidence and severity of infectious complications. The use of antibiotics in the postoperative period resulted in significantly reduced morbidity in the treated groups. Thiamphenicol appears to be the most effective drug. Bacteriological studies showed that local treatment of the vagina decreased the bacteria charge, but never brought about sterilization.

  4. [Maternal death of obstetrical origin. Medicolegal aspects].

    PubMed

    Chevrant-Breton, O; Lebervet, J Y; Vialard, J

    1985-01-01

    The authors have become interested in maternal mortality. This study has been carried out solely to look at the medico-legal aspect. Increasingly good health is seen as a right and the doctor the dispenser of this service. The rights of the mother (and of the infant) become of increasing importance. The improvement in obstetrical techniques, which are much better known to the public, have made families far more confident of the results of delivery. This is now seen as something without any danger. But delivering a baby still has lots of risks. Because of this, if an accident happens the obstetrician more than any other doctor perhaps can find himself in the courts. To avoid this he has to know very well the causes of maternal mortality in order to avoid them as far as possible. Furthermore, he must not undertake stupid emergency measures often initiated as measures of desperation caused by his emotional involvement for a patient who is approaching death. Finally, the expert should look for all the causes of death so that he does no wrongly blame the doctor for a maternal death.

  5. Provision for major obstetric haemorrhage: an Australian and New Zealand survey and review.

    PubMed

    Fowler, S J

    2005-12-01

    Obstetric haemorrhage is a leading cause of maternal death and the most common contributor to serious obstetric morbidity. Maternal mortality audit data suggest that appropriate preparation and good emergency management leads to improved outcome. The aim of this study was to assess facilities relevant to major obstetric haemorrhage management in all units in Australia and New Zealand that offer operative obstetric services. The questionnaire was divided into ten sections: demographics, facilities, staffing, policies and guidelines, drugs, procedures, equipment, point of care testing, availability of O negative blood and free comments. Responses were received from 240 (76.4%) of the 314 hospitals surveyed (187 public and 53 private). One hundred and nine units (45%) had fewer than 500 deliveries per year Distances to referral facilities were frequently very large. Of the 90 hospitals (38.1%) without an onsite blood bank, 12 did not have a supply of blood for emergencies. Half of all units (n=121) had on-site intensive care or high dependency facilities and 72.9% (n=175) had an on-site cardiac arrest team. Only 58.8% of units (n=141) had a written haemorrhage protocol. Findings are presented in the context of other literature, including evidence-based guidelines. Haemorrhage responds well to appropriate treatment, although careful preparation and anticipation of problems is required. In our region geographical factors and different systems of healthcare complicate provision of obstetric services. Where facilities are limited, women should be offered antenatal transfer to a larger centre.

  6. [HYPNOSIS IN OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY].

    PubMed

    Rabinerson, David; Yeoshua, Effi; Gabbay-Ben-Ziv, Rinat

    2015-05-01

    Hypnosis is an ancient method of treatment, in which an enhanced state of mind and elevated susceptibility for suggestion of the patient, are increased. Hypnosis is executed, either by a caregiver or by the person himself (after brief training). The use of hypnosis in alleviating labor pain has been studied as of the second half of the 20th century. In early studies, the use of hypnosis for this purpose has been proven quite effective. However, later studies, performed in randomized controlled trial terms, have shown controversial results. Other studies, in which the effect of hypnosis was tested in various aspects of both obstetrics and gynecology and with different levels of success, are elaborated on in this review.

  7. Haemostatic management of obstetric haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Collis, R E; Collins, P W

    2015-01-01

    The haemostatic management of major obstetric haemorrhage remains challenging, and current published guidance relies heavily on experience from the non-pregnant population and expert opinion. In recent years, an interest in the implications of relative hypofibrinogenaemia, point-of-care monitoring of coagulation abnormalities, and the potential to give goal-directed therapy to correct coagulopathies, have created the possibility of significantly challenging and changing guidance. There is evidence that the haemostatic impairment in the pregnant population is different from trauma-induced bleeding, and the type and rate of onset of coagulopathies differ depending on the underlying cause. This review examines areas such as possible intervention points, describes evidence for over-transfusion of fresh frozen plasma in some situations and challenges conventional thinking on formulaic management. It also examines the rationale for other therapeutic options, including fibrinogen concentrate and tranexamic acid.

  8. The "group" in obstetric psychoprophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Volpe, B; Tenaglia, F; Fede, T; Cerutti, R

    1983-01-01

    In the practice of obstetric psychoprophylaxis every method employed considered always the group both from a psychological and a pedagogic point of view. Today the group of pregnant women (or couples) is considered under various aspects: - psychological: the group as a support for members with regard to maternal and parental emotional feelings; - anthropological: the group fills up an empty vital space and becomes a "rite de passage" from a state of social identity to another one; - social: the group is a significative cultural intermediary between health services and the women-patient. The knowledge of these aspects becomes an important methodological support for group conductors. We present an analysis of our experience with groups and how this has affected the Psychoprophylaxis in the last years.

  9. Nationwide population-based cohort study of uterine rupture in Belgium: results from the Belgian Obstetric Surveillance System

    PubMed Central

    Vandenberghe, G; De Blaere, M; Van Leeuw, V; Roelens, K; Englert, Y; Hanssens, M; Verstraelen, H

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We aimed to assess the prevalence of uterine rupture in Belgium and to evaluate risk factors, management and outcomes for mother and child. Design Nationwide population-based prospective cohort study. Setting Emergency obstetric care. Participation of 97% of maternity units covering 98.6% of the deliveries in Belgium. Participants All women with uterine rupture in Belgium between January 2012 and December 2013. 8 women were excluded because data collection forms were not returned. Results Data on 90 cases of confirmed uterine rupture were obtained, of which 73 had a previous Caesarean section (CS), representing an estimated prevalence of 3.6 (95% CI 2.9 to 4.4) per 10 000 deliveries overall and of 27 (95% CI 21 to 33) and 0.7 (95% CI 0.4 to 1.2) per 10 000 deliveries in women with and without previous CS, respectively. Rupture occurred during trial of labour after caesarean section (TOLAC) in 57 women (81.4%, 95% CI 68% to 88%), with a high rate of augmented (38.5%) and induced (29.8%) labour. All patients who underwent induction of labour had an unfavourable cervix at start of induction (Bishop Score ≤7 in 100%). Other uterine surgery was reported in the history of 22 cases (24%, 95% CI 17% to 34%), including 1 case of myomectomy, 3 cases of salpingectomy and 2 cases of hysteroscopic resection of a uterine septum. 14 cases ruptured in the absence of labour (15.6%, 95% CI 9.5% to 24.7%). No mothers died; 8 required hysterectomy (8.9%, 95% CI 4.6% to 16.6%). There were 10 perinatal deaths (perinatal mortality rate 117/1000 births, 95% CI 60 to 203) and perinatal asphyxia was observed in 29 infants (34.5%, 95% CI 25.2% to 45.1%). Conclusions The prevalence of uterine rupture in Belgium is similar to that in other Western countries. There is scope for improvement through the implementation of nationally adopted guidelines on TOLAC, to prevent use of unsafe procedures, and thereby reduce avoidable morbidity and mortality. PMID:27188805

  10. Obstetric triage revisited: update on non-obstetric surgical conditions in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Angelini, Diane J

    2003-01-01

    New findings and diagnostic advances warrant revisiting key features of acute non-obstetric abdominal pain in pregnancy. Four of the most frequently seen conditions warranting surgical intervention are: appendicitis, cholecystitis, pancreatitis, and bowel obstruction. Because pregnancy often masks abdominal complaints, effectively assessing and triaging abdominal pain in pregnant women can be difficult. Working in obstetric triage settings and triaging obstetric phone calls demand continual updating of abdominal assessment knowledge and clinical skills.

  11. State-level Uterine Corpus Cancer Incidence Rates Corrected for Hysterectomy Prevalence, 2004-2008

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Rebecca L.; Devesa, Susan S.; Cokkinides, Vilma; Ma, Jiemin; Jemal, Ahmedin

    2012-01-01

    Background The interpretation of uterine cancer rates is hindered by the inclusion of women whose uterus has been surgically removed in the population at risk. Hysterectomy prevalence varies widely by state and race/ethnicity, exacerbating this issue. Methods We estimated hysterectomy-corrected, age-adjusted uterine corpus cancer incidence rates by race/ethnicity for 49 states and the District of Columbia during 2004-2008 using case counts obtained from population-based cancer registries; population data from the U.S. Census Bureau; and hysterectomy prevalence data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. Corrected and uncorrected incidence rates were compared with regard to geographic and racial/ethnic disparity patterns and the association with obesity. Results Among non-Hispanic whites, uterine cancer incidence rates (per 100,000 woman-years) uncorrected for hysterectomy prevalence ranged from 17.1 in Louisiana to 32.1 in New Jersey, mirrored regional hysterectomy patterns, and were not correlated with obesity prevalence (Pearson’s correlation coefficient, r = 0.06, two-sided p = 0.68). In comparison, hysterectomy-corrected rates were higher by 30% (District of Columbia) to more than 100% (Mississippi, Louisiana, Alabama, and Oklahoma), displayed no discernible geographic pattern, and were moderately associated with obesity (r = 0.37, two-sided p = 0.009). For most states, hysterectomy correction diminished or reversed the black/white deficit and accentuated the Hispanic/white deficit. Conclusion Failure to adjust uterine cancer incidence rates for hysterectomy prevalence distorts true geographic and racial patterns and substantially underestimates the disease burden, particularly for Southern states. Impact Correction for hysterectomy is necessary for the accurate evaluation of uterine cancer rates. PMID:23125334

  12. Is personalized medicine achievable in obstetrics?

    PubMed

    Quinney, Sara K; Patil, Avinash S; Flockhart, David A

    2014-12-01

    Personalized medicine seeks to identify the right dose of the right drug for the right patient at the right time. Typically, individualization of therapy is based on the pharmacogenomic makeup of the individual and environmental factors that alter drug disposition and response. In addition to these factors, during pregnancy, a woman's body undergoes many changes that can impact the therapeutic efficacy of medications. Yet, there is minimal research regarding personalized medicine in obstetrics. Adoption of pharmacogenetic testing into the obstetrical care is dependent on evidence of analytical validity, clinical validity, and clinical utility. Here, we briefly present information regarding the potential utility of personalized medicine for treating the obstetric patient for pain with narcotics, hypertension, and preterm labor, and discuss the impediments of bringing personalized medicine to the obstetrical clinic.

  13. Is Personalized Medicine Achievable in Obstetrics?

    PubMed Central

    Quinney, Sara K; Flockhart, David A; Patil, Avinash S

    2014-01-01

    Personalized medicine seeks to identify the right dose of the right drug for the right patient at the right time. Typically, individualization of therapy is based on the pharmacogenomic make-up of the individual and environmental factors that alter drug disposition and response. In addition to these factors, during pregnancy a woman’s body undergoes many changes that can impact the therapeutic efficacy of medications. Yet, there is minimal research regarding personalized medicine in obstetrics. Adoption of pharmacogenetic testing into the obstetrical care is dependent on evidence of analytical validity, clinical validity, and clinical utility. Here, we briefly present information regarding the potential utility of personalized medicine for treating the obstetric patient for pain with narcotics, hypertension, and preterm labor and discuss the impediments of bringing personalized medicine to the obstetrical clinic. PMID:25282474

  14. Mexican beliefs and attitudes toward hysterectomy and gender-role ideology in marriage.

    PubMed

    Marván, Ma Luisa; Quiros, Vanessa; López-Vázquez, Esperanza; Ehrenzweig, Yamilet

    2012-01-01

    One hundred and sixty-one Mexican respondents completed a questionnaire that measured beliefs and attitudes toward hysterectomy and another that measured gender-role ideology in marriage (GRIMQ). The participants were divided into two groups according to the GRIMQ: "high machismo/marianismo" and "low machismo/marianismo" groups. The participants belonging to the first group showed the most negative attitudes toward hysterectomy. In this group, men showed more negative attitudes toward hysterctomy and were less likely than women to believe that hysterectomy has positive aspects. The findings are discussed in light of male dominance and female subordination that prevail in certain cultural groups of Mexico.xs.

  15. Laparoscopic-assisted vaginal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy with suturing technique.

    PubMed

    Sadik, S; Uran, B; Ozaydin, T

    1995-08-01

    Since December 1992 we have performed laparoscopic-assisted vaginal hysterectomy (LAVH) in 50 women using strict, conventional, basic operative rules, and compared it with open abdominal hysterectomy with respect to operation time, cost, postoperative analgesia requirements, and length of hospital stay. The indications for hysterectomy were uterine myoma in 32 patients, dysfunctional bleeding in 13, and postmenopausal bleeding in 5. The mean operating time was 118 minutes. The mean blood loss was 3.2% for preoperative and postoperative hematocrit values. The complication rate was 15%. The advantages of LAVH include short hospitalization, early recovery, low blood loss, and minimal postoperative discomfort.

  16. Planning a collaborative conference to provide interdisciplinary education with a focus on patient safety in obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Jennifer; Newhouse, Linda; Flora, Robert; Burkett, Amy

    2014-01-01

    Collaboration is an important component of evidence-based practice in modern health care. A number of publications have touted the benefits of "team training" to improve obstetric outcomes during emergent situations. In August 2011, the Ohio sections of the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses (AWHONN) and the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) held a joint conference that focused on interdisciplinary education to promote patient safety. This joint venture drew more than 120 attendees, 12 exhibitors and 17 poster displays. Evaluations were positive and attendees cited planned practice changes for themselves as well as for their respective institutions.

  17. [Shock in obstetrics. Institutional experience].

    PubMed

    Bonfante Ramírez, E; Ahued Ahued, R; García-Benítez, C Q; Bolaños Ancona, R; Callejos, T; Juárez García, L

    1997-04-01

    Shock is one of the most difficult problems an obstetrician can face. Hemorrhage is the main reason of shock. A descriptive and retrospective research was conducted at Instituto Nacional de Perinatología, from January 1992 to May 1996, including all patients admitted to the intensive care unit with diagnosis of shock. There were found 90 cases with diagnosis of shock, 82 were hipovolemic, and 8 cases had the septic kind of shock. The average of age was 32.2 years, with a gestational age between 6.2 to 41.4 weeks . There were 71 healthy patients, hypertension was associated to pregnancy in 9 cases, infertility in two, myomatosis in 2, and diabetes in 2 more patients. Other 5 cases reported different pathologies. The most frequent cause for hipovolemic shock resulted to be placenta acreta (40 cases), followed by uterine tone alterations in 37 patients, ectopic pregnancy in 7, uterine rupture or perforation in 4, and vaginal or cervical lacerations in 2. The estimated blood loss varied from 2200 cc to 6500 cc, and the minimal arterial pressure registered during shock was between 40/20 mmHg to 90/60 mmHg. Medical initial assistance consisted in volume reposition with crystalloids, globular packages, and plasma expansors in 73 patients (81.1%). The rest of the patients received in addition coloids, platelets and cryoprecipitates. A total of 76 patients required surgical intervention consisting in total abdominal hysterectomy. In 5 cases the previous surgical procedure was done and ligation of hypogastric vessels was needed. Salpingectomy was performed in 5 patients, and rupture or perforation repair in 3. The average surgery time was 2 hours and 33 minutes. The observed complications were 7 cases with abscess of the cupula, consumption coagulopathy in 2, 1 vesical quirurgical injury, 1 intestinal occlusion, and 11 vesico-vaginal fistula. The average days of hospitalization resulted to be 5. The most frequent kind of shock seen by obstetricians is the hipovolemic type

  18. A New Approach to Teaching Obstetric Anaesthesia in Low-Resource Areas.

    PubMed

    Enright, Angela; Grady, Kate; Evans, Faye

    2015-10-01

    Maternal mortality is high in many low- and middle-income countries. Unsafe anaesthesia contributes to this, especially for women requiring Caesarean section. Anaesthesia providers with limited skills and poor resources are often faced with complicated obstetric patients. A new course called SAFE-OB teaches a systematic approach to anticipating, preparing for, and dealing with obstetric anaesthetic emergencies. The course has now been taught in many African, Asian, and Latin countries. Initial follow-up suggests improvement in skills and knowledge, and effective translation of these to the workplace. Efforts are made to make the course locally owned and sustainable. We feel that SAFE-OB is an effective method of improving obstetric anaesthesia care.

  19. Obstetrics in a Time of Violence: Mexican Midwives Critique Routine Hospital Practices.

    PubMed

    Zacher Dixon, Lydia

    2015-12-01

    Mexican midwives have long taken part in a broader Latin American trend to promote "humanized birth" as an alternative to medicalized interventions in hospital obstetrics. As midwives begin to regain authority in reproductive health and work within hospital units, they come to see the issue not as one of mere medicalization but of violence and violation. Based on ethnographic fieldwork with midwives from across Mexico during a time of widespread social violence, my research examines an emergent critique of hospital birth as a site of what is being called violencia obstétrica (obstetric violence). In this critique, women are discussed as victims of explicit abuse by hospital staff and by the broader health care infrastructures. By reframing obstetric practices as violent-as opposed to medicalized-these midwives seek to situate their concerns about women's health care in Mexico within broader regional discussions about violence, gender, and inequality.

  20. [Significance of Multi-center Obstetrics Perioperative Team Training Including Various Medical Staffs].

    PubMed

    Komasawa, Nobuyasu; Fujita, Daisuke; Nakayama, Mai; Fujiwara, Shunsuke; Mihara, Ryosuke; Okada, Daisuke; Omoto, Haruka; Tanaka, Motoshige; Nishihara, Isao; Minami, Toshiaki

    2016-02-01

    We report the development of a multi-center/multispecialist obstetrics perioperative team training program. Participants were members of the team, including anesthesiologists, obstetricians, and operation nurses. A questionnaire survey was conducted prior to course participation to clarify any questions team members had. The courses included a lecture and simulation training with scenario-based discussions or the use of a simulator. Scenarios included massive bleeding during cesarean section, massive bleeding after vaginal delivery, and emergency cesarean section for premature placental abruption. After each course, participants discussed problems associated with obstetrics medical safety in the context of each theme. Simulation-based perioperative team training with anesthesiologists, obstetricians, and operation nurses may serve as a vehicle to promote perioperative obstetrics patient safety.

  1. Denial of pregnancy: obstetrical aspects.

    PubMed

    Brezinka, C; Huter, O; Biebl, W; Kinzl, J

    1994-03-01

    Between 1987 and 1990 27 women were observed who professed they did not know they were pregnant until term or until premature contractions set in. The aim of this study was to evaluate obstetric history and pregnancy outcomes and assess defence mechanisms and coping strategies which contribute to negation of pregnancy. In 11 women pregnancy was denied until delivery, five of these had breech presentations. In nine women denial ended between 27 and 36 weeks and in seven women between 21 and 26 weeks of gestation. Three of the four fetal deaths that occurred and two of the three cases of prematurity occurred in the last group. There was no infanticide but one woman delivered her infant alone and concealed. Most women reported irregular, sometimes menstruation-like bleedings during pregnancy, three women had taken oral contraceptives during pregnancy. Few women reported actual symptoms of pregnancy, such as nausea and weight gain. Denial of pregnancy is a heterogeneous condition with different meanings and different psychiatric diagnoses in different women. Stressors (e.g. separation from partner, interpersonal problems etc.) do play an important role as precipitating factors for the development of an adjustment disorder with maladaptive denial of pregnancy. There is a fluid transition between conscious coping strategies and unconscious defence mechanisms.

  2. Obstetric audit: the Bradford way.

    PubMed

    Lodge, Virginia; Lomas, Karen; Jaworskyj, Suzanne; Thomson, Heidi

    2014-08-01

    Ultrasound is widely used as a screening tool in obstetrics with the aim of reducing maternal and foetal morbidity. However, to be effective it is recommended that scanning services follow standard protocols based on national guidelines and that scanning practice is audited to ensure consistency. Bradford has a multi-ethnic population with one of the highest rates of birth defects in the UK and it requires an effective foetal anomaly screening service. We implemented a rolling programme of audits of dating scans, foetal anomaly scans and growth scans carried out by sonographers in Bradford. All three categories of scan were audited using measurable parameters based on national guidelines. Following feedback and re-training to address issues identified, re-audits of dating and foetal anomaly scans were carried out. In both cases, sonographers being re-audited had a marked improvement in their practice. Analysis of foetal abnormality detection rates showed that as a department, we were reaching the nationally agreed detection rates for the Fetal Anomaly Screening Programme auditable conditions. Audit has been shown to be a useful and essential process in achieving consistent scanning practices and high quality images and measurements.

  3. [Obstetric analgesia in Norwegian hospitals].

    PubMed

    Dahl, V; Hagen, I E; Raeder, J C

    1998-04-30

    We report the results of a questionnaire sent to anaesthetists and midwives on the use of obstetric analgesia and anaesthesia in Norwegian hospitals in 1996. 95% of the 49 hospitals involved responded to the questionnaire, representing a total of 56,884 births. The use of epidural analgesia in labour varied from 0 to 25% in the different hospitals with a mean value of 15%. Epidural analgesia was much more widely used in university and regional hospitals than in local hospitals (p < 0.001). Five of the local hospitals did not offer epidural analgesia during labour at all. The combination of low-dose local anaesthetic and an opioid (either sufentanil or fentanyl) had not been introduced in nine of the hospitals (20%). The optimal use of epidural analgesia to relieve labour pain was judged to be more frequent by the anaesthetists than by the midwives (19% versus 11%, p < 0.01). In response to what factors limited the frequency of epidural analgesia, the anaesthetists specified factors related to the attitude of the midwife, and the midwives specified factors related to the anaesthetist. Only five of the hospitals provided written information on the various analgesic methods that could be employed during labour. The majority of midwives considered the analgesic methods employed on their maternity ward to be good or excellent. The frequency of Caesarean section was 12%; spinal anaesthesia was used in 55%, epidural anaesthesia in 17%, and general anaesthesia in 28% of the cases.

  4. Obstetric hemorrhage: A global review.

    PubMed

    Goffman, Dena; Nathan, Lisa; Chazotte, Cynthia

    2016-03-01

    Postpartum hemorrhage remains the number one cause of maternal death globally despite the fact that it is largely a preventable and most often a treatable condition. While the global problem is appreciated, some may not realize that in the United States postpartum hemorrhage is a leading cause of mortality and unfortunately, the incidence is on the rise. In New York, obstetric hemorrhage is the second leading cause of maternal mortality in the state. National data suggests that hemorrhage is disproportionally overrepresented as a contributor to severe maternal morbidity and we suspect as we explore further this will be true in New York State as well. Given the persistent and significant contribution to maternal mortality, it may be useful to analyze the persistence of this largely preventable cause of death within the framework of the historic "Three Delays" model of maternal mortality. The ongoing national and statewide problem with postpartum hemorrhage will be reviewed in this context of delays in an effort to inform potential solutions.

  5. [Hyperthermia after obstetrical epidural anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Mercier, F J; Benhamou, D

    1994-01-01

    Unlike epidural anaesthesia for general surgery or caesarean section, épidural analgesia for labour leads to maternal hyperthermia. Its recent demonstration is probably related to the multiple influencing factors: site of measurement, ambient temperature, previous labour duration and dilatation at the time of epidural puncture, and occurrence of shivering. During the first 2 to 5 hours of epidural analgesia, there is a weak--if any--thermic increase. Then, when labour is prolonged (mostly primiparae) a linear increase occurs with time, at a mean rate of 1 degree C per 7 hours. The pathophysiology remains hypothetical: heat loss (sweating and hyperventilation) would be reduced during epidural analgesia and therefore surpassed by the important labour-induced heat production. This hyperthermia has been correlated with foetal tachycardia but never with any infectious process. A potential deleterious effect is still debated and may lead to propose an active cooling for the mother. This hyperthermia must also be recognized to avoid an inadequate obstetrical attitude (antibiotics, extractions).

  6. Trends in pain relief in labour: implications for obstetric analgesia service in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Imarengiaye, C O

    2005-09-01

    Labour and delivery result in severe pain for most women. Attention to comfort and analgesia for women in labour is important for physiological reasons and out of compassion. A review of common methods of pain relief of labour was done. Inhalation method as well as intravenous administration of opioids for pain relief in labour is fast giving way to lumbar epidural analgesia. The use of local anaesthetic in labour offers superior pain relief, is effective and safe. The inhalation and parenteral routes seem reserved for patients with contraindication to insertion of epidural. The administration of high volume dilute concentration of local anaesthetic plus lipid soluble opioids, with some level of patient's control, appears to be the current trend in the management of labour pains. There is a body of evidence indicating that Nigerian women may want pain relief in labour. However, there is no organised labour analgesia service in Nigeria. An organised obstetric analgesia service can be developed within the limits of available manpower and technology in an emerging country like Nigeria. This article therefore, focuses on trends in obstetric analgesia and its implications on the development of organised obstetric analgesia services in Nigeria. Key words: obstetric analgesia, obstetric analgesia service, Nigeria.

  7. Diagnostic value of hysteroscopy: correlation with histological findings after dilatation and curettage and hysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Piccolboni, G; Arlacchi, E; Cattani, P; Zardini, R; Lavanda, E; Zardini, E

    1991-01-01

    The Authors carried out a comparative assessment of hysteroscopy diagnosis and histological findings obtained by dilatation and curettage and hysterectomy. Analysis of the data shows a good correlation between hysteroscopic diagnosis and histological findings obtained with dilatation and curettage.

  8. Application of da Vinci® Robot in simple or radical hysterectomy: Tips and tricks

    PubMed Central

    Iavazzo, Christos; Gkegkes, Ioannis D.

    2016-01-01

    The first robotic simple hysterectomy was performed more than 10 years ago. These days, robotic-assisted hysterectomy is accepted as an alternative surgical approach and is applied both in benign and malignant surgical entities. The two important points that should be taken into account to optimize postoperative outcomes in the early period of a surgeon’s training are how to achieve optimal oncological and functional results. Overcoming any technical challenge, as with any innovative surgical method, leads to an improved surgical operation timewise as well as for patients’ safety. The standardization of the technique and recognition of critical anatomical landmarks are essential for optimal oncological and clinical outcomes on both simple and radical robotic-assisted hysterectomy. Based on our experience, our intention is to present user-friendly tips and tricks to optimize the application of a da Vinci® robot in simple or radical hysterectomies. PMID:27403078

  9. Minilaparoscopic hysterectomy made easy: first report on alternative instrumentation and new integrated energy platform.

    PubMed

    Ng, Ying Woo; Lim, Li Min; Fong, Yoke Fai

    2014-05-01

    Minilaparoscopy is an attractive approach for hysterectomy due to advantages such as reduced morbidities and enhanced cosmesis. However, it has not been popularized due to the lack of suitable instruments and high technical demand. We aim to highlight the first case of minilaparoscopic hysterectomy reported in Asia and the use of a new integrated energy platform, Thunderbeat. We would like to propose an alternative method of instrumentation, so as to improve the feasibility and safety of minilaparoscopic hysterectomy. The first minilaparoscopic hysterectomy in Singapore was successfully completed using the alternative instrumentation and new energy platform. There was no conversion or complication during the surgery. The patient recovered uneventfully. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the use of such alternative instrumentation. This approach in instrumentation and the new energy platform will improve the feasibility and speed of the surgery and ensure safety in our patients.

  10. AAGL Practice Report: Practice guidelines for intraoperative cystoscopy in laparoscopic hysterectomy.

    PubMed

    2012-01-01

    Lower urinary tract injuries are a serious potential complication of laparoscopic hysterectomy. The risk of such injuries may be as high as 3%, and most, but not all, are detected at intraoperative cystoscopy. High-quality published data suggest a sensitivity of 80% to 90% for ureteral trauma. Among the injuries that may be missed are those related to the use of energy-based surgical tools that include ultrasound and radiofrequency electricity. Cystoscopic evaluation of the lower urinary tract should be readily available to gynecologic surgeons performing laparoscopic hysterectomy. To this end, it is essential that a surgeon with appropriate education, training, and institutional privileges be available without delay to perform this task. Currently available evidence supports cystoscopy at the time of laparoscopic hysterectomies. The rate of detectable but unsuspected lower urinary tract injuries is enough to suggest that surgeons consider cystoscopic evaluation following laparoscopic total hysterectomy as a routine procedure.

  11. Combined Spinal Epidural Anaesthesia for Caesarean Section and Hysterectomy in a Parturient with Placenta Accreta

    PubMed Central

    Seyhan, Tülay Özkan; Sungur, Mukadder Orhan; Edipoğlu, İpek; Baştu, Ercan

    2014-01-01

    Placenta accreta complicates the anaesthetic and surgical approach in caesarean section. In this report, a parturient with placenta accreta and multiple drug allergies who was managed using combined spinal epidural anaesthesia for caesarean hysterectomy is discussed. PMID:27366410

  12. Total laparoscopic hysterectomy of very enlarged uterus (3030 g): case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Roviglione, Giovanni; Pesci, Anna; Quintana, Sara; Bruni, Francesco; Clarizia, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Fibromatosis is the most frequent benign uterine pathology of fertile women, rarely causing anomalous enlargement of the uterus. Traditionally the surgical treatment has been abdominal hysterectomy. However, development of minimally invasive techniques has led to major safeness of the laparoscopic route. We report a case of total laparoscopic hysterectomy performed on a uterus weighting more than 3,000 g and present a review of the literature about the laparoscopic approach to very enlarged uteri. PMID:25097706

  13. Total laparoscopic hysterectomy of very enlarged uterus (3030 g): case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Ceccaroni, Marcello; Roviglione, Giovanni; Pesci, Anna; Quintana, Sara; Bruni, Francesco; Clarizia, Roberto

    2014-06-01

    Fibromatosis is the most frequent benign uterine pathology of fertile women, rarely causing anomalous enlargement of the uterus. Traditionally the surgical treatment has been abdominal hysterectomy. However, development of minimally invasive techniques has led to major safeness of the laparoscopic route. We report a case of total laparoscopic hysterectomy performed on a uterus weighting more than 3,000 g and present a review of the literature about the laparoscopic approach to very enlarged uteri.

  14. Laparoscopic and Other Intrafascial Hysterectomy Techniques or Mucosal Ablation—A Choice for Maximum Organ Conservation

    PubMed Central

    Semm, Kurt; Mettler, Lieselotte

    1995-01-01

    The operative methods of total uterine mucosal ablation (TUMA) as well as new abdominal and vaginal hysterectomy techniques are described. Classic intrafascial serrated edged macro-morcellator (SEMM) hysterectomy (CISH) by pelviscopy or laparotomy and intrafascial vaginal hysterectomy (IVH) are techniques that allow the nerve and the blood supply of the pelvic floor to remain intact, mainly because only the ascending branches of the uterine arteries are ligated. TUMA avoids the removal of the uterus altogether and is reserved for hypermenorrhea or menorrhagia without major enlargement of the uterus. Both CISH and IVH reduce the physical trauma of hysterectomy considerably and have the advantages of the supravaginal technique. Prophylaxis against cervical stump carcinoma is assured by coring out the cervix with the SEMM. In patients in whom both procedures are possible, IVH is preferred because it combines the minimal trauma and short operative time of vaginal hysterectomy. The decreased diameter of the cervix after coring out greatly simplifies this type of vaginal hysterectomy, the technique that has always been favored because of its short operative times and minimal trauma. PMID:18493384

  15. Considerations about our approach to obstetric psychoprophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Cerutti, R; Volpe, B; Sichel, M P; Sandri, M; Sbrignadello, C; Fede, T

    1983-01-01

    Usually the term "obstetric psychoprophylaxis" refers to a specific method or technique. We prefer to consider it as a procedure that involves on one side the woman, the child and its family, and on the other the services entitled to give pre- and post-natal assistance. In order to realize this, a reformation of our methodological parameters and a critical analysis of the results obtained are required. In the courses of obstetric psychoprophylaxis that are held in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology of the University of Padua we take into consideration the following themes: - Methodological approach - Professional training of the staff - Significance of psychosocial culture in the management of the pregnancy by the health services.

  16. Controversies concerning the antiphospholipid syndrome in obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Camarena Cabrera, Dulce María Albertina; Rodriguez-Jaimes, Claudia; Acevedo-Gallegos, Sandra; Gallardo-Gaona, Juan Manuel; Velazquez-Torres, Berenice; Ramírez-Calvo, José Antonio

    Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome is a non-inflammatory autoimmune disease characterized by recurrent thrombotic events and/or obstetric complications associated with the presence of circulating antiphospholipid antibodies (anticardiolipin antibodies, anti-β2 glycoprotein-i antibodies, and/or lupus anticoagulant. Antiphospholipid antibodies are a heterogeneous group of autoantibodies associated with recurrent miscarriage, stillbirth, fetal growth restriction and premature birth. The diversity of the features of the proposed placental antiphospholipid antibodies fingerprint suggests that several disease processes may occur in the placentae of women with antiphospholipid antibody syndrome in the form of immune responses: inflammatory events, complement activation, angiogenic imbalance and, less commonly, thrombosis and infarction. Because of the disparity between clinical and laboratory criteria, and the impact on perinatal outcome in patients starting treatment, we reviewed the aspects of antiphospholipid antibody syndrome related to obstetric complications and seronegative antiphospholipid antibody syndrome, and their treatment in obstetrics.

  17. Use of adrenaline in obstetric analgesia.

    PubMed

    Holdcroft, A

    1992-11-01

    A questionnaire on the use of adrenaline in obstetric analgesia was completed by 87 obstetric anaesthetists: 71% of consultants in teaching hospitals were prepared to use adrenaline mixed with local anaesthetics compared with 33% of consultants in district hospitals; they had a similar duration of obstetric anaesthetic experience. Test doses containing adrenaline were not commonly used in labour, but were more often used prior to elective Caesarean section. Adrenaline was used with either lignocaine or bupivacaine; few consultants used both solutions. Contraindications to the use of adrenaline in the nonuser group were in decreasing order of rank: neurological damage, pregnancy-induced hypertension, stenotic valvular heart disease, sickle cell disease or trait of fetal distress. Overall, the contraindications related to the systemic absorption of adrenaline were most common.

  18. Obstetric Anaesthetists' Association and Difficult Airway Society guidelines for the management of difficult and failed tracheal intubation in obstetrics*

    PubMed Central

    Mushambi, M C; Kinsella, S M; Popat, M; Swales, H; Ramaswamy, K K; Winton, A L; Quinn, A C

    2015-01-01

    The Obstetric Anaesthetists' Association and Difficult Airway Society have developed the first national obstetric guidelines for the safe management of difficult and failed tracheal intubation during general anaesthesia. They comprise four algorithms and two tables. A master algorithm provides an overview. Algorithm 1 gives a framework on how to optimise a safe general anaesthetic technique in the obstetric patient, and emphasises: planning and multidisciplinary communication; how to prevent the rapid oxygen desaturation seen in pregnant women by advocating nasal oxygenation and mask ventilation immediately after induction; limiting intubation attempts to two; and consideration of early release of cricoid pressure if difficulties are encountered. Algorithm 2 summarises the management after declaring failed tracheal intubation with clear decision points, and encourages early insertion of a (preferably second-generation) supraglottic airway device if appropriate. Algorithm 3 covers the management of the ‘can't intubate, can't oxygenate’ situation and emergency front-of-neck airway access, including the necessity for timely perimortem caesarean section if maternal oxygenation cannot be achieved. Table 1 gives a structure for assessing the individual factors relevant in the decision to awaken or proceed should intubation fail, which include: urgency related to maternal or fetal factors; seniority of the anaesthetist; obesity of the patient; surgical complexity; aspiration risk; potential difficulty with provision of alternative anaesthesia; and post-induction airway device and airway patency. This decision should be considered by the team in advance of performing a general anaesthetic to make a provisional plan should failed intubation occur. The table is also intended to be used as a teaching tool to facilitate discussion and learning regarding the complex nature of decision-making when faced with a failed intubation. Table 2 gives practical considerations of how

  19. 21 CFR 884.4900 - Obstetric table and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Obstetrical and Gynecological Surgical... with adjustable sections designed to support a patient in the various positions required during...: patient equipment, support attachments, and cabinets for warming instruments and disposing of wastes....

  20. Cross-Cultural Obstetric and Gynecologic Care of Muslim Patients.

    PubMed

    Shahawy, Sarrah; Deshpande, Neha A; Nour, Nawal M

    2015-11-01

    With the growing number of Muslim patients in the United States, there is a greater need for obstetrician-gynecologists (ob-gyns) to understand the health care needs and values of this population to optimize patient rapport, provide high-quality reproductive care, and minimize health care disparities. The few studies that have explored Muslim women's health needs in the United States show that among the barriers Muslim women face in accessing health care services is the failure of health care providers to understand and accommodate their beliefs and customs. This article outlines health care practices and cultural competency tools relevant to modern obstetric and gynecologic care of Muslim patients, incorporating emerging data. There is an exploration of the diversity of opinion, practice, and cultural traditions among Muslims, which can be challenging for the ob-gyn who seeks to provide culturally competent care while attempting to avoid relying on cultural or religious stereotypes. This commentary also focuses on issues that might arise in the obstetric and gynecologic care of Muslim women, including the patient-physician relationship, modesty and interactions with male health care providers, sexual health, contraception, abortion, infertility, and intrapartum and postpartum care. Understanding the health care needs and values of Muslims in the United States may give physicians the tools necessary to better deliver high-quality care to this minority population.

  1. Comparison of Two Bipolar Systems in Laparoscopic Hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hye-Yon; Choi, Kong-Ju; Lee, Young-Lan; Chang, Kylie Hae-Jin; Kim, Hong-Bae

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To compare the efficacy of 2 bipolar systems during total laparoscopic hysterectomy (TLH): the pulsed bipolar system (PlasmaKinetic; Olympus, Japan) vs. conventional bipolar electrosurgery (Kleppinger bipolar forceps; Richard Wolf Instruments, Vernon Hills, IL). Methods: We retrospectively reviewed medical records of 80 women who underwent TLH for benign gynecologic disease between 2009 and 2010. Forty women received TLH using the conventional bipolar system and another 40 using the pulsed bipolar system. The clinical outcomes and complications were compared between the 2 groups. Results: No significant differences between the 2 groups were observed in terms of age, body mass index, and hospital stay. However, the blood loss was greater (515.3 ± 41.2mL vs. 467.9 ± 33.4mL, P < .05) and the operation time was longer (173.4 ± 33.4min vs. 157.3 ± 21.3min, P < .05) in the conventional group. Additionally, the uterine weight was lighter in the conventional group (218.5 ± 23.4g vs. 299.4 ± 41.1g, P < .05). None of the surgeries were required to be converted to laparotomy. No significant differences were found in intraoperative or postoperative complications between the groups. Conclusion: The pulsed bipolar system has some advantages over the conventional system, and therefore, may offer an alternative option for patients undergoing TLH. PMID:23318073

  2. Postoperative pain relief following hysterectomy: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Raghvendra, K. P.; Thapa, Deepak; Mitra, Sukanya; Ahuja, Vanita; Gombar, Satinder; Huria, Anju

    2016-01-01

    Background: Women experience moderate to severe postoperative pain following total abdominal hysterectomy (TAH). The transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block is a new modality for providing postoperative pain relief in these patients. Materials and Methods: The present study was a single center, prospective randomized trial. After the Institutional Ethics Committee approval and informed consent, patients were randomized to either epidural group: Epidural block placement + general anesthesia (GA) or TAP group: Single shot TAP block + GA. Patients in both the groups received standard general anesthetic technique and intravenous tramadol patient-controlled analgesia in the postoperative period. Patients were monitored for tramadol consumption, visual analog scale (VAS) both at rest and on coughing, hemodynamics, and side effects at 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 12, and 24 h postoperatively. Results: The total consumption of tramadol in 24 h was greater in TAP group as compared to epidural group (68.8 [25.5] vs. 5.3 [11.6] mg, P < 0.001). The VAS scores at rest and on coughing were higher in TAP group as compared to the epidural group at 6, 8, 12, and 24 h postoperatively (P < 0.05). None of the patients in either group had any adverse effects. Conclusion: Epidural analgesia provided greater tramadol-sparing effect with superior analgesia postoperatively as compared to TAP block in patients up to 24 h following TAH. PMID:27499592

  3. Radical hysterectomy versus radiation therapy for stage IB squamous cell cancer of the cervix

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkins, M.P.; Morley, G.W. )

    1991-07-15

    Three hundred forty-five patients with Stage IB squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix were treated at the University of Michigan Medical Center from 1970 to 1985. The overall cumulative 5-year survival rate was 89% and the mean age was 44.6 years. In 213 patients undergoing radical hysterectomy the cumulative 5-year survival rate was 92%; 14 patients were explored for radical hysterectomy that was not performed due to high risk features and their survival rate was 50%. Ninety-seven patients underwent radiation therapy as initial treatment and had a 5-year survival rate of 86%. There was no significant difference when radiation therapy was compared with radical hysterectomy (P = 0.098). The survival rates for lesions 3 cm or smaller were 94% for radical hysterectomy and 88% for radiation therapy. When the lesion was larger than 3 cm, the survival rates were 82% with radical surgery and 73% with radiation therapy. Metastatic disease to lymph nodes was present in 26 of the 213 patients undergoing radical hysterectomy. When 1 to 3 nodes were involved 16 of 19 patients survived and when 4 to 10 nodes were involved 3 of 7 patients survived. The addition of radiation therapy did not influence survival. Complications were similar in both treatment groups. Fistulas occurred in 4 of 213 patients undergoing radical hysterectomy and 1 of 111 undergoing radiation. Second surgery for a complication was required in 6 of 213 patients undergoing radical hysterectomy and 7 of 111 undergoing radiation. Survival and complication rates in early stage squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix are equal with either radical surgery or radiation therapy.

