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Sample records for emergency obstetric hysterectomy

  1. Emergency Obstetric Hysterectomy: A Retrospective Study from a Teaching Hospital in North India over Eight Years

    PubMed Central

    Chawla, Jaya; Arora, D.; Paul, Mohini; Ajmani, Sangita N.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We sought to determine the frequency, demographic characteristics, indications, and feto-maternal outcomes associated with emergency peripartum hysterectomy in an easily accessible urban center. Methods We conducted a retrospective, observational, and analytical study over a period of eight years, from August 2006 to July 2014. A total of 56 cases of emergency obstetric hysterectomy (EOH) were studied in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Kasturba Hospital, New Delhi. Results The incidence of EOH in our study was 30 per 100,000 following vaginal delivery and 270 per 100,000 following cesarean section. The overall incidence was 83 per 100,000 deliveries. Atonic postpartum hemorrhage (25%) was the most common indication followed by placenta accreta (21%) and uterine rupture (17.5%). The most frequent sequelae were febrile morbidity (19.2%) and disseminated intravascular coagulation (13.5%). Maternal mortality was 17.7% whereas perinatal mortality was 37.5%. Conclusions A balanced approach to EOH can prove to be lifesaving at times when conservative surgical modalities fail and interventional radiology is not immediately available. Our study highlights the place of extirpative surgery in modern obstetrics in the face of rising rates of cesarean section and multiple pregnancies particularly in urban settings in developing countries. PMID:26171124

  2. Changing trends in emergency peripartum hysterectomy in a tertiary obstetric center in Turkey during 2000–2013

    PubMed Central

    Temizkan, Osman; Angın, Doğukan; Karakuş, Resul; Şanverdi, İlhan; Polat, Mesut; Karateke, Ateş

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate emergency peripartum hysterectomy (EPH) cases over a 14-year period in a tertiary center in İstanbul, Turkey. Material and Methods In this retrospective descriptive study, the records of all cases of EPH performed at the Zeynep Kamil Women and Children’s Training and Research Hospital between January 2000 and January 2014 were analyzed. Results for 2000–2006 and 2007–2013 were compared to identify changing trends. Demographic and clinical factors associated with EPH were assessed. Results During the 14-year study period, a total of 161,836 births occurred, out of which 104,783 (64.8%) were vaginal deliveries and 57,053 (35.2%) were cesarean section (CS). EPH was performed in 81 patients with an overall incidence of 0.5 in 1000 deliveries. The EPH rate in 2007–2013 (0.07%) was significantly higher than in 2000–2006 (0.03%). The major difference in the EPH populations between the two periods was the higher number of previous CS in 2007–2013 compared with 2000–2006 (p=0.01). Indications for EPH did not differ between the two periods. There were 7 (8.6%) maternal deaths in 2000–2013, with significantly fewer maternal deaths in 2007–2013 than in 2000–2006 (19.2% vs. 3.6%). Conclusion Rate of EPH increased considerably from 2000 to 2013. This increase was mostly related to the increasing rate of CS. Indications for EPH did not change over the study period, and the number of maternal deaths markedly decreased. PMID:27026776

  3. Emergency preparedness in obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Haeri, Sina; Marcozzi, David

    2015-04-01

    During and after disasters, focus is directed toward meeting the immediate needs of the general population. As a result, the routine health care and the special needs of some vulnerable populations such as pregnant and postpartum women may be overlooked within a resource-limited setting. In the event of hazards such as natural disasters, manmade disasters, and terrorism, knowledge of emergency preparedness strategies is imperative for the pregnant woman and her family, obstetric providers, and hospitals. Individualized plans for the pregnant woman and her family should include knowledge of shelter in place, birth at home, and evacuation. Obstetric providers need to have a personal disaster plan in place that accounts for work responsibilities in case of an emergency and business continuity strategies to continue to provide care to their communities. Hospitals should have a comprehensive emergency preparedness program utilizing an "all hazards" approach to meet the needs of pregnant and postpartum women and other vulnerable populations during disasters. With lessons learned in recent tragedies such as Hurricane Katrina in mind, we hope this review will stimulate emergency preparedness discussions and actions among obstetric providers and attenuate adverse outcomes related to catastrophes in the future.

  4. Emergency preparedness in obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Haeri, Sina; Marcozzi, David

    2015-04-01

    During and after disasters, focus is directed toward meeting the immediate needs of the general population. As a result, the routine health care and the special needs of some vulnerable populations such as pregnant and postpartum women may be overlooked within a resource-limited setting. In the event of hazards such as natural disasters, manmade disasters, and terrorism, knowledge of emergency preparedness strategies is imperative for the pregnant woman and her family, obstetric providers, and hospitals. Individualized plans for the pregnant woman and her family should include knowledge of shelter in place, birth at home, and evacuation. Obstetric providers need to have a personal disaster plan in place that accounts for work responsibilities in case of an emergency and business continuity strategies to continue to provide care to their communities. Hospitals should have a comprehensive emergency preparedness program utilizing an "all hazards" approach to meet the needs of pregnant and postpartum women and other vulnerable populations during disasters. With lessons learned in recent tragedies such as Hurricane Katrina in mind, we hope this review will stimulate emergency preparedness discussions and actions among obstetric providers and attenuate adverse outcomes related to catastrophes in the future. PMID:25751222

  5. [Modification of the obstetric hysterectomy in placental acretism].

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Villalobos, Roberto Carlos; González-Gómez, Israel Alejandro; Luna-Covarrubias, Edith Esmeralda; Bañuelos-Franco, Alberto; Serrano-Enríquez, Raymundo Felipe

    2014-03-01

    Acretismo is a condition of abnormal placentation, in which the villi invade the myometrium at the implantation site, Representing a risk of massive obstetric hemorrhage with possible alterations of the coagulation, besides to the damage to other organs. Moving forward even to his death, so it is a challenge for the obstetric services, to make a correct diagnosis and in a timely manner, along with the programming of the interruption of pregnancy, as well as the utilization of proper surgical techniques and the involvement of a multidisciplinary team to the possible complications. The following describes a surgical technique modified for patients with a diagnosis of acretismo placentario, used in the Hospital General de Occidente in Jalisco, Mexico from 1 year ago, presenting two clinical cases of patients who underwent surgery with this technique, considering it necessary to present up to the moment a significant decrease in the amount of bleeding, zero days stay of patients in intensive care, any complications in the mother as well as in the product, and more importantly, it has remained at the hospital with no maternal death by this pathology in the last year, considering the nature of being a referral hospital for the whole entity by the Servicios de Salud Jalisco. It is necessary to consider the risks/benefits in the short, medium and long term for the institution, the mother and the product, allowing present good practices that will impinge on the permanent reduction of the maternal death by this pathology.

  6. [Shoulder dystocia: an obstetrical emergency].

    PubMed

    Marques, Joana Borges; Reynolds, Ana

    2011-01-01

    Shoulder dystocia is one of the most feared obstetric emergencies due to related maternal and neonatal complications and therefore, the growing of medico-legal litigation that it entails. Although associated with risk factors such as fetal macrossomia, gestacional diabetes and instrumented delivery, the majority of cases are unpredictable. The lack of a consensus on shoulder dystocia diagnosis causes variations on its incidence and hampers a more comprehensive analysis. Management guidelines described for its resolution include several manoeuvres but the ideal sequence of procedures is not clearly defined in more severe cases. Hands-on and team training, through simulation-based techniques applied to medicine, seems to be a promising method to learn how to deal with shoulder dystocia having in mind a reduction in related maternal or neonatal morbidity and mortality. The main goal of this paper is to provide a comprehensive revision of shoulder dystocia highlighting its relevance as an obstetric emergency. A reflection on the management is presented emphasising the importance of simulation-based training.

  7. Hysterectomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... hysterectomy is performed with the help of a robotic machine controlled by the surgeon. In general, it ... in a better outcome than laparoscopy performed without robotic assistance. What are the benefits and risks of ...

  8. Developing protocols for obstetric emergencies.

    PubMed

    Roth, Cheryl K; Parfitt, Sheryl E; Hering, Sandra L; Dent, Sarah A

    2014-01-01

    There is potential for important steps to be missed in emergency situations, even in the presence of many health care team members. Developing a clear plan of response for common emergencies can ensure that no tasks are redundant or omitted, and can create a more controlled environment that promotes positive health outcomes. A multidisciplinary team was assembled in a large community hospital to create protocols that would help ensure optimum care and continuity of practice in cases of postpartum hemorrhage, shoulder dystocia, emergency cesarean surgical birth, eclamptic seizure and maternal code. Assignment of team roles and responsibilities led to the evolution of standardized protocols for each emergency situation.

  9. Emergency Peripartum Hysterectomy: A Multicenter Study of Incidence, Indications and Outcomes in Southwestern Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Akintayo, A A; Olagbuji, B N; Aderoba, A K; Akadiri, O; Olofinbiyi, B A; Bakare, B

    2016-06-01

    Objective To determine the incidence, indications and outcomes of emergency peripartum hysterectomy (EPH) in three tertiary institutions in south-west Nigeria between January, 2010 and December , 2013. Methods A retrospective review of all cases of EPH over a 4 year period was done. EPH was defined as hysterectomy performed at the time of delivery or within 24 h of delivery for uncontrollable postpartum bleeding not responsive to conservative measures. Relevant information was extracted from the hospital records and operation notes. Statistical analysis was done using SPSS software version 17.0. Statistical significance was set at p < 0.05. Results There were 102 EPHs performed among 39,738 deliveries within the study period, giving a rate of 2.6 per thousand deliveries. Indications were uterine rupture (44.1 %), uterine atony (37.3 %), morbidly adherent placenta (17.6 %) and extension of caesarean section incision involving the uterine arteries (1 %). Subtotal hysterectomy was performed in most cases (67.6 %).Maternal case fatality rate was 11.8 % and perinatal mortality rate was 55.9 %. Blood transfusion, severe postoperative anaemia, wound sepsis, febrile morbidity and acute kidney injury were common morbidities associated with the procedure. Following multivariate logistic regression, the unbooked status [odds-ratio 95 % CI = 12.80 (1.22-133.97) p = 0.03] was the only variable that significantly predicted maternal death. Conclusion The incidence of EPH from our study is high. Much more needs to be done in maternal health services, particularly provision of quality obstetric care to reduce the rates of EPH and the associated high maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. PMID:26961244

  10. Building team and technical competency for obstetric emergencies: the mobile obstetric emergencies simulator (MOES) system.

    PubMed

    Deering, Shad; Rosen, Michael A; Salas, Eduardo; King, Heidi B

    2009-01-01

    The infrequent and high-stakes nature of obstetric emergencies requires staff members to respond quickly and proficiently to a complex and high-stress situation, a situation they have likely had little opportunity to experience. This situation requires a systematic approach to preparing personnel to manage these situations. Therefore, this article seeks to contribute to the growing literature on training programs for obstetric emergencies by documenting the development and implementation of the Mobile Obstetric Emergencies Simulator (MOES) system. MOES is a comprehensive package of simulation technology, standardized curriculum, and instructional features that combines traditional classroom learning activities and simulation-based training on the actual labor and delivery (L&D) ward. Specifically, the MOES system leverages the TeamSTEPPS teamwork training being implemented throughout the US military healthcare system with opportunities to practice teamwork and technical skills using mannequin-based patient simulation embedded within L&D units. The primary goals of this article are twofold. First, this article explicitly identifies the unique training needs for preparing staff for obstetric emergencies through a comprehensive review and synthesis of the literature. Second, this article documents the approach taken in MOES to meet these needs. PMID:19680084

  11. Obstetric training in Emergency Medicine: a needs assessment

    PubMed Central

    Janicki, Adam James; MacKuen, Courteney; Hauspurg, Alisse; Cohn, Jamieson

    2016-01-01

    Background Identification and management of obstetric emergencies is essential in emergency medicine (EM), but exposure to pregnant patients during EM residency training is frequently limited. To date, there is little data describing effective ways to teach residents this material. Current guidelines require completion of 2 weeks of obstetrics or 10 vaginal deliveries, but it is unclear whether this instills competency. Methods We created a 15-item survey evaluating resident confidence and knowledge related to obstetric emergencies. To assess confidence, we asked residents about their exposure and comfort level regarding obstetric emergencies and eight common presentations and procedures. We assessed knowledge via multiple-choice questions addressing common obstetric presentations, pelvic ultrasound image, and cardiotocography interpretation. The survey was distributed to residency programs utilizing the Council of Emergency Medicine Residency Directors (CORD) listserv. Results The survey was completed by 212 residents, representing 55 of 204 (27%) programs belonging to CORD and 11.2% of 1,896 eligible residents. Fifty-six percent felt they had adequate exposure to obstetric emergencies. The overall comfort level was 2.99 (1–5 scale) and comfort levels of specific presentations and procedures ranged from 2.58 to 3.97; all increased moderately with postgraduate year (PGY) level. Mean overall percentage of items answered correctly on the multiple-choice questions was 58% with no statistical difference by PGY level. Performance on individual questions did not differ by PGY level. Conclusions The identification and management of obstetric emergencies is the cornerstone of EM. We found preliminary evidence of a concerning lack of resident comfort regarding obstetric conditions and knowledge deficits on core obstetrics topics. EM residents may benefit from educational interventions to increase exposure to these topics. PMID:27357908

  12. Multidisciplinary Obstetric Simulated Emergency Scenarios (MOSES): Promoting Patient Safety in Obstetrics with Teamwork-Focused Interprofessional Simulations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeth, Della; Ayida, Gubby; Berridge, Emma Jane; Mackintosh, Nicola; Norris, Beverley; Sadler, Chris; Strachan, Alasdair

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: We describe an example of simulation-based interprofessional continuing education, the multidisciplinary obstetric simulated emergency scenarios (MOSES) course, which was designed to enhance nontechnical skills among obstetric teams and, hence, improve patient safety. Participants' perceptions of MOSES courses, their learning, and…

  13. National Training Course. Emergency Medical Technician. Paramedic. Instructor's Lesson Plans. Module XI. Obstetric/Gynecologic Emergencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    This instructor's lesson plan guide on obstetric/gynecologic emergencies is one of fifteen modules designed for use in the training of emergency medical technicians (paramedics). Six units of study are presented: (1) anatomy and physiology of the female reproductive system; (2) patient assessment; (3) pathophysiology and management of gynecologic…

  14. Rural-Urban Inequity in Unmet Obstetric Needs and Functionality of Emergency Obstetric Care Services in a Zambian District

    PubMed Central

    Ng’anjo Phiri, Selia; Fylkesnes, Knut; Moland, Karen Marie; Byskov, Jens; Kiserud, Torvid

    2016-01-01

    Background Zambia has a high maternal mortality ratio, 398/100,000 live births. Few pregnant women access emergency obstetric care services to handle complications at childbirth. We aimed to assess the deficit in life-saving obstetric services in the rural and urban areas of Kapiri Mposhi district. Method A cross-sectional survey was conducted in 2011 as part of the ‘Response to Accountable priority setting for Trust in health systems’ (REACT) project. Data on all childbirths that occurred in emergency obstetric care facilities in 2010 were obtained retrospectively. Sources of information included registers from maternity ward admission, delivery and operation theatre, and case records. Data included age, parity, mode of delivery, obstetric complications, and outcome of mother and the newborn. An approach using estimated major obstetric interventions expected but not done in health facilities was used to assess deficit of life-saving interventions in urban and rural areas. Results A total of 2114 urban and 1226 rural childbirths occurring in emergency obstetric care facilities (excluding abortions) were analysed. Facility childbirth constituted 81% of expected births in urban and 16% in rural areas. Based on the reference estimate that 1.4% of childbearing women were expected to need major obstetric intervention, unmet obstetric need was 77 of 106 women, thus 73% (95% CI 71–75%) in rural areas whereas urban areas had no deficit. Major obstetric interventions for absolute maternal indications were higher in urban 2.1% (95% CI 1.60–2.71%) than in rural areas 0.4% (95% CI 0.27–0.55%), with an urban to rural rate ratio of 5.5 (95% CI 3.55–8.76). Conclusions Women in rural areas had deficient obstetric care. The likelihood of under-going a life-saving intervention was 5.5 times higher for women in urban than rural areas. Targeting rural women with life-saving services could substantially reduce this inequity and preventable deaths. PMID:26824599

  15. Emergency obstetric care: Making the impossible possible through task shifting.

    PubMed

    Schneeberger, Caroline; Mathai, Matthews

    2015-10-01

    Task shifting-moving tasks to healthcare workers with a shorter training-for emergency obstetric care (EmOC) can potentially improve access to lifesaving interventions and thereby contribute to reducing maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality. The present paper reviews studies on task shifting for the provision of EmOC. Most studies were performed in Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia and focused primarily on task shifting for the performance of cesarean deliveries. Cesarean delivery rates increased following EmOC training without significant increase in adverse outcomes. The paper discusses the advantages and disadvantages of task shifting in EmOC and the role of this approach in improving maternal and newborn health in the short and long term. PMID:26433509

  16. Delivering quality care: what can emergency gynaecology learn from acute obstetrics?

    PubMed

    Bika, O H; Edozien, L C

    2014-08-01

    Emergency obstetric care in the UK has been systematically developed over the years to high quality standards. More recently, advances have been made in the organisation and delivery of care for women presenting with acute gynaecological problems, but a lot remains to be done, and emergency gynaecology has a lot to learn from the evolution of its sister special interest area: acute obstetric care. This paper highlights areas such as consultant presence, risk management, patient flow pathways, out-of-hours care, clinical guidelines and protocols, education and training and facilities, where lessons from obstetrics are transferrable to emergency gynaecology.

  17. Barriers to emergency obstetric care services: accounts of survivors of life threatening obstetric complications in Malindi District, Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Echoka, Elizabeth; Makokha, Anselimo; Dubourg, Dominique; Kombe, Yeri; Nyandieka, Lillian; Byskov, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Pregnancy-related mortality and morbidity in most low and middle income countries can be reduced through early recognition of complications, prompt access to care and appropriate medical interventions following obstetric emergencies. We used the three delays framework to explore barriers to emergency obstetric care (EmOC) services by women who experienced life threatening obstetric complications in Malindi District, Kenya. Methods A facility-based qualitative study was conducted between November and December 2010. In-depth interviews were conducted with 30 women who experienced obstetric “near miss” at the only public hospital with capacity to provide comprehensive EmOC services in the district. Resuls Findings indicate that pregnant women experienced delays in making decision to seek care and in reaching an appropriate care facility. The “first” delay was due to lack of birth preparedness, including failure to identify a health facility for delivery services regardless of antenatal care and to seek care promptly despite recognition of danger signs. The “second” delay was influenced by long distance and inconvenient transport to hospital. These two delays resulted in some women arriving at the hospital too late to save the life of the unborn baby. Conclusion Delays in making the decision to seek care when obstetric complications occur, combined with delays in reaching the hospital, contribute to ineffective treatment upon arrival at the hospital. Interventions to reduce maternal mortality and morbidity must adequately consider the pre-hospital challenges faced by pregnant women in order to influence decision making towards addressing the three delays. PMID:24643142

  18. Effects of changes in copayment for obstetric emergency room visits on the utilization of obstetric emergency rooms.

    PubMed

    Raz, Iris; Novack, Lena; Yitshak-Sade, Maayan; Shahar, Yemima; Wiznitzer, Arnon; Sergienko, Ruslan; Warshawsky-Livne, Lora

    2015-10-01

    In view of the growing proportion of "non-urgent" admissions to obstetric emergency rooms (OERs) and recent changes in copayment policies for OER visits in Israel, we assessed factors contributing to OER overcrowding. The changes investigated were (a) exemption from copayment for women with birth contractions, (b) allowing phone referrals to the OER and (c) exemption from copayment during primary care clinic closing hours. We analyzed data of a large tertiary hospital with 37 deliveries per day. Counts of women discharged to home from the OER were an indicator of "non-urgent" visits. The annual number of non-urgent visits increased at a higher rate (3.4%) than the natural increase in deliveries (2.1%). Exemption from copayment for visits during non-working hours of primary care clinics was associated with increases in OER admissions (IRR=1.22) and in non-urgent OER visits (IRR=1.54). Younger and first-time mothers with medically unjustified complaints were more likely to be discharged to home. We showed that the changes in the policy for OER copayment meant to attract new clients to the HMO had an independent impact on OER utilization, and hence, added to the workload of medical personnel. The change in HMO policy regulating OER availability requires rigorous assessment of possible health system implications. PMID:26341842

  19. Effects of changes in copayment for obstetric emergency room visits on the utilization of obstetric emergency rooms.

    PubMed

    Raz, Iris; Novack, Lena; Yitshak-Sade, Maayan; Shahar, Yemima; Wiznitzer, Arnon; Sergienko, Ruslan; Warshawsky-Livne, Lora

    2015-10-01

    In view of the growing proportion of "non-urgent" admissions to obstetric emergency rooms (OERs) and recent changes in copayment policies for OER visits in Israel, we assessed factors contributing to OER overcrowding. The changes investigated were (a) exemption from copayment for women with birth contractions, (b) allowing phone referrals to the OER and (c) exemption from copayment during primary care clinic closing hours. We analyzed data of a large tertiary hospital with 37 deliveries per day. Counts of women discharged to home from the OER were an indicator of "non-urgent" visits. The annual number of non-urgent visits increased at a higher rate (3.4%) than the natural increase in deliveries (2.1%). Exemption from copayment for visits during non-working hours of primary care clinics was associated with increases in OER admissions (IRR=1.22) and in non-urgent OER visits (IRR=1.54). Younger and first-time mothers with medically unjustified complaints were more likely to be discharged to home. We showed that the changes in the policy for OER copayment meant to attract new clients to the HMO had an independent impact on OER utilization, and hence, added to the workload of medical personnel. The change in HMO policy regulating OER availability requires rigorous assessment of possible health system implications.

  20. Laparoscopic hysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Sokol, Andrew I; Green, Isabel C

    2009-09-01

    The use of laparoscopy to perform all or part of hysterectomy has become widely accepted, with laparoscopic hysterectomy accounting for up to 15% of all hysterectomies performed in the United States. A recent Cochrane analysis has clearly shown that laparoscopic hysterectomy is associated with decreased length of stay and faster recovery time compared with laparotomy. There is no evidence to support a supracervical hysterectomy over a total hysterectomy in terms of frequency of pelvic support disorders or sexual function. This does not preclude the use of a supracervical hysterectomy in some clinical situations.

  1. Community involvement in obstetric emergency management in rural areas: a case of Rukungiri district, Western Uganda

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Maternal mortality is a major public health problem worldwide especially in low income countries. Most causes of maternal deaths are due to direct obstetric complications. Maternal mortality ratio remains high in Rukungiri district, western Uganda estimated at 475 per 100,000 live births. The objectives were to identify types of community involvement and examine factors influencing the level of community involvement in the management of obstetric emergencies. Methods We conducted a descriptive study during 2nd to 28th February 2009 in rural Rukungiri district, western Uganda. A total of 448 heads of households, randomly selected from 6/11 (54.5%) of sub-counties, 21/42 (50.0%) parishes and 32/212 (15.1%) villages (clusters), were interviewed. Data were analysed using STATA version 10.0. Results Community pre-emergency support interventions available included community awareness creation (sensitization) while interventions undertaken when emergency had occurred included transportation and referring women to health facility. Community support programmes towards health care (obstetric emergencies) included establishment of community savings and credit schemes, and insurance schemes. The factors associated with community involvement in obstetric emergency management were community members being employed (AOR = 1.91, 95% CI: 1.02 - 3.54) and rating the quality of maternal health care as good (AOR = 2.22, 95% CI: 1.19 - 4.14). Conclusions Types of community involvement in obstetric emergency management include practices and support programmes. Community involvement in obstetric emergency management is influenced by employment status and perceived quality of health care services. Policies to promote community networks and resource mobilization strategies for health care should be implemented. There is need for promotion of community support initiatives including health insurance schemes and self help associations; further community sensitization by empowered

  2. [Hysterectomies at the Conakry university hospitals: social, demographic, and clinical characteristics, types, indications, surgical approaches, and prognosis].

    PubMed

    Baldé, I S; Sy, T; Diallo, B S; Diallo, Y; Mamy, M N; Diallo, M H; Bah, E M; Diallo, T S; Keita, N

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to calculate the frequency of hysterectomies at the Conakry university hospitals (Donka Hospital and Ignace Deen Hospital), describe the women's social, demographic, and clinical characteristics, and identify the key indications, the surgical techniques used, and the prognosis. This was a 2-year descriptive study, retrospective for the first year (May 2011-April 2012) and prospective for the second (May 2012-April 2013), of 333 consecutive hysterectomies performed in the obstetrics and gynecology departments of these two hospitals. Hysterectomy is one of the surgical procedures most commonly performed in these departments (following cesarean deliveries), with frequency of 4.4% interventions. The profile of the women undergoing this surgery was that of a woman aged younger than 49 years (61%), married (75.7%), multiparous (33%), of childbearing age (61%), and with no history of abdominal or pelvic surgery (79.6%). Nearly all hysterectomies were total (95%, compared with 5% subtotal; the approach was abdominal in 82.25% of procedures and vaginal in 17.75%. The most common indication for surgery was uterine fibroids (39.6%), followed by genital prolapse (22.2%), and obstetric emergencies (17.8%). The average duration of surgery was 96 minutes for abdominal and 55 minutes for vaginal hysterectomies. The principal intraoperative complication was hemorrhage (12.31%), and the main postoperative complication parietal suppuration (21.02%). The average length of hospital stay was 10.3 days for abdominal hysterectomies and 7.15 days for vaginal procedures. We recorded 14 deaths for a lethality rate of 4.2%; most of these deaths were associated with hemorrhagic shock during or after an obstetric hysterectomy (93%). Hysterectomy remains a common intervention in developing countries. Its indications are common during the pregnancy and postpartum period, with high morbidity and mortality rates. Improving obstetric coverage could reduce its

  3. Audit of referral of obstetric emergencies in Angola: a tool for assessing quality of care.

    PubMed

    Strand, R T; de Campos, P A; Paulsson, G; de Oliveira, J; Bergström, S

    2009-06-01

    By auditing various aspects of referrals of obstetric emergencies, we wanted to study the effectiveness over time of a recently established network of peripheral birth units and two central hospitals in Luanda. 157 women referred for obstetric emergencies were studied regarding clinical outcome and process indicators like waiting time, partogramme quality and Caesarean section rate (CSR). After a change in routines at hospital admission and further partogramme education 92 referred women were compared with the former. Maternal mortality decreased from 17.8% to nil in the second. Total mean waiting time was reduced from 13.7 hours to 1.2 hours. Partogramme quality was significantly improved. CSR increased from 13 to 30%. Prolonged labour was the most common diagnosis.This study demonstrates the importance of clinic-based audit to enhance quality of care regarding referrals of patients with obstetric emergencies. PMID:20690251

  4. Obstetric emergencies at the United States–Mexico border crossings in El Paso, Texas

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Jill A.; Rishel, Karen; Escobedo, Miguel A.; Arellano, Danielle E.; Cunningham, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe the frequency, characteristics, and patient outcomes for women who accessed Emergency Medical Services (EMS) for obstetric emergencies at the ports of entry (POE) between El Paso, Texas, United States of America, and Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua, Mexico. Methods A descriptive study of women 12–49 years of age for whom an EMS ambulance was called to an El Paso POE location from December 2008–April 2011 was conducted. Women were identified through surveillance of EMS records. EMS and emergency department (ED) records were abstracted for all women through December 2009 and for women with an obstetric emergency through April 2011. For obstetric patients admitted to the hospital, additional prenatal and birth characteristics were collected. Frequencies and proportions were estimated for each variable; differences between residents of the United States and Mexico were tested. Results During December 2008–December 2009, 47.6% (68/143) of women receiving EMS assistance at an El Paso POE had an obstetric emergency, nearly 20 times the proportion for Texas overall. During December 2008–April 2011, 60.1% (66/109) of obstetric patients with ED records were admitted to hospital and 52 gave birth before discharge. Preterm birth (23.1%; No. = 12), low birth weight (9.6%; No. = 5), birth in transit (7.7%; No. = 4), and postpartum hemorrhage (5.8%; No. = 3) were common; fewer than one-half the women (46.2%; No. = 24) had evidence of prenatal care. Conclusions The high proportion of obstetric EMS transports and high prevalence of complications in this population suggest a need for binational risk reduction efforts. PMID:25915011

  5. Chikungunya Fever: Obstetric Considerations on an Emerging Virus.

    PubMed

    Dotters-Katz, Sarah K; Grace, Matthew R; Strauss, Robert A; Chescheir, Nancy; Kuller, Jeffrey A

    2015-07-01

    Chikungunya fever is an increasingly common viral infection transmitted to humans by species of the Aedes mosquitoes. Characterized by fevers, myalgias, arthralgias, headache, and rash, the infection is endemic to tropical areas. However, identification of disease vectors to Europe and the Americas has raised concern for possible spread of chikungunya to these areas. More recently, these concerns have become a reality; with more than 500,000 new cases in the Western hemisphere in the last 2 years, questions have arisen about the implications of infection during pregnancy and delivery. A literature review was performed using MEDLINE in order to gather information regarding the obstetric implications of this infection. It appears that although this virus can cross the placenta in the first and second trimester leading to fetal infection and miscarriage, this is a very rare occurrence. In contrast, active maternal infection within 4 days of delivery conveys a high risk of vertical transmission. Maternal infection during pregnancy does not appear to be more severe than infection on the nonpregnant female. Given the increasing incidence of chikungunya, obstetric providers should be aware of the disease and its implication for the gravid female.

  6. Cesarean Hysterectomy and Uterine-Preserving Alternatives.

    PubMed

    Huls, Christopher Kevin

    2016-09-01

    Hysterectomy at the time of an obstetric delivery or postpartum is an uncommon time to perform one of the most common gynecologic procedures. Hysterectomy associated with pregnancy is often unplanned and undesired. Postpartum complications associated with the need for hysterectomy carry significant risks, which pose challenges for mother-infant bonding and can signify an unexpected end to fertility. The most common indication for hysterectomy is postpartum hemorrhage. Postpartum hemorrhage is caused by uterine atony, genital tract laceration, uterine rupture, invasive placentation, infection, or coagulopathy. Multidisciplinary teams improve outcomes and are capable of managing complex medical and surgical complications that occur postpartum. PMID:27521882

  7. Reducing maternal mortality on a countrywide scale: The role of emergency obstetric training.

    PubMed

    Moran, Neil F; Naidoo, Mergan; Moodley, Jagidesa

    2015-11-01

    Training programmes to improve health worker skills in managing obstetric emergencies have been introduced in various countries with the aim of reducing maternal mortality through these interventions. In South Africa, based on an ongoing confidential enquiry system started in 1997, detailed information about maternal deaths is published in the form of regular 'Saving Mothers' reports. This article tracks the recommendations made in successive Saving Mothers reports with regard to emergency obstetric training, and it assesses the impact of these recommendations on reducing maternal mortality. Since 2009, South Africa has had its own training package, Essential Steps in the Management of Obstetric Emergencies (ESMOE), which the last three Saving Mothers reports have specifically recommended for all doctors and midwives working in maternity units. A special emphasis has been placed on the need for the simulation training component of ESMOE, also called obstetric 'fire drills', to be integrated into the clinical routines of all maternity units. The latest Saving Mothers report (2011-2013) suggests there has been little progress so far in improving emergency obstetric skills, indicating a need for further scale-up of ESMOE training in the country. The example of the KwaZulu-Natal province of South Africa is used to illustrate the process of scale-up and factors likely to facilitate that scale-up, including the introduction of ESMOE into the undergraduate medical training curriculum. Additional factors in the health system that are required to convert improved skills levels into improved quality of care and a reduction in maternal mortality are discussed. These include intelligent government health policies, formulated with input from clinical experts; strong clinical leadership to ensure that doctors and nurses apply the skills they have learnt appropriately, and work professionally and ethically; and a culture of clinical governance.

  8. Women are still deprived of access to lifesaving essential and emergency obstetric care.

    PubMed

    Islam, Monir; Yoshida, Sachiyo

    2009-08-01

    Two decades have passed since the global community agreed in Nairobi to the Safe Motherhood Initiative to reduce maternal deaths. However, every year 536,000 pregnant women are dying. There is no ambiguity about why most of these women are dying. These tragedies are avoidable if women have timely access to quality essential obstetric and emergency care. Rural and poor women are mostly excluded from accessing skilled and emergency care. Quality facility-based care is the best option to reduce maternal mortality. Scaling up essential interventions and services-particularly for those who are excluded-is a substantial and challenging undertaking. We need to challenge our policy makers and program managers to refocus program content; to shift focus from development of new technologies toward development of viable organizational strategies to provide access to essential and emergency obstetric care 24 hours a day 7 days a week, and account for every birth and every death. PMID:19540492

  9. Paying the price: the cost and consequences of emergency obstetric care in Burkina Faso.

    PubMed

    Storeng, Katerini Tagmatarchi; Baggaley, Rebecca F; Ganaba, Rasmané; Ouattara, Fatoumata; Akoum, Mélanie S; Filippi, Véronique

    2008-02-01

    Substantial healthcare expenses can impoverish households or push them further into poverty. In this paper, we examine the cost of obstetric care and the social and economic consequences associated with exposure to economic shocks up to a year following the end of pregnancy in Burkina Faso. Burkina Faso is a low-income country with poor health outcomes and a poorly functioning health system. We present an inter-disciplinary analysis of an ethnographic study of 82 women nested in a prospective cohort study of 1013 women. We compare the experiences of women who survived life-threatening obstetric complications ('near-miss' events) with women who delivered without complications in hospitals. The cost of emergency obstetric care was significantly higher than the cost of care for uncomplicated delivery. Compared with women who had uncomplicated deliveries, women who survived near-miss events experienced substantial difficulties meeting the costs of care, reflecting the high cost of emergency obstetric care and the low socioeconomic status of their households. They reported more frequent sale of assets, borrowing and slower repayment of debt in the year following the expenditure. Healthcare costs consumed a large part of households' resources and women who survived near-miss events continued to spend significantly more on healthcare in the year following the event, while at the same time experiencing continued cost barriers to accessing healthcare. In-depth interviews confirm that the economic burden of emergency obstetric care contributed to severe and long-lasting consequences for women and their households. The necessity of meeting unexpectedly high costs challenged social expectations and patterns of reciprocity between husbands, wives and wider social networks, placed enormous strain on everyday survival and shaped physical, social and economic well-being in the year that followed the event. In conclusion, we consider the implications of our findings for financing

  10. Primary cesarean delivery results in emergency hysterectomy due to placenta accreta: a case study.

    PubMed

    Humphrey, Jaclyn

    2015-02-01

    Placenta accreta is a major cause of obstetric hemorrhage, a situation that remains the most significant cause of maternal morbidity and mortality worldwide. It is generally recognized that a previous cesarean delivery increases the risk of placenta accreta. However, the risk also increases with previous intrauterine procedures. In 2010, The Joint Commission released a sentinel event alert regarding the prevention of maternal death, which recommended the adoption of protocols to treat postpartum hemorrhage. This case study demonstrates the success of quickly initiating protocol interventions necessary to prevent disseminated intravascular coagulation and maternal mortality, while reviewing current literature on risk identification, management, and treatment of obstetric hemorrhage resulting from placenta accreta. PMID:25842631

  11. Radical Hysterectomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... the base of her partner’s penis during intercourse. Orgasm after radical hysterectomy Women who have had a ... the surgery will affect their ability to have orgasms. This has not been studied a great deal, ...

  12. [Laparoscopic hysterectomy].

    PubMed

    Minelli, L; Franciolini, G; Franchini, M A; Mutolo, F; Momoli, G

    1990-12-01

    Our first laparoscopic hysterectomy is reported. Our report includes the following surgical actions: coagulation and dissection of the round ligament: opening of the front-large ligament; hydrodissection of the connective tissue between the two peritoneal pellicles of the large ligament; coagulation and dissection of the salpinx for tissues and uterine-ovarian vessels; dissection of the large back ligament as far as the uterines and sacrals; detachment of the bladder by means of forceps and hydrodissection; the same operations on the opposite side; visualisation of uterine vessels and dissection; dissection of uterines and sacrals; completion of the operation and removal of the ill part through the vaginal way. Laparoscopic hysterectomy or vaginal-laparoscopic hysterectomy could, in some cases, substitute abdominal hysterectomy or be less risky than vaginal operations. We point out the need for more complete laparoscopic instrumentation and more practical laparoscopic experience for surgeons and assistants.

  13. The state of emergency obstetric care services in Nairobi informal settlements and environs: Results from a maternity health facility survey

    PubMed Central

    Ziraba, Abdhalah K; Mills, Samuel; Madise, Nyovani; Saliku, Teresa; Fotso, Jean-Christophe

    2009-01-01

    Background Maternal mortality in Sub-Saharan Africa remains a challenge with estimates exceeding 1,000 maternal deaths per 100,000 live births in some countries. Successful prevention of maternal deaths hinges on adequate and quality emergency obstetric care. In addition to skilled personnel, there is need for a supportive environment in terms of essential drugs and supplies, equipment, and a referral system. Many household surveys report a reasonably high proportion of women delivering in health facilities. However, the quality and adequacy of facilities and personnel are often not assessed. The three delay model; 1) delay in making the decision to seek care; 2) delay in reaching an appropriate obstetric facility; and 3) delay in receiving appropriate care once at the facility guided this project. This paper examines aspects of the third delay by assessing quality of emergency obstetric care in terms of staffing, skills equipment and supplies. Methods We used data from a survey of 25 maternity health facilities within or near two slums in Nairobi that were mentioned by women in a household survey as places that they delivered. Ethical clearance was obtained from the Kenya Medical Research Institute. Permission was also sought from the Ministry of Health and the Medical Officer of Health. Data collection included interviews with the staff in-charge of maternity wards using structured questionnaires. We collected information on staffing levels, obstetric procedures performed, availability of equipment and supplies, referral system and health management information system. Results Out of the 25 health facilities, only two met the criteria for comprehensive emergency obstetric care (both located outside the two slums) while the others provided less than basic emergency obstetric care. Lack of obstetric skills, equipment, and supplies hamper many facilities from providing lifesaving emergency obstetric procedures. Accurate estimation of burden of morbidity and

  14. Emergency obstetric care availability: a critical assessment of the current indicator.

    PubMed

    Gabrysch, Sabine; Zanger, Philipp; Campbell, Oona M R

    2012-01-01

    Monitoring progress in reducing maternal and perinatal mortality requires suitable indicators. The density of emergency obstetric care (EmOC) facilities has been proposed as a potentially useful indicator, but different UN documents make inconsistent recommendations, and its current formulation is not associated with maternal mortality. We compiled recently published indicator benchmarks and distinguished three sources of inconsistency: (i) use of different denominator metrics (per birth and per population), (ii) different assumptions on need for EmOC and for EmOC facilities and (iii) failure to specify facility capacity (birth load). The UN guidelines and handbook require fewer EmOC facilities than the World Health Report 2005 and do not specify capacity for deliveries or staffing levels. We recommend (i) always using births as the denominator for EmOC facility density, (ii) clearly stating assumptions on the proportion of deliveries needing basic and comprehensive emergency obstetric care and the desired proportion of deliveries in EmOC facilities and (iii) specifying facility capacity and staffing and adapting benchmarks for settings with different population density to ensure geographical accessibility. PMID:21831117

  15. Emergency Obstetric Care in a Rural Hospital: On-call Specialists Can Manage C-sections

    PubMed Central

    Ashtekar, Shyam V; Kulkarni, Madhav B; Ashtekar, Ratna S; Sadavarte, Vaishali S

    2012-01-01

    Background: Institutional birth and Emergency Obstetric Care (EmOC) are important strategies of the National Rural Health Mission (NRHM). While the Community Health Center (CHC) is expected to serve EmOC needs in NRHM, the CHCs are hamstrung due to chronic shortage of specialist doctors. Alternative strategies are therefore needed for ensuring EmOC. Objectives: This study aims to estimate the EmOC needs in a private rural hospital from case records and find some useful predictors for caesarian section (C-section) and to assess C-section needs in the context of on-call specialist support. Materials and Methods: We analyzed a two-decade series of 2587 obstetric cases in a private rural hospital for normal deliveries and EmOC including C-section. Results: About 80% of the obstetric cases were normal deliveries. Of the remaining 20% cases that required EmOC, nearly one-third required C-section. In the series, two maternal deaths occurred due to hemorrhage. About 13% case records showed past abortion, which adds to EmOC workload. Primipararous mothers with higher age had a greater incidence (23%) of C-section. The C-section rate shows a steady rise from 3% to above 10% in the series. Conclusions: This rural hospital required C-section in 6.4% cases. This C-section workload was managed with the help of on-call specialists. The local hospital team could manage 93.6% of the cases and abortions with only two maternal deaths. This strategy of an on-call specialist team can be an option for CHCs till resident specialists are adequately available. PMID:23112445

  16. Governing the implementation of Emergency Obstetric Care: experiences of Rural District Health Managers, Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Many health policies developed internationally often become adopted at the national level and are implemented locally at the district level. A decentralized district health system led by a district health management team becomes responsible for implementing such policies. This study aimed at exploring the experiences of a district health management team in implementing Emergency Obstetric Care (EmOC) related policies and identifying emerging governance aspects. Methods The study used a qualitative approach in which data was obtained from thirteen individual interviews and one focus group discussion (FGD). Interviews were conducted with members of the district health management team, district health service boards and NGO representatives. The FGD included key informants who were directly involved in the work of implementing EmOC services in the district. Documentary reviews and observation were done to supplement the data. All the materials were analysed using a qualitative content analysis approach. Results Implementation of EmOC was considered to be a process accompanied by achievements and challenges. Achievements included increased institutional delivery, increased number of ambulances, training service providers in emergency obstetric care and building a new rural health centre that provides comprehensive emergency obstetric care. These achievements were associated with good leadership skills of the team together with partnerships that existed between different actors such as the Non-Governmental Organization (NGO), development partners, local politicians and Traditional Birth Attendants (TBAs). Most challenges faced during the implementation of EmOC were related to governance issues at different levels and included delays in disbursement of funds from the central government, shortages of health workers, unclear mechanisms for accountability, lack of incentives to motivate overburdened staffs and lack of guidelines for partnership development

  17. Pilot study of radical hysterectomy versus radical trachelectomy on sexual distress.

    PubMed

    Brotto, Lori A; Smith, Kelly B; Breckon, Erin; Plante, Marie

    2013-01-01

    Radical trachelectomy, which leaves the uterus intact, has emerged as a desirable surgical option for eligible women with early-stage cervical cancer who wish to preserve fertility. The available data suggest excellent obstetrical outcomes with radical trachelectomy, and no differences in sexual responding between radical trachelectomy and radical hysterectomy. There is a need to examine the effect of radical hysterectomy on sexual distress given that it is distinct from sexual function. Participants were 34 women diagnosed with early-stage cervical cancer. The authors report 1-month postsurgery data for 29 women (radical hysterectomy group: n = 17, M age = 41.8 years; radical trachelectomy group: n = 12, M age = 31.8 years), and 6-month follow-up data on 26 women. Whereas both groups experienced an increase in sex-related distress immediately after surgery, distress continued to increase 6 months after surgery for the radical hysterectomy group but decreased in the radical trachelectomy group. There were no between-group differences in mood, anxiety, or general measures of health. The decrease in sex-related distress in the radical trachelectomy but not in the radical hysterectomy group suggests that the preservation of fertility may have attenuated sex-related distress. Care providers should counsel women exploring surgical options for cervical cancer about potential sex distress-related sequelae.

  18. Male involvement in birth preparedness and complication readiness for emergency obstetric referrals in rural Uganda

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Every pregnant woman faces risk of life-threatening obstetric complications. A birth-preparedness package promotes active preparation and assists in decision-making for healthcare seeking in case of such complications. The aim was to assess factors associated with birth preparedness and complication-readiness as well as the level of male participation in the birth plan among emergency obstetric referrals in rural Uganda. Methods This was a cross-sectional study conducted at Kabale regional hospital maternity ward among 140 women admitted as emergency obstetric referrals in antenatal, labor or the postpartum period. Data was collected on socio-demographics and birth preparedness and what roles spouses were involved in during developing the birth plan. Any woman who attended antenatal care at least 4 times, received health education on pregnancy and childbirth danger signs, saved money for emergencies, made a plan of where to deliver from and made preparations for a birth companion, was deemed as having made a birth plan. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was conducted to analyze factors that were independently associated with having a birth plan. Results The mean age was 26.8 ± 6.6 years, while mean age of the spouse was 32.8 ± 8.3 years. Over 100 (73.8%) women and 75 (55.2%) of their spouses had no formal education or only primary level of education respectively. On multivariable analysis, Primigravidae compared to multigravidae, OR 1.8 95%CI (1.0-3.0), education level of spouse of secondary or higher versus primary level or none, OR 3.8 95%CI (1.2-11.0), formal occupation versus informal occupation of spouse, OR 1.6 95%CI (1.1-2.5), presence of pregnancy complications OR 1.4 95%CI (1.1-2.0) and the anticipated mode of delivery of caesarean section versus vaginal delivery, OR 1.6 95%CI (1.0-2.4) were associated with having a birth plan. Conclusion Individual women, families and communities need to be empowered to contribute positively to making

  19. [Non elective cesarean section: use of a color code to optimize management of obstetric emergencies].

    PubMed

    Rudigoz, René-Charles; Huissoud, Cyril; Delecour, Lisa; Thevenet, Simone; Dupont, Corinne

    2014-06-01

    The medical team of the Croix Rousse teaching hospital maternity unit has developed, over the last ten years, a set of procedures designed to respond to various emergency situations necessitating Caesarean section. Using the Lucas classification, we have defined as precisely as possible the degree of urgency of Caesarian sections. We have established specific protocols for the implementation of urgent and very urgent Caesarean section and have chosen a simple means to convey the degree of urgency to all team members, namely a color code system (red, orange and green). We have set time goals from decision to delivery: 15 minutes for the red code and 30 minutes for the orange code. The results seem very positive: The frequency of urgent and very urgent Caesareans has fallen over time, from 6.1 % to 1.6% in 2013. The average time from decision to delivery is 11 minutes for code red Caesareans and 21 minutes for code orange Caesareans. These time goals are now achieved in 95% of cases. Organizational and anesthetic difficulties are the main causes of delays. The indications for red and orange code Caesarians are appropriate more than two times out of three. Perinatal outcomes are generally favorable, code red Caesarians being life-saving in 15% of cases. No increase in maternal complications has been observed. In sum: Each obstetric department should have its own protocols for handling urgent and very urgent Caesarean sections. Continuous monitoring of their implementation, relevance and results should be conducted Management of extreme urgency must be integrated into the management of patients with identified risks (scarred uterus and twin pregnancies for example), and also in structures without medical facilities (birthing centers). Obstetric teams must keep in mind that implementation of these protocols in no way dispenses with close monitoring of labour. PMID:26983190

  20. Obstetric audit in resource-poor settings: lessons from a multi-country project auditing 'near miss' obstetrical emergencies.

    PubMed

    Filippi, Veronique; Brugha, Ruairi; Browne, Edmund; Gohou, Valerie; Bacci, Alberta; De Brouwere, Vincent; Sahel, Amina; Goufodji, Sourou; Alihonou, Eusebe; Ronsmans, Carine

    2004-01-01

    This paper outlines the practical steps involved in setting up and running multi-professional, in-depth case reviews of 'near miss' obstetrical complications. It draws on lessons learned in 12 referral hospitals in Benin, Côte d'Ivoire, Ghana and Morocco. A range of feasibility indicators are presented which measured the implementation and frequency of audit activities, the quality of participation, adherence to the planned protocol for the near-miss audits, the quality of audit discussions and the sustainability of the project. Although the principles of the audit approach were well accepted and implemented everywhere, near-miss audits appeared most successful in first referral level hospitals. Contextual factors that determine the successful implementation of near-miss audit include staff finding adequate time for audit activities, financial incentives to groups rather than individuals, involvement of senior staff and hospital managers, the ease of communication in smaller units, the employment of social workers for the incorporation of women's views at audits, and the strength of external support provided by the research team. The poor quality of information recorded in case notes was recognized everywhere as a deficiency, but did not present a major obstacle to effective case reviews. Ownership and leadership within the hospital, more easily achieved in the first-level referral hospitals, were probably the most important determinants of successful implementation. Sustainability requires a commitment to audit from policy makers and managers at higher levels of the health system and some devolution of resources for implementing recommendations.

  1. Availability and Quality of Emergency Obstetric and Newborn Care in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Wichaidit, Wit; Alam, Mahbub-Ul; Halder, Amal K; Unicomb, Leanne; Hamer, Davidson H; Ram, Pavani K

    2016-08-01

    Bangladesh's maternal mortality and neonatal mortality remain unacceptably high. We assessed the availability and quality of emergency obstetric care (EmOC) and emergency newborn care (EmNC) services at health facilities in Bangladesh. We randomly sampled 50 rural villages and 50 urban neighborhoods throughout Bangladesh and interviewed the director of eight and nine health facilities nearest to each sampled area. We categorized health facilities into different quality levels (high, moderate, low, and substandard) based on staffing, availability of a phone or ambulance, and signal functions (six categories for EmOC and four categories for EmNC). We interviewed the directors of 875 health facilities. Approximately 28% of health facilities did not have a skilled birth attendant on call 24 hours per day. The least commonly performed EmOC signal function was administration of anticonvulsants (67%). The quality of EmOC services was high in 33% and moderate in 52% of the health facilities. The least common EmNC signal function was kangaroo mother care (7%). The quality of EmNC was high in 2% and moderate in 33% of the health facilities. Approximately one-third of health facilities lack 24-hour availability of skilled birth attendants, increasing the risk of peripartum complications. Most health facilities offered moderate to high quality services for EmOC and low to substandard quality for EmNC. PMID:27273640

  2. Availability and Quality of Emergency Obstetric and Newborn Care in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Wichaidit, Wit; Alam, Mahbub-Ul; Halder, Amal K; Unicomb, Leanne; Hamer, Davidson H; Ram, Pavani K

    2016-08-01

    Bangladesh's maternal mortality and neonatal mortality remain unacceptably high. We assessed the availability and quality of emergency obstetric care (EmOC) and emergency newborn care (EmNC) services at health facilities in Bangladesh. We randomly sampled 50 rural villages and 50 urban neighborhoods throughout Bangladesh and interviewed the director of eight and nine health facilities nearest to each sampled area. We categorized health facilities into different quality levels (high, moderate, low, and substandard) based on staffing, availability of a phone or ambulance, and signal functions (six categories for EmOC and four categories for EmNC). We interviewed the directors of 875 health facilities. Approximately 28% of health facilities did not have a skilled birth attendant on call 24 hours per day. The least commonly performed EmOC signal function was administration of anticonvulsants (67%). The quality of EmOC services was high in 33% and moderate in 52% of the health facilities. The least common EmNC signal function was kangaroo mother care (7%). The quality of EmNC was high in 2% and moderate in 33% of the health facilities. Approximately one-third of health facilities lack 24-hour availability of skilled birth attendants, increasing the risk of peripartum complications. Most health facilities offered moderate to high quality services for EmOC and low to substandard quality for EmNC.

  3. Barriers to emergency obstetric care services in perinatal deaths in rural gambia: a qualitative in-depth interview study.

    PubMed

    Jammeh, Abdou; Sundby, Johanne; Vangen, Siri

    2011-01-01

    Objective. The Gambia has one of the world's highest perinatal mortality rates. We explored barriers of timely access to emergency obstetric care services resulting in perinatal deaths and in survivors of severe obstetric complications in rural Gambia. Method. We applied the "three delays" model as a framework for assessing contributing factors to perinatal deaths and obstetric complications. Qualitative in-depth interviews were conducted with 20 survivors of severe obstetric complications at home settings within three to four weeks after hospital discharge. Family members and traditional birth attendants were also interviewed. The interviews were translated into English and transcribed verbatim. We used content analysis to identify barriers of care. Results. Transport/cost-related delays are the major contributors of perinatal deaths in this study. A delay in recognising danger signs of pregnancy/labour or decision to seek care outside the home was the second important contributor of perinatal deaths. Decision to seek care may be timely, but impaired access precluded utilization of EmOC services. Obtaining blood for transfusion was also identified as a deterrent to appropriate care. Conclusion. Delays in accessing EmOC are critical in perinatal deaths. Thus, timely availability of emergency transport services and prompt decision-making are warranted for improved perinatal outcomes in rural Gambia. PMID:21766039

  4. Training of midwives in advanced obstetrics in Liberia

    PubMed Central

    Dolo, Obed; Clack, Alice; Gibson, Hannah; Lewis, Naomi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Problem The shortage of doctors in Liberia limits the provision of comprehensive emergency obstetric and neonatal care. Approach In a pilot project, two midwives were trained in advanced obstetric procedures and in the team approach to the in-hospital provision of advanced maternity care. The training took two years and was led by a Liberian consultant obstetrician with support from international experts. Local setting The training took place in CB Dunbar Maternity Hospital. This rural hospital deals with approximately 2000 deliveries annually, many of which present complications. In February 2015 there were just 117 doctors available in Liberia. Relevant changes In the first 18 months of training, the trainees were involved with 236 caesarean sections, 35 manual evacuations of products of conception, 25 manual removals of placentas, 21 vaginal breech deliveries, 14 vacuum deliveries, four repairs of ruptured uteri, the management of four cases of shoulder dystocia, three hysterectomies, two laparotomies for ruptured ectopic pregnancies and numerous obstetric ultrasound examinations. The trainees also managed 41 cases of eclampsia or severe pre-eclampsia, 25 of major postpartum haemorrhage and 21 of shock. Although, initially they only assisted senior doctors, the trainees subsequently progressed from direct to indirect supervision and then to independent management. Lessons learnt To compensate for a shortage of doctors able to undertake comprehensive emergency obstetric and neonatal care, experienced midwives can be taught to undertake advanced obstetric care and procedures. Their team work with doctors can be particularly valuable in rural hospitals in resource-poor countries. PMID:27147768

  5. What is the impact of multi-professional emergency obstetric and neonatal care training?

    PubMed

    Bergh, Anne-Marie; Baloyi, Shisana; Pattinson, Robert C

    2015-11-01

    This paper reviews evidence regarding change in health-care provider behaviour and maternal and neonatal outcomes as a result of emergency obstetric and neonatal care (EmONC) training. A refined version of the Kirkpatrick classification for programme evaluation was used to focus on change in efficiency and impact of training (levels 3 and 4). Twenty-three studies were reviewed - five randomised controlled trials, two quasi-experimental studies and 16 before-and-after observational studies. Training programmes had all been developed in high-income countries and adapted for use in low- and middle-income countries. Nine studies reported on behaviour change and 13 on process and patient outcomes. Most showed positive results. Every maternity unit should provide EmONC teamwork training, mandatory for all health-care providers. The challenges are as follows: scaling up such training to all institutions, sustaining regular in-service training, integrating training into institutional and health-system patient safety initiatives and 'thinking out of the box' in evaluation research.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging - A troubleshooter in obstetric emergencies: A pictorial review

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Rohini; Bajaj, Sunil Kumar; Kumar, Nishith; Chandra, Ranjan; Misra, Ritu Nair; Malik, Amita; Thukral, Brij Bhushan

    2016-01-01

    The application of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in pregnancy faced initial skepticism of physicians because of fetal safety concerns. The perceived fetal risk has been found to be unwarranted and of late, the modality has attained acceptability. Its role in diagnosing fetal anomalies is well recognized and following its safety certification in pregnancy, it is finding increasing utilization during pregnancy and puerperium. However, the use of MRI in maternal emergency obstetric conditions is relatively limited as it is still evolving. In early gestation, ectopic implantation is one of the major life-threatening conditions that are frequently encountered. Although ultrasound (USG) is the accepted mainstay modality, the diagnostic predicament persists in many cases. MRI has a role where USG is indeterminate, particularly in the extratubal ectopic pregnancy. Later in gestation, MRI can be a useful adjunct in placental disorders like previa, abruption, and adhesion. It is a good problem-solving tool in adnexal masses such as ovarian torsion and degenerated fibroid, which have a higher incidence during pregnancy. Catastrophic conditions like uterine rupture can also be preoperatively and timely diagnosed. MRI has a definite role to play in postpartum and post-abortion life-threatening conditions, e.g., retained products of conception, and gestational trophoblastic disease, especially when USG is inconclusive or inadequate. PMID:27081223

  7. Status of emergency obstetric care in a local government area in south-south Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Mezie-Okoye, Margaret M; Adeniji, Foluke O; Tobin-West, Charles I; Babatunde, Seye

    2012-09-01

    This study assessed the status of the availability and performance of emergency obstetric care (EmOC) in 12 functional public health facilities out of the existing 19 in Gokana Local Government Area of Rivers State in south-south Nigeria, prior to the midwives service scheme (MSS) launch in 2009. No facility qualified as basic EmOC, while one had comprehensive EmOC status. Signal functions that required supply of medical consumables were performed by more facilities than services that required special training, equipment and maintenance. Only two facilities (16.67%) had the minimum requirement of > or =4 midwives for 24-hour EmOC service; while only 2.2% of expected births occurred at the facilities. The poor state of maternal health resources in the study area requires urgent interventions by Local and State Governments for infrastructure upgrade and deployment and training of staff towards attainment of MDG-5. A follow-up evaluation would be required since the commencement of the MSS. PMID:23437510

  8. An examination of women experiencing obstetric complications requiring emergency care: perceptions and sociocultural consequences of caesarean sections in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Khan, Rasheda; Blum, Lauren S; Sultana, Marzia; Bilkis, Sayeda; Koblinsky, Marge

    2012-06-01

    Little is known about the physical and socioeconomic postpartum consequences of women who experience obstetric complications and require emergency obstetric care (EmOC), particularly in resource-poor countries such as Bangladesh where historically there has been a strong cultural preference for births at home. Recent increases in the use of skilled birth attendants show socioeconomic disparities in access to emergency obstetric services, highlighting the need to examine birthing preparation and perceptions of EmOC, including caesarean sections. Twenty women who delivered at a hospital and were identified by physicians as having severe obstetric complications during delivery or immediately thereafter were selected to participate in this qualitative study. Purposive sampling was used for selecting the women. The study was carried out in Matlab, Bangladesh, during March 2008-August 2009. Data-collection methods included in-depth interviews with women and, whenever possible, their family members. The results showed that the women were poorly informed before delivery about pregnancy-related complications and medical indications for emergency care. Barriers to care-seeking at emergency obstetric facilities and acceptance of lifesaving care were related to apprehensions about the physical consequences and social stigma, resulting from hospital procedures and financial concerns. The respondents held many misconceptions about caesarean sections and distrust regarding the reason for recommending the procedure by the healthcare providers. Women who had caesarean sections incurred high costs that led to economic burdens on family members, and the blame was attributed to the woman. The postpartum health consequences reported by the women were generally left untreated. The data underscore the importance of educating women and their families about pregnancy-related complications and preparing families for the possibility of caesarean section. At the same time, the health systems

  9. An Examination of Women Experiencing Obstetric Complications Requiring Emergency Care: Perceptions and Sociocultural Consequences of Caesarean Sections in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Rasheda; Sultana, Marzia; Bilkis, Sayeda; Koblinsky, Marge

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the physical and socioeconomic postpartum consequences of women who experience obstetric complications and require emergency obstetric care (EmOC), particularly in resource-poor countries such as Bangladesh where historically there has been a strong cultural preference for births at home. Recent increases in the use of skilled birth attendants show socioeconomic disparities in access to emergency obstetric services, highlighting the need to examine birthing preparation and perceptions of EmOC, including caesarean sections. Twenty women who delivered at a hospital and were identified by physicians as having severe obstetric complications during delivery or immediately thereafter were selected to participate in this qualitative study. Purposive sampling was used for selecting the women. The study was carried out in Matlab, Bangladesh, during March 2008–August 2009. Data-collection methods included in-depth interviews with women and, whenever possible, their family members. The results showed that the women were poorly informed before delivery about pregnancy-related complications and medical indications for emergency care. Barriers to care-seeking at emergency obstetric facilities and acceptance of lifesaving care were related to apprehensions about the physical consequences and social stigma, resulting from hospital procedures and financial concerns. The respondents held many misconceptions about caesarean sections and distrust regarding the reason for recommending the procedure by the healthcare providers. Women who had caesarean sections incurred high costs that led to economic burdens on family members, and the blame was attributed to the woman. The postpartum health consequences reported by the women were generally left untreated. The data underscore the importance of educating women and their families about pregnancy-related complications and preparing families for the possibility of caesarean section. At the same time, the health

  10. Reducing maternal mortality: better monitoring, indicators and benchmarks needed to improve emergency obstetric care. Research summary for policymakers.

    PubMed

    Collender, Guy; Gabrysch, Sabine; Campbell, Oona M R

    2012-06-01

    Several limitations of emergency obstetric care (EmOC) indicators and benchmarks are analysed in this short paper, which synthesises recent research on this topic. A comparison between Sri Lanka and Zambia is used to highlight the inconsistencies and shortcomings in current methods of monitoring EmOC. Recommendations are made to improve the usefulness and accuracy of EmOC indicators and benchmarks in the future. PMID:22512353

  11. Radiologist, obstetric patient, and emergency department provider survey: radiologist-patient interaction in the emergency department setting.

    PubMed

    Erlichman, David B; Stein, Marjorie W; Weiss, Amanda; Mazzariol, Fernanda

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and acceptance of a model of direct interaction between radiologist and patients in the emergency department (ED) setting. The study population was comprised of pregnant patients accrued in a non-consecutive prospective manner from June 2014 to September 2015, who had an obstetrical ultrasound performed in the radiology department of an inner-city tertiary care hospital at the request of the ED. The feasibility and approval of direct communication between radiologist and patient were evaluated by means of a questionnaire presented by an independent observer to the ED provider, patient, and radiologist. The exam enrolled 54 patients. Ultrasound (US) exam results were divided into (31) normal live intrauterine gestation (group 1), (7) abnormal failed intrauterine gestation or ectopic pregnancy (group 2), and (16) indeterminate pregnancies that could not be placed in the former categories and may require a follow-up exam (group 3). Forty-five (83 %) ED providers approved of the radiologist's direct communication with patients. Fifty (93 %) patients stated a better understanding of the radiologist's role in their care after than before the interaction. The radiologists found the interaction with patients to be positive in 52 (96 %) cases. Direct communication between radiologist and patient yielded a good acceptance by the radiologist, ED provider, and patient. More importantly, after the encounter, the vast majority of patients reported a better understanding of the radiologist's role in their care. PMID:26965006

  12. Referrals between Public Sector Health Institutions for Women with Obstetric High Risk, Complications, or Emergencies in India - A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Singh, Samiksha; Doyle, Pat; Campbell, Oona M; Mathew, Manu; Murthy, G V S

    2016-01-01

    Emergency obstetric care (EmOC) within primary health care systems requires a linked referral system to be effective in reducing maternal death. This systematic review aimed to summarize evidence on the proportion of referrals between institutions during pregnancy and delivery, and the factors affecting referrals, in India. We searched 6 electronic databases, reviewed four regional databases and repositories, and relevant program reports from India published between 1994 and 2013. All types of study or reports (except editorials, comments and letters) which reported on institution-referrals (out-referral or in-referral) for obstetric care were included. Results were synthesized on the proportion and the reasons for referral, and factors affecting referrals. Of the 11,346 articles identified by the search, we included 232 articles in the full text review and extracted data from 16 studies that met our inclusion criteria Of the 16, one was RCT, seven intervention cohort (without controls), six cross-sectional, and three qualitative studies. Bias and quality of studies were reported. Between 25% and 52% of all pregnancies were referred from Sub-centres for antenatal high-risk, 14% to 36% from nurse run delivery or basic EmOC centres for complications or emergencies, and 2 to 7% were referred from doctor run basic EmOC centres for specialist care at comprehensive EmOC centres. Problems identified with referrals from peripheral health centres included low skills and confidence of staff, reluctance to induce labour, confusion over the clinical criteria for referral, non-uniform standards of care at referral institutions, a tendency to by-pass middle level institutions, a lack of referral communication and supervision, and poor compliance. The high proportion of referrals from peripheral health centers reflects the lack of appropriate clinical guidelines, processes, and skills for obstetric care and referral in India. This, combined with inadequate referral communication

  13. Evidence Basis for Hysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Byrnes, Jenifer N; Trabuco, Emanuel C

    2016-09-01

    Although vaginal hysterectomy has long been championed by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists as the preferred mode of uterine removal, nationwide vaginal hysterectomy utilization has steadily declined. This article reviews the evidence comparing vaginal with other modes of hysterectomy and highlights areas of ongoing controversy regarding contraindications to vaginal surgery, risk of subsequent prolapse development, and impacts of changing hysterectomy trends on resident education. PMID:27521881

  14. Utilization of Emergency Service of Obstetrics and Gynecology: A Cross-Sectional Analysis of a Training Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Aksoy, Huseyin; Aksoy, Ulku; Ozturk, Mustafa; Ozyurt, Sezin; Acmaz, Gokhan; Karadag, Ozge Idem; Yucel, Burak; Aydin, Turgut

    2015-01-01

    Background Overutilization and inappropriate use of emergency departments (EDs) by patients with non-urgent health problems has become a major concern worldwide. This study aims to describe the characteristics of obstetric and gynecologic patients admitted to the Department of Emergency Obstetric and Gynecology. Methods A retrospective and cross-sectional study was designed at our Emergency Service of Obstetrics and Gynecology of Kayseri Education and Research Hospital of Medicine between January 1 and December 31, 2013. A total of 30,853 patients applying to emergency service were retrospectively analyzed from the admission charts, patient files and hospital automation system. Patients were assessed in terms of demographic features, presentation times, complaints, admission type (with own facilities, with consultation or with ambulance), diagnoses (urgent or non-ergent), discharge rates, clinical admission, rejection rate of examination, and rejection rate of hospitalization. Results A total of 30,853 patients were analyzed retrospectively. The mean age of patients was 27.69 ± 8.44 years; 51% of patients were between 20 and 29 years old. The categories of patients in urgent and non-urgent were 69% and 31% respectively. Most common presentation time period was between 19:00 and 21:00. Labor pain, pain and bleeding during pregnency, routine antenatal control, pelvic pain and menstrual irregularity were the most common complaints. Labor pain with the rate of 21% was the most common cause of ED admission. All patients who presented with labor pain were hospitalized. Patients hospitalized for labor constituted 56% of all hospitalized patients. Among patients, 62% were treated on an outpatient basis and 38% were hospitalized. Of patients, 3.54% refused to hospitalization. The cases using the ambulance to admission constituted 1.07% of all ED patients. Of these patients who have used ambulance 3.65% refused to the patient examination. Conclusions To improve the

  15. Current Issues with Hysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Barker, Matthew A

    2016-09-01

    Hysterectomy is one of the most common gynecologic surgeries. Early adoption of surgical advancements in hysterectomies has raised concerns over safety, quality, and costs. The risk of potential leiomyosarcoma in women undergoing minimally invasive hysterectomy led the US Food and Drug Administration to discourage the use of electronic power morcellator. Minimally invasive hysterectomies have increased substantially despite lack of data supporting its use over other forms of hysterectomy and increased costs. Health care reform is incentivizing providers to improve quality, improve safety, and decrease costs through standardized outcomes and process measures.

