Science.gov

Sample records for emergency treatment

  1. Rosacea: new and emerging treatments.

    PubMed

    Moustafa, Farah A; Sandoval, Laura F; Feldman, Steven R

    2014-09-01

    Rosacea is a chronic inflammatory skin condition that negatively impacts patients' quality of life. We sought to review important aspects of the pathogenesis of rosacea and the role of new treatment options in its management. New, emerging treatments show promise; however, quality randomized controlled trials for many of these drugs are lacking. Brimonidine tartrate is an effective newly approved treatment for erythematotelangiectatic rosacea. Topical oxymetazoline has potential for the treatment of erythematotelangiectatic rosacea, with efficacy described in case reports and randomized controlled trials currently underway. Both oral and topical ivermectin have been studied for the treatment of papulopustular rosacea, both showing benefit; however, only topical ivermectin 1 % cream has been studied in randomized controlled trials. As our understanding of the etiology of rosacea continues to evolve, so will our options for therapeutic interventions. Further studies need to be performed to assess the long-term safety and efficacy of these treatments.

  2. Emergency treatment of status epilepticus: current thinking.

    PubMed

    Millikan, Dan; Rice, Brian; Silbergleit, Robert

    2009-02-01

    Current thinking about the acute treatment of status epilepticus (SE) emphasizes a more aggressive clinical approach to this common life-threatening neurologic emergency. In this review, the authors consider four concepts that can accelerate effective treatment of SE. These include (1) updating the definition of SE to make it more clinically relevant, (2) consideration of faster ways to initiate first-line benzodiazepine therapy in the prehospital environment, (3) moving to second-line agents more quickly in refractory status in the emergency department, and (4) increasing detection and treatment of unrecognized nonconvulsive SE in comatose neurologic emergency patients.

  3. Emerging Nonsurgical Treatments for Hyperhidrosis.

    PubMed

    Kurta, Anastasia O; Glaser, Dee Anna

    2016-11-01

    A variety of available treatment options are available for primary focal hyperhidrosis, and some can be combined to obtain maximum effective results. Most treatment options have only been studied in patients with axillary hyperhidrosis, and more studies are needed to develop therapies for other body regions. Several clinical trials are underway with promising preliminary results; however, there is still a large need for new therapies.

  4. Diagnosis, Treatment, and Prevention of Hemodialysis Emergencies.

    PubMed

    Saha, Manish; Allon, Michael

    2017-02-07

    Given the high comorbidity in patients on hemodialysis and the complexity of the dialysis treatment, it is remarkable how rarely a life-threatening complication occurs during dialysis. The low rate of dialysis emergencies can be attributed to numerous safety features in modern dialysis machines; meticulous treatment and testing of the dialysate solution to prevent exposure to trace elements, toxins, and pathogens; adherence to detailed treatment protocols; and extensive training of dialysis staff to handle medical emergencies. Most hemodialysis emergencies can be attributed to human error. A smaller number are due to rare idiosyncratic reactions. In this review, we highlight major emergencies that may occur during hemodialysis treatments, describe their pathogenesis, offer measures to minimize them, and provide specific interventions to prevent catastrophic consequences on the rare occasions when such emergencies arise. These emergencies include dialysis disequilibrium syndrome, venous air embolism, hemolysis, venous needle dislodgement, vascular access hemorrhage, major allergic reactions to the dialyzer or treatment medications, and disruption or contamination of the dialysis water system. Finally, we describe root cause analysis after a dialysis emergency has occurred to prevent a future recurrence.

  5. Emerging treatments in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Jones, Andrew M; Helm, Jennifer M

    2009-10-01

    There are a number of potential drugs for the treatment of cystic fibrosis (CF) currently undergoing clinical studies. A number of antibacterials formulated for delivery by inhalation are at various stages of study; these include dry-powder inhaler versions of colistin, tobramycin and ciprofloxacin, and formulations of azteonam, amikacin, levofloxacin, ciprofloxacin and fosfomycin/tobramycin for nebulization. Clinical trials of anti-inflammatory agents, including glutathione, phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors such as sildenafil, oral acetylcysteine, simvastatin, methotrexate, docosahexaenoic acid, hydroxychloroquine, pioglitazone and alpha1-antitrypsin, are ongoing. Ion channel modulating agents, such as lancovutide (Moli1901, duramycin) and denufosol, which activate alternate (non-CF transmembrane regulator [CFTR]) chloride channels, and GS 9411, a sodium channel antagonist, are now at the stages of clinical study and if successful, will offer a new category of therapeutic agent for the treatment of CF. Correction of the underlying gene effect, either by agents that help to correct the dysfunctional CFTR, such as ataluren, VX-770 and VX-809, or by gene transfer (gene therapy), is a particularly exciting prospect as a new therapy for CF and clinical studies are ongoing. This article reviews the exciting potential drug treatments for CF currently being evaluated in clinical studies, and also highlights some of the challenges faced by research and clinical teams in assessing the efficacy of potential new therapies for CF.

  6. Emerging anabolic treatments in osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Mosekilde, Leif; Tørring, Ove; Rejnmark, Lars

    2011-04-01

    Anabolic treatment that remodels bone tissue and restores bone biomechanical competence is essential in the treatment of osteoporosis. In addition, long term antiresorptive therapy may have limitations because of the reduced renewal of bone tissue. The only pure anabolic drugs available at present are intact PTH (1-84) (Preotact®) and the truncated PTH (1-34) (Teriparatide, Forteo®) while strontium ranelate may possess antiresorptive as well as anabolic properties. The marketed antiresorptive and anabolic antiosteoporotic drugs have limitations in their use due to adverse effects or to the occurrence of rare but severe late complications. Furthermore, indications may be restricted by co-existing diseases or treatment duration may be limited. However, new anabolic drugs are being developed mimicking the effect of PTH, or targeting the calcium sensing receptor (CaSR) or the Wnt/β-catenin signalling pathway. The PTH mimetics are truncated or altered PTH fragments, parathyroid hormone related peptide (PTHrP) and calcilytics stimulating endogenous PTH secretion. Calcimimetics (e.g. strontium) and calcilytics (e.g. lithium) may also affect bone cells directly through the CaSR. The Wnt pathway that stimulates osteoblastic proliferation, differentiation and function may be activated by neutralizing antibodies to secreted inhibitors of Wnt signalling (e.g. Sclerostin or Dickkopf) or by small molecules (e.g. lithium) that inhibits the glycogen synthase kinase 3β mediated degradation of β-catenin. Finally, blocking of activin A by soluble receptor fusion proteins has been shown to increase bone mass by a dual anabolic-antiresorptive action. The present paper summarises the physiological background and the present evidence for these effects.

  7. Emerging Treatments for Motor Rehabilitation After Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Chandramouli; Khot, Sandeep P.

    2015-01-01

    Although numerous treatments are available to improve cerebral perfusion after acute stroke and prevent recurrent stroke, few rehabilitation treatments have been conclusively shown to improve neurologic recovery. The majority of stroke survivors with motor impairment do not recover to their functional baseline, and there remains a need for novel neurorehabilitation treatments to minimize long-term disability, maximize quality of life, and optimize psychosocial outcomes. In recent years, several novel therapies have emerged to restore motor function after stroke, and additional investigational treatments have also shown promise. Here, we familiarize the neurohospitalist with emerging treatments for poststroke motor rehabilitation. The rehabilitation treatments covered in this review will include selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor medications, constraint-induced movement therapy, noninvasive brain stimulation, mirror therapy, and motor imagery or mental practice. PMID:25829989

  8. [Emergency Surgery and Treatments for Pneumothorax].

    PubMed

    Kurihara, Masatoshi

    2015-07-01

    The primary care in terms of emergency for pneumothorax is chest drainage in almost cases. The following cases of pneumothorax and the complications need something of surgery and treatments. Pneumothorax with subcutaneous emphysema often needs small skin incisions around the drainage tube. Tension pneumothorax often needs urgent chest drainage. Pneumothorax with intractable air leakage often needs interventional treatments like endobroncheal occlusion (EBO) or thoracographic fibrin glue sealing method (TGF) as well as urgent thoracoscopic surgery. Pneumothorax with acute empyema also often needs urgent thoracoscopic surgery within 2 weeks if chest drainage or drug therapy are unsuccessful. It will probably become chronic empyema of thorax after then. Pneumothorax with bleeding needs urgent thoracoscopic surgery in case of continuous bleeding over 200 ml/2 hours. In any cases of emergency for pneumothorax, respiratory physicians should collaborate with respiratory surgeons at the 1st stage because it is important to timely judge conversion of surgical treatments from medical treatments.

  9. [The emergency treatment of the psychotic patient].

    PubMed

    Naumann, Ute; Mavrogiorgou, Paraskevi; Pajonk, Frank-Gerald B; Juckel, Georg

    2012-06-01

    Psychosis can cause multiple psychiatric and somatic emergencies. Due to the complex character of the disease the communication and accessibility of the patient can be severely disturbed. In the pre-clinical emergency medical care the etiology of a psychosis remains often unclear, the most common causes are schizophrenia and drug-induced psychosis. Frequent emergencies are states of psychomotor agitation, self-endangerment and endangerment of others including suicidal tendencies/acts as well as catatonic and manic states. Antipsychotic drugs and benzodiazepines are the most efficient pharmacotherapeutic treatments. Extrapyramidal side effects of the prescribed medication can also cause the need for urgent medical care. In any case needs to be considered a severe somatic comorbidity. It is particularly necessary that all available information at the scene of emergency should be transferred to the clinicians since the further diagnostic and therapeutic assessment will rely hereon.

  10. Particle separation options for emergency water treatment.

    PubMed

    Dorea, C C; Bertrand, S; Clarke, B A

    2006-01-01

    Emergencies can result from the effects of unpredictable natural forces or from the cruelty of conflicts. The affected population is often left vulnerable to increased health risks. The victims' exposure to these risks can be reduced by timely public health interventions. Often, one of the first basic mitigations is the provision of water for essential needs. The quickest option, and generally more polluted, is of surface waters. We have reviewed particle separation options for emergency water treatment of surface waters. These vary from granular filtration package treatment facilities to ceramic candle filters and have therefore been broadly classified in three categories: modular, mobile and point-of-use (or household). The operational requirements and process limitations that can influence the choice of each option are discussed alongside with their underlying particle separation mechanisms and performance data.

  11. Chronic rhinosinusitis and emerging treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Piromchai, Patorn; Kasemsiri, Pornthep; Laohasiriwong, Supawan; Thanaviratananich, Sanguansak

    2013-01-01

    This review describes the epidemiology and various treatments in chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) with nasal polyps (CRSwNP) and CRS without nasal polyps (CRSsNP). Evidence for short-term use of systemic corticosteroids has been shown to be favorable in CRSwNP, but still limited in CRSsNP. Topical corticosteroids improve symptom scores in both CRS subgroups. The role of microbes in CRS is still controversial. Culture-directed antibiotics are recommended for CRSsNP with exacerbation. Long-term use of low dosage antibiotics is recommended for CRSsNP for their anti-inflammatory effects. Other emerging treatment options are also discussed. PMID:23785241

  12. Emerging treatments for irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Joseph; Ehrenpreis, Eli D

    2002-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional GI disorder that is associated with abdominal discomfort and altered bowel habits. It accounts for up to 28% of patients presenting to a gastroenterology practice and poses a significant personal, societal and economic burden internationally. The Manning, Rome I and Rome II criteria were developed to identify appropriate IBS patients for entry into IBS studies in a consistent manner. Refinements in the understanding of the physiology of the enteric nervous system (ENS), which controls motility, secretion and sensation, provided the basis for our comprehension of the pathophysiology of IBS. Visceral hypersensitivity and neurotransmitter imbalance currently receive the most attention as possible mechanisms of IBS. This article outlines conventional treatments and reviews the data on emerging and experimental therapies for IBS. Emerging therapies for IBS using 5-HT mediation include 5-HT(3) antagonists, such as ondasetron, granisetron and alosetron, as well as 5-HT(4) agonists such as tegaserod and prucalopride. In addition to opioid agonists (e.g. fedotozine) several other drugs that act on other ENS receptors are being studied. In spite of significant progress in IBS research, these emerging therapies require more studies before they can be utilised as clinical treatments.

  13. Emerging treatment options for type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Piya, Milan K; Tahrani, Abd A; Barnett, Anthony H

    2010-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is rapidly increasing in prevalence and is a major public health problem. It is a progressive disease which commonly requires multiple pharmacotherapy. Current options for treatment may have undesirable side effects (particularly weight gain and hypoglycaemia) and contraindications, and little effect on disease progression. Incretin based therapy is one of several newer therapies to improve glycaemia and is available in two different forms, dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) agonists. Use of these agents results in a ‘glucose-dependant’ increase in insulin secretion and glucagon suppression resulting in improved glycaemia with low incidence of hypoglycaemia. DPP-4 inhibitors are oral drugs which are weight neutral, while GLP-1 agonists are injected subcutaneously and help promote weight loss while improving glycaemia. GLP-1 agonists have also been shown to increase beta cell mass in rat models. Bariatric surgery is another option for the obese patient with T2DM, with blood glucose normalizing in over half of the patients following surgery. Other therapies in development for the treatment of T2DM include sodium-glucose transporter 2 (SGLT-2) inhibitors, glucagon receptor antagonists, glucokinase activators and sirtuins. In this article, we will review the various existing and emerging treatment options for T2DM. PMID:20831513

  14. Drug-resistant tuberculosis: emerging treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Adhvaryu, Meghna; Vakharia, Bhasker

    2011-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis has emerged worldwide, with an increasing incidence due to failure of implementation of apparently effective first-line antituberculous therapy as well as primary infection with drug-resistant strains. Failure of current therapy is attributed to a long duration of treatment leading to nonadherence and irregular therapy, lack of patient education about the disease, poverty, irregular supply by care providers, drug–drug interactions in patients coinfected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), inadequate regulations causing market overlap and irresponsible drug usage in the private sector, and lack of research, with no addition of new drugs in the last four decades. Present standards of care for the treatment of drugsusceptible tuberculosis, multidrug-resistant tuberculosis, tuberculosis-HIV coinfection, and latent tuberculosis infection are all unsatisfactory. Since 2000, the World Health Organization (WHO) has focused on drug development for tuberculosis, as well as research in all relevant aspects to discover new regimens by 2015 and to eliminate tuberculosis as a public health concern by 2050. As a result, some 20 promising compounds from 14 groups of drugs have been discovered. Twelve candidates from eight classes are currently being evaluated in clinical trials. Ongoing research should prioritize identification of novel targets and newer application of existing drugs, discovery of multitargeted drugs from natural compounds, strengthening host factors by immunopotentiation with herbal immunomodulators, as well as protective vaccines before and after exposure, consideration of surgical measures when indicated, development of tools for rapid diagnosis, early identification of resistant strains, and markers for adequacy of treatment and an integrative approach to fulfill WHO goals. However, regulatory control over the drug market, as well as public-private partnership to use health program facilities to track patients and ensure

  15. Mobile Emergency Response Water Treatment Technology Results

    EPA Science Inventory

    When natural disasters like hurricanes, floods and earthquakes occur, safe drinking water can be compromised, limited or unavailable. Under such situations, communities have emergency response plans. One of many options for providing safe drinking water during emergency situati...

  16. [Emergency treatment and management of anaphylaxis].

    PubMed

    Brockow, K; Ring, J

    2013-02-01

    Anaphylaxis, the maximal manifestation of an immediate allergic reaction, is a life-threatening systemic reaction. The immediate therapy is chosen according to the clinical manifestations and new German guidelines are in preparation. Required measures include immediate removal of allergen, adequate positioning, assessment of severity and organ involvement and activation of emergency medical services. In anaphylaxis with primarily cardiovascular involvement, epinephrine is the treatment of choice and given together with volume substitution, oxygen, H(1)-antihistamines and corticosteroids. Obstruction of the airways is treated with intramuscular and inhaled epinephrine, or alternatively β(2)-sympathicomimetics, and oxygen. Abdominal or cutaneous involvement, such as generalized urticaria, usually can be treated with intravenous H(1)-antihistamines, glucocorticoids and surveillance. In patients with anaphylaxis, the elicitor of the reaction has to be diagnosed by allergy testing. Patients with sustained risk for anaphylaxis should receive a self-medication kit and should be educated about behavioral patterns needed for prophylaxis and therapy of anaphylactic reactions. Patient educational intervention increases knowledge about anaphylaxis, and practical competence and thus, is a basis of a successful management of anaphylaxis.

  17. Laparoscopic Diagnosis and Treatment in Gynecologic Emergencies

    PubMed Central

    Cantele, Héctor; Leyba, José Luis; Navarrete, Manuel; Llopla, Salvador Navarrete

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To present an analysis of our experience with 22 consecutive cases of acute abdominal gynecologic emergencies managed with a laparoscopic approach. Methods: From March 1997 to October 1998, 22 patients with a diagnosis of acute abdominal gynecologic emergencies underwent laparoscopic intervention. A transvaginal ultrasound was performed on all patients preoperatively to supplement the diagnostic workup. Surgical time, complications, and length of hospital stay were evaluated, and the laparoscopic diagnosis was compared with the preoperative diagnosis. Results: The laparoscopic diagnosis was different from the preoperative diagnosis in 31.8% of patients. Of the 22 patients, laparoscopic therapeutic procedures were performed in 18 (81.8%), all satisfactorily, and with no need for conversion to open surgery. No morbidity or mortality occurred. Conclusion: Laparoscopy is a safe and effective method for diagnosing and treating gynecologic emergencies. PMID:14558712

  18. Emergency Medical Treatment for the "Wilderness" Context.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association for Search and Rescue, Fairfax, VA.

    This paper offers a brief outline of the training curriculum developed by the National Association for Search and Rescue (NASAR) for its Wilderness Medicine Programs. The training modules are designed for wilderness search and rescue units, rural emergency medical services (EMS) squads, military medics, backcountry rangers, epedition leaders,…

  19. System of acute medical support to emergency during dental treatment.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, M; Takeshita, T; Akita, S

    1986-01-01

    The Resuscitation Committee of Hiroshima City Dental Association was established in 1983 in order to provide acute medical support in case of emergency during dental treatment at private dental clinics. This Committee is composed of representatives from the Hiroshima City Dental Association, Hiroshima University School of Dentistry, Hiroshima University School of Medicine, Hiroshima City Health Bureau, and Hiroshima City Fire and Ambulance Department. A portable ECG monitor with defibrillator and a resuscitation kit are held in readiness at the Hiroshima University Hospital. In case of emergency during dental treatment at a private dental clinic, we hurry to the clinic with the resuscitation set and give emergency treatment. We have been involved in two cases of emergency since this system started. Both of them recovered without any sequelae. Besides these activities, we give lectures annually to dentists and dental hygienists on the treatment of medical emergencies.

  20. Emerging treatment options for early mycosis fungoides

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Guarino, Montserrat

    2013-01-01

    Mycosis fungoides is a candidate for skin-directed therapies in its initial stages. In recent years, therapeutic options outside of the normal treatment recommendations such as topical imiquimod, topical tazarotene, topical methotrexate, excimer light sources, and photodynamic therapy have been published with variable results. These alternatives have been useful in cases of localized mycosis fungoides that do not respond to routine treatments; nevertheless, more studies on these methods are still needed. This article summarizes the literature and data that are known so far about these treatments. PMID:23450851

  1. Emerging Drugs for the Treatment of Anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Murrough, James W.; Yaqubi, Sahab; Sayed, Sehrish; Charney, Dennis S.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Anxiety disorders are among the most prevalent and disabling psychiatric disorders in the United States and worldwide. Basic research has provided critical insights into the mechanism regulating fear behavior in animals and a host of animal models have been developed in order to screen compounds for anxiolytic properties. Despite this progress, no mechanistically novel agents for the treatment of anxiety have come to market in more than two decades. Areas covered The current review will provide a critical summary of current pharmacological approaches to the treatment of anxiety and will examine the pharmacotherapeutic pipeline for treatments in development. Anxiety and related disorders considered herein include panic disorder, social anxiety disorder, generalized anxiety disorder and posttraumatic stress disorder. The glutamate, neuropeptide and endocannabinoid systems show particular promise as future targets for novel drug development. Expert opinion In the face of an ever-growing understanding of fear related behavior, the field awaits the translation of this research into mechanistically novel treatments. Obstacles will be overcome through close collaboration between basic and clinical researchers with the goal of aligning valid endophenotypes of human anxiety disorders with improved animal models. Novel approaches are needed to move basic discoveries into new, more effective treatments for our patients. PMID:26012843

  2. Emerging hepatic syndromes: pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Bertino, Gaetano; Privitera, Graziella; Purrello, Francesco; Demma, Shirin; Crisafulli, Emanuele; Spadaro, Luisa; Koukias, Nikolaos; Tsochatzis, Emmanuel A

    2016-10-01

    Liver cirrhosis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, mainly due to complications of portal hypertension. In this article, we review the current understanding on the pathophysiology, the diagnostic criteria and the available therapeutic options for patients with emerging hepatic syndromes in cirrhosis, namely the hepatorenal, hepato-adrenal and hepatopulmonary syndrome. The hepatorenal syndrome is a well-recognized complication of advanced cirrhosis and is usually associated with an accelerated course to death unless liver transplantation is performed. The hepatopulmonary syndrome is often missed in the evaluation of patients with cirrhosis; however, early recognition is essential for the efficient management of individual patients. The hepato-adrenal syndrome, although not fully characterized, offers an exciting field for research and potential therapeutic interventions.

  3. Emerging Treatment Paradigms in Radiation Oncology.

    PubMed

    Le, Quynh-Thu; Shirato, Hiroki; Giaccia, Amato J; Koong, Albert C

    2015-08-01

    Rapid advancements in radiotherapy and molecularly targeted therapies have resulted in the development of potential paradigm-shifting use of radiotherapy in the treatment of cancer. In this review, we discuss some of the most promising therapeutic approaches in the field of radiation oncology. These strategies include the use of highly targeted stereotactic radiotherapy and particle therapy as well as combining radiotherapy with agents that modulate the DNA damage response, augment the immune response, or protect normal tissues.

  4. Current and emerging treatments for severe asthma

    PubMed Central

    Al Efraij, Khalid

    2015-01-01

    Severe asthma, which is poorly controlled despite the elimination of modifiable factors and the correct use of standard therapy, accounts only for 5% of people with asthma but it contributes to approximately 50% of the economic costs of asthma. Because of this unmet need, novel therapies have been developed for optimal treatment of these patients. The use of tiotropium, omalizumab, mepolizumab and thermoplasty in well-selected patients provides better control and most importantly a reduction in asthma exacerbations. PMID:26716048

  5. Intervertebral disk degeneration and emerging biologic treatments.

    PubMed

    Kepler, Christopher K; Anderson, D Greg; Tannoury, Chadi; Ponnappan, Ravi K

    2011-09-01

    Although understanding of the biologic basis of intervertebral disk (IVD) degeneration is rapidly advancing, the unique IVD environment presents challenges to the development and delivery of biologic treatments. Acceleration of cellular senescence and apoptosis in degenerative IVDs and the depletion of matrix proteins have prompted the development of treatments based on replacing IVD cells using various cell sources. However, this strategy has not been tested in animal models. IVD degeneration and associated pain have led to interest in pathologic innervation of the IVD and ultimately to the development of percutaneous devices to ablate afferent nerve endings in the posterior annulus. Degeneration leads to changes in the expression of matrix protein, cytokines, and proteinases. Injection of growth factors and mitogens may help overcome these degenerative changes in IVD phenotype, and these potential treatments are being explored in animal studies. Gene therapy is an elegant method to address changes in protein expression, but efforts to apply this technology to IVD degeneration are still at early stages.

  6. Fecal microbiota transplantation and emerging treatments for Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Gens, Krista D; Elshaboury, Ramy H; Holt, Jessica S

    2013-10-01

    Due to the increased incidence and recurrence of Clostridium difficile infection, health care providers are seeking new and alternative treatments to the standard antibiotic therapy. The objective of this article is to present a review on the background, microbiologic efficacy, clinical efficacy, and safety of fecal microbiota transplantation and to provide an overview of emerging treatment options currently under investigation. Emerging treatment options discussed include the use of monoclonal antibodies directed against toxins A and B, C difficile vaccination, and transplantation of nontoxigenic C difficile strains.

  7. Psychopharmacologic treatment of eating disorders: emerging findings.

    PubMed

    McElroy, Susan L; Guerdjikova, Anna I; Mori, Nicole; Keck, Paul E

    2015-05-01

    Psychopharmacologic treatment is playing a greater role in the management of patients with eating disorders. In this paper, we review randomized, placebo-controlled trials (RCTs) conducted in anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN), binge eating disorder (BED), and other eating disorders over the past 3 years. Fluoxetine remains the only medication approved for an eating disorder, that being BN. RCTs of antipsychotics in AN have had mixed results; the only agent with some evidence of efficacy is olanzapine. One study suggests dronabinol may induce weight gain in AN. Preliminary studies suggest lack of efficacy of alprazolam, dehydroepiandrosterone, or physiologic estrogen replacement in AN; erythromycin in BN; and the opioid antagonist ALKS-33 in BED. In BED with obesity or overweight, bupropion may cause mild weight loss without seizures, and chromium may improve glucose regulation. Also in BED, three RCTs suggest the stimulant prodrug lisdexamfetamine may reduce binge eating episodes, and another RCT suggests intranasal naloxone may decrease time spent binge eating. There remains a disconnection between the size of eating disorders as a public health problem and the lack of pharmacotherapy research of these conditions.

  8. Acute migraine: Current treatment and emerging therapies

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Arun A; Elliott, Debra

    2007-01-01

    Migraine is a common disabling primary headache disorder. Despite the need for a perfect treatment of this debilitating condition, the ideal “cure” eludes us. In 1992, the first triptan was released in the US for use in acute migraine. Triptans are more specific for the serotonin receptor 5-hydroxy triptamine (5-HT) 1 than previously prescribed drugs, such as ergotamines, with fewer side effects. This was an important first step in specific acute migraine therapy. Today however, triptans continue to be underutilized. There remains a concern, among practitioners and patients, about possible cardiovascular safety issues, despite the lack of strong evidence of serious adverse events. In fact, triptans now have a safe track record over more than a decade of use. Other perceived downfalls to use, include cost and variable efficacy. The more we learn about the clinical features and pathophysiology of migraine, the closer we are to finding a satisfactory monotherapy. Until then, recognizing that mixed mechanisms underlie migraine symptoms, rational polytherapy can be useful. Research on the roles of serotonin, calcitonin gene related peptide, glutamine and N-methyl-D-aspartate in the trigeminovascular system holds promise for those searching for the perfect migraine headache cure. PMID:18488069

  9. Pediatric multiple sclerosis: Escalation and emerging treatments.

    PubMed

    Chitnis, Tanuja; Ghezzi, Angelo; Bajer-Kornek, Barbara; Boyko, Alexey; Giovannoni, Gavin; Pohl, Daniela

    2016-08-30

    Over the last 20 years, there have been significant advances in multiple sclerosis (MS) therapeutics, with regulatory approval for 13 therapies in adults by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) and Food and Drug Administration. However, there is only limited approval for interferon-β and glatiramer acetate use in children 12 years and older by the EMA. Availability of disease-modifying therapies to children and adolescents with MS is variable by region, and is extremely limited in some regions of the world. Up to 30% of children experience breakthrough disease requiring therapies beyond traditional first-line agents. Recent legislation in both the United States and Europe has mandated clinical studies for all new therapeutics applicable to children. Several clinical trials in children are underway that will provide important information regarding the efficacy and safety of newer drugs. This review summarizes the current knowledge of breakthrough disease, escalation, and induction treatment approaches in children with MS, especially pertaining to disease course and disability outcomes in this group of patients. In addition, ongoing clinical trials and approaches and challenges in conducting clinical trials in the pediatric population are discussed.

  10. [Couples and families emergency/crisis consultation: emergency patterns and treatment assessment].

    PubMed

    León Giraldo, S; Campergue, S; Colin, L; Le Goff-Cubilier, V; Bryois, C

    2009-04-22

    Since the opening in 2003 of the Couple & Family Consultation Unit (UCCF) at Prangins Hospital, we have met urgent demands and observed that the suffering systems (i.e., couples and families) couldn't face any waiting period. So in 2007 an Emergency/Crisis Facility was created, based on the hypothesis that there is no contra-indication to systemic emergency care, if one understands and structures both crisis and treatment. We studied the suffering population in demand and the emergency/crisis issues and assessed therapy efficiency. Then we observed that treating suffering systems in emergency does produce therapeutic gain in terms of crisis resolution and patients' satisfaction. Those treatments refer to public health issues, as considered the human, social and financial cost of couples/families dysfunctions.

  11. Diagnosis and treatment of dental emergencies in two Finnish cities.

    PubMed

    Widström, E; Pietilä, I; Nilsson, B

    1990-06-01

    According to the present clinical survey of dental emergencies treated by organised emergency services in two of the larger Finnish cities, the main causes (64 per cent) of the problems leading to these visits were caries and its consequences. In about 80 per cent of the 839 cases treated, the acute treatment was based on clinical examination only. Temporary fillings were provided for 19 per cent, permanent fillings for 8 per cent, endodontic treatment for 22 per cent and extractions for 14 per cent of the patients. Extractions were most often provided for patients who normally visited a dentist irregularly and these had a low mean number of teeth. Patients with pain lasting longer than a week were likely to receive endodontic treatment, whereas permanent fillings were provided for regular dental visitors who had their own dentists. About 90 per cent of the patients were considered to need other dental treatment in addition to the treatment of the acute condition.

  12. Current and emerging treatment options for spinal cord ischemia.

    PubMed

    Nardone, Raffaele; Pikija, Slaven; Mutzenbach, J Sebastian; Seidl, Martin; Leis, Stefan; Trinka, Eugen; Sellner, Johann

    2016-10-01

    Spinal cord infarction (SCI) is a rare but disabling disorder caused by a wide spectrum of conditions. Given the lack of randomized-controlled trials, contemporary treatment concepts are adapted from guidelines for cerebral ischemia, atherosclerotic vascular disease, and acute traumatic spinal cord injury. In addition, patients with SCI are at risk for several potentially life-threatening but preventable systemic and neurologic complications. Notably, there is emerging evidence from preclinical studies for the use of neuroprotection in acute ischemic injury of the spinal cord. In this review, we discuss the current state of the art for the therapy and prevention of SCI and highlight potential emerging treatment concepts awaiting translational adoption.

  13. Current and Emerging Directions in the Treatment of Eating Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Tiffany A.; Keel, Pamela K.

    2012-01-01

    Eating disorders are a significant source of psychiatric morbidity in young women and demonstrate high comorbidity with mood, anxiety, and substance use disorders. Thus, clinicians may encounter eating disorders in the context of treating other conditions. This review summarizes the efficacy of current and emerging treatments for anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN), and binge eating disorder (BED). Treatment trials were identified using electronic and manual searches and by reviewing abstracts from conference proceedings. Family based therapy has demonstrated superiority for adolescents with AN but no treatment has established superiority for adults. For BN, both 60 mg fluoxetine and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) have well-established efficacy. For BED, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, CBT, and interpersonal psychotherapy have demonstrated efficacy. Emerging directions for AN include investigation of the antipsychotic olanzapine and several novel psychosocial treatments. Future directions for BN and BED include increasing CBT disseminability, targeting affect regulation, and individualized stepped-care approaches. PMID:22879753

  14. Emerging psychological treatments in the field of eating disorders.

    PubMed

    Berg, Kelly C; Wonderlich, Stephen A

    2013-11-01

    Few treatments for eating disorders have established a base of empirical support, and those that have are still limited by high dropout rates and low abstinence rates. Thus, there is a critical need for innovative eating disorder treatments to fill this gap. The past decade has seen a surge in the development of novel treatments that address eating pathology. This review provides an overview of the emerging psychological treatments for eating disorders, including descriptions of the therapeutic rationales, treatment techniques, and research support. The review will cover face-to-face interventions that are provided in the context of individual or group psychotherapy. Treatments included in this review were organized into the following six categories based on their underlying therapeutic rationales: (1) cognition-focused approaches, (2) emotion regulation approaches, (3) exposure-based approaches, (4) motivational enhancement, (5) integrative approaches, and (6) family- and couple-based interventions.

  15. Treatment for acute asthma in the Emergency Department: practical aspects.

    PubMed

    Urso, D L

    2010-03-01

    This article describes the management of acute asthma exacerbation in the Emergency Department (ED). An asthma exacerbation can be defined as clinical worsening of disease or an asymptomatic decrease in peak flows. Acute exacerbations of asthma may represent reactions to airway irritants or failures of chronic treatment. Hospitalizations and ED visits account for a large proportion of the health-care cost burden of asthma. The assessment of an asthma exacerbation constitutes a process with two different dimensions: to determine the severity of attack, and to evaluate the response to treatment. The principal goals of managing an asthma acute exacerbation may be summarized as maintenance of adequate arterial oxygen saturation with supplemental oxygen, relief of airflow obstruction with repetitive administration of short acting beta-2 agonists (SABA), and treatment of airway inflammation with systemic corticosteroids (CS) to prevent future relapses. SABA, oxygen, and CS form the basis of management of acute asthma exacerbation but a role is emerging for anthicolinergics.

  16. Optimising the management of pulmonary arterial hypertension patients: emergency treatments.

    PubMed

    Delcroix, M; Naeije, R

    2010-09-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a rare and potentially fatal disease whose management is usually restricted to a few specialised centres. As patients do not necessarily live in the neighbourhood of these centres, daily care and emergencies have to be delegated to first and second lines. Treatment guidelines do not usually provide recommendations for acute emergency situations as evidence is scarce. This short review provides a description of our therapeutic protocols based on available data. A model of transmural organisation of care for PAH patients, currently applied in Belgium, is described. Thereafter, based on an analysis of the reasons of death in the PAH population, a review of the main emergencies is provided. Cardiac arrest and resuscitation, decompensated right heart failure, respiratory failure, arrhythmia, pericardial effusion, haemoptysis, surgery and drug-related adverse events will be discussed successively. Case reports showing the precariousness of PAH patients will enforce our thesis of the need for optimal patient management organisation.

  17. Emergency Treatment and Labor Act (EMTALA). Avoiding the pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Glass, D Lynn; Rebstock, Jan; Handberg, Eileen

    2004-01-01

    The Federal Emergency Medical Treatment and Labor Act (EMTALA) is one of the most difficult laws to interpret and the easiest to violate. This federal law was enacted to ensure that all individuals presenting to an emergency department of any Medicare- or Medicaid-participating facility for evaluation and treatment of a medical condition will be seen, evaluated, treated, and stabilized, regardless of ability to pay. Within this law, the condition of active labor is defined as an unstable medical condition and, as such, EMTALA is applicable to the area of perinatal and neonatal nursing. The purpose of this article is to provide a basic overview of EMTALA, its mandates and definition of key terms, enforcement procedures specialty-specific applicability, and specific strategies for risk reduction of inadvertent violation.

  18. Emergency Endovascular Treatment of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: Feasibility and Results

    SciTech Connect

    Lagana, Domenico Carrafiello, Gianpaolo; Mangini, Monica; Fontana, Federico; Caronno, Roberto; Castelli, Patrizio; Cuffari, Salvatore; Fugazzola, Carlo

    2006-04-15

    Purpose. To assess the feasibility and effectiveness of emergency endovascular treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). Methods. During 36 months we treated, on an emergency basis, 30 AAAs with endovascular exclusion. In 21 hemodynamically stable patients preoperative CT angiography (CTA) was performed to confirm the diagnosis and to plan the treatment; 9 patients with hemorrhagic shock were evaluated with angiography performed in the operating room. Twenty-two Excluder (Gore) and 8 Zenith (Cook) stent-grafts (25 bifurcated and 5 aorto-uni-iliac) were used. The follow-up was performed by CTA at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months. Results. Technical success was achieved in 100% of cases with a 10% mortality rate. The total complication rate was 23% (5 increases in serum creatinine level and 2 wound infections). During the follow-up, performed in 27 patients (1-36 months, mean 15.2 months), 4 secondary endoleaks (15%) (3 type II, 2 spontaneously thrombosed and 1 under observation, and 1 type III treated by iliac extender insertion) and 1 iliac leg occlusion (treated with femoro-femoral bypass) occurred. We observed a shrinkage of the aneurysmal sac in 8 of 27 cases and stability in 19 of 27 cases; we did not observe any endotension. Conclusions. Endovascular repair is a good option for emergency treatment of AAAs. The team's experience allows correct planning of the procedure in emergency situations also, with technical results comparable with elective repair. In our experience the bifurcated stent-graft is the device of choice in patients with suitable anatomy because the procedure is less time-consuming than aorto-uni-iliac stent-grafting with surgical crossover, allowing faster aneurysm exclusion. However, further studies are required to demonstrate the long-term efficacy of endovascular repair compared with surgical treatment.

  19. Emerging therapeutics for the treatment of diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Brenneman, Jehrod; Hill, Jon; Pullen, Steve

    2016-09-15

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is the most common pathology contributing to the development of chronic kidney disease (CKD). DN caused by hypertension and unmitigated inflammation in diabetics, renders the kidneys unable to perform normally, and leads to renal fibrosis and organ failure. The increasing global prevalence of DN has been directly attributed to rising incidences of Type II diabetes, and is now the largest non-communicable cause of death worldwide. Despite the high morbidity, successful new treatments for DN are lacking. This review seeks to provide new insight on emerging clinical candidates under investigation for the treatment of DN.

  20. Current and emerging treatment options for nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Spratt, Daniel E; Lee, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we focus on the current and emerging treatments in nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC). A detailed evolution of the current standard of care, and new techniques and treatment options will be reviewed. Intergroup 0099 established the role for chemoradiotherapy (chemo-RT) in the treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Multiple randomized Phase III trials have shown the benefit of chemo-RT; however, none of these studies utilized modern radiotherapy (RT) techniques of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). IMRT has the ability to deliver high doses of radiation to the target structures while sparing adjacent bystander healthy tissues, and has now become the preferred RT treatment modality. Chemotherapy also has had a shifting paradigm of induction and/or adjuvant chemotherapy combined with RT alone, to the investigation with concurrent chemo-RT. New treatment options including targeted monoclonal antibodies and small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors are being studied in NPC. These new biologic therapies have promising in vitro activity for NPC, and emerging clinical studies are beginning to define their role. RT continues to expand its capabilities, and since IMRT and particle therapy, specifically intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT), has reports of impressive dosimetric efficacy in-silica. Adaptive RT is attempting to reduce toxicity while maintaining treatment efficacy, and the clinical results are still in their youth. Lastly, Epstein– Barr virus (EBV) DNA has recently been studied for prediction of tumor response and its use as a biomarker is increasingly promising to aid in early detection as well as supplementing the current staging system. RT with or without chemotherapy remains the standard of care for nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Advances in RT technique, timing of chemotherapy, biologically targeted agents, particle therapy, adaptive RT, and the incorporation of EBV DNA as a biomarker may aid in the current and future treatment of

  1. An Overview of Shiraz Emergency Medical Services, Dispatch to Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Peyravi, Mahmoudreza; Örtenwal, Per; Djalali, Ahmadreza; Khorram-Manesh, Amir

    2013-01-01

    Background Advanced ambulance service (Emergency Medical Services/EMS) is considered to be an integral part of emergency medical care as the first assets responding to emergencies and disasters in the prehospital setting in most developed countries. Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the current situation of Shiraz’s EMS by comparing data obtained during two different time periods. Materials and Methods This is a retrospective analytic and comparative study in which data obtained from Shiraz EMS during two one-year periods (21st of March 2011 to 20th of March 2012 and 22nd of September 1999 to 21st of September 2000) were compared. Furthermore, these data were also compared with available data from Gothenburg’s EMS (2010). Results Of 84084 missions performed by Shiraz EMS during one year trauma cases were the most common [39282 (46.7%)]. The most common cause of trauma was road traffic accidents (RTA) (27257; 76.5%). Near 56% of all patients were transported to hospitals; some 47% by ambulances and 8.8% by private cars. Around 36.2% of patients received definitive medical treatment at the scene. While there was an increase in response and evacuation times, the number of deaths at scene before ambulance arrival decreased. Conclusions Although Shiraz’s EMS has expanded during last decade and the mortality rate at scene has decreased, the number of RTA-related trauma cases, along with the response and evacuation time, has increased. More than one third of the patients received definitive treatment and could be dismissed directly from the scene. Standardized triage and treatment protocols are needed to improve the EMS activity. PMID:24616794

  2. Human spinal cord injury: new and emerging approaches to treatment.

    PubMed

    Johnston, L

    2001-11-01

    The World Health Organization together with the Iceland Ministry of Health and Social Security sponsored a conference entitled 'Human Spinal Cord Injury: New and Emerging Approaches to Treatment' held on May 31-June 2, 2001 in Reykjavik, Iceland. To help catalyze the development of new paradigms to address spinal cord injury, the conference's overall goal was to bring in a diversity of perspectives, ranging from state-of-the-art stem cell biology to the ancient wisdom of Eastern Medicine. The purpose of this paper is to summarize the presentations of the conference's 26 speakers.

  3. Emerging New Approaches for the Treatment of Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae; Jurcic, Joseph G.; Rosenblat, Todd; Tallman, Martin S.

    2011-01-01

    The introduction of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) in the late 1980s combined with anthracycline-based chemotherapy has revolutionized the prognosis of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) with more than 90% complete response rates and cure rates of approximately 80%. The subsequent advent of arsenic trioxide (ATO) in 1990s and progress in the treatment of APL have changed its course from a highly fatal to a highly curable disease. Despite the dramatic improvement in clinical outcome of APL, treatment failure still occurs due most often to early death. Relapse has become increasingly less frequent, most commonly occurring in patients with high-risk disease. A major focus of research for the past decade has been to develop risk-adapted and rationally targeted nonchemotherapy treatment strategies to reduce treatment-related morbidity and mortality to low- and intermediate-risk or older patients while targeting more intensive or alternative therapy to those patients at most risk of relapse. In this review, emerging new approaches to APL treatment with special emhasis on strategies to reduce early deaths, risk-adapted therapy during induction, consolidation and maintenance, as well as an overview of current and future clinical trials in APL will be discussed. PMID:23556100

  4. Technical Basis for Radiological Emergency Plan Annex for WTD Emergency Response Plan: West Point Treatment Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Hickey, Eva E.; Strom, Daniel J.

    2005-08-01

    Staff of the King County Wastewater Treatment Division (WTD) have concern about the aftermath of a radiological dispersion event (RDE) leading to the introduction of significant quantities of radioactive material into the combined sanitary and storm sewer system in King County, Washington. Radioactive material could come from the use of a radiological dispersion device (RDD). RDDs include "dirty bombs" that are not nuclear detonations but are explosives designed to spread radioactive material (National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) 2001). Radioactive material also could come from deliberate introduction or dispersion of radioactive material into the environment, including waterways and water supply systems. This document, Volume 3 of PNNL-15163 is the technical basis for the Annex to the West Point Treatment Plant (WPTP) Emergency Response Plan related to responding to a radiological emergency at the WPTP. The plan primarily considers response to radioactive material that has been introduced in the other combined sanitary and storm sewer system from a radiological dispersion device, but is applicable to any accidental or deliberate introduction of materials into the system.

  5. Mild Cognitive Impairment: Diagnosis, Longitudinal Course, and Emerging Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Vega, Jennifer N.; Newhouse, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is widely regarded as the intermediate stage of cognitive impairment between the changes seen in normal cognitive aging and those associated with dementia. Elderly patients with MCI constitute a high-risk population for developing dementia, in particular Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Although the core clinical criteria for MCI have remained largely unchanged, the operational definition of MCI has undergone several revisions over the course of the last decade and remains an evolving diagnosis. Prognostic implications of this diagnosis are becoming clearer with regard to the risk of progressive cognitive deterioration. Although patients with MCI may represent an optimal target population for pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions, results from clinical trials have been mixed and a definitive effective treatment remains elusive. This article provides a brief overview of the evolution of the concept of MCI and reviews current diagnostic criteria, the longitudinal course of the disorder, and current and emerging treatments for MCI. PMID:25160795

  6. Emerging treatment strategies in Tourette syndrome: what's in the pipeline?

    PubMed

    Termine, Cristiano; Selvini, Claudia; Rossi, Giorgio; Balottin, Umberto

    2013-01-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by multiple motor/phonic tics and a wide spectrum of behavioral problems (e.g., complex tic-like symptoms, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and obsessive-compulsive disorder). TS can be a challenging condition even for the specialists, because of the complexity of the clinical picture and the potential adverse effects of the most commonly prescribed medications. Expert opinions and consensus guidelines on the assessment and treatment of tic disorders have recently been published in Europe and Canada. All pharmacological treatment options are mere symptomatic treatments that alleviate, but do not cure, the tics. We still lack evidence of their effects on the natural long-term course and on the prognosis of TS and how these treatments may influence the natural course of brain development. The most commonly prescribed drugs are dopamine antagonists, such as typical (e.g., haloperidol, pimozide) and atypical neuroleptics (e.g., risperidone, aripiprazole), and α-2-adrenoreceptor agonists (e.g., clonidine). However, several studies have investigated the efficacy and tolerability of alternative pharmacological agents that may be efficacious, including the newest atypical antipsychotic agents (e.g., paliperidone, sertindole), tetrabenazine, drugs that modulate acetylcholine (e.g., nicotine) and GABA (e.g., baclofen, levetiracetam), tetrahydrocannabinol, botulinum toxin injections, anticonvulsant drugs (e.g., topiramate, carbamazepine), naloxone, lithium, norepinephrine, steroid 5α reductase, and other neuroactive agents (buspirone, metoclopramide, phytostigmine, and spiradoline mesylate). As regards nonpharmacological interventions, some of the more recent treatments that have been studied include electroconvulsive therapy and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation. This review focuses primarily on the efficacy and safety of these emerging treatment strategies in TS.

  7. Current and emerging treatment strategies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Mah, Jean K

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common form of muscular dystrophy in childhood. It is caused by mutations of the DMD gene, leading to progressive muscle weakness, loss of independent ambulation by early teens, and premature death due to cardiorespiratory complications. The diagnosis can usually be made after careful review of the history and examination of affected boys presenting with developmental delay, proximal weakness, and elevated serum creatine kinase, plus confirmation by muscle biopsy or genetic testing. Precise characterization of the DMD mutation is important for genetic counseling and individualized treatment. Current standard of care includes the use of corticosteroids to prolong ambulation and to delay the onset of secondary complications. Early use of cardioprotective agents, noninvasive positive pressure ventilation, and other supportive strategies has improved the life expectancy and health-related quality of life for many young adults with DMD. New emerging treatment includes viral-mediated microdystrophin gene replacement, exon skipping to restore the reading frame, and nonsense suppression therapy to allow translation and production of a modified dystrophin protein. Other potential therapeutic targets involve upregulation of compensatory proteins, reduction of the inflammatory cascade, and enhancement of muscle regeneration. So far, data from DMD clinical trials have shown limited success in delaying disease progression; unforeseen obstacles included immune response against the generated mini-dystrophin, inconsistent evidence of dystrophin production in muscle biopsies, and failure to demonstrate a significant improvement in the primary outcome measure, as defined by the 6-minute walk test in some studies. The long-term safety and efficacy of emerging treatments will depend on the selection of appropriate clinical end points and sensitive biomarkers to detect meaningful changes in disease progression. Correction of the underlying

  8. Current and Emerging Treatment Options for Fecal Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Fecal incontinence (FI) is a multifactorial disorder that imposes considerable social and economic burdens. The aim of this article is to provide an overview of current and emerging treatment options for FI. A MEDLINE search was conducted for English-language articles related to FI prevalence, etiology, diagnosis, and treatment published from January 1, 1990 through June 1, 2013. The search was extended to unpublished trials on ClinicalTrials.gov and relevant publications cited in included articles. Conservative approaches, including dietary modifications, medications, muscle-strengthening exercises, and biofeedback, have been shown to provide short-term benefits. Transcutaneous electrical stimulation was considered ineffective in a randomized clinical trial. Unlike initial studies, sacral nerve stimulation has shown reasonable short-term effectiveness and some complications. Dynamic graciloplasty and artificial sphincter and bowel devices lack randomized controlled trials and have shown inconsistent results and high rates of explantation. Of injectable bulking agents, dextranomer microspheres in non-animal stabilized hyaluronic acid (NASHA Dx) has shown significant improvement in incontinence scores and frequency of incontinence episodes, with generally mild adverse effects. For the treatment of FI, conservative measures and biofeedback therapy are modestly effective. When conservative therapies are ineffective, invasive procedures, including sacral nerve stimulation, may be considered, but they are associated with complications and lack randomized, controlled trials. Bulking agents may be an appropriate alternative therapy to consider before more aggressive therapies in patients who fail conservative therapies. PMID:25014235

  9. Mastocytosis 2016: Updated WHO Classification and Novel Emerging Treatment Concepts.

    PubMed

    Valent, Peter; Akin, Cem; Metcalfe, Dean D

    2016-12-28

    Over the past few years substantial advances have been made in understanding the pathogenesis, evolution, and complexity of mast cell neoplasms. New diagnostic and prognostic parameters and novel therapeutic targets with demonstrable clinical impact have been identified. A number of these new markers, molecular targets, and therapeutic approaches have been validated and translated into clinical practice. At the same time, the classification of mastocytosis and related diagnostic criteria have been refined and updated by the consensus group and the World Health Organization (WHO). As a result, more specific therapies tailored towards prognostic sub-groups of patients have been developed. Emerging treatment concepts employ drugs directed against KIT and other relevant targets in neoplastic mast cells, and will hopefully receive recognition by health authorities in the near future. The current article provides an overview of recent developments in the field, with emphasis on the updated WHO classification, refined criteria, additional prognostic parameters, and novel therapeutic approaches. Based on these emerging concepts, the prognosis, quality of life, and survival of patients with advanced mastocytosis are expected to improve in the coming years.

  10. Treatment-emergent mania/hypomania in unipolar patients

    PubMed Central

    Benvenuti, Antonella; Rucci, Paola; Miniati, Mario; Papasogli, Alessandra; Fagiolini, Andrea; Cassano, Giovanni B; Swartz, Holly; Frank, Ellen

    2012-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to estimate the incidence of treatment-emergent mania/hypomania (TEMH) and to describe the clinical characteristics of patients with major depression experiencing this event during treatment with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) and/or interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT). Methods Following an algorithm-based protocol, 344 patients with major depression confirmed with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV disorders were treated with an SSRI, interpersonal psychotherapy, or their combination for nine months. The emergence of mania/hypomania was carefully monitored throughout the study using the Young Mania Rating Scale and clinical assessment. Results Overall, eight patients experienced TEMH. The incidence of this event was 3.0% in patients treated with an SSRI and 0.9% in patients treated with IPT alone. Among patients treated with an SSRI, the difference between sites was higher than expected by chance alone (6.8% at Pisa and 0% at Pittsburgh, p = 0.002). Despite the adoption of an identical protocol at the two sites, some demographic and clinical characteristics of participants may account for this unexpected result. Alternatively, the greater number of episodes and earlier age of onset at the Pittsburgh site suggests that the unipolar course of illness was more clearly established prior to study entry. Conclusions TEMH is an infrequent event, occurring in 2.3% of patients treated for major depression. Nevertheless, its consequences are clinically relevant and require prompt and appropriate therapeutic interventions. For this reason, recognising those patients at risk for such an event is of paramount clinical significance. The observed difference in the incidence of TEMH between the two sites requires further investigation. PMID:18837867

  11. The clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of adrenal emergencies.

    PubMed

    Tucci, Veronica; Sokari, Telematé

    2014-05-01

    Emergency medicine physicians should be able to identify and treat patients whose clinical presentations, including key historical, physical examination, and laboratory findings are consistent with diagnoses of primary, secondary, and tertiary adrenal insufficiency, adrenal crisis, and pheochromocytoma. Failure to make a timely diagnosis leads to increased morbidity and mortality. As great mimickers, adrenal emergencies often present with a constellation of nonspecific signs and symptoms that can lead even the most diligent emergency physician astray. The emergency physician must include adrenal emergencies in the differential diagnosis when encountering such clinical pictures.

  12. Post-traumatic epilepsy: current and emerging treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Szaflarski, Jerzy P; Nazzal, Yara; Dreer, Laura E

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) leads to many undesired problems and complications, including immediate and long-term seizures/epilepsy, changes in mood, behavioral, and personality problems, cognitive and motor deficits, movement disorders, and sleep problems. Clinicians involved in the treatment of patients with acute TBI need to be aware of a number of issues, including the incidence and prevalence of early seizures and post-traumatic epilepsy (PTE), comorbidities associated with seizures and anticonvulsant therapies, and factors that can contribute to their emergence. While strong scientific evidence for early seizure prevention in TBI is available for phenytoin (PHT), other antiepileptic medications, eg, levetiracetam (LEV), are also being utilized in clinical settings. The use of PHT has its drawbacks, including cognitive side effects and effects on function recovery. Rates of recovery after TBI are expected to plateau after a certain period of time. Nevertheless, some patients continue to improve while others deteriorate without any clear contributing factors. Thus, one must ask, ‘Are there any actions that can be taken to decrease the chance of post-traumatic seizures and epilepsy while minimizing potential short- and long-term effects of anticonvulsants?’ While the answer is ‘probably,’ more evidence is needed to replace PHT with LEV on a permanent basis. Some have proposed studies to address this issue, while others look toward different options, including other anticonvulsants (eg, perampanel or other AMPA antagonists), or less established treatments (eg, ketamine). In this review, we focus on a comparison of the use of PHT versus LEV in the acute TBI setting and summarize the clinical aspects of seizure prevention in humans with appropriate, but general, references to the animal literature. PMID:25143737

  13. Current therapies and emerging targets for the treatment of diabetes.

    PubMed

    Wagman, A S; Nuss, J M

    2001-04-01

    Concurrent with the spread of the western lifestyle, the prevalence of all types of diabetes is on the rise in the world's population. The number of diabetics is increasing by 4-5% per year with an estimated 40-45% of individual's over the age of 65 years having either type II diabetes or impaired glucose tolerance. Since the signs of diabetes are not immediately obvious, diagnosis can be preceded by an extended period of impaired glucose tolerance resulting in the prevalence of beta-cell dysfunction and macrovascular complications. In addition to increased medical vigilance, diabetes is being combatted through aggressive treatment directed at lowering circulating blood glucose and inhibiting postprandial hyperglycemic spikes. Current strategies to treat diabetes include reducing insulin resistance using glitazones, supplementing insulin supplies with exogenous insulin, increasing endogenous insulin production with sulfonylureas and meglitinides, reducing hepatic glucose production through biguanides, and limiting postprandial glucose absorption with alpha-glucosidase inhibitors. In all of these areas, new generations of small molecules are being investigated which exhibit improved efficacy and safety profiles. Promising biological targets are also emerging such as (1) insulin sensitizers including protein tyrosine phosphatase-1B (PTP-1B) and glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3), (2) inhibitors of gluconeogenesis like pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDH) inhibitors, (3) lipolysis inhibitors, (4) fat oxidation including carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT) I and II inhibitors, and (5) energy expenditure by means of beta 3-adrenoceptor agonists. Also important are alternative routes of glucose disposal such as Na+-glucose cotransporter (SGLT) inhibitors, combination therapies, and the treatment of diabetic complications (eg. retinopathy, nephropathy, and neuropathy). With may new opportunities for drug discovery, the prospects are excellent for development of innovative

  14. Post-traumatic epilepsy: current and emerging treatment options.

    PubMed

    Szaflarski, Jerzy P; Nazzal, Yara; Dreer, Laura E

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) leads to many undesired problems and complications, including immediate and long-term seizures/epilepsy, changes in mood, behavioral, and personality problems, cognitive and motor deficits, movement disorders, and sleep problems. Clinicians involved in the treatment of patients with acute TBI need to be aware of a number of issues, including the incidence and prevalence of early seizures and post-traumatic epilepsy (PTE), comorbidities associated with seizures and anticonvulsant therapies, and factors that can contribute to their emergence. While strong scientific evidence for early seizure prevention in TBI is available for phenytoin (PHT), other antiepileptic medications, eg, levetiracetam (LEV), are also being utilized in clinical settings. The use of PHT has its drawbacks, including cognitive side effects and effects on function recovery. Rates of recovery after TBI are expected to plateau after a certain period of time. Nevertheless, some patients continue to improve while others deteriorate without any clear contributing factors. Thus, one must ask, 'Are there any actions that can be taken to decrease the chance of post-traumatic seizures and epilepsy while minimizing potential short- and long-term effects of anticonvulsants?' While the answer is 'probably,' more evidence is needed to replace PHT with LEV on a permanent basis. Some have proposed studies to address this issue, while others look toward different options, including other anticonvulsants (eg, perampanel or other AMPA antagonists), or less established treatments (eg, ketamine). In this review, we focus on a comparison of the use of PHT versus LEV in the acute TBI setting and summarize the clinical aspects of seizure prevention in humans with appropriate, but general, references to the animal literature.

  15. Anemia in the emergency department: evaluation and treatment.

    PubMed

    Janz, Timothy G; Johnson, Roy L; Rubenstein, Scott D

    2013-11-01

    Anemia is a common worldwide problem that is associated with nonspecific complaints. The initial focus for the emergency evaluation of anemia is to determine whether the problem is acute or chronic. Acute anemia is most commonly associated with blood loss, and the patient is usually symptomatic. Chronic anemia is usually well tolerated and is often discovered coincidentally. Once diagnosed, the etiology of anemia can often be determined by applying a systematic approach to its evaluation. The severity of the anemia impacts clinical outcomes, particularly in critically ill patients; however, the specific threshold to transfuse is uncertain. Evaluation of the current literature and clinical guidelines does not settle this controversy, but it does help clarify that a restrictive transfusion strategy (ie, for patients with a hemoglobin < 6-8 g/dL) is associated with better outcomes than a more liberal transfusion strategy. Certain anemias may have well-defined treatment options (eg, sickle cell disease), but empiric use of nutritional supplements to treat anemia of uncertain etiology is discouraged.

  16. Oncolytic viruses: emerging options for the treatment of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Suryawanshi, Yogesh R; Zhang, Tiantian; Essani, Karim

    2017-03-01

    Breast cancer (BC) is the most common type of cancer among women and is the second most common cause of cancer-related deaths, following lung cancer. Severe toxicity associated with a long-term use of BC chemo- and radiotherapy makes it essential to look for newer therapeutics. Additionally, molecular heterogeneity at both intratumoral and intertumoral levels among BC subtypes is known to result in a differential response to standard therapeutics. Oncolytic viruses (OVs) have emerged as one of the most promising treatment options for BC. Many preclinical and clinical studies have shown that OVs are effective in treating BC, both as a single therapeutic agent and as a part of combination therapies. Combination therapies involving multimodal therapeutics including OVs are becoming popular as they allow to achieve the synergistic therapeutic effects, while minimizing the associated toxicities. Here, we review the OVs for BC therapy in preclinical studies and in clinical trials, both as a monotherapy and as part of a combination therapy. We also briefly discuss the potential therapeutic targets for BC, as these are likely to be critical for the development of new OVs.

  17. Emerging targets in neurodegeneration: new opportunities for Alzheimer's disease treatment?

    PubMed

    Rampa, Angela; Gobbi, Silvia; Belluti, Federica; Bisi, Alessandra

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder of the brain associated with memory impairment, progressive cognitive decline and changes in personality and behavior, with rising incidence among elderly people. Reflecting the world population ageing, the scenario is expected to worsen in the next decades if novel drugs or mechanisms that help to counteract neurodegeneration will not be identified. The complex neuropathology of AD is characterized by cholinergic loss, extracellular deposition of amyloid-β plaques, formation of intracellular neurofibrillary tangles, chronic brain inflammation and oxidative damage. To date, there are no effective treatments that can slow or halt the disease, and currently approved drugs only seem to act as palliative by temporary ameliorating cognitive impairment. On the other hand, the role played by other biological systems in the pathogenetic process is now clearly growing and, as knowledge on how AD develops and triggers brain damage proceeds, drug discovery attempts to identify new potential therapeutic targets. This review will focus on these emerging strategies, some of which could open new therapeutic perspectives in Alzheimer's disease, adding new elements for the medicinal chemist to handle and combine for the design of novel multi-target-directed ligands able to simultaneously modulate 'old classic' and newly identified targets.

  18. [Treatment of childhood injuries and violence in public emergency services].

    PubMed

    Malta, Deborah Carvalho; Mascarenhas, Márcio Denis Medeiros; Neves, Alice Cristina Medeiros das; Silva, Marta Alves da

    2015-05-01

    This study aimed to analyze the profile of treatment for accidents and violence involving children under 10 years of age in Brazil in the year 2011. This was a cross-sectional descriptive study in 71 emergency services in the Brazilian Unified National Health System (SUS), located in the national capital and 24 state capitals. Data were obtained from the Ministry of Health's system of sentinel surveillance services for Violence and Accidents (VIVA Survey). The highest proportion of injuries (67.4%) occurred inside the child's home. Among unintentional injuries, falls were the most frequent (52.4%), followed by running into objects or persons (21.8%) and traffic injuries (10.9%), especially as passengers (bicycles were an important means of transportation involved in the injuries). The vast majority of unintentional injuries are avoidable, and educational measures should be adopted, especially with parents, teachers, the community, and health workers, calling attention to the risks and the adoption of safe behaviors in the home, at school, and in leisure-time activities. Cases of violence are subject to mandatory reporting, and prompt measures should be taken to protect victims.

  19. Treatment of Pediatric Migraine in the Emergency Room

    PubMed Central

    Gelfand, Amy A.; Goadsby, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    Migraine is a relatively common reason for pediatric emergency room visits. Given the paucity of randomized trials involving pediatric migraineurs in the emergency department setting compared to adults, recommendations for managing these children are largely extrapolated from adult migraine emergency room studies and trials involving outpatient home pediatric migraine therapy. This paper reviews what is known about pediatric migraineurs who present to the emergency room and how they are currently managed, then goes on to summarize the best evidence currently available to guide clinical decision making. PMID:22964436

  20. Viruses and disease: emerging concepts for prevention, diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Herrington, C S; Coates, P J; Duprex, W P

    2015-01-01

    Viruses cause a wide range of human diseases, ranging from acute self-resolving conditions to acute fatal diseases. Effects that arise long after the primary infection can also increase the propensity for chronic conditions or lead to the development of cancer. Recent advances in the fields of virology and pathology have been fundamental in improving our understanding of viral pathogenesis, in providing improved vaccination strategies and in developing newer, more effective treatments for patients worldwide. The reviews assembled here focus on the interface between virology and pathology and encompass aspects of both the clinical pathology of viral disease and the underlying disease mechanisms. Articles on emerging diseases caused by Ebola virus, Marburg virus, coronaviruses such as SARS and MERS, Nipah virus and noroviruses are followed by reviews of enteroviruses, HIV infection, measles, mumps, human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), influenza, cytomegalovirus (CMV) and varicella zoster virus (VZV). The issue concludes with a series of articles reviewing the relationship between viruses and cancer, including the role played by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in the pathogenesis of lymphoma and carcinoma; how human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are involved in the development of skin cancer; the involvement of hepatitis B virus infection in hepatocellular carcinoma; and the mechanisms by which Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) leads to Kaposi's sarcoma. We hope that this collection of articles will be of interest to a wide range of scientists and clinicians at a time when there is a renaissance in the appreciation of the power of pathology as virologists dissect the processes of disease.

  1. [Emergent treatment of source water contaminated by representative chemicals].

    PubMed

    Chen, Bei-Bei; Gao, Nai-Yun; Lu, Wen-Min; Shang, Ya-Bo; Qin, Zu-Qun

    2009-06-15

    Emergent treatment of source water polluted by representative chemical bisphenol-A (BPA) and Di-ethyl phthalate (DEP) was researched. The results indicate that activated carbon adsorption could achieve high efficiencies to remove the two chemicals. The pseudo second-order adsorption kinetic model and Elovich kinetic model can be used to describe the powdered activated carbon (PAC) adsorption process of BPA and DEP in raw water. In pilot test, 50 mg/L PAC dosage can get the pollution concentration of 500 microg/L BPA or 3.3 mg/L DEP comply with the requirement of water quality standard. The dynamic adsorption of carbon-sand filter was also studied, and removal efficiencies of BPA and DEP were hardly influenced by their original concentrations and the filtering velocity among 5.1-15.3 m/h of carbon-sand filter. When PAC adsorption was combined with carbon-sand filter, PAC adsorption contributes most to removing pollution, and carbon-sand filter as the supplement of PAC can strengthen safety. DEP can't be oxidized by KMnO4 or Cl2, but 850 microg/L BPA can be almost completely oxidized by 3 mg/L KMnO4 and 1.5 mg/L Cl2. The oxidation products of BPA as well as their toxicity need further study. PAC adsorption combined with 1.5 mg/L KMnO4 preoxidation can't improve the removal efficiency of DEP, but can improve BPA removal efficiency.

  2. [Emergency Decompressive Craniotomy in the Emergency Room was Effective in Severe Acute Subdural Hematoma Treatment:Two Case Reports].

    PubMed

    Shiomi, Naoto; Echigo, Tadashi; Oka, Hideki; Nozawa, Masahiro; Okada, Michiko; Hiraizumi, Shiho; Kato, Fumitaka; Koseki, Hirokazu; Hashimoto, Yoichi; Hino, Akihiko

    2017-02-01

    The outcome of severe acute subdural hematoma is unfavorable. In particular, patients with levels of consciousness of Glasgow Coma Scale(GCS)3 or 4 tend to be refractory to treatment. Decompressive craniotomy should be promptly performed to remove hematoma. However, if an operating room is not immediately available, emergency burr hole surgery is sometimes performed in the emergency room(primary care room)prior to craniotomy. A previous study has reported that the interval from injury to surgery influences the outcome of severe acute subdural hematoma. Therefore, emergency decompression is important to effectively treat patients with severe acute subdural hematoma. We present the cases of two patients with acute subdural hematomas. In both cases, emergency decompressive craniotomy(hematoma removal after craniotomy and external decompression)was performed in the emergency room of the Emergency and Critical Care Center. In both cases, the surgery was followed by favorable outcomes. Case 1 was a 36-year-old female. The patient's level of consciousness upon arrival was GCS 3. The interval from injury to diagnosis on the basis of CT findings was 75 minutes. Surgery began 20 minutes after diagnosis. Case 2 was a 25-year-old male. The second patient's level of consciousness upon arrival was GCS 4. The interval from injury to diagnosis on the basis of CT findings was 60 minutes. Surgery was begun 40 minutes after diagnosis. In both patients, we observed anisocoria and the loss of the light reflex. However, the postoperative course was favorable, and both patients were discharged. In summary, to treat severe acute subdural hematomas, early emergency decompressive craniotomy is optimal. Emergency decompressive surgery in the emergency room is independent of operating room or staff. Therefore, emergency decompressive craniotomy may improve the outcome of patients with severe acute subdural hematomas.

  3. [Injuries caused by acids and bases - emergency treatment].

    PubMed

    Reifferscheid, Florian; Stuhr, Markus; Kaiser, Guido; Freudenberg, Matthias; Kerner, Thoralf

    2014-06-01

    Emergency medical care for injuries caused by acids and bases is challenging for rescue services. They have to deal with operational safety, detection of the toxic agent, emergency medical care of the patient and handling of the rescue mission. Because of the rareness of such situations experience and routine are largely missing. This article highlights some basic points for the therapy and provides support for such rescue missions.

  4. Emergency department evaluation and treatment of cervical spine injuries.

    PubMed

    Kanwar, Rajdeep; Delasobera, Bronson E; Hudson, Korin; Frohna, William

    2015-05-01

    Most spinal cord injuries involve the cervical spine, highlighting the importance of recognition and proper management by emergency physicians. Initial cervical spine injury management should follow the ABCDE (airway, breathing, circulation, disability, exposure) procedure detailed by Advanced Trauma Life Support. NEXUS (National Emergency X-Radiography Utilization Study) criteria and Canadian C-spine Rule are clinical decision-making tools providing guidelines of when to obtain imaging. Computed tomography scans are the preferred initial imaging modality. Consider administering intravenous methylprednisolone after discussion with the neurosurgical consultant in patients who present with spinal cord injuries within 8 hours.

  5. EMERGING TECHNOLOGY SUMMARY: INNOVATIVE METHODS FOR BIOSLURRY TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The tests reported herein were conducted by IT Corporation (IT), Knoxville, TN, to investigate the feasibility of combined biological and chemical treatments to treat polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Bioslurry treatment of PAH-contaminated soils was demonstrated under the...

  6. [Immediate cooling with water: emergency treatment of burns].

    PubMed

    Latarjet, J

    1990-01-01

    Experimental data have demonstrated that prolonged immediate cooling with cold water is the best first-aid treatment for burn injuries. However in France, this treatment is rarely applied; instead old, inefficient and aggravating methods are still very popular. Pediatricians must help to change this practice by recommending immediate cold water treatment for burns in children.

  7. Implications of the Emergency Medical Treatment and Labor Act (EMTALA) during public health emergencies and on alternate sites of care.

