Science.gov

Sample records for emergency treatment

  1. Emerging treatments in alopecia.

    PubMed

    Falto-Aizpurua, Leyre; Choudhary, Sonal; Tosti, Antonella

    2014-12-01

    Alopecia is a common concern encountered in the medical practice. Treatment approach varies according to the type and severity of alopecia. However, available treatment options have limited efficacy and several adverse effects. Presently, there are different treatment options being studied to overcome these limitations. Additionally, cellular pathways involved in the pathophysiology of alopecia are further being clarified to potentially target pathogenic molecules. We searched the literature for recently published articles discussing new treatment options as well as mechanisms involved in alopecia. We discuss the use of stem cells, growth factors, cellular pathways and robotic hair transplant, among other emerging therapies used for alopecia. Future looks very promising and new effective treatments such as janus kinase inhibitors could possibly be available for alopecia areata. The stem-cell technology is advancing and companies involved in hair follicle neogenesis are starting clinical trials on patients with androgenetic alopecia.

  2. [Diabetic nephropathy: emerging treatments].

    PubMed

    Gueutin, Victor; Gauthier, Marion; Cazenave, Maud; Izzedine, Hassane

    2014-07-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is a leading cause of end-stage renal disease worldwide. The mainstay of treatment has been management of hyperglycaemia, blood pressure and proteinuria using hypoglycemic agents, ACE inhibitors, and angiotensin receptor blockers. Since 2000, new therapeutic strategies began to emerge targeting the biochemical activity of glucose molecules on the renal tissue. Various substances have been studied with varying degrees of success, ranging from vitamin B to camel's milk. Silymarin reduces urinary excretion of albumin, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and malondialdehyde in patients with diabetic nephropathy and may be considered as a novel addition to the anti-diabetic nephropathy armamentarium. Although some results are promising, studies on a larger scale are needed to validate the utility of these molecules in the treatment of the DN. Copyright © 2014 Association Société de néphrologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Rosacea: new and emerging treatments.

    PubMed

    Moustafa, Farah A; Sandoval, Laura F; Feldman, Steven R

    2014-09-01

    Rosacea is a chronic inflammatory skin condition that negatively impacts patients' quality of life. We sought to review important aspects of the pathogenesis of rosacea and the role of new treatment options in its management. New, emerging treatments show promise; however, quality randomized controlled trials for many of these drugs are lacking. Brimonidine tartrate is an effective newly approved treatment for erythematotelangiectatic rosacea. Topical oxymetazoline has potential for the treatment of erythematotelangiectatic rosacea, with efficacy described in case reports and randomized controlled trials currently underway. Both oral and topical ivermectin have been studied for the treatment of papulopustular rosacea, both showing benefit; however, only topical ivermectin 1 % cream has been studied in randomized controlled trials. As our understanding of the etiology of rosacea continues to evolve, so will our options for therapeutic interventions. Further studies need to be performed to assess the long-term safety and efficacy of these treatments.

  4. Emerging Treatments in Eating Disorders.

    PubMed

    Lutter, Michael

    2017-07-01

    Eating disorders (EDs), including anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and binge-eating disorder, constitute a class of common and deadly psychiatric disorders. While numerous studies in humans highlight the important role of neurobiological alterations in the development of ED-related behaviors, the precise neural substrate that mediates this risk is unknown. Historically, pharmacological interventions have played a limited role in the treatment of eating disorders, typically providing symptomatic relief of comorbid psychiatric issues, like depression and anxiety, in support of the standard nutritional and psychological treatments. To date there are no Food and Drug Administration-approved medications or procedures for anorexia nervosa, and only one Food and Drug Administration-approved medication each for bulimia nervosa (fluoxetine) and binge-eating disorder (lisdexamfetamine). While there is little primary interest in drug development for eating disorders, postmarket monitoring of medications and procedures approved for other indications has identified several novel treatment options for patients with eating disorders. In this review, I utilize searches of the PubMed and ClinicalTrials.gov databases to highlight emerging treatments in eating disorders.

  5. Emergency Planning for Municipal Wastewater Treatment Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lemon, R. A.; And Others

    This manual for the development of emergency operating plans for municipal wastewater treatment systems was compiled using information provided by over two hundred municipal treatment systems. It covers emergencies caused by natural disasters, civil disorders and strikes, faulty maintenance, negligent operation, and accidents. The effects of such…

  6. Emergency treatment of status epilepticus: current thinking.

    PubMed

    Millikan, Dan; Rice, Brian; Silbergleit, Robert

    2009-02-01

    Current thinking about the acute treatment of status epilepticus (SE) emphasizes a more aggressive clinical approach to this common life-threatening neurologic emergency. In this review, the authors consider four concepts that can accelerate effective treatment of SE. These include (1) updating the definition of SE to make it more clinically relevant, (2) consideration of faster ways to initiate first-line benzodiazepine therapy in the prehospital environment, (3) moving to second-line agents more quickly in refractory status in the emergency department, and (4) increasing detection and treatment of unrecognized nonconvulsive SE in comatose neurologic emergency patients.

  7. Emerging Nonsurgical Treatments for Hyperhidrosis.

    PubMed

    Kurta, Anastasia O; Glaser, Dee Anna

    2016-11-01

    A variety of available treatment options are available for primary focal hyperhidrosis, and some can be combined to obtain maximum effective results. Most treatment options have only been studied in patients with axillary hyperhidrosis, and more studies are needed to develop therapies for other body regions. Several clinical trials are underway with promising preliminary results; however, there is still a large need for new therapies.

  8. Diagnosis, Treatment, and Prevention of Hemodialysis Emergencies.

    PubMed

    Saha, Manish; Allon, Michael

    2017-02-07

    Given the high comorbidity in patients on hemodialysis and the complexity of the dialysis treatment, it is remarkable how rarely a life-threatening complication occurs during dialysis. The low rate of dialysis emergencies can be attributed to numerous safety features in modern dialysis machines; meticulous treatment and testing of the dialysate solution to prevent exposure to trace elements, toxins, and pathogens; adherence to detailed treatment protocols; and extensive training of dialysis staff to handle medical emergencies. Most hemodialysis emergencies can be attributed to human error. A smaller number are due to rare idiosyncratic reactions. In this review, we highlight major emergencies that may occur during hemodialysis treatments, describe their pathogenesis, offer measures to minimize them, and provide specific interventions to prevent catastrophic consequences on the rare occasions when such emergencies arise. These emergencies include dialysis disequilibrium syndrome, venous air embolism, hemolysis, venous needle dislodgement, vascular access hemorrhage, major allergic reactions to the dialyzer or treatment medications, and disruption or contamination of the dialysis water system. Finally, we describe root cause analysis after a dialysis emergency has occurred to prevent a future recurrence.

  9. Emerging treatments in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Jones, Andrew M; Helm, Jennifer M

    2009-10-01

    There are a number of potential drugs for the treatment of cystic fibrosis (CF) currently undergoing clinical studies. A number of antibacterials formulated for delivery by inhalation are at various stages of study; these include dry-powder inhaler versions of colistin, tobramycin and ciprofloxacin, and formulations of azteonam, amikacin, levofloxacin, ciprofloxacin and fosfomycin/tobramycin for nebulization. Clinical trials of anti-inflammatory agents, including glutathione, phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors such as sildenafil, oral acetylcysteine, simvastatin, methotrexate, docosahexaenoic acid, hydroxychloroquine, pioglitazone and alpha1-antitrypsin, are ongoing. Ion channel modulating agents, such as lancovutide (Moli1901, duramycin) and denufosol, which activate alternate (non-CF transmembrane regulator [CFTR]) chloride channels, and GS 9411, a sodium channel antagonist, are now at the stages of clinical study and if successful, will offer a new category of therapeutic agent for the treatment of CF. Correction of the underlying gene effect, either by agents that help to correct the dysfunctional CFTR, such as ataluren, VX-770 and VX-809, or by gene transfer (gene therapy), is a particularly exciting prospect as a new therapy for CF and clinical studies are ongoing. This article reviews the exciting potential drug treatments for CF currently being evaluated in clinical studies, and also highlights some of the challenges faced by research and clinical teams in assessing the efficacy of potential new therapies for CF.

  10. Emerging anabolic treatments in osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Mosekilde, Leif; Tørring, Ove; Rejnmark, Lars

    2011-04-01

    Anabolic treatment that remodels bone tissue and restores bone biomechanical competence is essential in the treatment of osteoporosis. In addition, long term antiresorptive therapy may have limitations because of the reduced renewal of bone tissue. The only pure anabolic drugs available at present are intact PTH (1-84) (Preotact®) and the truncated PTH (1-34) (Teriparatide, Forteo®) while strontium ranelate may possess antiresorptive as well as anabolic properties. The marketed antiresorptive and anabolic antiosteoporotic drugs have limitations in their use due to adverse effects or to the occurrence of rare but severe late complications. Furthermore, indications may be restricted by co-existing diseases or treatment duration may be limited. However, new anabolic drugs are being developed mimicking the effect of PTH, or targeting the calcium sensing receptor (CaSR) or the Wnt/β-catenin signalling pathway. The PTH mimetics are truncated or altered PTH fragments, parathyroid hormone related peptide (PTHrP) and calcilytics stimulating endogenous PTH secretion. Calcimimetics (e.g. strontium) and calcilytics (e.g. lithium) may also affect bone cells directly through the CaSR. The Wnt pathway that stimulates osteoblastic proliferation, differentiation and function may be activated by neutralizing antibodies to secreted inhibitors of Wnt signalling (e.g. Sclerostin or Dickkopf) or by small molecules (e.g. lithium) that inhibits the glycogen synthase kinase 3β mediated degradation of β-catenin. Finally, blocking of activin A by soluble receptor fusion proteins has been shown to increase bone mass by a dual anabolic-antiresorptive action. The present paper summarises the physiological background and the present evidence for these effects.

  11. Emerging treatments for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Schiff, M

    1997-01-27

    Rheumatoid arthritis was considered for centuries to be a nuisance condition, limiting in its effects on an individual's range of motion and the source of considerable distress, but not a life-threatening disease. Recently, however, it has become apparent that patients with severe rheumatoid arthritis may have a decreased life span. Current pharmacologic therapies for patients with rheumatoid arthritis, which include nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, methotrexate, and corticosteroids, have been moderately successful in alleviating the discomforts associated with swollen, painful joints. Many practitioners have sought to improve use of these agents and slow joint destruction by challenging traditional treatment paradigms, altering the sequence in which drugs are given. Nevertheless, most standard medical approaches to treatment have had little or no impact on the course of rheumatoid disease. Innovative strategies, particularly those based on new concepts in the immunobiology of rheumatoid arthritis, are being developed to target cellular inflammatory mechanisms and actually prevent disease progression. Some agents, such as inhibitors of 5-lipoxygenase-omega-3 fatty acid and zileuton-may be most useful in treatment of milder disease manifestations such as moderate synovitis. Other agents, such as oral type II collagen, minocycline, subcutaneous interleukin-1ra, and anti-CD4 monoclonal antibodies, have produced such inconsistent results that substantial additional research will be required before any conclusions may be drawn about their value. Among the most promising agents, and the most extensively studied, are tumor necrosis factor-alpha monoclonal antibodies, immunosuppressive drugs such as cyclosporine and mycophenolate mofetil, and the novel compound tenidap, which has both cytokine-modulating and anti-inflammatory properties.

  12. Emerging Treatments for Neuropathic Pain.

    PubMed

    Pessoa, Bruno L; Escudeiro, Gabriel; Nascimento, Osvaldo J M

    2015-12-01

    Neuropathic pain is a series of well-known conditions caused by diseases or lesions to the somatosensory system. Due to the better understanding of the pathophysiology of neuropathic pain, previously unexplored therapies have been used with encouraging results. As such, Acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC), Alpha-lipoic-acid (ALA), cannabinoids, Clonidine, EMA401, Botulinum Toxin type A, and new voltage-gated sodium channel blockers, can be cited. Furthermore, new modalities in neuromodulation such as high-frequency spinal cord stimulation, burst stimulation, dorsal root ganglion stimulation, transcranial direct current stimulation, and many others have been showing exciting results. Besides, changing paradigms may occur with the advent of optogenetics and a better understanding of epigenetic regulation. This article reviews the published literature on the treatment of NP. Despite the interesting results, randomized controlled trials are demanded for the majority of the therapies previously mentioned.

  13. Emerging Treatments for Motor Rehabilitation After Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Chandramouli; Khot, Sandeep P.

    2015-01-01

    Although numerous treatments are available to improve cerebral perfusion after acute stroke and prevent recurrent stroke, few rehabilitation treatments have been conclusively shown to improve neurologic recovery. The majority of stroke survivors with motor impairment do not recover to their functional baseline, and there remains a need for novel neurorehabilitation treatments to minimize long-term disability, maximize quality of life, and optimize psychosocial outcomes. In recent years, several novel therapies have emerged to restore motor function after stroke, and additional investigational treatments have also shown promise. Here, we familiarize the neurohospitalist with emerging treatments for poststroke motor rehabilitation. The rehabilitation treatments covered in this review will include selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor medications, constraint-induced movement therapy, noninvasive brain stimulation, mirror therapy, and motor imagery or mental practice. PMID:25829989

  14. [The emergency treatment of the psychotic patient].

    PubMed

    Naumann, Ute; Mavrogiorgou, Paraskevi; Pajonk, Frank-Gerald B; Juckel, Georg

    2012-06-01

    Psychosis can cause multiple psychiatric and somatic emergencies. Due to the complex character of the disease the communication and accessibility of the patient can be severely disturbed. In the pre-clinical emergency medical care the etiology of a psychosis remains often unclear, the most common causes are schizophrenia and drug-induced psychosis. Frequent emergencies are states of psychomotor agitation, self-endangerment and endangerment of others including suicidal tendencies/acts as well as catatonic and manic states. Antipsychotic drugs and benzodiazepines are the most efficient pharmacotherapeutic treatments. Extrapyramidal side effects of the prescribed medication can also cause the need for urgent medical care. In any case needs to be considered a severe somatic comorbidity. It is particularly necessary that all available information at the scene of emergency should be transferred to the clinicians since the further diagnostic and therapeutic assessment will rely hereon.

  15. [Emergency Surgery and Treatments for Pneumothorax].

    PubMed

    Kurihara, Masatoshi

    2015-07-01

    The primary care in terms of emergency for pneumothorax is chest drainage in almost cases. The following cases of pneumothorax and the complications need something of surgery and treatments. Pneumothorax with subcutaneous emphysema often needs small skin incisions around the drainage tube. Tension pneumothorax often needs urgent chest drainage. Pneumothorax with intractable air leakage often needs interventional treatments like endobroncheal occlusion (EBO) or thoracographic fibrin glue sealing method (TGF) as well as urgent thoracoscopic surgery. Pneumothorax with acute empyema also often needs urgent thoracoscopic surgery within 2 weeks if chest drainage or drug therapy are unsuccessful. It will probably become chronic empyema of thorax after then. Pneumothorax with bleeding needs urgent thoracoscopic surgery in case of continuous bleeding over 200 ml/2 hours. In any cases of emergency for pneumothorax, respiratory physicians should collaborate with respiratory surgeons at the 1st stage because it is important to timely judge conversion of surgical treatments from medical treatments.

  16. The emergency treatment of crescendo angina

    PubMed Central

    Levenstein, Joseph H.

    1980-01-01

    The Cape General Practitioner Emergency Coronary Care Study reported one of the lowest morbidity rates for acute myocardial infarction so far recorded. The next step is preventing infarcts. This may be achieved by prompt and energetic treatment of crescendo angina and its related forms of myocardial ischaemia. I report one practical plan of management which I have used in my own practice. PMID:7420319

  17. Current and emerging treatments for vitiligo.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Michelle; Ezzedine, Khaled; Hamzavi, Iltefat; Pandya, Amit G; Harris, John E

    2017-07-01

    Clinicians should be aware that vitiligo is not merely a cosmetic disease and that there are safe and effective treatments available for vitiligo. It is important to recognize common and uncommon presentations and those with active disease, as well as their implications for clinical management; these were discussed in the first article in this continuing medical education series. Existing treatments include topical and systemic immunosuppressants, phototherapy, and surgical techniques, which together may serve to halt disease progression, stabilize depigmented lesions, and encourage repigmentation. We discuss how to optimize the currently available treatments and highlight emerging treatments that may improve treatment efficacy in the future. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Particle separation options for emergency water treatment.

    PubMed

    Dorea, C C; Bertrand, S; Clarke, B A

    2006-01-01

    Emergencies can result from the effects of unpredictable natural forces or from the cruelty of conflicts. The affected population is often left vulnerable to increased health risks. The victims' exposure to these risks can be reduced by timely public health interventions. Often, one of the first basic mitigations is the provision of water for essential needs. The quickest option, and generally more polluted, is of surface waters. We have reviewed particle separation options for emergency water treatment of surface waters. These vary from granular filtration package treatment facilities to ceramic candle filters and have therefore been broadly classified in three categories: modular, mobile and point-of-use (or household). The operational requirements and process limitations that can influence the choice of each option are discussed alongside with their underlying particle separation mechanisms and performance data.

  19. Chronic rhinosinusitis and emerging treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Piromchai, Patorn; Kasemsiri, Pornthep; Laohasiriwong, Supawan; Thanaviratananich, Sanguansak

    2013-01-01

    This review describes the epidemiology and various treatments in chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) with nasal polyps (CRSwNP) and CRS without nasal polyps (CRSsNP). Evidence for short-term use of systemic corticosteroids has been shown to be favorable in CRSwNP, but still limited in CRSsNP. Topical corticosteroids improve symptom scores in both CRS subgroups. The role of microbes in CRS is still controversial. Culture-directed antibiotics are recommended for CRSsNP with exacerbation. Long-term use of low dosage antibiotics is recommended for CRSsNP for their anti-inflammatory effects. Other emerging treatment options are also discussed. PMID:23785241

  20. Emerging treatments for irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Joseph; Ehrenpreis, Eli D

    2002-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional GI disorder that is associated with abdominal discomfort and altered bowel habits. It accounts for up to 28% of patients presenting to a gastroenterology practice and poses a significant personal, societal and economic burden internationally. The Manning, Rome I and Rome II criteria were developed to identify appropriate IBS patients for entry into IBS studies in a consistent manner. Refinements in the understanding of the physiology of the enteric nervous system (ENS), which controls motility, secretion and sensation, provided the basis for our comprehension of the pathophysiology of IBS. Visceral hypersensitivity and neurotransmitter imbalance currently receive the most attention as possible mechanisms of IBS. This article outlines conventional treatments and reviews the data on emerging and experimental therapies for IBS. Emerging therapies for IBS using 5-HT mediation include 5-HT(3) antagonists, such as ondasetron, granisetron and alosetron, as well as 5-HT(4) agonists such as tegaserod and prucalopride. In addition to opioid agonists (e.g. fedotozine) several other drugs that act on other ENS receptors are being studied. In spite of significant progress in IBS research, these emerging therapies require more studies before they can be utilised as clinical treatments.

  1. Emergency endovascular treatment of popliteal aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Saratzis, Athanasios; Melas, Nikolaos; Dixon, Hannah; Saratzis, Nikolaos

    2010-12-01

    Popliteal artery aneurysm (PAA), despite being rare, is the most common peripheral aneurysm. It can present as acute thrombosis and occlusion of the aneurysmal segment, and distal embolization, causing either chronic or acute limb ischemia. It has traditionally been treated with open surgical reconstruction. Endovascular repair of PAAs has recently been applied electively with a favourable early and mid-term outcome; however there is a lack of reports on the endovascular treatment of PAAs presenting with acute complications. This report describes the treatment of a thrombosed PAA in a 58 year old male using an endovascular stent-graft and also provides a systematic review of the literature on the emergency endovascular treatment of PAAs.

  2. Emerging drugs for the treatment of sepsis.

    PubMed

    Heming, Nicholas; Lamothe, Laure; Ambrosi, Xavier; Annane, Djillali

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of sepsis, the systemic inflammatory response of the host to an infectious insult, has steadily increased over past decades. This trend is expected to continue. Sepsis is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide. Treatment relies on antibiotics associated to source control and supportive care. Major progress has been made in the understanding and overall management of sepsis. However, there is no specific treatment for sepsis. We searched PubMed and the ClinicalTrials.gov site for English language reports of phase II and III clinical trials pertaining to the field of sepsis. The current review provides a summary of promising candidate treatments for sepsis. We broadly separated candidate drugs into three distinct categories: Blood purification techniques, immunomodulatory drugs and treatments targeting other systems including the heart, the endothelium or coagulation. Efforts to identify an efficient treatment for sepsis are hampered by the broad definition of the syndrome associated with major heterogeneity between patients affected by sepsis. The characterization of homogeneous groups of patients, through biological or clinical markers is unfortunately lacking. Current research remains active. Candidate drugs for sepsis include hemoperfusion with polymyxin B coated fibre devices, modulation of the immune system with treatments such as hydrocortisone, intravenous immunoglobulins, mesenchymal stem cells, GM-CSF or interferon gamma. Candidate drugs acting on the cardiovascular system include short acting beta 1 blockers, levosimendan or selepressin. Finally, promising strategies, involving monoclonal antibodies or protein antagonists, which selectively inhibit bacterial virulence factors are being assessed at the bedside. A much awaited and needed specific treatment for sepsis will hopefully soon emerge.

  3. 7 CFR 205.672 - Emergency pest or disease treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Emergency pest or disease treatment. 205.672 Section... Exclusion from Sale § 205.672 Emergency pest or disease treatment. When a prohibited substance is applied to a certified operation due to a Federal or State emergency pest or disease treatment program and...

  4. 7 CFR 205.672 - Emergency pest or disease treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Emergency pest or disease treatment. 205.672 Section... Exclusion from Sale § 205.672 Emergency pest or disease treatment. When a prohibited substance is applied to a certified operation due to a Federal or State emergency pest or disease treatment program and...

  5. 7 CFR 205.672 - Emergency pest or disease treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Emergency pest or disease treatment. 205.672 Section... Exclusion from Sale § 205.672 Emergency pest or disease treatment. When a prohibited substance is applied to a certified operation due to a Federal or State emergency pest or disease treatment program and...

  6. 7 CFR 205.672 - Emergency pest or disease treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Emergency pest or disease treatment. 205.672 Section... Exclusion from Sale § 205.672 Emergency pest or disease treatment. When a prohibited substance is applied to a certified operation due to a Federal or State emergency pest or disease treatment program and...

  7. 7 CFR 205.672 - Emergency pest or disease treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Emergency pest or disease treatment. 205.672 Section... Exclusion from Sale § 205.672 Emergency pest or disease treatment. When a prohibited substance is applied to a certified operation due to a Federal or State emergency pest or disease treatment program and...

  8. Emerging treatment options for type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Piya, Milan K; Tahrani, Abd A; Barnett, Anthony H

    2010-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is rapidly increasing in prevalence and is a major public health problem. It is a progressive disease which commonly requires multiple pharmacotherapy. Current options for treatment may have undesirable side effects (particularly weight gain and hypoglycaemia) and contraindications, and little effect on disease progression. Incretin based therapy is one of several newer therapies to improve glycaemia and is available in two different forms, dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) agonists. Use of these agents results in a ‘glucose-dependant’ increase in insulin secretion and glucagon suppression resulting in improved glycaemia with low incidence of hypoglycaemia. DPP-4 inhibitors are oral drugs which are weight neutral, while GLP-1 agonists are injected subcutaneously and help promote weight loss while improving glycaemia. GLP-1 agonists have also been shown to increase beta cell mass in rat models. Bariatric surgery is another option for the obese patient with T2DM, with blood glucose normalizing in over half of the patients following surgery. Other therapies in development for the treatment of T2DM include sodium-glucose transporter 2 (SGLT-2) inhibitors, glucagon receptor antagonists, glucokinase activators and sirtuins. In this article, we will review the various existing and emerging treatment options for T2DM. PMID:20831513

  9. Mobile Emergency Response Water Treatment Technology Results

    EPA Science Inventory

    When natural disasters like hurricanes, floods and earthquakes occur, safe drinking water can be compromised, limited or unavailable. Under such situations, communities have emergency response plans. One of many options for providing safe drinking water during emergency situati...

  10. Mobile Emergency Response Water Treatment Technology Results

    EPA Science Inventory

    When natural disasters like hurricanes, floods and earthquakes occur, safe drinking water can be compromised, limited or unavailable. Under such situations, communities have emergency response plans. One of many options for providing safe drinking water during emergency situati...

  11. Drug-resistant tuberculosis: emerging treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Adhvaryu, Meghna; Vakharia, Bhasker

    2011-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis has emerged worldwide, with an increasing incidence due to failure of implementation of apparently effective first-line antituberculous therapy as well as primary infection with drug-resistant strains. Failure of current therapy is attributed to a long duration of treatment leading to nonadherence and irregular therapy, lack of patient education about the disease, poverty, irregular supply by care providers, drug–drug interactions in patients coinfected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), inadequate regulations causing market overlap and irresponsible drug usage in the private sector, and lack of research, with no addition of new drugs in the last four decades. Present standards of care for the treatment of drugsusceptible tuberculosis, multidrug-resistant tuberculosis, tuberculosis-HIV coinfection, and latent tuberculosis infection are all unsatisfactory. Since 2000, the World Health Organization (WHO) has focused on drug development for tuberculosis, as well as research in all relevant aspects to discover new regimens by 2015 and to eliminate tuberculosis as a public health concern by 2050. As a result, some 20 promising compounds from 14 groups of drugs have been discovered. Twelve candidates from eight classes are currently being evaluated in clinical trials. Ongoing research should prioritize identification of novel targets and newer application of existing drugs, discovery of multitargeted drugs from natural compounds, strengthening host factors by immunopotentiation with herbal immunomodulators, as well as protective vaccines before and after exposure, consideration of surgical measures when indicated, development of tools for rapid diagnosis, early identification of resistant strains, and markers for adequacy of treatment and an integrative approach to fulfill WHO goals. However, regulatory control over the drug market, as well as public-private partnership to use health program facilities to track patients and ensure

  12. [Emergency treatment and management of anaphylaxis].

    PubMed

    Brockow, K; Ring, J

    2013-02-01

    Anaphylaxis, the maximal manifestation of an immediate allergic reaction, is a life-threatening systemic reaction. The immediate therapy is chosen according to the clinical manifestations and new German guidelines are in preparation. Required measures include immediate removal of allergen, adequate positioning, assessment of severity and organ involvement and activation of emergency medical services. In anaphylaxis with primarily cardiovascular involvement, epinephrine is the treatment of choice and given together with volume substitution, oxygen, H(1)-antihistamines and corticosteroids. Obstruction of the airways is treated with intramuscular and inhaled epinephrine, or alternatively β(2)-sympathicomimetics, and oxygen. Abdominal or cutaneous involvement, such as generalized urticaria, usually can be treated with intravenous H(1)-antihistamines, glucocorticoids and surveillance. In patients with anaphylaxis, the elicitor of the reaction has to be diagnosed by allergy testing. Patients with sustained risk for anaphylaxis should receive a self-medication kit and should be educated about behavioral patterns needed for prophylaxis and therapy of anaphylactic reactions. Patient educational intervention increases knowledge about anaphylaxis, and practical competence and thus, is a basis of a successful management of anaphylaxis.

  13. [Emergence delirium in children - prophylaxis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Wermelt, Julius Z; Ellerkmann, Richard K

    2016-07-01

    Emergence Delirium in children after general anesthesia is a common and self limitating event. Although it might be seen as being harmless it can cause other serious complications and might leave both parents and other caregivers with a negative impression behind. Although the cause may still not be clear, potential predictors can be named: preschool age, the use of fast acting volatile anesthestics, higher preoperative anxiety levels and postoperative pain.A child-focused approach to reduce preoperative anxiety focusing on distraction methods rather than pharmacological sedation may be the key as well as sufficient postoperative pain control and the use of total intravenous anesthesia. Parenteal presence during induction of anaesthesia (PPIA) may be beneficial to reduce preoperative anxiety levels, but has failed to prove a better outcome regarding ED.The use of age adopted scores/scales to diagnose ED and Pain are mandatory.In the case of an ED event it is most important to protect the child from self injury and the loss of the iv-line. Postoperative pian needs to be ruled out before treating ED. Most cases can be treated by interrupting the situation and putting the child "back to sleep". Short acting drugs as Propofol have been used successfully due to its pharmacodynamics and short acting profile. Alternatively alpha-agonists or ketamin may be preferred by other authors. If potential predictors and a positive history are present, prophylactic treatment should be considered. A TIVA or the use of alpha-2-agonists have proven to be successful in reducing the risk of an ED. Midazolam may reduce preoperative anxiety but not the incidence of ED and should therefore be used carefully and is not a good choice in PACU for the treatment of ED.Parents who witnessed ED in their children should be guided and followed up. Explaining this phenomenon to parents beforehand should be part of the pre anaesthesia clinic talk and written consent.Standard protocols should be in

  14. 38 CFR 17.165 - Emergency outpatient dental treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... dental treatment. 17.165 Section 17.165 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Dental Services § 17.165 Emergency outpatient dental treatment. When outpatient emergency dental care is provided, as a humanitarian service, to individuals who have no established eligibility...

  15. 38 CFR 17.165 - Emergency outpatient dental treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... dental treatment. 17.165 Section 17.165 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Dental Services § 17.165 Emergency outpatient dental treatment. When outpatient emergency dental care is provided, as a humanitarian service, to individuals who have no established eligibility...

  16. 38 CFR 17.165 - Emergency outpatient dental treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... dental treatment. 17.165 Section 17.165 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Dental Services § 17.165 Emergency outpatient dental treatment. When outpatient emergency dental care is provided, as a humanitarian service, to individuals who have no established eligibility...

  17. 38 CFR 17.165 - Emergency outpatient dental treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... dental treatment. 17.165 Section 17.165 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Dental Services § 17.165 Emergency outpatient dental treatment. When outpatient emergency dental care is provided, as a humanitarian service, to individuals who have no established eligibility...

  18. 38 CFR 17.165 - Emergency outpatient dental treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... dental treatment. 17.165 Section 17.165 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Dental Services § 17.165 Emergency outpatient dental treatment. When outpatient emergency dental care is provided, as a humanitarian service, to individuals who have no established eligibility...

  19. Laparoscopic Diagnosis and Treatment in Gynecologic Emergencies

    PubMed Central

    Cantele, Héctor; Leyba, José Luis; Navarrete, Manuel; Llopla, Salvador Navarrete

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To present an analysis of our experience with 22 consecutive cases of acute abdominal gynecologic emergencies managed with a laparoscopic approach. Methods: From March 1997 to October 1998, 22 patients with a diagnosis of acute abdominal gynecologic emergencies underwent laparoscopic intervention. A transvaginal ultrasound was performed on all patients preoperatively to supplement the diagnostic workup. Surgical time, complications, and length of hospital stay were evaluated, and the laparoscopic diagnosis was compared with the preoperative diagnosis. Results: The laparoscopic diagnosis was different from the preoperative diagnosis in 31.8% of patients. Of the 22 patients, laparoscopic therapeutic procedures were performed in 18 (81.8%), all satisfactorily, and with no need for conversion to open surgery. No morbidity or mortality occurred. Conclusion: Laparoscopy is a safe and effective method for diagnosing and treating gynecologic emergencies. PMID:14558712

  20. Emergency Medical Treatment for the "Wilderness" Context.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association for Search and Rescue, Fairfax, VA.

    This paper offers a brief outline of the training curriculum developed by the National Association for Search and Rescue (NASAR) for its Wilderness Medicine Programs. The training modules are designed for wilderness search and rescue units, rural emergency medical services (EMS) squads, military medics, backcountry rangers, epedition leaders,…

  1. Emergency Medical Treatment for the "Wilderness" Context.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association for Search and Rescue, Fairfax, VA.

    This paper offers a brief outline of the training curriculum developed by the National Association for Search and Rescue (NASAR) for its Wilderness Medicine Programs. The training modules are designed for wilderness search and rescue units, rural emergency medical services (EMS) squads, military medics, backcountry rangers, epedition leaders,…

  2. System of acute medical support to emergency during dental treatment.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, M; Takeshita, T; Akita, S

    1986-01-01

    The Resuscitation Committee of Hiroshima City Dental Association was established in 1983 in order to provide acute medical support in case of emergency during dental treatment at private dental clinics. This Committee is composed of representatives from the Hiroshima City Dental Association, Hiroshima University School of Dentistry, Hiroshima University School of Medicine, Hiroshima City Health Bureau, and Hiroshima City Fire and Ambulance Department. A portable ECG monitor with defibrillator and a resuscitation kit are held in readiness at the Hiroshima University Hospital. In case of emergency during dental treatment at a private dental clinic, we hurry to the clinic with the resuscitation set and give emergency treatment. We have been involved in two cases of emergency since this system started. Both of them recovered without any sequelae. Besides these activities, we give lectures annually to dentists and dental hygienists on the treatment of medical emergencies.