  16. Current Issues with Hysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Barker, Matthew A

    2016-09-01

    Hysterectomy is one of the most common gynecologic surgeries. Early adoption of surgical advancements in hysterectomies has raised concerns over safety, quality, and costs. The risk of potential leiomyosarcoma in women undergoing minimally invasive hysterectomy led the US Food and Drug Administration to discourage the use of electronic power morcellator. Minimally invasive hysterectomies have increased substantially despite lack of data supporting its use over other forms of hysterectomy and increased costs. Health care reform is incentivizing providers to improve quality, improve safety, and decrease costs through standardized outcomes and process measures. PMID:27521886

  17. Maternal mortality and its relationship to emergency obstetric care (EmOC) in a tertiary care hospital in South India

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the trends in maternal mortality ratio over 5 years at JIPMER Hospital and to find out the proportion of maternal deaths in relation to emergency admissions. Methods: A retrospective analysis of maternal deaths from 2008 to 2012 with respect to type of admission, referral and ICU care and cause of death according to WHO classification of maternal deaths. Results: Of the 104 maternal deaths 90% were emergency admissions and 59% of them were referrals. Thirty two percent of them died within 24 hours of admission. Forty four percent could be admitted to ICU and few patients could not get ICU bed. The trend in cause of death was increasing proportion of indirect causes from 2008 to 2012. Conclusion: The trend in MMR was increasing proportion of indirect deaths. Ninety percent of maternal deaths were emergency admissions with complications requiring ICU care. Hence comprehensive EmOC facilities should incorporate Obstetric ICU care. PMID:27512460

  18. Getting women to hospital is not enough: a qualitative study of access to emergency obstetric care in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Pitchforth, E; van Teijlingen, E; Graham, W; Dixon‐Woods, M; Chowdhury, M

    2006-01-01

    Objective To explore what happened to poor women in Bangladesh once they reached a hospital providing comprehensive emergency obstetric care (EmOC) and to identify support mechanisms. Design Mixed methods qualitative study. Setting Large government medical college hospital in Bangladesh. Sample Providers and users of EmOC. Methods Ethnographic observation in obstetrics unit including interviews with staff and women using the unit and their carers. Results Women had to mobilise significant financial and social resources to fund out of pocket expenses. Poorer women faced greater challenges in receiving treatment as relatives were less able to raise the necessary cash. The official financial support mechanism was bureaucratic and largely unsuitable in emergency situations. Doctors operated a less formal “poor fund” system to help the poorest women. There was no formal assessment of poverty; rather, doctors made “adjudications” of women's need for support based on severity of condition and presence of friends and relatives. Limited resources led to a “wait and see” policy that meant women's condition could deteriorate before help was provided. Conclusions Greater consideration must be given to what happens at health facilities to ensure that (1) using EmOC does not further impoverish families; and (2) the ability to pay does not influence treatment. Developing alternative finance mechanisms to reduce the burden of out of pocket expenses is crucial but challenging. Increased investment in EmOC must be accompanied by an increased focus on equity. PMID:16751473

  19. Status of Emergency Obstetric Care in Six Developing Countries Five Years before the MDG Targets for Maternal and Newborn Health

    PubMed Central

    Ameh, Charles; Msuya, Sia; Hofman, Jan; Raven, Joanna; Mathai, Matthews; van den Broek, Nynke

    2012-01-01

    Background Ensuring women have access to good quality Emergency Obstetric Care (EOC) is a key strategy to reducing maternal and newborn deaths. Minimum coverage rates are expected to be 1 Comprehensive (CEOC) and 4 Basic EOC (BEOC) facilities per 500,000 population. Methods and Findings A cross-sectional survey of 378 health facilities was conducted in Kenya, Malawi, Sierra Leone, Nigeria, Bangladesh and India between 2009 and 2011. This included 160 facilities designated to provide CEOC and 218 designated to provide BEOC. Fewer than 1 in 4 facilities aiming to provide CEOC were able to offer the nine required signal functions of CEOC (23.1%) and only 2.3% of health facilities expected to provide BEOC provided all seven signal functions. The two signal functions least likely to be provided included assisted delivery (17.5%) and manual vacuum aspiration (42.3%). Population indicators were assessed for 31 districts (total population = 15.7 million). The total number of available facilities (283) designated to provide EOC for this population exceeded the number required (158) a ratio of 1.8. However, none of the districts assessed met minimum UN coverage rates for EOC. The population based Caesarean Section rate was estimated to be <2%, the maternal Case Fatality Rate (CFR) for obstetric complications ranged from 2.0–9.3% and still birth (SB) rates ranged from 1.9–6.8%. Conclusions Availability of EOC is well below minimum UN target coverage levels. Health facilities in the surveyed countries do not currently have the capacity to adequately respond to and manage women with obstetric complications. To achieve MDG 5 by 2015, there is a need to ensure that the full range of signal functions are available in health facilities designated to provide CEOC or BEOC and improve the quality of services provided so that CFR and SB rates decline. PMID:23236357

  20. [The importance of simulation in team training on obstetric emergencies: results of the first phase of the national plan for continuous medical training].

    PubMed

    Maio Matos, Francisco; Sousa Gomes, Andrea; Costa, Fernando Jorge; Santos Silva, Isabel; Carvalhas, Joana

    2012-01-01

    Obstetric emergencies are unexpected and random. The traditional model for medical training of these acute events has included lectures combined with sporadic clinical experiences, but this educational method has inherent limitations. Given the variety of manual skills that must be learned and high-risk environment, Obstetrics is uniquely suited for simulation. New technological educational tools provide an opportunity to learn and master technical skills needed in emergent situations as well as the opportunity to rehearse and learn from mistakes without risks to patients. The goals of this study are to assess which are the factors that trainees associate to human fallibility before and after clinical simulation based training; to compare the confidence level to solve emergent obstetric situations between interns and experts with up to 5 years of experience before and after training, and to determine the value that trainees give to simulation as a teaching tool on emergent events. 31 physicians participated at this course sessions. After the course, we verified changes in the factores that trainees associate to human fallibility, an increase in confidence level to solve emergent obstetric and an increase in the value that trainees give to simulation as a teaching tool.

  1. An assessment of priority setting process and its implication on availability of emergency obstetric care services in Malindi District, Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Nyandieka, Lilian Nyamusi; Kombe, Yeri; Ng'ang'a, Zipporah; Byskov, Jens; Njeru, Mercy Karimi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction In spite of the critical role of Emergency Obstetric Care in treating complications arising from pregnancy and childbirth, very few facilities are equipped in Kenya to offer this service. In Malindi, availability of EmOC services does not meet the UN recommended levels of at least one comprehensive and four basic EmOC facilities per 500,000 populations. This study was conducted to assess priority setting process and its implication on availability, access and use of EmOC services at the district level. Methods A qualitative study was conducted both at health facility and community levels. Triangulation of data sources and methods was employed, where document reviews, in-depth interviews and focus group discussions were conducted with health personnel, facility committee members, stakeholders who offer and/ or support maternal health services and programmes; and the community members as end users. Data was thematically analysed. Results Limitations in the extent to which priorities in regard to maternal health services can be set at the district level were observed. The priority setting process was greatly restricted by guidelines and limited resources from the national level. Relevant stakeholders including community members are not involved in the priority setting process, thereby denying them the opportunity to contribute in the process. Conclusion The findings illuminate that consideration of all local plans in national planning and budgeting as well as the involvement of all relevant stakeholders in the priority setting exercise is essential in order to achieve a consensus on the provision of emergency obstetric care services among other health service priorities. PMID:26889337

  2. Successes and Challenges of Interprofessional Physiologic Birth and Obstetric Emergency Simulations in a Nurse-Midwifery Education Program.

    PubMed

    Shaw-Battista, Jenna; Belew, Cynthia; Anderson, Deborah; van Schaik, Sandrijn

    2015-01-01

    This article describes childbirth simulation design and implementation within the nurse-midwifery education program at the University of California, San Francisco. Nurse-midwife and obstetrician faculty coordinators were supported by faculty from multiple professions and specialties in curriculum review and simulation development and implementation. The primary goal of the resulting technology-enhanced simulations of normal physiologic birth and obstetric emergencies was to assist learners' development of interprofessional competencies related to communication, teamwork, and patient-centered care. Trainees included nurse-midwifery students; residents in obstetrics, pediatrics, and family medicine; medical students; and advanced practice nursing students in pediatrics. The diversity of participant types and learning levels provided benefits and presented challenges to effective scenario-based simulation design among numerous other theoretical and logistical considerations. This project revealed practical solutions informed by emerging health sciences and education research literature, faculty experience, and formal course evaluations by learners. Best practices in simulation development and implementation were incorporated, including curriculum revision grounded in needs assessment, case- and event-based clinical scenarios, optimization of fidelity, and ample time for participant debriefing. Adequate preparation and attention to detail increased the immersive experience and benefits of simulation. Suggestions for fidelity enhancement are provided with examples of simulation scenarios, a timeline for preparations, and discussion topics to facilitate meaningful learning by maternity and newborn care providers and trainees in clinical and academic settings. Pre- and postsimulation measurements of knowledge, skills, and attitudes are ongoing and not reported. This article is part of a special series of articles that address midwifery innovations in clinical practice

  3. Has Chiranjeevi Yojana changed the geographic availability of free comprehensive emergency obstetric care services in Gujarat, India?

    PubMed Central

    Vora, Kranti Suresh; Yasobant, Sandul; Patel, Amit; Upadhyay, Ashish; Mavalankar, Dileep V.

    2015-01-01

    Background The high rate of maternal mortality in India is of grave concern. Poor rural Indian women are most vulnerable to preventable maternal deaths primarily because they have limited availability of affordable emergency obstetric care (EmOC) within reasonable geographic proximity. Scarcity of obstetricians in the public sector combined with financial barriers to accessing private sector obstetrician services preclude this underserved population from availing lifesaving functions of comprehensive EmOC such as C-section. In order to overcome this limitation, Government of Gujarat initiated a unique public–private partnership program called Chiranjeevi Yojana (CY) in 2005. The program envisaged leveraging private sector providers to increase availability and thereby accessibility of EmOC care for vulnerable sections of society. Under CY, private sector providers render obstetric care services to poor women at no cost to patients. This paper examines the CY's effectiveness in improving availability of CEmOC services between 2006 and 2012 in three districts of Gujarat, India. Methods Primary data on facility locations, EmOC functionality, and obstetric bed availability were collected in the years 2012 and 2013 in three study districts. Secondary data from Census 2001 and 2011 were used along with required geographic information from Topo sheets and Google Earth maps. ArcGIS version 10 was used to analyze the availability of services using two-step floating catchment area (2SFCA) method. Results Our analysis suggests that the availability of CEmOC services within reasonable travel distance has greatly improved in all three study districts as a result of CY. We also show that the declining participation of the private sector did not result in an increase in distance to the nearest facility, but the extent of availability of providers for several villages was reduced. Spatial and temporal analyses in this paper provide a comprehensive understanding of trends in the

  4. Tanzanian lessons in using non-physician clinicians to scale up comprehensive emergency obstetric care in remote and rural areas

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background With 15-30% met need for comprehensive emergency obstetrical care (CEmOC) and a 3% caesarean section rate, Tanzania needs to expand the number of facilities providing these services in more remote areas. Considering severe shortage of human resources for health in the country, currently operating at 32% of the required skilled workforce, an intensive three-month course was developed to train non-physician clinicians for remote health centres. Methods Competency-based curricula for assistant medical officers' (AMOs) training in CEmOC, and for nurses, midwives and clinical officers in anaesthesia and operation theatre etiquette were developed and implemented in Ifakara, Tanzania. The required key competencies were identified, taught and objectively assessed. The training involved hands-on sessions, lectures and discussions. Participants were purposely selected in teams from remote health centres where CEmOC services were planned. Monthly supportive supervision after graduation was carried out in the upgraded health centres Results A total of 43 care providers from 12 health centres located in 11 rural districts in Tanzania and 2 from Somalia were trained from June 2009 to April 2010. Of these 14 were AMOs trained in CEmOC and 31 nurse-midwives and clinical officers trained in anaesthesia. During training, participants performed 278 major obstetric surgeries, 141 manual removal of placenta and evacuation of incomplete and septic abortions, and 1161 anaesthetic procedures under supervision. The first 8 months after introduction of CEmOC services in 3 health centres resulted in 179 caesarean sections, a remarkable increase of institutional deliveries by up to 300%, decreased fresh stillbirth rate (OR: 0.4; 95% CI: 0.1-1.7) and reduced obstetric referrals (OR: 0.2; 95% CI: 0.1-0.4)). There were two maternal deaths, both arriving in a moribund condition. Conclusions Tanzanian AMOs, clinical officers, and nurse-midwives can be trained as a team, in a three

  5. Changing hysterectomy patterns after introduction of laparoscopically assisted vaginal hysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Harris, M B; Olive, D L

    1994-08-01

    Physicians reviewed the records of all 670 patients at Southeastern Regional Medical Center in Lumberton, North Carolina, who underwent hysterectomy during 1990-1992 to compare the differences between abdominal hysterectomies and laparoscopically assisted vaginal hysterectomy. The proportion of abdominal hysterectomies at the center fell considerably after introduction of laparoscopically assisted vaginal hysterectomy in 1992 (51.5% in 1990, 45.5% in 1991, and 35.6% in 1992; p = .0012). The proportion of unassisted vaginal hysterectomies did not change, however (e.g., 54.5% in 1991 and 54.3% in 1992). The mean length of stay was longer for abdominal hysterectomy patients than for unassisted and laparoscopically assisted vaginal hysterectomy patients (4.03 vs. 2.65 and 2.32 days, respectively; p = .0001). Hospital costs were significantly greater for laparoscopically assisted vaginal hysterectomy than for the other 2 hysterectomy methods ($11,931 vs. $7,031 for abdominal and $5343 unassisted vaginal; p = .0001). Increased operating time and charges for disposable staples and other instruments accounted for the increased costs. Laparoscopically assisted vaginal hysterectomy patients suffered complications at basically the same rate as the abdominal and unassisted vaginal hysterectomy groups (16% vs. 20% and 12%, respectively). These results suggest that even though laparoscopically assisted vaginal hysterectomy can reduce the number of patients who need to undergo laparotomy for a hysterectomy, the hospital costs are much greater for than the conventional method.

  6. Essential basic and emergency obstetric and newborn care: from education and training to service delivery and quality of care.

    PubMed

    Otolorin, Emmanuel; Gomez, Patricia; Currie, Sheena; Thapa, Kusum; Dao, Blami

    2015-06-01

    Approximately 15% of expected births worldwide will result in life-threatening complications during pregnancy, delivery, or the postpartum period. Providers skilled in emergency obstetric and newborn care (EmONC) services are essential, particularly in countries with a high burden of maternal and newborn mortality. Jhpiego and its consortia partners have implemented three global programs to build provider capacity to provide comprehensive EmONC services to women and newborns in these resource-poor settings. Providers have been educated to deliver high-impact maternal and newborn health interventions, such as prevention and treatment of postpartum hemorrhage and pre-eclampsia/eclampsia and management of birth asphyxia, within the broader context of quality health services. This article describes Jhpiego's programming efforts within the framework of the basic and expanded signal functions that serve as indicators of high-quality basic and emergency care services. Lessons learned include the importance of health facility strengthening, competency-based provider education, global leadership, and strong government ownership and coordination as essential precursors to scale-up of high impact evidence-based maternal and newborn interventions in low-resource settings. PMID:26115858

  7. Emergency obstetric referral in rural Sierra Leone: what can motorbike ambulances contribute? A mixed-methods study.

    PubMed

    Bhopal, Sunil S; Halpin, Stephen J; Gerein, Nancy

    2013-08-01

    Giving birth remains a dangerous endeavour for many of the world's women. Progress to improve this has been slow in sub-Saharan Africa. The second delay, where transport infrastructure is key in allowing a woman to reach care, has been a relatively neglected field of study. Six eRanger motorbike ambulances, specifically engineered for use on poor roads in resource-poor situations were provided in 2006 as part of an emergency referral system in rural Sierra Leone. The aim of this study was to evaluate the implementation of this referral system in terms of its use, acceptability and accessibility. Data were collected from usage records, and a series of semi-structured interviews and focus groups conducted to provide deeper understanding of the service. A total of 130 records of patients being transported to a health facility were found, 1/3 of which were for obstetric cases. The ambulance is being used regularly to transport patients to a health care facility. It is well known to the communities, is acceptable and accessible, and is valued by those it serves. District-wide traditional birth attendant training and the sensitisation activities provided a foundation for the introduction of the ambulance service, creating a high level of awareness of the service and its importance, particularly for women in labour. Motorbike ambulances are suited to remote areas and can function on poor roads inaccessible to other vehicles.

  8. Promoting cultural humility during labor and birth: putting theory into action during PRONTO obstetric and neonatal emergency training.

    PubMed

    Fahey, Jenifer O; Cohen, Susanna R; Holme, Francesca; Buttrick, Elizabeth S; Dettinger, Julia C; Kestler, Edgar; Walker, Dilys M

    2013-01-01

    Maternal and neonatal mortality in Northern Guatemala, a region with a high percentage of indigenous people, is disproportionately high. Initiatives to improve quality of care at local health facilities equipped for births, and increasing the number of births attended at these facilities will help address this problem. PRONTO (Programa de Rescate Obstétrico y Neonatal: Tratamiento Óptimo y Oportuno) is a low-tech, high-fidelity, simulation-based, provider-to-provider training in the management of obstetric and neonatal emergencies. This program has been successfully tested and implemented in Mexico. PRONTO will now be implemented in Guatemala as part of an initiative to decrease maternal and perinatal mortality. Guatemalan health authorities have requested that the training include training on cultural humility and humanized birth. This article describes the process of curricular adaptation to satisfy this request. The PRONTO team adapted the existing program through 4 steps: (a) analysis of the problem and context through a review of qualitative data and stakeholder interviews, (b) literature review and adoption of a theoretical framework regarding cultural humility and adult learning, (c) adaptation of the curriculum and design of new activities and simulations, and (d) implementation of adapted and expanded curriculum and further refinement in response to participant response. PMID:23360940

  9. Promoting cultural humility during labor and birth: putting theory into action during PRONTO obstetric and neonatal emergency training.

    PubMed

    Fahey, Jenifer O; Cohen, Susanna R; Holme, Francesca; Buttrick, Elizabeth S; Dettinger, Julia C; Kestler, Edgar; Walker, Dilys M

    2013-01-01

    Maternal and neonatal mortality in Northern Guatemala, a region with a high percentage of indigenous people, is disproportionately high. Initiatives to improve quality of care at local health facilities equipped for births, and increasing the number of births attended at these facilities will help address this problem. PRONTO (Programa de Rescate Obstétrico y Neonatal: Tratamiento Óptimo y Oportuno) is a low-tech, high-fidelity, simulation-based, provider-to-provider training in the management of obstetric and neonatal emergencies. This program has been successfully tested and implemented in Mexico. PRONTO will now be implemented in Guatemala as part of an initiative to decrease maternal and perinatal mortality. Guatemalan health authorities have requested that the training include training on cultural humility and humanized birth. This article describes the process of curricular adaptation to satisfy this request. The PRONTO team adapted the existing program through 4 steps: (a) analysis of the problem and context through a review of qualitative data and stakeholder interviews, (b) literature review and adoption of a theoretical framework regarding cultural humility and adult learning, (c) adaptation of the curriculum and design of new activities and simulations, and (d) implementation of adapted and expanded curriculum and further refinement in response to participant response.

  10. Availability and quality of emergency obstetric care, an alternative strategy to reduce maternal mortality: experience of Tongji Hospital, Wuhan, China.

    PubMed

    Bangoura, Ismael Fatou; Hu, Jian; Gong, Xun; Wang, Xuanxuan; Wei, Jingjing; Zhang, Wenbin; Zhang, Xiang; Fang, Pengqian

    2012-04-01

    The burden of maternal mortality (MM) and morbidity is especially high in Asia. However, China has made significant progress in reducing MM over the past two decades, and hence maternal death rate has declined considerably in last decade. To analyze availability and quality of emergency obstetric care (EmOC) received by women at Tongji Hospital, Wuhan, China, this study retrospectively analyzed various pregnancy-related complications at the hospital from 2000 to 2009. Two baseline periods of equal length were used for the comparison of variables. A total of 11 223 obstetric complications leading to MM were identified on a total of 15 730 hospitalizations, either 71.35% of all activities. No maternal death was recorded. Mean age of women was 29.31 years with a wide range of 14-52 years. About 96.26% of women had higher levels of schooling, university degrees and above and received the education of secondary school or college. About 3.74% received primary education at period two (P2) from 2005 to 2009, which was significantly higher than that of period one (P1) from 2000 to 2004 (P<0.05) (OR: 0.586; 95% CI: 0.442 to 0.776). About 65.69% were employed as skilled or professional workers at P2, which was significantly higher than that of P1 (P<0.05). About 34.31% were unskilled workers at P2, which was significantly higher than that of P1 (P<0.05). Caesarean section was performed for 9,930 women (88.48%) and the percentage of the procedure increased significantly from 19.25% at P1 to 69.23% at P2 (P<0.05). We were led to conclude that, despite the progress, significant gaps in the performance of maternal health services between rural and urban areas remain. However, MM reduction can be achieved in China. Priorities must include, but not limited to the following: secondary healthcare development, health policy and management, strengthening primary healthcare services. PMID:22528213

  11. Skilled birth attendants in Tanzania: a descriptive study of cadres and emergency obstetric care signal functions performed.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Etsuko; Adegoke, Adetoro A; Masenga, Gileard; Fimbo, Janeth; Msuya, Sia E

    2015-01-01

    Although most developing countries monitor the proportion of births attended by skilled birth attendants (SBA), they lack information on the availability and performance of emergency obstetric care (EmOC) signal functions by different cadres of health care providers (HCPs). The World Health Organisation signal functions are set of key interventions that targets direct obstetric causes of maternal deaths. Seven signal functions are required for health facilities providing basic EmOC and nine for facilities providing comprehensive EmOC. Our objectives were to describe cadres of HCPs who are considered SBAs in Tanzania, the EmOC signal functions they perform and challenges associated with performance of EmOC signal functions. We conducted a cross-sectional study of HCPs offering maternity care services at eight health facilities in Moshi Urban District in northern Tanzania. A questionnaire and health facility assessment forms were used to collect information from participants and health facilities. A total of 199 HCPs working at eight health facilities in Moshi Urban District met the inclusion criteria. Out of 199, 158 participated, giving a response rate of 79.4 %. Ten cadres of HCPs were identified as conducting deliveries regardless of the level of health facilities. Most of the participants (81 %) considered themselves SBAs, although some were not considered SBAs by the Ministry of Health and Social Welfare (MOHSW). Only two out of the eight facilities provided all of the required EmOC signal functions. While Assistant Medical Officers are expected to perform all the signal functions, only 38 % and 13 % had performed vacuum extraction or caesarean sections respectively. Very few registered and enrolled nurse-midwives had performed removal of retained products (22 %) or assisted vaginal delivery (24 and 11 %). Inadequate equipment and supplies, and lack of knowledge and skills in performing EmOC were two main challenges identified by health care providers in all

  12. Assessing skilled birth attendants and emergency obstetric care in rural Tanzania: the inadequacy of using global standards and indicators to measure local realities.

    PubMed

    Spangler, Sydney A

    2012-06-01

    Current efforts to reduce maternal mortality and morbidity in low-resource settings often depend on global standards and indicators to assess obstetric care, particularly skilled birth attendants and emergency obstetric care. This paper describes challenges in using these standards to assess obstetric services in the Kilombero Valley of Tanzania. A health facility survey and extensive participant observation showed existing services to be complicated and fluid, involving a wide array of skills, resources, and improvisations. Attempts to measure these services against established standards and indicators were not successful. Some aspects of care were over-valued while others were under-valued, with significant neglect of context and quality. This paper discusses the implications of these findings for ongoing maternal health care efforts in unique and complex settings, questioning the current reliance on generic (and often obscure) archetypes of obstetric care in policy and programming. It suggests that current indicators may be insufficient to assess services in low-resource settings, but not that these settings should settle for lower standards of care. In addition to global benchmarks, assessment approaches that emphasize quality of care and recognize available resources might better account for local realities, leading to more effective, more sustainable service delivery. PMID:22789091

  13. Obstetrical paralysis.

    PubMed

    Chung, S M; Nissenbaum, M M

    1975-04-01

    Most patients with obstetrical paralysis have some useful functional return, and early recognition and treatment help prevent rapidly developing shoulder contractures. Initial physical therapy includes passive range of motion exercises. Fixed contractures must be released prior to reconstructive surgery designed to improve funtion. An approach to the diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment of obstetrical paralysis is given.

  14. Referrals between Public Sector Health Institutions for Women with Obstetric High Risk, Complications, or Emergencies in India – A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Samiksha; Doyle, Pat; Campbell, Oona M.; Mathew, Manu; Murthy, G. V. S.

    2016-01-01

    Emergency obstetric care (EmOC) within primary health care systems requires a linked referral system to be effective in reducing maternal death. This systematic review aimed to summarize evidence on the proportion of referrals between institutions during pregnancy and delivery, and the factors affecting referrals, in India. We searched 6 electronic databases, reviewed four regional databases and repositories, and relevant program reports from India published between 1994 and 2013. All types of study or reports (except editorials, comments and letters) which reported on institution-referrals (out-referral or in-referral) for obstetric care were included. Results were synthesized on the proportion and the reasons for referral, and factors affecting referrals. Of the 11,346 articles identified by the search, we included 232 articles in the full text review and extracted data from 16 studies that met our inclusion criteria Of the 16, one was RCT, seven intervention cohort (without controls), six cross-sectional, and three qualitative studies. Bias and quality of studies were reported. Between 25% and 52% of all pregnancies were referred from Sub-centres for antenatal high-risk, 14% to 36% from nurse run delivery or basic EmOC centres for complications or emergencies, and 2 to 7% were referred from doctor run basic EmOC centres for specialist care at comprehensive EmOC centres. Problems identified with referrals from peripheral health centres included low skills and confidence of staff, reluctance to induce labour, confusion over the clinical criteria for referral, non-uniform standards of care at referral institutions, a tendency to by-pass middle level institutions, a lack of referral communication and supervision, and poor compliance. The high proportion of referrals from peripheral health centers reflects the lack of appropriate clinical guidelines, processes, and skills for obstetric care and referral in India. This, combined with inadequate referral communication

  15. Emergency obstetrical complications in a rural African setting (Kayes, Mali): the link between travel time and in-hospital maternal mortality.

    PubMed

    Pirkle, Catherine McLean; Fournier, Pierre; Tourigny, Caroline; Sangaré, Karim; Haddad, Slim

    2011-10-01

    The West African country of Mali implemented referral systems to increase spatial access to emergency obstetrical care and lower maternal mortality. We test the hypothesis that spatial access- proxied by travel time during the rainy and dry seasons- is associated with in-hospital maternal mortality. Effect modification by caesarean section is explored. All women treated for emergency obstetrical complications at the referral hospital in Kayes, Mali were considered eligible for study. First, we conducted descriptive analyses of all emergency obstetrical complications treated at the referral hospital between 2005 and 2007. We calculated case fatality rates by obstetric diagnosis and travel time. Key informant interviews provided travel times. Medical registers provided clinical and demographic data. Second, a matched case-control study assessed the independent effect of travel time on maternal mortality. Stratification was used to explore effect modification by caesarean section. Case fatality rates increased with increasing travel time to the hospital. After controlling for age, diagnosis, and date of arrival, a travel time of four or more hours was significantly associated with in-hospital maternal mortality (OR: 3.83; CI: 1.31-11.27). Travel times between 2 and 4 h were associated with increased odds of maternal mortality (OR 1.88), but the relationship was not significant. The effect of travel time on maternal mortality appears to be modified by caesarean section. Poor spatial access contributes to maternal mortality even in women who reach a health facility. Improving spatial access will help women arrive at the hospital in time to be treated effectively.

  16. Obstetric medical care in Canada.

    PubMed

    Magee, Laura A; Cote, Anne-Marie; Joseph, Geena; Firoz, Tabassum; Sia, Winnie

    2016-09-01

    Obstetric medicine is a growing area of interest within internal medicine in Canada. Canadians continue to travel broadly to obtain relevant training, particularly in the United Kingdom. However, there is now a sufficient body of expertise in Canada that a cadre of 'home-grown' obstetric internists is emerging and staying within Canada to improve maternity care. As this critical mass of practitioners grows, it is apparent that models of obstetric medicine delivery have developed according to local needs and patterns of practice. This article aims to describe the state of obstetric medicine in Canada, including general internal medicine services as the rock on which Canadian obstetric medicine has been built, the Canadian training curriculum and opportunities, organisation of obstetric medicine service delivery and the future. PMID:27630747

  17. Obstetric medical care in Canada.

    PubMed

    Magee, Laura A; Cote, Anne-Marie; Joseph, Geena; Firoz, Tabassum; Sia, Winnie

    2016-09-01

    Obstetric medicine is a growing area of interest within internal medicine in Canada. Canadians continue to travel broadly to obtain relevant training, particularly in the United Kingdom. However, there is now a sufficient body of expertise in Canada that a cadre of 'home-grown' obstetric internists is emerging and staying within Canada to improve maternity care. As this critical mass of practitioners grows, it is apparent that models of obstetric medicine delivery have developed according to local needs and patterns of practice. This article aims to describe the state of obstetric medicine in Canada, including general internal medicine services as the rock on which Canadian obstetric medicine has been built, the Canadian training curriculum and opportunities, organisation of obstetric medicine service delivery and the future.

  18. Competence of health workers in emergency obstetric care: an assessment using clinical vignettes in Brong Ahafo region, Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Lohela, Terhi Johanna; Nesbitt, Robin Clark; Manu, Alexander; Vesel, Linda; Okyere, Eunice; Kirkwood, Betty; Gabrysch, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To assess health worker competence in emergency obstetric care using clinical vignettes, to link competence to availability of infrastructure in facilities, and to average annual delivery workload in facilities. Design Cross-sectional Health Facility Assessment linked to population-based surveillance data. Setting 7 districts in Brong Ahafo region, Ghana. Participants Most experienced delivery care providers in all 64 delivery facilities in the 7 districts. Primary outcome measures Health worker competence in clinical vignette actions by cadre of delivery care provider and by type of facility. Competence was also compared with availability of relevant drugs and equipment, and to average annual workload per skilled birth attendant. Results Vignette scores were moderate overall, and differed significantly by respondent cadre ranging from a median of 70% correct among doctors, via 55% among midwives, to 25% among other cadres such as health assistants and health extension workers (p<0.001). Competence varied significantly by facility type: hospital respondents, who were mainly doctors and midwives, achieved highest scores (70% correct) and clinic respondents scored lowest (45% correct). There was a lack of inexpensive key drugs and equipment to carry out vignette actions, and more often, lack of competence to use available items in clinical situations. The average annual workload was very unevenly distributed among facilities, ranging from 0 to 184 deliveries per skilled birth attendant, with higher workload associated with higher vignette scores. Conclusions Lack of competence might limit clinical practice even more than lack of relevant drugs and equipment. Cadres other than midwives and doctors might not be able to diagnose and manage delivery complications. Checking clinical competence through vignettes in addition to checklist items could contribute to a more comprehensive approach to evaluate quality of care. Trial registration number NCT00623337

  19. Availability and use of emergency obstetric care services in public hospitals in Laos PDR: a systems analysis.

    PubMed

    Douangphachanh, Xaysomphou; Ali, Moazzam; Outavong, Phathammavong; Alongkon, Phengsavanh; Sing, Menorath; Chushi, Kuroiwa

    2010-12-01

    The maternal mortality ratio in Laos in 2005 was 660 per 100,000 lives birth which was the third highest in Asia-Pacific Region. The objective was to determine the availability and use of emergency obstetric care (EmOC) in provincial and district hospitals in Borikhamxay, Khammouane, and Savannakhet provinces using UN guidelines. A hospital-based cross sectional survey was conducted from January to March 2008. All district (30) and provincial hospitals (3) from three provinces were included. Analysis was based on hospital records reflecting 12 months of facility data. Data indicates that only 14 hospitals (42.4%) were providing EmOC services, i.e., 9 basic, 5 comprehensive services. The proportion of births in EmOC facilities was only 11.2%, the met need was a very low 14.5%, and the cesarean section rate was only 0.9%. The case fatality rate in Borikhanxay province was 2.8%; in Khammouane and in Savannakhet provinces it was less than 1%. Record keeping at hospitals was poor. Signal functions provided in the last three months showed only 48.5% of the facilities performed assisted vaginal delivery. This is the first study in Lao PDR to assess EmOC services. Almost all the indicators were below the UN recommendations. Health planners must take evidence-based decisions to rectify and improve the situation in the hospitals regarding EmOC services. These data can therefore help government to assign and allocate budgets appropriately, and help policymakers and planners to identify systemic bottlenecks and prioritize solutions and will help in improving maternal health. PMID:21248430

  20. The changing face of obstetric fistula surgery in Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Jeremy; Ayenachew, Fekade; Ballard, Karen D

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine the incidence and type of obstetric fistula presenting to Hamlin Fistula Ethiopia over a 4-year period. Study design This is a 4-year retrospective survey of obstetric fistula treated at three Hamlin Fistula Hospitals in Ethiopia, where approximately half of all women in the country are treated. The operation logbook was reviewed to identify all new cases of obstetric fistula presenting from 2011 to 2015. New cases of urinary fistula were classified by fistula type (high or low), age, and parity of the woman. Results In total, 2,593 new cases of urinary fistulae were identified in the study period. The number of new cases fell by 20% per year over the 4 years (P<0.001). A total of 1,845 cases (71.1%) were low (ischemic) fistulae, and 804 cases (43.6%) of these had an extreme form of low circumferential fistula. A total of 638 (24.6%) women had a high bladder fistula, which predominantly occurs following surgery, specifically cesarean section or emergency hysterectomy, and 110 (4.2%) women had a ureteric fistula. The incidence of high fistulae increased over the study period from 26.9% to 36.2% (P<0.001). A greater proportion of multiparous women had a high bladder fistula (70.3%) compared with primigravid women (29.7%) (P<0.001). Conversely, a greater proportion of primiparous women experienced a low circumferential fistulae (68.6%) compared with multiparous women (31.4%) (P<0.001). Conclusion There appears to be a decline in the number of Ethiopian women being treated for new obstetric urinary fistulae. However, the type of fistula being presented for treatment is changing, with a rise in high fistulae that very likely occurred following cesarean section and a decline in the classic low fistulae that arise following obstructed childbirth. PMID:27445505

  1. Potentially Avoidable Peripartum Hysterectomies in Denmark: A Population Based Clinical Audit

    PubMed Central

    Krebs, Lone; Langhoff-Roos, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Objective To audit the clinical management preceding peripartum hysterectomy and evaluate if peripartum hysterectomies are potentially avoidable and by which means. Material and Methods We developed a structured audit form based on explicit criteria for the minimal mandatory management of the specific types of pregnancy and delivery complications leading to peripartum hysterectomy. We evaluated medical records of the 50 Danish women with peripartum hysterectomy identified in the Nordic Obstetric Surveillance Study 2009–2012 and made short narratives of all cases. Results The most frequent indication for hysterectomy was hemorrhage. The two main initial causes were abnormally invasive placenta (26%) and lacerations (26%). Primary atony was third and occurred in 20%. Before hysterectomy another 26% had secondary atony following complications such as lacerations, retained placental tissue or coagulation defects. Of the 50 cases, 24% were assessed to be avoidable and 30% potentially avoidable. Hysterectomy following primary and secondary atony was assessed to be avoidable in 4/10 and 4/13 cases, respectively. Early sufficient suturing of lacerations and uterine ruptures, as well as a more widespread use of intrauterine balloons alone or in combination with uterine compression sutures (the sandwich model), could presumably have prevented about one fourth of the peripartum hysterectomies. Conclusion More than 50% of peripartum hysterectomies seem to be avoidable by simple measures. In order to minimize the number of unnecessary peripartum hysterectomies, obstetricians and anesthesiologists should investigate individual cases by structured clinical audit, and disseminate and discuss the results for educational purposes. An international collaboration is warranted to strengthen our recommendations and reveal if they are generally applicable. PMID:27560802

  2. The End of the Hysterectomy Epidemic and Endometrial Cancer Incidence: What Are the Unintended Consequences of Declining Hysterectomy Rates?

    PubMed Central

    Temkin, Sarah M.; Minasian, Lori; Noone, Anne-Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Population-level cancer incidence rates are one measure to estimate the cancer burden. The goal is to provide information on trends to measure progress against cancer at the population level and identify emerging patterns signifying increased risk for additional research and intervention. Endometrial cancer is the most common of the gynecologic malignancies but capturing the incidence of disease among women at risk (i.e., women with a uterus) is challenging and not routinely published. Decreasing rates of hysterectomy increase the number of women at risk for disease, which should be reflected in the denominator of the incidence rate calculation. Furthermore, hysterectomy rates vary within the United States by multiple factors including geographic location, race, and ethnicity. Changing rates of hysterectomy are important to consider when looking at endometrial cancer trends. By correcting for hysterectomy when calculating incidence rates of cancers of the uterine corpus, many of the disparities that have been assumed for this disease are diminished. PMID:27148481

  3. Obstetrical Forceps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Marshall inventors Seth Lawson and Stanley Smeltzer display a pair of obstetrical forceps they designed. The forceps, made from composite space-age materials, measure the force applied during instrument-assisted delivery. The new forceps will help medical students get a feel for instrument-assisted deliveries before entering practice.

  4. Depression, anxiety, hostility and hysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Ewalds-Kvist, S Béatrice M; Hirvonen, Toivo; Kvist, Mårten; Lertola, Kaarlo; Niemelä, Pirkko

    2005-09-01

    Sixty-five women (aged 32 - 54 yrs) were assessed at 2 months before to 8 months after total abdominal hysterectomy on four separate occasions. Beck's Depression Inventory (BDI), Taylor's Manifest Anxiety Scale (TMAS), the Buss-Durkee Hostility Inventory (BDHI), Measurement of Masculinity-Femininity (MF), Likert scales and semantic differentials for psychological, somatic and sexual factors varied as assessment tools. High-dysphoric and low-dysphoric women were compared with regard to hysterectomy outcomes. Married nulliparae suffered from enhanced depression post-surgery. Pre-surgery anxiety, back pain and lack of dyspareunia contributed to post-surgery anxiety. Pre-surgery anxiety was related to life crises. Pre- and post-surgery hostility occurred in conjunction with poor sexual gratification. Post-hysterectomy health improved, but quality of sexual relationship was impaired. Partner support and knowledge counteracted hysterectomy aftermath. Post-hysterectomy symptoms constituted a continuum to pre-surgery signs of depression, anxiety or hostility.

  5. Transthoracic echocardiography in obstetric anaesthesia and obstetric critical illness.

    PubMed

    Dennis, A T

    2011-04-01

    Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) is a powerful non-invasive diagnostic, monitoring and measurement device in medicine. In addition to cardiologists, many other specialised groups, including emergency and critical care physicians and cardiac anaesthetists, have recognised its ability to provide high quality information and utilise TTE in the care of their patients. In obstetric anaesthesia and management of obstetric critical illness, the favourable characteristics of pregnant women facilitate TTE examination. These include anterior and left lateral displacement of the heart, frequent employment of the left lateral tilted position to avoid aortocaval compression, spontaneous ventilation and wide acceptance of ultrasound technology by women. Of relevance to obstetric anaesthetists is that maternal morbidity and mortality due to cardiovascular disease is significant worldwide. This makes TTE an appropriate, important and applicable device in pregnant women. Clinician-performed TTE enables differentiation between the life-threatening causes of hypotension. In the critically ill woman this improves diagnostic accuracy and allows treatment interventions to be instituted and monitored at the point of patient care. This article outlines the application of TTE in the specialty of obstetric anaesthesia and in the management of obstetric critical illness. It describes the importance of TTE education, quality assurance and outcome recording. It also discusses how barriers to the routine implementation of TTE in obstetric anaesthesia and management of obstetric critical illness can be overcome. PMID:21315578

  6. Haemorrhagia post partum; an implementation study on the evidence-based guideline of the Dutch Society of Obstetrics and Gynaecology (NVOG) and the MOET (Managing Obstetric Emergencies and Trauma-course) instructions; the Fluxim study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background One of the most important causes of maternal mortality and severe morbidity worldwide is post partum haemorrhage (PPH). Factors as substandard care are frequently reported in the international literature and there are similar reports in the Netherlands. The incidence of PPH in the Dutch population is 5% containing 10.000 women a year. The introduction of an evidence-based guideline on PPH by the Dutch society of Obstetrics and Gynaecology (NVOG) and the initiation of the MOET course (Managing Obstetrics Emergencies and Trauma) did not lead to a reduction of PPH. This implies the possibility of an incomplete implementation of both the NVOG guideline and MOET-instructions. Therefore, the aim of this study is to develop and test a tailored strategy to implement both the NVOG guideline and MOET-instructions Methods/Design One step in the development procedure is to evaluate the implementation of the guideline and MOET-instructions in the current care. Therefore measurement of the actual care will be performed in a representative sample of 20 hospitals. This will be done by prospective observation of the third stage of labour of 320 women with a high risk of PPH using quality indicators extracted from the NVOG guideline and MOET instructions. In the next step barriers and facilitators for guideline adherence will be analyzed by performance of semi structured interviews with 30 professionals and 10 patients, followed by a questionnaire study among all Dutch gynaecologists and midwives to quantify the barriers mentioned. Based on the outcomes, a tailored strategy to implement the NVOG guideline and MOET-instructions will be developed and tested in a feasibility study in 4 hospitals, including effect-, process- and cost evaluation. Discussion This study will provide insight into current Dutch practice, in particular to what extent the PPH guidelines of the NVOG and the MOET-instructions have been implemented in the actual care, and into the barriers and

  7. Assessment of selected perioperative parameters in patients undergoing laparoscopic and abdominal supracervical hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Skręt-Magierło, Joanna; Kluz, Tomasz; Barnaś, Edyta; Sobolewski, Marek; Raś, Renata; Skręt, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Subtotal hysterectomy is a method of treatment of patients with mild changes in the uterine body. Laparoscopic methods are increasingly used in surgical gynaecology. One of the limitations of laparoscopy is the proper level of operating surgeon's training, which may be assessed with the use of the learning curve. The aim of the study was to compare data regarding the perioperative period in patients who underwent subtotal hysterectomy with the two methods, and to establish a learning curve for laparoscopic subtotal hysterectomy. Material and methods One hundred and twenty-seven patients qualified for subtotal hysterectomy due to mild disturbances in the uterine body participated in the study. The study was conducted at the Clinical Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics of Fryderyk Chopin Provincial Specialist Hospital in Rzeszów in 2012-2013. Results The time of laparoscopic subtotal hysterectomy is longer than that of the classical surgical procedure. Uterine myomas are the main indication for subtotal hysterectomy. Laparoscopic operation results in lower blood loss compared to the classical surgical method. The mean age of the patients operated due to mild changes in the uterine body is similar in both groups. Patients who are obese or have undergone Caesarean sections are more frequently qualified for the classical surgery. The study revealed a reduction in time of laparoscopic subtotal hysterectomy by ca. 31 minutes (33%). Conclusions Laparoscopic subtotal hysterectomy is a method chosen by operating surgeons for patients with a lower perioperative risk. The period of the study made it possible to determine a learning curve for laparoscopic subtotal hysterectomy. PMID:26848296

  8. Factors Contributing to Massive Blood Loss on Peripartum Hysterectomy for Abnormally Invasive Placenta: Who Bleeds More?

    PubMed Central

    Usui, Rie; Suzuki, Hirotada; Baba, Yosuke

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. To identify factors that determine blood loss during peripartum hysterectomy for abnormally invasive placenta (AIP-hysterectomy). Methods. We reviewed all of the medical charts of 11,919 deliveries in a single tertiary perinatal center. We examined characteristics of AIP-hysterectomy patients, with a single experienced obstetrician attending all AIP-hysterectomies and using the same technique. Results. AIP-hysterectomy was performed in 18 patients (0.15%: 18/11,919). Of the 18, 14 (78%) had a prior cesarean section (CS) history and the other 4 (22%) were primiparous women. Planned AIP-hysterectomy was performed in 12/18 (67%), with the remaining 6 (33%) undergoing emergent AIP-hysterectomy. Of the 6, 4 (4/6: 67%) patients were primiparous women. An intra-arterial balloon was inserted in 9/18 (50%). Women with the following three factors significantly bled less in AIP-hysterectomy than its counterpart: the employment of an intra-arterial balloon (4,448 ± 1,948 versus 8,861 ± 3,988 mL), planned hysterectomy (5,003 ± 2,057 versus 9,957 ± 4,485 mL), and prior CS (5,706 ± 2,727 versus 9,975 ± 5,532 mL). Patients with prior CS (−) bled more: this may be because these patients tended to undergo emergent surgery or attempted placental separation. Conclusion. Patients with intra-arterial balloon catheter insertion bled less on AIP-hysterectomy. Massive bleeding occurred in emergent AIP-hysterectomy without prior CS. PMID:27630716

  9. Factors Contributing to Massive Blood Loss on Peripartum Hysterectomy for Abnormally Invasive Placenta: Who Bleeds More?

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hironori; Ohkuchi, Akihide; Usui, Rie; Suzuki, Hirotada; Baba, Yosuke; Matsubara, Shigeki

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. To identify factors that determine blood loss during peripartum hysterectomy for abnormally invasive placenta (AIP-hysterectomy). Methods. We reviewed all of the medical charts of 11,919 deliveries in a single tertiary perinatal center. We examined characteristics of AIP-hysterectomy patients, with a single experienced obstetrician attending all AIP-hysterectomies and using the same technique. Results. AIP-hysterectomy was performed in 18 patients (0.15%: 18/11,919). Of the 18, 14 (78%) had a prior cesarean section (CS) history and the other 4 (22%) were primiparous women. Planned AIP-hysterectomy was performed in 12/18 (67%), with the remaining 6 (33%) undergoing emergent AIP-hysterectomy. Of the 6, 4 (4/6: 67%) patients were primiparous women. An intra-arterial balloon was inserted in 9/18 (50%). Women with the following three factors significantly bled less in AIP-hysterectomy than its counterpart: the employment of an intra-arterial balloon (4,448 ± 1,948 versus 8,861 ± 3,988 mL), planned hysterectomy (5,003 ± 2,057 versus 9,957 ± 4,485 mL), and prior CS (5,706 ± 2,727 versus 9,975 ± 5,532 mL). Patients with prior CS (-) bled more: this may be because these patients tended to undergo emergent surgery or attempted placental separation. Conclusion. Patients with intra-arterial balloon catheter insertion bled less on AIP-hysterectomy. Massive bleeding occurred in emergent AIP-hysterectomy without prior CS. PMID:27630716

  10. Factors Contributing to Massive Blood Loss on Peripartum Hysterectomy for Abnormally Invasive Placenta: Who Bleeds More?

    PubMed Central

    Usui, Rie; Suzuki, Hirotada; Baba, Yosuke

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. To identify factors that determine blood loss during peripartum hysterectomy for abnormally invasive placenta (AIP-hysterectomy). Methods. We reviewed all of the medical charts of 11,919 deliveries in a single tertiary perinatal center. We examined characteristics of AIP-hysterectomy patients, with a single experienced obstetrician attending all AIP-hysterectomies and using the same technique. Results. AIP-hysterectomy was performed in 18 patients (0.15%: 18/11,919). Of the 18, 14 (78%) had a prior cesarean section (CS) history and the other 4 (22%) were primiparous women. Planned AIP-hysterectomy was performed in 12/18 (67%), with the remaining 6 (33%) undergoing emergent AIP-hysterectomy. Of the 6, 4 (4/6: 67%) patients were primiparous women. An intra-arterial balloon was inserted in 9/18 (50%). Women with the following three factors significantly bled less in AIP-hysterectomy than its counterpart: the employment of an intra-arterial balloon (4,448 ± 1,948 versus 8,861 ± 3,988 mL), planned hysterectomy (5,003 ± 2,057 versus 9,957 ± 4,485 mL), and prior CS (5,706 ± 2,727 versus 9,975 ± 5,532 mL). Patients with prior CS (−) bled more: this may be because these patients tended to undergo emergent surgery or attempted placental separation. Conclusion. Patients with intra-arterial balloon catheter insertion bled less on AIP-hysterectomy. Massive bleeding occurred in emergent AIP-hysterectomy without prior CS.

  11. Quality of care for obstetric emergencies in 4 general hospitals in Egypt: an observational study of delays in receiving care and blood bank services.

    PubMed

    Nada, K H; Barakat, A A; Gipson, R

    2011-01-01

    A lack of available blood contributes to 16% of all maternal deaths in Egypt. This study aimed to assess the quality of care for obstetric emergencies in 4 general hospitals in Egypt over a 6-month period with the focus on delays in receiving care and blood bank services. Observations were made of the processes and delays in the clinical setting, from the start of each patient's complaint until discharge, and the receipt and filling of orders for blood at the blood bank. Patients failed to recognize danger signs. Lack of transportation, incorrect choice of provider or facility and unclear referral systems added further delays. Delays occurred in hospital admission, assessment of patients, initiation of resuscitation, initiation of medical or surgical interventions, ordering blood, J receipt of blood and administration of blood to patients. The blood ordering procedures were substandard. Lack of blood availability had multidisciplinary causes.

  12. 'Maybe it was her fate and maybe she ran out of blood': final caregivers' perspectives on access to care in obstetric emergencies in rural Indonesia.

    PubMed

    D'Ambruoso, Lucia; Byass, Peter; Qomariyah, Siti Nurul

    2010-03-01

    Maternal mortality persists in low-income settings despite preventability with skilled birth attendance and emergency obstetric care. Poor access limits the effectiveness of life-saving interventions and is typical of maternal health care in low-income settings. This paper examines access to care in obstetric emergencies from the perspectives of service users, using established and contemporary theoretical frameworks of access and a routine health surveillance method. The implications for health planning are also considered. The final caregivers of 104 women who died during pregnancy or childbirth were interviewed in two rural districts in Indonesia using an adapted verbal autopsy. Qualitative analysis revealed social and economic barriers to access and barriers that arose from the health system itself. Health insurance for the poor was highly problematic. For providers, incomplete reimbursements, and low public pay, acted as disincentives to treat the poor. For users, the schemes were poorly socialized and understood, complicated to use and led to lower quality care. Services, staff, transport, equipment and supplies were also generally unavailable or unaffordable. The multiple barriers to access conferred a cumulative disadvantage that culminated in exclusion. This was reflected in expressions of powerlessness and fatalism regarding the deaths. The analysis suggests that conceiving of access as a structurally determined, complex and dynamic process, and as a reciprocally maintained phenomenon of disadvantaged groups, may provide useful explanatory concepts for health planning. Health planning from this perspective may help to avoid perpetuating exclusion on social and economic grounds, by health systems and services, and help foster a sense of control at the micro-level, among peoples' feelings and behaviours regarding their health. Verbal autopsy surveys provide an opportunity to routinely collect information on the exclusory mechanisms of health systems

  13. Turkish hysterectomy and mastectomy patients - depression, body image, sexual problems and spouse relationships.

    PubMed

    Keskin, Gulseren; Gumus, Aysun Babacan

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare hysterectomy and mastectomy patients in terms of depression, body image, sexual problems and spouse relations. The study group comprised 94 patients being treated in Ege University Radiation Oncology Clinic, Tulay Aktas Oncology Hospital, Izmir Aegean Obstetrics and Gynecology Training and Research Hospital for breast and gynecological cancer (42 patients underwent mastectomy, 52 patient underwent hysterectomy). Five scales were used in the study: Sociodemographic Data Form, Beck Depression Scale, Body Image Scale, Dyadic Adjustment Scale, Golombok Rust Sexual Functions Scale. Mastectomy patients were more depressive than hysterectomy patients (t = 2.78, p < 0.01). Body image levels of the patients were bad but there was no significant difference between the two patient groups (p > 0.05). Hysterectomy patients had more problems in terms of vaginismus (t = 2.32, p < 0.05), avoidance of sexual intercourse (t = 2.31, p < 0.05), communication (t = 2.06, p < 0.05), and frequency of sexual intercourse than mastectomy patients (t = 2.10, p < 0.05). As compared with compliance levels between patients and spouses; hysterectomy patients had more problems related to expression of emotions than mastectomy patients (t = 2.12, p < 0.05). In conclusion, body image was negative, mastectomy was associated with more depression and hysterectomy with greater sexual problems and difficulties with spouse relationships. PMID:21545207

  14. Preoperative teaching and hysterectomy outcomes.

    PubMed

    Oetker-Black, Sharon L; Jones, Susan; Estok, Patricia; Ryan, Marian; Gale, Nancy; Parker, Carla

    2003-06-01

    This study used a theoretical model to determine whether an efficacy-enhancing teaching protocol was effective in improving immediate postoperative behaviors and selected short- and long-term health outcomes in women who underwent abdominal hysterectomies. The model used was the self-efficacy theory of Albert Bandura, PhD. One hundred eight patients in a 486-bed teaching hospital in the Midwest who underwent hysterectomies participated. The participation rate was 85%, and the attrition rate was 17% during the six-month study. The major finding was that participants in the efficacy-enhancing teaching group ambulated significantly longer than participants in the usual care group. This is an important finding because the most prevalent postoperative complications after hysterectomy are atelectasis, pneumonia, paralytic ileus, and deep vein thrombosis, and postoperative ambulation has been shown to decrease or prevent all of these complications. This finding could affect the overall health status of women undergoing hysterectomies.

  15. Preoperative teaching and hysterectomy outcomes.

    PubMed

    Oetker-Black, Sharon L; Jones, Susan; Estok, Patricia; Ryan, Marian; Gale, Nancy; Parker, Carla

    2003-06-01

    This study used a theoretical model to determine whether an efficacy-enhancing teaching protocol was effective in improving immediate postoperative behaviors and selected short- and long-term health outcomes in women who underwent abdominal hysterectomies. The model used was the self-efficacy theory of Albert Bandura, PhD. One hundred eight patients in a 486-bed teaching hospital in the Midwest who underwent hysterectomies participated. The participation rate was 85%, and the attrition rate was 17% during the six-month study. The major finding was that participants in the efficacy-enhancing teaching group ambulated significantly longer than participants in the usual care group. This is an important finding because the most prevalent postoperative complications after hysterectomy are atelectasis, pneumonia, paralytic ileus, and deep vein thrombosis, and postoperative ambulation has been shown to decrease or prevent all of these complications. This finding could affect the overall health status of women undergoing hysterectomies. PMID:12817743

  16. Vaginal hysterectomy: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Moen, Michael D; Richter, Holly E

    2014-09-01

    Vaginal hysterectomy is the oldest and least invasive of the hysterectomy techniques and fulfills the evidence-based requirements as the preferred route of hysterectomy for benign gynecologic disease. Currently, vaginal hysterectomy is commonly utilized for treating uterine prolapse, but despite proven safety and effectiveness, the use of vaginal hysterectomy for treating non-prolapse conditions has been and remains underutilized in surgical practice. Improving the use of vaginal hysterectomy in the future will likely depend on addressing the key issues of training and maintaining skills in the technique and increasing awareness of the scientific evidence supporting its use.

  17. 42 CFR 441.255 - Sterilization by hysterectomy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Sterilization by hysterectomy. 441.255 Section 441.255 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... description of the nature of the emergency. (e) Effective March 8, 1979, or any date thereafter through...

  18. Clinical observation of laparoscopic radical hysterectomy for cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Xiang-Hua; Wang, Zhong-Qin; Yang, Shi-Zhang; Jia, Hong-Yan; Shi, Min

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate safety, feasibility and the improvement of surgical method of laparoscopic extensive hysterectomy and pelvic lymph node dissection in patients with early-stage cervical cancer. Clinical data were prospectively collected from patients with IA2-IIA cervical cancer who underwent laparoscopic extensive hysterectomy (n1=22) and laparotomy (n2=23) in Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology in the Subei People’s Hospital from June 2010 to August 2013. The successful rates in two groups of operation were 100%. Blood loss, postoperative hospital stay, complication rate, postoperative recovery of gastrointestinal tract and bladder function of the laparoscopy group of the laparoscopic group were all better than those of the laparotomy group, and there were significant differences (all P < 0.05). But in the laparoscopy group, the operative time was longer than the laparotomy group with statistical significance (P < 0.05). There was no statistically significant difference in the number of excised lymph nodes and the duration time of postoperative urinary catheterization between the two groups (P > 0.05). Laparoscopic extensive hysterectomy and pelvic lymph node dissection can fully meet the requirement of laparotomy. It has the properties of minor trauma and rapid recovery. The clinical efficacy is superior to laparotomy surgery. The results indicated laparoscopic is an ideal method for the treatment of early cervical cancer. PMID:24995098

  19. Robotic radical hysterectomy: applying principles of the laparoscopic Pune technique.

    PubMed

    Puntambekar, Shailesh P; Agarwal, Geetanjali A; Joshi, Saurabh N; Rayate, Neeraj V; Puntambekar, Seema S; Sathe, Ravi M

    2010-12-01

    Minimal access surgery is an accepted treatment modality in cervical cancer. Despite the advantages of laparoscopy, the surgical technique of laparoscopic radical hysterectomy is not very commonly performed. Robotic surgery is an emerging field with rapid acceptance because of the 3-dimensional image, dexterity of instruments and autonomy of camera control. We report here our technique of performing robotic radical hysterectomy using the Da Vinci surgical system. Twenty patients with cervical cancer stage 1a1-1b2 underwent robotic radical hysterectomy since December 2009. The median duration of surgery was 122 min, and the average blood loss was 100 ml. Postoperative ureteric fistulas occurred in two patients and were managed by ureteric stenting. The median lymph node retrieval was 30 nodes (range 18-38). We compared our robotic results with our published data on laparoscopic radical hysterectomy (Pune technique). We were able to complete all 20 cases robotically with minimal morbidity, and could duplicate our laparoscopic steps in robotic radical hysterectomy. PMID:27627955

  20. Indications and Route of Hysterectomy for Benign Diseases. Guideline of the DGGG, OEGGG and SGGG (S3 Level, AWMF Registry No. 015/070, April 2015)

    PubMed Central

    Neis, K. J.; Zubke, W.; Römer, T.; Schwerdtfeger, K.; Schollmeyer, T.; Rimbach, S.; Holthaus, B.; Solomayer, E.; Bojahr, B.; Neis, F.; Reisenauer, C.; Gabriel, B.; Dieterich, H.; Runnenbaum, I. B.; Kleine, W.; Strauss, A.; Menton, M.; Mylonas, I.; David, M.; Horn, L-C.; Schmidt, D.; Gaß, P.; Teichmann, A. T.; Brandner, P.; Stummvoll, W.; Kuhn, A.; Müller, M.; Fehr, M.; Tamussino, K.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Official guideline “indications and methods of hysterectomy” to assign indications for the different methods published and coordinated by the German Society of Gynecology and Obstetrics (DGGG), the Austrian Society of Gynecology and Obstetrics (OEGGG) and the Swiss Society of Gynecology and Obstetrics (SGGG). Besides vaginal and abdominal hysterectomy, three additional techniques have been implemented due to the introduction of laparoscopy. Organ-sparing alternatives were also integrated. Methods: The guideline group consisted of 26 experts from Germany, Austria and Switzerland. Recommendations were developed using a structured consensus process and independent moderation. A systematic literature search and quality appraisal of benefits and harms of the therapeutic alternatives for symptomatic fibroids, dysfunctional bleeding and adenomyosis was done through MEDLINE up to 6/2014 focusing on systematic reviews and meta-analysis. Results: All types of hysterectomy led in studies to high rates of patient satisfaction. If possible, vaginal instead of abdominal hysterectomy should preferably be done. If a vaginal hysterectomy is not feasible, the possibility of a laparoscopic hysterectomy should be considered. An abdominal hysterectomy should only be done with a special indication. Organ-sparing interventions also led to high patient satisfaction rates, but contain the risk of symptom recurrence. Conclusion: As an aim, patients should be enabled to choose that therapeutic intervention for their benign disease of the uterus that convenes best to them and their personal life situation. PMID:27667852

  1. Impact of a low-technology simulation-based obstetric and newborn care training scheme on non-emergency delivery practices in Guatemala

    PubMed Central

    Walton, Anna; Kestler, Edgar; Dettinger, Julia C.; Zelek, Sarah; Holme, Francesca; Walker, Dilys

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the effect of a low-technology simulation-based training scheme for obstetric and perinatal emergency management (PRONTO; Programa de Rescate Obstétrico y Neonatal: Tratamiento Óptimo y Oportuno) on non-emergency delivery practices at primary level clinics in Guatemala. Methods A paired cross-sectional birth observation study was conducted with a convenience sample of 18 clinics (nine pairs of intervention and control clinics) from June 28 to August 7, 2013. Outcomes included implementation of practices known to decrease maternal and/or neonatal mortality and improve patient care. Results Overall, 25 and 17 births occurred in intervention and control clinics, respectively. Active management of the third stage of labor was appropriately performed by 20 (83%) of 24 intervention teams versus 7 (50%) of 14 control teams (P = 0.015). Intervention teams implemented more practices to decrease neonatal mortality than did control teams (P < 0.001). Intervention teams ensured patient privacy in 23 (92%) of 25 births versus 11 (65%) of 17 births for control teams (P = 0.014). All 15 applicable intervention teams kept patients informed versus 6 (55%) of 11 control teams (P = 0.001). Differences were also noted in teamwork; in particular, skill-based tools were used more often at intervention sites than control sites (P = 0.012). Conclusion Use of PRONTO enhanced non-emergency delivery care by increasing evidence-based practice, patient-centered care, and teamwork. PMID:26797198

  2. Massive obstetric hemorrhage: Current approach to management.

    PubMed

    Guasch, E; Gilsanz, F

    2016-01-01

    Massive obstetric hemorrhage is a major cause of maternal mortality and morbidity worldwide. It is defined (among others) as the loss of>2,500ml of blood, and is associated to a need for admission to critical care and/or hysterectomy. The relative hemodilution and high cardiac output found in normal pregnancy allows substantial bleeding before a drop in hemoglobin and/or hematocrit can be identified. Some comorbidities associated with pregnancy can contribute to the occurrence of catastrophic bleeding with consumption coagulopathy, which makes the situation even worse. Optimization, preparation, rational use of resources and protocolization of actions are often useful to improve outcomes in patients with postpartum hemorrhage. Using massive obstetric hemorrhage protocols is useful for facilitating rapid transfusion if needed, and can also be cost-effective. If hypofibrinogenemia during the bleeding episode is identified, early fibrinogen administration can be very useful. Other coagulation factors in addition to fibrinogen may be necessary during postpartum hemorrhage replacement measures in order to effectively correct coagulopathy. A hysterectomy is recommended if the medical and surgical measures prove ineffective. PMID:27184441

  3. [Caesarean hysterectomy or tubal coagulation following caesarean section--a comparison].

    PubMed

    Richter, K; Eiermann, W

    1983-04-01

    From 1973 to 1982 a total of 99 Caesarean hysterectomies and 105 Caesarean sections with subsequent tubal coagulation were performed. This represents 6.5% and 6.9%, respectively, of all Caesarean sections. After excluding the emergency cases, 86 planned Caesarean hysterectomies and 99 Caesarean sections combined with tubal coagulation remained. Statistical evaluation showed that the postoperative course was more favourable and less febrile with Caesarean hysterectomy than with tubal coagulation after Caesarean section. The somewhat greater loss of blood after hysterectomy is practically without any sequel. Hysterectomy saves the patient from subsequent uterine diseases, ascending infections, menstrual anaemias, problems of hygiene, etc. Caesarean hysterectomy appears to be the method of choice if surgical sterilisation is deemed appropriate besides performing the Caesarean section; if the patient has been informed of the operation in detail; if the patient feels no emotional ties towards the uterus; if there has been ample opportunity to think things over calmly; and if the surgeon is really skilled in performing hysterectomy.

  4. Use and misuse of the term "elective" in obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Berghella, Vincenzo; Blackwell, Sean C; Ramin, Susan M; Sibai, Baha M; Saade, George R

    2011-02-01

    The term "elective" is commonly used in obstetrics. We performed an electronic search of MEDLINE database using the terms "elective" and "obstetrics," which provided 2,208 publications. We found "elective" was more often used in relation to surgical interventions (eg, cesarean delivery, cerclage) and medical procedures (labor induction) rather than diagnostic procedures. Our review indicates the term lacks the necessary scientific specificity when used to modify procedures such as cerclage, cesarean delivery, timing of delivery, episiotomy, hysterectomy, labor induction, preterm delivery, termination of pregnancy, and ultrasonography. The lack of specificity of the term suggests the most reasonable and prudent course of action is to not use it, but rather to document the specific indication (whether medical or non-medical) for the intervention or procedure (eg, "cesarean delivery on maternal request," "history-indicated cerclage," "induction for preeclampsia"). We propose that the term "elective" should be eliminated from the vocabulary of obstetric practice.

  5. The Role of Interventional Radiology in Obstetric Hemorrhage

    SciTech Connect

    Gonsalves, M. Belli, A.

    2010-10-15

    Obstetric hemorrhage remains a major cause of maternal morbidity and mortality worldwide. Traditionally, in cases of obstetric hemorrhage refractory to conservative treatment, obstetricians have resorted to major surgery with the associated risks of general anesthesia, laparotomy, and, in the case of hysterectomy, loss of fertility. Over the past two decades, the role of pelvic arterial embolization has evolved from a novel treatment option to playing a key role in the management of obstetric hemorrhage. To date, interventional radiology offers a minimally invasive, fertility-preserving alternative to conventional surgical treatment. We review current literature regarding the role of interventional radiology in postpartum hemorrhage, abnormal placentation, abortion, and cervical ectopic pregnancy. We discuss techniques, success rates, and complications.

  6. Assessing emergency obstetric care provision in low- and middle-income countries: a systematic review of the application of global guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Banke-Thomas, Aduragbemi; Wright, Kikelomo; Sonoiki, Olatunji; Banke-Thomas, Oluwasola; Ajayi, Babatunde; Ilozumba, Onaedo; Akinola, Oluwarotimi

    2016-01-01

    Background Lack of timely and quality emergency obstetric care (EmOC) has contributed significantly to maternal morbidity and mortality, particularly in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Since 2009, the global guideline, referred to as the ‘handbook’, has been used to monitor availability, utilization, and quality of EmOC. Objective To assess application and explore experiences of researchers in LMICs in assessing EmOC. Design Multiple databases of peer-reviewed literature were systematically reviewed on EmOC assessments in LMICs, since 2009. Following set criteria, we included articles, assessed for quality based on a newly developed checklist, and extracted data using a pre-designed extraction tool. We used thematic summaries to condense our findings and mapped patterns that we observed. To analyze experiences and recommendations for improved EmOC assessments, we took a deductive approach for the framework synthesis. Results Twenty-seven studies met our inclusion criteria, with 17 judged as high quality. The highest publication frequency was observed in 2015. Most assessments were conducted in Nigeria and Tanzania (four studies each) and Bangladesh and Ghana (three each). Most studies (17) were done at subnational levels with 23 studies using the ‘handbook’ alone, whereas the others combined the ‘handbook’ with other frameworks. Seventeen studies conducted facility-based surveys, whereas others used mixed methods. For different reasons, intrapartum and very early neonatal death rate and proportion of deaths due to indirect causes in EmOC facilities were the least reported indicators. Key emerging themes indicate that data quality for EmOC assessments can be improved, indicators should be refined, a holistic approach is required for EmOC assessments, and assessments should be conducted as routine processes. Conclusions There is clear justification to review how EmOC assessments are being conducted. Synergy between researchers, EmOC program

  7. Tocolytic Drugs for Use in Veterinary Obstetrics

    PubMed Central

    Ménard, L.