    PubMed

    Roszak, Andrew R; Jensen, Frances R; Wild, Richard E; Yeskey, Kevin; Handrigan, Michael T

    2009-12-01

    Hospitals throughout the country are using innovative strategies to accommodate the surge of patients brought on by the novel H1N1 virus. One strategy has been to help decompress the amount of patients seeking care within emergency departments by using alternate sites of care, such as tents, parking lots, and community centers as triage, staging, and screening areas. As at any other time an individual presents on hospital property, hospitals and providers must be mindful of the requirements of the Emergency Medical Treatment and Labor Act. In this article we review the act and its implications during public health emergencies, with a particular focus on its implications on alternative sites of care.

  8. Emergency Endovascular 'Bridge' Treatment for Iliac-Enteric Fistula

    SciTech Connect

    Franchin, Marco; Tozzi, Matteo; Piffaretti, Gabriele; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo; Castelli, Patrizio

    2011-10-15

    Aortic aneurysm has been reported to be the dominant cause of primary iliac-enteric fistula (IEF) in >70% of cases [1]; other less common causes of primary IEF include peptic ulcer, primary aortitis, pancreatic pseudocyst, or neoplastic erosion into an adjacent artery [2, 3]. We describe an unusual case of IEF managed with a staged approach using an endovascular stent-graft as a 'bridge' in the emergency setting to optimize the next elective definitive excision of the lesion.

  9. An Emerging Problem: Methamphetamine Abuse among Treatment Seeking Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzales, Rachel; Ang, Alfonso; McCann, Michael J.; Rawson, Richard A.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined correlates of methamphetamine (MA) and marijuana (MJ) use and treatment response among treatment-involved youth (N = 4,430) in Los Angeles County, California treated between 2000 and 2005. Of the sample, 912 (21%) were primary MA and 3,518 (79%) were primary MJ users. Correlates of increased MA use included being female, White,…

  10. Treatment of Sexual Offenders: Research, Best Practices, and Emerging Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yates, Pamela M.

    2013-01-01

    Treatment of sexual offenders has evolved substantially over the years; various theoretical and practice models of treatment been developed, modified, refined, and proposed over time. The predominant current recommended approach, supported by research, adheres to specific principles of effective correctional intervention, follows a…

  11. Emerging Technologies in Autism Diagnosis, Therapy, Treatment, and Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Angela C.

    2014-01-01

    Autism Spectrum Disorder is the fastest growing developmental disability today. Autism is a syndrome with a diverse set of symptoms--rarely consistent across diagnosed individuals, and requiring a combination of therapies, educational approaches, and treatments. There is no known cure for autism. Instead treatment is left to educators and…

  12. [Emergency antibiotherapy and adjuvant treatments for acute bacterial meningitis].

    PubMed

    Mourvillier, B

    2009-01-01

    The management of bacterial meningitis is based on the combination of several components. The objective of this review is to give an overview of the literature concerning both the arguments for urgent antibiotic treatment associated with a particular focus on the place of corticosteroids. Among other treatments, glycerol seems the best rated but symptomatic measures, which may not be achieved by randomized studies, should not be overlooked. Many animal studies explore other treatment options, but none can be translated into clinical practice. The neuroimaging has been little evaluated despite recent technological advances but remains important in monitoring of patients whose evolution is considered unfavorable.

  13. Utilization of Nurse Practitioners in Emergency Medical Treatment.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-05-01

    study protocol as described in this report was submitted forSr- v’ew to nurse researchers familiar to and with the ANC and to e0mergency cure...Emergency Department Nurses’ Association in their published Core Curriculum. If the ENP concept is still considered a researchable question, recommend the...and Fo>, .. 1 c c Vi. , and Nurse Practitioners: A Survey of Baltimore Urban Residents. Vedical Care, 1979, 17:5 (May) 526-35 18. Waeckerle, J.F

  14. SITE EMERGING TECHNOLOGY REPORT: INNOVATIVE METHODS FOR BIOSLURRY TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    IT Corporation (IT), Knoxville, Tennessee, in collaboration with U.S. Environmental protection Agency (EPA), investigated the feasibility of combined biological and chemical oxidation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). Bioslurry treatment of PAH-contaminated soils was dem...

  15. Current and emerging options for the drug treatment of narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    De la Herrán-Arita, Alberto K; García-García, Fabio

    2013-11-01

    Narcolepsy/hypocretin deficiency (now called type 1 narcolepsy) is a lifelong neurologic disorder with well-established diagnostic criteria and etiology. Narcolepsy is a chronic sleep disorder characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) and symptoms of dissociated rapid eye movement sleep such as cataplexy (sudden loss of muscle tone), hypnagogic hallucinations (sensory events that occur at the transition from wakefulness to sleep), sleep paralysis (inability to perform movements upon wakening or sleep onset), and nocturnal sleep disruption. As these symptoms are often disabling, most patients need life-long treatment. The treatment of narcolepsy is well defined, and, traditionally, amphetamine-like stimulants (i.e., dopaminergic release enhancers) have been used for clinical management to improve EDS and sleep attacks, whereas tricyclic antidepressants have been used as anticataplectics. However, treatments have evolved to better-tolerated compounds such as modafinil or armodafinil (for EDS) and adrenergic/serotonergic selective reuptake inhibitors (as anticataplectics). In addition, night-time administration of a short-acting sedative, c-hydroxybutyrate (sodium oxybate), has been used for the treatment for EDS and cataplexy. These therapies are almost always needed in combination with non-pharmacologic treatments (i.e., behavioral modification). A series of new drugs is currently being tested in animal models and in humans. These include a wide variety of hypocretin agonists, melanin- concentrating hormone receptor antagonists, antigenspecific immunopharmacology, and histamine H3 receptor antagonists/inverse agonists (e.g., pitolisant), which have been proposed for specific therapeutic applications, including the treatment of Alzheimer's disease, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, epilepsy, and more recently, narcolepsy. Even though current treatment is strictly symptomatic, based on the present state of knowledge of the pathophysiology of

  16. Being prepared: emergency treatment following a nerve agent release.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Abby M; Baker, Stephanie N; Baum, Regan A; Chandler, Hannah E; Weant, Kyle A

    2014-01-01

    Nerve agents are extremely toxic and are some of the most lethal substances on earth. This group of chemicals consists of sarin, cyclosarin, soman, tabun, VX, and VR. It is currently unknown how many countries possess these chemicals and in what quantities. These agents work through altering the transmission and breakdown of acetylcholine by binding to, and inactivating, acetylcholinesterase. This results in an uncontrolled and overwhelming stimulation of both muscarinic and nicotinic receptors. Receptor activation at these sites can lead to a wide variety of clinical symptoms, with death frequently resulting from pulmonary edema. Antidotal therapy in this setting largely consists of atropine, pralidoxime, and benzodiazepines, all of which must be administered emergently to limit the progression of symptoms and prevent the enzyme inactivation from becoming permanent. This article reviews the mechanism of action of the nerve agents and their effects on the human body, the currently available therapies to mitigate their impact, and important therapeutic considerations for health care practitioners in the emergency department.

  17. Evaluation of guidelines for emergency triage assessment and treatment in developing countries

    PubMed Central

    Tamburlini, G.; Di, M; Maggi, R. S.; Vilarim, J. N.; Gove, S.

    1999-01-01

    AIM—To evaluate performance of a simplified algorithm and treatment instructions for emergency triage assessment and treatment (ETAT) of children presenting to hospital in developing countries.
METHODS—All infants aged 7 days to 5 years presenting to an accident and emergency department were simultaneously triaged and assessed by a nurse and a senior paediatrician. Nurse ETAT assessment was compared to standard emergency advanced paediatric life support (APLS) assessment by the paediatrician. Sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values were calculated and appropriateness of nurse treatments was evaluated.
RESULTS—The ETAT algorithm as used by nurses identified 731/3837 patients (19.05%); 98 patients (2.6%) were classified as needing emergency treatment and 633 (16.5%) as needing priority assessment. Sensitivity was 96.7% with respect to APLS assessment, 91.7% with respect to all patients given priority by the paediatrician, and 85.7% with respect to patients ultimately admitted. Specificity was 90.6%, 91.0%, and 85.2%, respectively. Nurse administered treatment was appropriate in 94/102 (92.2%) emergency conditions.
CONCLUSIONS—The ETAT algorithm and treatment instructions, when carried out by nurses after a short specific training period, performed well as a screening tool to identify priority cases and as a treatment guide for emergency conditions.

 PMID:10569961

  18. 7 CFR 6.7 - Submission of recommendations under section 8(a) (emergency treatment).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Submission of recommendations under section 8(a) (emergency treatment). 6.7 Section 6.7 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture IMPORT QUOTAS AND FEES General Provisions § 6.7 Submission of recommendations under section 8(a) (emergency...

  19. Current and emergent pharmacologic treatments for irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhea: evidence-based treatment in practice

    PubMed Central

    Lucak, Susan; Chang, Lin; Halpert, Albena; Harris, Lucinda A.

    2016-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhea (IBS-D) is a common, chronic functional gastrointestinal disorder with symptoms that can be distressing for patients and often result in substantially impaired quality of life. This review focuses on providing clinicians with information on practical, evidence-based treatment for IBS-D. Current therapies commonly used for the treatment of IBS-D, including pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic interventions, are briefly reviewed, followed by discussion of the emergent pharmacologic treatments (rifaximin and eluxadoline) and medical foods (IBgard® and EnteraGam®). Given the lack of a standard treatment algorithm for IBS-D and the emergence of new pharmacologic therapies, treatment needs to be tailored to the individual patient and take into account the severity of disease. In this context, the latter part of this manuscript examines how treatments for IBS-D can be used in clinical practice by presenting three patient case scenarios with varying degrees of IBS-D severity. For each case, the patient’s medical history and clinical presentation are related to the Rome Foundation multidimensional clinical profile (MDCP) and potential treatment options with current and emergent therapies are reviewed. The interplay of gastrointestinal symptoms and their psychosocial impact, as well as the importance of a patient-centered approach to therapy, are discussed. Consideration is given to the potential need for combination therapies and how emergent treatments could fit into the treatment pathway for mild, moderate, and severe cases of IBS-D in clinical practice. PMID:28203283

  20. Current and emerging treatment options for uveal melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Patricia Rusa; Odashiro, Alexandre Nakao; Lim, Li-Anne; Miyamoto, Cristina; Blanco, Paula L; Odashiro, Macanori; Maloney, Shawn; De Souza, Dominique F; Burnier, Miguel N

    2013-01-01

    Uveal melanoma (UM) is the most common primary malignant intraocular tumor in adults, with a 10-year cumulative metastatic rate of 34%. The most common site of metastasis is the liver (95%). Unfortunately, the current treatment of metastatic UM is limited by the lack of effective systemic therapy. Options for the management of the primary intraocular tumor include radical surgery as well as conservative treatments in order to preserve visual acuity. For metastatic disease, several approaches have been described with no standard method. Nevertheless, median survival after liver metastasis is poor, being around 4–6 months, with a 1-year survival of 10%–15%. In this review, the authors summarize current and promising new treatments for UM. PMID:24003303

  1. Plastic surgery telehealth consultation expedites Emergency Department treatment.

    PubMed

    Paik, Angie M; Granick, Mark S; Scott, Sandra

    2017-02-01

    Plastic surgery is a field that is particularly amenable to a telehealth milieu, as visual exam and radiographs guide proper diagnosis and management. The goals of this study were to evaluate telehealth feedback executed through an iPad app for plastic surgery-related consultations. A Quality Assurance/Quality Improvement (QA/QI) study was conducted over a 1-month period during which patients with hand injuries, facial injuries, or acute wounds presenting to the Emergency Department (ED) of a level-one trauma centre and university hospital were monitored. The study utilized a commercial iPad application through which up to four images and a brief history could be sent to a remote Plastic Surgery Educator (PSE) for evaluation. The PSE would respond with best practice information, references and videos to assist ED point-of-care providers. During the 1-month period of this study, there were 42 ED consultations for plastic surgical conditions. There was a highly significant difference in overall mean response time between consultants and PSEs (48.3 minutes vs. 8.9 minutes respectively, p < 0.001). The agreement between PSEs and consultants regarding patient assessment and care was 85.7% for in-person consultations and 100% for phone consultations. In four cases of telephone consultations, the ED providers placed splints incorrectly on hand-injured patients. Our results show that telehealth consultations to a remote plastic surgeon based on digital images and a brief history were able to produce timely and accurate responses in an emergency care facility. This design may have significant impact in rural areas, underserved populations, or regions abroad.

  2. Odanacatib: an emerging novel treatment alternative for postmenopausal osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Thomas C; Valenzano, Jonathan P; Verzella, Jessica L; Umland, Elena M

    2015-11-01

    Odanacatib represents a novel treatment option in the approach of postmenopausal women. Postmenopausal women with osteoporosis experience a disturbance in bone remodeling wherein bone resorption exceeds bone formation. Cathepsin K is a lysosomal cysteine protease found primarily in osteoclasts that plays a major role in the breakdown of bone via its collagenase properties. Targeting a new area of pathophysiology, odanacatib inhibits cathepsin K to reduce bone resorption while preserving bone formation. Phase II and III trials have shown efficacy in increasing bone mineral density in the target treatment group. Overall, safety studies have found odanacatib to be well-tolerated and comparable to placebo; however, some imbalances in adverse events have been observed in the Phase III trials. Current and future studies will analyze the long-term ability of odanacatib in preventing bone fracture.

  3. Current and Emerging Therapeutic Options in Adrenocortical Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Stigliano, Antonio; Cerquetti, Lidia; Sampaoli, Camilla; Bucci, Barbara; Toscano, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is a very rare endocrine tumour, with variable prognosis, depending on tumour stage and time of diagnosis. The overall survival is five years from detection. Radical surgery is considered the therapy of choice in the first stages of ACC. However postoperative disease-free survival at 5 years is only around 30% and recurrence rates are frequent. o,p'DDD (ortho-, para'-, dichloro-, diphenyl-, dichloroethane, or mitotane), an adrenolytic drug with significant toxicity and unpredictable therapeutic response, is used in the treatment of ACC. Unfortunately, treatment for this aggressive cancer is still ineffective. Over the past years, the growing interest in ACC has contributed to the development of therapeutic strategies in order to contrast the neoplastic spread. In this paper we discuss the most promising therapies which can be used in this endocrine neoplasia. PMID:22934112

  4. Emerging treatments for overactive bladder: clinical potential of botulinum toxins.

    PubMed

    Tincello, Douglas G; Rashid, Tina; Revicky, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    Overactive bladder (OAB) is a symptom syndrome including urgency, frequency, and nocturia - with or without incontinence. It is a common manifestation of detrusor overactivity (DO). DO is a urodynamic observation of spontaneous or provoked contractions of the detrusor muscle is seen during the filling phase of the micturition cycle. OAB is, therefore, both a motor and sensory disorder. Botulinum toxin is a purified form of the neurotoxin from Clostridium botulinum and has been used in medicine for many years. Over the last 10 years, it has been used for the treatment of DO and OAB when standard treatments, such as bladder training and oral anticholinergic medication, have failed to provide symptom relief. Botulinum toxin acts by irreversibly preventing neurotransmitter release from the neurons in the motor end plate and also at sensory synapses, although the clinical effect is not permanent due to the growth of new connections within treated tissues. It is known that botulinum toxin modulates vanillioid, purinergic, capsaicin, and muscarinic receptor expression within the lamina propria, returning them to levels seen in normal bladders. Clinically, the effect of botulinum toxin on symptoms of OAB and DO is profound, with large effects upon the symptom of urgency, and also large effects on frequency, nocturia, leakage episodes, and continence rates. These effects have been seen consistently within eight randomized trials and numerous case series. Botulinum toxin appears safe, with the only common side effect being that of voiding difficulty, occurring in up to 10% of treated patients. Dosing regimens are variable, depending on which preparation is used, but it is clear that dose recommendations have fallen over the last 5 years. There is limited evidence about the efficacy of repeat treatments. Botulinum toxin is an effective and safe second-line treatment for patients with OAB and DO.

  5. Current and emerging treatments for the management of osteogenesis imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Monti, Elena; Mottes, Monica; Fraschini, Paolo; Brunelli, PierCarlo; Forlino, Antonella; Venturi, Giacomo; Doro, Francesco; Perlini, Silvia; Cavarzere, Paolo; Antoniazzi, Franco

    2010-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is the most common bone genetic disorder and it is characterized by bone brittleness and various degrees of growth disorder. Clinical severity varies widely; nowadays eight types are distinguished and two new forms have been recently described although not yet classified. The approach to such a variable and heterogeneous disease should be global and therefore multidisciplinary. For simplicity, the objectives of treatment can be reduced to three typical situations: the lethal perinatal form (type II), in which the problem is survival at birth; the severe and moderate forms (types III–IX), in which the objective is ‘autonomy’; and the mild form (type I), in which the aim is to reach ‘normal life’. Three types of treatment are available: non-surgical management (physical therapy, rehabilitation, bracing and splinting), surgical management (intramedullary rod positioning, spinal and basilar impression surgery) and medical-pharmacological management (drugs to increase the strength of bone and decrease the number of fractures as bisphosphonates or growth hormone, depending on the type of OI). Suggestions and guidelines for a therapeutic approach are indicated and updated with the most recent findings in OI diagnosis and treatment. PMID:20856683

  6. Emergence of ghrelin as a treatment for cachexia syndromes.

    PubMed

    DeBoer, Mark Daniel

    2008-09-01

    Cachexia is a constellation of symptoms that amount to body wasting in the setting of a variety of chronic illnesses, including cancer, heart failure, chronic kidney disease, and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Cachexia is particularly worrisome clinically because it is associated with a worsened prognosis of the underlying disease. Despite a large amount of study in this area, no single agent has been shown to have consistent efficacy in human trials. One promising class in this setting is ghrelin receptor agonists. Ghrelin binds to the growth hormone secretagogue-1a receptor in appetite-regulating centers in the brain, increasing expression of neuropeptide Y and agouti-related peptide during short-term treatment. Ghrelin has also been shown to have anti-inflammatory properties, which is significant, given that cachexia is thought to be produced at least partly by inflammation induced by the underlying disease. Animal studies have demonstrated efficacy using growth hormone secretagogue receptor agonists to treat cachexia caused by cancer, chemotherapy, and chronic kidney disease. Limited human trials using ghrelin or ghrelin receptor agonists in cancer and heart disease have shown improved appetite and body mass during treatment, although longer-term trials are needed to confirm sustained effects. Also uncertain--but an intriguing possibility--is whether the improved weight gain with ghrelin treatment might also lessen the severity of the underlying disease and improve outcomes.

  7. Current and emerging treatment options in the management of lupus

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Natasha; D’Cruz, David

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex autoimmune disease with variable clinical manifestations. While the clearest guidelines for the treatment of SLE exist in the context of lupus nephritis, patients with other lupus manifestations such as neuropsychiatric, hematologic, musculoskeletal, and severe cutaneous lupus frequently require immunosuppression and/or biologic therapy. Conventional immunosuppressive agents such as mycophenolate mofetil, azathioprine, and cyclophosphamide are widely used in the management of SLE with current more rationalized treatment regimens optimizing the use of these agents while minimizing potential toxicity. The advent of biologic therapies has advanced the treatment of SLE particularly in patients with refractory disease. The CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab and the anti-BLyS agent belimumab are now widely in use in clinical practice. Several other biologic agents are in ongoing clinical trials. While immunosuppressive and biologic agents are the foundation of inflammatory disease control in SLE, the importance of managing comorbidities such as cardiovascular risk factors, bone health, and minimizing susceptibility to infection should not be neglected. PMID:27529058

  8. Current and emerging treatment options in the management of lupus.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Natasha; D'Cruz, David

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex autoimmune disease with variable clinical manifestations. While the clearest guidelines for the treatment of SLE exist in the context of lupus nephritis, patients with other lupus manifestations such as neuropsychiatric, hematologic, musculoskeletal, and severe cutaneous lupus frequently require immunosuppression and/or biologic therapy. Conventional immunosuppressive agents such as mycophenolate mofetil, azathioprine, and cyclophosphamide are widely used in the management of SLE with current more rationalized treatment regimens optimizing the use of these agents while minimizing potential toxicity. The advent of biologic therapies has advanced the treatment of SLE particularly in patients with refractory disease. The CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab and the anti-BLyS agent belimumab are now widely in use in clinical practice. Several other biologic agents are in ongoing clinical trials. While immunosuppressive and biologic agents are the foundation of inflammatory disease control in SLE, the importance of managing comorbidities such as cardiovascular risk factors, bone health, and minimizing susceptibility to infection should not be neglected.

  9. Emerging pharmacologic treatment options for fragile X syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, Tori L; Davenport, Matthew H; Erickson, Craig A

    2015-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common single gene cause of intellectual disability and autism spectrum disorder. Caused by a silenced fragile X mental retardation 1 gene and the subsequent deficiency in fragile X mental retardation protein, patients with FXS experience a range of physical, behavioral, and intellectual debilitations. The FXS field, as a whole, has recently met with some challenges, as several targeted clinical trials with high expectations of success have failed to elucidate significant improvements in a variety of symptom domains. As new clinical trials in FXS are planned, there has been much discussion about the use of the commonly used clinical outcome measures, as well as study design considerations, patient stratification, and optimal age range for treatment. The evidence that modification of these drug targets and use of these failed compounds would prove to be efficacious in human clinical study were rooted in years of basic and translational research. There are questions arising as to the use of the mouse models for studying FXS treatment development. This issue is twofold: many of the symptom domains and molecular and biochemical changes assessed and indicative of efficacy in mouse model study are not easily amenable to clinical trials in people with FXS because of the intolerability of the testing paradigm or a lack of noninvasive techniques (prepulse inhibition, sensory hypersensitivity, startle reactivity, or electrophysiologic, biochemical, or structural changes in the brain); and capturing subtle yet meaningful changes in symptom domains such as sociability, anxiety, and hyperactivity in human FXS clinical trials is challenging with the currently used measures (typically parent/caregiver rating scales). Clinicians, researchers, and the pharmaceutical industry have all had to take a step back and critically evaluate the way we think about how to best optimize future investigations into pharmacologic FXS treatments. As new clinical

  10. Emerging desalination technologies for water treatment: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Subramani, Arun; Jacangelo, Joseph G

    2015-05-15

    In this paper, a review of emerging desalination technologies is presented. Several technologies for desalination of municipal and industrial wastewater have been proposed and evaluated, but only certain technologies have been commercialized or are close to commercialization. This review consists of membrane-based, thermal-based and alternative technologies. Membranes based on incorporation of nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes or graphene-based ones show promise as innovative desalination technologies with superior performance in terms of water permeability and salt rejection. However, only nanocomposite membranes have been commercialized while others are still under fundamental developmental stages. Among the thermal-based technologies, membrane distillation and adsorption desalination show the most promise for enhanced performance with the availability of a waste heat source. Several alternative technologies have also been developed recently; those based on capacitive deionization have shown considerable improvements in their salt removal capacity and feed water recovery. In the same category, microbial desalination cells have been shown to desalinate high salinity water without any external energy source, but to date, scale up of the process has not been methodically evaluated. In this paper, advantages and drawbacks of each technology is discussed along with a comparison of performance, water quality and energy consumption.

  11. Identification and assessment of site treatment plan implementation opportunities for emerging technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, E.A.

    1995-12-31

    The Department of Energy (DOE), in response to the 1992 Federal Facility Compliance Act, has prepared Site Treatment Plans (STP) for the approximately 2,000 waste streams identified within its mixed waste inventory Concurrently, emerging mixed waste treatment technologies are in final development. This paper defines a three-phase process to identify and assess implementation opportunities for these emerging technologies within the STP. It highlights the first phase, functional matching of expected treatment capabilities with proposed treatment requirements. Matches are based on treatment type, regulated contaminant and waste matrix type, for both capabilities and requirements. Results identify specific waste streams and volumes that could be treated by each emerging technology. A study for Plasma Hearth Process, Delphi DETOX{sup sm}, Supercritical Water Oxidation and Vitrification shows that about 200,000 ml of DOE`s mixed waste inventory can potentially be treated by one or more of these emerging technologies. Actual implementations are small fractions of the treatable inventory. Differences between potential and actual implementations must be minimized to accrue optimum benefit from implementation of emerging or alternative treatment technologies. Functional matching is the first phase in identifying and quantifying benefits, addressing technology system and treatment issues, and providing, in part, the basis for STP implementation decisions. DOE, through EM`s Office of Technology Development, has funded this work.

  12. New and Emerging Treatment Options for Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lacy, Brian E.; Chey, William D.; Lembo, Anthony J.

    2015-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional gastrointestinal disorder associated with abdominal pain, diarrhea, constipation, or a mix of symptoms. The pathophysiology of IBS is not completely understood but appears to involve genetics, the gut microbiome, immune activation, altered intestinal permeability, and brain-gut interactions. There is no gold standard for diagnosis. Several sets of symptom-based guidelines exist. Treatment strategies for IBS may include both nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic approaches. Lifestyle modifications that aim to improve exercise, sleep, diet, and stress may be warranted. Recent data suggest that a gluten-free diet and a diet low in fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides, and polyols (FODMAPs) may benefit some patients. For patients with diarrhea-predominant IBS, treatment options include the synthetic peripheral μ-opioid receptor agonist loperamide, antispasmodic agents, antidepressants, serotonin 5-HT3 antagonists, and the gut-specific antibiotic rifaximin. Ongoing research is evaluating the use of probiotics. For patients with constipation-predominant IBS, therapeutic strategies may include dietary fiber, laxatives, and the prosecretory agents lubiprostone and linaclotide. Research is continuing to optimize the use of available agents and evaluating new approaches to further improve the care of patients with IBS. PMID:26491416

  13. Chemophototherapy: An Emerging Treatment Option for Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Dandan; Carter, Kevin A.; Miranda, Dyego

    2016-01-01

    Near infrared (NIR) light penetrates human tissues with limited depth, thereby providing a method to safely deliver non‐ionizing radiation to well‐defined target tissue volumes. Light‐based therapies including photodynamic therapy (PDT) and laser‐induced thermal therapy have been validated clinically for curative and palliative treatment of solid tumors. However, these monotherapies can suffer from incomplete tumor killing and have not displaced existing ablative modalities. The combination of phototherapy and chemotherapy (chemophototherapy, CPT), when carefully planned, has been shown to be an effective tumor treatment option preclinically and clinically. Chemotherapy can enhance the efficacy of PDT by targeting surviving cancer cells or by inhibiting regrowth of damaged tumor blood vessels. Alternatively, PDT‐mediated vascular permeabilization has been shown to enhance the deposition of nanoparticulate drugs into tumors for enhanced accumulation and efficacy. Integrated nanoparticles have been reported that combine photosensitizers and drugs into a single agent. More recently, light‐activated nanoparticles have been developed that release their payload in response to light irradiation to achieve improved drug bioavailability with superior efficacy. CPT can potently eradicate tumors with precise spatial control, and further clinical testing is warranted. PMID:28105389

  14. Emerging potential of exosomes for treatment of traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Ye; Mahmood, Asim; Chopp, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is one of the major causes of death and disability worldwide. No effective treatment has been identified from clinical trials. Compelling evidence exists that treatment with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) exerts a substantial therapeutic effect after experimental brain injury. In addition to their soluble factors, therapeutic effects of MSCs may be attributed to their generation and release of exosomes. Exosomes are endosomal origin small-membrane nano-sized vesicles generated by almost all cell types. Exosomes play a pivotal role in intercellular communication. Intravenous delivery of MSC-derived exosomes improves functional recovery and promotes neuroplasticity in rats after TBI. Therapeutic effects of exosomes derive from the exosome content, especially microRNAs (miRNAs). miRNAs are small non-coding regulatory RNAs and play an important role in posttranscriptional regulation of genes. Compared with their parent cells, exosomes are more stable and can cross the blood-brain barrier. They have reduced the safety risks inherent in administering viable cells such as the risk of occlusion in microvasculature or unregulated growth of transplanted cells. Developing a cell-free exosome-based therapy may open up a novel approach to enhancing multifaceted aspects of neuroplasticity and to amplifying neurological recovery, potentially for a variety of neural injuries and neurodegenerative diseases. This review discusses the most recent knowledge of exosome therapies for TBI, their associated challenges and opportunities. PMID:28250732

  15. Clostridium difficile infection: current, forgotten and emerging treatment options.

    PubMed

    Drekonja, Dimitri M

    2014-09-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has increased in incidence and severity, and is now among the most common nosocomial infections. Several agents are available for the initial treatment of CDI, some of which are rarely used, and none of which is clearly superior for initial clinical cure. Fidaxomicin appears to offer a benefit in terms of preventing recurrent disease, although the cost-benefit ratio is debated. Recurrent CDI is a major challenge, occurring after 15-30% of initial episodes. The treatment of recurrent CDI is difficult, with sparse evidence available to support any particular agent. Fecal microbiota therapy, also known as 'stool transplantation', appears to be highly effective, although availability is currently limited, and the regulatory environment is in flux. Synthetic stool products and an orally available fecal microbiota therapy product are both under investigation, which may address the problem of availability. As with most infectious diseases, an effective vaccine would be a welcome addition to our armamentarium, but none is currently available.

  16. Collagenase Clostridium histolyticum : emerging practice patterns and treatment advances

    PubMed Central

    Warwick, David; Arandes-Renú, José M.; Pajardi, Giorgio; Witthaut, Jörg; Hurst, Lawrence C.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: This study aims to provide a comprehensive review of the role of Collagenase Clostridium histolyticum (CCH). Methods: This review is based on a literature review and practical experience. Results: This review provides practical management strategies for using collagenase by sharing clinical experiences over the past few years; logistical aspects of in-clinic treatment, lessons learned, and novel approaches to correct traditionally hard-to-treat contractures are discussed. In addition a brief, yet comprehensive overview is provided on the pathophysiology of the disease, the mechanism of collagenase action and results of clinical studies. Conclusion: CCH has an evolving role as one of the tools available for treating Dupuytren's disease. PMID:27050718

  17. The prevention and regression of atherosclerotic plaques: emerging treatments

    PubMed Central

    Kalanuria, Atul Ashok; Nyquist, Paul; Ling, Geoffrey

    2012-01-01

    Occlusive vascular diseases, such as sudden coronary syndromes, stroke, and peripheral arterial disease, are a huge burden on the health care systems of developed and developing countries. Tremendous advances have been made over the last few decades in the diagnosis and treatment of atherosclerotic diseases. Intravascular ultrasound has been able to provide detailed information of plaque anatomy and has been used in several studies to assess outcomes. The presence of atherosclerosis disrupts the normal protective mechanism provided by the endothelium and this mechanism has been implicated in the pathophysiology of coronary artery disease and stroke. Efforts are being put into the prevention of atherosclerosis, which has been shown to begin in childhood. This paper reviews the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis and discusses the current options available for the prevention and reversal of plaque formation. PMID:23049260

  18. Mucopolysaccharidosis type III (Sanfilippo Syndrome): emerging treatment strategies.

    PubMed

    de Ruijter, J; Valstar, M J; Wijburg, F A

    2011-06-01

    Mucopolysaccharosis III (MPS III) is a lysosomal storage disorder and belongs to the group of mucopolysaccharidoses. MPS III is caused by a deficiency of one of the four enzymes catalyzing the degradation of the glycosaminoglycan heparan sulfate. MPS III is clinically characterized by progressive dementia with distinct behavioral disturbances and relatively mild somatic disease. This review will summarize and discuss the available and potential future therapeutic options for patients with MPS III. This includes enzyme replacement therapy (ERT), hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), substrate reduction therapy (SRT), chaperone-mediated therapy, and gene therapy. Although clinical efficacy has not yet been fully demonstrated for any of these therapies, it is likely that future developments will lead to disease-modifying treatment for this devastating disease.

  19. Emerging treatments in type 2 diabetes: focus on canagliflozin

    PubMed Central

    Rosiak, Marek; Grzeszczak, Susanna; Kosior, Dariusz A; Postuła, Marek

    2014-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a prevalent metabolic disorder, which affects more than 300 million people globally. The common effect of uncontrolled diabetes is the state of hyperglycemia, which results from beta-cell dysfunction as well as insulin resistance, which is accompanied with microvascular and macrovascular complications. As hyperglycemia defines diabetes, glycemic control is fundamental to the management of diabetes. Sodium glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitors (SGLT2) are a new group of oral antidiabetic medications that act by blocking the reabsorption of glucose, causing it to be excreted in the urine. Canagliflozin was the first SGLT2 inhibitor to be approved in the US by the Food and Drug Administration for the treatment and control of T2DM and on September 19, 2013, the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use of the European Medicines Agency adopted a positive opinion, recommending the granting of a marketing authorization for the medicinal product Invokana®. Canagliflozin is a SGLT2 inhibitor, which acts upon the proximal tubules of the kidneys and reduces the renal threshold for glucose. It is highly selective, binding 250 times more potently to SGLT2 than sodium glucose co-transporter 1 inhibitor. This action allows a higher amount of glucose to be excreted within the urine, causing the patient’s plasma glucose level to be decreased and indirectly causing weight loss. Among the most common adverse events are hypoglycemia, headache, nausea, female genital and urinary tract infections, nasopharyngitis, and transient postural dizziness. Given its high efficacy in reducing hyperglycemia and good safety profile as either monotherapy or an add-on treatment to metformin, sulfonylureas, or insulin, canagliflozin seems to be a promising antihyperglycemic drug. Nevertheless, further large-scale and long-term studies should be conducted to evaluate the impact of canagliflozin on cardiovascular risk in T2DM patients. PMID:25187722

  20. 42 CFR 483.372 - Medical treatment for injuries resulting from an emergency safety intervention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Psychiatric Residential Treatment Facilities Providing Inpatient Psychiatric Services for Individuals Under... as a result of an emergency safety intervention. (b) The psychiatric residential treatment facility... medical care or acute psychiatric care; (2) Medical and other information needed for care of the...

  1. 42 CFR 483.372 - Medical treatment for injuries resulting from an emergency safety intervention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Psychiatric Residential Treatment Facilities Providing Inpatient Psychiatric Services for Individuals Under... as a result of an emergency safety intervention. (b) The psychiatric residential treatment facility... medical care or acute psychiatric care; (2) Medical and other information needed for care of the...

  2. 42 CFR 483.372 - Medical treatment for injuries resulting from an emergency safety intervention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Psychiatric Residential Treatment Facilities Providing Inpatient Psychiatric Services for Individuals Under... as a result of an emergency safety intervention. (b) The psychiatric residential treatment facility... medical care or acute psychiatric care; (2) Medical and other information needed for care of the...

  3. 42 CFR 483.372 - Medical treatment for injuries resulting from an emergency safety intervention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Psychiatric Residential Treatment Facilities Providing Inpatient Psychiatric Services for Individuals Under... as a result of an emergency safety intervention. (b) The psychiatric residential treatment facility... medical care or acute psychiatric care; (2) Medical and other information needed for care of the...

  4. 42 CFR 483.372 - Medical treatment for injuries resulting from an emergency safety intervention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Psychiatric Residential Treatment Facilities Providing Inpatient Psychiatric Services for Individuals Under... as a result of an emergency safety intervention. (b) The psychiatric residential treatment facility... medical care or acute psychiatric care; (2) Medical and other information needed for care of the...

  5. Factors Governing the Emergence of Resistance to Nalidixic Acid in Treatment of Urinary Tract Infection

    PubMed Central

    Greenwood, David; O'Grady, Francis

    1977-01-01

    Cultures of Escherichia coli were exposed to nalidixic acid in an in vitro model in which the conditions of drug-organism interaction resembled those of bacterial cystitis treatment. Results obtained in this way suggested that emergence of bacterial resistance should not be a major problem in treatment of uncomplicated urinary infection; such cases might indeed respond to a less intensive course of treatment than is usual. More prolonged, high-dosage therapy with nalidixic acid may be required for patients with more complicated infections if the risk of failure from the emergence of bacterial resistance is to be minimized. PMID:337890

  6. Current and Emerging Drug Treatments for Binge Eating Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Reas, Deborah L.; Grilo, Carlos M.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction This study evaluated controlled treatment studies of pharmacotherapy for binge eating disorder (BED). Areas Covered The primary focus of the review was on phase II and III controlled trials testing medications for BED. A total of 46 studies were considered and 26 were reviewed in detail. BED outcomes included binge-eating remission, binge-eating frequency, associated eating-disorder psychopathology, associated depression, and weight loss. Expert Opinion Data from controlled trials suggests that certain medications are superior to placebo for stopping binge-eating and for producing faster reductions in binge eating, and - to varying degrees - for reducing associated eating-disorder psychopathology, depression, and weight loss over the short-term. Almost no data exist regarding longer-term effects of medication for BED. Except for topiramate, which reduces both binge eating and weight, weight loss is minimal with medications tested for BED. Psychological interventions and the combination of medication with psychological interventions produce binge-eating outcomes that are superior to medication-only approaches. Combining medications with psychological interventions does not significantly enhance binge-eating outcomes, although the addition of certain medications enhances weight losses achieved with cognitive-behavioral therapy and behavioral weight loss, albeit modestly. PMID:24460483

  7. Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis: emerging targeted therapies to optimize treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Milic, Sandra; Mikolasevic, Ivana; Krznaric-Zrnic, Irena; Stanic, Marija; Poropat, Goran; Stimac, Davor; Vlahovic-Palcevski, Vera; Orlic, Lidija

    2015-01-01

    Diet and lifestyle changes have led to worldwide increases in the prevalences of obesity and metabolic syndrome, resulting in substantially greater incidence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). NAFLD is considered a hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome and is related to diabetes, insulin resistance, central obesity, hyperlipidemia, and hypertension. Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is an entity that describes liver inflammation due to NAFLD. Growing evidence suggests that NAFLD is a multisystem disease with a clinical burden that is not only confined to liver-related morbidity and mortality, but that also affects several extra-hepatic organs and regulatory pathways. Thus, NAFLD is considered an important public health issue, but there is currently no effective therapy for all NAFLD patients in the general population. Studies seeking optimal therapy for NAFLD and NASH have not yet led to development of a universal protocol for treating this growing problem. Several pharmacological agents have been studied in an effort to improve insulin resistance and the proinflammatory mediators that may be responsible for NASH progression. Cardiovascular risk factors are highly prevalent among NASH patients, and the backbone of treatment regimens for these patients still comprises general lifestyle interventions, including dietary changes and increased physical activity. Vitamin E and thiazolidinedione derivatives are currently the most evidence-based therapeutic options, but only limited clinical evidence is available regarding their long-term efficacy and safety. Vitamin D and renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system blockers are promising drugs that are currently being intensively investigated for use in NAFLD/NASH patients. PMID:26316717

  8. Biomimetic nanocrystalline apatites: Emerging perspectives in cancer diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Al-Kattan, Ahmed; Girod-Fullana, Sophie; Charvillat, Cédric; Ternet-Fontebasso, Hélène; Dufour, Pascal; Dexpert-Ghys, Jeannette; Santran, Véronique; Bordère, Julie; Pipy, Bernard; Bernad, José; Drouet, Christophe

    2012-02-14

    Nanocrystalline calcium phosphate apatites constitute the mineral part of hard tissues, and the synthesis of biomimetic analogs is now well-mastered at the lab-scale. Recent advances in the fine physico-chemical characterization of these phases enable one to envision original applications in the medical field along with a better understanding of the underlying chemistry and related pharmacological features. In this contribution, we specifically focused on applications of biomimetic apatites in the field of cancer diagnosis or treatment. We first report on the production and first biological evaluations (cytotoxicity, pro-inflammatory potential, internalization by ZR-75-1 breast cancer cells) of individualized luminescent nanoparticles based on Eu-doped apatites, eventually associated with folic acid, for medical imaging purposes. We then detail, in a first approach, the preparation of tridimensional constructs associating nanocrystalline apatite aqueous gels and drug-loaded pectin microspheres. Sustained releases of a fluorescein analog (erythrosin) used as model molecule were obtained over 7 days, in comparison with the ceramic or microsphere reference compounds. Such systems could constitute original bone-filling materials for in situ delivery of anticancer drugs.

  9. Emerging treatments for severe obesity in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Coles, Nicole; Birken, Catherine; Hamilton, Jill

    2016-09-29

    Severe obesity in childhood is increasing in prevalence and is associated with considerable morbidity. Studies into pediatric obesity have focused largely on interventions that do not necessarily target the unique biologic or psychological underpinnings for the weight gain in the individual child or adolescent. Outcomes show modest improvement and are of questionable benefit for patients with severe obesity. Although weight is a commonly used outcome, other psychological and metabolic parameters including normalization of physical activity and eating behaviors should be primary outcome goals. The durability of weight loss is often limited by physiologic systems that are evolutionarily designed to promote weight gain. Drug therapies for children are limited, as is their effect on weight and metabolism. Existing drugs that are incidentally found to cause weight loss through off-target effects are being actively investigated for obesity indications. Bariatric surgery results in the most significant weight reduction, but it is associated with potential morbidity and long term data are not available for adolescents undergoing this procedure. As understanding of the biologic and psychosocial contributors to eating behaviors and body weight regulation increases, multifaceted and targeted behavioral, pharmacological, and surgical treatment algorithms should be developed and applied to target the underlying pathways involved for the individual child or adolescent with severe obesity.

  10. Emerging treatments for noise-induced hearing loss

    PubMed Central

    Oishi, Naoki; Schacht, Jochen

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Approximately 5% of the population worldwide suffer from industrial, military, or recreational noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) at great economic cost and detriment to the quality of life of affected individuals. This review discusses pharmacological strategies to attenuate NIHL that have been developed in animal models and that are now beginning to be tested in field trials. Areas covered The review describes the epidemiology, pathology and pathophysiology of NIHL in experimental animals and human. The underlying molecular mechanisms of damage are then discussed as a basis for therapeutic approaches to ameliorate the loss of auditory function. Finally, studies in military, industrial, and recreational settings are evaluated. Literature was searched employing the terms “noise-induced hearing loss” and “noise trauma”. Expert opinion NIHL, in principle, can be prevented. With the current pace of development, oral drugs to protect against NIHL should be available within the next 5 to 10 years. Positive results from ongoing trials combined with additional laboratory tests might accelerate the time from the bench to clinical treatment. PMID:21247358

  11. Emerging Drugs for the Treatment of Diabetic Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Tecilazich, Francesco; Dinh, Thanh L.; Veves, Aristidis

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Diabetic ulcers are chronic non-healing ulcerations that despite the available medical tools still result in high amputation rates. Growing evidence suggests that alteration of the biochemical milieu of the chronic wound plays a significant role in diabetic wound healing impairment. Areas covered The basic pathophysiology and the conventional treatment strategy of diabetic foot ulcers have been reviewed in the first section. In the second part we describe the most up-to-date bench and translational research in the field. The third section focuses on the drugs currently under development and the ongoing clinical trials evaluating their safety and efficacy. Finally, we analyze the major drug development issues and the possible scientific approaches to overcome them. Expert opinion Significant strides in understanding the chronic wound development have led to the development of topical therapies to address aberrant expression of growth factors and overexpression of inflammatory cytokines. Current research in our lab suggests that in while decreased growth factor expression occurs at the local wound level, increased systemic serum levels of growth factors suggest growth factor resistance. PMID:23687931

  12. Emerging surgical therapies in the treatment of pediatric epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Karsy, Michael; Guan, Jian; Ducis, Katrina

    2016-01-01

    In the approximately 1% of children affected by epilepsy, pharmacoresistance and early age of seizure onset are strongly correlated with poor cognitive outcomes, depression, anxiety, developmental delay, and impaired activities of daily living. These children often require multiple surgical procedures, including invasive diagnostic procedures with intracranial electrodes to identify the seizure-onset zone. The recent development of minimally invasive surgical techniques, including stereotactic electroencephalography (SEEG) and MRI-guided laser interstitial thermal therapy (MRgLITT), and new applications of neurostimulation, such as responsive neurostimulation (RNS), are quickly changing the landscape of the surgical management of pediatric epilepsy. In this review, the authors discuss these various technologies, their current applications, and limitations in the treatment of pediatric drug-resistant epilepsy, as well as areas for future research. The development of minimally invasive diagnostic and ablative surgical techniques together with new paradigms in neurostimulation hold vast potential to improve the efficacy and reduce the morbidity of the surgical management of children with drug-resistant epilepsy. PMID:27186523

  13. Emergency treatment of a snake bite: Pearls from literature

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Syed Moied; Ahmed, Mohib; Nadeem, Abu; Mahajan, Jyotsna; Choudhary, Adarash; Pal, Jyotishka

    2008-01-01

    Snake bite is a well-known occupational hazard amongst farmers, plantation workers, and other outdoor workers and results in much morbidity and mortality throughout the world. This occupational hazard is no more an issue restricted to a particular part of the world; it has become a global issue. Accurate statistics of the incidence of snakebite and its morbidity and mortality throughout the world does not exist; however, it is certain to be higher than what is reported. This is because even today most of the victims initially approach traditional healers for treatment and many are not even registered in the hospital. Hence, registering such patients is an important goal if we are to have accurate statistics and reduce the morbidity and mortality due to snakebite. World Health Organization/South East Asian Region Organisation (WHO/SEARO) has published guidelines, specific for the South East Asian region, for the clinical management of snakebites. The same guidelines may be applied for managing snakebite patients in other parts of the world also, since no other professional body has come up with any other evidence-based guidelines. In this article we highlight the incidence and clinical features of different types of snakebite and the management guidelines as per the WHO/SEARO recommendation. PMID:19561988

  14. Midostaurin: an emerging treatment for acute myeloid leukemia patients

    PubMed Central

    Gallogly, Molly Megan; Lazarus, Hillard M

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a hematologic malignancy that carries a poor prognosis and has garnered few treatment advances in the last few decades. Mutation of the internal tandem duplication (ITD) region of fms-like tyrosine kinase (FLT3) is considered high risk for decreased response and overall survival. Midostaurin is a Type III receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor found to inhibit FLT3 and other receptor tyrosine kinases, including platelet-derived growth factor receptors, cyclin-dependent kinase 1, src, c-kit, and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor. In preclinical studies, midostaurin exhibited broad-spectrum antitumor activity toward a wide range of tumor xenografts, as well as an FLT3-ITD-driven mouse model of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Midostaurin is orally administered and generally well tolerated as a single agent; hematologic toxicity increases substantially when administered in combination with standard induction chemotherapy. Clinical trials primarily have focused on relapsed/refractory AML and MDS and included single- and combination-agent studies. Administration of midostaurin to relapsed/refractory MDS and AML patients confers a robust anti-blast response sufficient to bridge a minority of patients to transplant. In combination with histone deacetylase inhibitors, responses appear comparable to historic controls, while the addition of midostaurin to standard induction chemotherapy may prolong survival in FLT3-ITD mutant patients. The response of some wild-type (WT)-FLT3 patients to midostaurin therapy is consistent with midostaurin’s ability to inhibit WT-FLT3 in vitro, and also may reflect overexpression of WT-FLT3 in those patients and/or off-target effects such as inhibition of kinases other than FLT3. Midostaurin represents a well-tolerated, easily administered oral agent with the potential to bridge mutant and WT-FLT3 AML patients to transplant and possibly deepen response to induction chemotherapy. Ongoing studies are

  15. Pancreatic cancer: optimizing treatment options, new, and emerging targeted therapies

    PubMed Central

    Chiorean, Elena Gabriela; Coveler, Andrew L

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the US and is expected to become the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the next decade. Despite 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin with irinotecan and oxaliplatin (FOLFIRINOX) and gemcitabine/nab-paclitaxel significantly improving outcomes for metastatic cancer, refractory disease still poses significant challenges. Difficulties with early detection and the inherent chemo- and radio-resistant nature of this malignancy led to attempts to define the sequential biology of pancreatic cancer in order to improve survival outcomes. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is characterized by several germline or acquired genetic mutations, the most common being KRAS (90%), CDK2NA (90%), TP53 (75%–90%), DPC4/SMAD4 (50%). In addition, the tumor microenvironment, chemoresistant cancer stem cells, and the desmoplastic stroma have been the target of some promising clinical investigations. Among the core pathways reproducibly shown to lead the development and progression of this disease, DNA repair, apoptosis, G1/S cell cycle transition, KRAS, Wnt, Notch, Hedgehog, TGF-beta, and other cell invasion pathways, have been the target of “precision therapeutics”. No single molecularly targeted therapeutic though has been uniformly successful, probably due to the tumor heterogeneity, but biomarker research is evolving and it hopes to select more patients likely to benefit. Recent reports note activity with immunotherapies such as CD40 agonists, CCR2 inhibitors, cancer vaccines, and novel combinations against the immunosuppressive tumor milieu are ongoing. While many obstacles still exist, clearly we are making progress in deciphering the heterogeneity within pancreatic cancers. Integrating conventional and immunological targeting will be the key to effective treatment of this deadly disease. PMID:26185420

  16. Pancreatic cancer: optimizing treatment options, new, and emerging targeted therapies.

    PubMed

    Chiorean, Elena Gabriela; Coveler, Andrew L

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the US and is expected to become the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the next decade. Despite 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin with irinotecan and oxaliplatin (FOLFIRINOX) and gemcitabine/nab-paclitaxel significantly improving outcomes for metastatic cancer, refractory disease still poses significant challenges. Difficulties with early detection and the inherent chemo- and radio-resistant nature of this malignancy led to attempts to define the sequential biology of pancreatic cancer in order to improve survival outcomes. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is characterized by several germline or acquired genetic mutations, the most common being KRAS (90%), CDK2NA (90%), TP53 (75%-90%), DPC4/SMAD4 (50%). In addition, the tumor microenvironment, chemoresistant cancer stem cells, and the desmoplastic stroma have been the target of some promising clinical investigations. Among the core pathways reproducibly shown to lead the development and progression of this disease, DNA repair, apoptosis, G1/S cell cycle transition, KRAS, Wnt, Notch, Hedgehog, TGF-beta, and other cell invasion pathways, have been the target of "precision therapeutics". No single molecularly targeted therapeutic though has been uniformly successful, probably due to the tumor heterogeneity, but biomarker research is evolving and it hopes to select more patients likely to benefit. Recent reports note activity with immunotherapies such as CD40 agonists, CCR2 inhibitors, cancer vaccines, and novel combinations against the immunosuppressive tumor milieu are ongoing. While many obstacles still exist, clearly we are making progress in deciphering the heterogeneity within pancreatic cancers. Integrating conventional and immunological targeting will be the key to effective treatment of this deadly disease.

  17. Emergency water treatment with bleach in the United States: the need to revise EPA recommendations.

    PubMed

    Lantagne, Daniele; Person, Bobbie; Smith, Natalie; Mayer, Ally; Preston, Kelsey; Blanton, Elizabeth; Jellison, Kristen

    2014-05-06

    During emergencies in the United States, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) currently recommends using bottled water, or boiling or treating water by adding 1/8 teaspoon (or 8 drops) of bleach to 1 gal of water. This bleach recommendation is internally inconsistent, a relatively high chlorine dose (5.55-8.67 mg/L), and unsupported by evidence. In this study, bleach was added in three different dosages to six waters available to emergency-affected populations in each of six states; free chlorine residual (FCR) and Escherichia coli/total coliforms were measured 1-24 h after treatment. Data were analyzed using four efficacy criteria. Results indicated the dosages in the current EPA recommendation are unnecessarily high to ensure (1) maintenance of FCR for 24 h after treatment, (2) absence of E. coli/total coliforms, and (3) establishment of a CT-factor sufficient to inactivate Giardia lamblia and enteric viruses 1 h after treatment. Additionally, emergency-prone populations did not have the materials to complete treatment with bleach in their household. Therefore, we recommend EPA review and revise the current recommendation to establish an internally consistent, criteria-based recommendation that is usable by emergency-affected populations. We also recommend investigating the use of new or commercially available water treatment products for emergency response in the United States.

  18. 38 CFR 17.121 - Limitations on payment or reimbursement of the costs of emergency treatment not previously...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... VA has an agreement with to furnish health care services for veterans), which means the non-VA... emergency treatment: (1) Could have been transferred from the non-VA facility to a VA medical center (or...) Continued non-emergency treatment. Claims for payment or reimbursement of the costs of emergency...

  19. 38 CFR 17.121 - Limitations on payment or reimbursement of the costs of emergency treatment not previously...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... VA has an agreement with to furnish health care services for veterans), which means the non-VA... emergency treatment: (1) Could have been transferred from the non-VA facility to a VA medical center (or...) Continued non-emergency treatment. Claims for payment or reimbursement of the costs of emergency...

  20. The relationship between child maltreatment and substance abuse treatment outcomes among emerging adults and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Garner, Bryan R; Hunter, Brooke D; Smith, Douglas C; Smith, Jane Ellen; Godley, Mark D

    2014-01-01

    Emerging adulthood is the period of greatest risk for problematic substance use. The primary aim of the current study was to examine the relationship between a broad measure of child maltreatment and several key outcomes for a large clinical sample of emerging adults (n = 858) and adolescents (n = 2,697). The secondary aim was to examine the extent to which the relationship between child maltreatment and treatment outcomes differed between emerging adults and adolescents. Multilevel latent growth curve analyses revealed emerging adults and adolescents who experienced child maltreatment reported significantly greater reductions over time on several treatment outcomes (e.g., substance use, substance-related problems, and emotional problems). Overall, analyses did not support differential relationships between child maltreatment and changes over time in these substance use disorder treatment outcomes for emerging adults and adolescents. The one exception was that although emerging adults with child maltreatment did reduce their HIV risk over time, their improvements were not as great as were the improvements in HIV risk reported by adolescents who had experienced child maltreatment.

  1. Akt inhibition improves irinotecan treatment and prevents cell emergence by switching the senescence response to apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Vétillard, Alexandra; Jonchère, Barbara; Moreau, Marie; Toutain, Bertrand; Henry, Cécile; Fontanel, Simon; Bernard, Anne-Charlotte; Campone, Mario; Guette, Catherine; Coqueret, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Activated in response to chemotherapy, senescence is a tumor suppressive mechanism that induces a permanent loss of proliferation. However, in response to treatment, it is not really known how cells can escape senescence and how irreversible or incomplete this pathway is. We have recently described that cells that escape senescence are more transformed than non-treated parental cells, they resist anoikis and rely on Mcl-1. In this study, we further characterize this emergence in response to irinotecan, a first line treatment used in colorectal cancer. Our results indicate that Akt was activated as a feedback pathway during the early step of senescence. The inhibition of the kinase prevented cell emergence and improved treatment efficacy, both in vitro and in vivo. This improvement was correlated with senescence inhibition, p21waf1 downregulation and a concomitant activation of apoptosis due to Noxa upregulation and Mcl-1 inactivation. The inactivation of Noxa prevented apoptosis and increased the number of emergent cells. Using either RNA interference or p21waf1-deficient cells, we further confirmed that an intact p53-p21-senescence pathway favored cell emergence and that its downregulation improved treatment efficacy through apoptosis induction. Therefore, although senescence is an efficient suppressive mechanism, it also generates more aggressive cells as a consequence of apoptosis inhibition. We therefore propose that senescence-inducing therapies should be used sequentially with drugs favoring cell death such as Akt inhibitors. This should reduce cell emergence and tumor relapse through a combined induction of senescence and apoptosis. PMID:26485768

  2. Retinal vein occlusion: evaluation of "classic" and "emerging" risk factors and treatment.

    PubMed

    Turello, Marina; Pasca, Samantha; Daminato, Roberto; Dello Russo, Patrizia; Giacomello, Roberta; Venturelli, Ugo; Barillari, Giovanni

    2010-05-01

    Retinal vein occlusion (RVO) is the second most common retinal vein disease and an important cause of blindness and visual morbidity. Systemic risk factors are commonly associated with RVO, while unclear it is the role of the thrombophilic and coagulation disorders. To evaluate "classic" and "emerging" risk factors, and to establish a good treatment for RVO. Fifty patients, 31 males and 19 females, with RVO were selected for our study. RVO patients were divided into two groups: those with central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO) and those with branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO). All patients were subjected to an anamnestic investigation and were tested for thrombophilia, coagulation disorders and hyperlipidemia. Treatment and prophylaxis were evaluated. We have named "classic" the systemic risk factors associated with RVO and "emerging" those risk factors, haemostasis related, not clearly associated with RVO. RVO occurs more commonly in patients aged over 50. "Emerging" risk factors were more frequent in CRVO, "classic" in BRVO. Hyperhomocysteinemia is the most common "emerging" risk factor related to RVO. 71.4% of tested patients had hypercholesterolemia. Treatment with LMWH would appear to be safe and effective, but the small number of patients considered not allow us a definitive evaluation of its efficacy. Although our study has shown the correlation between RVO and the "emerging" risk factors, more studies are necessary to better know the real role of thrombophilic and coagulation disorders in this disease and to determine a specific protocol for the treatment and prophylaxis of RVO.

  3. Emerging therapies for the treatment of relapsed or refractory follicular lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, D.; Prica, A.; Assouline, S.; Christofides, A.; Lawrence, T.; Sehn, L.H.

    2016-01-01

    With no treatment standard having been established for relapsed and refractory follicular lymphoma, a number of therapeutic approaches are used in Canada. In patients who relapse early or who eventually become resistant to subsequent treatment, prognosis is poor, and new approaches are needed. A number of novel therapies are being examined in this setting, including monoclonal antibodies, immunoconjugates, immunomodulatory agents, and signal transduction inhibitors. With the body of evidence for those emerging therapies accumulating and the standard upfront treatment changing from rituximab and chop (cyclophosphamide–doxorubicin–vincristine–prednisone) or rituximab and cvp (cyclophosphamide–vincristine–prednisone) to bendamustine and rituximab, treatment decisions in the relapsed and refractory setting have become more complex. The choice of subsequent treatment must consider type of upfront treatment; duration of remission; and patient-related factors such as age, comorbidities, and treatment preferences. This paper summarizes the evidence for novel therapies and proposes recommendations for subsequent treatment options by remission duration after induction and maintenance. PMID:28050137

  4. Emerging from Depression: Treatment of Adolescent Depression Using the Major Treatment Models of Adult Depression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Kathleen M.

    Noting that adolescents who commit suicide are often clinically depressed, this paper examines various approaches in the treatment of depression. Major treatment models of adult depression, which can be directly applied to the treatment of the depressed adolescent, are described. Major treatment models and selected research studies are reviewed in…

  5. Pulmonary embolism: the diagnosis, risk-stratification, treatment and disposition of emergency department patients

    PubMed Central

    Corrigan, Daniel; Prucnal, Christiana; Kabrhel, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    The diagnosis or exclusion of pulmonary embolism (PE) remains challenging for emergency physicians. Symptoms can be vague or non-existent, and the clinical presentation shares features with many other common diagnoses. Diagnostic testing is complicated, as biomarkers, like the D-dimer, are frequently false positive, and imaging, like computed tomography pulmonary angiography, carries risks of radiation and contrast dye exposure. It is therefore incumbent on emergency physicians to be both vigilant and thoughtful about this diagnosis. In recent years, several advances in treatment have also emerged. Novel, direct-acting oral anticoagulants make the outpatient treatment of low risk PE easier than before. However, the spectrum of PE severity varies widely, so emergency physicians must be able to risk-stratify patients to ensure the appropriate disposition. Finally, PE response teams have been developed to facilitate rapid access to advanced therapies (e.g., catheter directed thrombolysis) for patients with high-risk PE. This review will discuss the clinical challenges of PE diagnosis, risk stratification and treatment that emergency physicians face every day. PMID:27752629

  6. Antibody-drug conjugates—an emerging class of cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Diamantis, Nikolaos; Banerji, Udai

    2016-01-01

    Antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) are an emerging novel class of anticancer treatment agents that combines the selectivity of targeted treatment with the cytotoxic potency of chemotherapy drugs. New linker technology associated with novel highly potent cytotoxic payloads has permitted the development of more effective and safe ADCs. In recent years, two ADCs have been licensed, T-DM1 and brentuximab vedotin, and are already establishing their place in cancer treatment. A plethora of ADCs are being investigated in phases I and II trials, emerging data of which appears promising. As we deepen our understanding of what makes a successful ADC, an increasing number of ADCs will likely become viable treatment options as single agents or in combination with chemotherapy. This review will present the philosophy underlying ADCs, their main characteristics and current research developments with a focus on ADCs in solid tumours. PMID:26742008

  7. Antibody-drug conjugates--an emerging class of cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Diamantis, Nikolaos; Banerji, Udai

    2016-02-16

    Antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) are an emerging novel class of anticancer treatment agents that combines the selectivity of targeted treatment with the cytotoxic potency of chemotherapy drugs. New linker technology associated with novel highly potent cytotoxic payloads has permitted the development of more effective and safe ADCs. In recent years, two ADCs have been licensed, T-DM1 and brentuximab vedotin, and are already establishing their place in cancer treatment. A plethora of ADCs are being investigated in phases I and II trials, emerging data of which appears promising. As we deepen our understanding of what makes a successful ADC, an increasing number of ADCs will likely become viable treatment options as single agents or in combination with chemotherapy. This review will present the philosophy underlying ADCs, their main characteristics and current research developments with a focus on ADCs in solid tumours.

  8. The enduring role of the Emergency Medical Treatment and Active Labor Act.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, Sara

    2013-12-01

    The Emergency Medical Treatment and Active Labor Act (EMTALA) is a seminal law that imposes screening, stabilization, and transfer duties on all Medicare-participating hospitals that have emergency departments. More than twenty-five years after its enactment, EMTALA continues to generate controversy over the scope and depth of its obligations on issues ranging from the nature of the screening obligation and rules regarding on-call specialists to whether EMTALA's stabilization protections exclude emergency inpatients. Despite ongoing questions that flow from its detailed provisions, EMTALA is an enduring testament to society's evolving views that hospitals must provide emergency care not only to their established patients but to the broader communities they serve.

  9. Rapid assessment and initial patient treatment team -- a way forward for emergency care.

    PubMed

    Cronin, J G; Wright, J

    2005-04-01

    As a consequence of the UK Department of Health drive to introduce the 4-h emergency care target acute trusts have attempted to initialize a myriad of programmes to improve the patients' experience in this sector. Changes to how patients are managed and the flow that they enter within the emergency care system have become a popular option. This paper seeks to explore the concept of the Rapid Assessment and Initial Patient Treatment team (RAPT) within the Accident and Emergency (A and E) environment. We intend to provide information for readers who may be considering introducing such teams. The paper will explore the initial practical difficulties that were encountered. We will explore associated benefits for the RAPT approach including improved teamwork, better communication with the family, avoiding unnecessary duplication of work and discuss the benefits of having a direct referral process in place for emergency patients.

  10. [To further strengthen the construction of emergency medical treatment system of massive burn].

    PubMed

    Jia, C Y

    2017-03-20

    Although clinical medicine of our country has made great progress in recent years, the rescue of massive burn casualties is still facing enormous challenges. No matter it is the top level design, system configuration, plan preparation, training, education, or the operation process, the medical resource allocation, and the treatment efficiency, are far behind the demand of social development. Therefore, further strengthen the construction of emergency medical treatment system of massive burn is the unshirkable responsibility of burn medical workers in our country.

  11. The Emergence of Suicidal Ideation during the Post-Hospital Treatment of Depressed Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaudiano, Brandon A.; Andover, Margaret S.; Miller, Ivan W.

    2008-01-01

    There is a paucity of research on the emergence of suicidal ideation in recently hospitalized patients undergoing treatment for depression. As part of a larger clinical trial, patients (N = 103) with major depression without suicidal ideation at hospital discharge were followed for up to 6 months while receiving study-related outpatient…

  12. Emerging Standards of Care for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Panic Disorder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beamish, Patrica M.; Granello, Darcy Haag; Granello, Paul F.; McSteen, Patricia B.; Stone, David A.

    1997-01-01

    Proposes eight emerging standards of care, based on a literature review, for the diagnosis and treatment of panic disorder without agoraphobia in adults. The diagnostic criteria were particularly analyzed in terms of comorbid psychological disorders, medical disorders, and substances that mimic panic symptoms. Defines minimal professional conduct.…

  13. [The responsibility of the emergency service physician and patient consent to treatment and hospitalization].

    PubMed

    Wiernikowski, A; Szczepanek, M

    1997-01-01

    Amenability of emergency service physician for the treatment given without patient consent has been presented in the study. Depending on circumstances it can be penal, civil, disciplinary and professional responsibility. The study has been annotated with current legal and ethical rules, which should be not only commonly known to physicians but also respected to avoid legal consequences.

  14. Case reports describing treatments in the emergency medicine literature: missing and misleading information

    PubMed Central

    Richason, Tiffany P; Paulson, Stephen M; Lowenstein, Steven R; Heard, Kennon J

    2009-01-01

    Background Although randomized trials and systematic reviews provide the "best evidence" for guiding medical practice, many emergency medicine journals still publish case reports (CRs). The quality of the reporting in these publications has not been assessed. Objectives In this study we sought to determine the proportion of treatment-related case reports that adequately reported information about the patient, disease, interventions, co-interventions, outcomes and other critical information. Methods We identified CRs published in 4 emergency medicine journals in 2000–2005 and categorized them according to their purpose (disease description, overdose or adverse drug reactioin, diagnostic test or treatment effect). Treatment-related CRs were reviewed for the presence or absence of 11 reporting elements. Results All told, 1,316 CRs were identified; of these, 85 (6.5%; 95CI = 66, 84) were about medical or surgical treatments. Most contained adequate descriptions of the patient (99%; 95CI = 95, 100), the stage and severity of the patient's disease (88%; 95CI = 79, 93), the intervention (80%; 95CI = 70, 87) and the outcomes of treatment (90%; 95CI = 82, 95). Fewer CRs reported the patient's co-morbidities (45%; 95CI = 35, 56), concurrent medications (30%; 95CI = 21, 40) or co-interventions (57%; 95CI = 46, 67) or mentioned any possible treatment side-effects (33%; 95CI = 24, 44). Only 37% (95CI = 19, 38) discussed alternative explanations for favorable outcomes. Generalizability of treatment effects to other patients was mentioned in only 29% (95CI = 20, 39). Just 2 CRs (2.3%; 95CI = 1, 8) reported a 'denominator" (number of patients subjected to the same intervention, whether or not successful. Conclusion Treatment-related CRs in emergency medicine journals often omit critical details about treatments, co-interventions, outcomes, generalizability, causality and denominators. As a result, the information may be misleading to providers, and the clinical applications may

  15. Emergent Treatments Based on The Pathophysiology of Bipolar Disorder: A Selective Review

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Roscoe O.; Keshavan, Matcheri

    2015-01-01

    Bipolar disorder is a chronic psychiatric disorder that is a cause of significant symptomatology even in the setting of optimal treatment. Most current treatments are developed from serendipity, and not based on known pathophysiology. In this review we examine a number of somatic and pharmacologic therapies that are poised to become part of the armamentarium of interventions to treat bipolar illness. As a group, these interventions are derived from a growing understanding of the biological underpinnings of bipolar disorders. We will look at emergent treatments based on our understanding of the molecular biology, neuroanatomy, and the genetics of bipolar disorder. PMID:26525885

  16. A computerized standard protocol order entry for pediatric inpatient acute seizure emergencies reduces time to treatment.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yi; Morgan, Robin; Schiff, Linda; Hannah, Debbie; Wheless, James

    2014-02-01

    Time to treatment of seizures is critical to efficacy. We performed a quality initiative and evaluated time to treatment of inpatient seizure emergencies with first- and second-line medicines before and after implementation of a computerized, standard treatment protocol. Data from 125 patients revealed that 179 seizure episodes required first-line antiepileptic drugs, and the mean time to treatment was 7.72 minutes. In 87 episodes, patients (49%) received the drugs within 5 minutes. Forty-six episodes required second-line drugs. In 17 (37%), patients received them within 30 minutes (mean 49.48 minutes). After implementation of the protocol, the mean time to treatment with first-line drugs was 3.74 minutes, a reduction of >50% (P < .0001). The mean time to treatment with second-line drugs was 25.05 minutes, a reduction of ∼50% (P < .0001). This effective model for reducing the time to treatment of seizure emergencies may be useful to similar institutions.

  17. Efficacy of Fifteen Emerging Interventions for the Treatment of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, Olivia; Varker, Tracey; Forbes, David; Phelps, Andrea; Dell, Lisa; DiBattista, Ashley; Ralph, Naomi; O'Donnell, Meaghan

    2016-02-01

    Although there is an abundance of novel interventions for the treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), often their efficacy remains unknown. This systematic review assessed the evidence for 15 new or novel interventions for the treatment of PTSD. Studies that investigated changes to PTSD symptoms following the delivery of any 1 of the 15 interventions of interest were identified through systematic literature searches. There were 19 studies that met the inclusion criteria for this study. Eligible studies were assessed against methodological quality criteria and data were extracted. The majority of the 19 studies were of poor quality, hampered by methodological limitations, such as small sample sizes and lack of control group. There were 4 interventions, however, stemming from a mind-body philosophy (acupuncture, emotional freedom technique, mantra-based meditation, and yoga) that had moderate quality evidence from mostly small- to moderate-sized randomized controlled trials. The active components, however, of these promising emerging interventions and how they related to or were distinct from established treatments remain unclear. The majority of emerging interventions for the treatment of PTSD currently have an insufficient level of evidence supporting their efficacy, despite their increasing popularity. Further well-designed controlled trials of emerging interventions for PTSD are required.