  3. Withholding and withdrawing medical treatment: an emergency medicine perspective.

    PubMed

    Iserson, K V

    1996-07-01

    In emergency medicine, a significant difference rightfully persists between the withholding and withdrawal of life-sustaining medical treatment. The justification for this difference stems part from the nature of emergency medical practice and the unique manner in which clinicians apply many ethical principles. In the usual setting, the decision to withhold further medical treatment is done quietly, often without input from the patients surrogate decisionmaker, whereas withdrawal of ongoing medical treatment can be more obvious and difficult. This situation is reversed in the emergency medicine setting. The withholding of emergency medical treatment is much more problematic than later withdrawal of unwanted or useless interventions. Emergency physicians and prehospital providers often lack vital information about their patients' identities, medical conditions, and wishes. Society also has specific expectations of emergency physicians. Because of the nature of emergency medicine, both in the prehospital and the emergency department settings, the distinction between withdrawal and withholding of medical treatment has never disappeared and is not likely to do so in the future.

  4. Emerging treatment options for early mycosis fungoides

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Guarino, Montserrat

    2013-01-01

    Mycosis fungoides is a candidate for skin-directed therapies in its initial stages. In recent years, therapeutic options outside of the normal treatment recommendations such as topical imiquimod, topical tazarotene, topical methotrexate, excimer light sources, and photodynamic therapy have been published with variable results. These alternatives have been useful in cases of localized mycosis fungoides that do not respond to routine treatments; nevertheless, more studies on these methods are still needed. This article summarizes the literature and data that are known so far about these treatments. PMID:23450851

  5. New and emerging treatments for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Corbett, Anne; Ballard, Clive

    2012-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease and other dementias represent a significant and increasing clinical challenge. Dementia is also associated with a substantial economic cost and burden to health service provision. Existing treatments slow the progression of symptoms of the disease, but their efficacy does not extend to all patients and is not sustained beyond an average of 6 months. It is, therefore, critical to address the current lack of effective treatments to target the underlying pathology and disease process in Alzheimer's disease. This review aims to highlight the main areas of new therapeutic development and discuss some of the main therapies currently being evaluated in clinical trials. Despite a number of promising rationales for therapeutic treatments in Alzheimer's disease, very few of these avenues have been developed beyond preclinical studies. The predominant focus of the current article is on treatments currently in Phase II and Phase III clinical trials, but some other promising areas of development are also discussed. There are currently only three therapeutics being investigated in Phase III clinical trials. This emphasizes the substantial caution and underinvestment in treatment development in this area. There is a distinct lack of novel approaches in the pipeline, and whether there is a new disease-modifying therapy for Alzheimer's disease in the next 5 years almost entirely depends on the success of currently ongoing immunotherapy studies. Importantly, there is potential benefit in exploring existing licensed treatments alongside novel drug development to increase the focus on novel targets within this time frame.

  6. Emerging Drugs for the Treatment of Anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Murrough, James W.; Yaqubi, Sahab; Sayed, Sehrish; Charney, Dennis S.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Anxiety disorders are among the most prevalent and disabling psychiatric disorders in the United States and worldwide. Basic research has provided critical insights into the mechanism regulating fear behavior in animals and a host of animal models have been developed in order to screen compounds for anxiolytic properties. Despite this progress, no mechanistically novel agents for the treatment of anxiety have come to market in more than two decades. Areas covered The current review will provide a critical summary of current pharmacological approaches to the treatment of anxiety and will examine the pharmacotherapeutic pipeline for treatments in development. Anxiety and related disorders considered herein include panic disorder, social anxiety disorder, generalized anxiety disorder and posttraumatic stress disorder. The glutamate, neuropeptide and endocannabinoid systems show particular promise as future targets for novel drug development. Expert opinion In the face of an ever-growing understanding of fear related behavior, the field awaits the translation of this research into mechanistically novel treatments. Obstacles will be overcome through close collaboration between basic and clinical researchers with the goal of aligning valid endophenotypes of human anxiety disorders with improved animal models. Novel approaches are needed to move basic discoveries into new, more effective treatments for our patients. PMID:26012843

  7. Emerging hepatic syndromes: pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Bertino, Gaetano; Privitera, Graziella; Purrello, Francesco; Demma, Shirin; Crisafulli, Emanuele; Spadaro, Luisa; Koukias, Nikolaos; Tsochatzis, Emmanuel A

    2016-10-01

    Liver cirrhosis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, mainly due to complications of portal hypertension. In this article, we review the current understanding on the pathophysiology, the diagnostic criteria and the available therapeutic options for patients with emerging hepatic syndromes in cirrhosis, namely the hepatorenal, hepato-adrenal and hepatopulmonary syndrome. The hepatorenal syndrome is a well-recognized complication of advanced cirrhosis and is usually associated with an accelerated course to death unless liver transplantation is performed. The hepatopulmonary syndrome is often missed in the evaluation of patients with cirrhosis; however, early recognition is essential for the efficient management of individual patients. The hepato-adrenal syndrome, although not fully characterized, offers an exciting field for research and potential therapeutic interventions.

  8. Emerging drugs for the treatment of acne.

    PubMed

    Aslam, Imran; Fleischer, Alan; Feldman, Steve

    2015-03-01

    Acne is the most common skin condition in the US. The mainstay of acne therapy includes: topical retinoids, topical antibiotics, benzoyl peroxide (BP), and oral isotretinoin for severe cases. Although these treatment options are highly effective they do have certain drawbacks. Current acne treatment regimens often require patients to use multiple medications, some of which may have irritating side effects. Furthermore, Propionibacterium acnes resistance to antibiotics has become an increasing problem due to the rise in antibiotic use. New therapies that have either been released onto the market or that are being developed include: adapalene-BP combination agent, dapsone 5% gel, minocycline foam, topical nitric oxide-releasing agent, cortexolone 17 α-propionate, and CIP isotretinoin. Some of these new therapies address the challenges faced with existing treatment options. For instance, the relatively new combination therapy, adapalene-BP, limits antibiotic resistance and also helps simplify treatment regimens. The newly developed topical nitric oxide-releasing agent also holds potential in limiting antibiotic resistance. Many of the new therapies discussed in this paper are still in early stages of testing so it is difficult to predict their outlook; however, based on preliminary findings, these therapies seem to be promising.

  9. Emerging strategies for the treatment of retinoblastoma.

    PubMed

    Deegan, William F

    2003-10-01

    Over the past 10 years, the treatment of retinoblastoma has changed dramatically. The main impetus for these changes, which are more intensive than traditional modalities and require a multidisciplinary approach, has been the avoidance of the serious, often fatal, complications of external beam radiation. The use of potent, well known chemotherapy agents in a novel setting (ie, intraocular tumor) has been successful in treating all but the most advanced disease. This review will examine recent published work with chemotherapy and local (focal laser) treatment for intraocular (curable) retinoblastoma. Specifically, the concepts behind and the practice of chemoreduction and thermochemotherapy and their efficacies will be evaluated. The work discussed herein constitutes an extremely nascent and dynamic field of work in ocular oncology. Much uncertainty remains, especially as most of these patients will live for many decades after their presentation and treatment. The review will show that a significant number of treatment failures still occur and that continued work is needed before we can feel confident treating young patients with all forms of this rare tumor.

  10. Emergency preparedness guidelines for water treatment systems.

    PubMed

    Amato, R L

    2001-10-01

    While many dialysis facilities prepare for loss of power and water in disaster situations, it is equally important to prepare for loss of quality drinking water. Natural disasters like hurricanes, floods, earthquakes, and tornadoes can affect the quality of the potable water delivered for dialysis by adding contaminants. This article presents a checklist of how to prepare the water treatment system against natural disasters and what to do after an event occurs.

  11. Current and emerging treatments for severe asthma

    PubMed Central

    Al Efraij, Khalid

    2015-01-01

    Severe asthma, which is poorly controlled despite the elimination of modifiable factors and the correct use of standard therapy, accounts only for 5% of people with asthma but it contributes to approximately 50% of the economic costs of asthma. Because of this unmet need, novel therapies have been developed for optimal treatment of these patients. The use of tiotropium, omalizumab, mepolizumab and thermoplasty in well-selected patients provides better control and most importantly a reduction in asthma exacerbations. PMID:26716048

  12. Intervertebral disk degeneration and emerging biologic treatments.

    PubMed

    Kepler, Christopher K; Anderson, D Greg; Tannoury, Chadi; Ponnappan, Ravi K

    2011-09-01

    Although understanding of the biologic basis of intervertebral disk (IVD) degeneration is rapidly advancing, the unique IVD environment presents challenges to the development and delivery of biologic treatments. Acceleration of cellular senescence and apoptosis in degenerative IVDs and the depletion of matrix proteins have prompted the development of treatments based on replacing IVD cells using various cell sources. However, this strategy has not been tested in animal models. IVD degeneration and associated pain have led to interest in pathologic innervation of the IVD and ultimately to the development of percutaneous devices to ablate afferent nerve endings in the posterior annulus. Degeneration leads to changes in the expression of matrix protein, cytokines, and proteinases. Injection of growth factors and mitogens may help overcome these degenerative changes in IVD phenotype, and these potential treatments are being explored in animal studies. Gene therapy is an elegant method to address changes in protein expression, but efforts to apply this technology to IVD degeneration are still at early stages.

  13. Emerging technology: endoluminal treatment of obesity.

    PubMed

    Coté, Gregory A; Edmundowicz, Steven A

    2009-11-01

    Bariatric surgery remains the most effective treatment for the management of obesity. Endoluminal interventions offer the potential for an ambulatory weight loss procedure that may be safer and more cost-effective compared with current laparoscopic approaches. We review the currently available endoluminal techniques for obesity that have been presented or discussed in public forums and meetings, focusing on those with published trials. Literature review. Human trials of endoluminal treatments of obesity are primarily limited to restrictive interventions, including intragastric balloons, transoral gastroplasty, and endoluminal vertical gastroplasty. Currently, the duodenojejunal bypass sleeve is the only endoluminal device that has been studied in humans that promotes weight loss through malabsorption. Early results of these technologies are promising, but long-term data are lacking. Endoluminal treatments for obesity have promise, and recent technological advances have been astounding. However, these interventions will need to be held to the same standards of current operative techniques. Each device will need to be scrutinized within clinical trials to determine its safety, efficacy, and durability.

  14. Evaluation of semidecentralized emergency drinking water treatment.

    PubMed

    Eloidin, Océane; Dorea, Caetano C

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluates the potential for a novel semidecentralized approach that uses coagulant disinfectant products (CDPs) for humanitarian water treatment, by testing two commercially available products (CDP-W and CDP-T). Their performances were evaluated against the relevant water quality treatment objectives (The Sphere Project) under laboratory conditions, using a standardized testing protocol with both synthetic and natural surface test waters. Tests indicated a satisfactory performance by one of the products (CDP-W) with respect to humanitarian water quality objectives, (i.e., free chlorine residual, pH, and turbidity) that was dependent on initial water quality characteristics. Adequate bacterial inactivation (final thermotolerant coliform concentration of < 1 cfu/100 mL) was always attained and log reductions of up to 5 were achieved. The other product (CDP-T) did not exhibit any measurable coagulation and disinfection properties, indicating the variability of product quality and the need to conduct evaluations such as the ones presented in this study. Such results are of relevance to relief agencies delivering water supply interventions.

  15. [Treatment of emergencies in the hospital--problems and management].

    PubMed

    Sablotzki, A; Schubert, S; Kuhn, C; Radke, J; Czeslick, E

    2003-01-01

    Due to the growing number of high-risk patients, the increasing proportion of geriatric patients and the expansion of surgical and invasive-diagnostic procedures, medical stuff in hospitals are confronted with a rising number of emergency situations. Nearly 50% are of cardio-circulatory origin and occur during surgical interventions or immediately afterwards. Another cause of life-threatening complications are side-effects of orally or intravenously administered agents, especially after treatment with antibiotics, anaesthetics, analgetics and sedatives. Due to a lack of emergency training and management in most hospitals, the survival rate after cardiopulmonary resuscitation in general wards lies between just two and 35%. Thus it seems necessary to perform special training in CPR procedures and emergency management at regular intervals for the entire medical stuff. In addition, a special infrastructure for giving sufficient treatment in emergencies has to be established (emergency team, emergency telephone number, intra-hospital emergency car). The second part of this review presents current diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for the most common emergency situations, e.g. anaphylaxis, myocardial infarction, pulmonary embolism, gastrointestinal bleeding, and heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT).

  16. Fecal microbiota transplantation and emerging treatments for Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Gens, Krista D; Elshaboury, Ramy H; Holt, Jessica S

    2013-10-01

    Due to the increased incidence and recurrence of Clostridium difficile infection, health care providers are seeking new and alternative treatments to the standard antibiotic therapy. The objective of this article is to present a review on the background, microbiologic efficacy, clinical efficacy, and safety of fecal microbiota transplantation and to provide an overview of emerging treatment options currently under investigation. Emerging treatment options discussed include the use of monoclonal antibodies directed against toxins A and B, C difficile vaccination, and transplantation of nontoxigenic C difficile strains.

  17. Pediatric multiple sclerosis: Escalation and emerging treatments.

    PubMed

    Chitnis, Tanuja; Ghezzi, Angelo; Bajer-Kornek, Barbara; Boyko, Alexey; Giovannoni, Gavin; Pohl, Daniela

    2016-08-30

    Over the last 20 years, there have been significant advances in multiple sclerosis (MS) therapeutics, with regulatory approval for 13 therapies in adults by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) and Food and Drug Administration. However, there is only limited approval for interferon-β and glatiramer acetate use in children 12 years and older by the EMA. Availability of disease-modifying therapies to children and adolescents with MS is variable by region, and is extremely limited in some regions of the world. Up to 30% of children experience breakthrough disease requiring therapies beyond traditional first-line agents. Recent legislation in both the United States and Europe has mandated clinical studies for all new therapeutics applicable to children. Several clinical trials in children are underway that will provide important information regarding the efficacy and safety of newer drugs. This review summarizes the current knowledge of breakthrough disease, escalation, and induction treatment approaches in children with MS, especially pertaining to disease course and disability outcomes in this group of patients. In addition, ongoing clinical trials and approaches and challenges in conducting clinical trials in the pediatric population are discussed.

  18. Emerging treatment options for nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lu; Chen, Qiu-Yan; Liu, Huai; Tang, Lin-Quan; Mai, Hai-Qiang

    2013-01-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma is endemic in Asia and is etiologically associated with Epstein–Barr virus. Radiotherapy is the primary treatment modality. The role of systemic therapy has become more prominent. Based on multiple phase III studies and meta-analyses, concurrent cisplatin-based chemoradiotherapy is the current standard of care for locally advanced disease (American Joint Committee on Cancer manual [7th edition] stages II–IVb). The reported failure-free survival rates from phase II trials are encouraging for induction + concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Data from ongoing phase III trials comparing induction + concurrent chemoradiotherapy with concurrent chemoradiotherapy will validate the results of these phase II studies. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy techniques are recommended if the resources are available. Locoregional control exceeding 90% and reduced xerostomia-related toxicities can now be achieved using intensity-modulated radiotherapy, although distant control remains the most pressing research problem. The promising results of targeted therapy and Epstein–Barr virus-specific immunotherapy from early clinical trials should be validated in phase III clinical trials. New technology, more effective and less toxic chemotherapy regimens, and targeted therapy offer new opportunities for treating nasopharyngeal carcinoma. PMID:23403548

  19. Psychopharmacologic treatment of eating disorders: emerging findings.

    PubMed

    McElroy, Susan L; Guerdjikova, Anna I; Mori, Nicole; Keck, Paul E

    2015-05-01

    Psychopharmacologic treatment is playing a greater role in the management of patients with eating disorders. In this paper, we review randomized, placebo-controlled trials (RCTs) conducted in anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN), binge eating disorder (BED), and other eating disorders over the past 3 years. Fluoxetine remains the only medication approved for an eating disorder, that being BN. RCTs of antipsychotics in AN have had mixed results; the only agent with some evidence of efficacy is olanzapine. One study suggests dronabinol may induce weight gain in AN. Preliminary studies suggest lack of efficacy of alprazolam, dehydroepiandrosterone, or physiologic estrogen replacement in AN; erythromycin in BN; and the opioid antagonist ALKS-33 in BED. In BED with obesity or overweight, bupropion may cause mild weight loss without seizures, and chromium may improve glucose regulation. Also in BED, three RCTs suggest the stimulant prodrug lisdexamfetamine may reduce binge eating episodes, and another RCT suggests intranasal naloxone may decrease time spent binge eating. There remains a disconnection between the size of eating disorders as a public health problem and the lack of pharmacotherapy research of these conditions.

  20. Acute migraine: Current treatment and emerging therapies

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Arun A; Elliott, Debra

    2007-01-01

    Migraine is a common disabling primary headache disorder. Despite the need for a perfect treatment of this debilitating condition, the ideal “cure” eludes us. In 1992, the first triptan was released in the US for use in acute migraine. Triptans are more specific for the serotonin receptor 5-hydroxy triptamine (5-HT) 1 than previously prescribed drugs, such as ergotamines, with fewer side effects. This was an important first step in specific acute migraine therapy. Today however, triptans continue to be underutilized. There remains a concern, among practitioners and patients, about possible cardiovascular safety issues, despite the lack of strong evidence of serious adverse events. In fact, triptans now have a safe track record over more than a decade of use. Other perceived downfalls to use, include cost and variable efficacy. The more we learn about the clinical features and pathophysiology of migraine, the closer we are to finding a satisfactory monotherapy. Until then, recognizing that mixed mechanisms underlie migraine symptoms, rational polytherapy can be useful. Research on the roles of serotonin, calcitonin gene related peptide, glutamine and N-methyl-D-aspartate in the trigeminovascular system holds promise for those searching for the perfect migraine headache cure. PMID:18488069

  1. [Couples and families emergency/crisis consultation: emergency patterns and treatment assessment].

    PubMed

    León Giraldo, S; Campergue, S; Colin, L; Le Goff-Cubilier, V; Bryois, C

    2009-04-22

    Since the opening in 2003 of the Couple & Family Consultation Unit (UCCF) at Prangins Hospital, we have met urgent demands and observed that the suffering systems (i.e., couples and families) couldn't face any waiting period. So in 2007 an Emergency/Crisis Facility was created, based on the hypothesis that there is no contra-indication to systemic emergency care, if one understands and structures both crisis and treatment. We studied the suffering population in demand and the emergency/crisis issues and assessed therapy efficiency. Then we observed that treating suffering systems in emergency does produce therapeutic gain in terms of crisis resolution and patients' satisfaction. Those treatments refer to public health issues, as considered the human, social and financial cost of couples/families dysfunctions.

  2. Diagnosis and treatment of dental emergencies in two Finnish cities.

    PubMed

    Widström, E; Pietilä, I; Nilsson, B

    1990-06-01

    According to the present clinical survey of dental emergencies treated by organised emergency services in two of the larger Finnish cities, the main causes (64 per cent) of the problems leading to these visits were caries and its consequences. In about 80 per cent of the 839 cases treated, the acute treatment was based on clinical examination only. Temporary fillings were provided for 19 per cent, permanent fillings for 8 per cent, endodontic treatment for 22 per cent and extractions for 14 per cent of the patients. Extractions were most often provided for patients who normally visited a dentist irregularly and these had a low mean number of teeth. Patients with pain lasting longer than a week were likely to receive endodontic treatment, whereas permanent fillings were provided for regular dental visitors who had their own dentists. About 90 per cent of the patients were considered to need other dental treatment in addition to the treatment of the acute condition.

  3. Current and Emerging Directions in the Treatment of Eating Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Tiffany A.; Keel, Pamela K.

    2012-01-01

    Eating disorders are a significant source of psychiatric morbidity in young women and demonstrate high comorbidity with mood, anxiety, and substance use disorders. Thus, clinicians may encounter eating disorders in the context of treating other conditions. This review summarizes the efficacy of current and emerging treatments for anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN), and binge eating disorder (BED). Treatment trials were identified using electronic and manual searches and by reviewing abstracts from conference proceedings. Family based therapy has demonstrated superiority for adolescents with AN but no treatment has established superiority for adults. For BN, both 60 mg fluoxetine and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) have well-established efficacy. For BED, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, CBT, and interpersonal psychotherapy have demonstrated efficacy. Emerging directions for AN include investigation of the antipsychotic olanzapine and several novel psychosocial treatments. Future directions for BN and BED include increasing CBT disseminability, targeting affect regulation, and individualized stepped-care approaches. PMID:22879753

  4. Treatment Implementation in a Short-Term Emergency Shelter Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teare, John F.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Describes treatment activities at the Boys Town Emergency Shelter Program for runaway and homeless youths. An examination of data collected from 100 shelter users indicated a high number of teaching interactions between staff and youths high levels of youth satisfaction with the staff; and a low frequency of youth disruptive behaviors in the…

  5. Hospital-based ocular emergencies: epidemiology, treatment, and visual outcomes.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Cindy A; Rogers-Martel, Melanie; Golas, Liliya; Chepurny, Anna; Martel, James B; Martel, Joseph R

    2014-03-01

    Ocular trauma is recognized as the leading cause of unilateral blindness. However, few studies to date have focused on the clinical features of hospital-based ocular emergencies. Effectiveness of trauma centers in treating ocular emergencies was compared with treatment in traditional community hospital emergency departments. Demographics, causes, and nature of ocular emergencies, as well as visual outcome in community hospitals emergency departments and trauma centers, were also examined. Records of 1027 patients with ocular emergencies seen between July 2007 and November 2010 at 3 community hospitals emergency departments and 2 hospitals with level II trauma centers were retrospectively examined. Unpaired t test and Pearson χ(2) test were used to determine statistical significance. The incidence of patients requiring ophthalmic intervention was 77.2 per 100 000 in the community hospitals and 208.9 per 100 000 in the trauma centers. Rates of ocular emergencies were higher in middle-aged, white men. Orbital fractures were found in 86% of all orbital contusion cases in trauma centers, whereas 66.7% of patients with fall injuries and open globe diagnoses resulted in legal blindness. The middle-aged, white men are more vulnerable to ocular injuries caused mainly by motor vehicle accidents. The ability of trauma centers to provide comparable increases in vision outcomes, despite treating more severe ocular emergencies, demonstrates the effectiveness of trauma centers. Patients diagnosed as having orbital contusions or who have fall injuries deserve careful evaluation because they are more likely to have more severe sight-threatening injuries. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Emerging psychological treatments in the field of eating disorders.

    PubMed

    Berg, Kelly C; Wonderlich, Stephen A

    2013-11-01

    Few treatments for eating disorders have established a base of empirical support, and those that have are still limited by high dropout rates and low abstinence rates. Thus, there is a critical need for innovative eating disorder treatments to fill this gap. The past decade has seen a surge in the development of novel treatments that address eating pathology. This review provides an overview of the emerging psychological treatments for eating disorders, including descriptions of the therapeutic rationales, treatment techniques, and research support. The review will cover face-to-face interventions that are provided in the context of individual or group psychotherapy. Treatments included in this review were organized into the following six categories based on their underlying therapeutic rationales: (1) cognition-focused approaches, (2) emotion regulation approaches, (3) exposure-based approaches, (4) motivational enhancement, (5) integrative approaches, and (6) family- and couple-based interventions.

  7. Homeopathic treatment in emergency medicine: a case series.

    PubMed

    Oberbaum, M; Schreiber, R; Rosenthal, C; Itzchaki, M

    2003-01-01

    Following a multiple-casualty construction disaster in Israel, members of The Center of Integrated Complementary Medicine joined in the emergency activity of the Shaare Zedek Medical Center. They administered homeopathic treatment to injured patients to supplement conventional orthopaedic treatment. This was to our knowledge the first time that complementary medicine had been used officially in conjunction with conventional medicine in an emergency situation. Our objective is to report and summarize the rationale, procedures and outcome of the complementary medicine intervention. Fifteen orthopaedic patients were included. They were treated by homeopathy in two phases starting 24 h post-trauma. All patients initially received Arnica montana 200CH in a single dose. Anxiety was treated with Aconite 200CH in nine patients, Opium 200CH in three, Ignatia 200CH in two and Arsenicum album 200CH in one according to type of anxiety. One day later, most patients reported a lessening of pain, 58% felt improvement, 89% had reduced anxiety, and overall, 61% felt that homeopathic treatment was helpful. In the second phase, 48 h post-trauma, specific complaints were addressed with classical homeopathy. At discharge patients rated the homeopathic treatment successful in 67% of the specific complaints. Several issues relating to the use of homeopathy in emergency medicine and its relation to conventional treatment are discussed. These include compliance, the conduct of rounds, shortage of time and staff, and the procurement of medicines.

  8. Treatment for acute asthma in the Emergency Department: practical aspects.

    PubMed

    Urso, D L

    2010-03-01

    This article describes the management of acute asthma exacerbation in the Emergency Department (ED). An asthma exacerbation can be defined as clinical worsening of disease or an asymptomatic decrease in peak flows. Acute exacerbations of asthma may represent reactions to airway irritants or failures of chronic treatment. Hospitalizations and ED visits account for a large proportion of the health-care cost burden of asthma. The assessment of an asthma exacerbation constitutes a process with two different dimensions: to determine the severity of attack, and to evaluate the response to treatment. The principal goals of managing an asthma acute exacerbation may be summarized as maintenance of adequate arterial oxygen saturation with supplemental oxygen, relief of airflow obstruction with repetitive administration of short acting beta-2 agonists (SABA), and treatment of airway inflammation with systemic corticosteroids (CS) to prevent future relapses. SABA, oxygen, and CS form the basis of management of acute asthma exacerbation but a role is emerging for anthicolinergics.

  9. A review of emerging trends in the treatment of tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Manpreet; Garg, Tarun; Narang, R K

    2016-01-01

    This review attempts to summarize the information available on emerging trends in the treatment of tuberculosis caused by the bacteria Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Nanostructured biomaterials, liposomes, microparticles and solid lipid nanoparticles have unique physicochemical properties such as particularly small and convenient size, sustained release, great surface area to mass ratio and high reactivity with structure. These properties can be useful in easing the administration of antimicrobial drugs, thereby reducing the number of limitations in long-established antimicrobial therapeutics. In recent years, the encapsulation of antimicrobial drugs in all carrier systems has emerged as an innovative and promising change that increases therapeutic efficiency and reduces undesirable side effects of the drugs.

  10. Prevention and treatment of sleep deprivation among emergency physicians.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Douglas

    2007-07-01

    Emergency physicians commonly experience sleep deprivation because of the need to work shifts during evening and late night hours. The negative effects of this problem are compounded by job stress and traditional methods of scheduling work shifts. Sleep deprivation may be reduced by schedules designed to lessen interference with normal sleep patterns and circadian rhythms. Pharmacological treatments for sleep deprivation exist in the form of alertness-enhancing agents, caffeine and modafinil. Sleep-promoting agents may also help treat the problem by helping physicians to sleep during daytime hours. Minimizing sleep deprivation may help prevent job burnout and prolong the length of an emergency physician's career.

  11. Optimising the management of pulmonary arterial hypertension patients: emergency treatments.

    PubMed

    Delcroix, M; Naeije, R

    2010-09-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a rare and potentially fatal disease whose management is usually restricted to a few specialised centres. As patients do not necessarily live in the neighbourhood of these centres, daily care and emergencies have to be delegated to first and second lines. Treatment guidelines do not usually provide recommendations for acute emergency situations as evidence is scarce. This short review provides a description of our therapeutic protocols based on available data. A model of transmural organisation of care for PAH patients, currently applied in Belgium, is described. Thereafter, based on an analysis of the reasons of death in the PAH population, a review of the main emergencies is provided. Cardiac arrest and resuscitation, decompensated right heart failure, respiratory failure, arrhythmia, pericardial effusion, haemoptysis, surgery and drug-related adverse events will be discussed successively. Case reports showing the precariousness of PAH patients will enforce our thesis of the need for optimal patient management organisation.

  12. Treatment outcome and prognostic indices in patients with hyperglycemic emergencies

    PubMed Central

    Ezeani, IU; Eregie, A; Ogedengbe, OS

    2013-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study is to assess the treatment outcomes in patients with hyperglycemic emergencies and to ascertain the factors associated with outcome, with emphasis on the determinants of outcome. Method A total of 105 patients admitted to the Accident and Emergency unit, who fulfilled the criteria for hyperglycemic emergencies, were selected. The information extracted included sociodemographic, clinical, and laboratory data, as well as hospitalization outcome. Results Of the 105 subjects that participated in the study, hyperosmolar hyperglycemic nonketotic state (HHNK) was seen in 50% (53) of the subjects, while diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) was seen in 31% (29), normo-osmolar nonketotic hyperglycemic state (NNHS) in 12% (13), and mixed hyperglycemic emergency in 7% (10) of the subjects. The overall mortality rate in this study was 4.8%. Three deaths were recorded in patients with HHNK, while DKA and NNHS each had one death. Three of the deaths occurred within the first 24 hours of admission while the other two were more than 24 hours after admission. The mean (standard deviation) total duration of hospital stay was 24.2 days (SD), and the range of stay was 0.5–88 days. Conclusion The most common type of hyperglycemic emergency seen in this study was HHNK. Also, the presence of infection, and sex of the study subject, were significant determinants of outcome in this study. PMID:23983480

  13. Current and emerging treatment options for spinal cord ischemia.

    PubMed

    Nardone, Raffaele; Pikija, Slaven; Mutzenbach, J Sebastian; Seidl, Martin; Leis, Stefan; Trinka, Eugen; Sellner, Johann

    2016-10-01

    Spinal cord infarction (SCI) is a rare but disabling disorder caused by a wide spectrum of conditions. Given the lack of randomized-controlled trials, contemporary treatment concepts are adapted from guidelines for cerebral ischemia, atherosclerotic vascular disease, and acute traumatic spinal cord injury. In addition, patients with SCI are at risk for several potentially life-threatening but preventable systemic and neurologic complications. Notably, there is emerging evidence from preclinical studies for the use of neuroprotection in acute ischemic injury of the spinal cord. In this review, we discuss the current state of the art for the therapy and prevention of SCI and highlight potential emerging treatment concepts awaiting translational adoption. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Emergency Treatment and Labor Act (EMTALA). Avoiding the pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Glass, D Lynn; Rebstock, Jan; Handberg, Eileen

    2004-01-01

    The Federal Emergency Medical Treatment and Labor Act (EMTALA) is one of the most difficult laws to interpret and the easiest to violate. This federal law was enacted to ensure that all individuals presenting to an emergency department of any Medicare- or Medicaid-participating facility for evaluation and treatment of a medical condition will be seen, evaluated, treated, and stabilized, regardless of ability to pay. Within this law, the condition of active labor is defined as an unstable medical condition and, as such, EMTALA is applicable to the area of perinatal and neonatal nursing. The purpose of this article is to provide a basic overview of EMTALA, its mandates and definition of key terms, enforcement procedures specialty-specific applicability, and specific strategies for risk reduction of inadvertent violation.

  15. Antibacterial treatment of bacterial vaginosis: current and emerging therapies

    PubMed Central

    Menard, Jean-Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis is a common cause of malodorous vaginal discharge. It is also associated with sexually transmitted infections and adverse pregnancy outcomes. The magnitude of the gynecological and obstetrical consequences has stimulated therapeutic research and led to the testing of several therapies. The objective of this work is to present the currently available therapeutic strategies for the treatment of bacterial vaginosis and associated recommendations, and discuss the emerging therapies. PMID:21976983

  16. Emergency Endovascular Treatment of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: Feasibility and Results

    SciTech Connect

    Lagana, Domenico Carrafiello, Gianpaolo; Mangini, Monica; Fontana, Federico; Caronno, Roberto; Castelli, Patrizio; Cuffari, Salvatore; Fugazzola, Carlo

    2006-04-15

    Purpose. To assess the feasibility and effectiveness of emergency endovascular treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). Methods. During 36 months we treated, on an emergency basis, 30 AAAs with endovascular exclusion. In 21 hemodynamically stable patients preoperative CT angiography (CTA) was performed to confirm the diagnosis and to plan the treatment; 9 patients with hemorrhagic shock were evaluated with angiography performed in the operating room. Twenty-two Excluder (Gore) and 8 Zenith (Cook) stent-grafts (25 bifurcated and 5 aorto-uni-iliac) were used. The follow-up was performed by CTA at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months. Results. Technical success was achieved in 100% of cases with a 10% mortality rate. The total complication rate was 23% (5 increases in serum creatinine level and 2 wound infections). During the follow-up, performed in 27 patients (1-36 months, mean 15.2 months), 4 secondary endoleaks (15%) (3 type II, 2 spontaneously thrombosed and 1 under observation, and 1 type III treated by iliac extender insertion) and 1 iliac leg occlusion (treated with femoro-femoral bypass) occurred. We observed a shrinkage of the aneurysmal sac in 8 of 27 cases and stability in 19 of 27 cases; we did not observe any endotension. Conclusions. Endovascular repair is a good option for emergency treatment of AAAs. The team's experience allows correct planning of the procedure in emergency situations also, with technical results comparable with elective repair. In our experience the bifurcated stent-graft is the device of choice in patients with suitable anatomy because the procedure is less time-consuming than aorto-uni-iliac stent-grafting with surgical crossover, allowing faster aneurysm exclusion. However, further studies are required to demonstrate the long-term efficacy of endovascular repair compared with surgical treatment.