  4. 21 CFR 884.2225 - Obstetric-gynecologic ultrasonic imager.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Obstetric-gynecologic ultrasonic imager. 884.2225... Devices § 884.2225 Obstetric-gynecologic ultrasonic imager. (a) Identification. An obstetric-gynecologic ultrasonic imager is a device designed to transmit and receive ultrasonic energy into and from a...

  5. 21 CFR 884.2225 - Obstetric-gynecologic ultrasonic imager.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Obstetric-gynecologic ultrasonic imager. 884.2225... Devices § 884.2225 Obstetric-gynecologic ultrasonic imager. (a) Identification. An obstetric-gynecologic ultrasonic imager is a device designed to transmit and receive ultrasonic energy into and from a...

  6. 21 CFR 884.2050 - Obstetric data analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... § 884.2050 Obstetric data analyzer. (a) Identification. An obstetric data analyzer (fetal status data analyzer) is a device used during labor to analyze electronic signal data obtained from fetal and maternal... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Obstetric data analyzer. 884.2050 Section...

  7. 21 CFR 884.2050 - Obstetric data analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... § 884.2050 Obstetric data analyzer. (a) Identification. An obstetric data analyzer (fetal status data analyzer) is a device used during labor to analyze electronic signal data obtained from fetal and maternal... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Obstetric data analyzer. 884.2050 Section...

  8. The Current Status and Future of Academic Obstetrics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowers, John Z., Ed.; Purcell, Elizabeth F., Ed.

    The state of research in academic obstetrics and its relationship to research in other academic disciplines was addressed in a 1979 conference. Participants included representatives of academic obstetrics, academic pediatrics, and public health. After an introductory discussion by Howard C. Taylor, Jr. on changes in obstetrics in the last 25…

  9. 21 CFR 884.5100 - Obstetric anesthesia set.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Obstetric anesthesia set. 884.5100 Section 884... § 884.5100 Obstetric anesthesia set. (a) Identification. An obstetric anesthesia set is an assembly of... anesthetic drug. This device is used to administer regional blocks (e.g., paracervical, uterosacral,...

  10. 21 CFR 884.5100 - Obstetric anesthesia set.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Obstetric anesthesia set. 884.5100 Section 884... § 884.5100 Obstetric anesthesia set. (a) Identification. An obstetric anesthesia set is an assembly of... anesthetic drug. This device is used to administer regional blocks (e.g., paracervical, uterosacral,...

  11. 21 CFR 884.5100 - Obstetric anesthesia set.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Obstetric anesthesia set. 884.5100 Section 884... § 884.5100 Obstetric anesthesia set. (a) Identification. An obstetric anesthesia set is an assembly of... anesthetic drug. This device is used to administer regional blocks (e.g., paracervical, uterosacral,...

  12. 21 CFR 884.5100 - Obstetric anesthesia set.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Obstetric anesthesia set. 884.5100 Section 884... § 884.5100 Obstetric anesthesia set. (a) Identification. An obstetric anesthesia set is an assembly of... anesthetic drug. This device is used to administer regional blocks (e.g., paracervical, uterosacral,...

  13. 21 CFR 884.5100 - Obstetric anesthesia set.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Obstetric anesthesia set. 884.5100 Section 884... § 884.5100 Obstetric anesthesia set. (a) Identification. An obstetric anesthesia set is an assembly of... anesthetic drug. This device is used to administer regional blocks (e.g., paracervical, uterosacral,...

  14. 21 CFR 884.4400 - Obstetric forceps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Obstetric forceps. 884.4400 Section 884.4400 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL... delivery. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  15. Fifty years of obstetrics and gynaecology.

    PubMed

    Drife, James O

    2016-10-01

    The term 'obstetrics and gynaecology' now feels like an outmoded name for women's health care. Since the 1960s the specialty has been transformed by social change, technical innovation and medical subspecialization, although the core values of good clinical practice remain unchanged.

  16. Integrating Prevention into Obstetrics/Gynecology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carey, J. Christopher

    2000-01-01

    Discusses formats to teach preventive medicine in obstetrics and gynecology (including learning objectives, lectures/seminars, and rounds/office practice) and evaluation methods (oral examinations, computerized question banks, objective structured clinical examinations). Offers examples from specific programs at American medical schools, including…

  17. Achieving higher-value obstetrical care.

    PubMed

    Woo, Victoria G; Lundeen, Tifanny; Matula, Sierra; Milstein, Arnold

    2017-03-01

    Obstetrical care in the United States is unnecessarily costly. Birth is 1 of the most common reasons for healthcare use in the United States and 1 of the top expenditures for payers every year. However, compared with other Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development countries, the United States spends substantially more money per birth without better outcomes. Our team at the Clinical Excellence Research Center, a center that is focused on improving value in healthcare, spent a year studying ways in which obstetrical care in the United States can deliver better outcomes at a lower cost. After a thoughtful discovery process, we identified ways that obstetrical care could be delivered with higher value. In this article, we recommend 3 redesign steps that foster the delivery of higher-value maternity care: (1) to provide long-acting reversible contraception immediately after birth, (2) to tailor prenatal care according to women's unique medical and psychosocial needs by offering more efficient models such as fewer in-person visits or group care, and (3) to create hospital-affiliated integrated outpatient birth centers as the planned place of birth for low-risk women. For each step, we discuss the redesign concept, current barriers and implementation solutions, and our estimation of potential cost-savings to the United States at scale. We estimate that, if this model were adopted nationally, annual US healthcare spending on obstetrical care would decline by as much as 28%.

  18. Laparoscopic radical hysterectomy with pelvic lymphadenectomy in early invasive cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Salicrú, Sabina; Gil-Moreno, Antonio; Montero, Anabel; Roure, Marisa; Pérez-Benavente, Assumpció; Xercavins, Jordi

    2011-01-01

    Laparoscopic radical hysterectomy is one surgical procedure currently performed to treat gynecologic cancer. The objective of this review was to update the current knowledge of laparoscopic radical hysterectomy in early invasive cervical cancer. Articles indexed in the MEDLINE database using the key words "Laparoscopic radical hysterectomy" and "Cancer of the cervix" were reviewed. Studies of laparoscopic radical hysterectomy for treatment of early cervical cancer with a minimum study population of 10 patients were selected. The laparoscopic approach was associated with less surgical morbidity (surgical bleeding) and with shorter length of hospital stay, although the duration of the operation may be longer. Laparoscopic radical hysterectomy with endoscopic pelvic lymphadenectomy, and paraaortic lymphadenectomy if needed, is a safe surgical option for treatment and staging of early invasive cervical cancer considering surgical risk, intraoperative bleeding, intraoperative and postoperative complications, and patient recovery. It is important to respect the learning curve. Surgical advances including new laparoscopic instrumentation and, in particular, use of robotics will contribute to reducing the duration of the operation and to facilitating learning and teaching of the procedure.

  19. Long Term Patient Satisfaction of Burch Colposuspension with or Without Concomitant Total Abdominal Hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Ozturk, Mustafa; Keskin, Ugur; Fidan, Ulas; Firatligil, Fahri Burcin; Alanbay, Ibrahim; Yenen, Mufit Cemal

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Urinary incontinence negatively affects the quality of life. Various methods are used in the treatment of stress incontinence. Burch colposuspension (BC) is the classical treatment of urinary incontinence. Aim To compare the long-term satisfaction in patients receiving BC with or without concomitant total abdominal hysterectomy. Materials and Methods One hundred and twenty patients with stress incontinence underwent burch colposuspension with or without concomitant total abdominal hysterectomy. Ninety-three (77.5%) patients were interviewed by telephone. Of these, 91(75, 8%) patients agreed to participate in the study. The patients were divided into two groups according to the type of the surgical procedure. Group 1(N=48, 52.7%) had received burch colposuspension with concomitant total abdominal hysterectomy. Group 2 (N=43, 47.3%) had received burch colposuspension without concomitant total abdominal hysterectomy. Results In Group 1, 41 patients (85%) were satisfied with the surgery and did not complain of urinary incontinence (p<0.05). In Group 2, 37 (86%) patients were satisfied with the surgery (p<0.05). Conclusion There were no difference in patient satisfaction between hysterectomy and BC and only BC to treat incontinence. PMID:26816948

  20. Optimal timing for performing hysterectomy according to different phase of menstrual cycle: Which is best?

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong Jin; Kang, Jun Hyeok; Lee, Kyo Won; Kim, Kye Hyun; Song, Taejong

    2017-03-13

    The aim of this study was to determine whether the different phases of the menstrual cycle could affect operative bleeding in women undergoing laparoscopic hysterectomy. This was a retrospective comparative study. Based on the adjusted day of menstrual cycle, 212 women who underwent laparoscopic hysterectomy were classified into three groups: the follicular phase (n = 51), luteal phase group (n = 125), and menstruation group (n = 36). The primary outcome measure was the operative bleeding. There was no difference in the baseline characteristics of the patients belonging to the three groups. For the groups, there were no significant differences in operative bleeding (p = .469) and change in haemoglobin (p = .330), including operative time, length of hospital stay and complications. The menstrual cycle did not affect the operative bleeding and other parameters. Therefore, no phase of the menstrual cycle could be considered as an optimal timing for performing laparoscopic hysterectomy with minimal operative bleeding. Impact statement What is already known on this subject: the menstrual cycle results in periodic changes in haemostasis and blood flow in the reproductive organs. What the results of this study add: the menstrual cycle did not affect the operative bleeding and other operative parameters during laparoscopic hysterectomy. What the implications are of these findings for clinical practice and/or further research: no phase of the menstrual cycle could be considered as an optimal timing for performing laparoscopic hysterectomy with minimal operative bleeding.

  1. Global obstetric medicine: Collaborating towards global progress in maternal health

    PubMed Central

    Ateka-Barrutia, Oier; Rojas-Suarez, Jose Antonio; Wijeyaratne, Chandrika; Castillo, Eliana; Lombaard, Hennie; Magee, Laura A

    2015-01-01

    Globally, the nature of maternal mortality and morbidity is shifting from direct obstetric causes to an increasing proportion of indirect causes due to chronic conditions and ageing of the maternal population. Obstetric medicine can address an important gap in the care of women by broadening its scope to include colleagues, communities and countries that do not yet have established obstetric medicine training, education and resources. We present the concept of global obstetric medicine by highlighting three low- and middle-income country experiences as well as an example of successful collaboration. The article also discusses ideas and initiatives to build future partnerships within the global obstetric medicine community. PMID:27512469

  2. Midwifery and obstetrics: twenty years of collaborative academic practice.

    PubMed

    Angelini, Diane J; O'Brien, Barbara; Singer, Janet; Coustan, Donald R

    2012-09-01

    This review describes a collaborative educational practice model partnering midwifery and obstetrics within a department of obstetrics and gynecology. For more than 20 years, the authors' model has demonstrated sustainability and influence on medical education. The focus is on resident education in obstetrics, using midwifery faculty as teachers in the obstetric and obstetric triage settings. This noncompetitive and integrated educational practice model has achieved sustainability and success using midwives in a collaborative approach to medical education. The continuing collaboration and innovation within medical and resident education are important elements for the future of collaborative practice.

  3. An Assessment of Surgical Experience among Obstetric and Gynaecology SpR Trainees.

    PubMed

    Gaughan, E; Barry, S; Boyd, W; Walsh, T A

    2015-10-01

    Changes in gynaecological practice have resulted in a significant reduction in surgical exposure for trainees. We have attempted to assess surgical experience among obstetric and gynaecology SpR's in Ireland using an anonymous on-line questionnaire. Trainees were asked to assess their own ability to perform a variety of general gynaecological procedures. There was a 97% response rate (29/33 trainees). There were 11 trainees who were in the final or penultimate year of the scheme. This group were analysed separately to assess competency rates in those approaching the end of the scheme. They were subdivided in to those who have completed one year in a general hospital doing pure gynaecology and those who have not. Approximately half of this group (6/11) had completed a pure gynaecology year. All of these trainees deemed themselves competent to perform all general gynaecological procedures listed, with the exception of trans-urethral tape procedures, for which 3/6 reported the requirement of direct supervision. Only 2/6 deemed themselves competent to perform a total laparoscopic hysterectomy. Year 4/5 trainees who had not completed a pure gynaecology year displayed significantly lower competency rates for most of the procedures. With the current changes in gynaecological practice, these results highlight the importance of dedicated gynaecological surgical training.

  4. The role of obstetrics and gynecology national societies during natural disasters.

    PubMed

    Lalonde, André; Adrien, Lauré

    2015-07-01

    When a natural disaster occurs, such as an earthquake, floods, or a tsunami, the international response is quick. However, there is no organized strategy in place to address obstetric and gynecological (ob/gyn) emergencies. International organizations and national ob/gyn societies do not have an organized plan and rely on the good will of volunteers. Too often, local specialists are ignored and are not involved in the response. The massive earthquake in Haiti in 2010 exemplifies the lack of coordinated response involving national organizations following the disaster. The Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada (SOGC) engaged rapidly with Haitian colleagues in response to the obstetric and gynecological emergencies. An active strategy is proposed.

  5. Multiplying obstetrics: techniques of surveillance and forms of coordination.

    PubMed

    Akrich, M; Pasveer, B

    2000-01-01

    The article argues against the common notion of disciplinary medical traditions, i.e. Obstetrics, as macro-structures that quite unilinearily structure the practices associated with the discipline. It shows that the various existences of Obstetrics, their relations with practices and vice versa, the entities these obstetrical practices render present and related, and the ways they are connected to experiences, are more complex than the unilinear model suggests. What allows participants to go from one topos to another--from Obstetrics to practice, from practice to politics, from politics to experience--is not self-evidently induced by Obstetrics, but needs to be studied as a surprising range of passages that connect (or don't). Techniques and devices to supervise the delivery, to render present the fetus during pregnancy, and to monitoring birth, are described in order to show that such techniques acquire different roles in connecting and creating Obstetrics as a system and obstetrical practices.

  6. Who will be there when women deliver? Assuring retention of obstetric providers.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Frank W J; Mutchnick, Ian; Kwawukume, E Y; Danso, K A; Klufio, C A; Clinton, Y; Yun, Luke Lu; Johnson, Timothy R B

    2007-11-01

    The Safe Motherhood Initiative has highlighted the need for improved health services with skilled attendants at delivery and the provision of emergency obstetric care. "Brain drain" has hampered this process and has been particularly prevalent in Ghana. Between 1993 and 2000, 68% of Ghanaian trained medical school graduates left the country. In 1989, postgraduate training in obstetrics and gynecology was established in Ghana, and as of November 2006, 37 of the 38 specialists who have completed the program have stayed in the country, most working in the public sector providing health care and serving as faculty. Interviews with graduates in 2002 found that the first and single-most important factor related to retention was the actual presence of a training program leading to specialty qualification in obstetrics and gynecology by the West African College of Surgeons. Economic and social factors also played major roles in a graduates' decision to stay in Ghana to practice. This model deserves replication in other countries that have a commitment to sustainable development, human resource and health services capacity building, and maternal mortality reduction. A network of University partnerships between departments of obstetrics and gynecology in developed and developing countries throughout the world sharing internet resources, clinical information, training curriculum and assessment techniques could be created. Grand rounds could be shared through teleconferencing, and faculty exchanges would build capacity for all faculty and enrich both institutions. Through new partnerships, creating opportunity for medical school graduates to become obstetrician-gynecologists may reduce brain drain and maternal mortality.

  7. The effect of hysterectomy on urinary symptoms and residual bladder volume.

    PubMed

    Prasad, M; Sadhukhan, M; Tom, B; Al-Taher, H

    2002-09-01

    This was a prospective, clinical study to evaluate the effect of abdominal and vaginal hysterectomy for benign indications on urinary symptoms and residual bladder volume. One hundred and seven women undergoing hysterectomy for benign conditions were included in the study that took place in a district general hospital between April 1998 and January 2000. Urinary symptoms such as stress incontinence of urine, urgency, frequency, nocturia, sensation of incomplete voiding and voiding difficulties were considered. A questionnaire was filled out and the residual bladder volume measured with a 'Bard' bladder scanner on three occasions-before the operation, postoperative days 3 or 4 and at the 6-week postoperative visit. Statistical analysis involved using a generalised estimating equation and significance assessed at the 5% level. Each woman acted as her own control. There was no evidence of changes in nocturia and voiding difficulties after surgery. All other symptoms and residual bladder volumes decreased significantly postoperatively. The type of hysterectomy did not have an effect.

  8. Laparoendoscopic single-site radical hysterectomy for early stage cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ju Young; Kim, Yoo Min; Lee, Yoo-Young; Kim, Tae-Joong; Lee, Jeong-Won; Kim, Byoung-Gie; Bae, Duk-Soo

    2017-01-01

    Technical developments have made laparoendoscopic single-site (LESS) surgery increasingly more feasible for treating gynecological conditions, including cancer. However, complex surgeries such as radical hysterectomy have rarely been performed with single-port access because of technical difficulties. The majority of the difficulties are due to the inefficient retraction of tissue during dissection. Here, we report a detailed description of LESS radical hysterectomy plus pelvic lymph node dissection that was successfully performed in two patients with stage IB1 cervical cancer. We used our expertise with LESS to perform space development as much as possible before the ligaments were resected. The oncologic clearance was comparable to that of conventional laparoscopic radical hysterectomy. PMID:28217681

  9. Universal Cystoscopy After Benign Hysterectomy: Examining the Effects of an Institutional Policy

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Alice M; Curran, Diana S; Morgan, Daniel M; Fenner, Dee E; Swenson, Carolyn W

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the association between a universal cystoscopy policy at the time of benign hysterectomy and the detection of urologic injuries. Methods This is a retrospective cohort study at a tertiary care academic center where a policy of universal cystoscopy at the time of benign hysterectomy was instituted on October 1, 2008. Benign hysterectomies performed from March 3, 2006 –September 25, 2013 were included and dichotomized into preuniversal and postuniversal cystoscopy groups. Medical records were reviewed for baseline and perioperative characteristics, cystoscopy use, and urologic injuries related to hysterectomy. Urologic injuries were identified by using a search engine and a departmental quality improvement database. Results Two thousand nine hundred eighteen hysterectomies were identified during the study time period, 96 of which were excluded for indications of abdomino-pelvic cancers and peripartum indications. Therefore, 973 women were in the preuniversal cystoscopy group and 1,849 were in the postuniversal cystoscopy group. Thirty-six percent (347/973, 95% CI 32.8 – 38.8%) and 86.1% (1,592/1,849, 95% CI 84.5 – 87.7%) of cases underwent cystoscopy prepolicy and postpolicy, respectively. The urologic injury rates were 2.6% (25/973, 95% CI 1.6 – 3.6%) and 1.8% (34/1,849, 95% CI 1.2 – 2.5%) in the prepolicy and postpolicy groups, respectively. Delayed urologic injuries decreased significantly (0.7% [7/973], 95% CI 0.3 – 1.2% vs. 0.1% [2/1,849], 95% CI 0.0 – 0.3%). Of the nine delayed injuries, four had normal intraoperative cystoscopy findings and five had no cystoscopy performed. Conclusion The practice of universal cystoscopy at the time of hysterectomy for benign indications is associated with decreased delayed postoperative urologic complications. PMID:26942367

  10. Simultaneous Transabdominal Hysterectomy and Cystolithotomy in an Augmented Urinary Bladder: Challenges and Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vijay; Kapoor, Rakesh; Yadav, Priyank; Gaur, Pankaj

    2016-01-01

    Augmentation cystoplasty is a procedure to increase the anatomical as well as functional capacity of the urinary bladder using a segment of bowel or ureter. Upto half of these patients develop complications but most of them are minor and managed easily. Urolithiasis, especially bladder calculi are seen in upto half of the cases and are removed endoscopically or by open approach. Hysterectomy is an uncommon procedure in patients with augmentation cystoplasty and is complicated by the altered anatomy of the pelvis. We describe a rare case of simultaneous abdominal hysterectomy and cystolithotomy in a patient with augmentation cystoplasty and discuss the relevant surgical anatomy. PMID:28208926

  11. Multiple Organ Dysfunction Score Is Superior to the Obstetric-Specific Sepsis in Obstetrics Score in Predicting Mortality in Septic Obstetric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Helen M.; Magee, Laura A.; von Dadelszen, Peter; Fjell, Chris; Walley, Keith R.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Mortality prediction scores have been used for a long time in ICUs; however, numerous studies have shown that they over-predict mortality in the obstetric population. With sepsis remaining a major cause of obstetric mortality, we aimed to look at five mortality prediction scores (one obstetric-based and four general) in the septic obstetric population and compare them to a nonobstetric septic control group. Subject and Design: Women in the age group of 16–50 years with an admission diagnosis or suspicion of sepsis were included. In a multicenter obstetric population (n = 797), these included all pregnant and postpartum patients up to 6 weeks postpartum. An age- and gender-matched control nonobstetric population was drawn from a single-center general critical care population (n = 2,461). Sepsis in Obstetric Score, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II, Simplified Acute Physiology Score II, Sequential Organ Failure Assessment, and Multiple Organ Dysfunction Scores were all applied to patients meeting inclusion criteria in both cohorts, and their area under the receiver-operator characteristic curves was calculated to find the most accurate predictor. Measurements and Main Results: A total of 146 septic patients were found for the obstetric cohort and 299 patients for the nonobstetric control cohort. The Sepsis in Obstetric Score, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II, Simplified Acute Physiology Score II, Sequential Organ Failure Assessment, and Multiple Organ Dysfunction Scores gave area under the receiver-operator characteristic curves of 0.67, 0.68, 0.72, 0.79, and 0.84 in the obstetric cohort, respectively, and 0.64, 0.72, 0.61, 0.78, and 0.74 in the nonobstetric cohort, respectively. The Sepsis in Obstetric Score performed similarly to all the other scores with the exception of the Multiple Organ Dysfunction Score, which was significantly better (p < 0.05). Conclusion: The Sepsis in Obstetric Score, designed specifically for

  12. Clinical proteomics in obstetrics and neonatology.

    PubMed

    Klein, Julie; Buffin-Meyer, Benedicte; Mullen, William; Carty, David M; Delles, Christian; Vlahou, Antonia; Mischak, Harald; Decramer, Stéphane; Bascands, Jean-Loup; Schanstra, Joost P

    2014-02-01

    Clinical proteomics has been applied to the identification of biomarkers of obstetric and neonatal disease. We will discuss a number of encouraging studies that have led to potentially valid biomarkers in the context of Down's syndrome, preterm birth, amniotic infections, preeclampsia, intrauterine growth restriction and obstructive uropathies. Obtaining noninvasive biomarkers (e.g., from the maternal circulation, urine or cervicovaginal fluid) may be more feasible for obstetric diseases than for diseases of the fetus, for which invasive methods are required (e.g., amniotic fluid, fetal urine). However, studies providing validated proteomics-identified biomarkers are limited. Efforts should be made to save well-characterized samples of these invasive body fluids so that many valid biomarkers of pregnancy-related diseases will be identified in the coming years using proteomics based analysis upon adoption of 'clinical proteomics guidelines'.

  13. Magnesium in obstetric anesthesia and intensive care.

    PubMed

    Kutlesic, Marija S; Kutlesic, Ranko M; Mostic-Ilic, Tatjana

    2017-02-01

    Magnesium, one of the essential elements in the human body, has numerous favorable effects that offer a variety of possibilities for its use in obstetric anesthesia and intensive care. Administered as a single intravenous bolus dose or a bolus followed by continuous infusion during surgery, magnesium attenuates stress response to endotracheal intubation, and reduces intraoperative anesthetic and postoperative analgesic requirements, while at the same time preserving favorable hemodynamics. Applied as part of an intrathecal or epidural anesthetic mixture, magnesium prolongs the duration of anesthesia and diminishes total postoperative analgesic consumption with no adverse maternal or neonatal effects. In obstetric intensive care, magnesium represents a first-choice medication in the treatment and prevention of eclamptic seizures. If used in recommended doses with close monitoring, magnesium is a safe and effective medication.

  14. Aspects of obstetrical defibrination in West Malaysia.

    PubMed

    White, J C; Chan, L K; Lau, K S; Sen, D K

    1976-06-01

    Five patients illustrate various aspects of obstetrical defibrination in West Malaysia, resulting from exaggeration of changes in fibrinolytic-coagulation equilibrium that occur at delivery. Hypofibrinogenaemia and fibrinolysis may occur in association or either feature predominate. These patients are from a population in which a variety of genetic and environmental factors may interact, e.g. abnormal haemoglobins, cold agglutinins, viral and other infections, introducing additional complications.

  15. [Validity of psychoprophylaxis in obstetrics. Authors' experience].

    PubMed

    D'Alfonso, A; Zaurito, V; Facchini, D; Di Stefano, L; Patacchiola, F; Cappa, F

    1990-12-01

    The Authors report the results based on 20 years of practice on obstetric psycho-prophylaxis (PPO). Data on presence at course, on frequency, on primipares/pluripares ratio, on labour, on timing and mode of delivery, are assembled. Moreover, neonatal status at birth and at 10th day of life, are investigated. The data obtained were compared with a control group, constituted by women without any treatment before delivery. The acquired experience confirm the utility of PPO in the ordinary clinical practice.

  16. Cutaneous pseudovasculitis, antiphospholipid syndrome and obstetric misadventure.

    PubMed

    Thayaparan, A S; Lowe, S A

    2015-09-01

    We present two women with severe obstetric complications from antiphospholipid (aPL) syndrome associated with a rare dermatological manifestation, cutaneous pseudovasculitis. Both of these women developed a rash on the palmar aspect of the hands during the post partum period, with histology consistent with microthrombotic disease, despite anticoagulation. Cutaneous pseudovasculitis appears to be a maternal manifestation of aPL coagulopathy, possibly reflecting the severity of the underlying pregnancy pathology.

  17. Improved obstetric safety through programmatic collaboration.

    PubMed

    Goffman, Dena; Brodman, Michael; Friedman, Arnold J; Minkoff, Howard; Merkatz, Irwin R

    2014-01-01

    Healthcare safety and quality are critically important issues in obstetrics, and society, healthcare providers, patients and insurers share a common goal of working toward safer practice, and are continuously seeking strategies to facilitate improvements. To this end, 4 New York City voluntary hospitals with large maternity services initiated a unique collaborative quality improvement program. It was facilitated by their common risk management advisors, FOJP Service Corporation, and their professional liability insurer, Hospitals Insurance Company. Under the guidance of 4 obstetrics and gynecology departmental chairmen, consensus best practices for obstetrics were developed which included: implementation of evidence based protocols with audit and feedback; standardized educational interventions; mandatory electronic fetal monitoring training; and enhanced in-house physician coverage. Each institution developed unique safety related expertise (development of electronic documentation, team training, and simulation education), and experiences were shared across the collaborative. The collaborative group developed robust systems for audit of outcomes and documentation quality, as well as enforcement mechanisms. Ongoing feedback to providers served as a key component of the intervention. The liability carrier provided financial support for these patient safety innovations. As a result of the interventions, the overall AOI for our institutions decreased 42% from baseline (January-June 2008) to the most recently reviewed time period (July-December 2011) (10.7% vs 6.2%, p < 0.001). The Weighted Adverse Outcome Score (WAOS) also decreased during the same time period (3.9 vs 2.3, p = 0.001.) Given the improved outcomes noted, our unique program and the process by which it was developed are described in the hopes that others will recognize collaborative partnering with or without insurers as an opportunity to improve obstetric patient safety.

  18. Chicken pox in pregnancy : an obstetric concern.

    PubMed

    Wiwanitkit, Viroj

    2010-10-01

    Chicken pox is a common viral infection presenting with fever and discrete vesicular lesions. This infection can be widely detected in developing countries, especially for those tropical countries. The pregnant can get chicken pox, and this becomes an important obstetrical concern. In this specific paper, the author hereby details and discusses on chicken pox in pregnancy. Clinical presentation, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention are briefly summarized. In addition, the effects of chicken pox on pregnancy as well as the vertical transmission are also documented.

  19. The role of ultrasound in pregnancy-related emergencies.

    PubMed

    Lazebnik, Noam; Lazebnik, Roee S

    2004-03-01

    Most complications of pregnancy allow time for transfer to specialized obstetric ultrasound units, but many women present to the emergency room or the labor and delivery unit with signs and symptoms suggesting genuine acute medical emergencies, where successful outcome depends on prompt diagnosis of the disorder and rapid appropriate medical management. The use of ultrasound technology in obstetric emergencies is well established. Ultrasonography plays a major role in such cases as the most important tool clinicians are using to identify the correct etiology and diagnosis, whereas in other cases it helps limit the differential diagnosis. One of the goals of any advanced training program in obstetrics and gynecology and radiology is to allow the skilled physician to perform the proper ultrasound study in case of an obstetric emergency to facilitate the proper diagnosis, enabling the medical team to provide the best possible care.

  20. A pilot structured resident orientation curriculum improves the confidence of incoming first-year obstetrics and gynecology residents.

    PubMed

    Hiraoka, Mark; Kamikawa, Ginny; McCartin, Richard; Kaneshiro, Bliss

    2013-11-01

    A prospective, observational study was performed to evaluate a pilot orientation curriculum which involved all 7 incoming obstetrics and gynecology residents in June 2012. The objective of this study was to assess how a structured orientation curriculum, which employs an evaluation of baseline competency, affects the confidence of incoming first-year obstetrics and gynecology residents. The curriculum included didactic lectures, online modules, simulation, and mock clinical scenarios. Pre- and post-course surveys were conducted online via SurveyMonkey™ and were sent to all incoming obstetrics and gynecology residents. All seven incoming obstetrics and gynecology residents completed the orientation curriculum which included evaluations at the end of the orientation to assess baseline competency prior to taking part in clinical care. Confidence levels improved in all 27 elements assessed. Statistically significant improvement in confidence levels occurred in cognitive skills such as obstetric emergency management (2.9 vs 3.9, P< .05) and technical skills such as knot tying (3.9 vs. 4.6, P< .05). Certain teaching skills also demonstrated statistically significant improvements. A structured orientation program which improves resident self-confidence levels and demonstrates baseline competencies in certain clinical areas can be valuable for many residency training programs.

  1. Comparison of vaginal and abdominal hysterectomy:A prospective non-randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bing; Ren, Dong-Ping; Li, Jing-Xuan; Li, Chun-Dong

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To compare outcomes of vaginal and abdominal hysterectomy procedures in women with benign gynaecological diseases. Methods: This was a prospective study of outcomes of consecutive patients who underwent total vaginal hysterectomy (VH) or abdominal hysterectomy (AH) for benign gynaecological diseases. Patient characteristics before, during, and after the operations were reviewed. Patients were followed up for three months to evaluate postoperative complications. Results: This study included a total of 313 patients. 143 patients underwent AH and 170 patients underwent VH. Baseline characteristics were similar between the two groups. There were no intraoperative complications in either group. Operation time, intraoperative blood loss, first postoperative flatus time, time to out-of-bed activity, mean maximum postoperative body temperature, and duration of fever were all significantly shorter and less severe in the VH group compared with the AH group. In addition, vaginal length in the VH group was significantly shorter than in the AH group. Conclusions: Vaginal hysterectomy has advantages over AH in the treatment of benign gynaecological diseases, providing greater efficacy and safety with minimal invasiveness. PMID:25097536

  2. Metastatic adenocarcinoma after laparoscopic supracervical hysterectomy with morcellation: A case report.

    PubMed

    Turner, Taylor; Secord, Angeles Alvarez; Lowery, William J; Sfakianos, Gregory; Lee, Paula S

    2013-01-01

    •Uterine morcellation is common in minimally invasive hysterectomy but should be performed with caution due to risk of unsuspected malignancy.•Intraoperative techniques should be considered to minimize dissemination of endometrial tissue during morcellation.•Strategies to ensure accurate pathologic evaluation of morcellated specimens and to improve preoperative risk stratification before morcellation procedures are necessary.

  3. Factors Related to Hysterectomy in Women with Physical and Mobility Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Lan-Ping; Hsieh, Molly; Chen, Si-Fan; Wu, Chia-Ling; Hsu, Shang-Wei; Lin, Jin-Ding

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims to identify self-report data for hysterectomy prevalence and to explore its correlated factors among women with physical and mobility disabilities in Taiwan. This paper was part of a larger study, "Survey on Preventive Health Utilizations of People with Physical and Mobility Disability in Taiwan," which is a…

  4. Single-port access laparoscopic hysterectomy: a new dimension of minimally invasive surgery.

    PubMed

    Liliana, Mereu; Alessandro, Pontis; Giada, Carri; Luca, Mencaglia

    2011-01-01

    The fundamental idea is to have all of the laparoscopic working ports entering the abdominal wall through the same incision. Single-incision laparoscopic surgery is an alternative to conventional multiport laparoscopy. Single-access laparoscopy using a transumbilical port affords maximum cosmetic benefits because the surgical incision is hidden in the umbilicus and reduces morbidity of minimally invasive surgery. The advantages of single-access laparoscopic surgery may include less bleeding, infection, and hernia formation and better cosmetic outcome and less pain. The disadvantages and limitations include longer surgery time, difficulty in learning the technique, and the need for specialized instruments. This review summarizes the history of SPAL hysterectomy (single-port access laparoscopy), and emphasizes nomenclature, surgical technique, instrumentation, and perioperative outcomes. Specific gynecological applications of single-port hysterectomy to date are summarized. Using the PubMed database, the English-language literature was reviewed for the past 40 years. Keyword searches included scarless, scar free, single-port/trocar/incision, single-port access laparoscopic hysterectomy. Within the bibliography of selected references, additional sources were retrieved. The purpose of the present article was to review the development and current status of SPAL hysterectomy and highlight important advances associated with this innovative approach.

  5. Development and evaluation of a web site to improve recovery from hysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Dukeshire, Steven; Gilmour, Donna; MacDonald, Norman; MacKenzie, Kate

    2012-03-01

    Following surgery, information received upon discharge for recovery at home varies depending on the hospital, and the information is typically given to the patient all at once rather than timed to the recovery process. To address these information challenges, a Web site to help women recovering at home after hysterectomy was developed and evaluated. The Web site was designed to guide the hysterectomy patient through her postsurgical recovery by providing timely and relevant information tailored to the patient's stage of recovery. The Web site required patients to complete a checkup assessing 18 symptoms related to their recovery, and advice was given on how to deal with any symptom the patient had. The Web site also provided care tips specific to the patient's day of recovery along with general information regarding hysterectomy and recovery. Thirty-one women participated in the evaluation, which consisted of preoperative and postoperative surveys as well as a telephone interview. Results indicated that patients frequently used and were highly satisfied with the Web site. Patients reported that the Web site was easy to use and informative, helped to guide their recovery, reduced worry and anxiety, and helped to inform decisions of when and how to contact health professionals. Based on the findings, the Web site represents a potentially cost-effective means to aid women recovering from hysterectomy.

  6. Laparoscopic Supracervical Hysterectomy and Laparoscopic Total Hysterectomy in Patients with Very Large Uteri: a Retrospective Single-Center Experience at a Major University Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Schöller, Dorit; Taran, Florin-Andrei; Wallwiener, Markus; Schönfisch, Birgitt; Krämer, Bernhard; Abele, Harald; Neis, Felix; Wallwiener, Christian W.; Brucker, Sara

    2017-01-01

    Objective The main objectives of our study were to demonstrate that laparoscopic supracervical hysterectomy (LSH) or total laparoscopic hysterectomy (TLH) can be performed safely even in patients with a uterine weight ≥ 500 g, to analyze the rate of conversions to laparotomy due to uterine size and to estimate the incidence and type of intraoperative and long-term postoperative complications. Study Design Retrospective open, single-center, comparative interventional study of LSH and TLH. Results The present study comprised a total of 138 patients that underwent laparoscopic hysterectomy with a uterine weight ≥ 500 g; 109 patients (79.0 %) underwent LSH and 29 patients (21.0 %) underwent TLH. Median uterine weight across the entire cohort was 602 g, with the largest uterus weighing 1860 g. A total of 24 cases (17.4 %) among the 138 hysterectomies were converted to a laparotomy due to lack of adequate intraabdominal space and size of the uterus. Mean uterine weight of the patients in the LSH group that underwent conversion was 883 g (SD 380 g, n = 13) and 757 g (SD 371 g, n = 11) in the TLH group. The rate of conversion to laparotomy due to the uterine weight was significantly lower in the LSH group (11.9 %) compared to the TLH group (37.9 %) (p = 0.002). Intraoperative complications requiring laparotomy for other reasons but uterine size occurred in 6 patients of the study cohort (6/138; 4.3 %). Long-term postoperative complications occurred in 2 patients (2/138, 1.4 %), both patients from LSH group had to be re-operated on due to adhesions. Conclusions Our study adds further insight in the limited data set of laparoscopic hysterectomy for increased uterine weight and shows that LSH and TLH are safe and feasible even in patients with very large uteri (≥ 500 g).

  7. Auditing the standard of anaesthesia care in obstetric units.

    PubMed

    Mörch-Siddall, J; Corbitt, N; Bryson, M R

    2001-04-01

    We undertook an audit of 15 obstetric units in the north of England over a 10-month period to ascertain to what extent they conformed to the Obstetric Anaesthetists' Association 'Recommended Minimum Standards for Obstetric Anaesthetic Services' using a quality assurance approach. We demonstrated that all units conformed to the majority of standards but did not conform in at least one major and minor area.

  8. Potential Impact of Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospitalists on Safety of Obstetric Care.

    PubMed

    Srinivas, Sindhu K

    2015-09-01

    Staffing models are critical aspects of care delivery. Provider staffing on the labor and delivery unit has recently received heightened attention. Based on the general medicine hospitalist model, the obstetrics and gynecology hospitalist or laborist model of obstetric care was introduced more than a decade ago as a plausible model-of-care delivery to improve provider satisfaction, with the goal of also improving safety and outcomes through continuous coverage by providers whose sole focus was on the labor and delivery unit without other competing clinical duties. It is plausible that this model of provider staffing and care delivery will increase safety.