    1984-01-01

    The author presents a literature review of two tocolytic agents used in veterinary obstetrics: isoxsuprine and clenbuterol. The medical background from which these drugs emerged for human use and to which is linked their application in animal medicine is described. Each drug is reviewed according to its pharmacology, basic considerations for its clinical use and the reports on its application in the treatment and management of obstetrical disorders in veterinary medicine. PMID:17422462

  8. Size matters in planning hysterectomy approach.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Yasmina; Chiu, Vicki Y; Lonky, Neal M

    2016-07-01

    Hysterectomy is the second most common gynecologic surgery; approximately 600,000 women undergo hysterectomies each year in the United States. Estimated uterine size, either by bimanual examination, ultrasonography, or both, is one of the major factors in evaluating the need for hysterectomy and in selecting the surgical approach. In this article, we review how physician-estimated uterine size can be confidently used in providing optimal hysterectomy care, as data indicate estimation is closely correlated with actual post-surgical pelvic specimen weight. PMID:27638893

  9. Exchange of intraoperative balloon occlusion of the internal iliac artery for the common iliac artery during cesarean hysterectomy in a patient with placenta percreta

    PubMed Central

    Hishikawa, Kenji; Koshiyama, Masafumi; Ueda, Masashi; Yamaguchi, Ayaka; Ukita, Shingo; Yagi, Haruhiko; Kakui, Kazuyo

    2013-01-01

    Patient: Female, 36 Final Diagnosis: Pregnancy – placenta increta Symptoms: — Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Cesarean hysterectomy Specialty: Obstetrics and Gynecology Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: The generally accepted treatment for placenta percreta is cesarean hysterectomy without attempts to detach the placenta. Preoperative internal iliac artery balloon occlusion (IIABO) has been widely performed to minimize blood loss during cesarean hysterectomy for an abnormal attachment of the placenta. Our case is the first reported case of common iliac artery balloon occlusion (CIABO) being more effective than IIABO for reducing blood loss during a cesarean hysterectomy in the same patient. Case Report: We performed cesarean hysterectomy with IIABO in a 36-year-old Japanese female who had placenta percreta. However, there was still a large amount of blood loss. We immediately changed the balloon from the internal iliac artery to the common iliac artery, which visibly reduced the amount of blood loss. We finally achieved cesarean hysterectomy. Conclusions: CIABO was found to be more effective than IIABO for reducing blood loss during cesarean hysterectomy. Failure of IIABO can be explained by the presence of extensive anastomoses in the pelvic vasculature. PMID:24147189

  10. Barriers in the Delivery of Emergency Obstetric and Neonatal Care in Post-Conflict Africa: Qualitative Case Studies of Burundi and Northern Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Primus Che; Bulage, Patience; Urdal, Henrik; Sundby, Johanne

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Maternal and neonatal mortality and morbidity rates are particularly grim in conflict, post-conflict and other crisis settings, a situation partly blamed on non-availability and/or poor quality of emergency obstetric and neonatal care (EmONC) services. The aim of this study was to explore the barriers to effective delivery of EmONC services in post-conflict Burundi and Northern Uganda, in order to provide policy makers and other relevant stakeholders context-relevant data on improving the delivery of these lifesaving services. Methods This was a qualitative comparative case study that used 42 face-to-face semi-structured in-depth interviews and 4 focus group discussions for data collection. Participants were 32 local health providers and 37 staff of NGOs working in the area of maternal health. Data was analysed using the framework approach. Results The availability, quality and distribution of EmONC services were major challenges across the sites. The barriers in the delivery of quality EmONC services were categorised into two major themes; human resources-related challenges, and systemic and institutional failures. While some of the barriers were similar, others were unique to specific sites. The common barriers included shortage of qualified staff; lack of essential installations, supplies and medications; increasing workload, burn-out and turnover; and poor data collection and monitoring systems. Barriers unique to Northern Uganda were demoralised personnel and lack of recognition; poor referral system; inefficient drug supply system; staff absenteeism in rural areas; and poor coordination among key personnel. In Burundi, weak curriculum; poor harmonisation and coordination of training; and inefficient allocation of resources were the unique challenges. To improve the situation across the sites, efforts are ongoing to improve the training and recruitment of more staff; harmonise and strengthen the curriculum and training; increase the number of Em

  11. Involving traditional birth attendants in emergency obstetric care in Tanzania: policy implications of a study of their knowledge and practices in Kigoma Rural District

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Access to quality maternal health services mainly depends on existing policies, regulations, skills, knowledge, perceptions, and economic power and motivation of service givers and target users. Critics question policy recommending involvement of traditional birth attendants (TBAs) in emergency obstetric care (EmoC) services in developing countries. Objectives This paper reports about knowledge and practices of TBAs on EmoC in Kigoma Rural District, Tanzania and discusses policy implications on involving TBAs in maternal health services. Methods 157 TBAs were identified from several villages in 2005, interviewed and observed on their knowledge and practice in relation to EmoC. Quantitative and qualitative techniques were used for data collection and analysis depending on the nature of the information required. Findings Among all 157 TBAs approached, 57.3% were aged 50+ years while 50% had no formal education. Assisting mothers to deliver without taking their full pregnancy history was confessed by 11% of all respondents. Having been attending pregnant women with complications was experienced by 71.2% of all respondents. Only 58% expressed adequate knowledge on symptoms and signs of pregnancy complications. Lack of knowledge on possible risk of HIV infections while assisting childbirth without taking protective gears was claimed by 5.7% of the respondents. Sharing the same pair of gloves between successful deliveries was reported to be a common practice by 21.1% of the respondents. Use of unsafe delivery materials including local herbs and pieces of cloth for protecting themselves against HIV infections was reported as being commonly practiced among 27.6% of the respondents. Vaginal examination before and during delivery was done by only a few respondents. Conclusion TBAs in Tanzania are still consulted by people living in underserved areas. Unfortunately, TBAs’ inadequate knowledge on EmOC issues seems to have contributed to the rising concerns about

  12. Competence of birth attendants at providing emergency obstetric care under India’s JSY conditional cash transfer program for institutional delivery: an assessment using case vignettes in Madhya Pradesh province

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Access to emergency obstetric care by competent staff can reduce maternal mortality. India has launched the Janani Suraksha Yojana (JSY) conditional cash transfer program to promote institutional births. During implementation of the JSY, India witnessed a steep increase in the proportion of institutional deliveries-from 40% in 2004 to 73% in 2012. However, maternal mortality reduction follows a secular trend. Competent management of complications, when women deliver in facilities under the JSY, is essential for reduction in maternal mortality and therefore to a successful program outcome. We investigate, using clinical vignettes, whether birth attendants at institutions under the program are competent at providing appropriate care for obstetric complications. Methods A facility based cross-sectional study was conducted in three districts of Madhya Pradesh (MP) province. Written case vignettes for two obstetric complications, hemorrhage and eclampsia, were administered to 233 birth attendant nurses at 73 JSY facilities. Their competence at (a) initial assessment, (b) diagnosis, and (c) making decisions on appropriate first-line care for these complications was scored. Results The mean emergency obstetric care (EmOC) competence score was 5.4 (median = 5) on a total score of 20, and 75% of participants scored below 35% of the maximum score. The overall score, although poor, was marginally higher in respondents with Skilled Birth Attendant (SBA) training, those with general nursing and midwifery qualifications, those at higher facility levels, and those conducting >30 deliveries a month. In all, 14% of respondents were competent at assessment, 58% were competent at making a correct clinical diagnosis, and 20% were competent at providing first-line care. Conclusions Birth attendants in the JSY facilities have low competence at EmOC provision. Hence, births in the JSY program cannot be considered to have access to competent EmOC. Urgent efforts are

  13. Obstetric antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Esteve-Valverde, E; Ferrer-Oliveras, R; Alijotas-Reig, J

    2016-04-01

    Obstetric antiphospholipid syndrome is an acquired autoimmune disorder that is associated with various obstetric complications and, in the absence of prior history of thrombosis, with the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies directed against other phospholipids, proteins called cofactors or PL-cofactor complexes. Although the obstetric complications have been related to the procoagulant properties of antiphospholipid antibodies, pathological studies of human placenta have shown the proinflammatory capacity of antiphospholipid antibodies via the complement system and proinflammatory cytokines. There is no general agreement on which antiphospholipid antibodies profile (laboratory) confers the greatest obstetric risk, but the best candidates are categories I and IIa. Combined treatment with low doses of aspirin and heparin achieves good obstetric and maternal outcomes. In this study, we also review the therapeutic possibilities in refractory cases, although the likelihood of progressing to other autoimmune diseases is low. We briefly comment on incomplete obstetric antiphospholipid syndrome, also known as antiphospholipid antibody-mediated pregnancy morbidity syndrome. PMID:26603476

  14. Laparoscopic Supracervical Hysterectomy versus Laparoscopic-Assisted Vaginal Hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Waters, Heidi C.; Pan, Katy; Subramanian, Dhinagar; Sedgley, Robert C.; Raff, Gregory J.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To compare the incidence of perioperative complications and postoperative healthcare utilization and costs in laparoscopic supracervical hysterectomy (LSH) versus laparoscopic-assisted vaginal hysterectomy (LAVH) patients. Methods: Women ≥18 years with LSH or LAVH were extracted using a large national commercial claims database from 1/1/2007 through 9/30/2008. Outcome was perioperative complications and gynecologic-related postoperative resource use and costs. Multivariate analysis was performed to compare postsurgical outcomes between the cohorts. Results: The final sample consisted of 6,198 LSH patients and 14,181 LAVH patients. LSH patients were significantly more likely to have dysfunctional uterine bleeding and leiomyomas and less likely to have endometriosis and prolapse as the primary diagnosis, and also significantly more likely to have a uterus that weighed >250 grams than LAVH patients. Compared with LAVH patients, LSH patients had significantly lower overall infection rates (7.4% versus 6.2%, P=.002) and lower total gynecologic-related postoperative costs ($252 versus $385, P<.001, within 30 days of follow-up and $350 versus $569, P<.001, within 180 days of follow-up). Significant cost differences remained following multivariate adjustment for patient characteristics. Conclusions: LSH patients demonstrated fewer perioperative complications and lower GYN-related postoperative costs compared to LAVH patients. PMID:22643499

  15. Place of Schauta's radical vaginal hysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Roy, Michel; Plante, Marie

    2011-04-01

    Women affected by early stage invasive cancer of the cervix are usually treated by surgery. Radical abdominal hysterectomy with pelvic lymphadenectomy is the most widely used technique. Because the morbidity of the abdominal approach can be important, the radical vaginal hysterectomy has gained acceptance in gynaecologic oncology. New instrumentation in laparoscopy also opens the possibility of treating cervical cancer by laparoscopically assisted vaginal radical hysterectomy and also total laparoscopic radical hysterectomy. Before these techniques become widely accepted, it has to be shown that safety and efficacy are comparable with the 'standard' abdominal approach. In this chapter, we review the technique of radical vaginal hysterectomy with pelvic lymphadenectomy and evaluate results of published studies, comparing the abdominal, vaginal and laparoscopic approaches.

  16. An audit of indications, complications, and justification of hysterectomies at a teaching hospital in India.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Deeksha; Sehgal, Kriti; Saxena, Aashish; Hebbar, Shripad; Nambiar, Jayaram; Bhat, Rajeshwari G

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Aim of this audit was to analyze indications, complications, and correlation of preoperative diagnosis with final histopathology report of all hysterectomies, performed in a premier teaching hospital. Methods. Present study involved all patients who underwent hysterectomy at a premier university hospital in Southern India, in one year (from 1 January, 2012, to 31 December, 2012). Results. Most common surgical approach was abdominal (74.7%), followed by vaginal (17.8%), and laparoscopic (6.6%) hysterectomy. Most common indication for hysterectomy was symptomatic fibroid uterus (39.9%), followed by uterovaginal prolapse (16.3%). Overall complication rate was 8.5%. Around 84% had the same pathology as suspected preoperatively. Only 6 (5 with preoperative diagnosis of abnormal uterine bleeding and one with high grade premalignant cervical lesion) had no significant pathology in their hysterectomy specimen. Conclusion. Hysterectomy is used commonly to improve the quality of life; however at times it is a lifesaving procedure. As any surgical procedure is associated with a risk of complications, the indication should be carefully evaluated. With the emergence of many conservative approaches to deal with benign gynecological conditions, it is prudent to discuss available options with the patient before taking a direct decision of surgically removing her uterus.

  17. 'In situ simulation' versus 'off site simulation' in obstetric emergencies and their effect on knowledge, safety attitudes, team performance, stress, and motivation: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Unexpected obstetric emergencies threaten the safety of pregnant women. As emergencies are rare, they are difficult to learn. Therefore, simulation-based medical education (SBME) seems relevant. In non-systematic reviews on SBME, medical simulation has been suggested to be associated with improved learner outcomes. However, many questions on how SBME can be optimized remain unanswered. One unresolved issue is how 'in situ simulation' (ISS) versus 'off site simulation' (OSS) impact learning. ISS means simulation-based training in the actual patient care unit (in other words, the labor room and operating room). OSS means training in facilities away from the actual patient care unit, either at a simulation centre or in hospital rooms that have been set up for this purpose. Methods and design The objective of this randomized trial is to study the effect of ISS versus OSS on individual learning outcome, safety attitude, motivation, stress, and team performance amongst multi-professional obstetric-anesthesia teams. The trial is a single-centre randomized superiority trial including 100 participants. The inclusion criteria were health-care professionals employed at the department of obstetrics or anesthesia at Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, who were working on shifts and gave written informed consent. Exclusion criteria were managers with staff responsibilities, and staff who were actively taking part in preparation of the trial. The same obstetric multi-professional training was conducted in the two simulation settings. The experimental group was exposed to training in the ISS setting, and the control group in the OSS setting. The primary outcome is the individual score on a knowledge test. Exploratory outcomes are individual scores on a safety attitudes questionnaire, a stress inventory, salivary cortisol levels, an intrinsic motivation inventory, results from a questionnaire evaluating perceptions of the simulation and suggested changes needed in the

  18. Alternatives to Hysterectomy: Management of Uterine Fibroids.

    PubMed

    Laughlin-Tommaso, Shannon K

    2016-09-01

    Uterine fibroids are a common condition that can be debilitating and are the leading benign cause of hysterectomy. Women often live with the symptoms rather than choose hysterectomy, but survey studies have shown that work, social life, and physical activities are hindered by fibroid symptoms. Offering alternative therapies tailored to a woman's symptoms will allow her to choose a treatment that fits her needs and to preserve her uterus and fertility. The minimally invasive treatment options have a faster recovery and lower surgical risk than hysterectomy, but may require reintervention. One pharmacologic treatment offers short-term, intermittent therapy with lasting effects. PMID:27521875

  19. Pain following hysterectomy: epidemiological and clinical aspects.

    PubMed

    Brandsborg, Birgitte

    2012-01-01

    It is well known that different surgical procedures like amputation, thoracotomy, inguinal herniotomy, and mastectomy are associated with a risk of developing chronic postsurgical pain. Hysterectomy is the most frequent gynecological procedure with an annual frequency of 5000 hysterectomies for a benign indication in Denmark, but is has not previously been documented in detail to what extent this procedure leads to chronic pain. The aim of this PhD thesis was therefore to describe the epidemiology, type of pain, risk factors, and predictive factors associated with chronic pain after hysterectomy for a benign indication. The thesis includes four papers, of which one is based on a questionnaire study, two are based on a prospective clinical study, and one is a review of chronic pain after hysterectomy. The questionnaire paper included 1135 women one year after hysterectomy. A postal questionnaire about pain before and after hysterectomy was combined with data from the Danish Hysterectomy Database. Chronic postoperative pain was described by 32%, and the identified risk factors were preoperative pelvic pain, previous cesarean section, other pain problems and pain as an indication for hysterectomy. Spinal anesthesia was associated with a decreased risk of having pain after one year. The type of surgery (i.e. abdominal or vaginal hysterectomy) did not influence chronic pain. The prospective paper included 90 women referred for a hysterectomy on benign indication. The tests were performed before, on day 1, and 4 months after surgery and included questionnaires about pain, coping, and quality of life together with quantitative sensory testing of pain thresholds. Seventeen percent had pain after 4 months, and the risk factors were preoperative pain problems elsewhere and a high intensity of acute postoperative pain. Type of surgery was not a risk factor. Preoperative brush-evoked allodynia, pinprick hyperalgesia, and vaginal pain threshold were associated with a high

  20. Hysterectomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... made in either your abdomen or your vagina. Robotic surgery. Your doctor guides a robotic arm to ... made in either your abdomen or your vagina. Robotic surgery. Your doctor guides a robotic arm to ...

  1. Hysterectomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... cuts in the belly, in order to perform robotic surgery You and your doctor will decide which ... through the vagina using a laparoscope or after robotic surgery. When a larger surgical cut (incision) in ...

  2. Telemedicine in obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Odibo, Imelda N; Wendel, Paul J; Magann, Everett F

    2013-09-01

    Telemedicine lends itself to several obstetric applications and is of growing interest in developed and developing nations worldwide. In this article we review current trends and applications within obstetrics practice. We searched electronic databases, March 2010 to September 2012, for telemedicine use studies related to obstetrics. Thirty-four of 101 identified studies are the main focus of review. Other relevant studies published before March 2010 are included. Telemedicine plays an important role as an adjunct to delivery of health care to remote patients with inadequate medical access in this era of limited resources and emphasis on efficient use of those available resources.

  3. Hysterectomy - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Arabic) استئصال الرحم - العربية Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Chinese - Simplified (简体中文) Hysterectomy 子宫切除术 - 简体中文 (Chinese - Simplified) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Chinese - Traditional (繁體中文) Hysterectomy 子宮切除術 - 繁體中文 (Chinese - Traditional) ...

  4. Pragmatic prevention, permanent solution: Women's experiences with hysterectomy in rural India.

    PubMed

    Desai, Sapna

    2016-02-01

    Hysterectomy appears to be on the rise amongst low-income, rural women in India as routine treatment for gynaecological ailments. This paper explores the individual, household, socio-economic and health system factors that influenced women's decisions to undergo hysterectomy in rural Gujarat, with a focus on women's perspectives. Interviews were conducted with 35 rural, low-income women who had undergone hysterectomy, local gynaecologists and other key informants, alongside observation of daily life and health-related activities. Inductive, open coding was conducted within a framework analysis to identify thematic influences on the decision to undergo hysterectomy. Women underwent hysterectomy at an average age of 36, as treatment for typically severe gynaecological ailments. I argue that women, faced with embedded social inequality in the form of gender biases, lack of labour security and a maternal-centric health system, demonstrated pragmatic agency in their decision to remove the uterus. When they experienced gynaecological ailments, most sought two to three opinions and negotiated financial and logistical concerns. The health system offered few non-invasive services for non-maternal health issues. Moreover, women and health care providers believed there is limited utility of the uterus beyond childbearing. Women's responsibilities as caretakers, workers and producers drove them to seek permanent solutions that would secure their long-term work and health security. Thus, hysterectomy emerged as a normalised treatment for gynaecological ailments, particularly for low-income women with limited resources or awareness of potential side effects. In this setting, hysterectomy reflects the power structures and social inequalities in which women negotiated medical treatment--and the need to reverse a culture of permanent solutions for low-income women.

  5. Pragmatic prevention, permanent solution: Women's experiences with hysterectomy in rural India.

    PubMed

    Desai, Sapna

    2016-02-01

    Hysterectomy appears to be on the rise amongst low-income, rural women in India as routine treatment for gynaecological ailments. This paper explores the individual, household, socio-economic and health system factors that influenced women's decisions to undergo hysterectomy in rural Gujarat, with a focus on women's perspectives. Interviews were conducted with 35 rural, low-income women who had undergone hysterectomy, local gynaecologists and other key informants, alongside observation of daily life and health-related activities. Inductive, open coding was conducted within a framework analysis to identify thematic influences on the decision to undergo hysterectomy. Women underwent hysterectomy at an average age of 36, as treatment for typically severe gynaecological ailments. I argue that women, faced with embedded social inequality in the form of gender biases, lack of labour security and a maternal-centric health system, demonstrated pragmatic agency in their decision to remove the uterus. When they experienced gynaecological ailments, most sought two to three opinions and negotiated financial and logistical concerns. The health system offered few non-invasive services for non-maternal health issues. Moreover, women and health care providers believed there is limited utility of the uterus beyond childbearing. Women's responsibilities as caretakers, workers and producers drove them to seek permanent solutions that would secure their long-term work and health security. Thus, hysterectomy emerged as a normalised treatment for gynaecological ailments, particularly for low-income women with limited resources or awareness of potential side effects. In this setting, hysterectomy reflects the power structures and social inequalities in which women negotiated medical treatment--and the need to reverse a culture of permanent solutions for low-income women. PMID:26773294

  6. Cost Analysis When Open Surgeons Perform Minimally Invasive Hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Kantartzis, Kelly L.; Ahn, Ki Hoon; Bonidie, Michael J.; Lee, Ted

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objective: The costs to perform a hysterectomy are widely variable. Our objective was to determine hysterectomy costs by route and whether traditionally open surgeons lower costs when performing laparoscopy versus robotics. Methods: Hysterectomy costs including subcategories were collected from 2011 to 2013. Costs were skewed, so 2 statistical transformations were performed. Costs were compared by surgeon classification (open, laparoscopic, or robotic) and surgery route. Results: A total of 4,871 hysterectomies were performed: 34.2% open, 50.7% laparoscopic, and 15.1% robotic. Laparoscopic hysterectomy had the lowest total costs (P < .001). By cost subcategory, laparoscopic hysterectomy was lower than robotic hysterectomy in 6 and higher in 1. When performing robotic hysterectomy, open and robotic surgeon costs were similar. With laparoscopic hysterectomy, open surgeons had higher costs than laparoscopic surgeons for 1 of 2 statistical transformations (P = .007). Open surgeons had lower costs performing laparoscopic hysterectomy than robotic hysterectomy with robotic maintenance and depreciation included (P < .001) but similar costs if these variables were excluded. Conclusion: Although laparoscopic hysterectomy had lowest costs overall, robotics may be no more costly than laparoscopic hysterectomy when performed by surgeons who predominantly perform open hysterectomy. PMID:25489215

  7. [Medical errors in obstetrics].

    PubMed

    Marek, Z

    1984-08-01

    Errors in medicine may fall into 3 main categories: 1) medical errors made only by physicians, 2) technical errors made by physicians and other health care specialists, and 3) organizational errors associated with mismanagement of medical facilities. This classification of medical errors, as well as the definition and treatment of them, fully applies to obstetrics. However, the difference between obstetrics and other fields of medicine stems from the fact that an obstetrician usually deals with healthy women. Conversely, professional risk in obstetrics is very high, as errors and malpractice can lead to very serious complications. Observations show that the most frequent obstetrical errors occur in induced abortions, diagnosis of pregnancy, selection of optimal delivery techniques, treatment of hemorrhages, and other complications. Therefore, the obstetrician should be prepared to use intensive care procedures similar to those used for resuscitation.

  8. Septic shock in obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Knuppel, R A; Rao, P S; Cavanagh, D

    1984-03-01

    Septic shock in obstetric patients can be prevented by recognition of patients at risk and aggressive intervention in the warm-hypotensive phase. These patients must be monitored closely. Rarely will an obstetrical floor be capable of providing adequate monitoring of these patients; therefore, the patient should be transferred to an intensive care unit. Individualize therapy, but do not procrastinate in the surgical removal of the nidus of infection.

  9. The usage of blood components in obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Adukauskienė, Dalia; Veikutienė, Audronė; Adukauskaitė, Agnė; Veikutis, Vincentas; Rimaitis, Kęstutis

    2010-01-01

    Major obstetric hemorrhage remains the leading cause of maternal morbidity and mortality worldwide. Even though blood transfusion may be a life-saving procedure, an inappropriate usage of blood products in obstetric emergencies especially in cases of massive bleeding is associated with increased morbidity and risk of death. Thorough knowledge of the etiology, pathophysiology, and optimal therapeutic options of major obstetric hemorrhage may help to avoid lethal outcomes. There are evidence-based data about some risks related with transfusion of blood components: acute or delayed hemolytic, febrile, allergic reactions, transfusion-related acute lung injury, negative immunomodulative effect, transmission of infectious diseases, dissemination of cancer. This is why the indications for allogeneic blood transfusion are restricted, and new safer methods are being discovered to decrease the requirement for it. Red cell alloimmunization may develop in pregnancy; therefore, all pregnant women should pass screening for irregular antibodies. Antierythrocytic irregular antibodies may occur due to previous pregnancies or allogeneic red blood cell transfusions, and it is important for blood cross-matching in the future. Under certain circumstances, such as complicated maternal history, severe coagulation abnormalities, severe anemia, the preparation of cross-matched blood is necessary. There is evidence of very significant variation in the use of blood products (red cells, platelets, fresh frozen plasma, or cryoprecipitate) among clinicians in various medical institutions, and sometimes indications for transfusion are not correctly motivated. The transfusion of each single blood product must be performed only in case of evaluation of expected effect. The need for blood products and for their combination is necessary to estimate for each patient individually in case of obstetric emergencies either. Indications for transfusion of blood components in obstetrics are presented in

  10. Vasopressors in obstetric anesthesia: A current perspective

    PubMed Central

    Nag, Deb Sanjay; Samaddar, Devi Prasad; Chatterjee, Abhishek; Kumar, Himanshu; Dembla, Ankur

    2015-01-01

    Vasopressors are routinely used to counteract hypotension after neuraxial anesthesia in Obstetrics. The understanding of the mechanism of hypotension and the choice of vasopressor has evolved over the years to a point where phenylephrine has become the preferred vasopressor. Due to the absence of definitive evidence showing absolute clinical benefit of one over the other, especially in emergency and high-risk Cesarean sections, our choice of phenylephrine over the other vasopressors like mephentermine, metaraminol, and ephedrine is guided by indirect evidence on fetal acid-base status. This review article evaluates the present day evidence on the various vasopressors used in obstetric anesthesia today. PMID:25610851

  11. What is an Obstetrics/Gynecology Hospitalist?

    PubMed

    McCue, Brigid

    2015-09-01

    The obstetrics/gynecology (OB/GYN) hospitalist is the latest subspecialist to evolve from obstetrics and gynecology. Starting in 2002, academic leaders recognized the impact of such coalescing forces as the pressure to reduce maternal morbidity and mortality, stagnant reimbursements and the increasing cost of private practice, the decrease in applications for OB/GYN residencies, and the demand among practicing OB/GYNs for work/life balance. Initially coined laborist, the concept of the OB/GYN hospitalist emerged. Thinking of becoming an OB/GYN hospitalist? Here is what you need to know.

  12. [Is hysterectomy indicated during prolapsus treatment?].

    PubMed

    Fatton, B; Amblard, J; Jacquetin, B

    2007-06-01

    Hysterectomy remains a usual procedure in vaginal reconstructive pelvic surgery. However, it may seem illogical, given our improved knowledge of the pathologic pelvic anatomy, to begin pelvic repair by a removal procedure. The question about uterine preservation during vaginal reconstructive surgery is crucial. Although some authors have proposed some arguments on this topic, we don't have, at present, any rigorous prospective and randomized studies able to prove the superiority of hysterectomy or uterine preservation, on long-term anatomic results. Nevertheless, in reconstructive surgery with synthetic mesh, hysterectomy exposes to an increased risk of mesh exposure. Consequently, it increases blood lost, surgical duration and hospitalisation stay. On the other hand, uterine preservation imposes constant gynaecologic follow-up. Subsequently, if a hysterectomy is needed for benign or malignant diseases, the surgery is often difficult because of prior uterine fixation. Subtotal hysterectomy which prevents endometrial cancer can be a possible alternative but, at the moment, no study was able to demonstrate that uterine cervix has a role in pelvic static. Functional results, influenced by biological individual characteristics and by the number of associated procedures, are even more difficult to analyse. Sexual life after hysterectomy has been the subject of numerous publications of unequal scientific quality. Among correctly evaluated and informed patients, hysterectomy do not seem to produce negative consequences on sexuality; it can even improve, in some circumstances, the sexual life. We can admit that cervical conservation in some women may have a role in terms of pleasure, more from sexual fantasies and ballistic reasons than in relation with organic and physiologic reasons. Since no rigorous and specifically oriented works on that topic have been published until now, it seems justified today to promote prospective and randomized studies, advice against

  13. A critical analysis of laparoscopic assisted vaginal hysterectomies compared with vaginal hysterectomies unassisted by laparoscopy and transabdominal hysterectomies.

    PubMed

    Casey, M J; Garcia-Padial, J; Johnson, C; Osborne, N G; Sotolongo, J; Watson, P

    1994-01-01

    The first 115 laparoscopically assisted vaginal hysterectomies (LAVH) done by our faculty surgeons were compared with 220 vaginal hysterectomies (VH) and 194 abdominal hysterectomies (AH) done in our affiliated hospitals over the same period of time. Logistic regression analysis indicates that LAVHs were done for cases that would significantly be more likely selected for AH than for VH (p less than 0.0001). Matched case control studies with 28 LAVH/VH and 34 LAVH/AH pairs and bivariate analyses demonstrated that LAVH can be accomplished with low morbidity, short lengths of stay, and little, if any, increase in operating times compared with VH and AH. The LAVH procedure can be expected to replace many AHs in the future.

  14. The impact of a simulation-based training lab on outcomes of hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Asoğlu, Mehmet Reşit; Achjian, Tamar; Akbilgiç, Oğuz; Borahay, Mostafa A.; Kılıç, Gökhan S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the impact of a simulation-based training lab on surgical outcomes of different hysterectomy approaches in a resident teaching tertiary care center. Material and Methods This retrospective cohort study was conducted at The University of Texas, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology. In total, 1397 patients who had undergone total abdominal hysterectomy (TAH), vaginal hysterectomy (VH), total laparoscopy-assisted hysterectomy (TLH), or robot-assisted hysterectomy (RAH) for benign gynecologic conditions between 2009 and 2014 were included in the study. The comparison was made according to the year when the surgeries were performed: 2009 (before simulation training) and the combination of 2010–2014 (after simulation training) for each technique (TAH, VH, and LAH). Since a simulation lab for robotic surgery was introduced in 2010 at our institute, the comparison for robotic surgery was made between the combination of 2009–2010 as the control and the combination of 2010–2014 as the study group. Results The average estimated blood loss before and after simulation-based training was significantly different in TAH and RAH groups (317±170 mL versus 257±146 mL, p=0.003 and 154±107 mL versus 102±88 mL, p=0.004, respectively), but no difference was found for TLH and VH. The mean of length of hospital stay was significantly different before and after simulation-based training for each technique: 3.7±2.3 versus 2.9±2.2 days for TAH, 2.0±1.2 versus 1.3±0.9 days for VH, 2.4±1.3 versus 1.9±2.5 days for TLH, and 2.0±1.3 versus 1.4±1.7 days for RAH (p<0.01). Conclusion Based on our data, simulator-based training may play an integrative role in developing the residents’ surgical skills and thus improving the surgical outcomes of hysterectomy. PMID:27403070

  15. Obstetrics and Gynecology

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Joseph L.

    1992-01-01

    The Council on Scientific Affairs of the California Medical Association presents the following inventory of items of progress in obstetrics and gynecology. Each item, in the judgment of a panel of knowledgeable physicians, has recently become reasonably firmly established, both as to scientific fact and important clinical significance. The items are presented in simple epitome, and an authoritative reference, both to the item itself and to the subject as a whole, is generally given for those who may be unfamiliar with a particular item. The purpose is to assist busy practitioners, students, researchers, or scholars to stay abreast of these items of progress in obstetrics and gynecology that have recently achieved a substantial degree of authoritative acceptance, whether in their own field of special interest or another. The items of progress listed below were selected by the Advisory Panel to the Section on Obstetrics and Gynecology of the California Medical Association, and the summaries were prepared under its direction. PMID:1615657

  16. Ethical issues in obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Digiovanni, Laura M

    2010-06-01

    Obstetricians must become comfortable addressing the ethical issues involved in clinical obstetrics and therefore must have an understanding of the key elements of clinical medical ethics. Balancing the principles of medical ethics can guide clinicians toward solutions to ethical dilemmas encountered in the care of pregnant women. The purpose of this article is to review the ethical foundations of clinical practice, recognize the ethical issues obstetricians face every day in caring for patients, and facilitate decision making. This article discusses the relevant ethical principles, identifies unique features of obstetrical ethics, examines ethical principles as they apply to pregnant patient and her fetus, and thereby, provides a conceptual framework for considering ethical issues and facilitating decision making in clinical obstetrics.

  17. Laparoscopic hysterectomy with morcellation versus abdominal hysterectomy for presumed fibroids in premenopausal women: a decision analysis

    PubMed Central

    SIEDHOFF, Matthew T.; WHEELER, Stephanie B.; RUTSTEIN, Sarah E.; GELLER, Elizabeth J.; DOLL, Kemi M.; WU, Jennifer M.; CLARKE-PEARSON, Daniel L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To model outcomes in laparoscopic hysterectomy with morcellation compared to abdominal hysterectomy for the presumed fibroid uterus, examining short-and long-term complications, as well as mortality. Study Design A decision tree was constructed to compare outcomes for a hypothetical cohort of 100,000 premenopausal women undergoing hysterectomy for presumed fibroids over a 5-year time horizon. Parameter and quality of life utility estimates were determined from published literature for postoperative complications, leiomyosarcoma incidence, death related to leiomyomsarcoma, and procedure-related death. Results The decision analysis predicted fewer overall deaths with laparoscopic hysterectomy compared to abdominal hysterectomy (98 vs. 103 per 100,000). While there were more deaths from leiomyosarcoma following laparoscopic hysterectomy (86 vs. 71 per 100,000), there were more hysterectomy-related deaths with abdominal hysterectomy (32 vs. 12 per 100,000). The laparoscopic group had lower rates of transfusion (2,400 vs. 4,700 per 100,000), wound infection (1,500 vs 6,300 per 100,000), venous thromboembolism (690 vs. 840 per 100,000) and incisional hernia (710 vs. 8,800 per 100,000), but a higher rate of vaginal cuff dehiscence (640 vs. 290 per 100,000). Laparoscopic hysterectomy resulted in more quality-adjusted life years (499,171 vs. 490,711 over five years). Conclusion The risk of leiomyosarcoma morcellation is balanced by procedure-related complications associated with laparotomy, including death. This analysis provides patients and surgeons with estimates of risk and benefit, upon which patient-centered decisions can be made. PMID:25817518

  18. Outpatient vaginal hysterectomy in a community hospital.

    PubMed

    Meyer, M A; Lalich, R A; Meyer, M M; Widener, J

    1994-08-01

    From Sept 1, 1992 to Dec 31, 1993, 38 outpatient vaginal hysterectomy patients were evaluated for identification of complications after discharge, adequacy of pain relief at home, return to baseline lifestyle, and costs. No complications that would have necessitated an overnight or longer stay were identified. All patients reported adequate pain relief and a more rapid return to activity than they had expected. The hospital cost of outpatient vaginal hysterectomy was about half that of inpatient, and additional significant savings were realized in the cost of postoperative medication. Patients were positive about returning home the day of surgery and would recommend the protocol to others who qualified.

  19. Prevention in Obstetrics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children in the Tropics, 1984

    1984-01-01

    The aim of this issue of "Children in the Tropics" is to describe work that may be done by a motivated health team having only the strict minimum of material resources. While not a handbook of obstetrics, this text serves as a reminder of basic information and procedures workers must be able to perform. Following a review of the educational and…

  20. Urologic complications following obstetrics and gynecologicai surgery: Our experience in a tertiary care hospital

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Dilip Kumar; Wats, Varun; Ghosh, Bastab

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Urinary tract injuries are a known complication of obstetrical and gynecological surgeries because of their anatomical proximity. Delayed diagnosis and improper management leads to high morbidity and even mortality. This is our three year's experience of urological complications after obstetric and gynecological surgery, their treatment and follows up. Materials and Methods: We reviewed all cases of urological injuries managed in our department that were deemed to be of obstetric and gynecological origins. Results: Thirty seven women were treated in the department for urological complications secondary to obstetric and gynecological procedures from January 2012 to December 2014. The most common organ involved was urinary bladder, occurring in 54% patients followed by ureter in 35.13%. Vesicovaginal fistula (VVF) was the most common injury involving the bladder occurring in nineteen patients. Ureterovaginal fistula (UVF) occurred in nine patients and acute ureteric injury in three. Hysterectomy was the most common etiology occurring in 60% cases followed by obstetrical causes in 40% cases. All cases were successfully managed both with open surgery or laparoscopic surgery. Conclusion: Although obstetrical causes are still important in developing countries, gynecological procedures especially laparoscopic surgeries are on the rise. In these procedures the suspicion of urological injuries should be kept in mind and intra-operative detection and early repair should be attempted. Delayed diagnosis and improper treatment leads to severe complications. PMID:26834397

  1. Prohemostatic interventions in obstetric hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Bonnet, Marie-Pierre; Basso, Olga

    2012-04-01

    Obstetric hemorrhage is a major cause of maternal morbidity and mortality. Pregnancy is associated with substantial hemostatic changes, resulting in a relatively hypercoagulable state. Acquired coagulopathy can, however, develop rapidly in severe obstetric hemorrhage. Therefore, prohemostatic treatments based on high fresh frozen plasma and red blood cell (FFP:RBC) ratio transfusion and procoagulant agents (fibrinogen concentrates, recombinant activated factor VII, and tranexamic acid) are crucial aspects of management. Often, evidence from trauma patients is applied to obstetric hemorrhage management, although distinct differences exist between the two situations. Therefore, until efficacy and safety are demonstrated in obstetric hemorrhage, clinicians should be cautious about wholesale adoption of high FFP:RBC ratio products. Applications of transfusion protocols, dedicated to massive obstetric hemorrhage and multidisciplinarily developed, currently remain the best available option. Similarly, while procoagulant agents appear promising in treatment of obstetric hemorrhage, caution is nonetheless warranted as long as clear evidence in the context of obstetric hemorrhage is lacking. PMID:22510859

  2. CHALLENGES OF OBSTETRIC ANESTHESIA: DIFFICULT LARYNGEAL VISUALIZATION.

    PubMed

    Alanoğlu, Zekeriyya; Erkoç, Süheyla Karadağ; Güçlü, Çiğdem Yildirim; Meço, Başak Ceyda Orbey; Baytaş, Volkan; Can, Özlem Selvi; Alkiş, Neslihan

    2016-03-01

    Obstetric anesthesia is one of the high risk subspecialties of anesthesia practice. Anesthesia related complications are the sixth leading cause of maternal mortality. Difficult or failed intubation following induction of general anesthesia for CS remains the major contributory factor to anesthesia-related maternal complications. The airway management of obstetric patients is a challenging issue for several reasons. Anatomic and physiologic changes related to pregnancy may increase the difficult and failed intubation rates compared to the general surgical population. Proper evaluation of the airway anatomy and airway structures is vital to prevent airway management related catastrophes. In addition to basic airway and intubation equipment, each anesthesia department must have difficult intubation equipment cart including fiber optic laryngoscope, video laryngoscopes, and different types of laryngeal masks. It is essential that all anesthesiologists have a preconceived and well thought-out algorithm and emergency airway equipment to deal with airway emergencies during difficult or failed intubation of a parturient. PMID:27276775

  3. Managed care in obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Devoe, L D

    1997-08-01

    Managed care has marched relentlessly through all fields of obstetric care: individual and group practices, proprietary hospitals and academic medical centers, and public health systems. Emphasis on cost containment while preserving high quality has driven the redesign of healthcare delivery. A number of models for providing effective and less expensive obstetric care are now being examined in the USA and abroad. Increased market penetration by managed care will also exert profound and possibly harmful effects on traditional academic teaching institutions. These organizations must adapt to this new environment or face the erosion of physician support and training bases. Ultimately, significant moral and ethical dilemmas will arise when patients' best interests for care are being continually brought into conflict with the physician's need to earn a living.

  4. A comparison of abdominal and vaginal hysterectomies in Benghazi, Libya.

    PubMed

    Agnaeber, K; Bodalal, Z

    2013-08-01

    We performed a comparative study between abdominal and vaginal hysterectomies using clinical data from Al-Jamhouria hospital (one of the largest maternity hospitals in Eastern Libya). Various parameters were taken into consideration: the rates of each type (and their subtypes); average age of patients; indications; causes; postoperative complications; and duration of stay in the hospital afterwards. Conclusions and recommendations were drawn from the results of this study. In light of the aforementioned parameters, it was found that: (1) abdominal hysterectomies were more common than vaginal hysterectomies (p < 0.001); (2) patients admitted for abdominal hysterectomies are younger than those admitted for vaginal hysterectomies (p < 0.001); (3) the most common indication for an abdominal hysterectomy was menstrual disturbances, while for vaginal hysterectomies it was vaginal prolapse; (4) the histopathological cause for abdominal and vaginal hysterectomies were observed and the most common were found to be leiomyomas and atrophic endometrium; (5) there was no significant difference between the two routes in terms of postoperative complications; (6) patients who were admitted for abdominal hysterectomies spent a longer amount of time in the hospital (p < 0.01). It was concluded that efforts should be made to further pursue vaginal and laparoscopic hysterectomies as a viable option to the more conventional abdominal route.

  5. Interval Between Hysterectomy and Start of Radiation Treatment Is Predictive of Recurrence in Patients With Endometrial Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Cattaneo, Richard; Hanna, Rabbie K.; Jacobsen, Gordon; Elshaikh, Mohamed A.

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: Adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) has been shown to improve local control in patients with endometrial carcinoma. We analyzed the impact of the time interval between hysterectomy and RT initiation in patients with endometrial carcinoma. Methods and Materials: In this institutional review board-approved study, we identified 308 patients with endometrial carcinoma who received adjuvant RT after hysterectomy. All patients had undergone hysterectomy, oophorectomy, and pelvic and para-aortic lymph node evaluation from 1988 to 2010. Patients' demographics, pathologic features, and treatments were compared. The time interval between hysterectomy and the start of RT was calculated. The effects of time interval on recurrence-free (RFS), disease-specific (DSS), and overall survival (OS) were calculated. Following univariate analysis, multivariate modeling was performed. Results: The median age and follow-up for the study cohort was 65 years and 72 months, respectively. Eighty-five percent of the patients had endometrioid carcinoma. RT was delivered with high-dose-rate brachytherapy alone (29%), pelvic RT alone (20%), or both (51%). Median time interval to start RT was 42 days (range, 21-130 days). A total of 269 patients (74%) started their RT <9 weeks after undergoing hysterectomy (group 1) and 26% started ≥9 weeks after surgery (group 2). There were a total of 43 recurrences. Tumor recurrence was significantly associated with treatment delay of ≥9 weeks, with 5-year RFS of 90% for group 1 compared to only 39% for group 2 (P<.001). On multivariate analysis, RT delay of ≥9 weeks (P<.001), presence of lymphovascular space involvement (P=.001), and higher International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics grade (P=.012) were independent predictors of recurrence. In addition, RT delay of ≥9 weeks was an independent significant predictor for worse DSS and OS (P=.001 and P=.01, respectively). Conclusions: Delay in administering adjuvant RT after hysterectomy was

  6. Private health care coverage and increased risk of obstetric intervention

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background When clinically indicated, common obstetric interventions can greatly improve maternal and neonatal outcomes. However, variation in intervention rates suggests that obstetric practice may not be solely driven by case criteria. Methods Differences in obstetric intervention rates by private and public status in Ireland were examined using nationally representative hospital discharge data. A retrospective cohort study was performed on childbirth hospitalisations occurring between 2005 and 2010. Multivariate logistic regression analysis with correction for the relative risk was conducted to determine the risk of obstetric intervention (caesarean delivery, operative vaginal delivery, induction of labour or episiotomy) by private or public status while adjusting for obstetric risk factors. Results 403,642 childbirth hospitalisations were reviewed; approximately one-third of maternities (30.2%) were booked privately. After controlling for relevant obstetric risk factors, women with private coverage were more likely to have an elective caesarean delivery (RR: 1.48; 95% CI: 1.45-1.51), an emergency caesarean delivery (RR: 1.13; 95% CI: 1.12-1.16) and an operative vaginal delivery (RR: 1.25; 95% CI: 1.22-1.27). Compared to women with public coverage who had a vaginal delivery, women with private coverage were 40% more likely to have an episiotomy (RR: 1.40; 95% CI: 1.38-1.43). Conclusions Irrespective of obstetric risk factors, women who opted for private maternity care were significantly more likely to have an obstetric intervention. To better understand both clinical and non-clinical dynamics, future studies of examining health care coverage status and obstetric intervention would ideally apply mixed-method techniques. PMID:24418254

  7. Robotic radical hysterectomy. A literature review.

    PubMed

    Smith, A L; Pareja, R; Ramirez, P T

    2009-08-01

    Advanced laparoscopic procedures are increasingly being used as an alternative to laparotomy in gynecologic surgery. Several reviews have been completed that examine the advantages and drawbacks of this technique. Robotic technology offers the promise of overcoming many of the shortcomings of laparoscopy, while preserving classic operative techniques. This review article summarizes some of the most recent literature provided in the arena of robotic assisted radical hysterectomy for the treatment of cervical or endometrial cancer.

  8. Total Laparoscopic Versus Laparotomic Radical Hysterectomy and Lymphadenectomy in Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Meizhu; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This article aims to review our 13-year experience in the treatment of patients with cervical cancer by comparing total laparoscopic radical hysterectomy and lymphadenectomy with laparotomy. We reviewed all patients undergoing total laparoscopic or laparotomic radical hysterectomy and lymphadenectomy because of cervical cancer between 2001 and 2014 in our hospital. In total, 154 eligible patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics Ia–IIb were enrolled, including 106 patients undergoing total laparoscopic procedure and 48 patients undergoing laparotomic procedure. In the present study, patients in total laparoscopy group were associated with superior surgical outcomes, such as significantly lower blood transfusion compared to those in laparotomy group. Furthermore, patients had significantly lower postoperative complication rate in total laparoscopy group compared with that in laparotomy group (24.5% vs 52.1%) (P = 0.001). Three patients (2.8%) in total laparoscopy group had unplanned conversion to laparotomy. Disease-free survival rates were 89.7% and 88.9% in total laparoscopy and laparotomy groups (P = 0.39), respectively, and overall survival rates were 90.2% in total laparoscopy group and 91.3% in laparotomy group (P = 0.40). Total laparoscopic procedure is a surgically and oncologically safe and reliable alternative to laparotomic procedure in the treatment for cervical cancer. PMID:26222868

  9. Obesity in obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Liat, Salzer; Cabero, Luis; Hod, Moshe; Yogev, Yariv

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a rising global epidemic. Obesity during pregnancy is associated with increased maternal and fetal risks, which is inversely correlated with the severity level of obesity. Other comorbidities are common (diabetes mellitus, hypertensive disorders, etc.) and contribute to an even increased risk. Maternal obesity during pregnancy contributes also to offspring obesity and noncommunicable diseases later in life in a vicious cycle. Managing these problems, and potentially reducing their risk, can pose a challenge in obstetric care. It is important to provide preconception nutritional and exercise care, and guidance during pregnancy and post pregnancy for appropriate weight loss.

  10. Obstetrical disseminated intravascular coagulation score.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Takao

    2014-06-01

    Obstetrical disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is usually a very acute, serious complication of pregnancy. The obstetrical DIC score helps with making a prompt diagnosis and starting treatment early. This DIC score, in which higher scores are given for clinical parameters rather than for laboratory parameters, has three components: (i) the underlying diseases; (ii) the clinical symptoms; and (iii) the laboratory findings (coagulation tests). It is justifiably appropriate to initiate therapy for DIC when the obstetrical DIC score reaches 8 points or more before obtaining the results of coagulation tests. Improvement of blood coagulation tests and clinical symptoms are essential to the efficacy evaluation for treatment after a diagnosis of obstetrical DIC. Therefore, the efficacy evaluation criteria for obstetrical DIC are also defined to enable follow-up of the clinical efficacy of DIC therapy.

  11. A multicenter study on the appropriateness of hospitalization in obstetric wards: application of Obstetric Appropriateness Evaluation Protocol (Obstetric AEP).

    PubMed

    Mannocci, Alice; Specchia, Maria Lucia; Poppa, Giuseppina; Boccia, Giovanni; Cavallo, Pierpaolo; De Caro, Francesco; Vetrano, Giuseppe; Aleandri, Vincenzo; Capunzo, Mario; Ricciardi, Walter; Boccia, Antonio; Firenze, Alberto; Malvasi, Antonio; La Torre, Giuseppe

    2015-09-01

    The cross-sectional study has been based on the implementation of the Obstetric Appropriateness Evaluation Protocol (OAEP) in seven hospitals to determine inappropriate hospital admissions and days of stay. The outcomes were: inappropriateness of admission and "percentage of inappropriateness" for one hospitalization. A total number of 2196 clinical records were reviewed. The mean percentage of inappropriateness for hospitalization was 22%. The percentage of inappropriateness for the first 10 d of hospitalization peaked in correspondence of the fourth (42%). The logistic regression model on inappropriated admission reported that emergency admission was a protective factor (OR = 0.4) and to be hospitalized in wards with ≥30 beds risk factor (OR = 5.12). The second linear model on "percentage of inappropriateness" showed that inappropriated admission and wards with ≥30 beds increased the percentage (p < 0.001); whereas the admission in Teaching Hospitals was inversely associated (p < 0.001). The present study suggests that the percentage of inappropriate admission depends especially on the inappropriate admission and the large number of beds in obstetric wards. This probably indicates that management of big hospitals, which is very complex, needs improving the processes of support and coordination of health professionals. The OAEP tool seems to be an useful instrument for the decision-makers to monitor and manage the obstetric wards.

  12. Can training non-physician clinicians/associate clinicians (NPCs/ACs) in emergency obstetric, neonatal care and clinical leadership make a difference to practice and help towards reductions in maternal and neonatal mortality in rural Tanzania? The ETATMBA project

    PubMed Central

    Ellard, David R; Shemdoe, Aloisia; Mazuguni, Festo; Mbaruku, Godfrey; Davies, David; Kihaile, Paul; Pemba, Senga; Bergström, Staffan; Nyamtema, Angelo; Mohamed, Hamed-Mahfoudh; O'Hare, Joseph Paul

    2016-01-01

    Objectives During late 2010, 36 trainees including 19 assistant medical officers (AMOs) 1 senior clinical officer (CO) and 16 nurse midwives/nurses were recruited from districts across rural Tanzania and invited to join the Enhancing Human Resources and Use of Appropriate Technologies for Maternal and Perinatal Survival in the sub-Saharan Africa (ETATMBA) training programme. The ETATMBA project was training associate clinicians (ACs) as advanced clinical leaders in emergency obstetric care. The trainees returned to health facilities across the country with the hope of being able to apply their new skills and knowledge. The main aim of this study was to explore the impact of the ETATMBA training on health outcomes including maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality in their facilities. Secondly, to explore the challenges faced in working in these health facilities. Design The study is a pre-examination/postexamination of maternal and neonatal health indicators and a survey of health facilities in rural Tanzania. The facilities surveyed were those in which ETATMBA trainees were placed post-training. The maternal and neonatal indicators were collected for 2011 and 2013 and the survey of the facilities was in early 2014. Results 16 of 17 facilities were surveyed. Maternal deaths show a non-significant downward trend over the 2 years (282–232 cases/100 000 live births). There were no significant differences in maternal, neonatal and birth complication variables across the time-points. The survey of facilities revealed shortages in key areas and some are a serious concern. Conclusions This study represents a snapshot of rural health facilities providing maternal and neonatal care in Tanzania. Enhancing knowledge, practical skills, and clinical leadership of ACs may have a positive impact on health outcomes. However, any impact may be confounded by the significant challenges in delivering a service in terms of resources. Thus, training may be beneficial, but it

  13. Robotically Assisted Hysterectomy versus Vaginal Hysterectomy for Benign Disease: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Carbonnel, M.; Abbou, H.; N'Guyen, H. T.; Roy, S.; Hamdi, G.; Jnifen, A.; Ayoubi, J. M.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. A prospective study was carried out to compare vaginal hysterectomy (VH) and robotically assisted hysterectomy (RH) for benign gynecological disease. Materials and Methods. All patients who underwent hysterectomy from March 2010 to March 2012 for a benign disease were included. Patients' demographics per and post surgery results were collected from medical files. A questionnaire was also conducted 2 months after surgery. Results. Sixty patients were included in the RH group and thirty four in the VH one. Operative time was significantly longer in the RH group (132.1 ± 5.7 versus 75.3 ± 6.7 min; P < 0.0001). Blood loss and length of hospital stay were significantly reduced: 47 ± 7 versus 125 ± 20 ml; P < 0.01, and 2.4 ± 0.1 versus 3.3 ± 0.2 days; P < 0.0001, respectively. Less pain was reported at D1 and D2 by RH patients, and levels of analgesia were lower compared to those observed in the VH group. No differences were found regarding the rate of conversion to laparotomy, intra- or postoperative complications. Conclusion. Robotically assisted hysterectomy appears to reduce blood loss, postoperative pain, and length of hospital stay, but it is associated with longer operative time and higher cost. Specific indications for RH remain to be defined. PMID:23936645

  14. Robotically Assisted Hysterectomy versus Vaginal Hysterectomy for Benign Disease: A Prospective Study.

    PubMed

    Carbonnel, M; Abbou, H; N'guyen, H T; Roy, S; Hamdi, G; Jnifen, A; Ayoubi, J M

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. A prospective study was carried out to compare vaginal hysterectomy (VH) and robotically assisted hysterectomy (RH) for benign gynecological disease. Materials and Methods. All patients who underwent hysterectomy from March 2010 to March 2012 for a benign disease were included. Patients' demographics per and post surgery results were collected from medical files. A questionnaire was also conducted 2 months after surgery. Results. Sixty patients were included in the RH group and thirty four in the VH one. Operative time was significantly longer in the RH group (132.1 ± 5.7 versus 75.3 ± 6.7 min; P < 0.0001). Blood loss and length of hospital stay were significantly reduced: 47 ± 7 versus 125 ± 20 ml; P < 0.01, and 2.4 ± 0.1 versus 3.3 ± 0.2 days; P < 0.0001, respectively. Less pain was reported at D1 and D2 by RH patients, and levels of analgesia were lower compared to those observed in the VH group. No differences were found regarding the rate of conversion to laparotomy, intra- or postoperative complications. Conclusion. Robotically assisted hysterectomy appears to reduce blood loss, postoperative pain, and length of hospital stay, but it is associated with longer operative time and higher cost. Specific indications for RH remain to be defined. PMID:23936645

  15. 42 CFR 50.207 - Sterilization by hysterectomy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Sterilization by hysterectomy. 50.207 Section 50... GENERAL APPLICABILITY Sterilization of Persons in Federally Assisted Family Planning Projects § 50.207 Sterilization by hysterectomy. (a) Programs or projects to which this subpart applies shall not perform...

  16. Recognition and Management of Urologic Injuries With Laparoscopic Hysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Dassel, Mark W; Adelman, Marisa R; Sharp, Howard T

    2015-12-01

    Injuries to the urinary tract during laparoscopic hysterectomy are quite rare, but are among the most serious injuries that occur during gynecologic surgery. Injury rates among subtypes of laparoscopic hysterectomy have been found to be similar. The most effective way to avoid urinary tract injury is knowledge of urinary tract anatomy and careful and thoughtful dissection.

  17. Placenta Increta Complicating Persistent Cesarean Scar Ectopic Pregnancy following Failed Excision with Subsequent Preterm Cesarean Hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Cesarean scar pregnancies (CSPs) are one of the rarest forms of ectopic pregnancy. Given their rarity, there is lack of consensus regarding the management and natural course of CSPs. Case. A 37-year-old G10 P3063 female with a history of two prior cesarean deliveries was diagnosed with her second CSP at 6 weeks and 5 days in her tenth pregnancy. The patient underwent vertical hysterotomy, excision of a gestational sac implanted in the cesarean sac, and bilateral salpingectomy via a laparotomy incision. The histopathology report confirmed immature chorionic villi. The patient returned 10 weeks later and was found to be still pregnant. Obstetric ultrasound confirmed a viable fetus of 19 weeks and 4 days of gestational age with a thin endometrium and an anteroposterior and right lateral placenta with multiple placental lakes. The patient ruptured her membranes at 31 weeks of gestation and pelvic MRI revealed an anterior placenta invading the myometrium and extending to the external serosal surface consistent with placenta increta. Following obstetric interventions, a live female infant was delivered by cesarean hysterectomy (because of placenta increta) at 32 weeks of gestation. Conclusion. Development of standardized guidelines for management of CSPs, as well as heightened vigilance for possible complications, is required for proper care and avoidance of potential morbidity and mortality. PMID:27375911

  18. Placenta Increta Complicating Persistent Cesarean Scar Ectopic Pregnancy following Failed Excision with Subsequent Preterm Cesarean Hysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Malik, M F; Hoyos, L R; Rodriguez-Kovacs, J; Gillum, J; Johnson, S C

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Cesarean scar pregnancies (CSPs) are one of the rarest forms of ectopic pregnancy. Given their rarity, there is lack of consensus regarding the management and natural course of CSPs. Case. A 37-year-old G10 P3063 female with a history of two prior cesarean deliveries was diagnosed with her second CSP at 6 weeks and 5 days in her tenth pregnancy. The patient underwent vertical hysterotomy, excision of a gestational sac implanted in the cesarean sac, and bilateral salpingectomy via a laparotomy incision. The histopathology report confirmed immature chorionic villi. The patient returned 10 weeks later and was found to be still pregnant. Obstetric ultrasound confirmed a viable fetus of 19 weeks and 4 days of gestational age with a thin endometrium and an anteroposterior and right lateral placenta with multiple placental lakes. The patient ruptured her membranes at 31 weeks of gestation and pelvic MRI revealed an anterior placenta invading the myometrium and extending to the external serosal surface consistent with placenta increta. Following obstetric interventions, a live female infant was delivered by cesarean hysterectomy (because of placenta increta) at 32 weeks of gestation. Conclusion. Development of standardized guidelines for management of CSPs, as well as heightened vigilance for possible complications, is required for proper care and avoidance of potential morbidity and mortality. PMID:27375911

  19. Are hysterectomies necessary? Racial-ethnic differences in women's attitudes.

    PubMed

    Dillaway, Heather E

    2016-01-01

    There is a dearth of comparative information about how women from diverse social locations think about, talk about, and experience the various types of reproductive aging. In this article I analyze racial-ethnic differences in attitudes toward surgically induced menopause (hysterectomy) utilizing data from an interview study of 130 menopausal women. African American women in this study were more suspect of doctors' initial offers of hysterectomies than European American women, with the former group of interviewees still fearing a legacy of racial-ethnic discrimination within medical institutions. Only after seeking a second opinion or finding a trustworthy doctor did African American women feel comfortable accepting a hysterectomy. European American interviewees were not as wary as their African American counterparts and sometimes reported wishing for a hysterectomy. I argue that attitudes toward hysterectomy must be contextualized within women's experiences of racial-ethnic oppression and privilege to be fully understood. PMID:27045199

  20. Bilateral Carpal Spasm Under Spinal Anaesthesia During Abdominal Hysterectomy: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Naithani, Udita; Betkekar, Sneha Arun; Verma, Devendra; Dindor, Basant Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Acute hypocalcaemia is a medical emergency that can have catastrophic implications like tetany, seizures, cardiac arrythmias or laryngospasm if left untreated. We are presenting a case of a 30-year-old female patient undergoing total abdominal hysterectomy with bilateral salpingoopherectomy under spinal anaesthesia. She developed unexpected bilateral carpal spasm intraoperatively which was promptly diagnosed and successfully managed with intravenous calcium administration. We conclude that the anaesthetist should be aware of the clinical presentation of acute hypocalcaemia, its causes and emergency management in the perioperative period to prevent any adverse outcomes. PMID:26894157

  1. Reflex anuria affecting both kidneys following hysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Gholyaf, Mahmoud; Afzali, Saeed; Babolhavaegi, Hoshang; Rahimi, Abolfazl; Wagharseyedayn, Seyed A

    2009-01-01

    In situations when there is unilateral ureteral obstruction, the contralateral kidney retains its normal function. In rare instances however, it has been reported that unilateral ureteral obstruction can lead to reflex anuria (RA) and acute renal failure (ARF). Even more unusually, RA with ARF can occur without organic obstruction due to ureteric manipulation during pelvic surgery. We report a 78- year-old woman, who underwent hysterectomy because of endometrial carcinoma. She developed ARF evidenced by anuria of 120-hours duration, and gradual rise of serum creatinine levels to 11.8 mg/dL on the fifth day after hysterectomy. Ultrasound study of the urinary tract revealed bilateral moderate hydronephrosis. Detailed evaluation did not reveal any organic obstruction. She was managed with hemodialysis, control of hypertension and correction of fluid and electrolyte imbalances. By the sixth day, diuresis was established, and the blood urea and serum creatinine levels decreased to normal by the sixteenth day. The patient was finally discharged on the eighteenth day. Our case suggests that urologists and nephrologists should consider RA as one of the causes of anuria and ARF.

  2. Doing obstetrics and staying alive.

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, J. L.

    1993-01-01

    Many family physicians have a love-hate relationship with childbirth care and struggle to balance their personal and family needs with the need to provide high-quality personal care during labour and birth. Many false assumptions undermine family practice obstetrics. Strategies are presented to simplify obstetric care for women and families while promoting reasoned self-care for physicians. Images p1948-a PMID:8219843

  3. Safety Assurance in Obstetrical Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Douglas L

    2008-01-01

    Safety assurance for diagnostic ultrasound in obstetrics began with a tacit assumption of safety allowed by a federal law enacted in 1976 for then-existing medical ultrasound equipment. The implementation of the 510(k) pre-market approval process for diagnostic ultrasound resulted in the establishment of guideline upper limits for several examination categories in 1985. The obstetrical category has undergone substantial evolution from initial limits (I. e., 46 mW/cm2 spatial peak temporal average (SPTA) intensity) set in 1985. Thermal and mechanical exposure indices, which are displayed on-screen according to an Output Display Standard (ODS), were developed for safety assurance with relaxed upper limits. In 1992, with the adoption of the ODS, the allowable output for obstetrical ultrasound was increased both in terms of the average exposure (e. g. to a possible 720 mW/cm2 SPTA intensity) and of the peak exposure (via the Mechanical Index). There has been little or no subsequent research with the modern obstetrical ultrasound machines to systematically assess potential risks to the fetus using either relevant animal models of obstetrical exposure or human epidemiology studies. The assurance of safety for obstetrical ultrasound therefore is supported by three ongoing means: (I) review of a substantial but uncoordinated bioeffect research literature, (ii) the theoretical evaluation of diagnostic ultrasound exposure in terms of thermal and nonthermal mechanisms for bioeffects, and (iii) the skill and knowledge of professional sonographers. At this time, there is no specific reason to suspect that there is any significant health risk to the fetus or mother from exposure to diagnostic ultrasound in obstetrics. This assurance of safety supports the prudent use of diagnostic ultrasound in obstetrics by trained professionals for any medically indicated examination. PMID:18450141

  4. "Near miss" obstetric morbidity in an inner city hospital in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Nasrat, H A; Youssef, M H; Marzoogi, A; Talab, F

    1999-07-01

    A defined "near-miss" end-point, e.g. peripartum hysterectomy, is a more useful measure of obstetric care in a modern inner-city hospital than maternal mortality. Thus, indication(s), type of operation, risk factors and surgical morbidity of all cases of peripartum hysterectomy conducted over a period of 85 months at King Abdul Aziz Hospital, Jeddah were reviewed. The incidence of hysterectomy was 1.22 per 1000 deliveries. Atonic postpartum haemorrhage was the most common reason (43.5%), followed by ruptured uterus (30.4%) and placenta accreta (26.1%). Of the atonic group, five patients were primigravidae, three of whom had severe pre-eclampsia. Abnormally prolonged labour was noted in this group. In the uterine rupture group, only two patients had had previous caesarean sections. In the placenta accreta group, three patients had placenta praevia, two of whom had scars from previous caesarean sections. One maternal death was attributed to amniotic fluid embolism.

  5. Total Laparoscopic Hysterectomy Utilizing a Robotic Surgical System

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Keith H.; Daucher, James A.

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the use of a robotic surgical system for total laparoscopic hysterectomy. Methods: We report a series of laparoscopic hysterectomies performed using the da Vinci Robotic Surgical System. Participants were women eligible for hysterectomy by standard laparoscopy. Operative times and complications are reported. Results: We completed 10 total laparoscopic hysterectomies between November 2001 and December 2002 with the use of the da Vinci Robotic Surgical System. Operative results were similar to those of standard laparoscopic hysterectomy. Operative time varied from 2 hours 28 minutes to 4 hours 37 minutes. Blood loss varied from 25 mL to 350 mL. Uterine weights varied from 49 g to 227 g. A cystotomy occurred in a patient with a history of a prior cystotomy unrelated to the robotic system. Conclusion: Total laparoscopic hysterectomy is a complex surgical procedure requiring advanced laparoscopic skills. Tasks like lysis of adhesions, suturing, and knot tying were enhanced with the robotic surgical system, thus providing unique advantages over existing standard laparoscopy. Total laparoscopic hysterectomy can be performed using robotic surgical systems. PMID:15791963

  6. Business and Organizational Models of Obstetric and Gynecologic Hospitalist Groups.

    PubMed

    Garite, Thomas J; Levine, Lisa; Olson, Rob

    2015-09-01

    The growth of obstetric and gynecologic (OB/GYN) hospitalists throughout the United States has led to different organizational approaches, depending on the perception of what an OB/GYN hospitalist is. There are advantages of OB/GYN hospitalist practices; however, practitioners who do this as just 1 piece of their practice are not fulfilling the promise of what this new specialty can deliver. Because those with office practices have their own business models, this article is devoted to the organizational and business models of OB/GYN hospitalists for physicians whose practice is devoted to inpatient obstetrics with or without emergency room and/or inpatient gynecology coverage.

  7. Analgesia in Obstetrics

    PubMed Central

    Heesen, M.; Veeser, M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: An effective relief of labour pain has become an important part of obstetric medicine. Therefore regional nerve blocks, systemic analgesic and non-pharmacologic techniques are commonly used. This review article gives a summary of pathophysiology and anatomy of labour pain as well as advantages, disadvantages, risks and adverse reactions of analgesic techniques in newborns and parturients. Methods: We performed a selective literature search in Medline via PubMed using the search-terms “Analgesia” and “Obstetrics”. We also included the current guidelines of the German Society for Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine. Results: PDA and CSE are safe techniques for the relief of labour pain if contraindications are excluded. The risk for instrumental delivery but not for caesarean section is increased under neuraxial analgesia. PDA and CSE should be performed in an early stage of labour using low doses of local anaesthetics if possible. It is not necessary to wait for a defined cervical dilatation before starting neuraxial analgesia. Anesthesiologists and obstetricians should inform patients as soon as possible before the situation of stress during labour. Systemic opioid analgesia is a possible alternative for neuraxial techniques. Because of possible side effects systemic remifentanil analgesia should only be performed under continuous monitoring. Several nonpharmacologic methods can also relieve labour pain, but results of studies about their effectiveness are inconsistent. PMID:25264376

  8. A case of Klumpke's obstetric brachial plexus palsy following a Cesarean section.

    PubMed

    Al-Qattan, Mohammad M; El-Sayed, Amel A F

    2016-09-01

    It is generally thought that Klumpke's palsy is not seen as obstetric injury. The authors present a case of Klumpke's palsy with Horner syndrome following delivery by emergency Cesarean section. Neurolysis and nerve grafting partially corrected the paralysis. PMID:27648266

  9. Robotic-Assisted Total Laparoscopic Hysterectomy Versus Conventional Total Laparoscopic Hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Diana; Locher, Stephen R.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To compare patient characteristics, operative variables, and outcomes of 24 patients who underwent robotic-assisted total laparoscopic hysterectomy (TLH) with 44 patients who underwent conventional TLH. We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 44 patients with TLH and 24 patients with robotic TLH. Results: Robotic TLH was associated with a shorter hospital stay (1.0 vs 1.4 days, P=0.011) and a significant decrease in narcotic use (1.2 vs 5.0 units, P=0.002). EBL and drop in hemoglobin were not significantly different. The operative time was significantly longer in patients undergoing robotic TLH (142.2 vs 122.1 minutes, P=0.027). However, only need for laparoscopic morcellation, BMI, and uterine weight, not robotic use, were independently associated with increased operative times. Conclusions: Robotic hysterectomy can be performed safely with comparable operative times to those of conventional laparoscopic hysterectomy. Postoperative measures were improved over measures for conventional laparoscopy. PMID:19793478

  10. Obstetric simulation for medical student, resident, and fellow education.

    PubMed

    Deering, Shad; Auguste, Tamika; Lockrow, Ernest

    2013-06-01

    Simulation for training new providers is no longer the wave of the future, but the reality of the present. It provides significant activation and allows for both the integration of concepts with actual application and the ability to practice a wide range of procedural skills at an earlier stage of training than would otherwise be possible. It is also an optimal method to sharpen teamwork and communication skills that are critical to patient safety. These concepts are especially relevant in the field of obstetrics, where even routine deliveries may become life-threatening emergencies and the health of the mother and child are dependent on correct and timely interventions and teamwork. Almost all of the skills needed, even for advanced invasive procedures, in obstetrics can be taught with currently available simulators. In this report we will discuss the use of medical simulation for training obstetric providers from medical school through subspecialty level training.

  11. The tremendous cost of seeking hospital obstetric care in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Afsana, Kaosar

    2004-11-01

    In Bangladesh, maternal mortality is estimated to be 320 per 100,000 live births, among the highest in the world, and most deliveries in rural areas occur at home. Women with obstetric complications fear to seek hospital care for various reasons; one of which is the tremendous cost. This paper shows how cost impedes rural, poor women's access to emergency obstetric care. The data are from a larger ethnographic study of childbirth practices in 2000--01 in Apurbabari village, the adjacent sub-district health complex and more distant tertiary hospitals at district level. Families had to spend what for them added up to a fortune for a caesarean section and other surgery, medicines, laboratory investigations, blood transfusion, food, travel and other expenses. Corruption in the form of demands for under-the-table payments to obtain these aspects of essential care is rife. Adequate resources should be allocated to the different health facilities, including for emergency obstetric treatment. Thana health complexes (sub-district hospitals) should be upgraded to provide comprehensive obstetric care. The system for prescribing drugs should be reformed and the causes of corruption investigated and addressed. Hospital care should not be allowed to further impoverish the poor. Addressing these issues will help to encourage rural, poor women to seek skilled delivery and post-partum care, particularly in emergency situations.

  12. Ovarian vein thrombosis following total laparoscopic hysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yusuke; Kato, Hiroyasu; Hosoi, Ayako; Isobe, Masanori; Koyama, Shinsuke; Shiki, Yasuhiko

    2012-11-01

    Ovarian vein thrombosis usually occurs in pregnant patients, especially during the postpartum period. However, it is a rare complication following laparoscopic surgery in gynecology. The risk of a thromboembolic event is not well defined, and evidence-based guidelines regarding deep vein thrombosis prophylaxis in gynecological laparoscopic surgery are still lacking. Herein we report a rare case of ovarian vein thrombosis following total laparoscopic hysterectomy in a 35-year-old woman who developed a fever of unknown origin on postoperative day 3. A complete fever work-up was done. Her urine, vaginal stump and blood culture were all negative, and her white blood cell count was normal. CT revealed left ovarian vein thrombosis. The patient responded well to anticoagulation in conjunction with antibiotic therapy.

  13. Effect of hysterectomy on anorectal and urethrovesical physiology.

    PubMed

    Prior, A; Stanley, K; Smith, A R; Read, N W

    1992-02-01

    To investigate whether vaginal or total abdominal hysterectomy is associated with changes in anorectal and urethrovesical physiology, 26 women were studied before operation and six weeks and six months afterwards. The results showed a postoperative increase in both rectal and vesical sensitivity (p less than 0.01). Similar results were observed irrespective of the type of hysterectomy. No significant changes in rectal or bladder compliance were noted, and anal pressure and urethral pressure and length were unchanged after surgery. Whole gut transit was not affected by hysterectomy. Urinary symptoms occurred de novo in 6/26 women and gastrointestinal symptoms in 2/26 women. These results show that significant changes in rectal and vesical sensitivity occur after hysterectomy for benign disease. These persist for at least six months postoperatively but are not always associated with development of urinary or gastrointestinal symptoms.

  14. Composite redesign of obstetrical forceps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, Seth W.; Smeltzer, Stan S.

    1994-01-01

    Due to the increase in the number of children being born recently, medical technology has struggled to keep pace in certain areas. In these areas, particular needs have arisen to which the subject of this paper is directed. In the area of obstetrics, the forceps design and function has remained relatively unchanged for a number of years. In an effort to advance the technology, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center has been asked by the obstetrical community to help in a redesign of the obstetric forceps. Traditionally the forceps design has been of tubular stainless steel, constructed in two halves which interlock and hinge to provide the gripping force necessary to aid in the delivery of an infant. The stainless steel material was used to provide for ease of cleaning and sterilization. However, one of the drawbacks of the non-flexible steel design is that excessive force can be placed upon an infants head which could result in damage or injury to the infant. The redesign of this particular obstetric tool involves applying NASA's knowledge of advanced materials and state of the art instrumentation to create a tool which can be used freely throughout the obstetrics community without the fear of injury to an infant being delivered.