  17. Emerging therapeutics for the treatment of diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Brenneman, Jehrod; Hill, Jon; Pullen, Steve

    2016-09-15

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is the most common pathology contributing to the development of chronic kidney disease (CKD). DN caused by hypertension and unmitigated inflammation in diabetics, renders the kidneys unable to perform normally, and leads to renal fibrosis and organ failure. The increasing global prevalence of DN has been directly attributed to rising incidences of Type II diabetes, and is now the largest non-communicable cause of death worldwide. Despite the high morbidity, successful new treatments for DN are lacking. This review seeks to provide new insight on emerging clinical candidates under investigation for the treatment of DN.

  18. Emerging nanotechnology approaches for HIV/AIDS treatment and prevention

    PubMed Central

    Mamo, Tewodros; Moseman, E Ashley; Kolishetti, Nagesh; Salvador-Morales, Carolina; Shi, Jinjun; Kuritzkes, Daniel R; Langer, Robert; von Andrian, Ulrich

    2010-01-01

    Currently, there is no cure and no preventive vaccine for HIV/AIDS. Combination antiretroviral therapy has dramatically improved treatment, but it has to be taken for a lifetime, has major side effects and is ineffective in patients in whom the virus develops resistance. Nanotechnology is an emerging multidisciplinary field that is revolutionizing medicine in the 21st century. It has a vast potential to radically advance the treatment and prevention of HIV/AIDS. In this review, we discuss the challenges with the current treatment of the disease and shed light on the remarkable potential of nanotechnology to provide more effective treatment and prevention for HIV/AIDS by advancing antiretroviral therapy, gene therapy, immunotherapy, vaccinology and microbicides. PMID:20148638

  19. Treatment and triage recommendations for pediatric emergency mass critical care.

    PubMed

    Christian, Michael D; Toltzis, Philip; Kanter, Robert K; Burkle, Frederick M; Vernon, Donald D; Kissoon, Niranjan

    2011-11-01

    This paper will outline the Task Force recommendations regarding treatment during pediatric emergency mass critical care, issues related to the allocation of scarce resources, and current challenges in the development of pediatric triage guidelines. In May 2008, the Task Force for Mass Critical Care published guidance on provision of mass critical care to adults. Acknowledging that the critical care needs of children during disasters were unaddressed by this effort, a 17-member Steering Committee, assembled by the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education with guidance from members of the American Academy of Pediatrics, convened in April 2009 to determine priority topic areas for pediatric emergency mass critical care recommendations.Steering Committee members established subcommittees by topic area and performed literature reviews of MEDLINE and Ovid databases. The Steering Committee produced draft outlines through consensus-based study of the literature and convened October 6-7, 2009, in New York, NY, to review and revise each outline. Eight draft documents were subsequently developed from the revised outlines as well as through searches of MEDLINE updated through March 2010.The Pediatric Emergency Mass Critical Care Task Force, composed of 36 experts from diverse public health, medical, and disaster response fields, convened in Atlanta, GA, on March 29-30, 2010. Feedback on each manuscript was compiled and the Steering Committee revised each document to reflect expert input in addition to the most current medical literature. Recommendations are divided into three operational sections. The first section provides pediatric emergency mass critical care recommendations for hospitals that normally provide care to pediatric patients. The second section provides recommendations for pediatric emergency mass critical care at hospitals that do not routinely provide care to pediatric patients. The final section provides a discussion of issues related to developing

  20. Current and emerging treatment options for nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Spratt, Daniel E; Lee, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we focus on the current and emerging treatments in nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC). A detailed evolution of the current standard of care, and new techniques and treatment options will be reviewed. Intergroup 0099 established the role for chemoradiotherapy (chemo-RT) in the treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Multiple randomized Phase III trials have shown the benefit of chemo-RT; however, none of these studies utilized modern radiotherapy (RT) techniques of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). IMRT has the ability to deliver high doses of radiation to the target structures while sparing adjacent bystander healthy tissues, and has now become the preferred RT treatment modality. Chemotherapy also has had a shifting paradigm of induction and/or adjuvant chemotherapy combined with RT alone, to the investigation with concurrent chemo-RT. New treatment options including targeted monoclonal antibodies and small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors are being studied in NPC. These new biologic therapies have promising in vitro activity for NPC, and emerging clinical studies are beginning to define their role. RT continues to expand its capabilities, and since IMRT and particle therapy, specifically intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT), has reports of impressive dosimetric efficacy in-silica. Adaptive RT is attempting to reduce toxicity while maintaining treatment efficacy, and the clinical results are still in their youth. Lastly, Epstein– Barr virus (EBV) DNA has recently been studied for prediction of tumor response and its use as a biomarker is increasingly promising to aid in early detection as well as supplementing the current staging system. RT with or without chemotherapy remains the standard of care for nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Advances in RT technique, timing of chemotherapy, biologically targeted agents, particle therapy, adaptive RT, and the incorporation of EBV DNA as a biomarker may aid in the current and future treatment of

  1. [Cirurgia Taurina--emergency medical treatment of bullfighters in Spain].

    PubMed

    Lehmann, V; Lehmann, J

    2003-08-01

    A considerable risk of life-threatening injury is inherent to bullfighting. Thus, a unique form of emergency treatment has evolved over recent decades of organized bull-fighting. Today bullfight arenas in larger cities are equipped with emergency facilities including fully furnished operating rooms. During a fiesta these facilities are run by a medical team consisting of three surgeons, one intensive care specialist, and one anesthesiologist with their supporting medical personnel. In smaller arenas or villages immediate care units consist of emergency vehicles, and a mobile container equipped with a fully functional operating room. Of all toreros the matadores including the novilleros are most often injured in 56 % of cases. This rate decreases for banderillos (30 %), and for picadores (14 %). Parts of the body that are most frequently affected are thighs, and the inguinal region (54 %). Head and neck injuries are seen in 19 %, and 12 % of cases present with open abdominal wounds including liver or gastrointestinal tract traumas. 10 % of injuries affect the thorax, and 4 % the pelvic floor. The particular form of organised medical treatment for bullfighters in Spain has only developed since the nineteen-thirties. In 1972 a scientific society for bullfight surgery was founded in Spain by specialized surgeons, and immediate care specialists holding a first convention that year. The society is continuously striving to improve technical and logistical aspects of immediate medical care for injured bullfighters.

  2. Prophylaxis and Treatment of Pregnant Women for Emerging Infections and Bioterrorism Emergencies

    PubMed Central

    Cragan, Janet D.; Jamieson, Denise J.; Rasmussen, Sonja A.

    2006-01-01

    Emerging infectious disease outbreaks and bioterrorism attacks warrant urgent public health and medical responses. Response plans for these events may include use of medications and vaccines for which the effects on pregnant women and fetuses are unknown. Healthcare providers must be able to discuss the benefits and risks of these interventions with their pregnant patients. Recent experiences with outbreaks of severe acute respiratory syndrome, monkeypox, and anthrax, as well as response planning for bioterrorism and pandemic influenza, illustrate the challenges of making recommendations about treatment and prophylaxis for pregnant women. Understanding the physiology of pregnancy, the factors that influence the teratogenic potential of medications and vaccines, and the infection control measures that may stop an outbreak will aid planners in making recommendations for care of pregnant women during large-scale infectious disease emergencies. PMID:17283610

  3. [Antimicrobial treatment of bronchial infections in hospital emergency rooms].

    PubMed

    Vallano Ferraz, A; Danés Carreras, I; Ochoa Sangrador, C

    2004-08-01

    To analyze antimicrobial prescribing habits in children diagnosed with bronchial infections in hospital emergency rooms. A descriptive study was performed in a random sample of children diagnosed with acute bronchitis and bronchiolitis in the emergency rooms of 11 Spanish hospitals. Information about the type of bronchial infection diagnosed and the antimicrobial treatment prescribed was gathered. The appropriateness of antibiotic prescriptions was assessed by comparing clinical practice in the use of antibiotics for bronchial infections with consensus guidelines developed for this study. A total of 731 children were selected. The diagnosis was acute bronchitis in 531 (73 %) and bronchiolitis in 200 (27 %). Antimicrobial treatment was prescribed to 234 children (32 %; 95 % CI: 29-35 %). The most commonly prescribed antimicrobials were the aminopenicillins in 138 children (19 %; 95 % CI 16-22 %), cephalosporins in 54 (7 %; 95 % CI 5-9 %) and macrolides in 45 (6 % 95 % CI 4-8 %). The prescribed treatment was inappropriate in 26 % (95 % CI 23-29 %) of patients [31.5 % (95 % CI 27-35 %) of cases of acute bronchitis and 11.5 % (95 % CI 95 % 7-16 %) of cases of bronchiolitis]. Wide variability was observed in the inappropriate use of antimicrobial agents among the different hospitals, both in acute bronchitis (14-80 %) and in bronchiolitis (0-71 %). Inappropriate antimicrobial treatment is prescribed to a considerable proportion of the children with bronchial infections attended in hospital emergency rooms, although there is wide variability among different hospitals. Programs to improve the quality of antimicrobial prescription should be developed. These should combine regulatory and educational measures directed at health professionals and the general public.

  4. Topical treatment of glaucoma: established and emerging pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Dikopf, Mark S; Vajaranant, Thasarat S; Edward, Deepak P

    2017-06-01

    Glaucoma is a collection of optic neuropathies consisting of retinal ganglion cell death and corresponding visual field loss. Glaucoma is the leading cause of irreversible vision loss worldwide and is forecasted to precipitously increase in prevalence in the coming decades. Current treatment options aim to lower intraocular pressure (IOP) via topical or oral therapy, laser treatment to the trabecular meshwork or ciliary body, and incisional surgery. Despite increasing use of trabecular laser therapy, topical therapy remains first-line in the treatment of most forms of glaucoma. Areas covered: Novel glaucoma therapies are a long-standing focus of investigational study. More than two decades have passed since the last United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of a topical glaucoma drug. Here, the authors review established topical glaucoma drops as well as those currently in FDA phase 2 and 3 clinical trial, nearing clinical use. Expert opinion: Current investigational glaucoma drugs lower IOP, mainly through enhanced trabecular meshwork outflow. Although few emerging therapies show evidence of retinal ganglion cell and optic nerve neuroprotection in animal models, emerging drugs are focused on lowering IOP, similar to established medicines.

  5. An Overview of Shiraz Emergency Medical Services, Dispatch to Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Peyravi, Mahmoudreza; Örtenwal, Per; Djalali, Ahmadreza; Khorram-Manesh, Amir

    2013-01-01

    Background Advanced ambulance service (Emergency Medical Services/EMS) is considered to be an integral part of emergency medical care as the first assets responding to emergencies and disasters in the prehospital setting in most developed countries. Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the current situation of Shiraz’s EMS by comparing data obtained during two different time periods. Materials and Methods This is a retrospective analytic and comparative study in which data obtained from Shiraz EMS during two one-year periods (21st of March 2011 to 20th of March 2012 and 22nd of September 1999 to 21st of September 2000) were compared. Furthermore, these data were also compared with available data from Gothenburg’s EMS (2010). Results Of 84084 missions performed by Shiraz EMS during one year trauma cases were the most common [39282 (46.7%)]. The most common cause of trauma was road traffic accidents (RTA) (27257; 76.5%). Near 56% of all patients were transported to hospitals; some 47% by ambulances and 8.8% by private cars. Around 36.2% of patients received definitive medical treatment at the scene. While there was an increase in response and evacuation times, the number of deaths at scene before ambulance arrival decreased. Conclusions Although Shiraz’s EMS has expanded during last decade and the mortality rate at scene has decreased, the number of RTA-related trauma cases, along with the response and evacuation time, has increased. More than one third of the patients received definitive treatment and could be dismissed directly from the scene. Standardized triage and treatment protocols are needed to improve the EMS activity. PMID:24616794

  6. Contemporary management of uterine fibroids: focus on emerging medical treatments.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sukhbir Sony; Belland, Liane

    2015-01-01

    This review provides an overview of therapeutic options, with a specific focus on the emerging role of medical options for UF management. PubMed, Google Scholar, and Cochrane Systematic Reviews were searched for articles published between 1980 and 2013. Relevant articles were identified using the following terms: 'uterine fibroids', 'leiomyoma', 'heavy menstrual bleeding', and 'menorrhagia'. The reference lists of articles identified were also searched for other relevant publications. Because of the largely benign nature of UFs, the most conservative options that minimize morbidity/risk and optimize outcomes should be considered. Watchful waiting, or no immediate intervention combined with regular follow-up, is an appropriate option for the majority of UF patients who experience no symptoms. For women with symptomatic UFs, the optimal treatment should restore quality of life through rapid relief of UF signs and symptoms, reduce tumor size for a sustained period, and maintain or improve fertility. Invasive surgical treatments, such as hysterectomy, have historically been the mainstay of UF treatment. Less invasive surgical and interventional techniques, such as myomectomy, uterine artery embolization, endometrial ablation, and myolysis provide alternatives to hysterectomy. Until recently, medical management of UFs was characterized by short-term treatments and therapies that provided symptomatic control. In addition to controlling abnormal uterine bleeding, newer medical therapies, including the recently Health-Canada-approved ulipristal acetate, act directly to shrink the tumor. Although no agent is currently approved for such use, emerging evidence suggests the potential for long-term medical management of UFs. The advent of novel medical therapies may diminish the long-held reliance on more invasive surgical UF treatment options.

  7. Human spinal cord injury: new and emerging approaches to treatment.

    PubMed

    Johnston, L

    2001-11-01

    The World Health Organization together with the Iceland Ministry of Health and Social Security sponsored a conference entitled 'Human Spinal Cord Injury: New and Emerging Approaches to Treatment' held on May 31-June 2, 2001 in Reykjavik, Iceland. To help catalyze the development of new paradigms to address spinal cord injury, the conference's overall goal was to bring in a diversity of perspectives, ranging from state-of-the-art stem cell biology to the ancient wisdom of Eastern Medicine. The purpose of this paper is to summarize the presentations of the conference's 26 speakers.

  8. Pelvic Inflammatory Disease: Diagnosis And Treatment In The Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Bugg, Charles Walter; Taira, Taku

    2016-12-01

    Pelvic inflammatory disease is a common disease that is associated with significant complications including infertility, chronic pelvic pain, ruptured tubo-ovarian abscess, and ectopic pregnancy. The diagnosis may be delayed when the presentation has nonspecific signs and symptoms. Even when it is properly identified, pelvic inflammatory disease is often treated suboptimally. This review provides evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis, treatment, disposition, and follow-up of patients with pelvic inflammatory disease. Arranging follow-up of patients within 48 to 72 hours and providing clear patient education are fundamental to ensuring good patient outcomes. Emerging issues, including new pathogens and evolving resistance patterns among pelvic inflammatory disease pathogens are reviewed.

  9. Emerging New Approaches for the Treatment of Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae; Jurcic, Joseph G.; Rosenblat, Todd; Tallman, Martin S.

    2011-01-01

    The introduction of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) in the late 1980s combined with anthracycline-based chemotherapy has revolutionized the prognosis of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) with more than 90% complete response rates and cure rates of approximately 80%. The subsequent advent of arsenic trioxide (ATO) in 1990s and progress in the treatment of APL have changed its course from a highly fatal to a highly curable disease. Despite the dramatic improvement in clinical outcome of APL, treatment failure still occurs due most often to early death. Relapse has become increasingly less frequent, most commonly occurring in patients with high-risk disease. A major focus of research for the past decade has been to develop risk-adapted and rationally targeted nonchemotherapy treatment strategies to reduce treatment-related morbidity and mortality to low- and intermediate-risk or older patients while targeting more intensive or alternative therapy to those patients at most risk of relapse. In this review, emerging new approaches to APL treatment with special emhasis on strategies to reduce early deaths, risk-adapted therapy during induction, consolidation and maintenance, as well as an overview of current and future clinical trials in APL will be discussed. PMID:23556100

  10. Technical Basis for Radiological Emergency Plan Annex for WTD Emergency Response Plan: West Point Treatment Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Hickey, Eva E.; Strom, Daniel J.

    2005-08-01

    Staff of the King County Wastewater Treatment Division (WTD) have concern about the aftermath of a radiological dispersion event (RDE) leading to the introduction of significant quantities of radioactive material into the combined sanitary and storm sewer system in King County, Washington. Radioactive material could come from the use of a radiological dispersion device (RDD). RDDs include "dirty bombs" that are not nuclear detonations but are explosives designed to spread radioactive material (National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) 2001). Radioactive material also could come from deliberate introduction or dispersion of radioactive material into the environment, including waterways and water supply systems. This document, Volume 3 of PNNL-15163 is the technical basis for the Annex to the West Point Treatment Plant (WPTP) Emergency Response Plan related to responding to a radiological emergency at the WPTP. The plan primarily considers response to radioactive material that has been introduced in the other combined sanitary and storm sewer system from a radiological dispersion device, but is applicable to any accidental or deliberate introduction of materials into the system.

  11. Mild Cognitive Impairment: Diagnosis, Longitudinal Course, and Emerging Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Vega, Jennifer N.; Newhouse, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is widely regarded as the intermediate stage of cognitive impairment between the changes seen in normal cognitive aging and those associated with dementia. Elderly patients with MCI constitute a high-risk population for developing dementia, in particular Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Although the core clinical criteria for MCI have remained largely unchanged, the operational definition of MCI has undergone several revisions over the course of the last decade and remains an evolving diagnosis. Prognostic implications of this diagnosis are becoming clearer with regard to the risk of progressive cognitive deterioration. Although patients with MCI may represent an optimal target population for pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions, results from clinical trials have been mixed and a definitive effective treatment remains elusive. This article provides a brief overview of the evolution of the concept of MCI and reviews current diagnostic criteria, the longitudinal course of the disorder, and current and emerging treatments for MCI. PMID:25160795

  12. [Prediction of further hospital treatment for emergency patients by emergency medical service physicians].

    PubMed

    Bernhard, M; Trautwein, S; Stepan, R; Zahn, P; Greim, C-A; Gries, A

    2014-05-01

    Prehospital assessment of illness and injury severity with the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) score and hospital pre-arrival notification of a patient who is likely to need intensive care unit (ICU) or intermediate care unit (IMC) admission are both common in Germany's physician-staffed emergency medical services (EMS) system. This study aimed at comparing the prehospital evaluation of severity of disease or injuries by EMS physicians and the subsequent clinical treatment in unselected emergency department (ED) patients. This study involved a prospective observational analysis of patients transported to the ED of an academic level I hospital escorted by an EMS physician over a period of 6 months (February-July 2011). The physician's qualification and the patient's NACA score were documented and the EMS physician was asked to predict whether the patient would need hospital admission and, if so, to the general ward, IMC or ICU. After the ED treatment, discharge or admission, outcome and length of hospital and ICU or IMC stay were documented. A total of 378 mostly non-trauma patients (88 %) treated by experienced EMS physicians could be enrolled. The number of patients discharged from the ED decreased, while the number of patients admitted to the ICU increased with higher NACA scores. Prehospital prediction of discharge or admission, IMC or ICU treatment by EMS physicians was accurate in 47 % of the patients. In 40 % of patients a lower level of care was sufficient while 12 % needed treatment on a higher level of care than that predicted by EMS physicians. Of the patients 39 % who were predicted to be discharged after ED treatment, were admitted to hospital and 48 % of patients predicted to be admitted to the IMC were admitted to the general ward. Patients predicted to be admitted to the ICU were admitted to the ICU in 75 %. Higher NACA scores were associated with increased mortality and a longer hospital IMC or ICU length of stay

  13. Emerging treatments for the behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia.

    PubMed

    Anand, Abhinav; Khurana, Puneet; Chawla, Jasneet; Sharma, Neha; Khurana, Navneet

    2017-09-15

    Dementia is referred to a loss of memory and decline in other mental abilities at levels critical enough to hinder performance of daily activities. It can be of several types, depending on the underlying pathophysiology. The behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) are various, but the most clinically significant are depression, apathy, and anxiety. Other BPSD include agitation, aberrant motor behavior, elation, hallucinations, and alterations in sleep and appetite. About 90% of sufferers of dementia are affected by BPSD during the course of the illness. These symptoms occur in demented patients irrespective of the dementia subtype. However, there has not been significant development in the areas of disease-modifying pharmacotherapeutics for dementia. Therefore, tackling BPSD has emerged as a research avenue in the recent past. Existing antidepressants, antipsychotics, and cholinergic agents have been extensively used in the treatment of BPSD, independently and in different combinations. However, these agents have not successful in completely alleviating such symptoms. Research in this field is going on globally, but it is still limited by various factors. There is a strong need to develop new entities and test them clinically. This review focuses on emerging treatments for the management of clinically significant BPSD.

  14. Ragweed-induced allergic rhinoconjunctivitis: current and emerging treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Ihler, Friedrich; Canis, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Ragweed (Ambrosia spp.) is an annually flowering plant whose pollen bears high allergenic potential. Ragweed-induced allergic rhinoconjunctivitis has long been seen as a major immunologic condition in Northern America with high exposure and sensitization rates in the general population. The invasive occurrence of ragweed (A. artemisiifolia) poses an increasing challenge to public health in Europe and Asia as well. Possible explanations for its worldwide spread are climate change and urbanization, as well as pollen transport over long distances by globalized traffic and winds. Due to the increasing disease burden worldwide, and to the lack of a current and comprehensive overview, this study aims to review the current and emerging treatment options for ragweed-induced rhinoconjunctivitis. Sound clinical evidence is present for the symptomatic treatment of ragweed-induced allergic rhinoconjunctivitis with oral third-generation H1-antihistamines and leukotriene antagonists. The topical application of glucocorticoids has also been efficient in randomized controlled clinical trials. Combined approaches employing multiple agents are common. The mainstay of causal treatment to date, especially in Northern America, is subcutaneous immunotherapy with the focus on the major allergen, Amb a 1. Beyond this, growing evidence from several geographical regions documents the benefit of sublingual immunotherapy. Future treatment options promise more specific symptomatic treatment and fewer side effects during causal therapy. Novel antihistamines for symptomatic treatment are aimed at the histamine H3-receptor. New adjuvants with toll-like receptor 4 activity or the application of the monoclonal anti-immunoglobulin E antibody, omalizumab, are supposed to enhance conventional immunotherapy. An approach targeting toll-like receptor 9 by synthetic cytosine phosphate–guanosine oligodeoxynucleotides promises a new treatment paradigm that aims to modulate the immune response, but it has

  15. Drug repurposing and emerging adjunctive treatments for schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Bumb, Jan Malte; Enning, Frank; Leweke, F Markus

    2015-05-01

    Schizophrenia is a frequent disorder, which substantially impairs patients' quality of life. Moreover, the burden of illness for patients, their families and for the society, in general, is substantial. Nevertheless, the understanding of the pathophysiology of this syndrome, concise diagnostic methods and more effective and tolerable treatments are still lacking. Thus, innovative approaches and the exploration of new territories are required. An overview of repurposed drugs and emerging treatments for schizophrenia is presented, focusing on randomized, controlled trials and meta-analyses. Despite many years of drug research, several needs in the treatment of schizophrenia including the safety and tolerability, stage-dependent and personalized approaches, as well as drug delivery and sustainability have not been addressed sufficiently. Given the current failure of a number of mechanistically new drugs, repurposed compounds may serve as alternative and/or adjunctive agents for schizophrenic patients and for treatment refractory patients in particular. Anti-inflammatory drugs (e.g., acetylsalicylic acid, celecoxib and minocycline), as well as N-acetylcysteine, a precursor of the major antioxidant glutathione, hormones (e.g., estrogen, raloxifene and oxytocin), glutamatergic (e.g., glycine and d-serine) and nicotinergic compounds, 'nutraceuticals' (e.g., ω-3 fatty acids) and cannabidiol, an endocannabinoidmodulator, represent promising agents in this field.

  16. Emerging anabolic agents in the treatment of osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Lovato, Christina; Lewiecki, E Michael

    2017-08-04

    Osteoporosis is a common skeletal disease with serious consequences due to osteoporotic fractures and high costs to society for post-fracture care. Most patients at high risk for fracture are not receiving care to reduce fracture risk. The osteoporosis treatment gap has reached crisis proportions. Strategies to reduce the treatment gap include systematic methods for identifying and treating high risk patients, better education of patients and healthcare providers, better use of currently available drugs, and development of new drugs to treat osteoporosis. Areas covered: Two osteoanabolic agents with novel mechanisms of action have recently completed phase 3 clinical trials. The efficacy and safety findings of these studies are reviewed. Abaloparatide, a synthetic analog of parathyroid hormone-related protein, has received regulatory approval for the treatment of postmenopausal women with osteoporosis at high risk for fracture. Romosozumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody to sclerostin, an endogenous inhibitor of bone formation, is under regulatory review. Expert opinion: Osteoanabolic therapy for osteoporosis can restore, at least in part, the degradation of bone microarchitecture that is a hallmark of this disease. The emergence of new osteoanabolic compounds expands the treatment options for patients at high risk for fracture.

  17. Emerging drugs for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Dominique; Chughtai, Bilal; Kini, Mitali; Te, Alexis

    2017-09-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a common condition affecting over 50% of men as they reach their 5(th) decade of life. This leads to a number of sequelae such as lower urinary tract symptoms, urinary retention and a decrease in quality of life. Currently, the available treatments for BPH are alpha blockers and 5-alpha reductase inhibitors. Clinical studies have demonstrated these medical options are effective in alleviating a patient's symptoms, however there are a number of side effects. There is a paucity of information regarding long-term use of these medications. The purpose of this review is to identify potential and emerging medications for the treatment of BPH. Areas covered: Articles used in this review were retrieved from Pubmed, Google and through searching the PharmaProjects database over the last 10 years, giving the reader an in-depth knowledge about the current pharmacological agents available and other potential treatments for BPH. Expert opinion: The new paradigm of BPH treatment depends on addressing a patient's specific constellation of symptoms. This allows to tailor therapy of increasing efficacy and reduce adverse events that our patients have by increasing dosage.

  18. Emerging treatment strategies in Tourette syndrome: what's in the pipeline?

    PubMed

    Termine, Cristiano; Selvini, Claudia; Rossi, Giorgio; Balottin, Umberto

    2013-01-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by multiple motor/phonic tics and a wide spectrum of behavioral problems (e.g., complex tic-like symptoms, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and obsessive-compulsive disorder). TS can be a challenging condition even for the specialists, because of the complexity of the clinical picture and the potential adverse effects of the most commonly prescribed medications. Expert opinions and consensus guidelines on the assessment and treatment of tic disorders have recently been published in Europe and Canada. All pharmacological treatment options are mere symptomatic treatments that alleviate, but do not cure, the tics. We still lack evidence of their effects on the natural long-term course and on the prognosis of TS and how these treatments may influence the natural course of brain development. The most commonly prescribed drugs are dopamine antagonists, such as typical (e.g., haloperidol, pimozide) and atypical neuroleptics (e.g., risperidone, aripiprazole), and α-2-adrenoreceptor agonists (e.g., clonidine). However, several studies have investigated the efficacy and tolerability of alternative pharmacological agents that may be efficacious, including the newest atypical antipsychotic agents (e.g., paliperidone, sertindole), tetrabenazine, drugs that modulate acetylcholine (e.g., nicotine) and GABA (e.g., baclofen, levetiracetam), tetrahydrocannabinol, botulinum toxin injections, anticonvulsant drugs (e.g., topiramate, carbamazepine), naloxone, lithium, norepinephrine, steroid 5α reductase, and other neuroactive agents (buspirone, metoclopramide, phytostigmine, and spiradoline mesylate). As regards nonpharmacological interventions, some of the more recent treatments that have been studied include electroconvulsive therapy and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation. This review focuses primarily on the efficacy and safety of these emerging treatment strategies in TS.

  19. Current and emerging treatment strategies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Mah, Jean K

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common form of muscular dystrophy in childhood. It is caused by mutations of the DMD gene, leading to progressive muscle weakness, loss of independent ambulation by early teens, and premature death due to cardiorespiratory complications. The diagnosis can usually be made after careful review of the history and examination of affected boys presenting with developmental delay, proximal weakness, and elevated serum creatine kinase, plus confirmation by muscle biopsy or genetic testing. Precise characterization of the DMD mutation is important for genetic counseling and individualized treatment. Current standard of care includes the use of corticosteroids to prolong ambulation and to delay the onset of secondary complications. Early use of cardioprotective agents, noninvasive positive pressure ventilation, and other supportive strategies has improved the life expectancy and health-related quality of life for many young adults with DMD. New emerging treatment includes viral-mediated microdystrophin gene replacement, exon skipping to restore the reading frame, and nonsense suppression therapy to allow translation and production of a modified dystrophin protein. Other potential therapeutic targets involve upregulation of compensatory proteins, reduction of the inflammatory cascade, and enhancement of muscle regeneration. So far, data from DMD clinical trials have shown limited success in delaying disease progression; unforeseen obstacles included immune response against the generated mini-dystrophin, inconsistent evidence of dystrophin production in muscle biopsies, and failure to demonstrate a significant improvement in the primary outcome measure, as defined by the 6-minute walk test in some studies. The long-term safety and efficacy of emerging treatments will depend on the selection of appropriate clinical end points and sensitive biomarkers to detect meaningful changes in disease progression. Correction of the underlying

  20. Treatment Emergent Suicidal Ideation in depressed older adults.

    PubMed

    Cristancho, Pilar; O'Connor, Brendan; Lenze, Eric J; Blumberger, Daniel M; Reynolds, Charles F; Dixon, David; Mulsant, Benoit H

    2017-06-01

    Treatment-Emergent Suicidal Ideation (TESI) in older adults is poorly understood. We characterized TESI in older depressed adults during treatment with venlafaxine and explored whether TESI is related to antidepressant exposure versus dimensions of the psychiatric illness. We examined the relationship among medication exposure, onset of TESI, and clinical characteristics. We analyzed data on 233 clinical trial participants with major depression and no baseline suicidal ideation who were treated for up to 12 weeks with venlafaxine XR (target dose: 150-300 mg/day). Suicidal ideation was assessed weekly with the Scale for Suicide Ideation. A Kaplan-Meier curve displayed the time course of TESI. Differences in baseline demographic and clinical variables between the TESI and Non-TESI groups were assessed with analyses of covariance or logistic regression. A final multivariate logistic regression model indicated baseline predictors of TESI. Depression treatment outcomes in subjects developing TESI versus those who did not were examined with a mixed effects model. TESI occurred in 10% of participants, typically with onset within 4 weeks of the start of treatment. Anxiety, and depression severity at baseline were predictors of TESI. Most TESI was mild and transient, with 6/233 participants having TESI considered clinically meaningful. TESI was not associated with venlafaxine blood levels or side effects. In older depressed adults, TESI is relatively uncommon and it is likely related to the underlying illness rather than to a medication adverse effect. This suggests that TESI requires continuing rather than discontinuing antidepressant treatment. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Current and Emerging Treatment Options for Fecal Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Fecal incontinence (FI) is a multifactorial disorder that imposes considerable social and economic burdens. The aim of this article is to provide an overview of current and emerging treatment options for FI. A MEDLINE search was conducted for English-language articles related to FI prevalence, etiology, diagnosis, and treatment published from January 1, 1990 through June 1, 2013. The search was extended to unpublished trials on ClinicalTrials.gov and relevant publications cited in included articles. Conservative approaches, including dietary modifications, medications, muscle-strengthening exercises, and biofeedback, have been shown to provide short-term benefits. Transcutaneous electrical stimulation was considered ineffective in a randomized clinical trial. Unlike initial studies, sacral nerve stimulation has shown reasonable short-term effectiveness and some complications. Dynamic graciloplasty and artificial sphincter and bowel devices lack randomized controlled trials and have shown inconsistent results and high rates of explantation. Of injectable bulking agents, dextranomer microspheres in non-animal stabilized hyaluronic acid (NASHA Dx) has shown significant improvement in incontinence scores and frequency of incontinence episodes, with generally mild adverse effects. For the treatment of FI, conservative measures and biofeedback therapy are modestly effective. When conservative therapies are ineffective, invasive procedures, including sacral nerve stimulation, may be considered, but they are associated with complications and lack randomized, controlled trials. Bulking agents may be an appropriate alternative therapy to consider before more aggressive therapies in patients who fail conservative therapies. PMID:25014235

  2. The rise of food allergy: Environmental factors and emerging treatments.

    PubMed

    Benedé, Sara; Blázquez, Ana Belen; Chiang, David; Tordesillas, Leticia; Berin, M Cecilia

    2016-05-01

    Food allergy has rapidly increased in prevalence, suggesting an important role for environmental factors in disease susceptibility. The immune response of food allergy is characterized by IgE production, and new findings from mouse and human studies indicate an important role of the cytokine IL-9, which is derived from both T cells and mast cells, in disease manifestations. Emerging evidence suggests that route of exposure to food, particularly peanut, is important. Exposure through the skin promotes sensitization while early exposure through the gastrointestinal tract promotes tolerance. Evidence from mouse studies indicate a role of the microbiome in development of food allergy, which is supported by correlative human studies showing a dysbiosis in food allergy. There is no approved treatment for food allergy, but emerging therapies are focused on allergen immunotherapy to provide desensitization, while pre-clinical studies are focused on using adjuvants or novel delivery approaches to improve efficacy and safety of immunotherapy. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Treatment of four psychiatric emergencies in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Bienvenu, O Joseph; Neufeld, Karin J; Needham, Dale M

    2012-09-01

    To review the diagnosis and management of four selected psychiatric emergencies in the intensive care unit: agitated delirium, neuroleptic malignant syndrome, serotonin syndrome, and psychiatric medication overdose. Review of relevant medical literature. Standardized screening for delirium should be routine. Agitated delirium should be managed with an antipsychotic and, possibly, dexmedetomidine in treatment-refractory cases. Delirium management should also include ensuring a calming environment and adequate pain control, minimizing benzodiazepines and anticholinergics, normalizing the sleep-wake cycle, providing sensory aids as required, and providing early physical and occupational therapy. Neuroleptic malignant syndrome should be treated by discontinuing dopamine blockers, providing supportive therapy, and possibly administering medications (benzodiazepines, dopamine agonists, and/or dantrolene) or electroconvulsive therapy, if indicated. Serotonin syndrome should be treated by discontinuing all serotonergic agents, providing supportive therapy, controlling agitation with benzodiazepines, and possibly administering serotonin2A antagonists. It is often unnecessary to restart psychiatric medications upon which a patient has overdosed in the intensive care unit, though withdrawal syndromes should be prevented, and communication with outpatient prescribers is vital. Understanding the diagnosis and appropriate management of these four psychiatric emergencies is important to provide safe and effective care in the intensive care unit.