  18. Rapid intervention and treatment zone: redesigning nursing services to meet increasing emergency department demand.

    PubMed

    Considine, Julie; Lucas, Elspeth; Martin, Roslyn; Stergiou, Helen E; Kropman, Matthew; Chiu, Herman

    2012-02-01

    The impact of emergency nursing roles in demand management systems is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to evaluate emergency nurses' role in a specific emergency department (ED) demand management system: rapid intervention and treatment zone (RITZ). A descriptive exploratory approach was used. Data were collected from audit of 193 randomly selected patient records and 12 h of clinical practice observation. The median age of participants was 31 years, 51.8% were males and 99.5% were discharged home. Nurse qualifications or seniority had no significant effect on waiting time or length of stay (LOS). There were disparities between documented and observed nursing practice. The designation and qualifications of RITZ nurses made little difference to waiting times and ED LOS. Specific documentation and communication systems for areas of the ED that manage large numbers of low complexity patients warrant further research.

  19. Open versus laparoscopic approach in the treatment of abdominal emergencies in elderly population

    PubMed Central

    COCORULLO, G.; FALCO, N.; TUTINO, R.; FONTANA, T.; SCERRINO, G.; SALAMONE, G.; LICARI, L.; GULOTTA, G.

    2016-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the role of laparoscopy in the treatment of surgical emergency in old population. Patients and Methods Over-70 years-old patients submitted to emergency abdominal surgery from January 2013 to December 2014 were collected and grouped according to admission diagnoses. These accounted small bowel obstruction, colonic acute disease, appendicitis, ventral hernia, gastro-duodenal perforation, biliary disease. In each group it was analyzed the operation time (OT), the morbidity rate and the mortality rate comparing open and laparoscopic management using T-test and Chi-square test. Results 159 over 70-years-old patients underwent emergency surgery in the General and Emergency surgery Operative Unit (O.U.) of the Policlinic of Palermo. 75 patients were managed by a laparoscopic approach and 84 underwent traditional open emergency surgery. T-Test for OT and Chi-square test for morbidity rate and mortality rate showed no differences in small bowel emergencies (p=0,4; 0,250,9; p>0,95) and in gastro-duodenal perforation (p=0,9; p>0.9; p>0.95). In cholecystitis, laparoscopy group showed lower OT (T-Test: p= 0,0002) while Chi-square test for morbidity rate (0,1emergencies in elderly population. PMID:27734793

  20. Benefits of Early Roflumilast Treatment After Hospital or Emergency Department Discharge for a COPD Exacerbation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Qing; Mocarski, Michelle; Sun, Shawn X.

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic lower respiratory disease, which includes chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), is the third leading cause of death in the United States. Roflumilast is an oral, once-daily, selective phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitor approved for reducing the risk for COPD exacerbations in patients with severe COPD associated with chronic bronchitis and a history of exacerbations. Objectives To evaluate the effects of roflumilast treatment timing on COPD exacerbation rates (primary objective) and on resource utilization and healthcare costs (secondary objective) after hospital or emergency department discharge associated with a COPD exacerbation. Methods In this retrospective cohort study, claims data from March 2011 to March 2013 were extracted from Truven Health MarketScan combined commercial healthcare claims and Medicare supplemental claims databases and were analyzed to compare the exacerbation rates and the healthcare resource utilization and costs between the early roflumilast treatment (treatment initiation ≤30 days after hospital or emergency department discharge) and the delayed roflumilast treatment (treatment initiation 31–180 days after discharge) cohorts. Multivariate logistic regression and generalized linear models with log-link function and gamma distribution were adjusted for age, sex, insurance plan type, COPD disease complexity, and comorbidities. Results A total of 995 patients (N = 280 early roflumilast treatment, N = 715 delayed roflumilast treatment) were included. Compared with the delayed roflumilast treatment group, patients in the early roflumilast treatment group were 39% less likely to have an exacerbation after hospital discharge (P = .004). The patients receiving early roflumilast treatment also had 42% (P = .003) and 37% (P = .005) lower risks for COPD-related and all-cause rehospitalizations, respectively, than patients in the delayed roflumilast treatment group. Significantly fewer patients receiving early roflumilast

  1. Differentiating Types of Wide-Complex Tachycardia to Determine Appropriate Treatment in the Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    deSouza, Ian S; Peterson, Alanna C; Marill, Keith A

    2015-07-01

    Wide-complex tachycardia is a rare disease entity among patients presenting to the emergency department. However, due to its potential life-threatening nature, emergency clinicians must know how to assess and manage this condition. Wide-complex tachycardia encompasses a range of cardiac dysrhythmias, some of which can be difficult to distinguish and may require specific treatment approaches. This review summarizes the etiology and pathophysiology of wide-complex tachycardia, describes the differential diagnosis, and presents an evidence-based approach to identification of the different types of tachycardias through the use of a thorough history and physical examination, vagal maneuvers, electrocardiography, and adenosine. The treatment options and disposition for patients with various wide-complex tachycardias are also discussed, with attention to special circumstances and select controversial/contemporary topics.

  2. Travel medicine physician adherence to guidelines for the emergency self treatment of malaria.

    PubMed

    Flaherty, Gerard T; Walden, Lucas M; Townend, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Few studies have examined emergency self treatment (EST) antimalarial prescribing patterns. 110 physician-members of the Travel Medicine Society of Ireland and British Global and Travel Health Association participated in this study. There was a trend towards the prescription of EST for travel to remote low-risk malaria areas; for long-term residents living in low-risk areas; and for frequent travellers to low-risk areas. This study provides insights into the use of EST in travellers' malaria.

  3. Current and emerging therapeutic options for the treatment of chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Muratore, Claudio A; Baranchuk, Adrian

    2010-01-01

    Chagas’ disease is an endemic disease in Latin America caused by a unicellular parasite (Trypanosoma cruzi) that affects almost 18 million people. This condition involves the heart, causing heart failure, arrhythmias, heart block, thromboembolism, stroke, and sudden death. In this article, we review the current and emerging treatment of Chagas’ cardiomyopathy focusing mostly on management of heart failure and arrhythmias. Heart failure therapeutical options including drugs, stem cells and heart transplantation are revised. Antiarrhythmic drugs, catheter ablation, and intracardiac devices are discussed as well. Finally, the evidence for a potential role of specific antiparasitic treatment for the prevention of cardiovascular disease is reviewed. PMID:20730015

  4. α1-Antitrypsin deficiency · 6: New and emerging treatments for α1-antitrypsin deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Sandhaus, R

    2004-01-01

    Alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency is a genetic condition that increases the risk of developing lung and liver disease, as well as other associated conditions. Most treatment of affected individuals is not specifically directed at AAT deficiency but focuses on the resultant disease state. The only currently available specific therapeutic agent—namely, intravenous augmentation with plasma derived AAT protein—is marketed in a limited number of countries. Treatments aimed at correcting the underlying genetic abnormality, supplementing or modifying the gene product, and halting or reversing organ injury are now beginning to emerge. These innovative approaches may prove effective at modifying or eliminating diseases association with AAT deficiency. PMID:15454659

  5. Comparative assessment of the environmental sustainability of existing and emerging perchlorate treatment technologies for drinking water.

    PubMed

    Choe, Jong Kwon; Mehnert, Michelle H; Guest, Jeremy S; Strathmann, Timothy J; Werth, Charles J

    2013-05-07

    Environmental impacts of conventional and emerging perchlorate drinking water treatment technologies were assessed using life cycle assessment (LCA). Comparison of two ion exchange (IX) technologies (i.e., nonselective IX with periodic regeneration using brines and perchlorate-selective IX without regeneration) at an existing plant shows that brine is the dominant contributor for nonselective IX, which shows higher impact than perchlorate-selective IX. Resource consumption during the operational phase comprises >80% of the total impacts. Having identified consumables as the driving force behind environmental impacts, the relative environmental sustainability of IX, biological treatment, and catalytic reduction technologies are compared more generally using consumable inputs. The analysis indicates that the environmental impacts of heterotrophic biological treatment are 2-5 times more sensitive to influent conditions (i.e., nitrate/oxygen concentration) and are 3-14 times higher compared to IX. However, autotrophic biological treatment is most environmentally beneficial among all. Catalytic treatment using carbon-supported Re-Pd has a higher (ca. 4600 times) impact than others, but is within 0.9-30 times the impact of IX with a newly developed ligand-complexed Re-Pd catalyst formulation. This suggests catalytic reduction can be competitive with increased activity. Our assessment shows that while IX is an environmentally competitive, emerging technologies also show great promise from an environmental sustainability perspective.

  6. The ability of biologically based wastewater treatment systems to remove emerging organic contaminants--a review.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Rodríguez, Aida; Matamoros, Víctor; Fontàs, Clàudia; Salvadó, Victòria

    2014-10-01

    Biologically based wastewater treatment systems are considered a sustainable, cost-effective alternative to conventional wastewater treatment systems. These systems have been used and studied for the treatment of urban sewage from small communities, and recently, it has been reported that they can also effectively remove emerging organic contaminants (EOCs). EOCs are a new group of unregulated contaminants which include pharmaceutical and personal care products, some pesticides, veterinary products, and industrial compounds among others that are thought to have long-term adverse effects on human health and ecosystems. This review is focused on reporting the ability of biologically based wastewater treatment systems to remove EOCs and the main elimination mechanisms and degradation processes (i.e., biodegradation, photodegradation, phytoremediation, and sorption) taking place in constructed wetlands, ponds, and Daphnia and fungal reactors.

  7. Conventional and emerging treatments in the management of acute primary angle closure

    PubMed Central

    Boey, Pui Yi; Singhal, Shweta; Perera, Shamira A; Aung, Tin

    2012-01-01

    The management of acute primary angle closure is directed at lowering the intraocular pressure and relieving pupil block. Conventional treatment involves the use of medical treatment and laser peripheral iridotomy, respectively, as a means for achieving these aims. Newer therapeutic strategies have been described that are potentially useful adjuncts or alternatives to conventional treatment. Emerging strategies that lower intraocular pressure include anterior chamber paracentesis, as well as laser procedures such as iridoplasty and pupilloplasty. A possible alternative to relieving pupil block is lens extraction, and may be combined with adjunctive measures such as goniosynechiolysis and viscogoniosynechiolysis. Trabeculectomy has a limited role in the acute setting. This review paper reviews the current evidence regarding conventional and newer treatment modalities for acute primary angle closure. PMID:22536030

  8. Treatment of schizophrenia with antipsychotics in Norwegian emergency wards, a cross-sectional national study

    PubMed Central

    Kroken, Rune A; Johnsen, Erik; Ruud, Torleif; Wentzel-Larsen, Tore; Jørgensen, Hugo A

    2009-01-01

    Background Surveys on prescription patterns for antipsychotics in the Scandinavian public health system are scarce despite the prevalent use of these drugs. The clinical differences between antipsychotic drugs are mainly in the areas of safety and tolerability, and international guidelines for the treatment of schizophrenia offer rational strategies to minimize the burden of side effects related to antipsychotic treatment. The implementation of treatment guidelines in clinical practice have proven difficult to achieve, as reflected by major variations in the prescription patterns of antipsychotics between different comparable regions and countries. The objective of this study was to evaluate the practice of treatment of schizophrenic patients with antipsychotics at discharge from acute inpatient settings at a national level. Methods Data from 486 discharges of patients from emergency inpatient treatment of schizophrenia were collected during a three-month period in 2005; the data were collected in a large national study that covered 75% of Norwegian hospitals receiving inpatients for acute treatment. Antipsychotic treatment, demographic variables, scores from the Global Assessment of Functioning and Health of the Nation Outcome Scales and information about comorbid conditions and prior treatment were analyzed to seek predictors for nonadherence to guidelines. Results In 7.6% of the discharges no antipsychotic treatment was given; of the remaining discharges, 35.6% were prescribed antipsychotic polypharmacy and 41.9% were prescribed at least one first-generation antipsychotic (FGA). The mean chlorpromazine equivalent dose was 450 (SD 347, range 25–2800). In the multivariate regression analyses, younger age, previous inpatient treatment in the previous 12 months before index hospitalization, and a comorbid diagnosis of personality disorder or mental retardation predicted antipsychotic polypharmacy, while previous inpatient treatment in the previous 12 months also

  9. Emerging Technology Summary. ACID EXTRACTION TREATMENT SYSTEM FOR TREATMENT OF METAL CONTAMINATED SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Acid Extraction Treatment System (AETS) is intended to reduce the concentrations and/or teachability of heavy metals in contaminated soils so the soil can be returned to the site from which it originated. The objective of the project was to determine the effectiveness and com...

  10. Emerging treatment options for refractory angina pectoris: ranolazine, shock wave treatment, and cell-based therapies.

    PubMed

    Gennari, Marco; Gambini, Elisa; Bassetti, Beatrice; Capogrossi, Maurizio; Pompilio, Giulio

    2014-01-01

    A challenge of modern cardiovascular medicine is to find new, effective treatments for patients with refractory angina pectoris, a clinical condition characterized by severe angina despite optimal medical therapy. These patients are not candidates for surgical or percutaneous revascularization. Herein we review the most up-to-date information regarding the modern approach to the patient with refractory angina pectoris, from conventional medical management to new medications and shock wave therapy, focusing on the use of endothelial precursor cells (EPCs) in the treatment of this condition. Clinical limitations of the efficiency of conventional approaches justify the search for new therapeutic options. Regenerative medicine is considered the next step in the evolution of organ replacement therapy. It is driven largely by the same health needs as transplantation and replacement therapies, but it aims further than traditional approaches, such as cell-based therapy. Increasing knowledge of the role of circulating cells derived from bone marrow (EPCs) on cardiovascular homeostasis in physiologic and pathologic conditions has prompted the clinical use of these cells to relieve ischemia. The current state of therapeutic angiogenesis still leaves many questions unanswered. It is of paramount importance that the treatment is delivered safely. Direct intramyocardial and intracoronary administration has demonstrated acceptable safety profiles in early trials, and may represent a major advance over surgical thoracotomy. The combined efforts of bench and clinical researchers will ultimately answer the question of whether cell therapy is a suitable strategy for treatment of patients with refractory angina.

  11. Identifying a need for more focused treatment of chlamydia and gonorrhoea in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Sean P; Knych, McKenna; Iordanova, Rossitza; Mahan, Meredith; Vohra, Taher

    2016-10-01

    The indolent nature of chlamydia and gonorrhoea, along with the time delay associated with current diagnostic testing, makes definitive diagnosis while in the emergency department impossible. We therefore sought to determine the proportion of patients who receive accurate, presumptive antimicrobial treatment for these infections. A retrospective chart review was performed on all patient encounters that underwent chlamydia and gonorrhoea testing at an urban emergency department during a single month in 2012. Each encounter was reviewed for nucleic acid amplification test results and whether presumptive antibiotics were given during the initial visit. A total of 639 patient encounters were reviewed; 87.2% were female and the mean age was 26.7 years. Chlamydia was present in 11.1%, with women and men having similar infection rates: 10.6% vs. 14.6% (p = 0.277). Gonorrhoea was present in 5.0%, with a lower prevalence among women than men: 3.2% vs. 17.1% (p < 0.001). Women received presumptive treatment less often than men: 37.7% vs. 82.9% (p < 0.001). Presumptive treatment was less accurate in women than men: 7.9% vs. 25.6% (p < 0.001). After combining genders, 10.2% received accurate presumptive treatment; 33.3% were overtreated and 4.4% missed treatment. Presumptive treatment for chlamydia and gonorrhoea was more frequent and more accurate in men than in women. Overall, one-third of patients received unnecessary antibiotics, yet nearly 5% missed treatment. Better methods are needed for identifying patients who need treatment.

  12. Adhesions small bowel obstruction in emergency setting: conservative or operative treatment?

    PubMed Central

    ASSENZA, M.; DE GRUTTOLA, I.; ROSSI, D.; CASTALDI, S.; FALASCHI, F.; GIULIANO, G.

    2016-01-01

    Adhesions small bowel obstructions (aSBO) are among the leading causes of emergency operative intervention. About the 80% of aSBO cases resolve without a surgical treatment. It’s important to identify which patients could undergo a conservative treatment to prevent an useless surgery The aim of this study is to determine findings that can indicate whether patients with aSBO should undergo a conservative or a surgical treatment. 313 patients with diagnosis of submission of aSBO were restudied. Patients were divided into two groups based on the different type of treatment received, 225 patients who underwent surgical treatment within 24 hours after admission, 88 patients which underwent conservative treatment successfully. For each patient, clinical, hematochemical and radiological findings have been analysed. The treatment of aSBO should be, at the beginning, conservative except that cases that presents clinical and/or CT-scan findings predictive for a surgical treatment (free peritoneal fluid, mesenterial edema, transitional point) or a peritonitis (pneumatosis intestinalis, pneumoperitoneum). PMID:27938529

  13. Reduced Treatment-Emergent Sexual Dysfunction as a Potential Target in the Development of New Antidepressants

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, David S.; Palazzo, M. Carlotta; Masdrakis, Vasilios G.

    2013-01-01

    Pleasurable sexual activity is an essential component of many human relationships, providing a sense of physical, psychological, and social well-being. Epidemiological and clinical studies show that depressive symptoms and depressive illness are associated with impairments in sexual function and satisfaction, both in untreated and treated patients. The findings of randomized placebo-controlled trials demonstrate that most of the currently available antidepressant drugs are associated with the development or worsening of sexual dysfunction, in a substantial proportion of patients. Sexual difficulties during antidepressant treatment often resolve as depression lifts but can endure over long periods and may reduce self-esteem and affect mood and relationships adversely. Sexual dysfunction during antidepressant treatment is typically associated with many possible causes, but the risk and type of dysfunction vary with differing compounds and should be considered when making decisions about the relative merits and drawbacks of differing antidepressants. A range of interventions can be considered when managing patients with sexual dysfunction associated with antidepressants, including the prescription of phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors, but none of these approaches can be considered “ideal.” As treatment-emergent sexual dysfunction is less frequent with certain drugs, presumably related to differences in their pharmacological properties, and because current management approaches are less than ideal, a reduced burden of treatment-emergent sexual dysfunction represents a tolerability target in the development of novel antidepressants. PMID:23431429

  14. Neonatal infections due to multi-resistant strains: Epidemiology, current treatment, emerging therapeutic approaches and prevention.

    PubMed

    Tzialla, Chryssoula; Borghesi, Alessandro; Pozzi, Margherita; Stronati, Mauro

    2015-12-07

    Severe infections represent the main cause of neonatal mortality accounting for more than one million neonatal deaths worldwide every year. Antibiotics are the most commonly prescribed medications in neonatal intensive care units. The benefits of antibiotic therapy when indicated are clearly enormous, but the continued and widespread use of antibiotics has generated over the years a strong selective pressure on microorganisms, favoring the emergence of resistant strains. Health agencies worldwide are galvanizing attention toward antibiotic resistance in gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Infections in neonatal units due to multidrug and extensively multidrug resistant bacteria are rising and are already seriously challenging antibiotic treatment options. While there is a growing choice of agents against multi-resistant gram-positive bacteria, new options for multi-resistant gram-negative bacteria in the clinical practice have decreased significantly in the last 20 years making the treatment of infections caused by multidrug-resistant pathogens challenging mostly in neonates. Treatment options are currently limited and will be some years before any new treatment for neonates become available for clinical use, if ever. The aim of the review is to highlight the current knowledge on antibiotic resistance in the neonatal population, the possible therapeutic choices, and the prevention strategies to adopt in order to reduce the emergency and spread of resistant strains.

  15. Recent Patents and Emerging Therapeutics in the Treatment of Allergic Conjunctivitis

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Gyan P.; Tamboli, Viral; Jwala, Jwala; Mitra, Ashim K.

    2011-01-01

    Ocular allergy is an inflammatory response of the conjunctival mucosa that also affects the cornea and eyelids. Allergic conjunctivitis includes seasonal allergic conjunctivitis (SAC), perennial allergic conjunctivitis (PAC), vernal keratoconjunctivitis (VKC), atopic keratoconjunctivitis (AKC) and giant papillary conjunctivitis (GPC). In general, allergic conditions involve mast cell degranulation that leads to release of inflammatory mediators and activation of enzymatic cascades generating pro-inflammatory mediators. In chronic ocular inflammatory disorders associated with mast cell activation such as VKC and AKC constant inflammatory response is observed due to predominance of inflammatory mediators such as eosinophils and Th2-generated cytokines. Antihistamines, mast-cell stabilizers, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents, corticosteroids and immunomodulatory agents are commonly indicated for the treatment of acute and chronic allergic conjunctivitis. In recent years newer drug molecules have been introduced in the treatment of allergic conjunctivitis. This article reviews recent patents and emerging therapeutics in the treatment of allergic conjunctivitis. PMID:21171952

  16. [Diagnosis and treatment in the emergency room of acute asthma in childhood].

    PubMed

    Aldana Vergara, Ruth Saraí; Olivar Lòpez, Victor; Sienra Monge, Juan José Luis; Lezana Fernández, José Luis; Zepeda Ortega, Benjamin

    2009-01-01

    Acute asthma is characterized by acute air way obstruction episodes presented as short breath, increased coughing, wheezing and difficult breathing, reversible with bronchodilator. It constitutes one of the most frequent causes of pediatric ER visits whose diagnosis and treatment is not always adequate. It is necessary to carry out a complete medical history searching for the number of previous attacks, risk factors, associated illnesses, triggers, prior hospitalizations, preventive and maintenance treatment used, along with a complete physical examination. During the management of moderate-severe attacks frequent systematic assessments are required to ensure treatment response. In children above 5 years old, monitoring of expiratory peak flow (EPF) during mild-moderate attacks is recommended. In general, a national consensus to classify and treat acute asthma in emergency services does not exist for which the need to develop a clinical practice guide of diagnosis and management arises.

  17. Emergency Medical Treatment and Labor Act: what every physician should know about the federal antidumping law.

    PubMed

    Hyman, David A; Studdert, David M

    2015-06-01

    Since 1986, the Emergency Medical Treatment and Labor Act (EMTALA) has imposed an obligation on hospitals and physicians to evaluate and stabilize patients who present to a hospital ED seeking care. Available sanctions for noncompliance include fines, damages awarded in civil litigation, and exclusion from Medicare. EMTALA uses several terms that are familiar to physicians (eg, "emergency medical condition," "stabilize," and "transfer"), but the statutory definitions do not map neatly onto the way in which these terms are used and understood in clinical settings. Thus, there is potential for a mismatch between a physician's on-the-spot professional judgment and what the statute demands. We review what every physician should know about EMTALA and answer six common questions about the law.

  18. Emerging roles for miRNAs in the development, diagnosis, and treatment of diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    DiStefano, Johanna K; Taila, Matthew; Alvarez, M Lucrecia

    2013-08-01

    Although the causes of diabetic nephropathy are not yet fully known, emerging evidence suggests a role for epigenetic factors in the development of the disease. In particular, microRNAs (miRNAs) are becoming recognized as important mediators of biological processes relevant to diabetic nephropathy. Until recently, investigations of miRNAs in the development of diabetic nephropathy have remained relatively limited; however, the number of reports identifying potential new candidates and mechanisms of impact is presently expanding at a rapid pace. This review seeks to summarize these recent findings, focusing on new candidates and/or novel mechanisms, including the intersection between genetic variation and miRNA function in modulating disease expression, emerging in the field. We also review the latest advances in the diagnostic and therapeutic potential of miRNAs in the treatment of diabetic nephropathy.

  19. Self-Medication: Initial Treatments Used by Patients Seen in an Ophthalmologic Emergency Room

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Regina Souza; Kara-José, Newton; Temporini, Edméa Rita; Kara-Junior, Newton; Noma-Campos, Regina

    2009-01-01

    OJECTIVE This study seeks to identify practices of self-medication in the treatment of ocular emergencies. We examine patients’ use of both homemade preparations and manufactured products before seeking specialized care. MATERIALS AND METHODS We conducted a cross-sectional analytic survey of consecutive patients seen in the ophthalmology emergency room of a teaching hospital. RESULTS The sample included 561 subjects, 51.3% males and 48.7% females, with a mean age of 39.8 years. Prior to seeking emergency care, 40.5% reported self-medicating; 29.4% used a homemade preparation (13.9% referred to an industrialized product like boric acid as a homemade preparation), and 11.1% used a manufactured product. The most frequently used products included a boric acid solution (53.3%), a normal saline solution (35.7%), herbal infusions (6.1%) and breast milk (4.8%). Viral conjunctivitis was the most frequent diagnosis (24.4%), followed by the presence of a corneal foreign body (7.4%). No significant differences were found in the self-treatment of ocular injuries according to gender (p = 0.95), level of education (p = 0.21) or age (p = 0.14). In addition, self-medication practices were not related to the medically judged severity of the condition. CONCLUSION Patients often attempt to treat conditions that require ophthalmologic emergency care by self-medicating with homemade or manufactured products. The most widely used products include boric acid, normal saline, leaf infusions and breast milk. This behavior occurs independently of educational level, gender, age or the nature of the ocular condition. Self-medication is a culturally driven practice that is used even in cases of acute ocular injuries. PMID:19690656

  20. Treatment of emerging contaminants in wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) effluents by solar photocatalysis using low TiO2 concentrations.

    PubMed

    Prieto-Rodriguez, L; Miralles-Cuevas, S; Oller, I; Agüera, A; Li Puma, G; Malato, S

    2012-04-15

    The optimal photocatalyst concentration for industrial wastewater treatment in current photoreactor designs is several hundreds of milligrams per liter. However, the elimination of emerging contaminants (ECs), which are present at extremely low concentrations in waste water treatment plants (WWTP) effluents might be accomplished at much lower catalyst (TiO(2)) concentrations. One of the main drawbacks of reducing catalyst loading below the optimum is the loss of useful photons which instead are transmitted through the TiO(2) suspension without being absorbed by the catalyst. Accordingly, in this work, laboratory and solar pilot-scale experiments were performed with real WWTP effluents to evaluate the kinetics of photocatalytic degradation of 52 emerging contaminants under realistic (ppb) concentrations. The analysis of the samples was accomplished by solid phase extraction (SPE) followed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). In view of the results, low concentrations of TiO(2) of the order of tens of milligrams per liter were found to be insufficient for the degradation of the ECs in photoreactors with a short light-path length (29 cm). However, it was established that solar reactors of diameters of several hundreds of millimetres could be used for the efficient removal of ECs from WWTP effluents. The results presented show a general methodology for selecting the most efficient reactor diameter on the basis of the desired catalyst concentration.

  1. The future of therapy for relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma: emerging agents and novel treatment strategies.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Philippe

    2012-07-01

    Treatment of relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma (MM) continues to present a therapeutic challenge. The immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs) thalidomide and lenalidomide, and the proteasome inhibitor (PI) bortezomib, have dramatically improved clinical outcomes for patients with newly diagnosed and relapsed/refractory MM. However, nearly all patients will eventually relapse or become refractory to these drugs. Numerous agents are currently in development for the treatment of relapsed/refractory MM. Those farthest along in clinical development include new IMiDs (pomalidomide), new PIs (eg, carfilzomib, MLN9708, and marizomib), histone deacetylase inhibitors (eg, panobinostat and vorinostat), monoclonal antibodies (eg, elotuzumab, siltuximab, and BT062), and signal transduction modulators (eg, perifosine). These emerging agents with diverse mechanisms of action have demonstrated promising anti-tumor activity in patients with relapsed/refractory MM, and rationally designed combinations with established agents are being investigated in the clinic. These new agents are creating opportunities to target multiple pathways, overcome resistance, and improve clinical outcomes, particularly for those patients who are refractory to approved novel agents. This article describes emerging antimyeloma agents in mid-stage to late-stage clinical development, and highlights the novel treatment approaches and combination strategies being evaluated in the relapsed/refractory setting.

  2. Targeted treatment of recurrent platinum-resistant ovarian cancer: current and emerging therapies

    PubMed Central

    Mantia-Smaldone, Gina M; Edwards, Robert P; Vlad, Anda M

    2010-01-01

    With advances in surgical techniques and chemotherapeutic agents, mortality rates from epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) have slightly decreased over the last 30 years. However, EOC still ranks as the most deadly gynecologic cancer with an overall 5-year survival rate of 45%. Prognosis is especially disappointing for women with platinum-resistant disease, where 80% of patients will fail to respond to available therapies. Emerging treatment strategies have sub-sequently focused on targets which are integral to tumor growth and metastasis. In this review, we will focus on those innovative agents currently under investigation in clinical trials. PMID:21734812

  3. Emerging minimally invasive procedures for focal treatment of organ-confined prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Habibian, David J; Katz, Aaron E

    2016-11-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy amongst American men. However, the majority of prostate cancer diagnoses are of low risk, organ-confined disease. Many men elect to undergo definitive treatment, but may benefit from focal therapy to maintain continence and potency. This review reports the mechanism of action and outcomes of emerging focal therapies for prostate cancer. We report the mechanism of action of focal cryotherapy, high intensity focused ultrasound, focal laser ablation, and irreversible electroporation. In addition, we reviewed the largest studies available reporting rates of urinary incontinence, erectile dysfunction, biochemical recurrence-free survival (ASTRO), and post-operative adverse events for each procedure. Each treatment modality stated has a unique mechanism in the ablation of cancerous cells. Genito-urinary symptoms following these studies report incontinence and erectile dysfunction rates ranging from 0-15% and 0-53%, respectively. Biochemical disease-free survival was reported using the ASTRO definition. Some treatment modalities lack the necessary follow-up to determine effectiveness in cancer control. No focal therapy studies reported serious adverse events. These minimally invasive procedures are feasible in a clinical setting and show promising functional and disease control results with short to medium-term follow-up. However, each treatment requires additional robust prospective studies as well as its own unique domain to determine biochemical recurrence free survival to properly determine their role in treatment of organ-confined prostate cancer.

  4. Ovarian response to gonadotropin treatment initiated relative to wave emergence in ultrasonographically monitored ewes.

    PubMed

    Rubianes, E; Ungerfeld, R; Viñoles, C; Rivero, A; Adams, G P

    1997-06-01

    Follicular recruitment and luteal response to superovulatory treatment initiated relative to the status of the first wave of the ovine estrous cycle (Wave 1) were studied. All ewes (n = 25) received an intravaginal progestagen sponge to synchronize estrous cycles, and ewes were monitored daily by transrectal ultrasonography. Multiple-dose FSH treatment (total dose = 100 mg NIH-FSH-P1) was initiated on the day of ovulation (Day 0 group) in 16 ewes. In the remaining 9 ewes, FSH treatment was started 3 d after emergence of the largest follicle of Wave 1 (Day 3 group). Ewes received PGF(2alpha) with the last 2 FSH treatments to induce luteolysis. Daily blood samples were taken to determine progesterone profiles and to evaluate the luteal response subsequent to superovulation. The ovulation rate was determined by ultrasonography and correlated with direct observation of the ovaries during laparotomy 5 to 6 d after superovulatory estrus when the uterus was flushed to collect embryos. Results confirmed that follicular recruitment was suppressed by the presence of a large, growing follicle. In the Day 0 and Day 3 groups, respectively, mean numbers (+/- SEM) of large follicles (>/= 4 mm) recruited were 6.4 +/- 0.6 and 2.7 +/- 0.7 (P < 0.01) at 48 h after the onset of treatment, and 6.7 +/- 0.5 and 5.1 +/- 0.6 (P = 0.08) at 72 h after the onset of treatment. Ovulation rates were 5.6 +/- 0.8 and 3.3 +/- 0.8 in the respective groups (P < 0.05). The number of transferable embryos was 1.8 +/- 0.5 and 0.3 +/- 0.2 in the respective groups (P < 0.05). Short luteal phases (treatment initiated at the time of emergence of Wave 1 induced a superovulatory response in ewes. Response was influenced by the status of the follicular wave. The presence of a large growing follicle

  5. High Feasibility of Empiric HIV Treatment for Patients With Suspected Acute HIV in an Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Kathleen R; Arora, Sanjay; Walsh, Kristin B; Lora, Meredith; Merjavy, Stephen; Livermore, Shanna; Menchine, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Earlier intervention in acute HIV infection limits HIV reservoirs and may decrease HIV transmission. We developed criteria for empiric antiretroviral therapy (ART) in an emergency department (ED) routine HIV screening program. We assessed the feasibility and willingness of patients with suspected acute HIV infection in the ED to begin ART. A suspected acute HIV infection was defined as a positive HIV antigen antibody combination immunoassay with pending HIV-antibody differentiation test results and HIV RNA viral load. During the study period, there were 16 confirmed cases of acute HIV infection: 11 met our criteria for empiric ART and agreed to treatment, 10 were prescribed ART, and 1 left the ED against medical advice without a prescription for ART. Eight patients completed at least one follow-up visit. Empiric HIV treatment in an ED is feasible, well received by patients, and offers a unique entry point into the HIV care continuum.

  6. Improvements in current treatments and emerging therapies for adult obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Freedman, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is common and is associated with a number of adverse outcomes, including an increased risk for cardiovascular disease. Typical treatment approaches, including positive airway pressure, oral appliances, various upper airway surgeries, and/or weight loss, can improve symptoms and reduce the severity of disease in select patient groups. However, these approaches have several potential limitations, including suboptimal adherence, lack of suitability for all patient groups, and/or absence of adequate outcomes data. Emerging potential therapeutic options, including nasal expiratory positive airway pressure (PAP), oral negative pressure, upper airway muscle stimulation, and bariatric surgery, as well as improvements in existing treatments and the utilization of improving technologies are moving the field forward and should offer effective therapies to a wider group of patients with OSA.

  7. Hypocretin and its emerging role as a target for treatment of sleep disorders.

    PubMed

    Cao, Michelle; Guilleminault, Christian

    2011-04-01

    The neuropeptides hypocretin-1 and -2 (orexin A and B) are critical in the regulation of arousal and maintenance of wakefulness. Understanding the role of the hypocretin system in sleep/wake regulation has come from narcolepsy-cataplexy research. Deficiency of hypocretin results in loss of sleep/wake control with consequent unstable transitions from wakefulness into non-rapid eye movement (REM) and REM sleep, and clinical manifestations including daytime hypersomnolence, sleep attacks, and cataplexy. The hypocretin system regulates sleep/wake control through complex interactions between monoaminergic/cholinergic wake-promoting and GABAergic sleep-promoting neuronal systems. Research for the hypocretin agonist and the hypocretin antagonist for the treatment of sleep disorders has vigorously increased over the past 10 years. This review will focus on the origin, functions, and mechanisms in which the hypocretin system regulates sleep and wakefulness, and discuss its emerging role as a target for the treatment of sleep disorders.

  8. [Management of the pediatric dental patient with seizure disorder: prevention and treatment of emergencies].

    PubMed

    Shapira, Y; Sapir, S; Amir, E

    2003-09-01

    Seizures are not infrequent in childhood and may occur during dental treatment. Generalized seizures and particularly the Tonic-clonic (grand-mal) are the most hazardous and may induce self-injury, aspiration, and medical emergency as status epilepticus. The differential diagnosis of isolated seizure attack should consider hyperventilation, hyperglycemia, local anesthetic toxicity, and anoxia. The pediatric dentist should be aware of predisposing factors that may induce seizure attack in their patients. Proper precautionary measures could prevent the attack from occurring or at least reduce its consequences. The diagnosis as to the cause of the seizure, as well as providing proper management, could prevent further complications. This article presents the medical and dental history relevant for prevention of seizure attack in the dental chair, antiepileptic drugs with possible interactions with the dental treatment and management of such attack, should they occurs.

  9. Plant Alkaloids as an Emerging Therapeutic Alternative for the Treatment of Depression

    PubMed Central

    Perviz, Sadia; Khan, Haroon; Pervaiz, Aini

    2016-01-01

    Depression is a heterogeneous mood disorder that has been classified and treated in a variety of ways. Although, a number of synthetic drugs are being used as standard treatment for clinically depressed patients, but they have adverse effects that can compromise the therapeutic treatments and patient's compliance. Unlike, synthetic medications, herbal medicines are widely used across the globe due to their wide applicability and therapeutic efficacy associated with least side effects, which in turn has initiated the scientific research regarding the antidepressant activity. This review is mostly based on the literature of the last decade, aimed at exploring the preclinical profile of plant-based alkaloids (the abundant secondary metabolite) as an emerging therapy for depression. PMID:26913004

  10. POST Traumatic Stress Disorder in Emergency Workers: Risk Factors and Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argentero, Piergiorgio; Dell'Olivo, Bianca; Setti, Ilaria

    Post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are emergent phenomena resulting from exposure to a traumatic event that causes actual or threatened death or injury and produces intense fear, helplessness, or horror. In order to assess the role of different factors contributing to this kind of emergent phenomenon prevalence rates across gender, cultures, and samples exposed to different traumas are examined. Risk factors for PTSD, including pre-existing individual-based factors, features of the traumatic event, and post-trauma interventions are examined as well. Several characteristics of the trauma, related to cognitions, post-trauma social support and therapeutic interventions for PTSD are also considered. Further work is needed in order to analyze the inter-relationships among these factors and underlying mechanisms. The chaotic nature of traumatic processes, the multiple and interactive impacts on traumatic events require a comprehensive perspective aimed at planning effective interventions. Treatment outcome studies recommended the combined use of training and therapies as first-line treatment for PTSD.

  11. Clostridium difficile infection: update on emerging antibiotic treatment options and antibiotic resistance

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Dhara; Dang, Minh-Duc; Hasbun, Rodrigo; Koo, Hoonmo L; Jiang, Zhi-Dong; DuPont, Herbert L; Garey, Kevin W

    2010-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is the most common cause of identifiable diarrhea in hospitalized patients. The incidence and severity of CDIs are increasing. The increased incidence and severity of the disease has sparked interest in the optimal treatment of CDI as well as the use of new therapies and drug discovery. Current treatment strategies are inadequate with decreased response rates to metronidazole, and high recurrence rates with the use of metronidazole and oral vancomycin. Although incidence rates continue to be low, in vitro resistance to antibiotics used for the treatment of CDI has been noted. Recently, important data has emerged on new anti-C. difficile antibiotics such as rifaximin, rifalazil, fidaxomicin, nitazoxanide, tigecycline and ramoplanin. The purpose of this review is to provide an update on the in vitro susceptibility and new antibiotic treatment options for CDI. This review will focus primarily on scientific studies published in the last 36 months in order to provide an up-to-date review on the topic. PMID:20455684

  12. Chemotherapy-Induced Constipation and Diarrhea: Pathophysiology, Current and Emerging Treatments.

    PubMed

    McQuade, Rachel M; Stojanovska, Vanesa; Abalo, Raquel; Bornstein, Joel C; Nurgali, Kulmira

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) side-effects of chemotherapy are a debilitating and often overlooked clinical hurdle in cancer management. Chemotherapy-induced constipation (CIC) and Diarrhea (CID) present a constant challenge in the efficient and tolerable treatment of cancer and are amongst the primary contributors to dose reductions, delays and cessation of treatment. Although prevalence of CIC is hard to estimate, it is believed to affect approximately 16% of cancer patients, whilst incidence of CID has been estimated to be as high as 80%. Despite this, the underlying mechanisms of both CID and CIC remain unclear, but are believed to result from a combination of intersecting mechanisms including inflammation, secretory dysfunctions, GI dysmotility and alterations in GI innervation. Current treatments for CIC and CID aim to reduce the severity of symptoms rather than combating the pathophysiological mechanisms of dysfunction, and often result in worsening of already chronic GI symptoms or trigger the onset of a plethora of other side-effects including respiratory depression, uneven heartbeat, seizures, and neurotoxicity. Emerging treatments including those targeting the enteric nervous system present promising avenues to alleviate CID and CIC. Identification of potential targets for novel therapies to alleviate chemotherapy-induced toxicity is essential to improve clinical outcomes and quality of life amongst cancer sufferers.

  13. Chemotherapy-Induced Constipation and Diarrhea: Pathophysiology, Current and Emerging Treatments

    PubMed Central

    McQuade, Rachel M.; Stojanovska, Vanesa; Abalo, Raquel; Bornstein, Joel C.; Nurgali, Kulmira

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) side-effects of chemotherapy are a debilitating and often overlooked clinical hurdle in cancer management. Chemotherapy-induced constipation (CIC) and Diarrhea (CID) present a constant challenge in the efficient and tolerable treatment of cancer and are amongst the primary contributors to dose reductions, delays and cessation of treatment. Although prevalence of CIC is hard to estimate, it is believed to affect approximately 16% of cancer patients, whilst incidence of CID has been estimated to be as high as 80%. Despite this, the underlying mechanisms of both CID and CIC remain unclear, but are believed to result from a combination of intersecting mechanisms including inflammation, secretory dysfunctions, GI dysmotility and alterations in GI innervation. Current treatments for CIC and CID aim to reduce the severity of symptoms rather than combating the pathophysiological mechanisms of dysfunction, and often result in worsening of already chronic GI symptoms or trigger the onset of a plethora of other side-effects including respiratory depression, uneven heartbeat, seizures, and neurotoxicity. Emerging treatments including those targeting the enteric nervous system present promising avenues to alleviate CID and CIC. Identification of potential targets for novel therapies to alleviate chemotherapy-induced toxicity is essential to improve clinical outcomes and quality of life amongst cancer sufferers. PMID:27857691

  14. Creativity and dementia: emerging diagnostic and treatment methods for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Cummings, Jeffrey L; Miller, Bruce L; Christensen, Daniel D; Cherry, Debra

    2008-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease research is beginning to yield promising treatments and prevention strategies. Current Alzheimer's disease treatments benefit symptoms, but do not appreciably alter the basic disease process. The new generation of Alzheimer's disease medications, however, will likely include disease-modifying treatments, which will slow disease progression or stop it entirely. These new treatments pursue four points of intervention: increasing the clearance of amyloid-beta42 (Abeta42) proteins in the brain, blocking Abeta42 production, decreasing Abeta42 production, and decreasing Abeta42 aggregation. Neurogenerative therapies are being explored as well, suggesting future treatments may not only stop disease progression but also reverse it. Risk factors for developing Alzheimer's disease and factors associated with a lower risk of Alzheimer's disease have been identified. Future Alzheimer's disease management may come to resemble routine cardiovascular disease prevention and management, which involves the control of modifiable risk factors and the use of medications that decrease or stop underlying pathology. The hope is that such management will arrest the disease process before cognitive symptoms have begun. Like other neurologic illnesses, Alzheimer's disease has a profound impact on creativity. Alzheimer's disease attacks the right posterior part of the brain, which enables people to retrieve internal imagery and copy images. Alzheimer's disease patients may lose the ability to copy images entirely. However, people with Alzheimer's disease can continue to produce art by using their remaining strengths, such as color or composition instead of shapes or realism. Studying art and dementia is a model for identifying the strengths of psychiatric patients. Remarkably, art emerges in some patients even in the face of degenerative disease. In this expert roundtable supplement, Jeffrey L. Cummings, MD, offers an overview of recent advances in Alzheimer's disease

  15. The emerging role of Clostridium histolyticum collagenase in the treatment of Dupuytren disease

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Alexis; Bayat, Ardeshir

    2010-01-01

    this emerging treatment option. PMID:21127696

  16. Multiple interventions improve analgesic treatment of supracondylar fractures in a pediatric emergency department

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Robert N; Chafe, Roger E; Newhook, Leigh A; Murnaghan, Kyle D

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Provision of appropriate and timely treatment for pain in the pediatric population has been challenging. Children with painful conditions commonly present to emergency departments (EDs), a setting in which it may be particularly difficult to consistently provide timely analgesic interventions. OBJECTIVES: To measure the effectiveness of a set of interventions in improving the rate and timeliness of analgesic medication administration, as well as appropriate backslab immobilization (application of a moldable plaster or fiberglass splint), in a pediatric ED. METHODS: Data regarding pain management were collected on a consecutive sample of cases of supracondylar fracture over a 13-month period. This followed the implementation of a formal triage pain assessment and treatment medical directive, supplemented with relevant education of nursing and house staff, and posters in the ED. These data were compared with data previously collected from a similar cohort of cases, which presented before the interventions. RESULTS: Postintervention, the proportion of patients treated with an analgesic within 60 min of triage increased from 15% to 54% (P<0.001), and the median time to administration of an analgesic decreased from 72.5 min to 11 min (P<0.001). Rates for backslab application before radiography were similar before and after the intervention (29% and 33%, respectively; P=0.646). CONCLUSIONS: A multifaceted approach to improving early analgesic interventions was associated with considerably improved rates of early analgesic treatments for supracondylar fracture; however, no improvement in early immobilization was observed. PMID:26125193

  17. Treatment of severe hypertension and hypertensive emergencies with intravenous clonidine hydrochloride

    PubMed Central

    Niarchos, Andreas P.; Baksi, Arun K.

    1973-01-01

    Eleven severely hypertensive patients, median age 54 years, were treated with intravenous (i.v.) clonidine hydrochloride (Catapres). In nine there were life-threatening complications: severe left ventricular failure (LVF), hypertensive encephalopathy, cerebral haemorrhage, dissecting aortic aneurysm, renal failure, and severe epistaxis. In two patients there was pronounced, but uncomplicated, elevation of blood pressure. 0·15 mg or 0·3 mg clonidine was given every 40 min with electrocardiographic (ECG) monitoring. The mean systolic and diastolic blood pressures in the eleven patients were respectively 266 and 165 mmHg before treatment falling to 165 and 109 mmHg after treatment (P < 0·001). The mean decrease in heart rate was 26 beats/min (P < 0·001). Doses of clonidine required for control ranged from 0·15 mg (one ampoule) to 0·9 mg (mean 0·56 mg), although one patient received a total of 0·9 mg without an adequate response. The presenting condition caused the eventual death of two patients. There were no serious side effects, except for one transient episode of sino-atrial heart block. It is concluded that clonidine is effective and safe in the treatment of hypertensive emergencies. ImagesFig. 5 PMID:4806271

  18. Emerging treatment options in bipolar disorder in adolescents: focus on ziprasidone

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Afshan A; Strawn, Jeffrey R; Croarkin, Paul E

    2010-01-01

    Bipolar disorder is a debilitating, and chronic condition in adolescents. The rate of diagnosis and treatment is increasing in adolescents despite considerable controversy regarding criteria for diagnosis. Atypical antipsychotics have been studied extensively for adult and adolescent bipolar disorder. Ziprasidone is an atypical neuroleptic with novel receptor-binding activity and a favorable side effect profile. It has been marketed in the US since 2000, and now has several indications approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. Emerging case reports, open-label studies, and randomized controlled trials suggest that it may have a role in the management of adolescent bipolar disorder. Somnolence, akathisia, tachycardia, and prolonged corrected QT intervals are major safety concerns. There are no definitive guidelines for dosing ziprasidone in adolescents based on current literature. However, optimal treatment may involve dosages near the adult range. Given minimal data and understanding of its effects on cardiac conduction, it might be prudent to obtain electrocardiograms prior to initiation and during treatment. While not a first-line medication choice for adolescents struggling with bipolar disorder, it may be considered in certain situations in which metabolic side effects and weight gain are of concern. PMID:24600269

  19. Novel and emerging therapies in the treatment of recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa

    PubMed Central

    Rashidghamat, Ellie; McGrath, John A.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Epidermolysis bullosa (EB) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of inherited blistering diseases that affects ∼ 500,000 people worldwide. Clinically, individuals with EB have fragile skin and are susceptible to blistering following minimal trauma, with mucous membrane and other organ involvement in some subtypes. Within the spectrum of EB, ∼ 5% of affected individuals have the clinically more severe recessive dystrophic (RDEB) variant with a prevalence of 8 per one million of the population. RDEB is caused by loss-of-function mutations in the type VII collagen gene, COL7A1, which leads to reduced or absent type VII collagen (C7) and a paucity of structurally effective anchoring fibrils at the dermal-epidermal junction (DEJ). Currently, there is no cure for RDEB, although considerable progress has been made in testing novel treatments including gene therapy (lentiviral and gamma retroviral vectors for COL7A1 supplementation in keratinocytes and fibroblasts), as well as cell therapy (use of allogeneic fibroblasts, mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), and bone marrow transplantation (BMT)). Here, we review current treatment modalities available as well as novel and emerging therapies in the treatment of RDEB. Clinical trials of new translational therapies in RDEB offer hope for improved clinical management of patients as well as generating broader lessons for regenerative medicine that could be applicable to other inherited or acquired abnormalities of wound healing or scarring. PMID:28357176

  20. Novel Treatments for Metastatic Cutaneous Melanoma and the Management of Emergent Toxicities

    PubMed Central

    Lemech, Charlotte; Arkenau, Hendrik-Tobias

    2012-01-01

    The last 12 months have seen the beginning of a new era in the treatment options available for patients with metastatic cutaneous melanoma, a disease previously characterised by its poor prognosis and limited treatment options. Two mechanistically diverse agents have now demonstrated an overall survival benefit in different patient subgroups and further clinical trials are ongoing with emerging single agents and novel combinations. The first agent to demonstrate an overall survival benefit was the CTLA-4 antibody, ipilimumab, illustrating the importance of the immune system and immunomodulation in melanoma tumorigenesis. The second group of agents to show a survival benefit were the selective BRAF inhibitors, vemurafenib and GSK2118436, in patients who are BRAF V600 mutation positive. In addition, in the same BRAF mutant patient population, MEK inhibitors also show promising results and are currently under investigation in later stage trials. Although ipilimumab, BRAF and MEK inhibitors are just passing through the clinical trials arena, their use will rapidly become more widespread. Along with their significant clinical benefits, there are also unique adverse events related to these agents. Although the majority are mild and can be managed with supportive treatment, some toxicities require special management strategies. We outline up-to-date clinical development and management guidelines for ipilimumab, as well as the BRAF and MEK inhibitors. PMID:22253555

  1. Hospital effluents as a source of emerging pollutants: An overview of micropollutants and sustainable treatment options

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verlicchi, P.; Galletti, A.; Petrovic, M.; Barceló, D.

    2010-08-01

    SummaryHospital wastewaters contain a variety of toxic or persistent substances such as pharmaceuticals, radionuclides, solvents and disinfectants for medical purposes in a wide range of concentrations due to laboratory and research activities or medicine excretion. Most of these compounds belong to the so called emerging contaminants; quite often unregulated pollutants which may be candidates for future regulation depending on research on their potential health effects and monitoring of their occurrence. Their main characteristic is that they do not need to persist in the environment to cause negative effects since their high transformation/removal rates can be compensated for by their continuous introduction into the environment. Some of these compounds, most of them pharmaceuticals and personal care products may also be present in urban wastewaters. Their concentrations in the effluents may vary from ng L -1 to μg L -1. In this paper, hospital effluents and urban wastewaters are compared in terms of quali-quantitative characteristics. On the basis of an in-depth survey: (i) hospital average specific daily water consumptions (L patient -1 day -1) are evaluated and compared to urban ones (L person -1 day -1), (ii) conventional parameters concentrations in hospital effluents are compared to urban ones and (iii) main pharmaceuticals and other emerging compounds contents are compared in the two wastewaters. Finally, an overview of the removal capacity of the different treatments is reported.

  2. Emerging options for treatment of articular cartilage injury in the athlete.

    PubMed

    Mithoefer, Kai; McAdams, Timothy R; Scopp, Jason M; Mandelbaum, Bert R

    2009-01-01

    Articular cartilage injury is observed with increasing frequency in both elite and amateur athletes and results from the significant joint stress associated particularly with high-impact sports. The lack of spontaneous healing of these joint surface defects leads to progressive joint pain and mechanical symptoms with resulting functional impairment and limitation of athletic participation. Left untreated, articular cartilage defects can lead to chronic joint degeneration and athletic disability. Articular cartilage repair in athletes requires effective and durable joint surface restoration that can withstand the significant joint stresses generated during athletic activity. Several techniques for articular cartilage repair have been developed recently, which can successfully restore articular cartilage surfaces and allow for return to high-impact athletics after articular cartilage injury. Besides these existing techniques, new promising scientific concepts and techniques are emerging that incorporate modern tissue engineering technologies and promise further improvement for the treatment of these challenging injuries in the demanding athletic population.

  3. Contamination control by a greenhouse for emergency medical treatment of the contaminated patient.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yuji; Fukutsu, Kumiko; Akashi, Makoto

    2011-07-01

    In emergency medical treatment of patients contaminated with radioactivity, air contamination control is very important to prevent the secondary contamination of medical staff. In order to optimize design of a greenhouse, a numerical analysis was made by using the Flow Designer software. As a scenario of air contamination, the breathing air of the patient was assumed to be highly contaminated with radioactive gaseous or particulate matter. It was found that air contamination strongly depended on the characteristics of the contaminants. The contamination map of the coarse aerosols with low diffusivity was quite different from those of the fine aerosols and gas. If the setting conditions of air-flow rate of the ventilation and the exhausting position were optimized, secondary contamination of the medical staff standing by the patient is prevented securely by a greenhouse.

  4. Current and emerging therapies in irritable bowel syndrome: from pathophysiology to treatment.

    PubMed

    Chang, Joseph Y; Talley, Nicholas J

    2010-07-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome is a common functional gastrointestinal disorder with characteristic symptoms of abdominal pain/discomfort with a concurrent disturbance in defecation. It accounts for a significant healthcare burden, and symptoms may be debilitating for some patients. Traditional symptom-based therapies have been found to be ineffective in the treatment of the entire syndrome complex, and do not modify the natural history of the disorder. Although the exact etiopathogenesis of IBS is incompletely understood, recent advances in the elucidation of the pathophysiology and molecular mechanisms of IBS have resulted in the development of novel therapies, as well as potential future therapeutic targets. This article reviews current and emerging therapies in IBS based upon: IBS as a serotonergic disorder; stimulating intestinal chloride channels; modulation of visceral hypersensitivity; altering low-grade intestinal inflammation; and modulation of the gut microbiota.

  5. Current and Emerging Therapies for the Treatment of Cystic Fibrosis or Mitigation of Its Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Mark P; Caraher, Emma

    2016-03-01

    Clinical presentation of the chronic, heritable condition cystic fibrosis (CF) is complex, with a diverse range of symptoms often affecting multiple organs with varying severity. The primary source of morbidity and mortality is due to progressive destruction of the airways attributable to chronic inflammation arising from microbial colonisation. Antimicrobial therapy combined with practises to remove obstructive mucopurulent deposits form the cornerstone of current therapy. However, new treatment options are emerging which offer, for the first time, the opportunity to effect remission from the underlying cause of CF. Here, we discuss these therapies, their mechanisms of action, and their successes and failures in order to illustrate the shift in the nature of how CF will likely be managed into the future.

  6. Feasibility of emergency department bilingual computerized alcohol screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment.

    PubMed

    Vaca, Federico; Winn, Diane; Anderson, Craig; Kim, Doug; Arcila, Mauricio

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of utilizing a computerized alcohol screening and intervention (CASI) kiosk in an emergency department (ED). An interactive English and Spanish audiographical computer program, developed for used on a mobile computer cart, was administered to 5103 patients. Patients who screened at risk (19%) also received a fully computer-guided brief negotiated interview (BNI) and a printed personal alcohol reduction plan. A higher percentage of younger patients, and males (31% versus 16% females), screened at risk or dependent. Patient surveys indicated CASI was easy to use and over 75% did not prefer a medical professional over the computer. The ED-based bilingual computerized alcohol screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment required little time to administer, was acceptable to patients, identified at-risk and dependent drinkers, and was able to provide personalized feedback and brief intervention.

  7. Emerging strategies and therapies for treatment of Paget’s disease of bone

    PubMed Central

    Michou, Laëtitia; Brown, Jacques P

    2011-01-01

    Paget’s disease of bone (PDB) is a progressive monostotic or polyostotic metabolic bone disease characterized by focal abnormal bone remodeling, with increased bone resorption and excessive, disorganized, new bone formation. PDB rarely occurs before middle age, and it is the second most frequent metabolic bone disorder after osteoporosis, affecting up to 3% of adults over 55 years of age. One of the most striking and intriguing clinical features is the focal nature of the disorder, in that once the disease is established within a bone, there is only local spread within that bone and no systemic dissemination. Despite many years of intense research, the etiology of PDB has still to be conclusively determined. Based on a detailed review of genetic and viral factors incriminated in PDB, we propose a unifying hypothesis from which we can suggest emerging strategies and therapies. PDB results in weakened bone strength and abnormal bone architecture, leading to pain, deformity or, depending on the bone involved, fracture in the affected bone. The diagnostic assessment includes serum total alkaline phosphatase, total body bone scintigraphy, skull and enlarged view pelvis x-rays, and if needed, additional x-rays. The ideal therapeutic option would eliminate bone pain, normalize serum total alkaline phosphatase with prolonged remission, heal radiographic osteolytic lesions, restore normal lamellar bone, and prevent recurrence and complications. With the development of increasingly potent bisphosphonates, culminating in the introduction of a single intravenous infusion of zoledronic acid 5 mg, these goals of treatment are close to being achieved, together with long-term remission in almost all patients. Based on the recent pathophysiological findings, emerging strategies and therapies are reviewed: ie, pulse treatment with zoledronic acid; denosumab, a fully human monoclonal antibody directed against RANK ligand; tocilizumab, an interleukin-6 receptor inhibitor; odanacatib

  8. Effectiveness of Emergency Rehabilitation Treatments in Reducing Post-fire Erosion, Colorado Front Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rough, D. T.; MacDonald, L. H.

    2003-12-01

    Daniella T.M. Rough Department of Forest, Rangeland, and Watershed Stewardship, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO Lee H. MacDonald Department of Forest, Rangeland, and Watershed Stewardship, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO Burned area emergency rehabilitation (BAER) treatments are often applied to reduce post-fire flooding and erosion, but few studies have quantified their efficacy. The effectiveness of different BAER treatments in reducing post-fire erosion rates is being studied for three different wildfires in the Colorado Front Range. The treatments being monitored include seeding, contour felling, mulching, scarification with seeding, and a polyacrylamide (PAM). Sediment production rates are being measured at the hillslope scale using sediment fences installed immediately after the June 2000 Bobcat fire and the 2002 Hayman and Schoonover fires. Neither aerial- nor ground-based seeding significantly reduced erosion rates in the first three years after the Bobcat fire. In contrast, 4.5 t ha-1 of straw mulch consistently reduced sediment yields by more than 90%. Contour felling initially reduced erosion rates for small and moderate storms, but was less effective following the largest storms, presumably due to overwhelmed sediment storage capacity. A paired\\-swale design is being used for the 2002 Hayman and Schoonover fires, as this provides a more sensitive evaluation of BAER treatment effectiveness. The ground-based application of straw mulch and the aerial application of hydromulch each reduced sediment yields by more than 95% in both 2002 and 2003. However, the ground-based application of hydromulch in fall 2002 did not significantly reduce sediment yields in 2003. In 2002 the application of 11 kg ha-1 of PAM in an ammonium sulfate solution reduced sediment yields by 66%. In 2003 neither these sites nor three newly treated sites showed a significant reduction in sediment yields. A dry application of 5.6 kg ha-1 PAM had no detectable

  9. Emergency Department–Initiated Buprenorphine/Naloxone Treatment for Opioid Dependence

    PubMed Central

    D’Onofrio, Gail; O’Connor, Patrick G.; Pantalon, Michael V.; Chawarski, Marek C.; Busch, Susan H.; Owens, Patricia H.; Bernstein, Steven L.; Fiellin, David A.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Opioid-dependent patients often use the emergency department (ED) for medical care. OBJECTIVE To test the efficacy of 3 interventions for opioid dependence: (1) screening and referral to treatment (referral); (2) screening, brief intervention, and facilitated referral to community-based treatment services (brief intervention); and (3) screening, brief intervention, ED-initiated treatment with buprenorphine/naloxone, and referral to primary care for 10-week follow-up (buprenorphine). DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS A randomized clinical trial involving 329 opioid-dependent patients who were treated at an urban teaching hospital ED from April 7, 2009, through June 25, 2013. INTERVENTIONS After screening, 104 patients were randomized to the referral group, 111 to the brief intervention group, and 114 to the buprenorphine treatment group. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Enrollment in and receiving addiction treatment 30 days after randomization was the primary outcome. Self-reported days of illicit opioid use, urine testing for illicit opioids, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) risk, and use of addiction treatment services were the secondary outcomes. RESULTS Seventy-eight percent of patients in the buprenorphine group (89 of 114 [95% CI, 70%-85%]) vs 37% in the referral group (38 of 102 [95% CI, 28%-47%]) and 45% in the brief intervention group (50 of 111 [95% CI, 36%-54%]) were engaged in addiction treatment on the 30th day after randomization (P < .001). The buprenorphine group reduced the number of days of illicit opioid use per week from 5.4 days (95% CI, 5.1-5.7) to 0.9 days (95% CI, 0.5-1.3) vs a reduction from 5.4 days (95% CI, 5.1-5.7) to 2.3 days (95% CI, 1.7-3.0) in the referral group and from 5.6 days (95% CI, 5.3-5.9) to 2.4 days (95% CI, 1.8-3.0) in the brief intervention group (P < .001 for both time and intervention effects; P = .02 for the interaction effect). The rates of urine samples that tested negative for opioids did not differ

  10. Evaluation of emerging contaminants in a drinking water treatment plant using electrodialysis reversal technology.

    PubMed

    Gabarrón, S; Gernjak, W; Valero, F; Barceló, A; Petrovic, M; Rodríguez-Roda, I

    2016-05-15

    Emerging contaminants (EC) have gained much attention with globally increasing consumption and detection in aquatic ecosystems during the last two decades from ng/L to lower ug/L. The aim of this study was to evaluate the occurrence and removal of pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs), endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) and related compounds in a Drinking Water Treatment Plant (DWTP) treating raw water from the Mediterranean Llobregat River. The DWTP combined conventional treatment steps with the world's largest electrodialysis reversal (EDR) facility. 49 different PhACs, EDCs and related compounds were found above their limit of quantification in the influent of the DWTP, summing up to a total concentration of ECs between 1600-4200 ng/L. As expected, oxidation using chlorine dioxide and granular activated carbon filters were the most efficient technologies for EC removal. However, despite the low concentration detected in the influent of the EDR process, it was also possible to demonstrate that this process partially removed ionized compounds, thereby constituting an additional barrier against EC pollution in the product. In the product of the EDR system, only 18 out of 49 compounds were quantifiable in at least one of the four experimental campaigns, showing in all cases removals higher than 65% and often beyond 90% for the overall DWTP process.

  11. Current and emerging drugs for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Triantafillidis, John K; Merikas, Emmanuel; Georgopoulos, Filippos

    2011-01-01

    During the last decade a large number of biological agents against tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), as well as many biochemical substances and molecules specifically for the medical treatment of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), have been developed. This enormous progress was a consequence of the significant advances in biotechnology along with the increased knowledge of the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of IBD. However, conventional therapies remain the cornerstone of treatment for most patients. During recent years conventional and biologic IBD therapies have been optimized. Newer mesalazine formulations with a reduced pill size and only one dose per day demonstrate similar efficacy to older formulations. New corticosteroids retain the efficacy of older corticosteroids while exhibiting a higher safety profile. The role of antibiotics and probiotics has been further clarified. Significant progress in understanding thiopurine metabolism has improved the effective dose along with adjunctive therapies. Quite a large number of substances and therapies, including biologic agents other than TNF-α inhibitors, unfractionated or low-molecular-weight heparin, omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, microbes and microbial products, leukocytapheresis, and other substances under investigation, could offer important benefits to our patients. In this paper we review the established and emerging therapeutic strategies in patients with Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. PMID:21552489

  12. Removal and fate of emerging contaminants combining biological, flocculation and membrane treatments.

    PubMed

    Melo-Guimarães, Anemir; Torner-Morales, Francisco J; Durán-Álvarez, Juan C; Jiménez-Cisneros, Blanca E

    2013-01-01

    An experimental study combining biological treatment with flocculation (F) and ultrafiltration (UF) membrane technology was conducted, separately and in combination, seeking to increase insight into the capability of such treatment processes to remove emerging contaminants (ECs). The occurrence and removal efficiencies of 17 ECs are reported for wastewater from Mexico City. Results showed that activated sludge (AS) is the predominant process for removing acidic pharmaceutical compounds, and the use of a cationic flocculant increases the biodegradability of these compounds as well as that of 4-nonylphenol. The UF process alone showed greater removal of phenolic compounds than AS. However, the contribution of flocculation to EC removal by the UF unit was fairly limited. In general, the F + AS + UF processes yielded better results than their separate use, leading to the highest removal rates of 15 of the 17 compounds. In the case of some phenolic compounds and the phthalic acid esters, a competitive sorption process between the membrane and the sludge steps seemed to take place. Bis-2-ethylhexylphthalate (DEHP) was found to be significantly sorbed onto sludge. The F + AS + UF process operated as a membrane bioreactor (MBR) using 16 gL(-1) of suspended solids in the mixed liquor (MLSS) yielded the highest removal efficiencies for the ECs tested.

  13. Recent Patents on Emerging Therapeutics for the Treatment of Glaucoma, Age Related Macular Degeneration and Uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Vadlapudi, Aswani Dutt; Patel, Ashaben; Cholkar, Kishore; Mitra, Ashim K.

    2014-01-01

    Advancements in the field and rising interest among pharmaceutical researchers have led to the development of new molecules with enhanced therapeutic activity. Design of new drugs which can target a particular pathway and/or explore novel targets is of immense interest to ocular pharmacologists worldwide. Delivery of suitable pharmacologically active agents at proper dose (within the therapeutic window) to the target tissues without any toxicity to the healthy ocular tissues still remain an elusive task. Moreover, the presence of static and dynamic barriers to drug absorption including the corneal epithelium (lipophilic), corneal and scleral stroma (hydrophilic), conjunctival lymphatics, choroidal vasculature and the blood-ocular barriers also pose a significant challenge for achieving therapeutic drug concentrations at the target site. Although many agents are currently available, new compounds are being introduced for treating various ocular diseases. Deeper understanding of the etiology and complex mechanisms associated with the disease condition would aid in the development of potential therapeutic candidates. Novel small molecules as well as complex biotechnology derived macromolecules with superior efficacy, safety and tolerability are being developed. Therefore, this review article provides an overview of existing drugs, treatment options, advances in emerging therapeutics and related recent patents for the treatment of ocular disorders such as glaucoma, age related macular degeneration (AMD) and uveitis. PMID:25414810

  14. New and emerging technologies for the treatment of inherited retinal diseases: a horizon scanning review

    PubMed Central

    Smith, J; Ward, D; Michaelides, M; Moore, A T; Simpson, S

    2015-01-01

    The horizon scanning review aimed to identify new and emerging technologies in development that have the potential to slow or stop disease progression and/or reverse sight loss in people with inherited retinal diseases (IRDs). Potential treatments were identified using recognized horizon scanning methods. These included a combination of online searches using predetermined search terms, suggestions from clinical experts and patient and carer focus groups, and contact with commercial developers. Twenty-nine relevant technologies were identified. These included 9 gene therapeutic approaches, 10 medical devices, 5 pharmacological agents, and 5 regenerative and cell therapies. A further 11 technologies were identified in very early phases of development (typically phase I or pre-clinical) and were included in the final report to give a complete picture of developments ‘on the horizon'. Clinical experts and patient and carer focus groups provided helpful information and insights, such as the availability of specialised services for patients, the potential impacts of individual technologies on people with IRDs and their families, and helped to identify additional relevant technologies. This engagement ensured that important areas of innovation were not missed. Most of the health technologies identified are still at an early stage of development and it is difficult to estimate when treatments might be available. Further, well designed trials that generate data on efficacy, applicability, acceptability, and costs of the technologies, as well as the long-term impacts for various conditions are required before these can be considered for adoption into routine clinical practice. PMID:26113499

  15. Tuberous Sclerosis and Bilateral Renal Angiomyolipomas: A Case Report and Literature Review of Emerging Treatment Strategies

    PubMed Central

    James, Leighton R.

    2016-01-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex is a rare multisystemic genetic disorder associated with the development of benign hamartomas. Angiomyolipomas are one such characteristic finding that may be seen in 55–80% of tuberous sclerosis complex patients. While being normally asymptomatic, they can also cause significant morbidity and mortality. We present the case of a patient with tuberous sclerosis complex and recently discovered bilateral renal angiomyolipomas, admitted for hematuria who underwent left renal artery embolization; however, worsening renal function necessitated subsequent nephrectomy. Despite still being mainstays of treatment, invasive interventions are now being recommended for specific patient populations as demonstrated in our case. Emerging strategies targeting the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway have been shown to reduce the size of angiomyolipomas and are now used to treat asymptomatic cases >3 cm. Our review discusses these treatment options with the intention of increasing awareness of current recommendations and hopefully leading to increased application of these novel therapies that will reduce the need for invasive interventions. PMID:27525138

  16. Persistent Human Chorionic Gonadotropin After Methotrexate Treatment and an Emergency Surgical Procedure for Ectopic Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Kurt-Mangold, Michelle; Van Voorhis, Bradley J; Krasowski, Matthew D

    2015-01-01

    The case study is a 33-year-old white female with persistently elevated serum human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) levels following methotrexate treatment and emergency surgery for ectopic pregnancy. At the time of the first methotrexate dose, the serum hCG concentration was 27,995 IU/L. The laboratory was consulted 3.5 months after the surgery, because serum hCG levels had stopped declining and had leveled off to around 80 to 90 IU/L but with negative urine pregnancy tests. Laboratory studies ruled out heterophile antibody interference and hook effect by multiple methods including analysis by different serum hCG assays, treatment with heterophile antibody blocking agents, and dilution studies. Three additional doses of methotrexate over six months were required for serum hCG concentrations to decline to undetectable levels. This case illustrates challenges that may arise with serum hCG measurements in management of ectopic pregnancies. Close collaboration between the laboratory and clinical service is key for optimal patient care.