  15. Definitions of Obstetric and Gynecologic Hospitalists.

    PubMed

    McCue, Brigid; Fagnant, Robert; Townsend, Arthur; Morgan, Meredith; Gandhi-List, Shefali; Colegrove, Tanner; Stosur, Harriet; Olson, Rob; Meyer, Karenmarie; Lin, Andrew; Tessmer-Tuck, Jennifer

    2016-02-01

    The obstetric hospitalist and the obstetric and gynecologic hospitalist evolved in response to diverse forces in medicine, including the need for leadership on labor and delivery units, an increasing emphasis on quality and safety in obstetrics and gynecology, the changing demographics of the obstetric and gynecologic workforce, and rising liability costs. Current (although limited) research suggests that obstetric and obstetric and gynecologic hospitalists may improve the quality and safety of obstetric care, including lower cesarean delivery rates and higher vaginal birth after cesarean delivery rates as well as lower liability costs and fewer liability events. This research is currently hampered by the use of varied terminology. The leadership of the Society of Obstetric and Gynecologic Hospitalists proposes standardized definitions of an obstetric hospitalist, an obstetric and gynecologic hospitalist, and obstetric and gynecologic hospital medicine practices to standardize communication and facilitate program implementation and research. Clinical investigations regarding obstetric and gynecologic practices (including hospitalist practices) should define inpatient coverage arrangements using these standardized definitions to allow for fair conclusions and comparisons between practices. PMID:26942370

  16. Antiemetic effect of propofol administered at the end of surgery in laparoscopic assisted vaginal hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eu-Gene; Kang, Hyoseok; Choi, Juyoun; Lee, Hyun Jeong

    2014-01-01

    Background Postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) commonly occur after general anesthesia, especially in women. In this study, we evaluated the antiemetic efficacy of propofol administered at the end of surgery in highly susceptible patients undergoing a laparoscopy-assisted vaginal hysterectomy. Methods A total of 107 women undergoing a laparoscopy-assisted vaginal hysterectomy under general anesthesia were enrolled for this prospective, double-blind, randomized study. Fifteen minutes before the end of surgery, all patients received 50 µg fentanyl and 1 of following 3 doses; 0.5 mg/kg of propofol (propofol 0.5 group), 1 mg/kg of propofol (propofol 1.0 group), and normal saline (control group). All patients received intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (PCA). Emergence time, a visual analog scale for pain and nausea, duration of postanesthesia care unit (PACU) stay, and frequency of antiemetic use were recorded at 0-2, 2-24, and 24-48 hours postoperatively. Results The incidence of nausea significantly lower in the propofol 0.5 and propofol 1.0 groups than in the control group (12.1 vs 14.7 vs 40%). During the first postoperative 2 hours, antiemetics were less frequently administered in the propofol 0.5 and propofol 1.0 groups than in the control group (3.0 vs 5.9 vs 22.5%). Emergence time was slightly longer in the propofol 0.5 and propofol 1.0 groups than in the control group, but there was no significant difference in PACU stay time was observed between the 3 groups. Conclusions The results of this study suggest that low-dose propofol administration at the end of surgery may effectively reduce the incidence of PONV within 2 hours postoperatively in highly susceptible women undergoing a laparoscopiy-assisted vaginal hysterectomy and receiving opioid-based PCA. PMID:24729843

  17. Foetal Gender and Obstetric Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Schildberger, B.; Leitner, H.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Data on specific characteristics based on the gender of the unborn baby and their significance for obstetrics are limited. The aim of this study is to analyse selected parameters of obstetric relevance in the phases pregnancy, birth and postpartum period in dependence on the gender of the foetus. Materials and Methods: The selected study method comprised a retrospective data acquisition and evaluation from the Austrian birth register of the Department of Clinical Epidemiology of Tyrolean State Hospitals. For the analysis all inpatient singleton deliveries in Austria during the period from 2008 to 2013 were taken into account (live and stillbirths n = 444 685). The gender of the baby was correlated with previously defined, obstetrically relevant parameters. Results: In proportions, significantly more premature births and sub partu medical interventions (vaginal and abdominal surgical deliveries. episiotomies) were observed for male foetuses (p < 0.001). The neonatal outcome (5-min Apgar score, umbilical pH value less than 7.1, transfer to a neonatal special unit) is significantly poorer for boys (p < 0.001). Discussion: In view of the vulnerability of male foetuses and infants, further research is needed in order to be able to react appropriately to the differing gender-specific requirements in obstetrics. PMID:27065487

  18. Assessing preventability for obstetric hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Della Torre, Micaela; Kilpatrick, Sarah J; Hibbard, Judith U; Simonson, Louise; Scott, Shirley; Koch, Abby; Schy, Deborah; Geller, Stacie E

    2011-12-01

    We sought to determine preventability for cases of obstetric hemorrhage, identify preventable factors, and compare differences between levels of hospital. We retrospectively reviewed a 1-year cohort of severe and near-miss obstetric hemorrhage in an urban perinatal network. An expert panel, using a validated preventability model, reviewed all cases. Preventability and distribution of preventability factors were compared between levels of hospital care. Sixty-three severe and near-miss obstetric hemorrhage cases were identified from 11 hospitals; 54% were deemed potentially preventable. Overall preventability was not statistically different by level of hospital, and 88% were provider related. The only treatment-related preventability factors were significantly different between levels of hospital and significantly less common in level III hospitals (p < 0.01). The majority of obstetric hemorrhage was preventable. The most common potentially preventable factor was provider treatment error, and this was significantly more common in level II hospitals. New interventions should be focused on decreasing providers' treatment errors.

  19. Assessing preventability for obstetric hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Della Torre, Micaela; Kilpatrick, Sarah J; Hibbard, Judith U; Simonson, Louise; Scott, Shirley; Koch, Abby; Schy, Deborah; Geller, Stacie E

    2011-12-01

    We sought to determine preventability for cases of obstetric hemorrhage, identify preventable factors, and compare differences between levels of hospital. We retrospectively reviewed a 1-year cohort of severe and near-miss obstetric hemorrhage in an urban perinatal network. An expert panel, using a validated preventability model, reviewed all cases. Preventability and distribution of preventability factors were compared between levels of hospital care. Sixty-three severe and near-miss obstetric hemorrhage cases were identified from 11 hospitals; 54% were deemed potentially preventable. Overall preventability was not statistically different by level of hospital, and 88% were provider related. The only treatment-related preventability factors were significantly different between levels of hospital and significantly less common in level III hospitals (p < 0.01). The majority of obstetric hemorrhage was preventable. The most common potentially preventable factor was provider treatment error, and this was significantly more common in level II hospitals. New interventions should be focused on decreasing providers' treatment errors. PMID:21698554

  20. Neurologic issues and obstetric anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Chang, Laura Y; Carabuena, Jean Marie; Camann, William

    2011-09-01

    The rising popularity of regional anesthesia in the last several decades has greatly changed the experience of labor. Although the use of regional anesthesia has aided in decreasing maternal morbidity and mortality, a new dimension of neurologic issues, particularly headache and peripheral neuropathy, is apparent. Obstetric anesthesiologists frequently encounter patients with preexisting neurologic disease. Although very few of these disorders contraindicate the use of neuraxial technique, there are limited published data on specific neurologic and neuromuscular disorders in pregnancy. Neurologists are often consulted by anesthesiologists and obstetricians to evaluate pregnant patients for the feasibility of labor analgesia and when postpartum neurologic complications arise. Early consultation with an obstetric anesthesiologist, discussion with a neurologist, and communication with the obstetrician allows for the education and discussion of the risks and benefits of both the mode of delivery and anesthetic options. This multidisciplinary approach is crucial in forming reasonable expectations for the patient. The aim of this discussion is to provide an obstetric anesthesiologist's perspective on regional anesthesia and its implications in obstetrics, and to enhance communication between our specialties. PMID:22113509

  1. Septic Pelvic Thrombophlebitis Following Laparoscopic Hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Farhady, Parastoo; Lemyre, Madeleine

    2009-01-01

    Background: The diagnosis of septic pelvic thrombophlebitis is frequently one of exclusion; a suspicion should arise when fever fails to respond to standard broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy and defervesces within 48 hours of the addition of systemic anticoagulation. The risk of a thromboembolic event following minimally invasive surgery is not well defined. Case Report: We report the first case of septic pelvic thrombophlebitis following laparoscopic hysterectomy in a 51-year-old woman who developed fever on postoperative day 4. The fever workup was negative. The patient's temperature spikes were unresponsive to medical management. A clinical diagnosis of septic pelvic thrombophlebitis was made, and the patient responded excellently to anticoagulation in conjunction with antibiotic therapy. Conclusion: Although rare, septic pelvic thrombophlebitis should be suspected after laparoscopy in patients with appropriate risk factors and persistent fever despite antibiotic therapy. Considerable benefit will be derived from clinical trials that study and provide data on the risk and incidence of thromboembolism after laparoscopic procedures. PMID:19366549

  2. Dextromethorphan and pain after total abdominal hysterectomy.

    PubMed

    McConaghy, P M; McSorley, P; McCaughey, W; Campbell, W I

    1998-11-01

    Dextromethorphan is an N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist which has been shown to inhibit the development of cutaneous secondary hyperalgesia after tissue trauma. We studied 60 ASA I-II patients undergoing total abdominal hysterectomy in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Patients received either dextromethorphan 27 mg capsules, two doses before operation and three doses in the first 24 h after operation, or placebo. Visual analogue pain scores (VAS) at 24 and 48 h were assessed at rest, on coughing and on sitting up, and were not significantly different between groups. Morphine consumption from a patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) device was also not significantly different between groups. Evidence of secondary hyperalgesia was assessed with von Frey hairs 10 cm above the Pfannenstiel incision. Both groups of patients exhibited evidence of secondary hyperalgesia after 24 and 48 h but there were no significant differences between groups. There was also no difference between groups in VAS scores at 1 month.

  3. Laparoscopic hysterectomy of large uteri using three-trocar technique

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Wenjie; Chen, Liyou; Du, Weijie; Hu, Jinghui; Fang, Xiangming; Zhao, Xiaofeng

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The uterus with its size exceeds 12 weeks of gestation have been considered a relative contraindication to laparoscopic hysterectomy. With surgical techniques progressed and laparoscopic instruments improved, laparoscopic hysterectomy for large uteri have been performed safely and effectively. The aim of this study is to assess the feasibility and safety of laparoscopic hysterectomy on uterus more than 800 g using a three-trocar technique on 18 patients. Methods: From June 2011 to June 2013 a total of 18 consecutive patients underwent laparoscopic hysterectomy for benign gynaecological conditions. All of the 18 consecutive cases were successfully completed by laparoscopy with the instruction of the procedure. Results: All of the 18 cases were completed by laparoscopy without major complication. The average time of the surgery was 107 min (65-180), the average blood lost was 225 ml (50-800 ml), the average weight of the uterus was 1105 g (820-1880 g), and the average HGB drop was 0.9 g/dl (0.2-1.9 g/dl). Conclusion: Based on appropriate techniques and careful operate, Laparoscopic hysterectomies for large uteri using three-trocar is safe and feasible to most of the patients. PMID:26131249

  4. Liability in triage: management of EMTALA regulations and common obstetric risks.

    PubMed

    Angelini, Diane J; Mahlmeister, Laura R

    2005-01-01

    The Emergency Medical Treatment and Active Labor Act (EMTALA) affects all clinicians who provide triage care for pregnant women. EMTALA has specific regulations for hospitals relative to women in active labor. Violations can carry stiff penalties. It is critical for clinicians performing obstetric triage to understand the duties and obligations of this law. This article discusses EMTALA and reviews common liability risks in obstetric triage as well as strategies to modify those risks.

  5. Psychological meaning of a woman with a hysterectomy among Mexican physicians and women.

    PubMed

    Marván, Maria Luisa; Catillo-López, Rosa Lilia; Ehrenzweig, Yamilet; Palacios, Pedro

    2012-01-01

    The psychological meaning of women who have had a hysterectomy, and attitudes toward them, were explored in 121 Mexican gynecologists, 155 women who had undergone a hysterectomy, and 115 women who had not had a hysterectomy. The surveys were completed between January and May 2011. Both groups of women defined a woman who had had a hysterectomy using words with positive meanings (healthy, happy, reassured, and complete), as well as words with negative meanings (sad, incomplete, and irritable). However, the participants who had not had a hysterectomy defined a woman who had had a hysterectomy using more negative words and showed more negative attitudes toward such a woman with a hysterectomy than those women who had undergone a hysterectomy. Among participants who had undergone a hysterectomy, those who were premenopausal prior to the surgery and those who had undergone bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy defined a woman who had had a hysterectomy in a more negative manner and showed the most negative attitudes. The gynecologists did not use words with emotional content regarding women who had had a hysterectomy and showed more neutral attitudes toward such a woman than did both groups of women. These findings could be helpful in designing support programs for women facing a hysterectomy.

  6. Pain Characteristics after Total Laparoscopic Hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jong Bum; Kang, Kyeongjin; Song, Mi Kyung; Seok, Suhyun; Kim, Yoon Hee; Kim, Ji Eun

    2016-01-01

    Background. Total laparoscopic hysterectomy (TLH) causes various types of postoperative pain, and the pain pattern has not been evaluated in detail to date. This prospective observational study investigated the types of postoperative pain, intensity in the course of time, and pain characteristics during the first postoperative 72 hr after TLH. Methods. Sixty four female patients undergoing TLH were enrolled, which finally 50 patients were included for the data analyses. The locations of pain included overall pain, abdominal visceral and incisional pains, shoulder pain, and perineal pain. Assessments were made at rest and in motion, and pain level was scored with the use of the 100 mm visual analog scale. The pain was assessed at baseline, and at postoperative 30 min, 1 hr, 3 hr, 6 hr, 24 hr, 48 hr, and 72 hr. Results. Overall, visceral, and incisional pains were most intense on the day of operation and then decreased following surgery. In contrast, shoulder pain gradually increased, peaking at postoperative 24 hr. Shoulder pain developed in 90% of all patients (44/50). It was not more aggravated in motion than at rest, in comparison with other pains, and right shoulder pain was more severe than left shoulder pain (p=0.006). In addition, the preoperative exercise habit of patients increased the threshold of shoulder pain. Most patients (46/50) had perineal pain, which was more severe than abdominal pain in approximately 30% of patients (17/50). Conclusion. Pain after TLH showed considerably different duration, severity, and characteristics, compared with other laparoscopic procedures. Shoulder pain was most intense at postoperative 24 hr, and the intensity was associated with the prior exercise habit of patients and the high level of analgesic request. PMID:27499688

  7. Teamwork in obstetric critical care

    PubMed Central

    Guise, Jeanne-Marie; Segel, Sally

    2016-01-01

    Whether seeing a patient in the ambulatory clinic environment, performing a delivery or managing a critically ill patient, obstetric care is a team activity. Failures in teamwork and communication are among the leading causes of adverse obstetric events, accounting for over 70% of sentinel events according to the Joint Commission. Effective, efficient and safe care requires good teamwork. Although nurses, doctors and healthcare staff who work in critical care environments are extremely well trained and competent medically, they have not traditionally been trained in how to work well as part of a team. Given the complexity and acuity of critical care medicine, which often relies on more than one medical team, teamwork skills are essential. This chapter discusses the history and importance of teamwork in high-reliability fields, reviews key concepts and skills in teamwork, and discusses approaches to training and working in teams. PMID:18701352

  8. Teamwork in obstetric critical care.

    PubMed

    Guise, Jeanne-Marie; Segel, Sally

    2008-10-01

    Whether seeing a patient in the ambulatory clinic environment, performing a delivery or managing a critically ill patient, obstetric care is a team activity. Failures in teamwork and communication are among the leading causes of adverse obstetric events, accounting for over 70% of sentinel events according to the Joint Commission. Effective, efficient and safe care requires good teamwork. Although nurses, doctors and healthcare staff who work in critical care environments are extremely well trained and competent medically, they have not traditionally been trained in how to work well as part of a team. Given the complexity and acuity of critical care medicine, which often relies on more than one medical team, teamwork skills are essential. This chapter discusses the history and importance of teamwork in high-reliability fields, reviews key concepts and skills in teamwork, and discusses approaches to training and working in teams.

  9. Robotic Trachelectomy After Supracervical Hysterectomy for Benign Gynecologic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Aoun, Joelle; Hanna, Rabbie; Papalekas, Eleni; Schiff, Lauren; Theoharis, Evan; Eisenstein, David

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: A renewed interest in the supra cervical approach to hysterectomy has created a cohort of patients with a retained cervix at risk of persistent symptoms requiring a subsequent trachelectomy. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of robotic trachelectomy after a previous supracervical hysterectomy. Methods: This is a retrospective chart review of women who had robotic trachelectomy after supracervical hysterectomy for benign gynecologic disease from January 2009 through October 2014. Results: Eleven patients underwent robotic trachelectomy for benign conditions during the observed period. Prior supracervical hysterectomy had been performed for pelvic pain (8/11, 73%), abnormal uterine bleeding (7/11, 64%), and dysmenorrhea (5/11, 45%). In 10 of 11 patients, the symptoms leading to robotic trachelectomy were the same as those leading to supracervical hysterectomy. The time from hysterectomy to recurrence of symptoms ranged from 0.5 to 26 months (median, 6), whereas the time interval from previous surgery to robotic trachelectomy ranged from 1 to 57 months (median, 26). Mean age and body mass index at robotic trachelectomy were 42 ± 5.4 years and 32 ± 6.1 kg/m2. Mean length of surgery was 218 ± 88 minutes (range, 100–405). There was 1 major postoperative complication involving bladder perforation and subsequent vesicovaginal fistula (VVF). Endometriosis was seen in 27% of pathologic specimens and cervicitis in another 27%; 45% showed normal tissue histology. In 6 (55%) cases, symptoms leading to trachelectomy resolved completely after surgery, and the other 5 (45%) patients reported a significant improvement. Conclusions: Although trachelectomy can be a challenging surgery, our experience suggests that the robotic approach may be a valuable means of achieving safe and reproducible outcomes. PMID:27493470

  10. The Essential Elements of a Robotic-Assisted Laparoscopic Hysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Khara M; Advincula, Arnold P

    2016-09-01

    Robotic-assisted laparoscopic hysterectomies are being performed at higher rates since the da Vinci Surgical System (Intuitive Surgical, Inc, Sunnyvale, CA, USA) received US Food and Drug Administration approval in 2005 for gynecologic procedures. Despite the technological advancements over traditional laparoscopy, a discrepancy exists between what the literature states and what the benefits are as seen through the eyes of the end-user. There remains a significant learning curve in the adoption of safe and efficient robotic skills. The authors present important considerations when choosing to perform a robotic hysterectomy and a step-by-step technique. The literature on perioperative outcomes is also reviewed. PMID:27521880

  11. Maternal and Perinatal Outcome of Life Threatening Obstetrical Complications Requiring Multiple Transfusions

    PubMed Central

    Khatuja, Ritu; Radhakrishnan, Gita; Radhika, AG; Juneja, Atul; Singh, Bharat

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Obstetrical haemorrhage is the direct cause of maternal mortality, which can be prevented by timely recognition followed by quick and adequate treatment. Aim To evaluate maternal and perinatal outcome of life threatening obstetric complications requiring multiple transfusions. Materials and Methods It is an observational study conducted on 112 antenatal and postnatal women admitted in a tertiary level hospital, requiring blood and blood products transfusion of >1.5 liters in 24 hours, over a period of 15 months (Aug 2011 to Oct 2012). The demographic and obstetrical profile, amount transfused, mode of delivery, duration of hospital stay, maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality was evaluated. Statistical Analysis Statistical analysis of the data was performed using chi-squared test. Results There were 95 women who presented in antepartum period and 17 in the postpartum. Multigravidas comprised of 70 women, 81 had unsupervised pregnancies and 33 women presented in shock. At admission, 76 peripartum women had severe anaemia and 62 had coagulopathy. Obstetrical hysterectomy was done for 33 women and total 17 women expired. Haemorrhage was the most common indication for transfusion. The mean blood transfusion and volume replacement in 24 hours was 4.2 units & 2.25 liters respectively. The mean hospital stay was 10-15 days. Intra-uterine death at the time of admission was present in 40 women and 72 had live births. After birth, 21 babies required neonatal intensive care, of which 6 expired. Conclusion Antenatal care is important to prevent complications though pregnancy is always unpredictable. Patients’ condition at admission is single most important factor often influencing the maternal and perinatal outcome. PMID:26673661

  12. Recovery 3 and 12 months after hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Theunissen, Maurice; Peters, Madelon L.; Schepers, Jan; Maas, Jacques W.M.; Tournois, Fleur; van Suijlekom, Hans A.; Gramke, Hans-Fritz; Marcus, Marco A.E.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Chronic postsurgical pain (CPSP) is 1 important aspect of surgical recovery. To improve perioperative care and postoperative recovery knowledge on predictors of impaired recovery is essential. The aim of this study is to assess predictors and epidemiological data of CPSP, physical functioning (SF-36PF, 0–100), and global surgical recovery (global surgical recovery index, 0–100%) 3 and 12 months after hysterectomy for benign indication. A prospective multicenter cohort study was performed. Sociodemographic, somatic, and psychosocial data were assessed in the week before surgery, postoperatively up to day 4, and at 3- and 12-month follow-up. Generalized linear model (CPSP) and linear-mixed model analyses (SF-36PF and global surgical recovery index) were used. Baseline data of 468 patients were collected, 412 (88%) patients provided data for 3-month evaluation and 376 (80%) patients for 12-month evaluation. After 3 and 12 months, prevalence of CPSP (numeric rating scale ≥ 4, scale 0–10) was 10.2% and 9.0%, respectively, SF-36PF means (SD) were 83.5 (20.0) and 85.9 (20.2), global surgical recovery index 88.1% (15.6) and 93.3% (13.4). Neuropathic pain was reported by 20 (5.0%) patients at 3 months and 14 (3.9%) patients at 12 months. Preoperative pain, surgery-related worries, acute postsurgical pain on day 4, and surgery-related infection were significant predictors of CPSP. Baseline level, participating center, general psychological robustness, indication, acute postsurgical pain, and surgery-related infection were significant predictors of SF-36PF. Predictors of global surgical recovery were baseline expectations, surgery-related worries, American Society of Anesthesiologists classification, type of anesthesia, acute postsurgical pain, and surgery-related infection. Several predictors were identified for CPSP, physical functioning, and global surgical recovery. Some of the identified factors are modifiable and optimization of patients’ preoperative

  13. Obstetric fistula: what about gender power?

    PubMed

    Roush, Karen; Kurth, Ann; Hutchinson, M Katherine; Van Devanter, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    Despite over 40 years of research there has been little progress in the prevention of obstetric fistula and women continue to suffer in unacceptable numbers. Gender power imbalance has consistently been shown to have serious implications for women's reproductive health and is known to persist in regions where obstetric fistula occurs. Yet, there is limited research about the role gender power imbalance plays in childbirth practices that put women at risk for obstetric fistula. This information is vital for developing effective maternal health interventions in regions affected by obstetric fistula.

  14. Implementing safe obstetric anesthesia in Eastern Europe.

    PubMed

    Kuczkowski, Krzysztof M; Kuczkowski, Krzysztof M

    2009-08-01

    The position of woman in any civilization is an index of the advancement of that civilization; the position of woman is gauged best by the care given her at the birth of her child. Obstetric anesthesia, by definition, is a subspecialty of anesthesia devoted to peripartum, perioperative, pain and anesthetic management of women during pregnancy and the puerperium. Today, obstetric anesthesia has become a recognized subspecialty of anesthesiology and an integral part of practice of most anesthesiologists. Perhaps, no other subspecialty of anesthesiology provides more personal gratification than the practice of obstetric anesthesia. This article reviews the challenges associated with implementing safe obstetric anesthesia practice in Eastern Europe.

  15. Obstetric Fistula: Living With Incontinence and Shame

    PubMed Central

    Semere, Luwam; Nour, Nawal M

    2008-01-01

    Over 2 million women worldwide have an obstetric fistula, with the majority of cases occurring in resource-poor countries. Afflicted women tend to be young, primiparous, impoverished, and have little or no access to medical care. Incontinent of urine and/or stool, these women become ostracized and shunned by their community. Most obstetric fistulas are surgically correctible, although surgical outcomes have been poorly studied. Programs that improve nutrition, delay the age of marriage, improve family planning, and increase access to maternal and obstetric care are necessary to prevent obstetric fistula. PMID:19173024

  16. Histopathological audit of 373 nononcological hysterectomies in a teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Tiwana, Kanwardeep Kaur; Nibhoria, Sarita; Monga, Tanvi; Phutela, Richa

    2014-01-01

    Hysterectomy, the most common gynecological surgery, provides a definitive cure to various diseases like DUB (dysfunctional uterine bleeding), leiomyoma, adenomyosis, chronic pelvic pain, prolapse, and malignancy. However, with advent of effective medical and conservative treatment modalities for nononcological causes it is now posing question mark on justification of hysterectomy. Therefore, an audit is required to assess the correlation between preoperative diagnosis and histopathological examination of specimen for justification of the procedure. In this study over period of one year (April 2013 to March 2014) 373 hysterectomies specimens were received in the department of pathology for nononcological causes. The age of patients ranged from 22 to 85 years with mean 45 ± 9.2 years. All cases were divided into five categories on the basis of age and audit was done. In this study the most common finding was leiomyoma (43.7%) followed by adenomyosis (19.3%). Almost 50% of hysterectomies causes were justified as preoperative diagnosis matched with histopathology. Cohen kappa statistics were used to measure agreement between preoperative and postoperative histopathological diagnosis which was found to be fair with κ value being 0.36. This study highlights that regular audit of surgeries can help improve quality of health care services and provide safe conservative option to patients.

  17. Committee Opinion No. 657 Summary: The Obstetric and Gynecologic Hospitalist.

    PubMed

    2016-02-01

    The term "hospitalist" refers to physicians whose primary professional focus is the general medical care of hospitalized patients. Their activities may include patient care, teaching, research, and inpatient leadership. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists supports the continued development and study of the obstetric and gynecologic (ob-gyn) hospitalist model as one potential approach to improve patient safety and professional satisfaction across delivery settings. Effective patient handoffs, updates on progress, and clear follow-up instructions between ob-gyn hospitalists and patients, nurses, and other health care providers are vital to maintaining patient safety. Hospitals and other health care organizations should ensure that candidates for positions as ob-gyn hospitalists are drawn from those with documented training and experience appropriate for the management of the acute and potentially emergent clinical circumstances that may be encountered in obstetric care. PMID:26942385

  18. Obstetrics Hospitalists: Risk Management Implications.

    PubMed

    Veltman, Larry

    2015-09-01

    The concept of having an in-house obstetrician (serving as an obstetrics [OB] hospitalist) available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week provides a safety net for OB events that many need immediate intervention for a successful outcome. A key precept of risk management, that of loss prevention, fits perfectly with the addition of an OB hospitalist role in the perinatal department. Inherent in the role of OB hospitalists are the patient safety and risk management principles of improved communication, enhanced readiness, and immediate availability.

  19. Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospitalist Fellowships.

    PubMed

    Vintzileos, Anthony M

    2015-09-01

    This article establishes the rationale and development of an obstetrics and gynecology (OB/GYN) hospitalist fellowship program. The pool of OB/GYN hospitalists needs to be drastically expanded to accommodate the country's needs. Fellowship programs should provide extra training and confidence for recent resident graduates who want to pursue a hospitalist career. Fellowships should train physicians in a way that aligns their interests with those of the hospital with respect to patient care, teaching, and research. Research in the core measures should be a necessary component of the fellowship so as to provide long-term benefits for all stakeholders, including hospitals and patients.

  20. Robotic Radical Hysterectomy Versus Total Laparoscopic Radical Hysterectomy With Pelvic Lymphadenectomy for Treatment of Early Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Datta, M. Shoma; Liu, Connie; Chuang, Linus; Zakashansky, Konstantin

    2008-01-01

    Background and Objectives: To compare intraoperative, pathologic and postoperative outcomes of robotic radical hysterectomy (RRH) to total laparoscopic radical hysterectomy (TLRH) in patients with early stage cervical carcinoma. Methods: We prospectively analyzed cases of TLRH or RRH with pelvic lymphadenectomy performed for treatment of early cervical cancer between 2000 and 2008. Results: Thirty patients underwent TLRH and pelvic lymph-adenectomy for cervical cancer from August 2000 to June 2006. Thirteen patients underwent RRH and pelvic lymph-adenectomy for cervical cancer from April 2006 to January 2008. There were no differences between groups for age, tumor histology, stage, lymphovascular space involvement or nodal status. No statistical differences were observed regarding operative time (323 vs 318 min), estimated blood loss (157 vs 200 mL), or hospital stay (2.7 vs 3.8 days). Mean pelvic lymph node count was similar in the two groups (25 vs 31). None of the robotic or laparoscopic procedures required conversion to laparotomy. The differences in major operative and postoperative complications between the two groups were not significant. All patients in both groups are alive and free of disease at the time of last follow up. Conclusion: Based on our experience, robotic radical hysterectomy appears to be equivalent to total laparoscopic radical hysterectomy with respect to operative time, blood loss, hospital stay, and oncological outcome. We feel the intuitive nature of the robotic approach, magnification, dexterity, and flexibility combined with significant reduction in surgeon's fatigue offered by the robotic system will allow more surgeons to use a minimally invasive approach to radical hysterectomy. PMID:18765043

  1. Topics for Family Medicine Research in Obstetrics

    PubMed Central

    Hogg, William E.; Calonge, Ned

    1988-01-01

    Primarily because of improvements in care of the low-birthweight neonate, Canada's neonatal mortality rates have declined significantly over the last 20 years. To make further improvement, research is now focused on the prevention of prematurity. However, benefits from the implementation of such research and the maintenance of the current neonatal mortality rate depend on the availability of obstetric care providers in rural areas. The recent trend among family physicians to drop the practice of obstetrics significantly jeopardizes access to obstetric care for inhabitants of rural areas, and a significant body of literature suggests that such declines in access will be accompanied by an increase in the neonatal death rate. A logical research agenda for rural family physicians would include the forecasting of the effect of the decrease in obstetric care manpower, follwed by the study of factors behind this trend, and the evaluation programs designed to prevent family physicians abandoning obstetric practice. PMID:21253225

  2. Obstetric Provider Maldistribution: Georgia, USA, 2011.

    PubMed

    Spelke, Bridget; Zertuche, Adrienne D; Rochat, Roger

    2016-07-01

    Objectives In 2010, Georgia had the nation's highest maternal mortality rate, sixteenth highest infant mortality rate, and a waning obstetrician/gynecologist (ob/gyn) workforce. Statewide ob/gyn workforce data, however, masked obstetric-specific care shortages and regional variation in obstetric services. The Georgia Maternal and Infant Health Research Group thereby assessed each Georgia region's obstetric provider workforce to identify service-deficient areas. Methods We identified 63 birthing facilities in the 82 Primary Care Service Areas (PCSAs) outside metropolitan Atlanta and interviewed nurse managers and others to assess the age, sex, and expected departure year of each delivering professional. Using accepted annual delivery rates of 155 per obstetrician (OB), 100 per certified nurse midwife (CNM), and 70 per family medicine physician (FP) we converted obstetric providers into "OB equivalents" to standardize obstetric services available in any given area. Using facility births and computed OB equivalents (contemporary and 2020 estimates), we calculated current and projected average annual births per provider (AABP) for each PCSA, categorizing its obstetric provider workforce as "adequate" (AABP < 144), "at risk" (144 ≤ AABP ≤ 166), or "deficient" (AABP > 166). We mapped results using ArcGIS. Results Of 82 surveyed PCSAs, 52 % (43) were deficient in obstetric care; 16 % (13) had a shortage and 37 % (30) lacked obstetric providers entirely. There were no delivering FPs in 89 % (73) of PCSAs and no CNMs in 70 % (56). If Georgia fails to recruit delivering providers, 72 % (58/77) of PCSAs will have deficient or no obstetric care by 2020. Conclusions Obstetric provider shortages in Georgia hinder access to prenatal and delivery services. Care-deficient areas will expand if recruitment and retention of delivering professionals does not improve.

  3. Resuscitation in massive obstetric haemorrhage using an intraosseous needle.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, D J; Bukunola, B; Samuels, T L; Induruwage, L; Uncles, D R

    2011-04-01

    A 38-year-old woman experienced a massive postpartum haemorrhage 30 minutes after emergency caesarean delivery. The patient became severely haemodynamically compromised with an unrecordable blood pressure. Rapid fluid resuscitation was limited by the capacity of the intravenous cannula in place at the time and inability to establish additional vascular access using conventional routes in a timely manner. An intraosseous needle was inserted in the proximal humerus at the first attempt and administration of resuscitation fluid by this route subsequently enabled successful placement of further intravenous lines. Blood and blood products were deployed in conjunction with intra-operative cell salvage and transoesophageal Doppler cardiac output monitoring was used to assess adequacy of volume replacement. Haemorrhage control was finally achieved with the use of recombinant factor VIIa and hysterectomy. PMID:21401545

  4. Non-physician providers of obstetric care in Mexico: Perspectives of physicians, obstetric nurses and professional midwives

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In Mexico 87% of births are attended by physicians. However, the decline in the national maternal mortality rate has been slower than expected. The Mexican Ministry of Health’s 2009 strategy to reduce maternal mortality gives a role to two non-physician models that meet criteria for skilled attendants: obstetric nurses and professional midwives. This study compares and contrasts these two provider types with the medical model, analyzing perspectives on their respective training, scope of practice, and also their perception and/or experiences with integration into the public system as skilled birth attendants. Methodology This paper synthesizes qualitative research that was obtained as a component of the quantitative and qualitative study that evaluated three models of obstetric care: professional midwives (PM), obstetric nurses (ON) and general physicians (GP). A total of 27 individual interviews using a semi-structured guide were carried out with PMs, ONs, GPs and specialists. Interviews were transcribed following the principles of grounded theory, codes and categories were created as they emerged from the data. We analyzed data in ATLAS.ti. Results All provider types interviewed expressed confidence in their professional training and acknowledge that both professional midwives and obstetric nurses have the necessary skills and knowledge to care for women during normal pregnancy and childbirth. The three types of providers recognize limits to their practice, namely in the area of managing complications. We found differences in how each type of practitioner perceived the concept and process of birth and their role in this process. The barriers to incorporation as a model to attend birth faced by PMs and ONs are at the individual, hospital and system level. GPs question their ability and training to handle deliveries, in particular those that become complicated, and the professional midwifery model particularly as it relates to a clinical setting, is

  5. Robotic radical hysterectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy for uterine rhabdomyosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Backes, Floor J; Seamon, Leigh G; Fowler, Jeffrey M

    2008-09-01

    Mullerian rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is a rare malignancy most commonly diagnosed in childhood and adolescence. RMS of the female genital tract is often difficult to diagnose. Treatment includes chemotherapy with adjuvant surgery and/or radiation therapy reserved for persistent disease. We report a case of an 18-year-old African-American female who presented with severe menometrorrhagia, and was diagnosed with embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma of the uterus. After vincristine, dactinomycin, and cyclophosphamide failed to eradicate the central tumor, she underwent a robotic radical hysterectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy. Mullerian rhabdomyosarcoma was once managed with multimodality therapy that often included ultraradical surgery including total pelvic exenteration. Surgical procedures that were exclusively performed via large abdominal incisions can now be completed with minimally invasive techniques. Robotic surgery can be safely and successfully applied to radical hysterectomy and lymphadenectomy for uterine rhabdomyosarcoma. PMID:27628261

  6. Effects of a refugee-assistance programme on host population in Guinea as measured by obstetric interventions.

    PubMed

    Van Damme, W; De Brouwere, V; Boelaert, M; Van Lerberghe, W

    1998-05-30

    Since 1990, half a million people have fled Liberia and Sierra Leone to settle in Guinea, where the government has provided refuge and free medical assistance. To determine whether Guinea's refugee assistance program has improved access to hospital care for the host population, data on major obstetric interventions performed in the district hospital in the Gueckedou prefecture in 1988-96 were compared for three rural areas with varying numbers of refugees. The rate of major obstetric interventions was defined as the number of cesarean section deliveries, craniotomies, and breach repairs or hysterectomies divided by the expected number of deliveries for a study area. This rate for the host population increased from 0.03% in 1988 to 1.06% in 1996 in the area with a high number of refugees, from 0.34% to 0.92% in the area with a medium number, and from 0.07% to 0.27% in the area with a low number. The rate ratios over time were 4.35, 1.70, and 1.94, respectively. Thus, the rates of major obstetric interventions increased significantly more in the area with a relatively large influx of refugees than in the two with lesser numbers. In the former area, the refugee assistance program was associated with improvements in the overall health system, the transportation infrastructure, and general economic development. This trend suggests that Guinea's nondirective refugee policy offers many benefits to the host population and represents a cost-effective alternative to refugee camps.

  7. [HYPNOSIS IN OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY].

    PubMed

    Rabinerson, David; Yeoshua, Effi; Gabbay-Ben-Ziv, Rinat

    2015-05-01

    Hypnosis is an ancient method of treatment, in which an enhanced state of mind and elevated susceptibility for suggestion of the patient, are increased. Hypnosis is executed, either by a caregiver or by the person himself (after brief training). The use of hypnosis in alleviating labor pain has been studied as of the second half of the 20th century. In early studies, the use of hypnosis for this purpose has been proven quite effective. However, later studies, performed in randomized controlled trial terms, have shown controversial results. Other studies, in which the effect of hypnosis was tested in various aspects of both obstetrics and gynecology and with different levels of success, are elaborated on in this review.

  8. [HYPNOSIS IN OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY].

    PubMed

    Rabinerson, David; Yeoshua, Effi; Gabbay-Ben-Ziv, Rinat

    2015-05-01

    Hypnosis is an ancient method of treatment, in which an enhanced state of mind and elevated susceptibility for suggestion of the patient, are increased. Hypnosis is executed, either by a caregiver or by the person himself (after brief training). The use of hypnosis in alleviating labor pain has been studied as of the second half of the 20th century. In early studies, the use of hypnosis for this purpose has been proven quite effective. However, later studies, performed in randomized controlled trial terms, have shown controversial results. Other studies, in which the effect of hypnosis was tested in various aspects of both obstetrics and gynecology and with different levels of success, are elaborated on in this review. PMID:26168643

  9. Surgical treatment: Myomectomy and hysterectomy; Endoscopy: A major advancement.

    PubMed

    Thubert, Thibault; Foulot, Hervé; Vinchant, Marie; Santulli, Pietro; Marzouk, Paul; Borghese, Bruno; Chapron, Charles

    2016-07-01

    Uterine fibroids affect 25% of women worldwide. Symptomatic women can be treated by either medical or surgical treatment. Development of endoscopic surgery has widely changed the management of myoma. Currently, although laparoscopic or laparoscopic robot-assisted myomectomies or hysterectomies are common, there has been no consensual guideline concerning the surgical techniques, operative route, and usefulness of preoperative treatment. Hysteroscopy management is a major advancement avoiding invasive surgery. This study deals with a literature review concerning surgical management of fibroids. PMID:27400649

  10. Late onset hemorrhage caused by ruptured uterine artery pseudoaneurysm after robotic-assisted total hysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Gerardi, Melissa A; Díaz-Montes, Teresa P

    2011-12-01

    Robotic surgery has been used increasingly for the management of benign or malignant gynecologic conditions. Vaginal hemorrhage after hysterectomy is fairly uncommon. Uterine artery pseudoaneurysm is a rare phenomenon causing late onset hemorrhage that could be potentially life-threatening. This case describes the management of vaginal bleeding due to ruptured uterine artery pseudoaneurysm after robotic-assisted total hysterectomy. This is the first known reported case of a ruptured uterine artery pseudoaneurysm after a robotic-assisted hysterectomy. PMID:27628121

  11. A qualitative study of the experience of obstetric fistula survivors in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Gebresilase, Yenenesh Tadesse

    2014-01-01

    Research on obstetric fistula has paid limited attention to the lived experiences of survivors. This qualitative study explored the evolution of survivors' perceptions of their social relationships and health since developing this obstetric complication. In-depth interviews were conducted with eight survivors who were selected based on purposive and snowball sampling techniques. Thematic categorization and content analysis was used to analyze the data. The resultant themes included participants' understanding of factors predisposing to fistula, challenges they encounter, their coping responses, and the meaning of their experiences. First, the participants had a common understanding of the factors that predisposed them to obstetric fistula. They mentioned poor knowledge about pregnancy, early marriage, cultural practices, and a delay in or lack of access to emergency obstetric care. Second, the participants suffered from powerlessness experienced during their childhood and married lives. They also faced prolonged obstructed labor, physical injury, emotional breakdown, depression, erosion of social capital, and loss of healthy years. Third, to control their negative emotions, participants reported isolating themselves, having suicidal thoughts, positive interpretation about the future, and avoidance. To obtain relief from their disease, the women used their family support, sold their properties, and oriented to reality. Fourth, the participants were struggling to keep going, to accept their changed reality, and to change their perspectives on life. In conclusion, obstetric fistula has significant physical, psychosocial, and emotional consequences. The study participants were not passive victims but rather active survivors of these challenges. Adequate support was not provided by their formal or informal support systems. To prevent and manage obstetric fistula successfully, there should be family-based interventions that improve access to and provision of emergency

  12. The influence of number of high risk factors on clinical outcomes in patients with early-stage cervical cancer after radical hysterectomy and adjuvant chemoradiation

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Soyi; Lee, Seok-Ho; Park, Chan-Yong

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prognosis according to the number of high risk factors in patients with high risk factors after radical hysterectomy and adjuvant chemoradiation therapy for early stage cervical cancer. Methods Clinicopathological variables and clinical outcomes of patients with FIGO (International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics) stage IB1 to IIA cervical cancer who had one or more high risk factors after radical hysterectomy and adjuvant chemoradiation therapy were retrospectively analyzed. Patients were divided into two groups according to the number of high risk factors (group 1, single high risk factor; group 2, two or more high risk factors). Results A total of 93 patients were enrolled in the present study. Forty nine out of 93 (52.7%) patients had a single high risk factor, and 44 (47.3%) had two or more high risk factors. Statistically significant differences in stage and stromal invasion were observed between group 1 and group 2. However, age, histology, tumor size, and lymphovascular space invasion did not differ significantly between the groups. Distant recurrence occurred more frequently in group 2, and the probability of recurrence and death was higher in group 2. Conclusion Patients with two or more high risk factors had worse prognosis in early stage cervical cancer. For these patients, consideration of new strategies to improve survival may be worthwhile. Conduct of further clinical trials is warranted for development of adjuvant treatment strategies individualized to each risk group. PMID:27200308

  13. Radical Hysterectomy for Early Stage Cervical Cancer: Laparoscopy Versus Laparotomy

    PubMed Central

    McBee, William C.; Richard, Scott D.; Edwards, Robert P.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Gynecologic oncologists have recently begun using laparoscopic techniques to treat early stage cervical cancer. We evaluated a single institution's experience of laparoscopic radical hysterectomy and staging compared with laparotomy. Methods: A retrospective chart review identified stage IA2 and IB1 cervical cancer patients who underwent laparoscopic radical hysterectomy and pelvic lymph node dissection from July 2003 to April 2009. A 2:1 cohort of patients treated with laparotomy were matched by stage. Results: Nine laparoscopic patients (3 stage IA2, 6 stage IB1) with 18 matched controls (6 and 12) were identified. Demographics for each group were similar. None had positive margins or lymph nodes. An average of 11.2 vs.13.9 pelvic lymph nodes (P=0.237) were removed. Average operating time was 231.7 vs. 207.2 minutes (P=0.434), and average estimated blood loss was 161.1 vs. 394.4mL (P=0.059). Average length of stay was 2.9 vs. 5.5 days (P=0.012). No transfusions or operative complications were noted in the laparoscopic group vs. 3 each in the open group (P=0.194). No laparoscopic patients and 5 open patients had a postoperative wound infection (P=0.079). No recurrences were noted. Conclusions: Laparoscopic radical hysterectomy is a feasible alternative to laparotomy for early stage cervical cancer. Similar surgical outcomes are achieved with significantly less morbidity. PMID:21902978

  14. C.I.S.H. Laparoscopic Hysterectomy: The Experience at the "Centro Materno Infantil"

    PubMed

    Decunto; Traverso; Gibelli; Harpe

    1994-08-01

    Laparoscopic hysterectomy has been established firmly as a surgical alternative to standard abdominal hysterectomy around the world. In Argentina, we had introduced operative laparoscopy at the Hospital Aleman in May 1993, with a major change from basic diagnostic laparoscopy to advanced operative laparoscopy. A total of 180 major laparoscopic cases have been performed from May 1993 to January 1994, including laparoscopic hysterectomies. Of our first five C.I.S.H. laparoscopic hysterectomies, all had excellent outcomes, with greatly diminished hospital stay and less usage of analgesics postoperatively. The average length of stay was 2.5 days. No major complications occurred.

  15. Nationwide Trends in the Performance of Inpatient Hysterectomy in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Jason D.; Herzog, Thomas J.; Tsui, Jennifer; Ananth, Cande V.; Lewin, Sharyn N.; Lu, Yu-Shiang; Neugut, Alfred I.; Hershman, Dawn L.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine the use of inpatient hysterectomy and explore changes in the use of various routes of hysterectomy and patterns of referral. METHODS The Nationwide Inpatient Sample was used to identify all women aged 18 years or older who underwent inpatient hysterectomy between 1998 and 2010. Weighted estimates of national trends were calculated and the number of procedures performed estimated. Trends in hospital volume and across hospital characteristics were examined. RESULTS After weighting, we identified a total 7,438,452 women who underwent inpatient hysterectomy between 1998 and 2010. The number of hysterectomies performed annually rose from 543,812 in 1998 to a peak of 681,234 in 2002; it then declined consistently annually and reached 433,621 cases in 2010. Overall, 247,973 (36.4%) fewer hysterectomies were performed in 2010 compared with 2002. From 2002 to 2010 the number of hysterectomies performed for each of the following indications declined: leiomyoma (−47.6%), abnormal bleeding (−28.9%), benign ovarian mass (−63.1%), endometriosis (−65.3%), and pelvic organ prolapse (−39.4%). The median hospital case volume decreased from 83 procedures per year in 2002 to 50 cases per year in 2010 (P<.001). CONCLUSION The number of inpatient hysterectomies performed in the United States has declined substantially over the past decade. The median number of hysterectomies per hospital has declined likewise by more than 40%. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE III PMID:23969789

  16. Perinatal Asphyxia from the Obstetric Standpoint: Diagnosis and Interventions.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Christina A; Silver, Robert M

    2016-09-01

    Perinatal asphyxia is a general term referring to neonatal encephalopathy related to events during birth. Asphyxia refers to a deprivation of oxygen for a duration sufficient to cause neurologic injury. Most cases of perinatal asphyxia are not necessarily caused by intrapartum events but rather associated with underlying chronic maternal or fetal conditions. Of intrapartum causes, obstetric emergencies are the most common and are not always preventable. Screening high-risk pregnancies with ultrasound, Doppler velocimetry, and antenatal testing can aid in identifying fetuses at risk. Interventions such as intrauterine resuscitation or operative delivery may decrease the risk of severe hypoxia from intrauterine insults and improve long-term neurologic outcomes. PMID:27524445

  17. Dexmedetomidine in Postoperative Analgesia in Patients Undergoing Hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Chunguang; Chi, Meiying; Zhang, Yanwei; Zhang, Zongwang; Qi, Feng; Liu, Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Both dexmedetomidine and sufentanil modulate spinal analgesia by different mechanisms, and yet no human studies are available on their combination for analgesia during the first 72 hours after abdominal hysterectomy. This CONSORT-prospective, randomized, double-blinded, controlled trial sought to evaluate the safety and efficacy of the combination of dexmedetomidine and sufentanil in intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) for 72 hours after abdominal hysterectomy. Ninety women undergoing total abdominal hysterectomy were divided into 3 equal groups that received sufentanil (Group C; 0.02 μg/kg/h), sufentanil plus dexmedetomidine (Group D1; 0.02 μg/kg/h, each), or sufentanil (0.02 μg/kg/h) plus dexmedetomidine (0.05 μg/kg/h) (Group D2) for 72 hours after surgery in this double-blinded, randomized study. The primary outcome measure was the postoperative sufentanil consumption, whereas the secondary outcome measures were pain intensity (visual analogue scale), requirement of narcotic drugs during the operation, level of sedation, Bruggrmann comfort scale, and concerning adverse effects. The postoperative sufentanil consumption was significantly lower in Groups D1 and D2 than in Group C during the observation period (P < 0.05), but lower in Group D2 than in Group D1 at 24, 48, and 72 hours after surgery (P < 0.05). The heart rate after intubation and incision was lower in Groups D1 and D2 than in Group C (P < 0.05). On arrival at the recovery room, Groups D1 and D2 had lower mean blood pressure than Group C (P < 0.05). The intraoperative requirement of sevoflurane was 30% lesser in Groups D1 and D2 than in Group C. The sedation levels were greater in Groups D1 and D2 during the first hour (P < 0.05). Compared with Groups C and D1, Group D2 showed lower levels of the overall incidence of nausea and vomiting (P < 0.05). Among the tested PCA options, the addition of dexmedetomidine (0.05 μg/kg/h) and sufentanil (0

  18. Is personalized medicine achievable in obstetrics?

    PubMed

    Quinney, Sara K; Patil, Avinash S; Flockhart, David A

    2014-12-01

    Personalized medicine seeks to identify the right dose of the right drug for the right patient at the right time. Typically, individualization of therapy is based on the pharmacogenomic makeup of the individual and environmental factors that alter drug disposition and response. In addition to these factors, during pregnancy, a woman's body undergoes many changes that can impact the therapeutic efficacy of medications. Yet, there is minimal research regarding personalized medicine in obstetrics. Adoption of pharmacogenetic testing into the obstetrical care is dependent on evidence of analytical validity, clinical validity, and clinical utility. Here, we briefly present information regarding the potential utility of personalized medicine for treating the obstetric patient for pain with narcotics, hypertension, and preterm labor, and discuss the impediments of bringing personalized medicine to the obstetrical clinic. PMID:25282474

  19. Is Personalized Medicine Achievable in Obstetrics?

    PubMed Central

    Quinney, Sara K; Flockhart, David A; Patil, Avinash S

    2014-01-01

    Personalized medicine seeks to identify the right dose of the right drug for the right patient at the right time. Typically, individualization of therapy is based on the pharmacogenomic make-up of the individual and environmental factors that alter drug disposition and response. In addition to these factors, during pregnancy a woman’s body undergoes many changes that can impact the therapeutic efficacy of medications. Yet, there is minimal research regarding personalized medicine in obstetrics. Adoption of pharmacogenetic testing into the obstetrical care is dependent on evidence of analytical validity, clinical validity, and clinical utility. Here, we briefly present information regarding the potential utility of personalized medicine for treating the obstetric patient for pain with narcotics, hypertension, and preterm labor and discuss the impediments of bringing personalized medicine to the obstetrical clinic. PMID:25282474

  20. Is personalized medicine achievable in obstetrics?

    PubMed

    Quinney, Sara K; Patil, Avinash S; Flockhart, David A

    2014-12-01

    Personalized medicine seeks to identify the right dose of the right drug for the right patient at the right time. Typically, individualization of therapy is based on the pharmacogenomic makeup of the individual and environmental factors that alter drug disposition and response. In addition to these factors, during pregnancy, a woman's body undergoes many changes that can impact the therapeutic efficacy of medications. Yet, there is minimal research regarding personalized medicine in obstetrics. Adoption of pharmacogenetic testing into the obstetrical care is dependent on evidence of analytical validity, clinical validity, and clinical utility. Here, we briefly present information regarding the potential utility of personalized medicine for treating the obstetric patient for pain with narcotics, hypertension, and preterm labor, and discuss the impediments of bringing personalized medicine to the obstetrical clinic.

  1. Nationwide population-based cohort study of uterine rupture in Belgium: results from the Belgian Obstetric Surveillance System

    PubMed Central

    Vandenberghe, G; De Blaere, M; Van Leeuw, V; Roelens, K; Englert, Y; Hanssens, M; Verstraelen, H

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We aimed to assess the prevalence of uterine rupture in Belgium and to evaluate risk factors, management and outcomes for mother and child. Design Nationwide population-based prospective cohort study. Setting Emergency obstetric care. Participation of 97% of maternity units covering 98.6% of the deliveries in Belgium. Participants All women with uterine rupture in Belgium between January 2012 and December 2013. 8 women were excluded because data collection forms were not returned. Results Data on 90 cases of confirmed uterine rupture were obtained, of which 73 had a previous Caesarean section (CS), representing an estimated prevalence of 3.6 (95% CI 2.9 to 4.4) per 10 000 deliveries overall and of 27 (95% CI 21 to 33) and 0.7 (95% CI 0.4 to 1.2) per 10 000 deliveries in women with and without previous CS, respectively. Rupture occurred during trial of labour after caesarean section (TOLAC) in 57 women (81.4%, 95% CI 68% to 88%), with a high rate of augmented (38.5%) and induced (29.8%) labour. All patients who underwent induction of labour had an unfavourable cervix at start of induction (Bishop Score ≤7 in 100%). Other uterine surgery was reported in the history of 22 cases (24%, 95% CI 17% to 34%), including 1 case of myomectomy, 3 cases of salpingectomy and 2 cases of hysteroscopic resection of a uterine septum. 14 cases ruptured in the absence of labour (15.6%, 95% CI 9.5% to 24.7%). No mothers died; 8 required hysterectomy (8.9%, 95% CI 4.6% to 16.6%). There were 10 perinatal deaths (perinatal mortality rate 117/1000 births, 95% CI 60 to 203) and perinatal asphyxia was observed in 29 infants (34.5%, 95% CI 25.2% to 45.1%). Conclusions The prevalence of uterine rupture in Belgium is similar to that in other Western countries. There is scope for improvement through the implementation of nationally adopted guidelines on TOLAC, to prevent use of unsafe procedures, and thereby reduce avoidable morbidity and mortality. PMID:27188805

  2. Long-term cancer risk after hysterectomy on benign indications: Population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Altman, Daniel; Yin, Li; Falconer, Henrik

    2016-06-01

    Hysterectomy on benign indications is associated with an increased risk for adverse health effects. However, little is known about the association between hysterectomy and subsequent cancer occurrence later in life. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of hysterectomy on the incidence of cancer. In this population-based cohort study, we used data on 111,595 hysterectomized and 537,9843 nonhysterectomized women from nationwide Swedish Health Care registers including the Inpatient Register, the Cancer Register and the Cause of Death Register between 1973 and 2009. Hysterectomy with or without concomitant bilateral salpingo-ophorectomy (BSO) performed on benign indications was considered as exposure and incidence of primary cancers was used as outcome measure. Rare primary cancers (<100 cases for the two groups combined) were excluded from analysis. A marginal risk reduction for any cancer was observed for women with previous hysterectomy and for those with hysterectomy and concurrent BSO (HR 0.93, 95% CI 0.91-0.95 and HR 0.92, 95% CI 0.87-0.96, respectively). Compared to nonhysterectomized women, significant risks were observed for thyroid cancer (HR 1.76, 95% CI 1.45-2.14). For both hysterectomy and hysterectomy with BSO, an association with brain cancer was observed (HR 1.48, 95% CI 1.32-1.65 and HR 1.45, 95% CI 1.15-1.83, respectively). Hysterectomy, with or without BSO, was not associated with breast, lung or gastrointestinal cancer. We conclude that hysterectomy on benign indications is associated with an increased risk for thyroid and brain cancer later in life. Further research efforts are needed to identify patient groups at risk of malignancy following hysterectomy.

  3. The laryngeal mask airway in obstetrical anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Gataure, P S; Hughes, J A

    1995-02-01

    The laryngeal mask airway (LMA) has been used extensively to provide a safe airway in spontaneously breathing patients who are not at risk from aspiration of gastric contents. The role of the LMA in the event of a failed intubation in an obstetrical patient, and its place in a failed intubation drill remains unclear. Two hundred and fifty consultant obstetric anaesthetists in the United Kingdom were asked to complete an anonymous questionnaire regarding their views about using the laryngeal mask airway (LMA) in obstetrical anaesthesia. The LMA was available in 91.4% of obstetric units. Seventy-two per cent of anaesthetists were in favour of using the LMA to maintain oxygenation when tracheal intubation had failed and ventilation using a face mask was inadequate. Twenty-four respondents had had personal experience with the LMA in obstetrical anaesthesia, eight of whom stated that the LMA had proved to be a lifesaver. We believe that the LMA has a role in obstetrical anaesthesia when tracheal intubation has failed and ventilation using a face mask proves to be impossible, and it should be inserted before attempting cricothyroidectomy. PMID:7720155

  4. Planning a collaborative conference to provide interdisciplinary education with a focus on patient safety in obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Jennifer; Newhouse, Linda; Flora, Robert; Burkett, Amy

    2014-01-01

    Collaboration is an important component of evidence-based practice in modern health care. A number of publications have touted the benefits of "team training" to improve obstetric outcomes during emergent situations. In August 2011, the Ohio sections of the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses (AWHONN) and the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) held a joint conference that focused on interdisciplinary education to promote patient safety. This joint venture drew more than 120 attendees, 12 exhibitors and 17 poster displays. Evaluations were positive and attendees cited planned practice changes for themselves as well as for their respective institutions.

  5. The use of blood in obstetrics and gynecology in the developing world.

    PubMed

    Schantz-Dunn, Julianna; M, Nawal

    2011-01-01

    Access to safe blood is critical in comprehensive emergency obstetric care and for reducing maternal mortality. Many countries have inadequate blood supplies, and this disproportionately affects women and children in need of life-saving blood transfusions. Although preventative measures aimed at reducing postpartum hemorrhage by treating underlying anemia and infectious diseases are critical, they are insufficient for obstetric hemorrhage. In the developing world, efforts should focus on alternative means of providing safe blood in cases of hemorrhage, with particular focus on rapid testing, donation of warm whole blood, and autologous blood transfusion. PMID:22102932

  6. Obstetric audit: the Bradford way.

    PubMed

    Lodge, Virginia; Lomas, Karen; Jaworskyj, Suzanne; Thomson, Heidi

    2014-08-01

    Ultrasound is widely used as a screening tool in obstetrics with the aim of reducing maternal and foetal morbidity. However, to be effective it is recommended that scanning services follow standard protocols based on national guidelines and that scanning practice is audited to ensure consistency. Bradford has a multi-ethnic population with one of the highest rates of birth defects in the UK and it requires an effective foetal anomaly screening service. We implemented a rolling programme of audits of dating scans, foetal anomaly scans and growth scans carried out by sonographers in Bradford. All three categories of scan were audited using measurable parameters based on national guidelines. Following feedback and re-training to address issues identified, re-audits of dating and foetal anomaly scans were carried out. In both cases, sonographers being re-audited had a marked improvement in their practice. Analysis of foetal abnormality detection rates showed that as a department, we were reaching the nationally agreed detection rates for the Fetal Anomaly Screening Programme auditable conditions. Audit has been shown to be a useful and essential process in achieving consistent scanning practices and high quality images and measurements.

  7. [A review of 445 cases of laparoscopic hysterectomy: benefits and outcome].

    PubMed

    Malzoni, M; Perniola, G; Hannuna, K; Iuele, T; Fruscella, M L; Basili, R; Ebano, V; Marziani, R

    2004-01-01

    Hysterectomy is a major procedure indicated for women with gynaecologic pathologies. After reporting the first laparoscopic hysterectomy (Reich 1989), this technique has recently been considered as a safe and efficient alternative to traditional abdominal hysterectomy in the management of benign uterine pathologies when vaginal route is contraindicated. The laparoscopic approach should not be held to compete with vaginal hysterectomy. From 1995 to 2001 in our institute, the proportion of laparoscopic hysterectomy has increased and laparotomic hysterectomy has decreased. Between January 1999 and January 2001 we carried out 445 total laparoscopic hysterectomies. There were 5 laparotomy conversions for large uterus. The average haemoglobin drop was 1,36 g/dl. Median operative time was 95 +/- 27 min. The mean in postoperative stay was 2.7 +/- 0.8 gg. The postoperative complications were minimal. Laparoscopic approach is less painful, is associated to less blood loss, shorter hospital stay, more rapid recovery and a better assumption by affected women. Some disadvantages are reported too, such as larger operating time, high rate of complication and experience required for performing laparoscopy including a learning curve. A training period is necessary to standardize the operating procedure, to put in place methods of avoiding complication and to reach a plateau of surgical skill. The purpose of this study was to show the role of total laparoscopic hysterectomy and how it can be performed safely with a minimal morbidity after a period of training in which we worked out shrewdness to get a standardized technique with the most effective outcome.

  8. A Qualitative Study of Women's Decisions Not to Have a Hysterectomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fredericks, Erin

    2013-01-01

    In focusing on individual and physician demographics and system characteristics that lead to hysterectomy rate variations, researchers overlook the impact of culturally mediated meanings women assign to their bodies, hysterectomy, and other treatments. In this study I sought to provide a fuller description of this decision-making process by…

  9. Subsequent Oophorectomy and Ovarian Cancer after Hysterectomy for Benign Gynecologic Conditions at Chiang Mai University Hospital.

    PubMed

    Jitkunnatumkul, Aurapin; Tantipalakorn, Charuwan; Charoenkwan, Kittipat; Srisomboon, Jatupol

    2016-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the incidence of subsequent oophorectomy due to ovarian pathology or ovarian cancer in women with prior hysterectomy for benign gynecologic conditions at Chiang Mai University Hospital. Medical records of women who underwent hysterectomy for benign gynecologic diseases and pre-cancerous lesions between January 1, 2004 and December 31, 2013 at Chiang Mai University Hospital were retrospectively reviewed. The incidence and indications of oophorectomy following hysterectomy were analyzed. During the study period, 1,035 women had hysterectomy for benign gynecologic conditions. Of these, 590 women underwent hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy and 445 hysterectomy with bilateral ovarian preservation or unilateral salpingo-oophorectomy. The median age was 47 years (range, 11-75 years). Ten women (2.45 %) had subsequent oophorectomy for benign ovarian cysts. No case of ovarian cancer was found. The mean time interval between hysterectomy and subsequent oophorectomy was 43.1 months (range, 2-97 months) and the mean follow-up time for this patient cohort was 51 months (range, 1.3-124.9 months). According to our hospital-based data, the incidence of subsequent oophorectomy in women with prior hysterectomy for benign gynecologic conditions is low and all present with benign conditions. PMID:27644627

  10. Obstetrics in a Time of Violence: Mexican Midwives Critique Routine Hospital Practices.

    PubMed

    Zacher Dixon, Lydia

    2015-12-01

    Mexican midwives have long taken part in a broader Latin American trend to promote "humanized birth" as an alternative to medicalized interventions in hospital obstetrics. As midwives begin to regain authority in reproductive health and work within hospital units, they come to see the issue not as one of mere medicalization but of violence and violation. Based on ethnographic fieldwork with midwives from across Mexico during a time of widespread social violence, my research examines an emergent critique of hospital birth as a site of what is being called violencia obstétrica (obstetric violence). In this critique, women are discussed as victims of explicit abuse by hospital staff and by the broader health care infrastructures. By reframing obstetric practices as violent-as opposed to medicalized-these midwives seek to situate their concerns about women's health care in Mexico within broader regional discussions about violence, gender, and inequality.

  11. [Significance of Multi-center Obstetrics Perioperative Team Training Including Various Medical Staffs].

    PubMed

    Komasawa, Nobuyasu; Fujita, Daisuke; Nakayama, Mai; Fujiwara, Shunsuke; Mihara, Ryosuke; Okada, Daisuke; Omoto, Haruka; Tanaka, Motoshige; Nishihara, Isao; Minami, Toshiaki

    2016-02-01

    We report the development of a multi-center/multispecialist obstetrics perioperative team training program. Participants were members of the team, including anesthesiologists, obstetricians, and operation nurses. A questionnaire survey was conducted prior to course participation to clarify any questions team members had. The courses included a lecture and simulation training with scenario-based discussions or the use of a simulator. Scenarios included massive bleeding during cesarean section, massive bleeding after vaginal delivery, and emergency cesarean section for premature placental abruption. After each course, participants discussed problems associated with obstetrics medical safety in the context of each theme. Simulation-based perioperative team training with anesthesiologists, obstetricians, and operation nurses may serve as a vehicle to promote perioperative obstetrics patient safety.

  12. A New Approach to Teaching Obstetric Anaesthesia in Low-Resource Areas.

    PubMed

    Enright, Angela; Grady, Kate; Evans, Faye

    2015-10-01

    Maternal mortality is high in many low- and middle-income countries. Unsafe anaesthesia contributes to this, especially for women requiring Caesarean section. Anaesthesia providers with limited skills and poor resources are often faced with complicated obstetric patients. A new course called SAFE-OB teaches a systematic approach to anticipating, preparing for, and dealing with obstetric anaesthetic emergencies. The course has now been taught in many African, Asian, and Latin countries. Initial follow-up suggests improvement in skills and knowledge, and effective translation of these to the workplace. Efforts are made to make the course locally owned and sustainable. We feel that SAFE-OB is an effective method of improving obstetric anaesthesia care. PMID:26606700

  13. Leukocytosis after robotic hysterectomy: commonly observed but clinically insignificant.

    PubMed

    Goel, Meenu; McGonigle, Kathryn F; Vason, Emily; Muntz, Howard G

    2010-12-01

    Laboratory studies are commonly performed after surgery, but with little evidence of clinical utility. We evaluated our experience with measuring a complete blood count (CBC) to determine peripheral blood leukocyte count (WBC) postoperatively following consecutive robotic hysterectomies. From January 2008 through November 2009, two surgeons (KM, HM) performed 204 robotic hysterectomies. Patient age, weight, height, indication for surgery, surgical procedure, operative time, estimated blood loss, hospital length of stay, postoperative fever, and complications were prospectively recorded and correlated with WBC measured on the day after surgery. The postoperative WBC was elevated (>11,000/μl) in 59/204 (29%) patients. Eight (4%) patients had marked leukocytosis (WBC >15,000/μl; maximum 16,600/μl). There was no correlation between postoperative leukocytosis and operative time, BMI, performance of lymphadenectomy, or length of hospitalization. The only factor significantly associated with elevated postoperative WBC was elevated preoperative WBC (P < .001). Also, there was no correlation between postoperative leukocytosis with fever or infectious complications. The mean T max was 37.1ºC and T max over 38ºC was seen in nine patients. Of the five women who developed infectious complications, only one (diagnosed with pneumonia) had a minimally elevated postoperative WBC (11,600/μl); the other four (pneumonia and pelvic abscess, two each) had normal postoperative WBC. Routine measurement of WBC after robotic hysterectomy is not useful. In about 25% of cases there will be a slight leukocytosis, and rarely (about 4%) will the WBC exceed 15,000/μl. In no case was measurement of postoperative WBC clinically relevant. PMID:27627951

  14. Perioperative Outcomes of Robotic Versus Laparoscopic Hysterectomy for Benign Disease

    PubMed Central

    As-Sanie, Sawsan; Smorgick, Noam; Song, Arleen H.; Advincula, Arnold P.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives: We compared the perioperative outcomes of hysterectomy performed by robotic (RH) versus laparoscopic (LH) routes for benign indications using the Dindo-Clavien scale for classification of the surgical complications. Methods: Retrospective chart review of all patients who underwent robotic (n=288) and laparoscopic (n=257) hysterectomies by minimally invasive surgeons at the University of Michigan from March 2001 until June 2010. Results: Age, body mass index, operative time, and estimated blood loss were not statistically different between groups. The RH subgroup had a larger uterine weight (LH 186.4±130.6 g vs RH 234.9±193.9 g, P=.001), higher prevalence of severe adhesions (13.2% vs 23.3%, respectively, P=.003), and stage III–IV endometriosis (4.7% vs 15.3%, respectively, P<.05). There were no differences in the rates of Dindo-Clavien grade I, grade II, and grade III surgical complications between the RH and LH groups (9.7%, 13.2%, and 3.1%, respectively, in the RH group vs 6.2%, 9.3%, and 5.8%, respectively, in the LH group, P>.05). However, the rates of urinary tract infection were higher in the RH group (LH 2.7% vs RH 6.9%, P=.02), whereas the conversion to laparotomy rate was higher in the LH group (LH 6.2% vs RH 1.7%, P=.007). Conclusions: Perioperative outcomes for laparoscopic and robotic hysterectomy for benign indications appear to be equivalent. PMID:23743379

  15. The association between occupational characteristics and hysterectomies for treating uterine fibroids in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Ho, Ya-Lee; Hung, Chih-Jen; Lin, Che-Chen; Liu, Chwen-Chi; Li, Chu-Shiu; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between the occupational characteristics of women with uterine fibroids (UFs) and the decision to have a hysterectomy. Data from the Longitudinal Taiwan Health Insurance Database (LTHID) from 2000 to 2009 were analyzed to investigate the association between occupation and hysterectomies. Multivariable logistic regression analysis showed that, compared with white-collar UF patients, the odds ratio (OR) for hysterectomy surgery was 1.21 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.11-1.32) for blue-collar UF patients. Moreover, non-government employees with UFs also had significantly increased odds of having a hysterectomy compared to government employees with UFs (OR = 1.19, 95% CI = 1.04-1.36). This study provides information regarding the extent to which differences in occupation and decision-making processes might affect the marked variations in the use of hysterectomies for UFs. PMID:25531280

  16. [Pre- and postoperative complaints in women with total hysterectomy].