  4. Mastocytosis 2016: Updated WHO Classification and Novel Emerging Treatment Concepts.

    PubMed

    Valent, Peter; Akin, Cem; Metcalfe, Dean D

    2016-12-28

    Over the past few years substantial advances have been made in understanding the pathogenesis, evolution, and complexity of mast cell neoplasms. New diagnostic and prognostic parameters and novel therapeutic targets with demonstrable clinical impact have been identified. A number of these new markers, molecular targets, and therapeutic approaches have been validated and translated into clinical practice. At the same time, the classification of mastocytosis and related diagnostic criteria have been refined and updated by the consensus group and the World Health Organization (WHO). As a result, more specific therapies tailored towards prognostic sub-groups of patients have been developed. Emerging treatment concepts employ drugs directed against KIT and other relevant targets in neoplastic mast cells, and will hopefully receive recognition by health authorities in the near future. The current article provides an overview of recent developments in the field, with emphasis on the updated WHO classification, refined criteria, additional prognostic parameters, and novel therapeutic approaches. Based on these emerging concepts, the prognosis, quality of life, and survival of patients with advanced mastocytosis are expected to improve in the coming years.

  5. Treatment-emergent mania/hypomania in unipolar patients

    PubMed Central

    Benvenuti, Antonella; Rucci, Paola; Miniati, Mario; Papasogli, Alessandra; Fagiolini, Andrea; Cassano, Giovanni B; Swartz, Holly; Frank, Ellen

    2012-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to estimate the incidence of treatment-emergent mania/hypomania (TEMH) and to describe the clinical characteristics of patients with major depression experiencing this event during treatment with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) and/or interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT). Methods Following an algorithm-based protocol, 344 patients with major depression confirmed with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV disorders were treated with an SSRI, interpersonal psychotherapy, or their combination for nine months. The emergence of mania/hypomania was carefully monitored throughout the study using the Young Mania Rating Scale and clinical assessment. Results Overall, eight patients experienced TEMH. The incidence of this event was 3.0% in patients treated with an SSRI and 0.9% in patients treated with IPT alone. Among patients treated with an SSRI, the difference between sites was higher than expected by chance alone (6.8% at Pisa and 0% at Pittsburgh, p = 0.002). Despite the adoption of an identical protocol at the two sites, some demographic and clinical characteristics of participants may account for this unexpected result. Alternatively, the greater number of episodes and earlier age of onset at the Pittsburgh site suggests that the unipolar course of illness was more clearly established prior to study entry. Conclusions TEMH is an infrequent event, occurring in 2.3% of patients treated for major depression. Nevertheless, its consequences are clinically relevant and require prompt and appropriate therapeutic interventions. For this reason, recognising those patients at risk for such an event is of paramount clinical significance. The observed difference in the incidence of TEMH between the two sites requires further investigation. PMID:18837867

  6. Emerging drugs for the treatment of angina pectoris.

    PubMed

    Chong, Cher-Rin; Ong, Gao J; Horowitz, John D

    2016-12-01

    Angina pectoris, or symptomatic myocardial ischaemia, reflects an impairment of coronary blood flow, and usually a deficiency of available myocardial energetics. Treatment options vary with the precise cause, which may vary with regards to the roles of increased myocardial oxygen demand versus reduced supply. Traditionally, organic nitrates, β-adrenoceptor antagonists, and non-dihydropyridine calcium antagonists were the only commonly used prophylactic anti-anginal agents. However, many patients failed to respond adequately to such therapy, and/or were unsuitable for their use. Areas covered: A number of 'new' agents have been shown to represent ancillary forms of prophylactic anti-anginal therapy and are particularly useful in patients who are relatively unsuitable for either percutaneous or surgical revascularisation. These include modulators of myocardial metabolic efficiency, such as perhexiline, trimetazidine and ranolazine, as well as high dose allopurinol, nicorandil and ivabradine. The advantages and disadvantages of these various agents are summarized. Expert opinion: 'Optimal' medical treatment of angina pectoris now includes use of agents primarily intended to reduce risk of infarction (e.g. statins, aspirin, ACE inhibitors). In patients whose angina persists despite the use of 'standard' anti-anginal therapy, and who are not ideal for invasive revascularization options, a number of emerging drugs offer prospects of symptomatic relief.

  7. Emerging interleukin receptor antagonists for the treatment of asthma.

    PubMed

    Al Efraij, Khalid; FitzGerald, J Mark

    2017-09-01

    Asthma is a heterogeneous disease, usually characterized by chronic airway inflammation. Most patients with asthma can be well-controlled with inhaled corticosteroids and, if necessary, the addition of a long-acting beta agonist. Despite these therapies, 5% to 10% of patients with asthma have severe, uncontrolled asthma. Selecting patients based on peripheral eosinophil counts and a history of exacerbations has led to significant decreases in exacerbations and an improvement in asthma control with medications that target IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13/. Areas covered: This review will cover the definition of severe asthma, existing treatment options, biomarkers, and the emerging role of interleukin antagonists in the treatment of severe asthma. Expert opinion: IL antagonists are novel drugs targeting important inflammatory cytokines in asthma. Anti-IL-5 drugs provide the most promise as they have obtained regulatory approval and are available for use. Anti-IL-4 drug results are also promising. There is, however, uncertainty regarding the success of anti-IL-13 drugs development at this point. An ongoing focus of research is to significantly increase our understanding of the biology of asthma, and in particular severe asthma, making more and better targeted therapies. There may also be potential in the future to use these new drugs earlier in the development of asthma, as disease-modifying interventions that might be associated with remission or even cure.

  8. Emergency treatment of renal colic with intravenous ketoprofen.

    PubMed

    el-Baz, M A; el-Tayeb Nasser, M

    1995-01-01

    The non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) Ketoprofen (Profenid) is used as intravenous monotherapy incorporated in 0.9% normal saline solution (100 mg Ketoprofen ampoule + 200 ml normal saline) in the treatment of renal colic. We present our experience in 65 patients complaining of clinically diagnosed renal colic who were treated by intravenous saline-Ketoprofen. Prospective investigations revaled urinary calculi in 51 patients, oxaluria (crystalluria) in 5, acute colitis in 2, severe myositis in 2, negative investigations in 3 and radiculitis in 2 patients. Positive response was observed in 93.8% of patients as far as pain relief is concerned. Pain relief started within 5-7 minutes after beginning the infusion. Duration of analgesic effect ranged between 4 and 12 hours. Repeating the injection was done for maintenance of analgesia. Side effects included drowsiness in 2 patients, palpitation in 1 patient, epigastric pain in 1, muscular cramp in 1 patient. Ketoprofen, an antiprostaglandin, is a powerful anti-inflammatory and potent analgesic. Intravenous saline-Ketoprofen is a good emergency treatment for acute episodes of renal colic.

  9. Current and emerging treatment options for mantle cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Fakhri, Bita; Kahl, Brad

    2017-01-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is a B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma with typically aggressive behavior. The genetic signature is the chromosomal translocation t(11;14)(q13;q32) resulting in overexpression of cyclin D1. Asymptomatic newly diagnosed MCL patients with low tumor burden can be closely observed, deferring therapy to the time of disease progression. Although MCL classically responds to upfront chemotherapy, it remains incurable with standard approaches. For patients in need of frontline therapy, the initial decision is whether to proceed with an intensive treatment strategy or a non-intensive treatment strategy. In general, given the unfavorable risk–benefit profile, older MCL patients should be spared intensive strategies, while younger and fit patients can be considered for intensive strategies. The bendamustine and rituximab (BR) regimen is becoming an increasingly popular treatment option among the elderly population, with improved progression-free survival (PFS) and acceptable side-effect profile. Although rituximab maintenance after R-CHOP improves survival outcomes in elderly patients, no clinical trial to date has shown statistical significance to support the use of rituximab maintenance after BR induction in older patients. In young and fit patients with MCL, an intensive strategy to maximize the length of first remission has emerged as a worldwide standard of care. With current high-dose cytarabine-containing immunochemotherapy regimens followed by autologous stem cell transplantation, the median PFS has exceeded 7 years. In the relapsed or refractory (R/R) setting, reduced intensity conditioning allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation may offer the highest likelihood of long-term survival in young R/R MCL patients, at the cost of increased risk of non-relapse mortality and chronic graft versus host disease. Novel agents targeting activated pathways in MCL cells, such as bortezomib, lenalidamide, ibrutinib and temsirolimus are now available

  10. The clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of adrenal emergencies.

    PubMed

    Tucci, Veronica; Sokari, Telematé

    2014-05-01

    Emergency medicine physicians should be able to identify and treat patients whose clinical presentations, including key historical, physical examination, and laboratory findings are consistent with diagnoses of primary, secondary, and tertiary adrenal insufficiency, adrenal crisis, and pheochromocytoma. Failure to make a timely diagnosis leads to increased morbidity and mortality. As great mimickers, adrenal emergencies often present with a constellation of nonspecific signs and symptoms that can lead even the most diligent emergency physician astray. The emergency physician must include adrenal emergencies in the differential diagnosis when encountering such clinical pictures. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Post-traumatic epilepsy: current and emerging treatment options.

    PubMed

    Szaflarski, Jerzy P; Nazzal, Yara; Dreer, Laura E

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) leads to many undesired problems and complications, including immediate and long-term seizures/epilepsy, changes in mood, behavioral, and personality problems, cognitive and motor deficits, movement disorders, and sleep problems. Clinicians involved in the treatment of patients with acute TBI need to be aware of a number of issues, including the incidence and prevalence of early seizures and post-traumatic epilepsy (PTE), comorbidities associated with seizures and anticonvulsant therapies, and factors that can contribute to their emergence. While strong scientific evidence for early seizure prevention in TBI is available for phenytoin (PHT), other antiepileptic medications, eg, levetiracetam (LEV), are also being utilized in clinical settings. The use of PHT has its drawbacks, including cognitive side effects and effects on function recovery. Rates of recovery after TBI are expected to plateau after a certain period of time. Nevertheless, some patients continue to improve while others deteriorate without any clear contributing factors. Thus, one must ask, 'Are there any actions that can be taken to decrease the chance of post-traumatic seizures and epilepsy while minimizing potential short- and long-term effects of anticonvulsants?' While the answer is 'probably,' more evidence is needed to replace PHT with LEV on a permanent basis. Some have proposed studies to address this issue, while others look toward different options, including other anticonvulsants (eg, perampanel or other AMPA antagonists), or less established treatments (eg, ketamine). In this review, we focus on a comparison of the use of PHT versus LEV in the acute TBI setting and summarize the clinical aspects of seizure prevention in humans with appropriate, but general, references to the animal literature.

  12. Post-traumatic epilepsy: current and emerging treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Szaflarski, Jerzy P; Nazzal, Yara; Dreer, Laura E

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) leads to many undesired problems and complications, including immediate and long-term seizures/epilepsy, changes in mood, behavioral, and personality problems, cognitive and motor deficits, movement disorders, and sleep problems. Clinicians involved in the treatment of patients with acute TBI need to be aware of a number of issues, including the incidence and prevalence of early seizures and post-traumatic epilepsy (PTE), comorbidities associated with seizures and anticonvulsant therapies, and factors that can contribute to their emergence. While strong scientific evidence for early seizure prevention in TBI is available for phenytoin (PHT), other antiepileptic medications, eg, levetiracetam (LEV), are also being utilized in clinical settings. The use of PHT has its drawbacks, including cognitive side effects and effects on function recovery. Rates of recovery after TBI are expected to plateau after a certain period of time. Nevertheless, some patients continue to improve while others deteriorate without any clear contributing factors. Thus, one must ask, ‘Are there any actions that can be taken to decrease the chance of post-traumatic seizures and epilepsy while minimizing potential short- and long-term effects of anticonvulsants?’ While the answer is ‘probably,’ more evidence is needed to replace PHT with LEV on a permanent basis. Some have proposed studies to address this issue, while others look toward different options, including other anticonvulsants (eg, perampanel or other AMPA antagonists), or less established treatments (eg, ketamine). In this review, we focus on a comparison of the use of PHT versus LEV in the acute TBI setting and summarize the clinical aspects of seizure prevention in humans with appropriate, but general, references to the animal literature. PMID:25143737

  13. Current therapies and emerging targets for the treatment of diabetes.

    PubMed

    Wagman, A S; Nuss, J M

    2001-04-01

    Concurrent with the spread of the western lifestyle, the prevalence of all types of diabetes is on the rise in the world's population. The number of diabetics is increasing by 4-5% per year with an estimated 40-45% of individual's over the age of 65 years having either type II diabetes or impaired glucose tolerance. Since the signs of diabetes are not immediately obvious, diagnosis can be preceded by an extended period of impaired glucose tolerance resulting in the prevalence of beta-cell dysfunction and macrovascular complications. In addition to increased medical vigilance, diabetes is being combatted through aggressive treatment directed at lowering circulating blood glucose and inhibiting postprandial hyperglycemic spikes. Current strategies to treat diabetes include reducing insulin resistance using glitazones, supplementing insulin supplies with exogenous insulin, increasing endogenous insulin production with sulfonylureas and meglitinides, reducing hepatic glucose production through biguanides, and limiting postprandial glucose absorption with alpha-glucosidase inhibitors. In all of these areas, new generations of small molecules are being investigated which exhibit improved efficacy and safety profiles. Promising biological targets are also emerging such as (1) insulin sensitizers including protein tyrosine phosphatase-1B (PTP-1B) and glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3), (2) inhibitors of gluconeogenesis like pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDH) inhibitors, (3) lipolysis inhibitors, (4) fat oxidation including carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT) I and II inhibitors, and (5) energy expenditure by means of beta 3-adrenoceptor agonists. Also important are alternative routes of glucose disposal such as Na+-glucose cotransporter (SGLT) inhibitors, combination therapies, and the treatment of diabetic complications (eg. retinopathy, nephropathy, and neuropathy). With may new opportunities for drug discovery, the prospects are excellent for development of innovative

  14. [Treatment of childhood injuries and violence in public emergency services].

    PubMed

    Malta, Deborah Carvalho; Mascarenhas, Márcio Denis Medeiros; Neves, Alice Cristina Medeiros das; Silva, Marta Alves da

    2015-05-01

    This study aimed to analyze the profile of treatment for accidents and violence involving children under 10 years of age in Brazil in the year 2011. This was a cross-sectional descriptive study in 71 emergency services in the Brazilian Unified National Health System (SUS), located in the national capital and 24 state capitals. Data were obtained from the Ministry of Health's system of sentinel surveillance services for Violence and Accidents (VIVA Survey). The highest proportion of injuries (67.4%) occurred inside the child's home. Among unintentional injuries, falls were the most frequent (52.4%), followed by running into objects or persons (21.8%) and traffic injuries (10.9%), especially as passengers (bicycles were an important means of transportation involved in the injuries). The vast majority of unintentional injuries are avoidable, and educational measures should be adopted, especially with parents, teachers, the community, and health workers, calling attention to the risks and the adoption of safe behaviors in the home, at school, and in leisure-time activities. Cases of violence are subject to mandatory reporting, and prompt measures should be taken to protect victims.

  15. Anemia in the emergency department: evaluation and treatment.

    PubMed

    Janz, Timothy G; Johnson, Roy L; Rubenstein, Scott D

    2013-11-01

    Anemia is a common worldwide problem that is associated with nonspecific complaints. The initial focus for the emergency evaluation of anemia is to determine whether the problem is acute or chronic. Acute anemia is most commonly associated with blood loss, and the patient is usually symptomatic. Chronic anemia is usually well tolerated and is often discovered coincidentally. Once diagnosed, the etiology of anemia can often be determined by applying a systematic approach to its evaluation. The severity of the anemia impacts clinical outcomes, particularly in critically ill patients; however, the specific threshold to transfuse is uncertain. Evaluation of the current literature and clinical guidelines does not settle this controversy, but it does help clarify that a restrictive transfusion strategy (ie, for patients with a hemoglobin < 6-8 g/dL) is associated with better outcomes than a more liberal transfusion strategy. Certain anemias may have well-defined treatment options (eg, sickle cell disease), but empiric use of nutritional supplements to treat anemia of uncertain etiology is discouraged.

  16. Emerging targets in neurodegeneration: new opportunities for Alzheimer's disease treatment?

    PubMed

    Rampa, Angela; Gobbi, Silvia; Belluti, Federica; Bisi, Alessandra

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder of the brain associated with memory impairment, progressive cognitive decline and changes in personality and behavior, with rising incidence among elderly people. Reflecting the world population ageing, the scenario is expected to worsen in the next decades if novel drugs or mechanisms that help to counteract neurodegeneration will not be identified. The complex neuropathology of AD is characterized by cholinergic loss, extracellular deposition of amyloid-β plaques, formation of intracellular neurofibrillary tangles, chronic brain inflammation and oxidative damage. To date, there are no effective treatments that can slow or halt the disease, and currently approved drugs only seem to act as palliative by temporary ameliorating cognitive impairment. On the other hand, the role played by other biological systems in the pathogenetic process is now clearly growing and, as knowledge on how AD develops and triggers brain damage proceeds, drug discovery attempts to identify new potential therapeutic targets. This review will focus on these emerging strategies, some of which could open new therapeutic perspectives in Alzheimer's disease, adding new elements for the medicinal chemist to handle and combine for the design of novel multi-target-directed ligands able to simultaneously modulate 'old classic' and newly identified targets.

  17. Oncolytic viruses: emerging options for the treatment of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Suryawanshi, Yogesh R; Zhang, Tiantian; Essani, Karim

    2017-03-01

    Breast cancer (BC) is the most common type of cancer among women and is the second most common cause of cancer-related deaths, following lung cancer. Severe toxicity associated with a long-term use of BC chemo- and radiotherapy makes it essential to look for newer therapeutics. Additionally, molecular heterogeneity at both intratumoral and intertumoral levels among BC subtypes is known to result in a differential response to standard therapeutics. Oncolytic viruses (OVs) have emerged as one of the most promising treatment options for BC. Many preclinical and clinical studies have shown that OVs are effective in treating BC, both as a single therapeutic agent and as a part of combination therapies. Combination therapies involving multimodal therapeutics including OVs are becoming popular as they allow to achieve the synergistic therapeutic effects, while minimizing the associated toxicities. Here, we review the OVs for BC therapy in preclinical studies and in clinical trials, both as a monotherapy and as part of a combination therapy. We also briefly discuss the potential therapeutic targets for BC, as these are likely to be critical for the development of new OVs.

  18. Emerging drugs for the treatment of hemophilia A and B.

    PubMed

    Morfini, Massimo; Zanon, Ezio

    2016-09-01

    Replacement therapy with clotting factor concentrates is the most appropriate and effective way to treat bleedings of Hemophilia A&B to prevent chronic arthropathy. Unfortunately, the short half-life (HL) of FVIII/IX concentrates obliges the patients to receive frequent infusions, a big concern for children. The development of inhibitors in about 30-45% of hemophilia A and in 3-5% of hemophilia B patient is the major adverse event of replacement therapy. In the last few years, new rFIX have been developed with HL. New rFVIII concentrates are displaying small increase of PK characteristics. The new bio-engineering methods allowed the production of molecules fused with Fc fragment of IgG or Albumin or linked to PEG. A new approach to improve hemostasis is represented by Mab against TFPI and small RNA interfering with Antithrombin synthesis. Another innovative drug seems to be the new bi-specific antibody which mimics FVIII function in linking FXa and FX to tenase production. The emerging drugs for hemophilia treatment seem to be very promising. The extended half-life will improve the adherence of patients to therapy. Accurate post-marketing surveillance studies will be necessary to check the efficacy, safety and immunogenicity of these new molecules.

  19. Treatment of Pediatric Migraine in the Emergency Room

    PubMed Central

    Gelfand, Amy A.; Goadsby, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    Migraine is a relatively common reason for pediatric emergency room visits. Given the paucity of randomized trials involving pediatric migraineurs in the emergency department setting compared to adults, recommendations for managing these children are largely extrapolated from adult migraine emergency room studies and trials involving outpatient home pediatric migraine therapy. This paper reviews what is known about pediatric migraineurs who present to the emergency room and how they are currently managed, then goes on to summarize the best evidence currently available to guide clinical decision making. PMID:22964436

  20. Planning Emergency Treatment Services for Comprehensive Community Mental Health Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGee, Richard K., Ed.

    Proceedings of a conference designed to bring together persons interested in the operation of Suicide Prevention Programs and Comprehensive Community Mental Health Centers are reported. Content addresses deal with the following: (1) total emergency programs; (2) emergency service as an alternate to hospitalization; (3) the utilization of…

  1. [Emergent treatment of source water contaminated by representative chemicals].

    PubMed

    Chen, Bei-Bei; Gao, Nai-Yun; Lu, Wen-Min; Shang, Ya-Bo; Qin, Zu-Qun

    2009-06-15

    Emergent treatment of source water polluted by representative chemical bisphenol-A (BPA) and Di-ethyl phthalate (DEP) was researched. The results indicate that activated carbon adsorption could achieve high efficiencies to remove the two chemicals. The pseudo second-order adsorption kinetic model and Elovich kinetic model can be used to describe the powdered activated carbon (PAC) adsorption process of BPA and DEP in raw water. In pilot test, 50 mg/L PAC dosage can get the pollution concentration of 500 microg/L BPA or 3.3 mg/L DEP comply with the requirement of water quality standard. The dynamic adsorption of carbon-sand filter was also studied, and removal efficiencies of BPA and DEP were hardly influenced by their original concentrations and the filtering velocity among 5.1-15.3 m/h of carbon-sand filter. When PAC adsorption was combined with carbon-sand filter, PAC adsorption contributes most to removing pollution, and carbon-sand filter as the supplement of PAC can strengthen safety. DEP can't be oxidized by KMnO4 or Cl2, but 850 microg/L BPA can be almost completely oxidized by 3 mg/L KMnO4 and 1.5 mg/L Cl2. The oxidation products of BPA as well as their toxicity need further study. PAC adsorption combined with 1.5 mg/L KMnO4 preoxidation can't improve the removal efficiency of DEP, but can improve BPA removal efficiency.

  2. Viruses and disease: emerging concepts for prevention, diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Herrington, C S; Coates, P J; Duprex, W P

    2015-01-01

    Viruses cause a wide range of human diseases, ranging from acute self-resolving conditions to acute fatal diseases. Effects that arise long after the primary infection can also increase the propensity for chronic conditions or lead to the development of cancer. Recent advances in the fields of virology and pathology have been fundamental in improving our understanding of viral pathogenesis, in providing improved vaccination strategies and in developing newer, more effective treatments for patients worldwide. The reviews assembled here focus on the interface between virology and pathology and encompass aspects of both the clinical pathology of viral disease and the underlying disease mechanisms. Articles on emerging diseases caused by Ebola virus, Marburg virus, coronaviruses such as SARS and MERS, Nipah virus and noroviruses are followed by reviews of enteroviruses, HIV infection, measles, mumps, human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), influenza, cytomegalovirus (CMV) and varicella zoster virus (VZV). The issue concludes with a series of articles reviewing the relationship between viruses and cancer, including the role played by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in the pathogenesis of lymphoma and carcinoma; how human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are involved in the development of skin cancer; the involvement of hepatitis B virus infection in hepatocellular carcinoma; and the mechanisms by which Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) leads to Kaposi's sarcoma. We hope that this collection of articles will be of interest to a wide range of scientists and clinicians at a time when there is a renaissance in the appreciation of the power of pathology as virologists dissect the processes of disease. Copyright © 2014 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Portable Television for Recording Emergency Treatment - Phase II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howze, William C.; Audette, Louis G.

    1970-01-01

    Describes a study conducted jointly by the Yale University School of Medicine and the City of New Haven on the uses of portable television for the evaluation and improvement of emergency first aid services." (Author/AA)

  4. [Injuries caused by acids and bases - emergency treatment].

    PubMed

    Reifferscheid, Florian; Stuhr, Markus; Kaiser, Guido; Freudenberg, Matthias; Kerner, Thoralf

    2014-06-01

    Emergency medical care for injuries caused by acids and bases is challenging for rescue services. They have to deal with operational safety, detection of the toxic agent, emergency medical care of the patient and handling of the rescue mission. Because of the rareness of such situations experience and routine are largely missing. This article highlights some basic points for the therapy and provides support for such rescue missions. © Georg Thieme Verlag Stuttgart · New York.

  5. Current and emerging pharmacological treatments for sarcoidosis: a review

    PubMed Central

    Beegle, Scott H; Barba, Kerry; Gobunsuy, Romel; Judson, Marc A

    2013-01-01

    The treatment of sarcoidosis is not standardized. Because sarcoidosis may never cause significant symptoms or organ dysfunction, treatment is not mandatory. When treatment is indicated, oral corticosteroids are usually recommended because they are highly likely to be effective in a relative short period of time. However, because sarcoidosis is often a chronic condition, long-term treatment with corticosteroids may cause significant toxicity. Therefore, corticosteroid sparing agents are often indicated in patients requiring chronic therapy. This review outlines the indications for treatment, corticosteroid treatment, and corticosteroid sparing treatments for sarcoidosis. PMID:23596348

  6. [In-hospitaltraumamanagement - radiation emergency and multiple trauma - principals of treatment in the emergency room].

    PubMed

    Wurmb, Thomas; Kühne, Christian A; Schneider, Rita

    2014-09-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation combined with multiple trauma is a very rare but severe event. There are some important basic principles for the early inpatient management. An externally exposed patient poses no risk to the treatment team. Injuries require treatment in order of priority as known for example by ATLS(®). Against external contamination, the treatment team is adequately protected by wearing protective clothing and gloves in conformity with universal medical precautions. Treatment of life threatening injuries takes priority over decontamination. Specialized treatment centres should be involved early on in patient treatment. © Georg Thieme Verlag Stuttgart · New York.

  7. TB treatment in a chronic complex emergency: treatment outcomes and experiences in Somalia.

    PubMed

    Liddle, Karin Fischer; Elema, Riekje; Thi, Sein Sein; Greig, Jane; Venis, Sarah

    2013-11-01

    Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) provides TB treatment in Galkayo and Marere in Somalia. MSF international supervisory staff withdrew in 2008 owing to insecurity but maintained daily communication with Somali staff. In this paper, we aimed to assess the feasibility of treating TB in a complex emergency setting and describe the programme adaptations implemented to facilitate acceptable treatment outcomes. Routinely collected treatment data from 2005-2012 were retrospectively analysed. In multivariate analyses, factors associated with successful outcome (cure or completion versus failure, death and default) were assessed, including the presence of international supervisory staff. Informal interviews were conducted with Somali staff regarding programmatic factors affecting patient management and perceived reasons for default. In total, 6167 patients were admitted (34.8% female; median age 24.0 years [IQR 13.0-38.0 years]). Treatment success was 79% (programme range 69-87%). Presence of international staff did not improve outcomes (adjusted OR 0.85, 95% CI 0.66-1.09; p=0.27). Perceived reasons for default included being away from family, nomadic group, insecurity, travel cost, need to return to grazing land or feeling better. Despite the challenges, a high percentage of patients were successfully treated. Treatment outcomes were not adversely affected by withdrawal of international supervisory staff.

  8. Emergency department evaluation and treatment of cervical spine injuries.

    PubMed

    Kanwar, Rajdeep; Delasobera, Bronson E; Hudson, Korin; Frohna, William

    2015-05-01

    Most spinal cord injuries involve the cervical spine, highlighting the importance of recognition and proper management by emergency physicians. Initial cervical spine injury management should follow the ABCDE (airway, breathing, circulation, disability, exposure) procedure detailed by Advanced Trauma Life Support. NEXUS (National Emergency X-Radiography Utilization Study) criteria and Canadian C-spine Rule are clinical decision-making tools providing guidelines of when to obtain imaging. Computed tomography scans are the preferred initial imaging modality. Consider administering intravenous methylprednisolone after discussion with the neurosurgical consultant in patients who present with spinal cord injuries within 8 hours.

  9. EMERGING TECHNOLOGY SUMMARY: INNOVATIVE METHODS FOR BIOSLURRY TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The tests reported herein were conducted by IT Corporation (IT), Knoxville, TN, to investigate the feasibility of combined biological and chemical treatments to treat polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Bioslurry treatment of PAH-contaminated soils was demonstrated under the...

  10. EMERGING TECHNOLOGY SUMMARY: INNOVATIVE METHODS FOR BIOSLURRY TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The tests reported herein were conducted by IT Corporation (IT), Knoxville, TN, to investigate the feasibility of combined biological and chemical treatments to treat polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Bioslurry treatment of PAH-contaminated soils was demonstrated under the...

  11. [Immediate cooling with water: emergency treatment of burns].

    PubMed

    Latarjet, J

    1990-01-01

    Experimental data have demonstrated that prolonged immediate cooling with cold water is the best first-aid treatment for burn injuries. However in France, this treatment is rarely applied; instead old, inefficient and aggravating methods are still very popular. Pediatricians must help to change this practice by recommending immediate cold water treatment for burns in children.

  12. Emergency Endovascular 'Bridge' Treatment for Iliac-Enteric Fistula

    SciTech Connect

    Franchin, Marco; Tozzi, Matteo; Piffaretti, Gabriele; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo; Castelli, Patrizio

    2011-10-15

    Aortic aneurysm has been reported to be the dominant cause of primary iliac-enteric fistula (IEF) in >70% of cases [1]; other less common causes of primary IEF include peptic ulcer, primary aortitis, pancreatic pseudocyst, or neoplastic erosion into an adjacent artery [2, 3]. We describe an unusual case of IEF managed with a staged approach using an endovascular stent-graft as a 'bridge' in the emergency setting to optimize the next elective definitive excision of the lesion.

  13. Implications of the Emergency Medical Treatment and Labor Act (EMTALA) during public health emergencies and on alternate sites of care.

    PubMed

    Roszak, Andrew R; Jensen, Frances R; Wild, Richard E; Yeskey, Kevin; Handrigan, Michael T

    2009-12-01

    Hospitals throughout the country are using innovative strategies to accommodate the surge of patients brought on by the novel H1N1 virus. One strategy has been to help decompress the amount of patients seeking care within emergency departments by using alternate sites of care, such as tents, parking lots, and community centers as triage, staging, and screening areas. As at any other time an individual presents on hospital property, hospitals and providers must be mindful of the requirements of the Emergency Medical Treatment and Labor Act. In this article we review the act and its implications during public health emergencies, with a particular focus on its implications on alternative sites of care.

  14. Treatment of Sexual Offenders: Research, Best Practices, and Emerging Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yates, Pamela M.

    2013-01-01

    Treatment of sexual offenders has evolved substantially over the years; various theoretical and practice models of treatment been developed, modified, refined, and proposed over time. The predominant current recommended approach, supported by research, adheres to specific principles of effective correctional intervention, follows a…

  15. Emerging Technologies in Autism Diagnosis, Therapy, Treatment, and Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Angela C.

    2014-01-01

    Autism Spectrum Disorder is the fastest growing developmental disability today. Autism is a syndrome with a diverse set of symptoms--rarely consistent across diagnosed individuals, and requiring a combination of therapies, educational approaches, and treatments. There is no known cure for autism. Instead treatment is left to educators and…

  16. An Emerging Problem: Methamphetamine Abuse among Treatment Seeking Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzales, Rachel; Ang, Alfonso; McCann, Michael J.; Rawson, Richard A.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined correlates of methamphetamine (MA) and marijuana (MJ) use and treatment response among treatment-involved youth (N = 4,430) in Los Angeles County, California treated between 2000 and 2005. Of the sample, 912 (21%) were primary MA and 3,518 (79%) were primary MJ users. Correlates of increased MA use included being female, White,…

  17. Emerging Technologies in Autism Diagnosis, Therapy, Treatment, and Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Angela C.