  9. A systematic review and cost analysis of robot-assisted hysterectomy in malignant and benign conditions.

    PubMed

    Tapper, Anna-Maija; Hannola, Mikko; Zeitlin, Rainer; Isojärvi, Jaana; Sintonen, Harri; Ikonen, Tuija S

    2014-06-01

    In order to assess the effectiveness and costs of robot-assisted hysterectomy compared with conventional techniques we reviewed the literature separately for benign and malignant conditions, and conducted a cost analysis for different techniques of hysterectomy from a hospital economic database. Unlimited systematic literature search of Medline, Cochrane and CRD databases produced only two randomized trials, both for benign conditions. For the outcome assessment, data from two HTA reports, one systematic review, and 16 original articles were extracted and analyzed. Furthermore, one cost modelling and 13 original cost studies were analyzed. In malignant conditions, less blood loss, fewer complications and a shorter hospital stay were considered as the main advantages of robot-assisted surgery, like any mini-invasive technique when compared to open surgery. There were no significant differences between the techniques regarding oncological outcomes. When compared to laparoscopic hysterectomy, the main benefit of robot-assistance was a shorter learning curve associated with fewer conversions but the length of robotic operation was often longer. In benign conditions, no clinically significant differences were reported and vaginal hysterectomy was considered the optimal choice when feasible. According to Finnish data, the costs of robot-assisted hysterectomies were 1.5-3 times higher than the costs of conventional techniques. In benign conditions the difference in cost was highest. Because of expensive disposable supplies, unit costs were high regardless of the annual number of robotic operations. Hence, in the current distribution of cost pattern, economical effectiveness cannot be markedly improved by increasing the volume of robotic surgery.

  10. A retrospective study of the performance of video laryngoscopy in an obstetric unit.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Michael F; Kim, Diana; Mako, Jeffrey; Hand, Karen; Brambrink, Ansgar M

    2012-10-01

    We evaluated the performance of tracheal intubation using video laryngoscopy in an obstetric unit. We analyzed airway management details during a 3-year period, and observed 180 intubations. All cases were managed with direct or video laryngoscopy. Direct laryngoscopy resulted in 157 out of 163 (95% confidence interval [CI], 92%-99%) first attempt successful intubations and failed once. Video laryngoscopy resulted in 18 of 18 (95% CI, 81%-100%) successful intubations on first attempt. The failed direct laryngoscopy was rescued with video laryngoscopy. The patients managed with video laryngoscopy frequently required urgent or emergency surgery and had predictors of difficult direct laryngoscopy in 16 of 18 cases. Video laryngoscopy may be a useful adjunct for obstetric airway management, and its role in this difficult airway scenario should be further studied.

  11. [Legal and medico-legal assessment of medical errors in obstetrics].

    PubMed

    Jurek, Tomasz; Swiatek, Barbara; Rorat, Marta; Drozd, Radosław

    2011-01-01

    The authors review the doctrine of criminal law and the jurisdiction of the Supreme Court in search of a starting point for the legal protection of human life and health. In cases of medical errors in obstetrics concerning a fetus, an act of a perpetrator can be classified as manslaughter or exposure to direct danger of loss of life or great bodily injury depending on whether the fetus is recognized as "a human being". The authors criticize the doctrinal criteria of the beginning of legal protection: spatial, physiological, obstetric, and developmental, pointing to the possibilities of decriminalization of medical errors of omission. A solution to this situation is the presented evolution of the jurisdiction of the Supreme Court. It moves towards establishing the beginning of legal and criminal protection of life and health at the "moment of emergence of objective grounds to necessitate delivery".

  12. The critical role of supervision in retaining staff in obstetric services: a three country study.

    PubMed

    McAuliffe, Eilish; Daly, Michael; Kamwendo, Francis; Masanja, Honorati; Sidat, Mohsin; de Pinho, Helen

    2013-01-01

    Millennium Development Goal (MDG) 5 commits us to reducing maternal mortality rates by three quarters and MDG 4 commits us to reducing child mortality by two-thirds between 1990 and 2015. In order to reach these goals, greater access to basic emergency obstetric care (EmOC) as well as comprehensive EmOC which includes safe Caesarean section, is needed.. The limited capacity of health systems to meet demand for obstetric services has led several countries to utilize mid-level cadres as a substitute to more extensively trained and more internationally mobile healthcare workers. Although this does provide greater capacity for service delivery, concern about the performance and motivation of these workers is emerging. We propose that poor leadership characterized by inadequate and unstructured supervision underlies much of the dissatisfaction and turnover that has been shown to exist amongst these mid-level healthcare workers and indeed health workers more generally. To investigate this, we conducted a large-scale survey of 1,561 mid-level cadre healthcare workers (health workers trained for shorter periods to perform specific tasks e.g. clinical officers) delivering obstetric care in Malawi, Tanzania, and Mozambique. Participants indicated the primary supervision method used in their facility and we assessed their job satisfaction and intentions to leave their current workplace. In all three countries we found robust evidence indicating that a formal supervision process predicted high levels of job satisfaction and low intentions to leave. We find no evidence that facility level factors modify the link between supervisory methods and key outcomes. We interpret this evidence as strongly supporting the need to strengthen leadership and implement a framework and mechanism for systematic supportive supervision. This will promote better job satisfaction and improve the retention and performance of obstetric care workers, something which has the potential to improve

  13. The Critical Role of Supervision in Retaining Staff in Obstetric Services: A Three Country Study

    PubMed Central

    McAuliffe, Eilish; Daly, Michael; Kamwendo, Francis; Masanja, Honorati; Sidat, Mohsin; de Pinho, Helen

    2013-01-01

    Millennium Development Goal (MDG) 5 commits us to reducing maternal mortality rates by three quarters and MDG 4 commits us to reducing child mortality by two-thirds between 1990 and 2015. In order to reach these goals, greater access to basic emergency obstetric care (EmOC) as well as comprehensive EmOC which includes safe Caesarean section, is needed.. The limited capacity of health systems to meet demand for obstetric services has led several countries to utilize mid-level cadres as a substitute to more extensively trained and more internationally mobile healthcare workers. Although this does provide greater capacity for service delivery, concern about the performance and motivation of these workers is emerging. We propose that poor leadership characterized by inadequate and unstructured supervision underlies much of the dissatisfaction and turnover that has been shown to exist amongst these mid-level healthcare workers and indeed health workers more generally. To investigate this, we conducted a large-scale survey of 1,561 mid-level cadre healthcare workers (health workers trained for shorter periods to perform specific tasks e.g. clinical officers) delivering obstetric care in Malawi, Tanzania, and Mozambique. Participants indicated the primary supervision method used in their facility and we assessed their job satisfaction and intentions to leave their current workplace. In all three countries we found robust evidence indicating that a formal supervision process predicted high levels of job satisfaction and low intentions to leave. We find no evidence that facility level factors modify the link between supervisory methods and key outcomes. We interpret this evidence as strongly supporting the need to strengthen leadership and implement a framework and mechanism for systematic supportive supervision. This will promote better job satisfaction and improve the retention and performance of obstetric care workers, something which has the potential to improve

  14. Obstetric and Gynecologic Patients' Attitudes and Perceptions Toward Medical Students in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Anfinan, Nisrin; Alghunaim, Nadine; Boker, Abdulaziz; Hussain, Amro; Almarstani, Ahmad; Basalamah, Hussain; Sait, Hesham; Arif, Rawan; Sait, Khalid

    2014-01-01

    Objective To identify patients’ attitudes, preferences and comfort levels regarding the presence and involvement of medical students during consultations and examinations. Methods A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted from September 2011 to December 2011 at King Abdulaziz University Hospital in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Participants were randomly selected from the outpatient and inpatient clinics at the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and the Emergency Department, provided they were admitted for obstetric or gynecology-related conditions. Data were collected using a structured questionnaire, and data analysis was performed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences. Results Of the 327 patients who were recruited, 272 (83%) were elective patients who were seen at the outpatient and inpatient clinics of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology (group I). The other 55 (16.8%) were seen at the Emergency Department or the Labor and Delivery Ward (group II). One hundred seventy-nine participants (160 [58.8%] in group I and 19 [34.5%] in group II) reported positive attitudes about the presence of female medical students during consultations. Fewer participants (115 [42.3%] were in group I and 17 [30.9%] in group II) reported positive attitudes regarding the presence of male medical students during consultations (p=0.095). The gender of the medical student was the primary factor that influenced patients’ decision to accept or decline medical student involvement. No significant associations were observed between patients’ attitudes and perceptions toward medical students and the patients' age, educational level, nationality or the gender of the consultant. Conclusion Obstetrics and Gynecology patients are typically accepting of female medical student involvement during examinations. Student gender is the primary factor that influences patient attitudes regarding student involvement during physical examinations. PMID:24715936

  15. Malpractice Burden, Rural Location, and Discontinuation of Obstetric Care: A Study of Obstetric Providers in Michigan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, Xiao; Siefert, Kristine A.; Jacobson, Peter D.; Lori, Jody R.; Gueorguieva, Iana; Ransom, Scott B.

    2009-01-01

    Context: It has long been a concern that professional liability problems disproportionately affect the delivery of obstetrical services to women living in rural areas. Michigan, a state with a large number of rural communities, is considered to be at risk for a medical liability crisis. Purpose: This study examined whether higher malpractice…

  16. Automatic segmentation applied to obstetric images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuwong, Vanee; Hiller, John B.; Jin, Jesse S.

    1998-06-01

    This paper presents a shape-based approach for searching and extracting fetal skull boundaries from an obstetric image. The proposed method relies on two major steps. Firstly, we apply the reference axes to scan the image for all potential skull boundaries. The possible skull boundaries are determined whether they are candidates. The candidate with the highest confident value will be selected as the expected head boundary. Then, the position of the expected head boundary is initialized. Secondly, we refine the initial skull boundary using the fuzzy contour model modified from the active contour basis. This results the continuous and smooth fetal skull boundary that we can use for the medical parameter measurement.

  17. Obstetric epidurals and chronic adhesive arachnoiditis.

    PubMed

    Rice, I; Wee, M Y K; Thomson, K

    2004-01-01

    It has been suggested that obstetric epidurals lead to chronic adhesive arachnoiditis (CAA). CAA is a nebulous disease entity with much confusion over its symptomatology. This review outlines the pathological, clinical, and radiological features of the disease. The proposed diagnostic criteria for CAA are: back pain that increases on exertion, with or without leg pain; neurological abnormality on examination; and characteristic MRI findings. Using these criteria, there is evidence to show that epidural or subarachnoid placement of some contrast media, preservatives and possibly vasoconstrictors, may lead to CAA. No evidence was found that the preservative-free, low concentration bupivacaine with opioid mixtures or plain bupivacaine currently used in labour lead to CAA.

  18. Relevant Obstetric Factors for Cerebral Palsy: From the Nationwide Obstetric Compensation System in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Junichi; Toyokawa, Satoshi; Ikenoue, Tsuyomu; Asano, Yuri; Satoh, Shoji; Ikeda, Tomoaki; Ichizuka, Kiyotake; Tamiya, Nanako; Nakai, Akihito; Fujimori, Keiya; Maeda, Tsugio; Masuzaki, Hideaki; Suzuki, Hideaki; Ueda, Shigeru

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to identify the relevant obstetric factors for cerebral palsy (CP) after 33 weeks’ gestation in Japan. Study design This retrospective case cohort study (1:100 cases and controls) used a Japanese national CP registry. Obstetric characteristics and clinical course were compared between CP cases in the Japan Obstetric Compensation System for Cerebral Palsy database and controls in the perinatal database of the Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology born as live singleton infants between 2009 and 2011 with a birth weight ≥ 2,000 g and gestation ≥ 33 weeks. Results One hundred and seventy-five CP cases and 17,475 controls were assessed. Major relevant single factors for CP were placental abnormalities (31%), umbilical cord abnormalities (15%), maternal complications (10%), and neonatal complications (1%). A multivariate regression model demonstrated that obstetric variables associated with CP were acute delivery due to non-reassuring fetal status (relative risk [RR]: 37.182, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 20.028–69.032), uterine rupture (RR: 24.770, 95% CI: 6.006–102.160), placental abruption (RR: 20.891, 95% CI: 11.817–36.934), and preterm labor (RR: 3.153, 95% CI: 2.024–4.911), whereas protective factors were head presentation (RR: 0.199, 95% CI: 0.088–0.450) and elective cesarean section (RR: 0.236, 95% CI: 0.067–0.828). Conclusion CP after 33 weeks’ gestation in the recently reported cases in Japan was strongly associated with acute delivery due to non-reassuring fetal status, uterine rupture, and placental abruption. PMID:26821386

  19. Steps toward a national disaster plan for obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Kay; Oakeson, Ann Marie; Hilton, Gillian

    2014-07-01

    Hospitals play a central role in disasters by receiving an influx of casualties and coordinating medical efforts to manage resources. However, plans have not been fully developed in the event the hospital itself is severely damaged, either from natural disasters like earthquakes or tornados or manmade events such as a massive electrical failure or terrorist attacks. Of particular concern is the limited awareness of the obstetric units' specialized needs in the world of disaster planning. Within the same footprint of any obstetric unit, there exists a large variety of patient acuity and needs including laboring women, postoperative patients, and healthy postpartum patients with their newborns. An obstetric-specific triage method is paramount to accurately assess and rapidly triage patients during a disaster. An example is presented here called OB TRAIN (Obstetric Triage by Resource Allocation for Inpatient). To accomplish a comprehensive obstetric disaster plan, there must be 1) national adoption of a common triage and evacuation language including an effective patient tracking system to avoid maternal-neonatal separation; 2) a stratification of maternity hospital levels of care; and 3) a collaborative network of obstetric hospitals, both regionally and nationally. However, obstetric disaster planning goes beyond evacuation and must include plans for shelter-in-place and surge capacity, all uniquely designed for the obstetric patient. Disasters, manmade or natural, are neither predictable nor preventable, but we can and should prepare for them.

  20. Obstetrical Complications and Violent Delinquency: Testing Two Developmental Pathways.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arseneault, Louise; Tremblay, Richard E.; Boulerice, Bernard; Saucier, Jean-Francois

    2002-01-01

    Assessed interaction between obstetrical complications and early family adversity in predicting violent behavior during childhood and adolescence among 849 boys from low SES areas. Found that elevated scores on scale of obstetrical complications (preeclampsia, umbilical cord prolapse, induced labor) increased risk of being violent at 6 and 17…

  1. 21 CFR 884.2960 - Obstetric ultrasonic transducer and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... obstetric ultrasonic transducer is a device used to apply ultrasonic energy to, and to receive ultrasonic energy from, the body in conjunction with an obstetric monitor or imager. The device converts electrical signals into ultrasonic energy, and vice versa, by means of an assembly distinct from an...

  2. Experience with a Family-Practice-Resident-Directed Obstetrical Clinic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Jerry L.; Snyder, Frank

    1980-01-01

    At Toledo Hospital, family practice residents have assumed responsibility for the normal obstetrics clinic. Specialty consultations are provided by the hospital's obstetrics residency program. A medical audit of the clinic indicates that the family practice residents obtained consultations and made referrals at the appropriate times. (JMD)

  3. Female family physicians in obstetrics: achieving personal balance.

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, J C; Brown, J B; Reid, A J

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the experiences of female family physicians who practise obstetrics in balancing professional obligations with personal and family needs, given the unique challenges that such practice poses for these physicians. DESIGN: Qualitative study. SETTING: Ontario. PARTICIPANTS: A purposefully selected sample of nine female family physicians who met the criteria of being married, having children and currently practising obstetrics. OUTCOME MEASURES: Experiences of female family physicians and their strategies in their personal, family and professional lives that enable them to continue practising obstetrics. RESULTS: All participants continued to practise obstetrics because of the pleasure they derived from it, despite the challenges of balancing the unpredictable demands of obstetrics with their personal and family needs. To continue in obstetrics, they needed to make changes in their lives, either through a gradual, evolutionary process or in response to a critical event. Alterations to work and family arrangements permitted them to meet the challenges and led to increased satisfaction. Changes included making supportive call-group arrangements, limiting work hours and the number of births attended and securing help with household duties. CONCLUSIONS: An in-depth examination, through the use of qualitative methods, showed the reasons why some female family physicians continue to practise obstetrics despite the stressful aspects of doing so. This knowledge may be useful for women who are residents or experienced clinicians and who are considering including obstetrics in their practice. PMID:7497390

  4. The obstetric implications of teenage pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Lao, T T; Ho, L F

    1997-10-01

    A retrospective review was performed on the obstetric outcome of teenage pregnancies delivered in 1 year in a tertiary centre. The results were compared with the rest of the obstetric population in the same hospital in the same year. The teenage mothers (n = 194) had increased incidence of sexually transmitted diseases (5.2 versus 1.0%, P < 0.05), and preterm labour (13.0 versus 7.0%, P < 0.01), but decreased incidence of gestational glucose intolerance (3.1 versus 11.4%, P < 0.001), when compared with the non-teenage mothers (n = 4914). There was no difference in the types of labour, while the incidence of Caesarean section was lower (4.1 versus 12.6%, P < 0.001) in the teenage mothers. Although the incidence of low birthweight was higher in the teenage mothers (13.5 versus 6.5%, P < 0.001), there was no significant difference in the mean birthweight, gestation at delivery, incidence of total preterm delivery, or perinatal mortality or morbidity. The results indicate that the major risk associated with teenage pregnancies is preterm labour, but the perinatal outcome is favourable. The good results accomplished in our centre could be attributed to the free and readily available prenatal care and the quality of support from the family or welfare agencies that are involved with the care of teenage mothers.

  5. Questioning the indicators of need for obstetric care.

    PubMed Central

    Ronsmans, Carine; Campbell, Oona Meave Renee; McDermott, Jeanne; Koblinsky, Marge

    2002-01-01

    The difficulties in measuring maternal mortality have led to a shift in emphasis from indicators of health to indicators of use of health care services. Furthermore, the recognition that some women need specialist obstetric care to prevent maternal death has led to the search for indicators measuring the met need for obstetric care. Although intuitively appealing, the conceptualization and definition of the need for obstetric care is far from straightforward, and there is relatively little experience so far in the use and interpretation of indicators of service use or need for obstetric care. In this paper we review indicators of service use and need for obstetric care, and briefly discuss data collection issues. PMID:12075369

  6. [Determinants of urban obstetrical service utilization in rural pregnant women].

    PubMed

    Park, J S

    1991-12-01

    This study examines the decisions of rural pregnant women who sought obstetric care elsewhere, especially in an urban area. The principal data source was the "Patients' Survey of 1988", a nationwide data collection. Among 4091 rural pregnant women, 3090 women left their home counties for obstetric care; 1946 women went to small or medium-sized cities, 645 to large cities. Multivariate techniques were used to examine the factors related to selecting urban obstetric care. The analysis shows that younger, abnormally delivered women were more likely to seek urban obstetrical facilities. In addition, medical insurance, the number of registered cars/1000, the number of general hospitals in the county, and the distance to the nearest large city were positively related to the decision to go to any city. However, distance to the nearest small or medium-sized city had a negatively significant effect on urban obstetrical service utilization. (author's modified)

  7. Abdominal emergencies during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Bouyou, J; Gaujoux, S; Marcellin, L; Leconte, M; Goffinet, F; Chapron, C; Dousset, B

    2015-12-01

    Abdominal emergencies during pregnancy (excluding obstetrical emergencies) occur in one out of 500-700 pregnancies and may involve gastrointestinal, gynecologic, urologic, vascular and traumatic etiologies; surgery is necessary in 0.2-2% of cases. Since these emergencies are relatively rare, patients should be referred to specialized centers where surgical, obstetrical and neonatal cares are available, particularly because surgical intervention increases the risk of premature labor. Clinical presentations may be atypical and misleading because of pregnancy-associated anatomical and physiologic alterations, which often result in diagnostic uncertainty and therapeutic delay with increased risks of maternal and infant morbidity. The most common abdominal emergencies are acute appendicitis (best treated by laparoscopic appendectomy), acute calculous cholecystitis (best treated by laparoscopic cholecystectomy from the first trimester through the early part of the third trimester) and intestinal obstruction (where medical treatment is the first-line approach, just as in the non-pregnant patient). Acute pancreatitis is rare, usually resulting from trans-ampullary passage of gallstones; it usually resolves with medical treatment but an elevated risk of recurrent episodes justifies laparoscopic cholecystectomy in the 2nd trimester and endoscopic sphincterotomy in the 3rd trimester. The aim of the present work is to review pregnancy-induced anatomical and physiological modifications, to describe the main abdominal emergencies during pregnancy, their specific features and their diagnostic and therapeutic management.

  8. Sexuality and Body Image After Uterine Artery Embolization and Hysterectomy in the Treatment of Uterine Fibroids: A Randomized Comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Hehenkamp, Wouter J. K. Volkers, Nicole A.; Bartholomeus, Wouter; Blok, Sjoerd de; Birnie, Erwin; Reekers, Jim A.; Ankum, Willem M.

    2007-09-15

    In this paper the effect of uterine artery embolization (UAE) on sexual functioning and body image is investigated in a randomized comparison to hysterectomy for symptomatic uterine fibroids. The EMbolization versus hysterectoMY (EMMY) trial is a randomized controlled study, conducted at 28 Dutch hospitals. Patients were allocated hysterectomy (n = 89) or UAE (n 88). Two validated questionnaires (the Sexual Activity Questionnaire [SAQ] and the Body Image Scale [BIS]) were completed by all patients at baseline, 6 weeks, and 6, 12, 18, and 24 months after treatment. Repeated measurements on SAQ scores revealed no differences between the groups. There was a trend toward improved sexual function in both groups at 2 years, although this failed to reach statistical significance except for the dimensions discomfort and habit in the UAE arm. Overall quality of sexual life deteriorated in a minority of cases at all time points, with no significant differences between the groups (at 24 months: UAE, 29.3%, versus hysterectomy, 23.5%; p = 0.32). At 24 months the BIS score had improved in both groups compared to baseline, but the change was only significant in the UAE group (p = 0.009). In conclusion, at 24 months no differences in sexuality and body image were observed between the UAE and the hysterectomy group. On average, both after UAE and hysterectomy sexual functioning and body image scores improved, but significantly so only after UAE.

  9. Decision making, beliefs, and attitudes toward hysterectomy: a focus group study with medically underserved women in Texas.

    PubMed

    Groff, J Y; Mullen, P D; Byrd, T; Shelton, A J; Lees, E; Goode, J

    2000-01-01

    Variations in hysterectomy rates have been associated with assorted physician and patient characteristics, and the disproportionate rate of hysterectomies in African American women has been attributed to a higher prevalence of leiomyomas. The role of women's beliefs and attitudes toward hysterectomy and participation in decision making for medical treatment has not been explored as a source of variance. The purposes of this qualitative study were to explore these constructs in a triethnic sample of women to understand beliefs, attitudes, and decision-making preferences among underserved women; to facilitate development of a quantitative survey; and to inform development of interventions to assist women with such medical decisions. Twenty-three focus groups were conducted with 148 women from community sites and public health clinics. Thirteen self-identified lesbians participated in three groups. Analysis of audiotaped transcripts yielded four main themes: perceived outcomes of hysterectomy, perceived views of men/partners, opinions about healthcare providers, decision-making process. Across groups, the women expressed similar expectations from hysterectomy, differing only in the degree to which dimensions were emphasized. The women thought men perceived women with hysterectomy as less desirable for reasons unrelated to childbearing. Attitudes toward physicians were negative except among Hispanic women. All women expressed a strong desire to be involved in elective treatment decisions and would discuss their choice with important others. Implications for intervention development include enhancing women's skills and confidence to evaluate treatment options and to interact with physicians around treatment choices and creation of portable educational components for important others.

  10. Transfusion medicine in obstetrics and gynecology.

    PubMed

    Santoso, J T; Lin, D W; Miller, D S

    1995-06-01

    Obstetricians and Gynecologists care for many patients with conditions potentially requiring blood transfusions. Cesarean section and hysterectomy are the two surgeries performed most frequently and both have the potential for blood loss requiring transfusion. Other examples include postpartum hemorrhage, placenta previa, and ruptured ectopic pregnancy. Obstetricians and gynecologists need to become knowledgeable about the ever-changing aspects of blood transfusion and apply it in their clinical practice. This review intends to update obstetricians and gynecologists and other health care professionals about the basic as well as the latest technologies of blood transfusion. The different types of blood components are discussed including their preparation, indications, risks, and benefits. The complications of blood transfusion and their management are reviewed, including infections, noninfectious, and immunological etiologies. HIV and hepatitis are explored, these being the most serious infectious risks of transfusion. Autologous blood transfusion, an underutilized option, is examined. Hemodilution and intraoperative blood salvage, other techniques for using the patient's own blood, are discussed. Finally, synthetic agents such as erythropoietin, granulocyte colony-stimulating factors, factors, desmopressin acetate, gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists, and new products are introduced as potential replacements to blood transfusion in the future.

  11. Between Scylla and Charybdis: renegotiating resolution of the 'obstetric dilemma' in response to ecological change.

    PubMed

    Wells, Jonathan C K

    2015-03-05

    Hominin evolution saw the emergence of two traits-bipedality and encephalization-that are fundamentally linked because the fetal head must pass through the maternal pelvis at birth, a scenario termed the 'obstetric dilemma'. While adaptive explanations for bipedality and large brains address adult phenotype, it is brain and pelvic growth that are subject to the obstetric dilemma. Many contemporary populations experience substantial maternal and perinatal morbidity/mortality from obstructed labour, yet there is increasing recognition that the obstetric dilemma is not fixed and is affected by ecological change. Ecological trends may affect growth of the pelvis and offspring brain to different extents, while the two traits also differ by a generation in the timing of their exposure. Two key questions arise: how can the fit between the maternal pelvis and the offspring brain be 'renegotiated' as the environment changes, and what nutritional signals regulate this process? I argue that the potential for maternal size to change across generations precludes birthweight being under strong genetic influence. Instead, fetal growth tracks maternal phenotype, which buffers short-term ecological perturbations. Nevertheless, rapid changes in nutritional supply between generations can generate antagonistic influences on maternal and offspring traits, increasing the risk of obstructed labour.

  12. Total laparoscopic hysterectomy: A case report from ILE-IFE, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Badejoko, Olusegun O; Ajenifuja, Kayode O; Oluborode, Babawale O; Adeyemi, Adebanjo B

    2012-10-01

    Total laparoscopic hysterectomy (TLH) is an advanced gynecological laparoscopic procedure that is widely performed in the developed world. However, its feasibility in resource-poor settings is hampered by obvious lack of equipments and/or skilled personnel. Indeed, TLH has never been reported from any Nigerian hospital. We present a 50-year-old multipara scheduled for hysterectomy on account of pre-malignant disease of the cervix, who had TLH with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy in the Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospitals Complex, Ile-Ife, southwestern Nigeria and was discharged home on the first post-operative day. She was seen in the gynecology clinic a week later in stable condition and she was highly pleased with the outcome of her surgery. This case is presented to highlight the attainability of operative gynecological laparoscopy, including advanced procedures like TLH in a resource-constrained setting, through the employment of adequate local adaptation and clever improvisation.

  13. Fiber Optical Improvements for a Device Used in Laparoscopic Hysterectomy Surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández Garcia, Ricardo; Vázquez Mercado, Liliana; García-Torales, G.; Flores, Jorge L.; Barcena-Soto, Maximiliano; Casillas Santana, Norberto; Casillas Santana, Juan Manuel

    2006-09-01

    Hysterectomy removes uterus from patients suffering different pathologies. One of the most common techniques for performing it is the laparoscopically-assisted vaginal hysterectomy (LAVH). In the final stage of the procedure, surgeons face the need to unambiguously identify the vaginal cuff before uterus removal. The aim of this research is to adapt a local source of illumination to a polymer cup-like device adapted to a stainless steel shaft that surgeons nowadays use to manipulate the uterus in LAVH. Our proposal consists in implementing a set of optical fiber illuminators along the border of the cup-like device to illuminate the exact vaginal cupola, using an external light source. We present experimental results concerning temperature increases in quasi adiabatic conditions in cow meat under different light intensity illumination.

  14. Perioperative Management of Hysterectomy in a Patient with Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    K, Savitri.; S, Sreedevi

    2014-01-01

    Polycystic disease of the kidney, inherited as an autosomal dominant trait is characterised by progressive expansion of numerous fluid-filled cysts resulting in massive enlargement of the kidneys ultimately resulting in kidney failure. An understanding of alterations in the renal physiology due to hemodynamic changes is important for successful perioperative management. We report a successful perioperative management of a vaginal hysterectomy in a female patient with adult polycystic kidney disease. PMID:25177578

  15. Prophylactic Antibiotic Choice and Risk of Surgical Site Infection After Hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Uppal, Shitanshu; Harris, John; Al-Niaimi, Ahmed; Swenson, Carolyn W.; Pearlman, Mark D.; Reynolds, R. Kevin; Kamdar, Neil; Bazzi, Ali; Campbell, Darrell A.; Morgan, Daniel M.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate associations between prophylactic preoperative antibiotic choice and surgical site infection rates after hysterectomy. METHODS A retrospective cohort study was performed of patients in the Michigan Surgical Quality Collaborative undergoing hysterectomy from July 2012 to February 2015. The primary outcome was a composite outcome of any surgical site infection (superficial surgical site infections or combined deep–organ space surgical site infections). Preoperative antibiotics were categorized based on the recommendations set forth by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and the Surgical Care Improvement Project. Patients receiving a recommended antibiotic regimen were categorized into those receiving beta-lactam antibiotics and those receiving alternatives to beta-lactam antibiotics. Patients receiving non-recommended antibiotics were categorized into those receiving overtreatment (excluded from further analysis) and those receiving non-standard antibiotics. Multivariable logistic regression models were developed to estimate the independent effect of antibiotic choice. Propensity score matching analysis was performed to validate the results. RESULTS The study included 21,358 hysterectomies. The overall rate of any surgical site infection’ was 2.06% (N=441). Unadjusted rates of ‘any surgical site infection’ were 1.8%, 3.1% and 3.7% for beta-lactam, beta-lactam alternatives and non-standard groups, respectively. After adjusting for patient and operative factors within clusters of hospitals, compared to the beta-lactam antibiotics (reference group), the risk of ‘any surgical site infection’ was higher for the group receiving beta-lactam alternatives (OR 1.7, CI 1.27–2.07) or the non-standard antibiotics (OR 2.0, CI 1.31–3.1). CONCLUSION Compared to women receiving beta lactam antibiotic regimens, there is a higher risk of surgical site infection after hysterectomy among those receiving a recommended beta lactam

  16. The New "Obstetrical Dilemma": Stunting, Obesity and the Risk of Obstructed Labour.

    PubMed

    Wells, Jonathan C K

    2017-04-01

    The "obstetrical dilemma" refers to the tight fit between maternal pelvic dimensions and neonatal size at delivery. Most interest traditionally focused on its generic significance for humans, for example our neonatal altriciality and our complex and lengthy birth process. Across contemporary populations, however, the obstetrical dilemma manifests substantial variability, illustrated by differences in the incidence of cephalo-pelvic disproportion, obstructed labour and cesarean section. Beyond accounting for 12% of maternal mortality worldwide, obstructed labour also imposes a huge burden of maternal morbidity, in particular through debilitating birth injuries. This article explores how the double burden of malnutrition and the global obesity epidemic may be reshaping the obstetrical dilemma. First, short maternal stature increases the risk of obstructed labour, while early age at marriage also risks pregnancy before pelvic growth is completed. Second, maternal obesity increases the risk of macrosomic offspring. In some populations, short maternal stature may also promote the risk of gestational diabetes, another risk factor for macrosomic offspring. These nutritional influences are furthermore sensitive to social values relating to issues such as maternal and child nutrition, gender inequality and age at marriage. Secular trends in maternal obesity are substantially greater than those in adult stature, especially in low- and middle-income countries. The association between the dual burden of malnutrition and the obstetrical dilemma is therefore expected to increase, because the obesity epidemic is emerging faster than stunting is being resolved. However, we currently lack objective population-specific data on the association between maternal obesity and birth injuries. Anat Rec, 300:716-731, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Analysis of a Standardized Technique for Laparoscopic Cuff Closure following 1924 Total Laparoscopic Hysterectomies

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Alfred; Sten, Margaret S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To review the vaginal cuff complications from a large series of total laparoscopic hysterectomies in which the laparoscopic culdotomy closure was highly standardized. Methods. Retrospective cohort study (Canadian Task Force Classification II-3) of consecutive total and radical laparoscopic hysterectomy patients with all culdotomy closures performed laparoscopically was conducted using three guidelines: placement of all sutures 5 mm deep from the vaginal edge with a 5 mm interval, incorporation of the uterosacral ligaments with the pubocervical fascia at each angle, and, whenever possible, suturing the bladder peritoneum over the vaginal cuff edge utilizing two suture types of comparable tensile strength. Four outcomes are reviewed: dehiscence, bleeding, infection, and adhesions. Results. Of 1924 patients undergoing total laparoscopic hysterectomy, 44 patients (2.29%) experienced a vaginal cuff complication, with 19 (0.99%) requiring reoperation. Five patients (0.26%) had dehiscence after sexual penetration on days 30–83, with 3 requiring reoperation. Thirteen patients (0.68%) developed bleeding, with 9 (0.47%) requiring reoperation. Twenty-three (1.20%) patients developed infections, with 4 (0.21%) requiring reoperation. Three patients (0.16%) developed obstructive small bowel adhesions to the cuff requiring laparoscopic lysis. Conclusion. A running 5 mm deep × 5 mm apart culdotomy closure that incorporates the uterosacral ligaments with the pubocervical fascia, with reperitonealization when possible, appears to be associated with few postoperative vaginal cuff complications. PMID:27579179

  18. Learning Curve Analysis of Different Stages of Robotic-Assisted Laparoscopic Hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Feng-Hsiang

    2017-01-01

    Objective. To analyze the learning curves of the different stages of robotic-assisted laparoscopic hysterectomy. Design. Retrospective analysis. Design Classification. Canadian Task Force classification II-2. Setting. Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan. Patient Intervention. Women receiving robotic-assisted total and subtotal laparoscopic hysterectomies for benign conditions from May 1, 2013, to August 31, 2015. Measurements and Main Results. The mean age, body mass index (BMI), and uterine weight were 46.44 ± 5.31 years, 23.97 ± 4.75 kg/m2, and 435.48 ± 250.62 g, respectively. The most rapid learning curve was obtained for the main surgery console stage; eight experiences were required to achieve duration stability, and the time spent in this stage did not violate the control rules. The docking stage required 14 experiences to achieve duration stability, and the suture stage was the most difficult to master, requiring 26 experiences. BMI did not considerably affect the duration of the three stages. The uterine weight and the presence of adhesion did not substantially affect the main surgery console time. Conclusion. Different stages of robotic-assisted laparoscopic hysterectomy have different learning curves. The main surgery console stage has the most rapid learning curve, whereas the suture stage has the slowest learning curve. PMID:28373977

  19. Safety and Cost Considerations during the Introduction Period of Laparoscopic Radical Hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Decruze, B.; Macdonald, R.; Kirwan, J.

    2017-01-01

    Objective. To compare the safety, efficacy, and direct cost during the introduction of laparoscopic radical hysterectomy within an enhanced recovery pathway. Methods. A 1 : 1 single centre retrospective case control study of 36 propensity matched pairs of patients receiving open or laparoscopic surgery for early cervical cancer. Results. There were no significant differences in the baseline characteristics of the two cohorts. Open surgery cohort had significantly higher intraoperative blood loss (189 versus 934 mL) and longer postoperative hospital stay (2.3 versus 4.1 days). Although no significant difference in the intraoperative or postoperative complications was found more urinary tract injuries were recorded in the laparoscopic cohort. Laparoscopic surgery had significantly longer duration (206 versus 159 minutes), lower lymph node harvest (12.6 versus 16.9), and slower bladder function recovery. The median direct hospital cost was £4850 for laparoscopic radical hysterectomy and £4400 for open surgery. Conclusions. Laparoscopic radical hysterectomy can be safely introduced in an enhanced recovery environment without significant increase in perioperative morbidity. The 10% higher direct hospital cost is not statistically significant and is expected to even out when indirect costs are included. PMID:28167964

  20. Robot-assisted hysterectomy for endometrial and cervical cancers: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Nevis, Immaculate F; Vali, Bahareh; Higgins, Caroline; Dhalla, Irfan; Urbach, David; Bernardini, Marcus Q

    2017-03-01

    Total and radical hysterectomies are the most common treatment strategies for early-stage endometrial and cervical cancers, respectively. Surgical modalities include open surgery, laparoscopy, and more recently, minimally invasive robot-assisted surgery. We searched several electronic databases for randomized controlled trials and observational studies with a comparison group, published between 2009 and 2014. Our outcomes of interest included both perioperative and morbidity outcomes. We included 35 observational studies in this review. We did not find any randomized controlled trials. The quality of evidence for all reported outcomes was very low. For women with endometrial cancer, we found that there was a reduction in estimated blood loss between the robot-assisted surgery compared to both laparoscopy and open surgery. There was a reduction in length of hospital stay between robot-assisted surgery and open surgery but not laparoscopy. There was no difference in total lymph node removal between the three modalities. There was no difference in the rate of overall complications between the robot-assisted technique and laparoscopy. For women with cervical cancer, there were no differences in estimated blood loss or removal of lymph nodes between robot-assisted and laparoscopic procedure. Compared to laparotomy, robot-assisted hysterectomy for cervical cancer showed an overall reduction in estimated blood loss. Although robot-assisted hysterectomy is clinically effective for the treatment of both endometrial and cervical cancers, methodologically rigorous studies are lacking to draw definitive conclusions.

  1. Positive Glucose Breath Tests in Patients with Hysterectomy, Gastrectomy, and Cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae Bum; Paik, Chang-Nyol; Kim, Yeon Ji; Lee, Ji Min; Jun, Kyong-Hwa; Chung, Woo Chul; Lee, Kang-Moon; Yang, Jin-Mo; Choi, Myung-Gyu

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims This study aimed to investigate the prevalence and characteristics of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) in patients undergoing abdominal surgeries, such as gastrectomy, cholecystectomy, and hysterectomy. Methods One hundred seventy-one patients with surgery (50 hysterectomy, 14 gastrectomy, and 107 cholecystectomy), 665 patients with functional gastrointestinal disease (FGID) and 30 healthy controls undergoing a hydrogen (H2)-methane (CH4) glucose breath test (GBT) were reviewed. Results GBT positivity (+) was significantly different among the surgical patients (43.9%), FGID patients (31.9%), and controls (13.3%) (p<0.01). With respect to the patients, 65 (38.0%), four (2.3%), and six (3.5%) surgical patients and 150 (22.6%), 30 (4.5%), and 32 (4.8%) FGID patients were in the GBT (H2)+, (CH4)+ and (mixed)+ groups, respectively (p<0.01). The gastrectomy group had a significantly increased preference in GBT+ (71.4% vs 42.0% or 41.1%, respectively) and GBT (H2)+ (64.3% vs 32.0% or 37.4%, respectively) compared with the hysterectomy or cholecystectomy groups (p<0.01). During GBT, the total H2 was significantly increased in the gastrectomy group compared with the other groups. Conclusions SIBO producing H2 is common in abdominal surgical patients. Different features for GBT+ may be a result of the types of abdominal surgery. PMID:27965476

  2. Reduction of feral cat (Felis catus Linnaeus 1758) colony size following hysterectomy of adult female cats.

    PubMed

    Mendes-de-Almeida, Flavya; Remy, Gabriella L; Gershony, Liza C; Rodrigues, Daniela P; Chame, Marcia; Labarthe, Norma V

    2011-06-01

    The size of urban cat colonies is limited only by the availability of food and shelter; therefore, their population growth challenges all known population control programs. To test a new population control method, a free-roaming feral cat colony at the Zoological Park in the city of Rio de Janeiro was studied, beginning in 2001. The novel method consisted of performing a hysterectomy on all captured female cats over 6 months of age. To estimate the size of the colony and compare population from year to year, a method of capture-mark-release-recapture was used. The aim was to capture as many individuals as possible, including cats of all ages and gender to estimate numbers of cats in all population categories. Results indicated that the feral cat population remained constant from 2001 to 2004. From 2004 to 2008, the hysterectomy program and population estimates were performed every other year (2006 and 2008). The population was estimated to be 40 cats in 2004, 26 in 2006, and 17 cats in 2008. Although pathogens tend to infect more individuals as the population grows older and maintains natural behavior, these results show that free-roaming feral cat colonies could have their population controlled by a biannual program that focuses on hysterectomy of sexually active female cats.