    PubMed

    Rha, J G; Lee, J H

    1973-01-01

    A study was conducted at St. Mary's Hospital in Seoul, Korea, to determine levels of complaints before and after total hysterectomy. 113 women who underwent the operation from January 1968 to June 1972 were questioned as to medical, mental, and sexual complaints both pre- and postoperative. The total number of complaints decreased from 35.2% before to 30.2% after the operation. Each category of complaint decreased following the operation. Pelvic inflammatory disease and myom ata complaint rates decreased significantly. High rates of depression were common following the operation. PMID:12307215

  17. Laparoscopic Hysterectomy for Uterine Fibroids: Is it Safe?

    PubMed

    Hinchcliff, Emily M; Cohen, Sarah L

    2016-03-01

    As more complex cases and larger uterine specimens are able to be managed with minimally invasive surgery, the limitations of tissue retrieval with these methods are of increasing concern. Risks of morcellator-related injury, tissue dissemination, or fragmentation must be weighed against increased morbidity of abdominal approach to hysterectomy. In an effort to mitigate the risks of tissue morcellation, containment system use must be considered when fragmenting a specimen, either with power morcellation or a manual technique via the vagina or minilaparotomy. PMID:26670837

  18. Incidental Intravascular Lipoleiomyomatosis in A Hysterectomy Specimen: How To Manage?

    PubMed Central

    Aslanova, Rakhshanda; Can, Nuray; Okten, Sabri Berkem; Aslan, Mehmet Musa

    2015-01-01

    Leiomyomas are common benign tumors in female gynaecologic surgery. They are originated from smooth muscle cells of the uterus and/or sometimes of the uterine vessels. Intravascular lipoleiomyomatosis is a very rare form of leiomyomas which grow within veins and can extend up to vena cava inferior and right heart chamber with cardiac symptoms and is diagnosed by cardiovascular surgeons. We report a case of incidental intravascular lipoleiomyomatosis which was confined to the uterus being diagnosed after a total abdominal hysterectomy by pathology and its management strategy. PMID:25738043

  19. Robotic radical hysterectomy: comparison of outcomes and cost.

    PubMed

    Halliday, Darron; Lau, Susie; Vaknin, Zvi; Deland, Claire; Levental, Mark; McNamara, Elizabeth; Gotlieb, Raphael; Kaufer, Rebecca; How, Jeffrey; Cohen, Eva; Gotlieb, Walter H

    2010-12-01

    Operative and peri-operative outcomes, complications, and cost for radical hysterectomy for cervical cancer with negative sentinel nodes have been compared for robotics and laparotomy. Forty patients underwent radical hysterectomy with/out bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, for early-stage cervical cancer. All cases were performed by one of two surgeons, at a single institution (16 robotic, 24 laparotomy). The data for the robotic group were collected prospectively and compared with data for a historic cohort who underwent laparotomy. The data included demographics and peri-operative variables including operative time, estimated blood loss, lymph node count, hospital stay, and complications. Additionally, real direct hospital cost was compared for both modalities. Patients undergoing robotic radical hysterectomy experienced longer operative time than the laparotomy cohort (351 min vs. 283 min P = 0.0001). Estimated blood loss was significantly lower for the robotic cohort than for the laparotomy cohort (106 ml vs. 546 ml P < 0.0001). The minor complication rate was lower in the robotic cohort than for laparotomy (19% vs. 63% P = 0.003). Average hospital stay for the robotic patients was significantly shorter than for those undergoing laparotomy (1.9 days versus 7.2 days, P < 0.0001). Lymph node retrieval did not differ between the two groups (robotic 15 nodes, laparotomy 13 nodes). The total average peri-operative costs for radical hysterectomy with lymphadenectomy completed via laparotomy was CAN $11,764 ± 6,790, and for robotic assistance 8,183 ± 1,089 (P = 0.002). When amortization of the robot was included, there remained a trend in favor of the robotic approach, but it did not reach statistical significance. Whereas robotics takes longer to perform than traditional laparotomy, it provides the patient with a shorter hospital stay, less need for pain medications, and reduced peri-operative morbidity. In addition real average hospital costs

  20. Hysterectomy improves sexual response? Addressing a crucial omission in the literature

    PubMed Central

    Komisaruk, Barry R.; Frangos, Eleni; Whipple, Beverly

    2011-01-01

    The prevailing view in the literature is that hysterectomy improves the quality of life. This is based on claims that hysterectomy alleviates pain (dyspareunia and abnormal bleeding), and improves sexual response. Since hysterectomy requires cutting the sensory nerves that supply the cervix and/or uterus, it is surprising that the reports of deleterious effects on sexual response are so limited. However, we note that almost all the papers we found reported that some of the women in their studies claim that hysterectomy is detrimental to their sexual response. It is likely that the degree to which a woman’s sexual response and pleasure are affected by hysterectomy would depend not only upon which nerves were severed by the surgery, but also the genital regions whose stimulation the woman enjoys for eliciting sexual response. Since clitoral sensation (via pudendal and genitofemoral nerves) should not be affected by hysterectomy, this surgery would not diminish sexual response in women who prefer clitoral stimulation. However, women whose preferred source of stimulation is vaginal or cervical would be more likely to experience a decrement in sensation and consequently sexual response after hysterectomy, because the nerves innervating those organs -- pelvic, hypogastric and vagus -- are more likely to be damaged or severed in the course of hysterectomy. However, all the published reports of the effects of hysterectomy on sexual response fail to specify the women’s preferred sources of genital stimulation. As discussed in the present review, we believe that the critical lack of information as to the women’s preferred sources of genital stimulation is key to accounting for the discrepancies in the literature as to whether hysterectomy improves or attenuates sexual pleasure. PMID:21545957

  1. Congenital thrombophilia associated to obstetric complications.

    PubMed

    Villarreal, Cynthia; García-Aguirre, Gerardo; Hernández, Carmen; Vega, Olynka; Borbolla, José R; Collados, María T

    2002-10-01

    During pregnancy there are hemostatic changes that result in a hypercoagulable state and can have thrombotic consequences. This condition can be aggravated in women who are carriers of congenital thrombophilic factors. This thrombotic tendency can manifest as thrombotic lesions in the placenta with compromise of utero-placental circulation, which are common characteristics present in obstetric complications, such as preeclampsia/eclampsia, miscarriage, fetal loss, intrauterine growth retardation, and abruptio placentae. In this paper we review data concerning about the association of congenital thrombophilia in pregnancy with obstetric complications, mainly preeclampsia and fetal loss, focusing in factor V Leiden and its related activated protein C resistance, prothrombin mutation G20210A and hyperhomocysteinemia related with C677T mutation of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase. Although factor V Leiden has been the thrombophilic factor most studied, all three thrombophilic mutations have been related with obstetric complications; however, contradictory results about the specific association of each mutation with each type of obstetric complication are described. These discrepancies could obey to the ethnic difference of the studied groups, or to the fact that some studies were performed in closed populations with few migratory movement, where the genetic pool is relatively homogeneous, as well as the different inclusion and exclusion criteria. Even though this variability is present, the significance of recognizing true associations between these thrombophilic mutations and obstetric complications is essential in order to determine the likelihood of routinely screening for these conditions in pregnant women with risk factors for thrombosis and for carrying out specific prophylactic measures.

  2. [Has ketamine preemptive analgesic effect in patients undergoing abdominal hysterectomy?].

    PubMed

    Karaman, Semra; Kocabaş, Seden; Zincircioğlu, Ciler; Firat, Vicdan

    2006-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if preemptive use of the NMDA receptor antogonist ketamine decreases postoperative pain in patients undergoing abdominal hystrectomy. A total of 60 patients admitted for total abdominal hysterectomy were included in this study after the approval of the ethic committee, and the patients were randomly classified into three groups. After standart general anaesthesia, before or after incision patients received bolus saline or ketamine. Group S received only saline while Group Kpre received ketamine 0.4 mg/kg before incision and saline after incision, and Group Kpost received saline before incision and 0.4 mg/kg ketamine after incision. Postoperatif analgesia was maintained with i.v. PCA morphine. Pain scores were assessed with Vizüal Analog Scale (VAS), Verbal Rating Scale (VRS) at 1., 2, 3., 4., 8., 12. ve 24. hours postoperatively. First analgesic requirement time, morphine consumption and side effects were recorded. There were no significant differences between groups with respect to VAS / VRS scores, the time for first analgesic dose, and morphine consumption ( p>0.05). Patients in Group S had significantly lower sedation scores than either of the ketamine treated groups ( p<0.05). In conclusion, a single dose of ketamin had no preemptive analgesic effect in patients undergoing abdominal hysterectomy, but further investigation is needed for different operation types and dose regimens.

  3. Acute myocardial infarction in the obstetric patient.

    PubMed

    Firoz, Tabassum; Magee, Laura A

    2012-06-01

    Acute myocardial infraction (AMI) in the obstetric patient is a rare event, although the incidence is rising due to advancing maternal age and pre-existing cardiac risk factors and medical co-morbidities. While atherosclerotic disease is the leading cause of AMI, coronary artery dissection is an important consideration in pregnancy and in the postpartum period. The physiological changes of pregnancy as well as pregnancy-specific risk factors can predispose the obstetric patient to AMI. Diagnosis of AMI can be challenging as symptoms may be atypical. Furthermore, diagnostic tests must be interpreted in the context of pregnancy. While the overall management of the obstetric patient with AMI is similar to that outside of pregnancy, drug therapy requires modification as some medications may be contraindicated in pregnancy and breastfeeding. There is limited information about prognosis and risk stratification but it is anticipated that future studies will address this issue.

  4. Obstetric Anaesthetists' Association and Difficult Airway Society guidelines for the management of difficult and failed tracheal intubation in obstetrics*

    PubMed Central

    Mushambi, M C; Kinsella, S M; Popat, M; Swales, H; Ramaswamy, K K; Winton, A L; Quinn, A C

    2015-01-01

    The Obstetric Anaesthetists' Association and Difficult Airway Society have developed the first national obstetric guidelines for the safe management of difficult and failed tracheal intubation during general anaesthesia. They comprise four algorithms and two tables. A master algorithm provides an overview. Algorithm 1 gives a framework on how to optimise a safe general anaesthetic technique in the obstetric patient, and emphasises: planning and multidisciplinary communication; how to prevent the rapid oxygen desaturation seen in pregnant women by advocating nasal oxygenation and mask ventilation immediately after induction; limiting intubation attempts to two; and consideration of early release of cricoid pressure if difficulties are encountered. Algorithm 2 summarises the management after declaring failed tracheal intubation with clear decision points, and encourages early insertion of a (preferably second-generation) supraglottic airway device if appropriate. Algorithm 3 covers the management of the ‘can't intubate, can't oxygenate’ situation and emergency front-of-neck airway access, including the necessity for timely perimortem caesarean section if maternal oxygenation cannot be achieved. Table 1 gives a structure for assessing the individual factors relevant in the decision to awaken or proceed should intubation fail, which include: urgency related to maternal or fetal factors; seniority of the anaesthetist; obesity of the patient; surgical complexity; aspiration risk; potential difficulty with provision of alternative anaesthesia; and post-induction airway device and airway patency. This decision should be considered by the team in advance of performing a general anaesthetic to make a provisional plan should failed intubation occur. The table is also intended to be used as a teaching tool to facilitate discussion and learning regarding the complex nature of decision-making when faced with a failed intubation. Table 2 gives practical considerations of how

  5. A Comparative Study Between Laparoscopically Assisted Vaginal Hysterectomy and Vaginal Hysterectomy: Experience in a Tertiary Diabetes Care Hospital in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Jahan, Samsad; Das, Tripti; Mahmud, Nusrat; Khan, Masuda Islam; Akter, Latifa; Mondol, Samiron Kumar; Yasmin, Sharmin; Nahar, Nurun; Habib, Samira Humaira; Saha, Soma; Paul, Debashish; Joarder, Mahjabin

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The study was undertaken to compare the efficiency and outcome of Laparoscopic Assisted Vaginal Hysterectomy (LAVH) and Vaginal Hysterectomy (VH) in terms of operative time, cost, estimated blood loss, hospital stay, quantity of analgesia use, intra- and postoperative complication rates and patients recovery. Materials and Methods: A total of 500 diabetic patients were prospectively collected in the study period from January 2005 through January 2009. The performance of LAVH was compared with that of VH, in a tertiary care hospital. The procedures were performed by the same surgeon. Results: There was no significant difference in terms of age, parity, body weight or uterine weight. The mean estimated blood loss in LAVH was significantly lower when compared with the VH group (126.5±39.8 ml and 100±32.8 ml), respectively. As to postoperative pain, less diclofenac was required in the LAVH group compared to the VH group (70.38±13.45 mg and 75.18±16.45 mg), respectively. Conclusions: LAVH, is clinically and economically comparable to VH, with patient benefits of less estimated blood loss, lower quantity of analgesia use, lower rate of intra- and postoperative complications, less postoperative pain, rapid patient recovery, and shorter hospital stay. PMID:26085749

  6. 21 CFR 884.5100 - Obstetric anesthesia set.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Obstetric anesthesia set. 884.5100 Section 884... § 884.5100 Obstetric anesthesia set. (a) Identification. An obstetric anesthesia set is an assembly of... anesthetic drug. This device is used to administer regional blocks (e.g., paracervical, uterosacral,...

  7. 21 CFR 884.5100 - Obstetric anesthesia set.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Obstetric anesthesia set. 884.5100 Section 884... § 884.5100 Obstetric anesthesia set. (a) Identification. An obstetric anesthesia set is an assembly of... anesthetic drug. This device is used to administer regional blocks (e.g., paracervical, uterosacral,...

  8. 21 CFR 884.2225 - Obstetric-gynecologic ultrasonic imager.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Obstetric-gynecologic ultrasonic imager. 884.2225 Section 884.2225 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Obstetrical and Gynecological...

  9. 21 CFR 884.2050 - Obstetric data analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Obstetric data analyzer. 884.2050 Section 884.2050 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Obstetrical and Gynecological Monitoring...

  10. 21 CFR 884.5100 - Obstetric anesthesia set.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Obstetric anesthesia set. 884.5100 Section 884... § 884.5100 Obstetric anesthesia set. (a) Identification. An obstetric anesthesia set is an assembly of... anesthetic drug. This device is used to administer regional blocks (e.g., paracervical, uterosacral,...

  11. 21 CFR 884.5100 - Obstetric anesthesia set.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Obstetric anesthesia set. 884.5100 Section 884... § 884.5100 Obstetric anesthesia set. (a) Identification. An obstetric anesthesia set is an assembly of... anesthetic drug. This device is used to administer regional blocks (e.g., paracervical, uterosacral,...

  12. 21 CFR 884.5100 - Obstetric anesthesia set.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Obstetric anesthesia set. 884.5100 Section 884... § 884.5100 Obstetric anesthesia set. (a) Identification. An obstetric anesthesia set is an assembly of... anesthetic drug. This device is used to administer regional blocks (e.g., paracervical, uterosacral,...

  13. The Current Status and Future of Academic Obstetrics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowers, John Z., Ed.; Purcell, Elizabeth F., Ed.

    The state of research in academic obstetrics and its relationship to research in other academic disciplines was addressed in a 1979 conference. Participants included representatives of academic obstetrics, academic pediatrics, and public health. After an introductory discussion by Howard C. Taylor, Jr. on changes in obstetrics in the last 25…

  14. 21 CFR 884.4500 - Obstetric fetal destructive instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Obstetric fetal destructive instrument. 884.4500... Devices § 884.4500 Obstetric fetal destructive instrument. (a) Identification. An obstetric fetal destructive instrument is a device designed to crush or pull the fetal body to facilitate the delivery of...

  15. 21 CFR 884.4900 - Obstetric table and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Obstetric table and accessories. 884.4900 Section 884.4900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Obstetrical and Gynecological...

  16. [The end to the myth that hysterectomy has negative effects on the function of pelvic organs].

    PubMed

    Vierhout, M E

    2007-06-01

    Hysterectomy is sometimes considered the starting point of pelvic floor symptoms, such as urinary incontinence, constipation and sexual disturbances. However, it is questionable whether there is a causal relationship. Such an effect was not found in numerous prospective controlled studies. There is a striking discrepancy between prospective controlled studies and retrospective and cross-sectional studies in this regard. Retrospective and cross-sectional studies frequently report a negative effect of hysterectomy on pelvic organ function. On the basis of the recent literature it may be concluded that non-radical hysterectomy has no detrimental effect on pelvic organ functions.

  17. Mexican beliefs and attitudes toward hysterectomy and gender-role ideology in marriage.

    PubMed

    Marván, Ma Luisa; Quiros, Vanessa; López-Vázquez, Esperanza; Ehrenzweig, Yamilet

    2012-01-01

    One hundred and sixty-one Mexican respondents completed a questionnaire that measured beliefs and attitudes toward hysterectomy and another that measured gender-role ideology in marriage (GRIMQ). The participants were divided into two groups according to the GRIMQ: "high machismo/marianismo" and "low machismo/marianismo" groups. The participants belonging to the first group showed the most negative attitudes toward hysterectomy. In this group, men showed more negative attitudes toward hysterctomy and were less likely than women to believe that hysterectomy has positive aspects. The findings are discussed in light of male dominance and female subordination that prevail in certain cultural groups of Mexico.xs.

  18. Knowledge and Attitude of Obstetric Care Providers on Partograph and Its Associated Factors in East Gojjam Zone, Northwest Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Zelellw, Desalegne Amare; Tegegne, Teketo Kassaw; Getie, Girma Alem

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Universal use of partograph is recommended during labor, to improve maternal and fetal outcome. The aim was to assess knowledge and attitude of obstetric caregivers about partograph and associated factors. Methods. Facility based cross-sectional study was conducted on 273 study participants. Study facilities and study units were selected using simple random sampling technique. Midwives, Nurses, Public Health Officers, Medical Doctors, and masters in Emergency Surgery and Obstetric were included in the study. Epi-data and SPSS statistical software were used. Results. About 153 (56.04%) and 150 (54.95%) of the obstetric caregivers had good knowledge and favorable attitude about partograph, respectively. Knowledge of partograph was significantly higher among obstetric caregivers that learnt about partograph during their College and who had received partograph on job training (AOR: 2.14, 95% C.I (1.17–3.93)) and (AOR: 2.25, 95% C.I (1.21–4.19)), respectively. Favorable attitude towards partograph was significantly higher among obstetrical caregivers who had training and learnt about partograph during their college (AOR: 3.37, 95% C.I (1.49–5.65)) and (AOR: 2.134, 95% C.I (1.175–3.877)), correspondingly. Conclusion. Above half of obstetric caregivers had good knowledge and a favorable attitude on partograph. The provision of on preservice and job training is necessary to improve caregivers' knowledge and attitude. PMID:27403453

  19. Knowledge and Attitude of Obstetric Care Providers on Partograph and Its Associated Factors in East Gojjam Zone, Northwest Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Zelellw, Desalegne Amare; Tegegne, Teketo Kassaw; Getie, Girma Alem

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Universal use of partograph is recommended during labor, to improve maternal and fetal outcome. The aim was to assess knowledge and attitude of obstetric caregivers about partograph and associated factors. Methods. Facility based cross-sectional study was conducted on 273 study participants. Study facilities and study units were selected using simple random sampling technique. Midwives, Nurses, Public Health Officers, Medical Doctors, and masters in Emergency Surgery and Obstetric were included in the study. Epi-data and SPSS statistical software were used. Results. About 153 (56.04%) and 150 (54.95%) of the obstetric caregivers had good knowledge and favorable attitude about partograph, respectively. Knowledge of partograph was significantly higher among obstetric caregivers that learnt about partograph during their College and who had received partograph on job training (AOR: 2.14, 95% C.I (1.17-3.93)) and (AOR: 2.25, 95% C.I (1.21-4.19)), respectively. Favorable attitude towards partograph was significantly higher among obstetrical caregivers who had training and learnt about partograph during their college (AOR: 3.37, 95% C.I (1.49-5.65)) and (AOR: 2.134, 95% C.I (1.175-3.877)), correspondingly. Conclusion. Above half of obstetric caregivers had good knowledge and a favorable attitude on partograph. The provision of on preservice and job training is necessary to improve caregivers' knowledge and attitude. PMID:27403453

  20. Robotic Versus Abdominal Hysterectomy for Very Large Uteri

    PubMed Central

    Gallo, Taryn; Silasi, Michelle; Menderes, Gulden; Azodi, Masoud

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives: We sought to examine the outcomes of patients with myomatous uteri weighing >1000 g who underwent hysterectomy by one of two modalities, either with a robotic system or by laparotomy. Methods: All patients who underwent robotic hysterectomy for uteri weighing >1000 g at our institution between May 2007 and January 2011 were identified, and a retrospective chart review was performed. These patients were matched to a laparotomy control group by body mass index and uterine weight, and the postoperative outcomes in both groups were analyzed and compared. Results: Sixty patients with uteri weighing >1000 g underwent hysterectomy, 30 with the robotic system and 30 by laparotomy. The median body mass index was 31.8 kg/m2 (range, 18.5–56.3 kg/m2) and the median uterine weight was 1259 g (range, 1000–3543 g) in the robotic group versus 30.2 kg/m2 (range, 18–48 kg/m2) and 1509 g (range, 1000–3570 g), respectively, in the laparotomy group (P = .31). The median operating time was 255 minutes (range, 180–372 minutes) in the robotic group versus 150 minutes (range, 100–285 minutes) in the laparotomy group (P < .001). There were no conversions to laparotomy. In both groups the operative time was not increased with increasing specimen weight. The median blood loss was 150 mL in the robotic group versus 425 mL in the laparotomy group. Of 30 patients in the robotic group, 23 (76.6%) were discharged from the hospital on postoperative day 1. The median hospital stay for the robotic group was 1 day, and for the laparotomy group, it was 2.5 days (P < .01). Conclusion: Robotic surgeries for very large myomatous uteri are feasible and have minimal morbidity even in morbidly obese patients. The robotic surgery requires a longer operative time but results in a shorter hospital stay and decreased intraoperative blood loss. PMID:24018076

  1. [Forensic problems in bovine obstetrics and gynecology].

    PubMed

    Ahlers, D

    1992-02-01

    In the published statistical reports of liability insurance companies for veterinarians a high percentage of damage claims falls into the field of obstetrics and gynaecology, particularly in the bovine species. Veterinarians are held responsible for the consequences of insufficient clinical examinations of female animals or, after a correct diagnosis, initiation of therapeutic measures that ar not indicated. An increasing number of damage claims is due to the fact that the veterinarian has not informed the owner of an animal in advance about the possible medical or economic risks of a particular treatment. From the expert opinions requested of our clinic by insurance companies and law courts, it can be concluded that in veterinary obstetrics, lesions and damages occurring during vaginal deliveries are still the most frequent cause of compensation claims. Veterinarians are blamed for the use of too much traction force (number of persons assisting in an extraction, use of mechanical calf-pullers) and for incorrect procedures during the manual or instrumental correction of postural or positional abnormalities or a uterine torsion. Also, in case of complications after obstetrical surgery owners suspect failure of the veterinarian. Many losses in the puerperal period are due to the fact that the clinical examination after an obstetrical intervention has not been performed with the necessary accuracy or has been completely omitted. Compensation claims after gynaecological procedures are mostly based on a falsely positive or negative pregnancy diagnosis and complications after surgery involving the ovaries.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. 21 CFR 884.4400 - Obstetric forceps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Obstetric forceps. 884.4400 Section 884.4400 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL... handles, designed to grasp and apply traction to the fetal head in the birth passage and...

  3. Integrating Prevention into Obstetrics/Gynecology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carey, J. Christopher

    2000-01-01

    Discusses formats to teach preventive medicine in obstetrics and gynecology (including learning objectives, lectures/seminars, and rounds/office practice) and evaluation methods (oral examinations, computerized question banks, objective structured clinical examinations). Offers examples from specific programs at American medical schools, including…

  4. [Propanidid-ketamine combination in obstetrical anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Purita, N; Lisardi, S; Bilotta, F; Accorinti, L

    1979-09-01

    The A. have introduced a new technique in obstetrical, anaesthesia for short and long term intervention, included caesarean section, inducing anaesthesia with a mixture in the same syringe of propanidid and ketamin. The A. exhibit the results they have got treating the first 100 patients in this way and conclude with an extremely positive judgement.

  5. Ovarian and pituitary function in dogs after hysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, B; Höveler, R; Hasan, S H; Failing, K

    1992-11-01

    In studies of five hysterectomized and five control dogs, hysterectomy shortened the anoestrous interval (96.6 +/- 28.0 versus 149.4 +/- 50.9 days, P < 0.05). No differences in hormone concentrations (progesterone, oestradiol, prolactin and growth hormone) were observed between the control and hysterectomized dogs except for a brief fall in progesterone concentrations over 8 days immediately after surgery, between days 35 and 40 after onset of pro-oestrous bleeding; only these animals developed symptoms of overt pseudopregnancy. It is concluded that, in dogs, luteal regression occurs independently of a uterine luteolysin, but that the uterus may play a role in control of duration of anoestrus. Pseudopregnancy seems to be initiated by a fall in progesterone concentrations rather than by other hormonal changes.

  6. Global obstetric medicine: Collaborating towards global progress in maternal health

    PubMed Central

    Ateka-Barrutia, Oier; Rojas-Suarez, Jose Antonio; Wijeyaratne, Chandrika; Castillo, Eliana; Lombaard, Hennie; Magee, Laura A

    2015-01-01

    Globally, the nature of maternal mortality and morbidity is shifting from direct obstetric causes to an increasing proportion of indirect causes due to chronic conditions and ageing of the maternal population. Obstetric medicine can address an important gap in the care of women by broadening its scope to include colleagues, communities and countries that do not yet have established obstetric medicine training, education and resources. We present the concept of global obstetric medicine by highlighting three low- and middle-income country experiences as well as an example of successful collaboration. The article also discusses ideas and initiatives to build future partnerships within the global obstetric medicine community. PMID:27512469

  7. Midwifery and obstetrics: twenty years of collaborative academic practice.

    PubMed

    Angelini, Diane J; O'Brien, Barbara; Singer, Janet; Coustan, Donald R

    2012-09-01

    This review describes a collaborative educational practice model partnering midwifery and obstetrics within a department of obstetrics and gynecology. For more than 20 years, the authors' model has demonstrated sustainability and influence on medical education. The focus is on resident education in obstetrics, using midwifery faculty as teachers in the obstetric and obstetric triage settings. This noncompetitive and integrated educational practice model has achieved sustainability and success using midwives in a collaborative approach to medical education. The continuing collaboration and innovation within medical and resident education are important elements for the future of collaborative practice.

  8. Global obstetric medicine: Collaborating towards global progress in maternal health.

    PubMed

    Firoz, Tabassum; Ateka-Barrutia, Oier; Rojas-Suarez, Jose Antonio; Wijeyaratne, Chandrika; Castillo, Eliana; Lombaard, Hennie; Magee, Laura A

    2015-09-01

    Globally, the nature of maternal mortality and morbidity is shifting from direct obstetric causes to an increasing proportion of indirect causes due to chronic conditions and ageing of the maternal population. Obstetric medicine can address an important gap in the care of women by broadening its scope to include colleagues, communities and countries that do not yet have established obstetric medicine training, education and resources. We present the concept of global obstetric medicine by highlighting three low- and middle-income country experiences as well as an example of successful collaboration. The article also discusses ideas and initiatives to build future partnerships within the global obstetric medicine community. PMID:27512469

  9. Total laparoscopic hysterectomy via suture and ligation technique

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hye Won; Lee, Ji Won; Kim, Ho Yeon; Kim, Bo Wook

    2016-01-01

    Objective The term 'total laparoscopic hysterectomy (TLH) with classical suture method' refers to a surgical procedure performed using only sutures and ligations with intracorporeal or extracorporeal ties, without using any laser or electronic cauterization devices during laparoscopic surgery as in total abdominal hysterectomy. However, the method is not as widely used as electric coagulation equipment for TLH because further advances in technology and surgical technique are required and operative time can take longer. In the current study, we evaluated the benefits of the classical suture method for TLH. Methods This study retrospectively reviewed patients who received TLH using the classical suture method from August 2005 to April 2014. The patients' baseline characteristics were analyzed, including age, parity, cause of operation, medical and surgical history. Surgical outcomes analyzed included the weight of the uterus, operative time, complications, changes in hemoglobin level, blood transfusion requirements, and postoperative hospital stay. Results Of 746 patients who underwent TLH with the classical suture method, mean operation time was 96.9 minutes. Mean average decline in hemoglobin was 1.6 g/dL and transfusion rate was 6.2%. Urinary tract injuries were reported in 8 patients. Urinary tract injuries comprised 6 cases of bladder injury and 3 cases of ureter injury. There were no cases of vaginal stump infection, hematoma, bowel injury or abdominal wound complication. All cases involving complications occurred before 2010. Conclusion The classical suture method for TLH presents tolerable levels of complications and blood loss. Advanced surgical skill is expected to decrease operation time and complications. PMID:26866034

  10. Application of da Vinci(®) Robot in simple or radical hysterectomy: Tips and tricks.

    PubMed

    Iavazzo, Christos; Gkegkes, Ioannis D

    2016-01-01

    The first robotic simple hysterectomy was performed more than 10 years ago. These days, robotic-assisted hysterectomy is accepted as an alternative surgical approach and is applied both in benign and malignant surgical entities. The two important points that should be taken into account to optimize postoperative outcomes in the early period of a surgeon's training are how to achieve optimal oncological and functional results. Overcoming any technical challenge, as with any innovative surgical method, leads to an improved surgical operation timewise as well as for patients' safety. The standardization of the technique and recognition of critical anatomical landmarks are essential for optimal oncological and clinical outcomes on both simple and radical robotic-assisted hysterectomy. Based on our experience, our intention is to present user-friendly tips and tricks to optimize the application of a da Vinci® robot in simple or radical hysterectomies. PMID:27403078

  11. Minilaparoscopic hysterectomy made easy: first report on alternative instrumentation and new integrated energy platform.

    PubMed

    Ng, Ying Woo; Lim, Li Min; Fong, Yoke Fai

    2014-05-01

    Minilaparoscopy is an attractive approach for hysterectomy due to advantages such as reduced morbidities and enhanced cosmesis. However, it has not been popularized due to the lack of suitable instruments and high technical demand. We aim to highlight the first case of minilaparoscopic hysterectomy reported in Asia and the use of a new integrated energy platform, Thunderbeat. We would like to propose an alternative method of instrumentation, so as to improve the feasibility and safety of minilaparoscopic hysterectomy. The first minilaparoscopic hysterectomy in Singapore was successfully completed using the alternative instrumentation and new energy platform. There was no conversion or complication during the surgery. The patient recovered uneventfully. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the use of such alternative instrumentation. This approach in instrumentation and the new energy platform will improve the feasibility and speed of the surgery and ensure safety in our patients.

  12. Application of da Vinci® Robot in simple or radical hysterectomy: Tips and tricks

    PubMed Central

    Iavazzo, Christos; Gkegkes, Ioannis D.

    2016-01-01

    The first robotic simple hysterectomy was performed more than 10 years ago. These days, robotic-assisted hysterectomy is accepted as an alternative surgical approach and is applied both in benign and malignant surgical entities. The two important points that should be taken into account to optimize postoperative outcomes in the early period of a surgeon’s training are how to achieve optimal oncological and functional results. Overcoming any technical challenge, as with any innovative surgical method, leads to an improved surgical operation timewise as well as for patients’ safety. The standardization of the technique and recognition of critical anatomical landmarks are essential for optimal oncological and clinical outcomes on both simple and radical robotic-assisted hysterectomy. Based on our experience, our intention is to present user-friendly tips and tricks to optimize the application of a da Vinci® robot in simple or radical hysterectomies. PMID:27403078

  13. An Assessment of Surgical Experience among Obstetric and Gynaecology SpR Trainees.

    PubMed

    Gaughan, E; Barry, S; Boyd, W; Walsh, T A

    2015-10-01

    Changes in gynaecological practice have resulted in a significant reduction in surgical exposure for trainees. We have attempted to assess surgical experience among obstetric and gynaecology SpR's in Ireland using an anonymous on-line questionnaire. Trainees were asked to assess their own ability to perform a variety of general gynaecological procedures. There was a 97% response rate (29/33 trainees). There were 11 trainees who were in the final or penultimate year of the scheme. This group were analysed separately to assess competency rates in those approaching the end of the scheme. They were subdivided in to those who have completed one year in a general hospital doing pure gynaecology and those who have not. Approximately half of this group (6/11) had completed a pure gynaecology year. All of these trainees deemed themselves competent to perform all general gynaecological procedures listed, with the exception of trans-urethral tape procedures, for which 3/6 reported the requirement of direct supervision. Only 2/6 deemed themselves competent to perform a total laparoscopic hysterectomy. Year 4/5 trainees who had not completed a pure gynaecology year displayed significantly lower competency rates for most of the procedures. With the current changes in gynaecological practice, these results highlight the importance of dedicated gynaecological surgical training. PMID:26625657

  14. More than menorrhagia: a review of the obstetric and gynaecological manifestations of bleeding disorders.

    PubMed

    James, A H

    2005-07-01

    In women, menorrhagia may be the most common manifestation of a bleeding disorder, but it is not the only reproductive tract abnormality that women with bleeding disorders experience. Women with bleeding disorders appear to be at an increased risk of developing haemorrhagic ovarian cysts and possibly endometriosis. As they grow older, they may be more likely to manifest conditions, which present with bleeding such as fibroids, endometrial hyperplasia and polyps. Women with bleeding disorders are more likely to undergo a hysterectomy and are more likely to have the operation at a younger age. During pregnancy, they may be at greater risk of miscarriage and bleeding complications. At the time of childbirth, women with bleeding disorders appear to be more likely to experience postpartum haemorrhage, particularly delayed or secondary postpartum haemorrhage. Vaginal or vulvar haematomas, extremely rare in women without bleeding disorders, are not uncommon. While women with bleeding disorders are at risk for the same obstetrical and gynaecological problems that affect all women, they appear to be disproportionately affected by conditions that manifest with bleeding.

  15. The role of obstetrics and gynecology national societies during natural disasters.

    PubMed

    Lalonde, André; Adrien, Lauré

    2015-07-01

    When a natural disaster occurs, such as an earthquake, floods, or a tsunami, the international response is quick. However, there is no organized strategy in place to address obstetric and gynecological (ob/gyn) emergencies. International organizations and national ob/gyn societies do not have an organized plan and rely on the good will of volunteers. Too often, local specialists are ignored and are not involved in the response. The massive earthquake in Haiti in 2010 exemplifies the lack of coordinated response involving national organizations following the disaster. The Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada (SOGC) engaged rapidly with Haitian colleagues in response to the obstetric and gynecological emergencies. An active strategy is proposed.

  16. Salpingectomy as standard at hysterectomy? A Danish cohort study, 1977–2010

    PubMed Central

    Guldberg, Rikke; Wehberg, Sonja; Skovlund, Charlotte Wessel; Mogensen, Ole; Lidegaard, Øjvind

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess if the risk of first-time salpingectomy was affected by prior hysterectomy with retained fallopian tubes and by prior sterilisation. Design A historical cohort study. Setting Denmark. Participants 170 000 randomly selected women born 1947–1963 (10 000/year) were followed from 1977 until the end of 2010. Main outcome measures Effect of hysterectomy with retained fallopian tubes or sterilisation on the risk of salpingectomy. Both were modelled in a Cox proportional hazards model as time-dependent covariates, analysing time to first salpingectomy. End of follow-up period was 31 December 2010. Results Of 9591 hysterectomies, 6456 (67.3%) had both fallopian tubes retained. HRs for salpingectomy after hysterectomy with retained fallopian tubes and sterilisation were 2.13 (95% 1.88 to 2.42) and 2.42 (2.21 to 2.64), as compared with those for non-hysterectomised and non-sterilised women. Conclusions Women undergoing hysterectomy with retained fallopian tubes or sterilisation have at least a doubled risk of subsequent salpingectomy. Removal of the fallopian tubes at hysterectomy should therefore be recommended. PMID:23794553

  17. Cost and Reimbursement for Three Fibroid Treatments: Abdominal Hysterectomy, Abdominal Myomectomy, and Uterine Fibroid Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, Jay Bussard, Anne; McNeil, Jean; Diamond, James

    2007-02-15

    Purpose. To compare costs and reimbursements for three different treatments for uterine fibroids. Methods. Costs and reimbursements were collected and analyzed from the Thomas Jefferson University Hospital decision support database from 540 women who underwent abdominal hysterectomy (n 299), abdominal myomectomy (n = 105), or uterine fibroid embolization (UFE) (n = 136) for uterine fibroids during 2000-2002. We used the chi-square test and ANOVA, followed by Fisher's Least Significant Difference test, for statistical analysis. Results. The mean total hospital cost (US$) for UFE was $2,707, which was significantly less than for hysterectomy ($5,707) or myomectomy ($5,676) (p < 0.05). The mean hospital net income (hospital net reimbursement minus total hospital cost) for UFE was $57, which was significantly greater than for hysterectomy (-$572) or myomectomy (-$715) (p < 0.05). The mean professional (physician) reimbursements for UFE, hysterectomy, and myomectomy were $1,306, $979, and $1,078, respectively. Conclusion. UFE has lower hospital costs and greater hospital net income than abdominal hysterectomy or abdominal myomectomy for treating uterine fibroids. UFE may be more financially advantageous than hysterectomy or myomectomy for the insurer, hospital, and health care system. Costs and reimbursements may vary amongst different hospitals and regions.

  18. The obstetric dilemma: an ancient game of Russian roulette, or a variable dilemma sensitive to ecology?

    PubMed

    Wells, Jonathan C K; DeSilva, Jeremy M; Stock, Jay T

    2012-01-01

    The difficult birth process of humans, often described as the "obstetric dilemma," is commonly assumed to reflect antagonistic selective pressures favoring neonatal encephalization and maternal bipedal locomotion. However, cephalo-pelvic disproportion is not exclusive to humans, and is present in some primate species of smaller body size. The fossil record indicates mosaic evolution of the obstetric dilemma, involving a number of different evolutionary processes, and it appears to have shifted in magnitude between Australopithecus, Pleistocene Homo, and recent human populations. Most attention to date has focused on its generic nature, rather than on its variability between populations. We re-evaluate the nature of the human obstetric dilemma using updated hominin and primate literature, and then consider the contribution of phenotypic plasticity to variability in its magnitude. Both maternal pelvic dimensions and fetal growth patterns are sensitive to ecological factors such as diet and the thermal environment. Neonatal head girth has low plasticity, whereas neonatal mass and maternal stature have higher plasticity. Secular trends in body size may therefore exacerbate or decrease the obstetric dilemma. The emergence of agriculture may have exacerbated the dilemma, by decreasing maternal stature and increasing neonatal growth and adiposity due to dietary shifts. Paleodemographic comparisons between foragers and agriculturalists suggest that foragers have considerably lower rates of perinatal mortality. In contemporary populations, maternal stature remains strongly associated with perinatal mortality in many populations. Long-term improvements in nutrition across future generations may relieve the dilemma, but in the meantime, variability in its magnitude is likely to persist.

  19. Massive obstetric haemorrhage with disseminated intravascular coagulopathy.

    PubMed

    Su, Lin Lin; Chong, Yap Seng

    2012-02-01

    Massive obstetric haemorrhage is a major contributor towards maternal morbidity and mortality. The main causes are abruptio placentae, placenta praevia and postpartum haemorrhage. Clinicians managing pregnant women should be equipped with the knowledge and skills for managing massive obstetric haemorrhage to institute timely and appropriate life-saving treatment. Prompt resuscitation and reversal of coagulopathy are critical while definitive measures are carried out to arrest the bleeding. Massive antepartum haemorrhage necessitates deliveries whereas interventions for postpartum haemorrhage range from medical to surgical measures. Algorithms such as haemostasis are useful aids to the systematic and stepwise management of postpartum haemorrhage. Surgical measures used to avoid peripartum haemorrhage include uterine compression sutures, uterine balloon tamponade, uterine artery, and internal iliac artery ligation. Tranexamic acid and recombinant factor VII are more recent medical interventions in massive postpartum haemorrhage. Education, regular drills and adherence to guidelines and protocols are important to reduce haemorrhage-related maternal deaths. PMID:22101177

  20. The Obstetric Regulations 1986, 21 April 1986.

    PubMed

    1988-01-01

    These New Zealand Regulations revoke and replace the Obstetric Regulations 1975. They include provisions on the staffing of maternity hospitals (Reg. 3); the use of facilities in maternity hospitals (Reg. 4); the obligations on the part of medical practitioners to notify septic conditions, etc. (Reg. 6); the keeping of clinical records with respect to maternity patients (Reg. 9); and the maintenance, availability, and retention of registers and clinical records (Reg. 10). PMID:12289418

  1. Improved obstetric safety through programmatic collaboration.

    PubMed

    Goffman, Dena; Brodman, Michael; Friedman, Arnold J; Minkoff, Howard; Merkatz, Irwin R

    2014-01-01

    Healthcare safety and quality are critically important issues in obstetrics, and society, healthcare providers, patients and insurers share a common goal of working toward safer practice, and are continuously seeking strategies to facilitate improvements. To this end, 4 New York City voluntary hospitals with large maternity services initiated a unique collaborative quality improvement program. It was facilitated by their common risk management advisors, FOJP Service Corporation, and their professional liability insurer, Hospitals Insurance Company. Under the guidance of 4 obstetrics and gynecology departmental chairmen, consensus best practices for obstetrics were developed which included: implementation of evidence based protocols with audit and feedback; standardized educational interventions; mandatory electronic fetal monitoring training; and enhanced in-house physician coverage. Each institution developed unique safety related expertise (development of electronic documentation, team training, and simulation education), and experiences were shared across the collaborative. The collaborative group developed robust systems for audit of outcomes and documentation quality, as well as enforcement mechanisms. Ongoing feedback to providers served as a key component of the intervention. The liability carrier provided financial support for these patient safety innovations. As a result of the interventions, the overall AOI for our institutions decreased 42% from baseline (January-June 2008) to the most recently reviewed time period (July-December 2011) (10.7% vs 6.2%, p < 0.001). The Weighted Adverse Outcome Score (WAOS) also decreased during the same time period (3.9 vs 2.3, p = 0.001.) Given the improved outcomes noted, our unique program and the process by which it was developed are described in the hopes that others will recognize collaborative partnering with or without insurers as an opportunity to improve obstetric patient safety.

  2. Development of an obstetric vital sign alert to improve outcomes in acute care obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Behling, Diana J; Renaud, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Maternal morbidity and mortality is a national health problem. Causal analysis of near-miss and actual serious patient safety events, including those resulting in maternal death, within obstetric units often highlights a failure to promptly recognize and treat women who were exhibiting signs of decompensation/deterioration. The Obstetric Vital Sign Alert (OBVSA) is an early warning tool that leverages discrete data points in the electronic health record, calculating a risk score that is displayed as a visual cue for acute care obstetric staff. When studied in a cohort of women with postpartum hemorrhage, use of the OBVSA reduced symptom-to-response time and intervention time, as well as key process and outcome measures.

  3. Obstetric Outcomes of Mothers Previously Exposed to Sexual Violence

    PubMed Central

    Gisladottir, Agnes; Luque-Fernandez, Miguel Angel; Harlow, Bernard L.; Gudmundsdottir, Berglind; Jonsdottir, Eyrun; Bjarnadottir, Ragnheidur I.; Hauksdottir, Arna; Aspelund, Thor; Cnattingius, Sven; Valdimarsdottir, Unnur A.

    2016-01-01

    Background There is a scarcity of data on the association of sexual violence and women's subsequent obstetric outcomes. Our aim was to investigate whether women exposed to sexual violence as teenagers (12–19 years of age) or adults present with different obstetric outcomes than women with no record of such violence. Methods We linked detailed prospectively collected information on women attending a Rape Trauma Service (RTS) to the Icelandic Medical Birth Registry (IBR). Women who attended the RTS in 1993–2010 and delivered (on average 5.8 years later) at least one singleton infant in Iceland through 2012 formed our exposed cohort (n = 1068). For each exposed woman's delivery, nine deliveries by women with no RTS attendance were randomly selected from the IBR (n = 9126) matched on age, parity, and year and season of delivery. Information on smoking and Body mass index (BMI) was available for a sub-sample (n = 792 exposed and n = 1416 non-exposed women). Poisson regression models were used to estimate Relative Risks (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results Compared with non-exposed women, exposed women presented with increased risks of maternal distress during labor and delivery (RR 1.68, 95% CI 1.01–2.79), prolonged first stage of labor (RR 1.40, 95% CI 1.03–1.88), antepartum bleeding (RR 1.95, 95% CI 1.22–3.07) and emergency instrumental delivery (RR 1.16, 95% CI 1.00–1.34). Slightly higher risks were seen for women assaulted as teenagers. Overall, we did not observe differences between the groups regarding the risk of elective cesarean section (RR 0.86, 95% CI 0.61–1.21), except for a reduced risk among those assaulted as teenagers (RR 0.56, 95% CI 0.34–0.93). Adjusting for maternal smoking and BMI in a sub-sample did not substantially affect point estimates. Conclusion Our prospective data suggest that women with a history of sexual assault, particularly as teenagers, are at increased risks of some adverse obstetric outcomes. PMID:27007230

  4. [Centralization in obstetrics: pros and cons].

    PubMed

    Roemer, V M; Ramb, S

    1996-01-01

    Possible advantages and disadvantages of a general centralization of German obstetric facilities are analysed in the study. The need for centralization of risk cases, especially premature births (regionalization) is pointed out. Centralization appears appropriate, since every fifth maternity unit in Germany (19.78%) has 300 or fewer deliveries per year. This one fifth of perinatal clinics accounts for 6.3% of all deliveries (N = 49450). There are appreciable differences between the old and new federal states (Bundesländer): in the recently acceded federal states, 48.7% of all perinatal clinics have deliveries of 300 and less per year. This group of perinatal clinics accounts for 29% of all deliveries in the new federal states. We have carried out a survey of the mother's attitude to centralization: out of 416 patients in the Detmold women's hospital whose mean age was 29.0 +/- 4.2 years, 90.4% were not in favor of general centralization of obstetrics. 43% were also against a centralization of risk cases (regionalization). 75% of the women surveyed objected to centralized obstetrics because of the 'possible absence of the family', the 'possible absence of students and trainees' (44.9%), the 'unfamiliarity with staff and premises' (41.8%) and 'fear of anonymity' (44.5%). The majority of all women (84.1%) did not want to have a drive more than 20 km to an obstetrics center. Fear of 'delivery in a taxi'(78.6%), the 'fear that the husband will come too late to the delivery' (65.4%) and that the 'overall course of the delivery might not be adequate for reasons of time'. The presence of a pediatrics department in conjunction with the perinatal clinic was rated very positively (93%). It is concluded from the data and further juridical considerations that centralization of risk cases (regionalization) is indispensable in the near future and that somewhat more further into the future decentralization should be carried out by closing obstetrics departments with substantially

  5. Obstetric Provider Trainees in Georgia: Characteristics and Attitudes About Practice in Obstetric Provider Shortage Areas.

    PubMed

    Smulian, Elizabeth A; Zahedi, Leilah; Hurvitz, Julie; Talbot, Abigail; Williams, Audra; Julian, Zoë; Zertuche, Adrienne D; Rochat, Roger

    2016-07-01

    Objectives In Georgia, 52 % of the primary care service areas outside metropolitan Atlanta have a deficit of obstetric providers. This study was designed to identify factors associated with the likelihood of Georgia's obstetric trainees (obstetrics and gynecology (OB/GYN) residents and certified nurse midwifery (CNM) students) to practice in areas of Georgia that lack obstetric providers and services, i.e. rural Georgia. Methods Pilot-tested electronic and paper surveys were distributed to all of Georgia's OB/GYN residents (N = 95) and CNM students (N = 28). Mixed-methods survey questions assessed characteristics, attitudes, and incentives that might be associated with trainee desire to practice in areas of Georgia that lack obstetric providers and services. Surveys also gathered information about concerns that may prevent trainees from practicing in shortage areas. Univariate and bivariate analyses were performed, and qualitative themes were abstracted from open-ended questions. Results The survey response rate was 87.8 % (108/123). Overall, 24.4 % (19/78) of residents and 53.6 % (15/28) of CNM students expressed interest in practicing in rural Georgia, and both residents and CNM students were more likely to desire to practice in rural Georgia with the offer of any of six financial incentives (P < 0.001). Qualitative themes highlighted trainees' strong concerns about Georgia's political environment as it relates to reproductive healthcare. Conclusions Increasing state-level, rurally-focused financial incentive programs and emphasizing the role of CNMs may alleviate obstetric provider shortages in Georgia.

  6. Comparative analysis of vaginal versus robotic-assisted hysterectomy for benign indications.

    PubMed

    Jacome, Enrique G; Hebert, April E; Christian, Frank

    2013-03-01

    We aimed to compare perioperative outcomes of robotic-assisted hysterectomy versus vaginal hysterectomy in patients with benign gynecologic conditions, using a retrospective chart review of 240 consecutive benign hysterectomies from May 2008 to April of 2010 performed by a single surgical team at the Eisenhower Medical Center. The analysis included an equal number of cases in each group: 120 robotic-assisted total laparoscopic hysterectomies and 120 total vaginal hysterectomies. Consecutive cases met the inclusion criteria of benign disease. There were no statistically significant differences related to age, body mass index, history of prior abdominal surgery, or uterine weight. Operative times in the robotic group were significantly longer by an average of 59 min (p < 0.001). Patients with robotic-assisted hysterectomy had clinically equivalent estimated blood loss (55.5 ml vs. 84.7 ml, p < 0.001) and the intraoperative complication rates were 1.7% vaginal versus 0% robotic (p = 0.156). There was one conversion in the vaginal group due to pelvic adhesions and no conversions in the robotic group. Length of hospital stay was 1 day for both groups. The perioperative complication rates were equivalent between groups (6.7 vs. 11.7%, p = 0.180), but there were more major complications in the vaginal group (0 vs. 3.3%, p = 0.044). We conclude that, in a comparable group of patients, robotic-assisted hysterectomy takes longer to complete but results in fewer major complications. PMID:27000891

  7. Potential Impact of Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospitalists on Safety of Obstetric Care.

    PubMed

    Srinivas, Sindhu K

    2015-09-01

    Staffing models are critical aspects of care delivery. Provider staffing on the labor and delivery unit has recently received heightened attention. Based on the general medicine hospitalist model, the obstetrics and gynecology hospitalist or laborist model of obstetric care was introduced more than a decade ago as a plausible model-of-care delivery to improve provider satisfaction, with the goal of also improving safety and outcomes through continuous coverage by providers whose sole focus was on the labor and delivery unit without other competing clinical duties. It is plausible that this model of provider staffing and care delivery will increase safety. PMID:26333638

  8. Potential Impact of Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospitalists on Safety of Obstetric Care.

    PubMed

    Srinivas, Sindhu K

    2015-09-01

    Staffing models are critical aspects of care delivery. Provider staffing on the labor and delivery unit has recently received heightened attention. Based on the general medicine hospitalist model, the obstetrics and gynecology hospitalist or laborist model of obstetric care was introduced more than a decade ago as a plausible model-of-care delivery to improve provider satisfaction, with the goal of also improving safety and outcomes through continuous coverage by providers whose sole focus was on the labor and delivery unit without other competing clinical duties. It is plausible that this model of provider staffing and care delivery will increase safety.

  9. Contraceptive led to hysterectomy. Drug maker liable for side effects.

    PubMed

    Hladky, M

    1989-01-12

    Having previously suffered side effects with an IUD device and the contraceptive pill, Anne Marie MacMurdo sought an alternate method of contraception. She received her first injection of Depo-Provera in 1974 from a New Orleans gynecologist. Three months later, MacMurdo received a second injection from a gynecologist in Miami. Following this second injection, she experienced continuous menstrual bleeding and reported her condition to the gynecologist in New Orleans. He advised MacMurdo to undergo an hysterectomy to stop the painful bleeding and the operation was performed five months after the second injection. MacMurdo filed a product liability suit three years later against Upjohn Inc., the manufacturer of Depo-Provera. The fourth District Court of Appeals (DCA) in Broward County, Florida, in December 1988 ruled Upjohn negligent and awarded MacMurdo $370,000 in damages. Upjohn plans to contest the ruling. This case is already one of the longest running court fights in Broward County history, already going before the fourth DCA in West Palm Beach three times before this most recent ruling. Depo-Provera's uses, the MacMurdo case, and Upjohn's defense are reviewed.

  10. A pilot structured resident orientation curriculum improves the confidence of incoming first-year obstetrics and gynecology residents.

    PubMed

    Hiraoka, Mark; Kamikawa, Ginny; McCartin, Richard; Kaneshiro, Bliss

    2013-11-01

    A prospective, observational study was performed to evaluate a pilot orientation curriculum which involved all 7 incoming obstetrics and gynecology residents in June 2012. The objective of this study was to assess how a structured orientation curriculum, which employs an evaluation of baseline competency, affects the confidence of incoming first-year obstetrics and gynecology residents. The curriculum included didactic lectures, online modules, simulation, and mock clinical scenarios. Pre- and post-course surveys were conducted online via SurveyMonkey™ and were sent to all incoming obstetrics and gynecology residents. All seven incoming obstetrics and gynecology residents completed the orientation curriculum which included evaluations at the end of the orientation to assess baseline competency prior to taking part in clinical care. Confidence levels improved in all 27 elements assessed. Statistically significant improvement in confidence levels occurred in cognitive skills such as obstetric emergency management (2.9 vs 3.9, P< .05) and technical skills such as knot tying (3.9 vs. 4.6, P< .05). Certain teaching skills also demonstrated statistically significant improvements. A structured orientation program which improves resident self-confidence levels and demonstrates baseline competencies in certain clinical areas can be valuable for many residency training programs.

  11. Promoting accountability in obstetric care: use of criteria-based audit in Viet Nam.

    PubMed

    Bailey, P E; Binh, H T; Bang, H T

    2010-01-01

    Audits can improve clinical and managerial practices, enhance the rational use of limited resources, and improve staff morale and motivation. Staff at five hospitals in Thanh Hoa and Quang Tri provinces (Viet Nam) used criteria-based audit (CBA) as a tool to improve the quality of emergency obstetric and newborn care. CBA compares current practice with standards based on the best available evidence and the local context. The audit cycle begins with a known problem, proceeds with an initial assessment and data collection, analysis of those data, formulation and implementation of an action plan, and a re-evaluation of the topic initially assessed. Teams found that clinical protocols for treating major obstetric complications were not followed, although, national guidelines had been issued in 2002. In an audit of facility organisation, staff addressed obstacles to the timely treatment of obstetric emergencies during off hours. In each audit, teams devised mechanisms to correct problems that resulted in significant improvements when the audit cycle was repeated. CBA improved adherence to national guidelines, improved record-keeping, heightened teamwork, and showed staff that they could identify and solve many of their own problems.

  12. Hysterectomy: variations in rates across small areas and across physicians' practices.

    PubMed Central

    Roos, N P

    1984-01-01

    This analysis focuses on the practice of hysterectomy across 33 hospital catchment areas of one Canadian province, using claims data from the Manitoba health insurance system. Hysterectomy rates varied five-fold across hospital areas. The availability of hospitals and physicians was unrelated to area rates, and there appeared to be no access barriers in the low-rate areas. High-rate areas were characterized by women who visited large numbers of different physicians and by having larger proportions of French, Polish, and Italian residents (ethnic groups which are largely Catholic in Manitoba). Although women residents of high rate areas made somewhat more visits for gynecologic problems and had many more D&Cs (dilation and curretage of the uterus), it is concluded that this may be due as much to the practice style of physicians treating patients from these areas as to gynecologic need. Residents of high and medium-high rate areas are more likely to have hysterectomy-prone surgeons as their primary physicians. Such physicians appear both more likely to "label" their patients' conditions as gynecologic in origin and more likely to advise surgical intervention (both D&C and hysterectomy) once such conditions are diagnosed. Thus, a combination of patient and physician characteristics may explain much of the variation in small area hysterectomy rates, rather than narrowly defined medical need. PMID:6703159

  13. A comparison of robot-assisted and traditional radical hysterectomy for early-stage cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Lowe, M Patrick; Hoekstra, Anna V; Jairam-Thodla, Arati; Singh, Diljeet K; Buttin, Barbara M; Lurain, John R; Schink, Julian C

    2009-03-01

    A robotics surgery program was introduced into the division of gynecologic oncology at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in June 2007. A prospective database of all patients undergoing a type III radical hysterectomy for stage IB1 cervical cancer between July 2007 and June 2008 was collected and analyzed. Demographic data and perioperative outcomes were analyzed between a traditional and robot-assisted approach. A total of 14 patients were identified who underwent a type III radical hysterectomy for stage IB1 cervical cancer. Seven patients underwent robotic surgery and seven patients underwent traditional surgery. There were no significant differences in median age or body mass index between the two groups. A significant difference in blood loss between robotic (75 cc) and traditional (700 cc) surgery was detected (P = 0.002). A significant difference in hospital stay between robotic (1 day) and traditional (5 days) surgery was observed (P = 0.0007). No significant difference in operative time (260 vs. 264 min) or lymph node yield (19 and 14) was identified between the robotic and traditional approaches. No major operative complications occurred with robotic radical hysterectomy. Robot-assisted radical hysterectomy was associated with a significant reduction in blood loss and hospital stay. Improved nodal yields, fewer operative complications, and less pain was observed with the robotic approach. Robot-assisted radical hysterectomy appears safe and feasible and further investigation is warranted in a prospective fashion. PMID:27628448

  14. Incidence and predictors of severe obstetric morbidity: case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Waterstone, Mark; Bewley, Susan; Wolfe, Charles

    2001-01-01

    Objective To estimate the incidence and predictors of severe obstetric morbidity. Design Development of definitions of severe obstetric morbidity by literature review. Case-control study from a defined delivery population with four randomly selected pregnant women as controls for every case. Setting All 19 maternity units within the South East Thames region and six neighbouring hospitals caring for pregnant women from the region between 1 March 1997 and 28 February 1998. Participants 48 865 women who delivered during the time frame. Results There were 588 cases of severe obstetric morbidity giving an incidence of 12.0/1000 deliveries (95% confidence interval 11.2 to 13.2). During the study there were five maternal deaths attributed to conditions studied. Disease specific morbidities per 1000 deliveries were 6.7 (6.0 to 7.5) for severe haemorrhage, 3.9 (3.3 to 4.5) for severe pre-eclampsia, 0.2 (0.1 to 0.4) for eclampsia, 0.5 (0.3 to 0.8) for HELLP (Haemolysis, Elevated Liver enzymes, and Low Platelets) syndrome, 0.4 (0.2 to 0.6) for severe sepsis, and 0.2 (0.1 to 0.4) for uterine rupture. Age over 34 years, non-white ethnic group, past or current hypertension, previous postpartum haemorrhage, delivery by emergency caesarean section, antenatal admission to hospital, multiple pregnancy, social exclusion, and taking iron or anti-depressants at antenatal booking were all independently associated with morbidity after adjustment. Conclusion Severe obstetric morbidity and its relation to mortality may be more sensitive measures of pregnancy outcome than mortality alone. Most events are related to obstetric haemorrhage and severe pre-eclampsia. Caesarean section quadruples the risk of morbidity. Development and evaluation of ways of predicting and reducing risk are required with particular emphasis paid on the management of haemorrhage and pre-eclampsia. What is already known on this topicMaternal mortality is used internationally as a measure of the quality of obstetric

  15. A study of New York City obstetrics units demonstrates the potential for reducing hospital inpatient capacity.

    PubMed

    Green, Linda V; Liu, Nan

    2015-04-01

    Hospitals are under significant pressure from payers to reduce costs. The single largest fixed cost for a hospital is inpatient beds, yet there is significant variation in hospital capacity utilization. We study bed capacity in New York City hospital obstetrics units and find that while many hospitals have an insufficient number of beds to provide timely access to care, overall there is significant excess capacity. Our findings, coupled with current demographic and clinical practice trends, indicate that a large fraction of obstetrics units nationwide could likely reduce their bed capacity while assuring timely access to care, resulting in large savings in capital and staffing costs. Given emerging health care delivery and payment models that will likely decrease demand for other types of hospital beds, our study suggests that data-based methodologies should be used by hospitals and policy makers to identify opportunities for reducing excess bed capacity in other inpatient units as well.

  16. Malpractice Burden, Rural Location, and Discontinuation of Obstetric Care: A Study of Obstetric Providers in Michigan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, Xiao; Siefert, Kristine A.; Jacobson, Peter D.; Lori, Jody R.; Gueorguieva, Iana; Ransom, Scott B.

    2009-01-01

    Context: It has long been a concern that professional liability problems disproportionately affect the delivery of obstetrical services to women living in rural areas. Michigan, a state with a large number of rural communities, is considered to be at risk for a medical liability crisis. Purpose: This study examined whether higher malpractice…

  17. [Smoking and obstetric and gynecological disorders].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Fumiaki; Kasamatsu, Takahiro

    2013-03-01

    Smoking causes various health problems in women in relation to their life cycle. About the effects of smoking on obstetric and gynecological disorders, it is clarified that smoking has adverse effects on menopausal disorders, miscarriage, premature birth, low birth weight infant, breast cancer, uterine cancer and ovarian cancer. The high rate of smoking among women of reproductive age is of particular concern for the next generation because smoking affects not only the women themselves, but also the fetus. It is necessary to promote smoking prevention education to prevent women from developing a smoking habit and to provide smoking cessation education and support for smokers.

  18. Drug Resistant Fetal Arrhythmia in Obstetric Cholestasis

    PubMed Central

    Altug, Nahide; Kirbas, Ayse; Daglar, Korkut; Biberoglu, Ebru; Uygur, Dilek; Danisman, Nuri

    2015-01-01

    Obstetric cholestasis (OC) is a pregnancy specific liver disease characterized by increased levels of bile acid (BA) and pruritus. Raised maternal BA levels could be associated with intrauterine death, fetal distress, and preterm labor and also alter the rate and rhythm of cardiomyocyte contraction and may cause fetal arrhythmic events. We report a case of drug resistant fetal supraventricular tachycardia and concomitant OC. Conclusion. If there are maternal OC and concomitant fetal arrhythmia, possibility of the resistance to antiarrhythmic treatment should be kept in mind. PMID:25821617

  19. Automatic segmentation applied to obstetric images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuwong, Vanee; Hiller, John B.; Jin, Jesse S.

    1998-06-01

    This paper presents a shape-based approach for searching and extracting fetal skull boundaries from an obstetric image. The proposed method relies on two major steps. Firstly, we apply the reference axes to scan the image for all potential skull boundaries. The possible skull boundaries are determined whether they are candidates. The candidate with the highest confident value will be selected as the expected head boundary. Then, the position of the expected head boundary is initialized. Secondly, we refine the initial skull boundary using the fuzzy contour model modified from the active contour basis. This results the continuous and smooth fetal skull boundary that we can use for the medical parameter measurement.

  20. Obstetric infection control in a developing country.

    PubMed

    Cronin, W A; Quansah, M G; Larson, E

    1993-01-01

    In Ghana, infection has been identified as a major cause of birth-related mortality. Results of a 2-month observation of infection control practices among Ghanaian obstetric nurses and midwives indicated that most personnel did not practice basic rules of asepsis. Problems included frequent breaks in technique, inadequate sterilization and disinfection, and repeated exposure to large amounts of blood and vaginal secretions. Supplies were limited and, even when available, not always used appropriately. The situation in developing countries is different from that in the United States. Therefore, an observational needs assessment is essential to plan relevant and practical measures for change.

  1. The critical role of supervision in retaining staff in obstetric services: a three country study.

    PubMed

    McAuliffe, Eilish; Daly, Michael; Kamwendo, Francis; Masanja, Honorati; Sidat, Mohsin; de Pinho, Helen

    2013-01-01

    Millennium Development Goal (MDG) 5 commits us to reducing maternal mortality rates by three quarters and MDG 4 commits us to reducing child mortality by two-thirds between 1990 and 2015. In order to reach these goals, greater access to basic emergency obstetric care (EmOC) as well as comprehensive EmOC which includes safe Caesarean section, is needed.. The limited capacity of health systems to meet demand for obstetric services has led several countries to utilize mid-level cadres as a substitute to more extensively trained and more internationally mobile healthcare workers. Although this does provide greater capacity for service delivery, concern about the performance and motivation of these workers is emerging. We propose that poor leadership characterized by inadequate and unstructured supervision underlies much of the dissatisfaction and turnover that has been shown to exist amongst these mid-level healthcare workers and indeed health workers more generally. To investigate this, we conducted a large-scale survey of 1,561 mid-level cadre healthcare workers (health workers trained for shorter periods to perform specific tasks e.g. clinical officers) delivering obstetric care in Malawi, Tanzania, and Mozambique. Participants indicated the primary supervision method used in their facility and we assessed their job satisfaction and intentions to leave their current workplace. In all three countries we found robust evidence indicating that a formal supervision process predicted high levels of job satisfaction and low intentions to leave. We find no evidence that facility level factors modify the link between supervisory methods and key outcomes. We interpret this evidence as strongly supporting the need to strengthen leadership and implement a framework and mechanism for systematic supportive supervision. This will promote better job satisfaction and improve the retention and performance of obstetric care workers, something which has the potential to improve

  2. Obstetric and Gynecologic Patients' Attitudes and Perceptions Toward Medical Students in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Anfinan, Nisrin; Alghunaim, Nadine; Boker, Abdulaziz; Hussain, Amro; Almarstani, Ahmad; Basalamah, Hussain; Sait, Hesham; Arif, Rawan; Sait, Khalid

    2014-01-01

    Objective To identify patients’ attitudes, preferences and comfort levels regarding the presence and involvement of medical students during consultations and examinations. Methods A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted from September 2011 to December 2011 at King Abdulaziz University Hospital in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Participants were randomly selected from the outpatient and inpatient clinics at the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and the Emergency Department, provided they were admitted for obstetric or gynecology-related conditions. Data were collected using a structured questionnaire, and data analysis was performed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences. Results Of the 327 patients who were recruited, 272 (83%) were elective patients who were seen at the outpatient and inpatient clinics of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology (group I). The other 55 (16.8%) were seen at the Emergency Department or the Labor and Delivery Ward (group II). One hundred seventy-nine participants (160 [58.8%] in group I and 19 [34.5%] in group II) reported positive attitudes about the presence of female medical students during consultations. Fewer participants (115 [42.3%] were in group I and 17 [30.9%] in group II) reported positive attitudes regarding the presence of male medical students during consultations (p=0.095). The gender of the medical student was the primary factor that influenced patients’ decision to accept or decline medical student involvement. No significant associations were observed between patients’ attitudes and perceptions toward medical students and the patients' age, educational level, nationality or the gender of the consultant. Conclusion Obstetrics and Gynecology patients are typically accepting of female medical student involvement during examinations. Student gender is the primary factor that influences patient attitudes regarding student involvement during physical examinations. PMID:24715936

  3. The critical role of supervision in retaining staff in obstetric services: a three country study.

    PubMed

    McAuliffe, Eilish; Daly, Michael; Kamwendo, Francis; Masanja, Honorati; Sidat, Mohsin; de Pinho, Helen

    2013-01-01

    Millennium Development Goal (MDG) 5 commits us to reducing maternal mortality rates by three quarters and MDG 4 commits us to reducing child mortality by two-thirds between 1990 and 2015. In order to reach these goals, greater access to basic emergency obstetric care (EmOC) as well as comprehensive EmOC which includes safe Caesarean section, is needed.. The limited capacity of health systems to meet demand for obstetric services has led several countries to utilize mid-level cadres as a substitute to more extensively trained and more internationally mobile healthcare workers. Although this does provide greater capacity for service delivery, concern about the performance and motivation of these workers is emerging. We propose that poor leadership characterized by inadequate and unstructured supervision underlies much of the dissatisfaction and turnover that has been shown to exist amongst these mid-level healthcare workers and indeed health workers more generally. To investigate this, we conducted a large-scale survey of 1,561 mid-level cadre healthcare workers (health workers trained for shorter periods to perform specific tasks e.g. clinical officers) delivering obstetric care in Malawi, Tanzania, and Mozambique. Participants indicated the primary supervision method used in their facility and we assessed their job satisfaction and intentions to leave their current workplace. In all three countries we found robust evidence indicating that a formal supervision process predicted high levels of job satisfaction and low intentions to leave. We find no evidence that facility level factors modify the link between supervisory methods and key outcomes. We interpret this evidence as strongly supporting the need to strengthen leadership and implement a framework and mechanism for systematic supportive supervision. This will promote better job satisfaction and improve the retention and performance of obstetric care workers, something which has the potential to improve

  4. Relevant Obstetric Factors for Cerebral Palsy: From the Nationwide Obstetric Compensation System in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Junichi; Toyokawa, Satoshi; Ikenoue, Tsuyomu; Asano, Yuri; Satoh, Shoji; Ikeda, Tomoaki; Ichizuka, Kiyotake; Tamiya, Nanako; Nakai, Akihito; Fujimori, Keiya; Maeda, Tsugio; Masuzaki, Hideaki; Suzuki, Hideaki; Ueda, Shigeru

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to identify the relevant obstetric factors for cerebral palsy (CP) after 33 weeks’ gestation in Japan. Study design This retrospective case cohort study (1:100 cases and controls) used a Japanese national CP registry. Obstetric characteristics and clinical course were compared between CP cases in the Japan Obstetric Compensation System for Cerebral Palsy database and controls in the perinatal database of the Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology born as live singleton infants between 2009 and 2011 with a birth weight ≥ 2,000 g and gestation ≥ 33 weeks. Results One hundred and seventy-five CP cases and 17,475 controls were assessed. Major relevant single factors for CP were placental abnormalities (31%), umbilical cord abnormalities (15%), maternal complications (10%), and neonatal complications (1%). A multivariate regression model demonstrated that obstetric variables associated with CP were acute delivery due to non-reassuring fetal status (relative risk [RR]: 37.182, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 20.028–69.032), uterine rupture (RR: 24.770, 95% CI: 6.006–102.160), placental abruption (RR: 20.891, 95% CI: 11.817–36.934), and preterm labor (RR: 3.153, 95% CI: 2.024–4.911), whereas protective factors were head presentation (RR: 0.199, 95% CI: 0.088–0.450) and elective cesarean section (RR: 0.236, 95% CI: 0.067–0.828). Conclusion CP after 33 weeks’ gestation in the recently reported cases in Japan was strongly associated with acute delivery due to non-reassuring fetal status, uterine rupture, and placental abruption. PMID:26821386

  5. The effect of adenomyosis on the outcomes of laparoscopic hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Yavuzcan, Ali; Başbuğ, Alper; Baştan, Merve; Çağlar, Mete; Özdemir, İsmail

    2016-01-01

    Objective The presence of adenomyosis (ADS) may increase complication rates associated with laparoscopic hysterectomy (LH) due to an increased weight of the uterus, increased vascularization of the uterus, impaired myometrial tissue, and presence of additional gynecological pathologies such as leiomyoma or endometriosis. The aim of the present study was to evaluate perioperative and early postoperative parameters in patients with or without adenomyotic lesions. Material and Methods The study included patients who underwent LH in a university hospital. Patient data were retrieved from the hospital records and reviewed retrospectively. Sixty-one patients (85.9%) without adenomyotic lesions comprised the control group. Ten patients with adenomyotic lesions (14.1%) were regarded as the study group. Results In this study, the mean age of the patients was 50.93±9.39 years. The mean uterus size was significantly higher in patients with ADS (p=0.02). There was no statistically significant difference in perioperative variables such as delta hemoglobin (Hb), insertion of pelvic drainage catheter, and invasive assessment of the urinary tract between both the groups (p=0.27, p=1.0, and p=0.67, respectively). The difference between the groups in terms of postoperative blood transfusion was not statistically significant (p=0.25). There was no statistically significant difference in the postoperative maximum body temperature, length of hospital stay, and duration of urinary catheterization between both the groups (p=0.77, p=0.36, and p=0.75, respectively). Conclusion LH appears to be a safe alternative for patients with ADS. Large-scale, prospective, and randomized trials are required in order to suggest the routine use of LH in patients preoperatively diagnosed with ADS.