  17. Development and Psychometric Evaluation of the Treatment-Emergent Activation and Suicidality Assessment Profile

    PubMed Central

    Storch, Eric A.; Murphy, Tanya K.; Bodzin, Danielle; Mutch, P. Jane; Lehmkuhl, Heather; Aman, Michael; Goodman, Wayne K.

    2010-01-01

    Although effective in treating a range of childhood psychiatric conditions, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) have been implicated in the induction of an “activation syndrome” (characterized by symptoms of irritability, restlessness, emotional labiality, etc.) that may represent an intermediary state change that fosters suicidality. SSRI-induced activation syndrome is well-accepted by many clinicians and thought to be relatively common, particularly in children and teens. However, gaps exist in empirical data on phenomenology and tools for early detection. With this in mind, we report on a recently funded National Institutes of Health grant to develop a measure of behavioral activation to be completed in a clinical setting. We discuss the development of this measure—the Treatment-Emergent Activation and Suicidality Assessment Profile (TE-ASAP)—as well as psychometric results from a sample of youth with internalizing disorders who were at varying stages of SSRI treatment. Overall, psychometric data were quite promising, with the TE-ASAP demonstrating excellent reliability (i.e., internal consistency, inter-rater, short-term test–retest stability) and strong validity properties. Through further evaluation of the TE-ASAP in the context of a controlled multimodal trial in youth with obsessive–compulsive disorder, we hope to augment understanding of activation syndrome and, in turn, mitigate risks through early detection of this potentially lifethreatening adverse effect. PMID:20473344

  18. Development and Psychometric Evaluation of the Treatment-Emergent Activation and Suicidality Assessment Profile.

    PubMed

    Reid, Jeannette M; Storch, Eric A; Murphy, Tanya K; Bodzin, Danielle; Mutch, P Jane; Lehmkuhl, Heather; Aman, Michael; Goodman, Wayne K

    2010-02-04

    Although effective in treating a range of childhood psychiatric conditions, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) have been implicated in the induction of an "activation syndrome" (characterized by symptoms of irritability, restlessness, emotional labiality, etc.) that may represent an intermediary state change that fosters suicidality. SSRI-induced activation syndrome is well-accepted by many clinicians and thought to be relatively common, particularly in children and teens. However, gaps exist in empirical data on phenomenology and tools for early detection. With this in mind, we report on a recently funded National Institutes of Health grant to develop a measure of behavioral activation to be completed in a clinical setting. We discuss the development of this measure-the Treatment-Emergent Activation and Suicidality Assessment Profile (TE-ASAP)-as well as psychometric results from a sample of youth with internalizing disorders who were at varying stages of SSRI treatment. Overall, psychometric data were quite promising, with the TE-ASAP demonstrating excellent reliability (i.e., internal consistency, inter-rater, short-term test-retest stability) and strong validity properties. Through further evaluation of the TE-ASAP in the context of a controlled multimodal trial in youth with obsessive-compulsive disorder, we hope to augment understanding of activation syndrome and, in turn, mitigate risks through early detection of this potentially lifethreatening adverse effect.

  19. Influence of hummocks and emergent vegetation on hydraulic performance in a surface flow wastewater treatment wetland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keefe, Steffanie H.; Daniels, Joan S.; Runkel, Robert L.; Wass, Roland D.; Stiles, Eric A.; Barber, Larry B.

    2010-01-01

    A series of tracer experiments were conducted biannually at the start and end of the vegetation growing season in a surface flow wastewater treatment wetland located near Phoenix, AZ. Tracer experiments were conducted prior to and following reconfiguration and replanting of a 1.2 ha treatment wetland from its original design of alternating shallow and deep zones to incorporate hummocks (shallow planting beds situated perpendicular to flow). Tracer test data were analyzed using analysis of moments and the one-dimensional transport with inflow and storage numerical model to evaluate the effects of the seasonal vegetation growth cycle and hummocks on solute transport. Following reconfiguration, vegetation coverage was relatively small, and minor changes in spatial distribution influenced wetland hydraulics. During start-up conditions, the wetland underwent an acclimation period characterized by small vegetation coverage and large transport cross-sectional areas. At the start of the growing season, new growth of emergent vegetation enhanced hydraulic performance. At the end of the growing season, senescing vegetation created short-circuiting. Wetland hydrodynamics were associated with high volumetric efficiencies and velocity heterogeneities. The hummock design resulted in breakthrough curves characterized by multiple secondary tracer peaks indicative of varied flow paths created by bottom topography.

  20. Current Treatment, Emerging Translational Therapies, and New Therapeutic Targets for Autoimmune Myasthenia Gravis.

    PubMed

    Guptill, Jeffrey T; Soni, Madhu; Meriggioli, Matthew N

    2016-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disease associated with the production of autoantibodies against 1) the skeletal muscle acetylcholine receptor; 2) muscle-specific kinase, a receptor tyrosine kinase critical for the maintenance of neuromuscular synapses; 3) low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4, an important molecular binding partner for muscle-specific kinase; and 4) other muscle endplate proteins. In addition to the profile of autoantibodies, MG may be classified according the location of the affected muscles (ocular vs generalized), the age of symptom onset, and the nature of thymic pathology. Immunopathologic events leading to the production of autoantibodies differ in the various disease subtypes. Advances in our knowledge of the immunopathogenesis of the subtypes of MG will allow for directed utilization of the ever-growing repertoire of therapeutic agents that target distinct nodes in the immune pathway relevant to the initiation and maintenance of autoimmune disease. In this review, we examine the pathogenesis of MG subtypes, current treatment options, and emerging new treatments and therapeutic targets.

  1. Anesthesia treatment in cases of infant epiglottis cyst emergency extirpation operations.

    PubMed

    Xu, Q; Xu, J P; Wang, L Z

    2014-06-17

    Congenital epiglottic cyst is a rare embryonic disease. As a congenital laryngeal mucocele, its clinical manifestations include repeated sudden dyspneic respiration and even suffocation accompanied by laryngeal stridor after birth. During food intake, bucking and vomiting is a key feature. Delay in diagnosis and treatment of the disease affects growth and the development of neonatorum leading to suffocation and death. This study was designed to investigate the safety of anesthesia in infants with congenital epiglottic cyst during operation to reduce the occurrence of its complications. The treatment of operations on 12 infants with congenital epiglottic cysts were retrospectively analyzed. Twelve cases of infants with epiglottic cysts received emergency enucleation. Owing to adequate preanesthetic preparation, cystectomies were successfully performed with microwave cauterization under suspension laryngoscopy. None of the 12 patients showed apparent suffocation during anesthesia, the surgical results were good, and after 6 months to 1 year of follow-up, the disease had not recurred. Because of the acute onset of the disease and its severe symptoms and complications, attention should be paid to improve preoperative preparation. Careful selection of proper anesthesia is the key to achieving a successful operation.

  2. Emergence of mmpT5 Variants during Bedaquiline Treatment of Mycobacterium intracellulare Lung Disease.

    PubMed

    Alexander, David C; Vasireddy, Ravikiran; Vasireddy, Sruthi; Philley, Julie V; Brown-Elliott, Barbara A; Perry, Benjamin J; Griffith, David E; Benwill, Jeana L; Cameron, Andrew D S; Wallace, Richard J

    2017-02-01

    Bedaquiline (BDQ), a diarylquinoline antibiotic that targets ATP synthase, is effective for the treatment of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infections that no longer respond to conventional drugs. While investigating the off-label use of BDQ as salvage therapy, seven of 13 patients with Mycobacterium intracellulare lung disease had an initial microbiological response and then relapsed. Whole-genome comparison of pretreatment and relapse isolates of M. intracellulare uncovered mutations in a previously uncharacterized locus, mmpT5 Preliminary analysis suggested similarities between mmpT5 and the mmpR5 locus, which is associated with low-level BDQ resistance in M. tuberculosis Both genes encode transcriptional regulators and are adjacent to orthologs of the mmpS5-mmpL5 drug efflux operon. However, MmpT5 belongs to the TetR superfamily, whereas MmpR5 is a MarR family protein. Targeted sequencing uncovered nonsynonymous mmpT5 mutations in isolates from all seven relapse cases, including two pretreatment isolates. In contrast, only two relapse patient isolates had nonsynonymous changes in ATP synthase subunit c (atpE), the primary target of BDQ. Susceptibility testing indicated that mmpT5 mutations are associated with modest 2- to 8-fold increases in MICs for BDQ and clofazimine, whereas one atpE mutant exhibited a 50-fold increase in MIC for BDQ. Bedaquiline shows potential for the treatment of M. intracellulare lung disease, but optimization of treatment regimens is required to prevent the emergence of mmpT5 variants and microbiological relapse.

  3. Kind and estimated stocking amount of antidotes for initial treatment for acute poisoning at emergency medical centers in Korea.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Chang Hwan; Ryoo, Seung Mok; Lim, Kyoung Soo; Kim, Won; Lim, Hoon; Oh, Bum Jin

    2014-11-01

    Antidotes for toxicological emergencies can be life-saving. However, there is no nationwide estimation of the antidotes stocking amount in Korea. This study tried to estimate the quantities of stocking antidotes at emergency department (ED). An expert panel of clinical toxicologists made a list of 18 emergency antidotes. The quantity was estimated by comparing the antidote utilization frequency in a multicenter epidemiological study and the nation-wide EDs' data of National Emergency Department Information System (NEDIS). In an epidemiological study of 11 nationwide EDs from January 2009 to December 2010, only 92 (1.9%) patients had been administered emergency antidotes except activated charcoal among 4,870 cases of acute adult poisoning patients. Comparing with NEDIS data, about 1,400,000 patients visited the 124 EDs nationwide due to acute poisoning and about 103,348 adult doses of the 18 emergency antidotes may be required considering poisoning severity score. Of these, 13,224 (1.9%) adult doses of emergency antidotes (575 of atropine, 144 of calcium gluconate or other calcium salts, 2,587 of flumazenil, 3,450 of N-acetylcysteine, 5,893 of pralidoxime, 287 of hydroxocobalamin, 144 of sodium nitrite, and 144 of sodium thiosulfate) would be needed for maintaining the present level of initial treatment with emergency antidotes at EDs in Korea.

  4. Biologically active filters - An advanced water treatment process for contaminants of emerging concern.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuangyi; Gitungo, Stephen W; Axe, Lisa; Raczko, Robert F; Dyksen, John E

    2017-05-01

    With the increasing concern of contaminants of emerging concern (CECs) in source water, this study examines the hypothesis that existing filters in water treatment plants can be converted to biologically active filters (BAFs) to treat these compounds. Removals through bench-scale BAFs were evaluated as a function of media, granular activated carbon (GAC) and dual media, empty bed contact time (EBCT), and pre-ozonation. For GAC BAFs, greater oxygen consumption, increased pH drop, and greater dissolved organic carbon removal normalized to adenosine triphosphate (ATP) were observed indicating increased microbial activity as compared to anthracite/sand dual media BAFs. ATP concentrations in the upper portion of the BAFs were as much as four times greater than the middle and lower portions of the dual media and 1.5 times greater in GAC. Sixteen CECs were spiked in the source water. At an EBCT of 18 min (min), GAC BAFs were highly effective with overall removals greater than 80% without pre-ozonation; exceptions included tri(2-chloroethyl) phosphate and iopromide. With a 10 min EBCT, the degree of CECs removal was reduced with less than half of the compounds removed at greater than 80%. The dual media BAFs showed limited CECs removal with only four compounds removed at greater than 80%, and 10 compounds were reduced by less than 50% with either EBCT. This study demonstrated that GAC BAFs with and without pre-ozonation are an effective and advanced technology for treating emerging contaminants. On the other hand, pre-ozonation is needed for dual media BAFs to remove CECs. The most cost effective operating conditions for dual media BAFs were a 10 min EBCT with the application of pre-ozonation.

  5. GOST: A generic ordinal sequential trial design for a treatment trial in an emerging pandemic

    PubMed Central

    Whitehead, John

    2017-01-01

    Background Conducting clinical trials to assess experimental treatments for potentially pandemic infectious diseases is challenging. Since many outbreaks of infectious diseases last only six to eight weeks, there is a need for trial designs that can be implemented rapidly in the face of uncertainty. Outbreaks are sudden and unpredictable and so it is essential that as much planning as possible takes place in advance. Statistical aspects of such trial designs should be evaluated and discussed in readiness for implementation. Methodology/Principal findings This paper proposes a generic ordinal sequential trial design (GOST) for a randomised clinical trial comparing an experimental treatment for an emerging infectious disease with standard care. The design is intended as an off-the-shelf, ready-to-use robust and flexible option. The primary endpoint is a categorisation of patient outcome according to an ordinal scale. A sequential approach is adopted, stopping as soon as it is clear that the experimental treatment has an advantage or that sufficient advantage is unlikely to be detected. The properties of the design are evaluated using large-sample theory and verified for moderate sized samples using simulation. The trial is powered to detect a generic clinically relevant difference: namely an odds ratio of 2 for better rather than worse outcomes. Total sample sizes (across both treatments) of between 150 and 300 patients prove to be adequate in many cases, but the precise value depends on both the magnitude of the treatment advantage and the nature of the ordinal scale. An advantage of the approach is that any erroneous assumptions made at the design stage about the proportion of patients falling into each outcome category have little effect on the error probabilities of the study, although they can lead to inaccurate forecasts of sample size. Conclusions/Significance It is important and feasible to pre-determine many of the statistical aspects of an efficient trial

  6. Emergency Endovascular Treatment of Sac Rupture for Type IIIa Endoleak in Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Previously Excluded with Endovascular Repair

    SciTech Connect

    Carrafiello, Gianpaolo Mangini, Monica Bracchi, Elena Recaldini, Chiara; Cocozza, Eugenio; Piffaretti, Gabriele; Pellegrino, Carlo Lagana, Domenico Fugazzola, Carlo

    2010-08-15

    Elective endovascular treatment of thoracic aortic pathology has been applied in a variety of conditions. The complications of thoracic aortic stenting are also well recognized. Endoleak after endovascular repair of thoracic aortic aneurysms is the most frequent complication; among them, type III is the least frequent. Endovascular treatment of type III endoleak is generally performed under elective conditions; less frequently, in emergency. We report a successful emergency endovascular management of post-thoracic endovascular repair for thoracic aortic aneurysm rupture due to type IIIa endoleak.

  7. Application of Ureteroscope in Emergency Treatment with Persistent Renal Colic Patients during Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shilin; Liu, Guoqing; Duo, Yongfu; Wang, Jianfeng; Li, Jierong; Li, Chunjing

    2016-01-01

    Background Although the application of ureteroscopy in the treatment of ureteral calculi during pregnancy has been on the rise, for persistent renal colic patients without ultrasound-detected ureteral calculi, it may represent a clinical dilemma due to the potential risks for both mother and fetus. Objective The aim of the present study is to present our experience with the application of the ureteroscope in the emergency treatment of persistent renal colic patients during pregnancy. Methods From March 2009 to September 2014, a total of 117 pregnant women who received ureteroscopy for persistent renal colic were retrospectively analyzed. Patients were divided into three groups according to duration of the persistent renal colic: Group A (within 12 hours; 24 cases); Group B (12 to 24 hours; 76 cases); and Group C (more than 24 hours; 17 cases). The stone-free rate, complications, and other qualitative data were analyzed. Results Of the 117 patients, 31 patients who were found not to have renal or ureteral calculi received ureteroscopic double-J (DJ) stent insertion, whereas 86 patients who were found with ureteral calculi received ureteroscopic lithotripsy (URSL) and DJ stent insertion. Among them, 24 patients (27.9%) were found with ureteral calculi by ureteroscopy rather than ultrasound. In addition, 73 patients (84.9%) had complete fragmentation of calculi; 12 patients (10.3%) had a threatened abortion (the rates of threatened abortion in Groups A, B and C were 8.3% vs. 6.5% vs. 29.4%; Group C compared with Groups A and B, p<0.05), and one patient (1.2%) had urosepsis (in Group C). However, these complications were cured with conservative treatment, without postpartum infant and maternal complications. Conclusion For pregnant patients with persistent renal colic/ureteral calculi and hydronephrosis, ureteroscopic DJ stent insertion and URSL are effective and safe options when conservative treatment fails, even if no urinary calculi were found by ultrasound. At the

  8. Engineering application of activated alumina adsorption dams for emergency treatment of arsenic-contaminated rivers.

    PubMed

    Dou, Junfeng; Qin, Wei; Ding, Aizhong; Xie, En; Zheng, Lei; Ding, Wencheng

    2015-01-01

    A batch of lab-based adsorption experiments were performed to investigate the arsenic (As) removal efficacy by activated alumina. Four factors including contact time, pH, initial As concentration and different coexisting ions were examined. The adsorbent made of activated alumina (AA) with particles of 2-4 mm diameter showed a high As removal efficiency and the As concentrations of the samples were below 0.05 mg/L when the hydraulic retention time (HRT) was operated above 5 min. The As concentrations of the samples could remain below 0.05 mg/L for 30 days. A series of AA adsorption dams coupled with several other supporting adsorption techniques were employed for As-contaminated river restoration. The engineering project functioned well, and the effluent As concentration was below 0.05 mg/L when the influent was between 0.2 and 0.7 mg/L, which met the discharge requirement of the Surface Water Quality Standards criteria III in China. The results demonstrated that AA adsorption dams could be applied for emergency treatments of small- or medium-sized rivers contaminated with As.

  9. Trajectories of Adolescent Alcohol Use after Brief Treatment in an Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Sara J.; Spirito, Anthony; Hernandez, Lynn; Barnett, Nancy P.; Eaton, Cheryl A.; Lewander, William; Rohsenow, Damaris J.; Monti, Peter M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective The primary aim of this study was to identify distinct classes of trajectories of adolescent substance use following a brief motivational interviewing (MI) intervention in an Emergency Department (ED). The secondary aim was to identify predictors of class membership. Methods Latent growth mixture modeling was used with 177 adolescents who participated in two randomized clinical trials evaluating MI for an alcohol-related event. Results Three classes were identified: (1) moderate use, decreasers consisting of 56.8% of participants; (2) heavy use, decreasers, consisting of 10.5% of participants, and (3) heavy use sustainers, consisting of 32.7% of participants. Hispanic ethnicity, parental monitoring, and days of high-volume drinking were significant predictors of class membership. Hispanic ethnic status and high levels of parental monitoring were associated with decreased likelihood of belonging to either of the two heavy use classes. More frequent high-volume drinking at baseline was associated with increased likelihood of belonging to the heavy use, sustainer class, and decreased likelihood of belonging to the heavy use, decreaser class. Across all three classes, being female and having frequent high-volume drinking at baseline were associated with worse response to the intervention. Conclusions These findings have important implications for identifying adolescents who may benefit from different or additional intervention, and for anticipating and informing families of adolescents’ potential drinking course following treatment. PMID:22560729

  10. Emerging concepts in the treatment of myofascial pain: a review of medications, modalities, and needle-based interventions.

    PubMed

    Annaswamy, Thiru Mandyam; De Luigi, Arthur J; O'Neill, Bryan J; Keole, Nandita; Berbrayer, David

    2011-10-01

    Significant developments and changes in the use of interventions and treatments for the management of myofascial pain syndrome have occurred in the past 10 years. These emerging concepts have changed the approach for clinicians who manage these pain disorders. However, wide variations in practice patterns prevail, and no clear consensus exists regarding when and how to use these interventions; in addition, awareness of the evidence basis behind their use is limited. This review examines the most recent advances in the treatment of myofascial pain syndromes. Specifically, the evidence basis of various emerging interventions is reviewed and recommendations for routine clinical practice and their rationale are provided. The purpose of this review is to provide the clinician with a better understanding of emerging concepts in the interventions used for myofascial pain syndromes.

  11. Substance Use Prevention and Treatment Outcomes for Emerging Adults in Non-College Settings: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Davis, Jordan P; Smith, Douglas C; Briley, Daniel A

    2017-03-20

    Emerging adults have the highest prevalence rate of alcohol and drug use and represent a large proportion of treatment admissions in the United States. Those who do not attend college experience higher rates of use and may not have similar advantages as those attending college. A systematic review included studies investigating prevention and treatment outcomes among emerging adults in non-college settings. We included studies reporting an average age between 18 and 25 conducted outside of college settings. We extracted data for experimental effects (experimental group compared to control), and contrasted treatments with active and no intervention controls. We also examined several moderators. Fifty studies were meta-analyzed, including 32 prevention and 18 treatment studies. Overall, our experimental weighted mean effect size was d = .17 for both prevention and treatment studies. Comparisons across treatment types typically yielded nonsignificant results. Across prevention and treatment studies, smaller effects existed for studies delivering personalized feedback interventions. For treatment studies only, the percent of students included in the sample was a significant moderator. Overall effects were similar to current meta-analyses on college drinking. However, personalized feedback may be a less effective prevention strategy in non-college settings, and the field should prioritize increasing the effectiveness of treatments targeting non-college students. (PsycINFO Database Record

  12. 18 CFR 2.60 - Facilities and activities during an emergency-accounting treatment of defense-related expenditures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Facilities and activities during an emergency-accounting treatment of defense-related expenditures. 2.60 Section 2.60 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY...

  13. 18 CFR 2.60 - Facilities and activities during an emergency-accounting treatment of defense-related expenditures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Facilities and activities during an emergency-accounting treatment of defense-related expenditures. 2.60 Section 2.60 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY...

  14. 18 CFR 2.60 - Facilities and activities during an emergency-accounting treatment of defense-related expenditures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Facilities and activities during an emergency-accounting treatment of defense-related expenditures. 2.60 Section 2.60 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY...

  15. Beyond land application: Emerging technologies for the treatment and reuse of anaerobically digested agricultural and food waste.

    PubMed

    Sheets, Johnathon P; Yang, Liangcheng; Ge, Xumeng; Wang, Zhiwu; Li, Yebo

    2015-10-01

    Effective treatment and reuse of the massive quantities of agricultural and food wastes generated daily has the potential to improve the sustainability of food production systems. Anaerobic digestion (AD) is used throughout the world as a waste treatment process to convert organic waste into two main products: biogas and nutrient-rich digestate, called AD effluent. Biogas can be used as a source of renewable energy or transportation fuels, while AD effluent is traditionally applied to land as a soil amendment. However, there are economic and environmental concerns that limit widespread land application, which may lead to underutilization of AD for the treatment of agricultural and food wastes. To combat these constraints, existing and novel methods have emerged to treat or reuse AD effluent. The objective of this review is to analyze several emerging methods used for efficient treatment and reuse of AD effluent. Overall, the application of emerging technologies is limited by AD effluent composition, especially the total solid content. Some technologies, such as composting, use the solid fraction of AD effluent, while most other technologies, such as algae culture and struvite crystallization, use the liquid fraction. Therefore, dewatering of AD effluent, reuse of the liquid and solid fractions, and land application could all be combined to sustainably manage the large quantities of AD effluent produced. Issues such as pathogen regrowth and prevalence of emerging organic micro-pollutants are also discussed.

  16. The use of therapeutic plasmapheresis in the treatment of poisoned and snake bite victims: an academic emergency department's experiences.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Cuma; Bayraktaroğlu, Ziya; Gunay, Nurullah; Bozkurt, Selim; Köse, Ataman; Yilmaz, Mehmet

    2006-12-01

    The objective of this study is to describe the clinical status, procedural interventions, and outcomes of critically ill patients with poisoning and snake bite injuries presenting to a tertiary-care emergency department for treatment with therapeutic plasmapheresis. Records of 20 patients who presented to our academic emergency department over a 2-year period and who underwent plasmapheresis for poisoning or snake bite were retrospectively reviewed. Plasmapheresis was performed using centrifugation technology via an intravenous antecubital venous or subclavian vein catheter access. Human albumin or fresh frozen plasma were used as replacement fluids. Data extracted from the patient record included demographic data, clinical status, and outcome measures. Sixteen patients underwent plasmapheresis because of toxicity from snake bite. Three patients were treated for drug poisoning (phenytoin, theophylline, bipyridene HCl) and one patient for mushroom poisoning. Haematologic parameters such as platelet count, PT, and INR resolved rapidly in victims of snake bite injuries after treatment with plasmapheresis. Loss of limbs did not occur in these cases. Seven patients required admission to the intensive care unit. One patient with mushroom poisoning died. Mean length of hospital stay was 14.3 days (range 3-28 days) for all cases. Plasmapheresis was a clinically effective and safe approach in the treatment of snake bite envenomation and other drug poisoning victims especially in the management of hematologic problems and in limb preservation/salvage strategies. In addition to established conventional therapies, emergency physicians should consider plasmapheresis among the therapeutic options in treatment strategies for selected toxicologic emergencies.

  17. Long-Term Follow-Up After Endovascular Treatment of Acute Aortic Emergencies

    SciTech Connect

    Pitton, M. B. Herber, S.; Schmiedt, W.; Neufang, A.; Dorweiler, B.; Dueber, C.

    2008-01-15

    Purpose. To investigate the long-term outcome and efficacy of emergency treatment of acute aortic diseases with endovascular stent-grafts. Methods. From September 1995 to April 2007, 37 patients (21 men, 16 women; age 53.9 {+-} 19.2 years, range 18-85 years) with acute complications of diseases of the descending thoracic aorta were treated by endovascular stent-grafts: traumatic aortic ruptures (n = 9), aortobronchial fistulas due to penetrating ulcer or hematothorax (n = 6), acute type B dissections with aortic wall hematoma, penetration, or ischemia (n = 13), and symptomatic aneurysm of the thoracic aorta (n = 9) with pain, penetration, or rupture. Diagnosis was confirmed by contrast-enhanced CT. Multiplanar reformations were used for measurement of the landing zones of the stent-grafts. Stent-grafts were inserted via femoral or iliac cut-down. Two procedures required aortofemoral bypass grafting prior to stent-grafting due to extensive arteriosclerotic stenosis of the iliac arteries. In this case the bypass graft was used for introduction of the stent-graft. Results. A total of 46 stent-grafts were implanted: Vanguard/Stentor (n = 4), Talent (n = 31), and Valiant (n = 11). Stent-graft extension was necessary in 7 cases. In 3 cases primary graft extension was done during the initial procedure (in 1 case due to distal migration of the graft during stent release, in 2 cases due to the total length of the aortic aneurysm). In 4 cases secondary graft extensions were performed-for new aortic ulcers at the proximal stent struts (after 5 days) and distal to the graft (after 8 months) and recurrent aortobronchial fistulas 5 months and 9 years after the initial procedure-resulting in a total of 41 endovascular procedures. The 30-day mortality rate was 8% (3 of 37) and the overall follow-up was 29.9 {+-} 36.6 months (range 0-139 months). All patients with traumatic ruptures demonstrated an immediate sealing of bleeding. Patients with aortobronchial fistulas also

  18. Emergency endovascular treatment of a ruptured thoracic aneurysm discovered as a back pulsatile mass.

    PubMed

    Collart, Frédéric; Kerbaul, Francois; Jop, Bertrand; Magnan, Pierre-Edouard; Bartoli, Jean-Michel

    2005-07-20

    We report a case of a 65-year-old patient admitted in emergency for a sudden chest pain associated with a pulsatile mass of the back. The CT scan showed a ruptured dissecting aneurysm involving the chest wall. The patient was treated in emergency with an endovascular-covered prosthesis with a favorable outcome.

  19. Effects on outpatient and emergency mental health care of strict Medicaid early periodic screening, diagnosis, and treatment enforcement.

    PubMed

    Snowden, Lonnie R; Masland, Mary C; Wallace, Neal T; Evans-Cuellar, Allison

    2007-11-01

    We investigated enforcement of mental health benefits provided by California Medicaid's Early Periodic Screening, Diagnosis, and Treatment (EPSDT) program. Enforcement, compelled by a consumer-driven lawsuit, resulted in an almost 4-fold funding increase over a 5-year period. We evaluated the impact of enforcement on outpatient treatment intensity (number of visits per child) and rates of emergency care treatment. Using fixed-effects regression, we examined the number of outpatient mental health visits per client and the percentage of all clients using crisis care across 53 autonomous California county mental health plans over 32 three-month periods (quarters; emergency crisis care rates) and 36 quarters (out-patient mental health visits). Enforcement of EPSDT benefits in accordance with federal law produced favorable changes in patterns of mental health service use, consistent with policy aims.

  20. Treatment-emergent mutations in NAEβ confer resistance to the NEDD8-activating enzyme inhibitor MLN4924.

    PubMed

    Milhollen, Michael A; Thomas, Michael P; Narayanan, Usha; Traore, Tary; Riceberg, Jessica; Amidon, Benjamin S; Bence, Neil F; Bolen, Joseph B; Brownell, James; Dick, Lawrence R; Loke, Huay-Keng; McDonald, Alice A; Ma, Jingya; Manfredi, Mark G; Sells, Todd B; Sintchak, Mike D; Yang, Xiaofeng; Xu, Qing; Koenig, Erik M; Gavin, James M; Smith, Peter G

    2012-03-20

    MLN4924 is an investigational small-molecule inhibitor of NEDD8-activating enzyme (NAE) in clinical trials for the treatment of cancer. MLN4924 is a mechanism-based inhibitor, with enzyme inhibition occurring through the formation of a tight-binding NEDD8-MLN4924 adduct. In cell and xenograft models of cancer, we identified treatment-emergent heterozygous mutations in the adenosine triphosphate binding pocket and NEDD8-binding cleft of NAEβ as the primary mechanism of resistance to MLN4924. Biochemical analyses of NAEβ mutants revealed slower rates of adduct formation and reduced adduct affinity for the mutant enzymes. A compound with tighter binding properties was able to potently inhibit mutant enzymes in cells. These data provide rationales for patient selection and the development of next-generation NAE inhibitors designed to overcome treatment-emergent NAEβ mutations.

  1. Emergency care of esophageal foreign body impactions: timing, treatment modalities, and resource utilization.

    PubMed

    Crockett, S D; Sperry, S L W; Miller, C Brock; Shaheen, N J; Dellon, E S

    2013-01-01

    Esophageal foreign body impaction (EFBI) often requires urgent evaluation and treatment, but characteristics of emergency department (ED) care such as timing of presentation and therapeutic procedures and costs of care are unknown. We aimed to study health-care utilization for patients with EFBI presenting to the ED. Cases of EFBI from 2002 to 2009 were identified by querying three different databases from the University of North Carolina Hospitals for all records with ICD-9 CM code 935.1: 'foreign body in the esophagus.' Charts were reviewed to confirm EFBI and extract pertinent data related to the ED visit, including time of presentation, length of ED stay, medications administered, type of procedure performed, characteristics of procedures, and time to therapeutic procedure. Hospital charges for EFBI encounters and consult fees were determined from the Physicians' Fee Reference 2010, and were compiled to estimate costs. Of the 548 cases of EFBI identified, 351 subjects (64%) presented to the ED. A total of 118 (34%) patients received a medication to treat EFBI, which was only effective in 8% of those patients. Two hundred ninety (83%) subjects underwent a procedure including esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) (n=206) or ear, nose, and throat surgery (ENT)-performed laryngoscopy/esophagoscopy (n=138). Admission to the hospital occurred in 162 (46%) of cases. There was no relationship between ED arrival time and time-to-procedure or total time in ED. There was also no significant relationship between delivery of ED medications and likelihood of undergoing a procedure, or between ED arrival time and delivery of medications. The charges associated with a typical EFBI episode ranged from $2284-$6218. In conclusion, the majority of patients with EFBI at our institution presented to the ED. Medical management was largely ineffective. A therapeutic procedure was required to clear the EFBI in most patients. Time of ED arrival made no difference in time

  2. Current and emerging treatments for irritable bowel syndrome with constipation and chronic idiopathic constipation: focus on prosecretory agents.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Rachel H; Luthin, David R

    2015-06-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome with constipation (IBS-C) and chronic idiopathic constipation (CIC) are two common functional gastrointestinal disorders that impair quality of life and pose a significant economic burden to the health care system. Current therapeutic options include lifestyle modifications, over-the-counter (OTC) agents, antispasmodics, serotonin agonists, and lubiprostone and linaclotide, two prosecretory prescription drugs approved for the treatment of IBS-C and CIC. This review discusses the efficacy and safety of current treatments and emerging therapies for the treatment of IBS-C and CIC, with a focus on the prosecretory agents. A search of the PubMed database (1966-November 2014) was performed to identify relevant articles; clinical trials on emerging agents were also identified by searching the ClinicalTrials.gov registry. OTC laxatives may relieve constipation but do not treat abdominal pain and discomfort. Antispasmodics may provide short-term relief in patients with IBS-C, but their utility is limited by anticholinergic adverse effects. Tricyclic antidepressants, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors have shown benefit in providing global symptom relief and in improving abdominal discomfort, but further research is needed. Phase III clinical trials have demonstrated the efficacy of lubiprostone and linaclotide relative to placebo for the short-term treatment of IBS-C and CIC, with improvements reported in stool frequency, perceived constipation severity, and abdominal pain and discomfort. Relatively small response rates, higher costs, and adverse effects associated with lubiprostone and linaclotide will likely render these agents suitable as second-line therapies in the treatment of IBS-C and CIC. Emerging potential treatment options include prucalopride, plecanatide, elobixibat, and tenapanor. Several of these emerging therapies have novel mechanisms of action and may show promise in patients

  3. Striking observations during emergency catecholamine treatment of cardiac syncope in a patient with initially unrecognized takotsubo cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Dandel, Michael; Lehmkuhl, Hans B; Schmidt, Gunther; Knosalla, Christoph; Hetzer, Roland

    2009-08-01

    A case is presented of initially unrecognized takotsubo cardiomyopathy with a dramatic clinical course after emergency catecholamine treatment for circulatory support during stress-induced cardiac syncope followed by complete recovery of cardiac function after catecholamine withdrawal and starting beta-blocker therapy. Echocardiography including 2D-strain imaging suggested that the left ventricle (LV) wall motion abnormality was mainly the consequence of geometry-induced regional differences in wall stress (progressively amplified by catecholamines), which might be another possible pathophysiological mechanism involved in the development of LV dysfunction in takotsubo cardiomyopathy. This case also suggests that in emergency, before coronary angiography is possible, echocardiography can be helpful for initial therapeutic decisions, especially to avoid emergency inotropic therapy in such patients.

  4. Assessment and Treatment of Bipolar Spectrum Disorders in Emerging Adulthood: Applying the Behavioral Approach System Hypersensitivity Model

    PubMed Central

    Hamlat, Elissa J.; Garro-Moore, Jared K. O'; Nusslock, Robin; Alloy, Lauren B.

    2016-01-01

    Bipolar disorder is associated with a host of negative physical and interpersonal outcomes including suicide. Emerging adulthood is an age of risk for the onset of bipolar spectrum disorders (BSD) and there has been increased effort to focus on early identification and subsequent intervention for BSDs during this developmental period. Recent research on the behavioral approach system (BAS) hypersensitivity model of bipolar disorder may have implications for the assessment and treatment of BSD in emerging adulthood. We summarize relevant findings on the BAS hypersensitivity model that support the use of reward sensitivity in the early identification of BSDs and suggest evidence-based strategies for clinical work with emerging adults with bipolar spectrum disorders. PMID:28133431

  5. An evidence-based approach to the evaluation and treatment of low back pain in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Borczuk, Pierre

    2013-07-01

    Low back pain is the most common musculoskeletal complaint that results in a visit to the emergency department, and it is 1 of the top 5 most common complaints in emergency medicine. Estimates of annual healthcare expenditures for low back pain in the United States exceed $90 billion annually, not even taking lost productivity and business costs into account. This review explores an evidence-based rationale for the evaluation of the patient with low back pain, and it provides guidance on risk stratification pertaining to laboratory assessment and radiologic imaging in the emergency department. Published guidelines from the American College of Physicians and American Pain Society are reviewed, with emphasis on best evidence for pharmacologic treatments, self-care interventions, and more invasive procedures and surgery in management of low back pain. Utilizing effective and proven strategies will avoid medical errors, provide better care for patients, and help manage healthcare resources and costs.

  6. Fate and mass balance of contaminants of emerging concern during wastewater treatment determined using the fractionated approach.

    PubMed

    Baalbaki, Zeina; Sultana, Tamanna; Maere, Thomas; Vanrolleghem, Peter A; Metcalfe, Chris D; Yargeau, Viviane

    2016-12-15

    Contaminants of emerging concern (CECs) are often poorly removed from wastewater using conventional treatment technologies and there is limited understanding of their fate during treatment. Inappropriate sampling strategies lead to inaccuracies in estimating removals of CECs. In this study, we used the "fractionated approach" that accounts for the residence time distribution (RTD) in treatment units to investigate the fate of 26 target CECs in a municipal wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) that includes primary, secondary and tertiary treatment steps. Prior hydraulic calibration of each treatment unit was performed. Wastewater and sludge samples were collected at different locations along the treatment train and the concentrations of target CECs were measured by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry. The most substantial aqueous removal occurred during activated sludge treatment (up to 99%). Removals were <50% in the primary clarifier and tertiary rotating biological contactors (RBCs) and up to 70% by sand filtration. Mass balance calculations demonstrated that (bio)degradation accounted for up to 50% of the removal in the primary clarifier and 100% in activated sludge. Removal by sorption to primary and secondary sludge was minimal for most CECs. Analysis of the selected metabolites demonstrated that negative removals obtained could be explained by transformations between the parent compound and their metabolites. This study contributes to the growing literature by applying the fractionated approach to calculate removal of different types of CECs across each wastewater treatment step. An additional level of understanding of the fate of CECs was provided by mass balance calculations in primary and secondary treatments.

  7. Postabortion Care: 20 Years of Strong Evidence on Emergency Treatment, Family Planning, and Other Programming Components

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Douglas; Curtis, Carolyn; Irani, Laili; Pappa, Sara; Arrington, Lauren

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Worldwide 75 million women need postabortion care (PAC) services each year following safe or unsafe induced abortions and miscarriages. We reviewed more than 550 studies on PAC published between 1994 and 2013 in the peer-reviewed and gray literature, covering emergency treatment, postabortion family planning, organization of services, and related topics that impact practices and health outcomes, particularly in the Global South. In this article, we present findings from studies with strong evidence that have major implications for programs and practice. For example, vacuum aspiration reduced morbidity, costs, and time in comparison to sharp curettage. Misoprostol 400 mcg sublingually or 600 mcg orally achieved 89% to 99% complete evacuation rates within 2 weeks in multiple studies and was comparable in effectiveness, safety, and acceptability to manual vacuum aspiration. Misoprostol was safely introduced in several PAC programs through mid-level providers, extending services to secondary hospitals and primary health centers. In multiple studies, postabortion family planning uptake before discharge increased by 30–70 percentage points within 1–3 years of strengthening postabortion family planning services; in some cases, increases up to 60 percentage points in 4 months were achieved. Immediate postabortion contraceptive acceptance increased on average from 32% before the interventions to 69% post-intervention. Several studies found that women receiving immediate postabortion intrauterine devices and implants had fewer unintended pregnancies and repeat abortions than those who were offered delayed insertions. Postabortion family planning is endorsed by the professional organizations of obstetricians/gynecologists, midwives, and nurses as a standard of practice; major donors agree, and governments should be encouraged to provide universal access to postabortion family planning. Important program recommendations include offering all postabortion women

  8. Treatment challenges in the management of relapsed or refractory non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma – novel and emerging therapies

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Mark P

    2013-01-01

    Over the last few decades, advances in immunochemotherapy have led to dramatic improvement in the prognosis of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL). Despite these advances, relapsed and refractory disease represents a major treatment challenge. For both aggressive and indolent subtypes of NHL, there is no standard of care for salvage regimens, with prognosis after relapse remaining relatively poor. Nevertheless, there are multiple emerging classes of targeted therapies for relapsed/refractory disease, including monoclonal antibodies, antibody– drug conjugates, radioimmunotherapy, small-molecule inhibitors of cell-growth pathways, and novel chemotherapy agents. This review will discuss treatment challenges of NHL, current available salvage regimens for relapsed/refractory NHL, and the safety and efficacy of novel emerging therapies. PMID:24049458

  9. Cannabis Withdrawal, Posttreatment Abstinence, and Days to First Cannabis Use Among Emerging Adults in Substance Use Treatment: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Jordan P.; Smith, Douglas C.; Morphew, Jason W.; Lei, Xinrong; Zhang, Saijun

    2015-01-01

    Very little prospective research investigates how cannabis withdrawal is associated with treatment outcomes, and this work has not used the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (5th ed.; DSM-5) thresholds for cannabis withdrawal. The sample included 110 emerging adults entering outpatient substance use treatment who were heavy cannabis users with no other drug use and limited alcohol use. We used survival analyses to predict days to first use of cannabis and logistic regression to predict whether participants were abstinent and living in the community at 3 months. Those meeting criteria for cannabis withdrawal were more likely to return to use sooner than those not meeting criteria for cannabis withdrawal. However, the presence of cannabis withdrawal was not a significant predictor of 3-month abstinence. Emerging adults with DSM-5 cannabis withdrawal may have difficulty initiating abstinence in the days following their intake assessment, implying the need for strategies to mitigate their more rapid return to cannabis use. PMID:26877548

  10. Can post-wildfire Burned Area Emergency Response treatments mitigate watershed degradation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neary, D.; Ffolliott, P.; Bautista, S.; Wittenberg, L.

    2009-04-01

    Wildfire is a natural phenomenon that began with the development of terrestrial vegetation in a lightning-filled atmosphere 350 million years ago. As human populations developed in the Pleistocene and Holocene epochs, mankind transformed fire into one of its oldest tools. A negative impact of prime concern in the 21st Century is desertification. This term refers to land degradation, not the immediate creation of classical deserts. It is about the loss of the land's proper hydrologic function and biological productivity as a result of human activities and climate change. It affects 33% of the earth's surface and over a billion people. Fire-related desertification has a number of environmental, social, and economic consequences. The two key environmental consequences are soil erosion and exotic plant invasions. Wildfires typically have exotic plant species abundances ten times that of undisturbed forests (Neary et al. 2003). Seeding has been used for many years in the USA as a prime Burned Area Emergency Response (BAER) treatment. Until recently, this seeding contributed to exotic plant invasions since fast-growing, but non native plants seeds were used. The use of native plant seeds and sterile hybrids has reduced this problem somewhat. Erosion after wildfires documented in the USA can be in the range of <1 to 370 Mg/ha, depending on fire severity, degree of water repellency, slope, and post-fire rainfall events. Soil losses in the high end of that range definitely exceed soil loss tolerances and contribute to desertification. Soil disturbance and degradation after wildfires is a function of fire severity, and the impacts can range from the minimal to catastrophic and long-lasting. The most obvious impact is the loss of organic matter from combustion of the forest floor. Changes in soil physical and chemical properties with high-severity wildfire can produce water repellency, aggravating rainfall runoff and erosion. Since soils take long times to form (50 to 75

  11. Emergencies in Orthodontics. Part 2: Management of Removable Appliances, Functional Appliances and other Adjuncts to Orthodontic Treatment.

    PubMed

    Dowsing, Paul; Murray, Alison; Sandler, Jonathan

    2015-04-01

    In the second of two papers, management of orthodontic emergencies involving appliances other than Fixed appliances will be detailed. Problems relating to removable appliances, as well as other orthodontic adjuncts, will be discussed. Unfortunately, orthodontic appliance breakage does occur, despite the clinicians giving clear and concise instructions to the patients and their parents at fitting. If general dental practitioners have a practical knowledge of how to diagnose problems and to provide appropriate advice or timely 'emergency' treatment, this will significantly reduce the inconvenience for all parties concerned. It should also ensure that treatment progresses in the most efficient and comfortable manner for their patients. In specific situations the early, accurate identification of the problem and instigation of its appropriate management can avoid more serious consequences. Clinical Relevance: Appropriate handling of an orthodontic 'emergency' by the dentist can, on many occasions, provide immediate relief to the patient. This will, in turn, allow treatment to continue in the right direction, thus allowing more efficient and effective use of valuable resources.

  12. Emergency drinking water treatment during source water pollution accidents in China: origin analysis, framework and technologies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Jian; Chen, Chao; Lin, Peng-Fei; Hou, Ai-Xin; Niu, Zhang-Bin; Wang, Jun

    2011-01-01

    China has suffered frequent source water contamination accidents in the past decade, which has resulted in severe consequences to the water supply of millions of residents. The origins of typical cases of contamination are discussed in this paper as well as the emergency response to these accidents. In general, excessive pursuit of rapid industrialization and the unreasonable location of factories are responsible for the increasing frequency of accidental pollution events. Moreover, insufficient attention to environmental protection and rudimentary emergency response capability has exacerbated the consequences of such accidents. These environmental accidents triggered or accelerated the promulgation of stricter environmental protection policy and the shift from economic development mode to a more sustainable direction, which should be regarded as the turning point of environmental protection in China. To guarantee water security, China is trying to establish a rapid and effective emergency response framework, build up the capability of early accident detection, and develop efficient technologies to remove contaminants from water.

  13. Hypnosis in the treatment of acute pain in the emergency department setting.

    PubMed Central

    Deltito, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    Emergency ward physicians are presented daily with patients in pain. Provisions of safe, quick pain control remains one of their major duties. Hypnosis can be used as an effective adjunct or substitute for analgesic medications when these drugs prove to be ineffective or contraindicated. Four such illustrative cases of attempted pain control are presented. The psychological foundations of pain and its assessment are discussed. The emergency ward physician can obtain facility in hypnotic techniques with only modest training. Hypnosis may then become a valuable tool in helping him provide safe and effective pain management. PMID:6728748

  14. Emerging Implications of Balancing Disinfection and Primary Treatment as an Element in CSO Control: Model Requirements

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper describes early results and directions arising from ongoing research into factors that affect the preferred balance between primary treatment and disinfection in a conventional wastewater treatment plant during periods of wet weather overflow. Despite the fact that na...

  15. Chloroquine could be used for the treatment of filoviral infections and other viral infections that emerge or emerged from viruses requiring an acidic pH for infectivity.

    PubMed

    Akpovwa, Hephzibah

    2016-06-01

    Viruses from the Filoviridae family, as many other virus families, require an acidic pH for successful infection and are therefore susceptible to the actions of 4-aminoquinolines, such as chloroquine. Although the mechanisms of action of chloroquine clearly indicate that it might inhibit filoviral infections, several clinical trials that attempted to use chloroquine in the treatment of other acute viral infections - including dengue and influenza A and B - caused by low pH-dependent viruses, have reported that chloroquine had no clinical efficacy, and these results demoted chloroquine from the potential treatments for other virus families requiring low pH for infectivity. The present review is aimed at investigating whether chloroquine could combat the present Ebola virus epidemic, and also at exploring the main reasons for the reported lack of efficacy. Literature was sourced from PubMed, Scopus, Google Scholar, reference list of articles and textbooks - Fields Virology (Volumes 1and 2), the cytokine handbook, Pharmacology in Medicine: Principles and Practice, and hydroxychloroquine and chloroquine retinopathy. The present analysis concludes that (1) chloroquine might find a place in the treatment of Ebola, either as a monotherapy or in combination therapies; (2) the ineffectiveness of chloroquine, or its analogue, hydroxychloroquine, at treating infections from low pH-dependent viruses is a result of the failure to attain and sustain a steady state concentration sufficient to increase and keep the pH of the acidic organelles to approximately neutral levels; (3) to successfully treat filoviral infections - or other viral infections that emerge or emerged from low pH-dependent viruses - a steady state chloroquine plasma concentration of at least 1 µg/mL(~3.125 μM/L) or a whole blood concentration of 16 μM/L must be achieved and be sustained until the patients' viraemia becomes undetectable. These concentrations, however, do not rule out the efficacy of

  16. Does Treatment Work with Internet Sex Offenders? Emerging Findings from the Internet Sex Offender Treatment Programme (i-SOTP)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middleton, David; Mandeville-Norden, Rebecca; Hayes, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    The increase in convictions for internet-related sexual offending has led to new challenges for treatment providers. By 2005 nearly one-third of all sexual convictions in England and Wales were for internet-related sexual offending. In late 2006 a treatment programme for internet-related sexual offending (the i-SOTP) was given accreditation for…

  17. National Analysis of Differences among Substance Abuse Treatment Outcomes: College Student and Nonstudent Emerging Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sahker, Ethan; Acion, Laura; Arndt, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To discover differences between student and nonstudent substance abuse treatment demographics, treatment characteristics, and outcomes. Participants: Conducted February 2014, clients without prior treatment admissions, aged 18-24, not in methadone maintenance therapy, and in nonintensive and ambulatory intensive outpatient treatment…

  18. One-stage emergency treatment of open grade IIIB tibial shaft fractures with bone loss.

    PubMed

    Tropet, Y; Garbuio, P; Obert, L; Jeunet, L; Elias, B

    2001-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to report the authors' experience with emergency reconstruction of severe tibial shaft fractures. Five male patients were admitted to the emergency room with a grade IIIB open tibial shaft fracture with bone loss (average age, 33 years; age range, 18-65 years). Injuries were the result of motorcycle accidents (N = 2), pedestrian accidents (N = 1), gunshot wound (N = 1), and paragliding fall (N = 1). Primary emergent one-stage management for all patients consisted of administration of antibiotics, debridement, stabilization by locked intramedullary nailing, bone grafting from the iliac crest, and coverage using free muscle flaps (four latissimus dorsi and one gracilis). The average follow-up was 21 months (range, 8 months-3.5 years). Partial weight bearing with no immobilization was started at 3 months, and full weight bearing began 5 months after trauma. No angular complications and no nonunions were observed. There was one case of superficial infection without osteitis. All fractures healed within 6 months in 4 patients and within 10 months in 1 patient. At the last follow-up examination, ankle and knee motion was normal and no pain was noted, except for 1 patient who had associated lesions (ankle motion reduced by 50%). Aggressive emergency management of severe open tibial fractures provides good results. It improves end results markedly, not only by reducing tissue loss from infection, but also reducing healing and rehabilitation times.

  19. Outpatient Care of Young People after Emergency Treatment of Deliberate Self-Harm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridge, Jeffrey A.; Marcus, Steven C.; Olfson, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Little is known about the mental health care received by young people after an episode of deliberate self-harm. This study examined predictors of emergency department (ED) discharge, mental health assessments in the ED, and follow-up outpatient mental health care for Medicaid-covered youth with deliberate self-harm. Method: A…

  20. Antibiotic resistance of mixed biofilms in cystic fibrosis: impact of emerging microorganisms on treatment of infection.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Susana Patrícia; Ceri, Howard; Azevedo, Nuno Filipe; Pereira, Maria Olívia

    2012-09-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a genetic disorder associated with multispecies infections where interactions between classical and newly identified bacteria might be crucial to understanding the persistent colonisation in CF lungs. This study investigated the interactions between two emerging species, Inquilinus limosus and Dolosigranulum pigrum, and the conventional CF pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa by evaluating the ability to develop biofilms of mixed populations and then studying their susceptibility patterns to eight different antimicrobials. Monospecies biofilms formed by I. limosus and D. pigrum produced significantly less biomass than P. aeruginosa and displayed greater sensitivity to antimicrobials. However, when in dual-species biofilms with P. aeruginosa, the emerging species I. limosus and D. pigrum were crucial in increasing tolerance of the overall consortia to most antibiotics, even without a change in the number of biofilm-encased cells. These results may suggest that revising these and other species interactions in CF might enable the development of more suitable and effective therapies in the future.

  1. Case report: treatment of subdural hematoma in the emergency department utilizing the subdural evacuating port system.

    PubMed

    Asfora, Wilson T; Klapper, Hendrik B

    2013-08-01

    Patients with acute or chronic subdural hematomas may present with rapidly deteriorating neurological function and are at risk for irreversible brainstem injury. In such cases, rapid surgical intervention is required to evacuate the hematoma and reverse critically elevated intracranial pressure. A variety of surgical drainage methods are in existence, none of which are clearly superior to the others. This report presents the case of a 74-year-old woman who suffered an acute-on-chronic subdural hematoma which was evacuated in the emergency department utilizing the subdural evacuating port system (SEPS). The SEPS provides for a minimally invasive technique to drain subdural hematomas and is advantageous in that it can be performed at the bedside. The SEPS is relatively simple to use and may be especially useful to emergency department staff in outlying areas where there is a shortage of neurosurgical coverage.

  2. Response trees for detection, diagnosis, and treatment of emergency conditions at the LOFT facility

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, W.R.

    1980-01-01

    A technique for detecting, diagnosing, and treating emergency conditions has been developed at the LOFT facility. A response tree is a pictorial representation of many different cooling modes which can be used to cool the reactor core. A comprehensive methodology is being developed which will assist the reactor operator in choosing the correct cooling mode, monitoring its performance, and selecting an alternate mode when required. The technique will be implemented using a computer to monitor system status and evaluate the response trees.

  3. Computer-Based Script Training for Aphasia: Emerging Themes from Post-Treatment Interviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cherney, Leora R.; Halper, Anita S.; Kaye, Rosalind C.

    2011-01-01

    This study presents results of post-treatment interviews following computer-based script training for persons with chronic aphasia. Each of the 23 participants received 9 weeks of AphasiaScripts training. Post-treatment interviews were conducted with the person with aphasia and/or a significant other person. The 23 interviews yielded 584 coded…

  4. Novel emerging treatments for hepatitis C infection: a fast-moving pipeline.

    PubMed

    Kardashian, Ara A; Pockros, Paul J

    2017-02-01

    Advances in the treatment of chronic hepatitis C has been one of the pinnacles of medical science in the last 25 years. The age of direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) has led to cure rates >95% with shorter duration and low toxicity regimens, thus changing the landscape of the era of pegylated interferon and ribavirin (RBV). However, there remain some challenges with these therapies as there are multiple regimens available with a fair amount of sophistication required to administer them. Treatment continues to require knowledge of prior treatment status, viral genotype and fibrosis assessment, thus affording an opportunity for improvement in future regimens. This update reviews some upcoming therapies for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C.

  5. Novel emerging treatments for hepatitis C infection: a fast-moving pipeline

    PubMed Central

    Kardashian, Ara A.; Pockros, Paul J.

    2017-01-01

    Advances in the treatment of chronic hepatitis C has been one of the pinnacles of medical science in the last 25 years. The age of direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) has led to cure rates >95% with shorter duration and low toxicity regimens, thus changing the landscape of the era of pegylated interferon and ribavirin (RBV). However, there remain some challenges with these therapies as there are multiple regimens available with a fair amount of sophistication required to administer them. Treatment continues to require knowledge of prior treatment status, viral genotype and fibrosis assessment, thus affording an opportunity for improvement in future regimens. This update reviews some upcoming therapies for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C. PMID:28203284

  6. Selection of representative emerging micropollutants for drinking water treatment studies: a systematic approach.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xiaohui; Peldszus, Sigrid

    2012-01-01

    Micropollutants remain of concern in drinking water, and there is a broad interest in the ability of different treatment processes to remove these compounds. To gain a better understanding of treatment effectiveness for structurally diverse compounds and to be cost effective, it is necessary to select a small set of representative micropollutants for experimental studies. Unlike other approaches to-date, in this research micropollutants were systematically selected based solely on their physico-chemical and structural properties that are important in individual water treatment processes. This was accomplished by linking underlying principles of treatment processes such as coagulation/flocculation, oxidation, activated carbon adsorption, and membrane filtration to compound characteristics and corresponding molecular descriptors. A systematic statistical approach not commonly used in water treatment was then applied to a compound pool of 182 micropollutants (identified from the literature) and their relevant calculated molecular descriptors. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to summarize the information residing in this large dataset. D-optimal onion design was then applied to the PCA results to select structurally representative compounds that could be used in experimental treatment studies. To demonstrate the applicability and flexibility of this selection approach, two sets of 22 representative micropollutants are presented. Compounds in the first set are representative when studying a range of water treatment processes (coagulation/flocculation, oxidation, activated carbon adsorption, and membrane filtration), whereas the second set shows representative compounds for ozonation and advanced oxidation studies. Overall, selected micropollutants in both lists are structurally diverse, have wide-ranging physico-chemical properties and cover a large spectrum of applications. The systematic compound selection approach presented here can also be adjusted to fit

  7. Cyanide intoxication as part of smoke inhalation--a review on diagnosis and treatment from the emergency perspective.

    PubMed

    Lawson-Smith, Pia; Jansen, Erik C; Hyldegaard, Ole

    2011-03-03

    This paper reviews the current literature on smoke inhalation injuries with special attention to the effects of hydrogen cyanide. It is assumed that cyanide poisoning is still an overlooked diagnosis in fire victims. Treatment against cyanide poisoning in the emergency setting should be given based on the clinical diagnosis only. Oxygen in combination with a recommended antidote should be given immediately, the first to reduce cellular hypoxia and the second to eliminate cyanide. A specific antidote is hydroxycobalamin, which can be given iv. and has few side effects.

  8. Emerging therapies for the treatment of neovascular age-related macular degeneration and diabetic macular edema.

    PubMed

    Emerson, M Vaughn; Lauer, Andreas K

    2007-01-01

    Diabetic macular edema (DME) and choroidal neovascularization (CNV) associated with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) are the leading causes of vision loss in the industrialized world. The mainstay of treatment for both conditions has been thermal laser photocoagulation, while there have been recent advances in the treatment of CNV using photodynamic therapy with verteporfin. While both of these treatments have prevented further vision loss in a subset of patients, vision improvement is rare. Anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A therapy has revolutionized the treatment of both conditions. Pegaptanib, an anti-VEGF aptamer, prevents vision loss in CNV, although the performance is similar to that of photodynamic therapy. Ranibizumab, an antibody fragment, and bevacizumab, a full-length humanized monoclonal antibody against VEGF, have both shown promising results, with improvements in visual acuity in the treatment of both diseases. VEGF trap, a modified soluble VEGF receptor analog, binds VEGF more tightly than all other anti-VEGF therapies, and has also shown promising results in early trials. Other treatment strategies to decrease the effect of VEGF have used small interfering RNA to inhibit VEGF production and VEGF receptor production. Corticosteroids have shown efficacy in controlled trials, including anacortave acetate in the treatment and prevention of CNV, and intravitreal triamcinolone acetonide and the fluocinolone acetonide implant in the treatment of DME. Receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors, such as vatalanib, inhibit downstream effects of VEGF, and have been effective in the treatment of CNV in early studies. Squalamine lactate inhibits plasma membrane ion channels with downstream effects on VEGF, and has shown promising results with systemic administration. Initial results are also encouraging for other growth factors, including pigment epithelium-derived factor administered via an adenoviral vector. Ruboxistaurin, which decreases protein

  9. Emerging role of aripiprazole for treatment of irritability associated with autistic disorder in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Stachnik, Joan; Gabay, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Autistic disorder is a largely misunderstood and difficult to treat neurodevelopmental disorder. Three core domains of functioning are affected by autistic disorder, ie, socialization, communication, and behavior. Signs of autistic disorder may be present early, but are frequently overlooked, resulting in a delay in its diagnosis and a subsequent delay in treatment. No one definitive therapy is available, and treatment consists of early educational and behavioral interventions, as well as drug therapy. Atypical antipsychotics have often been used in the treatment of autistic disorder to target irritability, aggression, and self-injurious behavior, all of which can interfere with other aspects of treatment. One atypical antipsychotic, aripiprazole, has recently been approved for treatment of irritability associated with autistic disorder. Based on the results from two randomized, controlled trials, with efficacy data from nearly 300 patients, treatment with aripiprazole was associated with reductions in irritability, global improvements in behavior, and improvements in quality of life from both the patient and caregiver perspectives. Dosage of aripiprazole ranged from 5 mg to 15 mg per day. Aripiprazole was well tolerated during clinical trials, with most adverse events considered mild or moderate. Clinically relevant weight gain occurred in about 30% of patients given aripiprazole, although when compared with other atypical antipsychotics, aripiprazole appears to have fewer metabolic effects and a lower risk of weight gain. However, pediatric patients taking any atypical antipsychotic should be carefully monitored for potential adverse events, because the long-term effects of antipsychotic therapy in this population are not well known. When used appropriately, aripiprazole has the potential to be an effective treatment for children with autistic disorder to improve irritability and aggressive behavior and improve quality of life.

  10. Opioid Substitution Treatment Planning in a Disaster Context: Perspectives from Emergency Management and Health Professionals in Aotearoa/New Zealand

    PubMed Central

    Blake, Denise; Lyons, Antonia

    2016-01-01

    Opioid Substitution Treatment (OST) is a harm reduction strategy enabling opiate consumers to avoid withdrawal symptoms and maintain health and wellbeing. Some research shows that within a disaster context service disruptions and infrastructure damage affect OST services, including problems with accessibility, dosing, and scripts. Currently little is known about planning for OST in the reduction and response phases of a disaster. This study aimed to identify the views of three professional groups working in Aotearoa/New Zealand about OST provision following a disaster. In-depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 17 service workers, health professionals, and emergency managers in OST and disaster planning fields. Thematic analysis of transcripts identified three key themes, namely “health and wellbeing”, “developing an emergency management plan”, and “stock, dose verification, and scripts” which led to an overarching concept of “service continuity in OST preparedness planning”. Participants viewed service continuity as essential for reducing physical and psychological distress for OST clients, their families, and wider communities. Alcohol and drug and OST health professionals understood the specific needs of clients, while emergency managers discussed the need for sufficient preparedness planning to minimise harm. It is concluded that OST preparedness planning must be multidisciplinary, flexible, and inclusive. PMID:27834915

  11. Laccase immobilization and insolubilization: from fundamentals to applications for the elimination of emerging contaminants in wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Ba, Sidy; Arsenault, Alexandre; Hassani, Thanina; Jones, J Peter; Cabana, Hubert

    2013-12-01

    Over the last few decades many attempts have been made to use biocatalysts for the biotransformation of emerging contaminants in environmental matrices. Laccase, a multicopper oxidoreductase enzyme, has shown great potential in oxidizing a large number of phenolic and non-phenolic emerging contaminants. However, laccases and more broadly enzymes in their free form are biocatalysts whose applications in solution have many drawbacks rendering them currently unsuitable for large scale use. To circumvent these limitations, the enzyme can be immobilized onto carriers or entrapped within capsules; these two immobilization techniques have the disadvantage of generating a large mass of non-catalytic product. Insolubilization of the free enzymes as cross-linked enzymes (CLEAs) is found to yield a greater volume ratio of biocatalyst while improving the characteristics of the biocatalyst. Ultimately, novel techniques of enzymes insolubilization and stabilization are feasible with the combination of cross-linked enzyme aggregates (combi-CLEAs) and enzyme polymer engineered structures (EPESs) for the elimination of emerging micropollutants in wastewater. In this review, fundamental features of laccases are provided in order to elucidate their catalytic mechanism, followed by different chemical aspects of the immobilization and insolubilization techniques applicable to laccases. Finally, kinetic and reactor design effects for enzymes in relation with the potential applications of laccases as combi-CLEAs and EPESs for the biotransformation of micropollutants in wastewater treatment are discussed.

  12. Trabectedin therapy as an emerging treatment strategy for recurrent platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    López-Guerrero, José Antonio; Romero, Ignacio; Poveda, Andrés

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (OC) is a common gynecologic malignancy in women. The standard treatment for OC is maximal cytoreductive surgical debulking followed by platinum-based chemotherapy. Despite the high response rate to primary therapy, approximately 85% of patients will develop recurrent ovarian cancer (ROC). This review identifies the clinical use of trabectedin in the treatment algorithm for ROC, with specific emphasis on platinum-sensitive ROC, for which trabectedin in combination with pegylated liposomal doxorubicin has been approved as a treatment protocol. The main mechanisms of action of trabectedin at the cellular level and in the tumor microenvironment is also discussed as bases for identifying biomarkers for selecting patients who may largely benefit from trabectedin-based therapies. PMID:25556617

  13. Determining optimal treatment strategy for diffuse glioma: the emerging role of IDH mutations.

    PubMed

    Juratli, Tareq A; Cahill, Daniel P; McCutcheon, Ian E

    2015-06-01

    The isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (IDH1 and IDH2) genes mutate frequently in gliomas, and it has become increasingly apparent that IDH mutation status accounts for much of the prognostic information previously rendered by histological grading. Most glioblastomas (90-95%) are IDH wild-type and most lower-grade diffuse gliomas (80%) are IDH-mutant. We examine here how IDH mutation status interacts with treatments known to influence survival (surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy) in patients with gliomas, and the impact of the IDH mutations on patients' survival after such treatments. IDH mutations is associated with more complete surgical resection of enhancing disease, and with a better response to RT. In addition, there is increasing clinical evidence that, in certain contexts, IDH mutations predict chemotherapeutic sensitivity. Mutations in IDH and other genes are beginning to drive decisions on therapy for diffuse gliomas and will likely allow tailoring of treatment by molecular profile in the future.

  14. Unmet needs of patients with narcolepsy: perspectives on emerging treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Wozniak, Dariusz R; Quinnell, Timothy G

    2015-01-01

    The treatment options currently available for narcolepsy are often unsatisfactory due to suboptimal efficacy, troublesome side effects, development of drug tolerance, and inconvenience. Our understanding of the neurobiology of narcolepsy has greatly improved over the last decade. This knowledge has not yet translated into additional therapeutic options for patients, but progress is being made. Some compounds, such as histaminergic H3 receptor antagonists, may prove useful in symptom control of narcolepsy. The prospect of finding a cure still seems distant, but hypocretin replacement therapy offers some promise. In this narrative review, we describe these developments and others which may yield more effective narcolepsy treatments in the future. PMID:26045680

  15. Transthyretin Cardiac Amyloidosis: Pathogenesis, Treatments, and Emerging Role in Heart Failure with Preserved Ejection Fraction

    PubMed Central

    Ton, Van-Khue; Mukherjee, Monica; Judge, Daniel P

    2014-01-01

    Transthyretin (TTR) amyloidosis causes heart failure from cardiac deposition of TTR amyloid fibrils, the by-product of TTR homotetramer disassembly. Wild-type (WT) TTR deposition leads to senile amyloidosis, predominantly manifesting with cardiomyopathy. Missense mutations in the TTR gene result in familial TTR amyloidosis. Certain mutations are more likely to affect the heart, while others cause more neurologic involvement. Extracellular fibril deposition triggers intracellular stress response, upregulation of the inflammatory cascades, apoptosis, and organ dysfunction. Recent studies suggest that TTR cardiac amyloid may be a significant contributor to the pathogenesis of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). Summarized in this review are the molecular pathways underlying the cellular toxicity of TTR amyloid fibrils and the emerging therapies aimed at TTR tetramer stabilization, abrogation of TTR synthesis in the liver, or inhibition of amyloidogenesis. PMID:25628512

  16. Merkel Cell Carcinoma: Current Issues Regarding Diagnosis, Management, and Emerging Treatment Strategies.

    PubMed

    Brummer, Grace C; Bowen, Anneli R; Bowen, Glen M

    2016-02-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare but aggressive cutaneous tumor with a predilection for the head and neck of elderly Caucasian patients. Although much less common than melanoma, MCC has higher rates of sentinel lymph node involvement, local and regional recurrences, and mortality. The majority of MCC cases have been linked to the relatively newly discovered Merkel cell polyomavirus, which is a ubiquitous constituent of the skin flora. Recent discoveries regarding viral integration and carcinogenesis and the immunologic features of MCC have expanded the understanding of MCC. These discoveries have led to the development and application of emerging therapies such as somatostatin analogs, immune checkpoint inhibition, adoptive cell therapy, and other exciting possibilities for targeted therapy.

  17. Emergency department external fixation for provisional treatment of pilon and unstable ankle fractures

    PubMed Central

    Lareau, Craig R.; Daniels, Alan H.; Vopat, Bryan G.; Kane, Patrick M.