  3. Acupuncture for Preventing Complications after Radical Hysterectomy: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Wei-min; Chen, Qing; Liu, Chang-hao; Hou, Jia-yun; Chen, Liu-dan; Wu, Wei-kang

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the preventive effects of acupuncture for complications after radical hysterectomy. A single-center randomized controlled single-blinded trial was performed in a western-style hospital in China. One hundred and twenty patients after radical hysterectomy were randomly allocated to two groups and started acupuncture from sixth postoperative day for five consecutive days. Sanyinjiao (SP6), Shuidao (ST28), and Epangxian III (MS4) were selected with electrical stimulation and Zusanli (ST36) without electrical stimulation for thirty minutes in treatment group. Binao (LI14) was selected as sham acupuncture point without any stimulation in control group. The main outcome measures were bladder function and prevalence of postoperative complications. Compared with control group, treatment group reported significantly improved bladder function in terms of maximal cystometric capacity, first voiding desire, maximal flow rate, residual urine, and bladder compliance, and decreased bladder sensory loss, incontinence, and urinary retention on fifteenth and thirtieth postoperative days. Treatment group showed significant advantage in reduction of urinary tract infection on thirtieth postoperative day. But no significant difference between groups was observed for lymphocyst formation. By improving postoperative bladder function, early intervention of acupuncture may provide a valuable alternative method to prevent bladder dysfunctional disorders and urinary tract infection after radical hysterectomy. PMID:24839455

  4. Use of Monsel solution to treat obstetrical hemorrhage: a review and comparison to other topical hemostatic agents.

    PubMed

    Miller, Devin T; Roque, Dana M; Santin, Alessandro D

    2015-06-01

    Peripartum hemorrhage accounts for 8% of maternal deaths in the United States, and nearly 27% worldwide. A growing need exists for tactics to spare morbidity given a rise of abnormal placentation that contributes to excessive blood loss at the time of delivery. Approaches such as compression sutures, balloon tamponade, and pelvic artery embolization are not without side effects and potential implications for future fertility. The use of topical hemostatic agents has become widespread in gynecologic and obstetric surgery despite a paucity of distinct studies in the field, and may allow providers to increasingly avoid cesarean hysterectomy. A variety of topical hemostatic agents exist along a wide cost continuum, each characterized by specific efficacy, advantages, drawbacks, and often gaps in long-term data to support safety and impact on future fertility. Herein, we comprehensively review these agents and illustrate a nontraditional use of Monsel solution applied directly to the placental bed in a case of focal placenta accreta. This ultimately contributed to successful uterine preservation with no known adverse sequelae. Monsel solution may have a role in establishing hemostasis in the setting of abnormal placentation, and may be a particularly attractive alternative in resource-poor nations.

  5. Use of Monsel’s Solution to Treat Obstetrical Hemorrhage: A Review and Comparison to Other Topical Hemostatic Agents

    PubMed Central

    MILLER, Devin T.; ROQUE, Dana M.; SANTIN, Alessandro D.

    2014-01-01

    Peripartum hemorrhage accounts for 8% of maternal deaths in the United States, and nearly 27% worldwide. A growing need exists for tactics to spare morbidity given a rise of abnormal placentation that contributes to excessive blood loss at the time of delivery. Approaches such as compression sutures, balloon tamponade, and pelvic artery embolization are not without side effects and potential implications for future fertility. The use of topical hemostatic agents has become widespread in gynecologic and obstetric surgery despite a paucity of distinct studies in the field, and may allow providers to increasingly avoid cesarean hysterectomy. A variety of topical hemostatic agents exist along a wide cost continuum, each characterized by specific efficacy, advantages, drawbacks, and often gaps in long-term data to support safety and impact on future fertility. Herein, we comprehensively review these agents and illustrate a non-traditional use of Monsel’s solution applied directly to the placental bed in a case of focal placenta accreta. This ultimately contributed to successful uterine preservation with no known adverse sequelae. Monsel’s solution may have a role in establishing hemostasis in the setting of abnormal placentation, and may be a particularly attractive alternative in resource-poor nations. PMID:25577672

  6. Obstetric handling of a deaf patient.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, M S; Addar, M H

    2000-12-01

    We report our experience of obstetric handling of a deaf pregnant patient antenatally, in labor and postpartum. The patient was deaf from childhood. The attending obstetrician had no training in the necessary skills for communication with the deaf. Fortunately, the patient could read and write English very well and communication was carried out through pen and paper. This proved to be difficult, time-consuming and required a lot of patience. The clinical, psychological and human aspects of the management were gratifying. The patient brought up interesting aspects that need to be considered when dealing with similar patients. Experience of deaf mothers and their ingenious approaches in dealing with babies, in the postpartum period, are quoted in this communication.

  7. Obstetric care in the central Canadian Arctic.

    PubMed

    Baskett, T F

    1978-10-07

    All pregnancies that occurred during 1971-5 among 4000 Canadian Eskimos living in isolated settlements in a district of the North-west Territories were reviewed. Obstetric care was provided in settlement nursing stations, at a base hospital manned by general practitioners, and at a teaching hospital in Winnipeg. Of the 622 infants delivered in 1971-5 218 were delivered in nursing stations by midwives, 338 in the base hospital, and 54 in the teaching hospital. Caesarean sections were performed in 10 cases, and the perinatal mortality was 25.7 per 1000 births. Though it is hard to defend patients delivering their babies in remote areas with no medical help, the results seemed to be acceptable. The credit for this goes to experienced midwives, a liberal evacuation policy, close co-operation from general practitioners, and the specialist visiting and consulting service.

  8. Celiac disease and obstetrical-gynecological contribution

    PubMed Central

    Casella, Giovanni; Orfanotti, Guido; Giacomantonio, Loredana; Bella, Camillo Di; Crisafulli, Valentina; Villanacci, Vincenzo; Baldini, Vittorio; Bassotti, Gabrio

    2016-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) shows an increased prevalence in female, particularly during the fertile period. Celiac disease should be researched in infertility, spontaneous and recurrent abortions, delayed menarche, amenorrhea, early menopause, and children with low birth-weight. Celiac disease is still little considered during the evaluation of infertility. Up to 50% of women with untreated CD refer an experience of miscarriage or an unfavorable outcome of pregnancy. Celiac patients taking a normal diet (with gluten) have a shorter reproductive period. Women with undiagnosed CD had a higher risk of small for gestation age infants very small for gestational age infants and pre-term birth when compared with women with noted CD. The link between NCGS and infertility is actually unknown. The goal of our work is to perform an actual review about this topic and to increase the awareness in the medical population to research celiac disease in selected obstetric and gynecological disorders. PMID:27895849

  9. [Pethidine or nalbuphine for obstetric analgesia?].

    PubMed

    Mitterschiffthaler, G; Huter, O

    1991-05-01

    Because of the risk of ventilatory depression, agonistic and partially agonistic/antagonistic opiates are well suited for providing pain relief in obstetrics. We compared two groups of 20 women each with pregnancy on term who received equipotent doses of nalbuphin (0.1 mg/kg) and pethidin (0.8 mg/kg) intramuscularly. We found a significantly longer (6h) and better analgesic effect in the nalbuphin group but also a significantly more pronounced sedation. Other side effects were fewer in this last-named group. There were no differences in the behaviour of the babies between both groups. We consider that because of the "ceiling effect" of ventilatory depression, nalbuphin may allow better analgesia without the risk of ventilatory depression of both mother and newborn.

  10. Diagnosis and management of non-criteria obstetric antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Arachchillage, Deepa R Jayakody; Machin, Samuel J; Mackie, Ian J; Cohen, Hannah

    2015-01-01

    Accurate diagnosis of obstetric antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is a prerequisite for optimal clinical management. The international consensus (revised Sapporo) criteria for obstetric APS do not include low positive anticardiolipin (aCL) and anti β2 glycoprotein I (aβ2GPI) antibodies (< 99th centile) and/or certain clinical criteria such as two unexplained miscarriages, three non-consecutive miscarriages, late pre-eclampsia, placental abruption, late premature birth, or two or more unexplained in vitro fertilisation failures. In this review we examine the available evidence to address the question of whether patients who exhibit non-criteria clinical and/or laboratory manifestations should be included within the spectrum of obstetric APS. Prospective and retrospective cohort studies of women with pregnancy morbidity, particularly recurrent pregnancy loss, suggest that elimination of aCL and/or IgM aβ2GPI, or low positive positive aCL or aβ2GPI from APS laboratory diagnostic criteria may result in missing the diagnosis in a sizeable number of women who could be regarded to have obstetric APS. Such prospective and retrospective studies also suggest that women with non-criteria obstetric APS may benefit from standard treatment for obstetric APS with low-molecular-weight heparin plus low-dose aspirin, with good pregnancy outcomes. Thus, non-criteria manifestations of obstetric APS may be clinically relevant, and merit investigation of therapeutic approaches. Women with obstetric APS appear to be at a higher risk than other women of pre-eclampsia, placenta-mediated complications and neonatal mortality, and also at increased long-term risk of thrombotic events. The applicability of these observations to outcomes in women with non-criteria obstetric APS remains to be determined.

  11. Integrating psychotherapy with obstetrics and gynaecology.

    PubMed

    Linder, Rupert

    2007-01-01

    As a specialist Obstetrics and Gynaecology I then became a specialist also in psychotherapy, including: psychodynamic therapy, group therapy, hypnotherapy, and body-therapy. In the last nineteen years I have been working to integrate the medical and psychotherapeutic approach, including attention to psychosocial factors. After some years, I found our German rate of premature birth to be 7%. This amazed me because prematurity very rarely occurred in my patients, which was down to about 1%. In France they did some surveys and studies. By informing the mothers how to live, and reducing smoking and drugs, they reduced their prematurity rate to about half, but still much above my rate of 1%. I have described my method in articles. This is vital work, because serious prematurity is responsible for most damage and death amongst the children. A mother's complaint may be an early suggestion of danger. We then check it with the regular obstetric assessments. Even before birth symptoms can indicate a problem, such as premature labour, much as postnatal problems while breast feeding are indicated by symptoms. And before birth, as well as after birth stress and emotional problems can be the cause for serious somatic illness. It is really an effect of one relationship on the other. The way a woman relates to her child depends on her feeling of security among all who support her. All her relationships are important: how she grew up with her parents; her work: her other children. Further problems that experience of psychotherapy can help to reduce are: exceeding the estimated date of delivery: pre-eclampsia: HELLP-syndrome (Hemolysis, Elevated Liver enzymes and Low Platelets). The lectures we offer on the subject are also relevant to psychotherapeutic understanding and in guiding to treatment.

  12. Patient Satisfaction with Virtual Obstetric Care.

    PubMed

    Pflugeisen, Bethann Mangel; Mou, Jin

    2017-02-07

    Introduction The importance of patient satisfaction in US healthcare is increasing, in tandem with the advent of new patient care modalities, including virtual care. The purpose of this study was to compare the satisfaction of obstetric patients who received one-third of their antenatal visits in videoconference ("Virtual-care") compared to those who received 12-14 face-to-face visits in-clinic with their physician/midwife ("Traditional-care"). Methods We developed a four-domain satisfaction questionnaire; Virtual-care patients were asked additional questions about technology. Using a modified Dillman method, satisfaction surveys were sent to Virtual-care (N = 378) and Traditional-care (N = 795) patients who received obstetric services at our institution between January 2013 and June 2015. Chi-squared tests of association, t-tests, logistic regression, and ANOVA models were used to evaluate differences in satisfaction and self-reported demographics between respondents. Results Overall satisfaction was significantly higher in the Virtual-care cohort (4.76 ± 0.44 vs. 4.47 ± 0.59; p < .001). Parity ≥ 1 was the sole significant demographic variable impacting Virtual-care selection (OR = 2.4, 95% CI: 1.5-3.8; p < .001). Satisfaction of Virtual-care respondents was not significantly impacted by the incorporation of videoconferencing, Doppler, and blood pressure monitoring technology into their care. The questionnaire demonstrated high internal consistency as measured by domain-based correlations and Cronbach's alpha. Discussion Respondents from both models were highly satisfied with care, but those who had selected the Virtual-care model reported significantly higher mean satisfaction scores. The Virtual-care model was selected by significantly more women who already have children than those experiencing pregnancy for the first time. This model of care may be a reasonable alternative to traditional care.

  13. [The expertise evaluation of organization of rendering of acute, emergency and urgent medical care in rural regions of Novosibirsk oblast'].

    PubMed

    Ivaninskiĭ, O I; Sharapov, I V; Sadovoĭ, M A

    2013-01-01

    The most problematic spheres in the resource support of emergency medical care to rural residents are the completeness of staff of physicians in rural medical surgeries, community hospitals and departments of emergency medical care in central district hospitals. The provision of feldsher obstetrics posts with sanitary motor transport and medical equipment is yet another problematic sphere. The main troubles during provision of emergency medical care at feldsher obstetrics posts are related to surgery treatment. The organization of emergency and urgent medical care suffers of many unresolved problems related to informational program support at feldsher obstetrics posts, polyclinics of central district hospitals.

  14. Hard labor: the personal experiences of two obstetric nurses in Balad, Iraq.

    PubMed

    Poole, Katrina; Lacek, Angela

    2010-06-01

    This article describes the experiences of two obstetric nurses as they deployed to the war zone in Iraq. Each discusses her role as a medical-surgical nurse and an emergency room nurse, respectively, and how she dealt with learning to practice in these areas. Each nurse came away from the experience with newfound confidence in her abilities and an appreciation for flexibility in practice. They also describe the challenges of deployment and being away from family, and how they coped with their feelings associated with nursing in a war zone and caring for injured service members and the indigenous population.

  15. Lived experiences of Ghanaian women with obstetric fistula.

    PubMed

    Mwini-Nyaledzigbor, Prudence P; Agana, Alice A; Pilkington, F Beryl

    2013-01-01

    Obstetric fistula is a worldwide problem that is devastating for women. This qualitative descriptive study explores the experiences of Ghanaian women who sustained obstetric fistula during childbirth. In-depth interviews were conducted with 10 participants. The resultant themes include cultural beliefs and practices surrounding prolonged labor in childbirth, barriers to delivering at a health care facility, and the challenges of living with obstetric fistula, including psychosocial, socioeconomic, physical, and health care access issues. Recommendations include strategies to address this complex problem, including education of men and women on safe motherhood practices, training of traditional birth attendants (TBAs), and improving access to health care.

  16. Ultrasound in obstetric anaesthesia: a review of current applications.

    PubMed

    Ecimovic, P; Loughrey, J P R

    2010-07-01

    Ultrasound equipment is increasingly used by non-radiologists to perform interventional techniques and for diagnostic evaluation. Equipment is becoming more portable and durable, with easier user-interface and software enhancement to improve image quality. While obstetric utilisation of ultrasound for fetal assessment has developed over more than 40years, the same technology has not found a widespread role in obstetric anaesthesia. Within the broader specialty of anaesthesia; vascular access, cardiac imaging and regional anaesthesia are the areas in which ultrasound is becoming increasingly established. In addition to ultrasound for neuraxial blocks, these other clinical applications may be of value in obstetric anaesthesia practice.

  17. Knowledge of Obstetric Fistula Prevention amongst Young Women in Urban and Rural Burkina Faso: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Banke-Thomas, Aduragbemi O.; Kouraogo, Salam F.; Siribie, Aboubacar; Taddese, Henock B.; Mueller, Judith E.

    2013-01-01

    Obstetric fistula is a sequela of complicated labour, which, if untreated, leaves women handicapped and socially excluded. In Burkina Faso, incidence of obstetric fistula is 6/10,000 cases amongst gynaecological patients, with more patients affected in rural areas. This study aims to evaluate knowledge on obstetric fistula among young women in a health district of Burkina Faso, comparing rural and urban communities. This cross-sectional study employed multi-stage sampling to include 121 women aged 18-20 years residing in urban and rural communities of Boromo health district. Descriptive statistics and multiple logistic regression analysis were used to compare differences between the groups and to identify predictors of observed knowledge levels. Rural women were more likely to be married (p<0.000) and had higher propensity to teenage pregnancy (p=0.006). The survey showed overall poor obstetric fistula awareness (36%). Rural residents were less likely to have adequate preventive knowledge than urban residents [OR=0.35 (95%-CI, 0.16–0.79)]. This effect was only slightly explained by lack of education [OR=0.41 (95%-CI, 0.18–0.93)] and only slightly underestimated due to previous pregnancy [OR=0.27 (95%-CI, 0.09–0.79)]. Media were the most popular source of awareness amongst urban young women in contrast to their rural counterparts (68% vs. 23%). Most rural young women became ‘aware’ through word-of-mouth (68% vs. 14%). All participants agreed that the hospital was safer for emergency obstetric care, but only 11.0% believed they could face pregnancy complications that would require emergency treatment. There is urgent need to increase emphasis on neglected health messages such as the risks of obstetric fistula. In this respect, obstetric fistula prevention programs need to be adapted to local contexts, whether urban or rural, and multi-sectoral efforts need to be exerted to maximise use of other sectoral resources and platforms, including existing routine

  18. Knowledge of obstetric fistula prevention amongst young women in urban and rural Burkina Faso: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Banke-Thomas, Aduragbemi O; Kouraogo, Salam F; Siribie, Aboubacar; Taddese, Henock B; Mueller, Judith E

    2013-01-01

    Obstetric fistula is a sequela of complicated labour, which, if untreated, leaves women handicapped and socially excluded. In Burkina Faso, incidence of obstetric fistula is 6/10,000 cases amongst gynaecological patients, with more patients affected in rural areas. This study aims to evaluate knowledge on obstetric fistula among young women in a health district of Burkina Faso, comparing rural and urban communities. This cross-sectional study employed multi-stage sampling to include 121 women aged 18-20 years residing in urban and rural communities of Boromo health district. Descriptive statistics and multiple logistic regression analysis were used to compare differences between the groups and to identify predictors of observed knowledge levels. Rural women were more likely to be married (p<0.000) and had higher propensity to teenage pregnancy (p=0.006). The survey showed overall poor obstetric fistula awareness (36%). Rural residents were less likely to have adequate preventive knowledge than urban residents [OR=0.35 (95%-CI, 0.16-0.79)]. This effect was only slightly explained by lack of education [OR=0.41 (95%-CI, 0.18-0.93)] and only slightly underestimated due to previous pregnancy [OR=0.27 (95%-CI, 0.09-0.79)]. Media were the most popular source of awareness amongst urban young women in contrast to their rural counterparts (68% vs. 23%). Most rural young women became 'aware' through word-of-mouth (68% vs. 14%). All participants agreed that the hospital was safer for emergency obstetric care, but only 11.0% believed they could face pregnancy complications that would require emergency treatment. There is urgent need to increase emphasis on neglected health messages such as the risks of obstetric fistula. In this respect, obstetric fistula prevention programs need to be adapted to local contexts, whether urban or rural, and multi-sectoral efforts need to be exerted to maximise use of other sectoral resources and platforms, including existing routine health

  19. What's new in obstetric anesthesia? The 2011 Gerard W. Ostheimer Lecture.

    PubMed

    Toledo, Paloma

    2011-12-01

    The "What's New in Obstetric Anesthesia" lecture was established by the Society for Obstetric Anesthesia and Perinatology in 1975 to update members on the preceding year's medical literature. In 1995, the lecture was renamed in honor of Gerard W. Ostheimer, an obstetric anesthesiologist from Brigham and Women's Hospital who contributed significantly to the knowledge and practice of obstetric anesthesia. The Ostheimer lecturer reviews the obstetric anesthesia, obstetric, perinatology, and health services literature to identify articles that are relevant to the practice of obstetric anesthesiology. This review summarizes the most relevant publications from the 2010 literature.

  20. Development of a self-assessment tool for measuring competences of obstetric nurses in rooming-in wards in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ju; Ye, Wenqin; Fan, Fan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: To provide high-quality nursing care, a reliable and feasible competency assessment tool is critical. Although several questionnaire-based competency assessment tools have been reported, a tool specific for obstetric nurses in rooming-in wards is lacking. Therefore, the purpose of this research is to develop a competency assessment tool for obstetric rooming-in ward nurses. Methods: A literature review was conducted to create an individual intensive interview with 14 nurse managers, educators, and primary nurses in rooming-in wards. Expert reviews (n = 15) were conducted to identify emergent themes in a Delphi fashion. A competency assessment questionnaire was then developed and tested with 246 rooming-in ward nurses in local hospitals. Results: We constructed a three-factor linear model for obstetric rooming-in nurse competency assessment. Further refinement resulted in a self-assessment questionnaire containing three first-tier, 12 second-tier, and 43 third-tier items for easy implementation. The questionnaire was reliable, contained satisfactory content, and had construct validity. Discussion: Our competency assessment tool provides a systematic, easy, and operational subjective evaluation model for nursing managers and administrators to evaluate obstetric rooming-in ward primary nurses. The application of this tool will facilitate various human resources functions, such as nurse training/education effect evaluation, and will eventually promote high-quality nursing care delivery. PMID:26770468

  1. The Challenge of Teaching Obstetrics to Family Practice Residents

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, June C.

    1986-01-01

    Physicians who incorporate maternity care into family practice experience an increase in job satisfaction and enjoy a more favourable practice profile. Yet many family physicians are opting out of the obstetrical care of their patients. This development presents a major challenge to the teachers of family medicine. In many teaching programs the response of staff has been to move significant portions of residency training in obstetrics to smaller community hospitals. At Mount Sinai Hospital in Toronto, we believe that an integrated program in the tertiary care centre offers definite advantages. Our obstetrical training program integrates four elements: the community, the hospital, the Department of Family and Community Medicine, and the training program offered by that Department. We expect that family practice residents, by participating in this multifaceted, integrated program, will make a better-informed choice about practising obstetrics. PMID:21267328

  2. [110 years--University Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital "Maichin dom"].

    PubMed

    Zlatkov, V

    2014-01-01

    The first specialized Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital in Bulgaria was founded based on the idea of Queen Maria Luisa (1883). Construction began in 1896 and the official opening of the hospital took place on November 19, 1903. What is unique about the University Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital "Maichin dom" is above all the fact that the Bulgarian school of obstetrics and gynecology was founded within its institution. Currently, the hospital has nearly 400 beds and 600 employees who work at nine clinics and six laboratories, covering the entire spectrum of obstetric and gynecological activities. Its leading specialists still continue to embody the highest level of professionalism and dedication. The future development of the hospital is chiefly associated with the renovation of facilities, resources and equipment and with the enhancement of the professional competence of the staff and of the quality of hospital products to improve the health and satisfaction of the patients.

  3. Obstetric Complications Tied to Slightly Upped Risk for Autism

    MedlinePlus

    ... Obstetric Complications Tied to Slightly Upped Risk for Autism Study suggests link, but one expert stressed that most complicated pregnancies result in babies without autism To use the sharing features on this page, ...

  4. Social implications of obstetric fistula: an integrative review.

    PubMed

    Roush, Karen M

    2009-01-01

    Obstetric fistula is a devastating complication of obstructed labor that affects more than two million women in developing countries, with at least 75,000 new cases every year. Prolonged pressure of the infant's skull against the tissues of the birth canal leads to ischemia and tissue death. The woman is left with a hole between her vagina and bladder (vesicovaginal) or vagina and rectum (rectovaginal) or both, and has uncontrollable leakage of urine or feces or both. It is widely reported in scientific publications and the media that women with obstetric fistula suffer devastating social consequences, but these claims are rarely supported with evidence. Therefore, the true prevalence and nature of the social implications of obstetric fistula are unknown. An integrative review was undertaken to determine the current state of the science on social implications of obstetric fistula in sub-Saharan Africa.

  5. The principles and practice of ultrasonography in obstetrics and gynecology

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, R.C.; James, A.E.

    1985-01-01

    This is the latest edition of a reference on diagnostic ultrasound in obstetrics and gynecology. Chapters have been added on infertility, legal aspects of ultrasound, and interventional techniques. Descriptions of instrumentation, physics and bioeffects, measurement data and normal anatomy in the fetus are given. There is a section on fetal anomalies and the investigation and management of various obstetrical problems, such as multiple pregnancy and hydatidiform mole. Coverage of gynecological ultrasound includes normal pelvic anatomy, pelvic masses, pelvic inflammatory disease, and breast evaluation.

  6. [Husband's presence at childbirth in light of obstetric psychoprophylaxis].

    PubMed

    Sioma-Markowska, Urszula; Sipiński, Adam; Majerczyk, Iwona; Selwet, Monika; Kuna, Anna; Machura, Mariola

    2004-01-01

    Contemporary obstetric psychoprophylaxis gives prospective parents wide opportunities to prepare to the pregnancy period and delivery. It is educationally-minded and points the importance to modify the life style, introduces exercises accompanied by the relative during the pregnancy and delivery. The survey portrays husband's--child father's role in obstetric psychoprophylaxis. The importance to continue the psychoprophylaxis in the delivery room was spotted in the survey, too. The continuation might be reached by close relative's presence.

  7. Providing services to obstetrical patients: an overview and implications.

    PubMed

    Marshall, B S; Javalgi, R G; Gombeski, W R

    1995-01-01

    Obstetrics is one of the few hospital services with the potential for developing favorable client relationships resulting in increased market share, repeat purchase behavior, and referral of other patients in a direct marketing environment. To determine what qualities women find appealing in an obstetrics service and if women's preferences for a specific type of birthing arrangement had been examined and reported, a review of the literature was carried out. After reviewing the extant literature, the article provides strategic implications for health care marketers.

  8. Women's sexual behavior, body image and satisfaction with surgical outcomes after hysterectomy: a comparison of vaginal and abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Gütl, P; Greimel, E R; Roth, R; Winter, R

    2002-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of vaginal and abdominal hysterectomy on women's sexual behavior, sexual dysfunction, body image and satisfaction with surgery. A prospective study was conducted on 90 women to evaluate the outcomes of hysterectomy. Data were collected prior to surgery, three months and two years after surgery, using self-report questionnaires. The results showed significant differences in women's sexual behavior and sexual dysfunction before and after hysterectomy, independent of the surgical procedure performed. Women in both groups reported improvements in sexual desire, sexual activity and sexual intercourse three months and two years after surgery. Sexual dysfunction such as dyspareunia, vaginismus, lack of orgasm and loss of sexual interest diminished significantly after surgery. Regression analyses revealed that postmenopausal status, severity of gynecological complaints and frequency of sexual intercourse were the most important factors for improved sexual outcomes. Women in the abdominal group were dissatisfied with their body image because of the abdominal scar, experienced more pain and had a longer period of recovery from surgery compared to women in the vaginal group. According to the results, sexual behavior alone is not an important factor in choosing vaginal or abdominal hysterectomy. However, sexual behavior was important in both groups when evaluating outcomes after hysterectomy.

  9. The effects of hysterectomy on body image, self-esteem, and marital adjustment in Turkish women with gynecologic cancer.

    PubMed

    Pinar, Gul; Okdem, Seyda; Dogan, Nevin; Buyukgonenc, Lale; Ayhan, Ali

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the differences in the effect of hysterectomy on body image, self-esteem, and marital adjustment in Turkish women with gynecologic cancer based on specific independent variables, including age, education, employment, having or not having children, and income. This cross-sectional study compared a group of women who underwent a hysterectomy (n = 100) with a healthy control group (n = 100). The study findings indicate that women who had a hysterectomy were found in worse conditions in terms of body image, self-esteem, and dyadic adjustment compared to healthy women. In terms of dyadic adjustment and body image among women who had undergone a hysterectomy, those with lower levels of income and education were found in poorer conditions. The study's findings show that hysterectomies have negative effects on body image, self-esteem, and dyadic adjustment in women affected by gynecologic cancer. Nursing assessment of self-esteem and marital adjustment indicators and implementation of strategies to increase self-confidence and self-esteem are needed for high-risk women.

  10. A framework for analyzing the determinants of obstetric fistula formation.

    PubMed

    Wall, L Lewis

    2012-12-01

    Obstetric fistula, a devastating complication of prolonged obstructed labor, was once common in the Western world but now occurs almost exclusively in resource-poor countries. Although much has been written about the surgical repair of obstetric fistulas, prevention of fistulas has garnered comparatively little attention. Because obstetric fistulas result from obstructed labor (one of the common causes of maternal death in impoverished countries), this study assesses the obstetric fistula problem using a framework originally developed to analyze the determinants of maternal mortality. The framework identifies and explicates three sets of determinants of obstetric fistulas: the general socioeconomic milieu in which such injuries occur (the status of women, their families, and their communities); intermediate factors (health, reproductive status, and use of health care resources); and the acute clinical factors that determine the ultimate outcome of any particular case of obstructed labor. Interventions most likely to work rapidly in fistula prevention are those that have a direct impact on acute clinical situations, but these interventions will only be effective when general socioeconomic and cultural conditions promote an enabling environment for health care delivery and use. Sustained efforts that impact all three levels of determining factors will be necessary to eradicate obstetric fistula.

  11. [Interventional ultrasound in obstetrics and gynecology].

    PubMed

    Kurjak, A; Alfirević, Z

    1989-01-01

    During 1988 there were 1029 invasive obstetrical and gynecological ultrasonically guided procedures: 788 early amniocenteses and 84 late amniocenteses, 26 chorion villi sampling, 24 by transcervical and 2 by transabdominal route, 74 fetal blood sampling (chordocenthesis) mainly for fetal karyotyping, in 9 cases the assessment of the fetal acid-base status was the main indication for the procedure. There was one patient with the increased risk of epidermolysis bulosa in whom fetal skin biopsy was performed. Prostaglandine was administered intraamnially under ultrasound control in 44 cases, in which the second trimester termination of pregnancy was indicated for medical reasons. In 3 cases a huge polyhydramnion was evacuated and in one case of several fetal hydrocephaly, craniocentesis and aspiration of the cerebral fluid were performed. There was one selective fetocide in twin pregnancy with a large meningomyelocele in one twin. In one case of a nonimune fetal hydrops at the 27-week gestation, the aspiration of the accumulated fluid and the intraperitoneal injection of albumin at 27 and 34 weeks, respectively, were performed. A total number of 6 gynecological invasive ultrasonically guided procedures was done. Three of them were punctures of ovarian follicles as part of IVF programme, one puncture of a large simple ovarian cyst, and two aspirations of extrauterine pregnancy with the administration of Metotrexate.

  12. Obstetrical staff nurses experiences of clinical learning.

    PubMed

    Veltri, Linda M

    2015-01-01

    The clinical learning experience is used in nursing programs of study worldwide to prepare nurses for professional practice. This study's purpose was to use Naturalistic Inquiry to understand the experiences of staff nurses in an obstetrical unit with undergraduate nursing students present for clinical learning. A convenience sample of 12 staff nurses, employed on a Family Birth Center, participated in semi-structured interviews. The constant comparative method as modified by Lincoln and Guba was used to analyze data. Five themes related to staff nurses experiences of clinical learning were identified: Giving and Receiving; Advancing Professionally and Personally; Balancing Act; Getting to Know and Working with You; and Past and Present. This research highlights staff nurses' experiences of clinical learning in undergraduate nursing education. Staff nurses exert a powerful, long lasting influence on students. A need exists to prepare and judiciously select nurses to work with students. Clinical agencies and universities can take joint responsibility providing tangible incentives, financial compensation, and recognition to all nurses working with nursing students.

  13. Obstetric Pharmacokinetic Dosing Studies are Urgently Needed

    PubMed Central

    McCormack, Shelley A.; Best, Brookie M.

    2014-01-01

    Use of pharmacotherapy during pregnancy is common and increasing. Physiologic changes during pregnancy may significantly alter the overall systemic drug exposure, necessitating dose changes. A search of PubMed for pharmacokinetic clinical trials showed 494 publications during pregnancy out of 35,921 total pharmacokinetic published studies (1.29%), from the late 1960s through August 31, 2013. Closer examination of pharmacokinetic studies in pregnant women published since 2008 (81 studies) revealed that about a third of the trials were for treatment of acute labor and delivery issues, a third included studies of infectious disease treatment during pregnancy, and the remaining third were for varied ante-partum indications. Approximately, two-thirds of these recent studies were primarily funded by government agencies worldwide, one-quarter were supported by private non-profit foundations or combinations of government and private funding, and slightly <10% were supported by pharmaceutical industry. As highlighted in this review, vast gaps exist in pharmacology information and evidence for appropriate dosing of medications in pregnant women. This lack of knowledge and understanding of drug disposition throughout pregnancy place both the mother and the fetus at risk for avoidable therapeutic misadventures – suboptimal efficacy or excess toxicity – with medication use in pregnancy. Increased efforts to perform and support obstetric dosing and pharmacokinetic studies are greatly needed. PMID:24575394

  14. Color Doppler sonography in obstetrics and gynecology.

    PubMed

    Fleischer, Arthur C; Andreotti, Rochelle F

    2005-09-01

    This review aims to provide the reader with an overview of the present and future clinical applications in color Doppler sonography for the evaluation of vascularity and blood flow within the uterus (both gravid and nongravid), ovaries, fetus and placenta. The clinical use of color Doppler sonography has been demonstrated within many organ systems. Color Doppler sonography has become an integral part of cardiovascular imaging. Significant improvements have recently occurred, improving the visualization and evaluation of intra-organ vascularity, resulting from enhancements in delineation of tissue detail through electronic compounding and harmonics, as well as enhancements in signal processing of frequency- and/or amplitude-based color Doppler sonography. Spatial representation of vascularity can be improved by utilizing 3D and 4D (live 3D) processing. Greater sensitivity of color Doppler sonography to macro- and microvascular flow has provided improved anatomic and physiologic assessment throughout pregnancy and for pelvic organs. The potential use of contrast enhancement is also mentioned as a means to further differentiate benign from malignant ovarian lesions. The rapid development of these new sonographic techniques will continue to enlarge the scope of clinical applications in a variety of obstetric and gynecologic disorders.

  15. Obstetrics in Mexico prior to 1600.

    PubMed

    Van Patten, N

    1932-03-01

    Surviving Indian codices and inscriptions, reports written down by the Spanish, and continuity of practice from pre-conquest times are the sources of knowledge about obstetrics in Mexico prior to 1600. Antenatal care included avoidance of exposure to heat, no sleep during the day, and plenty of nourishment, although certain dietary precautions were recommended. Moderate intercourse during the first trimester was permitted but prohibited near the time of parturition. In general, midwives counseled the prospective mother to eat well, to rest physically and mentally, and to engage very moderately in manual labor. Massage was given at regular intervals, and vapor baths were taken. Juices of medicinal plants were administered during labor both to expedite it and to relieve pain. Women assumed a squatting position during labor, which was also assisted by abdominal massage and the manual dilation of the vulva. If parturition was prolonged, pressure was applied by the midwife who used her feet for this purpose. The child was bathed immediately after birth. Lactation was prolonged among the Mexicans.