  6. The effect of adenomyosis on the outcomes of laparoscopic hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Yavuzcan, Ali; Başbuğ, Alper; Baştan, Merve; Çağlar, Mete; Özdemir, İsmail

    2016-01-01

    Objective The presence of adenomyosis (ADS) may increase complication rates associated with laparoscopic hysterectomy (LH) due to an increased weight of the uterus, increased vascularization of the uterus, impaired myometrial tissue, and presence of additional gynecological pathologies such as leiomyoma or endometriosis. The aim of the present study was to evaluate perioperative and early postoperative parameters in patients with or without adenomyotic lesions. Material and Methods The study included patients who underwent LH in a university hospital. Patient data were retrieved from the hospital records and reviewed retrospectively. Sixty-one patients (85.9%) without adenomyotic lesions comprised the control group. Ten patients with adenomyotic lesions (14.1%) were regarded as the study group. Results In this study, the mean age of the patients was 50.93±9.39 years. The mean uterus size was significantly higher in patients with ADS (p=0.02). There was no statistically significant difference in perioperative variables such as delta hemoglobin (Hb), insertion of pelvic drainage catheter, and invasive assessment of the urinary tract between both the groups (p=0.27, p=1.0, and p=0.67, respectively). The difference between the groups in terms of postoperative blood transfusion was not statistically significant (p=0.25). There was no statistically significant difference in the postoperative maximum body temperature, length of hospital stay, and duration of urinary catheterization between both the groups (p=0.77, p=0.36, and p=0.75, respectively). Conclusion LH appears to be a safe alternative for patients with ADS. Large-scale, prospective, and randomized trials are required in order to suggest the routine use of LH in patients preoperatively diagnosed with ADS. PMID:27651723

  7. Tubal ligation, hysterectomy, and epithelial ovarian cancer in the New England Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Megan S.; Murphy, Megan A.; Vitonis, Allison F.; Cramer, Daniel W.; Titus, Linda J.; Tworoger, Shelley S.; Terry, Kathryn L.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have observed that tubal ligation and hysterectomy are associated with a decreased risk of ovarian cancer; however little is known about whether these associations vary bysurgical characteristics, individual characteristics, or tumor histology. We used logistic regression to examine tubal ligation, simple hysterectomy, and hysterectomy with unilateral oophorectomy in relation to risk of epithelial ovarian cancer in the New England Case-Control study. Our primary analysis included 2,265 cases and 2,333 controls. Overall, tubal ligation was associated with a lower risk of epithelial ovarian cancer (OR: 0.82, 95%CI: 0.68-0.97), especially for endometrioid tumors (OR=0.45, 95%CI: 0.29-0.69). The inverse association between tubal ligation and ovarian cancer risk was stronger for women who had undergone the procedure at the time of last delivery (OR=0.60, 95%CI: 0.42-0.84) rather than at a later time (OR=0.93, 95%CI: 0.75-1.15). Overall, simple hysterectomy was not associated with ovarian cancer risk (OR: 1.09, 95%CI: 0.83, 1.42), although it was associated with a non-significant decreased risk of ovarian cancer among women who underwent the procedure at age 45 or older (RR: 0.64, 95%CI: 0.40, 1.02) or within the last 10 years (OR=0.65, 95%CI: 0.38, 1.13). Overall, women who had a hysterectomy with a unilateral oophorectomy had significantly lower risk of ovarian cancer (OR=0.65, 95%CI: 0.45-0.94). In summary, tubal ligation and hysterectomy with unilateral oophorectomy were inversely associated with ovarian cancer risk in a large population-based case-control study. Additional research is necessary to understand the potential biologic mechanisms by which these procedures may reduce ovarian cancer risk. PMID:23650079

  8. An Ethical Issue in Medical Education of Obstetrics and Gynecology

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Seung Do; Woo, Su-Hyeon

    2015-01-01

    There are four principles of medical ethics; Beneficence, Respect for autonomy, Non-maleficence, and Justice. It is not easy to apply to principles of medical ethics in the special circumstances of obstetrics and gynecology. Student doctors must learn to be familiar with principles of medical ethics tailored to the special circumstances while the obstetrics and gynecology practice. PMID:26793677

  9. 21 CFR 884.2960 - Obstetric ultrasonic transducer and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Obstetric ultrasonic transducer and accessories. 884.2960 Section 884.2960 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Monitoring Devices § 884.2960 Obstetric ultrasonic transducer and accessories. (a) Identification....

  10. 21 CFR 884.4900 - Obstetric table and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Obstetric table and accessories. 884.4900 Section 884.4900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... obstetric and gynecologic procedures. This generic type of device may include the following...

  11. Obstetrical Complications and Violent Delinquency: Testing Two Developmental Pathways.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arseneault, Louise; Tremblay, Richard E.; Boulerice, Bernard; Saucier, Jean-Francois

    2002-01-01

    Assessed interaction between obstetrical complications and early family adversity in predicting violent behavior during childhood and adolescence among 849 boys from low SES areas. Found that elevated scores on scale of obstetrical complications (preeclampsia, umbilical cord prolapse, induced labor) increased risk of being violent at 6 and 17…

  12. Experience with a Family-Practice-Resident-Directed Obstetrical Clinic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Jerry L.; Snyder, Frank

    1980-01-01

    At Toledo Hospital, family practice residents have assumed responsibility for the normal obstetrics clinic. Specialty consultations are provided by the hospital's obstetrics residency program. A medical audit of the clinic indicates that the family practice residents obtained consultations and made referrals at the appropriate times. (JMD)

  13. Management of Abnormal Uterine Bleeding with Emphasis on Alternatives to Hysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Billow, Megan R; El-Nashar, Sherif A

    2016-09-01

    Abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) is a common problem that negatively impacts a woman's health-related quality of life and activity. Initial medical treatment includes hormonal and nonhormonal medications. If bleeding persists and no structural abnormalities are present, a repeat trial of medical therapy, a levonorgestrel intrauterine system, or an endometrial ablation can be used dependent on future fertility wishes. The levonorgestrel intrauterine system and endometrial ablation are effective, less invasive, and safe alternatives to a hysterectomy in women with AUB. A hysterectomy is the definitive treatment of AUB irrespective of the suspected cause when alternative treatments fail. Future studies should focus on detection of predictors for treatment outcomes. PMID:27521876

  14. [Life threatening postpartal haemorrhage after rupture of the vagina, uterine cervix, caesarean section or hysterectomy].

    PubMed

    Kozovski, I; Radoinova, D

    2010-01-01

    The authors discuss 10 cases--seven after vaginal and cervical rupture, 2 after Caesarean section and 1 after hysterectomy. Six of them died--5 after rupture of the vagina and cervix and one after Caesarean section. The lethal issue was avoidable in all cases because it was a result of untimely done or not done at all hysterectomy and other interventions, e.g., ligation of the hypogastric arteries, as well as of faulty surgical performance. Basic principles of surgical behavior in such cases are postulated.

  15. [VAGINAL LEIOMYOMA AFTER TOTAL ABDOMINAL HYSTERECTOMY--CLINICAL CASE AND REVIEW OF LITERATURE].

    PubMed

    Stankova, T; Ganovska, A; Kovachev, S

    2015-01-01

    Vaginal myomas are rare benign, mesenchyme, monoclonal tumors. They originate from smooth muscle cells and have a diverse and non-specific clinical feature. They are normally presented as single solid nodules localized in anterior vaginal wall in women between the ages of 35-50 years. Often times they are secondary originating from a cervical or vaginal lesion in woman who had undergone a hysterectomy on account of a myoma. We present a rare case of vaginal myoma localized in the posterior vaginal wall in a patient, who had undergone a total hysterectomy 19 years ago on account of a myoma. PMID:26817262

  16. Questioning the indicators of need for obstetric care.

    PubMed Central

    Ronsmans, Carine; Campbell, Oona Meave Renee; McDermott, Jeanne; Koblinsky, Marge

    2002-01-01

    The difficulties in measuring maternal mortality have led to a shift in emphasis from indicators of health to indicators of use of health care services. Furthermore, the recognition that some women need specialist obstetric care to prevent maternal death has led to the search for indicators measuring the met need for obstetric care. Although intuitively appealing, the conceptualization and definition of the need for obstetric care is far from straightforward, and there is relatively little experience so far in the use and interpretation of indicators of service use or need for obstetric care. In this paper we review indicators of service use and need for obstetric care, and briefly discuss data collection issues. PMID:12075369

  17. Obstetrics anyone? How family medicine residents' interests changed.

    PubMed Central

    Ruderman, J.; Holzapfel, S. G.; Carroll, J. C.; Cummings, S.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine family medicine residents' attitudes and plans about practising obstetrics when they enter and when they graduate from their residency programs. DESIGN: Residents in each of 4 consecutive years, starting July 1991, were surveyed by questionnaire when they entered the program and again when they graduated (ending in June 1996). Only paired questionnaires were used for analysis. SETTING: Family medicine residency programs at the University of Toronto in Ontario. PARTICIPANTS: Of 358 family medicine residents who completed the University of Toronto program, 215 (60%) completed questionnaires at entry and exit. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Changes in attitudes and plans during the residency program as ascertained from responses to entry and exit questionnaires. RESULTS: Analysis was based on 215 paired questionnaires. Women residents had more interest in obstetric practice at entry: 58% of women, but only 31% of men were interested. At graduation, fewer women (49%) and men (22%) were interested in practising obstetrics. The intent to undertake rural practice was strongly associated with the intent to practise obstetrics. By graduation, residents perceived lifestyle factors and compensation as very important negative factors in relation to obstetric practice. Initial interest and the eventual decision to practise obstetrics were strongly associated. CONCLUSIONS: Intent to practise obstetrics after graduation was most closely linked to being a woman, intending to practise in a rural area, and having an interest in obstetrics prior to residency. Building on the interest in obstetrics that residents already have could be a better strategy for producing more physicians willing to practise obstetrics than trying to change the minds of those uninterested in such practice. PMID:10099803

  18. Obstetric and gynaecological profile in patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Skopouli, F N; Papanikolaou, S; Malamou-Mitsi, V; Papanikolaou, N; Moutsopoulos, H M

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To describe the effects of Sjögren's syndrome (SS) on the fertility, parity and sexual activity as well as investigating the aetiopathology of dyspareunia in female patients. METHODS--Fifty one female patients with primary SS (pSS) and 57 healthy controls were interviewed concerning their past gynaecological, obstetric and sexual history and underwent a complete gynaecological examination. Punch biopsy of the vagina was performed in six patients and one healthy individual. In addition, the vaginal tissue was evaluated following hysterectomy in two patients with pSS. RESULTS--No differences were observed in fertility, parity or reproductive success rate between patients and controls. Atrophy of the external genitalia and production of cervical mucus in both patients and controls correlated with age and menopause, but not with other clinical or serological pSS manifestations. Dyspareunia was observed in 40% of the patients during the premenopause period compared with 3% observed in controls. Half of the patients, however, had an obvious aetiology for dyspareunia (trauma or inflammation) not related to pSS. The histological picture of the patients' vaginal tissue revealed perivascular infiltration. Finally, pSS patients appeared to have a similar intercourse frequency with the controls. However, unlike that observed in controls, the intercourse frequency did not diminish with age nor with the presence of dyspareunia. CONCLUSION--The fertility, parity and sexual activity of pSS patients does not appear to differ from that of the healthy population. Dyspareunia is a frequent symptom in these patients and local perivascular in these patients and local perivascular inflammation may contribute to the expression of this manifestation. Images PMID:7979594

  19. Emergency time: caring in Congo.

    PubMed

    Reading, Claire

    2016-01-01

    Midwifery practice in rural central Africa is full of joys (an abundance of twins, births by candlelight and resilience and stoicism that would leave even the very experienced birth practitioner speechless), but also a lot of challenges (every obstetric emergency in your wildest nightmares and worse) that are compounded by a lack of access to a skilled birth attendant. Women here have a strong culture of traditional practices and remedies, and hospital is often not the first port of call. Caring for women who cannot, themselves, consent to emergency life-saving caesarean sections, is a cultural aspect that we accept and respect as medical professionals working in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). In a busy maternity ward in a low-resource setting, in a hospital supported by emergency humanitarian medical organisation Médecins sans Frontières (MSF), just how are obstetric emergencies managed--and are the outcomes what you would expect? PMID:26975127

  20. Contracting for Trust in Family Practice Obstetrics

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Michael

    1983-01-01

    A case is presented, illustrating a problem faced by family physicians who practice obstetrics; women who present with lists of inflexible requirements for labor and delivery may be attempting to control a situation in which they feel a great deal of fear, and little trust for the physician. The physician who tries to deal with every item on the list, rather than to explore the meaning of the total presentation, risks establishing a contract that cannot be met—and attracting more demanding patients. It is better to offer to discuss the patient's fear and distrust; this is described as `contracting for trust', and is a way to promote patient and doctor flexibility. PMID:21283484

  1. [Obstetrical handbook in comic strip form].

    PubMed

    1998-04-01

    An obstetric handbook was created in comic strip form in cooperation with the Ministry of Health in the region of Segou, Mali, for training of traditional midwives living far from community health centers. The drawings illustrate pregnancies at risk that the midwife should be able to identify in order to advise women to stay near the health facility before onset of labor. Drawings indicate pregnancies that are at risk because of the following: small stature, limping as a result of polio or sciatic paralysis, high parity, prior cesarean delivery, heart disease, overly large uterus, or prior stillbirth. Serious complications requiring referral to a health service are also illustrated and include severe anemia, genital bleeding, and signs of toxemia and edema. The midwife should accompany the woman during transport.

  2. Obstetric admissions to ICUs in Finland: A multicentre study.

    PubMed

    Seppänen, Pia; Sund, Reijo; Roos, Mervi; Unkila, Riitta; Meriläinen, Merja; Helminen, Mika; Ala-Kokko, Tero; Suominen, Tarja

    2016-08-01

    In this study, the objective was to describe and analyse reasons for obstetric admissions to the ICU, severity of illness, level and types of interventions, adverse events and patient outcomes. In a retrospective database study, we identified 291 obstetric patients during pregnancy and puerperium from four Finnish university hospitals. Most were admitted in the post-partum period and hypertensive disorders were the main indications for admissions, followed by obstetric haemorrhage. The median length of stay was 21hours. The most common intervention was blood transfusion and mechanical ventilation was required in nearly one fifth of the patients. Three patients had a prolonged stay and nine had re-admissions. One maternal death was recorded. This study found that severity of illness and organ failure scores describe the obstetric patient as having a good probability of recovery and a short length of stay. However, the obstetric patients reason for admission and their type of delivery were associated with both the severity of illness scores and level of intervention required. Those admitted for non-obstetric reasons and having had a vaginal delivery demonstrated higher severity of illness scores, organ failure scores, and levels of intervention when compared to those admitted for obstetric reasons or those who had delivered by caesarean section. In conclusion, care of these patients can be improved by understanding the severity of illness scores, common ICU interventions and patient outcomes.

  3. Obstetric admissions to ICUs in Finland: A multicentre study.

    PubMed

    Seppänen, Pia; Sund, Reijo; Roos, Mervi; Unkila, Riitta; Meriläinen, Merja; Helminen, Mika; Ala-Kokko, Tero; Suominen, Tarja

    2016-08-01

    In this study, the objective was to describe and analyse reasons for obstetric admissions to the ICU, severity of illness, level and types of interventions, adverse events and patient outcomes. In a retrospective database study, we identified 291 obstetric patients during pregnancy and puerperium from four Finnish university hospitals. Most were admitted in the post-partum period and hypertensive disorders were the main indications for admissions, followed by obstetric haemorrhage. The median length of stay was 21hours. The most common intervention was blood transfusion and mechanical ventilation was required in nearly one fifth of the patients. Three patients had a prolonged stay and nine had re-admissions. One maternal death was recorded. This study found that severity of illness and organ failure scores describe the obstetric patient as having a good probability of recovery and a short length of stay. However, the obstetric patients reason for admission and their type of delivery were associated with both the severity of illness scores and level of intervention required. Those admitted for non-obstetric reasons and having had a vaginal delivery demonstrated higher severity of illness scores, organ failure scores, and levels of intervention when compared to those admitted for obstetric reasons or those who had delivered by caesarean section. In conclusion, care of these patients can be improved by understanding the severity of illness scores, common ICU interventions and patient outcomes. PMID:27209560

  4. [Laparoscopic Galvin-TeLinde hysterectomy for treatment of a microinvasive cervical carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Skret, A; Obrzut, B; Chruściel, A

    1999-01-01

    The original technique of laparoscopical Galvin-TeLinde-hysterectomy in patients with FIGO IA1 cervical cancer is presented. Differences between this technique and classical abdominal procedure are discussed. Based on the presented case the authors discuss the significance of laparoscopy in cervical cancer treatment. PMID:10408079

  5. Factors Related to Hysterectomy in Women with Physical and Mobility Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Lan-Ping; Hsieh, Molly; Chen, Si-Fan; Wu, Chia-Ling; Hsu, Shang-Wei; Lin, Jin-Ding

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims to identify self-report data for hysterectomy prevalence and to explore its correlated factors among women with physical and mobility disabilities in Taiwan. This paper was part of a larger study, "Survey on Preventive Health Utilizations of People with Physical and Mobility Disability in Taiwan," which is a cross-sectional survey…

  6. The information requirements and self-perceptions of Turkish women undergoing hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Gercek, Emine; Dal, Nursel Alp; Dag, Hande; Senveli, Seyran

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the affects, information requirements and self-perceptions of Turkish women undergoing hysterectomy. Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted on 37 Turkish women undergoing hysterectomy and followed in a gynecology unit of a state hospital in Canakkale, Turkey, between February and August 2012. Data were collected before discharge with a questionnaire composed of 32 questions. Percentage distributions and Chi-square test were used in the evaluation of the data. Results: There was a significant relationship between fear of anesthesia and number of pregnancies (p=0.007) and between death during surgery and number of pregnancies in the preoperative period (p=0.027). The relationship between knowing type of surgery and knowing when sutures would be removed was also significant in post-operative period (p=0.045). In addition, there was a significant relationship between women’s living only with their husbands and worrying about not having children anymore (p=0.032). Conclusion: The women’s information needs were high and women’s self-perceptions had been affected negatively after hysterectomy. It is recommended that nurses, primarily health professionals should have adequate knowledge on comprehensive care and psychosocial support after hysterectomy. PMID:27022368

  7. Does prolapse equal hysterectomy? The role of uterine conservation in women with uterovaginal prolapse.

    PubMed

    Ridgeway, Beri M

    2015-12-01

    Hysterectomy has historically been a mainstay in the surgical treatment of uterovaginal prolapse, even in cases in which the removal of the uterus is not indicated. However, uterine-sparing procedures have a long history and are now becoming more popular. Whereas research on these operations is underway, hysteropexy for the treatment of prolapse is not as well studied as hysterectomy-based repairs. Compared with hysterectomy and prolapse repair, hysteropexy is associated with a shorter operative time, less blood loss, and a faster return to work. Other advantages include maintenance of fertility, natural timing of menopause, and patient preference. Disadvantages include the lack of long-term prolapse repair outcomes and the need to continue surveillance for gynecological cancers. Although the rate of unanticipated abnormal pathology in this population is low, women who have uterine abnormalities or postmenopausal bleeding are not good candidates for uterine-sparing procedures. The most studied approaches to hysteropexy are the vaginal sacrospinous ligament hysteropexy and the abdominal sacrohysteropexy, which have similar objective and subjective prolapse outcomes compared with hysterectomy and apical suspension. Pregnancy and delivery have been documented after vaginal and abdominal hysteropexy approaches, although very little is known about outcomes following parturition. Uterine-sparing procedures require more research but remain an acceptable option for most patients with uterovaginal prolapse after a balanced and unbiased discussion reviewing the advantages and disadvantages of this approach.

  8. Hysterectomies in one Canadian Province: a new look at risks and benefits.

    PubMed Central

    Roos, N P

    1984-01-01

    This paper assesses the risks and benefits associated with hysterectomy by comparing the age-adjusted health care usage patterns of all women receiving hysterectomy in the Province of Manitoba in 1974 during the two years before and the two years after surgery with those of women undergoing cholecystectomy, and with those of an age and sex matched population sample. Less than half of the women have dilation and curettage of the uterus prior to hysterectomy, despite the fact that menstrual disorders are the most frequent problem bringing women to the physician's office. Despite a low mortality rate, there is a significant risk (40 per 1,000 cases) of complications requiring hospital readmission during the two years after hysterectomy and associated repair procedures. Although women visit their physician less frequently with gynecologic problems after surgery, they visit more frequently for psychological problems, urinary tract infections, and menopausal symptoms. Both before and after surgery women visit the physicians more frequently than do the age-matched comparison groups. PMID:6689840

  9. Comparison of vaginal and abdominal hysterectomy:A prospective non-randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bing; Ren, Dong-Ping; Li, Jing-Xuan; Li, Chun-Dong

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To compare outcomes of vaginal and abdominal hysterectomy procedures in women with benign gynaecological diseases. Methods: This was a prospective study of outcomes of consecutive patients who underwent total vaginal hysterectomy (VH) or abdominal hysterectomy (AH) for benign gynaecological diseases. Patient characteristics before, during, and after the operations were reviewed. Patients were followed up for three months to evaluate postoperative complications. Results: This study included a total of 313 patients. 143 patients underwent AH and 170 patients underwent VH. Baseline characteristics were similar between the two groups. There were no intraoperative complications in either group. Operation time, intraoperative blood loss, first postoperative flatus time, time to out-of-bed activity, mean maximum postoperative body temperature, and duration of fever were all significantly shorter and less severe in the VH group compared with the AH group. In addition, vaginal length in the VH group was significantly shorter than in the AH group. Conclusions: Vaginal hysterectomy has advantages over AH in the treatment of benign gynaecological diseases, providing greater efficacy and safety with minimal invasiveness. PMID:25097536

  10. Perimenopausal invasive hyadatidiform mole treated by total abdominal hysterectomy followed by chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Nakashima, Ayaka; Miyoshi, Ai; Miyatake, Takashi; Kazuhide, Ogita; Takeshi, Yokoi

    2016-01-01

    Gestational trophoblastic neoplasias (GTNs) are rare tumors that constitute <1% of all gynecological malignancies. GTNs in postmenopausal women are rare and usually malignant. We present a rare case of an invasive mole of the uterus with metastasis to the right ovary and labium minus treated by total abdominal hysterectomy followed by chemotherapy. PMID:27651108

  11. Perimenopausal invasive hyadatidiform mole treated by total abdominal hysterectomy followed by chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Ayaka; Miyoshi, Ai; Miyatake, Takashi; Kazuhide, Ogita; Takeshi, Yokoi

    2016-01-01

    Gestational trophoblastic neoplasias (GTNs) are rare tumors that constitute <1% of all gynecological malignancies. GTNs in postmenopausal women are rare and usually malignant. We present a rare case of an invasive mole of the uterus with metastasis to the right ovary and labium minus treated by total abdominal hysterectomy followed by chemotherapy. PMID:27651108

  12. Perimenopausal invasive hyadatidiform mole treated by total abdominal hysterectomy followed by chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Nakashima, Ayaka; Miyoshi, Ai; Miyatake, Takashi; Kazuhide, Ogita; Takeshi, Yokoi

    2016-01-01

    Gestational trophoblastic neoplasias (GTNs) are rare tumors that constitute <1% of all gynecological malignancies. GTNs in postmenopausal women are rare and usually malignant. We present a rare case of an invasive mole of the uterus with metastasis to the right ovary and labium minus treated by total abdominal hysterectomy followed by chemotherapy.

  13. [The capacities of ultrasound study and magnetic resonance imaging of small pelvic masses after hysterectomy].

    PubMed

    Boldyreva, O G; Briukhanov, A V

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to develop the ultrasound study (USS) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) semiotics of small pelvic masses after hysterectomy, to comprehensively use USS and MRI for the diagnosis of these masses, and to define indications for MRI. One hundred and seventy-five female patients with small pelvic masses after hysterectomy were examined. For the specification of the pattern of small pelvic masses and their differential diagnosis, USS and MRI were carried out in 175 and 72 patients, respectively. Four groups of the masses were identified; of them there were tumor-like masses of the uterine appendages in 67 (38.2%) patients, ovarian tumors in 31 (17.7%), other additional masses of the small pelvis in 27 (15.4%), and a mixed variant of its masses in 50 (28.5%). The findings suggest that it is reasonable to concurrently use USS and MRI in the diagnosis of small pelvic masses following hysterectomy for the specification of their pattern and their differential diagnosis. The benefit of MRI is that information images of the basic structures of the small pelvis can be obtained in patients with a marked commissural process after hysterectomy in the absence of limitations in large mass sizes. Practical guidelines were proposed to comprehensively use USS and MRI for the diagnosis of small pelvic pathology.

  14. Use of Monsel’s Solution to Treat Obstetrical Hemorrhage: A Review and Comparison to Other Topical Hemostatic Agents

    PubMed Central

    MILLER, Devin T.; ROQUE, Dana M.; SANTIN, Alessandro D.

    2014-01-01

    Peripartum hemorrhage accounts for 8% of maternal deaths in the United States, and nearly 27% worldwide. A growing need exists for tactics to spare morbidity given a rise of abnormal placentation that contributes to excessive blood loss at the time of delivery. Approaches such as compression sutures, balloon tamponade, and pelvic artery embolization are not without side effects and potential implications for future fertility. The use of topical hemostatic agents has become widespread in gynecologic and obstetric surgery despite a paucity of distinct studies in the field, and may allow providers to increasingly avoid cesarean hysterectomy. A variety of topical hemostatic agents exist along a wide cost continuum, each characterized by specific efficacy, advantages, drawbacks, and often gaps in long-term data to support safety and impact on future fertility. Herein, we comprehensively review these agents and illustrate a non-traditional use of Monsel’s solution applied directly to the placental bed in a case of focal placenta accreta. This ultimately contributed to successful uterine preservation with no known adverse sequelae. Monsel’s solution may have a role in establishing hemostasis in the setting of abnormal placentation, and may be a particularly attractive alternative in resource-poor nations. PMID:25577672

  15. A systematic review and cost analysis of robot-assisted hysterectomy in malignant and benign conditions.

    PubMed

    Tapper, Anna-Maija; Hannola, Mikko; Zeitlin, Rainer; Isojärvi, Jaana; Sintonen, Harri; Ikonen, Tuija S

    2014-06-01

    In order to assess the effectiveness and costs of robot-assisted hysterectomy compared with conventional techniques we reviewed the literature separately for benign and malignant conditions, and conducted a cost analysis for different techniques of hysterectomy from a hospital economic database. Unlimited systematic literature search of Medline, Cochrane and CRD databases produced only two randomized trials, both for benign conditions. For the outcome assessment, data from two HTA reports, one systematic review, and 16 original articles were extracted and analyzed. Furthermore, one cost modelling and 13 original cost studies were analyzed. In malignant conditions, less blood loss, fewer complications and a shorter hospital stay were considered as the main advantages of robot-assisted surgery, like any mini-invasive technique when compared to open surgery. There were no significant differences between the techniques regarding oncological outcomes. When compared to laparoscopic hysterectomy, the main benefit of robot-assistance was a shorter learning curve associated with fewer conversions but the length of robotic operation was often longer. In benign conditions, no clinically significant differences were reported and vaginal hysterectomy was considered the optimal choice when feasible. According to Finnish data, the costs of robot-assisted hysterectomies were 1.5-3 times higher than the costs of conventional techniques. In benign conditions the difference in cost was highest. Because of expensive disposable supplies, unit costs were high regardless of the annual number of robotic operations. Hence, in the current distribution of cost pattern, economical effectiveness cannot be markedly improved by increasing the volume of robotic surgery.

  16. Comparison of robotic surgery and laparoscopy to perform total hysterectomy with pelvic adhesions or large uterus

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Li-Hsuan; Chen, Ching-Hui; Tu, Pei-Chia; Chang, Ching-Wen; Yen, Yuan-Kuei; Liu, Wei-Min

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Currently, benefits of robotic surgery in patients with benign gynecological conditions remain unclear. In this study, we compared the surgical outcome of robotic and laparoscopic total hysterectomies and evaluated the feasibility of robotic surgery in cases with pelvic adhesions or large uterus. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 216 patients receiving total hysterectomy via robotic or laparoscopic approach were included in this study. Of all 216 patients, 88 underwent robotic total hysterectomy and 128 underwent laparoscopic total hysterectomy. All cases were grouped by surgical type, adhesion score, and uterine weight to evaluate the interaction or individual effect to the surgical outcomes. The perioperative parameters, including operation time, blood loss, postoperative pain score, time to full diet resumption, length of hospital stay, conversion rate, and surgery-related complications were compared between the groups. RESULTS: Operation time and blood loss were affected by both surgical type and adhesion score. For cases with severe adhesions (adhesion score greater than 4), robotic surgery was associated with a shortened operation time (113.9 ± 38.4 min versus 164.3 ± 81.4 min, P = 0.007) and reduced blood loss (187.5 ± 148.7 mL versus 385.7 ± 482.6, P=0.044) compared with laparoscopy. Moreover, robotic group showed a lower postoperative pain score than laparoscopic group, as the effect was found to be independent of adhesion score or uterine weight. The grade-II complication rate was also found to be lower in the robotic group. CONCLUSIONS: Comparing to laparoscopic approach, robotic surgery is a feasible and potential alternative for performing total hysterectomy with severe adhesions. PMID:25598606

  17. Development of a self-assessment tool for measuring competences of obstetric nurses in rooming-in wards in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ju; Ye, Wenqin; Fan, Fan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: To provide high-quality nursing care, a reliable and feasible competency assessment tool is critical. Although several questionnaire-based competency assessment tools have been reported, a tool specific for obstetric nurses in rooming-in wards is lacking. Therefore, the purpose of this research is to develop a competency assessment tool for obstetric rooming-in ward nurses. Methods: A literature review was conducted to create an individual intensive interview with 14 nurse managers, educators, and primary nurses in rooming-in wards. Expert reviews (n = 15) were conducted to identify emergent themes in a Delphi fashion. A competency assessment questionnaire was then developed and tested with 246 rooming-in ward nurses in local hospitals. Results: We constructed a three-factor linear model for obstetric rooming-in nurse competency assessment. Further refinement resulted in a self-assessment questionnaire containing three first-tier, 12 second-tier, and 43 third-tier items for easy implementation. The questionnaire was reliable, contained satisfactory content, and had construct validity. Discussion: Our competency assessment tool provides a systematic, easy, and operational subjective evaluation model for nursing managers and administrators to evaluate obstetric rooming-in ward primary nurses. The application of this tool will facilitate various human resources functions, such as nurse training/education effect evaluation, and will eventually promote high-quality nursing care delivery. PMID:26770468

  18. [110 years--University Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital "Maichin dom"].

    PubMed

    Zlatkov, V

    2014-01-01

    The first specialized Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital in Bulgaria was founded based on the idea of Queen Maria Luisa (1883). Construction began in 1896 and the official opening of the hospital took place on November 19, 1903. What is unique about the University Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital "Maichin dom" is above all the fact that the Bulgarian school of obstetrics and gynecology was founded within its institution. Currently, the hospital has nearly 400 beds and 600 employees who work at nine clinics and six laboratories, covering the entire spectrum of obstetric and gynecological activities. Its leading specialists still continue to embody the highest level of professionalism and dedication. The future development of the hospital is chiefly associated with the renovation of facilities, resources and equipment and with the enhancement of the professional competence of the staff and of the quality of hospital products to improve the health and satisfaction of the patients.

  19. Primary care obstetrics and perinatal health in The Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Hingstman, L

    1994-01-01

    The Netherlands is the only industrialized country in which a large percentage of obstetric care takes place at home. Almost 31% of all deliveries are home confinements under supervision of a midwife or a general practitioner, and 84% of all postnatal care is given at home by maternity care assistants. To gain a better understanding of this unique situation, the structure of Dutch obstetric care is examined with special attention to the four pillars on which the system rests: the special protected position of the midwife, a generally accepted screening system for high-risk pregnancies, a well-organized maternity home care system, and the sociocultural environment in The Netherlands in which pregnancy and childbirth are considered normal physiological processes. Description of the obstetric system shows a degree of competition between the obstetricians, midwives, and general practitioners, in which the general practitioner has lost a considerable part of the "obstetric market." PMID:7830147

  20. What Role Does Obstetrical Care Play in Childbirth?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications What role does obstetrical care play in childbirth? Skip sharing on ... has ruptured (the woman’s water breaks), but labor does not start within 24 to 48 hours When ...

  1. A case of uterine rupture diagnosed based on routine focused assessment with sonography for obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Tauchi, Maiko; Hasegawa, Junichi; Oba, Tomohiro; Arakaki, Tatsuya; Takita, Hiroko; Nakamura, Masamitsu; Sekizawa, Akihiko

    2016-01-01

    The patient was a 38-year-old primigravida woman with a previous history of myomectomy via laparotomy. At 30 weeks of gestation, she visited our emergency center because of sudden severe abdominal pain. Routine focused assessment with sonography for obstetrics (FASO) indicated no echo-free space at Douglas' pouch or between the spleen and kidney; however, echo-free spaces were visualized around the intestinal tract and at Morrison's pouch. Therefore, a diagnosis of hemoperitoneum due to uterine rupture was suspected, and emergency cesarean section was planned. During surgery, a small defect of the myometrium was found on the posterior to fundal uterine wall, with bleeding from the defect. We believe that routine FASO is useful for detecting emergency conditions, including uterine rupture during pregnancy and postpartum. When a pregnant woman complains of abdominal pain, an assessment with FASO is strongly recommended in the daily clinical setting.

  2. Abdominal emergencies during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Bouyou, J; Gaujoux, S; Marcellin, L; Leconte, M; Goffinet, F; Chapron, C; Dousset, B

    2015-12-01

    Abdominal emergencies during pregnancy (excluding obstetrical emergencies) occur in one out of 500-700 pregnancies and may involve gastrointestinal, gynecologic, urologic, vascular and traumatic etiologies; surgery is necessary in 0.2-2% of cases. Since these emergencies are relatively rare, patients should be referred to specialized centers where surgical, obstetrical and neonatal cares are available, particularly because surgical intervention increases the risk of premature labor. Clinical presentations may be atypical and misleading because of pregnancy-associated anatomical and physiologic alterations, which often result in diagnostic uncertainty and therapeutic delay with increased risks of maternal and infant morbidity. The most common abdominal emergencies are acute appendicitis (best treated by laparoscopic appendectomy), acute calculous cholecystitis (best treated by laparoscopic cholecystectomy from the first trimester through the early part of the third trimester) and intestinal obstruction (where medical treatment is the first-line approach, just as in the non-pregnant patient). Acute pancreatitis is rare, usually resulting from trans-ampullary passage of gallstones; it usually resolves with medical treatment but an elevated risk of recurrent episodes justifies laparoscopic cholecystectomy in the 2nd trimester and endoscopic sphincterotomy in the 3rd trimester. The aim of the present work is to review pregnancy-induced anatomical and physiological modifications, to describe the main abdominal emergencies during pregnancy, their specific features and their diagnostic and therapeutic management.

  3. The principles and practice of ultrasonography in obstetrics and gynecology

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, R.C.; James, A.E.

    1985-01-01

    This is the latest edition of a reference on diagnostic ultrasound in obstetrics and gynecology. Chapters have been added on infertility, legal aspects of ultrasound, and interventional techniques. Descriptions of instrumentation, physics and bioeffects, measurement data and normal anatomy in the fetus are given. There is a section on fetal anomalies and the investigation and management of various obstetrical problems, such as multiple pregnancy and hydatidiform mole. Coverage of gynecological ultrasound includes normal pelvic anatomy, pelvic masses, pelvic inflammatory disease, and breast evaluation.

  4. Evaluation of different approaches to obstetric care: Part 1.

    PubMed

    Chalmers, I; Lawson, J G; Turnbull, A C

    1976-12-01

    The obstetric management and results obtained by two obstetric teams working in the Cardiff Maternity Hospital over a five-year period are compared. One team had a more active approach to induction of labour and antepartum monitoring with urinary oestrogen assay and serial ultrasound cephalometry than the other. After controlling for differences in the attributes of the two groups of patients treated, it was not possible to show any striking advantage or disadvantage of the more active approach. PMID:1009031

  5. The Impact of the West Africa Ebola Outbreak on Obstetric Health Care in Sierra Leone

    PubMed Central

    Brolin Ribacke, Kim J.; van Duinen, Alex J.; Nordenstedt, Helena; Höijer, Jonas; Molnes, Ragnhild; Froseth, Torunn Wigum; Koroma, AP; Darj, Elisabeth; Bolkan, Håkon Angel; Ekström, AnnaMia

    2016-01-01

    Background As Sierra Leone celebrates the end of the Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) outbreak, we can begin to fully grasp its impact on already weak health systems. The EVD outbreak in West Africa forced many hospitals to close down or reduce their activity, either to prevent nosocomial transmission or because of staff shortages. The aim of this study is to assess the potential impact of EVD on nationwide access to obstetric care in Sierra Leone. Methods and Findings Community health officers collected weekly data between January 2014—May 2015 on in-hospital deliveries and caesarean sections (C-sections) from all open facilities (public, private for-profit and private non-profit sectors) offering emergency obstetrics in Sierra Leone. This was compared to official data of EVD cases per district. Logistic and Poisson regression analyses were used to compute risk and rate estimates. Nationwide, the number of in-hospital deliveries and C-sections decreased by over 20% during the EVD outbreak. The decline occurred early on in the EVD outbreak and was mainly attributable to the closing of private not-for-profit hospitals rather than government facilities. Due to difficulties in collecting data in the midst of an epidemic, limitations of this study include some missing data points. Conclusions Both the number of in-hospital deliveries and C-sections substantially declined shortly after the onset of the EVD outbreak. Since access to emergency obstetric care, like C-sections, is associated with decreased maternal mortality, many women are likely to have died due to the reduced access to appropriate care during childbirth. Future research on indirect health effects of health system breakdown should ideally be nationwide and continue also into the recovery phase. It is also important to understand the mechanisms behind the deterioration so that important health services can be reestablished. PMID:26910462

  6. Integrated interventions for improving negative emotions and stress reactions of young women receiving total hysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fen; Li, Chun-Bo; Li, Shenghua; Li, Quan

    2014-01-01

    50% of women had obvious abnormal emotions before hysterectomy and hysterectomy can cause strong mental stress reaction. This study was to investigate the impact of psychological health education based integrated interventions on the preoperative negative emotions and stress of patients younger than 45 years receiving total hysterectomy. Forty patients undergoing total hysterectomy were randomly divided into psychological intervention (PI) group and control group (n=20 per group). Patients in PI received peri-operative psychological intervention (supportive psychotherapy, health education, individual depth psychotherapy, family and society supportive care, education on anesthesia and surgery etc.); Interventions were not used in control group. Hamilton Anxiety Scale and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale were used to evaluate patients in two groups on admission (T1) and before surgery (T2; after interventions in PI group). Serum levels of cortisol and IL-6 were detected at T1, T2 and the second day after surgery (T3). Results showed that 1) Patients had obvious anxiety and depression symptoms before and after total hysterectomy. For patients in PI group, the Hamilton Anxiety Scale (HAMA) score decreased from 14.4±5.9 to 9.1±4.2 and the Hamilton Depressing Scale (HAMD) score from 17.8±3.5 to 9.4±6.8 after interventions; 2) In PI group, the serum cortisol was 13.4±3.9 μg/dl at T2 and 14.2±4.8 μg/dl at T3 which were significantly lower than that at T1 (16.6±4.0 μg/dl) and that in the control group at T2 (13.4±3.9/15.5±4.3 μg/dl, t=2.10, P<0.05). Thus, preoperative integrated intervention based on psychological health education can improve peri-operative negative emotions and psychological stress in young patients undergoing hysterectomy. PMID:24482729

  7. Validity of self-reported hysterectomy: a prospective cohort study within the UK Collaborative Trial of Ovarian Cancer Screening (UKCTOCS)

    PubMed Central

    Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Taylor, Henry; Kalsi, Jatinderpal; Ryan, Andy; Burnell, Matthew; Sharma, Aarti; Apostolidou, Sophia; Campbell, Stuart; Jacobs, Ian; Menon, Usha

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the validity of self-reported hysterectomy against the gold standard of uterine visualisation using pelvic ultrasound. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting UK Collaborative Trial of Ovarian Cancer Screening (UKCTOCS) based in 13 National Health Service (NHS) Trusts in England, Wales and Northern Ireland. Participants Between April 2001 and October 2005, 48 215 postmenopausal women aged 50–74 randomised to the ultrasound screening arm of UKCTOCS underwent the first (initial) scan on the trial. Interventions At recruitment, the women completed a recruitment questionnaire (RQ) which included previous hysterectomy. The sonographer asked each woman regarding previous hysterectomy (interview format, IF) prior to the scan. At the scan, in addition to ovarian morphology, endometrial thickness (ET)/endometrial abnormality were captured if the uterus was visualised at the scan. Outcome measures Self-reported hysterectomy at RQ or IF was compared to ultrasound data on ET/endometrial abnormality (as surrogate uterine visualisation markers) on the first (initial) scan. Results Of 48 215 women, 3 had congenital uterine agenesis and 218 inconclusive results. The uterus was visualised in 39 121 women. 8871 self-reported hysterectomy at RQ, 8641 at IF and 8487 at both. The uterus was visualised in 39 123, 39 353 and 38 969 women not self-reporting hysterectomy at RQ, IF or both. Validity, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of using RQ alone, IF or both RQ/IF were 99.6%, 98.9%, 99.7%, 98.9% and 99.7%; 98.9%, 98.4%, 99.1%, 95.9% and 99.7%; 99.8%, 99.6%, 99.9%, 99.4% and 99.9%, respectively. Conclusions Self-reported hysterectomy is a highly accurate and valid source for studying long-term associations of hysterectomy with disease onset. Trial registration International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial Number (ISRCTN)—22488978 PMID:24589827

  8. Comparison of robot-assisted total laparoscopic hysterectomy and total abdominal hysterectomy for treatment of endometrial cancer in obese and morbidly obese patients.

    PubMed

    Nevadunsky, N; Clark, R; Ghosh, S; Muto, M; Berkowitz, R; Vitonis, A; Feltmate, C

    2010-12-01

    The objective of our study was to compare clinical and pathologic outcomes of robot-assisted and open abdominal techniques for treatment of uterine cancer in obese patients. Institutional review board approval was obtained. Patient demographic data, pathological data, and surgical data were collected by retrospective chart review. Data were analyzed using SAS statistical software. One-hundred and eighty-nine consecutive cases of suspected uterine cancer were identified from October 2003 until January 2009. Of these, 116 patients (61%) had a body mass index (BMI) over 30. There were 66 completed robot-assisted hysterectomies (RAHs), 43 total abdominal hysterectomies (TAHs), and seven patients that were converted from RAH to open abdominal hysterectomy. There were no significant differences in preoperative patient demographics, including body mass index (BMI), medical co-morbidities, or preoperative cytology, except for parity. There were no differences in postoperative grade, stage, lymph vascular space invasion, positive pelvic washings, mean number of pelvic lymph nodes, or proportion of patients undergoing pelvic lymphadenectomy. Length of stay and estimated blood loss were lower for the robotic technique; RAHs had a significantly longer operative time, however. Postoperative blood transfusions and wound infections were more frequent in the TAH group. Of the RAH group there were seven conversions to TAH (10%). Differences in surgical times with and without lymphadenectomy were least in patients in the largest BMI category of >50. Length of time required for RAH was significantly longer then TAH in obese and morbidly obese patients, however benefits to patients of a minimally invasive approach included reduced incidence of wound infections, reduced transfusion rates, reduced blood loss, and shortened length of stay. These data also suggest the greatest advantage of robotic technology over laparotomy in patients with BMI over 50. PMID:27627953

  9. Obstetrical staff nurses experiences of clinical learning.

    PubMed

    Veltri, Linda M

    2015-01-01

    The clinical learning experience is used in nursing programs of study worldwide to prepare nurses for professional practice. This study's purpose was to use Naturalistic Inquiry to understand the experiences of staff nurses in an obstetrical unit with undergraduate nursing students present for clinical learning. A convenience sample of 12 staff nurses, employed on a Family Birth Center, participated in semi-structured interviews. The constant comparative method as modified by Lincoln and Guba was used to analyze data. Five themes related to staff nurses experiences of clinical learning were identified: Giving and Receiving; Advancing Professionally and Personally; Balancing Act; Getting to Know and Working with You; and Past and Present. This research highlights staff nurses' experiences of clinical learning in undergraduate nursing education. Staff nurses exert a powerful, long lasting influence on students. A need exists to prepare and judiciously select nurses to work with students. Clinical agencies and universities can take joint responsibility providing tangible incentives, financial compensation, and recognition to all nurses working with nursing students.

  10. Obstetric Pharmacokinetic Dosing Studies are Urgently Needed

    PubMed Central

    McCormack, Shelley A.; Best, Brookie M.

    2014-01-01

    Use of pharmacotherapy during pregnancy is common and increasing. Physiologic changes during pregnancy may significantly alter the overall systemic drug exposure, necessitating dose changes. A search of PubMed for pharmacokinetic clinical trials showed 494 publications during pregnancy out of 35,921 total pharmacokinetic published studies (1.29%), from the late 1960s through August 31, 2013. Closer examination of pharmacokinetic studies in pregnant women published since 2008 (81 studies) revealed that about a third of the trials were for treatment of acute labor and delivery issues, a third included studies of infectious disease treatment during pregnancy, and the remaining third were for varied ante-partum indications. Approximately, two-thirds of these recent studies were primarily funded by government agencies worldwide, one-quarter were supported by private non-profit foundations or combinations of government and private funding, and slightly <10% were supported by pharmaceutical industry. As highlighted in this review, vast gaps exist in pharmacology information and evidence for appropriate dosing of medications in pregnant women. This lack of knowledge and understanding of drug disposition throughout pregnancy place both the mother and the fetus at risk for avoidable therapeutic misadventures – suboptimal efficacy or excess toxicity – with medication use in pregnancy. Increased efforts to perform and support obstetric dosing and pharmacokinetic studies are greatly needed. PMID:24575394

  11. [Gynecology and obstetrics in Ancient Rome].

    PubMed

    Dumont, M

    1992-10-01

    Gods and Goddesses were invoked by the Romans for the termination of a good delivery. Diana, Juno, Lucina and Cybele were the preferred ones. Sterility was sometimes treated by the whip of the Lupercali of ministers of Pan. The first doctors in Rome were coming from Greece. Celsus, Pliny the Elder were encyclopedists, Rufus an anatomist, Dioscorides a pharmacologist. Archigenes, Aretaeus and Antyllus surgeons. Soranus from Ephesus, was the first to recommend podalic version. His works was a long time buried in a profound oblivion and discovered by scholars during the nineteenth century. Galen was looked as the most famous medical man after Hippocrates. During the Roman Empire of Occident (Byzantine Empire), Oribasius, Aurelianus Caelius, Moschion and above all Aetius and Paul of Aegina wrote many works which were many times plagiarized. Roman laws concerning public health were severe. Midwives took an important action in the care of pregnant women. Roman poets as Plautus, Terence, Lucilius, Catullus, Virgil, Tibullus, Ovid and Martial were many times concerned in their writings with gynecologic or obstetric subjects. Children were easily forsaken. Three Emperors, Trajan, Marcus-Aurelius and Alexander Severius, a writer, Aulu-Gelles, and a rhetor, Quintilian, took protection of them.

  12. Obstetric management of adolescents with bleeding disorders.

    PubMed

    James, Andra H

    2010-12-01

    Adolescents with bleeding disorders who become pregnant must contend with the dual challenges of their bleeding disorder and their pregnancy. Adolescents are more likely to terminate a pregnancy than adult women, and when they do carry a pregnancy, they are more likely to deliver prematurely. Otherwise, they are at risk for the same complications that adult women with bleeding disorders experience, particularly bleeding complications postpartum. Since one half to two thirds of adolescent pregnancies are unplanned, issues related to reproduction should be addressed during routine visits with the pediatrician, hematologist or gynecologist. Girls who are at risk of being carriers for hemophilia A and B, severe von Willebrand disease, and other severe bleeding disorders should have their bleeding disorder status determined before they become pregnant. During pregnancy, a plan should be established to ensure that both mother and fetus deliver safely. Young women at risk for severe bleeding or at risk of having a severely affected infant should be referred for prenatal care and delivery to a center where, in addition to specialists in high-risk obstetrics, there is a hemophilia treatment center or a hematologist with expertise in hemostasis. Prior to delivery or any invasive procedures, young women at risk for severe bleeding should receive prophylaxis. Since administration of desmopressin may result in hyponatremia, whenever available, virally inactivated or recombinant clotting factor concentrates should be used for replacement as opposed to fresh frozen plasma or cryoprecipitate.

  13. Nerve injuries due to obstetric trauma.

    PubMed

    Bhat, V; Ravikumara; Oumachigui, A

    1995-01-01

    The incidence of nerve injuries among 32,637 deliveries over a period of ten years was 1.81/1000. Brachial plexus injury (1/1000) and facial nerve injury (0.74/1000) accounted for 98% of nerve injuries. Both the right and left side were involved equally. Bilateral nerve injury was not seen. Lack of antenatal care, macrosomia, abnormal presentations, and operative vaginal deliveries significantly increased the risk of nerve injuries. These babies had significantly higher incidence of meconium stained liquor and intrapartum asphyxia. Parity of the mother, gestational age and sex of the baby did not have significant role in the causation of nerve injuries. Injuries to brachial plexus and facial nerve were seen even in babies born by caesarean section, when it was performed for obstructed labour caused by cephalo-pelvic disproportion and abnormal presentations. Three babies with injuries expired and forty-three could be followed up for varying periods. None of the babies had residual defects. Detection of cephalopelvic disproportion and abnormal lie in the third trimester and their appropriate management would decrease the incidence of obstetric palsies to a significant extent. PMID:10829869

  14. [The expertise evaluation of organization of rendering of acute, emergency and urgent medical care in rural regions of Novosibirsk oblast'].

    PubMed

    Ivaninskiĭ, O I; Sharapov, I V; Sadovoĭ, M A

    2013-01-01

    The most problematic spheres in the resource support of emergency medical care to rural residents are the completeness of staff of physicians in rural medical surgeries, community hospitals and departments of emergency medical care in central district hospitals. The provision of feldsher obstetrics posts with sanitary motor transport and medical equipment is yet another problematic sphere. The main troubles during provision of emergency medical care at feldsher obstetrics posts are related to surgery treatment. The organization of emergency and urgent medical care suffers of many unresolved problems related to informational program support at feldsher obstetrics posts, polyclinics of central district hospitals.

  15. Sexuality and Body Image After Uterine Artery Embolization and Hysterectomy in the Treatment of Uterine Fibroids: A Randomized Comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Hehenkamp, Wouter J. K. Volkers, Nicole A.; Bartholomeus, Wouter; Blok, Sjoerd de; Birnie, Erwin; Reekers, Jim A.; Ankum, Willem M.

    2007-09-15

    In this paper the effect of uterine artery embolization (UAE) on sexual functioning and body image is investigated in a randomized comparison to hysterectomy for symptomatic uterine fibroids. The EMbolization versus hysterectoMY (EMMY) trial is a randomized controlled study, conducted at 28 Dutch hospitals. Patients were allocated hysterectomy (n = 89) or UAE (n 88). Two validated questionnaires (the Sexual Activity Questionnaire [SAQ] and the Body Image Scale [BIS]) were completed by all patients at baseline, 6 weeks, and 6, 12, 18, and 24 months after treatment. Repeated measurements on SAQ scores revealed no differences between the groups. There was a trend toward improved sexual function in both groups at 2 years, although this failed to reach statistical significance except for the dimensions discomfort and habit in the UAE arm. Overall quality of sexual life deteriorated in a minority of cases at all time points, with no significant differences between the groups (at 24 months: UAE, 29.3%, versus hysterectomy, 23.5%; p = 0.32). At 24 months the BIS score had improved in both groups compared to baseline, but the change was only significant in the UAE group (p = 0.009). In conclusion, at 24 months no differences in sexuality and body image were observed between the UAE and the hysterectomy group. On average, both after UAE and hysterectomy sexual functioning and body image scores improved, but significantly so only after UAE.

  16. Sexuality and Body Image After Uterine Artery Embolization and Hysterectomy in the Treatment of Uterine Fibroids: A Randomized Comparison

    PubMed Central

    Volkers, Nicole A.; Bartholomeus, Wouter; de Blok, Sjoerd; Birnie, Erwin; Reekers, Jim A.; Ankum, Willem M.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper the effect of uterine artery embolization (UAE) on sexual functioning and body image is investigated in a randomized comparison to hysterectomy for symptomatic uterine fibroids. The EMbolization versus hysterectoMY (EMMY) trial is a randomized controlled study, conducted at 28 Dutch hospitals. Patients were allocated hysterectomy (n = 89) or UAE (n = 88). Two validated questionnaires (the Sexual Activity Questionnaire [SAQ] and the Body Image Scale [BIS]) were completed by all patients at baseline, 6 weeks, and 6, 12, 18, and 24 months after treatment. Repeated measurements on SAQ scores revealed no differences between the groups. There was a trend toward improved sexual function in both groups at 2 years, although this failed to reach statistical significance except for the dimensions discomfort and habit in the UAE arm. Overall quality of sexual life deteriorated in a minority of cases at all time points, with no significant differences between the groups (at 24 months: UAE, 29.3%, versus hysterectomy, 23.5%; p = 0.32). At 24 months the BIS score had improved in both groups compared to baseline, but the change was only significant in the UAE group (p = 0.009). In conclusion, at 24 months no differences in sexuality and body image were observed between the UAE and the hysterectomy group. On average, both after UAE and hysterectomy sexual functioning and body image scores improved, but significantly so only after UAE. PMID:17671809

  17. Door to disposition times for obstetric triage visits: Is there a July phenomenon?

    PubMed

    Mehra, S; Gavard, J A; Gross, G; Myles, T; Nguyen, T; Amon, E

    2016-01-01

    The July phenomenon refers to a change in patient outcomes within teaching hospitals with the arrival of new and inexperienced house staff at the start of the academic year (July to June). In our obstetric triage unit we retrospectively evaluated the door to disposition time (DTDT) for 1817 patients who presented across July, December and May of academic years 2009-2010 and 2010-2011. DTDT was examined for three visit levels: non-urgent, urgent and emergent. No significant differences in disposition time were found for emergent visits. For urgent visits the median DTDT significantly decreased from 171 min in July to 155 min in December and 135 min in May (p < 0.001). Similarly for non-urgent visits, the median DTDT was greater during July than May (179 min vs. 133 min; p < 0.05). Electronic medical records (EMRs) were implemented in November 2010. Following the introduction of EMR shorter DTDT was seen in December 2010 versus December 2009 (median, 171 min vs. 150 min; p < 0.05), respectively. Our findings suggest a 'July Phenomenon' of greater disposition intervals for urgent and non-urgent obstetric triage visits across the academic year. Additionally the use of EMRs may facilitate patient flow through the OB triage unit. PMID:26368274

  18. Fiber Optical Improvements for a Device Used in Laparoscopic Hysterectomy Surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández Garcia, Ricardo; Vázquez Mercado, Liliana; García-Torales, G.; Flores, Jorge L.; Barcena-Soto, Maximiliano; Casillas Santana, Norberto; Casillas Santana, Juan Manuel

    2006-09-01

    Hysterectomy removes uterus from patients suffering different pathologies. One of the most common techniques for performing it is the laparoscopically-assisted vaginal hysterectomy (LAVH). In the final stage of the procedure, surgeons face the need to unambiguously identify the vaginal cuff before uterus removal. The aim of this research is to adapt a local source of illumination to a polymer cup-like device adapted to a stainless steel shaft that surgeons nowadays use to manipulate the uterus in LAVH. Our proposal consists in implementing a set of optical fiber illuminators along the border of the cup-like device to illuminate the exact vaginal cupola, using an external light source. We present experimental results concerning temperature increases in quasi adiabatic conditions in cow meat under different light intensity illumination.

  19. Laparoscopic subtotal hysterectomy due to giant uterine fibroids: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ruan, J Y; Chen, H Q; Gong, Y H; Shi, G; Wang, H

    2016-01-01

    The laparoscopic subtotal hysterectomy (LSH) was given to a patient whose uterus was about seven-month pregnanacy because of fibroids. The biggest problem was the operation space and visual field was too narrow. Different from the usual procedure we do, we morcellated the uterus at the beginning to expand the space. Loop ligature of the uterine isthmus was adopted to block uterine ateries before morcellating the uterus. After the adnexa exposed totally, we started to cut off the round ligaments, proper ligaments and fallopian tubes like usual. It was the first time we did LSH for so giant uterus in our hospital, although which was usually suitable for the uterus smaller than four-month pregnancy. But if the uterine ateries can be blocked effectively at the beginning, the uterus can be morcellated and the space will be enlarged. The laparoscopic subtotal hysterectomy will also be completed successfully. PMID:27048036

  20. Should we recommend hysterectomy more often to premenopausal and climacteric women?

    PubMed

    Qvigstad, Erik; Langebrekke, Anton

    2011-08-01

    In developed countries, women live on average over 30 years as postmenopausal. In the premenopausal and climacteric period, abnormal uterine bleeding and other symptoms may occur. In addition, endometrial cancer is the most common gynecological malignancy, and possible hormone replacement therapy is much more beneficial among women with prior hysterectomy. With this background and the recommended use of minimally invasive surgical techniques, we argue in favor of more liberal hysterectomy practice before and around the menopause. Many will disagree, because for many years we have argued to save the uterus, but considering pros and cons with the patient in focus, we discuss the topic and advertise for studies to support our view. PMID:21615359

  1. Acute Colonic Pseudo-Obstruction (Ogilvie's Syndrome) Following Total Laparoscopic Hysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Cebola, Monique; Eddy, Eliza; Davis, Suzanne; Chin-Lenn, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Rapid identification of acute colonic pseudo-obstruction (ACPO), or Ogilvie's syndrome, is paramount in the management of this condition, which, if unresolved, can progress to bowel ischemia and perforation with significant morbidity and mortality. We present the first case report, to our knowledge, of ACPO following total laparoscopic hysterectomy. We describe the presentation and management of ACPO in a patient who underwent uncomplicated total laparoscopic hysterectomy to treat menorrhagia and dysmenorrhea after declining conservative treatment. Following initial conservative management, the patient rapidly deteriorated and required laparotomy for clinically suspected cecal ischemia. Cecal resection, colonic decompression, and end ileostomy formation were performed. A brief review of the current literature is presented with respect to the case report.

  2. Acute Colonic Pseudo-Obstruction (Ogilvie's Syndrome) Following Total Laparoscopic Hysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Cebola, Monique; Eddy, Eliza; Davis, Suzanne; Chin-Lenn, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Rapid identification of acute colonic pseudo-obstruction (ACPO), or Ogilvie's syndrome, is paramount in the management of this condition, which, if unresolved, can progress to bowel ischemia and perforation with significant morbidity and mortality. We present the first case report, to our knowledge, of ACPO following total laparoscopic hysterectomy. We describe the presentation and management of ACPO in a patient who underwent uncomplicated total laparoscopic hysterectomy to treat menorrhagia and dysmenorrhea after declining conservative treatment. Following initial conservative management, the patient rapidly deteriorated and required laparotomy for clinically suspected cecal ischemia. Cecal resection, colonic decompression, and end ileostomy formation were performed. A brief review of the current literature is presented with respect to the case report. PMID:26164536

  3. Effects of inspired gas composition during anaesthesia for abdominal hysterectomy on postoperative lung volumes.

    PubMed

    Joyce, C J; Baker, A B

    1995-10-01

    We have studied 51 patients who were allocated randomly and prospectively to receive either 100% oxygen (n = 16), 70% nitrous oxide in oxygen (n = 18) or 30% oxygen in nitrogen (n = 17) as the inspired gas during anaesthesia for abdominal hysterectomy. Lung volumes were measured before and after surgery. TLC, VC, FVC and FEV1 but not RV or FRC were reduced after surgery. There were no significant differences between the three treatment groups in any of the lung volumes measured. We conclude that absorption atelectasis during anaesthesia is not the main cause of perioperative changes in lung volume after abdominal hysterectomy. Any effect of the inspired gas is likely to be of limited clinical significance. PMID:7488480

  4. Cutting inoperable bodies: particularizing rural sociality to normalize hysterectomies in Balochistan, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Towghi, Fouzieyha

    2012-01-01

    Drawing on 15 months of ethnographic research in Balochistan, Pakistan (2005 -2006), I explore Panjguri midwives' (dïnabogs, kawwās, or balloks) narrative links between routine injections of prostaglandins around childbirth and the increasing number of hysterectomies. These techno-medical interventions reflect the postcolonial biomedicalization of women's bodies and reproductive health care, and are reinforced by shifts in Pakistan's public health policy against maternal mortality in a context where about 90 percent of births occur outside of hospitals. Transnational campaigns against maternal mortality further biomedicalize women's lives. Interviews with doctors, midwives, and women, and analysis of women's experiences, illustrate the practical considerations that were used to normalize radical hysterectomies over less invasive procedures.

  5. Laparoscopic subtotal hysterectomy due to giant uterine fibroids: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ruan, J Y; Chen, H Q; Gong, Y H; Shi, G; Wang, H

    2016-01-01

    The laparoscopic subtotal hysterectomy (LSH) was given to a patient whose uterus was about seven-month pregnanacy because of fibroids. The biggest problem was the operation space and visual field was too narrow. Different from the usual procedure we do, we morcellated the uterus at the beginning to expand the space. Loop ligature of the uterine isthmus was adopted to block uterine ateries before morcellating the uterus. After the adnexa exposed totally, we started to cut off the round ligaments, proper ligaments and fallopian tubes like usual. It was the first time we did LSH for so giant uterus in our hospital, although which was usually suitable for the uterus smaller than four-month pregnancy. But if the uterine ateries can be blocked effectively at the beginning, the uterus can be morcellated and the space will be enlarged. The laparoscopic subtotal hysterectomy will also be completed successfully.

  6. Perioperative Management of Hysterectomy in a Patient with Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    K, Savitri.; S, Sreedevi

    2014-01-01

    Polycystic disease of the kidney, inherited as an autosomal dominant trait is characterised by progressive expansion of numerous fluid-filled cysts resulting in massive enlargement of the kidneys ultimately resulting in kidney failure. An understanding of alterations in the renal physiology due to hemodynamic changes is important for successful perioperative management. We report a successful perioperative management of a vaginal hysterectomy in a female patient with adult polycystic kidney disease. PMID:25177578

  7. Chronic plasma cell endometritis in hysterectomy specimens of HIV-infected women: a retrospective analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Kerr-Layton, J A; Stamm, C A; Peterson, L S; McGregor, J A

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Abnormal uterine bleeding is a common and troublesome problem in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected women. We sought to evaluate endometrial pathology among HIV-infected women requiring hysterectomy to explore if endometritis may be common among these patients. METHODS: We performed a retrospective analysis of uterine pathology specimens obtained from HIV-infected and control patients requiring hysterectomy in two urban hospitals between 1988 and 1997 matched for age, surgical indication, and history of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) use. Cases were evaluated for the presence of plasma cells and assigned a grade between 0 and 3. RESULTS: Indications included cervical dysplasia (4), carcinoma in situ (2), abnormal uterine bleeding (3), and adnexal mass (3). Some degree of abnormal uterine bleeding occurred in all cases. Plasma cell endometritis was twice as common in HIV-infected women compared to HIV-negative specimens (11/11 versus 11/22) (P < 0.05). Plasma cell endometritis was also of a higher grade in specimens from HIV-infected women than in controls (P = 0.001). CONCLUSION: Chronic endometritis was common and of a higher grade among HIV-infected women requiring hysterectomy in our series. Diagnosis and treatment of endometritis should be considered in HIV-infected women with uterine bleeding and/or tenderness. We speculate that antiretroviral and/or antimicrobial treatment for endometritis may effectively treat endometritis and eliminate the need for surgery in some HIV-infected women. We suggest that consideration and treatment of endometritis in HIV-1 infected women being evaluated for possible hysterectomy has the potential to reduce costs and morbidity for patients and providers who may be exposed during surgical procedures. PMID:9812252

  8. Tubal ligation, hysterectomy, unilateral oophorectomy, and risk of ovarian cancer in the Nurses’ Health Studies

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Megan S; Hankinson, Susan E; Tworoger, Shelley S

    2014-01-01

    Objective To prospectively examine if the association between tubal ligation, hysterectomy, unilateral oophorectomy, and ovarian cancer varied by patient, tumor, and surgical characteristics. Design Two prospective cohort studies (Nurses’ Health Study and NHSII). Setting Participants were identified from across the US and followed for up to 34 years. Patient(s) A cohort of 121,700 married US female nurses, aged 30 to 55 at baseline and another cohort of 116,430 US female nurses aged 25 to 42 at baseline. Intervention(s) We obtained data on gynecologic surgeries and ovarian cancer incidence through biennial questionnaires. We calculated hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals adjusted for known and suspected ovarian cancer risk factors. Main Outcome Measure(s) Confirmed incident epithelial ovarian cancer. Results Overall, tubal ligation was associated with a decreased risk of ovarian cancer HR: 0.76, 95%CI: 0.64–0.90). The inverse association was stronger for non-serous tumors (HR: 0.57, 95%CI: 0.40–0.82) and among women younger than 35 at surgery HR: 0.67, 95%CI: 0.49–0.90). Hysterectomy was associated with a decreased risk of ovarian cancer (HR: 0.80, 95%CI: 0.66–0.97) and was somewhat stronger for non-serous tumors (HR: 0.70, 95%CI: 0.49–1.02). Unilateral oophorectomy was associated with a 30% lower risk (HR: 0.70, 95%CI: 0.53–0.91), which did not differ by histologic subtype. Conclusions Our study provides further support that tubal ligation reduces the risk of ovarian cancer, particularly for non-serous tumors and when conducted prior to age 35. The inverse association with hysterectomy along with the stronger associations for non-serous tumors supports shared biologic mechanisms for tubal ligation and hysterectomy. PMID:24825424

  9. Robotic-assisted hysterectomy in a patient with a ventriculoperitoneal shunt.

    PubMed

    Bush, Stephen H; Greg Heywood, S; Calhoun, Byron C

    2011-12-01

    There are several articles in the literature reporting laparoscopic surgery in patients with ventriculoperitoneal shunts (VPSs). Although the majority of these conclude that a pneumoperitoneum in these patients is safe, there are other reports indicating possible complications of the insufflation. This is the first known report of a robotic-assisted hysterectomy performed on a patient with a VPS and the management of the shunt during the procedure. PMID:27628120

  10. Strategies to optimize the performance of Robotic-assisted ­laparoscopic hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Lambrou, N.; Diaz, R.E.; Hinoul, P.; Parris, D.; Shoemaker, K.; Yoo, A.; Schwiers, M.