    2015-01-01

    Unstable ankle fractures and impacted tibial pilon fractures often benefit from provisional external fixation as a temporizing measure prior to definitive fixation. Benefits of external fixation include improved articular alignment, decreased articular impaction, and soft tissue rest. Uniplanar external fixator placement in the Emergency Department (ED ex-fix) is a reliable and safe technique for achieving ankle reduction and stability while awaiting definitive fixation. This procedure involves placing transverse proximal tibial and calcaneal traction pins and connecting the pins with two external fixator rods. This technique is particularly useful in austere environments or when the operating room is not immediately available. Additionally, this bedside intervention prevents the patient from requiring general anesthesia and may be a cost-effective strategy for decreasing valuable operating time. The ED ex-fix is an especially valuable procedure in busy trauma centers and during mass casualty events, in which resources may be limited. PMID:25709258

  18. New and emerging immune-targeted drugs for the treatment of multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Alan M

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a neurodegenerative disease with a major inflammatory component that constitutes the most common progressive and disabling neurological condition in young adults. Injectable immunomodulatory medicines such as interferon drugs and glatiramer acetate have dominated the MS market for over the past two decades but this situation is set to change. This is because of: (i) patent expirations, (ii) the introduction of natalizumab, which targets the interaction between leukocytes and the blood–CNS barrier, (iii) the launch of three oral immunomodulatory drugs (fingolimod, dimethyl fumarate and teriflunomide), with another (laquinimod) under regulatory review and (iv) a number of immunomodulatory monoclonal antibodies (alemtuzumab, daclizumab and ocrelizumab) about to enter the market. Current and emerging medicines are reviewed and their impact on people with MS considered. PMID:24251808

  19. Allergy evaluation after emergency treatment: anaphylaxis to the over‐the‐counter medication clobutinol

    PubMed Central

    Seitz, Cornelia S; Bröcker, Eva‐B; Trautmann, Axel

    2007-01-01

    Anaphylaxis is traditionally diagnosed and treated as an acute emergency but should be always followed by a search for specific triggers, resulting in avoidance strategies. This case report highlights the relevance of a detailed evaluation after anaphylaxis for diagnosis of a rare but potentially life‐threatening allergy. Considering the high frequency of clobutinol application, IgE‐mediated allergic hypersensitivity seems extremely rare and has to be distinguished from infection‐associated urticaria and angioedema as well as non‐specific summation effects. Accidental re‐exposure has to be strictly avoided and therefore after identification of clobutinol as the anaphylaxis trigger, the patient received detailed allergy documents including international non‐proprietary and trade names of the culprit drug. PMID:17351213

  20. [Perioperative management of direct oral anticoagulant in emergency surgery and bleeding. Haemostasis monitoring and treatment].

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, F; Gómez-Luque, A; Ferrandis, R; Llau, J V; de Andrés, J; Gomar, C; Sierra, P; Castillo, J; Torres, L M

    2015-10-01

    There is an almost unanimous consensus on the management of the direct new oral anticoagulants, dabigatran, rivaroxaban, and apixaban in elective surgery. However, this general consensus does not exist in relation with the direct new oral anticoagulants use in emergency surgery, especially in the bleeding patient. For this reason, a literature review was performed using the MEDLINE-PubMed. An analysis was made of the journal articles, reviews, systematic reviews, and practices guidelines published between 2000 and 2014 using the terms "monitoring" and "reversal". From this review, it was shown that the routine tests of blood coagulation, such as the prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time, have a limited efficacy in the perioperative control of blood coagulation in these patients. There is currently no antidote to reverse the effects of these drugs, although the possibility of using concentrated prothrombin complex and recombinant activated factor vii has been suggested for the urgent reversal of the anticoagulant effect.

  1. Diagnosis and treatment planning of acute aortic emergencies using a handheld DICOM viewer.

    PubMed

    Choudhri, Asim F; Norton, Patrick T; Carr, Thomas M; Stone, James R; Hagspiel, Klaus D; Dake, Michael D

    2013-08-01

    Acute aortic syndromes and traumatic aortic injury are often diagnosed on CT angiography, possibly requiring emergent intervention. Advances in handheld computing have created the possibility of viewing full DICOM datasets from a remote location. We evaluated the ability to diagnose and characterize acute aortic pathologies on CT angiograms of the thorax using an iPhone-based DICOM viewer. This study was performed after Institutional Review Board approval. Fifteen CT angiograms of the thorax in suspected acute aortic syndromes were evaluated by three blinded radiologists on a handheld device using a DICOM viewer. Studies were evaluated for the ability to identify and classify aortic dissection, transection, or intramural hematoma, measure aortic dimensions, and identify mediastinal hematoma, arch variants, and pulmonary pathology. Studies were compared to blinded interpretations on a dedicated PACS workstation. The aortic pathology was correctly identified as aortic transection/pseudoaneurysm (n = 5), type A dissection (n = 2), and type A intramural hematoma (n = 1) by all reviewers, with no false-positive interpretations. This represents a sensitivity and specificity of 100 %. Mediastinal hematoma (n = 6), pneumothorax (five right, three left), and arch vessel involvement (n = 2) were identified in all cases. There was 88.5 % accuracy in identifying arch variants. Measurement of the size of the involved aortic segment was similar on handheld device and PACS workstation; however the adjacent normal aorta was 1.2 ± 1.0 mm larger on the handheld device (p = 0.03). Handheld DICOM viewers may be useful for emergent consultations and triage, and may expedite preprocedure planning to reduce the time interval between diagnostic scan and therapeutic intervention.

  2. Additive, Multi-Component Treatment of Emerging Refusal Topographies in a Pediatric Feeding Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharp, William G.; Jaquess, David L.; Bogard, Jennifer D.; Morton, Jane F.

    2010-01-01

    This case study describes inter-disciplinary treatment of chronic food refusal and tube dependency in a 2-year-old female with a pediatric feeding disorder. Evidence-based behavioral components--including escape extinction (EE), differential reinforcement of alterative mealtime behavior (DRA), and stimulus fading--were introduced sequentially as…

  3. Emerging treatments in neurogastroenterology: a multidisciplinary working group consensus statement on opioid-induced constipation

    PubMed Central

    CAMILLERI, M.; DROSSMAN, D. A.; BECKER, G.; WEBSTER, L. R.; DAVIES, A. N.; MAWE, G. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Opioids are effective for acute and chronic pain conditions, but their use is associated with often difficult-to-manage constipation and other gastrointestinal (GI) effects due to effects on peripheral μ-opioid receptors in the gut. The mechanism of opioid-induced constipation (OIC) differs from that of functional constipation (FC), and OIC may not respond as well to most first-line treatments for FC. The impact of OIC on quality of life (QoL) induces some patients to decrease or stop their opioid therapy to relieve or avoid constipation. Purpose At a roundtable meeting on OIC, a working group developed a consensus definition for OIC diagnosis across disciplines and reviewed current OIC treatments and the potential of treatments in development. By consensus, OIC is defined as follows: ‘A change when initiating opioid therapy from baseline bowel habits that is characterized by any of the following: reduced bowel movement frequency, development or worsening of straining to pass bowel movements, a sense of incomplete rectal evacuation, or harder stool consistency’. The working group noted the prior validation of a patient response outcome and end point for clinical trials and recommended future efforts to create treatment guidelines and QoL measures specific for OIC. Details from the working group’s discussion and consensus recommendations for patient care and research are presented in this article. PMID:25164154

  4. Addressing the unmet needs of patients with persistent negative symptoms of schizophrenia: emerging pharmacological treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Chue, Pierre; Lalonde, Justine K

    2014-01-01

    The negative symptoms of schizophrenia represent an impairment of normal emotional responses, thought processes and behaviors, and include blunting or flattening of affect, alogia/aprosody, avolition/apathy, anhedonia, and asociality. Negative symptoms contribute to a reduced quality of life, increased functional disability, increased burden of illness, and poorer long-term outcomes, to a greater degree than positive symptoms. Primary negative symptoms are prominent and persistent in up to 26% of patients with schizophrenia, and they are estimated to occur in up to 58% of outpatients at any given time. Negative symptoms respond less well to medications than positive symptoms, and to date treatment options for negative symptoms have been limited, with no accepted standard treatment. Modest benefits have been reported with a variety of different agents, including second-generation antipsychotics and add-on therapy with antidepressants and other pharmacological classes. Recent clinical research focusing on negative symptoms target novel biological systems, such as glutamatergic neurotransmission. Different approaches include: enhancing N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor function with agents that bind directly to the glycine ligand site or with glycine reuptake inhibitors; influencing the metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR2/3) with positive allosteric modulators; and stimulating nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. In conclusion, the lack of clearly efficacious pharmacological treatments for the management of negative symptoms represents a significant unmet need, especially considering the importance of these symptoms on patient outcomes. Hence, further research to identify and characterize novel pharmacological treatments for negative symptoms is greatly needed. PMID:24855363

  5. Emerging strategies for the treatment of older patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sanz, Miguel A; Iacoboni, Gloria; Montesinos, Pau; Venditti, Adriano

    2016-10-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the most common acute leukemia in adults, and its incidence increases with age. Clinical outcomes in younger patients have improved over the years but, unfortunately, there is little evidence for an equivalent improvement in outcome for older patients. Approximately 50 % of older patients who are able to receive intensive chemotherapy will achieve a complete remission; however, they face a much higher relapse rate than younger patients, and survival rates for this group are low. Therefore, there is an urgent need to improve outcomes in older patients with AML. In this article, we discuss current treatment paradigms for older patients with AML including the challenges faced when determining which patients are eligible for intensive chemotherapy. We then highlight new treatments in development that may benefit this patient group. Cytotoxic agents, hypomethylating agents, molecularly targeted agents, and cell cycle kinase inhibitors are discussed, with a focus on novel agents that have achieved an advanced stage of development. Overall, the treatment of AML in older patients remains a challenge and, whenever possible, treatment should be offered in the context of clinical trials and should be planned with curative intent.

  6. Gaseous decontamination treatments of food and food environments and emerging technologies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of gaseous sanitation treatments for decontamination of foods and food processing facilities show promise. Gases can penetrate into crevices and niches in foods and in facilities where entrapped microbes could be missed by conventional techniques of cleaning and sanitization. Many of these...

  7. Opinions and Beliefs About Telemedicine for Emergency Treatment During Ambulance Transportation and for Chronic Care at Home

    PubMed Central

    Guldolf, Kaat; Vandervorst, Fenne; Van Hooff, Robbert-Jan; Fernandez Tellez, Helio; Desmaele, Sara; Cambron, Melissa; Hubloue, Ives

    2016-01-01

    Background Telemedicine is a valid alternative to face-to-face patient care in many areas. However, the opinion of all stakeholders is decisive for successful adoption of this technique, especially as telemedicine expands into novel domains such as emergency teleconsultations during ambulance transportation and chronic care at home. Objective We evaluate the viewpoints of the broad public, patients, and professional caregivers in these situations. Methods A 10-question survey was developed and obtained via face-to-face interviews of visitors at the Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel (UZB). The online questionnaire was also distributed among professional caregivers via the intranet of the UZB and among the broad public using social media. Results In total, 607 individuals responded to the questionnaire, expressing a positive opinion regarding telemedicine for in-ambulance emergency treatment and for chronic care at home. Privacy issues were not perceived as relevant, and most respondents were ready to participate in future teleconsultations. Lack of telecommunication knowledge (213/566, 37.6%) was the only independent factor associated with rejection of telemedicine at home and respondents via social media (250/607, 41.2%) were less concerned about privacy issues than respondents via face-to-face interviews (visitors, 234/607, 38.6%). The visitors were more positive towards in-ambulance telemedicine and more likely to agree with future participation in teleconsultations than respondents via social media. Conclusions The broad public, professional caregivers, and patients reported a positive attitude towards telemedicine for emergency treatment during ambulance transportation and for chronic care at home. These results support further improvement of telemedicine solutions in these domains. PMID:27029999

  8. Effects of centralized and onsite wastewater treatment on the occurrence of traditional and emerging contaminants in streams.

    PubMed

    Ferrell, G M; Grimes, B H

    2014-01-01

    The authors conducted a survey of small streams to evaluate the effects of centralized and onsite wastewater treatment on the occurrence of selected traditional and emerging contaminants in small streams in the upper Neuse River basin, North Carolina. An undeveloped site was included to assess effects of residential land use activities on stream quality. Concentrations of nutrients and ions were higher in samples from streams in residential sites than from the stream in an undeveloped area. Overall, streams draining residential areas showed relatively small differences with respect to type of wastewater treatment. Two sites, however--one in an area of centralized wastewater treatment apparently near a suspected sewer line leak, and the second in an area of onsite wastewater treatment--showed effects of wastewater. Organic wastewater compounds were detected more frequently in samples from these two sites than from the other sites. Optical brighteners levels were correlated (r2 = .88) with the number of organic wastewater and pharmaceutical compounds detected at the residential sites and could potentially serve as a screening method to assess wastewater effects on small streams.

  9. Brain mechanisms of Change in Addictions Treatment: Models, Methods, and Emerging Findings.

    PubMed

    Chung, Tammy; Noronha, Antonio; Carroll, Kathleen M; Potenza, Marc N; Hutchison, Kent; Calhoun, Vince D; Gabrieli, John D E; Morgenstern, Jon; Nixon, Sara Jo; Wexler, Bruce E; Brewer, Judson; Ray, Lara; Filbey, Francesca; Strauman, Timothy J; Kober, Hedy; Feldstein Ewing, Sarah W

    2016-09-01

    Increased understanding of "how" and "for whom" treatment works at the level of the brain has potential to transform addictions treatment through the development of innovative neuroscience-informed interventions. The 2015 Science of Change meeting bridged the fields of neuroscience and psychotherapy research to identify brain mechanisms of behavior change that are "common" across therapies, and "specific" to distinct behavioral interventions. Conceptual models of brain mechanisms underlying effects of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, mindfulness interventions, and Motivational Interviewing were discussed. Presentations covered methods for integrating neuroimaging into psychotherapy research, and novel analytic approaches. Effects of heavy substance use on the brain, and recovery of brain functioning with sustained abstinence, which may be facilitated by cognitive training, were reviewed. Neuroimaging provides powerful tools for determining brain mechanisms underlying psychotherapy and medication effects, predicting and monitoring outcomes, developing novel interventions that target specific brain circuits, and identifying for whom an intervention will be effective.

  10. Rituximab: an emerging treatment for recurrent diffuse alveolar hemorrhage in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Tse, J R; Schwab, K E; McMahon, M; Simon, W

    2015-06-01

    Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) is a rare manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and is associated with high mortality rates. Treatment typically consists of aggressive immunosuppression with pulse-dose steroids, cyclophosphamide, and plasma exchange therapy. Mortality rates remain high despite use of multiple medical therapies. We present a case of recurrent DAH in a 52-year-old female with SLE after a deceased donor renal transplant who was successfully treated with rituximab. Our report highlights the pathophysiologic importance of B-cell-mediated immunosuppression in SLE-associated DAH and suggests that rituximab may represent a viable alternative to cyclophosphamide in the treatment of this disease. We also review eight other reported cases of rituximab use in SLE-associated DAH.

  11. Emerging aspects of molecular biomarkers for diagnosis, prognosis and treatment response in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Márquez, Ana; Martín, Javier; Carmona, F David

    2016-06-01

    Important advances have occurred during the last decade in the understanding of the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, we are still far from having a clear picture of the molecular network that predisposes an individual to develop the disease, to worsen the symptoms after that, or to successfully respond to a specific treatment. In this sense, different -omics fields (including transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics, genomics and epigenomics) have recently produced promising insights that could definitively help us to sharpen such picture if integrated trough a systems biology approach. In this review we will summarise and discuss the recent progress achieved in those fields and its possible impact on the discovery of suitable biomarkers for RA diagnosis, prognosis and treatment response.

  12. Emerging treatments in the management of bipolar disorder – focus on risperidone long acting injection

    PubMed Central

    El-Hage, Wissam; Surguladze, Simon A

    2010-01-01

    Bipolar disorder is a life-long psychiatric illness characterized by a high frequency of relapses and substantial societal costs. Almost half of the patients are prescribed second generation antipsychotics for treatment of manic states, or as the maintenance therapy. Risperidone long acting injection (RLAI) as a monotherapy or as adjunctive therapy to lithium or valproate for the maintenance treatment of bipolar I disorder was approved by Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in United States in May 2009. In this review we will consider the aspects of pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, metabolism, safety and tolerability, and clinical trials focusing on the efficacy of RLAI in bipolar disorder. The patients’ perspective and attitudes to long-acting injections will also be discussed. PMID:20856609

  13. Anti-mitotic agents: Are they emerging molecules for cancer treatment?

    PubMed

    Penna, Larissa Siqueira; Henriques, João Antonio Pêgas; Bonatto, Diego

    2017-02-04

    Mutations in cancer cells frequently result in cell cycle alterations that lead to unrestricted growth compared to normal cells. Considering this phenomenon, many drugs have been developed to inhibit different cell-cycle phases. Mitotic phase targeting disturbs mitosis in tumor cells, triggers the spindle assembly checkpoint and frequently results in cell death. The first anti-mitotics to enter clinical trials aimed to target tubulin. Although these drugs improved the treatment of certain cancers, and many anti-microtubule compounds are already approved for clinical use, severe adverse events such as neuropathies were observed. Since then, efforts have been focused on the development of drugs that also target kinases, motor proteins and multi-protein complexes involved in mitosis. In this review, we summarize the major proteins involved in the mitotic phase that can also be targeted for cancer treatment. Finally, we address the activity of anti-mitotic drugs tested in clinical trials in recent years.

  14. An emerging role of cGMP in the treatment of schizophrenia: A review.

    PubMed

    Shim, Seong; Shuman, Michael; Duncan, Erica

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a progressive psychotic disorder with devastating effects on the broad aspects of human emotion, perception, thought, and psychosocial interactions. Although treatment with antipsychotic drugs, the mainstay in the treatment of schizophrenia, the large number of patients with schizophrenia respond poorly to the pharmacological and, the large number of patients with schizophrenia poorly respond to the pharmacological treatment. Although a variety of novel therapeutics have long been tested, to date, no drugs clinically efficacious for schizophrenia are available. The multiple lines of evidence strongly suggest that the modulation of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) is a promising target in promoting the novel therapeutic strategies of schizophrenia beyond the "receptor-dependent" psychopharmacology. cGMP is modulated via regulating its synthesis by N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) and nitric oxide (NO), which regulate guannylyl cyclase (GC), the enzyme producing cGMP. cGMP is also regulated by phosphodiesterase (PDE), the enzyme hydrolyzing cGMP. In this review, we critically evaluate the therapeutic potential of agents modulating cGMP activity by regulating cGMP synthesis including NMDAR enhancers, NO enhancers, NO inhibitors including minocycline with anti-inflammatory properties and PDE inhibitors in improving the negative, cognitive and positive symptoms of schizophrenia. We also discuss the possible mechanisms by which these agents produce therapeutic effects on schizophrenia including cGMP signaling pathways, oxidative stress, and neuroinflammation.

  15. Acupuncture Treatment for Acute Ankle Injury in the Emergency Department: A Preliminary Case Report.

    PubMed

    Tantivesruangdet, Nopmanee

    2016-02-01

    Acupuncture is an ancient medical treatment that is increasingly attracting the interest of the public. It is a complementary therapy that is widely used for management of pain, especially chronic discomfort caused by migraine, low-back pain and osteoarthritis of the knee(¹⁻³). The evidence base for the effectiveness of acupuncture and its clinical applications is controversial, and although its efficacy and safety in the management of acute pain have been demonstrated, the quality of this modality is still questionable. The present study reports a case of acute ankle injury, which was treated with acupuncture. A 33-year-old man presented with acute twisted ankle injury. He had pain with swelling around the ankle, and he was experiencing difficulty in walking. His clinical diagnosis was acute ankle sprain with severe pain. Several drug treatments are used for pain control, but in this case, we used acupuncture. After treatment, his pain diminished significantly with a decrease in VAS pain level from 8 to 4 in 20 minutes. At follow-up after one month, we found no skin infection in this case.

  16. Current and emerging medical treatments for non-small cell lung cancer: a primer for pulmonologists.

    PubMed

    Mazzone, Peter; Mekhail, Tarek

    2012-04-01

    Pulmonary physicians commonly develop relationships with lung cancer patients through the evaluation and staging of the disease prior to the discussion of treatment options with oncologists. Given the relationship that develops, a pulmonologist is often asked about aspects of the treatment plan that may be slightly outside of their comfort zone. The aim of this overview of medical treatment of non-small cell lung cancer is to provide the pulmonologist with an overview of the evidence guiding current practice so that they can be more comfortable answering their patients' questions while awaiting the expert opinion of the oncologist. We discuss standard chemotherapeutic agents, their common side effects, and their use in the adjuvant and neoadjuvant setting, as definitive therapy for locally advanced disease, as palliative therapy for advanced disease, and as maintenance therapy. We also discuss the mechanisms of action and side effects of targeted therapies (including inhibitors of vascular endothelial growth factor [VEGF], epidermal growth factor receptor [EGFR] signaling and the anaplastic lymphoma kinase [ALK] protein), their currently accepted uses, and upcoming phase III trials, the results of which may influence standard practice.

  17. Emergency membrane contactor based absorption system for ammonia leaks in water treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Shao, Jiahui; Fang, Xuliang; He, Yiliang; Jin, Qiang

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Because of the suspected health risks of trihalomethanes (THMs), more and more water treatment plants have replaced traditional chlorine disinfection process with chloramines but often without the proper absorption system installed in the case of ammonia leaks in the storage room. A pilot plant membrane absorption system was developed and installed in a water treatment plant for this purpose. Experimentally determined contact angle, surface tension, and corrosion tests indicated that the sulfuric acid was the proper choice as the absorbent for leaking ammonia using polypropylene hollow fiber membrane contactor. Effects of several operating conditions on the mass transfer coefficient, ammonia absorption, and removal efficiency were examined, including the liquid concentration, liquid velocity, and feed gas concentration. Under the operation conditions investigated, the gas absorption efficiency over 99.9% was achieved. This indicated that the designed pilot plant membrane absorption system was effective to absorb the leaking ammonia in the model storage room. The removal rate of the ammonia in the model storage room was also experimentally and theoretically found to be primarily determined by the ammonia suction flow rate from the ammonia storage room to the membrane contactor. The ammonia removal rate of 99.9% was expected to be achieved within 1.3 h at the ammonia gas flow rate of 500 m3/h. The success of the pilot plant membrane absorption system developed in this study illustrated the potential of this technology for ammonia leaks in water treatment plant, also paved the way towards a larger scale application.

  18. Emerging technology for advancing the treatment of epilepsy using a dynamic control framework.

    PubMed

    Stanslaski, Scott; Giftakis, John; Stypulkowski, Paul; Carlson, Dave; Afshar, Pedram; Cong, Peng; Denison, Timothy

    2011-01-01

    We briefly describe a dynamic control system framework for neuromodulation for epilepsy, with an emphasis on its practical challenges and the preliminary validation of key prototype technologies in a chronic animal model. The current state of neuromodulation can be viewed as a classical dynamic control framework such that the nervous system is the classical "plant", the neural stimulator is the controller/actuator, clinical observation, patient diaries and/or measured bio-markers are the sensor, and clinical judgment applied to these sensor inputs forms the state estimator. Technology can potentially address two main factors contributing to the performance limitations of existing systems: "observability," the ability to observe the state of the system from output measurements, and "controllability," the ability to drive the system to a desired state. In addition to improving sensors and actuator performance, methods and tools to better understand disease state dynamics and state estimation are also critical for improving therapy outcomes. We describe our preliminary validation of key "observability" and "controllability" technology blocks using an implanted research tool in an epilepsy disease model. This model allows for testing the key emerging technologies in a representative neural network of therapeutic importance. In the future, we believe these technologies might enable both first principles understanding of neural network behavior for optimizing therapy design, and provide a practical pathway towards clinical translation.

  19. Emerging therapies for the treatment of skeletal muscle wasting in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Passey, Samantha L; Hansen, Michelle J; Bozinovski, Steven; McDonald, Christine F; Holland, Anne E; Vlahos, Ross

    2016-10-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a progressive lung disease that constitutes a major global health burden. A significant proportion of patients experience skeletal muscle wasting and loss of strength as a comorbidity of their COPD, a condition that severely impacts on their quality of life and survival. At present, the lung pathology is considered to be largely irreversible; however, the inherent adaptability of muscle tissue offers therapeutic opportunities to tackle muscle wasting and potentially reverse or delay the progression of this aspect of the disease, to improve patients' quality of life. Muscle wasting in COPD is complex, with contributions from a number of factors including inflammatory cytokines, oxidative stress, growth and anabolic hormones, nutritional status, and physical activity. In this review, we discuss current and emerging therapeutic approaches to treat muscle wasting in COPD, including a number of pharmacological therapies that are in development for muscle atrophy in other pathological states that could be of relevance for treating muscle wasting in COPD patients.

  20. Feasibility studies: UV/chlorine advanced oxidation treatment for the removal of emerging contaminants.

    PubMed

    Sichel, C; Garcia, C; Andre, K

    2011-12-01

    UV/chlorine (UV/HOCl and UV/ClO(2)) Advanced Oxidation Processes (AOPs) were assessed with varying process layout and compared to the state of the art UV/H(2)O(2) AOP. The process comparison focused on the economical and energy saving potential of the UV/chlorine AOP. Therefore the experiments were performed at technical scale (250 L/h continuous flow reactor) and at process energies, oxidant and model contaminant concentrations expected in full scale reference plants. As model compounds the emerging contaminants (ECs): desethylatrazine, sulfamethoxazole, carbamazepine, diclofenac, benzotriazole, tolyltriazole, iopamidole and 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2) were degraded at initial compound concentrations of 1 μg/L in tap water and matrixes with increased organic load (46 mg/L DOC). UV/chlorine AOP organic by-product forming potential was assessed for trihalomethanes (THMs) and N-Nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA). A process design was evaluated which can considerably reduce process costs, energy consumption and by-product generation from UV/HOCl AOPs.

  1. Free fatty acid receptors: emerging targets for treatment of diabetes and its complications

    PubMed Central

    Vangaveti, Venkat; Shashidhar, Venkatesh; Jarrod, Ghassan; Baune, Bernhard T.; Kennedy, R. Lee

    2010-01-01

    Fatty acids (FAs) are important as metabolic substrates and as structural components of biological membranes. However, they also function as signalling molecules. Recently, a series of G protein-coupled receptors (GPRs) for FAs has been described and characterized. These receptors have differing specificities for FAs of differing chain length and degree of saturation, for FA derivatives such as oleoylethanolamide, and for oxidized FAs. They are a critical component of the body's nutrient sensing apparatus, and small molecule agonists and antagonists of these receptors show considerable promise in the management of diabetes and its complications. Agonists of the long-chain free fatty acid receptors FFAR1 and GPR119 act as insulin secretagogues, both directly and by increasing incretins. Although, drugs acting at short-chain FFA receptors (FFAR2 and FFAR3) have not yet been developed, they are attractive targets as they regulate nutrient balance through effects in the intestine and adipose tissue. These include regulation of the secretion of cholecystokinin, peptide YY and leptin. Finally, GPR132 is a receptor for oxidized FAs, which may be a sensor of lipid overload and oxidative stress, and which is involved in atherosclerosis. Regulation of its signalling pathways with drugs may decrease the macrovascular risk experienced by diabetic patients. In summary, FA receptors are emerging drug targets that are involved in the regulation of nutrient status and carbohydrate tolerance, and modulators of these receptors may well figure prominently in the next generation of antidiabetic drugs. PMID:23148161

  2. Toxicity of emerging energetic soil contaminant CL-20 to potworm Enchytraeus crypticus in freshly amended or weathered and aged treatments.

    PubMed

    Kuperman, Roman G; Checkai, Ronald T; Simini, Michael; Phillips, Carlton T; Anthony, J Steven; Kolakowski, Jan E; Davis, Emily A

    2006-03-01

    We investigated the toxicity of an emerging polynitramine energetic material hexanitrohexaazaisowurtzitane (CL-20) to the soil invertebrate species Enchytraeus crypticus by adapting then using the Enchytraeid Reproduction Test (ISO/16387:2003). Studies were designed to develop ecotoxicological benchmark values for ecological risk assessment of the potential impacts of accidental release of this compound into the environment. Tests were conducted in Sassafras Sandy Loam soil, which supports relatively high bioavailability of CL-20. Weathering and aging procedures for CL-20 amended into test soil were incorporated into the study design to produce toxicity data that better reflect soil exposure conditions in the field compared with the toxicity in freshly amended soils. Concentration-response relationships for measurement endpoints were determined using nonlinear regressions. Definitive tests showed that toxicities for E. crypticus adult survival and juvenile production were significantly increased in weathered and aged soil treatments compared with toxicity in freshly amended soil, based on 95% confidence intervals. The median effect concentration (EC50) and EC20 values for juvenile production were 0.3 and 0.1 mg kg-1, respectively, for CL-20 freshly amended into soil, and 0.1 and 0.035 mg kg-1, respectively, for weathered and aged CL-20 soil treatments. These findings of increased toxicity to E. crypticus in weathered and aged CL-20 soil treatments compared with exposures in freshly amended soils show that future investigations should include a weathering and aging component to generate toxicity data that provide more complete information on ecotoxicological effects of emerging energetic contaminants in soil.

  3. Psychiatric Emergencies

    PubMed Central

    Bayrakal, Sadi

    1972-01-01

    Dr. Bayrakal believes that the time has come for the family physician to deal with minor psychiatric disturbances in his office as well as psychiatric emergencies in the emergency department. The newly emerging medico-social philosophy of both the federal and provincial governments, he says, is giving greater responsibility and authority to the family physician in every area of medicine, including psychiatry. The author discusses major psychiatric emergencies (suicide, suicidal attempt, homicide, social scandal, as well as other psychiatric emergencies) on the ward including adolescent psychiatry. (The descriptions and treatment procedures are given on a concrete clinical level without theoretical overload.) In the family physician's work, psychological understanding is of profound importance. Giving him the added scope of psychiatric consideration to see the patient in bio-psycho-social totality will enable him to practice a more humanized form of medicine. PMID:20468779

  4. INTRAPERITONEAL DEXTROSE ADMINISTRATION AS AN ALTERNATIVE EMERGENCY TREATMENT FOR HYPOGLYCEMIC YEARLING CALIFORNIA SEA LIONS (ZALOPHUS CALIFORNIANUS).

    PubMed

    Fravel, Vanessa A; Van Bonn, William; Gulland, Frances; Rios, Carlos; Fahlman, Andreas; Graham, James L; Havel, Peter J

    2016-03-01

    The Marine Mammal Center (TMMC) cares for malnourished California sea lion (CSL) (Zalophus californianus) pups and yearlings every year. Hypoglycemia is a common consequence of malnutrition in young CSLs. Administering dextrose during a hypoglycemic crisis is vital to recovery. Traditional veterinary approaches to treat hypoglycemia pose therapeutic challenges in otariids, as vascular access and catheter maintenance can be difficult. The current approach to a hypoglycemic episode at TMMC is to administer dextrose intravenously (i.v.) by medically trained personnel. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) dextrose administration is an attractive alternative to i.v. administration because volunteer staff with basic training can administer treatment instead of waiting for trained staff to treat. This study compares the effects of i.v., i.p., and no dextrose administration on serum glucose and insulin in clinically healthy, euglycemic CSL yearlings. Three groups of animals, consisting of five sea lions each, were treated with 500 mg/kg dextrose using one of the following routes: i.v., i.p., or no dextrose (control). A jugular catheter was placed, and blood samples were collected at times 0, 5, 15, 30, 60, 120, 180, and 240 min after dextrose administration. I.v. dextrose administration resulted in an increase of serum glucose concentrations from a baseline level of approximately 150 mg/dl to a peak of approximately 350 mg/dl. The resulting hyperglycemia persisted for approximately 2 hr and was associated with an attenuated plasma insulin response compared with most terrestrial mammals. Intraperitoneal dextrose administration resulted in increases of serum glucose to approximately 200 mg/dl, which gradually declined to baseline by 2 hr after dextrose administration. These data suggest that the initial treatment of a hypoglycemic crisis in young malnourished CSLs can be accomplished with i.p. dextrose, thus enabling minimally trained volunteer staff to respond immediately to a crisis

  5. Conventional methods and emerging wastewater polishing technologies for palm oil mill effluent treatment: a review.

    PubMed

    Liew, Wai Loan; Kassim, Mohd Azraai; Muda, Khalida; Loh, Soh Kheang; Affam, Augustine Chioma

    2015-02-01

    The Malaysian palm oil industry is a major revenue earner and the country is ranked as one of the largest producers in the world. However, growth of the industry is synonymous with a massive production of agro-industrial wastewater. As an environmental protection and public health concern, the highly polluting palm oil mill effluent (POME) has become a major attention-grabber. Hence, the industry is targeting for POME pollution abatement in order to promote a greener image of palm oil and to achieve sustainability. At present, most palm oil mills have adopted the ponding system for treatment. Due to the successful POME pollution abatement experiences, Malaysia is currently planning to revise the effluent quality standards towards a more stringent discharge limits. Hence, the current trend of POME research focuses on developing tertiary treatment or polishing systems for better effluent management. Biotechnologically-advanced POME tertiary (polishing) technologies as well as other physicochemical methods are gaining much attention as these processes are the key players to push the industry towards the goal of environmental sustainability. There are still ongoing treatment technologies being researched and the outcomes maybe available in a while. However, the research completed so far are compiled herein and reported for the first time to acquire a better perspective and insight on the subject with a view of meeting the new standards. To this end, the most feasible technology could be the combination of advanced biological processes (bioreactor systems) with extended aeration, followed by solids separation prior to discharge. Chemical dosing is favoured only if effluent of higher quality is anticipated.

  6. Massive Pulmonary Embolism: Percutaneous Emergency Treatment Using an Aspirex Thrombectomy Catheter

    SciTech Connect

    Popovic, Peter; Bunc, Matjaz

    2010-10-15

    Massive pulmonary embolism (PE) is a life-threatening condition with a high early mortality rate caused by acute right ventricular failure and cardiogenic shock. A 51-year-old woman with a massive PE and contraindication for thrombolytic therapy was treated with percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy using an Aspirex 11F catheter (Straub Medical AG, Wangs, Switzerland). The procedure was successfully performed and showed a good immediate angiographic result. The patient made a full recovery from the acute episode and was discharged on heparin treatment. Our case report indicates that in patients with contraindications to systemic thrombolysis, catheter thrombectomy may constitute a life-saving intervention for massive PE.

  7. Emerging Treatment Mechanisms for Depression: Focus on Glutamate and Synaptic Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Gerhard, Danielle M.; Wohleb, Eric S.; Duman, Ronald S.

    2016-01-01

    Major depression is a chronic and debilitating illness that effects approximately 1 in 5 people, but currently available treatments are limited by low rates of efficacy, therapeutic time lag, and undesirable side effects. Recent efforts have been directed towards investigating rapid-acting agents that reverse the behavioral and neuronal deficits of chronic stress and depression, notably the glutamate NMDA receptor antagonist ketamine. The cellular mechanisms underlying the rapid antidepressant actions of ketamine and related agents are discussed, as well as novel, selective glutamatergic receptor targets that are safer and have fewer side effects. PMID:26854424

  8. Strontium ranelate in the treatment of knee osteoarthritis: new insights and emerging clinical evidence

    PubMed Central

    Beaudart, Charlotte; Neuprez, Audrey; Bruyère, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is a primary cause of disability and functional incapacity. Pharmacological treatment is currently limited to symptomatic management, and in advanced stages, surgery remains the only solution. The therapeutic armamentarium for osteoarthritis remains poor in treatments with an effect on joint structure, that is, disease-modifying osteoarthritis drugs (DMOADs). Glucosamine sulfate and chondroitin sulfate are the only medications for which some conclusive evidence for a disease-modifying effect is available. Strontium ranelate is currently indicated for the prevention of fracture in severe osteoporosis. Its efficacy and safety as a DMOAD in knee osteoarthritis has recently been explored in the SEKOIA trial, a 3-year randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Outpatients with knee osteoarthritis, Kellgren and Lawrence grade 2 or 3, and joint space width (JSW) of 2.5–5 mm received strontium ranelate 1 g/day (n = 558) or 2 g/day (n = 566), or placebo (n = 559). This sizable population was aged 62.9 years and had a JSW of 3.50 ± 0.84 mm. Treatment with strontium ranelate led to significantly less progression of knee osteoarthritis: estimates for annual difference in joint space narrowing versus placebo were 0.14 mm [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.05–0.23 mm; p < 0.001] for 1 g/day and 0.10 mm (95% CI 0.02–0.19 mm; p = 0.018) for 2 g/day, with no difference between strontium ranelate groups. Radiological progression was less frequent with strontium ranelate (22% with 1 g/day and 26% with 2 g/day versus 33% with placebo, both p < 0.05), as was radioclinical progression (8% and 7% versus 12%, both p < 0.05). Symptoms also improved with strontium ranelate 2 g/day only in terms of total WOMAC (Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index) score (p = 0.045), and its components for pain (p = 0.028) and physical function (p = 0.099). Responder analyses using a range of criteria for symptoms indicated that the effect of strontium

  9. Pharmacological management of binge eating disorder: current and emerging treatment options

    PubMed Central

    McElroy, Susan L; Guerdjikova, Anna I; Mori, Nicole; O’Melia, Anne M

    2012-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests that pharmacotherapy may be beneficial for some patients with binge eating disorder (BED), an eating disorder characterized by repetitive episodes of uncontrollable consumption of abnormally large amounts of food without inappropriate weight loss behaviors. In this paper, we provide a brief overview of BED and review the rationales and data supporting the effectiveness of specific medications or medication classes in treating patients with BED. We conclude by summarizing these data, discussing the role of pharmacotherapy in the BED treatment armamentarium, and suggesting future areas for research. PMID:22654518

  10. Clinicians' Perception of Patient Readiness for Treatment: An Emerging Theme in Implementation Science?

    PubMed

    Zubkoff, Lisa; Carpenter-Song, Elizabeth; Shiner, Brian; Ronconi, Julia M; Watts, Bradley V

    2016-03-01

    Despite a training program to help veterans administration (VA) clinicians implement evidence-based psychotherapies (EBPs) for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), uptake has been limited. To understand clinicians' implementation challenges, we performed thematic analysis of semi-structured telephone interviews guided by the Promoting Action on Research Implementation in Health Services framework. Our sample included 22 psychotherapists in VA PTSD clinics in one region. We identified a theme not captured by our implementation framework: clinicians' perceptions about their patients' readiness for treatment. Clinician perception of patient readiness may be important to the uptake of EBPs and should be considered in mental health implementation work.

  11. [Surgical treatment of wounds of the neck in practice of the emergency hospital during peacetime].

    PubMed

    Mosiagin, V B; Ryl'kov, V F; Moiseev, A A

    2013-01-01

    The data of the follow-up study of 60 patients with wounds of the neck are presented in this article. The authors describe the volume and severity of injuries of the neck and at the same time examine the difficulties of diagnostics and treatment. The scope of investigations, the necessity of consultation of "narrow" specialist, the volume of surgical handbook and the conservative therapy are determined. The significance of the up-to-date methods of instrumental researches, such as computed tomography, Doppler tomography, are emphasized particularly for evaluation of the injury volume.

  12. New and emerging therapies for the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome: an update for gastroenterologists.

    PubMed

    Foxx-Orenstein, Amy E

    2016-05-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome is a functional bowel disorder with gastrointestinal symptoms (e.g. abdominal pain, straining, urgency, incomplete evacuation, nausea, and bloating) that occur alongside bowel function alterations (i.e. constipation, diarrhea, or both). Patients with irritable bowel syndrome may also experience comorbid anxiety and depression. Irritable bowel syndrome is common, with a prevalence estimated between 3% and 28%, affecting patient health and quality of life. Patients with moderate or severe irritable bowel syndrome generally seek medical care, whereas those with milder symptoms may choose self-management. Most patients with irritable bowel syndrome receive outpatient care, but irritable bowel syndrome-related hospitalizations do occur. The pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome is multifactorial (i.e. genetics, immune components, changes in the gut microbiota, disturbances in physiologic stress response systems, and psychosocial factors). Management of irritable bowel syndrome can include lifestyle changes, dietary interventions, counseling, psychologic medication, and agents that affect gastrointestinal motility. A number of therapies have emerged in recent years with clinical trial data demonstrating efficacy and safety for patients with irritable bowel syndrome, including agents that target gastrointestinal motility (i.e. linaclotide), gastrointestinal opioid receptors (i.e. asimadoline, eluxadoline), and gut microbiota (i.e. rifaximin). Linaclotide has been shown to significantly improve stool frequency and abdominal pain compared with placebo in constipation-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (number needed to treat, 5.1). Asimadoline shows efficacy in patients with moderate-to-severe irritable bowel syndrome-related pain. Rifaximin provided adequate relief of global irritable bowel syndrome symptoms versus placebo for a significantly greater percentage of patients with diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (p < 0

  13. New and emerging therapies for the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome: an update for gastroenterologists

    PubMed Central

    Foxx-Orenstein, Amy E.

    2016-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome is a functional bowel disorder with gastrointestinal symptoms (e.g. abdominal pain, straining, urgency, incomplete evacuation, nausea, and bloating) that occur alongside bowel function alterations (i.e. constipation, diarrhea, or both). Patients with irritable bowel syndrome may also experience comorbid anxiety and depression. Irritable bowel syndrome is common, with a prevalence estimated between 3% and 28%, affecting patient health and quality of life. Patients with moderate or severe irritable bowel syndrome generally seek medical care, whereas those with milder symptoms may choose self-management. Most patients with irritable bowel syndrome receive outpatient care, but irritable bowel syndrome-related hospitalizations do occur. The pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome is multifactorial (i.e. genetics, immune components, changes in the gut microbiota, disturbances in physiologic stress response systems, and psychosocial factors). Management of irritable bowel syndrome can include lifestyle changes, dietary interventions, counseling, psychologic medication, and agents that affect gastrointestinal motility. A number of therapies have emerged in recent years with clinical trial data demonstrating efficacy and safety for patients with irritable bowel syndrome, including agents that target gastrointestinal motility (i.e. linaclotide), gastrointestinal opioid receptors (i.e. asimadoline, eluxadoline), and gut microbiota (i.e. rifaximin). Linaclotide has been shown to significantly improve stool frequency and abdominal pain compared with placebo in constipation-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (number needed to treat, 5.1). Asimadoline shows efficacy in patients with moderate-to-severe irritable bowel syndrome-related pain. Rifaximin provided adequate relief of global irritable bowel syndrome symptoms versus placebo for a significantly greater percentage of patients with diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (p < 0

  14. Emerging treatment options in the management of non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Filosso, Pier Luigi; Sandri, Alberto; Oliaro, Alberto; Filippi, Andrea Riccardo; Cassinis, Maria Carla; Ricardi, Umberto; Lausi, Paolo Olivo; Asioli, Sofia; Ruffini, Enrico

    2011-01-01

    Lung cancer (LC) has become the leading cancer-related cause of death in the US and in developed European countries in the last decade. Its incidence is still growing in females and in smokers. Surgery remains the treatment of choice whenever feasible, but unfortunately, many patients have an advanced LC at presentation and one-third of potentially operable patients do not receive a tumor resection because of their low compliance for intervention due to their compromised cardiopulmonary functions and other comorbidities. For these patients the alternative therapeutic options are stereotactic radiotherapy or percutaneous radiofrequency. When surgery is planned, an anatomical resection (segmentectomy, lobectomy, bilobectomy, pneumonectomy, sleeve lobectomy) is usually performed; wedge resection (considered as a nonanatomical one) is generally the accepted option for unfit patients. The recent increase in discovering small and peripheral LCs and/or ground-glass opacities with screening programs has dramatically increased surgeons’ interest in limited resections. The role of these resections is discussed. Also, recent improvements in molecular biology techniques have increased the chemotherapic options for neoadjuvant LC treatment. The role and the importance of targeted chemotherapy is also discussed. PMID:28210115

  15. Emerging Targets and Novel Approaches to Ebola Virus Prophylaxis and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jin Huk; Croyle, Maria A.

    2013-01-01

    Ebola is a highly virulent pathogen causing severe hemorrhagic fever with a high case fatality rate in humans and non-human primates (NHPs). Although safe and effective vaccines or other medicinal agents to block Ebola infection are currently unavailable, a significant effort has been put forth to identify several promising candidates for the treatment and prevention of Ebola hemorrhagic fever. Among these, recombinant-virus based vectors have been identified as potent vaccine candidates with some affording both pre- and post-exposure protection from the virus. Recently, Investigational New Drug (IND) applications have been approved by the United States (U.S.) Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and Phase I clinical trials initiated for two small molecule therapeutics, 1) anti-sense phosphorodiamidate morphino oligomers (PMOs: AVI-6002, AVI-6003), and 2) lipid-nanoparticle/small interfering RNA (LNP/siRNA: TKM-Ebola). These potential alternatives to vector-based vaccines require multiple doses to achieve therapeutic efficacy which is not ideal with regard to patient compliance and outbreak scenarios. These concerns have fueled a quest for even better vaccination and treatment strategies. Here, we summarize recent advances in vaccines or post-exposure therapeutics for prevention of Ebola hemorrhagic fever. The utility of novel pharmaceutical approaches to refine and overcome barriers associated with the most promising therapeutic platforms will also be discussed. PMID:23813435

  16. Emerging targets and novel approaches to Ebola virus prophylaxis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jin Huk; Croyle, Maria A

    2013-12-01

    Ebola is a highly virulent pathogen causing severe hemorrhagic fever with a high case fatality rate in humans and non-human primates (NHPs). Although safe and effective vaccines or other medicinal agents to block Ebola infection are currently unavailable, a significant effort has been put forth to identify several promising candidates for the treatment and prevention of Ebola hemorrhagic fever. Among these, recombinant adenovirus-based vectors have been identified as potent vaccine candidates, with some affording both pre- and post-exposure protection from the virus. Recently, Investigational New Drug (IND) applications have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and phase I clinical trials have been initiated for two small-molecule therapeutics: anti-sense phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers (PMOs: AVI-6002, AVI-6003) and lipid nanoparticle/small interfering RNA (LNP/siRNA: TKM-Ebola). These potential alternatives to vector-based vaccines require multiple doses to achieve therapeutic efficacy, which is not ideal with regard to patient compliance and outbreak scenarios. These concerns have fueled a quest for even better vaccination and treatment strategies. Here, we summarize recent advances in vaccines or post-exposure therapeutics for prevention of Ebola hemorrhagic fever. The utility of novel pharmaceutical approaches to refine and overcome barriers associated with the most promising therapeutic platforms are also discussed.

  17. Modeling the transport behavior of 16 emerging organic contaminants during soil aquifer treatment.

    PubMed

    Nham, Hang Thuy Thi; Greskowiak, Janek; Nödler, Karsten; Rahman, Mohammad Azizur; Spachos, Thomas; Rusteberg, Bernd; Massmann, Gudrun; Sauter, Martin; Licha, Tobias

    2015-05-01

    In this study, four one-dimensional flow and transport models based on the data of a field scale experiment in Greece were constructed to investigate the transport behavior of sixteen organic trace pollutants during soil aquifer treatment. At the site, tap water and treated wastewater were intermittently infiltrated into a porous aquifer via a small pilot pond. Electrical conductivity data was used to calibrate the non-reactive transport models. Transport and attenuation of the organic trace pollutants were simulated assuming 1st order degradation and linear adsorption. Sorption was found to be largely insignificant at this site for the compounds under investigation. In contrast, flow path averaged first order degradation rate constants were mostly higher compared to the literature and lay between 0.036 d(-1) for clofibric acid and 0.9 d(-1) for ibuprofen, presumably owing to the high temperatures and a well adapted microbial community originating from the wastewater treatment process. The study highlights the necessity to obtain intrinsic attenuation parameters at each site, as findings cannot easily be transferred from one site to another.

  18. Emerging options for the treatment of melanoma – focus on ipilimumab

    PubMed Central

    Roddie, Claire; Peggs, Karl S

    2014-01-01

    Ipilimumab is a fully human immunoglobulin subclass G1 anticytotoxic-T-lymphocyte-antigen-4 monoclonal antibody. It has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the European Medicines Agency for use in advanced melanoma following clear evidence of survival benefit in randomized Phase III studies. It is also under investigation as a treatment for other solid tumors such as renal cell, lung, and prostate cancers. The purported mechanism of antitumor activity of ipilimumab is through T-cell activation, and the side effect profile reflects this. Immune-related adverse events (irAEs) affect 60% of treated patients and 15% are defined as severe. Fortunately, most irAEs are reversible with early diagnosis and correct management. FDA approval of ipilimumab is dependent on the careful execution of a risk evaluation and mitigation strategy, with the aim of increasing awareness amongst patients and clinicians of the immunological risks of treatment, and providing algorithms for management of irAEs as they develop. Ipilimumab is one of the first immunotherapies to become widely available in the setting of solid tumors, and ongoing research aims to elucidate optimal dosing, optimal scheduling, and expanded access to ipilimumab as an adjuvant or maintenance therapy where appropriate. The identification of clinical correlates or biomarkers to identify those likely to benefit from this high-cost therapy is a top priority. PMID:27482517

  19. Emerging nonsurgical methods for the treatment of vitreomacular adhesion: a review

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Eric W; Johnson, Mark W

    2011-01-01

    With the dissemination of optical coherence tomography over the past two decades, the role of persistent vitreomacular adhesion (VMA) in the development of numerous macular pathologies – including idiopathic macular hole, vitreomacular traction syndrome, cystoid and diabetic macular edema, neovascularization in diabetic retinopathy and retinal vein occlusion, exudative age-related macular degeneration, and myopic traction maculopathy – has been established. While invasive vitreoretinal procedures have long been utilized to address complications related to these disorders, such an approach is hampered by incomplete vitreoretinal separation and vitreous removal, surgical complications, and high costs. In light of such limitations, investigators have increasingly looked to nonsurgical means for the treatment of persistent pathologic VMA. Chief among these alternative measures is the intravitreal application of pharmacologic agents for the induction of vitreous liquefaction and/or vitreoretinal separation, an approach termed pharmacologic vitreolysis. This article aims to review the available evidence regarding the use of pharmacologic agents in the treatment of VMA-related pathology. In addition, a discussion of vitreous molecular organization and principles of physiologic posterior vitreous detachment is provided to allow for a consideration of vitreolytic agent mode of action and molecular targets. PMID:21887098

  20. Focus on emerging drugs for the treatment of patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Federico, Alessandro; Zulli, Claudio; de Sio, Ilario; Del Prete, Anna; Dallio, Marcello; Masarone, Mario; Loguercio, Carmela

    2014-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has become the most common liver disorder in Western countries and is increasingly being recognized in developing nations. Fatty liver disease encompasses a spectrum of hepatic pathology, ranging from simple steatosis to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma and end-stage liver disease. Moreover, NAFLD is often associated with other metabolic conditions, such as diabetes mellitus type 2, dyslipidemia and visceral obesity. The most recent guidelines suggest the management and treatment of patients with NAFLD considering both the liver disease and the associated metabolic co-morbidities. Diet and physical exercise are considered the first line of treatment for patients with NAFLD, but their results on therapeutic efficacy are often contrasting. Behavior therapy is necessary most of the time to achieve a sufficient result. Pharmacological therapy includes a wide variety of classes of molecules with different therapeutic targets and, often, little evidence supporting the real efficacy. Despite the abundance of clinical trials, NAFLD therapy remains a challenge for the scientific community, and there are no licensed therapies for NAFLD. Urgently, new pharmacological approaches are needed. Here, we will focus on the challenges facing actual therapeutic strategies and the most recent investigated molecules. PMID:25492998

  1. Prevalence and predictors of initial oral antibiotic treatment failure in adult emergency department patients with cellulitis: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Quirke, Michael; Boland, Fiona; Fahey, Tom; O'Sullivan, Ronan; Hill, Arnold; Stiell, Ian; Wakai, Abel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Assessment of cellulitis severity in the emergency department (ED) setting is problematic. Given the lack of research performed to describe the epidemiology and management of cellulitis, it is unsurprising that heterogeneous antibiotic prescribing and poor adherence to guidelines is common. It has been shown that up to 20.5% of ED patients with cellulitis require either a change in route or dose of the initially prescribed antibiotic regimen. The current treatment failure rate for empirically prescribed oral antibiotic therapy in Irish EDs is unknown. The association of patient risk factors with treatment failure has not been described in our setting. Lower prevalence of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus-associated infection, differing antibiotic prescribing preferences and varying availability of outpatient intravenous therapy programmes may result in different rates of empiric antibiotic treatment failure from those previously described. Methods and analysis Consecutive ED patients with cellulitis will be enrolled on a 24/7 basis from 3 Irish EDs. A prespecified set of clinical variables will be measured on each patient discharged on empiric oral antibiotic therapy. A second independent study recruiter will assess at least 10% of cases for each of the predictor variables. Follow-up by telephone call will occur at 14 days for all discharged patients where measurement of the primary outcome will occur. Our primary outcome is treatment failure, defined as a change in route of antibiotic administration from oral to intravenous antibiotic. Our secondary outcome is change in dose or type of prescribed antibiotic. A cohort of approximately 152 patients is required to estimate the proportion of patients failing oral antibiotic treatment with a margin of error of 0.05 around the estimate. Ethics and dissemination Full ethics approval has been granted. An integrated dissemination plan, involving diverse clinical specialties and

  2. Adenocarcinoma of Mullerian origin: review of pathogenesis, molecular biology, and emerging treatment paradigms.

    PubMed

    Cobb, Lauren Patterson; Gaillard, Stephanie; Wang, Yihong; Shih, Ie-Ming; Secord, Angeles Alvarez

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, epithelial ovarian, tubal, and peritoneal cancers have been viewed as separate entities with disparate origins, pathogenesis, clinical features, and outcomes. Additionally, previous classification systems for ovarian cancer have proposed two primary histologic groups that encompass the standard histologic subtypes. Recent data suggest that these groupings no longer accurately reflect our knowledge surrounding these cancers. In this review, we propose that epithelial ovarian, tubal, and peritoneal carcinomas represent a spectrum of disease that originates in the Mullerian compartment. We will discuss the incidence, classification, origin, molecular determinants, and pathologic analysis of these cancers that support the conclusion they should be collectively referred to as adenocarcinomas of Mullerian origin. As our understanding of the molecular and pathologic profiling of adenocarcinomas of Mullerian origin advances, we anticipate treatment paradigms will shift towards genomic driven therapeutic interventions.

  3. Re-emergence of posttraumatic stress disorder nightmares with nursing home admission: treatment with prazosin.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Kim G; Rosen, Jules

    2013-02-01

    Seniors with a history of emotional trauma decades earlier can experience a recurrence of posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms when transitioning to a nursing home. We present the case of an 86-year-old male Holocaust survivor admitted to a nursing home for physical therapy and rehabilitation 6 weeks after the death of his wife; the patient was expressing a persistent death wish. Despite the multiple risk factors for depression, his distress was specifically related to the reemergence of nightly posttraumatic nightmares. Over the course of 1 week of treatment with 1 mg prazosin at bedtime, his nightmares and his death wish completely resolved. He achieved his rehabilitation goals and was discharged to a community setting. This report highlights the importance of considering posttraumatic stress disorder in nursing home residents with a history of emotional trauma, and understanding how to address these symptoms pharmacologically and nonpharmacologically.

  4. Improving outcomes of refractory celiac disease – current and emerging treatment strategies

    PubMed Central

    Woodward, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal inflammation and symptoms of celiac disease (CD) usually respond well to gluten withdrawal, but rare cases are refractory to diet. Two types of refractory CD are discriminated on the basis of the presence or absence of an atypical population of mucosal lymphocytes that may progress to enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma. Challenges remain in the secure diagnosis of both types of refractory disease, and evidence on which to base treatment recommendations is flawed by the small numbers of reported patients and the use of different diagnostic strategies. Recent advances in our understanding of the mechanisms of the condition in conjunction with the development of immunomodulatory agents for managing other inflammatory diseases are helping to shape future approaches to targeted therapy. Progression will depend on collaboration and recruitment to trials. In the meantime, there is evidence to suggest that earlier diagnosis and better follow-up and management of CD may prevent the development of refractoriness. PMID:27536154

  5. Gene therapy in an era of emerging treatment options for hemophilia B.

    PubMed

    Monahan, P E

    2015-06-01

    Factor IX deficiency (hemophilia B) is less common than factor VIII deficiency (hemophilia A), and innovations in therapy for hemophilia B have generally lagged behind those for hemophilia A. Recently, the first sustained correction of the hemophilia bleeding phenotype by clotting factor gene therapy has been described using recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) to deliver factor IX. Despite this success, many individuals with hemophilia B, including children, men with active hepatitis, and individuals who have pre-existing natural immunity to AAV, are not eligible for the current iteration of hemophilia B gene therapy. In addition, recent advances in recombinant factor IX protein engineering have led some hemophilia treaters to reconsider the urgency of genetic cure. Current clinical and preclinical approaches to advancing AAV-based and alternative approaches to factor IX gene therapy are considered in the context of current demographics and treatment of the hemophilia B population.

  6. Hypertrophic Scarring and Keloids: Pathomechanisms and Current and Emerging Treatment Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Gauglitz, Gerd G; Korting, Hans C; Pavicic, Tatiana; Ruzicka, Thomas; Jeschke, Marc G

    2011-01-01

    Excessive scars form as a result of aberrations of physiologic wound healing and may arise following any insult to the deep dermis. By causing pain, pruritus and contractures, excessive scarring significantly affects the patient’s quality of life, both physically and psychologically. Multiple studies on hypertrophic scar and keloid formation have been conducted for decades and have led to a plethora of therapeutic strategies to prevent or attenuate excessive scar formation. However, most therapeutic approaches remain clinically unsatisfactory, most likely owing to poor understanding of the complex mechanisms underlying the processes of scarring and wound contraction. In this review we summarize the current understanding of the pathophysiology underlying keloid and hypertrophic scar formation and discuss established treatments and novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:20927486

  7. A comparative assessment of intensive and extensive wastewater treatment technologies for removing emerging contaminants in small communities.

    PubMed

    Matamoros, Víctor; Rodríguez, Yolanda; Albaigés, Joan

    2016-01-01

    Ecosystem pollution due to the lack of or inefficient wastewater treatment coverage in small communities is still a matter of great concern, even in developed countries. This study assesses the seasonal performance of 4 different full-scale wastewater technologies that have been used in small communities (<2000 population equivalent) for more than 10 years in terms of emerging contaminant (EC), chemical oxygen demand (COD), total suspended solids (TSS) and NH4-N removal efficiency. The studied technologies, which were selected due to their widespread use, included two intensive treatment systems (an extended aeration system (AS) and a rotating biological contactor (RBC)) and two extensive treatment systems (a constructed wetland (CW) and a waste stabilization pond (WSP)), all located in north-eastern Spain. The studied compounds belonged to the groups of pharmaceuticals, sunscreen compounds, fragrances, antiseptics, flame retardants, surfactants, pesticides and plasticizers. The 25 ECs occurred in wastewater at concentrations ranging from undetectable to 80 μg L(-1). The average removal efficiency was 42% for the CW, 62% for the AS, 63% for the RBC and 82% for the WSP. All the technologies except the WSP system showed seasonal variability in the removal of ECs. The ecotoxicological assessment study revealed that, whilst all the technologies were capable of decreasing the aquatic risk, only the WSP yielded no risk in both seasons.

  8. JAK3 as an Emerging Target for Topical Treatment of Inflammatory Skin Diseases.

    PubMed

    Alves de Medeiros, Ana Karina; Speeckaert, Reinhart; Desmet, Eline; Van Gele, Mireille; De Schepper, Sofie; Lambert, Jo

    2016-01-01

    The recent interest and elucidation of the JAK/STAT signaling pathway created new targets for the treatment of inflammatory skin diseases (ISDs). JAK inhibitors in oral and topical formulations have shown beneficial results in psoriasis and alopecia areata. Patients suffering from other ISDs might also benefit from JAK inhibition. Given the development of specific JAK inhibitors, the expression patterns of JAKs in different ISDs needs to be clarified. We aimed to analyze the expression of JAK/STAT family members in a set of prevalent ISDs: psoriasis, lichen planus (LP), cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE), atopic dermatitis (AD), pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) and alopecia areata (AA) versus healthy controls for (p)JAK1, (p)JAK2, (p)JAK3, (p)TYK2, pSTAT1, pSTAT2 and pSTAT3. The epidermis carried in all ISDs, except for CLE, a strong JAK3 signature. The dermal infiltrate showed a more diverse expression pattern. JAK1, JAK2 and JAK3 were significantly overexpressed in PG and AD suggesting the need for pan-JAK inhibitors. In contrast, psoriasis and LP showed only JAK1 and JAK3 upregulation, while AA and CLE were characterized by a single dermal JAK signal (pJAK3 and pJAK1, respectively). This indicates that the latter diseases may benefit from more targeted JAK inhibitors. Our in vitro keratinocyte psoriasis model displayed reversal of the psoriatic JAK profile following tofacitinib treatment. This direct interaction with keratinocytes may decrease the need for deep skin penetration of topical JAK inhibitors in order to exert its effects on dermal immune cells. In conclusion, these results point to the important contribution of the JAK/STAT pathway in several ISDs. Considering the epidermal JAK3 expression levels, great interest should go to the investigation of topical JAK3 inhibitors as therapeutic option of ISDs.

  9. JAK3 as an Emerging Target for Topical Treatment of Inflammatory Skin Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Alves de Medeiros, Ana Karina; Speeckaert, Reinhart; Desmet, Eline; Van Gele, Mireille; De Schepper, Sofie; Lambert, Jo

    2016-01-01

    The recent interest and elucidation of the JAK/STAT signaling pathway created new targets for the treatment of inflammatory skin diseases (ISDs). JAK inhibitors in oral and topical formulations have shown beneficial results in psoriasis and alopecia areata. Patients suffering from other ISDs might also benefit from JAK inhibition. Given the development of specific JAK inhibitors, the expression patterns of JAKs in different ISDs needs to be clarified. We aimed to analyze the expression of JAK/STAT family members in a set of prevalent ISDs: psoriasis, lichen planus (LP), cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE), atopic dermatitis (AD), pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) and alopecia areata (AA) versus healthy controls for (p)JAK1, (p)JAK2, (p)JAK3, (p)TYK2, pSTAT1, pSTAT2 and pSTAT3. The epidermis carried in all ISDs, except for CLE, a strong JAK3 signature. The dermal infiltrate showed a more diverse expression pattern. JAK1, JAK2 and JAK3 were significantly overexpressed in PG and AD suggesting the need for pan-JAK inhibitors. In contrast, psoriasis and LP showed only JAK1 and JAK3 upregulation, while AA and CLE were characterized by a single dermal JAK signal (pJAK3 and pJAK1, respectively). This indicates that the latter diseases may benefit from more targeted JAK inhibitors. Our in vitro keratinocyte psoriasis model displayed reversal of the psoriatic JAK profile following tofacitinib treatment. This direct interaction with keratinocytes may decrease the need for deep skin penetration of topical JAK inhibitors in order to exert its effects on dermal immune cells. In conclusion, these results point to the important contribution of the JAK/STAT pathway in several ISDs. Considering the epidermal JAK3 expression levels, great interest should go to the investigation of topical JAK3 inhibitors as therapeutic option of ISDs. PMID:27711196

  10. Will alternative immediate care services reduce demands for non-urgent treatment at accident and emergency?

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, P; Irons, R; Nicholl, J

    2001-01-01

    Methods—A questionnaire survey and notes review of 267 adults presenting to the A&E department of a large teaching hospital in Sheffield, England, triaged to the two lowest priority treatment streams, was conducted over seven weeks. Using defined criteria, patients were classified by the suitability of the presenting health problem to be managed by alternative immediate care services or only by A&E, and also by the likelihood, in similar circumstances, of patients presenting to other services given their reasons for seeking A&E care. Results—Full data were obtained for 96% of participants (255 of 267). Using objective criteria, it is estimated that 55% (95% CI 50%, 62%) of the health problems presented by a non-urgent population attending A&E are suitable for treatment in either general practice, or a minor injury unit, or a walk in centre or by self care after advice from NHS Direct. However, in almost one quarter (24%) of low priority patients who self referred, A&E was not the first contact with the health services for the presenting health problem. The reason for attending A&E cited most frequently by the patients was a belief that radiography was necessary. The reason given least often was seeking advice from a nurse practitioner. Taking into account the objective suitability of the health problem to be treated elsewhere, and the reasons for attending A&E given by the patients, it is estimated that, with similar health problems, as few as 7% (95% CI 3%, 10%) of the non-urgent A&E population may be expected to present to providers other than A&E in the future. Conclusions—The increasing availability of alternative services offering first contact care for non-urgent health problems, is likely to have little impact on the demand for A&E services. PMID:11696509

  11. Current and Emerging Therapeutic Strategies for the Treatment of Meibomian Gland Dysfunction (MGD).

    PubMed

    Thode, Adam R; Latkany, Robert A

    2015-07-01

    Meibomian gland (MG) dysfunction (MGD) is a multifactorial, chronic condition of the eyelids, leading to eye irritation, inflammation and ocular surface disease. Initial conservative therapy often includes a combination of warm compresses in addition to baby shampoo or eyelid wipes. The practice of lid hygiene dates back to the 1950s, when selenium sulfide-based shampoo was first used to treat seborrhoeic dermatitis of the eyelids. Today, tear-free baby shampoo has replaced dandruff shampoo for MGD treatment and offers symptom relief in selected patients. However, many will not achieve significant improvement on this therapy alone; some may even develop an allergy to the added dyes and fragrances in these products. Other manual and mechanical techniques to treat MGD include MG expression and massage, MG probing and LipiFlow(®). While potentially effective in patients with moderate MGD, these procedures are more invasive and may be cost prohibitive. Pharmacological treatments are another course of action. Supplements rich in omega-3 fatty acids have been shown to improve both MGD and dry eye symptoms. Tea tree oil, specifically the terpenin-4-ol component, is especially effective in treating MGD associated with Demodex mites. Topical antibiotics, such as azithromycin, or systemic antibiotics, such as doxycycline or azithromycin, can improve MGD symptoms both by altering the ocular flora and through anti-inflammatory mechanisms. Addressing and treating concurrent ocular allergy is integral to symptom management. Topical N-acetylcysteine and topical cyclosporine can both be effective therapeutic adjuncts in patients with concurrent dry eye. A short course of topical steroid may be used in some severe cases, with monitoring for steroid-induced glaucoma and cataracts. While the standard method to treat MGD is simply warm compresses and baby shampoo, a more tailored approach to address the multiple aetiologies of the disease is suggested.

  12. Emergencies in parkinsonism: akinetic crisis, life-threatening dyskinesias, and polyneuropathy during L-Dopa gel treatment.

    PubMed

    Onofrj, Marco; Bonanni, Laura; Cossu, Giovanni; Manca, Davide; Stocchi, Fabrizio; Thomas, Astrid

    2009-12-01

    This article reviews literature on three emergencies in Parkinson's disease (PD): Akinetic crisis, severe dyskinesias or life-threatening dyskinesias, and polyneuropathy during duodenal L-Dopa gel infusion treatment. Akinetic crisis is also known as Parkinsonian hyperpyrexia, Neuroleptic-like malignant syndrome, Acute akinesia, and Malignant syndrome in parkinsonism. It appears in 0.3% of PD patients/year, and is characterized in the most severe cases by total akinesia with dysphagia, hyperthermia, dysautonomia, increment of muscle enzymes and alterations of mental status, but it may also appear in less severe forms ("forme frusta"). At difference with the continuum of motor hypokinesias observed in PD it is characterized by transient (in cases with favorable outcome) unresponsiveness to rescue drugs. Life-supporting measures are mandatory in patients affected by this emergency. Severe dyskinesia, or life-threatening dyskinesia, is due to increased dopaminergic stimulation (either by the patient or by the prescriber): when it appears the level of dopaminomimetic stimulation should be reduced. Polyneuropathy during duodenal L-Dopa gel infusion is a recently described complication, attributed to the onset of Guillain-Barré syndromes. However, hemapheresis was not effective in some reported cases, and recent evidence suggests that Vitamin B12 deficiency or direct high-dose chronic L-Dopa toxicity might play a role in its origin.

  13. [Emergency care for patients in palliative situations--algorithm for decision-making and recommendations for treatment].

    PubMed

    Makowski, Corinna; Marung, Hartwig; Callies, Andreas; Knacke, Peter; Kerner, Thoralf

    2013-03-01

    Emergency care for patients in palliative situations is not a rare event, but often difficult to handle, because training in palliative care for emergency physicians is often insufficient. This article proposes an algorithm that should facilitate the decision-making process in such emergencies. In addition, recommendations concerning the management of symptoms in the emergency medical services are presented.

  14. Time dictates: emerging clinical analyses of the impact of circadian rhythms on diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of disease.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Andras D; Reddy, Akhilesh B

    2015-12-01

    Since the advent of modern molecular tools, researchers have extensively shown that essential cellular machineries have robust circadian (roughly 24 hours) variations in their pace. This molecular rhythmicity translates directly into time-of-day-dependent variation in physiology in most organ systems, which in turn provides the mechanistic rationale for why timing on a daily basis should matter in many aspects of human health. However, these basic science findings have been slow to move from bench to bedside because clinical studies are still lacking to demonstrate the importance of timing. Therefore, it has not been clear how physicians should incorporate knowledge of natural 24-hour rhythms into routine practice. This review is a brief summary of results from recently completed clinical studies on hypertension, myocardial infarction, diabetes mellitus, and adrenal dysfunction that highlights new evidence for the emerging importance of circadian rhythms in diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of disease.