  16. The Association between Endometriosis, Tubal Ligation, Hysterectomy and Epithelial Ovarian Cancer: Meta-Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chunpeng; Liang, Zhenzhen; Liu, Xin; Zhang, Qian; Li, Shuang

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the association between endometriosis, tubal ligation, hysterectomy and epithelial ovarian cancer. Relevant published literatures were searched in PubMed, ProQuest, Web of Science and Medline databases during 1995–2016. Heterogeneity was evaluated by I2 statistic. Publication bias was tested by funnel plot and Egger’s test. Odds ratio and 95% CI were used to assess the association strength. The statistical analyses in this study were accomplished by STATA software package. A total of 40,609 cases of epithelial ovarian cancer and 368,452 controls in 38 publications were included. The result suggested that endometriosis was associated with an increased risk of epithelial ovarian cancer (OR = 1.42, 95% CI = 1.28–1.57), tubal ligation was associated with a decreased risk of epithelial ovarian cancer (OR = 0.70, 95% CI = 0.60–0.81), while hysterectomy show no relationship with epithelial ovarian cancer (OR = 0.97, 95% CI = 0.81–1.14). A stratified analysis showed there were associations between endometriosis and the increased risk of epithelial ovarian cancer for studies conducted in USA and Europe. Meanwhile, there were associations between tubal ligation and the decreased risk of epithelial ovarian cancer for studies conducted in USA, Asia, Europe and Australia. The result indicated that endometriosis was a risk factor of epithelial ovarian cancer whereas tubal ligation was a protective risk factor of epithelial ovarian cancer, hysterectomy may have no relationship with epithelial ovarian cancer. PMID:27854255

  17. Intrafascial Supracervical Hysterectomy Without Colpotomy and Transuterine Mucosal Resection by Pelviscopy and Laparotomy

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Rodas, Erick; Lehmann-Willenbrock, Enrique; Lüttges, Jutta; Semm, Kurt

    1995-01-01

    Between September 1991 and December 1993, 253 patients were operated on using the Classical Intrafascial SEMM (Serrated Edged Macro Morcellator) Hysterectomy (CISH) technique. One hundred fifty-two patients were assigned to pelviscopic CISH and 101 to laparotomic CISH. Uterine leiomyomas with menstrual disorders and pressure symptoms topped the list of indications with 61%. In all cases, initially transuterine mucosal resection and coring of the cervicouterine cylinder were carried out followed by the intrafascial supracervical dissection of the uterus. The size of the uterus played a decisive role in selecting the cases for CISH technique either by pelviscopy or laparotomy. The cervicouterine mucosal cylinders were cored using the Calibrated Uterine Resection Tool (CURT). Cervical thickness and diameters were measured preoperatively by transvaginal sonography for facilitating the use of a specific-sized CURT. After removal of this cylinder, hemostasis in the area was secured by coagulating with an endocoagulation device. The advantage of this technique is that the pelvic floor integrity remains intact, and because uterine arteries and ureters were not touched, the so called “complication zone” is thus avoided. The histological findings are in agreement with the indications, the leiomyomas and leiomyomas with adenomyosis being the most frequent pathology. The histologic analysis showed that in all cases the squamocolumnar transformation zone was totally removed. There were 11 (4.4%) complications, promptly identified and treated without further problems. The value of the Classical intrafascial supracervical hysterectomy without colpotomy including the resection of transformation zone speaks for itself, because there is less physical stress and recovery is quick. However, it has yet to prove its value as compared with other techniques for hysterectomy for specific indications. PMID:18493366

  18. Uterine metastases in ovarian carcinoma: frequency and survival in women who underwent hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Chetrit, Angela; Sadetzki, Siegal

    2010-01-01

    Objective Possible reasons for hysterectomy in the initial surgical management of advanced invasive epithelial ovarian carcinoma (EOC) might be a high frequency of uterine involvement and its impact on survival. The aim of the present study was to describe the frequency of uterine involvement and its association with survival in an unselected population of EOC patients who underwent hysterectomy. Methods All incident cases of EOC diagnosed in Israeli Jewish women between March 1994 to June 1999, were identified within the framework of a nationwide case-control epidemiological study. The target population of the present report includes all stage II-IV EOC patients who had a uterus at the time of diagnosis. Of the 822 such patients, 695 fulfilled the inclusion criterion. Excluded were 141 patients for various reasons. The present analysis is based on the remaining 554 patients. Results Uterine involvement was present in 291 (52.5%) of the patients and it was macroscopic in only 78 (14.1%). The serosa was the most common site of isolated metastases. Multivariate analysis showed that advanced stage significantly increased the risk for uterine involvement. The overall median survival with any uterine involvement was significantly lower compared to those with no involvement (38.9 months vs. 58.0 months; p<0.001). Conclusion There is an association between uterine involvement, whether macro- or microscopic, and lower survival even after hysterectomy although residual tumor could not be included in the analysis. Further studies are required to establish whether uterine involvement itself is an unfavorable risk factor or merely a marker of other unfavorable prognostic factors. PMID:20922143

  19. Cavitron Ultrasonic Surgical Aspirator in Laparoscopic Nerve-Sparing Radical Hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Min; Wang, Zhilian; Wei, Fang; Wang, Jingfang; Wang, Wei; Ping, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Objective Pelvic autonomic nerve preservation during radical hysterectomy for cervical cancer has become a priority in recent years. This pilot study was undertaken to evaluate laparoscopic nerve-sparing radical hysterectomy (L-NSRH) using the Cavitron Ultrasonic Surgical Aspirator (CUSA) in women with cervical cancer. Methods Patients with stage IB1 or IIA1 cervical cancer underwent L-NSRH with pelvic lymphadenectomy. The patients were randomly assigned to receive L-NSRH using a CUSA (CUSA group; n = 24) or using other techniques (non-CUSA group; n = 21). Recovery of bladder function (indwelling catheter time and time to spontaneous voiding) blood loss, duration of hospital stay, lymph node harvesting, and postoperative complications were compared between the 2 groups. Patients were followed for up to 3 years to determine the maintenance of effect. Results All patients underwent L-NSRH successfully. Intraoperative blood loss was significantly less in the CUSA than in the non-CUSA group (P = 0.005). Length of hospital stay (P = 0.006) and indwelling catheter time (P = 0.008) were both significantly reduced in the CUSA group compared with that in the non-CUSA group. The spontaneous voiding rate 10 days postoperatively was 95.8% with CUSA and 85.7% with non-CUSA techniques. Two patients developed postoperative complications in the CUSA group as did 3 patients in the non-CUSA group. These were cases of lymphocyst formation or urinary tract infection. Conclusions Laparoscopic nerve-sparing radical hysterectomy using CUSA was safe and feasible in patients with cervical cancer. Our results provide initial evidence that L-NSRH using CUSA preserves pelvic autonomic nerve function. PMID:26807637

  20. Risk factors for obstetric fistula: a clinical review.

    PubMed

    Tebeu, Pierre Marie; Fomulu, Joseph Nelson; Khaddaj, Sinan; de Bernis, Luc; Delvaux, Thérèse; Rochat, Charles Henry

    2012-04-01

    Obstetric fistula is the presence of a hole between a woman's genital tract and either the urinary or the intestinal tract. Better knowledge of the risk factors for obstetric fistula could help in preventing its occurrence. The purpose of this study was to assess the characteristics of obstetric fistula patients. We conducted a search of the literature to identify all relevant articles published during the period from 1987-2008. Among the 19 selected studies, 15 were reports from sub-Saharan Africa and 4 from the Middle East. Among the reported fistula cases, 79.4% to 100% were obstetrical while the remaining cases were from other causes. Rectovaginal fistulae accounted for 1% to 8%, vesicovaginal fistulae for 79% to 100% of cases, and combined vesicovaginal and rectovaginal fistulae were reported in 1% to 23% of cases. Teenagers accounted for 8.9% to 86% of the obstetrical fistulae patients at the time of treatment. Thirty-one to 67% of these women were primiparas. Among the obstetric fistula patients, 57.6% to 94.8% of women labor at home and are secondarily transferred to health facilities. Nine to 84% percent of these women delivered at home. Many of the fistula patients were shorter than 150 cm tall (40-79.4%). The mean duration of labor among the fistula patients ranged from 2.5 to 4 days. Twenty to 95.7% of patients labored for more than 24 h. Operative delivery was eventually performed in 11% to 60% of cases. Obstetric fistula was associated with several risk factors, and they appear to be preventable. This knowledge should be used in strengthening the preventive strategy both at the health facility and at the community level.

  1. Obstetrics and Gynecology Residency and Fertility Needs.

    PubMed

    Aghajanova, Lusine; Hoffman, Jacquelyn; Mok-Lin, Evelyn; Herndon, Christopher N

    2017-03-01

    Infertility is a common reproductive disease, with a prevalence of 9% to 18% of the general population. To date, no studies have attempted to examine the prevalence and experience of infertility among resident physicians in the United States. In female obstetrics and gynecology (Ob/Gyn) residents of age where infertility becomes more prevalent, ability to seek fertility may be influenced by rigorous professional demands and low remuneration. We seek to understand the prevalence of infertility, as well as experience and utilization of infertility services among Ob/Gyn residents. Cross-sectional descriptive survey was distributed among US Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-accredited Ob/Gyn programs. Demographics, intentions to conceive during residency, fertility problems, fertility treatment, affordability of care, and perceptions of support were surveyed. A total of 241 responses were received in an equal distribution between junior (n = 120) and senior (n = 121) residents. The majority of respondents were female (91%), 25 to 35 years old (94%), and married (54%). Eighty-five percent (195 of 230) did not actively pursue fertility during residency. Twenty-nine percent (68 of 235) considered fertility preservation, but only 2% sought consultation. Twenty-nine percent of those interested in fertility (22 of 75) experienced infertility of some degree. Sixty-three percent felt low or no support from the program. Thirty-five percent reported stigma associated with their infertility. In conclusion, infertility is a prevalent reproductive health impairment among Ob/Gyn residents. The majority of residents defer childbearing during residency despite advancing reproductive age. A majority felt little or no support from training programs in addressing their fertility care. Further studies are indicated to understand the barriers and impact among resident trainees.

  2. Obstetrical events that shaped Western European history.

    PubMed

    Ober, W B

    1992-01-01

    Taking into account that marriage, the family as a social unit, and concepts of legitimacy developed to ensure the devolution of property and that, when these concepts apply in a society based on hierarchically organized monarchies, they also involve the devolution of power, this essay furnishes examples of dislocations in such devolutions, in terms of familiar incidents in western European history. That Jane Seymour died in childbirth but her son Edward VI survived long enough to ensure the stability of the Church of England is the first example. The infertility of Mary Tudor, when married to Philip II of Spain, prevented the formation of an Anglo-Spanish dynasty that would have been Roman Catholic is the second example of such a dislocation. Likewise, the infertility of Charles II's wife, Catherine of Braganza, led to the succession of James II, a practicing Roman Catholic, whose attempts to undermine the Church of England led to the Glorious Revolution of 1788 and the preservation of English Protestantism. Another example is the death in 1817 of Princess Charlotte, in childbirth, which led to the scramble of George III's aging sons to marry and beget an heir to the throne. The only success led to the birth of the future Queen Victoria, whose dynastic competence remains unquestionable, but who herself had some passing involvement with obstetrical developments. Finally, the delivery of Kaiser Wilhelm II, who sustained a brachial plexus injury that produced Erb's palsy of the left arm, is considered, and the question of intrapartum fetal hypoxia is raised as a hypothesis, in addition to the mechanical trauma and its effect on his personality.

  3. Intrathecal injection of morphine for obstetric analgesia.

    PubMed

    Baraka, A; Noueihid, R; Hajj, S

    1981-02-01

    Intrathecal injection of morphine was used to provide obstetric analgesia in 20 primiparous women in labor. When the cervix was at least 3 cm dilated, morphine, 1 or 2 mg, was injected intrathecally. In all parturients, labor pains were completely relieved after 15-60 min and analgesia lasted as long as eight to 11 hours. The analgesia was not associated with any alteration of pin-prick sensation or motor power, and there was no change in the arterial blood pressure or heart rate. All infants were delivered vaginally by use of episiotomy annd a low forceps, except two infants of mothers in the 2 mg of morphine group who needed cesarean section. During the second stage of labor, analgesia was supplemented by lidocaine, 2 per cent, using local perineal infiltration in 14 parturients and pudendal block in two parturients, and by epidural block in four parturients. Nineteen of the 20 newborns cried immediately at birth, and had Apgar scores o 7-9 at 1 min and 8-10 at 5 min. During the first 24 hours of life, the neurobehavioral responses of all newborns were scored as normal. Systemic maternal side effects such as somnolence, nausea, vomiting, and itching occurred in a high proportion of the parturients. However, in the majority of cases, these side effects were mild. Only two parturients of the 2 mg morphine group complained of marked somnolence, itching, and vomiting, which persisted post partum; these were effectively reversed by the specific antagonist naloxone. The analgesic effect of intrathecal morphine can be attributed to its action on the opiate receptors in the substantia gelatinosa of the dorsal horn of the spinal cord. However, supraspinal effects of morphine cannot be excluded. The low lipid solubility of morphine can explain its slow onset and prolonged duration of action. Also, this will result in minimal systemic absorption of morphine, which protects the fetus and results in selective maternal analgesia.

  4. Nerve Transfer in Delayed Obstetrical Palsy Repair

    PubMed Central

    Sénès, Filippo; Catena, Nunzio; Sénès, Jacopo

    2015-01-01

    Objective  When root avulsions are detected in children suffering from obstetrical brachial plexus palsy (OBPP), neurotization procedures of different nerve trunks are commonly applied in primary brachial plexus repair, to connect distally the nerves of the upper limbs using healthy nerve structures. This article aims to outline our experience of neurotization procedures in OBPP, which involves nerve transfers in the event of delayed repair, when a primary repair has not occurred or has failed. In addition, we propose the opportunity for late repair, focusing on extending the time limit for nerve surgery beyond that which is usually recommended. Although, according to different authors, the time limit is still unclear, it is generally estimated that nerve repair should take place within the first months of life. In fact, microsurgical repair of OBPP is the technique of choice for young children with the condition who would otherwise have an unfavorable outcome. However, in certain cases the recovery process is not clearly defined so not all the patients are direct candidates for primary nerve surgery. Methods  In the period spanning January 2005 through January 2011, among a group of 105 patients suffering from OBPP, ranging from 1 month to 7 years of age, the authors have identified a group of 32 partially recovered patients. All these patients underwent selective neurotization surgery, which was performed in a period ranging from 5 months to 6.6 years of age. Results  Late neurotization of muscular groups achieved considerable functional recovery in these patients, who presented with reduced motor function during early childhood. The said patients, with the exception of five, would initially have avoided surgery because they had not met the criteria for nerve surgery. Conclusion  We have concluded that the execution of late nerve surgical procedures can be effective in children affected by OBPP. PMID:27917233

  5. Does previous abdominal surgery effect the feasibility of total laparoscopic hysterectomy?

    PubMed Central

    Çelik, Cem; Abalı, Remzi; Taşdemir, Nicel; Aksu, Erson; Akkuş, Didem; Gül, Abdülaziz

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The primary aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of previous abdominal surgery on the feasibility of performing and the safety of total laparoscopic hysterectomy (TLH). Material and Methods: In this retrospective study, we analysed 62 laparoscopic hysterectomies which were performed at our institute between February 2011 and January 2013. We chose to perform laparoscopic surgery for all patients, including those who had previously undergone abdominal surgery. The patients were classified into two groups: Group 1 included patients with a history of abdominal surgery (n=24) and Group 2 included patients without a history of abdominal surgery (n=38). Results: The operating period was compared in both groups: 184.43±51.0 min. for Group 1 and 195.41±64.1 min. for Group 2 (p=0.471). Postoperative hospital stay and blood loss was also compared. There was just 1 conversion from TLH to a laparotomy in both groups. None of the patients in Group 1 needed a blood transfusion, whereas 1 in Group 2 did. Conclusion: We found that operation time, postoperative hospital stay, blood loss, rate of operative complications or conversion rate to open surgery between patients with and without a history of abdominal surgery were comparable. Therefore, it appears that a history of abdominal surgery does not adversely affect the safety of TLH. PMID:24592078

  6. Cervical koilocytosis in hysterectomy specimens of Israeli residents and new immigrants.

    PubMed

    Abramov, D; Fintsi, Y; Zakut, H; Menczer, J

    1997-01-01

    There is an impression that the prevalence of cervical squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) among new immigrants from the former Soviet Union, is higher than among Israeli residents. Etiologically, SCC is associated with human papilloma virus infection (HPV). The purpose of the present study was to assess the prevalence of cervical HPV infection in new immigrants from the Soviet Union and in Israeli residents as indicated by the presence of koilocytosis in hysterectomy specimens. The study group consisted of 304 women (60 new immigrants and 244 Israeli residents who underwent hysterectomy for benign reasons). The original histological slides of the cervix were reviewed with special attention to the presence of koilocytosis. The two study subgroups differed, as expected, with regard to some characteristics, but koilocytosis was not present in any of the cervical specimens of new immigrants nor of residents. Although the study subgroups may be too small or selective, our findings do not support a possible higher HPV infection rate among new immigrants, yet may indicate a low reservoir of HPV in new immigrants and residents, in line with the low SCC incidence in Israeli women.

  7. Robotic-assisted laparoscopic surgery for hysterectomy and pelvic organ prolapse repair.

    PubMed

    Paraiso, Marie Fidela R

    2014-10-01

    The robotic platform is a tool that has enabled many gynecologic surgeons to perform procedures by minimally invasive route that would have otherwise been performed by laparotomy. Before the widespread use of this technology, a larger percentage of hysterectomies and sacrocolpopexies were completed via the open route because of the lack of training in traditional laparoscopic suturing, knot tying, and retroperitoneal dissection. Additional deterrents of traditional laparoscopic surgery adoption have included the lengthy learning curve associated with development of advanced laparoscopic skills; and surgeon preference for the open route because of surgical ergonomics, decreased operative time, and more experience with laparotomy. Level I evidence regarding robotic-assisted laparoscopy in benign gynecology is sparse, with most of the data supporting robotic surgery comprised of retrospective cohorts. The literature demonstrates the safety and efficacy of robotic-assisted laparoscopy for hysterectomy and pelvic organ prolapse repair; however, most level I data show increased operative time and cost. The true indications for robotic-assisted laparoscopy in benign gynecology have yet to be discerned. A review of the best available evidence is summarized.

  8. Utilization of obstetric services in Ghana between 1999 and 2003.

    PubMed

    Adanu, Richard M K

    2010-09-01

    Analysis of the 2003 Ghana Demographic and Health Survey shows that even though over 90% of pregnant women attend antenatal care in health institutions, only 43% deliver in the health institutions. The quality of antenatal care received is also lower than is expected for standard obstetric care. The national caesarean section rate of 3.7% reflects inadequate obstetric coverage. There is a need for continued education of health workers to improve the quality of antenatal care. The Ghanaian health system needs to consider how to improve obstetric coverage by skilled attendants and to study the reasons for inadequate use of delivery services in order to be able to achieve the target for maternal health set in the Millennium Development Goals.

  9. [The first Dutch debate on anaesthesia in obstetrics].

    PubMed

    Bijker, Liselotte E

    2015-01-01

    After the publication of the Dutch medical guideline on pharmacological analgesia during childbirth in 2008, the question of whether pharmacological pain relief should be permissible during labour was hotly debated. This discussion has been going on since the second half of the 19th century when the introduction of ether and chloroform was extensively studied and described in Great Britain. This article looks back on the same debate in the Netherlands when inhalational anaesthetics were introduced into obstetrics. Study of historical journals and textbooks, originating in the Netherlands and elsewhere, and of historical medical literature on anaesthesia and obstetrics shows that the Dutch protagonists adopted more nuanced ideas on this issue than many of their foreign colleagues. This description of the first Dutch debate on anaesthesia in obstetrics shows that in fact the issues and arguments are timeless.

  10. Women's recall of obstetric complications in south Kalimantan, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Ronsmans, C; Achadi, E; Cohen, S; Zazri, A

    1997-09-01

    The search for indicators for monitoring progress toward safe motherhood has prompted research into population-based measures of obstetric morbidity. One possible such measure is based on women's reports of their past childbirth experiences. In this prospective study in three hospitals in South Kalimantan, Indonesia, the accuracy of women's reporting of severe birth-related complications was examined. The findings of this study suggest that poor agreement exists between the way women report their experience of childbirth and the way doctors diagnose obstetric problems, although the degree of agreement varies with the type of complication. Questionnaires relying on women's experience of childbirth will tend to overestimate the prevalence of medically diagnosed obstetric problems such as those associated with excessive vaginal bleeding or dysfunctional labor. Questions suggestive of eclampsia may be more promising, although the small number of eclamptic women in this study precludes firm conclusions.

  11. [Obstetrical APS: Is there a place for additional treatment to aspirin-heparin combination?

    PubMed

    Mekinian, A; Kayem, G; Cohen, J; Carbillon, L; Abisror, N; Josselin-Mahr, L; Bornes, M; Fain, O

    2017-01-01

    Obstetrical APS is defined by thrombosis and/or obstetrical morbidity associated with persistent antiphospholipid antibodies. The aspirin and low molecular weighted heparin combination dramatically improved obstetrical outcome in APS patients. Several factors could be associated with obstetrical prognosis, as previous history of thrombosis, associated SLE, the presence of lupus anticoagulant and triple positivity of antiphospholipid antibodies. Obstetrical APS with isolated recurrent miscarriages is mostly associated with isolated anticardiolipids antibodies and have better obstetrical outcome. The pregnancy loss despite aspirin and heparin combination define the refractory obstetrical APS, and the prevalence could be estimated to 20-39%. Several other treatments have been used in small and open labeled studies, as steroids, intravenous immunoglobulins, plasma exchanges and hydroxychloroquine to improve the obstetrical outcome. Some other drugs as eculizumab and statins could also have physiopathological rational, but studies are necessary to define the place of these various drugs.

  12. Absent organs—Present selves: Exploring embodiment and gender identity in young Norwegian women's accounts of hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Solbrække, Kari Nyheim; Bondevik, Hilde

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we explore how younger women in Norway construct their embodiment and sense of self after hysterectomy. To do this, we conducted in-depth interviews with eight ethnic Norwegian women aged between 25 and 43 who had undergone hysterectomy. In line with a broad phenomenological approach to illness, the study was designed to explore the trajectories of the women's illness with a specific focus on concrete human experience and identity claims from a subjective point of view. In analysing the stories, we encountered feelings of suffering due to the loss of the uterus as well as profound side-effects, such as menopause. However, we also found evidence of relief from being treated for heavy bleeding and serious illness. In order to accentuate the individual voices in these illness stories, we chose a case-oriented analysis in line with Radley and Chamberlain (2001) and Riessman (2008). From this, two main seemingly contradictory storylines stood out: They have removed what made me a woman versus Without a uterus, I feel more like a woman. We also identified heteronormativity as an unstated issue in both these storylines and in the research data as a whole. Acknowledging diversity in the way women experience hysterectomy is important for a better understanding of the ways in which hysterectomy may affect women as humans as well as for developing more cultural competent healthcare services for this group. PMID:25937002

  13. Absent organs--present selves: exploring embodiment and gender identity in young Norwegian women's accounts of hysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Solbrække, Kari Nyheim; Bondevik, Hilde

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we explore how younger women in Norway construct their embodiment and sense of self after hysterectomy. To do this, we conducted in-depth interviews with eight ethnic Norwegian women aged between 25 and 43 who had undergone hysterectomy. In line with a broad phenomenological approach to illness, the study was designed to explore the trajectories of the women's illness with a specific focus on concrete human experience and identity claims from a subjective point of view. In analysing the stories, we encountered feelings of suffering due to the loss of the uterus as well as profound side-effects, such as menopause. However, we also found evidence of relief from being treated for heavy bleeding and serious illness. In order to accentuate the individual voices in these illness stories, we chose a case-oriented analysis in line with Radley and Chamberlain (2001) and Riessman (2008). From this, two main seemingly contradictory storylines stood out: They have removed what made me a woman versus Without a uterus, I feel more like a woman. We also identified heteronormativity as an unstated issue in both these storylines and in the research data as a whole. Acknowledging diversity in the way women experience hysterectomy is important for a better understanding of the ways in which hysterectomy may affect women as humans as well as for developing more cultural competent healthcare services for this group.

  14. Intelligent navigation to improve obstetrical sonography.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Lami; Romero, Roberto

    2016-04-01

    use of software to perform manual navigation of volume datasets. Diagnostic planes and VIS-Assistance videoclips can be transmitted by telemedicine so that expert consultants can evaluate the images to provide an opinion. The end result is a user-friendly, simple, fast and consistent method of obtaining sonographic images with decreased operator dependency. Intelligent navigation is one approach to improve obstetrical sonography. Published 2015. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  15. [Prognosis and intensive care for massive obstetric blood loss].

    PubMed

    Sadchikov, D V; Marshalov, D V

    2005-01-01

    The study covered 235 obstetric patients having varying blood loss (1.8 to 55.7%) at labor. Their constitutional, history, clinical, functional, and biochemical data were studied, which allowed the authors to develop a strategic and tactic line of prediction of the development of massive blood loss at labor. The algorithm of preventive intensive care, developed on the basis of predictive criteria, was found to significantly improve the results of treatment and to reduce the frequency and severity of obstetric hemorrhagic complications.

  16. Radical Hysterectomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Overcoming depression Dealing with grief and loss Rebuilding self-esteem Good communication: The key to building a successful ... Overcoming depression Dealing with grief and loss Rebuilding self-esteem Good communication: The key to building a successful ...

  17. Interprofessional Obstetric Ultrasound Education: Successful Development of Online Learning Modules; Case-Based Seminars; and Skills Labs for Registered and Advanced Practice Nurses, Midwives, Physicians, and Trainees.

    PubMed

    Shaw-Battista, Jenna; Young-Lin, Nichole; Bearman, Sage; Dau, Kim; Vargas, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound is an important aid in the clinical diagnosis and management of normal and complicated pregnancy and childbirth. The technology is widely applied to maternity care in the United States, where comprehensive standard ultrasound examinations are routine. Targeted scans are common and used for an increasing number of clinical indications due to emerging research and a greater availability of equipment with better image resolution at lower cost. These factors contribute to an increased demand for obstetric ultrasound education among students and providers of maternity care, despite a paucity of data to inform education program design and evaluation. To meet this demand, from 2012 to 2015 the University of California, San Francisco nurse-midwifery education program developed and implemented an interprofessional obstetric ultrasound course focused on clinical applications commonly managed by maternity care providers from different professions and disciplines. The course included matriculating students in nursing and medicine, as well as licensed practitioners such as registered and advanced practice nurses, midwives, and physicians and residents in obstetrics and gynecology and family medicine. After completing 10 online modules with a pre- and posttest of knowledge and interprofessional competencies related to teamwork and communication, trainees attended a case-based seminar and hands-on skills practicum with pregnant volunteers. The course aimed to establish a foundation for further supervised clinical training prior to independent practice of obstetric ultrasound. Course development was informed by professional guidelines and clinical and education research literature. This article describes the foundations, with a review of the challenges and solutions encountered in obstetric ultrasound education development and implementation. Our experience will inform educators who wish to facilitate obstetric ultrasound competency development among new and experienced

  18. 76 FR 50485 - Obstetrics and Gynecology Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Amendment of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Obstetrics and Gynecology Devices Panel of the Medical... Obstetrics and Gynecology Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee. This meeting was announced... July 14, 2011, FDA announced that a meeting of the Obstetrics and Gynecology Devices Panel of...

  19. Obstetric analgesia for vaginal birth in contemporary obstetrics: a survey of the practice of obstetricians in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Contemporary obstetrics in sub-Saharan Africa is yet to meet the analgesic needs of most women during child birth for a satisfactory birth experience and expectedly, obstetricians have a major role to play in achieving this. Methods This was a questionnaire-based, cross-sectional study of 151 obstetricians and gynecologists that attended the 46th Annual General Meeting and Scientific Conference of the Society of Gynaecology and Obstetrics of Nigeria (SOGON) held in Abakaliki, southeast Nigeria in November, 2012. SOGON is the umbrella body that oversees the obstetric and gynecological practice in Nigeria. Data was collated and analyzed with Epi-info statistical software, and conclusions were drawn by means of simple percentages and inferential statistics using Odds Ratio, with P-value < 0.05 at 95% Confidence Interval (CI) taken to be statistically significant. Results Of the 151 participants, males predominated; 110 (72.9%) practiced in government-owned tertiary hospitals in urban locations. Only 74 (49%) offered obstetric analgesia. Among users, only 20 (13.3%) offered obstetric analgesia routinely to parturients, 44 (29.1%) sometimes and 10 (6.6%) on patients’ requests. The commonest analgesia was opioids (41.1%). Among non-users, the commonest reasons adduced were fear of respiratory distress (31.1%), cost (24.7%) and late presentation in labour (15.6%). Conclusion The routine prescription and utilization of obstetric analgesia by obstetricians in Nigeria is still low. Obstetricians are encouraged to step up its use to make childbirth a more fulfilling experience for parturients. PMID:24725280

  20. Between Scylla and Charybdis: renegotiating resolution of the ‘obstetric dilemma’ in response to ecological change

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Jonathan C. K.

    2015-01-01

    Hominin evolution saw the emergence of two traits—bipedality and encephalization—that are fundamentally linked because the fetal head must pass through the maternal pelvis at birth, a scenario termed the ‘obstetric dilemma’. While adaptive explanations for bipedality and large brains address adult phenotype, it is brain and pelvic growth that are subject to the obstetric dilemma. Many contemporary populations experience substantial maternal and perinatal morbidity/mortality from obstructed labour, yet there is increasing recognition that the obstetric dilemma is not fixed and is affected by ecological change. Ecological trends may affect growth of the pelvis and offspring brain to different extents, while the two traits also differ by a generation in the timing of their exposure. Two key questions arise: how can the fit between the maternal pelvis and the offspring brain be ‘renegotiated’ as the environment changes, and what nutritional signals regulate this process? I argue that the potential for maternal size to change across generations precludes birthweight being under strong genetic influence. Instead, fetal growth tracks maternal phenotype, which buffers short-term ecological perturbations. Nevertheless, rapid changes in nutritional supply between generations can generate antagonistic influences on maternal and offspring traits, increasing the risk of obstructed labour. PMID:25602071

  1. Should cystoscopy be routinely performed after laparoscopy-assisted vaginal hysterectomy?

    PubMed

    Ko, Ma-Lee; Lin, Hui-Wen; Chen, Su-Chee; Pan, Hun-Shan

    2008-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the usefulness of routine intra-operative cystoscopy in documenting ureteral patency after laparoscopy-assisted vaginal hysterectomy (LAVH). There were eighty patients who underwent LAVH for benign tumors of the uterus (adenomyosis and myoma), uterine prolapse, persistent intraepithelial neoplasm of the cervix (CIN3) and cervical carcinoma in situ (CIS). Intra-operative cystoscopy with ureteral stenting was performed at the time of LAVH to evaluate the urinary tract. From among the 80 patients who underwent LAVH, 52 had myoma, 19 had adenomyosis, six patients had uterine prolapse, one had CIS and seven patients were diagnosed to have CIN3. Cystoscopy discovered one unsuspected bladder injury. Hematuria was the immediate complication caused by intraoperative cystoscopy. It was observed in ten patients. Urinary tract evaluation, including cystoscopy and ureteral stenting at the time of complex gynecologic surgery such as LAVH could be incorporated in the whole surgical procedure. It decreases morbidity associated with unrecognized injury.

  2. Moral absolutism and abortion: Alan Donagan on the hysterectomy and craniotomy cases.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Terrence

    1985-07-01

    Reynolds argues that the nonconsequentialist moral theory proposed by Alan Donagan in his book The Theory of Morality (University of Chicago Press; 1977) does not resolve the cases in which craniotomy or removal of a cancerous uterus appears necessary to save the life of a pregnant woman. Donagan's absolute prohibition against the murder of the innocent and his rejection of the principle of double effect have led him to view the fetus as a pursuer or assailant or to assert the theory of proleptic agreement--that in risk taking ventures the parties may agree that killing one person to save the lives of the others will be accepted. Reynolds holds these arguments to be inapplicable in therapeutic abortions involving craniotomy or hysterectomy and concludes that Donagan's absolutist theory must be reexamined.

  3. Health Disparities in Native Hawaiians and Other Pacific Islanders Following Hysterectomy for Endometrial Cancer.

    PubMed

    Terada, Keith; Carney, Michael; Kim, Robert; Ahn, Hyeong Jun; Miyamura, Jill

    2016-05-01

    The current study was undertaken to assess disparities in 5 year admission rates and mortality following hysterectomy for endometrial cancer in the State of Hawai'i. Data from the Hawai'i Health Information Corporation was utilized to determine five-year admission rates and overall mortality. Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander (NHOPI) patients were compared to non-NHOPI patients for the period January 1, 2007 to December 31, 2013. Secondary admission rates were significantly higher for NHOPI patients compared to non-NHOPI patients (P=.02). Overall mortality was not different. NHOPI patients living on Oahu were less likely to live in Honolulu (P=.01), were more likely to have government insurance (P=.01), and were significantly younger (P=.02) than non-NHOPI patients. The findings suggest that race, insurance, and demographic factors are interrelated and are associated with disparities following surgery for endometrial cancer.

  4. Laparoscopic hysterectomy with bilateral orchidectomy for Persistent Mullerian duct syndrome with seminoma testes: Case report

    PubMed Central

    Palanisamy, Senthilnathan; Patel, Nikunj D.; Sabnis, Sandeep C.; Palanisamy, Nalankilli; Vijay, Anand; Chinnusamy, Palanivelu

    2015-01-01

    Persistent Mullerian duct syndrome (PMDS) is one of the three rare intersex disorders caused by defective anti-mullerian hormone or its receptor, characterized by undescended testes with presence of underdeveloped derivatives of mullerian duct in genetically male infant or adult with normal external genitals and virilization. This population will essentially have normal, 46(XY), phenotype. We hereby present a case of PMDS, presented with incarcerated left inguinal hernia associated with cryptorchidism and seminoma of right testes. Patient underwent laparoscopic hernia repair with bilateral orchidectomy and hysterectomy with uneventful postoperative recovery. Here we highlight the importance of minimal access approach for this scenario in terms of better visualization, less blood loss, combining multiple procedures along with early return to work and excellent cosmetic outcome. PMID:26622120

  5. Sacral neuromodulation as a treatment for neuropathic clitoral pain after abdominal hysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Marcelissen, Tom; Van Kerrebroeck, Philip; de Wachter, Stefan

    2010-10-01

    Sacral neuromodulation (SNM) may be beneficial in the treatment of patients with chronic pelvic pain, although it is not an FDA-approved indication. We present a case of a 51-year-old patient that presented with symptoms of lower urinary tract dysfunction and clitoral pain after an abdominal hysterectomy. Electrophysiological evaluation suggested a pudendal nerve lesion. After failure of conservative treatment, she was offered SNM as a treatment for her voiding symptoms. During test stimulation, she experienced only moderate improvement in voiding symptoms, but a striking improvement in pain symptoms. She underwent a two-stage implantation of a neurostimulator with a successful outcome after 6 months' follow-up. The results of this report suggest that SNM may be effective in patients with neuropathic pelvic pain.

  6. Buttock Necrosis after Uterine Artery Embolization for Delayed Hysterectomy in Placenta Percreta

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Delboy, Annette; Burke, William M.; Tergas, Ana I.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Morbidly adherent placenta (MAP) is increasing in incidence and is commonly associated with maternal hemorrhage and cesarean hysterectomy. Uterine artery embolization (UAE) may be utilized in the conservative management of placenta percreta to potentially reduce blood loss. The incidence of complications from UAE in the conservative management of placenta percreta is poorly described. To our knowledge, we present the first reported case of buttock necrosis in this setting. Case. A 39-year-old gravida nine para two with placenta percreta who underwent conservative management with UAE complicated by right buttock necrosis. Conclusion. While UAE may potentially decrease blood loss, it is not without risk. More studies must be performed in order to quantify those risks and determine the clinical utility of UAE. PMID:28050294

  7. Radical abdominal hysterectomy using the ENDO-GIA stapler: report of 150 cases and literature review.

    PubMed

    Patsner, B

    1998-01-01

    Over a seven-year period from 1990-1997 150 consecutive patients underwent Type III radical abdominal hysterectomy using the ENDO-GIA stapler on the cardinal and uterosacral ligaments. Compared to prior patients operated on with standard suturing methods, the stapler patients had shorter operating times, lower blood loss and infection rates, and shorter hospital stays without any increase in recurrence rate. The equipment failure rate was 3%. Although not all improvements in surgical and post-operative morbidity are likely due to use of the ENDO-GIA stapler, the use of the stapler clearly lowered operating times, blood loss, surgical morbidity, hospital stay with no adverse effect on patient survival.

  8. Single-field sterile-scrub, preparation, and dwell for laparoscopic hysterectomy.

    PubMed

    O'Hanlan, Katherine A; McCutcheon, Stacey Paris; McCutcheon, John G; Charvonia, Beth E

    2012-01-01

    Type VII laparoscopic hysterectomy is classified as a "clean-contaminated" procedure because the surgery involves contact with both the abdominal and vaginal fields. Because the vulva has traditionally been perceived as a separate but contaminated field, operating room guidelines have evolved to require that surgeons gloved and gowned at the abdominal field either avoid contact with the urethral catheter, the uterine manipulator, and the introitus or change their gloves and even re-gown after any contact with those fields. In the belief that the perception of the vaginal field as contaminated stems from inadequate preoperative preparation instructions, we have developed a rigorous abdomino-perineo-vaginal field preparation technique to improve surgical efficiency and prevent surgical site infections. This thorough scrub, preparation, and dwell technique enables the entire abdomino-perineo-vaginal field to be safely treated as a single sterile field while maintaining a low rate of surgical site infection, and should be further investigated in randomized studies.

  9. Prevention, Identification, and Successful Transvaginal Repair of Bladder Injuries During Laparoscopic-Assisted Vaginal Hysterectomy

    PubMed

    Thanos; Thanos; Weinberg

    1996-08-01

    A retrospective review of laparoscopic-assisted vaginal hysterectomies performed at a medium-size community hospital revealed eight bladder injuries from December 1991 through December 1995. The preoperative indications varied widely, as did the operating physicians. All of the injuries occurred in the vaginal dissection portion of the procedures and all were identified and repaired during the initial surgery. The first six cases involved vaginal repair with interposition of a fat pad when possible between the bladder suture line and the vaginal cuff. The last two included laparoscopic-directed placement of omentum between these two layers. All of the patients did well and had no further complications. Since these injuries tend to occur at the bladder neck, identification of the ureteral orifices is critical to a successful repair.

  10. [Repair of post-hysterectomy vesicovaginal fistulae: the state of the art].

    PubMed

    Giusti, Giuseppe; De Lisa, Antonello

    2015-01-01

    In western countries, vesicovaginal fistulae (VVF) are mostly iatrogenic and in the majority of cases are secondary to hysterectomy. The golden standard for the treatment of VVF has remained largely unchanged since 1953 (Couvelaire): good visualization, good dissection, good approximation of the margins, and good urine drainage. However, several aspects are still being debated, including whether or not to pursue conservative repair, the timing for surgical repair, whether to perform excision of the fistula tract, the best type of surgical access, and whether or not to use tissue interposition. We decided to review the state of the art in the treatment of VVF, which are exclusively of a traumatic nature and non-radiated, by performing a bibliography search carried on Pubmed using keywords such as "vesicovaginal fistula". The search focused on recent articles and was largely restricted to the past 10 years.

  11. Anesthetic management of patient with systemic lupus erythematosus and thrombocytopenia for vaginal hysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Gaurav; Gupta, Kapil; Kashyap, Chandni; Nayar, Pavan

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of a female having systemic lupus erythematosus, who was on steroid therapy and was scheduled for vaginal hysterectomy. She presented with breathlessness on mild exertion, a characteristic facial malar rash, and a platelet count 56,000 cells/cu mm. The patient was given a subarachnoid block with 2.8 ml 0.5% bupivacaine heavy in L3-L4 intervertebral space. Inj. Hydrocortisone 25 mg was given I.V. intraoperatively and repeated every 6 hours for 24 hours. Anesthetic management included considerations of systemic organ involvement, thrombocytopenia, and perioperative steroid replacement. Spinal block can be given with platelet count > 50,000/cumm. Strict asepsis should be maintained for invasive procedures. Maintenance of normothermia decreases the impact of Raynaud's phenomenon.

  12. The ancient origins of obstetrics, a role for women.

    PubMed

    Gazzaniga, V; Serarcangeli, C

    2000-06-01

    Ancient literature, epics and medical texts well testify the existence of a female competence in Obstetrics since the time of Hippocrates. Until the Imperial Age, both in Greece and in Rome, women were the only ministers of the rites involving birth and death: in particular, delivery was the special moment in which a specific female competence was required.

  13. Obstetric Outcomes in Non-Gynecologic Cancer Patients in Remission

    PubMed Central

    Timur, Hakan; Tokmak, Aytekin; Iskender, Cantekin; Yildiz, Elif Sumer; Inal, Hasan Ali; Uygur, Dilek; Danisman, Nuri

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the obstetric and perinatal outcomes in treated women who were diagnosed with non-gynecologic cancer and to compare these findings with pregnant women with no history of cancer. Materials and Methods: This retrospective study was conducted on 21 pregnant women with non-gynecologic cancer who were in remission (study group) and 63 pregnant women with no history of cancer (control group). The women were admitted to the high-risk pregnancy clinic of Zekai Tahir Burak Women’s Health Training and Research Hospital with a diagnosis of pregnancy and cancer between January 2010 and January 2015. Obstetric outcomes and demographic characteristics of the patients were recorded. Age, gravida, parity, abortus, body mass index (BMI), gestational week, smoking, mode of delivery, gestational weight, and perinatal outcomes were examined for each woman. Results: The most common cancer types were thyroid (28.5%) and breast cancers (23.8%), which constituted just over half of the non-gynecologic cancer cases during pregnancy. The time elapsed after the diagnosis was 3.8±2.2 (1–9) years. No statistically significant differences were found between the two groups with regard to age, obstetric history, BMI, gestational week, smoking, and obstetric and perinatal outcomes (p>0.05). Conclusion: Negative perinatal outcomes in non-gynecologic cancer patients in remission were found to be within acceptable levels. PMID:27551177

  14. Use of health professionals for obstetric care in northern Ghana.

    PubMed

    Mills, Samuel; Bertrand, Jane T

    2005-03-01

    This study explores the role of access versus traditional beliefs in the decision to seek obstetric care from health professionals. Eighteen purposively sampled homogenous groups in Kassena-Nankana District of northern Ghana participated in focus-group discussions about traditional beliefs, barriers to the use of health professionals, and ways to improve obstetric care. All the groups were knowledgeable about the life-threatening signs and symptoms of complications of pregnancy and labor. Decisions about place of delivery generally were made after the onset of labor. Accessibility factors (cost, distance, transport, availability of health facilities, and nurses' attitudes) were major barriers, whereas traditional beliefs were reported as less significant. Informants made pertinent recommendations on how to improve obstetric services in the district. These findings demonstrate that even in this district, where African traditional religion is practiced by a third of the population, compared with a national average of 4 percent, lack of access was perceived as the main barrier to seeking professional obstetric care.

  15. 21 CFR 884.4500 - Obstetric fetal destructive instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Obstetric fetal destructive instrument. 884.4500 Section 884.4500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... destructive instrument is a device designed to crush or pull the fetal body to facilitate the delivery of...

  16. 21 CFR 884.4900 - Obstetric table and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Obstetric table and accessories. 884.4900 Section 884.4900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...: patient equipment, support attachments, and cabinets for warming instruments and disposing of wastes....