    2014-01-01

    Autism Spectrum Disorder is the fastest growing developmental disability today. Autism is a syndrome with a diverse set of symptoms--rarely consistent across diagnosed individuals, and requiring a combination of therapies, educational approaches, and treatments. There is no known cure for autism. Instead treatment is left to educators and…

  18. An Emerging Problem: Methamphetamine Abuse among Treatment Seeking Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzales, Rachel; Ang, Alfonso; McCann, Michael J.; Rawson, Richard A.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined correlates of methamphetamine (MA) and marijuana (MJ) use and treatment response among treatment-involved youth (N = 4,430) in Los Angeles County, California treated between 2000 and 2005. Of the sample, 912 (21%) were primary MA and 3,518 (79%) were primary MJ users. Correlates of increased MA use included being female, White,…

  19. [Emergency antibiotherapy and adjuvant treatments for acute bacterial meningitis].

    PubMed

    Mourvillier, B

    2009-01-01

    The management of bacterial meningitis is based on the combination of several components. The objective of this review is to give an overview of the literature concerning both the arguments for urgent antibiotic treatment associated with a particular focus on the place of corticosteroids. Among other treatments, glycerol seems the best rated but symptomatic measures, which may not be achieved by randomized studies, should not be overlooked. Many animal studies explore other treatment options, but none can be translated into clinical practice. The neuroimaging has been little evaluated despite recent technological advances but remains important in monitoring of patients whose evolution is considered unfavorable.

  20. Emergency assessment and treatment planning for traumatic dental injuries.

    PubMed

    Moule, A; Cohenca, N

    2016-03-01

    Trauma involving the dentoalveolar region is a frequent occurrence which can result in the fracturing and displacement of teeth, crushing and/or fracturing of bone and soft tissue injuries including contusions, abrasions and lacerations. This review describes the assessment of patients with these injuries, not in a didactic sense by repeating excellent already published classifications and treatment options, but by addressing questions that arise during assessment. It covers trauma first aid, examination of the patient, factors that affect treatment planning decisions, and the importance of communicating treatment options and prognosis to traumatized patients. © 2016 Australian Dental Association.

  1. [Treatment of oncology patients in the final stadium of disease by prehospital emergency physicians].

    PubMed

    Wiese, C; Bartels, U; Ruppert, D; Quintel, M; Graf, B M; Hanekop, G G

    2007-02-01

    Presently and even more in the near future more cancer patients will be treated at home especially in the final stage of their disease. For this reason the prehospital emergency system will be confronted with the specific needs of these patients. Palliative care is not part of the German model of post-graduate training regulations for emergency medicine and palliative care teams (PCT) are only involved in the treatment of cancer patients in emergency situations. Over a 12-month period we retrospectively analysed all emergency cases that had been categorised as final cancer stage at 2 emergency sites (one air-based, the other ground-based) involving physicians in an out-of-hospital setting. We analysed all cases for indications of emergency call, prehospital treatment and involvement of a PCT in the treatment of symptoms. For this period we analysed 2,765 emergency documents and identified more than 2.5% as emergency calls by cancer patients or their relatives (the majority of patients had been in the final stage of the disease). Most emergency calls occurred at times when no general practitioner was on duty and acute dyspnoea (42.7%) was the prominent diagnosis. After emergency treatment 61.8% patients had been admitted to hospital. In most settings a PCT was not involved in the treatment of palliative care patients or their relatives (92.7%). Our data demonstrate that care of cancer patients in the final stage of the disease is relevant in emergency medicine. These patients are in need of help based on principles of palliative care. Under these circumstances cooperation of the medical disciplines (emergency and palliative medicine) concerned seems to be necessary. This may increase the possibility for patients to stay at home for the last days of their life. Because of this we are convinced that basic knowledge of palliative care should be integrated into the German model of post-graduate training regulations for emergency care. Combining parts of the curricula

  2. Utilization of Nurse Practitioners in Emergency Medical Treatment.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-05-01

    study protocol as described in this report was submitted forSr- v’ew to nurse researchers familiar to and with the ANC and to e0mergency cure...Emergency Department Nurses’ Association in their published Core Curriculum. If the ENP concept is still considered a researchable question, recommend the...and Fo>, .. 1 c c Vi. , and Nurse Practitioners: A Survey of Baltimore Urban Residents. Vedical Care, 1979, 17:5 (May) 526-35 18. Waeckerle, J.F

  3. SITE EMERGING TECHNOLOGY REPORT: INNOVATIVE METHODS FOR BIOSLURRY TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    IT Corporation (IT), Knoxville, Tennessee, in collaboration with U.S. Environmental protection Agency (EPA), investigated the feasibility of combined biological and chemical oxidation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). Bioslurry treatment of PAH-contaminated soils was dem...

  4. SITE EMERGING TECHNOLOGY REPORT: INNOVATIVE METHODS FOR BIOSLURRY TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    IT Corporation (IT), Knoxville, Tennessee, in collaboration with U.S. Environmental protection Agency (EPA), investigated the feasibility of combined biological and chemical oxidation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). Bioslurry treatment of PAH-contaminated soils was dem...

  5. Current and emerging options for the drug treatment of narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    De la Herrán-Arita, Alberto K; García-García, Fabio

    2013-11-01

    Narcolepsy/hypocretin deficiency (now called type 1 narcolepsy) is a lifelong neurologic disorder with well-established diagnostic criteria and etiology. Narcolepsy is a chronic sleep disorder characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) and symptoms of dissociated rapid eye movement sleep such as cataplexy (sudden loss of muscle tone), hypnagogic hallucinations (sensory events that occur at the transition from wakefulness to sleep), sleep paralysis (inability to perform movements upon wakening or sleep onset), and nocturnal sleep disruption. As these symptoms are often disabling, most patients need life-long treatment. The treatment of narcolepsy is well defined, and, traditionally, amphetamine-like stimulants (i.e., dopaminergic release enhancers) have been used for clinical management to improve EDS and sleep attacks, whereas tricyclic antidepressants have been used as anticataplectics. However, treatments have evolved to better-tolerated compounds such as modafinil or armodafinil (for EDS) and adrenergic/serotonergic selective reuptake inhibitors (as anticataplectics). In addition, night-time administration of a short-acting sedative, c-hydroxybutyrate (sodium oxybate), has been used for the treatment for EDS and cataplexy. These therapies are almost always needed in combination with non-pharmacologic treatments (i.e., behavioral modification). A series of new drugs is currently being tested in animal models and in humans. These include a wide variety of hypocretin agonists, melanin- concentrating hormone receptor antagonists, antigenspecific immunopharmacology, and histamine H3 receptor antagonists/inverse agonists (e.g., pitolisant), which have been proposed for specific therapeutic applications, including the treatment of Alzheimer's disease, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, epilepsy, and more recently, narcolepsy. Even though current treatment is strictly symptomatic, based on the present state of knowledge of the pathophysiology of

  6. Cognitive Function as an Emerging Treatment Target for Marijuana Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Sofuoglu, Mehmet; Sugarman, Dawn E.; Carroll, Kathleen M.

    2010-01-01

    Cannabis is the most widely used illicit substance in the world and demand for effective treatment is increasing. However, abstinence rates following behavioral therapies have been modest, and there are no effective pharmacotherapies for the treatment of cannabis addiction. We propose a novel research agenda and a potential treatment strategy, based on observations that both acute and chronic exposure to cannabis are associated with dose-related cognitive impairments, most consistently in attention, working memory, verbal learning, and memory functions. These impairments are not completely reversible upon cessation of marijuana use and moreover may interfere with the treatment of marijuana addiction. Therefore, targeting cognitive impairment associated with chronic marijuana use may be a promising novel strategy for the treatment of marijuana addiction. Preclinical studies suggest that medications enhancing the cholinergic transmission may attenuate cannabis-induced cognitive impairments, but these cognitive enhancing medications have not been examined in controlled human studies. Preliminary evidence from individuals addicted to other drugs suggests that computerized cognitive rehabilitation may also have utility to improve cognitive function in marijuana users. Future clinical studies optimally designed to measure cognitive function as well as drug use behavior would be needed to test the efficacy of these treatments for marijuana addiction. PMID:20384422

  7. Being prepared: emergency treatment following a nerve agent release.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Abby M; Baker, Stephanie N; Baum, Regan A; Chandler, Hannah E; Weant, Kyle A

    2014-01-01

    Nerve agents are extremely toxic and are some of the most lethal substances on earth. This group of chemicals consists of sarin, cyclosarin, soman, tabun, VX, and VR. It is currently unknown how many countries possess these chemicals and in what quantities. These agents work through altering the transmission and breakdown of acetylcholine by binding to, and inactivating, acetylcholinesterase. This results in an uncontrolled and overwhelming stimulation of both muscarinic and nicotinic receptors. Receptor activation at these sites can lead to a wide variety of clinical symptoms, with death frequently resulting from pulmonary edema. Antidotal therapy in this setting largely consists of atropine, pralidoxime, and benzodiazepines, all of which must be administered emergently to limit the progression of symptoms and prevent the enzyme inactivation from becoming permanent. This article reviews the mechanism of action of the nerve agents and their effects on the human body, the currently available therapies to mitigate their impact, and important therapeutic considerations for health care practitioners in the emergency department.

  8. 7 CFR 6.7 - Submission of recommendations under section 8(a) (emergency treatment).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Submission of recommendations under section 8(a) (emergency treatment). 6.7 Section 6.7 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture IMPORT QUOTAS AND FEES General Provisions § 6.7 Submission of recommendations under section 8(a) (emergency...

  9. Evaluation of guidelines for emergency triage assessment and treatment in developing countries

    PubMed Central

    Tamburlini, G.; Di, M; Maggi, R. S.; Vilarim, J. N.; Gove, S.

    1999-01-01

    AIM—To evaluate performance of a simplified algorithm and treatment instructions for emergency triage assessment and treatment (ETAT) of children presenting to hospital in developing countries.
METHODS—All infants aged 7 days to 5 years presenting to an accident and emergency department were simultaneously triaged and assessed by a nurse and a senior paediatrician. Nurse ETAT assessment was compared to standard emergency advanced paediatric life support (APLS) assessment by the paediatrician. Sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values were calculated and appropriateness of nurse treatments was evaluated.
RESULTS—The ETAT algorithm as used by nurses identified 731/3837 patients (19.05%); 98 patients (2.6%) were classified as needing emergency treatment and 633 (16.5%) as needing priority assessment. Sensitivity was 96.7% with respect to APLS assessment, 91.7% with respect to all patients given priority by the paediatrician, and 85.7% with respect to patients ultimately admitted. Specificity was 90.6%, 91.0%, and 85.2%, respectively. Nurse administered treatment was appropriate in 94/102 (92.2%) emergency conditions.
CONCLUSIONS—The ETAT algorithm and treatment instructions, when carried out by nurses after a short specific training period, performed well as a screening tool to identify priority cases and as a treatment guide for emergency conditions.

 PMID:10569961

  10. Emerging treatments in chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting.

    PubMed

    Grunberg, Steven M; Slusher, Barbara; Rugo, Hope S

    2013-02-01

    Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) is a concern for many cancer patients. It can have an enormous impact on quality of life. CINV occurring in the first 24 hours after treatment is considered acute, and CINV occurring on days 2 through 5 after treatment is considered delayed. Anticipatory nausea and depression can also occur when patients are reminded of their chemotherapy treatment. CINV can lead to weight changes, fatigue, and the need for additional medications. Even mild to moderate CINV can increase health care utilization and costs, as well as delay treatment. Nausea and vomiting are separate events, although their mechanisms are entwined. Drugs that stop vomiting do not necessarily treat nausea. Control of CINV allows patients to complete treatment and to minimize use of health care resources and additional medications. Current antiemesis agents, such as 5-hydroxytryptamine-3 (5-HT3) antagonists and neurokinin-1 (NK-1) antagonists, have markedly decreased hospitalization for chemotherapy and have nearly eliminated acute emesis. The second-generation 5-HT3 receptor palonosetron has a unique pharmacology that makes it especially effective at preventing delayed emesis.

  11. Emerging pollutant treatments in wastewater: Cases of antibiotics and hormones.

    PubMed

    Méndez, Erika; González-Fuentes, Miguel A; Rebollar-Perez, Georgette; Méndez-Albores, Alia; Torres, Eduardo

    2017-02-23

    Because of the intensive use of pharmaceutical substances in human life, studies on the detection of these chemical compounds and their metabolites as pollutants in water bodies are continuously reported. Some pharmaceutical agents are associated with adverse effects to aquatic life, even at very low concentrations (ng L(-1) to μg L(-1)). For instance, the presence of antibiotics and hormones has been associated with increasing proliferation of antibiotic resistant pathogens and feminization and masculinization of some aquatic organisms. Currently, new attempts are being made to minimize or fully remove these types of pollutants from aquatic systems to protect the environment and human health. In this regard, physicochemical and biological treatments are among the most promising technologies for the treatment of wastewater containing pharmaceutical pollutants. These treatments are green alternatives for the degradation of hazardous organic compounds into nontoxic by-products. Here, we review some of the physicochemical and biological treatment methods used for the removal of the most extensively used antibiotics and hormones. Enzymatic oxidation, photocatalysis and electrochemical oxidation are described in terms of the aforementioned pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs). The use of membrane technologies to separate different groups of antibiotics and hormones prior to biologic or physicochemical treatment methods is also addressed.

  12. Current and emergent pharmacologic treatments for irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhea: evidence-based treatment in practice

    PubMed Central

    Lucak, Susan; Chang, Lin; Halpert, Albena; Harris, Lucinda A.

    2016-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhea (IBS-D) is a common, chronic functional gastrointestinal disorder with symptoms that can be distressing for patients and often result in substantially impaired quality of life. This review focuses on providing clinicians with information on practical, evidence-based treatment for IBS-D. Current therapies commonly used for the treatment of IBS-D, including pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic interventions, are briefly reviewed, followed by discussion of the emergent pharmacologic treatments (rifaximin and eluxadoline) and medical foods (IBgard® and EnteraGam®). Given the lack of a standard treatment algorithm for IBS-D and the emergence of new pharmacologic therapies, treatment needs to be tailored to the individual patient and take into account the severity of disease. In this context, the latter part of this manuscript examines how treatments for IBS-D can be used in clinical practice by presenting three patient case scenarios with varying degrees of IBS-D severity. For each case, the patient’s medical history and clinical presentation are related to the Rome Foundation multidimensional clinical profile (MDCP) and potential treatment options with current and emergent therapies are reviewed. The interplay of gastrointestinal symptoms and their psychosocial impact, as well as the importance of a patient-centered approach to therapy, are discussed. Consideration is given to the potential need for combination therapies and how emergent treatments could fit into the treatment pathway for mild, moderate, and severe cases of IBS-D in clinical practice. PMID:28203283

  13. Current and emerging treatment options for uveal melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Patricia Rusa; Odashiro, Alexandre Nakao; Lim, Li-Anne; Miyamoto, Cristina; Blanco, Paula L; Odashiro, Macanori; Maloney, Shawn; De Souza, Dominique F; Burnier, Miguel N

    2013-01-01

    Uveal melanoma (UM) is the most common primary malignant intraocular tumor in adults, with a 10-year cumulative metastatic rate of 34%. The most common site of metastasis is the liver (95%). Unfortunately, the current treatment of metastatic UM is limited by the lack of effective systemic therapy. Options for the management of the primary intraocular tumor include radical surgery as well as conservative treatments in order to preserve visual acuity. For metastatic disease, several approaches have been described with no standard method. Nevertheless, median survival after liver metastasis is poor, being around 4–6 months, with a 1-year survival of 10%–15%. In this review, the authors summarize current and promising new treatments for UM. PMID:24003303

  14. Current and emerging treatment options for Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome.

    PubMed

    Worth, Austen J J; Thrasher, Adrian J

    2015-01-01

    Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome is a life-threatening primary immunodeficiency associated with a bleeding tendency, eczema and a high incidence of autoimmunity and malignancy. Stem cell transplantation offers the opportunity of cure for all these complications, and over the past 35 years there has been a remarkable improvement in survival following this treatment. Here, we review advances in management of clinical complications pre- and post-transplant, as well as discuss the morbidity Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome patients experience following treatment. For patients with a poorly matched stem cell donor, recent gene therapy trials demonstrate encouraging results and the potential of low-toxicity therapy for all patients.

  15. Plastic surgery telehealth consultation expedites Emergency Department treatment.

    PubMed

    Paik, Angie M; Granick, Mark S; Scott, Sandra

    2017-02-01

    Plastic surgery is a field that is particularly amenable to a telehealth milieu, as visual exam and radiographs guide proper diagnosis and management. The goals of this study were to evaluate telehealth feedback executed through an iPad app for plastic surgery-related consultations. A Quality Assurance/Quality Improvement (QA/QI) study was conducted over a 1-month period during which patients with hand injuries, facial injuries, or acute wounds presenting to the Emergency Department (ED) of a level-one trauma centre and university hospital were monitored. The study utilized a commercial iPad application through which up to four images and a brief history could be sent to a remote Plastic Surgery Educator (PSE) for evaluation. The PSE would respond with best practice information, references and videos to assist ED point-of-care providers. During the 1-month period of this study, there were 42 ED consultations for plastic surgical conditions. There was a highly significant difference in overall mean response time between consultants and PSEs (48.3 minutes vs. 8.9 minutes respectively, p < 0.001). The agreement between PSEs and consultants regarding patient assessment and care was 85.7% for in-person consultations and 100% for phone consultations. In four cases of telephone consultations, the ED providers placed splints incorrectly on hand-injured patients. Our results show that telehealth consultations to a remote plastic surgeon based on digital images and a brief history were able to produce timely and accurate responses in an emergency care facility. This design may have significant impact in rural areas, underserved populations, or regions abroad.

  16. Emergency watershed treatments on burned lands in southwestern Oregon

    Treesearch

    Ed Gross; Ivars Steinblums; Curt Ralston; Howard Jubas

    1989-01-01

    Following extensive, natural wildfires on the Siskiyou National Forest in southwest Oregon during fall 1987, numerous rehabilitation measures were applied to severely burned public and private forest watersheds. Treatments were designed to prevent offsite degradation of water quality and fisheries, to minimize soil erosion and productivity losses, and to prevent...

  17. Emerging use of everolimus in the treatment of neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Gajate, Pablo; Martínez-Sáez, Olga; Alonso-Gordoa, Teresa; Grande, Enrique

    2017-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) consist of a diverse family of malignancies, which are derived from neuroendocrine cells, most commonly originating from the gastroenteropancreatic (GEP) tract or the bronchopulmonary system. In general, NETs are more indolent than epithelial tumors, with median survival rates of longer than 30 months. The upregulation of mTOR pathway has been shown to play a pivotal role in NET pathogenesis. Inhibition of mTOR protein with everolimus represents a progress in the treatment of advanced NETs. Everolimus has shown a significant improvement in progression-free survival (PFS) among patients with pancreatic NETs (pNETs) and nonfunctional GEP and lung NETs in the Phase III RAD001 in Advanced Neuroendocrine Tumors (RADIANT)-3 and RADIANT-4 studies, respectively. In addition, the combination of everolimus with octreotide showed a clinically significant improvement versus octreotide alone in functional NETs in the RADIANT-2 trial. These studies led to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and European Medical Agency (EMA) approval of everolimus. Safety profile of everolimus is generally acceptable. The most common adverse events are stomatitis, diarrhea, rash and fatigue. There is a growing range of novel treatment options in the setting of NETs, but there are no data comparing the activity of different treatment strategies. Thus, treatment decisions are based on different aspects, such as clinical course, patient symptomatology, primary tumor site, tumor functionality, rate of progression and burden of disease. Further research is required to clarify the treatment sequencing to achieve the maximum prolongation in survival and maintenance of quality of life. Future research should concentrate on identification of predictive biomarkers for benefit from different therapies, and studies should also include quality of life as an important measurement in this disease. PMID:28684922

  18. Odanacatib: an emerging novel treatment alternative for postmenopausal osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Thomas C; Valenzano, Jonathan P; Verzella, Jessica L; Umland, Elena M

    2015-11-01

    Odanacatib represents a novel treatment option in the approach of postmenopausal women. Postmenopausal women with osteoporosis experience a disturbance in bone remodeling wherein bone resorption exceeds bone formation. Cathepsin K is a lysosomal cysteine protease found primarily in osteoclasts that plays a major role in the breakdown of bone via its collagenase properties. Targeting a new area of pathophysiology, odanacatib inhibits cathepsin K to reduce bone resorption while preserving bone formation. Phase II and III trials have shown efficacy in increasing bone mineral density in the target treatment group. Overall, safety studies have found odanacatib to be well-tolerated and comparable to placebo; however, some imbalances in adverse events have been observed in the Phase III trials. Current and future studies will analyze the long-term ability of odanacatib in preventing bone fracture.

  19. Current and Emerging Therapeutic Options in Adrenocortical Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Stigliano, Antonio; Cerquetti, Lidia; Sampaoli, Camilla; Bucci, Barbara; Toscano, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is a very rare endocrine tumour, with variable prognosis, depending on tumour stage and time of diagnosis. The overall survival is five years from detection. Radical surgery is considered the therapy of choice in the first stages of ACC. However postoperative disease-free survival at 5 years is only around 30% and recurrence rates are frequent. o,p'DDD (ortho-, para'-, dichloro-, diphenyl-, dichloroethane, or mitotane), an adrenolytic drug with significant toxicity and unpredictable therapeutic response, is used in the treatment of ACC. Unfortunately, treatment for this aggressive cancer is still ineffective. Over the past years, the growing interest in ACC has contributed to the development of therapeutic strategies in order to contrast the neoplastic spread. In this paper we discuss the most promising therapies which can be used in this endocrine neoplasia. PMID:22934112

  20. Emerging treatments for overactive bladder: clinical potential of botulinum toxins.

    PubMed

    Tincello, Douglas G; Rashid, Tina; Revicky, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    Overactive bladder (OAB) is a symptom syndrome including urgency, frequency, and nocturia - with or without incontinence. It is a common manifestation of detrusor overactivity (DO). DO is a urodynamic observation of spontaneous or provoked contractions of the detrusor muscle is seen during the filling phase of the micturition cycle. OAB is, therefore, both a motor and sensory disorder. Botulinum toxin is a purified form of the neurotoxin from Clostridium botulinum and has been used in medicine for many years. Over the last 10 years, it has been used for the treatment of DO and OAB when standard treatments, such as bladder training and oral anticholinergic medication, have failed to provide symptom relief. Botulinum toxin acts by irreversibly preventing neurotransmitter release from the neurons in the motor end plate and also at sensory synapses, although the clinical effect is not permanent due to the growth of new connections within treated tissues. It is known that botulinum toxin modulates vanillioid, purinergic, capsaicin, and muscarinic receptor expression within the lamina propria, returning them to levels seen in normal bladders. Clinically, the effect of botulinum toxin on symptoms of OAB and DO is profound, with large effects upon the symptom of urgency, and also large effects on frequency, nocturia, leakage episodes, and continence rates. These effects have been seen consistently within eight randomized trials and numerous case series. Botulinum toxin appears safe, with the only common side effect being that of voiding difficulty, occurring in up to 10% of treated patients. Dosing regimens are variable, depending on which preparation is used, but it is clear that dose recommendations have fallen over the last 5 years. There is limited evidence about the efficacy of repeat treatments. Botulinum toxin is an effective and safe second-line treatment for patients with OAB and DO.

  1. 38 CFR 17.120 - Payment or reimbursement for emergency treatment furnished by non-VA providers to certain...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... for emergency treatment furnished by non-VA providers to certain veterans with service-connected... Payment or reimbursement for emergency treatment furnished by non-VA providers to certain veterans with... emergency treatment, not previously authorized, in a private or public (or Federal) hospital not operated by...

  2. Current and emerging treatment options in the management of lupus

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Natasha; D’Cruz, David

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex autoimmune disease with variable clinical manifestations. While the clearest guidelines for the treatment of SLE exist in the context of lupus nephritis, patients with other lupus manifestations such as neuropsychiatric, hematologic, musculoskeletal, and severe cutaneous lupus frequently require immunosuppression and/or biologic therapy. Conventional immunosuppressive agents such as mycophenolate mofetil, azathioprine, and cyclophosphamide are widely used in the management of SLE with current more rationalized treatment regimens optimizing the use of these agents while minimizing potential toxicity. The advent of biologic therapies has advanced the treatment of SLE particularly in patients with refractory disease. The CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab and the anti-BLyS agent belimumab are now widely in use in clinical practice. Several other biologic agents are in ongoing clinical trials. While immunosuppressive and biologic agents are the foundation of inflammatory disease control in SLE, the importance of managing comorbidities such as cardiovascular risk factors, bone health, and minimizing susceptibility to infection should not be neglected. PMID:27529058

  3. Current and emerging treatment options in the management of lupus.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Natasha; D'Cruz, David

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex autoimmune disease with variable clinical manifestations. While the clearest guidelines for the treatment of SLE exist in the context of lupus nephritis, patients with other lupus manifestations such as neuropsychiatric, hematologic, musculoskeletal, and severe cutaneous lupus frequently require immunosuppression and/or biologic therapy. Conventional immunosuppressive agents such as mycophenolate mofetil, azathioprine, and cyclophosphamide are widely used in the management of SLE with current more rationalized treatment regimens optimizing the use of these agents while minimizing potential toxicity. The advent of biologic therapies has advanced the treatment of SLE particularly in patients with refractory disease. The CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab and the anti-BLyS agent belimumab are now widely in use in clinical practice. Several other biologic agents are in ongoing clinical trials. While immunosuppressive and biologic agents are the foundation of inflammatory disease control in SLE, the importance of managing comorbidities such as cardiovascular risk factors, bone health, and minimizing susceptibility to infection should not be neglected.

  4. Emergence of ghrelin as a treatment for cachexia syndromes.

    PubMed

    DeBoer, Mark Daniel

    2008-09-01

    Cachexia is a constellation of symptoms that amount to body wasting in the setting of a variety of chronic illnesses, including cancer, heart failure, chronic kidney disease, and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Cachexia is particularly worrisome clinically because it is associated with a worsened prognosis of the underlying disease. Despite a large amount of study in this area, no single agent has been shown to have consistent efficacy in human trials. One promising class in this setting is ghrelin receptor agonists. Ghrelin binds to the growth hormone secretagogue-1a receptor in appetite-regulating centers in the brain, increasing expression of neuropeptide Y and agouti-related peptide during short-term treatment. Ghrelin has also been shown to have anti-inflammatory properties, which is significant, given that cachexia is thought to be produced at least partly by inflammation induced by the underlying disease. Animal studies have demonstrated efficacy using growth hormone secretagogue receptor agonists to treat cachexia caused by cancer, chemotherapy, and chronic kidney disease. Limited human trials using ghrelin or ghrelin receptor agonists in cancer and heart disease have shown improved appetite and body mass during treatment, although longer-term trials are needed to confirm sustained effects. Also uncertain--but an intriguing possibility--is whether the improved weight gain with ghrelin treatment might also lessen the severity of the underlying disease and improve outcomes.

  5. Current and emerging treatment options for hairy cell leukemia

    PubMed Central

    López-Rubio, Montserrat; Garcia-Marco, Jose Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Hairy cell leukemia (HCL) is a lymphoproliferative B-cell disorder characterized by pancytopenia, splenomegaly, and characteristic cytoplasmic hairy projections. Precise diagnosis is essential in order to differentiate classic forms from HCL variants, such as the HCL-variant and VH4-34 molecular variant, which are more resistant to available treatments. The current standard of care is treatment with purine analogs (PAs), such as cladribine or pentostatin, which provide a high rate of long-lasting clinical remissions. Nevertheless, ~30%–40% of the patients relapse, and moreover, some of these are difficult-to-treat refractory cases. The use of the monoclonal antibody rituximab in combination with PA appears to produce even higher responses, and it is often employed to minimize or eliminate residual disease. Currently, research in the field of HCL is focused on identifying novel therapeutic targets and potential agents that are safe and can universally cure the disease. The discovery of the BRAF mutation and progress in understanding the biology of the disease has enabled the scientific community to explore new therapeutic targets. Ongoing clinical trials are assessing various treatment strategies such as the combination of PA and anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies, recombinant immunotoxins targeting CD22, BRAF inhibitors, and B-cell receptor signal inhibitors. PMID:26316784

  6. Current trends in endodontic practice: emergency treatments and technological armamentarium.

    PubMed

    Lee, Michelle; Winkler, Johnathon; Hartwell, Gary; Stewart, Jeffrey; Caine, Rufus

    2009-01-01

    The current clinical practice of endodontics includes the utilization of a variety of new technological advances and materials. The last comprehensive survey that compared treatment modalities used in endodontic practices was conducted in 1990. The purpose of the current survey was to determine the frequency with which these new endodontic technologies and materials are being used in endodontic practices today. An e-mail questionnaire was sent to the 636 active diplomates of the American Board of Endodontics with current e-mail addresses. Two hundred thirty-two diplomates responded for a response rate of 35%. Calcium hydroxide was found to be the most frequently used intracanal medicament for all cases diagnosed with necrotic pulps. Ibuprofen was the most frequently prescribed medication for pain, and penicillin was the most frequently prescribed antibiotic when an active infection was present. Eighty-two percent of the respondents are still incorporating hand files in some fashion during the cleansing and shaping phase of treatment. Lateral condensation and continuous wave were the most common methods used for obturation. Digital radiography was reported as being used by 72.5% of the respondents, whereas 45.3% reported using the microscope greater than 75% of the patient treatment. Ultrasonics was used by 97.8% of the respondents. It appears from the results that new endodontic technology is currently being used in the endodontic offices of those who responded to the survey.

  7. Current and emerging treatments for the management of osteogenesis imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Monti, Elena; Mottes, Monica; Fraschini, Paolo; Brunelli, PierCarlo; Forlino, Antonella; Venturi, Giacomo; Doro, Francesco; Perlini, Silvia; Cavarzere, Paolo; Antoniazzi, Franco

    2010-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is the most common bone genetic disorder and it is characterized by bone brittleness and various degrees of growth disorder. Clinical severity varies widely; nowadays eight types are distinguished and two new forms have been recently described although not yet classified. The approach to such a variable and heterogeneous disease should be global and therefore multidisciplinary. For simplicity, the objectives of treatment can be reduced to three typical situations: the lethal perinatal form (type II), in which the problem is survival at birth; the severe and moderate forms (types III–IX), in which the objective is ‘autonomy’; and the mild form (type I), in which the aim is to reach ‘normal life’. Three types of treatment are available: non-surgical management (physical therapy, rehabilitation, bracing and splinting), surgical management (intramedullary rod positioning, spinal and basilar impression surgery) and medical-pharmacological management (drugs to increase the strength of bone and decrease the number of fractures as bisphosphonates or growth hormone, depending on the type of OI). Suggestions and guidelines for a therapeutic approach are indicated and updated with the most recent findings in OI diagnosis and treatment. PMID:20856683

  8. Emerging desalination technologies for water treatment: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Subramani, Arun; Jacangelo, Joseph G

    2015-05-15

    In this paper, a review of emerging desalination technologies is presented. Several technologies for desalination of municipal and industrial wastewater have been proposed and evaluated, but only certain technologies have been commercialized or are close to commercialization. This review consists of membrane-based, thermal-based and alternative technologies. Membranes based on incorporation of nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes or graphene-based ones show promise as innovative desalination technologies with superior performance in terms of water permeability and salt rejection. However, only nanocomposite membranes have been commercialized while others are still under fundamental developmental stages. Among the thermal-based technologies, membrane distillation and adsorption desalination show the most promise for enhanced performance with the availability of a waste heat source. Several alternative technologies have also been developed recently; those based on capacitive deionization have shown considerable improvements in their salt removal capacity and feed water recovery. In the same category, microbial desalination cells have been shown to desalinate high salinity water without any external energy source, but to date, scale up of the process has not been methodically evaluated. In this paper, advantages and drawbacks of each technology is discussed along with a comparison of performance, water quality and energy consumption. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Emerging pharmacologic treatment options for fragile X syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, Tori L; Davenport, Matthew H; Erickson, Craig A

    2015-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common single gene cause of intellectual disability and autism spectrum disorder. Caused by a silenced fragile X mental retardation 1 gene and the subsequent deficiency in fragile X mental retardation protein, patients with FXS experience a range of physical, behavioral, and intellectual debilitations. The FXS field, as a whole, has recently met with some challenges, as several targeted clinical trials with high expectations of success have failed to elucidate significant improvements in a variety of symptom domains. As new clinical trials in FXS are planned, there has been much discussion about the use of the commonly used clinical outcome measures, as well as study design considerations, patient stratification, and optimal age range for treatment. The evidence that modification of these drug targets and use of these failed compounds would prove to be efficacious in human clinical study were rooted in years of basic and translational research. There are questions arising as to the use of the mouse models for studying FXS treatment development. This issue is twofold: many of the symptom domains and molecular and biochemical changes assessed and indicative of efficacy in mouse model study are not easily amenable to clinical trials in people with FXS because of the intolerability of the testing paradigm or a lack of noninvasive techniques (prepulse inhibition, sensory hypersensitivity, startle reactivity, or electrophysiologic, biochemical, or structural changes in the brain); and capturing subtle yet meaningful changes in symptom domains such as sociability, anxiety, and hyperactivity in human FXS clinical trials is challenging with the currently used measures (typically parent/caregiver rating scales). Clinicians, researchers, and the pharmaceutical industry have all had to take a step back and critically evaluate the way we think about how to best optimize future investigations into pharmacologic FXS treatments. As new clinical

  10. Identification and assessment of site treatment plan implementation opportunities for emerging technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, E.A.