  15. Emerging role of fecal microbiota therapy in the treatment of gastrointestinal and extra-gastrointestinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Konturek, P C; Haziri, D; Brzozowski, T; Hess, T; Heyman, S; Kwiecien, S; Konturek, S J; Koziel, J

    2015-08-01

    In the recent decade our understanding of the role of the human gut microbiome has been revolutionized by advances in development of molecular methods. Approximately, up to 100 trillion (10(14)) microorganisms per human body colonize the intestinal tract making an additional acquired organ that provides many vital functions to the host. A healthy gut microbiome can be defined by the presence of the various classes of microbes that enhance metabolism, resistance to infection and inflammation, prevention against cancer and autoimmunity and that positively influence so called braingut axis. Diet represents one of the most important driving forces that besides environmental and genetic factors, can define and influence the microbial composition of the gut. Aging process due to different changes in gut physiology (i.e. gastric hypochlorhydria, motility disorders, use of drugs, degenerative changes in enteric nervous system) has a profound effect on the composition, diversity and functional features of gut microbiota. A perturbed aged gut microbiome has been associated with the increasing number of gastrointestinal (e.g. Clostridium difficile infection - CDI) and non-gastrointestinal diseases (metabolic syndrome, diabetes mellitus, fatty liver disease, atherosclerosis etc.). Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is a highly effective method in the treatment of refractory CDI. FMT is the term used when stool is taken from a healthy individual and instilled during endoscopy (colonoscopy or enteroscopy) into a gut of the sick person to cure certain disease. FMT represents an effective therapy in patient with recurrent CDI and the effectiveness of FMT in the prevention of CDI recurrence had reached approx. 90%. There is also an increasing evidence that the manipulation of gut microbiota by FMT represents a promising therapeutic method in patients with inflammatory bowel disease and irritable bowel syndrome. There is also an increased interest in the role of FMT for the

  16. A systematic review of transarterial embolization versus emergency surgery in treatment of major nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Beggs, Andrew D; Dilworth, Mark P; Powell, Susan L; Atherton, Helen; Griffiths, Ewen A

    2014-01-01

    Background Emergency surgery or transarterial embolization (TAE) are options for the treatment of recurrent or refractory nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Surgery has the disadvantage of high rates of postoperative morbidity and mortality. Embolization has become more available and has the advantage of avoiding laparotomy in this often unfit and elderly population. Objective To carry out a systematic review and meta-analysis of all studies that have directly compared TAE with emergency surgery in the treatment of major upper gastrointestinal bleeding that has failed therapeutic upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Methods A literature search of Ovid MEDLINE, Embase, and Google Scholar was performed. The primary outcomes were all-cause mortality and rates of rebleeding. The secondary outcomes were length of stay and postoperative complications. Results A total of nine studies with 711 patients (347 who had embolization and 364 who had surgery) were analyzed. Patients in the TAE group were more likely to have ischemic heart disease (odds ratio [OR] =1.99; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.33, 2.98; P=0.0008; I2=67% [random effects model]) and be coagulopathic (pooled OR =2.23; 95% CI: 1.29, 3.87; P=0.004; I2=33% [fixed effects model]). Compared with TAE, surgery was associated with a lower risk of rebleeding (OR =0.41; 95% CI: 0.22, 0.77; P<0.0001; I2=55% [random effects]). There was no difference in mortality (OR =0.70; 95% CI: 0.48, 1.02; P=0.06; I2=44% [fixed effects]) between TAE and surgery. Conclusion When compared with surgery, TAE had a significant increased risk of rebleeding rates after TAE; however, there were no differences in mortality rates. These findings are subject to multiple sources of bias due to poor quality studies. These findings support the need for a well-designed clinical trial to ascertain which technique is superior. PMID:24790465

  17. Differentiated Thyroid Cancer: Focus on Emerging Treatments for Radioactive Iodine-Refractory Patients

    PubMed Central

    Gruber, Joshua J.

    2015-01-01

    Background. The treatment of differentiated thyroid cancer refractory to radioactive iodine (RAI) had been hampered by few effective therapies. Recently, tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have shown activity in this disease. Clinical guidance on the use of these agents in RAI-refractory thyroid cancer is warranted. Materials and Methods. Molecular mutations found in RAI-refractory thyroid cancer are summarized. Recent phase II and III clinical trial data for TKIs axitinib, lenvatinib, motesanib, pazopanib, sorafenib, sunitinib, and vandetinib are reviewed including efficacy and side effect profiles. Molecular targets and potencies of these agents are compared. Inhibitors of BRAF, mammalian target of rapamycin, and MEK are considered. Results. Routine testing for molecular alterations prior to therapy is not yet recommended. TKIs produce progression-free survival of approximately 1 year (range: 7.7–19.6 months) and partial response rates of up to 50% by Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors. Pazopanib and lenvatinib are the most active agents. The majority of patients experienced tumor shrinkage with TKIs. Common adverse toxicities affect dermatologic, gastrointestinal, and cardiovascular systems. Conclusion. Multiple TKIs have activity in RAI-refractory differentiated thyroid cancer. Selection of a targeted agent should depend on disease trajectory, side effect profile, and goals of therapy. PMID:25616432

  18. Treatment of Metastatic Bone Disease and the Emerging Role of Radium-223.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Robert

    2016-03-01

    Bone metastases are common in advanced malignancy and, despite the developments in both anticancer and bone-targeted therapies in recent years, new therapeutic strategies are still needed. Traditionally, radioisotopes have been rarely used in part owing to concerns about bone marrow toxicity that limits retreatment and may prevent safe administration of subsequent chemotherapy. Radium-223 dichloride (Ra-223) is a calcium mimetic that binds preferentially to newly formed bone in areas of bone metastases, is the first alpha-emitting radionuclide to be developed for clinical use, and is approved for treatment of castration-resistant prostate cancer and symptomatic bone metastases. In this setting, it improves overall survival and delays symptomatic skeletal complications. The high linear energy transfer of the emitted alpha particles causes predominantly nonrepairable double-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid breaks in tumor cells, and the large size of the alpha particle, compared with other forms of radiation, results in a short path length and highly localized tissue destruction. As a result, Ra-223 has a highly favorable safety profile with a low level of myelosuppression. The role of Ra-223 in malignancy is discussed and the prospects for future development outlined.

  19. IgG4-related disease: pathophysiologic insights drive emerging treatment approaches.

    PubMed

    Stone, John H

    2016-01-01

    IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) is a fibroinflammatory condition that can affect essentially any organ. The disease shows similar histopathology findings across organ systems, consisting of a lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate enriched in IgG4-positive plasma cells, storiform fibrosis, and obliterative phlebitis. IgG4 itself appears to be a reactive phenomenon rather than the primary disease driver. Recent investigations have focused on the interactions between cells of the B cell lineage and a novel CD4+ SLAMF7+ cytotoxic T cells capable of promoting fibrosis. Plasmablasts appear to play a crucial role along with B cells in the presentation of antigen to this T cell. IgG4-RD is marked by responsiveness to glucocorticoids, but frequent disease relapse, the inability to taper glucocorticoids completely, and steroid toxicity are problematic. Targeted treatment approaches against the B cell lineage appear promising, and therapeutic efforts focused upon the CD4+ SLAMF7+ cytotoxic T cell may also be feasible.

  20. Emerging treatment options for short bowel syndrome: potential role of teduglutide

    PubMed Central

    Tee, Cheng T; Wallis, Katharina; Gabe, Simon M

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Current medical management of short bowel syndrome (SBS) involves the use of lifelong parenteral nutrition (PN). Glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2), an important intestinotrophic growth factor has been shown to increase intestinal absorption in SBS through augmentation of post-resection intestinal adaptation. This may lead to the reduction of PN dependence in patients with SBS. Areas covered in review: Advancing research of GLP-2 physiology has spurred the growing understanding of the diverse effects of GLP-2. The development of the degradation resistant GLP-2 analog, teduglutide (GattexTM, NPS Pharmaceuticals, Bedminster, NJ), has allowed its exploration as a therapeutic agent in a variety of clinical settings. Recent multicenter, placebo-controlled studies of GLP-2 in SBS patients demonstrate meaningful reductions in PN requirements with good safety profiles. The reparative and immunomodulatory effects of teduglutide may also be beneficial in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Safety concerns about possible carcinogenic properties during long-term use require ongoing evaluation. Summary: GLP-2 appears to offer a novel adjuvant treatment modality for SBS. Promise for its use in other clinical settings like IBD has been shown in small pilot studies. PMID:22016579

  1. Bioaugmentation: An Emerging Strategy of Industrial Wastewater Treatment for Reuse and Discharge

    PubMed Central

    Nzila, Alexis; Razzak, Shaikh Abdur; Zhu, Jesse

    2016-01-01

    A promising long-term and sustainable solution to the growing scarcity of water worldwide is to recycle and reuse wastewater. In wastewater treatment plants, the biodegradation of contaminants or pollutants by harnessing microorganisms present in activated sludge is one of the most important strategies to remove organic contaminants from wastewater. However, this approach has limitations because many pollutants are not efficiently eliminated. To counterbalance the limitations, bioaugmentation has been developed and consists of adding specific and efficient pollutant-biodegrading microorganisms into a microbial community in an effort to enhance the ability of this microbial community to biodegrade contaminants. This approach has been tested for wastewater cleaning with encouraging results, but failure has also been reported, especially during scale-up. In this review, work on the bioaugmentation in the context of removal of important pollutants from industrial wastewater is summarized, with an emphasis on recalcitrant compounds, and strategies that can be used to improve the efficiency of bioaugmentation are also discussed. This review also initiates a discussion regarding new research areas, such as nanotechnology and quorum sensing, that should be investigated to improve the efficiency of wastewater bioaugmentation. PMID:27571089

  2. Clinician-Reported Outcome Assessments of Treatment Benefit: Report of the ISPOR Clinical Outcome Assessment Emerging Good Practices Task Force

    PubMed Central

    Powers, John H.; Patrick, Donald L.; Walton, Marc K.; Marquis, Patrick; Cano, Stefan; Hobart, Jeremy; Isaac, Maria; Vamvakas, Spiros; Slagle, Ashley; Molsen, Elizabeth; Burke, Laurie B.

    2017-01-01

    A clinician-reported outcome (ClinRO) assessment is a type of clinical outcome assessment (COA). ClinRO assessments, like all COAs (patient-reported, observer-reported, or performance outcome assessments), are used to 1) measure patients’ health status and 2) define end points that can be interpreted as treatment benefits of medical interventions on how patients feel, function, or survive in clinical trials. Like other COAs, ClinRO assessments can be influenced by human choices, judgment, or motivation. A ClinRO assessment is conducted and reported by a trained health care professional and requires specialized professional training to evaluate the patient’s health status. This is the second of two reports by the ISPOR Clinical Outcomes Assessment—Emerging Good Practices for Outcomes Research Task Force. The first report provided an overview of COAs including definitions important for an understanding of COA measurement practices. This report focuses specifically on issues related to ClinRO assessments. In this report, we define three types of ClinRO assessments (readings, ratings, and clinician global assessments) and describe emerging good measurement practices in their development and evaluation. The good measurement practices include 1) defining the context of use; 2) identifying the concept of interest measured; 3) defining the intended treatment benefit on how patients feel, function, or survive reflected by the ClinRO assessment and evaluating the relationship between that intended treatment benefit and the concept of interest; 4) documenting content validity; 5) evaluating other measurement properties once content validity is established (including intra- and inter-rater reliability); 6) defining study objectives and end point(s) objectives, and defining study end points and placing study end points within the hierarchy of end points; 7) establishing interpretability in trial results; and 8) evaluating operational considerations for the implementation

  3. Emerging organic contaminant removal depending on primary treatment and operational strategy in horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands: influence of redox.

    PubMed

    Avila, Cristina; Reyes, Carolina; Bayona, Josep María; García, Joan

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed at assessing the influence of primary treatment (hydrolytic upflow sludge blanket (HUSB) reactor vs. conventional settling) and operational strategy (alternation of saturated/unsaturated phases vs. permanently saturated) on the removal of various emerging organic contaminants (i.e. ibuprofen, diclofenac, acetaminophen, tonalide, oxybenzone, bisphenol A) in horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands. For that purpose, a continuous injection experiment was carried out in an experimental treatment plant for 26 days. The plant had 3 treatment lines: a control line (settler-wetland permanently saturated), a batch line (settler-wetland operated with saturate/unsaturated phases) and an anaerobic line (HUSB reactor-wetland permanently saturated). In each line, wetlands had a surface area of 2.95 m(2), a water depth of 25 cm and a granular medium D(60) = 7.3 mm, and were planted with common reed. During the study period the wetlands were operated at a hydraulic and organic load of 25 mm/d and about 4.7 g BOD/m(2)d, respectively. The injection experiment delivered very robust results that show how the occurrence of higher redox potentials within the wetland bed promotes the elimination of conventional quality parameters as well as emerging microcontaminants. Overall, removal efficiencies were always greater for the batch line than for the control and anaerobic lines, and to this respect statistically significantly differences were found for ibuprofen, diclofenac, oxybenzone and bisphenol A. As an example, ibuprofen, whose major removal mechanism has been reported to be biodegradation under aerobic conditions, showed a higher removal in the batch line (85%) than in the control (63%) and anaerobic (52%) lines. Bisphenol A showed also a great dependence on the redox status of the wetlands, finding an 89% removal rate for the batch line, as opposed to the control and anaerobic lines (79 and 65%, respectively). Furthermore, diclofenac showed a greater

  4. Niacin: a re-emerging pharmaceutical for the treatment of dyslipidaemia

    PubMed Central

    Vosper, Helen

    2009-01-01

    Dyslipidaemias, particularly those characterized by the ‘atherogenic profile’ of high low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol and triglycerides and low high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, are the major modifiable risk factor for atherosclerosis. The search for drugs to favourably alter such lipid profiles, reducing the associated morbidity and mortality, remains a major research focus. Niacin (nicotinic acid) is the most effective agent available for increasing high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, but its use is associated with side effects that negatively affect patient compliance: these appear to arise largely as a result of production of prostaglandin D2 and its subsequent activation of the DP1 receptor. Desire to reduce the side effects (and improve pharmacokinetic parameters) has led to the development of a number of agonists that have differing effects, both in terms of clinical potency and the severity of adverse effects. The recent discovery of the niacin G-protein-coupled receptor HM74A (GPR109A) has clarified the distinction between the mechanism whereby niacin exerts its therapeutic effects and the mechanisms responsible for the generation of side effects. This has allowed the development of new drugs that show great potential for the treatment of dyslipidaemia. However, recent advances in understanding of the contribution of prostaglandin metabolism to vascular wall health suggest that some of the beneficial effects of niacin may well result from activation of the same pathways responsible for the adverse reactions. The purpose of this review is to emphasize that the search for agonists that show higher tolerability must take into account all aspects of signalling through this receptor. PMID:19627285

  5. Oral antiplatelet therapy for atherothrombotic disease: overview of current and emerging treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Fintel, Dan J

    2012-01-01

    Clinical presentations of atherothrombotic vascular disease, such as acute coronary syndromes, ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack, and symptomatic peripheral arterial disease, are major causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Platelet activation and aggregation play a seminal role in the arterial thrombus formation that precipitates acute manifestations of atherothrombotic disease. As a result, antiplatelet therapy has become the cornerstone of therapy for the prevention and treatment of atherothrombotic disease. Dual antiplatelet therapy with aspirin and a P2Y12 adenosine diphosphate (ADP) receptor inhibitor, such as clopidogrel or prasugrel, is the current standard-of-care antiplatelet therapy in patients with acute coronary syndromes managed with an early invasive strategy. However, these agents are associated with several important clinical limitations, including significant residual risk for ischemic events, bleeding risk, and variability in the degree of platelet inhibition. The residual risk can be attributed to the fact that aspirin and P2Y12 inhibitors block only the thromboxane A2 and ADP platelet activation pathways but do not affect the other pathways that lead to thrombosis, such as the protease-activated receptor-1 pathway stimulated by thrombin, the most potent platelet agonist. Bleeding risk associated with aspirin and P2Y12 inhibitors can be explained by their inhibitory effects on the thromboxane A2 and ADP pathways, which are critical for protective hemostasis. Interpatient variability in the degree of platelet inhibition in response to antiplatelet therapy may have a genetic component and contribute to poor clinical outcomes. These considerations underscore the clinical need for therapies with a novel mechanism of action that may reduce ischemic events without increasing the bleeding risk. PMID:22393298

  6. Successful Tobacco Dependence Treatment in Low-Income Emergency Department Patients: A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Steven L.; D’Onofrio, Gail; Rosner, June; O’Malley, Stephanie; Makuch, Robert; Busch, Susan; Pantalon, Michael V.; Toll, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Background Tobacco use is common among ED patients, many of whom are low-income. Our objective was to study the efficacy of an intervention incorporating motivational interviewing, nicotine replacement, and quitline referral for adult smokers in an ED. Methods A two-arm randomized clinical trial conducted from October 2010–December 2012, at a 90,000 visit/year urban ED in the northeastern U.S. Eligible subjects were age 18 years or older who smoked and were self-pay or had Medicaid insurance. Intervention subjects received a motivational interview by a trained research assistant, 6 weeks of nicotine patches and gum initiated in the ED, a faxed referral to the state smokers’ quitline, a booster call, and a brochure. Control subjects received the brochure, which provided quitline information. The primary outcome was biochemically confirmed tobacco abstinence at three months. Secondary endpoints included quitline utilization. Results Of 778 enrolled subjects, 774 (99.5%) were alive at three months. The prevalence of biochemically confirmed abstinence was 12.2% (47/386) in the intervention arm vs. 4.9% (19/388) in the control arm, for a difference in quit rates of 7.3% (95% CI 3.2%, 11.5%). In multivariable logistic modeling controlling for age, sex, and race/ethnicity, study subjects remained more likely to be abstinent than controls (OR 2.72, 95% CI 1.55, 4.75). Conclusions An intensive intervention improved tobacco abstinence rates in low-income ED smokers. Because approximately 20 million smokers, many of whom are low-income, visit US EDs annually, these results suggest ED-initiated treatment may be an effective technique to treat this group of smokers. PMID:25920384

  7. Monitoring contaminants of emerging concern from tertiary wastewater treatment plants using passive sampling modelled with performance reference compounds.

    PubMed

    Sultana, Tamanna; Murray, Craig; Ehsanul Hoque, M; Metcalfe, Chris D

    2016-12-01

    The Lake Simcoe watershed in Ontario, Canada is an important recreational area and a recharge zone for groundwater resources. Lake Simcoe is a relatively shallow lotic system that has been impacted by urban development, recreation, industry and agriculture. As part of a watershed management plan, six wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) located in this catchment basin were selected to measure the inputs of contaminants of emerging concern (CECs) of wastewater origin. These WWTPs were recently upgraded to tertiary treatment for phosphorus removal. Polar organic chemical integrative samplers (POCIS) and semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) were used to monitor for hydrophilic and hydrophobic CECs, respectively, in treated and untreated wastewater. The passive samplers were calibrated with performance reference compounds (PRCs) by measuring the loss of deuterated beta blocker drugs spiked into POCIS and the loss of PCB congeners spiked into SPMDs over the course of 14-day deployment periods. From the PRC data, field sampling rates of CECs were determined and applied to estimate time-weighted average (TWA) concentrations and mass loadings in mg/day/1000 members of the population serviced. In treated wastewater, TWA concentrations of an antibiotic, sulfamethoxazole, the prescription drugs, carbamazepine, naproxen and gemfibrozil, and the non-prescription drug, ibuprofen, were estimated to be in the low (<18 ng/L) range. The artificial sweeteners, sucralose and acesulfame, were particularly useful chemical tracers, with estimated TWA concentrations in treated wastewater ranging from 128 to 213 ng/L and 4 to 33 ng/L, respectively. The steroid hormones were detected only rarely in treated wastewater. Triclosan, triclocarban and the synthetic musks, HHCB and AHTN, were removed efficiently (>77 %), possibly because of the tertiary treatment technologies. Therefore, the mass loadings for these personal care products were all <5 mg/day/1000 people. Overall, this study

  8. Familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy: current and emerging treatment options for transthyretin-mediated amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Hund, Ernst

    2012-01-01

    approved by European authorities for treatment of FAP. The substance has been shown to stabilize the TTR tetramer, thereby improving the outcome of patients with TTR-FAP. Various other strategies have been studied in vitro to prevent TTR amyloidosis, including gene therapy, immunization, dissolution of TTR aggregates, and free radical scavengers, but none of them is ready for clinical use so far.

  9. Familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy: current and emerging treatment options for transthyretin-mediated amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    Hund, Ernst

    2012-01-01

    approved by European authorities for treatment of FAP. The substance has been shown to stabilize the TTR tetramer, thereby improving the outcome of patients with TTR-FAP. Various other strategies have been studied in vitro to prevent TTR amyloidosis, including gene therapy, immunization, dissolution of TTR aggregates, and free radical scavengers, but none of them is ready for clinical use so far. PMID:23776379

  10. Emergency treatment and nursing of children with severe pneumonia complicated by heart failure and respiratory failure: 10 case reports

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wanli; An, Xinjiang; Fu, Mingyu; Li, Chunli

    2016-01-01

    Pneumonia refers to lung inflammation caused by different pathogens or other factors, and is a common pediatric disease occurring in infants and young children. It is closely related to the anatomical and physiological characteristics of infants and young children and is more frequent during winter and spring, or sudden changes in temperature. Pneumonia is a serious disease that poses a threat to children's health and its morbidity and mortality rank first, accounting for 24.5–65.2% of pediatric inpatients. Due to juvenile age, severe illness and rapid changes, children often suffer acute heart failure, respiratory failure and even toxic encephalopathy at the same time. The concurrence in different stages of the process of emergency treatment tends to relapse, which directly places the lives of these children at risk. Severe pneumonia constitutes one of the main causes of infant mortality. In the process of nursing children with severe pneumonia, intensive care was provided, including condition assessment and diagnosis, close observation of disease, keeping the airway unblocked, rational oxygen therapy, prevention and treatment of respiratory and circulatory failure, support of vital organs, complications, and health education. The inflammatory response was proactively controlled, to prevent suffocation and reduce mortality. In summary, positive and effective nursing can promote the rehabilitation of children patients, which can be reinforced with adequate communication with the parents and/or caretakers. PMID:27698703

  11. Emergency treatment and nursing of children with severe pneumonia complicated by heart failure and respiratory failure: 10 case reports.

    PubMed

    Li, Wanli; An, Xinjiang; Fu, Mingyu; Li, Chunli

    2016-10-01

    Pneumonia refers to lung inflammation caused by different pathogens or other factors, and is a common pediatric disease occurring in infants and young children. It is closely related to the anatomical and physiological characteristics of infants and young children and is more frequent during winter and spring, or sudden changes in temperature. Pneumonia is a serious disease that poses a threat to children's health and its morbidity and mortality rank first, accounting for 24.5-65.2% of pediatric inpatients. Due to juvenile age, severe illness and rapid changes, children often suffer acute heart failure, respiratory failure and even toxic encephalopathy at the same time. The concurrence in different stages of the process of emergency treatment tends to relapse, which directly places the lives of these children at risk. Severe pneumonia constitutes one of the main causes of infant mortality. In the process of nursing children with severe pneumonia, intensive care was provided, including condition assessment and diagnosis, close observation of disease, keeping the airway unblocked, rational oxygen therapy, prevention and treatment of respiratory and circulatory failure, support of vital organs, complications, and health education. The inflammatory response was proactively controlled, to prevent suffocation and reduce mortality. In summary, positive and effective nursing can promote the rehabilitation of children patients, which can be reinforced with adequate communication with the parents and/or caretakers.

  12. The emergence of non-secretory multiple myeloma during the non-cytotoxic treatment of essential thrombocythemia: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The emergence of multiple myeloma as a second malignancy in patients with essential thrombocythemia is extremely rare. Several cases have been published so far, pointing out the impact of a cytotoxic effect during treatment of essential thrombocythemia on the development of multiple myeloma. Case presentation We report the case of a 52-year-old Caucasian man who presented to our hospital because of leukocytosis, a slightly decreased hemoglobin level and thrombocytosis. After a complete hematological work-up, essential thrombocythemia was diagnosed. The patient was included in a multicenter clinical study, treated with anagrelide and his platelet counts were maintained in the normal range for more than 3 years. A sudden drop in his hemoglobin level with normal leukocyte and platelet count occurred at the same time as a back pain. Magnetic resonance imaging of his spine revealed the existence of a pathological fracture of Th4, the collapse of the upper edge of Th7 and osteolytic lesions of multiple thoracic vertebrae. Repeated hematological examinations, including bone biopsy with immunohistochemistry, disclosed diagnosis of multiple myeloma of the non-secretory type. Conclusions To the best of our knowledge this is the first published case in which multiple myeloma developed during the treatment of essential thrombocythemia with the non-cytotoxic drug anagrelide. Our attempts to find a common origin for the coexistence of multiple myeloma and essential thrombocythemia have not confirmed the genetic basis of their appearance. Further studies are needed to determine the biological impact of this coexistence. PMID:24025541

  13. Psychometric properties of the treatment-emergent activation and suicidality assessment profile (TEASAP) in youth with OCD

    PubMed Central

    Bussing, Regina; Murphy, Tanya K.; Storch, Eric A.; McNamara, Joseph P.H.; Reid, Adam M.; Garvan, Cynthia W.; Goodman, Wayne K.

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the psychometric properties of the treatment-emergent activation and suicidality assessment profile (TEASAP) in a clinical sample of 56 youth ages 7 to 17 with obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) who participated in a double-blind randomized controlled trial. The 38-item TEASAP demonstrated good internal consistency for its total score (α = 0.93) and adequate to good performance for its five subscale scores (α = 0.65 to 0.92). One week test-retest stability (N = 18) was adequate (Intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC] = 0.68 to 0.80) except for Self-Injury (ICC = 0.46). Construct validity was supported by total and subscale TEASAP score relationships with related constructs, including irritability, hyperactivity, externalizing behaviors, manic symptoms, and suicidal ideation, and the absence of relationships with unrelated constructs. Predictive validity was established for the Disinhibition subscale through significant associations with subsequent activation events. Furthermore, TEASAP sensitivity to change in activation scores over time was supported by longitudinal associations of TEASAP scores with clinician ratings of activation over the course of treatment. Findings indicate that the TEASAP has acceptable psychometric properties in a clinical sample of youth with OCD and merits further study in larger samples for additional refinement of its measurement approaches. PMID:23031804

  14. Reporter phage and breath tests: emerging phenotypic assays for diagnosing active tuberculosis, antibiotic resistance, and treatment efficacy.

    PubMed

    Jain, Paras; Thaler, David S; Maiga, Mamoudou; Timmins, Graham S; Bishai, William R; Hatfull, Graham F; Larsen, Michelle H; Jacobs, William R

    2011-11-15

    The rapid and accurate diagnosis of active tuberculosis (TB) and its drug susceptibility remain a challenge. Phenotypic assays allow determination of antibiotic susceptibilities even if sequence data are not available or informative. We review 2 emerging diagnostic approaches, reporter phage and breath tests, both of which assay mycobacterial metabolism. The reporter phage signal, Green fluorescent protein (GFP) or β-galactosidase, indicates transcription and translation inside the recipient bacilli and its attenuation by antibiotics. Different breath tests assay, (1) exhaled antigen 85, (2) mycobacterial urease activity, and (3) detection by trained rats of disease-specific odor in sputum, have also been developed. When compared with culture, reporter phage assays shorten the time for initial diagnosis of drug susceptibility by several days. Both reporter phage and breath tests have promise as early markers to determine the efficacy of treatment. While sputum often remains smear and Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA positive early in the course of efficacious antituberculous treatment, we predict that both breath and phage tests will rapidly become negative. If this hypothesis proves correct, phage assays and breath tests could become important surrogate markers in early bactericidal activity (EBA) studies of new antibiotics.

  15. Emerging strategies for the diagnosis and treatment of meibomian gland dysfunction: Proceedings of the OCEAN group meeting.

    PubMed

    Geerling, Gerd; Baudouin, Christophe; Aragona, Pasquale; Rolando, Maurizio; Boboridis, Kostas G; Benítez-Del-Castillo, José M; Akova, Yonca A; Merayo-Lloves, Jesús; Labetoulle, Marc; Steinhoff, Martin; Messmer, Elisabeth M

    2017-01-26

    Meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD) is a common and chronic disorder that has a significant adverse impact on patients' quality of life. It is a leading cause of evaporative dry eye disease (DED), as meibomian glands play an important role in providing lipids to the tear film, which helps to retard the evaporation of tears from the ocular surface. MGD is also often present in conjunction with primary aqueous-deficient DED. Obstructive MGD, the most commonly observed type of MGD, is the main ocus of this article. MGD is probably caused by a combination of separate conditions: primary obstructive hyperkeratinization of the meibomian gland, abnormal meibomian gland secretion, eyelid inflammation, corneal inflammation and damage, microbiological changes, and DED. Furthermore, skin diseases such as rosacea may play a part in its pathology. Accurate diagnosis is challenging, as it is difficult to differentiate between ocular surface diseases, but is crucial when choosing treatment options. Ocular imaging has advanced in recent years, providing ophthalmologists with a better understanding of ocular diseases. This review presents a literature update on the 2011 MGD workshop and an optimized approach to accurate diagnosis of MGD using currently available methods and tests. It also outlines the emerging technologies of interferometry, non-contact meibography, keratography and in vivo confocal laser microscopy, which offer exciting possibilities for the future. Selected treatment options for MGD are also discussed.

  16. Use of fluorescence EEM to monitor the removal of emerging contaminants in full scale wastewater treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Sgroi, Massimiliano; Roccaro, Paolo; Korshin, Gregory V; Greco, Valentina; Sciuto, Sebastiano; Anumol, Tarun; Snyder, Shane A; Vagliasindi, Federico G A

    2017-02-05

    This study investigated the applicability of different techniques for fluorescence excitation/emission matrices data interpretations, including peak-picking method, fluorescence regional integration and PARAFAC modelling, to act as surrogates in predicting emerging trace organic compounds (ETOrCs) removal during conventional wastewater treatments that usually comprise primary and secondary treatments. Results showed that fluorescence indexes developed using alternative methodologies but indicative of a same dissolved organic matter component resulted in similar predictions of the removal of the target compounds. The peak index defined by the excitation/emission wavelength positions (λex/λem) 225/290nm and related to aromatic proteins and tyrosine-like fluorescence was determined to be a particularly suitable surrogate for monitoring ETOrCs that had very high removal rates (average removal >70%) (i.e., triclosan, caffeine and ibuprofen). The peak index defined by λex/λem=245/440nm and the PARAFAC component with wavelength of the maxima λex/λem=245, 350/450, both identified as humic-like fluorescence, were found remarkably well correlated with ETOrCs such as atenolol, naproxen and gemfibrozil that were moderately removed (51-70% average removal). Finally, the PARAFAC component with wavelength of the maxima λex/λem=<240, 315/380 identified as microbial humic-like fluorescence was the only index correlated with the removal of the antibiotic trimethoprim (average removal 68%).

  17. Approaches to treatment of emerging Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli infections highlighting the O104:H4 serotype

    PubMed Central

    Rahal, Elias A.; Fadlallah, Sukayna M.; Nassar, Farah J.; Kazzi, Natalie; Matar, Ghassan M.

    2015-01-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) are a group of diarrheagenic bacteria associated with foodborne outbreaks. Infection with these agents may result in grave sequelae that include fatality. A large number of STEC serotypes has been identified to date. E. coli serotype O104:H4 is an emerging pathogen responsible for a 2011 outbreak in Europe that resulted in over 4000 infections and 50 deaths. STEC pathogenicity is highly reliant on the production of one or more Shiga toxins that can inhibit protein synthesis in host cells resulting in a cytotoxicity that may affect various organ systems. Antimicrobials are usually avoided in the treatment of STEC infections since they are believed to induce bacterial cell lysis and the release of stored toxins. Some antimicrobials have also been reported to enhance toxin synthesis and production from these organisms. Various groups have attempted alternative treatment approaches including the administration of toxin-directed antibodies, toxin-adsorbing polymers, probiotic agents and natural remedies. The utility of antibiotics in treating STEC infections has also been reconsidered in recent years with certain modalities showing promise. PMID:25853096

  18. Dental Emergencies

    PubMed Central

    Symington, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    Patients with dental emergencies sometimes present to their physician. This article outlines the role of the physician in the management of dental patients who have suffered traumatic injuries, postoperative hemorrhage, pain, and infection. It deals with those difficulties for which the physician may easily prescribe treatment and outlines the treatment that would be undertaken by a dentist who receives such a patient on referral. PMID:21253249

  19. Emergency department outpatient treatment of alcohol-intoxicated bicyclists increases the cost of medical care in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Yamauchi, Sunao; Mizobe, Michiko; Nakashima, Yoshiyuki; Takahashi, Jin; Funakoshi, Hiraku; Urayama, Kevin Y.; Ohde, Sachiko; Takahashi, Osamu; Shiga, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    Riding a bicycle under the influence of alcohol is illegal in Japan. Nevertheless, intoxicated bicyclists are frequently treated at hospital emergency departments for bicycle-related injuries. This patient population usually requires more hospital resources, even for relatively minor injuries. Therefore, we hypothesized that bicycle-related crashes involving bicyclists under the influence of alcohol cost more to treat than those that do not involve alcohol intoxication. The aim of the present study was to examine the costs associated with bicycle-related minor injuries and alcohol intoxication of the bicyclist. The study was conducted at the Tokyo Bay Urayasu Ichikawa Medical Center Emergency Department, Japan. All minor bicycle crashes involving 217 individuals aged ≥20 years treated from September 1, 2012 to August 31, 2013 were included in the analysis of data obtained from medical records. Variables included alcohol intoxication, sex, age, collision with a motor vehicle, Glasgow Coma Scale, injury severity score (ISS), laboratory tests, treatment of wounds, number of X-ray images, number of computed tomography scans, and medical costs. Multiple linear regression analysis was performed to evaluate the association between alcohol intoxication and medical costs. Seventy (32%) patients consumed alcohol, and the median medical cost was 253 USD (interquartile range [IQR], 164–330). Multivariable analysis showed that alcohol intoxication was independently associated with higher medical costs (p = 0.030, adjusted R-square value = 0.55). These findings support our hypothesis and should encourage authorities to implement comprehensive measures to prohibit bicycling under the influence of alcohol to prevent injuries and to reduce medical costs. PMID:28329002

  20. Lung Emergencies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Emergencies Cardiac Emergencies Eye Emergencies Lung Emergencies Surgeries Lung Emergencies People with Marfan syndrome can be at ... should be considered an emergency. Symptoms of sudden lung collapse (pneumothorax) Symptoms of a sudden lung collapse ...

  1. Anorectal emergencies

    PubMed Central

    Lohsiriwat, Varut

    2016-01-01

    Anorectal emergencies refer to anorectal disorders presenting with some alarming symptoms such as acute anal pain and bleeding which might require an immediate management. This article deals with the diagnosis and management of common anorectal emergencies such as acutely thrombosed external hemorrhoid, thrombosed or strangulated internal hemorrhoid, bleeding hemorrhoid, bleeding anorectal varices, anal fissure, irreducible or strangulated rectal prolapse, anorectal abscess, perineal necrotizing fasciitis (Fournier gangrene), retained anorectal foreign bodies and obstructing rectal cancer. Sexually transmitted diseases as anorectal non-surgical emergencies and some anorectal emergencies in neonates are also discussed. The last part of this review dedicates to the management of early complications following common anorectal procedures that may present as an emergency including acute urinary retention, bleeding, fecal impaction and anorectal sepsis. Although many of anorectal disorders presenting in an emergency setting are not life-threatening and may be successfully treated in an outpatient clinic, an accurate diagnosis and proper management remains a challenging problem for clinicians. A detailed history taking and a careful physical examination, including digital rectal examination and anoscopy, is essential for correct diagnosis and plan of treatment. In some cases, some imaging examinations, such as endoanal ultrasonography and computerized tomography scan of whole abdomen, are required. If in doubt, the attending physicians should not hesitate to consult an expert e.g., colorectal surgeon about the diagnosis, proper management and appropriate follow-up. PMID:27468181

  2. Anorectal emergencies.

    PubMed

    Lohsiriwat, Varut

    2016-07-14

    Anorectal emergencies refer to anorectal disorders presenting with some alarming symptoms such as acute anal pain and bleeding which might require an immediate management. This article deals with the diagnosis and management of common anorectal emergencies such as acutely thrombosed external hemorrhoid, thrombosed or strangulated internal hemorrhoid, bleeding hemorrhoid, bleeding anorectal varices, anal fissure, irreducible or strangulated rectal prolapse, anorectal abscess, perineal necrotizing fasciitis (Fournier gangrene), retained anorectal foreign bodies and obstructing rectal cancer. Sexually transmitted diseases as anorectal non-surgical emergencies and some anorectal emergencies in neonates are also discussed. The last part of this review dedicates to the management of early complications following common anorectal procedures that may present as an emergency including acute urinary retention, bleeding, fecal impaction and anorectal sepsis. Although many of anorectal disorders presenting in an emergency setting are not life-threatening and may be successfully treated in an outpatient clinic, an accurate diagnosis and proper management remains a challenging problem for clinicians. A detailed history taking and a careful physical examination, including digital rectal examination and anoscopy, is essential for correct diagnosis and plan of treatment. In some cases, some imaging examinations, such as endoanal ultrasonography and computerized tomography scan of whole abdomen, are required. If in doubt, the attending physicians should not hesitate to consult an expert e.g., colorectal surgeon about the diagnosis, proper management and appropriate follow-up.

  3. Benefits and risks of emerging technologies: integrating life cycle assessment and decision analysis to assess lumber treatment alternatives.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Michael P; Bates, Matthew E; Madison, Marcus; Linkov, Igor

    2014-10-07

    Assessing the best options among emerging technologies (e.g., new chemicals, nanotechnologies) is complicated because of trade-offs across benefits and risks that are difficult to quantify given limited and fragmented availability of information. This study demonstrates the integration of multicriteria decision analysis (MCDA) and life cycle assessment (LCA) to address technology alternative selection decisions. As a case study, prioritization of six lumber treatment alternatives [micronized copper quaternary (MCQ); alkaline copper quaternary (ACQ); water-borne copper naphthenate (CN); oil-borne copper naphthenate (CNo); water-borne copper quinolate (CQ); and water-borne zinc naphthenate (ZN)] for military use are considered. Multiattribute value theory (MAVT) is used to derive risk and benefit scores. Risk scores are calculated using a cradle-to-gate LCA. Benefit scores are calculated by scoring of cost, durability, and corrosiveness criteria. Three weighting schemes are used, representing Environmental, Military and Balanced stakeholder perspectives. Aggregated scores from all three perspectives show CQ to be the least favorable alterative. MCQ is identified as the most favorable alternative from the Environmental stakeholder perspective. From the Military stakeholder perspective, ZN is determined to be the most favorable alternative, followed closely by MCQ. This type of scoring and ranking of multiple heterogeneous criteria in a systematic and transparent way facilitates better justification of technology selection and regulation.

  4. EVALUATION OF DEMONSTRATED AND EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES FOR THE TREATMENT OF CONTAMINATED LAND AND GROUNDWATER (PHASE III) - 1999 SPECIAL SESSION ON MONITORED NATURAL ATTENUATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report includes the papers presented at the NATO/CCMS Pilot Study Meeting in Angers, France, May 9-14, 1999, for the special session on Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA). This is the Phase III of the Evaluation of Demonstrated and Emerging Technologies for the Treatment a...

  5. [2008 update of the 8th Consensus Development Conference of the Francophone Society of Medical Emergencies of 1999. The treatment of adult renal colic by the emergency services and in emergency rooms].

    PubMed

    El Khebir, M; Fougeras, O; Le Gall, C; Santin, A; Perrier, C; Sureau, C; Miranda, J; Ecollan, P; Bagou, G; Trinh-Duc, A; Traxer, O

    2009-07-01

    The care in the emergencies of the renal colic at the adult was the object in 1999 of a conference of consensus of the French Society of Emergency (SFMU) in association with the French Association of Urology and the Society of Nephrology. This already former text was the object of an update in 2008 by the subcommittee of scientific monitoring of the SFMU and was presented to the congress 2008. This public presentation in the presence of an expert urologist allowed to confront this new text with the practices and to publish an updating of the conference of consensus of 1999. A survey of practice was led with the emergency physicians, whose results are presented.

  6. Rare emergence of drug resistance in HIV-1 treatment-naïve patients after 48 weeks of treatment with elvitegravir/cobicistat/emtricitabine/tenofovir alafenamide.

    PubMed

    Margot, Nicolas A; Kitrinos, Kathryn M; Fordyce, Marshall; McCallister, Scott; Miller, Michael D; Callebaut, Christian

    2016-03-01

    Tenofovir alafenamide (TAF), a novel prodrug of the NtRTI tenofovir (TFV), delivers TFV-diphosphate (TFV-DP) to target cells more efficiently than the current prodrug, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF), with a 90% reduction in TFV plasma exposure. TAF, within the fixed dose combination of elvitegravir /cobicistat / emtricitabine (FTC)/TAF (E/C/F/TAF), has been evaluated in one Phase 2 and two Phase 3 randomized, double-blinded studies in HIV-infected treatment-naive patients, comparing E/C/F/TAF to E/C/F/TDF. In these studies, the TAF-containing group demonstrated non-inferior efficacy to the TDF-containing comparator group with 91.9% of E/C/F/TAF patients having <50 copies/mL of HIV-1 RNA at week 48. An integrated resistance analysis across these three studies was conducted, including HIV-1 genotypic analysis at screening, and genotypic/phenotypic analysis for patients with HIV-1 RNA>400 copies/mL at virologic failure. Pre-existing primary resistance-associated mutations (RAMs) were observed at screening among the 1903 randomized and treated patients: 7.5% had NRTI-RAMs, 18.2% had NNRTI-RAMs, and 3.4% had primary PI-RAMs. Pre-treatment RAMs did not influence treatment response at Week 48. In the E/C/F/TAF group, resistance development was rare; seven patients (0.7%, 7/978) developed NRTI-RAMs, five of whom (0.5%, 5/978) also developed primary INSTI-RAMs. In the E/C/F/TDF group, resistance development was also rare; seven patients (0.8%, 7/925) developed NRTI-RAMs, four of whom (0.4%, 4/925) also developed primary INSTI-RAMs. An additional analysis by deep sequencing in virologic failures revealed minimal differences compared to population sequencing. Overall, resistance development was rare in E/C/F/TAF-treated patients, and the pattern of emergent mutations was similar to E/C/F/TDF.

  7. Pre-sowing Seed Treatments in Direct-seeded Early Rice: Consequences for Emergence, Seedling Growth and Associated Metabolic Events under Chilling Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weiqin; Chen, Qian; Hussain, Saddam; Mei, Junhao; Dong, Huanglin; Peng, Shaobing; Huang, Jianliang; Cui, Kehui; Nie, Lixiao

    2016-01-01

    Double direct-seeding for double rice cropping is a simplified, labor saving, and efficient cropping system to improve multiple-crop index and total rice production in central China. However, poor crop establishment of direct-seeded early rice due to chilling stress is the main obstacle to wide spread of this system. A series of experiments were conducted to unravel the effects of pre-sowing seed treatments on emergence, seedling growth and associated metabolic events of direct-seeded early rice under chilling stress. Two seed priming treatments and two seed coating treatments were used in all the experiments. A non-treated control treatment was also maintained for comparison. In both the field and growth chamber studies, seed priming with selenium or salicylic acid significantly enhanced the emergence and seedling growth of rice compared with non-treated control. Nevertheless, such positive effects were not apparent for seed coating treatments. Better emergence and vigorous seedling growth of rice after seed priming was associated with enhanced α-amylase activity, higher soluble sugars contents, and greater respiration rate in primed rice seedlings under chilling stress. Taking together, these findings may provide new avenues for understanding and advancing priming-induced chilling tolerance in direct-seeded early rice in double rice cropping system.

  8. Pre-sowing Seed Treatments in Direct-seeded Early Rice: Consequences for Emergence, Seedling Growth and Associated Metabolic Events under Chilling Stress.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weiqin; Chen, Qian; Hussain, Saddam; Mei, Junhao; Dong, Huanglin; Peng, Shaobing; Huang, Jianliang; Cui, Kehui; Nie, Lixiao

    2016-01-19

    Double direct-seeding for double rice cropping is a simplified, labor saving, and efficient cropping system to improve multiple-crop index and total rice production in central China. However, poor crop establishment of direct-seeded early rice due to chilling stress is the main obstacle to wide spread of this system. A series of experiments were conducted to unravel the effects of pre-sowing seed treatments on emergence, seedling growth and associated metabolic events of direct-seeded early rice under chilling stress. Two seed priming treatments and two seed coating treatments were used in all the experiments. A non-treated control treatment was also maintained for comparison. In both the field and growth chamber studies, seed priming with selenium or salicylic acid significantly enhanced the emergence and seedling growth of rice compared with non-treated control. Nevertheless, such positive effects were not apparent for seed coating treatments. Better emergence and vigorous seedling growth of rice after seed priming was associated with enhanced α-amylase activity, higher soluble sugars contents, and greater respiration rate in primed rice seedlings under chilling stress. Taking together, these findings may provide new avenues for understanding and advancing priming-induced chilling tolerance in direct-seeded early rice in double rice cropping system.

  9. Pre-sowing Seed Treatments in Direct-seeded Early Rice: Consequences for Emergence, Seedling Growth and Associated Metabolic Events under Chilling Stress

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weiqin; Chen, Qian; Hussain, Saddam; Mei, Junhao; Dong, Huanglin; Peng, Shaobing; Huang, Jianliang; Cui, Kehui; Nie, Lixiao

    2016-01-01

    Double direct-seeding for double rice cropping is a simplified, labor saving, and efficient cropping system to improve multiple-crop index and total rice production in central China. However, poor crop establishment of direct-seeded early rice due to chilling stress is the main obstacle to wide spread of this system. A series of experiments were conducted to unravel the effects of pre-sowing seed treatments on emergence, seedling growth and associated metabolic events of direct-seeded early rice under chilling stress. Two seed priming treatments and two seed coating treatments were used in all the experiments. A non-treated control treatment was also maintained for comparison. In both the field and growth chamber studies, seed priming with selenium or salicylic acid significantly enhanced the emergence and seedling growth of rice compared with non-treated control. Nevertheless, such positive effects were not apparent for seed coating treatments. Better emergence and vigorous seedling growth of rice after seed priming was associated with enhanced α-amylase activity, higher soluble sugars contents, and greater respiration rate in primed rice seedlings under chilling stress. Taking together, these findings may provide new avenues for understanding and advancing priming-induced chilling tolerance in direct-seeded early rice in double rice cropping system. PMID:26782108

  10. Evaluation of a coagulation/flocculation-lamellar clarifier and filtration-UV-chlorination reactor for removing emerging contaminants at full-scale wastewater treatment plants in Spain.

    PubMed

    Matamoros, Víctor; Salvadó, Victòria

    2013-03-15

    The presence and elimination of 25 emerging contaminants in two full-scale Spanish wastewater treatment plants was studied. The tertiary treatment systems consisted of coagulation, flocculation lamellar settlement and filtration (pulsed-bed sand filters) units, and disinfection was carried out by medium pressure UV light lamps and chlorination. Diclofenac and carbamazepine were found to be the emerging contaminants with the highest concentrations in secondary effluents. Photodegradable emerging contaminants (e.g. ketoprofen, triclosan and diclofenac) were removed by filtration-UV light radiation-chlorination whereas most hydrophobic compounds (e.g. galaxolide and tonalide) were eliminated by coagulation-flocculation followed by lamellar clarification, a unit in which a seasonal trend was observed. Overall mass removal efficiency was about 60%. 1-(8-Chlorocarbazolyl) acetic acid, an intermediate product of the photodegradation of diclofenac, was detected after filtration-UV-chlorination, but not after coagulation-flocculation and lamellar clarification. This study demonstrated potential for general applicability of two established tertiary treatment systems to eliminate emerging contaminants.

  11. Constructed Wetlands for Treatment of Organic and Engineered Nanomaterial Contaminants of Emerging Concerns (WaterRF Report 4334)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goal of this project was to determine hydraulic and carbon loading rates for constructed wetlands required for achieving different levels of organic and nanomaterial contaminants of emerging concern (CECs) removal in constructed wetlands. Specific research objectives included...

  12. Application of molecularly imprinted and non-imprinted polymers for removal of emerging contaminants in water and wastewater treatment: a review.

    PubMed

    Murray, Audrey; Ormeci, Banu

    2012-11-01

    Over the past decade, several studies have reported trace levels of endocrine disrupting compounds, pharmaceuticals, and personal care products in surface waters, drinking water, and wastewater effluents. There has also been an increased concern about the ecological and human health impact of these contaminants, and their removal from water and wastewater has become a priority. Traditional treatment processes are limited in their ability to remove emerging contaminants from water, and there is a need for new technologies that are effective and feasible. This paper presents a review on recent research results on molecularly imprinted (MIP) and non-imprinted (NIP) polymers and evaluates their potential as a treatment method for the removal of emerging contaminants from water and wastewater. It also discusses the relative benefits and limitations of using MIP or NIP for water and wastewater treatment. MIP, and in particular NIP, offer promising applications for wastewater treatment, but their toxicity and possible health effects should be carefully studied before they are considered for drinking water treatment. More research is also required to determine how best to incorporate MIP and NIP in treatment plants.

  13. Emergency treatment on facial laceration of dog bite wounds with immediate primary closure: a prospective randomized trial study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To investigate the emergency treatment on facial laceration of dog bite wounds and identify whether immediate primary closure is feasible. Methods Six hundred cases with facial laceration attacked by dog were divided into two groups randomly and evenly. After thorough debridement, the facial lacerations of group A were left open, while the lacerations of group B were undertaken immediate primary closure. Antibiotics use was administrated only after wound infected, not prophylactically given. The infection rate, infection time and healing time were analyzed. Results The infection rate of group A and B was 8.3% and 6.3% respectively (P>0.05); the infection time was 26.3±11.6h and 24.9±13.8h respectively (P>0.05), the healing time was 9.12±1.30d and 6.57±0.49d respectively (P<0.05) in taintless cases, 14.24±2.63d and 10.65±1.69d respectively (P<0.05) in infected cases. Compared with group A, there was no evident tendency in increasing infection rate (8.3% in group A and 6.3% in group B respectively) and infection period (26.3±11.6h in group A and 24.9±13.8h in group B respectively) in group B. Meanwhile, in group B, the wound healing time was shorter than group A statistically in both taintless cases (9.12±1.30d in group A and 6.57±0.49d in group B respectively) and infected cases (14.24±2.63d in group A and 10.65±1.69d in group B respectively). Conclusion The facial laceration of dog bite wounds should be primary closed immediately after formal and thoroughly debridement. And the primary closure would shorten the healing time of the dog bite wounds without increasing the rate and period of infection. There is no potentiality of increasing infection incidence and infection speed, compared immediate primary closure with the wounds left open. On the contrary, primary closure the wounds can promote its primary healing. Prophylactic antibiotics administration was not recommended. and the important facial organ or tissue injuries should be secondary

  14. A novel two-stage evaluation system based on a Group-G1 approach to identify appropriate emergency treatment technology schemes in sudden water source pollution accidents.

    PubMed

    Qu, Jianhua; Meng, Xianlin; Hu, Qi; You, Hong

    2016-02-01

    Sudden water source pollution resulting from hazardous materials has gradually become a major threat to the safety of the urban water supply. Over the past years, various treatment techniques have been proposed for the removal of the pollutants to minimize the threat of such pollutions. Given the diversity of techniques available, the current challenge is how to scientifically select the most desirable alternative for different threat degrees. Therefore, a novel two-stage evaluation system was developed based on a circulation-correction improved Group-G1 method to determine the optimal emergency treatment technology scheme, considering the areas of contaminant elimination in both drinking water sources and water treatment plants. In stage 1, the threat degree caused by the pollution was predicted using a threat evaluation index system and was subdivided into four levels. Then, a technique evaluation index system containing four sets of criteria weights was constructed in stage 2 to obtain the optimum treatment schemes corresponding to the different threat levels. The applicability of the established evaluation system was tested by a practical cadmium-contaminated accident that occurred in 2012. The results show this system capable of facilitating scientific analysis in the evaluation and selection of emergency treatment technologies for drinking water source security.

  15. Brief Report: Knowledge and Confidence of Emergency Medical Service Personnel Involving Treatment of an Individual with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    PubMed

    Wachob, David; Pesci, Louis J

    2016-12-01

    In order to best respond to an emergency situation, professionals need to have an understanding about Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and techniques that will ensure proper care. The purpose of this study was to determine the knowledge and confidence of EMS personnel on interacting and treating an individual with ASD. Emergency Medical Technicians (EMT), and Paramedics were surveyed on their knowledge of ASD; familiarity or experience with ASD, and level of comfort responding to emergencies involving an individual with ASD. The results found that autism-specific training and resources were associated with higher comfort levels, but not knowledge. It was also determined that newer and younger professionals had higher knowledge and comfort when compared to the more experienced and older professionals.

  16. Eye Emergencies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fight for victory. Marfan & Related Disorders What is Marfan Syndrome? What are Related Disorders? What are the Signs? ... Emergencies Eye Emergencies Lung Emergencies Surgeries Eye Emergencies Marfan syndrome significantly increases your risk of retinal detachment, a ...

  17. Childhood Emergencies

    MedlinePlus

    ... SUBSCRIBE Emergency 101 Share this! Home » Emergency 101 Childhood Emergencies Keeping children healthy and safe is every ... and tools to prevent, recognize and address a childhood emergency is the first step in keeping your ...

  18. Emerging Implications of Balancing Disinfection and Primary Treatment as an Element in CSO Control: Model Requirements. A presentation.

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper describes early results and directions arising from ongoing research into factors that affect the preferred balance between primary treatment and disinfection in a conventional wastewater treatment plant during periods of wet weather overflow. Despite the fact that na...

  19. The Effect of Increased Flows on the Treatability of Emerging Contaminants at a Wastewater Treatment Plant during Rain Events

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT A large number of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) have been found in U.S. surface waters. These products are part of a growing class of pollutants known as emerging contaminants, chemical compounds or organisms only recently found in significant propo...

  20. Effect of preoperative oral midazolam sedation on separation anxiety and emergence delirium among children undergoing dental treatment under general anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    El Batawi, Hisham Yehia

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the possible effects of preoperative oral Midazolam on parental separation anxiety, emergence delirium, and post-anesthesia care unit time on children undergoing dental rehabilitation under general anesthesia. Methods: Randomized, prospective, double-blind study. Seventy-eight American Society of Anesthesiology (ASA) I children were divided into two groups of 39 each. Children of the first group were premedicated with oral Midazolam 0.5 mg/kg, while children of the control group were premedicated with a placebo. Scores for parental separation, mask acceptance, postoperative emergence delirium, and time spent in the post-anesthesia care unit were compared statistically. Results: The test group showed significantly lower parental separation scores and high acceptance rate for anesthetic mask. There was no significant difference between the two groups regarding emergence delirium and time spent in post-anesthesia care unit. Conclusions: Preoperative oral Midazolam could be a useful adjunct in anxiety management for children suffering dental anxiety. The drug may not reduce the incidence of postoperative emergence delirium. The suggested dose does not seem to affect the post-anesthesia care unit time. PMID:25992332

  1. Impact of Frequent and Persistent Use of Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM) on Hypoglycemia Fear, Frequency of Emergency Medical Treatment, and SMBG Frequency After One Year

    PubMed Central

    Chamberlain, James J.; Dopita, Dana; Gilgen, Emily; Neuman, Annie

    2015-01-01

    Background: We assessed the impact of “almost daily” use of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) in adults with type 1 diabetes who had at least 1 year of CGM experience. Methods: In this single-center survey, we utilized a 16-item questionnaire to assess changes hypoglycemia fear, incidence of emergency medical treatment and utilization of self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) before and after 1 year of CGM use. Participation was restricted to individuals who used the same brand of CGM system to avoid confounding responses due to differences between commercial devices. Participants were recruited on an “as-seen” basis from a major, urban internal medicine clinic and associated diabetes education center. The questionnaire was completed during the clinic visit. Responses to the survey were analyzed by standard descriptive statistics. Results: Seventy-four patients completed the survey: 42.9 years (range: 23-71 years), 38 (51%) female, 59 current insulin pump users. Most (84%) reported wearing their devices “almost daily” (n = 58) or 3 weeks per month (n = 4). “Almost daily” users reported an 86% reduction in incidence of emergency medical treatment events (P = .0013) and >50% reduction in daily SMBG frequency (P < .0001). Reductions in hypoglycemia fear were apparent but not statistically significant (P = .7359). Conclusions: “Almost daily” use of CGM with the Dexcom G4 system reduced incidence of emergency treatment events and daily SMBG utilization among survey respondents and a trend toward reduced hypoglycemia fear. This may indicate cost savings in reduction of emergency medical intervention and likely improved quality of life without increasing safety concerns related to hypoglycemia. PMID:26353781

  2. Emerging anxiolytics.

    PubMed

    Pillay, Nirvana S; Stein, Dan J

    2007-11-01

    Anxiety disorders are the most common of the psychiatric disorders and are also associated with significant economic costs and impaired work productivity. The first-line pharmacotherapy of pharmatherapy for a number of anxiety disorders comprises selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and serotonin and noradrenaline re-uptake inhibitors (SNRIs). Benzodiazepines are still widely used for the treatment of several anxiety disorders. Although these agents are effective, many patients are treatment-refractory and more effective, better tolerated medications are required. This paper discusses the understandings of mechanisms involved in the anxiety disorders and reviews emerging medications. Mechanisms underlying the use of d-cycloserine, second generation antipsychotics and beta-blockers are particularly exciting.

  3. Factors associated with no dental treatment in preschoolers with toothache: a cross-sectional study in outpatient public emergency services.

    PubMed

    Machado, Geovanna C M; Daher, Anelise; Costa, Luciane R

    2014-08-08

    Many parents rely on emergency services to deal with their children's dental problems, mostly pain and infection associated with dental caries. This cross-sectional study analyzed the factors associated with not doing an oral procedure in preschoolers with toothache attending public dental emergency services. Data were obtained from the clinical files of preschoolers treated at all nine dental emergency centers in Goiania, Brazil, in 2011. Data were children's age and sex, involved teeth, oral procedures, radiography request, medications prescribed and referrals. A total of 531 files of children under 6 years old with toothache out of 1,108 examined were selected. Children's mean age was 4.1 (SD 1.0) years (range 1-5 years) and 51.6% were girls. No oral procedures were performed in 49.2% of cases; in the other 50.8%, most of the oral procedures reported were endodontic intervention and temporary restorations. Primary molars were involved in 48.4% of cases. With the exception of "sex", the independent variables tested in the regression analysis significantly associated with non-performance of oral procedures: age (OR 0.7; 95% CI 0.5-0.8), radiography request (OR 3.8; 95% CI 1.7-8.2), medication prescribed (OR 7.5; 95% CI 4.9-11.5) and patient referred to another service (OR 5.7; 3.0-10.9). Many children with toothache received no oral procedure for pain relief.

  4. Delinquent Behavior and Emerging Substance Use in the MTA at 36 Months: Prevalence, Course, and Treatment Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molina, Brooke S. G.; Flory, Kate; Hinshaw, Stephen P.; Greiner, Andrew R.; Arnold, L. Eugene; Swanson, James M.; Hechtman, Lily; Jensen, Peter S.; Vitiello, Benedetto; Hoza, Betsy; Pelham, William E.; Elliott, Glen R.; Wells, Karen C.; Abikoff, Howard B.; Gibbons, Robert D.; Marcus, Sue; Conners, C. Keith; Epstein, Jeffery N.; Greenhill, Laurence L.; March, John S.; Newcorn, Jeffrey H.; Severe, Joanne B.; Wigal, Timothy

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To compare delinquent behavior and early substance use between the children in the Multimodal Treatment Study of Children With ADHD (MTA; N = 487) and those in a local normative comparison group (n = 272) at 24 and 36 months postrandomization and to test whether these outcomes were predicted by the randomly assigned treatments and…

  5. Application of human factors engineering (HFE) to the design of a naloxone auto-injector for the treatment of opioid emergencies.

    PubMed

    Raffa, Robert B; Taylor, Robert; Pergolizzi, Joseph V; Nalamachu, Srinivas; Edwards, Eric S; Edwards, Evan T

    2017-02-01

    The increased use of opioids for chronic treatment of pain and the resulting epidemic of opioid overdoses have created a major public health challenge. Parenteral naloxone has been used since the 1970's to treat opioid overdose. Recently, a novel naloxone auto-injector device (EVZIO, kaleo, Inc., Richmond, VA) was approved by the Food and Drug Administration. In this article, we review the Human Factors Engineering (HFE) process used in the development and testing of this novel naloxone auto-injector currently used in nonmedical settings for the emergency treatment of known or suspected opioid overdose. HFE methods were employed throughout the product development process for the naloxone auto-injector including formative and summative studies in order to optimize the auto-injector's user interface, mitigate use-related hazards and increase reliability during an opioid emergency use scenario. HFE was also used to optimize the product's design and user interface in order to reduce or prevent user confusion and misuse. The naloxone auto-injector went through a rigorous HFE process that included perceptual, cognitive, and physical action analysis; formative usability evaluations; use error analysis and summative design validation studies. Applying HFE resulted in the development of a product that is safe, fast, easy and predictably reliable to deliver a potentially life-saving dose of naloxone during an opioid overdose emergency. The naloxone auto-injector may be considered as a universal precaution option for at-risk patients prescribed opioids or those who are at increased risk for an opioid overdose emergency.

  6. Irinotecan treatment and senescence failure promote the emergence of more transformed and invasive cells that depend on anti-apoptotic Mcl-1

    PubMed Central

    Jonchère, Barbara; Vétillard, Alexandra; Toutain, Bertrand; Lam, David; Bernard, Anne Charlotte; Henry, Cécile; Trécesson, Sophie De Carné; Gamelin, Erick; Juin, Philippe; Guette, Catherine; Coqueret, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Induction of senescence by chemotherapy was initially characterized as a suppressive response that prevents tumor cell proliferation. However, in response to treatment, it is not really known how cells can survive senescence and how irreversible this pathway is. In this study, we analyzed cell escape in response to irinotecan, a first line treatment used in colorectal cancer that induced senescence. We detected subpopulations of cells that adapted to chemotherapy and resumed proliferation. Survival led to the emergence of more transformed cells that induced tumor formation in mice and grew in low adhesion conditions. A significant amount of viable polyploid cells was also generated following irinotecan failure. Markers such as lgr5, CD44, CD133 and ALDH were downregulated in persistent clones, indicating that survival was not associated with an increase in cancer initiating cells. Importantly, malignant cells which resisted senescence relied on survival pathways induced by Mcl-1 signaling and to a lesser extent by Bcl-xL. Depletion of Mcl-1 increased irinotecan efficiency, induced the death of polyploid cells, prevented cell emergence and inhibited growth in low-adhesion conditions. We therefore propose that Mcl-1 targeting should be considered in the future to reduce senescence escape and to improve the treatment of irinotecan-refractory colorectal cancers. PMID:25565667

  7. Factors Associated with No Dental Treatment in Preschoolers with Toothache: A Cross-Sectional Study in Outpatient Public Emergency Services

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Geovanna C. M.; Daher, Anelise; Costa, Luciane R.

    2014-01-01

    Many parents rely on emergency services to deal with their children’s dental problems, mostly pain and infection associated with dental caries. This cross-sectional study analyzed the factors associated with not doing an oral procedure in preschoolers with toothache attending public dental emergency services. Data were obtained from the clinical files of preschoolers treated at all nine dental emergency centers in Goiania, Brazil, in 2011. Data were children’s age and sex, involved teeth, oral procedures, radiography request, medications prescribed and referrals. A total of 531 files of children under 6 years old with toothache out of 1,108 examined were selected. Children’s mean age was 4.1 (SD 1.0) years (range 1–5 years) and 51.6% were girls. No oral procedures were performed in 49.2% of cases; in the other 50.8%, most of the oral procedures reported were endodontic intervention and temporary restorations. Primary molars were involved in 48.4% of cases. With the exception of “sex”, the independent variables tested in the regression analysis significantly associated with non-performance of oral procedures: age (OR 0.7; 95% CI 0.5–0.8), radiography request (OR 3.8; 95% CI 1.7–8.2), medication prescribed (OR 7.5; 95% CI 4.9–11.5) and patient referred to another service (OR 5.7; 3.0–10.9). Many children with toothache received no oral procedure for pain relief. PMID:25111875

  8. [Review of admissions to the emergency unit of the specialist hospital of the Institute of Social Security responsible for the treatment of civil servants in the Puebla State, 1996 (Mexico)].

    PubMed

    Fajardo-Ortiz, G; Ramirez-Fernandez, F A

    2000-01-01

    In a review carried out in a specialist hospital of the city of Puebla, it was found that of the 26,005 patients that required attention from the emergency unit during 1996, only 9333 (35.8%) were "real emergencies". "Real emergencies" were considered those where the patient had to be admitted into hospital. The study also found that the morning shift had the highest percentage (29) of patients requesting treatment. The paper gives guidance regarding planning and funding.

  9. Definite Project Report for Section 14. Emergency Streambank Protection, Sangamon River Sewage Treatment Facility, Riverton, Illinois. Revision.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-01

    solution under the authority of Section 14 of the 1946 Flood Control Act,&s amended. The proposal for emergency streambank protection presented in...the authority of Section 14 of the 1946 Flood Control Actas amended. The Rock Island District, by letter dated December 29, 1986,inforeed the village...for this report is provided under Se:tion 14 of the 1946 Flood Control Act,approved 24 July 1946(33 U.S.C. 701 R),as amended by the Water Resources

  10. EMERGING TECHNOLOGY BULLETIN: PROCESS FOR THE TREATMENT OF VOLATILE ORGANIC CARBON AND HEAVY-METAL- CONTAMINATED SOIL - INTERNATIONAL TECHNOLOGY CORPORATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The batch steam distillation and metal extraction treatment process is a two-stage system that treats soils contaminated with organics and inorganics. This system uses conventional, readily available process equipment, and does not produce hazardous combustion products. Hazar...

  11. Emergency contraception

    MedlinePlus

    Morning-after pill; Postcoital contraception; Birth control - emergency; Plan B; Family planning - emergency contraception ... Emergency contraception most likely prevents pregnancy in the same way as regular birth control pills: By preventing or delaying ...

  12. Emergency Contraception

    MedlinePlus

    ... contraception are available: emergency contraceptive pills and the copper-containing intrauterine device (IUD).Emergency contraceptive pills include ... for emergency use, talk to your doctor.The copper-containing IUD (brand name: Paragard) is a small, ...

  13. Modelling the consequences of targeted selective treatment strategies on performance and emergence of anthelmintic resistance amongst grazing calves.

    PubMed

    Berk, Zoe; Laurenson, Yan C S M; Forbes, Andrew B; Kyriazakis, Ilias

    2016-12-01

    The development of anthelmintic resistance by helminths can be slowed by maintaining refugia on pasture or in untreated hosts. Targeted selective treatments (TST) may achieve this through the treatment only of individuals that would benefit most from anthelmintic, according to certain criteria. However TST consequences on cattle are uncertain, mainly due to difficulties of comparison between alternative strategies. We developed a mathematical model to compare: 1) the most 'beneficial' indicator for treatment selection and 2) the method of selection of calves exposed to Ostertagia ostertagi, i.e. treating a fixed percentage of the population with the lowest (or highest) indicator values versus treating individuals who exceed (or are below) a given indicator threshold. The indicators evaluated were average daily gain (ADG), faecal egg counts (FEC), plasma pepsinogen, combined FEC and plasma pepsinogen, versus random selection of individuals. Treatment success was assessed in terms of benefit per R (BPR), the ratio of average benefit in weight gain to change in frequency of resistance alleles R (relative to an untreated population). The optimal indicator in terms of BPR for fixed percentages of calves treated was plasma pepsinogen and the worst ADG; in the latter case treatment was applied to some individuals who were not in need of treatment. The reverse was found when calves were treated according to threshold criteria, with ADG being the best target indicator for treatment. This was also the most beneficial strategy overall, with a significantly higher BPR value than any other strategy, but its degree of success depended on the chosen threshold of the indicator. The study shows strong support for TST, with all strategies showing improvements on calves treated selectively, compared with whole-herd treatment at 3, 8, 13 weeks post-turnout. The developed model appeared capable of assessing the consequences of other TST strategies on calf populations.

  14. [Surgical treatment in severe acute pancreatitis. Last 15 years of experience in Emergency County Hospital of Baia Mare].

    PubMed

    Leşe, Mihaela; Tămăşan, Anca; Stoicescu, B; Brânduşe, M; Puia, Ioana; Mare, C; Lazăr, C

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the particular course of the patients operated for severe acute pancreatitis in a period of 15 years in surgical department of Emergency County Hospital of Baia Mare. Medical records of 202 patients admitted and operated for severe acute pancreatitis, were studied. Follow-up parameters were: age, gender, etiology, moment of operation, the type of operations and postoperative evolution of this patients. In the group of deceased patients alcoholic etiology of pancreatitis was prevailing. Almost a half of patients were operated in the first day of admission. A high number of patients were operated for diagnosis of acute abdomen with intention of exploratory laparotomy. In the last years, besides the usual closed drainage, open drainage and planning drainage were performed. Postoperative mortality is still high. The diagnose of severe acute pancreatitis is difficult in emergency. Global mortality in pancreatitis remains high, especially in the period of enzymatic shock, and is correlated with masculine gender, alcoholic etiology and somewhat with precocity of operation.