  17. 21 CFR 884.4900 - Obstetric table and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Obstetric table and accessories. 884.4900 Section 884.4900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...: patient equipment, support attachments, and cabinets for warming instruments and disposing of wastes....

  18. High dependency care in an obstetric setting in the UK.

    PubMed

    Saravanakumar, K; Davies, L; Lewis, M; Cooper, G M

    2008-10-01

    Our objective was to establish the utilisation and pattern of high dependency care in a tertiary referral obstetric unit. Data of pregnant or recently pregnant women admitted to the obstetric high dependency unit from 1984 to 2007 were included to evaluate the admission rate. Four years' information of an ongoing prospective audit was collated to identify the indications for admission, maternal monitoring, transfers to intensive care unit, and location of the baby. The overall high dependency unit admission rate is 2.67%, but increased to 5.01% in the most recent 4 years. Massive obstetric haemorrhage is now the most common reason for admission. Invasive monitoring was undertaken in 30% of women. Two-thirds of neonates (66.3%) stayed with their critically ill mothers in the high dependency unit. Transfer to the intensive care unit was needed in 1.4 per 1000 deliveries conducted. We conclude that obstetric high dependency care provides holistic care from midwives, obstetricians and anaesthetists while retaining the opportunity of early bonding with babies for critically ill mothers.

  19. Critically ill obstetric patients in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Demirkiran, O; Dikmen, Y; Utku, T; Urkmez, S

    2003-10-01

    We aimed to determine the morbidity and mortality among obstetric patients admitted to the intensive care unit. In this study, we analyzed retrospectively all obstetric admissions to a multi-disciplinary intensive care unit over a five-year period. Obstetric patients were identified from 4733 consecutive intensive care unit admissions. Maternal age, gestation of newborns, mode of delivery, presence of coexisting medical problems, duration of stay, admission diagnosis, specific intensive care interventions (mechanical ventilation, continuous veno-venous hemofiltration, central venous catheterization, and arterial cannulation), outcome, maternal mortality, and acute physiology and chronic health evaluation (APACHE) II score were recorded. Obstetric patients (n=125) represented 2.64% of all intensive care unit admissions and 0.89% of all deliveries during the five-year period. The overall mortality of those admitted to the intensive care unit was 10.4%. Maternal age and gestation of newborns were similar in survivors and non-survivors. There were significant differences in length of stay and APACHE II score between survivors and non-survivors P < 0.05. The commonest cause of intensive care unit admission was preeclampsia/eclampsia (73.6%) followed by post-partum hemorrhage (11.2%). Intensive care specialists should be familiar with these complications of pregnancy and should work closely with obstetricians.

  20. Obstetrics Patients' Assessment of Medical Students' Role in Their Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magrane, Diane

    1988-01-01

    Obstetric patients rated the skills and assessed the roles of students caring for them during a clinical clerkship. They rated skills and attitudes high, generally, with lower ratings for their ability to answer questions and preparation to participate in care. Most felt students improved their care, primarily in supportive ways. (Author/MSE)

  1. Clearinghouse: Diagnostic Categories and Obstetric Complication Histories in Disturbed Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeil, Thomas F.; Wiegerink, Ronald

    1971-01-01

    No significant differences in the obstetric complication measures were found among the various diagnostic groupings of 61 psychologically or behaviorally disturbed children, nor between any complication measures and any of the three disturbed behavior patterns identified (psychotic withdrawal, acting-out aggression, organic signs). (KW)

  2. Acquired Clitoromegaly: A Gynaecological Problem or an Obstetric Complication?

    PubMed Central

    Saini, Vandana; Poddar, Anju; Kumari, Supriya; Maitra, Ashesh

    2016-01-01

    Acquired non-hormonal clitoromegaly is a rare condition and is due to benign or malignant tumours and sometimes idiopathic. Few cases of clitoral abscesses have been reported after female circumcision. We hereby report a case of clitoral abscess causing acquired clitoromegaly following an obstetrical surgery. PMID:28208951

  3. Obstetric nephrology: pregnancy and the kidney--inextricably linked.

    PubMed

    August, Phyllis

    2012-12-01

    This issue's Moving Points highlights the challenges and victories of a subspecialty within nephrology, obstetric nephrology. This article presents an overview of the renal physiology of normal pregnancy and exciting new developments in the understanding of both common renal disorders, such as lupus nephritis, diabetic kidney disease, and preeclampsia, and less common but life-threatening disorders, such as thrombotic microangiopathies.

  4. Continuum of Medical Education in Obstetrics and Gynecology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dohner, Charles W.; Hunter, Charles A., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Over the past eight years the obstetric and gynecology specialty has applied a system model of instructional planning to the continuum of medical education. The systems model of needs identification, preassessment, instructional objectives, instructional materials, learning experiences; and evaluation techniques directly related to objectives was…

  5. A National Survey of Undergraduate Teaching in Obstetrics and Gynecology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    And Others; Stenchever, Morton A.

    1979-01-01

    A survey of academic departments of obstetrics and gynecology was designed to assess undergraduate educational programs and the impact of efforts made to improve teaching in the specialty. It focuses on instructional patterns, the clinical clerkship, student evaluation, and program administration and evaluation. Prior surveys are noted.…

  6. 21 CFR 884.2960 - Obstetric ultrasonic transducer and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... type of device does not include devices used to generate the ultrasonic frequency electrical signals... energy from, the body in conjunction with an obstetric monitor or imager. The device converts electrical signals into ultrasonic energy, and vice versa, by means of an assembly distinct from an...

  7. Ultrasonography in obstetrics and gynecology, 2nd edition

    SciTech Connect

    Callen, P.W.

    1988-01-01

    A text on obstetric and gynecologic ultrasound for radiologists, OB/GYN practitioners, and radiologic technicians. The second edition places greater emphasis on diagnosis of specific systemic disorders in the fetus, as well as the most current applications of ultrasound in gynecologic diagnosis.

  8. Novel Port Placement and 5-mm Instrumentation for Robotic-Assisted Hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Adi; Dun, Erica C.; Kho, Kimberly A.; Wieser, Friedrich A.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The value of robotic surgery for gynecologic procedures has been critically evaluated over the past few years. Its drawbacks have been noted as larger port size, location of port placement, limited instrumentation, and cost. In this study, we describe a novel technique for robotic-assisted laparoscopic hysterectomy (RALH) with 3 important improvements: (1) more aesthetic triangular laparoscopic port configuration, (2) use of 5-mm robotic cannulas and instruments, and (3) improved access around the robotic arms for the bedside assistant with the use of pediatric-length laparoscopic instruments. Methods: We reviewed a series of 44 women who underwent a novel RALH technique and concomitant procedures for benign hysterectomy between January 2008 and September 2011. Results: The novel RALH technique and concomitant procedures were completed in all of the cases without conversion to larger ports, laparotomy, or video-assisted laparoscopy. Mean age was 49.9 years (SD 8.8, range 33–70), mean body mass index was 26.1 (SD 5.1, range 18.9–40.3), mean uterine weight was 168.2 g (SD 212.7, range 60–1405), mean estimated blood loss was 69.7 mL (SD 146.9, range 20–1000), and median length of stay was <1 day (SD 0.6, range 0–2.5). There were no major and 3 minor peri- and postoperative complications, including 2 urinary tract infections and 1 case of intravenous site thrombophlebitis. Mean follow-up time was 40.0 months (SD 13.6, range 15–59). Conclusion: Use of the triangular gynecology laparoscopic port placement and 5-mm robotic instruments for RALH is safe and feasible and does not impede the surgeon's ability to perform the procedures or affect patient outcomes. PMID:24960478

  9. Association between day of delivery and obstetric outcomes: observational study

    PubMed Central

    Bottle, A; Aylin, P

    2015-01-01

    Study question What is the association between day of delivery and measures of quality and safety of maternity services, particularly comparing weekend with weekday performance? Methods This observational study examined outcomes for maternal and neonatal records (1 332 835 deliveries and 1 349 599 births between 1 April 2010 and 31 March 2012) within the nationwide administrative dataset for English National Health Service hospitals by day of the week. Groups were defined by day of admission (for maternal indicators) or delivery (for neonatal indicators) rather than by day of complication. Logistic regression was used to adjust for case mix factors including gestational age, birth weight, and maternal age. Staffing factors were also investigated using multilevel models to evaluate the association between outcomes and level of consultant presence. The primary outcomes were perinatal mortality and—for both neonate and mother—infections, emergency readmissions, and injuries. Study answer and limitations Performance across four of the seven measures was significantly worse for women admitted, and babies born, at weekends. In particular, the perinatal mortality rate was 7.3 per 1000 babies delivered at weekends, 0.9 per 1000 higher than for weekdays (adjusted odds ratio 1.07, 95% confidence interval 1.02 to 1.13). No consistent association between outcomes and staffing was identified, although trusts that complied with recommended levels of consultant presence had a perineal tear rate of 3.0% compared with 3.3% for non-compliant services (adjusted odds ratio 1.21, 1.00 to 1.45). Limitations of the analysis include the method of categorising performance temporally, which was mitigated by using a midweek reference day (Tuesday). Further research is needed to investigate possible bias from unmeasured confounders and explore the nature of the causal relationship. What this study adds This study provides an evaluation of the “weekend effect” in obstetric care

  10. The 2013 Gerard W. Ostheimer Lecture: What's New in Obstetric Anesthesia?

    PubMed

    Palanisamy, A

    2014-02-01

    The "What's New in Obstetric Anesthesia?" lecture is delivered annually in honor of the eminent obstetric anesthesiologist Gerard. W. Ostheimer. This lecture summarizes topics of importance and clinical relevance published in the fields of obstetric anesthesia, obstetrics, and perinatology in the preceding year. The review is a redacted version of the lecture delivered at the Society for Obstetric Anesthesia and Perinatology's Annual Meeting in April 2013. Special emphasis is placed on non-invasive technologies and biomarkers that have the potential to improve clinical care of the pregnant woman. Furthermore, sufficient attention is focused on medical diseases that have their onset or are worsened during pregnancy.

  11. [The optimization of organizational technologies in obstetrics service of the Ryazan oblast].

    PubMed

    Petrova, Ye I; Medvedeva, O V

    2014-01-01

    The article emphasizes that, the protection of health of mother and child is actual especially in the present conditions considering demographic characteristics of particular territory. Hence, the development of optimal strategy in system of rendering of obstetrics and perinatal care and organization of operation of obstetrics institutions are the most important issues of modern obstetrics. The analysis is presented concerning conditions and main directions of optimization of organizational technologies in the system of obstetrics of the Ryazan oblast. The purpose and tasks of mechanism of optimization of rendering obstetrics and perinatal care are determined.

  12. Developmental evidence for obstetric adaptation of the human female pelvis

    PubMed Central

    Huseynov, Alik; Zollikofer, Christoph P. E.; Coudyzer, Walter; Gascho, Dominic; Kellenberger, Christian; Hinzpeter, Ricarda; Ponce de León, Marcia S.

    2016-01-01

    The bony pelvis of adult humans exhibits marked sexual dimorphism, which is traditionally interpreted in the framework of the “obstetrical dilemma” hypothesis: Giving birth to large-brained/large-bodied babies requires a wide pelvis, whereas efficient bipedal locomotion requires a narrow pelvis. This hypothesis has been challenged recently on biomechanical, metabolic, and biocultural grounds, so that it remains unclear which factors are responsible for sex-specific differences in adult pelvic morphology. Here we address this issue from a developmental perspective. We use methods of biomedical imaging and geometric morphometrics to analyze changes in pelvic morphology from late fetal stages to adulthood in a known-age/known-sex forensic/clinical sample. Results show that, until puberty, female and male pelves exhibit only moderate sexual dimorphism and follow largely similar developmental trajectories. With the onset of puberty, however, the female trajectory diverges substantially from the common course, resulting in rapid expansion of obstetrically relevant pelvic dimensions up to the age of 25–30 y. From 40 y onward females resume a mode of pelvic development similar to males, resulting in significant reduction of obstetric dimensions. This complex developmental trajectory is likely linked to the pubertal rise and premenopausal fall of estradiol levels and results in the obstetrically most adequate pelvic morphology during the time of maximum female fertility. The evidence that hormones mediate female pelvic development and morphology supports the view that solutions of the obstetrical dilemma depend not only on selection and adaptation but also on developmental plasticity as a response to ecological/nutritional factors during a female’s lifetime. PMID:27114515

  13. Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) in an obstetric patient.

    PubMed

    Michala, L; Madhavan, B; Win, N; De Lord, C; Brown, R

    2008-01-01

    Transfusion-related lung injury (TRALI) is the leading cause of mortality following transfusion of blood products. Despite increasing awareness, the condition often remains unrecognised and therefore underreported. A 28-year-old with moderate preeclampsia had a post-partum haemorrhage following emergency caesarean section. Shortly after receiving three units of packed red cells she went into respiratory failure, which progressed to cardiac arrest. She was successfully resuscitated and made a slow but full recovery. Investigation through the National Blood Service confirmed the diagnosis of TRALI. TRALI is an increasingly common life-threatening complication of blood transfusion and should be included in the differential diagnosis of collapse in an obstetric patient who has recently received a blood product transfusion.

  14. Class I versus Class III radical hysterectomy in stage IB1 (tumor ≤ 2 cm) cervical cancer: a matched cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Shang, Chun-liang; Du, Qi-qiao; Wu, Di; Liang, Yan-chun; Liu, Tian-yu; Huang, Jia-ming; Yao, Shu-zhong

    2017-01-01

    Background & Aims: The long-term oncological outcome of Class I hysterectomy to treat stage IB1 cervical cancer is unclear. The aim of the present study was to compare the surgical and long-term oncological outcomes of Class I hysterectomy and Class III radical hysterectomy for treatment of stage IB1 cervical cancer (tumor ≤ 2 cm). Methods: Seventy stage IB1 cervical cancer patients (tumor ≤ 2 cm) underwent Class I hysterectomy and 577 stage IB1 cervical cancer patients (tumor ≤ 2 cm) underwent Class III radical hysterectomy were matched with known risk factors for recurrence by greedy algorithm. Clinical, pathologic and follow-up data were retrospectively collected. Five-year survival outcomes were assessed using Kaplan-Meier model. Results: After matching, a total of 70 patient pairs (Class I - Class III) were included. The median follow-up times were 75 (range, 26-170) months in the Class III group and 75 (range, 27-168) months in the Class I group. The Class I and Class III group had similar 5-year recurrence-free survival rates (RFS) (98.6% vs. 97.1%, P = 0.56) and overall survival rates (OS) (100.0% vs. 98.5%, P = 0.32). Compared with the Class III group, the Class I group resulted in significantly shorter operating time, less intra-operative blood loss, less intraoperative complications, less postoperative complications, and shorter hospital stay. Conclusions: These findings suggest that Class I hysterectomy is an oncological safe alternative to Class III radical hysterectomy in treatment of stage IB1 cervical cancer (tumor ≤ 2 cm) and Class I hysterectomy is associated with fewer perioperative complication and earlier recovery.

  15. Lung Emergencies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Emergencies Cardiac Emergencies Eye Emergencies Lung Emergencies Surgeries Lung Emergencies People with Marfan syndrome can be at ... should be considered an emergency. Symptoms of sudden lung collapse (pneumothorax) Symptoms of a sudden lung collapse ...

  16. Hysterectomy due to Abnormal Uterine Bleeding in a 15-year Old Girl with Rubinstein-Taybi Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kwang Ho; Park, Eun Young; Jung, Sang Woo; Song, Seung Woo; Lim, Hyun Kyo

    2016-01-01

    Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome is characterized by mental retardation, atypical facial features, broad thumbs and toes, and scoliosis. Polycystic ovaries are associated with chronic anovulation and abnormal uterine bleeding. A 15-year old female patient was diagnosed with Rubinstein-Taybi Syndrome, and had prolonged abnormal uterine bleeding for 2 years, accompanied by a polycystic ovary. As she showed no improvement during hormonal therapy or medical treatment, a hysterectomy was performed to control the bleeding. PMID:27924288

  17. Which surgical decisions should patients participate in and how? Reflections on women's recollections of discussions about variants of hysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Entwistle, Vikki; Williams, Brian; Skea, Zoe; MacLennan, Graeme; Bhattacharya, Siladitya

    2006-01-01

    Current guidance about informed consent suggests patients ought to know about the procedures involved in any treatments they agree to undergo, and have a right to be involved in decisions about their care. However, it is not clear how this guidance is and should be applied to decisions between variant surgical procedures such as abdominal or vaginal hysterectomy. We sent structured questionnaires about information provision and decision-making to 157 women who were scheduled for hysterectomy in north-east Scotland. A purposive sub-sample of 20 women was interviewed in depth post-operatively. 104 women (66%) responded to the questionnaires. 75% reported being told at outpatient clinics what kind of hysterectomy they would have, but fewer than half had been told about the advantages and disadvantages of different kinds. Between 26% and 65% of women thought they had been given too little information about various issues pertaining to different types of hysterectomy. The interview accounts suggested that gynaecologists offered women little opportunity to influence the selection of a surgical procedure. Women did not express a desire for a greater say in this selection, but appreciated being told, or would have liked to know, why particular procedures were recommended for them. There may be circumstances in which it is important for surgeons to tell patients about options they have ruled out in their particular cases. Decisions between alternative surgical procedures are often highly contingent on the dispositions and skills of individual surgeons. They raise practical and ethical issues that have been neglected in recent discussions about patient involvement in decision-making. As policy makers continue to emphasise the importance of choice and patients become increasingly aware of the existence of variant procedures, these issues need careful consideration.

  18. Effects of propofol and sevoflurane on perioperative immune response in patients undergoing laparoscopic radical hysterectomy for cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Songtao; Gu, Xinyu; Zhu, Lijiao; Wu, Guannan; Zhou, Hai; Song, Yan; Wu, Congyou

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study is to compare the effects of propofol and sevoflurane anesthesia on perioperative immune response in patients undergoing laparoscopic radical hysterectomy for cervical cancer. Sixty patients with cervical cancer scheduled for elective laparoscopic radical hysterectomy under general anesthesia were randomized into 2 groups. TIVA group received propofol induction and maintenance and SEVO group received sevoflurane induction and maintenance. Blood samples were collected at 30 min before induction (T0); the end of the operation (T1); and 24 h (T2), 48 h (T3), and 72 h (T4) after operation. The T lymphocyte subsets (including CD3+ cells, CD4+ cells, and CD8+ cells) and CD4+/CD8+ ratio, natural killer (NK) cells, and B lymphocytes were analyzed by flow cytometry. After surgery, all immunological indicators except CD8+ cells were significantly decreased in both groups compared to basal levels in T0, and the counts of CD3+ cells, CD4+ cells, NK cells, and the CD4+/CD8+ ratios were significantly lower in the SEVO groups than that in the TIVA group. However, the numbers of B cells were comparable at all the time points between 2 groups. Laparoscopic radical hysterectomy for cervical cancer is associated with postoperative lymphopenia. In terms of protecting circulating lymphocytes, propofol is superior to sevoflurane. PMID:27930529

  19. Intraoperative Dexmedetomidine Promotes Postoperative Analgesia and Recovery in Patients after Abdominal Hysterectomy: a Double-Blind, Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Dong-Jian; Qi, Bin; Tang, Gang; Li, Jin-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Surgery-induced acute postoperative pain and stress response can lead to prolonged convalescence. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of intraoperative dexmedetomidine on postoperative analgesia and recovery following abdominal hysterectomy surgeries. Sixty-four patients scheduled for abdominal hysterectomy under general anesthesia were divided into two groups that were maintained using propofol/remifentanil/dexmedetomidine (PRD) or propofol/remifentanil/saline (PRS). During surgery, patients in the PRD group had a lower bispectral index (BIS) value, which indicated a deeper anesthetic state, and a higher sedation score immediately after extubation than patients in the PRS group. During the first 24 hours post-surgery, PRD patients consumed less morphine with patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) and had lower scores on a visual analogue scale (VAS) than their controls from the PRS group. The global 40-item quality of recovery questionnaire and 9-question fatigue severity score both showed higher recovery scores from day 3 after surgery in the PRD group. with the data are considered together, intraoperative administration of dexmedetomidine appeared to promote the analgesic properties of morphine-based PCA and to expedite recovery following surgery in patients undergoing abdominal hysterectomy. PMID:26903197

  20. Randomized clinical trial of short-term antibiotic prophylaxis in 750 patients undergoing vaginal and abdominal hysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, A; Baccolo, M; Privitera, G; Ortisi, G; Sartor, V; Gritti, P; Bongetta, R; Moroni, M; Mangioni, C

    1984-01-01

    We have carried out a controlled, prospective, randomized study with the aim of evaluating the efficacy of a short-term antibiotic prophylaxis on patients undergoing simple total hysterectomy. 750 patients entered the trial, starting in September 1977, 260 underwent vaginal hysterectomy, 490 abdominal hysterectomy. The patients were subdivided randomly into four groups, which were homogeneous in number, age, weight, associated disease, indication for surgery and hormonal status: control group, without treatment; prophylaxis with Cefazolin; prophylaxis with Thiamphenicol; prophylaxis with Cefazolin plus Thiamphenicol. Each antibiotic was administered parenterally, at the dose of 1 g, 1 hour before surgery, and 5 and 12 hours later. Postoperative infectious morbidity was evaluated according to febrile morbidity, the need for antibiotic therapy during the postoperative period and the length of postoperative hospitalization. The incidence and severity of febrile morbidity was significantly reduced in the three groups of patients who received prophylaxis. The use of antibiotics in the postoperative period resulted significantly reduced and the period of hospitalization was shorter for the groups with prophylaxis than for the control group.

  1. The vanishing mother: Cesarean section and "evidence-based obstetrics".

    PubMed

    Wendland, Claire L

    2007-06-01

    The philosophy of "evidence-based medicine"--basing medical decisions on evidence from randomized controlled trials and other forms of aggregate data rather than on clinical experience or expert opinion--has swept U.S. medical practice in recent years. Obstetricians justify recent increases in the use of cesarean section, and dramatic decreases in vaginal birth following previous cesarean, as evidence-based obstetrical practice. Analysis of pivotal "evidence" supporting cesarean demonstrates that the data are a product of its social milieu: The mother's body disappears from analytical view; images of fetal safety are marketing tools; technology magically wards off the unpredictability and danger of birth. These changes in practice have profound implications for maternal and child health. A feminist project within obstetrics is both feasible and urgently needed as one locus of resistance.

  2. To Assess the Effect of Maternal BMI on Obstetrical Outcome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakhanpal, Shuchi; Aggarwal, Asha; Kaur, Gurcharan

    2012-06-01

    AIMS: To assess the effect of maternal BMI on complications in pregnancy, mode of delivery, complications of labour and delivery.METHODS:A crossectional study was carried out in the Obst and Gynae department, Kasturba Hospital, Delhi. The study enrolled 100 pregnant women. They were divided into 2 groups based on their BMI, more than or equal to 30.0 kg/m2 were categorized as obese and less than 30 kg/m2 as non obese respectively. Maternal complications in both types of patients were studied.RESULTS:CONCLUSION: As the obstetrical outcome is significantly altered due to obesity, we can improve maternal outcome by overcoming obesity. As obesity is a modifiable risk factor, preconception counseling creating awareness regarding health risk associated with obesity should be encouraged and obstetrical complications reduced.

  3. Survey of robotic surgery training in obstetrics and gynecology residency.

    PubMed

    Gobern, Joseph M; Novak, Christopher M; Lockrow, Ernest G

    2011-01-01

    To examine the status of resident training in robotic surgery in obstetrics and gynecology programs in the United States, an online survey was emailed to residency program directors of 247 accredited programs identified through the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education website. Eighty-three of 247 program directors responded, representing a 34% response rate. Robotic surgical systems for gynecologic procedures were used at 65 (78%) institutions. Robotic surgery training was part of residency curriculum at 48 (58%) residency programs. Half of respondents were undecided on training effectiveness. Most program directors believed the role of robotic surgery would increase and play a more integral role in gynecologic surgery. Robotic surgery was widely reported in residency training hospitals with limited availability of effective resident training. Robotic surgery training in obstetrics and gynecology residency needs further assessment and may benefit from a structured curriculum.

  4. The development of an obstetric triage acuity tool.

    PubMed

    Paisley, Kathleen S; Wallace, Ruth; DuRant, Patricia G

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the journey a multicampus hospital system took to improve the obstetric triage process. A review of literature revealed no current comprehensive obstetric acuity tool, and thus our team developed a tool with a patient flow process, revised and updated triage nurse competencies, and then educated the nurses about the new tool and process. Data were collected to assess the functionality of the new process in assigning acuity upon patient arrival, conveying appropriate acuities based on patient complaints, and initiating the medical screening examination, all within prescribed time intervals. Initially data indicated that processes were still not optimal, and re-education was provided for all triage nurses. This improved all data points. The result of this QI project is that our patients are now seen based on their acuity within designated time frames.

  5. Cystic fibrosis and pregnancy: counseling, obstetrical management and perinatal outcome.

    PubMed

    Grigoriadis, Charalampos; Tympa, Aliki; Theodoraki, Kassiani

    2015-03-01

    The progress in research of in vitro fertilization and fetal-maternal medicine allows more women and men, with fertility problems due to cystic fibrosis, to have a baby. In the majority of cases, pregnancy in women with cystic fibrosis results in favorable maternal and fetal outcomes. However, the incidence of preterm delivery, intrauterine growth restriction, caesarean section and deterioration of the maternal health are increased. Pre-pregnancy counseling is a crucial component of overall obstetric care, especially in women with poor pulmonary function. Additionally, closer monitoring during pregnancy with a multidisciplinary approach is required. The value of serial ultrasound scans and fetal Doppler assessment is important for the control of maternal and fetal wellbeing, as well as for the definition of the appropriate timing of delivery. In this article, clinical issues of pregnant women with cystic fibrosis are reviewed; counseling, obstetrical management and perinatal outcomes are being discussed.

  6. [An update of the obstetrics hemorrhage treatment protocol].

    PubMed

    Morillas-Ramírez, F; Ortiz-Gómez, J R; Palacio-Abizanda, F J; Fornet-Ruiz, I; Pérez-Lucas, R; Bermejo-Albares, L

    2014-04-01

    Obstetric hemorrhage is still a major cause of maternal and fetal morbimortality in developed countries. This is an underestimated problem, which usually appears unpredictably. A high proportion of the morbidity of obstetric hemorrhage is considered to be preventable if adequately managed. The major international clinical guidelines recommend producing consensus management protocols, adapted to local characteristics and keep them updated in the light of experience and new scientific publications. We present a protocol updated, according to the latest recommendations, and our own experience, in order to be used as a basis for those anesthesiologists who wish to use and adapt it locally to their daily work. This last aspect is very important to be effective, and is a task to be performed at each center, according to the availability of resources, personnel and architectural features.

  7. Biopsychosocial obstetrics and gynaecology - a perspective from Australia.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Heather

    2016-01-01

    Prior to and throughout the twentieth century, biomedical understandings of health predominated. Australian obstetrician and gynaecologist, Professor Derek Llewellyn-Jones responded to frustrations with the limitations of this narrow approach from both within and beyond the medical profession. His pioneering research, education and writings re-conceptualised the discipline as encompassing the social and psychological contexts and profoundly influenced women's own understanding of their health and the practice of obstetrics and gynaecology. The biopsychosocial model has replaced biological determinism and is now pervasive in education and clinical practice in many parts of the world. Widespread acceptance of the model has until now been associated with under-recognition of the importance of biology. Recent findings from epigenetics and neuroscience are enabling integration of body, mind and society and enhanced understanding and practice of psychosomatic obstetrics and gynaecology.

  8. A retrospective study of neoadjuvant chemotherapy plus radical hysterectomy versus radical hysterectomy alone in patients with stage II cervical squamous cell carcinoma presenting as a bulky mass

    PubMed Central

    Takatori, Eriko; Shoji, Tadahiro; Takada, Anna; Nagasawa, Takayuki; Omi, Hideo; Kagabu, Masahiro; Honda, Tatsuya; Miura, Fumiharu; Takeuchi, Satoshi; Sugiyama, Toru

    2016-01-01

    Objective In order to evaluate the usefulness of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) for stage II cervical squamous cell carcinoma with a bulky mass, we retrospectively compared patients receiving NAC followed by radical hysterectomy (RH; NAC group) with patients who underwent RH without NAC (Ope group). Patients and methods The study period was from June 2002 to March 2014. The subjects were 28 patients with a stage II bulky mass in the NAC group and 17 such patients in the Ope group. The chi-square test was used to compare operative time, volume of intraoperative blood loss, use of blood transfusion, and time from surgery to discharge between the two groups. Moreover, the log-rank test using the Kaplan–Meier method was performed to compare disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) between the groups. Results There were no statistically significant differences between the two groups in operative time, volume of intraoperative blood loss, or use of blood transfusion. However, the time from surgery to discharge was 18 days (14–25 days) in the NAC group and 25 days (21–34 days) in the Ope group; the patients in the NAC group were discharged earlier (P=0.032). The hazard ratio for DFS in the NAC group as compared with that in the Ope group was 0.36 (95% CI 0.08–0.91), and the 3-year DFS rates were 81.2% and 41.0%, respectively (P=0.028). Moreover, the hazard ratio for OS was 0.39 (95% CI 0.11–1.24), and the 3-year OS rates were 82.3% and 66.4%, respectively (P=0.101). Conclusion NAC with cisplatin and irinotecan was confirmed to prolong DFS as compared with RH alone. The results of this study suggest that NAC might be a useful adjunct to surgery in the treatment of stage II squamous cell carcinoma presenting as a bulky mass. PMID:27695343

  9. Outcomes of patients undergoing radical hysterectomy for cervical cancer of high-risk histologic subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Sonika; Schmeler, Kathleen M.; Ramirez, Pedro T.; Sun, Charlotte C.; Nick, Alpa; dos Reis, Ricardo; Brown, Jubilee; Frumovitz, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Structured Abstract Introduction The most common types of cervical cancer are squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, and adenosquamous carcinoma, referred to here collectively as SA cervical cancer. Other types of cervical cancer, referred to here collectively as nonsquamous/nonadenocarcinoma (NSNA) cervical cancer, include neuroendocrine, small cell, clear cell, sarcomatoid, and serous tumors. Anecdotally, NSNA tumors seem to have a worse prognosis than their SA counterparts. We sought to determine whether patients with early-stage NSNA have a worse prognosis than those with early-stage SA cervical cancer. Methods We retrospectively reviewed charts of women with stage IA1-IB2 NSNA cervical cancer treated by radical hysterectomy and lymph node staging at MD Anderson Cancer Center from 1990 to 2006. NSNA patients were matched 1:2 to patients with grade 3 SA lesions on the basis of stage, age at diagnosis, tumor size, and date of diagnosis. Results Eighteen patients with NSNA primary cervical cancer subtypes [neuroendocrine (n=7), small cell (5), clear cell (4), papillary serous (1), and sarcomatoid (1)] were matched to 36 patients with grade 3 SA lesions. There were no differences between the 2 groups in age, body mass index, clinical stage, or lesion size. The 2 groups also did not differ with respect to number of nodes resected, lymphovascular space invasion, margin status, lymph node metastasis, or adjuvant radiation therapy or chemotherapy. At a median follow-up of 44 months, median progression-free and overall survivals had not been reached; however, both progression-free survival (p=0.018) and overall survival (p=0.028) were worse for the NSNA group. The 5-year progression-free and overall survival rates were 61.2% and 67.6%, respectively, for the NSNA group, compared to 90.1% and 88.3%, respectively, for the SA group. Conclusions Patients with early-stage NSNA cervical cancer undergoing radical hysterectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy have a worse prognosis

  10. Efficacy of Pregabalin as Premedication for Post-Operative Analgesia in Vaginal Hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Rajappa, Geetha Chamanhalli; Vig, Saurabh; Bevanaguddaiah, Yatish; Anadaswamy, Tejesh C

    2016-01-01

    Background Pregabalin, a structural analogue of gamma amino butyric acid (GABA), is shown to be effective in treatment of several types of neuropathic pain, incisional injury, and inflammatory injury. Objectives The aim of the present study is to compare the efficacy of two doses (75 mg or 150 mg) of pregabalin with the administration of a placebo for post-operative analgesia in patients undergoing hysterectomy under spinal anesthesia. Patients and Methods A randomized, placebo-controlled trial was conducted on 135 patients undergoing vaginal hysterectomy under spinal anesthesia. The patients were divided in three groups of 45 patients each: group 0, placebo; group 1, 75 mg pregabalin; and group 2, 150 mg pregabalin; each treatment of which was administered one hour before surgery. The Ramsay sedation scale (RSS) was used for pre-operative assessment and the visual analog scale (VAS) was used to determine pain at rest and for cough on the first post-operative day. The time for the requirement of rescue analgesics on the first post-operative day was also assessed. Results The RSS scores were significantly higher in groups 1 and 2 as compared to the controls (P < 0.001). Postoperative VAS scores for pain both at rest and on cough were significantly reduced in groups 1 and 2 (P < 0.001). Rescue analgesic consumption decreased significantly in groups 1 and 2 (P < 0.001). The time at which rescue analgesia was administered (first dose) was 4.45 hours in group 0, 10.86 hours in group 1, and 16.82 hours in group 2 (P < 0.001). Conclusions Pregabalin administered as premedication provided significant postoperative pain relief and decreased the requirement of other parenteral analgesics. Pregabalin doses of 150 mg had a better analgesic profile, but the advantages of their use may be limited by side effects such as dizziness. Thus, it is concluded that pregabalin doses of 75 mg may be the optimal pre-emptive dose. PMID:27642577

  11. Childbirth in ancient Rome: from traditional folklore to obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Todman, Donald

    2007-04-01

    In ancient Rome, childbirth was a hazardous event for both mother and child with high rates of infant and maternal mortality. Traditional Roman medicine centred on folklore and religious practices, but with the development of Hippocratic medicine came significant advances in the care of women during pregnancy and confinement. Midwives or obstetrices played an important role and applied rational scientific practices to improve outcomes. This evolution from folklore to obstetrics was a pivotal point in the history of childbirth.

  12. The Use of Barbed Sutures in Obstetrics and Gynecology

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, James A

    2010-01-01

    Despite the multitude of different procedures performed with a host of different wound closure biomaterials, no study or surgeon has yet identified the perfect suture for all situations. In recent years, a new class of suture material—barbed suture—has been introduced into the surgeon’s armamentarium. This review focuses on barbed suture to better understand the role of this newer material in obstetrics and gynecology. PMID:21364859

  13. Serum metabolic profiles of pregnant women with burdened obstetrical history.

    PubMed

    Khaustova, S A; Senyavina, N V; Tonevitsky, A G; Eremina, O V; Pavlovich, S V

    2013-11-01

    The content of low-molecular-weight components in blood serum was studied by tandem mass-spectrometry in pregnant women. Serum metabolic profiles of patients with a grave obstetrical history were detected. The most significant changes were observed for the concentrations of low-molecular-weight substances involved in glucogenesis and β-oxidation processes and in metabolic chains involving carbohydrates, carnitines, amino acids, and lipids.

  14. Maternal characteristics and clinical diagnoses influence obstetrical outcomes in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Adisasmita, Asri; Smith, Carl V; El-Mohandes, Ayman A E; Deviany, Poppy Elvira; Ryon, Judith J; Kiely, Michele; Rogers-Bloch, Quail; Gipson, Reginald F

    2015-07-01

    This Indonesian study evaluates associations between near-miss status/death with maternal demographic, health care characteristics, and obstetrical complications, comparing results using retrospective and prospective data. The main outcome measures were obstetric conditions and socio-economic factors to predict near-miss/death. We abstracted all obstetric admissions (1,358 retrospective and 1,240 prospective) from two district hospitals in East Java, Indonesia between 4/1/2009 and 5/15/2010. Prospective data added socio-economic status, access to care and referral patterns. Reduced logistic models were constructed, and multivariate analyses used to assess association of risk variables to outcome. Using multivariate analysis, variables associated with risk of near-miss/death include postpartum hemorrhage (retrospective AOR 5.41, 95 % CI 2.64-11.08; prospective AOR 10.45, 95 % CI 5.59-19.52) and severe preeclampsia/eclampsia (retrospective AOR 1.94, 95 % CI 1.05-3.57; prospective AOR 3.26, 95 % CI 1.79-5.94). Associations with near-miss/death were seen for antepartum hemorrhage in retrospective data (AOR 9.34, 95 % CI 4.34-20.13), and prospectively for poverty (AOR 2.17, 95 % CI 1.33-3.54) and delivering outside the hospital (AOR 2.04, 95 % CI 1.08-3.82). Postpartum hemorrhage and severe preeclampsia/eclampsia are leading causes of near-miss/death in Indonesia. Poverty and delivery outside the hospital are significant risk factors. Prompt recognition of complications, timely referrals, standardized care protocols, prompt hospital triage, and structured provider education may reduce obstetric mortality and morbidity. Retrospective data were reliable, but prospective data provided valuable information about barriers to care and referral patterns.

  15. [Levobupivacaine in obstetric analgesia and anaesthesia. Where is its place?].

    PubMed

    Bremerich, D H; Zwissler, B

    2004-07-01

    Levobupivacaine, the S-enantiomer of racemic bupivacaine, will be available in Germany in mid-2004. Pharmacological studies demonstrated that, compared to bupivacaine, levobupivacaine has equal local anaesthetic potency with reduced potential for cardiac and CNS toxicity. This review introduces the new long-acting amide local anaesthetic levobupivacaine to the reader and evaluates its place in obstetric analgesia and anaesthesia compared to bupivacaine and ropivacaine.

  16. Standardization of Information about Birth in the Obstetric Discharge Summary.

    PubMed

    Nogueira Reis, Zilma S; Gaspar, Juliano S; Oliveira, Isaias J R; de Souza, Andreia C; Maia, Thais A

    2015-01-01

    Clinical information about the birth composes an important set of data to the documentation about the care provided during childbirth. Formalized in the document Obstetric Impatient Discharge Summary (OIDS), such information are essential for continuity of mother and child attention, in the health care network. The main paper's objective is to propose an Information Model for this document based on ISO Standard 13606 for interoperability between health information systems in Minas Gerais, Brazil.

  17. Obstetrical Forceps Would Limit Force On An Infant's Head

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smeltzer, Stan; Lawson, Seth

    1995-01-01

    Improved obstetrical forceps proposed to reduce injuries to newborn infants. Fabricated mostly of thermoplastic material. Reinforcing fibers added in hinge region of forceps. Combination of material, size, and shape chosen to make forceps yield elastically by amount keeping applied force from rising beyond maximum allowable value. Fiber-optic sensors for measuring strains embedded in forceps. Strain measurements used to compute tensile and compressive forces applied to infant's head.

  18. A practical guide to ultrasound in obstetrics and gynecology

    SciTech Connect

    Sauerbrei, E.E.; Nguyen, K.T.; Nolan, R.L.

    1986-01-01

    This book reviews the indications for ultrasound during pregnancy and establishes guidelines for conducting obstetrical ultrasound examinations. A selection of scans follows. These scans depict normal female pelvic anatomy; the nongravid uterus; the ovaries and adnexae; early pregnancy (the embryonic period); the placenta; the membranes, amniotic fluid, and umbilical cord; the uterus and adnexae in pregnancy; and the fetus. The book contains information on making accurate fetal measurements and calculations.