    1995-12-31

    The Department of Energy (DOE), in response to the 1992 Federal Facility Compliance Act, has prepared Site Treatment Plans (STP) for the approximately 2,000 waste streams identified within its mixed waste inventory Concurrently, emerging mixed waste treatment technologies are in final development. This paper defines a three-phase process to identify and assess implementation opportunities for these emerging technologies within the STP. It highlights the first phase, functional matching of expected treatment capabilities with proposed treatment requirements. Matches are based on treatment type, regulated contaminant and waste matrix type, for both capabilities and requirements. Results identify specific waste streams and volumes that could be treated by each emerging technology. A study for Plasma Hearth Process, Delphi DETOX{sup sm}, Supercritical Water Oxidation and Vitrification shows that about 200,000 ml of DOE`s mixed waste inventory can potentially be treated by one or more of these emerging technologies. Actual implementations are small fractions of the treatable inventory. Differences between potential and actual implementations must be minimized to accrue optimum benefit from implementation of emerging or alternative treatment technologies. Functional matching is the first phase in identifying and quantifying benefits, addressing technology system and treatment issues, and providing, in part, the basis for STP implementation decisions. DOE, through EM`s Office of Technology Development, has funded this work.

  11. Identifying the benefits and risks of emerging treatments for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Bridges, John F P; Paly, Victoria Federico; Barker, Elizabeth; Kervitsky, Dolly

    2015-02-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a rare, progressive, and fatal disease, with very few therapeutic options. Given a paucity of qualitative research to the perspective of patients and other stakeholders in IPF, we sought to identify issues associated with the benefits and risks of emerging treatments and other issues relevant to design of a survey for assessing patient preferences for IPF treatments. Semi-structured key informant interviews were conducted, predominately via telephone, with a range of stakeholder perspectives identified through partnership with a national advocacy organization using a combination of purposive and snowball sampling. Stakeholders were asked guiding questions related to emerging trends impacting IPF patients, likely benefits and risks of emerging treatments, and the outcomes most relevant to patients. Detailed and de-identified field notes were analyzed using interpretive phenomenological analysis (IPA), and a taxonomy of key themes was developed. A total of 20 interviews (participation rate 63%) were conducted with patients/advocates/caregivers (n = 7), providers/researchers (n = 8), and experts associated with policy/industry (n = 5). All interviewees expressed great hope with regards to emerging treatments. Three super-ordinate themes emerged: impact of emerging therapies (spanning the benefits, risks, and unintended consequences of emerging therapies); documenting the patient experience (spanning measuring patient-reported outcomes and quality of life and understanding the burden of disease); and coping with disease progression (including symptom mitigation, lung transplantation, and end-of-life considerations). In identifying issues associated with emerging IPF treatments, we demonstrate the value of qualitative research in understanding the views of diverse stakeholders and in providing a basis for future survey research. As such, qualitative methods should play an important role in understanding the benefits and

  12. Emergency management and treatment of the poisoned small animal patient.

    PubMed

    Lee, Justine A

    2013-07-01

    This article reviews management of the acutely poisoned veterinary patient, including initial telephone triage, appropriate communication and history gathering from the pet owner, decontamination methods (including the use of appropriate emetic agents and dosing of activated charcoal), and general treatment of the poisoned patient. Symptomatic and supportive care of the poisoned patient includes the use of fluid therapy, gastrointestinal support (eg, antacids), central nervous system support (eg, muscle relaxants, anticonvulsants), sedatives/reversal agents (eg, phenothiazines, naloxone, flumazenil), hepatoprotectants, and miscellaneous antidotal therapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Collagenase Clostridium histolyticum: emerging practice patterns and treatment advances.

    PubMed

    Warwick, David; Arandes-Renú, José M; Pajardi, Giorgio; Witthaut, Jörg; Hurst, Lawrence C

    2016-10-01

    This study aims to provide a comprehensive review of the role of Collagenase Clostridium histolyticum (CCH). This review is based on a literature review and practical experience. This review provides practical management strategies for using collagenase by sharing clinical experiences over the past few years; logistical aspects of in-clinic treatment, lessons learned, and novel approaches to correct traditionally hard-to-treat contractures are discussed. In addition a brief, yet comprehensive overview is provided on the pathophysiology of the disease, the mechanism of collagenase action and results of clinical studies. CCH has an evolving role as one of the tools available for treating Dupuytren's disease.

  14. Update on New and Emerging Treatments for Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Gopalakrishna, Ganesh; Ithman, Muaid H; Lauriello, John

    2016-06-01

    Although there has been more than 50 years of development, there remains a great need for better antipsychotic medications. This article looks at the recent advances in treatment of schizophrenia. New hypotheses have been suggested that may replace or complement the dopamine hypotheses. The article explores the different novel drugs that impact some of the key neurotransmitter systems currently. Phosphodiesterase 10A inhibitors and α-7 neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor modulators constitute the majority. The marketing of these medications eventually may result in change about how schizophrenia is treated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Emerging potential of exosomes for treatment of traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Ye; Mahmood, Asim; Chopp, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is one of the major causes of death and disability worldwide. No effective treatment has been identified from clinical trials. Compelling evidence exists that treatment with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) exerts a substantial therapeutic effect after experimental brain injury. In addition to their soluble factors, therapeutic effects of MSCs may be attributed to their generation and release of exosomes. Exosomes are endosomal origin small-membrane nano-sized vesicles generated by almost all cell types. Exosomes play a pivotal role in intercellular communication. Intravenous delivery of MSC-derived exosomes improves functional recovery and promotes neuroplasticity in rats after TBI. Therapeutic effects of exosomes derive from the exosome content, especially microRNAs (miRNAs). miRNAs are small non-coding regulatory RNAs and play an important role in posttranscriptional regulation of genes. Compared with their parent cells, exosomes are more stable and can cross the blood-brain barrier. They have reduced the safety risks inherent in administering viable cells such as the risk of occlusion in microvasculature or unregulated growth of transplanted cells. Developing a cell-free exosome-based therapy may open up a novel approach to enhancing multifaceted aspects of neuroplasticity and to amplifying neurological recovery, potentially for a variety of neural injuries and neurodegenerative diseases. This review discusses the most recent knowledge of exosome therapies for TBI, their associated challenges and opportunities. PMID:28250732

  16. Chemophototherapy: An Emerging Treatment Option for Solid Tumors.

    PubMed

    Luo, Dandan; Carter, Kevin A; Miranda, Dyego; Lovell, Jonathan F

    2017-01-01

    Near infrared (NIR) light penetrates human tissues with limited depth, thereby providing a method to safely deliver non-ionizing radiation to well-defined target tissue volumes. Light-based therapies including photodynamic therapy (PDT) and laser-induced thermal therapy have been validated clinically for curative and palliative treatment of solid tumors. However, these monotherapies can suffer from incomplete tumor killing and have not displaced existing ablative modalities. The combination of phototherapy and chemotherapy (chemophototherapy, CPT), when carefully planned, has been shown to be an effective tumor treatment option preclinically and clinically. Chemotherapy can enhance the efficacy of PDT by targeting surviving cancer cells or by inhibiting regrowth of damaged tumor blood vessels. Alternatively, PDT-mediated vascular permeabilization has been shown to enhance the deposition of nanoparticulate drugs into tumors for enhanced accumulation and efficacy. Integrated nanoparticles have been reported that combine photosensitizers and drugs into a single agent. More recently, light-activated nanoparticles have been developed that release their payload in response to light irradiation to achieve improved drug bioavailability with superior efficacy. CPT can potently eradicate tumors with precise spatial control, and further clinical testing is warranted.

  17. Clostridium difficile infection: current, forgotten and emerging treatment options.

    PubMed

    Drekonja, Dimitri M

    2014-09-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has increased in incidence and severity, and is now among the most common nosocomial infections. Several agents are available for the initial treatment of CDI, some of which are rarely used, and none of which is clearly superior for initial clinical cure. Fidaxomicin appears to offer a benefit in terms of preventing recurrent disease, although the cost-benefit ratio is debated. Recurrent CDI is a major challenge, occurring after 15-30% of initial episodes. The treatment of recurrent CDI is difficult, with sparse evidence available to support any particular agent. Fecal microbiota therapy, also known as 'stool transplantation', appears to be highly effective, although availability is currently limited, and the regulatory environment is in flux. Synthetic stool products and an orally available fecal microbiota therapy product are both under investigation, which may address the problem of availability. As with most infectious diseases, an effective vaccine would be a welcome addition to our armamentarium, but none is currently available.

  18. Chemophototherapy: An Emerging Treatment Option for Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Dandan; Carter, Kevin A.; Miranda, Dyego

    2016-01-01

    Near infrared (NIR) light penetrates human tissues with limited depth, thereby providing a method to safely deliver non‐ionizing radiation to well‐defined target tissue volumes. Light‐based therapies including photodynamic therapy (PDT) and laser‐induced thermal therapy have been validated clinically for curative and palliative treatment of solid tumors. However, these monotherapies can suffer from incomplete tumor killing and have not displaced existing ablative modalities. The combination of phototherapy and chemotherapy (chemophototherapy, CPT), when carefully planned, has been shown to be an effective tumor treatment option preclinically and clinically. Chemotherapy can enhance the efficacy of PDT by targeting surviving cancer cells or by inhibiting regrowth of damaged tumor blood vessels. Alternatively, PDT‐mediated vascular permeabilization has been shown to enhance the deposition of nanoparticulate drugs into tumors for enhanced accumulation and efficacy. Integrated nanoparticles have been reported that combine photosensitizers and drugs into a single agent. More recently, light‐activated nanoparticles have been developed that release their payload in response to light irradiation to achieve improved drug bioavailability with superior efficacy. CPT can potently eradicate tumors with precise spatial control, and further clinical testing is warranted. PMID:28105389

  19. New and Emerging Treatment Options for Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lacy, Brian E.; Chey, William D.; Lembo, Anthony J.

    2015-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional gastrointestinal disorder associated with abdominal pain, diarrhea, constipation, or a mix of symptoms. The pathophysiology of IBS is not completely understood but appears to involve genetics, the gut microbiome, immune activation, altered intestinal permeability, and brain-gut interactions. There is no gold standard for diagnosis. Several sets of symptom-based guidelines exist. Treatment strategies for IBS may include both nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic approaches. Lifestyle modifications that aim to improve exercise, sleep, diet, and stress may be warranted. Recent data suggest that a gluten-free diet and a diet low in fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides, and polyols (FODMAPs) may benefit some patients. For patients with diarrhea-predominant IBS, treatment options include the synthetic peripheral μ-opioid receptor agonist loperamide, antispasmodic agents, antidepressants, serotonin 5-HT3 antagonists, and the gut-specific antibiotic rifaximin. Ongoing research is evaluating the use of probiotics. For patients with constipation-predominant IBS, therapeutic strategies may include dietary fiber, laxatives, and the prosecretory agents lubiprostone and linaclotide. Research is continuing to optimize the use of available agents and evaluating new approaches to further improve the care of patients with IBS. PMID:26491416

  20. Canthal cutdown for emergent treatment of orbital compartment syndrome.

    PubMed

    Strand, Andrew T; Czyz, Craig N; Gibson, Amanda

    2017-08-16

    This article evaluates the use of a "canthal cutdown" technique in orbital compartment syndrome in a cadaveric model. Twelve cadaver orbits were used to simulate orbital compartment syndrome using a blood analog solution. Two pressure probes, in different orbital locations, were used to monitor orbital pressure. Pressure was monitored during successive procedures: canthotomy, cantholysis, and canthal cutdown. Orbits were then re-injected with solution, simulating an active orbital hemorrhage, and pressure measurements were recorded over a 10-minute duration. No statistically significant difference was found between the two orbital pressure monitoring devices at each measurement point (p = 0.99). Significant pressure reductions, for both probes, were observed after canthal cutdown compared to initial measurement after injection of 20 mL blood analog (p < 0.001 and p = 0.005). When comparing the orbital pressure following canthotomy and inferior cantholysis versus canthal cutdown, the cutdown procedure provided an additional 74% in orbital pressure reduction (p =0.01). After re-injection of 10 mL of solution and 10 minutes of egress, pressure returned to baseline (probe 1: baseline 7 mm Hg vs. post-cutdown at 10 minutes 7 mm Hg; p = 0.83; and probe 2: 5 mm Hg vs. 5 mm Hg; p = 0.83). The canthal cutdown technique provides further reduction in orbital pressure versus canthotomy and cantholysis alone. The technique may be effective for treatment of static orbital compartment syndrome and temporizing treatment of compartment syndrome from active orbital hemorrhages.

  1. Short dental implants: an emerging concept in implant treatment.

    PubMed

    Al-Hashedi, Ashwaq Ali; Taiyeb Ali, Tara Bai; Yunus, Norsiah

    2014-06-01

    Short implants have been advocated as a treatment option in many clinical situations where the use of conventional implants is limited. This review outlines the effectiveness and clinical outcomes of using short implants as a valid treatment option in the rehabilitation of edentulous atrophic alveolar ridges. Initially, an electronic search was performed on the following databases: Medline, PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and DARE using key words from January 1990 until May 2012. An additional hand search was included for the relevant articles in the following journals: International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Implants, Clinical Oral Implants Research, Journal of Clinical Periodontology, International Journal of Periodontics, Journal of Periodontology, and Clinical Implant Dentistry and Related Research. Any relevant papers from the journals' references were hand searched. Articles were included if they provided detailed data on implant length, reported survival rates, mentioned measures for implant failure, were in the English language, involved human subjects, and researched implants inserted in healed atrophic ridges with a follow-up period of at least 1 year after implant-prosthesis loading. Short implants demonstrated a high rate of success in the replacement of missing teeth in especially atrophic alveolar ridges. The advanced technology and improvement of the implant surfaces have encouraged the success of short implants to a comparable level to that of standard implants. However, further randomized controlled clinical trials and prospective studies with longer follow-up periods are needed.

  2. Emerging drugs for the treatment of wound healing.

    PubMed

    Zielins, Elizabeth R; Brett, Elizabeth A; Luan, Anna; Hu, Michael S; Walmsley, Graham G; Paik, Kevin; Senarath-Yapa, Kshemendra; Atashroo, David A; Wearda, Taylor; Lorenz, H Peter; Wan, Derrick C; Longaker, Michael T

    2015-06-01

    Wound healing can be characterized as underhealing, as in the setting of chronic wounds, or overhealing, occurring with hypertrophic scar formation after burn injury. Topical therapies targeting specific biochemical and molecular pathways represent a promising avenue for improving and, in some cases normalizing, the healing process. A brief overview of both normal and pathological wound healing has been provided, along with a review of the current clinical guidelines and treatment modalities for chronic wounds, burn wounds and scar formation. Next, the major avenues for wound healing drugs, along with drugs currently in development, are discussed. Finally, potential challenges to further drug development, and future research directions are discussed. The large body of research concerning wound healing pathophysiology has provided multiple targets for topical therapies. Growth factor therapies with the ability to be targeted for localized release in the wound microenvironment are most promising, particularly when they modulate processes in the proliferative phase of wound healing.

  3. Collagenase Clostridium histolyticum : emerging practice patterns and treatment advances

    PubMed Central

    Warwick, David; Arandes-Renú, José M.; Pajardi, Giorgio; Witthaut, Jörg; Hurst, Lawrence C.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: This study aims to provide a comprehensive review of the role of Collagenase Clostridium histolyticum (CCH). Methods: This review is based on a literature review and practical experience. Results: This review provides practical management strategies for using collagenase by sharing clinical experiences over the past few years; logistical aspects of in-clinic treatment, lessons learned, and novel approaches to correct traditionally hard-to-treat contractures are discussed. In addition a brief, yet comprehensive overview is provided on the pathophysiology of the disease, the mechanism of collagenase action and results of clinical studies. Conclusion: CCH has an evolving role as one of the tools available for treating Dupuytren's disease. PMID:27050718

  4. Mucopolysaccharidosis type III (Sanfilippo Syndrome): emerging treatment strategies.

    PubMed

    de Ruijter, J; Valstar, M J; Wijburg, F A

    2011-06-01

    Mucopolysaccharosis III (MPS III) is a lysosomal storage disorder and belongs to the group of mucopolysaccharidoses. MPS III is caused by a deficiency of one of the four enzymes catalyzing the degradation of the glycosaminoglycan heparan sulfate. MPS III is clinically characterized by progressive dementia with distinct behavioral disturbances and relatively mild somatic disease. This review will summarize and discuss the available and potential future therapeutic options for patients with MPS III. This includes enzyme replacement therapy (ERT), hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), substrate reduction therapy (SRT), chaperone-mediated therapy, and gene therapy. Although clinical efficacy has not yet been fully demonstrated for any of these therapies, it is likely that future developments will lead to disease-modifying treatment for this devastating disease.

  5. Emergency treatment options for pediatric traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Exo, J; Smith, C; Smith, R; Bell, MJ

    2010-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury is a leading killer of children and is a major public health problem around the world. Using general principles of neurocritical care, various treatment strategies have been developed to attempt to restore homeostasis to the brain and allow brain healing, including mechanical factors, cerebrospinal fluid diversion, hyperventilation, hyperosmolar therapies, barbiturates and hypothermia. Careful application of these therapies, normally in a step-wise fashion as intracranial injuries evolve, is necessary in order to attain maximal neurological outcome for these children. It is hopeful that new therapies, such as early hypothermia or others currently in preclinical trials, will ultimately improve outcome and quality of life for children after traumatic brain injury. PMID:20191093

  6. The prevention and regression of atherosclerotic plaques: emerging treatments

    PubMed Central

    Kalanuria, Atul Ashok; Nyquist, Paul; Ling, Geoffrey

    2012-01-01

    Occlusive vascular diseases, such as sudden coronary syndromes, stroke, and peripheral arterial disease, are a huge burden on the health care systems of developed and developing countries. Tremendous advances have been made over the last few decades in the diagnosis and treatment of atherosclerotic diseases. Intravascular ultrasound has been able to provide detailed information of plaque anatomy and has been used in several studies to assess outcomes. The presence of atherosclerosis disrupts the normal protective mechanism provided by the endothelium and this mechanism has been implicated in the pathophysiology of coronary artery disease and stroke. Efforts are being put into the prevention of atherosclerosis, which has been shown to begin in childhood. This paper reviews the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis and discusses the current options available for the prevention and reversal of plaque formation. PMID:23049260

  7. Emerging treatments in type 2 diabetes: focus on canagliflozin

    PubMed Central

    Rosiak, Marek; Grzeszczak, Susanna; Kosior, Dariusz A; Postuła, Marek

    2014-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a prevalent metabolic disorder, which affects more than 300 million people globally. The common effect of uncontrolled diabetes is the state of hyperglycemia, which results from beta-cell dysfunction as well as insulin resistance, which is accompanied with microvascular and macrovascular complications. As hyperglycemia defines diabetes, glycemic control is fundamental to the management of diabetes. Sodium glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitors (SGLT2) are a new group of oral antidiabetic medications that act by blocking the reabsorption of glucose, causing it to be excreted in the urine. Canagliflozin was the first SGLT2 inhibitor to be approved in the US by the Food and Drug Administration for the treatment and control of T2DM and on September 19, 2013, the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use of the European Medicines Agency adopted a positive opinion, recommending the granting of a marketing authorization for the medicinal product Invokana®. Canagliflozin is a SGLT2 inhibitor, which acts upon the proximal tubules of the kidneys and reduces the renal threshold for glucose. It is highly selective, binding 250 times more potently to SGLT2 than sodium glucose co-transporter 1 inhibitor. This action allows a higher amount of glucose to be excreted within the urine, causing the patient’s plasma glucose level to be decreased and indirectly causing weight loss. Among the most common adverse events are hypoglycemia, headache, nausea, female genital and urinary tract infections, nasopharyngitis, and transient postural dizziness. Given its high efficacy in reducing hyperglycemia and good safety profile as either monotherapy or an add-on treatment to metformin, sulfonylureas, or insulin, canagliflozin seems to be a promising antihyperglycemic drug. Nevertheless, further large-scale and long-term studies should be conducted to evaluate the impact of canagliflozin on cardiovascular risk in T2DM patients. PMID:25187722

  8. 42 CFR 483.372 - Medical treatment for injuries resulting from an emergency safety intervention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Psychiatric Residential Treatment Facilities Providing Inpatient Psychiatric Services for Individuals Under Age 21 § 483.372 Medical treatment for injuries resulting from an emergency safety intervention. (a... participation under the Medicaid program that reasonably ensure that— (1) A resident will be transferred from...

  9. 42 CFR 483.372 - Medical treatment for injuries resulting from an emergency safety intervention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Psychiatric Residential Treatment Facilities Providing Inpatient Psychiatric Services for Individuals Under Age 21 § 483.372 Medical treatment for injuries resulting from an emergency safety intervention. (a... participation under the Medicaid program that reasonably ensure that— (1) A resident will be transferred from...

  10. 42 CFR 483.372 - Medical treatment for injuries resulting from an emergency safety intervention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Psychiatric Residential Treatment Facilities Providing Inpatient Psychiatric Services for Individuals Under Age 21 § 483.372 Medical treatment for injuries resulting from an emergency safety intervention. (a... participation under the Medicaid program that reasonably ensure that— (1) A resident will be transferred from...

  11. 42 CFR 483.372 - Medical treatment for injuries resulting from an emergency safety intervention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Psychiatric Residential Treatment Facilities Providing Inpatient Psychiatric Services for Individuals Under Age 21 § 483.372 Medical treatment for injuries resulting from an emergency safety intervention. (a... participation under the Medicaid program that reasonably ensure that— (1) A resident will be transferred from...

  12. 42 CFR 483.372 - Medical treatment for injuries resulting from an emergency safety intervention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Psychiatric Residential Treatment Facilities Providing Inpatient Psychiatric Services for Individuals Under Age 21 § 483.372 Medical treatment for injuries resulting from an emergency safety intervention. (a... participation under the Medicaid program that reasonably ensure that— (1) A resident will be transferred from...

  13. Factors Governing the Emergence of Resistance to Nalidixic Acid in Treatment of Urinary Tract Infection

    PubMed Central

    Greenwood, David; O'Grady, Francis

    1977-01-01

    Cultures of Escherichia coli were exposed to nalidixic acid in an in vitro model in which the conditions of drug-organism interaction resembled those of bacterial cystitis treatment. Results obtained in this way suggested that emergence of bacterial resistance should not be a major problem in treatment of uncomplicated urinary infection; such cases might indeed respond to a less intensive course of treatment than is usual. More prolonged, high-dosage therapy with nalidixic acid may be required for patients with more complicated infections if the risk of failure from the emergence of bacterial resistance is to be minimized. PMID:337890

  14. Emerging Drugs for the Treatment of Diabetic Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Tecilazich, Francesco; Dinh, Thanh L.; Veves, Aristidis

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Diabetic ulcers are chronic non-healing ulcerations that despite the available medical tools still result in high amputation rates. Growing evidence suggests that alteration of the biochemical milieu of the chronic wound plays a significant role in diabetic wound healing impairment. Areas covered The basic pathophysiology and the conventional treatment strategy of diabetic foot ulcers have been reviewed in the first section. In the second part we describe the most up-to-date bench and translational research in the field. The third section focuses on the drugs currently under development and the ongoing clinical trials evaluating their safety and efficacy. Finally, we analyze the major drug development issues and the possible scientific approaches to overcome them. Expert opinion Significant strides in understanding the chronic wound development have led to the development of topical therapies to address aberrant expression of growth factors and overexpression of inflammatory cytokines. Current research in our lab suggests that in while decreased growth factor expression occurs at the local wound level, increased systemic serum levels of growth factors suggest growth factor resistance. PMID:23687931

  15. Emerging treatments for noise-induced hearing loss

    PubMed Central

    Oishi, Naoki; Schacht, Jochen

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Approximately 5% of the population worldwide suffer from industrial, military, or recreational noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) at great economic cost and detriment to the quality of life of affected individuals. This review discusses pharmacological strategies to attenuate NIHL that have been developed in animal models and that are now beginning to be tested in field trials. Areas covered The review describes the epidemiology, pathology and pathophysiology of NIHL in experimental animals and human. The underlying molecular mechanisms of damage are then discussed as a basis for therapeutic approaches to ameliorate the loss of auditory function. Finally, studies in military, industrial, and recreational settings are evaluated. Literature was searched employing the terms “noise-induced hearing loss” and “noise trauma”. Expert opinion NIHL, in principle, can be prevented. With the current pace of development, oral drugs to protect against NIHL should be available within the next 5 to 10 years. Positive results from ongoing trials combined with additional laboratory tests might accelerate the time from the bench to clinical treatment. PMID:21247358

  16. Emerging surgical therapies in the treatment of pediatric epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Karsy, Michael; Guan, Jian; Ducis, Katrina

    2016-01-01

    In the approximately 1% of children affected by epilepsy, pharmacoresistance and early age of seizure onset are strongly correlated with poor cognitive outcomes, depression, anxiety, developmental delay, and impaired activities of daily living. These children often require multiple surgical procedures, including invasive diagnostic procedures with intracranial electrodes to identify the seizure-onset zone. The recent development of minimally invasive surgical techniques, including stereotactic electroencephalography (SEEG) and MRI-guided laser interstitial thermal therapy (MRgLITT), and new applications of neurostimulation, such as responsive neurostimulation (RNS), are quickly changing the landscape of the surgical management of pediatric epilepsy. In this review, the authors discuss these various technologies, their current applications, and limitations in the treatment of pediatric drug-resistant epilepsy, as well as areas for future research. The development of minimally invasive diagnostic and ablative surgical techniques together with new paradigms in neurostimulation hold vast potential to improve the efficacy and reduce the morbidity of the surgical management of children with drug-resistant epilepsy. PMID:27186523

  17. [Emergency fiberoptic bronchoscopy for diagnostics and treatment of lung atelectasis].

    PubMed

    Mironov, A V; Pinchuk, T P; Selina, I E; Kosolapov, D A

    2013-01-01

    The article deals with results of fiberoptic bronchoscopy using during treating of patients suffering atelectasis. According to the research atelectasis is likely to advance in the first three days after serious patients have been admitted to the intensive therapy unit or after operative treatment. Left-sided atelectasis is half as widespread again the right-sided one. The research highlights the effectiveness of atelectasis X-ray diagnosis. Fiberoptic bronchoscopy in almost all the cases allowed diagnosing the degree of tracheobronchial tree obstruction and its causes. Single suction fiberoptic bronchoscopy leads to normalization and encouraged positive dynamics in 76% of all the cases (57 patients). Repeated endoscopic sanation in the first two days was necessary for 25 patients (25.3%) with unresolved or reoccurring atelectasis. The effectiveness of second research was to 84%. It's important to add that mostly patients with serious chest injury were subjected to unresolved or reoccurring atelectasis. And mainly in these cases blood was seen through the tracheobronchial tree lumen.

  18. Alzheimers disease: review of emerging treatment role for intravenous immunoglobulins.

    PubMed

    Kayed, Rakez; Jackson, George R; Estes, D Mark; Barrett, Alan D T

    2011-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disorder. Currently available therapies are symptomatic but do not alter underlying disease progression. Immunotherapeutic approaches such as anti Aβ peptide active vaccination trials have had limited success to date. Intravenous immunoblobulin (IVIg) is widely used in immune-mediated neurological disorders such myasthenia gravis and Guillain-Barre syndrome. These preparations have been obtained from the pooled plasma of healthy human donors and contain natural anti-amyloid antibodies and are well tolerated. A small pilot study of passive immunotherapy using IVIg has suggested cognitive improvement. A multicenter phase III trial is ongoing and will determine whether or not this treatment can ameliorate cognitive deficits in mild-to-moderate AD. Here, we briefly review the pathogenic role of amyloid and tau in AD, as well as immunotherapeutic efforts to date. We also summarize what is known about naturally occurring anti-Aβ and tau antibodies in IVIg with a view toward explaining potential mechanisms underlying their therapeutic effects.

  19. Emerging treatments for severe obesity in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Coles, Nicole; Birken, Catherine; Hamilton, Jill

    2016-09-29

    Severe obesity in childhood is increasing in prevalence and is associated with considerable morbidity. Studies into pediatric obesity have focused largely on interventions that do not necessarily target the unique biologic or psychological underpinnings for the weight gain in the individual child or adolescent. Outcomes show modest improvement and are of questionable benefit for patients with severe obesity. Although weight is a commonly used outcome, other psychological and metabolic parameters including normalization of physical activity and eating behaviors should be primary outcome goals. The durability of weight loss is often limited by physiologic systems that are evolutionarily designed to promote weight gain. Drug therapies for children are limited, as is their effect on weight and metabolism. Existing drugs that are incidentally found to cause weight loss through off-target effects are being actively investigated for obesity indications. Bariatric surgery results in the most significant weight reduction, but it is associated with potential morbidity and long term data are not available for adolescents undergoing this procedure. As understanding of the biologic and psychosocial contributors to eating behaviors and body weight regulation increases, multifaceted and targeted behavioral, pharmacological, and surgical treatment algorithms should be developed and applied to target the underlying pathways involved for the individual child or adolescent with severe obesity.

  20. Emerging treatments for ulcerative colitis: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Kokkinidis, Damianos G; Bosdelekidou, Eftychia E; Iliopoulou, Sotiria Maria; Tassos, Alexandros G; Texakalidis, Pavlos T; Economopoulos, Konstantinos P; Kousoulis, Antonis A

    2017-09-01

    Various investigational medicinal products have been developed for ulcerative colitis (UC). Our aim was to systematically evaluate novel pharmacological therapeutic agents for the treatment of UC. Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) recommendations were followed. A search of the medical literature was conducted in the MEDLINE database for original research papers published between 01 January 2010 and 31 October 2014. Twenty one studies, including 11,524 adults were analyzed. Thirteen different novel therapeutic drug options were identified. Vedolizumab and golimumab were superior to placebo as induction and maintenance therapy. Tofacitinib showed dose related efficacy for induction therapy. Etrolizumab showed higher clinical remission rates compared to placebo. Phosphatidylcholine led to an improved clinical activity index. HMPL-004 may become a mesalamine alternative for mild to moderate UC. PF00547,659 was well tolerated. Statins were not beneficial for acute exacerbations of UC. Abatacept, rituximab and visilizumab did not lead to improved outcomes compared to placebo. Higher concentration of BMS 936557 was associated with improved efficacy compared to placebo. Basiliximab did not enhance corticosteroid efficacy. Patients with UC might achieve clinical response or remission by utilizing some of these agents with a favorable side effect profile. Further studies are needed to evaluate their short- and long-term efficacy and safety.

  1. Current and Emerging Drug Treatments for Binge Eating Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Reas, Deborah L.; Grilo, Carlos M.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction This study evaluated controlled treatment studies of pharmacotherapy for binge eating disorder (BED). Areas Covered The primary focus of the review was on phase II and III controlled trials testing medications for BED. A total of 46 studies were considered and 26 were reviewed in detail. BED outcomes included binge-eating remission, binge-eating frequency, associated eating-disorder psychopathology, associated depression, and weight loss. Expert Opinion Data from controlled trials suggests that certain medications are superior to placebo for stopping binge-eating and for producing faster reductions in binge eating, and - to varying degrees - for reducing associated eating-disorder psychopathology, depression, and weight loss over the short-term. Almost no data exist regarding longer-term effects of medication for BED. Except for topiramate, which reduces both binge eating and weight, weight loss is minimal with medications tested for BED. Psychological interventions and the combination of medication with psychological interventions produce binge-eating outcomes that are superior to medication-only approaches. Combining medications with psychological interventions does not significantly enhance binge-eating outcomes, although the addition of certain medications enhances weight losses achieved with cognitive-behavioral therapy and behavioral weight loss, albeit modestly. PMID:24460483

  2. Is every intussusception treatment an emergency intervention or surgery?

    PubMed

    Güney, Lütfi Hakan; Fakıoğlu, Ender; Acer, Tuğba; Ötgün, İbrahim; Arslan, Esra Elif; Sağnak Akıllı, Müge; Hiçsönmez, Akgün

    2016-03-01

    Intussusception is the second most common cause of acute abdomen in children, following appendicitis. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the experience of the authors, in an effort to promote intussusception management, especially that of small bowel intussusception. Records of intussusception diagnosed between July 2002 and September 2014 were evaluated in terms of patient age, sex, clinical findings, admission time, ultrasonographic findings, treatment methods, and outcomes. Eighty-one patients, 52 males and 29 females, were included (mean age: 10.6 months). Intussusceptions were ileocolic (IC) in 52 cases, ileoileal (IL) in 26, and jejunojejunal (JJ) in 3. Nineteen (23.5%) patients underwent surgery. Hydrostatic reduction was performed in 45 (55.5%) IC cases. Seventeen (21%) patients with small bowel intussusceptions (SBIs), measuring 1.8-2.3 cm in length, spontaneously reduced. All patients who underwent surgery had intussusceptums ≥4 cm. Three of the 4 intestinal resection cases had history of abdominal surgery. If peritoneal irritation is present, patients with intussusception must undergo surgery. Otherwise, in patients with IC intussusception and no sign of peritoneal irritation, hydrostatic or pneumatic reduction is indicated. When this fails, surgery is the next step. SBIs free of peritoneal irritation and shorter than 2.3 cm tend to spontaneously reduce. For those longer than 4 cm, particularly in patients with history of abdominal surgery, spontaneous reduction is unlikely.