    2014-01-01

    A hybrid technique of robot-assisted, laparoscopic hysterectomy using the ENSEAL® Tissue Sealing Device is described in a retrospective, consecutive, observational case series. Over a 45 month period, 590 robot-assisted total laparoscopic hysterectomies +/- oophorectomy for benign and malignant indications were performed by a single surgeon with a bedside assistant at a tertiary healthcare center. Patient demographics, indications for surgery, comorbidities, primary and secondary surgical procedures, total operative and surgical time, estimated blood loss (EBL), length of stay (LOS), complications, transfusions and subsequent readmissions were analyzed. The overall complication rate was 5.9% with 35 patients experiencing 69 complications. Mean (SD) surgery time, operating room (OR) time, EBL, and LOS for the entire cohort were 75.5 (39.42) minutes, 123.8 (41.15) minutes, 83.1 (71.29) millilitres, and 1.2 (0.93) days, respectively. Mean surgery time in the first year (2009) was 91.6 minutes, which declined significantly each year by 18.0, 19.0, and 24.3 minutes, respectively. EBL and LOS did not vary ­significantly across the entire series. Using the cumulative sum method, an optimization curve for surgery time was evaluated, with three distinct optimization phases observed. In summary, the use of an advanced laparoscopic tissue-sealing device by a bedside surgical assistant provided an improved operative efficiency and reliable vessel sealing during robotic hysterectomy. PMID:25374656

  11. A medical audit and patient survey of hysterectomies performed for menstrual disorders.

    PubMed

    Roberts, R N; Norman, B P; Harrison, C G; Heaton, N R; Law, J K; Wadehra, V; Younger, H M; West, C P

    1996-04-01

    The aim of the study was to carry out an audit of 283 hysterectomies performed for menstrual disorders over a one year period, and to determine the satisfaction of the women concerned towards their treatment. The medical records of these patients were examined, and they were each sent a questionnaire, 69% of which were completed and returned. The most common presenting symptoms were menorrhagia and dysmenorrhoea. In 53% of cases no clinical abnormality was postulated and in 31% of cases no pathological abnormality was found. The preoperative clinical and pathological diagnoses were in agreement for 59% of patients. Over 90% of women were satisfied with the management of their case by their GP and the gynaecology outpatient clinic. The use of patient-controlled analgesia systems was associated with better post-operative pain relief than intramuscular injections. Thirteen percent of patients required blood transfusion; 21% suffered some form of postoperative complication, most of which were minor. Ninety-four percent of the women were pleased that they had undergone hysterectomy, and 76% wished that they had had the operation sooner. It was concluded that hysterectomy is perceived positively by patients and should not necessarily be considered as a last resort treatment for menstrual disorders.

  12. Analysis of a Standardized Technique for Laparoscopic Cuff Closure following 1924 Total Laparoscopic Hysterectomies

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Alfred; Sten, Margaret S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To review the vaginal cuff complications from a large series of total laparoscopic hysterectomies in which the laparoscopic culdotomy closure was highly standardized. Methods. Retrospective cohort study (Canadian Task Force Classification II-3) of consecutive total and radical laparoscopic hysterectomy patients with all culdotomy closures performed laparoscopically was conducted using three guidelines: placement of all sutures 5 mm deep from the vaginal edge with a 5 mm interval, incorporation of the uterosacral ligaments with the pubocervical fascia at each angle, and, whenever possible, suturing the bladder peritoneum over the vaginal cuff edge utilizing two suture types of comparable tensile strength. Four outcomes are reviewed: dehiscence, bleeding, infection, and adhesions. Results. Of 1924 patients undergoing total laparoscopic hysterectomy, 44 patients (2.29%) experienced a vaginal cuff complication, with 19 (0.99%) requiring reoperation. Five patients (0.26%) had dehiscence after sexual penetration on days 30–83, with 3 requiring reoperation. Thirteen patients (0.68%) developed bleeding, with 9 (0.47%) requiring reoperation. Twenty-three (1.20%) patients developed infections, with 4 (0.21%) requiring reoperation. Three patients (0.16%) developed obstructive small bowel adhesions to the cuff requiring laparoscopic lysis. Conclusion. A running 5 mm deep × 5 mm apart culdotomy closure that incorporates the uterosacral ligaments with the pubocervical fascia, with reperitonealization when possible, appears to be associated with few postoperative vaginal cuff complications. PMID:27579179

  13. Analysis of a Standardized Technique for Laparoscopic Cuff Closure following 1924 Total Laparoscopic Hysterectomies.

    PubMed

    O'Hanlan, Katherine A; Emeney, Pamela L; Peters, Alfred; Sten, Margaret S; McCutcheon, Stacey P; Struck, Danielle M; Hoang, Joseph K

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To review the vaginal cuff complications from a large series of total laparoscopic hysterectomies in which the laparoscopic culdotomy closure was highly standardized. Methods. Retrospective cohort study (Canadian Task Force Classification II-3) of consecutive total and radical laparoscopic hysterectomy patients with all culdotomy closures performed laparoscopically was conducted using three guidelines: placement of all sutures 5 mm deep from the vaginal edge with a 5 mm interval, incorporation of the uterosacral ligaments with the pubocervical fascia at each angle, and, whenever possible, suturing the bladder peritoneum over the vaginal cuff edge utilizing two suture types of comparable tensile strength. Four outcomes are reviewed: dehiscence, bleeding, infection, and adhesions. Results. Of 1924 patients undergoing total laparoscopic hysterectomy, 44 patients (2.29%) experienced a vaginal cuff complication, with 19 (0.99%) requiring reoperation. Five patients (0.26%) had dehiscence after sexual penetration on days 30-83, with 3 requiring reoperation. Thirteen patients (0.68%) developed bleeding, with 9 (0.47%) requiring reoperation. Twenty-three (1.20%) patients developed infections, with 4 (0.21%) requiring reoperation. Three patients (0.16%) developed obstructive small bowel adhesions to the cuff requiring laparoscopic lysis. Conclusion. A running 5 mm deep × 5 mm apart culdotomy closure that incorporates the uterosacral ligaments with the pubocervical fascia, with reperitonealization when possible, appears to be associated with few postoperative vaginal cuff complications. PMID:27579179

  14. Vanishing intravenous leiomyomatosis after hysterectomy: Assessment of the need to perform complete resection.

    PubMed

    Maneyama, Haruka; Miyasaka, Naoyuki; Wakana, Kimio; Nakamura, Megumi; Kitazume, Yoshio; Kubota, Toshiro

    2016-08-01

    Intravenous leiomyomatosis (IVL) is a rare smooth muscle tumor that may extend into extrauterine veins. A high IVL recurrence rate has been reported after hysterectomy. A 44-year-old woman underwent total hysterectomy as a result of uterine leiomyoma, and IVL within the left uterine vein was incidentally found during the surgery. A residual tumor within the right ovarian vein was detected on contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) two days postoperatively. The tumor was diagnosed as IVL because it showed contrast enhancement on preoperative magnetic resonance imaging by retrospective re-interpretation. However, the tumor completely disappeared on contrast-enhanced CT without any medical treatment five months postoperatively. This is the first report of spontaneous regression of IVL. Postsurgical imaging was important to determine the residual extrauterine extension of IVL when it was incidentally found during gynecologic surgery. A hysterectomy alone may be adequate in selected cases, but long-term follow-up imaging is strongly recommended in all cases. PMID:27080990

  15. Beta-adrenoceptors in obstetrics and gynecology.

    PubMed

    Modzelewska, Beata

    2016-01-01

    One hundred and twenty years after the description of extracts from the adrenal medulla, the use of beta-blockers and beta-agonists evolved from antianginal drugs and tocolytics to ligand-directed signaling. Beta-blockers in the fields of obstetrics and gynecology have so far been limited to the consideration of continuing treatment of disorders of the cardiovascular system and other dysfunctions that started before pregnancy. Studies in recent years have shown that beta-adrenoceptor signaling might be crucial in carcinogenesis and metastasis, apoptosis and anoikis. On the other hand, the use of beta-adrenoceptor agonists in tocolysis is, as yet, the primary method for inhibiting premature uterine contractions. Unfortunately, the efficacy of current pharmacological treatment for the management of preterm labor is regularly questioned. Moreover, studies related to non-pregnant myometrium performed to date indicate that the rhythmic contractions of the uterus are required for menstruation and have an important role in human reproduction. In turn, abnormal uterine contractility has been linked to dysmenorrhea, a condition associated with painful uterine cramping. The benefits of the use of beta2-adrenoceptor agonists in dysmenorrhea are still unclear and should be balanced against a wide range of adverse effects recognized with this class of medication. The ideal tocolytic agent is one which is effective for the pregnant or non-pregnant woman but has no side effects on either the woman or the baby. Looking to the future with both caution and hope, the potential metamorphosis of beta3-adrenoceptor agonists from experimental tools into therapeutic drugs for tocolysis warrants attention. PMID:27442692

  16. Obstetrical events that shaped Western European history.

    PubMed

    Ober, W B

    1992-01-01

    Taking into account that marriage, the family as a social unit, and concepts of legitimacy developed to ensure the devolution of property and that, when these concepts apply in a society based on hierarchically organized monarchies, they also involve the devolution of power, this essay furnishes examples of dislocations in such devolutions, in terms of familiar incidents in western European history. That Jane Seymour died in childbirth but her son Edward VI survived long enough to ensure the stability of the Church of England is the first example. The infertility of Mary Tudor, when married to Philip II of Spain, prevented the formation of an Anglo-Spanish dynasty that would have been Roman Catholic is the second example of such a dislocation. Likewise, the infertility of Charles II's wife, Catherine of Braganza, led to the succession of James II, a practicing Roman Catholic, whose attempts to undermine the Church of England led to the Glorious Revolution of 1788 and the preservation of English Protestantism. Another example is the death in 1817 of Princess Charlotte, in childbirth, which led to the scramble of George III's aging sons to marry and beget an heir to the throne. The only success led to the birth of the future Queen Victoria, whose dynastic competence remains unquestionable, but who herself had some passing involvement with obstetrical developments. Finally, the delivery of Kaiser Wilhelm II, who sustained a brachial plexus injury that produced Erb's palsy of the left arm, is considered, and the question of intrapartum fetal hypoxia is raised as a hypothesis, in addition to the mechanical trauma and its effect on his personality.

  17. Beta-adrenoceptors in obstetrics and gynecology.

    PubMed

    Modzelewska, Beata

    2016-01-01

    One hundred and twenty years after the description of extracts from the adrenal medulla, the use of beta-blockers and beta-agonists evolved from antianginal drugs and tocolytics to ligand-directed signaling. Beta-blockers in the fields of obstetrics and gynecology have so far been limited to the consideration of continuing treatment of disorders of the cardiovascular system and other dysfunctions that started before pregnancy. Studies in recent years have shown that beta-adrenoceptor signaling might be crucial in carcinogenesis and metastasis, apoptosis and anoikis. On the other hand, the use of beta-adrenoceptor agonists in tocolysis is, as yet, the primary method for inhibiting premature uterine contractions. Unfortunately, the efficacy of current pharmacological treatment for the management of preterm labor is regularly questioned. Moreover, studies related to non-pregnant myometrium performed to date indicate that the rhythmic contractions of the uterus are required for menstruation and have an important role in human reproduction. In turn, abnormal uterine contractility has been linked to dysmenorrhea, a condition associated with painful uterine cramping. The benefits of the use of beta2-adrenoceptor agonists in dysmenorrhea are still unclear and should be balanced against a wide range of adverse effects recognized with this class of medication. The ideal tocolytic agent is one which is effective for the pregnant or non-pregnant woman but has no side effects on either the woman or the baby. Looking to the future with both caution and hope, the potential metamorphosis of beta3-adrenoceptor agonists from experimental tools into therapeutic drugs for tocolysis warrants attention.

  18. Demands on obstetrical care in the urban environment: postpartal survey.

    PubMed

    Ahner, R; Stokreiter, C; Bikas, D; Kubista, E; Husslein, P

    1999-12-01

    In recent years, obstetrical management reflecting the individual needs of parturient women and newborn children has acquired an increasing significance. Today, the majority of obstetrical departments provide alternatives to traditional methods of delivery. The purpose of this study was to analyze the current obstetric situation as perceived by the women concerned. During the lying-in period spent in the care of the obstetrical department, 386 women were interviewed as to their birth experience. The questionnaire employed used a predominantly structured format. The present study examined a total of six of Vienna's municipal hospitals. The majority of women interviewed were satisfied with the standard of care provided by obstetricians and midwives. However, certain administrative and organizational aspects were subject to criticism, for example, shift changes among the medical staff as well as the presence of an excessive number of people during delivery were felt to detract from the intimate character of giving birth. In general, the standards of care provided by urban obstetrical departments as well as the experience of giving birth itself confirmed women's expectations. However, certain areas remain where improvements seem both desirable and feasible without requiring undue effort. Women who gave a positive assessment of their personal experience of delivery also tended to carry away a favorable impression of their stay in hospital as a whole.

  19. Simulation laboratories for training in obstetrics and gynecology.

    PubMed

    Macedonia, Christian R; Gherman, Robert B; Satin, Andrew J

    2003-08-01

    Simulations have been used by the military, airline industry, and our colleagues in other medical specialties to educate, evaluate, and prepare for rare but life-threatening scenarios. Work hour limits for residents in obstetrics and gynecology and decreased patient availability for teaching of students and residents require us to think creatively and practically on how to optimize their education. Medical simulations may address scenarios in clinical practice that are considered important to know or understand. Simulations can take many forms, including computer programs, models or mannequins, virtual reality data immersion caves, and a combination of formats. The purpose of this commentary is to call attention to a potential role for medical simulation in obstetrics and gynecology. We briefly describe an example of how simulation may be incorporated into obstetric and gynecologic residency training. It is our contention that educators in obstetrics and gynecology should be aware of the potential for simulation in education. We hope this commentary will stimulate interest in the field, lead to validation studies, and improve training in and the practice of obstetrics and gynecology.

  20. Limb preference in children with obstetric brachial plexus palsy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lynda J-S; Anand, Praveen; Birch, Rolfe

    2005-07-01

    Brachial plexus palsy affects children differently than adults. In children with obstetric brachial plexus palsy, motor development must depend on nervous system adaptation. Previous studies report sensory plasticity in these children. This noninvasive study provides support for neural plasticity (the general ability of the brain to reorganize neural pathways based on new experiences) in children with obstetric brachial plexus palsy by considering upper limb preference. As in the general population, we expect that 90% of children would prefer their right upper limb. However, only 17% of children affected by right obstetric brachial plexus palsy prefer the right upper limb for overall movement; children with left obstetric brachial plexus palsy did not significantly differ from the general population in upper limb preference. This study also provides the first evidence of a significant correlation between actual task performance and select obstetric brachial plexus palsy outcome measurement systems, thereby justifying the routine use of these outcome measurement systems as a reflection of the practical utility of the affected limb to the patient. PMID:15876521

  1. Obstetric implications of minor müllerian anomalies in oligomenorrheic women.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, S S; Trauelsen, A G

    1987-05-01

    The obstetric performance of 50 consecutive women with minor müllerian anomalies was compared with that of 141 subjects having a normal uterine cavity on hysterosalpingography. All 191 patients had a history of some years' infertility. Spontaneous abortion was the outcome of the first pregnancy in 27.8% of women with müllerian anomalies (not statistically different from the outcome of the control group). However, the evidence of a greater risk of variously complicated first pregnancies and labors (30.3% versus 12.9%, p less than 0.05) and of emergency cesarean sections (21.2% versus 7.1%, p less than 0.05) in the group of minor müllerian anomalies than in the group with normal uteri confirmed the innate pathologic condition and clinical significance of these mild to moderate malformations present in about 40% to 50% of oligomenorrheic women. The most frequent complications were threatened abortion and abnormal fetal lie. Even the very mildest müllerian anomalies seemed to have gynecologic and obstetric implications, but the clinical impact in this group still remains uncertain. It is concluded that a genital tract anomaly of a certain obstetric significance (ratio between distance from nadir of fundal indentation to line connecting summits of uterine horns and length of this line or H/L ratio greater than 0.15) must be suspected in about one third of women with oligomenorrhea. Consequently a high risk in the event of a future pregnancy is evident, and about half the pregnancies (42.1%) in this group will be complicated in one or more ways.

  2. [The first Dutch debate on anaesthesia in obstetrics].

    PubMed

    Bijker, Liselotte E

    2015-01-01

    After the publication of the Dutch medical guideline on pharmacological analgesia during childbirth in 2008, the question of whether pharmacological pain relief should be permissible during labour was hotly debated. This discussion has been going on since the second half of the 19th century when the introduction of ether and chloroform was extensively studied and described in Great Britain. This article looks back on the same debate in the Netherlands when inhalational anaesthetics were introduced into obstetrics. Study of historical journals and textbooks, originating in the Netherlands and elsewhere, and of historical medical literature on anaesthesia and obstetrics shows that the Dutch protagonists adopted more nuanced ideas on this issue than many of their foreign colleagues. This description of the first Dutch debate on anaesthesia in obstetrics shows that in fact the issues and arguments are timeless.

  3. Intelligent navigation to improve obstetrical sonography.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Lami; Romero, Roberto

    2016-04-01

    use of software to perform manual navigation of volume datasets. Diagnostic planes and VIS-Assistance videoclips can be transmitted by telemedicine so that expert consultants can evaluate the images to provide an opinion. The end result is a user-friendly, simple, fast and consistent method of obtaining sonographic images with decreased operator dependency. Intelligent navigation is one approach to improve obstetrical sonography. Published 2015. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. PMID:26525650

  4. Intelligent navigation to improve obstetrical sonography.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Lami; Romero, Roberto

    2016-04-01

    use of software to perform manual navigation of volume datasets. Diagnostic planes and VIS-Assistance videoclips can be transmitted by telemedicine so that expert consultants can evaluate the images to provide an opinion. The end result is a user-friendly, simple, fast and consistent method of obtaining sonographic images with decreased operator dependency. Intelligent navigation is one approach to improve obstetrical sonography. Published 2015. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  5. Teaching veterinary obstetrics using three-dimensional animation technology.

    PubMed

    Scherzer, Jakob; Buchanan, M Flint; Moore, James N; White, Susan L

    2010-01-01

    In this three-year study, test scores for students taught veterinary obstetrics in a classroom setting with either traditional media (photographs, text, and two-dimensional graphical presentations) were compared with those for students taught by incorporating three-dimensional (3D) media (linear animations and interactive QuickTime Virtual Reality models) into the classroom lectures. Incorporation of the 3D animations and interactive models significantly increased students' scores on essay questions designed to assess their comprehension of the subject matter. This approach to education may help to better prepare students for dealing with obstetrical cases during their final clinical year and after graduation. PMID:20847340

  6. Evaluation of different approaches to obstetric care: Part II.

    PubMed

    Chalmers, I; Lawson, J G; Turnbull, A C

    1976-12-01

    The obstetric management and outcome of normal patients presenting to two obstetric teams working in the Cardiff Maternity Hospital are compared over a five-year period. One team induced labour with amniotomy and oxytocin infusion three times more frequently than the other. No advantage or disadvantage of this practice was demonstrated using various measures of perinatal morbidity and mortality. The implications of these findings are discussed together with those of two previously reported observational studies. The need for experimental research in perinatal medicine is stressed. PMID:1009032

  7. Interprofessional Obstetric Ultrasound Education: Successful Development of Online Learning Modules; Case-Based Seminars; and Skills Labs for Registered and Advanced Practice Nurses, Midwives, Physicians, and Trainees.

    PubMed

    Shaw-Battista, Jenna; Young-Lin, Nichole; Bearman, Sage; Dau, Kim; Vargas, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound is an important aid in the clinical diagnosis and management of normal and complicated pregnancy and childbirth. The technology is widely applied to maternity care in the United States, where comprehensive standard ultrasound examinations are routine. Targeted scans are common and used for an increasing number of clinical indications due to emerging research and a greater availability of equipment with better image resolution at lower cost. These factors contribute to an increased demand for obstetric ultrasound education among students and providers of maternity care, despite a paucity of data to inform education program design and evaluation. To meet this demand, from 2012 to 2015 the University of California, San Francisco nurse-midwifery education program developed and implemented an interprofessional obstetric ultrasound course focused on clinical applications commonly managed by maternity care providers from different professions and disciplines. The course included matriculating students in nursing and medicine, as well as licensed practitioners such as registered and advanced practice nurses, midwives, and physicians and residents in obstetrics and gynecology and family medicine. After completing 10 online modules with a pre- and posttest of knowledge and interprofessional competencies related to teamwork and communication, trainees attended a case-based seminar and hands-on skills practicum with pregnant volunteers. The course aimed to establish a foundation for further supervised clinical training prior to independent practice of obstetric ultrasound. Course development was informed by professional guidelines and clinical and education research literature. This article describes the foundations, with a review of the challenges and solutions encountered in obstetric ultrasound education development and implementation. Our experience will inform educators who wish to facilitate obstetric ultrasound competency development among new and experienced

  8. Interprofessional Obstetric Ultrasound Education: Successful Development of Online Learning Modules; Case-Based Seminars; and Skills Labs for Registered and Advanced Practice Nurses, Midwives, Physicians, and Trainees.

    PubMed

    Shaw-Battista, Jenna; Young-Lin, Nichole; Bearman, Sage; Dau, Kim; Vargas, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound is an important aid in the clinical diagnosis and management of normal and complicated pregnancy and childbirth. The technology is widely applied to maternity care in the United States, where comprehensive standard ultrasound examinations are routine. Targeted scans are common and used for an increasing number of clinical indications due to emerging research and a greater availability of equipment with better image resolution at lower cost. These factors contribute to an increased demand for obstetric ultrasound education among students and providers of maternity care, despite a paucity of data to inform education program design and evaluation. To meet this demand, from 2012 to 2015 the University of California, San Francisco nurse-midwifery education program developed and implemented an interprofessional obstetric ultrasound course focused on clinical applications commonly managed by maternity care providers from different professions and disciplines. The course included matriculating students in nursing and medicine, as well as licensed practitioners such as registered and advanced practice nurses, midwives, and physicians and residents in obstetrics and gynecology and family medicine. After completing 10 online modules with a pre- and posttest of knowledge and interprofessional competencies related to teamwork and communication, trainees attended a case-based seminar and hands-on skills practicum with pregnant volunteers. The course aimed to establish a foundation for further supervised clinical training prior to independent practice of obstetric ultrasound. Course development was informed by professional guidelines and clinical and education research literature. This article describes the foundations, with a review of the challenges and solutions encountered in obstetric ultrasound education development and implementation. Our experience will inform educators who wish to facilitate obstetric ultrasound competency development among new and experienced

  9. Associations of Premenopausal Hysterectomy and Oophorectomy With Breast Cancer Among Black and White Women: The Carolina Breast Cancer Study, 1993-2001.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Whitney R; Nichols, Hazel B; Tse, Chiu Kit; Olshan, Andrew F; Troester, Melissa A

    2016-09-01

    Black women experience higher rates of hysterectomy than other women in the United States. Although research indicates that premenopausal hysterectomy with bilateral oophorectomy decreases the risk of breast cancer in black women, it remains unclear how hysterectomy without ovary removal affects risk, whether menopausal hormone therapy use attenuates inverse associations, and whether associations vary by cancer subtype. In the population-based, case-control Carolina Breast Cancer Study of invasive breast cancer in 1,391 black (725 cases, 666 controls) and 1,727 white (939 cases, 788 controls) women in North Carolina (1993-2001), we investigated the associations of premenopausal hysterectomy and oophorectomy with breast cancer risk. Compared with no history of premenopausal surgery, bilateral oophorectomy and hysterectomy without oophorectomy were associated with lower odds of breast cancer (for bilateral oophorectomy, multivariable-adjusted odds ratios = 0.60, 95% confidence interval: 0.47, 0.77; for hysterectomy without oophorectomy, multivariable-adjusted odds ratios = 0.68, 95% confidence interval: 0.55, 0.84). Estimates did not vary by race and were similar for hormone receptor-positive and hormone receptor-negative cancers. Use of estrogen-only menopausal hormone therapy did not attenuate the associations. Premenopausal hysterectomy, even without ovary removal, may reduce the long-term risk of hormone receptor-positive and hormone receptor-negative breast cancers. Varying rates of hysterectomy are a potentially important contributor to differences in breast cancer incidence among racial/ethnic groups. PMID:27555487

  10. "Short report" staffing in practice: five years' experience of a consultant based service in obstetrics and neonatal paediatrics.

    PubMed Central

    Hare, M J; Miles, R N; Lattimore, C R; Southern, J P

    1990-01-01

    Recent government plans include the concept of a core of doctors of intermediate grade providing 24 hour emergency cover in hospital departments. Hinchingbrooke Hospital has, since its opening in 1983, been run on a two tier basis, with consultants and a part time senior registrar supported only by senior house officers in their first post, usually on general practice vocational training schemes. With a planned rate of around 2000 deliveries per year all high risk obstetric and neonatal paediatric procedures, including ventilation of very small babies, have been carried out within the hospital. A study of the first five complete years of operation of the obstetric and paediatric departments showed that the perinatal mortality rate was low (hospital rate 4.7/1000 in 9149 deliveries during 1984-8 v district rate 5.1/1000 during 1986-8), and patient satisfaction seemed to be high. In a separate prospective study of out of hours work performed by consultants in paediatrics (four weeks) and obstetrics (20 days) three consultants in paediatrics spent 71 hours working out of hours; for the obstetricians, of the 56 request for advice and 38 interventions, only five and six respectively occurred between midnight and 9 am. Although successful at this hospital, the two tier system would be expensive under the Royal College of Obstetricians' guidelines of one consultant to a maximum of 500 deliveries. An equal mixture of two tier and three tier systems might be the best solution for patient care and training of junior doctors. PMID:2337703

  11. Between Scylla and Charybdis: renegotiating resolution of the ‘obstetric dilemma’ in response to ecological change

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Jonathan C. K.

    2015-01-01

    Hominin evolution saw the emergence of two traits—bipedality and encephalization—that are fundamentally linked because the fetal head must pass through the maternal pelvis at birth, a scenario termed the ‘obstetric dilemma’. While adaptive explanations for bipedality and large brains address adult phenotype, it is brain and pelvic growth that are subject to the obstetric dilemma. Many contemporary populations experience substantial maternal and perinatal morbidity/mortality from obstructed labour, yet there is increasing recognition that the obstetric dilemma is not fixed and is affected by ecological change. Ecological trends may affect growth of the pelvis and offspring brain to different extents, while the two traits also differ by a generation in the timing of their exposure. Two key questions arise: how can the fit between the maternal pelvis and the offspring brain be ‘renegotiated’ as the environment changes, and what nutritional signals regulate this process? I argue that the potential for maternal size to change across generations precludes birthweight being under strong genetic influence. Instead, fetal growth tracks maternal phenotype, which buffers short-term ecological perturbations. Nevertheless, rapid changes in nutritional supply between generations can generate antagonistic influences on maternal and offspring traits, increasing the risk of obstructed labour. PMID:25602071

  12. Litigation, electronic fetal monitoring, and the obstetric nurse.

    PubMed

    McRae, M J

    1993-01-01

    Using excerpts from actual lawsuits that allege malpractice and name obstetric nurses as defendants, this article explores the process and some possible outcomes of malpractice litigation. It discusses the duty of the nurse, the concept of reasonably prudent practice, and the role of the expert. In addition, it identifies some institutional standards that can mitigate potential damages in malpractice claims.

  13. Measuring and communicating blood loss during obstetric hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Gabel, Kristi T; Weeber, Tracy A

    2012-01-01

    Accurate quantification of blood loss is an essential skill necessary to prevent maternal morbidity and mortality associated with obstetric hemorrhage. Visual estimation of blood has been consistently shown to be extremely inaccurate. The nurse plays a pivotal role in quantifying blood loss after birth, recognizing triggers, mobilizing needed interventions, and providing essential communication. PMID:22548283

  14. 21 CFR 884.4900 - Obstetric table and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Obstetric table and accessories. 884.4900 Section 884.4900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...: patient equipment, support attachments, and cabinets for warming instruments and disposing of wastes....

  15. 21 CFR 884.4900 - Obstetric table and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Obstetric table and accessories. 884.4900 Section 884.4900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...: patient equipment, support attachments, and cabinets for warming instruments and disposing of wastes....

  16. 21 CFR 884.4900 - Obstetric table and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Obstetric table and accessories. 884.4900 Section 884.4900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...: patient equipment, support attachments, and cabinets for warming instruments and disposing of wastes....

  17. [Metabolic therapy and pulmonary disfunction in patients with obstetric sepsis].

    PubMed

    Iakovlev, A Iu; Zaĭtsev, P M; Zubeev, P S; Mokrov, K B; Balandina, A V; Gushchina, N N; Kucherenko, V E

    2011-01-01

    The role of reamberin, a succinate-containing infusion preparation in correlation of pulmonary metabolic and respiratory disturbances in patients with obstetric puerperal sepsis was estimated. The prospective randomized study enrolled 43 patients with puerperal obstetric sepsis complicated by polyorganic deficiency (SOFA 8-10). Nineteen patients of the 1st group and 24 patients of the 2nd group were additionally treated with reamberin in a dose of 800 ml/day for 8 days. The venous and arterial difference by glucose, lactate, pyruvate, diene conjugates, malondialdehyde and ceruloplasmin was investigated. The blood gases were determined with the Ciba Corning 45 apparatus. Lower metabolic activity of the lungs with prevalence of the glucose anaerobic metabolism and lower activity of the intrapulmonary antioxidant protection were observed in the patients with obstetric sepsis. The use of reamberin in the complex therapy of obstetric sepsis promoted maintenance of the initial balance and anaeroibic and aerobic pulmonary metabolism, thus providing shorter terms of the decompensation and recovery of the lungs respiratory function. PMID:21913408

  18. 21 CFR 884.2225 - Obstetric-gynecologic ultrasonic imager.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Obstetric-gynecologic ultrasonic imager. 884.2225 Section 884.2225 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... ultrasonic imager is a device designed to transmit and receive ultrasonic energy into and from a...

  19. 21 CFR 884.4500 - Obstetric fetal destructive instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Obstetric fetal destructive instrument. 884.4500 Section 884.4500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... destructive instrument is a device designed to crush or pull the fetal body to facilitate the delivery of...

  20. Anxiety, Stress and Social Support: Prenatal Predictors of Obstetrical Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nethercut, Gail; Adler, Nancy

    The role of anxiety, stress, and social support in predicting negative obstetrical outcomes was examined in a high-risk group of pregnant women. The predictor variables were assessed with separate self-report scales, including The Sarason Life Experience Survey, the Spielberger State/Trait Inventory, and a modified version of the Lazarus and Cohen…

  1. 21 CFR 884.2960 - Obstetric ultrasonic transducer and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Obstetric ultrasonic transducer and accessories. 884.2960 Section 884.2960 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN..., amplifiers, signal conditioners with their power supply, connecting cables, and component parts. This...

  2. Clearinghouse: Diagnostic Categories and Obstetric Complication Histories in Disturbed Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeil, Thomas F.; Wiegerink, Ronald

    1971-01-01

    No significant differences in the obstetric complication measures were found among the various diagnostic groupings of 61 psychologically or behaviorally disturbed children, nor between any complication measures and any of the three disturbed behavior patterns identified (psychotic withdrawal, acting-out aggression, organic signs). (KW)

  3. Continuum of Medical Education in Obstetrics and Gynecology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dohner, Charles W.; Hunter, Charles A., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Over the past eight years the obstetric and gynecology specialty has applied a system model of instructional planning to the continuum of medical education. The systems model of needs identification, preassessment, instructional objectives, instructional materials, learning experiences; and evaluation techniques directly related to objectives was…

  4. A National Survey of Undergraduate Teaching in Obstetrics and Gynecology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    And Others; Stenchever, Morton A.

    1979-01-01

    A survey of academic departments of obstetrics and gynecology was designed to assess undergraduate educational programs and the impact of efforts made to improve teaching in the specialty. It focuses on instructional patterns, the clinical clerkship, student evaluation, and program administration and evaluation. Prior surveys are noted.…

  5. Obstetrics Patients' Assessment of Medical Students' Role in Their Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magrane, Diane

    1988-01-01

    Obstetric patients rated the skills and assessed the roles of students caring for them during a clinical clerkship. They rated skills and attitudes high, generally, with lower ratings for their ability to answer questions and preparation to participate in care. Most felt students improved their care, primarily in supportive ways. (Author/MSE)

  6. Moral implications of obstetric technologies for pregnancy and motherhood.

    PubMed

    Brauer, Susanne

    2016-03-01

    Drawing on sociological and anthropological studies, the aim of this article is to reconstruct how obstetric technologies contribute to a moral conception of pregnancy and motherhood, and to evaluate that conception from a normative point of view. Obstetrics and midwifery, so the assumption, are value-laden, value-producing and value-reproducing practices, values that shape the social perception of what it means to be a "good" pregnant woman and to be a "good" (future) mother. Activities in the medical field of reproduction contribute to "kinning", that is the making of particular social relationships marked by closeness and special moral obligations. Three technologies, which belong to standard procedures in prenatal care in postmodern societies, are presently investigated: (1) informed consent in prenatal care, (2) obstetric sonogram, and (3) birth plan. Their widespread application is supposed to serve the moral (and legal) goal of effecting patient autonomy (and patient right). A reconstruction of the actual moral implications of these technologies, however, reveals that this goal is missed in multiple ways. Informed consent situations are marked by involuntariness and blindness to social dimensions of decision-making; obstetric sonograms construct moral subjectivity and agency in a way that attribute inconsistent and unreasonable moral responsibilities to the pregnant woman; and birth plans obscure the need for a healthcare environment that reflects a shared-decision-making model, rather than a rational-choice-framework.

  7. Obstetric Outcomes in Non-Gynecologic Cancer Patients in Remission

    PubMed Central

    Timur, Hakan; Tokmak, Aytekin; Iskender, Cantekin; Yildiz, Elif Sumer; Inal, Hasan Ali; Uygur, Dilek; Danisman, Nuri

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the obstetric and perinatal outcomes in treated women who were diagnosed with non-gynecologic cancer and to compare these findings with pregnant women with no history of cancer. Materials and Methods: This retrospective study was conducted on 21 pregnant women with non-gynecologic cancer who were in remission (study group) and 63 pregnant women with no history of cancer (control group). The women were admitted to the high-risk pregnancy clinic of Zekai Tahir Burak Women’s Health Training and Research Hospital with a diagnosis of pregnancy and cancer between January 2010 and January 2015. Obstetric outcomes and demographic characteristics of the patients were recorded. Age, gravida, parity, abortus, body mass index (BMI), gestational week, smoking, mode of delivery, gestational weight, and perinatal outcomes were examined for each woman. Results: The most common cancer types were thyroid (28.5%) and breast cancers (23.8%), which constituted just over half of the non-gynecologic cancer cases during pregnancy. The time elapsed after the diagnosis was 3.8±2.2 (1–9) years. No statistically significant differences were found between the two groups with regard to age, obstetric history, BMI, gestational week, smoking, and obstetric and perinatal outcomes (p>0.05). Conclusion: Negative perinatal outcomes in non-gynecologic cancer patients in remission were found to be within acceptable levels. PMID:27551177

  8. 21 CFR 884.2050 - Obstetric data analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Obstetric data analyzer. 884.2050 Section 884.2050 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... labor management and clinical interventions. This generic type of device may include signal analysis...

  9. Histopathology findings in patients presenting with menorrhagia: A study of 100 hysterectomy specimen

    PubMed Central

    Sawke, Nilima G.; Sawke, Gopal Krishna; Jain, Hanisha

    2015-01-01

    Background: Menorrhagia, by definition, is heavy cyclical blood loss in excess of 80 ml/month of menstrual period lasting longer than 7 days. There are many possible causes of heavy menstrual bleeding which include hormonal imbalance, fibroids, miscarriage or ectopic pregnancy, nonhormonal intrauterine device, adenomyosis, pelvic inflammatory disease, and rarely uterine, ovarian, or cervical cancer. Treatment depends on the causes of the menorrhagia. Hysterectomy is one of the several surgical procedures as definitive treatment. Objective: To determine the histopathologic spectrum of lesions associated with menorrhagia in different age groups. Study Design: This prospective descriptive study was conducted at the Department of Pathology, People's College of Medical Sciences and Research Centre, Bhopal. During the study period, 100 hysterectomy specimens were taken which were performed for the treatment of menorrhagia. Patients with menorrhagia in the age group of 30-50 years were selected after detailed history and fulfilling the inclusion criteria. Result: In our study, it was observed that maximum number of cases were in the age group of 41-50 years (n = 35) followed by the age group of 31-40 (n = 30). Out of 100 cases, 31% cases (n = 31) showed adenomyosis followed by leiomyomas 25% (n = 25), endometrial hyperplasia 23% (n = 23), and endometrial polyp 4% (n = 4). 11% cases (n = 11) showed dual pathology consisting of both adenomyosis and endometrial hyperplasia and 6% cases (n = 6) of leiomyoma with adenomyosis. Conclusion: Uterine adenomyosis and leiomyoma are the most common benign conditions found in hysterectomy specimens with peak incidence at 31-50 years. Patients having menorrhagia above 40 years should be screened for any endometrial pathology. Histopathology is mandatory for confirming diagnosis and the key to effective therapy and optimal outcome. PMID:26903755

  10. Endoscopic removal of intravesical polypropylene suture with plasmakinetic resection after abdominal hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Küçükdurmaz, Faruk; Can, Selman; Barut, Osman

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Intravesical foreign substances such as mesh or suture are among the rare reasons of recurrent urinary tract infections. Anti-incontinence and prolapsus procedures are associated with mesh/suture extrusion into the bladder, however, this complication is uncommon with abdominal hysterectomy. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 61-year-old female, obese patient admitted to our clinic with recurrent urinary tract infections and voiding symptoms which were worsened after abdominal hysterectomy. Radiological evaluation revealed an intravesical foreign material within the bladder. The cytoscopy was performed and a polypropylene suture which was inserted from dome, passed through the base and exited from the dome of bladder during abdominal hysterectomy. Transurethral plasmakinetic resection of superficial layer of urothelium between suture entrance and exit sites was performed and suture was removed from the bladder. DISCUSSION Urogynecological procedures are associated with the increased risk of urethral or ureteral injury, intravesical mesh or suture erosion and fistulae formation. Many different techniques including open, laparoscopic and transvaginal approaches were described for the removal of intravesical mesh/suture extrusion in the literature. Transurethral approach with its minimally invasive and safe nature was used to remove suture in this patient. This technique with the use of plasmakinetic energy has the advantage of decreased risk of bleeding and urothelial injury when compared to monopolar cautery. It also avoids the need for open or extensive surgery which may have a high rate of complications. CONCLUSION Transurethral resection is the treatment of choice for the removal of intravesical foreign substances. Use of plasmakinetic energy will decrease the risk of complications and avoid the need for open interventions. PMID:25437667

  11. Comparison of analgesic efficacy of intravenous Paracetamol and intravenous dexketoprofen trometamol in multimodal analgesia after hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Ünal, Çiğdem; Çakan, Türkay; Baltaci, Bülent; Başar, Hülya

    2013-01-01

    Backround: We aimed to evaluate analgesic efficacy, opioid-sparing, and opioid-related adverse effects of intravenous paracetamol and intravenous dexketoprofen trometamol in combination with iv morphine after total abdominal hysterectomy. Materials and Methods: Sixty American Society of Anesthesiologist Physical Status Classification I-II patients scheduled for total abdominal hysterectomy were enrolled to this double-blinded, randomized, placebo controlled, and prospective study. Patients were divided into three groups as paracetamol, dexketoprofen trometamol, and placebo (0.9% NaCl) due to their post-operative analgesic usage. Intravenous patient controlled analgesia morphine was used as a rescue analgesic in all groups. Pain scores, hemodynamic parameters, morphine consumption, patient satisfaction, and side-effects were evaluated. Results: Visual Analog Scale (VAS) scores were not statistically significantly different among the groups in all evaluation times, but decrease in VAS scores was statistically significant after the evaluation at 12th h in all groups. Total morphine consumption (morphine concentration = 0.2 mg/ml) in group paracetamol (72.3 ± 38.0 ml) and dexketoprofen trometamol (69.3 ± 24.1 ml) was significantly lower than group placebo (129.3 ± 22.6 ml) (P < 0.001). Global satisfaction scores of the patients in group placebo was significantly lower than group dexketoprofen trometamol after surgery and the increase in global satisfaction score was significant only in group placebo. Conclusion: Dexketoprofen trometamol and Paracetamol didn’t cause significant change on pain scores, but increased patients’ comfort. Although total morphine consumption was significantly decreased by both drugs, the incidence of nausea and vomiting were similar among the groups. According to results of the present study routine addition of dexketoprofen trometamol and paracetamol to patient controlled analgesia morphine after hysterectomies is not recommended. PMID

  12. Tubal sterilisation, hysterectomy and decreased risk of ovarian cancer. Survey of Women's Health Study Group.

    PubMed

    Green, A; Purdie, D; Bain, C; Siskind, V; Russell, P; Quinn, M; Ward, B

    1997-06-11

    We have examined the effect of tubal sterilisation and hysterectomy on risk of ovarian cancer in a large case-control study in eastern Australia involving 824 women aged 18-79 years, diagnosed with epithelial ovarian cancer between 1990 and 1993, and 855 controls randomly selected from the electoral roll. Relative risks for ovarian cancer were estimated using multiple categorical regression to adjust for age, parity, oral contraceptive use and other risk factors. Tubal sterilisation was associated with a 39% reduction in risk of ovarian cancer (RR 0.61, 95% CI 0.46-0.85) and hysterectomy with a 36% reduction (RR 0.64, 95% CI 0.48-0.85). Risk remained low 25 years after surgery and was reduced irrespective of sterilisation technique, and estimates were similar among various types of epithelial ovarian cancer. The greatest reduction (74%) was observed among women with primary peritoneal tumours. Pelvic infection and use of vaginal sprays or contraceptive foams were not related to ovarian cancer, while use of talc in the perineal region slightly but significantly increased risk among women with patent fallopian tubes. Reportedly heavy or painful menses, perhaps associated with retrograde flow, were associated with ovarian cancer, and reduction in risk of disease after hysterectomy was greatest among women who had heavy periods. Our findings support the theory that contaminants from the vagina, such as talc, and from the uterus, such as endometrium, gain access to the peritoneal cavity through patent fallopian tubes and may enhance the malignant transformation of ovarian surface epithelium. Surgical tubal occlusion may reduce the risk of ovarian cancer by preventing the access of such agents.

  13. The effect of increased experience on complications in robotic hysterectomy for malignant and benign gynecological disease.

    PubMed

    Lönnerfors, Celine; Reynisson, Petur; Geppert, Barbara; Persson, Jan

    2015-12-01

    The study objective was to assess the effect of increased experience on complications in robotic hysterectomy for malignant and benign gynecological disease. This is a retrospective cohort study. It is a Canadian Task Force classification II-2 study conducted at the University Hospital, Sweden. The patients were 949 women planned for robotic hysterectomy for malignant (75 %) and benign (25 %) gynecological disease between October 2005 and December 2013. They were continuously evaluated for the rate of intraoperative and postoperative complications up to 1-year post-surgery, the latter according to Clavien-Dindo classification following the introduction of robotic surgery with special awareness of complications possibly related to robot-specific risk factors, the description of refinement of practice and assessment of the effect of these measures. The rate of intraoperative complications, the overall rate of complications and the rate of ≥grade 3 complications decreased from the first to the last time period (4.8 vs 2.6 %, p = 0.037, 34 vs 19 %, p = 0.003 and 13.5 vs 3.2 %, p = 0.0003, respectively). The rate of intraoperative complications and the rate of postoperative complications possibly related to robot-specific risk factors was reduced from the first to the last time period (3.8 vs 0.6 %, p = 0.028 and 7.7 vs 1.5 %, p = 0.003, respectively). In patients undergoing robotic hysterectomy for malignant and benign gynecological disease intraoperative and postoperative complications and complications possibly related to the robotic approach diminish with training, experience and refinement of practice. PMID:26530844

  14. Incidence and characteristics of vaginal cuff dehiscence in robotic-assisted and traditional total laparoscopic hysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Dauterive, Erin; Morris, George

    2012-06-01

    This study compares the incidence of vaginal cuff dehiscence following robotic-assisted total laparoscopic hysterectomy (RALH) with total laparoscopic hysterectomy (TLH) and examines factors that may be related to risk. A retrospective chart review was performed for all patients undergoing RALH (n = 268), TLH (n = 463), and/or repair of vaginal cuff dehiscence at our clinic from July 2006 to January 2010. The cumulative incidence was calculated only for dehiscence that occurred after hysterectomies without evidence of malignancy. The incidence of cuff dehiscence in RALH (2.61%) versus TLH (1.94%) was not statistically significant (P = 0.60). However, among RALH patients, the overall incidence of cuff dehiscence after each surgeon's first 25 cases was low at 0.85%. Mean time to presentation was similar in both groups, 8.2 weeks in RALH and 8.7 weeks in TLH, with sexual intercourse the most common inciting event. Where documented, records of dehisced patients showed that all colpotomy incisions were created using monopolar cautery and closed using 0 Vicryl sutures. In TLH, 87.5% of the colpotomy incisions were closed using the Endo Stitch device in a variety of fashions. While our findings show that the overall incidence of vaginal cuff dehiscence in RALH and TLH is comparable, the data also suggest that increased experience with robotic-assisted surgery may decrease dehiscence rates over time. Randomized controlled trials comparing different methods of colpotomy creation, particularly electrocautery, and cuff closure are needed to help guide us in the best surgical practices to reduce vaginal cuff dehiscence and related complications. PMID:27628278

  15. Association between day of delivery and obstetric outcomes: observational study

    PubMed Central

    Bottle, A; Aylin, P

    2015-01-01

    Study question What is the association between day of delivery and measures of quality and safety of maternity services, particularly comparing weekend with weekday performance? Methods This observational study examined outcomes for maternal and neonatal records (1 332 835 deliveries and 1 349 599 births between 1 April 2010 and 31 March 2012) within the nationwide administrative dataset for English National Health Service hospitals by day of the week. Groups were defined by day of admission (for maternal indicators) or delivery (for neonatal indicators) rather than by day of complication. Logistic regression was used to adjust for case mix factors including gestational age, birth weight, and maternal age. Staffing factors were also investigated using multilevel models to evaluate the association between outcomes and level of consultant presence. The primary outcomes were perinatal mortality and—for both neonate and mother—infections, emergency readmissions, and injuries. Study answer and limitations Performance across four of the seven measures was significantly worse for women admitted, and babies born, at weekends. In particular, the perinatal mortality rate was 7.3 per 1000 babies delivered at weekends, 0.9 per 1000 higher than for weekdays (adjusted odds ratio 1.07, 95% confidence interval 1.02 to 1.13). No consistent association between outcomes and staffing was identified, although trusts that complied with recommended levels of consultant presence had a perineal tear rate of 3.0% compared with 3.3% for non-compliant services (adjusted odds ratio 1.21, 1.00 to 1.45). Limitations of the analysis include the method of categorising performance temporally, which was mitigated by using a midweek reference day (Tuesday). Further research is needed to investigate possible bias from unmeasured confounders and explore the nature of the causal relationship. What this study adds This study provides an evaluation of the “weekend effect” in obstetric care

  16. Socio-demographic profile and obstetric experience of fistula patients managed at the Addis Ababa Fistula Hospital.

    PubMed

    Muleta, Mulu

    2004-01-01

    Obstetric experience, clinical and socio-economic characteristics, and reasons for preference of place of delivery of 639 fistula patients admitted to the Addis Ababa Fistula Hospital between May 1999 and February 2000 are described About 94% of fistula patients were married and 83.6% had been through with the delivery caused the fistula before the age of 20. The mean ages at the first marriage and at the causative delivery were 14.7 (sd=2.6) and 17.8 (sd=3.2) years respectively. Mean height of fistula patients studied was 149 cms (sd=8). About 64% were primiparous, 44% (279) delivered at home, and labor lasted for 3.8 days on average. Majority of fistula patients mentioned distance as a main problem for the delays. Lack of money, poor knowledge and delay in referral were the other frequently mentioned reasons for the delays. About 62%(399) of fistula patients owned nothing valuable. Of 279 patients delivered at home 186 were those who owned nothing. Out of 180-fistula patients mentioned distance as the major problem, 103 (57%) stayed at home for delivery. About 54% of fistula patients were already divorced on arrival to the hospital and this figure varied among women with different parity and among those owning different property. Teenage and short stature are observed features of fistula patients. The study also showed the huge problems faced by fistula patients in accessing emergency obstetric care services. Analytic study is recommended to compare the magnitude of these problems among other mothers with different obstetric outcome. Meanwhile, community education about problems following teenage pregnancy, sign and symptoms of obstructed labor and the advantage of institutional delivery might reduce the occurrence rate of obstetric fistula. Community organized fund and maternity waiting areas for young and short expecting mothers are among other recommendations to be considered. PMID:15884272

  17. Developmental evidence for obstetric adaptation of the human female pelvis

    PubMed Central

    Huseynov, Alik; Zollikofer, Christoph P. E.; Coudyzer, Walter; Gascho, Dominic; Kellenberger, Christian; Hinzpeter, Ricarda; Ponce de León, Marcia S.

    2016-01-01

    The bony pelvis of adult humans exhibits marked sexual dimorphism, which is traditionally interpreted in the framework of the “obstetrical dilemma” hypothesis: Giving birth to large-brained/large-bodied babies requires a wide pelvis, whereas efficient bipedal locomotion requires a narrow pelvis. This hypothesis has been challenged recently on biomechanical, metabolic, and biocultural grounds, so that it remains unclear which factors are responsible for sex-specific differences in adult pelvic morphology. Here we address this issue from a developmental perspective. We use methods of biomedical imaging and geometric morphometrics to analyze changes in pelvic morphology from late fetal stages to adulthood in a known-age/known-sex forensic/clinical sample. Results show that, until puberty, female and male pelves exhibit only moderate sexual dimorphism and follow largely similar developmental trajectories. With the onset of puberty, however, the female trajectory diverges substantially from the common course, resulting in rapid expansion of obstetrically relevant pelvic dimensions up to the age of 25–30 y. From 40 y onward females resume a mode of pelvic development similar to males, resulting in significant reduction of obstetric dimensions. This complex developmental trajectory is likely linked to the pubertal rise and premenopausal fall of estradiol levels and results in the obstetrically most adequate pelvic morphology during the time of maximum female fertility. The evidence that hormones mediate female pelvic development and morphology supports the view that solutions of the obstetrical dilemma depend not only on selection and adaptation but also on developmental plasticity as a response to ecological/nutritional factors during a female’s lifetime. PMID:27114515

  18. Obstetric mortality and its causes in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Barns, T

    1991-04-01

    Discusses dual concerns of the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RCOG): that a widening gap between obstetric standards in Britain and those in the developing world exists and that the RCOG is unable to meet the needs of Third World doctors who come to the RCOG for postgraduate study. A meeting sponsored by Birthright and held at the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RCOG) in June 1989 which explored aspects of Third World obstetric care reflects these concerns. The proceedings of the meeting have been published and verbatim recordings of the discussions are available on tape from the RCOG. Reports on maternal mortality/morbidity in the Third World indicate persistence of poor obstetrical practices and of common obstetrical complications. Suggestions for improvement include the redeployment of and the replanning of services within countries and an increase in health education for women. Access to care at the first referral institution level is seen as the key to the improvement of care. Problems of transport and communication create serious obstacles to the link between community care and the first referral institution. The goal of the World Health Organization (WHO) is to cut the Third World maternal mortality in half by the year 2000. To reach this goal WHO plans to field obstetric teams in Latin America, Africa and South Asia; to train nurse-midwives to perform life saving measures on their own initiative; and to employ community resources by training indigenous midwives to function as extensions of the health team. The RCOG will sponsor training designed for doctors who will work in developing countries.

  19. Developmental evidence for obstetric adaptation of the human female pelvis.

    PubMed

    Huseynov, Alik; Zollikofer, Christoph P E; Coudyzer, Walter; Gascho, Dominic; Kellenberger, Christian; Hinzpeter, Ricarda; Ponce de León, Marcia S

    2016-05-10

    The bony pelvis of adult humans exhibits marked sexual dimorphism, which is traditionally interpreted in the framework of the "obstetrical dilemma" hypothesis: Giving birth to large-brained/large-bodied babies requires a wide pelvis, whereas efficient bipedal locomotion requires a narrow pelvis. This hypothesis has been challenged recently on biomechanical, metabolic, and biocultural grounds, so that it remains unclear which factors are responsible for sex-specific differences in adult pelvic morphology. Here we address this issue from a developmental perspective. We use methods of biomedical imaging and geometric morphometrics to analyze changes in pelvic morphology from late fetal stages to adulthood in a known-age/known-sex forensic/clinical sample. Results show that, until puberty, female and male pelves exhibit only moderate sexual dimorphism and follow largely similar developmental trajectories. With the onset of puberty, however, the female trajectory diverges substantially from the common course, resulting in rapid expansion of obstetrically relevant pelvic dimensions up to the age of 25-30 y. From 40 y onward females resume a mode of pelvic development similar to males, resulting in significant reduction of obstetric dimensions. This complex developmental trajectory is likely linked to the pubertal rise and premenopausal fall of estradiol levels and results in the obstetrically most adequate pelvic morphology during the time of maximum female fertility. The evidence that hormones mediate female pelvic development and morphology supports the view that solutions of the obstetrical dilemma depend not only on selection and adaptation but also on developmental plasticity as a response to ecological/nutritional factors during a female's lifetime. PMID:27114515

  20. [The optimization of organizational technologies in obstetrics service of the Ryazan oblast].

    PubMed

    Petrova, Ye I; Medvedeva, O V

    2014-01-01

    The article emphasizes that, the protection of health of mother and child is actual especially in the present conditions considering demographic characteristics of particular territory. Hence, the development of optimal strategy in system of rendering of obstetrics and perinatal care and organization of operation of obstetrics institutions are the most important issues of modern obstetrics. The analysis is presented concerning conditions and main directions of optimization of organizational technologies in the system of obstetrics of the Ryazan oblast. The purpose and tasks of mechanism of optimization of rendering obstetrics and perinatal care are determined.

  1. The 2013 Gerard W. Ostheimer Lecture: What's New in Obstetric Anesthesia?

    PubMed

    Palanisamy, A

    2014-02-01

    The "What's New in Obstetric Anesthesia?" lecture is delivered annually in honor of the eminent obstetric anesthesiologist Gerard. W. Ostheimer. This lecture summarizes topics of importance and clinical relevance published in the fields of obstetric anesthesia, obstetrics, and perinatology in the preceding year. The review is a redacted version of the lecture delivered at the Society for Obstetric Anesthesia and Perinatology's Annual Meeting in April 2013. Special emphasis is placed on non-invasive technologies and biomarkers that have the potential to improve clinical care of the pregnant woman. Furthermore, sufficient attention is focused on medical diseases that have their onset or are worsened during pregnancy.

  2. Multidimensional assessment of women's experience of childbirth: relationship to obstetric procedure, antenatal preparation and obstetric history.

    PubMed

    Salmon, P; Drew, N C

    1992-05-01

    Primiparous postnatal patients (N = 110) rated their experience of childbirth on a 20-item questionnaire based on an earlier survey of women's spontaneous descriptions. Principal components analysis of the ratings identified three independent dimensions, describing feelings of fulfillment, distress and difficulty, respectively. Ratings by 104 primiparous antenatal patients in the third trimester yielded similar dimensions. The postnatal sample was divided, in turn, according to obstetric procedure at delivery, antenatal classes attended, whether the present pregnancy was planned and history of previous termination. Their experience of childbirth was compared on each dimension. Forceps and unassisted deliveries were experienced similarly. Caesarian section was a less difficult, but also less fulfilling and more distressing, experience than either of these. Delivery was less distressing in those who attended antenatal classes, but only one type of class was associated with more fulfilling birth. Finally, delivery was more distressing in women whose pregnancy was unplanned, or in whom a previous pregnancy had been terminated. Future controlled investigations will be incomplete unless each of the three dimensions is measured.

  3. An update on the use of massive transfusion protocols in obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Luis D; Saade, George R; Costantine, Maged M; Clark, Steven L; Hankins, Gary D V

    2016-03-01

    Obstetrical hemorrhage remains a leading cause of maternal mortality worldwide. New concepts involving the pathophysiology of hemorrhage have been described and include early activation of both the protein C and fibrinolytic pathways. New strategies in hemorrhage treatment include the use of hemostatic resuscitation, although the optimal ratio to administer the various blood products is still unknown. Massive transfusion protocols involve the early utilization of blood products and limit the traditional approach of early massive crystalloid-based resuscitation. The evidence behind hemostatic resuscitation has changed in the last few years, and debate is ongoing regarding optimal transfusion strategies. The use of tranexamic acid, fibrinogen concentrates, and prothrombin complex concentrates has emerged as new potential alternative treatment strategies with improved safety profiles.

  4. Successful obstetrical management of 110-day intertwin delivery interval without cerclage: counseling and conservative management approach to extreme asynchronous twin birth

    PubMed Central

    Ghulmiyyah, Labib M; Wehbe, Salim A; Schwartz, Seth A; Sills, Eric Scott

    2004-01-01

    Background This report describes a patient counseling approach and non-surgical management of a dichorionic-diamniotic twin pregnancy where delivery of the second twin followed the delivery of the first by 110 days. Case presentation An early transvaginal sonogram at 19 1/2 weeks suggested cervical dilation with protruding amniotic membranes. Tocolytic and antibiotic therapy was initiated; no cerclage was placed. Spontaneous rupture of membranes and cord prolapse occurred 48 h later, resulting in delivery of a stillborn female infant. Conservative management was offered after counseling for possible risks associated with maternal sepsis, need for extended hospitalization, potential for hysterectomy and death. The cervix appeared closed after delivery and the umbilical cord was ligated, with subsequent spontaneous cord retraction in utero. Reassuring fetal status was observed for twin B without evidence of contractions or chorioamnionitis. A viable male infant (2894 g) was delivered vaginally at 35 1/2 weeks. Conclusions This report outlines a counseling approach useful for patients with premature delivery of one twin, and presents application of conservative obstetrical management principles for the aftercoming twin even when delivery interval is extreme. PMID:15581427

  5. [Doula--a new concept in obstetrics].

    PubMed

    Thomassen, Peter; Lundwall, Majlis; Wiger, Eva; Wollin, Lena; Uvnäs-Moberg, Kerstin

    2003-12-18

    We wanted to study the effect of extra emotional support in the form of a non-professional woman (doula) before and during delivery. About 200 primiparae were invited to participate in a prospective study which intended to assess differences in delivery outcome between women with and without a doula. Fifty-four declined to participate, 55 had a delivery with doula and 46 were controls. Lower rate of emergency caesarean sections in the doula-group was noted. The parents as well as the staff, became to regard the doula as a valuable support during delivery.

  6. Incidence of unanticipated difficult airway in obstetric patients in a teaching institution.

    PubMed

    Tao, Weike; Edwards, Jason T; Tu, Faping; Xie, Yang; Sharma, Shiv K

    2012-01-31

    PURPOSE: Our aim was to determine the incidence of difficult intubation during pregnancy-related surgery at a high-risk, high-volume teaching institution. METHODS: Airway experience was analyzed among patients who had pregnancy-related surgery under general anesthesia from January 2001 through February 2006. A difficult airway was defined as needing three or more direct laryngoscopy (DL) attempts, use of the additional airway equipment after the DL attempts, or conversion to regional anesthesia due to inability to intubate. Airway characteristics were compared between patients with and without a difficult airway. In addition, pre- and postoperative airway evaluations were compared to identify factors closely related to changes from pregnancy. RESULTS: In a total of 30,766 operations, 2,158 (7%) were performed with general anesthesia. Among these, 1,026 (47.5%) were for emergency cesarean delivery (CD), 610 (28.3%) for nonemergency CD, and 522 (24.2%) for non-CD procedures. A total of 12 patients (0.56%) were identified as having a difficult airway. Four patients were intubated with further DL attempts; others required mask ventilation and other airway equipment. Two patients were ventilated through a laryngeal mask airway without further intubation attempts. Ten of the 12 difficult airway cases were encountered by residents during their first year of clinical anesthesia training. There were no maternal or fetal complications except one possible aspiration. CONCLUSION: Unanticipated difficult airways accounted for 0.56% of all pregnancy-related surgical patients. More than 99.9% of all obstetric patients could be intubated. A difficult airway is more likely to be encountered by anesthesia providers with <1 year of experience. Proper use of airway equipment may help secure the obstetric airway or provide adequate ventilation. Emergency CD did not add an additional level of difficulty over nonemergency CD.

  7. [Massive hemorrhage during abdominal total hysterectomy in a patient with placenta percreta].

    PubMed

    Morita, Yoshihisa; Mizuno, Ju; Takada, Shinji; Yunokawa, Seki; Morita, Shigeho

    2009-08-01

    A 33-year-old pregnant woman, who had undergone three previous cesarean sections and suspected of having placenta accrete, was scheduled for artificial abortion and abdominal total hysterectomy at 15 weeks gestation because of a probable high mortality rate. The general anesthesia was induced using fentanyl, propofol, and vecuronium and maintained with sevoflurane, fentanyl, and vecuronium, in combination with epidural anesthesia using ropivacaine. During the operation, we found that the placenta had penetrated into the posterior abdominal peritoneum and bladder wall. Sudden, massive hemorrhage was encountered when attempting to separate the placenta percreta. The massive hemorrhage, up to 11,054 ml, was controlled by transfusion, infusion, and temporary clamping of the bilateral common iliac arteries. Rapid infuser LEVEL1 and autologous blood recovery systems Electa were also used. After the surgery, the patient was transferred to the intensive care unit intubated and was discharged on the 16th posteroperative day without any complications. Anesthesiologists should be prepared for massive hemorrhage in cases of abdominal total hysterectomy with suspected placenta percreta.

  8. Environmental Impacts of Surgical Procedures: Life Cycle Assessment of Hysterectomy in the United States

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The healthcare sector is a driver of economic growth in the U.S., with spending on healthcare in 2012 reaching $2.8 trillion, or 17% of the U.S. gross domestic product, but it is also a significant source of emissions that adversely impact environmental and public health. The current state of the healthcare industry offers significant opportunities for environmental efficiency improvements, potentially leading to reductions in costs, resource use, and waste without compromising patient care. However, limited research exists that can provide quantitative, sustainable solutions. The operating room is the most resource-intensive area of a hospital, and surgery is therefore an important focal point to understand healthcare-related emissions. Hybrid life cycle assessment (LCA) was used to quantify environmental emissions from four different surgical approaches (abdominal, vaginal, laparoscopic, and robotic) used in the second most common major procedure for women in the U.S., the hysterectomy. Data were collected from 62 cases of hysterectomy. Life cycle assessment results show that major sources of environmental emissions include the production of disposable materials and single-use surgical devices, energy used for heating, ventilation, and air conditioning, and anesthetic gases. By scientifically evaluating emissions, the healthcare industry can strategically optimize its transition to a more sustainable system. PMID:25517602

  9. Chronic postsurgical pain and neuropathic symptoms after abdominal hysterectomy: A silent epidemic.

    PubMed

    Beyaz, Serbülent Gökhan; Özocak, Hande; Ergönenç, Tolga; Palabyk, Onur; Tuna, Ayça Taş; Kaya, Burak; Erkorkmaz, Ünal; Akdemir, Nermin

    2016-08-01

    Chronic postsurgical pain (CPSP) is an important clinic problem. It is assessed that prevalence of chronic pain extends to 30% but it is contended that there are various risk factors. We aimed to evaluate the prevalence of chronic pain after hysterectomy, risk factors of chronicity, neuropathic features of pain, and sensorial alterations at surgery area.Between years 2012 and 2015, 16 to 65 ages old patients that electively undergone total abdominal hysterectomy bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy and passed minimum 3 months after surgery were included to study. Visual analog scale (VAS) and Douleur Neuropathique 4-questionnaire (DN-4) surveys were used to evaluate pain symptoms, algometry device was used for evaluating abdominal pressure threshold and Von Frey Filament was used for sensorial alterations.Ninety-three of 165 eligible patients were included to study. As the groups were compared by demographic data, no difference was obtained (P > 0.05). There was no difference between groups regarding patient and surgery attributes (P > 0.05). Most frequently performed incision type was Pfannenstiel. Neuropathic symptoms were observed in 90 patients (96.8%). Sensorial alterations as hypoesthesia and hyperesthesia were detected around abdominal scar in 18 patients (19.4%) with pinprick test.Neuropathic symptoms should not be ignored in studies evaluating CPSP and a standard methodology should be designed for studies in this topic. PMID:27537570

  10. Environmental impacts of surgical procedures: life cycle assessment of hysterectomy in the United States.

    PubMed

    Thiel, Cassandra L; Eckelman, Matthew; Guido, Richard; Huddleston, Matthew; Landis, Amy E; Sherman, Jodi; Shrake, Scott O; Copley-Woods, Noe; Bilec, Melissa M

    2015-02-01

    The healthcare sector is a driver of economic growth in the U.S., with spending on healthcare in 2012 reaching $2.8 trillion, or 17% of the U.S. gross domestic product, but it is also a significant source of emissions that adversely impact environmental and public health. The current state of the healthcare industry offers significant opportunities for environmental efficiency improvements, potentially leading to reductions in costs, resource use, and waste without compromising patient care. However, limited research exists that can provide quantitative, sustainable solutions. The operating room is the most resource-intensive area of a hospital, and surgery is therefore an important focal point to understand healthcare-related emissions. Hybrid life cycle assessment (LCA) was used to quantify environmental emissions from four different surgical approaches (abdominal, vaginal, laparoscopic, and robotic) used in the second most common major procedure for women in the U.S., the hysterectomy. Data were collected from 62 cases of hysterectomy. Life cycle assessment results show that major sources of environmental emissions include the production of disposable materials and single-use surgical devices, energy used for heating, ventilation, and air conditioning, and anesthetic gases. By scientifically evaluating emissions, the healthcare industry can strategically optimize its transition to a more sustainable system.

  11. A comparison of oxycodone and fentanyl in intravenous patient-controlled analgesia after laparoscopic hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Nan-Seol; Yoo, Sie Hyeon; Chung, Jin Hun; Chung, Ji-Won; Seo, Yonghan; Chung, Ho-Soon; Jeon, Hye-Rim; Gong, Hyung Youn; Lee, Hyun-Young; Mun, Seong-Taek

    2015-01-01

    Background We planned to compare the effect of intravenous oxycodone and fentanyl on post-operative pain after laparoscopic hysterectomy. Methods We examined 60 patients were randomized to postoperative pain treatment with either oxycodone (n = 30, Group O) or fentanyl (n = 30, Group F). The patients received 10 mg oxycodone/100 µg fentanyl with ketorolac 30 mg before the end of anesthesia and then continued with patient-controlled analgesia for 48 h postoperatively. Results The accumulated oxycodone consumption was less than fentanyl during 8, 24 and 48 h postoperatively. Numeric rating score of Group O showed significantly lower than that of Group F during 30 min, 2, 4, 8 and 24 h postoperatively. The incidences of adverse reactions were similar in the two groups, though the incidence of nausea was higher in the Group O during the 24 and 48 h postoperative period. Conclusions Oxycodone IV-PCA was more advantageous than fentanyl IV-PCA for laparoscopic hysterectomy in view of accumulated oxycodone consumption, pain control and cost beneficial effect. However, patient satisfaction was not good in the group O compared to group F. PMID:26045929

  12. Laparo-endoscopic single-site surgery hysterectomy using robotic lightweight endoscope assistants.

    PubMed

    Kane, Sarah; Stepp, Kevin J

    2010-01-01

    Current laparoscopic and robotic hysterectomy techniques require three to five small incisions in the abdominal wall. Each additional port contributes an additional risk for port site complications. Because of these risks, and in an effort to improve cosmesis, surgery through a single incision is being explored. New versatile robot devices can provide a less cumbersome and less expensive alternative to the conventional multi-arm robot devices. In the case reported here, that of a 37-year-old female undergoing hysterectomy, we combined the use of these two technologies in a novel way. By utilizing a single laparoscopic port site in addition to two lightweight robotic endoscope assistants, we were able to decrease risk and improve cosmesis while allowing single-operator control of all instrumentation. The novel use of this robotic device demonstrates a potential decrease in the need for surgical assistants and thus a decrease in cost. When combined with single-site laparoscopy, it also allows the surgeon complete control of the operative environment and may enable more surgeons to embrace the single-incision technique. PMID:27628640

  13. Delayed Presentation of Vaginal Cuff Dehiscence after Robotic Hysterectomy for Gynecologic Cancer: A Case Series and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Escobar, Pamela A.; Gressel, Gregory M.; Goldberg, Gary L.; Kuo, Dennis Yi-Shin

    2016-01-01

    Background. Vaginal cuff dehiscence after hysterectomy has varying incidence according to surgical approach, with highest rates associated with laparoscopic surgery. Comparative data on timing of diagnosis describe a wide range of clinical presentation from weeks to years after hysterectomy. Limited reports have focused specifically on delayed presentation of vaginal cuff dehiscence. Cases. All cases of vaginal cuff dehiscence at our institution between 2005 and 2015 were collectively reviewed and three cases were identified of women who presented with cuff dehiscence greater than 180 days from index surgery. Diagnosis occurred at 342 to 461 days after operation. One patient presented with abdominal pain, a second case presented with vaginal discharge, and the third case lacked clinical symptoms altogether. Prior to diagnosis, one case received chemotherapy and external beam radiation for Stage IB1 cervical cancer and another case received external beam radiation alone for Stage II endometrioid adenocarcinoma. All cuffs were repaired vaginally with interrupted, early absorbable suture. Conclusion. Robotic total laparoscopic hysterectomy may be associated with increased risk of vaginal cuff dehiscence. Further studies are needed to determine risk factors and patient characteristics associated with delayed presentation of vaginal cuff dehiscence in robotic total hysterectomy as well as all surgical approaches. PMID:27110413

  14. Absent organs—Present selves: Exploring embodiment and gender identity in young Norwegian women's accounts of hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Solbrække, Kari Nyheim; Bondevik, Hilde

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we explore how younger women in Norway construct their embodiment and sense of self after hysterectomy. To do this, we conducted in-depth interviews with eight ethnic Norwegian women aged between 25 and 43 who had undergone hysterectomy. In line with a broad phenomenological approach to illness, the study was designed to explore the trajectories of the women's illness with a specific focus on concrete human experience and identity claims from a subjective point of view. In analysing the stories, we encountered feelings of suffering due to the loss of the uterus as well as profound side-effects, such as menopause. However, we also found evidence of relief from being treated for heavy bleeding and serious illness. In order to accentuate the individual voices in these illness stories, we chose a case-oriented analysis in line with Radley and Chamberlain (2001) and Riessman (2008). From this, two main seemingly contradictory storylines stood out: They have removed what made me a woman versus Without a uterus, I feel more like a woman. We also identified heteronormativity as an unstated issue in both these storylines and in the research data as a whole. Acknowledging diversity in the way women experience hysterectomy is important for a better understanding of the ways in which hysterectomy may affect women as humans as well as for developing more cultural competent healthcare services for this group. PMID:25937002

  15. Absent organs--present selves: exploring embodiment and gender identity in young Norwegian women's accounts of hysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Solbrække, Kari Nyheim; Bondevik, Hilde

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we explore how younger women in Norway construct their embodiment and sense of self after hysterectomy. To do this, we conducted in-depth interviews with eight ethnic Norwegian women aged between 25 and 43 who had undergone hysterectomy. In line with a broad phenomenological approach to illness, the study was designed to explore the trajectories of the women's illness with a specific focus on concrete human experience and identity claims from a subjective point of view. In analysing the stories, we encountered feelings of suffering due to the loss of the uterus as well as profound side-effects, such as menopause. However, we also found evidence of relief from being treated for heavy bleeding and serious illness. In order to accentuate the individual voices in these illness stories, we chose a case-oriented analysis in line with Radley and Chamberlain (2001) and Riessman (2008). From this, two main seemingly contradictory storylines stood out: They have removed what made me a woman versus Without a uterus, I feel more like a woman. We also identified heteronormativity as an unstated issue in both these storylines and in the research data as a whole. Acknowledging diversity in the way women experience hysterectomy is important for a better understanding of the ways in which hysterectomy may affect women as humans as well as for developing more cultural competent healthcare services for this group.