  19. Prenatal Depression in Women Hospitalized for Obstetric Risk

    PubMed Central

    Brandon, Anna R.; Trivedi, Madhukar H.; Hynan, Linda S.; Miltenberger, Paula D.; Labat, Dana Broussard; Rifkin, Jamie B.; Stringer, C. Allen

    2009-01-01

    Objective Little is known about depression during pregnancy in women with high maternal or fetal risk, as this population is often excluded from research samples. The aim of this study was to evaluate depressive symptoms and known risk factors for depression in a group of women hospitalized with severe obstetric risk. Method In the antenatal unit, 129 inpatients completed the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS), the Dyadic Adjustment Scale (DAS), and the Maternal Antenatal Attachment Scale (MAAS) from October 2005 through December 2006. A subset of women were administered the Mood Disorder module of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders (SCID) based upon a score of ≥ 11 on the EPDS. Obstetric complications were classified according to the Hobel Risk Assessment for Prematurity. Results Fifty-seven of the 129 women (44.2%) scored 11 or greater on the EPDS, and at least 25/129 (19%) met the DSM-IV criteria for Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). Mothers reporting high attachment to the fetus on the MAAS reported lower severity of depressive symptoms (rho = −0.33, p < 0.001); those reporting interpersonal relationship dissatisfaction on the DAS endorsed higher depressive severity (rho = −0.21, p = 0.02). Severity of obstetric risk was unrelated to depression but, one complication, incompetent cervix, was positively associated with level of depressive symptomatology. Conclusion Findings indicate a higher prevalence rate of MDD in women with severe obstetric risk than that reported in low-risk pregnancy samples, suggesting the need for routine depression screening to identify those who need treatment. Fewer depressive symptoms were reported by mothers reporting strong maternal fetal attachment andgreater relationship satisfaction. PMID:18312059

  20. Need for a global obstetric fistula training strategy.

    PubMed

    Rushwan, Hamid; Khaddaj, Sinan; Knight, Louise; Scott, Rachel

    2012-10-01

    Obstetric fistula is a complication of childbirth that often follows obstructed labor and is almost exclusive to low-resource countries. The original Global Burden of Disease Study (GBD 1990 Study) reported an incidence of 8.68 per 100000 and a prevalence of 51.35 per 100,000 for women aged 15-44 years in low-resource regions. The most cited global prevalence estimate is 2 million women. Although the global burden of obstetric fistula remains unclear, the number of women suffering from the condition is increasing, while surgical treatment remains limited. There are few experienced fistula surgeons and past surgical training approaches have been inconsistent. The Global Competency-Based Fistula Surgery Training Manual developed by FIGO and partners contains a set curriculum and, to ensure its implementation, a global strategy and training program have been developed. This paper describes key elements of the training program and its implementation. The anticipated impact of the training program is a reduction in global morbidity caused by obstetric fistula.

  1. Obstetrics anal sphincter injury and repair technique: a review.

    PubMed

    Temtanakitpaisan, Teerayut; Bunyacejchevin, Suvit; Koyama, Masayasu

    2015-03-01

    The Urogynecology Committee of the Asia and Oceania Federation of Obstetrics and Gynaecology (AOFOG) has held seminars and workshops on various urogynecological problems in each country in the Asia-Oceania area in order to encourage young obstetricians and gynecologists. In 2013, we organized the operative seminar for obstetrical anal sphincter injuries (OASIS) in which we prepared porcine models to educate young physicians in a hands-on workshop at the 23rd Asian and Oceanic Congress of Obstetrics and Gynaecology in Bangkok, Thailand. Laceration of the anal sphincter mostly occurs during vaginal delivery and it can develop into anal sphincter deficiency, which causes fecal incontinence, if an appropriate suture is not performed. OASIS has become an important issue, especially in developing countries. The prevalence of OASIS of more than the third degree is around 5% in primary parous women and the frequency is higher when detected by ultrasonographic evaluation. Several risk factors, such as macrosomia, instrumental labor, perineal episiotomy and high maternal age, have been recognized. In a society where pregnant women are getting older, OASIS is becoming a more serious issue. An intrapartum primary appropriate stitch is important, but the 1-year outcome of a delayed operation after 2 weeks postpartum is similar. A randomized controlled study showed that overlapping suture of the external sphincter is better than that of end-to-end surgical repair. The Urogynecology Committee of the AOFOG would like to continue with educative programs about the appropriate therapy for OASIS.

  2. Pregnancy, obstetric and neonatal outcomes in HIV positive Nigerian women.

    PubMed

    Ezechi, O C; Gab-Okafor, C V; Oladele, D A; Kalejaiye, O O; Oke, B O; Ohwodo, H O; Adu, R A; Ekama, S O; Musa, Z; Onwujekwe, D I; David, A N; Ujah, I A O

    2013-09-01

    While the effect of HIV infection on some maternal outcomes is well established, for some others there is conflicting information on possible association with HIV. In this study we investigated pregnancy and neonatal outcome of HIV positive women in large HIV treatment centre over a period of 84 months. They were managed according to the Nigerian PMTCT protocol. Adverse obstetric and neonatal outcome were observed in 48.3% HIV positives compared 30.3% to the negatives (OR: 2.08; CI: 1.84-2.34). Low birth weight ( OR:2.95; CI:1.95-3.1), preterm delivery (OR:2.05; CI:1.3-3.1), perinatal death (OR:1.9;CI:1.3-3.2), and spontaneous abortion (OR:1.37; CI:1.1-2.3) were factors found to be independently associated with HIV. Low CD4 count (OR: 2.45; CI: 1.34- 4.56) and opportunistic infections (OR: 2.11; CI: 1.56-3.45) were to be associated with adverse obstetric and neonatal outcome. This study confirms the association of HIV, severe immunosuppression and opportunistic infection and adverse obstetric and neonatal outcome.

  3. Integrated System for Monitoring and Prevention in Obstetrics-Gynaecology.

    PubMed

    Robu, Andreea; Gauca, Bianca; Crisan-Vida, Mihaela; Stoicu-Tivadar, Lăcrămioara

    2016-01-01

    A better monitoring of pregnant women, mainly during the third trimester of pregnancy and an easy communication between physician and patients are very important for the prevention and good health of baby and mother. The paper presents an integrated system as support for the Obstetrics - Gynaecology domain consisting in two modules: a mobile application, ObGynCare, dedicated to the pregnant women and a new component of the Obstetrics-Gynaecology Department Information System dedicated to the physicians for a better monitoring of the pregnant women. The mobile application informs the pregnant women about their status, permits them to introduce glycaemia and weight values and has as option pulse and blood pressure acquisition from a smart sensor and provides results in a graphic format. It also provides support for easy patient-doctor communication related to any health problems. ObGyn Care offers nutrition recommendations and gives the pregnant women the possibility to enter a social space of common interests using social networks (Facebook) to exchange useful and practical information. Data collected from patients and from sensor are stored on the cloud and the physician may access the information and analyse it. The extended module of the Obstetrics-Gynaecology Department Information System already developed supports the physicians to visualize weekly, monthly, or on a trimester, the patient data and to discuss with her through the chat module. The mobile application is in test by pregnant women and medical personnel.

  4. ROBOTIC VERSUS LAPAROSCOPIC HYSTERECTOMY FOR BENIGN DISEASE: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW AND META-ANALYSIS OF RANDOMIZED TRIALS

    PubMed Central

    Albright, Benjamin B.; Witte, Tilman; Tofte, Alena N.; Chou, Jeremy; Black, Jonathan D.; Desai, Vrunda B.; Erekson, Elisabeth A.

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the safety and effectiveness of robotic versus laparoscopic hysterectomy in women with benign uterine disease, as determined by randomized studies. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, ClinicalTrials.gov, and Controlled-Trials.com from inception to October 9th, 2014, using the intersection of the themes “robotic” and “hysterectomy.” We included only randomized and quasi-randomized controlled trials of robotic versus laparoscopic hysterectomy in women for benign disease. Four trials met inclusion criteria and were included in the analyses. Data was extracted and studies were assessed for methodological quality in duplicate. For meta-analysis, we used random effects to calculate pooled risk ratios (RR) and weighted mean differences. For our primary outcome, we used a modified version of the Expanded Accordion Severity Grading System to classify perioperative complications. We identified 41 total complications among 326 patients. When comparing robotic to laparoscopic hysterectomy, we found no statistically significant differences in the rate of class 1 and 2 complications (RR=0.66, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 0.23–1.89) or in the rate of class 3 and 4 complications (RR=0.99, 95%CI 0.22–4.40). Analyses of secondary outcomes were limited due to heterogeneity, but showed no significant benefit of robotic compared to laparoscopic technique in terms of length of hospital stay (weighted mean difference= −0.39 days, 95%CI −0.92–0.14), total operating time (weighted mean difference=9.0 minutes, 95%CI −31.27–47.26), conversions to laparotomy, or blood loss. Outcomes of cost, pain, and quality of life were inconsistently reported and not amenable to pooling. Current evidence demonstrates neither statistically significant, nor clinically meaningful differences in surgical outcomes between robotic and laparoscopic hysterectomy for benign disease. The role of robotic surgery in

  5. The Changing Scenario of Obstetrics and Gynecology Residency Training

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Natasha; Dragovic, Kristina; Trester, Richard; Blankstein, Josef

    2015-01-01

    Background Significant changes have been noted in aspects of obstetrics-gynecology (ob-gyn) training over the last decade, which is reflected in Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) operative case logs for graduating ob-gyn residents. Objective We sought to understand the changing trends of ob-gyn residents' experience in obstetric procedures over the past 11 years. Methods We analyzed national ACGME procedure logs for all obstetric procedures recorded by 12 728 ob-gyn residents who graduated between academic years 2002–2003 and 2012–2013. Results The average number of cesarean sections per resident increased from 191.8 in 2002–2003 to 233.4 in 2012–2013 (17%; P < .001; 95% CI −47.769 to −35.431), the number of vaginal deliveries declined from 320.8 to 261 (18.6%; P < .001; 95% CI 38.842–56.35), the number of forceps deliveries declined from 23.8 to 8.4 (64.7%; P < .001; 95% CI 14.061–16.739), and the number of vacuum deliveries declined from 23.8 to 17.6 (26%; P < .001; 95% CI 5.043–7.357). Between 2002–2003 and 2007–2008, amniocentesis decreased from 18.5 to 11 (P < .001, 95% CI 6.298–8.702), and multifetal vaginal deliveries increased from 10.8 to 14 (P < .001, 95% CI −3.895 to −2.505). Both were not included in ACGME reporting after 2008. Conclusions Ob-gyn residents' training experience changed substantially over the past decade. ACGME obstetric logs demonstrated decreases in volume of vaginal, forceps, and vacuum deliveries, and increases in cesarean and multifetal deliveries. Change in experience may require use of innovative strategies to help improve residents' basic obstetric skills. PMID:26457146

  6. Prognostic models in obstetrics: available, but far from applicable.

    PubMed

    Kleinrouweler, C Emily; Cheong-See, Fiona M; Collins, Gary S; Kwee, Anneke; Thangaratinam, Shakila; Khan, Khalid S; Mol, Ben Willem J; Pajkrt, Eva; Moons, Karel G M; Schuit, Ewoud

    2016-01-01

    Health care provision is increasingly focused on the prediction of patients' individual risk for developing a particular health outcome in planning further tests and treatments. There has been a steady increase in the development and publication of prognostic models for various maternal and fetal outcomes in obstetrics. We undertook a systematic review to give an overview of the current status of available prognostic models in obstetrics in the context of their potential advantages and the process of developing and validating models. Important aspects to consider when assessing a prognostic model are discussed and recommendations on how to proceed on this within the obstetric domain are given. We searched MEDLINE (up to July 2012) for articles developing prognostic models in obstetrics. We identified 177 papers that reported the development of 263 prognostic models for 40 different outcomes. The most frequently predicted outcomes were preeclampsia (n = 69), preterm delivery (n = 63), mode of delivery (n = 22), gestational hypertension (n = 11), and small-for-gestational-age infants (n = 10). The performance of newer models was generally not better than that of older models predicting the same outcome. The most important measures of predictive accuracy (ie, a model's discrimination and calibration) were often (82.9%, 218/263) not both assessed. Very few developed models were validated in data other than the development data (8.7%, 23/263). Only two-thirds of the papers (62.4%, 164/263) presented the model such that validation in other populations was possible, and the clinical applicability was discussed in only 11.0% (29/263). The impact of developed models on clinical practice was unknown. We identified a large number of prognostic models in obstetrics, but there is relatively little evidence about their performance, impact, and usefulness in clinical practice so that at this point, clinical implementation cannot be recommended. New efforts should be directed

  7. Morbidity and survival patterns in patients after radical hysterectomy and postoperative adjuvant pelvic radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fiorica, J.V.; Roberts, W.S.; Greenberg, H.; Hoffman, M.S.; LaPolla, J.P.; Cavanagh, D. )

    1990-03-01

    Morbidity and survival patterns were reviewed in 50 patients who underwent radical hysterectomy, pelvic lymphadenectomy, and adjuvant postoperative pelvic radiotherapy for invasive cervical cancer. Ninety percent of the patients were FIGO stage IB, and 10% were clinical stage IIA or IIB. Indications for adjuvant radiotherapy included pelvic lymph node metastasis, large volume, deep stromal penetration, lower uterine segment involvement, or capillary space involvement. Seventy-two percent of the patients had multiple high-risk factors. An average of 4700 cGy of whole-pelvis radiotherapy was administered. Ten percent of the patients suffered major gastrointestinal complications, 14% minor gastrointestinal morbidity, 12% minor genitourinary complications, one patient a lymphocyst, and one patient lymphedema. Of the five patients with major gastrointestinal morbidity, all occurred within 12 months of treatment. Three patients required intestinal bypass surgery for distal ileal obstructions and all are currently doing well and free of disease. All of the patients who developed recurrent disease had multiple, high-risk factors. The median time of recurrence was 12 months. All patients recurred within the radiated field. Actuarial survival was 90% and disease-free survival 87% at 70 months. It is our opinion that the morbidity of postoperative pelvic radiotherapy is acceptable, and benefit may be gained in such a high-risk patient population.

  8. Post-hysterectomy intravenous leiomyomatosis: A case of successful multidisciplinary surgery under non-extracorporeal circulation

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Yucui; Tang, Huiru; Zeng, Liping; Wei, Lihui; Zhang, Xiaoming; Wu, Ruifang

    2017-01-01

    Intravenous leiomyomatosis is a rare benign disease. We here in present the case of a 39-year-old woman with a history of hysterectomy who presented with intermittent abdominal pain, palpitations and tightness of the chest. Physical examination revealed the presence of a pelvic mass of regular shape. Gynecological ultrasonography, computed tomography scans and three-dimensional (3D) cardiac ultrasonography were used to evaluate the imaging characteristics of the mass and reach a final diagnosis. The mass appeared to extend to the iliac veins, renal veins and inferior vena cava on imaging examination. The mass was successfully excised under non-extracorporeal circulation in one stage. Pathological examination of tumor samples indicated intravenous leiomyomatosis. After the operation, the symptoms were dissipated and no abnormal echo was observed in the inferior vena cava or the right atrium on 3D-cardiac ultrasonography. The patient is currently followed up without signs of recurrence. The aim of the present study was to describe in detail the diagnostic procedure and treatment in order to improve our current understanding of this disease. PMID:28123726

  9. [Value of the preventive use of antibiotics following vaginal obstetric operations].

    PubMed

    Rechlin, D; Wolf, M; Koeniger, W

    1988-01-01

    For a period of 6 years 838 puerperal cases after vaginal obstetric operations (forceps delivery, vacuum extraction, delivery with speculum, manual placenta separation, palpation of the uterus) were critically analysed. The result of the studies suggest that an antibiotic or chemoprophylaxis after vaginal obstetric operations is not successful because of the relatively low infectious morbidity. In obstetrics this prophylaxis is indicated only in delivery by caesarean section as a perioperative short-time prophylaxis.

  10. To the point: obstetrics and gynecology global health experiences for medical students.

    PubMed

    Hampton, Brittany S; Chuang, Alice W; Abbott, Jodi F; Buery-Joyner, Samantha D; Cullimore, Amie J; Dalrymple, John L; Forstein, David A; Hueppchen, Nancy A; Kaczmarczyk, Joseph M; Page-Ramsey, Sarah; Pradhan, Archana; Wolf, Abigail; Dugoff, Lorraine

    2014-07-01

    This article, from the To the Point series prepared by the Association of Professors of Gynecology and Obstetrics Undergraduate Medical Education Committee, provides educators with an overview of considerations for obstetrics and gynecology global health experiences for the medical student. Options for integration of obstetrics and gynecology global health into undergraduate medical curricula are discussed. Specific considerations for global health clinical experiences for medical students, including choosing a clinical location, oversight and mentorship, goals and objectives, predeparture preparation, and evaluation, are reviewed.

  11. Pain and Return to Daily Activities after Uterine Artery Embolization and Hysterectomy in the Treatment of Symptomatic Uterine Fibroids: Results from the Randomized EMMY Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Hehenkamp, Wouter J.K. Volkers, Nicole A.; Birnie, Erwin; Reekers, Jim A.; Ankum, Willem M.

    2006-04-15

    Purpose. To evaluate the safety and efficacy of uterine artery embolization (UAE) and hysterectomy for symptomatic uterine fibroids by means of a randomized controlled trial. The present paper analyses short-term outcomes, i.e., pain and return to daily activities. Methods. Patients were randomized (1:1) to UAE or hysterectomy. Pain was assessed during admission and after discharge, both quantitatively and qualitatively, using a numerical rating scale and questionnaires. Time to return to daily activities was assessed by questionnaire. Results. Seventy-five patients underwent hysterectomy and 81 patients underwent UAE. UAE patients experienced significantly less pain during the first 24 hr after treatment (p = 0.012). Non-white patients had significantly higher pain scores. UAE patients returned significantly sooner to daily activities than hysterectomy patients (for paid work: 28.1 versus 63.4 days; p < 0.001). In conclusion, pain appears to be less after UAE during hospital stay. Return to several daily activities was in favor of UAE in comparison with hysterectomy.

  12. Cost-Effectiveness of Global Endometrial Ablation vs. Hysterectomy for Treatment of Abnormal Uterine Bleeding: US Commercial and Medicaid Payer Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Lenhart, Gregory M.; Bonafede, Machaon M.; Lukes, Andrea S.; Laughlin-Tommaso, Shannon K.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Cost-effectiveness modeling studies of global endometrial ablation (GEA) for treatment of abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) from a US perspective are lacking. The objective of this study was to model the cost-effectiveness of GEA vs. hysterectomy for treatment of AUB in the United States from both commercial and Medicaid payer perspectives. The study team developed a 1-, 3-, and 5-year semi-Markov decision-analytic model to simulate 2 hypothetical patient cohorts of women with AUB—1 treated with GEA and the other with hysterectomy. Clinical and economic data (including treatment patterns, health care resource utilization, direct costs, and productivity costs) came from analyses of commercial and Medicaid claims databases. Analysis results show that cost savings with simultaneous reduction in treatment complications and fewer days lost from work are achieved with GEA versus hysterectomy over almost all time horizons and under both the commercial payer and Medicaid perspectives. Cost-effectiveness metrics also favor GEA over hysterectomy from both the commercial payer and Medicaid payer perspectives—evidence strongly supporting the clinical-economic value about GEA versus hysterectomy. Results will interest clinicians, health care payers, and self-insured employers striving for cost-effective AUB treatments. (Population Health Management 2015;18:373–382) PMID:25714906

  13. Comparison of the short-term and long-term outcomes of laparoscopic hysterectomies and of abdominal hysterectomies: a case study of 4,895 patients in the Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, China

    PubMed Central

    He, Hongying; Yang, Zhijun; Zeng, Dingyuan; Fan, Jiangtao; Hu, Xiaoxia; Ye, Yuan; Bai, Hua; Jiang, Yanming; Lin, Zhong; Lei, Zhiying; Li, Xinlin; Li, Lian; Gan, Jinghua; Lan, Ying; Tang, Xiongzhi; Wang, Danxia; Jiang, Junsong; Wu, Xiaoyan; Li, Meiying; Ren, Xiaoqing; Yang, Xiaomin; Liu, Mei; Wang, Qinmei; Jiang, Fuyan; Li, Li

    2016-01-01

    Background: To evaluate the short-term and long-term outcomes after laparoscopic hysterectomy (LH) compared with abdominal hysterectomy (AH) in case of benign gynecological disease. Methods: A multi-center cohort retrospective comparative study of population among 4,895 hysterectomies (3,539 LH vs.1,356 AH) between 2007 and 2013 was involved. Operative time (OT), estimated blood loss (EBL), intra-operative and post-operative complications, passing flatus; days with indwelling catheter, questionnaires covering pelvic floor functions and sexual functions were assessed. Results: The EBL (174.1±157.4 vs. 263.1±183.2 cc, LH and AH groups, respectively), passing flatus (38.7±14.1 vs. 48.1±13.2 hours), days with indwelling catheter (1.5±0.6 vs. 2.2±0.8 days), use of analgesics (6.5% vs. 73.1%), intra-operative complication rate (2.4% vs. 4.1%), post-operative complication rate (2.3% vs. 5.7%), post-operative constipation (12.1% vs. 24.6%), mild and serious stress urinary incontinence (SUI) post-operative (P<0.001; P=0.014), and proportion of Female Sexual Functioning Index (FSFI) total score <26.55 post-operative (P<0.001) of the LH group were significantly less than those of AH group. There were no significant differences in OT (106.5±34.5 vs. 106.2±40.3 min) between the two groups. Conclusions: LH is a safe and efficient operation for improving patients?long-term quality of life (QoL), and LH is a cost-effectiveness procedure for treating benign gynecological disease. LH is superior to AH due to reduced EBL, reduced post-operative pain and earlier passing flatus. PMID:27199516

  14. Celiac disease and obstetric complications: a systematic review and metaanalysis.

    PubMed

    Saccone, Gabriele; Berghella, Vincenzo; Sarno, Laura; Maruotti, Giuseppe M; Cetin, Irene; Greco, Luigi; Khashan, Ali S; McCarthy, Fergus; Martinelli, Domenico; Fortunato, Francesca; Martinelli, Pasquale

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this metaanalysis was to evaluate the risk of the development of obstetric complications in women with celiac disease. We searched electronic databases from their inception until February 2015. We included all cohort studies that reported the incidence of obstetric complications in women with celiac disease compared with women without celiac disease (ie, control group). Studies without a control group and case-control studies were excluded. The primary outcome was defined a priori and was the incidence of a composite of obstetric complications that included intrauterine growth restriction, small for gestational age, low birthweight, preeclampsia and preterm birth. Secondary outcomes included the incidence of preterm birth, intrauterine growth restriction, stillbirth, preeclampsia, small for gestational age, and low birthweight. The review was registered with PROSPERO (CRD42015017263) before data extraction. All authors were contacted to obtain the original databases and perform individual participant data metaanalysis. Primary and secondary outcomes were assessed in the aggregate data analysis and in the individual participant data metaanalysis. We included 10 cohort studies (4,844,555 women) in this metaanalysis. Four authors provided the entire databases for the individual participant data analysis. Because none of the included studies stratified data for the primary outcome (ie, composite outcome), the assessment of this outcome for the aggregate analysis was not feasible. Aggregate data analysis showed that, compared with women in the control group, women with celiac disease (both treated and untreated) had a significantly higher risk of the development of preterm birth (adjusted odds ratio, 1.35; 95% confidence interval, 1.09-1.66), intrauterine growth restriction (odds ratio, 2.48; 95% confidence interval, 1.32-4.67), stillbirth (odds ratio, 4.84; 95% confidence interval, 1.08-21.75), low birthweight (odds ratio, 1.63; 95% confidence interval, 1

  15. Books for the Hospital Emergency Service

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Donald E.; Morgan, Virginia W.

    1966-01-01

    This is a list of books that should be available in either the hospital emergency room or the medical library. The forty-nine books listed are divided into the following categories: General, Surgery and Trauma, Burns, Cardiology, Dentistry, Disaster Medicine, First Aid, Geriatrics, Obstetrics, Pediatrics, Psychiatry, Toxicology, and Transportation. An asterisk has been placed before twelve books that are particularly recommended for the hospital emergency room as well as the medical library. The latest edition is given for each book, and, unless otherwise noted, each has been annotated by one of the authors. PMID:5945569

  16. Obstetrics and gynecology at the crossroads--again? Still!

    PubMed

    Sokol, R J

    2001-06-01

    It seems, if one can believe presidential addresses, as if our specialty is always at some crossroads or other. In this "opinion piece," uniquely, I don't complain about managed care. I do attempt to identify some of the issues that will be of import for obstetrics and gynecology in the near and not-so-near futures. With regard to research, we await breakthroughs, for example, in the early detection of ovarian cancer, so as to finally be able to improve outcomes. A problem, though, is our failure to focus enough effort on developing a cadre of clinician scientists, who can work out research findings with direct clinical application; this is an issue with which the specialty needs to come to grips. Regarding education, I believe we need to refocus from what type of practitioners we might want to produce to best meet the needs of our patients. The bottom line should be more flexibility in training and emphasis on clinical competence, so that excellent practitioners with competence across the breadth of our specialty are available to provide a full range of appropriate women's health care. The concept of "women's health" is controversial and evolving rapidly. Review of several available sources suggests that reproductive medicine will remain an important component of women's health but that our specialty must now evolve to include other areas, as the major health problems of women change. We need to shift from an organ-based paradigm to a more holistic view, reflecting the woman-centered focus for our specialty. This "paradigm shift" will need to entail continuation of first-rate surgical and obstetrics services but will be expanded to include a full range of services, probably offered by highly trained and competent individuals with specific areas of expertise, practicing in a multi-single-specialty group. Obstetrics and gynecology at the crossroads, indeed!

  17. [Gyneco-obstetrical morbidity in the population of Santiago].

    PubMed

    Salinas, H; Kaempffer, A M; Walton, R; Bocaz, J; Hernández, E; Ramírez, R; Villaroel, R; Báez, M; Carmona, M; Castillo, P

    1988-01-01

    1607 women were interviewed about their gyneco-obstetrical health in a survey of 469 randomly selected households in the province of Santiago, Chile. The dependent variables correspond to the frequency of gynecologic or obstetrical morbidity and demand for medical attention in 2 weeks of April, 1987. Independent variables were age, educational status, and health insurance coverage. 125 of the households were headed by uninsured persons. The average woman was 34.4 years old. 43.1% had 8 years or less of education, 42.6% had 9.12 years, and 14.2% had 13 or more years. 21 new cases of acute obstetrical or gynecological disorders were reported, including 15 of vulvovaginitis, 3 abortions, 1 bartholinitis, 1 intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy, and 1 urinary tract infection. There were 55 cases of chronic disorders, including 12 benign ovarian lesions, 8 dysmenorrheas, 8 uterine dystropias, 10 cases of menstrual disturbances, 1 of infertility, 4 benign cervical lesions, 5 benign uterine lesions, 2 pelvic inflammations, 2 cervical cancers, 2 breast cancers, and 1 ovarian cancer. Among the 1607 women, 11 had consulted for family planning in the 2 weeks, 25 for pregnancy, 22 for gynecological conditions, and 9 for postpartum care. 58.3% of the women aged 15-49 used a contraceptive method. The proportions of users of oral contraceptives and IUDs respectively were 62.5% and 37.5% for women under 20, 60% and 40% for women 20-29, 27% and 61% for women 30-39, and 15.1% and 60.6% for women 40-49. 28.2% of women over 15 had had a Pap test in the past year. The proportions of different age groups having Pap tests ranged from 2.0% for women under 20 to 46.7% for women aged 30-39. 3 women in the sample households had died in the past year of gyneco-obstetric causes, 1 of complications of childbirth and 2 of cervical cancer.

  18. A bill of rights for patients with obstetric fistula.

    PubMed

    Wall, L Lewis

    2014-12-01

    According to the seven categories of vulnerability proposed by Kipnis (cognitive, juridical, deferential, medical, allocational, social, and infrastructural), and the four generally accepted principles of biomedical ethics (respect, beneficence, non-maleficence, and fairness), women with obstetric fistulas are an exceptionally vulnerable population. Therefore, they merit special consideration in both clinical care and research settings. Adoption of a formal bill of rights for patients with fistula similar to the one proposed in the present report should be encouraged at all facilities where these women are treated. Acknowledgment of their rights would help to improve their care and end the abuses they are exposed to in institutional settings.

  19. Group B Streptococcal Endocarditis in Obstetric and Gynecologic Practice

    PubMed Central

    Crespo, Antonio; Retter, Avi S.

    2003-01-01

    Background: We describe a case and review ten other instances of group B streptococcal endocarditis in the setting of obstetric and gynecologic practice reported since the last review in 1985. Case: Abortion remains a common antecedent event, but in contrast to earlier reports, most patients did not have underlying valvular disease, the tricuspid valve was most often involved, and mortality was low. Patients with tricuspid valve infection tended to have a subacute course, whereas those with aortic or mitral involvement typically had a more acute, fulminant course. Conclusion: Despite an improvement in mortality, morbidity remains high, with 8 of 11 patients having clinically significant emboli. PMID:14627217

  20. Risk factors for obstetric fistulae in north-eastern Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Melah, G S; Massa, A A; Yahaya, U R; Bukar, M; Kizaya, D D; El-Nafaty, A U

    2007-11-01

    This prospective comparative study of obstetric fistulae (OF) was aimed at identifying risk factors. A total of 80 obstetric fistulae treated at the gynaecological unit of the FMCG, and 80 inpatients without fistulae recruited randomly as controls formed the basis of this study. Through interview and case record review, information on age, parity and marital status was collected. Other features were educational status, occupation and booking status of the pregnancy that might have led to this condition. The duration of labour, place of birth and mode of delivery, including its outcome were also collected. The data were analysed using the Epi Info. The majority of the patients were Hausa/Fulani 87.5%, Muslims 91.2%, with large vesicovaginal fistulae (average size 5.0 cm) mainly resulting from obstructed labour (93.7%). Major risk factors included early age at first marriage (average 14 years), short stature (average height 146.2 cm) and illiteracy (96.3%). Also low social class and lack of gainful employment were factors. Failure to book for antenatal care (93.7%), and rural place of residence (95%) were also factors associated with acquiring the fistulae. Living far away (>3 km) from a health facility also contributed or predisposed to the development of an obstetric fistula. Social violence and stigma associated with the fistulae included divorce, being ostracised as a social outcast, and lack of assistance from relations in terms of finding and funding treatment. This study supports improved access to basic essential obstetric care, family planning services, and timely referral when and where necessary. Universal education will provide a long-term solution by improving the standard of living and quality of life. Especially important are media- and community-based programmes on the ills of teenage marriage and child pregnancy using cultural and religiously-based values to give sound advice. In a male dominated society, reaching out to men with traditionally

  1. Adjuvant radiotherapy following radical hysterectomy for patients with stage IB and IIA cervical cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Soisson, A.P.; Soper, J.T.; Clarke-Pearson, D.L.; Berchuck, A.; Montana, G.; Creasman, W.T. )

    1990-06-01

    From 1971 through 1984, 320 women underwent radical hysterectomy as primary therapy of stage IB and IIA cervical cancer. Two hundred forty-eight patients (78%) were treated with surgery alone and 72 patients (22%) received adjuvant postoperative external-beam radiotherapy. Presence of lymph node metastasis, large lesion (greater than 4 cm in diameter), histologic grade, race (noncaucasian), and age (greater than 40 years) were significant poor prognostic factors for the entire group of patients. Patients treated with surgery alone had a better disease-free survival than those who received combination therapy (P less than 0.001). However, patients receiving adjuvant radiation therapy had a higher incidence of lymphatic metastases, tumor involvement of the surgical margin, and large cervical lesions. Adjuvant pelvic radiation therapy did not improve the survival of patients with unilateral nodal metastases or those who had a large cervical lesion with free surgical margins and the absence of nodal involvement. Radiation therapy appears to reduce the incidence of pelvic recurrences. Unfortunately, 84% of patients who developed recurrent tumor after combination therapy had a component of distant failure. The incidence of severe gastrointestinal or genitourinary tract complications was not different in the two treatment groups. However, the incidence of lymphedema was increased in patients who received adjuvant radiation therapy. Although adjuvant radiation therapy appears to be tolerated without a significant increase in serious complications, the extent to which it may improve local control rates and survival in high-risk patients appears to be limited. In view of the high incidence of distant metastases in high-risk patients, consideration should be given to adjuvant systemic chemotherapy in addition to radiation therapy.

  2. Laparoscopic Supracervical Hysterectomy with Morcellation: Should it stay or should it go?1

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Jubilee; Taylor, Kristal; Ramirez, Pedro T.; Sun, Charlotte; Holman, Laura L.; Cone, S. Mark; Irwin, John; Frumovitz, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Objective To establish the risk of unidentified neoplasia and subsequent adverse outcomes in patients undergoing laparoscopic supracervical hysterectomy (SCH) with morcellation. Methods This was a retrospective review of all consecutive women who had undergone laparoscopic SCH at a single institution between January 2002 and December 2008. We abstracted charts for patient characteristics and outcomes. Results We identified 808 women with planned laparoscopic SCH with morcellation. The median age was 44.1 years (range, 23.4-79.8 years). The most common indications were menorrhagia (n=472 patients, 58.4%) and leiomyomata (n=400 patients, 49.5%). Of the 30 patients converted to an open procedure prior to morcellation, one had leiomyosarcoma on final pathology. Of the 778 patients who completed laparoscopic SCH with morcellation, 16 (2.0%) patients had endometrial hyperplasia and 3 (0.4%) patients had cancer on final pathology. Abnormal pathology appeared more likely in women over 50 years of age with abnormal bleeding. Of the 778 patients, 189 were under 40 years of age, and 4 (2.1%) of these 189 women had hyperplasia on final pathology; none had cancer. Of the 433 patients age 40-49 years, 8 (1.8%) patients had hyperplasia or cancer. Of the 156 patients age 50 years or older, 7 (4.5%) had hyperplasia (P=.18); none had cancer. No patient with hyperplasia or morcellated cancer had adverse sequelae after a median follow-up of 90.4 months.. Conclusion In this cohort of patients who underwent laparoscopic SCH, the risk of hyperplasia or malignancy was low. Laparoscopic SCH with morcellation appears to be a low risk procedure. PMID:25242233

  3. Oxycodone versus fentanyl for intravenous patient-controlled analgesia after laparoscopic supracervical hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Nan Seol; Lee, Jeong Seok; Park, Su Yeon; Ryu, Aeli; Chun, Hea Rim; Chung, Ho Soon; Kang, Kyou Sik; Chung, Jin Hun; Jung, Kyung Taek; Mun, Seong Taek

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Oxycodone, a semisynthetic thebaine derivative opioid, is widely used for the relief of moderate to severe pain. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy and side effects of oxycodone and fentanyl in the management of postoperative pain by intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IV-PCA) in patients who underwent laparoscopic supracervical hysterectomy (LSH). Methods: The 127 patients were randomized to postoperative pain treatment with either oxycodone (n = 64, group O) or fentanyl group (n = 63, group F). Patients received 7.5 mg oxycodone or 100 μg fentanyl with 30-mg ketorolac at the end of anesthesia followed by IV-PCA (potency ratio 75:1) for 48 hours postoperatively. A blinded observer assessed postoperative pain based on the numerical rating scale (NRS), infused PCA dose, patient satisfaction, sedation level, and side effects. Results: Accumulated IV-PCA consumption in group O was less (63.5 ± 23.9 mL) than in group F (85.3 ± 2.41 mL) during the first 48 hours postoperatively (P = 0.012). The NRS score of group O was significantly lower than that of group F at 4 and 8 hours postoperatively (P < .001); however, the incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV), dizziness, and drowsiness was significantly higher in group O than in group F. Patient satisfaction was lower in group O than in group F during the 48 hours after surgery (P < 0.001). Conclusions: Oxycodone IV-PCA (potency ratio 1:75) provided superior analgesia to fentanyl IV-PCA after LSH; however, the higher incidence of side effects, including PONV, dizziness, and drowsiness, suggests that the doses used in this study were not equipotent. PMID:28272250

  4. Evaluation of clonidine as an adjuvant to bupivacaine in wound infiltration for providing postoperative analgesia after abdominal hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Selvaraj, Venkatesh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Clonidine is an effective adjuvant to local anesthetics in peripheral nerve blocks. We studied the effect of clonidine as an adjuvant in wound infiltration for postoperative analgesia. Aim: To evaluate the role of clonidine as an adjuvant to bupivacaine in wound infiltration in terms of quality and duration of postoperative analgesia in patients undergoing total abdominal hysterectomy. Settings and Study Design: Prospective, randomized, double-blinded study. Materials and Methods: One hundred patients of American Society of Anesthesiologists I–II posted for abdominal hysterectomy were randomly allotted to two groups. Group A received wound infiltration with 45 ml of 0.25% bupivacaine with 3 μg/kg clonidine while Group B received wound infiltration with 45 ml of 0.25% bupivacaine. A standard general anesthesia technique was used in all the patients. Postoperative analgesia was provided with injection ketorolac 0.5 mg/kg intravenous infusion and tramadol being the rescue analgesic. Postoperative pain score, duration of effective analgesia before the first rescue analgesic, percentage of patients requiring rescue analgesic at different time intervals, and total number of rescue analgesic doses in 24 h were compared between the groups. Statistical Analysis: Difference between the bivariate samples in independent groups with Mann–Whitney U-test. For categorical data, Chi-square test was used. Results: Clonidine group has better pain score, longer duration of effective analgesia, lower percentage of patients requiring rescue analgesic, and less number of doses of rescue analgesia in the first 24 h. Conclusion: We conclude that Clonidine 3 μg/kg is an effective adjuvant to bupivacaine for wound infiltration in terms of quality and duration of postoperative analgesia following total abdominal hysterectomy. PMID:27746524

  5. Comparison Between Intraperitoneal and Intravenous Lidocaine for Postoperative Analgesia After Elective Abdominal Hysterectomy, a Double-Blind Placebo Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Samimi, Saghar; Taheri, Arman; Davari Tanha, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare the efficacy of intravenous and intraperitoneal injection of lidocaine and normal saline in relieving postoperative pain after elective abdominal hysterectomy. Materials and methods: For this double-blind randomized controlled study 109 patients undergoing elective abdominal hysterectomy were randomly allocated to three groups :1) IV group (intravenous injection group) received intravenous lidocaine %2 bolus 1.5mg/kg 30 min before incision and then a continuous lidocaine infusion of 2mg/kg and before the wound closure an intraperitoneal injection of N/S , 2) IP group (intraperitoneal group) received intravenous N/S and intraperitoneal lidocaine 3mg/kg , 3) P group (placebo, N/S) received both intravenous and intraperitoneal N/S. The pain scores (VAS) at rest, total morphine consumption , the time to first need for rescue analgesic ,incidence of lidocaine related adverse effects and nausea and vomiting were recorded at 0,2,4,8,12 and 24 hrs postoperatively. Results: The VAS scores were significantly lower in IP and IV groups compared with placebo (p = 0.001). Total consumption of morphine (p = 0.001) and time to firs request of recue analgesic (p = 0.001) were lower too in IP and IV groups.Incidence of vomiting was comparable between groups (p < 0.05) but nausea was higher in control group (p > 0.05).There were not notable lidocaine-related adverse effects. IP and IV groups were not statistically different for all investigated variables. Conclusion: This study showed lidocaine administration both intravenously and intraperitoneally are effective in reducing the postoperative pain and also have opioid sparing effect and can be safely used in elective abdominal hysterectomy without any major adverse effects. PMID:27047566

  6. Dose-Volume Histogram Predictors of Chronic Gastrointestinal Complications After Radical Hysterectomy and Postoperative Concurrent Nedaplatin-Based Chemoradiation Therapy for Early-Stage Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Isohashi, Fumiaki; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Mabuchi, Seiji; Konishi, Koji; Koizumi, Masahiko; Takahashi, Yutaka; Ogata, Toshiyuki; Maruoka, Shintaroh; Kimura, Tadashi; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate dose-volume histogram (DVH) predictors for the development of chronic gastrointestinal (GI) complications in cervical cancer patients who underwent radical hysterectomy and postoperative concurrent nedaplatin-based chemoradiation therapy. Methods and Materials: This study analyzed 97 patients who underwent postoperative concurrent chemoradiation therapy. The organs at risk that were contoured were the small bowel loops, large bowel loop, and peritoneal cavity. DVH parameters subjected to analysis included the volumes of these organs receiving more than 15, 30, 40, and 45 Gy (V15-V45) and their mean dose. Associations between DVH parameters or clinical factors and the incidence of grade 2 or higher chronic GI complications were evaluated. Results: Of the clinical factors, smoking and low body mass index (BMI) (<22) were significantly associated with grade 2 or higher chronic GI complications. Also, patients with chronic GI complications had significantly greater V15-V45 volumes and higher mean dose of the small bowel loops compared with those without GI complications. In contrast, no parameters for the large bowel loop or peritoneal cavity were significantly associated with GI complications. Results of the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve analysis led to the conclusion that V15-V45 of the small bowel loops has high accuracy for prediction of GI complications. Among these parameters, V40 gave the highest area under the ROC curve. Finally, multivariate analysis was performed with V40 of the small bowel loops and 2 other clinical parameters that were judged to be potential risk factors for chronic GI complications: BMI and smoking. Of these 3 parameters, V40 of the small bowel loops and smoking emerged as independent predictors of chronic GI complications. Conclusions: DVH parameters of the small bowel loops may serve as predictors of grade 2 or higher chronic GI complications after postoperative

  7. Eye Emergencies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fight for victory. Marfan & Related Disorders What is Marfan Syndrome? What are Related Disorders? What are the Signs? ... Emergencies Eye Emergencies Lung Emergencies Surgeries Eye Emergencies Marfan syndrome significantly increases your risk of retinal detachment, a ...