  3. Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis: emerging targeted therapies to optimize treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Milic, Sandra; Mikolasevic, Ivana; Krznaric-Zrnic, Irena; Stanic, Marija; Poropat, Goran; Stimac, Davor; Vlahovic-Palcevski, Vera; Orlic, Lidija

    2015-01-01

    Diet and lifestyle changes have led to worldwide increases in the prevalences of obesity and metabolic syndrome, resulting in substantially greater incidence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). NAFLD is considered a hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome and is related to diabetes, insulin resistance, central obesity, hyperlipidemia, and hypertension. Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is an entity that describes liver inflammation due to NAFLD. Growing evidence suggests that NAFLD is a multisystem disease with a clinical burden that is not only confined to liver-related morbidity and mortality, but that also affects several extra-hepatic organs and regulatory pathways. Thus, NAFLD is considered an important public health issue, but there is currently no effective therapy for all NAFLD patients in the general population. Studies seeking optimal therapy for NAFLD and NASH have not yet led to development of a universal protocol for treating this growing problem. Several pharmacological agents have been studied in an effort to improve insulin resistance and the proinflammatory mediators that may be responsible for NASH progression. Cardiovascular risk factors are highly prevalent among NASH patients, and the backbone of treatment regimens for these patients still comprises general lifestyle interventions, including dietary changes and increased physical activity. Vitamin E and thiazolidinedione derivatives are currently the most evidence-based therapeutic options, but only limited clinical evidence is available regarding their long-term efficacy and safety. Vitamin D and renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system blockers are promising drugs that are currently being intensively investigated for use in NAFLD/NASH patients. PMID:26316717

  4. Biomimetic nanocrystalline apatites: Emerging perspectives in cancer diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Al-Kattan, Ahmed; Girod-Fullana, Sophie; Charvillat, Cédric; Ternet-Fontebasso, Hélène; Dufour, Pascal; Dexpert-Ghys, Jeannette; Santran, Véronique; Bordère, Julie; Pipy, Bernard; Bernad, José; Drouet, Christophe

    2012-02-14

    Nanocrystalline calcium phosphate apatites constitute the mineral part of hard tissues, and the synthesis of biomimetic analogs is now well-mastered at the lab-scale. Recent advances in the fine physico-chemical characterization of these phases enable one to envision original applications in the medical field along with a better understanding of the underlying chemistry and related pharmacological features. In this contribution, we specifically focused on applications of biomimetic apatites in the field of cancer diagnosis or treatment. We first report on the production and first biological evaluations (cytotoxicity, pro-inflammatory potential, internalization by ZR-75-1 breast cancer cells) of individualized luminescent nanoparticles based on Eu-doped apatites, eventually associated with folic acid, for medical imaging purposes. We then detail, in a first approach, the preparation of tridimensional constructs associating nanocrystalline apatite aqueous gels and drug-loaded pectin microspheres. Sustained releases of a fluorescein analog (erythrosin) used as model molecule were obtained over 7 days, in comparison with the ceramic or microsphere reference compounds. Such systems could constitute original bone-filling materials for in situ delivery of anticancer drugs.

  5. Emergency treatment of a snake bite: Pearls from literature

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Syed Moied; Ahmed, Mohib; Nadeem, Abu; Mahajan, Jyotsna; Choudhary, Adarash; Pal, Jyotishka

    2008-01-01

    Snake bite is a well-known occupational hazard amongst farmers, plantation workers, and other outdoor workers and results in much morbidity and mortality throughout the world. This occupational hazard is no more an issue restricted to a particular part of the world; it has become a global issue. Accurate statistics of the incidence of snakebite and its morbidity and mortality throughout the world does not exist; however, it is certain to be higher than what is reported. This is because even today most of the victims initially approach traditional healers for treatment and many are not even registered in the hospital. Hence, registering such patients is an important goal if we are to have accurate statistics and reduce the morbidity and mortality due to snakebite. World Health Organization/South East Asian Region Organisation (WHO/SEARO) has published guidelines, specific for the South East Asian region, for the clinical management of snakebites. The same guidelines may be applied for managing snakebite patients in other parts of the world also, since no other professional body has come up with any other evidence-based guidelines. In this article we highlight the incidence and clinical features of different types of snakebite and the management guidelines as per the WHO/SEARO recommendation. PMID:19561988

  6. Pancreatic cancer: optimizing treatment options, new, and emerging targeted therapies.

    PubMed

    Chiorean, Elena Gabriela; Coveler, Andrew L

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the US and is expected to become the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the next decade. Despite 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin with irinotecan and oxaliplatin (FOLFIRINOX) and gemcitabine/nab-paclitaxel significantly improving outcomes for metastatic cancer, refractory disease still poses significant challenges. Difficulties with early detection and the inherent chemo- and radio-resistant nature of this malignancy led to attempts to define the sequential biology of pancreatic cancer in order to improve survival outcomes. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is characterized by several germline or acquired genetic mutations, the most common being KRAS (90%), CDK2NA (90%), TP53 (75%-90%), DPC4/SMAD4 (50%). In addition, the tumor microenvironment, chemoresistant cancer stem cells, and the desmoplastic stroma have been the target of some promising clinical investigations. Among the core pathways reproducibly shown to lead the development and progression of this disease, DNA repair, apoptosis, G1/S cell cycle transition, KRAS, Wnt, Notch, Hedgehog, TGF-beta, and other cell invasion pathways, have been the target of "precision therapeutics". No single molecularly targeted therapeutic though has been uniformly successful, probably due to the tumor heterogeneity, but biomarker research is evolving and it hopes to select more patients likely to benefit. Recent reports note activity with immunotherapies such as CD40 agonists, CCR2 inhibitors, cancer vaccines, and novel combinations against the immunosuppressive tumor milieu are ongoing. While many obstacles still exist, clearly we are making progress in deciphering the heterogeneity within pancreatic cancers. Integrating conventional and immunological targeting will be the key to effective treatment of this deadly disease.

  7. Pancreatic cancer: optimizing treatment options, new, and emerging targeted therapies

    PubMed Central

    Chiorean, Elena Gabriela; Coveler, Andrew L

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the US and is expected to become the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the next decade. Despite 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin with irinotecan and oxaliplatin (FOLFIRINOX) and gemcitabine/nab-paclitaxel significantly improving outcomes for metastatic cancer, refractory disease still poses significant challenges. Difficulties with early detection and the inherent chemo- and radio-resistant nature of this malignancy led to attempts to define the sequential biology of pancreatic cancer in order to improve survival outcomes. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is characterized by several germline or acquired genetic mutations, the most common being KRAS (90%), CDK2NA (90%), TP53 (75%–90%), DPC4/SMAD4 (50%). In addition, the tumor microenvironment, chemoresistant cancer stem cells, and the desmoplastic stroma have been the target of some promising clinical investigations. Among the core pathways reproducibly shown to lead the development and progression of this disease, DNA repair, apoptosis, G1/S cell cycle transition, KRAS, Wnt, Notch, Hedgehog, TGF-beta, and other cell invasion pathways, have been the target of “precision therapeutics”. No single molecularly targeted therapeutic though has been uniformly successful, probably due to the tumor heterogeneity, but biomarker research is evolving and it hopes to select more patients likely to benefit. Recent reports note activity with immunotherapies such as CD40 agonists, CCR2 inhibitors, cancer vaccines, and novel combinations against the immunosuppressive tumor milieu are ongoing. While many obstacles still exist, clearly we are making progress in deciphering the heterogeneity within pancreatic cancers. Integrating conventional and immunological targeting will be the key to effective treatment of this deadly disease. PMID:26185420

  8. Midostaurin: an emerging treatment for acute myeloid leukemia patients

    PubMed Central

    Gallogly, Molly Megan; Lazarus, Hillard M

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a hematologic malignancy that carries a poor prognosis and has garnered few treatment advances in the last few decades. Mutation of the internal tandem duplication (ITD) region of fms-like tyrosine kinase (FLT3) is considered high risk for decreased response and overall survival. Midostaurin is a Type III receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor found to inhibit FLT3 and other receptor tyrosine kinases, including platelet-derived growth factor receptors, cyclin-dependent kinase 1, src, c-kit, and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor. In preclinical studies, midostaurin exhibited broad-spectrum antitumor activity toward a wide range of tumor xenografts, as well as an FLT3-ITD-driven mouse model of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Midostaurin is orally administered and generally well tolerated as a single agent; hematologic toxicity increases substantially when administered in combination with standard induction chemotherapy. Clinical trials primarily have focused on relapsed/refractory AML and MDS and included single- and combination-agent studies. Administration of midostaurin to relapsed/refractory MDS and AML patients confers a robust anti-blast response sufficient to bridge a minority of patients to transplant. In combination with histone deacetylase inhibitors, responses appear comparable to historic controls, while the addition of midostaurin to standard induction chemotherapy may prolong survival in FLT3-ITD mutant patients. The response of some wild-type (WT)-FLT3 patients to midostaurin therapy is consistent with midostaurin’s ability to inhibit WT-FLT3 in vitro, and also may reflect overexpression of WT-FLT3 in those patients and/or off-target effects such as inhibition of kinases other than FLT3. Midostaurin represents a well-tolerated, easily administered oral agent with the potential to bridge mutant and WT-FLT3 AML patients to transplant and possibly deepen response to induction chemotherapy. Ongoing studies are

  9. Emergency water treatment with bleach in the United States: the need to revise EPA recommendations.

    PubMed

    Lantagne, Daniele; Person, Bobbie; Smith, Natalie; Mayer, Ally; Preston, Kelsey; Blanton, Elizabeth; Jellison, Kristen

    2014-05-06

    During emergencies in the United States, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) currently recommends using bottled water, or boiling or treating water by adding 1/8 teaspoon (or 8 drops) of bleach to 1 gal of water. This bleach recommendation is internally inconsistent, a relatively high chlorine dose (5.55-8.67 mg/L), and unsupported by evidence. In this study, bleach was added in three different dosages to six waters available to emergency-affected populations in each of six states; free chlorine residual (FCR) and Escherichia coli/total coliforms were measured 1-24 h after treatment. Data were analyzed using four efficacy criteria. Results indicated the dosages in the current EPA recommendation are unnecessarily high to ensure (1) maintenance of FCR for 24 h after treatment, (2) absence of E. coli/total coliforms, and (3) establishment of a CT-factor sufficient to inactivate Giardia lamblia and enteric viruses 1 h after treatment. Additionally, emergency-prone populations did not have the materials to complete treatment with bleach in their household. Therefore, we recommend EPA review and revise the current recommendation to establish an internally consistent, criteria-based recommendation that is usable by emergency-affected populations. We also recommend investigating the use of new or commercially available water treatment products for emergency response in the United States.

  10. Quality Improvement Project to Improve Timeliness Between Bronchodilator Treatments from Emergency Department to Medical Wards.

    PubMed

    Cockerham, Jennifer R; Lowe, Gary R; Willis, Randy; Stecks, Ryan M; Berlinski, Ariel

    2016-12-01

    Quality improvement methodology was applied to study sporadic reports that patients with asthma were not given bronchodilator treatments or assessed within an appropriate time frame when they were admitted from the emergency department to the medical ward. The goal was to increase the number of patients who had an interval between emergency department assessment/bronchodilator treatment and medical ward assessment/treatment of <120 min. A flow chart diagram, a fishbone diagram, data collection, intervention implementation, and data monitoring and analysis were used in this study. Data were collected on a pre-test of change cohort of 227 subjects with asthma from January 2013 to March 2014. A test of change adding a Q2H respiratory therapist assessment and as needed bronchodilator treatment order while the subject was in the emergency department was implemented during May of 2014. These data were compared with a post-test of change cohort of 278 subjects with asthma from May 2014 to July 2015. Data collection for both cohorts included the time from the last assessment/bronchodilator treatment in the emergency department to emergency department discharge, the time from emergency department discharge to assessment/treatment in the medical ward, and the sum of these 2 time periods. Mean times (minutes) were noted, and comparisons were made using 2-tailed independent t tests with significance set at P < .05. Mean monthly times were also compared in process control charts. There was a 124% increase noted in the percentage of subjects who received bronchodilator treatment within 120 min, a 53% increase within 180 min, and a 19% increase within 240 min. The interval time between treatments decreased 21%. Through quality improvement methodology, the group was able to significantly decrease the time between the last assessment/bronchodilator treatment in the emergency department and the first assessment/treatment in the medical ward for subjects with asthma. Moreover

  11. Emerging Concepts About Prenatal Genesis, Aberrant Metabolism and Treatment Paradigms in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Witchel, Selma F; Recabarren, Sergio E; Gonzalez, Frank; Diamanti-Kandarakis, Evanthia; Cheang, Kai I; Duleba, Antoni J; Legro, Richard S; Homburg, Roy; Pasquali, Renato; Lobo, Rogerio; Zouboulis, Christos C.; Kelestimur, Fahrettin; Fruzzetti, Franca; Futterweit, Walter; Norman, Robert J; Abbott, David H

    2012-01-01

    The interactive nature of the 8th Annual Meeting of the Androgen Excess & PCOS Society Annual Meeting in Munich, Germany (AEPCOS 2010) and subsequent exchanges between speakers led to emerging concepts in PCOS regarding its genesis, metabolic dysfunction, and clinical treatment of inflammation, metabolic dysfunction, anovulation and hirsutism. Transition of care in congenital adrenal hyperplasia from pediatric to adult providers emerged as a potential model for care transition involving PCOS adolescents. PMID:22661293

  12. The relationship between child maltreatment and substance abuse treatment outcomes among emerging adults and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Garner, Bryan R; Hunter, Brooke D; Smith, Douglas C; Smith, Jane Ellen; Godley, Mark D

    2014-01-01

    Emerging adulthood is the period of greatest risk for problematic substance use. The primary aim of the current study was to examine the relationship between a broad measure of child maltreatment and several key outcomes for a large clinical sample of emerging adults (n = 858) and adolescents (n = 2,697). The secondary aim was to examine the extent to which the relationship between child maltreatment and treatment outcomes differed between emerging adults and adolescents. Multilevel latent growth curve analyses revealed emerging adults and adolescents who experienced child maltreatment reported significantly greater reductions over time on several treatment outcomes (e.g., substance use, substance-related problems, and emotional problems). Overall, analyses did not support differential relationships between child maltreatment and changes over time in these substance use disorder treatment outcomes for emerging adults and adolescents. The one exception was that although emerging adults with child maltreatment did reduce their HIV risk over time, their improvements were not as great as were the improvements in HIV risk reported by adolescents who had experienced child maltreatment.

  13. The Relationship Between Child Maltreatment and Substance Abuse Treatment Outcomes Among Emerging Adults and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Garner, Bryan R.; Hunter, Brooke D.; Smith, Douglas C.; Smith, Jane Ellen; Godley, Mark D.

    2015-01-01

    Emerging adulthood is the period of greatest risk for problematic substance use. The primary aim of the current study was to examine the relationship between a broad measure of child maltreatment and several key outcomes for a large clinical sample of emerging adults (n = 858) and adolescents (n = 2,697). The secondary aim was to examine the extent to which the relationship between child maltreatment and treatment outcomes differed between emerging adults and adolescents. Multilevel latent growth curve analyses revealed emerging adults and adolescents who experienced child maltreatment reported significantly greater reductions over time on several treatment outcomes (e.g., substance use, substance-related problems, and emotional problems). Overall, analyses did not support differential relationships between child maltreatment and changes over time in these substance use disorder treatment outcomes for emerging adults and adolescents. The one exception was that although emerging adults with child maltreatment did reduce their HIV risk over time, their improvements were not as great as were the improvements in HIV risk reported by adolescents who had experienced child maltreatment. PMID:25125233

  14. 38 CFR 17.121 - Limitations on payment or reimbursement of the costs of emergency treatment not previously...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... VA has an agreement with to furnish health care services for veterans), which means the non-VA... emergency treatment: (1) Could have been transferred from the non-VA facility to a VA medical center (or...) Continued non-emergency treatment. Claims for payment or reimbursement of the costs of emergency...

  15. 38 CFR 17.121 - Limitations on payment or reimbursement of the costs of emergency treatment not previously...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... VA has an agreement with to furnish health care services for veterans), which means the non-VA... emergency treatment: (1) Could have been transferred from the non-VA facility to a VA medical center (or...) Continued non-emergency treatment. Claims for payment or reimbursement of the costs of emergency...

  16. [Advance directives in prehospital emergency treatment : prospective questionnaire-based analysis].

    PubMed

    Brokmann, J C; Grützmann, T; Pidun, A K; Groß, D; Rossaint, R; Beckers, S K; May, A T

    2014-01-01

    The handling of advance directives (AD) in prehospital emergency treatment in Germany is characterized by instability. In the project "Advance directives in preclinical emergency medical aid" ("Patientenverfügungen in der präklinischen Notfallmedizin") the frequency and quality of ADs in emergency situations was investigated. The aim of this study was to fill the gaps in research and to collate data on how consideration of the self-determination of patients in emergency situations can be optimized. Over a period of 12 months from December 2007 to December 2008 a questionnaire was included in the emergency documentation of the medical emergency service in Aachen. Emergency patients were asked by emergency physicians to provide an AD and the quantitative as well as qualitative features of these ADs were examined. Furthermore, the study recorded what kinds of problems occurred with ADs in emergency situations and what measures were needed to correct this deficiency. The reactions of patients were documented on a numeral rating scale with a score of 1 reflecting a negative and 10 reflecting a positive reaction. In the 12-month period emergency doctors recorded 1,321 missions and after application of the exclusion criteria (e.g. missing signature, incomplete documentation and late delivery) 1,047 documented questionnaires were available for the analysis. A total of 127 out of 1,047 emergency patients provided an AD, 44 had a durable power of attorney and 27 had appointed a legal representative for healthcare. Of the emergency patients 20 had a legal attendant and 43 out of the 127 ADs could be presented to the emergency team during the emergency mission. The emergency team often encountered difficulties regarding the handling of the ADs due to the time factor and unclear wording. The latter included the following problems: misleading formulation (19.1 %), difficulty with the complexity (14.9 %) and contradicting information (4 %). Only 29 (61.7 %) of the

  17. Retinal vein occlusion: evaluation of "classic" and "emerging" risk factors and treatment.

    PubMed

    Turello, Marina; Pasca, Samantha; Daminato, Roberto; Dello Russo, Patrizia; Giacomello, Roberta; Venturelli, Ugo; Barillari, Giovanni

    2010-05-01

    Retinal vein occlusion (RVO) is the second most common retinal vein disease and an important cause of blindness and visual morbidity. Systemic risk factors are commonly associated with RVO, while unclear it is the role of the thrombophilic and coagulation disorders. To evaluate "classic" and "emerging" risk factors, and to establish a good treatment for RVO. Fifty patients, 31 males and 19 females, with RVO were selected for our study. RVO patients were divided into two groups: those with central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO) and those with branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO). All patients were subjected to an anamnestic investigation and were tested for thrombophilia, coagulation disorders and hyperlipidemia. Treatment and prophylaxis were evaluated. We have named "classic" the systemic risk factors associated with RVO and "emerging" those risk factors, haemostasis related, not clearly associated with RVO. RVO occurs more commonly in patients aged over 50. "Emerging" risk factors were more frequent in CRVO, "classic" in BRVO. Hyperhomocysteinemia is the most common "emerging" risk factor related to RVO. 71.4% of tested patients had hypercholesterolemia. Treatment with LMWH would appear to be safe and effective, but the small number of patients considered not allow us a definitive evaluation of its efficacy. Although our study has shown the correlation between RVO and the "emerging" risk factors, more studies are necessary to better know the real role of thrombophilic and coagulation disorders in this disease and to determine a specific protocol for the treatment and prophylaxis of RVO.

  18. Akt inhibition improves irinotecan treatment and prevents cell emergence by switching the senescence response to apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Vétillard, Alexandra; Jonchère, Barbara; Moreau, Marie; Toutain, Bertrand; Henry, Cécile; Fontanel, Simon; Bernard, Anne-Charlotte; Campone, Mario; Guette, Catherine; Coqueret, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Activated in response to chemotherapy, senescence is a tumor suppressive mechanism that induces a permanent loss of proliferation. However, in response to treatment, it is not really known how cells can escape senescence and how irreversible or incomplete this pathway is. We have recently described that cells that escape senescence are more transformed than non-treated parental cells, they resist anoikis and rely on Mcl-1. In this study, we further characterize this emergence in response to irinotecan, a first line treatment used in colorectal cancer. Our results indicate that Akt was activated as a feedback pathway during the early step of senescence. The inhibition of the kinase prevented cell emergence and improved treatment efficacy, both in vitro and in vivo. This improvement was correlated with senescence inhibition, p21waf1 downregulation and a concomitant activation of apoptosis due to Noxa upregulation and Mcl-1 inactivation. The inactivation of Noxa prevented apoptosis and increased the number of emergent cells. Using either RNA interference or p21waf1-deficient cells, we further confirmed that an intact p53-p21-senescence pathway favored cell emergence and that its downregulation improved treatment efficacy through apoptosis induction. Therefore, although senescence is an efficient suppressive mechanism, it also generates more aggressive cells as a consequence of apoptosis inhibition. We therefore propose that senescence-inducing therapies should be used sequentially with drugs favoring cell death such as Akt inhibitors. This should reduce cell emergence and tumor relapse through a combined induction of senescence and apoptosis. PMID:26485768

  19. Emerging and future therapies for the treatment of bone loss associated with chronic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Haynes, D R

    2006-12-01

    Currently there are many emerging therapies for the treatment of chronic osteoporosis. This is a major problem world wide and particularly of concern in post-menopausal women. This has offered a large expanding market for the pharmaceutical industry and consequently large amounts of money and resources have been used to develop new treatments. These new and emerging treatments have largely targeted the mechanisms of bone loss associated with post-menopausal osteoporosis. However, there are many other important bone loss disorders and it is possible that some of these new therapies may be useful in treating bone loss associated with other diseases. This review identifies several of these pharmacologic treatments of osteoporosis and discusses the possibility of using these drugs for the treatment of bone loss associated with inflammatory diseases. In addition, other approaches, such as regulating apoptosis and intracellular signalling, may be developed in the future and may better target bone loss associated with chronic inflammation are identified.

  20. Does parental involvement in pediatric emergency department asthma treatment affect home management?

    PubMed

    Hussain-Rizvi, Ambrin; Kunkov, Sergey; Crain, Ellen F

    2009-10-01

    To determine whether parents who deliver albuterol treatments in a pediatric emergency department with a metered dose inhaler with a spacer device (MDIS) report better adherence to MDIS use at home compared to parents whose children undergo standard nebulizer therapy. Children aged 1-5 years were randomized by day to usual treatment with nebulized albuterol (40 children) or to treatment by the parent with albuterol with an MDIS (46 children). All caregivers received standard discharge instructions, a spacer and an MDI. Two weeks following the visit, a trained research assistant blinded to the child's group status, administered a brief telephone questionnaire to each caretaker. At follow-up, children in the MDIS group were 7.5 times more likely to be using the MDIS for their albuterol treatments (95%CI 1.6-35.6). Involving parents in treatment of asthma exacerbations in the emergency department using an MDIS may improve adherence to MDIS use at home.

  1. Emerging therapies for the treatment of relapsed or refractory follicular lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, D.; Prica, A.; Assouline, S.; Christofides, A.; Lawrence, T.; Sehn, L.H.

    2016-01-01

    With no treatment standard having been established for relapsed and refractory follicular lymphoma, a number of therapeutic approaches are used in Canada. In patients who relapse early or who eventually become resistant to subsequent treatment, prognosis is poor, and new approaches are needed. A number of novel therapies are being examined in this setting, including monoclonal antibodies, immunoconjugates, immunomodulatory agents, and signal transduction inhibitors. With the body of evidence for those emerging therapies accumulating and the standard upfront treatment changing from rituximab and chop (cyclophosphamide–doxorubicin–vincristine–prednisone) or rituximab and cvp (cyclophosphamide–vincristine–prednisone) to bendamustine and rituximab, treatment decisions in the relapsed and refractory setting have become more complex. The choice of subsequent treatment must consider type of upfront treatment; duration of remission; and patient-related factors such as age, comorbidities, and treatment preferences. This paper summarizes the evidence for novel therapies and proposes recommendations for subsequent treatment options by remission duration after induction and maintenance. PMID:28050137

  2. Emerging from Depression: Treatment of Adolescent Depression Using the Major Treatment Models of Adult Depression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Kathleen M.

    Noting that adolescents who commit suicide are often clinically depressed, this paper examines various approaches in the treatment of depression. Major treatment models of adult depression, which can be directly applied to the treatment of the depressed adolescent, are described. Major treatment models and selected research studies are reviewed in…

  3. Emerging from Depression: Treatment of Adolescent Depression Using the Major Treatment Models of Adult Depression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Kathleen M.

    Noting that adolescents who commit suicide are often clinically depressed, this paper examines various approaches in the treatment of depression. Major treatment models of adult depression, which can be directly applied to the treatment of the depressed adolescent, are described. Major treatment models and selected research studies are reviewed in…

  4. Pulmonary embolism: the diagnosis, risk-stratification, treatment and disposition of emergency department patients

    PubMed Central

    Corrigan, Daniel; Prucnal, Christiana; Kabrhel, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    The diagnosis or exclusion of pulmonary embolism (PE) remains challenging for emergency physicians. Symptoms can be vague or non-existent, and the clinical presentation shares features with many other common diagnoses. Diagnostic testing is complicated, as biomarkers, like the D-dimer, are frequently false positive, and imaging, like computed tomography pulmonary angiography, carries risks of radiation and contrast dye exposure. It is therefore incumbent on emergency physicians to be both vigilant and thoughtful about this diagnosis. In recent years, several advances in treatment have also emerged. Novel, direct-acting oral anticoagulants make the outpatient treatment of low risk PE easier than before. However, the spectrum of PE severity varies widely, so emergency physicians must be able to risk-stratify patients to ensure the appropriate disposition. Finally, PE response teams have been developed to facilitate rapid access to advanced therapies (e.g., catheter directed thrombolysis) for patients with high-risk PE. This review will discuss the clinical challenges of PE diagnosis, risk stratification and treatment that emergency physicians face every day. PMID:27752629

  5. The enduring role of the Emergency Medical Treatment and Active Labor Act.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, Sara

    2013-12-01

    The Emergency Medical Treatment and Active Labor Act (EMTALA) is a seminal law that imposes screening, stabilization, and transfer duties on all Medicare-participating hospitals that have emergency departments. More than twenty-five years after its enactment, EMTALA continues to generate controversy over the scope and depth of its obligations on issues ranging from the nature of the screening obligation and rules regarding on-call specialists to whether EMTALA's stabilization protections exclude emergency inpatients. Despite ongoing questions that flow from its detailed provisions, EMTALA is an enduring testament to society's evolving views that hospitals must provide emergency care not only to their established patients but to the broader communities they serve.

  6. Rapid assessment and initial patient treatment team -- a way forward for emergency care.

    PubMed

    Cronin, J G; Wright, J

    2005-04-01

    As a consequence of the UK Department of Health drive to introduce the 4-h emergency care target acute trusts have attempted to initialize a myriad of programmes to improve the patients' experience in this sector. Changes to how patients are managed and the flow that they enter within the emergency care system have become a popular option. This paper seeks to explore the concept of the Rapid Assessment and Initial Patient Treatment team (RAPT) within the Accident and Emergency (A and E) environment. We intend to provide information for readers who may be considering introducing such teams. The paper will explore the initial practical difficulties that were encountered. We will explore associated benefits for the RAPT approach including improved teamwork, better communication with the family, avoiding unnecessary duplication of work and discuss the benefits of having a direct referral process in place for emergency patients.

  7. Antibody-drug conjugates—an emerging class of cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Diamantis, Nikolaos; Banerji, Udai

    2016-01-01

    Antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) are an emerging novel class of anticancer treatment agents that combines the selectivity of targeted treatment with the cytotoxic potency of chemotherapy drugs. New linker technology associated with novel highly potent cytotoxic payloads has permitted the development of more effective and safe ADCs. In recent years, two ADCs have been licensed, T-DM1 and brentuximab vedotin, and are already establishing their place in cancer treatment. A plethora of ADCs are being investigated in phases I and II trials, emerging data of which appears promising. As we deepen our understanding of what makes a successful ADC, an increasing number of ADCs will likely become viable treatment options as single agents or in combination with chemotherapy. This review will present the philosophy underlying ADCs, their main characteristics and current research developments with a focus on ADCs in solid tumours. PMID:26742008

  8. Antibody-drug conjugates--an emerging class of cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Diamantis, Nikolaos; Banerji, Udai

    2016-02-16

    Antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) are an emerging novel class of anticancer treatment agents that combines the selectivity of targeted treatment with the cytotoxic potency of chemotherapy drugs. New linker technology associated with novel highly potent cytotoxic payloads has permitted the development of more effective and safe ADCs. In recent years, two ADCs have been licensed, T-DM1 and brentuximab vedotin, and are already establishing their place in cancer treatment. A plethora of ADCs are being investigated in phases I and II trials, emerging data of which appears promising. As we deepen our understanding of what makes a successful ADC, an increasing number of ADCs will likely become viable treatment options as single agents or in combination with chemotherapy. This review will present the philosophy underlying ADCs, their main characteristics and current research developments with a focus on ADCs in solid tumours.

  9. [To further strengthen the construction of emergency medical treatment system of massive burn].

    PubMed

    Jia, C Y

    2017-03-20

    Although clinical medicine of our country has made great progress in recent years, the rescue of massive burn casualties is still facing enormous challenges. No matter it is the top level design, system configuration, plan preparation, training, education, or the operation process, the medical resource allocation, and the treatment efficiency, are far behind the demand of social development. Therefore, further strengthen the construction of emergency medical treatment system of massive burn is the unshirkable responsibility of burn medical workers in our country.

  10. Neuroprotection: the emerging concept of restorative neural stem cell biology for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Carletti, Barbara; Piemonte, Fiorella; Rossi, Ferdinando

    2011-06-01

    During the past decades Neural Stem Cells have been considered as an alternative source of cells to replace lost neurons and NSC transplantation has been indicated as a promising treatment for neurodegenerative disorders. Nevertheless, the current understanding of NSC biology suggests that, far from being mere spare parts for cell replacement therapies, NSCs could play a key role in the pharmacology of neuroprotection and become protagonists of innovative treatments for neurodegenerative diseases. Here, we review this new emerging concept of NSC biology.

  11. Post-fire erosion and the effectiveness of emergency rehabilitation treatments over time

    Treesearch

    Lee H. MacDonald; Peter R. Robichaud

    2008-01-01

    High-severity wildfires can increase runoff and erosion rates by one or more orders of magnitude, and these increases can threaten life and property as well as severely degrading water quality and aquatic ecosystems. Each year millions of dollars are spent on emergency postfire rehabilitation treatments to minimize flood runoff and soil erosion. Few data have been...

  12. The Emergence of Suicidal Ideation during the Post-Hospital Treatment of Depressed Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaudiano, Brandon A.; Andover, Margaret S.; Miller, Ivan W.

    2008-01-01

    There is a paucity of research on the emergence of suicidal ideation in recently hospitalized patients undergoing treatment for depression. As part of a larger clinical trial, patients (N = 103) with major depression without suicidal ideation at hospital discharge were followed for up to 6 months while receiving study-related outpatient…

  13. Emerging Standards of Care for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Panic Disorder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beamish, Patrica M.; Granello, Darcy Haag; Granello, Paul F.; McSteen, Patricia B.; Stone, David A.

    1997-01-01

    Proposes eight emerging standards of care, based on a literature review, for the diagnosis and treatment of panic disorder without agoraphobia in adults. The diagnostic criteria were particularly analyzed in terms of comorbid psychological disorders, medical disorders, and substances that mimic panic symptoms. Defines minimal professional conduct.…

  14. [The responsibility of the emergency service physician and patient consent to treatment and hospitalization].

    PubMed

    Wiernikowski, A; Szczepanek, M

    1997-01-01

    Amenability of emergency service physician for the treatment given without patient consent has been presented in the study. Depending on circumstances it can be penal, civil, disciplinary and professional responsibility. The study has been annotated with current legal and ethical rules, which should be not only commonly known to physicians but also respected to avoid legal consequences.

  15. 7 CFR 6.7 - Submission of recommendations under section 8(a) (emergency treatment).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Submission of recommendations under section 8(a... FEES General Provisions § 6.7 Submission of recommendations under section 8(a) (emergency treatment). (a) Section 22. The Administrator's report submitted pursuant to § 6.6 shall indicate whether or not...