  15. Selected emerging organic contaminants in the Yangtze Estuary, China: a comprehensive treatment of their association with aquatic colloids.

    PubMed

    Yan, Caixia; Yang, Yi; Zhou, Junliang; Nie, Minghua; Liu, Min; Hochella, Michael F

    2015-01-01

    Contaminants that are becoming detected in the environment but are not yet generally regulated or monitored are known collectively as emerging contaminants. In the present study, the occurrence and distribution of 42 emerging organic compounds (EOCs) were investigated in the Yangtze River Estuary and adjacent East China Sea coastal areas. Study compounds were mainly pharmaceuticals, including antibiotics, hormones and sterols, and also included two industrial endocrine disruptors. Samples were analyzed using cross-flow ultrafiltration (CFUF) and ultra-performance liquid chromatograph-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS). Results revealed that chloramphenicols, sulfonamides and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were the dominant compounds in filtered samples with relatively high concentrations and detection frequencies. EOC levels varied with location, with the highest concentrations being observed around rivers discharging into the estuary, and near sewage outfalls. Colloids that were separated by CFUF tended to be a sink for EOCs with up to 60% being colloid-associated in the water phase. In addition, colloidal properties, including hydrodynamic size, zeta-potential and organic carbon composition, were found to be the main factors controlling the association of EOCs with aquatic colloids. Moreover, these colloidal properties were all significantly related to salinity, indicating the critical role played by increasing salinity in EOCs-colloids interaction in an estuarine system.

  16. Emergencies in motoneuron disease.

    PubMed

    Finsterer, Josef; Stöllberger, Claudia

    2017-03-09

    Genetic and acquired motor-neuron-disorders (MNDs) may undergo acute deterioration resulting in various emergency situations. This literature review aims at summarising and discussing current knowledge about emergencies in MNDs. Emergencies that have been reported in MND patients include: respiratory, bulbar, cardiac, septic, epileptic, psychiatric, pain-related, and traumatic emergencies. Emergencies due to respiratory insufficiency have the strongest impact on morbidity and mortality in MNDs. To optimise the management of emergencies in MNDs, it is recommended to discuss these topics with the patient prior to their occurrence. After informed consent, patients may indicate their decision by signing an advance directive as to how such emergencies should be managed in case they arise. Generally, treatment of emergencies in MNDs is not at variance from treatment of similar emergencies due to other causes, but some peculiarities need to be pointed out. It is concluded that patients with MNDs may experience various emergencies during the disease course. Management of these conditions should be discussed with the patient prior to their appearance. Management of these emergencies follows general guidelines, which widely vary between countries, and depend on the availability of a patient's advance directive.

  17. Orthodontic Wire Ingestion during Treatment: Reporting a Case and Review the Management of Foreign Body Ingestion or Aspiration (Emergencies).

    PubMed

    Hoseini, Mohammad; Mostafavi, Seyed Morteza Saadat; Rezaei, Navid; Boluri, Ehsan Javadzadeh

    2013-01-01

    Today orthodontic treatment is in growing demand and is not limited to a specific age or social group. The nature of orthodontic treatment is such that the orthodontic wires and appliances, which are used to apply force and move the teeth, are exposed to the oral cavity. Shaping and replacing these wires in oral cavity are the major assignments of orthodontist on appointments. Therefore, we can say that orthodontic treatment requires working with dangerous tools in a sensitive place like oral cavity which is the entrance of respiratory and digestive systems. In this paper, a case of ingesting a broken orthodontic wire during eating is reported, and also necessary remedial measures at the time of encountering foreign body ingestion or aspiration are provided.

  18. Orthodontic Wire Ingestion during Treatment: Reporting a Case and Review the Management of Foreign Body Ingestion or Aspiration (Emergencies)

    PubMed Central

    Hoseini, Mohammad; Mostafavi, Seyed Morteza Saadat; Rezaei, Navid; Boluri, Ehsan Javadzadeh

    2013-01-01

    Today orthodontic treatment is in growing demand and is not limited to a specific age or social group. The nature of orthodontic treatment is such that the orthodontic wires and appliances, which are used to apply force and move the teeth, are exposed to the oral cavity. Shaping and replacing these wires in oral cavity are the major assignments of orthodontist on appointments. Therefore, we can say that orthodontic treatment requires working with dangerous tools in a sensitive place like oral cavity which is the entrance of respiratory and digestive systems. In this paper, a case of ingesting a broken orthodontic wire during eating is reported, and also necessary remedial measures at the time of encountering foreign body ingestion or aspiration are provided. PMID:23853727

  19. 76 FR 79067 - Payment or Reimbursement for Emergency Treatment Furnished by Non-VA Providers in Non-VA...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-21

    ... the Veterans' Mental Health and Other Care Improvements Act of 2008. Among other things, the... treatment. On October 10, 2008, the Veterans' Mental Health and Other Care Improvements Act of 2008, Public... rule, because this portion of the rule simply adopts customary practice as implemented in the...

  20. EMERGING TECHNOLOGY BULLETIN: ELECTRON BEAM TREATMENT FOR THE REMOVAL OF BENZENE AND TOULENE FROM AQUEOUS STREAMS AND SLUDGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The electron accelerator utilized in this treatment process has a potential of 1.5 MeV, rated from 0 to 50 mA, providing radiation doses of 0-850 krad (0-8.5 kGy). The horizontal electron beam is scanned at 200 Hz and impacts the waste stream as it flows over a weir approximately...

  1. Emergence of Competitive Dominant Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacterial Populations in a Full-Scale Industrial Wastewater Treatment Plant

    PubMed Central

    Layton, Alice C.; Dionisi, Hebe; Kuo, H.-W.; Robinson, Kevin G.; Garrett, Victoria M.; Meyers, Arthur; Sayler, Gary S.

    2005-01-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing bacterial populations in an industrial wastewater treatment plant were investigated with amoA and 16S rRNA gene real-time PCR assays. Nitrosomonas nitrosa initially dominated, but over time RI-27-type ammonia oxidizers, also within the Nitrosomonas communis lineage, increased from below detection to codominance. This shift occurred even though nitrification remained constant. PMID:15691975

  2. Emerging risks from ballast water treatment: the run-up to the International Ballast Water Management Convention.

    PubMed

    Werschkun, Barbara; Banerji, Sangeeta; Basurko, Oihane C; David, Matej; Fuhr, Frank; Gollasch, Stephan; Grummt, Tamara; Haarich, Michael; Jha, Awadhesh N; Kacan, Stefan; Kehrer, Anja; Linders, Jan; Mesbahi, Ehsan; Pughiuc, Dandu; Richardson, Susan D; Schwarz-Schulz, Beatrice; Shah, Amisha; Theobald, Norbert; von Gunten, Urs; Wieck, Stefanie; Höfer, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    Uptake and discharge of ballast water by ocean-going ships contribute to the worldwide spread of aquatic invasive species, with negative impacts on the environment, economies, and public health. The International Ballast Water Management Convention aims at a global answer. The agreed standards for ballast water discharge will require ballast water treatment. Systems based on various physical and/or chemical methods were developed for on-board installation and approved by the International Maritime Organization. Most common are combinations of high-performance filters with oxidizing chemicals or UV radiation. A well-known problem of oxidative water treatment is the formation of disinfection by-products, many of which show genotoxicity, carcinogenicity, or other long-term toxicity. In natural biota, genetic damages can affect reproductive success and ultimately impact biodiversity. The future exposure towards chemicals from ballast water treatment can only be estimated, based on land-based testing of treatment systems, mathematical models, and exposure scenarios. Systematic studies on the chemistry of oxidants in seawater are lacking, as are data about the background levels of disinfection by-products in the oceans and strategies for monitoring future developments. The international approval procedure of ballast water treatment systems compares the estimated exposure levels of individual substances with their experimental toxicity. While well established in many substance regulations, this approach is also criticised for its simplification, which may disregard critical aspects such as multiple exposures and long-term sub-lethal effects. Moreover, a truly holistic sustainability assessment would need to take into account factors beyond chemical hazards, e.g. energy consumption, air pollution or waste generation.

  3. [Ultrasound in emergency medicine].

    PubMed

    Lapostolle, F; Deltour, S; Petrovic, T

    2015-12-01

    Ultrasound has revolutionized the practice of emergency medicine, particularly in prehospital setting. About a patient with dyspnea, we present the role of ultrasound in the diagnosis and emergency treatment. Echocardiography, but also hemodynamic ultrasound (vena cava) and lung exam are valuable tools. Achieving lung ultrasound and diagnostic value of B lines B are detailed.

  4. Clinical efficacy of Spasmofen® suppository in the emergency treatment of renal colic: a randomized, double-blind, double-dummy comparative trial

    PubMed Central

    Yakoot, Mostafa; Salem, Amel; Yousef, Sameh; Helmy, Sherine

    2014-01-01

    Background Renal colic is typically characterized by the sudden onset of severe pain radiating from the flank to the groin and its acute management in emergency departments essentially aims at rapid pain relief. Spasmofen® is a brand of Amriya Pharmaceutical Industries in the form of rectal suppositories containing ketoprofen 100 mg and hyoscine butylbromide 10 mg. This combination is intended for the rapid relief of severe colicky pain in the renal system, hepatobiliary system, or gastrointestinal tract. This trial aims to compare a single-dose of Spasmofen rectal suppository to a single intravenous (IV) ketorolac tromethamine 30 mg/2 mL dose in patients with acute renal colic. Methods A total of 80 eligible consecutive patients presenting to the emergency departments of two medical centers with acute renal colic were included in the study. Eligible patients who signed the informed consent were randomly assigned into two treatment groups: an experimental group (Spasmofen group) who received one Spasmofen rectal suppository plus an IV injection of 2 mL of normal saline solution; and a control group (ketorolac group) who received one ketorolac 30 mg/2 mL ampoule IV plus one placebo suppository. Treatment success, defined as a change in the verbal rating score from severe or moderate pain to none or mild at 60 minutes after the dose, was compared between groups using the chi-square/Fisher’s exact test. Percentage reductions in visual pain analog scale (VPAS) scores at 15 and 60 minutes after the dose were compared between groups using the Z-test for proportions. Results Successful treatment at 60 minutes occurred in 35 of 40 (87.5%) of Spasmofen-treated patients and in 33 of 40 (82.5%) of ketorolac-treated patients. The difference was not statistically significant by Fisher’s exact test (P=0.755). The mean percentage reduction of VPAS after 15 minutes was 61.82% in the Spasmofen-treated group and 64.76% in the ketorolac-treated group. The difference was also not

  5. Characteristics and treatment interests among individuals with substance use disorders and a history of past six-month violence: Findings from an emergency department study

    PubMed Central

    Chermack, Stephen T.; Murray, Regan; Kraus, Shane; Walton, Maureen A.; Cunningham, Rebecca M.; Barry, Kristen L.; Booth, Brenda M.; Blow, Frederic C.

    2014-01-01

    The study examined clinical characteristics and treatment interests of individuals identified to have substance use disorders (SUDs) in an urban emergency department (ED) who reported past six-month history of violence or victimization. Specifically, participants were 1441 ED patients enrolled in a randomized controlled trial of interventions designed to link those with SUDs to treatment. To examine factors related to violence type, four groups based on participants’ reports of violence toward others were created: no violence (46.8%), partner violence only (17.3%), non-partner violence only (20.2%), and both partner and non-partner violence (15.7%). Four groups based on participants’ reports of victimization were also created: no violence (42.1%), victimization from partner only (18.7%), victimization from non-partner only (20.2%), and both partner and non-partner victimization (17.7%). Separate multinomial logistic regression analyses were conducted to examine which variables distinguished the violence and victimization groups from those reporting no violence or victimization. For violence toward others, demographic variables, alcohol and cocaine disorders, and rating treatment for psychological problems were higher for violence groups, with some differences depending on type of violence. For victimization, demographic variables, having an alcohol disorder, and rating treatment for family/social problems were higher for violence groups, also with some differences depending on type of violence. Findings from the present study could be useful for designing effective brief interventions and services for ED settings. PMID:24148140

  6. Emergence of Linezolid-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus after Prolonged Treatment of Cystic Fibrosis Patients in Cleveland, Ohio ▿

    PubMed Central

    Endimiani, Andrea; Blackford, Martha; Dasenbrook, Elliot C.; Reed, Michael D.; Bajaksouszian, Saralee; Hujer, Andrea M.; Rudin, Susan D.; Hujer, Kristine M.; Perreten, Vincent; Rice, Louis B.; Jacobs, Michael R.; Konstan, Michael W.; Bonomo, Robert A.

    2011-01-01

    Linezolid (LZD)-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LRSA) isolates were monitored from 2000 to 2009 in Cleveland, OH. LRSA first emerged in 2004 only in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, with 11 LRSA-infected CF patients being identified by 2009. LRSA was isolated from 8 of 77 CF patients with S. aureus respiratory tract infection treated with LZD from 2000 to 2006. Analysis of clinical data showed that the 8 CF patients with LRSA received more LZD courses (18.8 versus 5.9; P = 0.001) for a longer duration (546.5 versus 211.9 days; P < 0.001) and had extended periods of exposure to LZD (83.1 versus 30.1 days/year; P < 0.001) than the 69 with LZD-susceptible isolates. Five LRSA isolates included in the clinical analysis (2000 to 2006) and three collected in 2009 were available for molecular studies. Genotyping by repetitive extrapalindromic PCR and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis revealed that seven of these eight LRSA strains from unique patients were genetically similar. By multilocus sequence typing, all LRSA isolates were included in clonal complex 5 (seven of sequence type 5 [ST5] and one of ST1788, a new single-locus variant of ST5). However, seven different variants were identified by spa typing. According to the Escherichia coli numbering system, seven LRSA isolates contained a G2576T mutation (G2603T, S. aureus numbering) in one to four of the five copies of domain V of the 23S rRNA genes. One strain also contained a mutation (C2461T, E. coli numbering) not previously reported. Two strains, including one without domain V mutations, possessed single amino acid substitutions (Gly152Asp or Gly139Arg) in the ribosomal protein L3 of the peptidyltransferase center, substitutions not previously reported in clinical isolates. Emergence of LRSA is a serious concern for CF patients who undergo prolonged courses of LZD therapy. PMID:21263048

  7. Treatment of colored effluents with lignin-degrading enzymes: an emerging role of marine-derived fungi.

    PubMed

    Raghukumar, Chandralata; D'Souza-Ticlo, Donna; Verma, Ashutosh Kumar

    2008-01-01

    Some of the industries that discharge highly colored effluents are paper and pulp mills, textiles and dye-making industries, alcohol distilleries, and leather industries. Terrestrial white-rot basidiomycetous fungi and their lignin-degrading enzymes laccase, manganese-peroxidase and lignin peroxidases are useful in the treatment of colored industrial effluents and other xenobiotics. Free mycelia, mycelial pellets, immobilized fungi or their lignin-degrading enzymes from terrestrial fungi have been reported in treatment of several effluents. Marine obligate or facultative (marine-derived) fungi may have unique properties but have not been explored sufficiently for this purpose. This article presents a critical review of bioremediation potential of such fungi and their lignin-degrading enzymes in comparison with the state-of-the-art in terrestrial white-rot fungi.

  8. Applications and Emerging Trends of Hyaluronic Acid in Tissue Engineering, as a Dermal Filler, and in Osteoarthritis Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Fakhari, Amir; Berkland, Cory

    2013-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) is a naturally occurring biodegradable polymer with a variety of applications in medicine including scaffolding for tissue engineering, dermatological fillers, and viscosupplementation for osteoarthritis treatment. HA is available in most connective tissues in body fluids such as synovial fluid and the vitreous humor of the eye. HA is responsible for several structural properties of tissues as a component of extracellular matrix (ECM) and is involved in cellular signaling. Degradation of HA is a step-wise process that can occur via enzymatic or non-enzymatic reactions. A reduction in HA mass or molecular weight via degradation or slowing of synthesis affects physical and chemical properties such as tissue volume, viscosity, and elasticity. This review addresses the distribution, turnover, and tissue-specific properties of HA. This information is used as context for considering recent products and strategies for modifying the viscoelastic properties of HA in tissue engineering, as a dermal filler, and in osteoarthritis treatment. PMID:23507088

  9. Emerging Science in TBI Care: Diagnosis and Treatment: The Quadruple Aim: Learning & Growth, Readiness, Experience of Care

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-25

    Military Acute Concussion Evaluation (MACE) tool  JAN 07: In-Theater Clinical Practice Guidelines (Version 1.0)  APR 07: VA Facilities – MANDATORY...the NFL  Improving Collaborations with VA, Academia and Civilian Organizations  Deployment Related Assessments - Neurocognitive Issues after... Concussion – e.g. Testing after event or deployment  Effective treatments - Repeat Concussions - Co-Morbidities  Research - “Fast tracking” for objective

  10. Hierarchical nested trial design (HNTD) for demonstrating treatment efficacy of new antibacterial drugs in patient populations with emerging bacterial resistance.

    PubMed

    Huque, Mohammad F; Valappil, Thamban; Soon, Guoxing Greg

    2014-11-10

    In the last decade or so, pharmaceutical drug development activities in the area of new antibacterial drugs for treating serious bacterial diseases have declined, and at the same time, there are worries that the increased prevalence of antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections, especially the increase in drug-resistant Gram-negative infections, limits available treatment options . A recent CDC report, 'Antibiotic Resistance Threats in the United States', indicates that antimicrobial resistance is one of our most serious health threats. However, recently, new ideas have been proposed to change this situation. An idea proposed in this regard is to conduct randomized clinical trials in which some patients, on the basis of a diagnostic test, may show presence of bacterial pathogens that are resistant to the control treatment, whereas remaining patients would show pathogens that are susceptible to the control. The control treatment in such trials can be the standard of care or the best available therapy approved for the disease. Patients in the control arm with resistant pathogens can have the option for rescue therapies if their clinical signs and symptoms worsen. A statistical proposal for such patient populations is to use a hierarchical noninferiority-superiority nested trial design that is informative and allows for treatment-to-control comparisons for the two subpopulations without any statistical penalty. This design can achieve in the same trial dual objectives: (i) to show that the new drug is effective for patients with susceptible pathogens on the basis of a noninferiority test and (ii) to show that it is superior to the control in patients with resistant pathogens. This paper addresses statistical considerations and methods for achieving these two objectives for this design. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  11. Emerging new pathways of pathogenesis and targets for treatment in systemic lupus erythematosus and Sjogren’s syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Perl, Andras

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and Sjogren’s syndrome are chronic inflammatory diseases characterized by the dysfunction of T cells, B cells, and dendritic cells and the production of antinuclear autoantibodies. Here, we evaluate newly discovered molecular and cellular targets for the treatment of SLE and Sjogren’s syndrome. Recent findings The mammalian target of rapamycin in T and B cells has been successfully targeted for treatment of SLE with rapamycin or sirolimus both in patients and animal models. Inhibition of oxidative stress, nitric oxide production, interferon alpha, toll-like receptors 7 and 9, histone deacetylase, spleen tyrosine kinase, proteasome function, lysosome function, endosome recycling, and the nuclear factor kappa B pathway showed efficacy in animal models of lupus. B-cell depletion and blockade of anti-DNA antibodies and T–B cell interaction have shown success in animal models, whereas human studies have so far failed to accomplish clinical endpoints, possibly due to inadequacies in study design. Summary Discovery of novel genes and signaling pathways in lupus pathogenesis offers novel biomarker-targeted approaches for treatment of SLE and Sjogren’s syndrome. PMID:19584730

  12. Differential pharmacology and clinical utility of emerging combination treatments in the management of COPD – role of umeclidinium/vilanterol

    PubMed Central

    Malerba, Mario; Morjaria, Jaymin Bhagwanji; Radaeli, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a preventable and treatable disease characterized by airflow limitation that is not fully reversible. Bronchodilator therapy is the cornerstone in COPD treatment. Bronchodilation in COPD is mainly achieved via administration of long- and ultralong-acting β2-agonists and with long-acting muscarinic antagonists. New combinations of bronchodilators with dual-acting muscarinic antagonist and β2-agonist properties have been licensed, and others are currently being developed with the aim of achieving once-daily dosing, and therefore may improve the likelihood of treatment compliance. These combination bronchodilators include glycopyrronium bromide/indacaterol maleate, umeclidinium (UMEC) bromide/vilanterol trifenatate (VI), aclidinium bromide/formoterol and tiotropium bromide/olodaterol (Boehringer Ingelheim, Germany). This review will focus mainly on studies and clinical trials involving the novel fixed-dose combination of UMEC/VI at doses of 125/25 μg and 62.5/25 μg in patients with COPD. Data from large clinical trials involving more than 4,500 COPD patients indicate that UMEC/VI is an effective once-daily treatment in COPD with improved pulmonary function. Future studies assessing the impact of this combination on exacerbations, delay in disease progression, and health status in patients with COPD are warranted. PMID:25061288

  13. Celiac disease: a disorder emerging from antiquity, its evolving classification and risk, and potential new treatment paradigms.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Hugh J

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease is a chronic genetically based gluten-sensitive immune-mediated enteropathic process primarily affecting the small intestinal mucosa. The disorder classically presents with diarrhea and weight loss; however, more recently, it has been characterized by subclinical occult or latent disease associated with few or no intestinal symptoms. Diagnosis depends on the detection of typical histopathological biopsy changes followed by a gluten-free diet response. A broad range of clinical disorders may mimic celiac disease, along with a wide range of drugs and other therapeutic agents. Recent and intriguing archeological data, largely from the Gobleki Tepe region of the Fertile Crescent, indicate that celiac disease probably emerged as humans transitioned from hunter-gatherer groups to societies dependent on agriculture to secure a stable food supply. Longitudinal studies per-formed over several decades have suggested that changes in the prevalence of the disease, even apparent epidemic disease, may be due to superimposed or novel environmental factors that may precipitate its appearance. Recent therapeutic approaches are being explored that may supplement, rather than replace, gluten-free diet therapy and permit more nutritional options for future management.

  14. Celiac Disease: A Disorder Emerging from Antiquity, Its Evolving Classification and Risk, and Potential New Treatment Paradigms

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Hugh J.

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease is a chronic genetically based gluten-sensitive immune-mediated enteropathic process primarily affecting the small intestinal mucosa. The disorder classically presents with diarrhea and weight loss; however, more recently, it has been characterized by subclinical occult or latent disease associated with few or no intestinal symptoms. Diagnosis depends on the detection of typical histopathological biopsy changes followed by a gluten-free diet response. A broad range of clinical disorders may mimic celiac disease, along with a wide range of drugs and other therapeutic agents. Recent and intriguing archeological data, largely from the Gobleki Tepe region of the Fertile Crescent, indicate that celiac disease probably emerged as humans transitioned from hunter-gatherer groups to societies dependent on agriculture to secure a stable food supply. Longitudinal studies performed over several decades have suggested that changes in the prevalence of the disease, even apparent epidemic disease, may be due to superimposed or novel environmental factors that may precipitate its appearance. Recent therapeutic approaches are being explored that may supplement, rather than replace, gluten-free diet therapy and permit more nutritional options for future management. PMID:25547088

  15. [Emergence of beta-lactam-dependent Bacillus cereus associated with prolonged treatment with cefepime in a neutropenic patient].

    PubMed

    Ko, Sun-Young; Chung, Hee-Jung; Sung, Heong-Sup; Kim, Mi-Na

    2007-06-01

    Antibiotic dependence in clinical isolates has been reported, albeit rarely, such as vancomycin-dependent enterococcus and beta-lactam-dependent Staphylococcus saprophyticus. We report herein a clinical isolate of beta-lactam-dependent Bacillus cereus. A 16-yr-old female was admitted on 8 September 2005 with neutropenic fever during chemotherapy following surgical removal of peripheral neuroectodermal tumor. She had had an indwelling chemoport since August 2004 and experienced B. cereus bacteremia three times during the recent 3-month period prior to the admission; the bacteremias were treated with cefepime-based chemotherapy. On hospital days 1 and 3, B. cereus was isolated from blood drawn through the chemoport. The isolates were resistant to penicillin, ceftriaxone, and erythromycin, and susceptible to vancomycin and ciprofloxacin. The isolate of hospital day 3 grew only nearby the beta-lactam disks including penicillin and ceftriaxone on disk diffusion testing. The beta-lactam-dependent isolate required a minimum of 0.064 microg/mL of penicillin or 0.023 microgram/mL of cefotaxime for growth, which was demonstrated by E test (AB Biodisk, Sweden). Light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy revealed a marked elongation of the dependent strain compared with the non-dependent strain. Prolonged therapy with beta-lactams in the patient with an indwelling intravenous catheter seemed to be a risk factor for the emergence of beta-lactam-dependence in B. cereus.

  16. Zr-doped TiO2 supported on delaminated clay materials for solar photocatalytic treatment of emerging pollutants.

    PubMed

    Belver, C; Bedia, J; Rodriguez, J J

    2017-01-15

    Solar light-active Zr-doped TiO2 nanoparticles were successfully immobilized on delaminated clay materials by a one-step sol-gel route. Fixing the amount of TiO2 at 65wt.%, this work studies the influence of Zr loading (up to 2%) on the photocatalytic activity of the resulting Zr-doped TiO2/clay materials. The structural characterization demonstrates that all samples were formed by a delaminated clay with nanostructured anatase assembled on its surface. The Zr dopant was successfully incorporated into the anatase lattice, resulting in a slight deformation of the anatase crystal and the reduction of the band gap. These materials exhibit high surface area with a disordered mesoporous structure formed by TiO2 particles (15-20nm) supported on a delaminated clay. They were tested in the solar photodegradation of antipyrine, usually used as an analgesic drug and selected as an example of emerging pollutant. High degradation rates have been obtained at low antipyrine concentrations and high solar irradiation intensities with the Zr-doped TiO2/clay catalyst, more effective than the undoped one. This work demonstrates the potential application of the synthesis method for preparing novel and efficient solar-light photocatalysts based on metal-doped anatase and a delaminated clay.

  17. Baseline quasispecies selection and novel mutations contribute to emerging resistance-associated substitutions in hepatitis C virus after direct-acting antiviral treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kai, Yugo; Hikita, Hayato; Morishita, Naoki; Murai, Kazuhiro; Nakabori, Tasuku; Iio, Sadaharu; Hagiwara, Hideki; Imai, Yasuharu; Tamura, Shinji; Tsutsui, Syusaku; Naito, Masafumi; Nishiuchi, Meiko; Kondo, Yasuteru; Kato, Takanobu; Suemizu, Hiroshi; Yamada, Ryoko; Oze, Tsugiko; Yakushijin, Takayuki; Hiramatsu, Naoki; Sakamori, Ryotaro; Tatsumi, Tomohide; Takehara, Tetsuo

    2017-01-01

    Resistance-associated substitutions (RASs) in hepatitis C virus (HCV) appear upon failure of treatment with direct-acting antivirals (DAAs). However, their origin has not been clarified in detail. Among 11 HCV genotype 1b patients who experienced virologic failure with asunaprevir (ASV)/daclatasvir (DCV), 10 had major NS5A L31M/V-Y93H variants after treatment. L31M/V-Y93H variants were detected as a minor clone before therapy in 6 patients and were the most closely related to the post-treatment variants by phylogenetic tree analysis in 4 patients. Next, to consider the involvement of a trace amount of pre-existing variants below the detection limit, we analysed human hepatocyte chimeric mice infected with DAA-naïve patient serum. L31V-Y93H variants emerged after treatment with ledipasvir (LDV)/GS-558093 (nucleotide NS5B inhibitor) and decreased under the detection limit, but these variants were dissimilar to the L31V-Y93H variants reappearing after ASV/DCV re-treatment. Finally, to develop an infection derived from a single HCV clone, we intrahepatically injected full-genome HCV RNA (engineered based on the wild-type genotype 1b sequence) into chimeric mice. A new Y93H mutation actually occurred in this model after LDV monotherapy failure. In conclusion, post-treatment RASs appear by 2 mechanisms: the selection of pre-existing substitutions among quasispecies and the generation of novel mutations during therapy. PMID:28134353

  18. Impact of emergency department probiotic treatment of pediatric gastroenteritis: study protocol for the PROGUT (Probiotic Regimen for Outpatient Gastroenteritis Utility of Treatment) randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The burden of acute gastroenteritis on children and their families continues to be enormous. Probiotics, defined as viable microbial preparations that have a beneficial effect on the health of the host, represent a rapidly expanding field. Although clinical trials in children with gastroenteritis have been performed, most have significant flaws, and guidelines do not consistently endorse their use. Methods/Design PROGUT is a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, five-center, Canadian, emergency department trial. Children aged 3 months to 48 months who present between November 2013 and June 2017 with <72 hours of gastroenteritis symptoms will be assessed for eligibility. A total of 886 children will be randomized (1:1 allocation via an internet based, third party, randomization service) to receive 5 days of a combination probiotic agent (Lactobacillus rhamnosus and L. helveticus) or placebo. All participants, caregivers, and outcome assessors will be blinded to group assignment. The study includes three key outcomes: 1) clinical - the development of moderate to severe disease following an emergency department (ED) evaluation that employs a validated clinical score (Modified Vesikari Scale); 2) safety - side effect; and 3) mechanism - fecal secretory immunoglobulin A levels. Discussion Definitive data are lacking to guide the clinical use of probiotics in children with acute gastroenteritis. Hence, probiotics are rarely prescribed by North American physicians. However, the following current trends obligate an urgent assessment: 1) probiotics are sold as food supplements, and manufacturers can encourage their use while their relevance has yet to be established; 2) North American and European government agencies remain concerned about their value and safety; 3) some institutions are now recommending the routine use of probiotics; and 4) parents of affected children are often providing probiotics. With probiotic consumption increasing in the

  19. Current Understanding of HSP90 as a Novel Therapeutic Target: An Emerging Approach for the Treatment of Cancer.

    PubMed

    Haque, Absarul; Alam, Qamre; Alam, Mohammad Zubair; Azhar, Esam I; Sait, Khalid Hussain Wali; Anfinan, Nisrin; Mushtaq, Gohar; Kamal, Mohammad Amjad; Rasool, Mahmood

    2016-01-01

    Heat Shock Protein 90 (HSP90) is a ubiquitous molecular chaperone that is considered to be the most abundantly expressed protein in various human cancers such as breast, lung, colon, prostate, leukemia and skin. The master regulator, HSP90 plays a pivotal role in the conformational stabilization, maturation and activity of its various labile oncogenic client proteins such as p53, ErbB2, Bcr-Abl, Akt, Her-2, Cdk4, Cdk6, Raf-1 and v-Src in altered cells. Hence, making a guaranteed attempt to inhibit such a master regulator for cancer therapy appears to be a potential approach for combinatorial inhibition of numerous oncogenic signaling pathways simultaneously. Considerable efforts are being under way to develop novel molecular targets and its inhibitors that may block key signaling pathways involved in the process of tumorigenesis and metastasis. In this regards, HSP90 has acquired immense interest as a potent anticancer drug-target due to its key functional link with multiple signaling pathways involved in the process of cell proliferation and cell survival. Notably, geldanamycin and its derivatives (17-AAG, 17-DMAG) have shown quite encouraging results in inhibiting HSP90 function in several cancers and currently almost 17 drug candidates known to be target HSP90 are being under clinical trials either as single agents or combinatorial therapy. Hence, this review is an attempt to get new insight into novel drug target therapy by focusing on recent advances made in understanding HSP90 chaperone structure-function relationships, identification of new HSP90 client proteins and, more importantly, on the advancements of HSP90 targeted therapy based on various existing and emerging classical inhibitors.

  20. Humanism in emergency medicine.

    PubMed

    Rosenzweig, S

    1993-09-01

    Emergency medicine has not yet appropriated "humanism" as a term of its own. Medical humanism needs to be interpreted in a way that is consistent with the practical goals of emergency medicine. In this essay, humanism in emergency medicine is defined by identifying the dehumanizing aspects of sudden illness and exploring of ways for sustaining the humanity of emergency department patients. Excerpts from Dr Oliver Sacks' autobiographical work A Leg to Stand On give voice to the human needs created by sudden illness and its treatment.

  1. The Novartis view on emerging drugs and novel targets for the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Compton, C; McBryan, D; Bucchioni, E; Patalano, F

    2013-10-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a debilitating lung disease characterized by airflow limitation and chronic inflammation in the lungs. The mainstay of drug therapy for COPD is represented by long-acting bronchodilators, an important aspect of Novartis' development program. Novel once-daily dosing bronchodilators, such as the long-acting muscarinic antagonist (LAMA) glycopyrronium and the LAMA/long-acting β2-agonist (LABA) fixed-dose combination QVA149, have been shown to provide significant benefits to patients with COPD in terms of improvement in lung function, exercise tolerance, health-related quality of life, symptoms and reduction in the rate of exacerbations. Despite the benefits provided by these new treatment options, prevention of disease progression and control of exacerbations in certain patient phenotypes remain key challenges in the treatment of COPD. In order to address these needs and gain new insights into the complexity of COPD, Novartis is, in addition to bronchodilator-only therapies, developing LABA/inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) combinations to target inflammation, such as QMF149, as well as non-steroid based anti-inflammatory agents against key novel targets. These commitments are central to the Novartis' final goal of improving the standard of care in respiratory medicine and offering a better quality of life to patients with COPD.

  2. Hypertensive Emergencies in the Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Adebayo, Omoyemi; Rogers, Robert L

    2015-08-01

    Hypertension affects approximately one-third of Americans. An additional 30% are unaware that they harbor the disease. Significantly increased blood pressure constitutes a hypertensive emergency that could lead to end-organ damage. When organs such as the brain, heart, or kidney are affected, an intervention that will lower the blood pressure in several hours is indicated. Several pharmacologic options are available for treatment, with intravenous antihypertensive therapy being the cornerstone, but there is no standard of care. Careful consideration of each patient's specific complaint, history, and physical examination guides the emergency physician through the treatment algorithm.

  3. A simplified way for the urgent treatment of somatic pain in patients admitted to the emergency room: the SUPER algorithm.

    PubMed

    Franceschi, Francesco; Marsiliani, Davide; Alesi, Andrea; Mancini, Maria Grazia; Ojetti, Veronica; Candelli, Marcello; Gabrielli, Maurizio; D'Aurizio, Gabriella; Gilardi, Emanuele; Adducci, Enrica; Proietti, Rodolfo; Buccelletti, Francesco

    2015-12-01

    Somatic pain is one of the most frequent symptoms reported by patients presenting to the emergency department (ED), but, in spite of this, it is very often underestimated and under-treated. Moreover, pain-killers prescriptions are usually related to the medical examination, leading to a delay in its administration, thus worsening the patient's quality of life. With our study, we want to define and validate a systematic and homogeneous approach to analgesic drugs administration, testing a new therapeutic algorithm in terms of earliness, safety, and efficacy. 442 consecutive patients who accessed our ED for any kind of somatic pain were enrolled, and then randomly divided into two groups: group A follow the normal process of access to pain-control drugs, and group B follow our SUPER algorithm for early administration of drugs to relieve pain directly from triage. We excluded from the study, patients with abdominal pain referred to the surgeon, patients with headache, recent history of trauma, history of drug allergies, and life-threatening conditions or lack of cooperation. Drugs used in the study were those available in our ED, such as paracetamol, paracetamol/codeine, ketorolac-tromethamine, and tramadol-hydrochloride. Pain level, risk factors, indication, and contraindication of each drug were taken into account in our SUPER algorithm for a rapid and safe administration of it. The Verbal Numeric Scale (VNS) and the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) were used to verify the patient's health and perception of it. Only 59 patient from group A (27.1 %) received analgesic therapy (at the time of the medical examination) compared to 181 patients (100 %) of group B (p < 0.001). Group B patients, received analgesic therapy 76 min before group A subjects (p < 0.01), resulting in a significant lower VNS (7.31 ± 1.68 vs 4.75 ± 2.3; p < 0.001), and a superior VAS after discharge (54.43 ± 22.16 vs 61.30 ± 19.13; p < 0.001) compared to group A subjects. No significant differences

  4. ISG15 in the tumorigenesis and treatment of cancer: An emerging role in malignancies of the digestive system

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Chaohui; Sheng, Xinyi; Ma, Min; Xia, Man; Ouyang, Linda

    2016-01-01

    The interferon-stimulated gene 15 ubiquitin-like modifier (ISG15) encodes an IFN-inducible, ubiquitin-like protein. The ISG15 protein forms conjugates with numerous cellular proteins that are involved in a multitude of cellular functions, including interferon-induced immune responses and the regulation of cellular protein turnover. The expression of ISG15 and ISG15-mediated conjugation has been implicated in a wide range of human tumors and cancer cell lines, but the roles of ISG15 in tumorigenesis and responses to anticancer treatments remain largely unknown. In this review, we discuss the findings of recent studies with regard to the role of ISG15 pathways in cancers of the digestive system. PMID:27626310

  5. Emergence of resistance in normal human aerobic commensal flora during telithromycin and amoxicillin-clavulanic acid treatments.

    PubMed

    Crémieux, Anne-Claude; Muller-Serieys, Claudette; Panhard, Xavière; Delatour, Frédérique; Tchimichkian, Marina; Mentre, France; Andremont, Antoine

    2003-06-01

    Mean fecal global yeast counts increased similarly during 7 days of treatment with telithromycin (800 mg once daily) or amoxicillin-clavulanic acid (amoxiclav) (1 g of amoxicillin and 125 mg of clavulanic acid 3 times daily) in human volunteers and decreased slowly thereafter. On skin, coagulase-negative staphylococci of decreased susceptibility (DS) to telithromycin increased in the telithromycin group, whereas those with DS to methicillin increased in the amoxiclav group. A similar antibiotic-related shift towards homologous DS was observed for oral nongroupable streptococci (NGS), but in addition, the prevalence of NGS resistant to both classes of antibiotics was significantly greater in the amoxiclav group at days 8 (P < 0.01) and 45 (P < 0.015).

  6. Protons, Photons, and the Prostate - Is There Emerging Evidence in the Ongoing Discussion on Particle Therapy for the Treatment of Prostate Cancer?

    PubMed

    Schiller, Kilian C; Habl, Gregor; Combs, Stephanie E

    2016-01-01

    Proton therapy is actively and repeatedly discussed within the framework of particle therapy for the treatment of prostate cancer (PC). The argument in favor of treating the prostate with protons is partly financial: given that small volumes are treated, treatment times are low, resulting in a hypothetical high patient throughput. However, such considerations should not form the basis of medical decision-making. There are also physical and biological arguments which further support the use of particle therapy for PC. The only relevant randomized data currently available is the study by Zietman and colleagues, comparing a high to a low proton boost, resulting in a significant increase in PSA-free survival in the experimental (high dose) arm (1). With modern photon treatments and image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT), equally high doses can be applied with photons and, thus, a randomized trial comparing high-end photons to protons is warranted. For high-linear energy transfer (LET) particles, such as carbon ions, the increase in relative biological effectiveness could potentially convert into an improvement in outcome. Additionally, through the physical differences of protons and carbon ions, the steeper dose gradient with carbon ions and the lack of beam broadening in the carbon beam lead to a superior dose distribution supporting the idea of hypofractionation. Biological and clinical data are emerging, however, has practice-changing evidence already arrived?

  7. The emerging farmed fish species meagre (Argyrosomus regius): how culinary treatment affects nutrients and contaminants concentration and associated benefit-risk balance.

    PubMed

    Costa, Sara; Afonso, Cláudia; Bandarra, Narcisa Maria; Gueifão, Sandra; Castanheira, Isabel; Carvalho, Maria Luísa; Cardoso, Carlos; Nunes, Maria Leonor

    2013-10-01

    The effect of cooking methods (boiling, grilling, and roasting) on the proximate and mineral composition, contaminants concentration and fatty acids profile was evaluated aiming to understand the benefits and risks associated to the consumption of the emerging farmed fish meagre (Argyrosomus regius). All the treatments led to lower moisture content. After grilling and roasting, the SFA, MUFA and PUFA contents increased. There was no degradation of EPA and DHA during the culinary processes. Significant retention of minerals in grilled and roasted meagre samples was registered. For Pb and Cd there were no concentration differences between culinary treatments and regarding raw fish. Whereas As level was higher in grilled meagre, total Hg and Me-Hg values were augmented in grilled and roasted meagre. The consumption of meagre is advisable due to the low and healthy fat, high selenium and protein content. Grilling would be the best culinary treatment due to the retention of protein, EPA, DHA and minerals. But as the risk of ingestion of Me-Hg content also increases, based on the risk assessment, intake should not exceed two weekly meals, provided that no other important Me-Hg food source is present in the diet. Otherwise, even this maximum threshold should be lower.

  8. Protons, Photons, and the Prostate – Is There Emerging Evidence in the Ongoing Discussion on Particle Therapy for the Treatment of Prostate Cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Schiller, Kilian C.; Habl, Gregor; Combs, Stephanie E.

    2016-01-01

    Proton therapy is actively and repeatedly discussed within the framework of particle therapy for the treatment of prostate cancer (PC). The argument in favor of treating the prostate with protons is partly financial: given that small volumes are treated, treatment times are low, resulting in a hypothetical high patient throughput. However, such considerations should not form the basis of medical decision-making. There are also physical and biological arguments which further support the use of particle therapy for PC. The only relevant randomized data currently available is the study by Zietman and colleagues, comparing a high to a low proton boost, resulting in a significant increase in PSA-free survival in the experimental (high dose) arm (1). With modern photon treatments and image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT), equally high doses can be applied with photons and, thus, a randomized trial comparing high-end photons to protons is warranted. For high-linear energy transfer (LET) particles, such as carbon ions, the increase in relative biological effectiveness could potentially convert into an improvement in outcome. Additionally, through the physical differences of protons and carbon ions, the steeper dose gradient with carbon ions and the lack of beam broadening in the carbon beam lead to a superior dose distribution supporting the idea of hypofractionation. Biological and clinical data are emerging, however, has practice-changing evidence already arrived? PMID:26858936

  9. Incidence rates of treatment-emergent adverse events and related hospitalization are reduced with azacitidine compared with conventional care regimens in older patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Seymour, John F; Döhner, Hartmut; Minden, Mark D; Stone, Richard; Gambini, Dominique; Dougherty, Donna; Beach, C L; Weaver, Jerry; Dombret, Hervé

    2017-06-01

    Relative risks of treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs) and related hospitalization is most accurate when accounting for treatment exposure. AZA-AML-001 showed azacitidine (AZA) prolonged overall survival versus conventional care regimens (CCR) in older patients (≥65 years) with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) by 3.9 months. Preselection of CCR before study randomization allows evaluation of AZA safety in patient subgroups with similar clinical features. Within preselection groups, AZA exposure was greater than each CCR. Incidence rates (IRs; numbers of events normalized for drug exposure time) of hospitalizations and days in hospital for TEAEs per patient-year of exposure were to varying degrees lower with AZA versus each CCR. Overall survival was significantly prolonged with AZA versus best supportive care (BSC) in AZA-AML-001; this analysis showed 55% and 41% reductions in IRs of TEAE-related hospitalization and days in hospital, respectively, with AZA versus BSC. Older patients with AML unable to tolerate intensive therapy should be offered active low-intensity treatment.

  10. Sorption of ionized and neutral emerging trace organic compounds onto activated sludge from different wastewater treatment configurations.

    PubMed

    Hyland, Katherine C; Dickenson, Eric R V; Drewes, Jörg E; Higgins, Christopher P

    2012-04-15

    The objective of this study was to examine sorption of a suite of 19 trace organic contaminants (TOrCs) to activated sludge. Compounds examined in this study included neutral, nonionized TOrCs as well as acidic TOrCs which may carry a negative charge and basic TOrCs which may carry a positive charge at the pH of wastewater. These TOrCs were evaluated to examine how sorptive behavior might differ for TOrCs in different states of charge. Additionally, multiple sludges from geographically and operationally different wastewater treatment plants were studied to elicit how solid-phase characteristics influence TOrC sorption. Characterization of sludge solids from 6 full scale treatment facilities and 3 bench-scale reactors showed no significant difference in fraction organic carbon (f(oc)) and cation exchange capacity (CEC). Sorption experiments demonstrated that sorption of TOrCs also exhibits little variation between these different sludges. Organic carbon normalized partition coefficients (logK(oc)) were determined as a measure of sorption, and were found to correlate well with octanol-water partition coefficients (logK(ow)) for nonionized TOrCs, and logD(ow) for anionic TOrCs where logD(ow) is greater than 2. These data were used to construct a linear free energy relationship (LFER), which was comparable to existing LFERs for sorption onto sludge. No trend in sorption was apparent for the remaining anionic TOrCs or for the cationic TOrCs. These data suggest that predicting sorption to activated sludge based on K(ow) values is a reasonable approach for neutral TOrCs using existing LFERs, but electrostatic (and likely other) interactions may govern the sorptive behavior of the charged organic chemicals to sludge.

  11. Emergency Contraception

    MedlinePlus

    ... against STDs even when using another method of birth control. If a condom breaks (or a couple has ... Emergency contraception is not recommended as a regular birth control method . Instead, it is used for emergencies only. ...

  12. Emergency Contraception

    MedlinePlus

    f AQ FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS FAQ114 CONTRACEPTION Emergency Contraception • What is emergency contraception (EC)? • How does EC work? • What are the different types of EC? • What is the most ...

  13. Past Emergencies

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    These activities, some of national significance requiring coordination with other agencies, demonstrate the emergency response program and provide valuable experience so that EPA can better prevent, prepare for, and respond to emergencies in the future.

  14. The contribution of health anxiety to retrospectively-recalled emergency department visits within a sample of patients in residential substance abuse treatment.

    PubMed

    Fergus, Thomas A; Bardeen, Joseph R; Gratz, Kim L; Fulton, Jessica J; Tull, Matthew T

    2015-01-01

    With the burden of emergency department (ED) use increasing, research examining the factors associated with ED visits among individuals who use the ED most frequently is needed. Given that substance use is strongly linked to ED visits, this study sought to examine the factors associated with greater ED visits among patients with substance use disorders (SUD). More precisely, we examined whether health anxiety incrementally contributes to the prediction of ED visits for medical care among adult patients (N = 118) in a residential substance abuse disorder treatment facility. As predicted, health anxiety was significantly positively correlated with ED visits during the past year. Furthermore, health anxiety remained a significant predictor of ED visits after accounting for sociodemographic variables, frequency of substance use, and physical health status. These results suggest that health anxiety may contribute to increased ED visits for medical care among individuals with SUD.

  15. Effect of zinc in tablet and suspension formulations in the treatment of acute diarrhoea among young children in an emergency setting of earthquake affected region of Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Habib, Muhammad Atif; Soofi, Sajid Bashir; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A

    2010-12-01

    A longitudinal cohort study was conducted at Camp Hospital Batagram in August 2006 to ascertain the effect of Zinc utilization in tablet and suspension formulations on the frequency and recovery rates of diarrhoea among young children in the emergency settings of earthquake affected region of Pakistan. Two hundred patients were recruited and followed up, the patients were allocated either of the 2 groups i.e. A (zinc in tablets form) and B (zinc in suspension form). Both groups also received WHO recommended treatment for diarrhoea. Most of the cases recovered from the illness within 3 days after presentation. Significant p-values were established among Zinc use and reduction in frequency of stools on Day 2 and 3, with better outcome in group B. The study supports the notion that zinc reduces the frequency and improves recovery rates of diarrhoea in any form and has better compliance and outcomes with the use in suspension form.

  16. Emergence of Ceftazidime-Avibactam Resistance Due to Plasmid-Borne blaKPC-3 Mutations during Treatment of Carbapenem-Resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae Infections.

    PubMed

    Shields, Ryan K; Chen, Liang; Cheng, Shaoji; Chavda, Kalyan D; Press, Ellen G; Snyder, Avin; Pandey, Ruchi; Doi, Yohei; Kreiswirth, Barry N; Nguyen, M Hong; Clancy, Cornelius J

    2017-03-01

    Ceftazidime-avibactam is a novel β-lactam/β-lactamase inhibitor with activity against carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) that produce Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC). We report the first cases of ceftazidime-avibactam resistance to develop during treatment of CRE infections and identify resistance mechanisms. Ceftazidime-avibactam-resistant K. pneumoniae emerged in three patients after ceftazidime-avibactam treatment for 10 to 19 days. Whole-genome sequencing (WGS) of longitudinal ceftazidime-avibactam-susceptible and -resistant K. pneumoniae isolates was used to identify potential resistance mechanisms. WGS identified mutations in plasmid-borne blaKPC-3, which were not present in baseline isolates. blaKPC-3 mutations emerged independently in isolates of a novel sequence type 258 sublineage and resulted in variant KPC-3 enzymes. The mutations were validated as resistance determinants by measuring MICs of ceftazidime-avibactam and other agents following targeted gene disruption in K. pneumoniae, plasmid transfer, and blaKPC cloning into competent Escherichia coli In rank order, the impact of KPC-3 variants on ceftazidime-avibactam MICs was as follows: D179Y/T243M double substitution > D179Y > V240G. Remarkably, mutations reduced meropenem MICs ≥4-fold from baseline, restoring susceptibility in K. pneumoniae from two patients. Cefepime and ceftriaxone MICs were also reduced ≥4-fold against D179Y/T243M and D179Y variant isolates, but susceptibility was not restored. Reverse transcription-PCR revealed that expression of blaKPC-3 encoding D179Y/T243M and D179Y variants was diminished compared to blaKPC-3 expression in baseline isolates. In conclusion, the development of resistance-conferring blaKPC-3 mutations in K. pneumoniae within 10 to 19 days of ceftazidime-avibactam exposure is troubling, but clinical impact may be ameliorated if carbapenem susceptibility is restored in certain isolates.

  17. Emergent Expertise?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGivern, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    The concept of emergence appears in various places within the literature on expertise and expert practice. Here, I examine some of these applications of emergence in the light of two prominent accounts of emergence from the philosophy of science and philosophy of mind. I evaluate these accounts with respect to several specific contexts in which…

  18. Emergent Treatment of Acute Embolic Superior Mesenteric Ischemia with Combination of Thrombolysis and Angioplasty: Report of Two Cases

    SciTech Connect

    Wakabayashi, H. Shiode, Tsuyoki; Kurose, Michihiro; Moritani, Hiroki; Fujiki, Shigeatsu; Morimoto, Naoki; Kusachi, Shozo

    2004-08-15

    We successfully revascularized the acutely occluded superior mesenteric artery (SMA), caused by a thromboembolus, with a combination of thrombolysis and percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) in 2 patients. Considerable percent luminal reduction (>90%) was still observed after thrombolysis in both patients. Subsequent adjunctive balloon angioplasty produced sufficient luminal diameter of the SMA (<20% luminal reduction). No serious acute procedural complication occurred. The time from onset to partial reperfusion by thrombolysis was approximately 4.5 and 5.5 hours. Approximately 1 week after the combination therapy, colonoscopy and a small bowel radiocontrast series showed localized mucosal ischemia with mild erosions and ulcerations in the terminal ileum and ascending colon in 1 patient. Subsequent bowel resection was required but the resection was short (<20 cm). The other patient's bowel condition was good and did not require any surgical treatment. The present cases suggest that combination therapy is useful for achieving rapid and sufficient revascularization of acute proximal thromboembolic SMA occlusion, and prevents the considerably broad bowel necrosis that requires surgical bowel resection, resulting in short bowel syndrome.

  19. Rationale and emerging approaches for targeting lung repair and regeneration in the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Rennard, Stephen I; Wachenfeldt, Karin von

    2011-08-01

    Lung repair and regeneration are appropriate therapeutic targets for the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Abnormal repair results if fibrosis of the airways is a major contributor to fixed airflow limitation in airway disease. Inadequate repair in the face of tissue injury can contribute to the development of emphysema. With respect to the latter, acute exposure to cigarette smoke can impair repair responses of several cell types in the lung. Fibroblasts cultured from the lungs of patients with emphysema have persistent defects in repair that include modulation of extracellular matrix as well as production of growth factors that modulate other lung parenchymal cells. Some of the deficient repair functions appear to result from insensitivity to TGF-β and overproduction of prostaglandin E. Pharmacologic interventions targeting these pathways have the potential to at least partially reverse the abnormal repair. Alternate strategies that could modulate lung repair and regeneration could target resident or circulating stem/progenitor cells or potentially involve transplantation of new stem cells. Therapy directed at lung repair has the potential to restore lost lung function. In contrast to therapy designed to slow the progression of COPD, it may be much easier and less expensive to demonstrate efficacy for a therapy that restores lung function.

  20. Application of CWPO to the treatment of pharmaceutical emerging pollutants in different water matrices with a ferromagnetic catalyst.

    PubMed

    Munoz, Macarena; Mora, Francisco J; de Pedro, Zahara M; Alvarez-Torrellas, Silvia; Casas, Jose A; Rodriguez, Juan J

    2017-06-05

    CWPO has proved to be effective for the treatment of representative pharmaceuticals (sulfamethoxazole, atenolol, metronidazole, diltiazem, trimethoprim and ranitidine) in different water matrices (ultrapure water, surface water, WWTP effluent and hospital wastewater). Complete removal of the pollutants and the aromatic intermediates was achieved using the stoichiometric dose of H2O2, a catalyst (Fe3O4/γ-Al2O3) load of 2gL(-1), pH 3 and temperature of 50-75°C. Accordingly, the ecotoxicity was reduced to negligible values. The degradation was faster when the pharmaceuticals were together, being the reaction time for the elimination of the most refractory species (metronidazole) shortened from 4h to 1h. The mineralization of the drugs was fairly different, being the most reactive species those containing several aromatic rings (XTOC∼80%) and the most refractory that bearing an imidazolium ring (XTOC∼35%). The water matrix affected the kinetics of the process but in all cases complete conversion of the drugs was reached within 1h. The presence of dissolved organic matter (surface water) seemed to promote drugs degradation while the occurrence of inorganic ions (real WTTP and hospital effluents) partially inhibited it due to scavenging effects. Remarkably, the process was successfully operated at the typical concentrations of main micropollutant sources (μgL(-1)).

  1. Psychiatric emergencies.

    PubMed

    Cavanaugh, S V

    1986-09-01

    Psychiatric disorders are common in medical inpatient and outpatient populations. As a result, internists commonly are the first to see psychiatric emergencies. As with all medical problems, a good history, including a collateral history from relatives and friends, physical and mental status examination, and appropriate laboratory tests help establish a preliminary diagnosis and treatment plan. Patients with suicidal ideation usually have multiple stressors in the environment and/or a psychiatric disorder (i.e., a major affective disorder, dysthymic disorder, anxiety or panic disorder, psychotic disorder, alcohol or drug abuse, a personality disorder, and/or an adjustment disorder). Of all patients who commit suicide, 70% have a major depressive disorder, schizophrenia, psychotic organic mental disorder, alcoholism, drug abuse, and borderline personality disorder. Patients who are at great risk have minimal supports, a history of previous suicide attempts, a plan with high lethality, hopelessness, psychosis, paranoia, and/or command self-destructive hallucinations. Treatment is directed toward placing the patient in a protected environment and providing psychotropic medication and/or psychotherapy for the underlying psychiatric problem. Other psychiatric emergencies include psychotic and violent patients. Psychotic disorders fall into two categories etiologically: those that have an identifiable organic factor causing the psychosis and those that have an underlying psychiatric disorder. Initially, it is essential to rule out organic pathology that is life-threatening or could cause irreversible brain damage. After such organic causes are ruled out, neuroleptic medication is indicated. If the patient is not agitated or combative, he or she may be placed on oral divided doses of neuroleptics in the antipsychotic range. Patients who are agitated or psychotic need rapid tranquilization with an intramuscular neuroleptic every half hour to 1 hour until the agitation and

  2. Large number of rebounding/founder HIV variants emerge from multifocal infection in lymphatic tissues after treatment interruption.

    PubMed

    Rothenberger, Meghan K; Keele, Brandon F; Wietgrefe, Stephen W; Fletcher, Courtney V; Beilman, Gregory J; Chipman, Jeffrey G; Khoruts, Alexander; Estes, Jacob D; Anderson, Jodi; Callisto, Samuel P; Schmidt, Thomas E; Thorkelson, Ann; Reilly, Cavan; Perkey, Katherine; Reimann, Thomas G; Utay, Netanya S; Nganou Makamdop, Krystelle; Stevenson, Mario; Douek, Daniel C; Haase, Ashley T; Schacker, Timothy W

    2015-03-10

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) suppresses HIV replication in most individuals but cannot eradicate latently infected cells established before ART was initiated. Thus, infection rebounds when treatment is interrupted by reactivation of virus production from this reservoir. Currently, one or a few latently infected resting memory CD4 T cells are thought be the principal source of recrudescent infection, but this estimate is based on peripheral blood rather than lymphoid tissues (LTs), the principal sites of virus production and persistence before initiating ART. We, therefore, examined lymph node (LN) and gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) biopsies from fully suppressed subjects, interrupted therapy, monitored plasma viral load (pVL), and repeated biopsies on 12 individuals as soon as pVL became detectable. Isolated HIV RNA-positive (vRNA+) cells were detected by in situ hybridization in LTs obtained before interruption in several patients. After interruption, multiple foci of vRNA+ cells were detected in 6 of 12 individuals as soon as pVL was measureable and in some subjects, in more than one anatomic site. Minimal estimates of the number of rebounding/founder (R/F) variants were determined by single-gene amplification and sequencing of viral RNA or DNA from peripheral blood mononuclear cells and plasma obtained at or just before viral recrudescence. Sequence analysis revealed a large number of R/F viruses representing recrudescent viremia from multiple sources. Together, these findings are consistent with the origins of recrudescent infection by reactivation from many latently infected cells at multiple sites. The inferred large pool of cells and sites to rekindle recrudescent infection highlights the challenges in eradicating HIV.

  3. Randomised controlled comparison of continuous positive airways pressure, bilevel non-invasive ventilation, and standard treatment in emergency department patients with acute cardiogenic pulmonary oedema

    PubMed Central

    Crane, S; Elliott, M; Gilligan, P; Richards, K; Gray, A

    2004-01-01

    Background: Continuous positive airways pressure (CPAP) and bilevel non-invasive ventilation may have beneficial effects in the treatment of patients with acute cardiogenic pulmonary oedema. The efficacy of both treatments was assessed in the UK emergency department setting, in a randomised comparison with standard oxygen therapy. Methods: Sixty patients presenting with acidotic (pH<7.35) acute, cardiogenic pulmonary oedema, were randomly assigned conventional oxygen therapy, CPAP (10 cm H2O), or bilevel ventilation (IPAP 15 cm H2O, EPAP 5 cm H2O) provided by a standard ventilator through a face mask. The main end points were treatment success at two hours and in-hospital mortality. Analyses were by intention to treat. Results: Treatment success (defined as all of respiratory rate<23 bpm, oxygen saturation of>90%, and arterial blood pH>7.35 (that is, reversal of acidosis), at the end of the two hour study period) occurred in three (15%) patients in the control group, seven (35%) in the CPAP group, and nine (45%) in the bilevel group (p = 0.116). Fourteen (70%) of the control group patients survived to hospital discharge, compared with 20 (100%) in the CPAP group and 15 (75%) in the bilevel group (p = 0.029; Fisher's test). Conclusions: In this study, patients presenting with acute cardiogenic pulmonary oedema and acidosis, were more likely to survive to hospital discharge if treated with CPAP, rather than with bilevel ventilation or with conventional oxygen therapy. There was no relation between in hospital survival and early physiological changes. Survival rates were similar to other studies despite a low rate of endotracheal intubation. PMID:14988338

  4. Treatment of visceral leishmaniasis: anomalous pricing and distribution of AmBisome and emergence of an indigenous liposomal amphotericin B, FUNGISOME.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Pradyot; Ali, Nahid

    2016-09-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is one of the severest forms of parasite borne diseases worldwide with a mortality rate second only to malaria. Treatment of VL patients with currently available chemotherapeutic agents poses problems of large scale failure, toxicity, prolonged hospitalization time, high treatment cost and drug resistance. However, most of these problems can be overcome by the use of liposomal formulations of Amphotericin B (L-AmB). Of the two L-AmBs currently available in Indian market, AmBisome is imported and FUNGISOME is indigenous. Initially AmBisome remained exorbitantly costly and therefore inaccessible to most of the VL patients. However, with the launch of FUNGISOME in India, Gilead in agreement with WHO started a donation program of AmBisome in developing countries through a slashed price of US $18 per vial. The price reduction is, however, restricted to clinical trials thus eluding majority of the VL patients. In fact, India was not included in this program and AmBisome was sold in Indian market at prices higher than the WHO proposed price of US $18 per vial. FUNGISOME, on the other hand, produced consistently good results against VL both clinically and experimentally. In the context of unavailability and price anomaly of AmBisome, successful emergence of FUNGISOME could mark it as the major L-AmB against VL.

  5. Role of emerging neuroimaging modalities in patients with cognitive impairment: a review from the Canadian Consensus Conference on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Dementia 2012

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The Fourth Canadian Consensus Conference on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Dementia (CCCDTD4) was held 3 to 4 May 2012 in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. A group of neuroimaging experts were assigned the task of reviewing and summarizing the literature on clinical and research applications of different neuroimaging modalities in cognitive disorders. This paper summarizes the literature and recommendations made to the conference regarding the role of several emerging neuroimaging modalities in cognitive disorders. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and diffusion tensor imaging are discussed in detail within this paper. Other emergent neuroimaging modalities such as positron emission tomography with novel ligands, high-field MRI, arterial spin labeling MRI and noncerebral blood flow single-photon emission computerized tomography are only discussed briefly. Neuroimaging modalities that were recommended at the CCCDTD4 for both clinical and research applications such as amyloid and flurodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography, computerized tomography and structural MRI are discussed in a separate paper by the same authors. A literature search was conducted using the PubMed database including articles in English that involved human subjects and covered the period from the last CCCDTD publication (CCCDTD3; January 2006) until April 2012. Search terms included the name of the specific modality, dementia, Alzheimer's disease, and mild cognitive impairment. A separate search used the same parameters but was restricted to review articles to identify recent evidence-based reviews. Case studies and small case series were not included. Papers representing current evidence were selected, reviewed, and summarized, and the results were presented at the CCCDTD4 meeting with recommendations regarding the utility of various neuroimaging modalities in cognitive disorders. The evidence was graded according to the Oxford Centre for Evidence Based

  6. Role of emerging neuroimaging modalities in patients with cognitive impairment: a review from the Canadian Consensus Conference on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Dementia 2012.

    PubMed

    Burhan, Amer M; Bartha, Robert; Bocti, Christian; Borrie, Michael; Laforce, Robert; Rosa-Neto, Pedro; Soucy, Jean-Paul

    2013-07-08

    The Fourth Canadian Consensus Conference on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Dementia (CCCDTD4) was held 3 to 4 May 2012 in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. A group of neuroimaging experts were assigned the task of reviewing and summarizing the literature on clinical and research applications of different neuroimaging modalities in cognitive disorders. This paper summarizes the literature and recommendations made to the conference regarding the role of several emerging neuroimaging modalities in cognitive disorders. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and diffusion tensor imaging are discussed in detail within this paper. Other emergent neuroimaging modalities such as positron emission tomography with novel ligands, high-field MRI, arterial spin labeling MRI and noncerebral blood flow single-photon emission computerized tomography are only discussed briefly. Neuroimaging modalities that were recommended at the CCCDTD4 for both clinical and research applications such as amyloid and flurodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography, computerized tomography and structural MRI are discussed in a separate paper by the same authors. A literature search was conducted using the PubMed database including articles in English that involved human subjects and covered the period from the last CCCDTD publication (CCCDTD3; January 2006) until April 2012. Search terms included the name of the specific modality, dementia, Alzheimer's disease, and mild cognitive impairment. A separate search used the same parameters but was restricted to review articles to identify recent evidence-based reviews. Case studies and small case series were not included. Papers representing current evidence were selected, reviewed, and summarized, and the results were presented at the CCCDTD4 meeting with recommendations regarding the utility of various neuroimaging modalities in cognitive disorders. The evidence was graded according to the Oxford Centre for Evidence Based

  7. Life cycle assessment for emerging materials: case study of a garden bed constructed from lumber produced with three different copper treatments

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although important data and methodological challenges facing LCA and emerging materials exist, this LCA captures material and process changes that are important drivers of environmental impacts. LCA methods need to be amended to reflect properties of emerging materials that deter...

  8. Oral risperidone with lorazepam versus oral zuclopenthixol with lorazepam in the treatment of acute psychosis in emergency psychiatry: a prospective, comparative, open-label study.

    PubMed

    Hovens, J E; Dries, P J T; Melman, C T M; Wapenaar, R J C; Loonen, A J M

    2005-01-01

    Acutely psychotic patients presenting as psychiatric emergencies with aggression or agitation are often administered conventional antipsychotics intramuscularly. However, patients view intramuscular administration as coercive, and conventional antipsychotics are often associated with adverse events. In this open study, consecutive adult patients presenting with an acute exacerbation of schizophrenia or other psychotic disorder were assigned to oral risperidone 2-6 mg/day (n = 48) or oral zuclopenthixol 20-50 mg/day (n = 27) for 7-14 days. Lorazepam (either oral or intramuscular) was administered to both groups as needed. Patients were assessed regularly until day 14 or discharge. Mean Positive And Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) aggression scores (sum of item scores on excitement, poor impulse control, hostility and uncooperativeness) decreased steadily and similarly in both groups; the mean changes from baseline were statistically significant at days 10 and 14 and at study end-point. The mean decrease at study end-point in the PANSS component score for hostility was statistically significant in the risperidone group, but not in the zuclopenthixol group. Social Dysfunction and Aggression Scale aggression scores and Clinical Global Impression scores decreased significantly and similarly in both groups. Overall, 18.7% of patients showed minor extrapyramidal symptoms during the study, but only 16.7% of risperidone-treated patients, compared to 59.3% of zuclopenthixol-treated patients, received anti-parkinsonian medication (p < 0.001). Lorazepam was administered to all of the patients assigned to risperidone and to 89% of those assigned to zuclopenthixol. Oral risperidone plus lorazepam is a convenient, effective and well-tolerated alternative to conventional antipsychotics for the treatment of acute psychosis in emergency psychiatry.

  9. Emerging therapies in rosacea.

    PubMed

    Layton, Alison; Thiboutot, Diane

    2013-12-01

    Rosacea is a common skin disorder with multiple symptoms. The emergence of research that furthers understanding of pathophysiological mechanisms has created new targets for disease treatment. Specifically, there is a need for new treatments that address the various erythematic symptoms associated with rosacea. Systemic and topical therapies have both yielded positive results in treating rosacea with various medications. Subantimicrobial-dose doxycycline is one such promising treatment. Development of novel products in the near future should help achieve more satisfactory outcomes for patients.

  10. Correlates of Performance of Healthcare Workers in Emergency, Triage, Assessment and Treatment plus Admission Care (ETAT+) Course in Rwanda: Context Matters

    PubMed Central

    Hategekimana, Celestin; Shoveller, Jeannie; Tuyisenge, Lisine; Kenyon, Cynthia; Cechetto, David F.; Lynd, Larry D.

    2016-01-01

    Background The Emergency, Triage, Assessment and Treatment plus Admission care (ETAT+) course, a comprehensive advanced pediatric life support course, was introduced in Rwanda in 2010 to facilitate the achievement of the fourth Millennium Development Goal. The impact of the course on improving healthcare workers (HCWs) knowledge and practical skills related to providing emergency care to severely ill newborns and children in Rwanda has not been studied. Objective To evaluate the impact of the ETAT+ course on HCWs knowledge and practical skills, and to identify factors associated with greater improvement in knowledge and skills. Methods We used a one group, pre-post test study using data collected during ETAT+ course implementation from 2010 to 2013. The paired t-test was used to assess the effect of ETAT+ course on knowledge improvement in participating HCWs. Mixed effects linear and logistic regression models were fitted to explore factors associated with HCWs performance in ETAT+ course knowledge and practical skills assessments, while accounting for clustering of HCWs in hospitals. Results 374 HCWs were included in the analysis. On average, knowledge scores improved by 22.8/100 (95% confidence interval (CI) 20.5, 25.1). In adjusted models, bilingual (French & English) participants had a greater improvement in knowledge 7.3 (95% CI 4.3, 10.2) and higher odds of passing the practical skills assessment (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 2.60; 95% CI 1.25, 5.40) than those who were solely proficient in French. Participants who attended a course outside of their health facility had higher odds of passing the skills assessment (aOR = 2.11; 95% CI 1.01, 4.44) than those who attended one within their health facility. Conclusions The current study shows a positive impact of ETAT+ course on improving participants’ knowledge and skills related to managing emergency pediatric and neonatal care conditions. The findings regarding key factors influencing ETAT+ course outcomes

  11. Emergency medical dispatching: rapid identification and treatment of acute myocardial infarction. National Heart Attack Alert Program Coordinating Committee Access to Care Subcommittee.