  16. Sonographic and Histological Morphometry of the Uterine Cervix—An Assessment of Laparoscopic and Other lntrafascial Hysterectomy Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Semm, Kurt; Lüttges, Jutta; Mettler, Lieselotte

    1995-01-01

    New abdominal and vaginal hysterectomy techniques, such as classic intrafascial serrated edged macro-morcellator (SEMM) hysterectomy (CISH), by pelviscopy/laparoscopy or laparotomy, and intrafascial vaginal hysterectomy (IVH), are both essentially supravaginal techniques. It has been claimed that they give a prophylaxis against cervical stump carcinoma by coring out the cervix with the SEMM. We set out to answer two questions: 1) How can vaginosonography help to choose an adequate SEMM diameter so that the cervical mucosa and transformation zone are completely removed, and 2) How often do cervical glands remain after the coring out procedure? We were able to show a good correlation between sonographic and histological morphology by giant and serial sections. In 253 CISH operations, resection of both endocervix and transformation zone was complete in 92.9%. Dysplasias were always removed completely; only 18 cervical cores exhibited healthy glands (retention cysts) in the resection margin. Therefore, CISH procedures should be able to prevent most of the cervical stump carcinomata that follow traditional supravaginal hysterectomy, but only long-term follow-up will give the final proof. PMID:18493385

  17. To Assess the Effect of Maternal BMI on Obstetrical Outcome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakhanpal, Shuchi; Aggarwal, Asha; Kaur, Gurcharan

    2012-06-01

    AIMS: To assess the effect of maternal BMI on complications in pregnancy, mode of delivery, complications of labour and delivery.METHODS:A crossectional study was carried out in the Obst and Gynae department, Kasturba Hospital, Delhi. The study enrolled 100 pregnant women. They were divided into 2 groups based on their BMI, more than or equal to 30.0 kg/m2 were categorized as obese and less than 30 kg/m2 as non obese respectively. Maternal complications in both types of patients were studied.RESULTS:CONCLUSION: As the obstetrical outcome is significantly altered due to obesity, we can improve maternal outcome by overcoming obesity. As obesity is a modifiable risk factor, preconception counseling creating awareness regarding health risk associated with obesity should be encouraged and obstetrical complications reduced.

  18. Recipes for obstetric spinal hypotension: The clinical context counts.

    PubMed

    Bishop, David G; Rodseth, Reitze N; Dyer, Robert A

    2016-09-01

    Hypotension following obstetric spinal anaesthesia remains a common and important problem. While recent research advances have brought us closer to the perfect recipe for the obstetric spinal anaesthetic, these advances have not been translated into practical guidelines able to reduce the unacceptable number of fatalities that occur in environments where resources are limited. In South Africa, more than half of anaesthetic deaths are still related to spinal hypotension. A gap exists between the 'perfect recipe', developed from a clinical context rooted in resource-rich research environments, and its application and performance in real-world resource-poor environments - conditions experienced by more than 75% of the world's population. This review attempts to define this knowledge gap and proposes a research agenda to address the deficiencies. PMID:27601104

  19. Invisible wounds: obstetric violence in the United States.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Tello, Farah

    2016-05-01

    In recent years, there has been growing public attention to a problem many US health institutions and providers disclaim: bullying and coercion of pregnant women during birth by health care personnel, known as obstetric violence. Through a series of real case studies, this article provides a legal practitioner's perspective on a systemic problem of institutionalized gender-based violence with only individual tort litigation as an avenue for redress, and even that largely out of reach for women. It provides an overview of the limitations of the civil justice system in addressing obstetric violence, and compares alternatives from Latin American jurisdictions. Finally, the article posits policy solutions for the legal system and health care systems. PMID:27578339

  20. [An update of the obstetrics hemorrhage treatment protocol].

    PubMed

    Morillas-Ramírez, F; Ortiz-Gómez, J R; Palacio-Abizanda, F J; Fornet-Ruiz, I; Pérez-Lucas, R; Bermejo-Albares, L

    2014-04-01

    Obstetric hemorrhage is still a major cause of maternal and fetal morbimortality in developed countries. This is an underestimated problem, which usually appears unpredictably. A high proportion of the morbidity of obstetric hemorrhage is considered to be preventable if adequately managed. The major international clinical guidelines recommend producing consensus management protocols, adapted to local characteristics and keep them updated in the light of experience and new scientific publications. We present a protocol updated, according to the latest recommendations, and our own experience, in order to be used as a basis for those anesthesiologists who wish to use and adapt it locally to their daily work. This last aspect is very important to be effective, and is a task to be performed at each center, according to the availability of resources, personnel and architectural features. PMID:24560060

  1. A Short History of Sonography in Obstetrics and Gynaecology

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, S.

    2013-01-01

    The history of sonography in Obstetrics and Gynaecology dates from the classic 1958 Lancet paper of Ian Donald and his team from Glasgow. Fifty years on it is impossible to conceive of practising Obstetrics and Gynaecology without one of the many forms of ultrasound available today. Technological developments such as solid state circuitry, real time imaging, colour and power Doppler, transvaginal sonography and 3/4D imaging have been seized by clinical researchers to enhance the investigation and management of patients in areas as diverse as assessment of fetal growth and wellbeing, screening for fetal anomalies, prediction of pre-eclampsia and preterm birth, detection of ectopic gestation, evaluation of pelvic masses, screening for ovarian cancer and fertility management. Ultrasound guided procedures are now essential components of fetal therapy and IVF treatment. This concise history is written by someone who has witnessed each of these advances throughout the ultrasound era and is able to give perspective to these momentous happenings. PMID:24753947

  2. Disseminated intravascular coagulation in obstetric and gynecologic disorders.

    PubMed

    Montagnana, Martina; Franchi, Massimo; Danese, Elisa; Gotsch, Francesca; Guidi, Gian Cesare

    2010-06-01

    Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is a syndrome characterized by a massive, widespread, and ongoing activation of the coagulation system, secondary to a variety of clinical conditions. Many obstetric complications, such as abruptio placentae, amniotic fluid embolism, endotoxin sepsis, retained dead fetus, post-hemorrhagic shock, hydatidiform mole, and gynecologic malignancies, might trigger DIC. In these gynecologic and obstetric settings, DIC is usually associated with high mortality and morbidity rates. No single laboratory test is sensitive or specific enough to diagnose DIC definitively, but it can be diagnosed by using a combination of multiple clinical and laboratory tests that reflect the pathophysiology of the syndrome. At present, the therapeutical approach to pregnancy- and gynecologic-related DIC comprises the specific and aggressive treatment of the underlying disease, eventually followed by a supportive blood product replacement therapy and restoration of physiological anticoagulant pathways. This article reviews the etiopathogenesis, clinical manifestations, laboratory diagnosis, and therapy of pregnancy- and gynecologic-related DIC.

  3. Biopsychosocial obstetrics and gynaecology - a perspective from Australia.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Heather

    2016-01-01

    Prior to and throughout the twentieth century, biomedical understandings of health predominated. Australian obstetrician and gynaecologist, Professor Derek Llewellyn-Jones responded to frustrations with the limitations of this narrow approach from both within and beyond the medical profession. His pioneering research, education and writings re-conceptualised the discipline as encompassing the social and psychological contexts and profoundly influenced women's own understanding of their health and the practice of obstetrics and gynaecology. The biopsychosocial model has replaced biological determinism and is now pervasive in education and clinical practice in many parts of the world. Widespread acceptance of the model has until now been associated with under-recognition of the importance of biology. Recent findings from epigenetics and neuroscience are enabling integration of body, mind and society and enhanced understanding and practice of psychosomatic obstetrics and gynaecology.

  4. Anaesthesia for non-obstetric surgery during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Upadya, Madhusudan; Saneesh, PJ

    2016-01-01

    Non-obstetric surgery during pregnancy posts additional concerns to anaesthesiologists. The chief goals are to preserve maternal safety, maintain the pregnant state and achieve the best possible foetal outcome. The choice of anaesthetic technique and the selection of appropriate anaesthetic drugs should be guided by indication for surgery, nature, and site of the surgical procedure. Anaesthesiologist must consider the effects of the disease process itself and inhibit uterine contractions and avoid preterm labour and delivery. Foetal safety requires avoidance of potentially dangerous drugs and assurance of continuation of adequate uteroplacental perfusion. Until date, no anaesthetic drug has been shown to be clearly dangerous to the human foetus. The decision on proceeding with surgery should be made by multidisciplinary team involving anaesthesiologists, obstetricians, surgeons and perinatologists. This review describes the general anaesthetic principles, concerns regarding anaesthetic drugs and outlines some specific conditions of non-obstetric surgeries. PMID:27141105

  5. Anaesthesia for non-obstetric surgery during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Upadya, Madhusudan; Saneesh, P J

    2016-04-01

    Non-obstetric surgery during pregnancy posts additional concerns to anaesthesiologists. The chief goals are to preserve maternal safety, maintain the pregnant state and achieve the best possible foetal outcome. The choice of anaesthetic technique and the selection of appropriate anaesthetic drugs should be guided by indication for surgery, nature, and site of the surgical procedure. Anaesthesiologist must consider the effects of the disease process itself and inhibit uterine contractions and avoid preterm labour and delivery. Foetal safety requires avoidance of potentially dangerous drugs and assurance of continuation of adequate uteroplacental perfusion. Until date, no anaesthetic drug has been shown to be clearly dangerous to the human foetus. The decision on proceeding with surgery should be made by multidisciplinary team involving anaesthesiologists, obstetricians, surgeons and perinatologists. This review describes the general anaesthetic principles, concerns regarding anaesthetic drugs and outlines some specific conditions of non-obstetric surgeries. PMID:27141105

  6. [An update of the obstetrics hemorrhage treatment protocol].

    PubMed

    Morillas-Ramírez, F; Ortiz-Gómez, J R; Palacio-Abizanda, F J; Fornet-Ruiz, I; Pérez-Lucas, R; Bermejo-Albares, L

    2014-04-01

    Obstetric hemorrhage is still a major cause of maternal and fetal morbimortality in developed countries. This is an underestimated problem, which usually appears unpredictably. A high proportion of the morbidity of obstetric hemorrhage is considered to be preventable if adequately managed. The major international clinical guidelines recommend producing consensus management protocols, adapted to local characteristics and keep them updated in the light of experience and new scientific publications. We present a protocol updated, according to the latest recommendations, and our own experience, in order to be used as a basis for those anesthesiologists who wish to use and adapt it locally to their daily work. This last aspect is very important to be effective, and is a task to be performed at each center, according to the availability of resources, personnel and architectural features.

  7. Observations on obstetric practice in a multicultural setting.

    PubMed

    TambyRaja, R L

    1999-06-01

    Singapore provides a rich environment for investigations into ethnic differences in pregnancy outcome, as it is populated by Malays, Indians, and Chinese. Years of clinical practice and obstetric research in this environment have affirmed the observation that many factors interact in determining length of gestation and birth weight, and that these factors have differential affects among these three different ethnic groups. Although technological advances have furthered our understanding of obstetrical outcomes and provided essential tools to promote the survival of premature infants, the persistent use of uniform growth standards hampers our ability to assure positive outcomes for women of different ethnicity. Recognition of ethnic differences has resulted in declines in certain negative pregnancy outcomes for women in Singapore. The development of race-specific uterine growth curves will enhance the provision of perinatal care for all women.

  8. Obstetrical Forceps Would Limit Force On An Infant's Head

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smeltzer, Stan; Lawson, Seth

    1995-01-01

    Improved obstetrical forceps proposed to reduce injuries to newborn infants. Fabricated mostly of thermoplastic material. Reinforcing fibers added in hinge region of forceps. Combination of material, size, and shape chosen to make forceps yield elastically by amount keeping applied force from rising beyond maximum allowable value. Fiber-optic sensors for measuring strains embedded in forceps. Strain measurements used to compute tensile and compressive forces applied to infant's head.

  9. Maternal characteristics and clinical diagnoses influence obstetrical outcomes in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Adisasmita, Asri; Smith, Carl V; El-Mohandes, Ayman A E; Deviany, Poppy Elvira; Ryon, Judith J; Kiely, Michele; Rogers-Bloch, Quail; Gipson, Reginald F

    2015-07-01

    This Indonesian study evaluates associations between near-miss status/death with maternal demographic, health care characteristics, and obstetrical complications, comparing results using retrospective and prospective data. The main outcome measures were obstetric conditions and socio-economic factors to predict near-miss/death. We abstracted all obstetric admissions (1,358 retrospective and 1,240 prospective) from two district hospitals in East Java, Indonesia between 4/1/2009 and 5/15/2010. Prospective data added socio-economic status, access to care and referral patterns. Reduced logistic models were constructed, and multivariate analyses used to assess association of risk variables to outcome. Using multivariate analysis, variables associated with risk of near-miss/death include postpartum hemorrhage (retrospective AOR 5.41, 95 % CI 2.64-11.08; prospective AOR 10.45, 95 % CI 5.59-19.52) and severe preeclampsia/eclampsia (retrospective AOR 1.94, 95 % CI 1.05-3.57; prospective AOR 3.26, 95 % CI 1.79-5.94). Associations with near-miss/death were seen for antepartum hemorrhage in retrospective data (AOR 9.34, 95 % CI 4.34-20.13), and prospectively for poverty (AOR 2.17, 95 % CI 1.33-3.54) and delivering outside the hospital (AOR 2.04, 95 % CI 1.08-3.82). Postpartum hemorrhage and severe preeclampsia/eclampsia are leading causes of near-miss/death in Indonesia. Poverty and delivery outside the hospital are significant risk factors. Prompt recognition of complications, timely referrals, standardized care protocols, prompt hospital triage, and structured provider education may reduce obstetric mortality and morbidity. Retrospective data were reliable, but prospective data provided valuable information about barriers to care and referral patterns.

  10. A practical guide to ultrasound in obstetrics and gynecology

    SciTech Connect

    Sauerbrei, E.E.; Nguyen, K.T.; Nolan, R.L.

    1986-01-01

    This book reviews the indications for ultrasound during pregnancy and establishes guidelines for conducting obstetrical ultrasound examinations. A selection of scans follows. These scans depict normal female pelvic anatomy; the nongravid uterus; the ovaries and adnexae; early pregnancy (the embryonic period); the placenta; the membranes, amniotic fluid, and umbilical cord; the uterus and adnexae in pregnancy; and the fetus. The book contains information on making accurate fetal measurements and calculations.

  11. Advances in Suture Material for Obstetric and Gynecologic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, James A; Clark, Rachel M

    2009-01-01

    Despite millennia of experience with wound closure biomaterials, no study or surgeon has yet identified the perfect suture for all situations. Tissue characteristics, tensile strength, reactivity, absorption rates, and handling properties should be taken into account when selecting a wound closure suture. This review discusses the wound healing process and the biomechanical properties of currently available suture materials to better understand how to choose suture material in obstetrics and gynecology. PMID:19826572

  12. Childbirth in ancient Rome: from traditional folklore to obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Todman, Donald

    2007-04-01

    In ancient Rome, childbirth was a hazardous event for both mother and child with high rates of infant and maternal mortality. Traditional Roman medicine centred on folklore and religious practices, but with the development of Hippocratic medicine came significant advances in the care of women during pregnancy and confinement. Midwives or obstetrices played an important role and applied rational scientific practices to improve outcomes. This evolution from folklore to obstetrics was a pivotal point in the history of childbirth.

  13. Integrated System for Monitoring and Prevention in Obstetrics-Gynaecology.

    PubMed

    Robu, Andreea; Gauca, Bianca; Crisan-Vida, Mihaela; Stoicu-Tivadar, Lăcrămioara

    2016-01-01

    A better monitoring of pregnant women, mainly during the third trimester of pregnancy and an easy communication between physician and patients are very important for the prevention and good health of baby and mother. The paper presents an integrated system as support for the Obstetrics - Gynaecology domain consisting in two modules: a mobile application, ObGynCare, dedicated to the pregnant women and a new component of the Obstetrics-Gynaecology Department Information System dedicated to the physicians for a better monitoring of the pregnant women. The mobile application informs the pregnant women about their status, permits them to introduce glycaemia and weight values and has as option pulse and blood pressure acquisition from a smart sensor and provides results in a graphic format. It also provides support for easy patient-doctor communication related to any health problems. ObGyn Care offers nutrition recommendations and gives the pregnant women the possibility to enter a social space of common interests using social networks (Facebook) to exchange useful and practical information. Data collected from patients and from sensor are stored on the cloud and the physician may access the information and analyse it. The extended module of the Obstetrics-Gynaecology Department Information System already developed supports the physicians to visualize weekly, monthly, or on a trimester, the patient data and to discuss with her through the chat module. The mobile application is in test by pregnant women and medical personnel. PMID:27071866

  14. Need for a global obstetric fistula training strategy.

    PubMed

    Rushwan, Hamid; Khaddaj, Sinan; Knight, Louise; Scott, Rachel

    2012-10-01

    Obstetric fistula is a complication of childbirth that often follows obstructed labor and is almost exclusive to low-resource countries. The original Global Burden of Disease Study (GBD 1990 Study) reported an incidence of 8.68 per 100000 and a prevalence of 51.35 per 100,000 for women aged 15-44 years in low-resource regions. The most cited global prevalence estimate is 2 million women. Although the global burden of obstetric fistula remains unclear, the number of women suffering from the condition is increasing, while surgical treatment remains limited. There are few experienced fistula surgeons and past surgical training approaches have been inconsistent. The Global Competency-Based Fistula Surgery Training Manual developed by FIGO and partners contains a set curriculum and, to ensure its implementation, a global strategy and training program have been developed. This paper describes key elements of the training program and its implementation. The anticipated impact of the training program is a reduction in global morbidity caused by obstetric fistula.

  15. Prenatal emotion management improves obstetric outcomes: a randomized control study

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jian; Li, He-Jiang; Wang, Jue; Mao, Hong-Jing; Jiang, Wen-Ying; Zhou, Hong; Chen, Shu-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Negative emotions can cause a number of prenatal problems and disturb obstetric outcomes. We determined the effectiveness of prenatal emotional management on obstetric outcomes in nulliparas. Methods: All participants completed the PHQ-9 at the baseline assessment. Then, the participants were randomly assigned to the emotional management (EM) and usual care (UC) groups. The baseline evaluation began at 31 weeks gestation and the participants were followed up to 42 days postpartum. Each subject in the EM group received an extra EM program while the participants in the UC groups received routine prenatal care and education only. The PHQ-9 and Edinburgh Postnatal Depression scale (EPDS) were used for assessment. Results: The EM group had a lower PHQ-9 score at 36 weeks gestation, and 7 and 42 days after delivery (P < 0.01), and a lower EPDS score 42 days postpartum (P < 0.05). The rate of cesarean section in the EM group was lower than the UC group (P < 0.01), and the cesarean section rate without a medical indication was lower (P < 0.01). The duration of the second stage of labor in the EM group was shorter than the UC group (P < 0.01). Conclusions: Prenatal EM intervention could control anxiety and depressive feelings in nulliparas, and improve obstetric outcomes. It may serve as an innovative approach to reduce the cesarean section rate in China. PMID:26309641

  16. Utility of proteomics in obstetric disorders: a review

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Núñez, Jónathan; Valdés-Yong, Magel

    2015-01-01

    The study of proteomics could explain many aspects of obstetric disorders. We undertook this review with the aim of assessing the utility of proteomics in the specialty of obstetrics. We searched the electronic databases of MEDLINE, EBSCOhost, BVS Bireme, and SciELO, using various search terms with the assistance of a librarian. We considered cohort studies, case-control studies, case series, and systematic review articles published until October 2014 in the English or Spanish language, and evaluated their quality and the internal validity of the evidence provided. Two reviewers extracted the data independently, then both researchers simultaneously revised the data later, to arrive at a consensus. The search retrieved 1,158 papers, of which 965 were excluded for being duplicates, not relevant, or unrelated studies. A further 86 papers were excluded for being guidelines, protocols, or case reports, along with another 64 that did not contain relevant information, leaving 43 studies for inclusion. Many of these studies showed the utility of proteomic techniques for prediction, pathophysiology, diagnosis, management, monitoring, and prognosis of pre-eclampsia, perinatal infection, premature rupture of membranes, preterm birth, intrauterine growth restriction, and ectopic pregnancy. Proteomic techniques have enormous clinical significance and constitute an invaluable weapon in the management of obstetric disorders that increase maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. PMID:25926758

  17. Obstetric and vascular APS: same autoantibodies but different diseases?

    PubMed

    Meroni, P L; Raschi, E; Grossi, C; Pregnolato, F; Trespidi, L; Acaia, B; Borghi, M O

    2012-06-01

    Beta2 glycoprotein I (β2GPI)-dependent antiphospholipid antibodies (aPLs) are the main pathogenic autoantibody population and at the same time the laboratory diagnostic tool for the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). These antibodies are responsible for both the vascular and the obstetric manifestations of the syndrome but the pathogenic mechanisms behind these manifestations are not the same. For example, thrombotic events do not appear to play a major role in APS miscarriages and a direct reactivity of β2GPI-dependent aPLs on decidual and trophoblast cells was reported. A local expression of β2GPI on these tissues was reported both in physiological conditions and in APS women, thus explaining the local tropism of the autoantibodies. The two hit hypothesis was suggested to explain why the vascular manifestations of APS may occur only occasionally in spite of the persistent presence of aPLs. This is not apparently the case for the obstetric variant of the syndrome, making the difference even more striking. A different pathogenesis may also provide the rationale for the well-known fact that the vascular and the obstetric manifestations may occur independently although in a minority of cases.

  18. Robotic Versus Laparoscopic Hysterectomy for Benign Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Trials.

    PubMed

    Albright, Benjamin B; Witte, Tilman; Tofte, Alena N; Chou, Jeremy; Black, Jonathan D; Desai, Vrunda B; Erekson, Elisabeth A

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the safety and effectiveness of robotic vs laparoscopic hysterectomy in women with benign uterine disease, as determined by randomized studies. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, ClinicalTrials.gov, and Controlled-Trials.com from study inception to October 9, 2014, using the intersection of the themes "robotic" and "hysterectomy." We included only randomized and quasi-randomized controlled trials of robotic vs laparoscopic hysterectomy in women for benign disease. Four trials met our inclusion criteria and were included in the analyses. We extracted data, and assessed the studies for methodological quality in duplicate. For meta-analysis, we used random effects to calculate pooled risk ratios (RRs) and weighted mean differences. For our primary outcome, we used a modified version of the Expanded Accordion Severity Grading System to classify perioperative complications. We identified 41 complications among 326 patients. Comparing robotic and laparoscopic hysterectomy, revealed no statistically significant differences in the rate of class 1 and 2 complications (RR, 0.66; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.23-1.89) or in the rate of class 3 and 4 complications (RR, 0.99; 95% CI, 0.22-4.40). Analyses of secondary outcomes were limited owing to heterogeneity, but showed no significant benefit of the robotic technique over the laparoscopic technique in terms of length of hospital stay (weighted mean difference, -0.39 day; 95% CI, -0.92 to 0.14 day), total operating time (weighted mean difference, 9.0 minutes; 95% CI, -31.27 to 47.26 minutes), conversions to laparotomy, or blood loss. Outcomes of cost, pain, and quality of life were reported inconsistently and were not amenable to pooling. Current evidence demonstrates neither statistically significant nor clinically meaningful differences in surgical outcomes between robotic and laparoscopic hysterectomy for benign disease. The role of robotic

  19. The Changing Scenario of Obstetrics and Gynecology Residency Training

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Natasha; Dragovic, Kristina; Trester, Richard; Blankstein, Josef

    2015-01-01

    Background Significant changes have been noted in aspects of obstetrics-gynecology (ob-gyn) training over the last decade, which is reflected in Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) operative case logs for graduating ob-gyn residents. Objective We sought to understand the changing trends of ob-gyn residents' experience in obstetric procedures over the past 11 years. Methods We analyzed national ACGME procedure logs for all obstetric procedures recorded by 12 728 ob-gyn residents who graduated between academic years 2002–2003 and 2012–2013. Results The average number of cesarean sections per resident increased from 191.8 in 2002–2003 to 233.4 in 2012–2013 (17%; P < .001; 95% CI −47.769 to −35.431), the number of vaginal deliveries declined from 320.8 to 261 (18.6%; P < .001; 95% CI 38.842–56.35), the number of forceps deliveries declined from 23.8 to 8.4 (64.7%; P < .001; 95% CI 14.061–16.739), and the number of vacuum deliveries declined from 23.8 to 17.6 (26%; P < .001; 95% CI 5.043–7.357). Between 2002–2003 and 2007–2008, amniocentesis decreased from 18.5 to 11 (P < .001, 95% CI 6.298–8.702), and multifetal vaginal deliveries increased from 10.8 to 14 (P < .001, 95% CI −3.895 to −2.505). Both were not included in ACGME reporting after 2008. Conclusions Ob-gyn residents' training experience changed substantially over the past decade. ACGME obstetric logs demonstrated decreases in volume of vaginal, forceps, and vacuum deliveries, and increases in cesarean and multifetal deliveries. Change in experience may require use of innovative strategies to help improve residents' basic obstetric skills. PMID:26457146

  20. Prognostic models in obstetrics: available, but far from applicable.

    PubMed

    Kleinrouweler, C Emily; Cheong-See, Fiona M; Collins, Gary S; Kwee, Anneke; Thangaratinam, Shakila; Khan, Khalid S; Mol, Ben Willem J; Pajkrt, Eva; Moons, Karel G M; Schuit, Ewoud

    2016-01-01

    Health care provision is increasingly focused on the prediction of patients' individual risk for developing a particular health outcome in planning further tests and treatments. There has been a steady increase in the development and publication of prognostic models for various maternal and fetal outcomes in obstetrics. We undertook a systematic review to give an overview of the current status of available prognostic models in obstetrics in the context of their potential advantages and the process of developing and validating models. Important aspects to consider when assessing a prognostic model are discussed and recommendations on how to proceed on this within the obstetric domain are given. We searched MEDLINE (up to July 2012) for articles developing prognostic models in obstetrics. We identified 177 papers that reported the development of 263 prognostic models for 40 different outcomes. The most frequently predicted outcomes were preeclampsia (n = 69), preterm delivery (n = 63), mode of delivery (n = 22), gestational hypertension (n = 11), and small-for-gestational-age infants (n = 10). The performance of newer models was generally not better than that of older models predicting the same outcome. The most important measures of predictive accuracy (ie, a model's discrimination and calibration) were often (82.9%, 218/263) not both assessed. Very few developed models were validated in data other than the development data (8.7%, 23/263). Only two-thirds of the papers (62.4%, 164/263) presented the model such that validation in other populations was possible, and the clinical applicability was discussed in only 11.0% (29/263). The impact of developed models on clinical practice was unknown. We identified a large number of prognostic models in obstetrics, but there is relatively little evidence about their performance, impact, and usefulness in clinical practice so that at this point, clinical implementation cannot be recommended. New efforts should be directed

  1. To the point: obstetrics and gynecology global health experiences for medical students.

    PubMed

    Hampton, Brittany S; Chuang, Alice W; Abbott, Jodi F; Buery-Joyner, Samantha D; Cullimore, Amie J; Dalrymple, John L; Forstein, David A; Hueppchen, Nancy A; Kaczmarczyk, Joseph M; Page-Ramsey, Sarah; Pradhan, Archana; Wolf, Abigail; Dugoff, Lorraine

    2014-07-01

    This article, from the To the Point series prepared by the Association of Professors of Gynecology and Obstetrics Undergraduate Medical Education Committee, provides educators with an overview of considerations for obstetrics and gynecology global health experiences for the medical student. Options for integration of obstetrics and gynecology global health into undergraduate medical curricula are discussed. Specific considerations for global health clinical experiences for medical students, including choosing a clinical location, oversight and mentorship, goals and objectives, predeparture preparation, and evaluation, are reviewed.

  2. Moral absolutism and abortion: Alan Donagan on the hysterectomy and craniotomy cases.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Terrence

    1985-07-01

    Reynolds argues that the nonconsequentialist moral theory proposed by Alan Donagan in his book The Theory of Morality (University of Chicago Press; 1977) does not resolve the cases in which craniotomy or removal of a cancerous uterus appears necessary to save the life of a pregnant woman. Donagan's absolute prohibition against the murder of the innocent and his rejection of the principle of double effect have led him to view the fetus as a pursuer or assailant or to assert the theory of proleptic agreement--that in risk taking ventures the parties may agree that killing one person to save the lives of the others will be accepted. Reynolds holds these arguments to be inapplicable in therapeutic abortions involving craniotomy or hysterectomy and concludes that Donagan's absolutist theory must be reexamined.

  3. Two methods for establishing primary human endometrial stromal cells from hysterectomy specimens.

    PubMed

    Jividen, Kasey; Movassagh, Mercedeh Javanbakht; Jazaeri, Amir; Li, Hui

    2014-01-01

    Many efforts have been devoted to establish in vitro cell culture systems. These systems are designed to model a vast number of in vivo processes. Cell culture systems arising from human endometrial samples are no exception. Applications range from normal cyclic physiological processes to endometrial pathologies such as gynecological cancers, infectious diseases, and reproductive deficiencies. Here, we provide two methods for establishing primary endometrial stromal cells from surgically resected endometrial hysterectomy specimens. The first method is referred to as "the scraping method" and incorporates mechanical scraping using surgical or razor blades whereas the second method is termed "the trypsin method." This latter method uses the enzymatic activity of trypsin to promote the separation of cells and primary cell outgrowth. We illustrate step-by-step methodology through digital images and microscopy. We also provide examples for validating endometrial stromal cell lines via quantitative real time polymerase chain reactions (qPCR) and immunofluorescence (IF). PMID:24894444

  4. Moral absolutism and abortion: Alan Donagan on the hysterectomy and craniotomy cases.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Terrence

    1985-07-01

    Reynolds argues that the nonconsequentialist moral theory proposed by Alan Donagan in his book The Theory of Morality (University of Chicago Press; 1977) does not resolve the cases in which craniotomy or removal of a cancerous uterus appears necessary to save the life of a pregnant woman. Donagan's absolute prohibition against the murder of the innocent and his rejection of the principle of double effect have led him to view the fetus as a pursuer or assailant or to assert the theory of proleptic agreement--that in risk taking ventures the parties may agree that killing one person to save the lives of the others will be accepted. Reynolds holds these arguments to be inapplicable in therapeutic abortions involving craniotomy or hysterectomy and concludes that Donagan's absolutist theory must be reexamined. PMID:11658636

  5. [Repair of post-hysterectomy vesicovaginal fistulae: the state of the art].

    PubMed

    Giusti, Giuseppe; De Lisa, Antonello

    2015-01-01

    In western countries, vesicovaginal fistulae (VVF) are mostly iatrogenic and in the majority of cases are secondary to hysterectomy. The golden standard for the treatment of VVF has remained largely unchanged since 1953 (Couvelaire): good visualization, good dissection, good approximation of the margins, and good urine drainage. However, several aspects are still being debated, including whether or not to pursue conservative repair, the timing for surgical repair, whether to perform excision of the fistula tract, the best type of surgical access, and whether or not to use tissue interposition. We decided to review the state of the art in the treatment of VVF, which are exclusively of a traumatic nature and non-radiated, by performing a bibliography search carried on Pubmed using keywords such as "vesicovaginal fistula". The search focused on recent articles and was largely restricted to the past 10 years.

  6. Comparison between Preoperative Rectal Diclofenac Plus Paracetamol and Diclofenac Alone for PostoperativePain of Hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Samimi Sede, Saghar; Davari Tanha, Fateme; Valadan, Mehrnaz; Modaressi, Zeinab

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To detect whether the preoperative combined administration of rectal diclofenac and paracetamol is superior to placebo or rectal diclofenac alone for pain after abdominal hysterectomy. Materials and methods: Ninety female patients (American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) physical status I-II), scheduled for abdominal hysterectomy were recruited to this double blind trial and were randomized to receive one of three modalities before surgery: rectal combination of diclofenac and paracetamol, rectal diclofenac alone or rectal placebo alone which were given as a suppository one hour prior to surgery. The primary outcomes were visual analogue pain scores measured at 0, 0.5, 2, 4, 8, 16 and 24 hours after surgery and the time of first administration and also total amount of morphine used in the first 24 hour after surgery. A 10 cm visual analog scale (VAS ) was used to assess pain intensity at rest. Results: In patients receiving the combination of diclofenac and paracetamol total dose of morphine used in the first 24 hour after surgery was significantly lower (13.9 ± 2.7 mg) compared to diclofenac group (16.8± 2.8 mg) and placebo group (20.1 ± 3.6 mg) (p<0.05). VAS pain score was significantly lower in combination group compared to other groups all time during first 24 hours (p<0.05). There had been a significant difference between combination group and the two other groups in terms of the first request of morphine (p<0.05). Conclusion: According to our study Patients who receive the rectal diclofenac-paracetamol combination experience significantly a lower pain scale in the first 24 hour after surgery compared with patients receiving diclofenac or placebo alone. Their need to supplementary analgesic is significantly later and lower compared to placebo and diclofenac alone. PMID:25628716

  7. Celiac disease and obstetric complications: a systematic review and metaanalysis.

    PubMed

    Saccone, Gabriele; Berghella, Vincenzo; Sarno, Laura; Maruotti, Giuseppe M; Cetin, Irene; Greco, Luigi; Khashan, Ali S; McCarthy, Fergus; Martinelli, Domenico; Fortunato, Francesca; Martinelli, Pasquale

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this metaanalysis was to evaluate the risk of the development of obstetric complications in women with celiac disease. We searched electronic databases from their inception until February 2015. We included all cohort studies that reported the incidence of obstetric complications in women with celiac disease compared with women without celiac disease (ie, control group). Studies without a control group and case-control studies were excluded. The primary outcome was defined a priori and was the incidence of a composite of obstetric complications that included intrauterine growth restriction, small for gestational age, low birthweight, preeclampsia and preterm birth. Secondary outcomes included the incidence of preterm birth, intrauterine growth restriction, stillbirth, preeclampsia, small for gestational age, and low birthweight. The review was registered with PROSPERO (CRD42015017263) before data extraction. All authors were contacted to obtain the original databases and perform individual participant data metaanalysis. Primary and secondary outcomes were assessed in the aggregate data analysis and in the individual participant data metaanalysis. We included 10 cohort studies (4,844,555 women) in this metaanalysis. Four authors provided the entire databases for the individual participant data analysis. Because none of the included studies stratified data for the primary outcome (ie, composite outcome), the assessment of this outcome for the aggregate analysis was not feasible. Aggregate data analysis showed that, compared with women in the control group, women with celiac disease (both treated and untreated) had a significantly higher risk of the development of preterm birth (adjusted odds ratio, 1.35; 95% confidence interval, 1.09-1.66), intrauterine growth restriction (odds ratio, 2.48; 95% confidence interval, 1.32-4.67), stillbirth (odds ratio, 4.84; 95% confidence interval, 1.08-21.75), low birthweight (odds ratio, 1.63; 95% confidence interval, 1

  8. Failed tracheal intubation during obstetric general anaesthesia: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Kinsella, S M; Winton, A L; Mushambi, M C; Ramaswamy, K; Swales, H; Quinn, A C; Popat, M

    2015-11-01

    We reviewed the literature on obstetric failed tracheal intubation from 1970 onwards. The incidence remained unchanged over the period at 2.6 (95% CI 2.0 to 3.2) per 1000 anaesthetics (1 in 390) for obstetric general anaesthesia and 2.3 (95% CI 1.7 to 2.9) per 1000 general anaesthetics (1 in 443) for caesarean section. Maternal mortality from failed intubation was 2.3 (95% CI 0.3 to 8.2) per 100000 general anaesthetics for caesarean section (one death per 90 failed intubations). Maternal deaths occurred from aspiration or hypoxaemia secondary to airway obstruction or oesophageal intubation. There were 3.4 (95% CI 0.7 to 9.9) front-of-neck airway access procedures (surgical airway) per 100000 general anaesthetics for caesarean section (one procedure per 60 failed intubations), usually carried out as a late rescue attempt with poor maternal outcomes. Before the late 1990s, most cases were awakened after failed intubation; since the late 1990s, general anaesthesia has been continued in the majority of cases. When general anaesthesia was continued, a laryngeal mask was usually used but with a trend towards use of a second-generation supraglottic airway device. A prospective study of obstetric general anaesthesia found that transient maternal hypoxaemia occurred in over two-thirds of cases of failed intubation, usually without sequelae. Pulmonary aspiration occurred in 8% but the rate of maternal intensive care unit admission after failed intubation was the same as that after uneventful general anaesthesia. Poor neonatal outcomes were often associated with preoperative fetal compromise, although failed intubation and lowest maternal oxygen saturation were independent predictors of neonatal intensive care unit admission.

  9. Obstetric and gynaecological factors in susceptibility to peripheral joint osteoarthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Silman, A J; Newman, J

    1996-01-01

    There is clear evidence that the age period coinciding with the peak age of the menopause is associated with an increased prevalence of osteoarthritis and this fits in with clinical observation of high likelihood of presentation at this age. A number of pieces of biological evidence also support the notion that changes in sex hormone status might influence risk of degenerative disease at peripheral joint sites. There do not appear, however, to be any important epidemiological predictors based on menstrual or obstetric history that might be useful in predicting who these women might be. PMID:8882147

  10. A bill of rights for patients with obstetric fistula.

    PubMed

    Wall, L Lewis

    2014-12-01

    According to the seven categories of vulnerability proposed by Kipnis (cognitive, juridical, deferential, medical, allocational, social, and infrastructural), and the four generally accepted principles of biomedical ethics (respect, beneficence, non-maleficence, and fairness), women with obstetric fistulas are an exceptionally vulnerable population. Therefore, they merit special consideration in both clinical care and research settings. Adoption of a formal bill of rights for patients with fistula similar to the one proposed in the present report should be encouraged at all facilities where these women are treated. Acknowledgment of their rights would help to improve their care and end the abuses they are exposed to in institutional settings.

  11. Organizing an Effective Obstetric/Gynecologic Hospitalist Program.

    PubMed

    Swain, Christopher; Simon, Mark; Monks, Brian

    2015-09-01

    The thoughtful development and implementation of a comprehensive obstetric/gynecologic (OB/GYN) hospitalist program can result in a cost-effective practice model that provides increased value through a wide variety of services. The continuous on-site availability of an OB/GYN specialist affords many benefits to patients, hospitals, and practicing physicians. A well-implemented and effective OB/GYN hospitalist program will be associated with many different service line improvements for hospitals. Such programs increase patient safety, promote risk reduction, and improve clinical outcomes, while enriching the quality of life of obstetricians and gynecologists.

  12. [Neural therapy and accupuncture in gynaecology and obstetrics].

    PubMed

    Becke, H

    1982-01-01

    A brief characterisation is made of the working principles underlying neural therapy under local anaesthesia or accupuncture. Common approaches to therapy are offered by disorders of autonomous regulation, including inflammatory processes, and by purely functional disorders.--There are many applications in gynaecology and obstetrics. A brief statistical information on lumbosacral pain is quoted as an example. Optimum performance can be expected from them, when used in combination with proven therapeutic methods. They provide a low-cost approach to reducing both the consumption of antibiotics and other pharmaceuticals as well as time of morbidity. PMID:6289567

  13. Do increases in payments for obstetrical deliveries affect prenatal care?

    PubMed

    Fox, M H; Phua, K L

    1995-01-01

    Raising fees is one of the primary means that State Medicaid Programs employ to maintain provider participation. While a number of studies have sought to quantify the extent to which this policy retains or attracts providers, few have looked at the impact of these incentives on patients. In this study, the authors used Medicaid claims data to examine changes in volume and site of prenatal care among women who delivered babies after the Maryland Medicaid Program raised physicians fees for deliveries 200 percent at the end of its 1986 fiscal year. Although the State's intent was to stabilize the pool of nonhospital providers who were willing to deliver Medicaid babies, it was also hoped that women would benefit through greater access to prenatal care, especially care rendered in a nonhospital setting. The authors' hypotheses were that (a) the fee increase for obstetrical deliveries would result in an increase in prenatal visits by women on Medicaid, and (b) the fee increase would lead to a shift in prenatal visits from hospital to community based providers. The data for Maryland's Medicaid claims for the fiscal years 1985 through 1987 were used. Comparisons were made in the average number of prenatal visits and the ratio of hospital to nonhospital prenatal visits before and after the fee increase. Data for continuously enrolled women who delivered in the last 4 months of each fiscal year were analyzed for between and within year differences using Student's t-test and ANOVA techniques. The findings indicate very little overall change in either the amount or location of prenatal care during the year after the large fee increase for deliveries.Though significant increases in the number of prenatal visits occurred for women who lived outside of Baltimore City, it is difficult to attribute these changes solely to the fee increase. Where an effect was observed, it appeared to be greatest in non urban areas of the State, probably because coordination of care by fewer

  14. A bill of rights for patients with obstetric fistula.

    PubMed

    Wall, L Lewis

    2014-12-01

    According to the seven categories of vulnerability proposed by Kipnis (cognitive, juridical, deferential, medical, allocational, social, and infrastructural), and the four generally accepted principles of biomedical ethics (respect, beneficence, non-maleficence, and fairness), women with obstetric fistulas are an exceptionally vulnerable population. Therefore, they merit special consideration in both clinical care and research settings. Adoption of a formal bill of rights for patients with fistula similar to the one proposed in the present report should be encouraged at all facilities where these women are treated. Acknowledgment of their rights would help to improve their care and end the abuses they are exposed to in institutional settings. PMID:25194211

  15. Organizing an Effective Obstetric/Gynecologic Hospitalist Program.

    PubMed

    Swain, Christopher; Simon, Mark; Monks, Brian

    2015-09-01

    The thoughtful development and implementation of a comprehensive obstetric/gynecologic (OB/GYN) hospitalist program can result in a cost-effective practice model that provides increased value through a wide variety of services. The continuous on-site availability of an OB/GYN specialist affords many benefits to patients, hospitals, and practicing physicians. A well-implemented and effective OB/GYN hospitalist program will be associated with many different service line improvements for hospitals. Such programs increase patient safety, promote risk reduction, and improve clinical outcomes, while enriching the quality of life of obstetricians and gynecologists. PMID:26333641

  16. Group B Streptococcal Endocarditis in Obstetric and Gynecologic Practice

    PubMed Central

    Crespo, Antonio; Retter, Avi S.

    2003-01-01

    Background: We describe a case and review ten other instances of group B streptococcal endocarditis in the setting of obstetric and gynecologic practice reported since the last review in 1985. Case: Abortion remains a common antecedent event, but in contrast to earlier reports, most patients did not have underlying valvular disease, the tricuspid valve was most often involved, and mortality was low. Patients with tricuspid valve infection tended to have a subacute course, whereas those with aortic or mitral involvement typically had a more acute, fulminant course. Conclusion: Despite an improvement in mortality, morbidity remains high, with 8 of 11 patients having clinically significant emboli. PMID:14627217

  17. Waiting for attention and care: birthing accounts of women in rural Tanzania who developed obstetric fistula as an outcome of labour

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Obstetric fistula is a physically and socially disabling obstetric complication that affects about 3,000 women in Tanzania every year. The fistula, an opening that forms between the vagina and the bladder and/or the rectum, is most frequently caused by unattended prolonged labour, often associated with delays in seeking and receiving appropriate and adequate birth care. Using the availability, accessibility, acceptability and quality of care (AAAQ) concept and the three delays model, this article provides empirical knowledge on birth care experiences of women who developed fistula after prolonged labour. Methods We used a mixed methods approach to explore the birthing experiences of women affected by fistula and the barriers to access adequate care during labour and delivery. Sixteen women were interviewed for the qualitative study and 151 women were included in the quantitative survey. All women were interviewed at the Comprehensive Community Based Rehabilitation Tanzania in Dar es Salaam and Bugando Medical Centre in Mwanza. Results Women experienced delays both before and after arriving at a health facility. Decisions on where to seek care were most often taken by husbands and mothers-in-law (60%). Access to health facilities providing emergency obstetric care was inadequate and transport was a major obstacle. About 20% reported that they had walked or were carried to the health facility. More than 50% had reported to a health facility after two or more days of labour at home. After arrival at a health facility women experienced lack of supportive care, neglect, poor assessment of labour and lack of supervision. Their birth accounts suggest unskilled birth care and poor referral routines. Conclusions This study reveals major gaps in access to and provision of emergency obstetric care. It illustrates how poor quality of care at health facilities contributes to delays that lead to severe birth injuries, highlighting the need to ensure women's rights to

  18. Lung Emergencies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Emergencies Cardiac Emergencies Eye Emergencies Lung Emergencies Surgeries Lung Emergencies People with Marfan syndrome can be at ... should be considered an emergency. Symptoms of sudden lung collapse (pneumothorax) Symptoms of a sudden lung collapse ...

  19. Effects of hysterectomy, administration of uterine extract, posterior pituitary extract and aspirin on the length of pseudopregnancy in rats.

    PubMed

    Uddin Kabiraj, M; Fariduddin, K M

    1975-10-01

    Effects of hysterectomy, administration of uterine extract, posterior pituitary extract and aspirin on the length of pseudopregnancy were investigated in 174 virgin, female rats. Pseudopregnancy was induced by injecting a single dose of reserpine (1 mg/kg body weight) subcutaneously on the 1st day of diestrus. The mean length of pseudopregnancy in the control group was 13.8 days. There was an increase (p less than .001) in the duration of pseudopregnancy to 17.1 days following hysterectomy. The administration of uterine extract reduced the duration to 15.9 days. Administration of posterior pituitary extract reduced the duration of pseudopregnancy in the pseudopregnant hysterectomized rats to 12.4 days (p less than .001). Aspirin treatment did not effect the length of pseudopregnancy. It is concluded that there is a definite pituitary-utero-ovarian relationship. The neurohypophyseal hormones may be involved in the mechanism of regression of corpora lutea of pseudopregnancy in rats.

  20. Robot-assisted laparoscopic hysterectomy, gonadal biopsy, and orchiopexies in an infant with persistent mullerian duct syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jonathan A; Hsieh, Michael H

    2014-04-01

    An infant born with hypospadias and no palpable gonads was diagnosed with persistent mullerian duct syndrome (PMDS) based on history, physical examination, laboratory testing, and radiologic imaging. A robot-assisted laparoscopic hysterectomy, right gonadal biopsy, and bilateral orchiopexies were performed without incident. Final pathology confirmed the diagnosis of PMDS. To our knowledge, this is only the second report of PMDS managed through a robot-assisted laparoscopic approach. PMID:24246315

  1. Psychological Symptoms Among Obstetric Fistula Patients Compared to Gynecology Outpatients in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Sarah M.; Sikkema, Kathleen J.; Watt, Melissa H.; Masenga, Gileard G.

    2016-01-01

    Background Obstetric fistula is a childbirth injury prevalent in sub-Saharan Africa that causes uncontrollable leaking of urine and/or feces. Research has documented the social and psychological sequelae of obstetric fistula, including mental health dysfunction and social isolation. Purpose This cross-sectional study sought to quantify the psychological symptoms and social support in obstetric fistula patients, compared with a patient population of women without obstetric fistula. Methods Participants were gynecology patients (N = 144) at the Kilimanjaro Christian Medical Center in Moshi, Tanzania, recruited from the Fistula Ward (n = 54) as well as gynecology outpatient clinics (n = 90). Measures included previously validated psychometric questionnaires, administered orally by Tanzanian nurses. Outcome variables were compared between obstetric fistula patients and gynecology outpatients, controlling for background demographic variables and multiple comparisons. Results Compared to gynecology outpatients, obstetric fistula patients reported significantly higher symptoms of depression, posttraumatic stress disorder, somatic complaints, and maladaptive coping. They also reported significantly lower social support. Conclusions Obstetric fistula patients present for repair surgery with more severe psychological distress than gynecology outpatients. In order to address these mental health concerns, clinicians should engage obstetric fistula patients with targeted mental health interventions. PMID:25670025

  2. The impact of perinatal death on obstetrics nurses: a longitudinal and cross-sectional examination.

    PubMed

    Ben-Ezra, Menachem; Palgi, Yuval; Walker, Reut; Many, Ariel; Hamam-Raz, Yaira

    2014-01-01

    Mental health and well-being among obstetrics nurses after perinatal death are understudied. Beyond the normal strain imposed on obstetric nurses, exposure to perinatal death may add significant stress. Two studies were conducted on obstetrics nurses. In study 1, obstetrics nurses were measured longitudinally, at baseline (with no recent history of exposure to perinatal death in the past 3 months), and 3 months after (2 months after two consecutive events of perinatal death have occurred 1 month after baseline). In study 2, a cross-sectional study was conducted comparing obstetrics nurses with a history of perinatal death (nurses from study 1) to obstetrics nurses with no history of exposure to perinatal death in the past 6 months. The results of study 1 showed that obstetrics nurses showed a higher level of psychiatric symptoms [posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depressive, and psychosomatic symptoms] at time 2 (after exposure to perinatal death) in comparison to time 1. The results of study 2 showed a higher level of psychiatric symptoms (PTSD, depressive, and psychosomatic symptoms) in the exposed group in comparison to the non-exposed group. The effect of exposure to perinatal death is severe and needs to be addressed by developing intervention and preparation programs to help obstetric nurses cope with this critical incident.

  3. The Role of Obstetric Knowledge in Utilization of Delivery Service in Nepal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karkee, Rajendra; Baral, Om Bahadur; Khanal, Vishnu; Lee, Andy H.

    2014-01-01

    Birth Preparedness and Complication Readiness (BP/CR) program has been promoted in Nepal to equip pregnant women with obstetric knowledge so as to motivate them to seek professional care. Using a prospective design of 701 pregnant women of more than 5 months gestation in a central hills district of Nepal, we evaluated if having obstetric knowledge…

  4. Regional Obstetric Anesthesia and Newborn Behavior: A Reanalysis toward Synergistic Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lester, Barry M.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    The Brazelton Neonatal Behavioral Assessment Scale was administered to 54 full-term, healthy infants on days 1 through 5 and on days 7 and 10. Infants were divided into eight groups, differing in terms of the obstetrical medication mothers received. Low dosages of obstetrical medication were found to have significant but subtle effects on the…

  5. Pervasive Developmental Disorder and Obstetric Complications in Children and Adolescents with Tuberous Sclerosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Rebecca J.; Bolton, Patrick F.

    2001-01-01

    This study investigated the role of obstetric complications in determining phenotypic manifestations in tuberous sclerosis (TS), a disorder associated with autism spectrum disorders. Comparison of 43 children with TS and 40 unaffected siblings found children with TS experienced more obstetric complications, but these were related to mild rather…

  6. Sonographers' Complex Communication during the Obstetric Sonogram Exam: An Interview Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brasseur, Lee

    2012-01-01

    A study of the oral communication experiences and training of obstetric sonographers can provide insight into the complex expectations these medical professionals face as they complete their technical tasks and communicate with patients. Unlike other diagnostic medical professionals, obstetric sonographers are expected to provide detailed…

  7. 76 FR 50485 - Obstetrics and Gynecology Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Amendment of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-15

    ... Obstetrics and Gynecology Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee. This meeting was announced in the Federal Register of July 14, 2011 (76 FR 41507). The amendment is being made to reflect a... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Obstetrics and Gynecology Devices Panel of the...

  8. The professional responsibility model of obstetric ethics and caesarean delivery.

    PubMed

    Chervenak, Frank A; McCullough, Laurence B

    2013-04-01

    In this chapter, we provide an account of the professional responsibility model of obstetric ethics, and identify its implications for two major topics: patient-choice caesarean delivery and trial of labour after caesarean delivery. The professional responsibility model of obstetric ethics is based on the ethical concept of medicine as a profession and the ethical principles of beneficence and respect for autonomy. The obstetrician has beneficence-based and autonomy-based obligations to the pregnant woman and beneficence-based obligations to the fetus when it is a patient. Because the viable fetus is a patient, the ethics of caesarean delivery requires balancing of obligations to the pregnant and fetal patient. The implication of the professional responsibility model for patient-choice caesarean delivery is that the obstetrician should respond to such requests with a recommendation against non-indicated caesarean delivery and for vaginal delivery. These recommendations should be explained and discussed in the informed consent process. It is ethically permissible to implement an informed, reflective decision for non-indicated caesarean delivery. The implication for trial of labour after caesarean delivery is that, in settings properly equipped and staffed, the obstetrician should offer both trial of labour after caesarean delivery and planned caesarean delivery to women who have had one previous low transverse incision. The obstetrician should recommend against trial of labour after caesarean delivery for women with a previous classical incision.

  9. Shigellosis and Pregnancy in French Guiana: Obstetric and Neonatal Complications.

    PubMed

    Parisot, Michaël; Jolivet, Anne; Boukhari, Rachida; Carles, Gabriel

    2016-07-01

    Shigella is a major cause of dysentery worldwide. Only a few cases of shigellosis during pregnancy have been reported. However, the neonatal and obstetric complications are potentially severe. The objective of this study was to describe the obstetric and neonatal complications of shigellosis during pregnancy. We carried out a retrospective study of 37 cases of shigellosis diagnosed in pregnant women at the maternity unit of Saint-Laurent du Maroni Hospital in west French Guiana between 2000 and 2014. Shigellosis diagnosis was based on the detection of Shigella in stool cultures from pregnant women (34 patients) or in a neonatal sample collected immediately after delivery (three neonates). In addition to the classic symptoms of shigellosis-an association of diarrhea, fever, and abdominal pain-we observed uterine contractions before the completion of 37 weeks of gestation in 61% of patients (N = 17/28). Cervical changes were associated with uterine contractions in 82% of cases (N = 14/17); 25% of the patients at risk of preterm birth went on to give birth prematurely (N = 3/12). Three cases of mother-to-child transmission were observed. Episodes of shigellosis in pregnant women may trigger uterine contractions and changes to the cervix, potentially resulting in miscarriage or preterm birth. PMID:27114299

  10. [Epidemiological surveillance and obstetrical dystocias surgery in Senegal].

    PubMed

    Bouillin, D; Fournier, G; Gueye, A; Diadhiou, F; Cissé, C T

    1994-01-01

    Maternal morbidity and mortality remain major problems of public health in developing countries. Having long been neglected, maternal health is now being included among the priorities of a large number of countries. The rate of maternal mortality in Senegal is 850 per 100,000 live births, among the highest in the world. The main causes of maternal mortality in Africa are obstructed labour and uterine rupture, hypertensive disorders of pregnancy, puerperal infection and haemorrhage. An epidemiological survey of obstetric disorders was initiated in 1992 in Senegal to characterise the requirements for surgical coverage during pregnancy and delivery. In 1992, the national rate of caesarean section was low (0.66% of estimated births). However, rates differed greatly between regions, and between rural and urban areas. The indications for caesarean section were classified into three groups, each corresponding to a different public health issue. The rate of maternal mortality associated with surgery was high: 4.7%, of which 29% during surgery and 71% post op. Perinatal prognosis was also poor, with a mortality rate of approximately 30%. There are only 18 reference obstetrics units functioning, and they give a very uneven coverage of the country. These finding have led to new guidelines to improve the quality and cover of maternal care over the coming years. PMID:7850191

  11. Committee Opinion No. 652 Summary: Magnesium Sulfate Use in Obstetrics.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration advises against the use of magnesium sulfate injections for more than 5-7 days to stop preterm labor in pregnant women. Based on this, the drug classification was changed from Category A to Category D, and the labeling was changed to include this new warning information. However, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's change in classification addresses an unindicated and nonstandard use of magnesium sulfate in obstetric care. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine continue to support the short-term (usually less than 48 hours) use of magnesium sulfate in obstetric care for appropriate conditions and for appropriate durations of treatment, which includes the prevention and treatment of seizures in women with preeclampsia or eclampsia, fetal neuroprotection before anticipated early preterm (less than 32 weeks of gestation) delivery, and short-term prolongation of pregnancy (up to 48 hours) to allow for the administration of antenatal corticosteroids in pregnant women who are at risk of preterm delivery within 7 days.

  12. Committee Opinion No 652: Magnesium Sulfate Use in Obstetrics.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration advises against the use of magnesium sulfate injections for more than 5-7 days to stop preterm labor in pregnant women. Based on this, the drug classification was changed from Category A to Category D, and the labeling was changed to include this new warning information. However, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's change in classification addresses an unindicated and nonstandard use of magnesium sulfate in obstetric care. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine continue to support the short-term (usually less than 48 hours) use of magnesium sulfate in obstetric care for appropriate conditions and for appropriate durations of treatment, which includes the prevention and treatment of seizures in women with preeclampsia or eclampsia, fetal neuroprotection before anticipated early preterm (less than 32 weeks of gestation) delivery, and short-term prolongation of pregnancy (up to 48 hours) to allow for the administration of antenatal corticosteroids in pregnant women who are at risk of preterm delivery within 7 days.

  13. Residential proximity to major roads and obstetrical complications.

    PubMed

    Yorifuji, Takashi; Naruse, Hiroo; Kashima, Saori; Murakoshi, Takeshi; Doi, Hiroyuki

    2015-03-01

    Exposure to air pollution is linked with an increased risk of preterm births. To provide further evidence on this relationship, we evaluated the association between proximity to major roads--as an index for air pollution exposure--and various obstetrical complications. Data were extracted from a database maintained by the perinatal hospital in Shizuoka, Japan. We restricted the analysis to mothers with singleton pregnancies of more than 22 weeks of gestation from 1997 to 2012 (n=19,077). Using the geocoded residential information, each mother was assigned proximity to major roads. We then estimated multivariate adjusted odds ratios and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the effects of proximity to major roads on various obstetrical complications (preeclampsia, gestational diabetes mellitus, placenta abruption, placenta previa, preterm premature rupture of membrane (pPROM), preterm labor, and preterm births). We found positive associations of proximity to major roads with preeclampsia and pPROM. Living within 200 m increased the odds of preeclampsia by 1.3 times (95% CI, 1.0-1.8) and pPROM by 1.6 times (95% CI, 1.1-2.2). Furthermore, living within 200 m increased the odds of preterm births by 1.4 fold (95% CI, 1.2-1.7). Exposure to traffic-related air pollution increased the risk of preeclampsia and pPROM in this study. We propose a mechanism responsible for the association between air pollution and preterm births.

  14. Changes in the Practice of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

    PubMed

    Rayburn, William F; Tracy, Erin E

    2016-01-01

    A projected shortage of obstetrician-gynecologists (OB-GYNs) is a result of both the increasing US population and the relatively static number of residency graduates. In addition, generational changes have contributed to increasing subspecialization, more desiring part-time employment, and earlier retirement. This article reviews data regarding changes in the practice of obstetrics and gynecology. Residency education is focusing more on a core curriculum in general obstetrics and gynecology, while subspecialty fellowship training has grown in popularity. There are no recent data to describe whether OB-GYNs are working fewer hours, yet more are employed in larger practices at mostly metropolitan locations. A team-based care model that incorporates nonphysician clinicians and digital conversion of clinical data has been encouraged to increase accessibility, improve comprehensiveness, commit to more continuity of care, and reduce redundancy. Compared with other medical specialists, OB-GYNs retire slightly earlier, especially females who will represent the field more. The specialty is moving toward a more comprehensive women's health care practice model that is more patient-centered, efficient, cost controlling, team-based, and adaptable to the needs of a diverse population. Implications from these changes for our practices and improving patient care are currently unclear and await more reported experience.

  15. The breathing hand: obstetric brachial plexopathy reinnervation from thoracic roots?

    PubMed

    Friedenberg, S M; Hermann, R C

    2004-01-01

    It has been found that in cases of obstetric brachial plexopathy, injured phrenic nerve or C3/4/5 roots may sprout into the adjacent injured upper and middle trunks of the brachial plexus. This aberrant regeneration produces co-contraction of the diaphragm and proximal upper limb muscles. This phenomenon, referred to as respiratory synkinesis or "the breathing arm", may not be limited to the upper cervical roots. We present two cases, identified through electromyographic investigations, of respiratory synkinesis selectively affecting intrinsic hand muscles, and propose that upper thoracic roots and their intercostal nerves may also produce respiratory synkinesis, resulting in a "breathing hand." This novel brand of synkinesis indicates that obstetric brachial plexus neuropathies can have quite proximal nerve injury in all trunks. The findings in our patients may not be entirely unique. The time required to develop distal muscle synkinesis and the subtle nature of our findings may suggest that with time and the assistance of EMG the breathing hand may be more common. When considering brachial plexus surgery, the significance of respiratory synkinesis should not be overlooked as its presence indicates injury at a root or proximal trunk level and may come from either nerves destined for the diaphragm or for the intercostal muscles.

  16. [Combined subarachnoid-epidural technique for obstetric analgesia].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Guisasola, J; García del Valle, S; Gómez-Arnau, J I

    2000-05-01

    Combined spinal-epidural blockade for labor pain has enjoyed increasing popularity in obstetric anesthesia. The usual procedure is to use a single space and a single needle for dural puncture, inserting a spinal needle through an epidural needle followed by insertion of a catheter. A small dose of one or several substances (usually a lipophilic opioid and a local anesthetic) is first injected in the intrathecal space to provide rapid, effective analgesia with minimal muscle blockade. The epidural catheter is used if labor lasts longer than the spinal block, if the spinal block is insufficient, or in case of cesarean section. Combined spinal-epidural blockade is a safe, valid alternative to conventional epidural analgesia and has become the main technique for providing obstetric analgesia in many hospitals. The most widely-recognized advantage of the technique is high maternal satisfaction with rapid and effective analgesia. Mobility of the lower extremities is preserved and the mother is often able to walk. Because opioids are injected into the intrathecal space and because the technique is more invasive than standard epidural analgesia, the potential risk to mother and fetus increases.

  17. Marginalizing Women: Images of Pregnancy in Williams Obstetrics

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Sheila A.; Condit, Deirdre M.

    2000-01-01

    This research analyzes the historical development of the medical construction of the pregnant body in 17 of 20 editions of Williams Obstetrics, an obstetrical textbook published continually from 1904 to 1997. Examination of the visual imagery of these works produced three key findings. First, depictions of the healthy or “normal” pregnant body are virtually absent throughout the series. Second, visual depictions of women's full bodies adhere to a race-based hierarchy of presentation. Finally, the fundamental discourse about pregnant and female bodies communicated to physicians (primarily) by these images is one of pathology and fragmentation. We conclude that the resulting social and medical construction of the pregnant and female body presented in the Williams series is one of disembodiment, abjection, and ultimately marginality. These findings support recent feminist research that criticizes both the increasing erasure of the person of the women from the medical interpretation of pregnancy and the concomitant decrease in women's perceived sense of empowerment as pregnant beings. PMID:17273202

  18. Applying developmental programming to clinical obstetrics: my ward round.

    PubMed

    Painter, R C

    2015-10-01

    The theory of developmental programming is supported by accumulating evidence, both observational and experimental. The direct application of the principles of developmental programming by clinicians to benefit pregnant women remains an area of limited attention. Examining a selection of inpatients at an obstetric referral center, I searched for situations in which clinical decision making could be driven by the principles of developmental programming. I also looked for situations in which the clinical research agenda could be dictated by these concepts. In the decision to undertake preventive measures to avoid preeclampsia, the offspring's perspective may support more liberal application of calcium and aspirin. Consideration of the long-term health perspective of the offspring could drive choices in the management of obesity and diabetes in pregnancy. The administration of corticosteroids in women delivering by elective cesarean at term may have modest short-term benefits, but additional trials are necessary to investigate long-term offspring health. The offspring of women suffering hyperemesis gravidarum may benefit from nutritional therapy. The long-term health of the offspring could affect couples' choice for IVF or expectant management. Applying the principles of developmental programming to the management of pregnant women could drive clinical decision making and is driving the clinical research agenda. Increasingly, developmental programming concepts are becoming an integral part of clinical practice, as well as determining the choice of outcomes in trials in obstetrics and fertility medicine. The presented cases underscore the need for more research to guide clinical practice.

  19. Intraoperative Dexmedetomidine Promotes Postoperative Analgesia and Recovery in Patients after Abdominal Hysterectomy: a Double-Blind, Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Dong-Jian; Qi, Bin; Tang, Gang; Li, Jin-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Surgery-induced acute postoperative pain and stress response can lead to prolonged convalescence. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of intraoperative dexmedetomidine on postoperative analgesia and recovery following abdominal hysterectomy surgeries. Sixty-four patients scheduled for abdominal hysterectomy under general anesthesia were divided into two groups that were maintained using propofol/remifentanil/dexmedetomidine (PRD) or propofol/remifentanil/saline (PRS). During surgery, patients in the PRD group had a lower bispectral index (BIS) value, which indicated a deeper anesthetic state, and a higher sedation score immediately after extubation than patients in the PRS group. During the first 24 hours post-surgery, PRD patients consumed less morphine with patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) and had lower scores on a visual analogue scale (VAS) than their controls from the PRS group. The global 40-item quality of recovery questionnaire and 9-question fatigue severity score both showed higher recovery scores from day 3 after surgery in the PRD group. with the data are considered together, intraoperative administration of dexmedetomidine appeared to promote the analgesic properties of morphine-based PCA and to expedite recovery following surgery in patients undergoing abdominal hysterectomy. PMID:26903197

  20. Ultrasound Guided Subcostal Transversus Abdominis Plane (TAP) Infiltration with Liposomal Bupivacaine for Patients Undergoing Robotic Assisted Hysterectomy: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Hutchins, Jacob; Vogel, Rachel Isaksson; Ghebre, Rahel; McNally, Amy; Downs, Levi S.; Gryzmala, Elizabeth; Geller, Melissa A

    2015-01-01

    Objective We sought to determine the effect of a subcostal TAP block with liposomal bupivacaine on post-operative maximal pain score and length of hospital stay among women undergoing robotic assisted hysterectomy. Methods This was a retrospective study comparing patients before and after consistent implementation of TAP blocks with liposomal bupivacaine during robotic assisted hysterectomies at a single academic institution. Analysis compared patient demographic and operative characteristics by TAP block use, along with outcomes of interest, including post-operative pain and length of hospital stay. Results There was a statistically significant decrease in maximal numerical rating score (NRS) pain scores, presence of nausea and vomiting, and length of hospital stay in those who had a TAP block with liposomal bupivacaine compared to those who did not receive a TAP block. These differences remained even after adjustment for potential confounders. Conclusions In this retrospective study, liposomal bupivacaine used in a TAP block was a useful method to provide postoperative pain control in patients undergoing robotic assisted hysterectomy and was associated with lower post-operative maximal pain scores and length of hospital stay. PMID:25790044