  8. Childhood Emergencies

    MedlinePlus

    ... SUBSCRIBE Emergency 101 Share this! Home » Emergency 101 Childhood Emergencies Keeping children healthy and safe is every ... and tools to prevent, recognize and address a childhood emergency is the first step in keeping your ...

  9. Adenocarcinoma arising from vaginal stump: unusual vaginal carcinogenesis 7 years after hysterectomy due to cervical intraepithelial neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Takashi; Ikura, Yoshihiro; Iwai, Yasuhiro; Tokuda, Hisato; Cho, Yuka; Morimoto, Noriyuki; Nakago, Satoshi; Oishi, Tetsuya

    2013-11-01

    Primary vaginal adenocarcinomas are one of the rarest malignant neoplasms, which develop in the female genital tract. Because of the extremely low incidence, their clinical and pathologic characteristics are still obscure. Recently, we experienced a case of vaginal adenocarcinoma that appeared 7 yr after hysterectomy because of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia. The patient, a 65-yr-old obese woman, was diagnosed as having adenocarcinoma in the vaginal stump and was treated by simple tumor excision and radiation. Immunohistochemical and molecular biologic examinations indicated a potential association with human papilloma virus infection in the development of the vaginal adenocarcinoma. There has been no evidence of recurrence for 3 yr after the operation.

  10. Synchronous single-port access laparoscopic right hemicolectomy and laparoscopic-assisted vaginal hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy

    PubMed Central

    Ybañez-Morano, Jessica; Tiu, Andrew C.

    2017-01-01

    Laparoscopic surgery through a single incision is gaining popularity with different stakeholders. The advantages of improved cosmetics, decreased postoperative pain and blood loss continue to attract patients from different surgical fields. Multidisciplinary approach to different surgical entities through a single incision has just been introduced. We report the first case of a synchronous single-port access (SPA) laparoscopic right hemicolectomy and laparoscopic-assisted vaginal hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy through a single incision above the umbilicus in a 48-year-old female with ascending colon mass and uterine mass with good postoperative outcomes. SPA laparoscopic surgery is feasible for multidisciplinary approach in resectable tumors. PMID:28096321

  11. Psychological Symptoms Among Obstetric Fistula Patients Compared to Gynecology Outpatients in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Sarah M.; Sikkema, Kathleen J.; Watt, Melissa H.; Masenga, Gileard G.

    2016-01-01

    Background Obstetric fistula is a childbirth injury prevalent in sub-Saharan Africa that causes uncontrollable leaking of urine and/or feces. Research has documented the social and psychological sequelae of obstetric fistula, including mental health dysfunction and social isolation. Purpose This cross-sectional study sought to quantify the psychological symptoms and social support in obstetric fistula patients, compared with a patient population of women without obstetric fistula. Methods Participants were gynecology patients (N = 144) at the Kilimanjaro Christian Medical Center in Moshi, Tanzania, recruited from the Fistula Ward (n = 54) as well as gynecology outpatient clinics (n = 90). Measures included previously validated psychometric questionnaires, administered orally by Tanzanian nurses. Outcome variables were compared between obstetric fistula patients and gynecology outpatients, controlling for background demographic variables and multiple comparisons. Results Compared to gynecology outpatients, obstetric fistula patients reported significantly higher symptoms of depression, posttraumatic stress disorder, somatic complaints, and maladaptive coping. They also reported significantly lower social support. Conclusions Obstetric fistula patients present for repair surgery with more severe psychological distress than gynecology outpatients. In order to address these mental health concerns, clinicians should engage obstetric fistula patients with targeted mental health interventions. PMID:25670025

  12. The teaching of obstetrics and gynaecology in Singapore from 1905 to the present.

    PubMed

    Singh, K; Yong, E L; Wong, P C

    2005-07-01

    Medical education commenced a century ago in 1905. In 1922, the Department of Midwifery and Gynaecology was established. This was renamed the Department of Obstetrics in 1951. Medical undergraduate curriculum in Obstetrics and Gynaecology has evolved and undergone radical changes. From a compulsory 11-week residential posting in Kandang Kerbau Hospital, medical students are now only expected to be resident when they are scheduled for night duties. Having been an examination subject by itself in the Final MBBS Examination, Obstetrics and Gynaecology has in the latest revised undergraduate medical curriculum been incorporated into the Surgical tract and has ceased to be evaluated as a subject on its own. In this review, the establishment of postgraduate training in Obstetrics and Gynaecology is traced over the last 50 years and the important changes over the years are described. The first local Master of Medicine (Obstetrics and Gynaecology) was awarded in 1971. Currently, the specialist training for Obstetrics and Gynaecology in Singapore spans a period of 6 years, comprising 3 years of basic structural training and 3 years of advanced structural training. Over the years, the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, National University of Singapore, has played a pivotal role in the teaching of clinical and laboratory research. This has added substantially to Singapore's efforts to become a world-class knowledge hub, especially in the areas of relevance to Obstetrics and Gynaecology.

  13. The Role of Obstetric Knowledge in Utilization of Delivery Service in Nepal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karkee, Rajendra; Baral, Om Bahadur; Khanal, Vishnu; Lee, Andy H.

    2014-01-01

    Birth Preparedness and Complication Readiness (BP/CR) program has been promoted in Nepal to equip pregnant women with obstetric knowledge so as to motivate them to seek professional care. Using a prospective design of 701 pregnant women of more than 5 months gestation in a central hills district of Nepal, we evaluated if having obstetric knowledge…

  14. Sonographers' Complex Communication during the Obstetric Sonogram Exam: An Interview Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brasseur, Lee

    2012-01-01

    A study of the oral communication experiences and training of obstetric sonographers can provide insight into the complex expectations these medical professionals face as they complete their technical tasks and communicate with patients. Unlike other diagnostic medical professionals, obstetric sonographers are expected to provide detailed…

  15. Present status of obstetrics in family practice and the effects of malpractice issues.

    PubMed

    Bredfeldt, R; Colliver, J A; Wesley, R M

    1989-03-01

    A survey of 800 active members of the American Academy of Family Physicians 1985-1987 membership directory was conducted for the purpose of determining the impact, over time, of malpractice issues upon the practice of obstetrics by family physicians. The survey response rate was 60.4 percent. Almost 20 percent of all respondents reported that they have never provided obstetric care of any type. Another 40 percent have provided obstetric care previously but have now discontinued this care, while the remaining 40 percent currently offer obstetric care to their patients. The proportion of respondents who discontinued the practice of obstetrics because of increased risk of malpractice litigation increased significantly over the years from 1947 to 1986 (P = .0084). The proportion of respondents who discontinued obstetric practice because of increased malpractice insurance costs also increased significantly from 1945 to 1986 (P = .0002). The proportion of those entering practice during the past five years who decided not to offer obstetric services because of malpractice risks was significantly greater than the proportion entering practice earlier (21.0 percent vs 2.0 percent, P = .0090). Although the current patterns of obstetric practice showed regional variation, the accelerating impact of malpractice risk and insurance cost on these patterns was similar throughout the nation.

  16. Pervasive Developmental Disorder and Obstetric Complications in Children and Adolescents with Tuberous Sclerosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Rebecca J.; Bolton, Patrick F.

    2001-01-01

    This study investigated the role of obstetric complications in determining phenotypic manifestations in tuberous sclerosis (TS), a disorder associated with autism spectrum disorders. Comparison of 43 children with TS and 40 unaffected siblings found children with TS experienced more obstetric complications, but these were related to mild rather…

  17. Regional Obstetric Anesthesia and Newborn Behavior: A Reanalysis toward Synergistic Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lester, Barry M.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    The Brazelton Neonatal Behavioral Assessment Scale was administered to 54 full-term, healthy infants on days 1 through 5 and on days 7 and 10. Infants were divided into eight groups, differing in terms of the obstetrical medication mothers received. Low dosages of obstetrical medication were found to have significant but subtle effects on the…

  18. The "virtual" obstetrical intensive care unit: providing critical care for contemporary obstetrics in nontraditional locations.

    PubMed

    Leovic, Michael P; Robbins, Hailey N; Foley, Michael R; Starikov, Roman S

    2016-12-01

    Management of the critically ill pregnant patient presents a clinical dilemma in which there are sparse objective data to determine the optimal setting for provision of high-quality care to these patients. This clinical scenario will continue to present a challenge for providers as the chronic illness and comorbid conditions continue to become more commonly encountered in the obstetric population. Various care models exist across a broad spectrum of facilities that are characterized by differing levels of resources; however, no studies have identified which model provides the highest level of care and patient safety while maintaining a reasonable degree of cost-effectiveness. The health care needs of the critically ill obstetric patient calls for clinicians to move beyond the traditional definition of the intensive care unit and develop a well-rounded, quickly responsive, and communicative interdisciplinary team that can provide high-quality, unique, and versatile care that best meets the needs of each particular patient. We propose a model in which a virtual intensive care unit team composed of preselected specialists from multiple disciplines (maternal-fetal medicine, neonatology, obstetric anesthesiology, cardiology, pulmonology, etc) participate in the provision of individualized, precontemplated care that is readily adapted to the specific patient's clinical needs, regardless of setting. With this team-based approach, an environment of trust and familiarity is fostered among team members and well thought-out patient care plans are developed through routine prebrief discussions regarding individual clinical care for parturients anticipated to required critical care services. Incorporating debriefings between team members following these intricate cases will allow for the continued evolution of care as the medical needs of this patient population change as well.

  19. More Accurate Definition of Clinical Target Volume Based on the Measurement of Microscopic Extensions of the Primary Tumor Toward the Uterus Body in International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics Ib-IIa Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Cervix

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Wen-Jia; Wu, Xiao; Xue, Ren-Liang; Lin, Xiang-Ying; Kidd, Elizabeth A.; Yan, Shu-Mei; Zhang, Yao-Hong; Zhai, Tian-Tian; Lu, Jia-Yang; Wu, Li-Li; Zhang, Hao; Huang, Hai-Hua; Chen, Zhi-Jian; Li, De-Rui; Xie, Liang-Xi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To more accurately define clinical target volume for cervical cancer radiation treatment planning by evaluating tumor microscopic extension toward the uterus body (METU) in International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage Ib-IIa squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix (SCCC). Patients and Methods: In this multicenter study, surgical resection specimens from 318 cases of stage Ib-IIa SCCC that underwent radical hysterectomy were included. Patients who had undergone preoperative chemotherapy, radiation, or both were excluded from this study. Microscopic extension of primary tumor toward the uterus body was measured. The association between other pathologic factors and METU was analyzed. Results: Microscopic extension toward the uterus body was not common, with only 12.3% of patients (39 of 318) demonstrating METU. The mean (±SD) distance of METU was 0.32 ± 1.079 mm (range, 0-10 mm). Lymphovascular space invasion was associated with METU distance and occurrence rate. A margin of 5 mm added to gross tumor would adequately cover 99.4% and 99% of the METU in the whole group and in patients with lymphovascular space invasion, respectively. Conclusion: According to our analysis of 318 SCCC specimens for METU, using a 5-mm gross tumor volume to clinical target volume margin in the direction of the uterus should be adequate for International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage Ib-IIa SCCC. Considering the discrepancy between imaging and pathologic methods in determining gross tumor volume extent, we recommend a safer 10-mm margin in the uterine direction as the standard for clinical practice when using MRI for contouring tumor volume.

  20. The professional responsibility model of obstetric ethics and caesarean delivery.

    PubMed

    Chervenak, Frank A; McCullough, Laurence B

    2013-04-01

    In this chapter, we provide an account of the professional responsibility model of obstetric ethics, and identify its implications for two major topics: patient-choice caesarean delivery and trial of labour after caesarean delivery. The professional responsibility model of obstetric ethics is based on the ethical concept of medicine as a profession and the ethical principles of beneficence and respect for autonomy. The obstetrician has beneficence-based and autonomy-based obligations to the pregnant woman and beneficence-based obligations to the fetus when it is a patient. Because the viable fetus is a patient, the ethics of caesarean delivery requires balancing of obligations to the pregnant and fetal patient. The implication of the professional responsibility model for patient-choice caesarean delivery is that the obstetrician should respond to such requests with a recommendation against non-indicated caesarean delivery and for vaginal delivery. These recommendations should be explained and discussed in the informed consent process. It is ethically permissible to implement an informed, reflective decision for non-indicated caesarean delivery. The implication for trial of labour after caesarean delivery is that, in settings properly equipped and staffed, the obstetrician should offer both trial of labour after caesarean delivery and planned caesarean delivery to women who have had one previous low transverse incision. The obstetrician should recommend against trial of labour after caesarean delivery for women with a previous classical incision.

  1. [Combined subarachnoid-epidural technique for obstetric analgesia].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Guisasola, J; García del Valle, S; Gómez-Arnau, J I

    2000-05-01

    Combined spinal-epidural blockade for labor pain has enjoyed increasing popularity in obstetric anesthesia. The usual procedure is to use a single space and a single needle for dural puncture, inserting a spinal needle through an epidural needle followed by insertion of a catheter. A small dose of one or several substances (usually a lipophilic opioid and a local anesthetic) is first injected in the intrathecal space to provide rapid, effective analgesia with minimal muscle blockade. The epidural catheter is used if labor lasts longer than the spinal block, if the spinal block is insufficient, or in case of cesarean section. Combined spinal-epidural blockade is a safe, valid alternative to conventional epidural analgesia and has become the main technique for providing obstetric analgesia in many hospitals. The most widely-recognized advantage of the technique is high maternal satisfaction with rapid and effective analgesia. Mobility of the lower extremities is preserved and the mother is often able to walk. Because opioids are injected into the intrathecal space and because the technique is more invasive than standard epidural analgesia, the potential risk to mother and fetus increases.

  2. Applying developmental programming to clinical obstetrics: my ward round.

    PubMed

    Painter, R C

    2015-10-01

    The theory of developmental programming is supported by accumulating evidence, both observational and experimental. The direct application of the principles of developmental programming by clinicians to benefit pregnant women remains an area of limited attention. Examining a selection of inpatients at an obstetric referral center, I searched for situations in which clinical decision making could be driven by the principles of developmental programming. I also looked for situations in which the clinical research agenda could be dictated by these concepts. In the decision to undertake preventive measures to avoid preeclampsia, the offspring's perspective may support more liberal application of calcium and aspirin. Consideration of the long-term health perspective of the offspring could drive choices in the management of obesity and diabetes in pregnancy. The administration of corticosteroids in women delivering by elective cesarean at term may have modest short-term benefits, but additional trials are necessary to investigate long-term offspring health. The offspring of women suffering hyperemesis gravidarum may benefit from nutritional therapy. The long-term health of the offspring could affect couples' choice for IVF or expectant management. Applying the principles of developmental programming to the management of pregnant women could drive clinical decision making and is driving the clinical research agenda. Increasingly, developmental programming concepts are becoming an integral part of clinical practice, as well as determining the choice of outcomes in trials in obstetrics and fertility medicine. The presented cases underscore the need for more research to guide clinical practice.

  3. Changes in the Practice of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

    PubMed

    Rayburn, William F; Tracy, Erin E

    2016-01-01

    A projected shortage of obstetrician-gynecologists (OB-GYNs) is a result of both the increasing US population and the relatively static number of residency graduates. In addition, generational changes have contributed to increasing subspecialization, more desiring part-time employment, and earlier retirement. This article reviews data regarding changes in the practice of obstetrics and gynecology. Residency education is focusing more on a core curriculum in general obstetrics and gynecology, while subspecialty fellowship training has grown in popularity. There are no recent data to describe whether OB-GYNs are working fewer hours, yet more are employed in larger practices at mostly metropolitan locations. A team-based care model that incorporates nonphysician clinicians and digital conversion of clinical data has been encouraged to increase accessibility, improve comprehensiveness, commit to more continuity of care, and reduce redundancy. Compared with other medical specialists, OB-GYNs retire slightly earlier, especially females who will represent the field more. The specialty is moving toward a more comprehensive women's health care practice model that is more patient-centered, efficient, cost controlling, team-based, and adaptable to the needs of a diverse population. Implications from these changes for our practices and improving patient care are currently unclear and await more reported experience.

  4. The commodification of obstetric ultrasound scanning in Hanoi, Viet Nam.

    PubMed

    Gammeltoft, Tine; Nguyen, Hanh Thi Thuý

    2007-05-01

    Growing numbers of pregnant women across the world now routinely have ultrasound scans as part of antenatal care, including in low-income countries. This article presents the findings of anthropological research on the use of obstetric ultrasonography in routine antenatal care in Hanoi, Viet Nam. The findings come from observation, a survey and interviews with women seeking ultrasound scans at a main maternity hospital and interviews with doctors providing ultrasound there. We found a dramatic overuse of ultrasound scanning; the 400 women surveyed had had an average of 6.6 scans and 8.3 antenatal visits during pregnancy, while one-fifth had had ten scans or more. Doctors considered obstetric ultrasound an indispensable part of modern antenatal care. For two-thirds of the women, the main reason for frequent scans was reassurance of normal fetal development. However, the women often also said their doctor had recommended the scans. This overuse must be seen in the context of growing commercialisation in the Vietnamese health care system, where ultrasound provides an important source of revenue for both private and public providers. There is an urgent need in Viet Nam for policy and practice guidelines on the appropriate use of ultrasonography in pregnancy and how best to combine it with essential antenatal care, and information dissemination to women.

  5. Obstetric Care and Method of Delivery in Mexico: Results from the 2012 National Health and Nutrition Survey

    PubMed Central

    Heredia-Pi, Ileana; Servan-Mori, Edson E.; Wirtz, Veronika J.; Avila-Burgos, Leticia; Lozano, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Objective To identify the current clinical, socio-demographic and obstetric factors associated with the various types of delivery strategies in Mexico. Materials and Methods This is a cross-sectional study based on the 2012 National Health and Nutrition Survey (ENSANUT) of 6,736 women aged 12 to 49 years. Delivery types discussed in this paper include vaginal delivery, emergency cesarean section and planned cesarean section. Using bivariate analyses, sub-population group differences were identified. Logistic regression models were applied, including both binary and multinomial outcome variables from the survey. The logistic regression results identify those covariates associated with the type of delivery. Results 53.1% of institutional births in the period 2006 through 2012 were vaginal deliveries, 46.9% were either a planned or emergency cesarean sections. The highest rates of this procedure were among women who reported a complication during delivery (OR: 4.21; 95%CI: 3.66–4.84), between the ages of 35 and 49 at the time of their last child birth (OR: 2.54; 95%CI: 2.02–3.20) and women receiving care through private healthcare providers during delivery (OR: 2.36; 95%CI: 1.84–3.03). Conclusions The existence of different socio-demographic and obstetric profiles among women who receive care for vaginal or cesarean delivery, are supported by the findings of the present study. The frequency of vaginal delivery is higher in indigenous women, when the care provider is public and, in women with two or more children at time of the most recent child birth. Planned cesarean deliveries are positively associated with years of schooling, a higher socioeconomic level, and higher age. The occurrence of emergency cesarean sections is elevated in women with a diagnosis of a health issue during pregnancy or delivery, and it is reduced in highly marginalized settings. PMID:25101781

  6. Stability and Change of Interest in Obstetrics-Gynecology among Medical Students: Eighteen Years of Longitudinal Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forouzan, Iraj; Hojat, Mohammadreza

    1993-01-01

    A study investigated, first, the percentage of medical students maintaining interest in obstetrics/gynecology during medical school compared to those maintaining interest in other specialties and, second, changes of interest from obstetrics/gynecology to other specialties and other specialties to obstetrics/gynecology. Results indicate instability…

  7. Survival and prognostic factors comparing stage IB 1 versus stage IB 2 cervical cancer treated with primary radical hysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Srisomboon, Jatupol; Kietpeerakool, Chumnan; Suprasert, Prapaporn; Manopanya, Manatsawee; Siriaree, Sitthicha; Charoenkwan, Kittipat; Cheewakriangkrai, Chalong; Sae-Teng, Charuwan

    2011-01-01

    This study was undertaken to compare the survival rates of stage IB 1 versus stage IB 2 cervical cancer patients and to evaluate the prognostic factors after treatment primarily with radical hysterectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy (RHPL). Patients with stage IB cervical cancer undergoing primary RHPL at Chiang Mai University Hospital between January 2002 and December 2009 were evaluated for survival and recurrence. Clinicopathological variables were analyzed to identify the prognostic factors affecting the survival of the patients. During the study period, RHPL was performed on 570 stage IB 1 and 110 stage IB 2 cervical cancer patients. With a median follow-up of 48 months, the 5-year disease-free survivals were 98.1% and 82.8% respectively (p<0.001). Multivariate analysis identified four significant prognostic factors affecting survival including sub-staging, non-squamous cell carcinoma histology, lymph node metastasis and the presence of lymph-vascular space invasion. In conclusion, with a primary radical hysterectomy, stage IB 1 cervical cancer patients have a significantly better survival rate than those with stage IB 2. Significant prognostic factors for stage IB cervical cancer include tumor histology, nodal status, and the presence of lymph-vascular space invasion.

  8. Prognostic and Safety Roles in Laparoscopic Versus Abdominal Radical Hysterectomy in Cervical Cancer: A Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Tiefeng; Feng, Yanling; Huang, Qidan; Wan, Ting

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: Studies comparing the prognostic results between laparoscopic radical hysterectomy (LRH) and abdominal radical hysterectomy (ARH) in cervical cancer reported contradictory results. We aimed to evaluate the prognostic and safety roles of LRH by pooling studies in a meta-analysis. Materials and Methods: Original articles were searched in PubMed, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library. The survival results (5-year disease-free survival [DFS], 5-year overall survival [OS], and recurrence rate [RR]), safety parameters (intra-, peri-, and postoperative complication rates and postoperative bowel or bladder recovery days), efficiency parameters (pelvic/para-aortic lymph nodes removed), and other parameters (operative time, estimated blood loss, and hospital of stay) between the two approaches were reviewed. Results: For the 2922 cases identified, DFS, OS, and RR did not differ in balanced prognostic factors, including lymph node metastasis, Stage IIB or above, non–squamous cancer histology, grade G3, lymphovascular space invasion, tumor size ≥4 cm, and positive parametrial and vaginal margin rates. Meanwhile, LRH was associated with higher complication rates and a shorter time to the recovery of bowel or bladder function than for ARH. The number of removed pelvic or para-aortic lymph nodes did not significantly differ. Other parameters showed LRH was associated with a longer operative time, less blood loss, and a shorter length of hospital stay. The survival and prognostic results did not differ in balanced prognostic factors. Conclusions: LRH is safe and has lower operative complication rates than ARH. PMID:26584414

  9. Effects of improved access to transportation on emergency obstetric care outcomes in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Mucunguzi, Stephen; Wamani, Henry; Lochoro, Peter; Tylleskar, Thorkild

    2014-09-01

    Reduction in maternal mortality has not been appreciable in most low-income countries. Improved access to transport for mothers is one way to improve maternal health. This study evaluated a free-of-charge 24-hour ambulance and communication services intervention in Oyam district using 'Caesarean section rate' (CSR) and compared with the neighbouring non-intervention district. Ecological data were collected retrospectively from maternity/theatre registers in October 2010 for 3 years pre and 3 years intervention period. The average CSR in the intervention district increased from 0.57% before the intervention to 1.21% (p = 0.022) during the intervention, while there was no change in the neighbouring district (0.51% to 0.58%, p = 0.512). Hospital deliveries increased by over 50% per year with a slight reduction in the average hospital stillbirths per 1000 hospital births in the intervention district (46.6 to 37.5, p = 0.253). Reliable communication and transport services increased access to and utilization of maternal health services, particularly caesarean delivery services.

  10. [Emergency obstetric causes and Immediate Response Team in a secondary hospital].

    PubMed

    López-Ocaña, Luis Rafael; Hernández-Pineda, Norma Angélica; Cruz-Cruz, Polita Rocío; Ramiro-H, Manuel; Pérez Del Valle-Ibarra, Víctor Octavio

    2017-01-01

    Introducción: el objetivo es describir las causas de emergencia obstétrica que motivaron la activación del Equipo de Respuesta Inmediata en un hospital de segundo nivel del Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social que no tiene Unidad de CuidadosIntensivos del Adulto. Métodos: estudio retrospectivo y observacional de las causas de emergencia obstétrica que se presentaron en los dominios de Admisión, Hospitalización, Labor, Expulsión, Quirófano y Recuperación del Hospital General de Zona No. 53 del IMSS, durante los años 2014 y 2015. Resultados: en 2014 se atendieron por causa obstétrica 3915 mujeres, de esta población, hubo 75 casos de emergencia obstétrica y 3276 nacidos vivos. En 2015, fueron 4390 mujeres y 80 casos de emergencia obstétrica con 3842 nacidos vivos. Los principales dominios en donde actuó el Equipo de Respuesta Inmediata en 2014 y 2015, fueron: Labor, Admisión y Recuperación. En 2014, la preeclampsia-eclampsia-Hellp ocupó el primer lugar como causa de emergencia obstétrica con 42 casos, mientras que en 2015 se presentaron 36 casos; la hemorragia obstétrica se presentó en 28 casos en 2014 y 34 casos en 2015. En 2014, hubo una muerte materna por preeclampsia severa y rotura hepática extensa. Conclusiones: la consolidación del Equipo de Respuesta Inmediata, de acuerdo al entorno sanitario, es fundamental, sobre todo, en la acepción otorgada por los integrantes del mismo.

  11. Epidemiology and Related Risk Factors of Preterm Labor as an obstetrics emergency

    PubMed Central

    Halimi asl, Ali asghar; Safari, Saeed; Parvareshi Hamrah, Mohsen

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Preterm birth is still a major health problem throughout the world, which results in 75% of neonatal mortality. Preterm labor not only inflicts financial and emotional distress, it may also lead to permanent disability. The present study was conducted to determine the related risk factors and preventive measures of preterm labor. Methods: This retrospective cross-sectional study assessed all preterm labors, as well as an equal number of term labors, during seven years, at an educational hospital. Probable risk factors of preterm labor were collected using medical profiles of participants by the aid of a pre-designed checklist. Significant related factors of preterm labor were used for multivariate logistic regression analysis with SPSS 21.0. Result: 810 cases with the mean age of 28.33 ± 6.1 years were evaluated (48.7% preterm). Multipartite; fetal anomaly; prenatal care; smoking; not consuming folic acid and iron supplements; in vitro fertilization; history of infertility, caesarian section, trauma, systemic disease, and hypertension; amniotic fluid leak; rupture of membranes; cephalic presentation; vaginal bleeding; placenta decolman; oligohydramnios; pre-eclampsia; chorioamnionitis; uterine abnormalities; cervical insufficiency; intercourse during the previous week; short time since last delivery; and mother’s weight significantly correlated with preterm labor. Conclusion: Based on the results of the present study, intercourse during the previous week, multipartite, short time from last delivery, preeclampsia, fetal anomaly, rupture of membranes, hypertension, and amniotic fluid leak, respectively, were risk factors for preterm labor. On the other hand, iron consumption, cephalic presentation, systematic disease, history of caesarian section, prenatal care, and mother’s weight could be considered as protective factors. PMID:28286810

  12. The evolution of the human pelvis: changing adaptations to bipedalism, obstetrics and thermoregulation.

    PubMed

    Gruss, Laura Tobias; Schmitt, Daniel

    2015-03-05

    The fossil record of the human pelvis reveals the selective priorities acting on hominin anatomy at different points in our evolutionary history, during which mechanical requirements for locomotion, childbirth and thermoregulation often conflicted. In our earliest upright ancestors, fundamental alterations of the pelvis compared with non-human primates facilitated bipedal walking. Further changes early in hominin evolution produced a platypelloid birth canal in a pelvis that was wide overall, with flaring ilia. This pelvic form was maintained over 3-4 Myr with only moderate changes in response to greater habitat diversity, changes in locomotor behaviour and increases in brain size. It was not until Homo sapiens evolved in Africa and the Middle East 200 000 years ago that the narrow anatomically modern pelvis with a more circular birth canal emerged. This major change appears to reflect selective pressures for further increases in neonatal brain size and for a narrow body shape associated with heat dissipation in warm environments. The advent of the modern birth canal, the shape and alignment of which require fetal rotation during birth, allowed the earliest members of our species to deal obstetrically with increases in encephalization while maintaining a narrow body to meet thermoregulatory demands and enhance locomotor performance.

  13. Seroprevalence of Chlamydia trachomatis infection in women with bad obstetric history and infertility.

    PubMed

    Salmani, Manjunath P; Mindolli, Preeti B; Vishwanath, G

    2011-12-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis has currently emerged as the most common sexually transmitted pathogen. It is usually asymptomatic and is difficult to diagnose clinically. It is one of the causes for bad Obstetric History (BOH) and infertility. Women at highest risk often have the least access to health care facilities. Therefore there is a need for a rapid, simple, inexpensive and non-invasive test to detect C. trachomatis infection. Serological testing forms the mainstay of diagnosing the disease and to treat BOH and infertility. Hence the present study was conducted. Enzyme linked immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) was used for detection of IgG antibodies against C. trachomatis. Out of 260 cases, 130 had history of BOH, 80 had history of infertility and 50 healthy pregnant women (HPW) were used as controls. The seropositivity of C. trachomatis in the study was 25.4% (66). Out of 130 cases of BOH, seropositivity was 27.7% (36). Out of 80 cases of infertility, seropositivity was 35% (28) and out of 50 cases of HPW seropositivity was 4% (2). In BOH cases, women with history of two abortions showed seropositivity of 7.3% and women with history of three or more abortions showed seropositivity of 62.5%. Hence, seropositivity of C. trachomatis infection was found to be significant among women with BOH and infertility as compared to HPW.

  14. The evolution of the human pelvis: changing adaptations to bipedalism, obstetrics and thermoregulation

    PubMed Central

    Gruss, Laura Tobias; Schmitt, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The fossil record of the human pelvis reveals the selective priorities acting on hominin anatomy at different points in our evolutionary history, during which mechanical requirements for locomotion, childbirth and thermoregulation often conflicted. In our earliest upright ancestors, fundamental alterations of the pelvis compared with non-human primates facilitated bipedal walking. Further changes early in hominin evolution produced a platypelloid birth canal in a pelvis that was wide overall, with flaring ilia. This pelvic form was maintained over 3–4 Myr with only moderate changes in response to greater habitat diversity, changes in locomotor behaviour and increases in brain size. It was not until Homo sapiens evolved in Africa and the Middle East 200 000 years ago that the narrow anatomically modern pelvis with a more circular birth canal emerged. This major change appears to reflect selective pressures for further increases in neonatal brain size and for a narrow body shape associated with heat dissipation in warm environments. The advent of the modern birth canal, the shape and alignment of which require fetal rotation during birth, allowed the earliest members of our species to deal obstetrically with increases in encephalization while maintaining a narrow body to meet thermoregulatory demands and enhance locomotor performance. PMID:25602067

  15. Of missing voices and the obstetric imaginary: commentary on Jankowski and Burcher.

    PubMed

    Cheney, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    In this commentary, I respond to an ethical analysis of a case study, reported by Jankowski and Burcher, in which a woman gives birth to an infant with a known heart anomaly of unknown severity, at home, attended by a midwife. Jankowski and Burcher argue that the midwife who attended this family acted unethically because she knowingly operated outside of her scope of practice. While I agree that the authors' conclusions are well supported by the portion of the story they were able to gather, the fact that the midwife and mother declined to engage in the ethics consult that informs their piece means that critical segments of the narrative are left untold. Some important additional considerations emerge from these silences. I explore the implicit assumptions of the biotechnical embrace, the roles of the political economy of hope and the obstetric imaginary in driving prenatal testing, and institutional blame for the divisiveness of the home-hospital divide in the United States. The value of Jankowski and Burcher's case study lies in its ability to highlight the intersections and potential conflicts between the principles of beneficence, patients' autonomy, and professional ethics, and to begin to chart a course for us through them.

  16. The impact of a longitudinal curriculum on medical student obstetrics and gynecology clinical training.

    PubMed

    Melo, Juliana; Kaneshiro, Bliss; Kellett, Lisa; Hiraoka, Mark

    2014-05-01

    Clinical training in most medical schools consists of separate rotations, based out of tertiary-care facilities, across the core medical disciplines. In addition to a traditional clinical curriculum, the University of Hawai'i offers a longitudinal clinical curriculum as an option to medical students. The longitudinal curriculum provides students with an innovative, alternative educational track to achieve their educational goals in clinical medicine. The objective of this study was to describe the obstetrics and gynecology procedural experiences of third-year medical students who participated in a longitudinal curriculum versus a traditional block clerkship. The number of procedures reported by third-year medical students who participated in a non-traditional, longitudinal clerkship was compared with the number of procedures reported by students who participated in the traditional block third-year curriculum between July 2007 and June 2009. National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) subject scores, clerkship grade and chosen residency specialty were also compared. The mean number of pelvic exams (longitudinally-trained 36 [SD 33] versus block-trained 8 [SD 6], [t=4.3, P<.01]) and pap smears (longitudinally-trained 28 [SD 26] versus block-trained 7 [SD 3] [t=4.4, P<.01]) was significantly higher for longitudinally-trained students compared to block-trained students. No significant differences in overall clerkship grades or NBME shelf scores emerged.

  17. [Obstetric analgesia and anesthesia with remifentanyl in a patient with von Willebrand disease].

    PubMed

    Novoa, L; Navarro Egea, M; Vieito Amor, M; Hernández Iniesta, J; Arxer, A; Villalonga, A

    2003-05-01

    A 30-year-old woman with von Willebrand's disease was admitted in labor. As epidural analgesia was ruled out due to risk of spinal hematoma, a pump for patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) was provided with boluses of remifentanil and set for intravenous infusion of 24 micrograms with a lockout time of 5 minutes. The patient reported analgesia to be satisfactory. Later, because of abnormal fetal positioning, an emergency cesarean was performed with the patient under general anesthesia with remifentanil, with propofol and succinylcholine for induction. A healthy girl was born free of respiratory depression. Von Willebrand's disease is a hemorrhagic disorder of autosomal dominant inheritance due to a quantitative or functional factor VIII deficit. Various subtypes and degrees of severity of abnormal bleeding have been described. It is the most common genetic hemostatic disorder affecting obstetric procedures, and although epidural analgesia has been used with strict hematologic monitoring, that technique carries a risk of hematoma. PCA is useful in patients for whom regional techniques are contraindicated. With adequate fetal and maternal monitoring, remifentanil in PCA is safe and more effective than other opiates for labor pain.

  18. Training initiatives for essential obstetric care in developing countries: a 'state of the art' review.

    PubMed

    Penny, S; Murray, S F

    2000-12-01

    Increased international awareness of the need to provide accessible essential or emergency obstetric and newborn care in developing countries has resulted in the recognition of new training needs and in a number of new initiatives to meet those needs. This paper reviews experience in this area so far. The first section deals with some of the different educational approaches and teaching methods that have now been employed, ranging from the traditional untheorized 'chalk and talk', to competency-based training, to theories of adult learning, problem solving and transferable skills. The second section describes a range of different types of indicators and data sources (learner assessments, user and community assessments, trainer assessments and institutional data) that have been used in the assessment of the effectiveness of such training. The final section of the paper draws together some of the lessons. It considers evaluation design issues such as the inclusion of medium and long term evaluation, the importance of methods that allow for the detection of iatrogenic effects of training, and the roles of community randomized trials and 'before, during and after' studies. Issues identified for the future include comparative work, how to keep training affordable, and where training ought to lie on the continuum between straightforward technical skills acquisition and the more complex learning processes required for demanding professional work.

  19. Effects of anticoagulant therapy on pregnancy outcomes in patients with thrombophilia and previous poor obstetric history.

    PubMed

    Mutlu, Ilknur; Mutlu, Mehmet Firat; Biri, Aydan; Bulut, Berk; Erdem, Mehmet; Erdem, Ahmet

    2015-04-01

    This study investigates the effects of anticoagulant therapy on pregnancy outcomes in 204 patients with thrombophilia and previous poor obstetric outcomes. Patients with poor obstetric history (pre-eclampsia, intrauterine growth retardation, fetal death, placental abruption, recurrent pregnancy loss) and having hereditary thrombophilia were included in this study. Poor obstetric outcomes were observed more frequently in patients who had not taken anticogulant therapy compared with treated group. Live birth rate, gestational age at birth and Apgar scores were significantly higher in the treated group when compared with the untreated group. There were no significant differences in terms of birthweight, mode of delivery and admission rates to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) plus acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) had higher gestational age at birth, Apgar scores, live birth rate and a lower abortion rates when compared with controls; in contrast, no significant difference was observed in terms of birthweight, mode of delivery, obstetric complications and admission rates to NICU. There were no significant differences between control group and both LMWH only and ASA only groups in terms of gestational age at birth, Apgar scores, birthweight, mode of delivery, obstetric complications and admission rates to NICU. Only LMWH group had higher live birth rate as compared with control group. The use of only ASA did not seem to affect the perinatal complication rates and outcomes. In conclusion, anticoagulant therapy with both LMWH and ASA seems to provide better obstetric outcomes in pregnant women with thrombophilia and previous poor obstetric outcomes.

  20. Post-traumatic stress disorder managed successfully with hypnosis and the rewind technique: two cases in obstetric patients.

    PubMed

    Slater, P M

    2015-08-01

    Two obstetric patients presenting with post-traumatic stress disorder in the antenatal period are discussed. The first patient had previously had an unexpected stillborn delivered by emergency caesarean section under general anaesthesia. She developed post-traumatic stress disorder and presented for repeat caesarean section in her subsequent pregnancy, suffering flashbacks and severe anxiety. Following antenatal preparation with hypnosis and a psychological method called the rewind technique, she had a repeat caesarean section under spinal anaesthesia, successfully managing her anxiety. The second patient suffered post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms after developing puerperal psychosis during the birth of her first child. Before the birth of her second child, she was taught self-hypnosis, which she used during labour in which she had an uneventful water birth. These cases illustrate the potential value of hypnosis and alternative psychological approaches in managing women with severe antenatal anxiety.