    PubMed

    1995-01-01

    Emergency medical telephone calls (ie, those made to 9-1-1 or 7-digit emergency numbers) are directed to emergency medical dispatchers (EMDs) who are responsible for quickly obtaining critical pieces of information from the caller, then activating an appropriate level of emergency medical services (EMS) response and providing the caller with patient care instructions until medical help arrives. The impact of well-trained, medically managed EMDs on the early care of potential acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patients is believed to be beneficial. However, standards for emergency medical dispatching vary widely across the nation. To improve emergency medical dispatching for AMI patients in the United States, this article by the Access to Care Subcommittee on behalf of the National Heart Attack Alert Program makes a number of recommendations regarding the use of medical dispatch protocols, provision of dispatch life support, EMD training, EMD certification, and emergency medical dispatch quality control and improvement processes.

  12. Dermatologic emergencies.

    PubMed

    Sica, P A

    1986-03-01

    Being able to recognize and treat a dermatologic emergency is extremely important to the primary care physician. This ability is very rewarding for the patient and gratifying to the physician. In this article, some of the more commonly encountered emergencies are discussed.

  13. Corneal Emergencies.

    PubMed

    Belknap, Ellen B

    2015-09-01

    Corneal emergencies can be due to a number of different causes and may be vision threatening if left untreated. In an attempt to stabilize the cornea, it is of benefit to place an Elizabethan collar on the patient to prevent further corneal damage. This article discusses the diagnosis, prognosis, and management of corneal emergencies in dogs and cats.

  14. The Impact of Screening, Brief Intervention and Referral for Treatment in Emergency Department Patients’ Alcohol Use: A 3-, 6- and 12-month Follow-up

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Aims: This study aims to determine the impact of Screening, Brief Intervention and Referral for Treatment (SBIRT) in reducing alcohol consumption in emergency department (ED) patients at 3, 6, and 12 months following exposure to the intervention. Methods: Patients drinking above the low-risk limits (at-risk to dependence), as defined by National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), were recruited from 14 sites nationwide from April to August 2004. A quasi-experimental comparison group design included sequential recruitment of intervention and control patients at each site. Control patients received a written handout. The Intervention group received the handout and participated in a brief negotiated interview with direct referral for treatment if indicated. Follow-up surveys were conducted at 3, 6, and 12 months by telephone using an Interactive Voice Response (IVR) system. Results: Of the 1132 eligible patients consented and enrolled (581 control, 551 intervention), 699 (63%), 575 (52%) and 433 (38%) completed follow-up surveys via IVR at 3, 6, and 12 months, respectively. Regression analysis adjusting for the clustered sampling design and using multiple imputation procedures to account for subject attrition revealed that those receiving SBIRT reported roughly three drinks less per week than controls (B = −3.00, SE = 1.06, P < 0.05) and the level of maximum drinks per occasion was approximately three-fourths of a drink less than controls (B = -0.76, SE = 0.29, P < 0.05) at 3 months. At 6 and 12 months post-intervention, these effects had weakened considerably and were no longer statistically or substantively significant. Conclusion: SBIRT delivered by ED providers appears to have short-term effectiveness in reducing at-risk drinking, but multi-contact interventions or booster programs may be necessary to maintain long-term reductions in risky drinking. PMID:20876217

  15. The emergence of proteinase-activated receptor-2 as a novel target for the treatment of inflammation-related CNS disorders

    PubMed Central

    Bushell, Trevor

    2007-01-01

    The signalling molecules that are involved in inflammatory pathways are now thought to play a part in many disorders of the central nervous system (CNS). In common with peripheral chronic inflammatory diseases such a rheumatoid arthritis and ulcerative colitis, evidence now exists for the involvement of inflammatory cytokines, for example tumour necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukins (IL), in neurological disorders. A common factor observed with the up-regulation of these cytokines in peripheral inflammatory diseases, is the increased expression of the proteinase-activated receptor (PAR) subtype PAR-2. Indeed, recent evidence suggests that targeting PAR-2 helps reduce joint swelling observed in animal models of arthritis. So could targeting this receptor prove to be useful in treating those CNS disorders where inflammatory processes are thought to play an intrinsic role? The aim of this review is to summarize the emerging data regarding the role of PAR-2 in neuroinflammation and ischaemic injury and discuss its potential as an exciting new target for the prevention and/or treatment of CNS disorders. PMID:17347265

  16. Emergency contraception.

    PubMed

    Van Look, P F; von Hertzen, H

    1993-01-01

    The term 'emergency contraception', as employed in this paper, refers to methods that are used as emergency procedures to prevent pregnancy following unprotected intercourse. Alternative, less appropriate, terms are postcoital and 'morning-after' contraception. References to postcoital preparations can be found as far back as 1500 BC in Egyptian papyri, but it was not until fairly recently that contraceptive research has been able to at least partially fulfill that need. The development of hormonal methods of emergency contraception goes back to the 1960s when the first human trials of postcoitally administered high-dose oestrogens were undertaken. Combined oestrogen- progestogen combination therapy (the so-called Yuzpe regimen) was introduced in the early 1970s, while the postcoital insertion of an intrauterine contraceptive device (IUD) for emergency contraception was first reported in 1976. Other compounds that have been tested more recently include levonorgestrel, the antiprogestogen mifepristone, and danazol. Although there is some debate about the magnitude of the protective effect, few people question the important role that emergency contraception can play in preventing unwanted pregnancy and hence maternal mortality and morbidity resulting from unsafe abortion. Given that the most often used methods of emergency contraception, namely the Yuzpe regimen and postcoital insertion of an IUD, rely on technology that has been available for some 30 years, family planning programmes that claim to be concerned with improving women's reproductive health, cannot really be excused if they do not provide emergency contraception as part of their routine services.

  17. Swimming Emergencies

    PubMed Central

    Beerman, Stephen B.

    1988-01-01

    Persons who have undergone swimming emergencies are seen in emergency departments everywhere. They are frequently young healthy citizens. In some instances they will receive better care in large specialized referral hospitals. Other problems can be managed well at local facilities. This article attempts to equip all family physicians with some knowledge and management guidelines for dealing with swimming emergencies, submersion injuries including near-drowning, accidental hypothermia, and triathalon hypothermia. The unique problems of hot tub near-drowning, infant water intoxication, and spinal injuries caused by diving are presented. PMID:21253260

  18. The Best-of-2-Worlds philosophy: developing local dismantling and global infrastructure network for sustainable e-waste treatment in emerging economies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng; Huisman, Jaco; Meskers, Christina E M; Schluep, Mathias; Stevels, Ab; Hagelüken, Christian

    2012-11-01

    E-waste is a complex waste category containing both hazardous and valuable substances. It demands for a cost-efficient treatment system which simultaneously liberates and refines target fractions in an environmentally sound way. In most developing countries there is a lack of systems covering all steps from disposal until final processing due to limited infrastructure and access to technologies and investment. This paper introduces the 'Best-of-2-Worlds' philosophy (Bo2W), which provides a network and pragmatic solution for e-waste treatment in emerging economies. It seeks technical and logistic integration of 'best' pre-processing in developing countries to manually dismantle e-waste and 'best' end-processing to treat hazardous and complex fractions in international state-of-the-art end-processing facilities. A series of dismantling trials was conducted on waste desktop computers, IT equipment, large and small household appliances, in order to compare the environmental and economic performances of the Bo2W philosophy with other conventional recycling scenarios. The assessment showed that the performance of the Bo2W scenario is more eco-efficient than mechanical separation scenarios and other local treatment solutions. For equipment containing substantial hazardous substances, it demands the assistance from domestic legislation for mandatory removal and safe handling of such fractions together with proper financing to cover the costs. Experience from Bo2W pilot projects in China and India highlighted key societal factors influencing successful implementation. These include market size, informal competitors, availability of national e-waste legislation, formal take-back systems, financing and trust between industrial players. The Bo2W philosophy can serve as a pragmatic and environmentally responsible transition before establishment of end-processing facilities in developing countries is made feasible. The executive models of Bo2W should be flexibly differentiated

  19. [Pediatric emergencies: Knowledge of basic measures for the emergency physician].

    PubMed

    Meyer, S; Grundmann, U; Reinert, J; Gortner, L

    2015-11-01

    Life-threatening pediatric emergencies are relatively rare in the prehospital setting. Thus, the treating emergency physician may not always be familiar with and well trained in these situations. However, pediatric emergencies require early recognition and initiation of specific diagnostic and therapeutic interventions to prevent further damage. The treatment of pediatric emergencies follows current recommendations as detailed in published international guidelines. The aim of this review is to familiarize the emergency physician with general aspects pertinent to this topic-most importantly anatomical and physiological characteristics in this cohort. Also, specific information with regard to analgesia and sedation, which may be warranted in the prehospital setting, will be provided.

  20. Emergency Response

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Information for first responders, industry, federal, state and local governments on EPA's role and available resources for response to oil spills, chemical, biological, radiological releases, and large-scale national emergencies.

  1. Emerging Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Denise

    1988-01-01

    Youth services programs and cholesterol in children's diets, two topics that may emerge as issues in schools and school districts in the near future, are addressed. Resources for further information are listed. (CB)

  2. Emergency contraception.

    PubMed

    Grimes, David A; Raymond, Elizabeth G

    2002-08-06

    Emergency contraception is used to prevent pregnancy after a coital act not adequately protected by a regular method of contraception. In contrast to early medical abortion, emergency contraception prevents a pregnancy from starting and does not disrupt an established pregnancy. The most commonly used approaches consist of two oral doses of contraceptive steroids. The levonorgestrel-only regimen (levonorgestrel, 0.75 mg, repeated in 12 hours) appears to be more effective and better tolerated than the Yuzpe regimen (ethinyl estradiol, 100 microg, and levonorgestrel, 0.5 mg, repeated in 12 hours). In the largest randomized, controlled trial to date, levonorgestrel prevented about 85% of pregnancies that would have occurred without its use. Hormonal emergency contraception has no known medical contraindications, although it is not indicated for suspected or confirmed pregnancy. However, if hormonal emergency contraception is inadvertently taken in early pregnancy, neither the woman nor the fetus will be harmed. Nausea and vomiting associated with the Yuzpe regimen can be reduced by prophylactic use of meclizine. A strong medical and legal case exists for making hormonal emergency contraception available over the counter, as has happened in countries other than the United States. Easier access to and wider use of emergency contraception could dramatically lower the high rates of unintended pregnancy and induced abortion in the United States.

  3. Emergency contraception.

    PubMed

    1994-01-01

    Two oral postcoital contraceptive agents are currently available. The first is a 2 x 2 pill; the second is a 5 x 5. Both release a higher dose of hormones than conventional contraceptive pills. Success rates range between 96% and 99%. They must be taken within 72 hours of intercourse. Side effects include nausea and vomiting. Contraindications are the same as for the common oral contraceptives. The contraceptive mode of action can be any of the following: 1) by making the lining of the uterus unreceptive; 2) by slowing the movement of the egg in the fallopian tube; or 3) by affecting the release of the egg. Emergency contraceptive pills have no effect once implantation takes place. The IUD can be used as an emergency postcoital contraceptive method if placed within 10 days of coitus. They are usually placed within 5-7 days because of laws regarding when birth control becomes abortion. One failure has been reported in Great Britain (December, 1993). Side effects are the same as with regular use. RU486/PG may be used in the future as an emergency contraceptive agent. Research is in progress on success rates and side effects. This agent could potentially be used at any time. Currently, emergency contraception can only be obtained by prescription. Limited hours and interrogating staff are obstacles in such emergencies. British women's groups are asking that emergency oral contraceptive pills be made available over the counter with advice from the pharmacist.

  4. Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) in a Polish Emergency Department: Three-Month Outcomes of a Randomized, Controlled Clinical Trial*

    PubMed Central

    Cherpitel, Cheryl J.; Moskalewicz, Jacek; Swiatkiewicz, Grazyna; Ye, Yu; Bond, Jason

    2009-01-01

    Objective: A randomized, controlled trial of screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) for drinking and related problems among at-risk and dependent drinkers was conducted in an emergency department (ED) in Sosnowiec, Poland, among patients ages 18 years and older. Method: Data were collected over a 23-week period, from 4:00 pm to midnight, and resulted in 446 patients being recruited into the study (90% of those who screened positive) and randomized to three conditions following a two-stage process: screened only (n = 147), assessed (n = 152), and received intervention (n = 147). Patients in the assessment (85%) and intervention (83%) conditions were blindly reassessed at 3 months via a telephone interview. Results: At 3-month follow-up, both groups showed significant decreases in the proportion who were positive for at-risk drinking, the primary outcome variable. Both groups also showed significant decreases in drinking days per week, drinks per drinking day, maximum drinks per occasion, and negative consequences of drinking. Using analysis of covariance to control for baseline measures and demographic characteristics, no difference in outcome measures was found between intervention and assessment conditions. Subgroup analysis found some significant interactions between intervention and secondary outcomes. Conclusions: Although the main findings were similar to those from other brief-intervention studies in Western cultures, findings here also suggest that intervention may have differential benefits for specific subgroups of patients in the ED, an area of research that may warrant additional study of brief intervention in the ED setting. PMID:19895777

  5. Current levels and composition profiles of emerging halogenated flame retardants and dehalogenated products in sewage sludge from municipal wastewater treatment plants in China.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Lixi; Yang, Ruiqiang; Zhang, Qinghua; Zhang, Haidong; Xiao, Ke; Zhang, Haiyan; Wang, Yawei; Lam, Paul K S; Jiang, Guibin

    2014-11-04

    Occurrence of new toxic chemicals in sludge from wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) is of concern for the environment and human health. Alternative halogenated flame retardants (HFRs) are a group of potentially harmful organic contaminants in the environment. In this study, a nationwide survey was carried out to identify the occurrence of HFRs and their potential dehalogenated products in sewage sludge from 62 WWTPs in China. Of all 20 target chemicals analyzed, decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE), hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) and 1, 2-bis (2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)-ethane (BTBPE) were detected in all sludge samples, and the concentrations were in the range of 0.82-215, 0.09-65.8, and 0.10-2.26 ng g(-1) d.w., respectively. Dechlorane Plus (DP) was found in 60 of 62 samples, and the concentration ranged from nd-298 ng g(-1) with a mean of 18.9 ng g(-1) d.w. The anti-DP fractional abundance fanti (0.79) in the samples was much higher than the commercial DP composition (fanti=0.59), indicating a stereoselective degradation. Comparison with global sludge concentrations of HFRs indicate that China is at the medium pollution level in the world. Principal components analysis revealed that strong correlations existed between ln-transformed concentrations (natural logarithm) of the dominant BFRs and total organic carbon (TOC) as well as industrial wastewater proportion, influent volume and serving population. Significant linear relationships (R=0.360-0.893, p<0.01) were found among emerging brominated flame retardants (BFRs), suggesting their common commercial applications and release sources to the environment. Two kinds of dehalogenated products, pentabromocyclododecane (PBCD) and undecachloropentacyclooctadecadiene (Cl11-DP), derived from HBCD and DP, were also identified in sewage sludge for the first time.

  6. Impact of age, sex and route of administration on adverse events after opioid treatment in the emergency department: A retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Daoust, Raoul; Paquet, Jean; Lavigne, Gilles; Piette, Éric; Chauny, Jean-Marc

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The efficacy of opioids for acute pain relief in the emergency department (ED) is well recognized, but treatment with opioids is associated with adverse events ranging from minor discomforts to life-threatening events. OBJECTIVE: To assess the impact of age, sex and route of administration on the incidence of adverse events due to opioid administration in the ED. METHODS: Real-time archived data were analyzed retrospectively in a tertiary care urban hospital. All consecutive patients (≥16 years of age) who were assigned to an ED bed and received an opioid between March 2008 and December 2012 were included. Adverse events were defined as: nausea/vomiting (minor); systolic blood pressure (SBP) <90 mmHg, oxygen saturation (Sat) <92% and respiration rate <10 breaths/min (major) within 2 h of the first opioid doses. RESULTS: In the study period, 31,742 patients were treated with opioids. The mean (± SD) age was 55.8±20.5 years, and 53% were female. The overall incidence of adverse events was 12.0% (95% CI 11.6% to 12.4%): 5.9% (95% CI 5.6% to 6.2%) experienced nausea/vomiting, 2.4% (95% CI 2.2% to 2.6%) SBP <90 mmHg, 4.7% (95% CI 4.5% to 4.9%) Sat that dropped to <92% and 0.09% respiration rate <10 breaths/min. After controlling for confounding factors, these adverse events were associated with: female sex (more nausea/vomiting, more SBP <90 mmHg, less Sat <92%); age ≥65 years (less nausea/vomiting, more SBP <90 mmHg, more Sat <92%); and route of administration (intravenous > subcutaneous > oral). CONCLUSIONS: The incidence of adverse events associated with opioid administration in the ED is generally low and is associated with age, sex and route of administration. PMID:25664538

  7. Knowledge and skills retention following Emergency Triage, Assessment and Treatment plus Admission course for final year medical students in Rwanda: a longitudinal cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Tuyisenge, Lisine; Kyamanya, Patrick; Van Steirteghem, Samuel; Becker, Martin; English, Mike; Lissauer, Tom

    2014-01-01

    Aim To determine whether, after the Emergency Triage, Assessment and Treatment plus Admission (ETAT+) course, a comprehensive paediatric life support course, final year medical undergraduates in Rwanda would achieve a high level of knowledge and practical skills and if these were retained. To guide further course development, student feedback was obtained. Methods Longitudinal cohort study of knowledge and skills of all final year medical undergraduates at the University of Rwanda in academic year 2011–2012 who attended a 5-day ETAT+ course. Students completed a precourse knowledge test. Knowledge and clinical skills assessments, using standardised marking, were performed immediately postcourse and 3–9 months later. Feedback was obtained using printed questionnaires. Results 84 students attended the course and re-evaluation. Knowledge test showed a significant improvement, from median 47% to 71% correct answers (p<0.001). For two clinical skills scenarios, 98% passed both scenarios, 37% after a retake, 2% failed both scenarios. Three to nine months later, students were re-evaluated, median score for knowledge test 67%, not significantly different from postcourse (p>0.1). For clinical skills, 74% passed, with 32% requiring a retake, 8% failed after retake, 18% failed both scenarios, a significant deterioration (p<0.0001). Conclusions Students performed well on knowledge and skills immediately after a comprehensive ETAT+ course. Knowledge was maintained 3–9 months later. Clinical skills, which require detailed sequential steps, declined, but most were able to perform them satisfactorily after feedback. The course was highly valued, but several short courses and more practical teaching were advocated. PMID:24925893

  8. Alcoholic metabolic emergencies.

    PubMed

    Allison, Michael G; McCurdy, Michael T

    2014-05-01

    Ethanol intoxication and ethanol use are associated with a variety of metabolic derangements encountered in the Emergency Department. In this article, the authors discuss alcohol intoxication and its treatment, dispel the myth that alcohol intoxication is associated with hypoglycemia, comment on electrolyte derangements and their management, review alcoholic ketoacidosis, and end with a section on alcoholic encephalopathy.

  9. Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ban For Clinicians Clinical Recognition Specimen Collection Treatment Smallpox Vaccine Guidance Infection Control: Hospital Infection Control: Home ... Mouth Infection) Poxvirus and Rabies Branch Travelers’ Health: Smallpox & Other Orthopoxvirus-Associated Infections Poxvirus Treatment Recommend on ...

  10. Reptile Critical Care and Common Emergencies.

    PubMed

    Music, Meera Kumar; Strunk, Anneliese

    2016-05-01

    Reptile emergencies are an important part of exotic animal critical care, both true emergencies and those perceived as emergencies by owners. The most common presentations for reptile emergencies are addressed here, with information on differential diagnoses, helpful diagnostics, and approach to treatment. In many cases, reptile emergencies are actually acute presentations originating from a chronic problem, and the treatment plan must include both clinical treatment and addressing husbandry and dietary deficiencies at home. Accurate owner expectations must be set in order to have owner compliance to long-term treatment plans.

  11. Abdominal emergencies during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Bouyou, J; Gaujoux, S; Marcellin, L; Leconte, M; Goffinet, F; Chapron, C; Dousset, B

    2015-12-01

    Abdominal emergencies during pregnancy (excluding obstetrical emergencies) occur in one out of 500-700 pregnancies and may involve gastrointestinal, gynecologic, urologic, vascular and traumatic etiologies; surgery is necessary in 0.2-2% of cases. Since these emergencies are relatively rare, patients should be referred to specialized centers where surgical, obstetrical and neonatal cares are available, particularly because surgical intervention increases the risk of premature labor. Clinical presentations may be atypical and misleading because of pregnancy-associated anatomical and physiologic alterations, which often result in diagnostic uncertainty and therapeutic delay with increased risks of maternal and infant morbidity. The most common abdominal emergencies are acute appendicitis (best treated by laparoscopic appendectomy), acute calculous cholecystitis (best treated by laparoscopic cholecystectomy from the first trimester through the early part of the third trimester) and intestinal obstruction (where medical treatment is the first-line approach, just as in the non-pregnant patient). Acute pancreatitis is rare, usually resulting from trans-ampullary passage of gallstones; it usually resolves with medical treatment but an elevated risk of recurrent episodes justifies laparoscopic cholecystectomy in the 2nd trimester and endoscopic sphincterotomy in the 3rd trimester. The aim of the present work is to review pregnancy-induced anatomical and physiological modifications, to describe the main abdominal emergencies during pregnancy, their specific features and their diagnostic and therapeutic management.

  12. Evaluation of Emerging Contaminants of Concern at the South District Wastewater Treatment Plant Based on Seasonal Events, Miami-Dade County, Florida, 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lietz, Arthur C.; Meyer, Michael T.

    2006-01-01

    The Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan has identified highly treated wastewater as a possible water source for the restoration of natural water flows and hydroperiods in selected coastal areas, including the Biscayne Bay coastal wetlands. One potential source of reclaimed wastewater for the Biscayne Bay coastal wetlands is the effluent from the South District Wastewater Treatment Plant in southern Miami-Dade County. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan Wastewater Reuse Technology Pilot Project Delivery Team, initiated a study to assess the presence of emerging contaminants of concern in the South District Wastewater Treatment Plant influent and effluent using current wastewater-treatment methods. As part of the study, 24-hour composite and discrete samples were collected at six locations (influent at plants 1 and 2, effluent pump, reuse train, chlorine dioxide unit, and ultraviolet pilot unit) at the plant during: (1) a dry-season, low-flow event on March 2-3, 2004, with an average inflow rate of 83.7 million gallons per day; (2) a wet-season, average-flow event on July 20-21, 2004, with an average inflow rate of 89.7 million gallons per day; and (3) high-rate disinfection tests on October 5 and 20, 2004, with average flow rates of 84.1 and 119.6 million gallons per day, respectively. During these four sampling events, 26, 27, 29, and 35 constituents were detected, respectively. The following transformations in concentration were determined in the waste stream: -100 to 180 percent at the effluent pump and -100 to 85 percent at the reuse train on March 2-3, 2004, and -100 to 1,609 percent at the effluent pump and -100 to 832 percent at the reuse train on July 20-21, 2004; -100 to -37 percent at the effluent pump, -100 to -62 percent at the reuse train, -100 to -56 percent at the chlorine dioxide unit, and -100 to -40 percent at the ultraviolet pilot unit on October 5, 2004; and -100 to -4 percent at the

  13. Levetiracetam extended release and levetiracetam immediate release as adjunctive treatment for partial-onset seizures: an indirect comparison of treatment-emergent adverse events using meta-analytic techniques.

    PubMed

    Richy, Florent F; Banerjee, Soutrik; Brabant, Yves; Helmers, Sandra

    2009-10-01

    The safety profiles of once-daily adjunctive levetiracetam (LEV) extended release (XR) (1000mg/day) and adjunctive LEV immediate release (IR) (500mg twice daily) were compared using data from three randomized, placebo (PBO)-controlled phase III clinical trials in patients with partial-onset seizures. MedDRA 9.0 treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs) were indirectly compared using meta-analytic techniques, including calculation of risk difference (RD) and mixed-effects analysis. Statistical significance was set at 10% alpha risk, the normative value for these analyses. Data from 555 patients older than 16 (204 LEV IR, 70 LEV XR, 281 PBO) were analyzed. Following adjustment for incidence of placebo TEAEs, LEV XR showed statistically significantly lower rates of TEAEs than LEV IR across nervous system disorders (RD=-18%, P=0.03), psychiatric disorders (RD=-11%, P=0.08), and metabolism and nutrition disorders (RD=-3%, P=0.08). Among nervous system disorders, the RD for headache favored LEV XR (RD=-11%, P=0.08). These results suggest that adjunctive LEV XR may be associated with a lower incidence of nervous system, psychiatric, and nutritional and metabolic TEAEs as compared with LEV IR. However, this difference was observed at a broad scale and not at a specific TEAE level except for headache.

  14. Transport and transformation of pharmaceuticals and other contaminants of emerging concern from wastewater discharge through surface water to drinking water intake and treatment

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ubiquitous presence of pharmaceuticals, hormones, and other contaminants of emerging concern (CECs) in surface-water resources have necessitated research that better elucidates pathways of transport and transformation for these compounds from their discharged wastewater, thro...

  15. [Outpatient emergencies].

    PubMed

    Rivallan, Armel; Le Nagard, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    The outpatient monitoring of patients sometimes involves emergency situations. In their practice, the nurses who visit the patient's home are confronted with the limits of their intervention. Faced with these delicate situations team coordination is a strength and the reactivity of the caregivers often contributes to a satisfactory outcome for the patient.

  16. Radiation Emergencies

    MedlinePlus

    ... If the exposure is large enough, it can cause premature aging or even death. Although there are no guarantees of safety during a radiation emergency, you can take actions to protect yourself. You should have a disaster plan. Being prepared can help reduce fear, anxiety ...

  17. Coital emergencies.

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, A.

    1996-01-01

    The act of heterosexual coitus is associated with morbidity due to a variety of conditions as well as with a small risk of sudden death. Awareness of the presentation of coital emergencies is essential to allow appropriate medical management and sexual counselling. PMID:8944205

  18. Emerging Scholars

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anyaso, Hilary Hurd; Rolo, Mark Anthony; Roach, Ronald; Delos, Robin Chen; Branch-Brioso, Karen; Miranda, Maria Eugenia; Seymour, Add, Jr.; Grossman, Wendy; Nealy, Michelle J.; Lum, Lydia

    2009-01-01

    This year's group of "emerging scholars" is a force to be reckoned with. This diverse group of young (under-40) crusaders is pushing the boundaries of research, technology and public policy in ways never imagined and reaching new heights of accomplishments. The Class of 2009 includes a physiologist who devised an artificial pancreas to produce the…

  19. Diabetic Emergencies

    MedlinePlus

    ... How to Peform CPR Use “ICE” in Your Cell Phone Prepare for Disasters Communication With Your Family And Your Doctor About Your Wishes Visiting the ER Who Takes Care Of You In An Emergency? Checking Into the ER Medical Tests Why Am I Waiting So Long? Admission ...

  20. Emergency contraception.

    PubMed

    Ellertson, C; Trussell, J; Stewart, F; Koenig, J; Raymond, E G; Shochet, T

    2001-12-01

    Emergency contraceptives are methods that prevent pregnancy when used shortly after unprotected sex. Three different emergency contraceptive methods are safe, simple, and widely available in the United States. These are: (1) ordinary combined oral contraceptives containing ethinyl estradiol and levonorgestrel taken in a higher dose for a short period of time and started within a few days after unprotected intercourse; (2) levonorgestrel-only tablets used similarly; and (3) copper-bearing intrauterine devices inserted within approximately 1 week after unprotected intercourse. Emergency contraceptive use is best known for women who have been raped, but the methods are also appropriate for women who have experienced condom breaks, women who did not use any method because they were not planning on having sex, or women who had unprotected intercourse for any other reason. Unfortunately, few women know about emergency contraceptives, and few clinicians think to inform their patients routinely about the option. A nationwide toll-free hotline (1-888-NOT-2-LATE) and a website (http://not-2-late.com) can help women learn about these options. Sharing "family planning's best-kept secret" widely with women could prevent as many as a million unwanted pregnancies annually in the United States.

  1. Neurologic emergencies.

    PubMed

    Piecuch, J F; Lieblich, S E

    1995-07-01

    Neurologic emergencies are rare, and they usually occur in easily identifiable patients, provided that a thorough medical history has been previously obtained. Rare as these may be, however, they occur without warning and are potentially life threatening. Consequently, the dentist should be prepared by virtue of knowledge of the pathophysiology and therapy and by formal training and certification in basic life support.

  2. Wildlife Emergency and Critical Care.

    PubMed

    Riley, Jennifer; Barron, Heather

    2016-05-01

    Wildlife patients often present as emergencies. For veterinarians who do not typically treat wildlife, it is important to be able to stabilize and determine the underlying cause of the animal's signs. This article discusses initial assessment, stabilization, and treatment of common emergency presentations in wild birds, reptiles, and mammals.

  3. Emergency Communications Console

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    NASA has applied its communications equipment expertise to development of a communications console that provides, in a compact package only slightly larger than an electric typewriter, all the emergency medical services communications functions needed for a regional hospital. A prototype unit, built by Johnson Space Center, has been installed in the Odessa (Texas) Medical Center Hospital. The hospital is the medical control center for the 17-county Permian Basin Emergency Medical System in west Texas. The console project originated in response to a request to NASA from the Texas governor's office, which sought a better way of providing emergency medical care in rural areas. Because ambulance travel time is frequently long in remote areas of west Texas, it is important that treatment begin at the scene of the emergency rather than at the hospital emergency room. A radio and telephone system linking ambulance emergency technicians and hospital staff makes this possible. But earlier equipment was complex, requiring specialized operators. A highly reliable system was needed to minimize breakdowns and provide controls of utmost simplicity, so that the system could be operated by physicians and nurses rather than by communications specialists. The resulting console has both radio and telephone sections. With the radio equipment, hospital personnel can communicate with ambulance drivers and paramedics, receive incoming electrocardiagrams, consult with other hospitals, page hospital staff and set up a radio-to-telephone "patch." The telephone portion of the system includes a hotline from the Permian Basin Emergency Medical Service's resource control center, an automatic dialer for contacting special care facilities in the Permian Basin network, a hospital intercom terminal and a means of relaying cardioscope displays and other data between hospitals. The integrated system also provides links with local disaster and civil defense organizations and with emergency "Dial 911

  4. Removal of a wide range of emerging pollutants from wastewater treatment plant discharges by micro-grain activated carbon in fluidized bed as tertiary treatment at large pilot scale.

    PubMed

    Mailler, R; Gasperi, J; Coquet, Y; Buleté, A; Vulliet, E; Deshayes, S; Zedek, S; Mirande-Bret, C; Eudes, V; Bressy, A; Caupos, E; Moilleron, R; Chebbo, G; Rocher, V

    2016-01-15

    Among the solutions to reduce micropollutant discharges into the aquatic environment, activated carbon adsorption is a promising technique and a large scale pilot has been tested at the Seine Centre (240,000 m(3)/d - Paris, France) wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). While most of available works studied fixed bed or contact reactors with a separated separation step, this study assesses a new type of tertiary treatment based on a fluidized bed containing a high mass of activated carbon, continuously renewed. For the first time in the literature, micro-grain activated carbon (μGAC) was studied. The aims were (1) to determine the performances of fluidized bed operating with μCAG on both emerging micropollutants and conventional wastewater quality parameters, and (2) to compare its efficiency and applicability to wastewater to former results obtained with PAC. Thus, conventional wastewater quality parameters (n=11), pharmaceuticals and hormones (PPHs; n=62) and other emerging pollutants (n=57) have been monitored in μGAC configuration during 13 campaigns. A significant correlation has been established between dissolved organic carbon (DOC), PPHs and UV absorbance at 254 nm (UV-254) removals. This confirms that UV-254 could be used as a tertiary treatment performance indicator to monitor the process. This parameter allowed identifying that the removals of UV-254 and DOC reach a plateau from a μGAC retention time (SRT) of 90-100 days. The μGAC configuration substantially improves the overall quality of the WWTP discharges by reducing biological (38-45%) and chemical oxygen demands (21-48%), DOC (13-44%) and UV-254 (22-48%). In addition, total suspended solids (TSS) are retained by the μGAC bed and a biological activity (nitratation) leads to a total elimination of NO2(-). For micropollutants, PPHs have a good affinity for μGAC and high (>60%) or very high (>80%) removals are observed for most of the quantified compounds (n=22/32), i.e. atenolol (92

  5. Emergency cricothyrotomy.

    PubMed

    Hart, Kristopher L; Thompson, Stevan H

    2010-03-01

    Establishment of an unobstructed airway and adequate oxygenation is a basic tenet of life support. Mechanical or anatomic airway obstructions can arise secondary to trauma, pathology, foreign bodies, and infection. The oral and maxillofacial surgeon is uniquely trained to provide surgical and anesthetic care, and must be prepared to provide emergency airway management. This article reviews the indications, contraindications, and techniques of surgical and needle cricothyrotomy. Fortunately, with advances in airway techniques and equipment, emergency cricothyrotomy is not a common procedure. However, in the event that a surgeon has no other means of securing an airway, this procedure may avert a catastrophe. If such a situation does occur, quick and decisive action can best be carried out if there is a thorough understanding of the anatomy and techniques involved.

  6. Emerging jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwaller, Pedro; Stolarski, Daniel; Weiler, Andreas

    2015-05-01

    In this work, we propose a novel search strategy for new physics at the LHC that utilizes calorimeter jets that (i) are composed dominantly of displaced tracks and (ii) have many different vertices within the jet cone. Such emerging jet signatures are smoking guns for models with a composite dark sector where a parton shower in the dark sector is followed by displaced decays of dark pions back to SM jets. No current LHC searches are sensitive to this type of phenomenology. We perform a detailed simulation for a benchmark signal with two regular and two emerging jets, and present and implement strategies to suppress QCD backgrounds by up to six orders of magnitude. At the 14 TeV LHC, this signature can be probed with mediator masses as large as 1.5 TeV for a range of dark pion lifetimes, and the reach is increased further at the high-luminosity LHC. The emerging jet search is also sensitive to a broad class of long-lived phenomena, and we show this for a supersymmetric model with R-parity violation. Possibilities for discovery at LHCb are also discussed.

  7. Is it an Emergency?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Emergency 101 Share this! Home » Emergency 101 Is it an Emergency? Medical emergencies can be frightening and ... situation. Here you can find information about emergencies. It is essential to know how to recognize the ...

  8. DNA/MVA Vaccination of HIV-1 Infected Participants with Viral Suppression on Antiretroviral Therapy, followed by Treatment Interruption: Elicitation of Immune Responses without Control of Re-Emergent Virus

    PubMed Central

    Heath, Sonya L.; Sweeton, Bentley; Williams, Kathy; Cunningham, Pamela; Keele, Brandon F.; Sen, Sharon; Palmer, Brent E.; Chomont, Nicolas; Xu, Yongxian; Basu, Rahul; Hellerstein, Michael S.; Kwa, Suefen

    2016-01-01

    GV-TH-01, a Phase 1 open-label trial of a DNA prime—Modified Vaccinia Ankara (MVA) boost vaccine (GOVX-B11), was undertaken in HIV infected participants on antiretroviral treatment (ART) to evaluate safety and vaccine-elicited T cell responses, and explore the ability of elicited CD8+ T cells to control viral rebound during analytical treatment interruption (TI). Nine men who began antiretroviral therapy (ART) within 18 months of seroconversion and had sustained plasma HIV-1 RNA <50 copies/mL for at least 6 months were enrolled. Median age was 38 years, median pre-ART HIV-1 RNA was 140,000 copies/ml and mean baseline CD4 count was 755/μl. Two DNA, followed by 2 MVA, inoculations were given 8 weeks apart. Eight subjects completed all vaccinations and TI. Clinical and laboratory adverse events were generally mild, with no serious or grade 4 events. Only reactogenicity events were considered related to study drug. No treatment emergent viral resistance was seen. The vaccinations did not reduce viral reservoirs and virus re-emerged in all participants during TI, with a median time to re-emergence of 4 weeks. Eight of 9 participants had CD8+ T cells that could be stimulated by vaccine-matched Gag peptides prior to vaccination. Vaccinations boosted these responses as well as eliciting previously undetected CD8+ responses. Elicited T cells did not display signs of exhaustion. During TI, temporal patterns of viral re-emergence and Gag-specific CD8+ T cell expansion suggested that vaccine-specific CD8+ T cells had been stimulated by re-emergent virus in only 2 of 8 participants. In these 2, transient decreases in viremia were associated with Gag selection in known CD8+ T cell epitopes. We hypothesize that escape mutations, already archived in the viral reservoir, plus a poor ability of CD8+ T cells to traffic to and control virus at sites of re-emergence, limited the therapeutic efficacy of the DNA/MVA vaccine. Trial Registration clinicaltrials.gov NCT01378156 PMID

  9. Emergency Lighting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A lighting system originally developed for NASA's Apollo and Skylab manned spacecraft resulted in a industrial spinoff and creation of a whole new company to produce and market the product line. The company is UDEC Corp., Waltham, Mass. UDEC's "Multi-Mode" electronic lighting systems are designed for plant emergency and supplemental use, such as night lighting, "always-on" stairwell lights and illuminated exit signs. Their advantages stem from the qualities demanded for spacecraft installation: extremely high fight output with very low energy drain, compactness, light weight, and high reliability. The Multi-Mode system includes long-life fluorescent lamps operated by electronic circuitry, a sealed battery that needs no maintenance for 10 years, and a solid-state battery charger. A typical emergency installation consists of a master module with battery and an eight watt lamp, together with four remote "Satellight" modules powered by the master's battery. As a night lighting system for maintenance or I security, UDEC fixtures can bypass the battery and 1 operate on normal current at a fraction of the energy 1 demand of conventional night lighting. Industrial customers have realized savings of better than ninety percent with UDEC night lights. UDEC started as a basement industry in 1972 but the company has already sold more than 1,000 lighting systems to building operators.

  10. A multi-disciplinary approach to the removal of emerging contaminants in municipal wastewater treatment plants in New York state (2003-2004)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Philips, Patrick J.; Stinson, Beverley; Zaugg, Steven D.; Furlong, Edward T.; Kolpin, Dana W.; Esposito, Kathleen; Bodniewicz, B.; Pape, R.; Anderson, J.

    2008-01-01

    Across the United States, there is a rapidly growing awareness of the occurrence and the toxicological impacts of natural and synthetic trace compounds in the environment. These trace compounds, referred to as emerging contaminants (ECs), are reported to cause a range of negative impacts in the environment, such as adverse effects on biota in receiving streams and interference with the normal functions of the endocrine system, which controls growth and development in living organisms.

  11. Emergency preparedness.

    PubMed

    Mahon, Christine F; Long, Carol O

    2006-01-01

    The Boy Scout motto is "be prepared," but can your home health agency abide by this standard? The post-9/11 days of 2001 and the natural disasters that have threatened people and plagued our home and countries abroad illustrate the heightened level of awareness and preparedness home healthcare agencies must achieve to satisfactorily meet emergency preparedness standards. Community-based nurses often are on the front line of response to a man-made, biological, or naturally occurring event. You may have been assigned to work on a plan for your agency's response or have had questions asked about preparedness by your clients and family members. Here are six Web sites to get you started on the answers to those questions and concerns.

  12. SURGICAL EMERGENCIES

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Felix R.

    1950-01-01

    Action according to preconceived plans may be life-saving at the scene of accidents involving serious injury to several persons. Severe hemorrhage and respiratory obstruction must be dealt with immediately. As the latter may not be apparent at a glance, it should be looked for specifically. Artificial respiration may be necessary. Spinal puncture is a procedure in first aid which should be carried out at the site of an accident if there are symptoms of cerebral edema or of increased cerebral pressure. Routine plans should be laid to meet the emergency of cardiac arrest on the operating table. The surgeon must be prepared to begin cardiac massage within three minutes in such instances. PMID:18731685

  13. Emerging holography

    SciTech Connect

    Erlich, Joshua; Kribs, Graham D.; Low, Ian

    2006-05-01

    We rederive AdS/CFT predictions for infrared two-point functions by an entirely four-dimensional approach, without reference to holography. This approach, originally due to Migdal in the context of QCD, utilizes an extrapolation from the ultraviolet to the infrared using a Pade approximation of the two-point function. We show that the Pade approximation and AdS/CFT give the same leading order predictions, and we discuss including power corrections such as those due to condensates of gluons and quarks in QCD. At finite order the Pade approximation provides a gauge invariant regularization of a higher dimensional gauge theory in the spirit of deconstructed extra dimensions. The radial direction of anti-de Sitter space emerges naturally in this approach.

  14. Emergencies and Emergency Permits for Ocean Dumping

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Emergency permits under the MPRSA are issued if disposed material poses a threat to human health. Information is provided on emergency permit examples and disposal sites. Emergencies to safeguard life at sea does not require an ocean dumping permit.

  15. Which treatment for low back pain? A factorial randomised controlled trial comparing intravenous analgesics with oral analgesics in the emergency department and a centrally acting muscle relaxant with placebo over three days [ISRCTN09719705

    PubMed Central

    Havel, Christof; Sieder, Anna; Herkner, Harald; Domanovits, Hans; Schmied, Mascha; Segel, Rudolf; Koreny, Maria; Laggner, Anton N; Müllner, Marcus

    2001-01-01

    Background About two thirds of adults suffer from backpain at some time during their life. In the emergency room many patients with acute back pain are treated with intravenous non-steroidal analgesics. Whether this treatment is superior to oral administration of non-steroidal analgesics is unknown. Intravenous administration, however, requires considerable amounts of resources and accounts for high workload in busy clinics. In the further course centrally acting muscle relaxants are prescribed but the effectiveness remains unclear. The objective of this study is on the one hand to compare the effectiveness of intravenous with oral non-steroidal analgesics for acute treatment and on the other hand to compare the effectiveness of a centrally active muscle relaxant with placebo given for three days after presentation to the ED (emergency department). Methods/Design This study is intended as a randomised controlled factorial trial mainly for two reasons: (1) the sequence of treatments resembles the actual proceedings in every-day clinical practice, which is important for the generalisability of the results and (2) this design allows to take interactions between the two sequential treatment strategies into account. There is a patient preference arm included because patients preference is an important issue providing valuable information: (1) it allows to assess the interaction between desired treatment and outcome, (2) results can be extrapolated to a wider group while (3) conserving the advantages of a fully randomised controlled trial. Conclusion We hope to shed more light on the effectiveness of treatment modalities available for acute low back pain. PMID:11716789

  16. Which treatment for low back pain? A factorial randomised controlled trial comparing intravenous analgesics with oral analgesics in the emergency department and a centrally acting muscle relaxant with placebo over three days [ISRCTN09719705].

    PubMed

    Havel, Christof; Sieder, Anna; Herkner, Harald; Domanovits, Hans; Schmied, Mascha; Segel, Rudolf; Koreny, Maria; Laggner, Anton N; Müllner, Marcus

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: About two thirds of adults suffer from backpain at some time during their life. In the emergency room many patients with acute back pain are treated with intravenous non-steroidal analgesics. Whether this treatment is superior to oral administration of non-steroidal analgesics is unknown. Intravenous administration, however, requires considerable amounts of resources and accounts for high workload in busy clinics. In the further course centrally acting muscle relaxants are prescribed but the effectiveness remains unclear. The objective of this study is on the one hand to compare the effectiveness of intravenous with oral non-steroidal analgesics for acute treatment and on the other hand to compare the effectiveness of a centrally active muscle relaxant with placebo given for three days after presentation to the ED (emergency department). METHODS/DESIGN: This study is intended as a randomised controlled factorial trial mainly for two reasons: (1) the sequence of treatments resembles the actual proceedings in every-day clinical practice, which is important for the generalisability of the results and (2) this design allows to take interactions between the two sequential treatment strategies into account. There is a patient preference arm included because patients preference is an important issue providing valuable information: (1) it allows to assess the interaction between desired treatment and outcome, (2) results can be extrapolated to a wider group while (3) conserving the advantages of a fully randomised controlled trial. CONCLUSION: We hope to shed more light on the effectiveness of treatment modalities available for acute low back pain.

  17. Family-Based Treatment of a 17-Year-Old Twin Presenting with Emerging Anorexia Nervosa: A Case Study Using the "Maudsley Method"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loeb, Katharine L.; Hirsch, Alicia M.; Greif, Rebecca; Hildebrandt, Thomas B.

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the successful application of family-based treatment (FBT) for a 17-year-old identical twin presenting with a 4-month history of clinically significant symptoms of anorexia nervosa (AN). FBT is a manualized treatment that has been studied in randomized controlled trials for adolescents with AN. This case study illustrates…

  18. Preliminary investigation of the potential of four tropical emergent macrophytes for treatment of pre-treated pulp and papermill wastewater in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Abira, M A; Ngirigacha, H W; van Bruggen, J J A

    2003-01-01

    The potential of four aquatic macrophytes for treatment of wastewater in constructed wetlands was investigated in bucket mesocosms at Pan African Paper Mills (E.A) Limited. The buckets were operated as semi-continuous batch reactors with reversed vertical flow for a period of 3 months. Four treatments were applied involving two hydraulic retention times (HRT) and two wastewater concentrations. Plants appear healthier and greener in treatments at HRT5 than at HRT10. Cyperus immensus and Typha domingensis had higher biomass gain compared to the other two species. Plant nitrogen and phosphorus content, based on dry weight, was lower at the end of the experiment than at the beginning in all treatments for all species The removal efficiency achieved for COD ranged from 10 to 55% for planted buckets at HRT5 and 15 to 65% at HRT10 for similar buckets. The mean percentage COD removal in unplanted buckets was significantly lower than in planted ones. TSS removal efficiency ranged from 44-86%. Buckets planted with Typha exhibited the highest removal efficiency in all treatments. Those at HRT5 showed significantly higher removal efficiencies than those at HRT10 for all species. The results indicate that the plants are suitable for use in constructed wetlands for treatment of the wastewater provided the appropriate treatment is applied.

  19. [Management of major bleeding complications and emergency surgery in patients on long-term treatment with direct oral anticoagulants, thrombin or factor-Xa inhibitors. Proposals of the Working Group on Perioperative Haemostasis (GIHP) - March 2013].

    PubMed

    Pernod, G; Albaladejo, P; Godier, A; Samama, C M; Susen, S; Gruel, Y; Blais, N; Fontana, P; Cohen, A; Llau, J V; Rosencher, N; Schved, J F; de Maistre, E; Samama, M M; Mismetti, P; Sié, P

    2013-10-01

    New direct oral anticoagulants (NOAC), inhibitors of factor IIa or Xa, are expected to be widely used for the treatment of venous thromboembolic disease, or in case of atrial fibrillation. Such anticoagulant treatments are known to be associated with haemorrhagic complications. Moreover, it is likely that such patients on long-term treatment with NOAC will be exposed to emergency surgery or invasive procedures. Due to the present lack of experience in such conditions, we cannot make recommendations, but only propose management for optimal safety as regards the risk of bleeding in such emergency conditions. In this article, only dabigatran and rivaroxaban were discussed. For emergency surgery at risk of bleeding, we propose to dose the plasmatic concentration of drug. Levels inferior or equal to 30ng/mL for both dabigatran and rivaroxaban, should enable the realization of a high bleeding risk surgery. For higher concentration, it was proposed to postpone surgery by monitoring the evolution of the drug concentration. Action is then defined by the kind of NOAC and its concentration. If the dosage of the drug is not immediately available, proposals only based on the usual tests, PT and aPTT, also are presented. However, these tests do not really assess drug concentration or bleeding risk. In case of severe haemorrhage in a critical organ, it is proposed to reduce the effect of anticoagulant therapy using a nonspecific procoagulant drug (activated prothrombin concentrate, FEIBA, 30-50U/kg, or non-activated 4-factors prothrombin concentrates 50U/kg). For any other type of severe haemorrhage, the administration of such a procoagulant drug, potentially thrombogenic in these patients, will be discussed regarding concentration of NACO and possibilities for mechanical haemostasis.

  20. Emerging drugs for acne.

    PubMed

    James, Kirk A; Burkhart, Craig N; Morrell, Dean S

    2009-12-01

    Acne vulgaris is a common skin disorder that affects most individuals at some point in their lives. It may result in significant morbidity, including cutaneous scarring and psychological impairment. Current treatments include topical retinoids, benzoyl peroxide, topical and systemic antibiotics, and systemic isotretinoin. There are growing concerns of rising antibiotic resistance, significant side effects of isotretinoin therapy, and lack of safe and effective treatment for pregnant females. Recent advances in the pathogenesis of acne have led to a greater understanding of the underlying inflammatory mechanisms and the role the Propionibacterium acnes and biofilms. This has led to the development of new therapeutic targets. This article reviews emerging treatments of acne, including topical picolinic acid, topical antibiotic dapsone, systemic zinc salts, oral antibiotic lymecycline, new formulations of and synergistic combinations of benzoyl peroxide, photodynamic therapy with topical photosensitizers and potential acne vaccines.

  1. Emerging technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Shin-yee

    1993-03-01

    The mission of the Emerging Technologies thrust area at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is to help individuals establish technology areas that have national and commercial impact, and are outside the scope of the existing thrust areas. We continue to encourage innovative ideas that bring quality results to existing programs. We also take as our mission the encouragement of investment in new technology areas that are important to the economic competitiveness of this nation. In fiscal year 1992, we have focused on nine projects, summarized in this report: (1) Tire, Accident, Handling, and Roadway Safety; (2) EXTRANSYT: An Expert System for Advanced Traffic Management; (3) Odin: A High-Power, Underwater, Acoustic Transmitter for Surveillance Applications; (4) Passive Seismic Reservoir Monitoring: Signal Processing Innovations; (5) Paste Extrudable Explosive Aft Charge for Multi-Stage Munitions; (6) A Continuum Model for Reinforced Concrete at High Pressures and Strain Rates: Interim Report; (7) Benchmarking of the Criticality Evaluation Code COG; (8) Fast Algorithm for Large-Scale Consensus DNA Sequence Assembly; and (9) Using Electrical Heating to Enhance the Extraction of Volatile Organic Compounds from Soil.

  2. Emerging technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Hodson, C.O.; Williams, D.

    1996-07-01

    Among the emerging technologies for air, hazardous waste and water come new ways of looking at pollution, in both the figurative and quite literal sense. The use of microbes for remediation and pollution control is a component in many of the technologies in this report and is the focus of environmental research at many university and industry labs. Bacteria are the engines driving one featured emissions control technology: the air biofilter. Biofilters are probably more acceptable to most engineers as a soil remediation technology--such as the innovative method described in the hazardous waste section--rather than as means of cleaning off-gases, but in many cases bugs can perform the function inexpensively. The authors give the basics on this available technology. A more experimental application of microbes is being investigated as a potential quantum leap in heavy metals removal technology: bio-engineered, metal consuming plants. The effort to genetically engineer a green remediation tool is detailed in the hazardous waste section.

  3. Heroin: from drug to ambivalent medicine : on the introduction of medically prescribed heroin and the emergence of a new space for treatment.

    PubMed

    Schepelern Johansen, Birgitte; Schepelern Johansen, Katrine

    2015-03-01

    This article provides an anthropological analysis of the introduction of medically prescribed heroin as part of official substance abuse treatment. While anthropological inquiries of substance abuse treatment have mainly focused on providing the users perspectives on the (ab)use or unraveling the conflicts and negotiations between users and staff, the present article argues for the merits of paying attention to the spatial dimensions of substance abuse treatment. Focusing on the spatial and material ramification of the treatment can shed a nuanced light on the still vulnerable process of altering the heroin from drug to medicine, and thereby on the attempts to settle heroin in a new practical and semantic landscape. The heroin is anchored in some powerful discourses of crime, death, and pleasure, and the analysis shows how these discourses (re-)appear in the spatial textures of the clinic, contesting the attempts to medicalize the heroin. Further, the article argues that even though the treatment aims at a marginalization of the heroin in the life of the clients, the spatial arrangements and the practices within them simultaneously enforces a centralization of the heroin, making the space for treatment highly ambivalent.

  4. [Emerging invasive fungal infections].

    PubMed

    Alvez, F; Figueras, C; Roselló, E

    2010-07-01

    The frequency and diversity of invasive fungal infections has changed over the last 25 years. The emergence of less common, but medically important fungi has increased, and the children at risk has expanded, with the inclusion of medical conditions such as cancer, mainly haematological malignancy or stem cell transplant, immunosuppressive therapy, prolonged neutropenia, and T-cell immunodeficiency. Among mould infections, fusariosis and phaeohyphomycosis (Dematiaceous fungi) have been increasingly reported in this group of patients. To successfully manage these challenging infections, it is imperative that paediatricians and sub-specialists remain aware of the optimal and timely diagnosis and therapeutic options. Unlike other common mycoses that cause human disease, there no simple antigen or serological tests available to detect these pathogens in tissue or blood. The outcome for these disseminate, and often refractory fungal infections in neutropenic patients and transplant recipients remains extremely poor, requiring early and aggressive therapy. Unfortunately there are no guidelines outlining the choices for optimal therapy in the treatment of paediatric invasive fungal infections do not exist, and on the other hand are limited paediatric data available comparing antifungal agents in children with proven, probable or suspected invasive fungal infection. The options for treatment rest mainly on some adult guidelines that comment on the treatment of these emerging and uncommon important fungi in children. Despite the sparse clinical trials available on treatment and its poor outcome, options for treatment of invasive fungal infections have increased with the advance of new antifungal agents, with improved tolerability and increased range of activity. The epidemiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis and treatment of fusariosis and phaeohyphomycosis are discussed in this article.

  5. Emergency management of alveolar osteitis.

    PubMed

    Summers, Anthony

    2011-12-01

    Patients with urgent dental problems who present to emergency departments (EDs) during weekday office hours are usually referred to their dentists, often after being provided with analgesia. Outside these hours, however, ED professionals may have to provide treatment before referral. One dental emergency with which patients may present but of which ED staff are unlikely to have experience is alveolar osteitis, a painful condition that occurs usually after tooth extraction. This article defines alveolar osteitis and describes management in an ED.

  6. The threat of emerging infections.

    PubMed

    1996-11-01

    A variety of newly discovered pathogens and new forms of older infectious agents threaten to reemerge. Typical symptoms of acute infection are fever, headache, malaise, vomiting, and diarrhea. Some of the better-known emerging viral infections include dengue, filoviruses (Ebola, Marburg), hantaviruses, hepatitis B, hepatitis C, HIV, influenza, lassa fever, measles, rift valley fever, rotavirus, and yellow fever. Emerging bacterial infections include cholera, Escherichia coli 0157:H7, legionnaires disease (Legionella), lyme disease, streptococcus infections (group A), tuberculosis, and typhoid. Emerging parasitic infections include cryptosporidium and other waterborne pathogens and malaria. The causes of many diseases are still shrouded in mystery; thus, treatments and cures for them are as yet unknown.

  7. Progressive emergence of an oseltamivir-resistant A(H3N2) virus over two courses of oseltamivir treatment in an immunocompromised paediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Hurt, Aeron C; Leang, Sook Kwan; Tiedemann, Karin; Butler, Jeff; Mechinaud, Francoise; Kelso, Anne; Downie, Peter; Barr, Ian G

    2013-11-01

    A minor viral population of oseltamivir-resistant A(H3N2) viruses (E119V neuraminidase mutation) was selected and maintained in a continually infected immunocompromised child following initial oseltamivir treatment. A subsequent course of oseltamivir given 7 weeks later rapidly selected for the E119V variant resulting in a near-pure population of the resistant virus. The study highlights the challenges of oseltamivir treatment of immunocompromised patients that are continually shedding virus and demonstrates the ability of the E119V oseltamivir-resistant virus to be maintained for prolonged periods even in the absence of drug-selective pressure.

  8. [New aspects of polytrauma treatment - current facts and developments: report of the first annual conference of the Committee on Emergency Medicine, Intensive Care and Trauma Management (Sektion NIS)].

    PubMed

    Trentzsch, H; Wölfl, C; Matthes, G; Paffrath, T; Lefering, R; Flohé, S

    2013-11-01

    Taking care of severely injured patients is a complex and ambitious mission. The committee on emergency medicine, intensive care and trauma management of the German Society of Trauma Surgery (Sektion NIS) has accepted this challenge. On the occasion of the release of the annual report of the TraumaRegistry DGU®, the committee held its first annual congress in order to provide members and an intrigued audience with current trends and results from the latest research in national trauma care ranging from the animal facility to the S3 guidelines. Topics of focus were new realizations based on data from the TraumaRegistry DGU® and means of quality assurance in trauma care. This article gives a report on the meeting and summarizes the major results of the presented studies and the latest deployments in this field of trauma research.

  9. Emerging therapeutic targets for the treatment of human acute myeloid leukemia (part 1) - gene transcription, cell cycle regulation, metabolism and intercellular communication.

    PubMed

    Reikvam, Håkon; Hauge, Michelle; Brenner, Annette K; Hatfield, Kimberley Joanne; Bruserud, Øystein

    2015-06-01

    Human acute myeloid leukemia is a heterogeneous disease and the effect of therapeutic targeting of specific molecular mechanisms will probably vary between patient subsets. Cell cycle regulators are among the emerging targets (e.g., aurora and polo-like kinases, cyclin-dependent kinases). Inhibition of communication between acute myeloid leukemia and stromal cells is also considered; among the most promising of these strategies are inhibition of hedgehog-initiated, CXCR4-CXCL12 and Axl-Gas6 signaling. Finally, targeting of energy and protein metabolism is considered, the most promising strategy being inhibition of isocitrate dehydrogenase in patients with IDH mutations. Thus, several strategies are now considered, and a major common challenge for all of them is to clarify how they should be combined with each other or with conventional chemotherapy, and whether their use should be limited to certain subsets of patients.

  10. A multi-disciplinary approach to the removal of emerging contaminants in municipal wastewater treatment plans in New York State, 2003-2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Philips, Patrick J.; Stinson, Beverley; Zaugg, Steven D.; Furlong, Edward T.; Kolpin, Dana W.; Esposito, Kathleen; Bodniewicz, B.; Pape, R.; Anderson, J.

    2005-01-01

    The second phase of the study focused on one of the most common wastewater treatment processes operated in the United States, the Activated Sludge process. Using four controlled parallel activated sludge pilots, a more detailed assessment of the impact of Sludge Retention Time (SRT) on the reduction or removal of ECs was performed.

  11. Dermatologic emergencies.

    PubMed

    Usatine, Richard P; Sandy, Natasha

    2010-10-01

    Life-threatening dermatologic conditions include Rocky Mountain spotted fever; necrotizing fasciitis; toxic epidermal necrolysis; and Stevens-Johnson syndrome. Rocky Mountain spotted fever is the most common rickettsial disease in the United States, with an overall mortality rate of 5 to 10 percent. Classic symptoms include fever, headache, and rash in a patient with a history of tick bite or exposure. Doxycycline is the first-line treatment. Necrotizing fasciitis is a rapidly progressive infection of the deep fascia, with necrosis of the subcutaneous tissues. It usually occurs after surgery or trauma. Patients have erythema and pain out of proportion to the physical findings. Immediate surgical debridement and antibiotic therapy should be initiated. Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis are acute hypersensitivity cutaneous reactions. Stevens-Johnson syndrome is characterized by target lesions with central dusky purpura or a central bulla. Toxic epidermal necrolysis is a more severe reaction with full-thickness epidermal necrosis and exfoliation. Most cases of Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis are drug induced. The causative drug should be discontinued immediately, and the patient should be hospitalized for supportive care.

  12. Emergency care in Namibia.

    PubMed

    Tintinalli, J; Lisse, E; Begley, A; Campbell, C

    1998-09-01

    Namibia is a sparsely populated nation in southwest Africa. A state-run health service provides care to most of the population. The geography and population distribution dictate the delivery systems for prehospital and emergency care. A state-run ambulance service provides basic patient transportation to the state-run hospitals. There is no 911 system. Two private aeromedical companies in Namibia provide the full range of ground and aeromedical treatment, diver rescue, and helicopter and fixed-wing transport services. The scope of care includes cricothyrotomies, chest tubes, and rapid-sequence intubation. Equipment is modern and virtually identical to what is used in the United States. There are no emergency physicians in Namibia. General medical officers are the backbone of the state-run health service. General medical officers assigned to cover the ED are called casualty officers. No specialized training beyond internship is required, and assignments to casualty are viewed as temporary until better positions become available. Only the largest state hospital in the capital has a dedicated, 24-hour emergency staff. The private prehospital care/transport systems are well organized and sophisticated. Formal efforts should be undertaken to develop ties with our colleagues in Namibia. Potential areas for collaboration include injury surveillance and prevention, field trauma resuscitation, and prehospital care.

  13. EMERGE. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Vonderhoe, Robert H.

    2002-03-12

    EMERGE had two basic goals: (1) To ensure that the DOE-funded labs at UW-Madison, U of Chicago, and UIUC were connected to the DOE National Labs at the highest available speeds. EMERGE grantees were to work with DOE network engineers to achieve this goal. (2) Establish a testbed for DiffServ networking, develop monitoring, measuring and, visualization tools, develop a grid services package, cooperate with Internet2's Quality DiffServ efforts, and deploy results. For the most part these goals have been achieved, although there were some gaps. By the same token there were also some achievements that came about beyond expectations. The EMERGE testbed was established and extended to Internet2 and, via STAR TAP, to CERN. Additionally, software was developed. Differentiated Services (DiffServ) is a mechanism for supporting network Quality of Service (or QoS) whereby packets that are transmitted by a client program are marked with a priority setting that can be interpreted by the router to effect special treatment of the packet. In particular the marked packets are promoted to a higher priority queue in the router and, as a result, spend a minimum amount of time in the router. Packets that are not marked are attached to a lower priority queue, and in some cases may be dropped when congestion arises.

  14. Towards evidence-based emergency medicine: Best BETs from the Manchester Royal Infirmary. BET 2: Steroid therapy in the treatment of intractable hyperemesis gravidarum.

    PubMed

    Poon, Siu Ling

    2011-10-01

    A short-cut review was performed to evaluate whether steroids could be an effective therapy in hyper-emesis gravidarum. A database search revealed 9 papers relevant to this question and the details of each study methods and results were displayed in a table. The quality of these studies was generally low. There is only weak evidence that steroids could be an effective treatment for intractable hyper-emesis gravidarum.

  15. Eye problems in mountain and remote areas: prevention and onsite treatment--official recommendations of the International Commission for Mountain Emergency Medicine ICAR MEDCOM.

    PubMed

    Ellerton, John A; Zuljan, Igor; Agazzi, Giancelso; Boyd, Jeffrey J

    2009-01-01

    Although eyes are not frequently injured in the mountains, they are exposed to many adverse factors from the environment. This article, intended for first responders, paramedics, physicians, and mountaineers, is the consensus opinion of the International Commission for Mountain Emergency Medicine (ICAR-MEDCOM). Its aim is to give practical advice on the management of eye problems in mountainous and remote areas. Snow blindness and minor injuries, such as conjunctival and corneal foreign bodies, could immobilize a person and put him or her at risk of other injuries. Blunt or penetrating trauma can result in the loss of sight in the eye; this may be preventable if the injury is managed properly. In almost all cases of severe eye trauma, protecting the eye and arranging an immediate evacuation are necessary. The most common eye problems, however, are due to ultraviolet light and high altitude. People wearing contact lenses and with previous history of eye diseases are more vulnerable. Any sight-threatening eye problem or unexplained visual loss at high altitude necessitates descent. Wearing appropriate eye protection, such as sunglasses with sidepieces and goggles with polarized or photochromic lenses, could prevent most of the common eye problems in mountaineering.

  16. Final Report for Emergency Stabilization and Rehabilitation Treatment Monitoring of the Keeney Pass, Cow Hollow, Double Mountain, and Farewell Bend Fires

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wirth, Troy A.; Pyke, David A.

    2009-01-01

    A strategy for monitoring post-fire seedings in the sagebrush steppe of the Intermountain West was developed and used to monitor four example fires in the Vale, Oregon District of the Bureau of Land Management (BLM). We began to develop a potential approach by (1) reviewing previous vegetation monitoring manuals produced by the Federal government to determine what techniques and approaches had been approved for use, and (2) monitoring a set of example fire rehabilitation projects from 2006 through 2008. We reviewed seven vegetation monitoring manuals approved for use by the Federal government. From these seven manuals, we derived a set of design elements appropriate for monitoring post-fire rehabilitation and stabilization projects. These design elements consisted of objectives, stratification, control plots, random sampling, data quality, and statistical analysis. Additionally, we chose three quantitative vegetation field procedures that were objective and repeatable to be used in conjunction with these six design elements. During the spring and summer of 2006 to 2008, U.S. Geological Survey personnel monitored vegetation in seven post-fire seeding treatments in four burned areas in the Vale district of the BLM in eastern Oregon. Treatments monitored included a native and non-native seeding in each of the Farewell Bend, Double Mountain, and Keeney Pass fires, and a native seeding at the Cow Hollow fire. All fires occurred in 2005. There generally was a low level of plant establishment for all seedings by 2008. The quantitative objective established by the BLM was to achieve 5 seeded grass plants/m2 by the end of 3 years as a result of the seeding. There was an estimated 3.97 and 6.28 plants/m2 in 2006 and 1.06 and 0.85 plants/m2 seeded perennial grasses in 2008 from the Keeney Pass non-native and native seeding, respectively. The Cow Hollow seeding resulted in the lowest establishment of perennial seeded grasses of the four project areas with 0.69 plants/m2 in

  17. Development and Testing of a Computerized Decision Support System to Facilitate Brief Tobacco Cessation Treatment in the Pediatric Emergency Department: Proposal and Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Dexheimer, Judith W; Khoury, Jane C; Miller, Julie A; Gordon, Judith S

    2016-01-01

    Background Tobacco smoke exposure (TSE) is unequivocally harmful to children's health, yet up to 48% of children who visit the pediatric emergency department (PED) and urgent care setting are exposed to tobacco smoke. The incorporation of clinical decision support systems (CDSS) into the electronic health records (EHR) of PED patients may improve the rates of screening and brief TSE intervention of caregivers and result in decreased TSE in children. Objective We propose a study that will be the first to develop and evaluate the integration of a CDSS for Registered Nurses (RNs) into the EHR of pediatric patients to facilitate the identification of caregivers who smoke and the delivery of TSE interventions to caregivers in the urgent care setting. Methods We will conduct a two-phase project to develop, refine, and integrate an evidence-based CDSS into the pediatric urgent care setting. RNs will provide input on program content, function, and design. In Phase I, we will develop a CDSS with prompts to: (1) ASK about child TSE and caregiver smoking, (2) use a software program, Research Electronic Data Capture (REDCap), to ADVISE caregivers to reduce their child's TSE via total smoking home and car bans and quitting smoking, and (3) ASSESS their interest in quitting and ASSIST caregivers to quit by directly connecting them to their choice of free cessation resources (eg, Quitline, SmokefreeTXT, or SmokefreeGOV) during the urgent care visit. We will create reports to provide feedback to RNs on their TSE counseling behaviors. In Phase II, we will conduct a 3-month feasibility trial to test the results of implementing our CDSS on changes in RNs’ TSE-related behaviors, and child and caregiver outcomes. Results This trial is currently underway with funding support from the National Institutes of Health/National Cancer Institute. We have completed Phase I. The CDSS has been developed with input from our advisory panel and RNs, and pilot tested. We are nearing completion of

  18. Occurrence and persistence of organic emerging contaminants and priority pollutants in five sewage treatment plants of Spain: two years pilot survey monitoring.

    PubMed

    Bueno, M J Martínez; Gomez, M J; Herrera, S; Hernando, M D; Agüera, A; Fernández-Alba, A R

    2012-05-01

    This work summarized all results obtained during almost two-years of a monitoring programme carried out in five municipal sewage treatment plants (STPs) located in the north, centre and south-east of Spain. The study evaluated the occurrence and persistence of a group of 100 organic compounds belonging to several chemical groups (pharmaceuticals, personal care products, pesticides and metabolites). The average removal efficiencies of the STPs studied varied from 20% (erythromycin) to 99% (acetaminophen). In analysed samples, we identified a large number of compounds at mean range concentrations between 7-59,495 ng/L and 5-32,720 ng/L for influent and effluent samples, respectively. This study also identified 20 of the mostly detected and persistent compounds in wastewater effluent, of which hydrochlorothiazide, atenolol, gemfibrozil, galaxolide and three metabolites (fenofibric acid, 4-AAA and 4-FAA), presented the highest average contribution percentages, in relation to the total load of contaminants for the different STPs effluent studied.

  19. Emerging Contaminants Identification, Concerns, Actions

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation serves as a background introduction to a current EPA/ORD study on the characterization and treatment of emerging contaminants (ECs ) in wet-weather flows. It briefly discusses other ongoing work relating to ECs and provides the foundation for prioritizing the c...

  20. Emerging causes of canine lameness.

    PubMed

    Rochat, Mark C

    2005-09-01

    Most orthopedic conditions that affect dogs are well described established conditions. Often, the current literature is focused on refinements in diagnosis, treatment, and management of these conditions. Improvement in worldwide reporting of emerging conditions offers veterinarians a greater awareness of new conditions as they occur. This article compiles into a single source what has been reported for five newly described disorders.