  16. Chlorpromazine for the treatment of migraine in a pediatric emergency department.

    PubMed

    Kanis, Jessica M; Timm, Nathan L

    2014-02-01

    Migraine headache is a common presenting condition to the pediatric emergency department (PED). Dopamine receptor antagonists, such as prochlorperazine and metoclopramide, serve as the primary treatment for migraine headache in many emergency departments; however, in 2012, our institution experienced a shortage of these drugs, resulting in the use of alternative medications. Chlorpromazine was included as an option for treatment at our institution during this shortage, although limited data exist on the effectiveness in children. The objectives of this study were: (1) to compare the treatment failure rate of chlorpromazine in the treatment of migraine headache in youth presenting to the PED with those who received prochlorperazine; and (2) to identify the frequency and type of adverse events, and change in pain score. We performed a retrospective cohort study of patients 12-21 years of age treated for migraine headache in our emergency department. Our treatment group received intravenous chlorpromazine between February and April 2012, while the comparison group consisted of children treated with intravenous prochlorperazine between February and April 2011. The outcomes of interest were: (1) treatment failure, defined as need for additional therapy, hospitalization or 48-hour return; (2) adverse reactions to drug therapy; and (3) change in pain score. This study yielded 75 patients in the treatment group and 274 in the comparison group. Forty percent (30/75) of the treatment group had treatment failure compared with 15% (41/274) of the comparison group. There was no difference in mean change in pain score between the groups. The most common adverse effects included hypotension in the treatment group (12%) and akathisia in the comparison group (12%). This is the first study that has examined the use of chlorpromazine as a therapy in pediatric migraines. Abortive therapy for migraine headache in the PED with chlorpromazine is associated with greater need for rescue

  17. Practice variations in the treatment of febrile infants among pediatric emergency physicians.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Ran D; Scolnik, Dennis; Chauvin-Kimoff, Laurel; Farion, Ken J; Ali, Samina; Lynch, Tim; Gouin, Serge; Osmond, Martin H; Johnson, David W; Klassen, Terry P

    2009-08-01

    The objectives of this study were to characterize variations in treatment decisions for young febrile infants in pediatric emergency departments across Canada and to document the extent of practice variations among pediatric emergency department practitioners. This was a prospective, concurrent, cohort study of consecutive infants up to 90 days of age who presented to 6 pediatric emergency departments in Canada with fever (rectal temperature of >or=38.0 degrees C). We recorded information in the emergency department and contacted the families by telephone to confirm the final disposition. A total of 257 infants were recruited over 2 to 4 months. Patients were similar across centers in terms of gestational age and weight, chronologic age at arrival, weight, and gender. Temperatures measured at home and during triage and durations of fever also were similar among centers. In one center, significantly more children arrived with cough; in another center, fewer parents reported sick contacts at home. Rates of blood and urine testing were not significantly different across sites, but rates of lumbar puncture, respiratory virus testing, and chest radiography were different. A total of 55% of infants received antibiotics, and significant practice variations in the numbers and types of antibiotics used were documented. Practices in the evaluation of young infants with fever in tertiary pediatric emergency departments varied substantially. Blood and urine tests were ordered in the majority of centers, but rates of cerebrospinal fluid testing and antibiotic treatment differed across centers.

  18. Case reports describing treatments in the emergency medicine literature: missing and misleading information

    PubMed Central

    Richason, Tiffany P; Paulson, Stephen M; Lowenstein, Steven R; Heard, Kennon J

    2009-01-01

    Background Although randomized trials and systematic reviews provide the "best evidence" for guiding medical practice, many emergency medicine journals still publish case reports (CRs). The quality of the reporting in these publications has not been assessed. Objectives In this study we sought to determine the proportion of treatment-related case reports that adequately reported information about the patient, disease, interventions, co-interventions, outcomes and other critical information. Methods We identified CRs published in 4 emergency medicine journals in 2000–2005 and categorized them according to their purpose (disease description, overdose or adverse drug reactioin, diagnostic test or treatment effect). Treatment-related CRs were reviewed for the presence or absence of 11 reporting elements. Results All told, 1,316 CRs were identified; of these, 85 (6.5%; 95CI = 66, 84) were about medical or surgical treatments. Most contained adequate descriptions of the patient (99%; 95CI = 95, 100), the stage and severity of the patient's disease (88%; 95CI = 79, 93), the intervention (80%; 95CI = 70, 87) and the outcomes of treatment (90%; 95CI = 82, 95). Fewer CRs reported the patient's co-morbidities (45%; 95CI = 35, 56), concurrent medications (30%; 95CI = 21, 40) or co-interventions (57%; 95CI = 46, 67) or mentioned any possible treatment side-effects (33%; 95CI = 24, 44). Only 37% (95CI = 19, 38) discussed alternative explanations for favorable outcomes. Generalizability of treatment effects to other patients was mentioned in only 29% (95CI = 20, 39). Just 2 CRs (2.3%; 95CI = 1, 8) reported a 'denominator" (number of patients subjected to the same intervention, whether or not successful. Conclusion Treatment-related CRs in emergency medicine journals often omit critical details about treatments, co-interventions, outcomes, generalizability, causality and denominators. As a result, the information may be misleading to providers, and the clinical applications may

  19. Medical Emergency Triage and Treatment System (METTS): a new protocol in primary triage and secondary priority decision in emergency medicine.

    PubMed

    Widgren, Bengt R; Jourak, Majid

    2011-06-01

    In many Emergency Department (ED) triage scoring systems, vital signs are not included as an assessment parameter. To evaluate the validity of a new protocol for Emergency Medicine in a large cohort of patients referred to in-hospital care. From January 1 to June 30, 2006, 22,934 patients were admitted to the ED at Sahlgrenska University Hospital. Of those, 8695 were referred to in-hospital care and included in the study. A new five-level triage tool, combining vital signs, symptoms, and signs in the triage decision, was used. A small control of the inter-rater disagreement was also performed in 132 parallel, single-blinded observations. Fifty percent of the patients were admitted by ambulance and the other 50% by walk-in. Hospital stay was significantly (p < 0.001) longer in those admitted by ambulance (9.3 ± 14 days) as compared with walk-in patients (6.2 ± 10 days). In-hospital mortality incidence was higher (8.1%) in patients admitted by ambulance, as compared with walk-in patients (2.4%). Hospital stay and in-hospital mortality increased with higher level of priority. In the highest priority groups, 32-53% of the patients were downgraded to a lower priority level after primary treatment. In the present study, the METTS protocol was shown to be a reliable triage method and a sensitive tool for secondary re-evaluation of the patient in the ED. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Addiction to Prescription Opioids: Characteristics of the Emerging Epidemic and Treatment with Buprenorphine

    PubMed Central

    Mendelson, John; Flower, Keith; Pletcher, Mark; Galloway, Gantt P.

    2015-01-01

    Dependence on and abuse of prescription opioid drugs is now a major health problem, with initiation of prescription opioid abuse exceeding cocaine in young people. Coincident with the emergence of abuse and dependence on prescription opioids, there has been an increased emphasis on the treatment of pain. Pain is now the “5th vital sign” and physicians face disciplinary action for failure to adequately relieve pain. Thus, physicians are whipsawed between the imperative to treat pain with opioids and the fear of producing addiction in some patients. In this article we characterize the emerging epidemic of prescription opioid abuse, discuss the utility of buprenorphine in the treatment of addiction to prescription opioids, and present illustrative case histories of successful treatment with buprenorphine. PMID:18837640

  1. Emerging strategies for the treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis: promise and limitations?

    PubMed

    Yew, Wing Wai; Koh, Won-Jung

    2016-01-01

    A worsening scenario of drug-resistant tuberculosis has increased the need for new treatment strategies to tackle this worldwide emergency. There is a pressing need to simplify and shorten the current 6-month treatment regimen for drug-susceptible tuberculosis. Rifamycins and fluoroquinolones, as well as several new drugs, are potential candidates under evaluation. At the same time, treatment outcomes of patients with drug-resistant tuberculosis should be improved through optimizing the use of fluoroquinolones, repurposed agents and newly developed drugs. In this context, the safety and tolerance of new therapeutic approaches must be addressed.

  2. Emergent Treatments Based on The Pathophysiology of Bipolar Disorder: A Selective Review

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Roscoe O.; Keshavan, Matcheri

    2015-01-01

    Bipolar disorder is a chronic psychiatric disorder that is a cause of significant symptomatology even in the setting of optimal treatment. Most current treatments are developed from serendipity, and not based on known pathophysiology. In this review we examine a number of somatic and pharmacologic therapies that are poised to become part of the armamentarium of interventions to treat bipolar illness. As a group, these interventions are derived from a growing understanding of the biological underpinnings of bipolar disorders. We will look at emergent treatments based on our understanding of the molecular biology, neuroanatomy, and the genetics of bipolar disorder. PMID:26525885

  3. A computerized standard protocol order entry for pediatric inpatient acute seizure emergencies reduces time to treatment.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yi; Morgan, Robin; Schiff, Linda; Hannah, Debbie; Wheless, James

    2014-02-01

    Time to treatment of seizures is critical to efficacy. We performed a quality initiative and evaluated time to treatment of inpatient seizure emergencies with first- and second-line medicines before and after implementation of a computerized, standard treatment protocol. Data from 125 patients revealed that 179 seizure episodes required first-line antiepileptic drugs, and the mean time to treatment was 7.72 minutes. In 87 episodes, patients (49%) received the drugs within 5 minutes. Forty-six episodes required second-line drugs. In 17 (37%), patients received them within 30 minutes (mean 49.48 minutes). After implementation of the protocol, the mean time to treatment with first-line drugs was 3.74 minutes, a reduction of >50% (P < .0001). The mean time to treatment with second-line drugs was 25.05 minutes, a reduction of ∼50% (P < .0001). This effective model for reducing the time to treatment of seizure emergencies may be useful to similar institutions.

  4. Efficacy of Fifteen Emerging Interventions for the Treatment of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, Olivia; Varker, Tracey; Forbes, David; Phelps, Andrea; Dell, Lisa; DiBattista, Ashley; Ralph, Naomi; O'Donnell, Meaghan

    2016-02-01

    Although there is an abundance of novel interventions for the treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), often their efficacy remains unknown. This systematic review assessed the evidence for 15 new or novel interventions for the treatment of PTSD. Studies that investigated changes to PTSD symptoms following the delivery of any 1 of the 15 interventions of interest were identified through systematic literature searches. There were 19 studies that met the inclusion criteria for this study. Eligible studies were assessed against methodological quality criteria and data were extracted. The majority of the 19 studies were of poor quality, hampered by methodological limitations, such as small sample sizes and lack of control group. There were 4 interventions, however, stemming from a mind-body philosophy (acupuncture, emotional freedom technique, mantra-based meditation, and yoga) that had moderate quality evidence from mostly small- to moderate-sized randomized controlled trials. The active components, however, of these promising emerging interventions and how they related to or were distinct from established treatments remain unclear. The majority of emerging interventions for the treatment of PTSD currently have an insufficient level of evidence supporting their efficacy, despite their increasing popularity. Further well-designed controlled trials of emerging interventions for PTSD are required.

  5. Rapid intervention and treatment zone: redesigning nursing services to meet increasing emergency department demand.

    PubMed

    Considine, Julie; Lucas, Elspeth; Martin, Roslyn; Stergiou, Helen E; Kropman, Matthew; Chiu, Herman

    2012-02-01

    The impact of emergency nursing roles in demand management systems is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to evaluate emergency nurses' role in a specific emergency department (ED) demand management system: rapid intervention and treatment zone (RITZ). A descriptive exploratory approach was used. Data were collected from audit of 193 randomly selected patient records and 12 h of clinical practice observation. The median age of participants was 31 years, 51.8% were males and 99.5% were discharged home. Nurse qualifications or seniority had no significant effect on waiting time or length of stay (LOS). There were disparities between documented and observed nursing practice. The designation and qualifications of RITZ nurses made little difference to waiting times and ED LOS. Specific documentation and communication systems for areas of the ED that manage large numbers of low complexity patients warrant further research.

  6. Open versus laparoscopic approach in the treatment of abdominal emergencies in elderly population

    PubMed Central

    COCORULLO, G.; FALCO, N.; TUTINO, R.; FONTANA, T.; SCERRINO, G.; SALAMONE, G.; LICARI, L.; GULOTTA, G.

    2016-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the role of laparoscopy in the treatment of surgical emergency in old population. Patients and Methods Over-70 years-old patients submitted to emergency abdominal surgery from January 2013 to December 2014 were collected and grouped according to admission diagnoses. These accounted small bowel obstruction, colonic acute disease, appendicitis, ventral hernia, gastro-duodenal perforation, biliary disease. In each group it was analyzed the operation time (OT), the morbidity rate and the mortality rate comparing open and laparoscopic management using T-test and Chi-square test. Results 159 over 70-years-old patients underwent emergency surgery in the General and Emergency surgery Operative Unit (O.U.) of the Policlinic of Palermo. 75 patients were managed by a laparoscopic approach and 84 underwent traditional open emergency surgery. T-Test for OT and Chi-square test for morbidity rate and mortality rate showed no differences in small bowel emergencies (p=0,4; 0,250,9; p>0,95) and in gastro-duodenal perforation (p=0,9; p>0.9; p>0.95). In cholecystitis, laparoscopy group showed lower OT (T-Test: p= 0,0002) while Chi-square test for morbidity rate (0,1emergencies in elderly population. PMID:27734793

  7. 18 CFR 2.60 - Facilities and activities during an emergency-accounting treatment of defense-related expenditures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... activities during an emergency-accounting treatment of defense-related expenditures. 2.60 Section 2.60... Natural Gas Act § 2.60 Facilities and activities during an emergency—accounting treatment of defense... national emergency, sets forth the following interpretation and statement of policy: (a) Facilities. The...

  8. Differentiating Types of Wide-Complex Tachycardia to Determine Appropriate Treatment in the Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    deSouza, Ian S; Peterson, Alanna C; Marill, Keith A

    2015-07-01

    Wide-complex tachycardia is a rare disease entity among patients presenting to the emergency department. However, due to its potential life-threatening nature, emergency clinicians must know how to assess and manage this condition. Wide-complex tachycardia encompasses a range of cardiac dysrhythmias, some of which can be difficult to distinguish and may require specific treatment approaches. This review summarizes the etiology and pathophysiology of wide-complex tachycardia, describes the differential diagnosis, and presents an evidence-based approach to identification of the different types of tachycardias through the use of a thorough history and physical examination, vagal maneuvers, electrocardiography, and adenosine. The treatment options and disposition for patients with various wide-complex tachycardias are also discussed, with attention to special circumstances and select controversial/contemporary topics.

  9. MANIA IN PARKINSON'S DISEASE WITH TREATMENT EMERGENT DYSKINEISA : A CASE REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Rajeev; Pinto, Charles

    2000-01-01

    A case of parkinson's disease starting 7 yrs. ago in 1993 with 2 episodes of mania is presented. The 1st episode (1993) was of 1-1/2 months duration, when early parkinsons symptoms had already set in. This was treated with anti-psychotic medications for a month, the picture was complicated with stroke and post-stroke sequlae for 5-6 months, where anti-psychotics were continued. He developed dyskinesia, when antipsychotics were stopped. The patient was on selegiline for Parkinson's disease for 2 years and off all medications subsequently. The 2nd episode of mania occurred after 7 years in January 2000. This episode of mania lasting for 2 months duration was treated with divalproate sodium and I-dopa for Parkinson's. Treatment emergent dyskinesia had to be treated with Clozapine. This unusual combination of bipolar-l disorer (2 episodes of mania) with Parkinson's disease and treatment emergent dyskinesia is presented with management strategy. PMID:21407984

  10. Benefits of Early Roflumilast Treatment After Hospital or Emergency Department Discharge for a COPD Exacerbation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Qing; Mocarski, Michelle; Sun, Shawn X.

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic lower respiratory disease, which includes chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), is the third leading cause of death in the United States. Roflumilast is an oral, once-daily, selective phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitor approved for reducing the risk for COPD exacerbations in patients with severe COPD associated with chronic bronchitis and a history of exacerbations. Objectives To evaluate the effects of roflumilast treatment timing on COPD exacerbation rates (primary objective) and on resource utilization and healthcare costs (secondary objective) after hospital or emergency department discharge associated with a COPD exacerbation. Methods In this retrospective cohort study, claims data from March 2011 to March 2013 were extracted from Truven Health MarketScan combined commercial healthcare claims and Medicare supplemental claims databases and were analyzed to compare the exacerbation rates and the healthcare resource utilization and costs between the early roflumilast treatment (treatment initiation ≤30 days after hospital or emergency department discharge) and the delayed roflumilast treatment (treatment initiation 31–180 days after discharge) cohorts. Multivariate logistic regression and generalized linear models with log-link function and gamma distribution were adjusted for age, sex, insurance plan type, COPD disease complexity, and comorbidities. Results A total of 995 patients (N = 280 early roflumilast treatment, N = 715 delayed roflumilast treatment) were included. Compared with the delayed roflumilast treatment group, patients in the early roflumilast treatment group were 39% less likely to have an exacerbation after hospital discharge (P = .004). The patients receiving early roflumilast treatment also had 42% (P = .003) and 37% (P = .005) lower risks for COPD-related and all-cause rehospitalizations, respectively, than patients in the delayed roflumilast treatment group. Significantly fewer patients receiving early roflumilast

  11. [Opinion survey on information, communication and treatment in an Emergency Department].

    PubMed

    García-García, A; Arévalo-Velasco, A; García-Iglesias, M A; Sánchez-Barba, M; Delgado-Vicente, M A; Bajo-Bajo, A; Diego-Robledo, F

    2015-01-01

    To gather specific details about the information, communication, and treatment as regards users of hospital emergency services using a telephone survey, in order to implement improvement measures, if necessary. A prospective study was conducted in two emergency departments in Salamanca. A total of 400 patients were included in the study (mean age 56.4±20.5years, 58.4% women). A telephone survey was performed with 19 items, of which 12 required responses on a Likert-type scale, with scores of 1 (very bad) to 5 (very good). The remainder of the questions allowed to answer "yes" or "no". The treatment received by the professionals in general was evaluated positively by 86% of the patients; with 92% reporting they were respectful, 87% were treated by doctors and 71% received treatment from nurses. More than one-quarter (27.5%) did not recall receiving information from blue point staff (personnel specially trained to provide information. Statistical significance (P=.045) was found in relation to the kindness and respect shown by nurses. Most patients that were admitted to the observation area of the emergency department were not informed about the visiting hours (P=.003). Perception of care received by patients is good, while in relation to information and communication it is evidently improvable, and could be assessed using the survey that is proposed in order to detect and use the weaknesses in these aspects of health care as implementation initiatives. Copyright © 2014 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  12. α1-Antitrypsin deficiency · 6: New and emerging treatments for α1-antitrypsin deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Sandhaus, R

    2004-01-01

    Alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency is a genetic condition that increases the risk of developing lung and liver disease, as well as other associated conditions. Most treatment of affected individuals is not specifically directed at AAT deficiency but focuses on the resultant disease state. The only currently available specific therapeutic agent—namely, intravenous augmentation with plasma derived AAT protein—is marketed in a limited number of countries. Treatments aimed at correcting the underlying genetic abnormality, supplementing or modifying the gene product, and halting or reversing organ injury are now beginning to emerge. These innovative approaches may prove effective at modifying or eliminating diseases association with AAT deficiency. PMID:15454659

  13. Current and emerging therapeutic options for the treatment of chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Muratore, Claudio A; Baranchuk, Adrian

    2010-01-01

    Chagas’ disease is an endemic disease in Latin America caused by a unicellular parasite (Trypanosoma cruzi) that affects almost 18 million people. This condition involves the heart, causing heart failure, arrhythmias, heart block, thromboembolism, stroke, and sudden death. In this article, we review the current and emerging treatment of Chagas’ cardiomyopathy focusing mostly on management of heart failure and arrhythmias. Heart failure therapeutical options including drugs, stem cells and heart transplantation are revised. Antiarrhythmic drugs, catheter ablation, and intracardiac devices are discussed as well. Finally, the evidence for a potential role of specific antiparasitic treatment for the prevention of cardiovascular disease is reviewed. PMID:20730015

  14. Sensitivity and Specificity of Empiric Treatment for Sexually Transmitted Infections in a Pediatric Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Breslin, Kristen; Tuchman, Lisa; Hayes, Katie L; Badolato, Gia; Goyal, Monika K

    2017-10-01

    To determine test characteristics of provider judgment for empiric antibiotic provision to patients undergoing testing for a sexually transmitted infection. We conducted a retrospective cross-sectional electronic health record review of all patients aged 13-19 years who had Neisseria gonorrhoeae (GC) and Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) testing sent from an urban, academic pediatric emergency department in 2012. We abstracted data, including patient demographics, chief complaint, sexually transmitted infection test results, and treatment. We calculated test characteristics comparing clinician judgment for presumptive treatment for a sexually transmitted infection with the reference standard of the actual results of testing for a sexually transmitted infection. Of 1223 patient visits meeting inclusion criteria, 284 (23.2%) had a positive GC and/or CT test result. Empiric treatment was provided in 615 encounters (50.3%). Provider judgment for presumptive treatment had an overall sensitivity of 67.6% (95% CI, 61.8-73.0) and a specificity of 55% (95% CI, 51.7-58.2) for accurate GC and/or CT detection. Many adolescents tested for GC and CT receive empiric treatment at the initial emergency department visit. Provider judgment may lack sufficient sensitivity and specificity for identifying infected patients, resulting in the potential for undertreatment of true disease, overtreatment of uninfected patients, or both. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Increased Medicaid Financing and Equalization of African Americans' and Whites' Outpatient and Emergency Treatment Expenditures.

    PubMed

    Snowden, Lonnie R; Wallace, Neal; Cordell, Kate; Graaf, Genevieve

    2016-09-01

    We investigated whether a new funding opportunity to finance mental health treatment, provided to autonomous county-level mental health systems without customary cost sharing requirements, equalized African American and White children's outpatient and emergency treatment expenditure inequalities. Using Whites as a benchmark, we considered expenditure patterns favoring Whites over African Americans ("disparities") and favoring African Americans over Whites ("reverse disparities"). Settlement-mandated Early Periodic Screening Diagnosis and Treatment (EPSDT) expenditure increases began in the third quarter of 1995. We analyzed Medi-Cal paid claims for mental health services delivered to youth (under 18 years of age) over 64 quarters for a study period covering July 1, 1991 through June 30, 2007 in controlled cross-sectional (systems), longitudinal (quarters) analyses. Settlement-mandated increases in EPSDT treatment funding was associated with relatively greater African American vs. White expenditures for outpatient care when systems initially spent more on Whites. When systems initially spent more on African Americans, relative increases were greater for Whites for outpatient and emergency services. With new funding that requires no matching funds from the county, county mental health systems did reduce outpatient treatment expenditure inequalities. This was found to be true in counties that initially favored African Americans and in counties that initially favored Whites. Adopting a systems level perspective and taking account of initial conditions and trends can be critical for understanding inequalities.

  16. Comparative assessment of the environmental sustainability of existing and emerging perchlorate treatment technologies for drinking water.

    PubMed

    Choe, Jong Kwon; Mehnert, Michelle H; Guest, Jeremy S; Strathmann, Timothy J; Werth, Charles J

    2013-05-07

    Environmental impacts of conventional and emerging perchlorate drinking water treatment technologies were assessed using life cycle assessment (LCA). Comparison of two ion exchange (IX) technologies (i.e., nonselective IX with periodic regeneration using brines and perchlorate-selective IX without regeneration) at an existing plant shows that brine is the dominant contributor for nonselective IX, which shows higher impact than perchlorate-selective IX. Resource consumption during the operational phase comprises >80% of the total impacts. Having identified consumables as the driving force behind environmental impacts, the relative environmental sustainability of IX, biological treatment, and catalytic reduction technologies are compared more generally using consumable inputs. The analysis indicates that the environmental impacts of heterotrophic biological treatment are 2-5 times more sensitive to influent conditions (i.e., nitrate/oxygen concentration) and are 3-14 times higher compared to IX. However, autotrophic biological treatment is most environmentally beneficial among all. Catalytic treatment using carbon-supported Re-Pd has a higher (ca. 4600 times) impact than others, but is within 0.9-30 times the impact of IX with a newly developed ligand-complexed Re-Pd catalyst formulation. This suggests catalytic reduction can be competitive with increased activity. Our assessment shows that while IX is an environmentally competitive, emerging technologies also show great promise from an environmental sustainability perspective.

  17. The ability of biologically based wastewater treatment systems to remove emerging organic contaminants--a review.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Rodríguez, Aida; Matamoros, Víctor; Fontàs, Clàudia; Salvadó, Victòria

    2014-10-01

    Biologically based wastewater treatment systems are considered a sustainable, cost-effective alternative to conventional wastewater treatment systems. These systems have been used and studied for the treatment of urban sewage from small communities, and recently, it has been reported that they can also effectively remove emerging organic contaminants (EOCs). EOCs are a new group of unregulated contaminants which include pharmaceutical and personal care products, some pesticides, veterinary products, and industrial compounds among others that are thought to have long-term adverse effects on human health and ecosystems. This review is focused on reporting the ability of biologically based wastewater treatment systems to remove EOCs and the main elimination mechanisms and degradation processes (i.e., biodegradation, photodegradation, phytoremediation, and sorption) taking place in constructed wetlands, ponds, and Daphnia and fungal reactors.

  18. Conventional and emerging treatments in the management of acute primary angle closure

    PubMed Central

    Boey, Pui Yi; Singhal, Shweta; Perera, Shamira A; Aung, Tin

    2012-01-01

    The management of acute primary angle closure is directed at lowering the intraocular pressure and relieving pupil block. Conventional treatment involves the use of medical treatment and laser peripheral iridotomy, respectively, as a means for achieving these aims. Newer therapeutic strategies have been described that are potentially useful adjuncts or alternatives to conventional treatment. Emerging strategies that lower intraocular pressure include anterior chamber paracentesis, as well as laser procedures such as iridoplasty and pupilloplasty. A possible alternative to relieving pupil block is lens extraction, and may be combined with adjunctive measures such as goniosynechiolysis and viscogoniosynechiolysis. Trabeculectomy has a limited role in the acute setting. This review paper reviews the current evidence regarding conventional and newer treatment modalities for acute primary angle closure. PMID:22536030

  19. Emerging Technology Summary. ACID EXTRACTION TREATMENT SYSTEM FOR TREATMENT OF METAL CONTAMINATED SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Acid Extraction Treatment System (AETS) is intended to reduce the concentrations and/or teachability of heavy metals in contaminated soils so the soil can be returned to the site from which it originated. The objective of the project was to determine the effectiveness and com...

  20. Emerging treatment options for refractory angina pectoris: ranolazine, shock wave treatment, and cell-based therapies.

    PubMed

    Gennari, Marco; Gambini, Elisa; Bassetti, Beatrice; Capogrossi, Maurizio; Pompilio, Giulio

    2014-01-01

    A challenge of modern cardiovascular medicine is to find new, effective treatments for patients with refractory angina pectoris, a clinical condition characterized by severe angina despite optimal medical therapy. These patients are not candidates for surgical or percutaneous revascularization. Herein we review the most up-to-date information regarding the modern approach to the patient with refractory angina pectoris, from conventional medical management to new medications and shock wave therapy, focusing on the use of endothelial precursor cells (EPCs) in the treatment of this condition. Clinical limitations of the efficiency of conventional approaches justify the search for new therapeutic options. Regenerative medicine is considered the next step in the evolution of organ replacement therapy. It is driven largely by the same health needs as transplantation and replacement therapies, but it aims further than traditional approaches, such as cell-based therapy. Increasing knowledge of the role of circulating cells derived from bone marrow (EPCs) on cardiovascular homeostasis in physiologic and pathologic conditions has prompted the clinical use of these cells to relieve ischemia. The current state of therapeutic angiogenesis still leaves many questions unanswered. It is of paramount importance that the treatment is delivered safely. Direct intramyocardial and intracoronary administration has demonstrated acceptable safety profiles in early trials, and may represent a major advance over surgical thoracotomy. The combined efforts of bench and clinical researchers will ultimately answer the question of whether cell therapy is a suitable strategy for treatment of patients with refractory angina.

  1. Emerging Technology Summary. ACID EXTRACTION TREATMENT SYSTEM FOR TREATMENT OF METAL CONTAMINATED SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Acid Extraction Treatment System (AETS) is intended to reduce the concentrations and/or teachability of heavy metals in contaminated soils so the soil can be returned to the site from which it originated. The objective of the project was to determine the effectiveness and com...

  2. Treatment of schizophrenia with antipsychotics in Norwegian emergency wards, a cross-sectional national study

    PubMed Central

    Kroken, Rune A; Johnsen, Erik; Ruud, Torleif; Wentzel-Larsen, Tore; Jørgensen, Hugo A

    2009-01-01

    Background Surveys on prescription patterns for antipsychotics in the Scandinavian public health system are scarce despite the prevalent use of these drugs. The clinical differences between antipsychotic drugs are mainly in the areas of safety and tolerability, and international guidelines for the treatment of schizophrenia offer rational strategies to minimize the burden of side effects related to antipsychotic treatment. The implementation of treatment guidelines in clinical practice have proven difficult to achieve, as reflected by major variations in the prescription patterns of antipsychotics between different comparable regions and countries. The objective of this study was to evaluate the practice of treatment of schizophrenic patients with antipsychotics at discharge from acute inpatient settings at a national level. Methods Data from 486 discharges of patients from emergency inpatient treatment of schizophrenia were collected during a three-month period in 2005; the data were collected in a large national study that covered 75% of Norwegian hospitals receiving inpatients for acute treatment. Antipsychotic treatment, demographic variables, scores from the Global Assessment of Functioning and Health of the Nation Outcome Scales and information about comorbid conditions and prior treatment were analyzed to seek predictors for nonadherence to guidelines. Results In 7.6% of the discharges no antipsychotic treatment was given; of the remaining discharges, 35.6% were prescribed antipsychotic polypharmacy and 41.9% were prescribed at least one first-generation antipsychotic (FGA). The mean chlorpromazine equivalent dose was 450 (SD 347, range 25–2800). In the multivariate regression analyses, younger age, previous inpatient treatment in the previous 12 months before index hospitalization, and a comorbid diagnosis of personality disorder or mental retardation predicted antipsychotic polypharmacy, while previous inpatient treatment in the previous 12 months also

  3. Identifying a need for more focused treatment of chlamydia and gonorrhoea in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Sean P; Knych, McKenna; Iordanova, Rossitza; Mahan, Meredith; Vohra, Taher

    2016-10-01

    The indolent nature of chlamydia and gonorrhoea, along with the time delay associated with current diagnostic testing, makes definitive diagnosis while in the emergency department impossible. We therefore sought to determine the proportion of patients who receive accurate, presumptive antimicrobial treatment for these infections. A retrospective chart review was performed on all patient encounters that underwent chlamydia and gonorrhoea testing at an urban emergency department during a single month in 2012. Each encounter was reviewed for nucleic acid amplification test results and whether presumptive antibiotics were given during the initial visit. A total of 639 patient encounters were reviewed; 87.2% were female and the mean age was 26.7 years. Chlamydia was present in 11.1%, with women and men having similar infection rates: 10.6% vs. 14.6% (p = 0.277). Gonorrhoea was present in 5.0%, with a lower prevalence among women than men: 3.2% vs. 17.1% (p < 0.001). Women received presumptive treatment less often than men: 37.7% vs. 82.9% (p < 0.001). Presumptive treatment was less accurate in women than men: 7.9% vs. 25.6% (p < 0.001). After combining genders, 10.2% received accurate presumptive treatment; 33.3% were overtreated and 4.4% missed treatment. Presumptive treatment for chlamydia and gonorrhoea was more frequent and more accurate in men than in women. Overall, one-third of patients received unnecessary antibiotics, yet nearly 5% missed treatment. Better methods are needed for identifying patients who need treatment.

  4. Adrenaline in anaphylaxis treatment and self-administration: experience from an inner city emergency department.

    PubMed

    Mostmans, Y; Grosber, M; Blykers, M; Mols, P; Naeije, N; Gutermuth, J

    2017-03-01

    Anaphylaxis is a life-threatening emergency of which reliable epidemiological data are lacking. This study aimed to analyze how quickly patients presenting with anaphylaxis were treated in emergency and whether treatment followed the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI) guidelines. Patient data were collected between April 2009 and April 2013. Emergency doctors completed a questionnaire for adult patients presenting at the emergency department (ED) of the St. Pierre hospital in Brussels with anaphylaxis. Inclusion criteria were based on the Sampson criteria of anaphylaxis. Data were analyzed using a Microsoft Excel database. About 0.04% (100/230878) of all emergency visits in adults presented with anaphylaxis. 64% of patients received their first medical help later than 30 min after symptom onset. 67% of patients received adrenaline, 85% oral antihistamines, and 89% received IV glucocorticosteroids. 46/100 patients were discharged directly from the ED, of which 87% received further medical prescriptions for self-administration: 67% corticosteroids, 83% antihistamines, and 9% intramuscular adrenaline. 74% were instructed to consult an allergologist for adequate diagnosis. 54/100 patients were hospitalized. The majority of patients were treated according to the EAACI guidelines for management of anaphylaxis, but only a minority received the recommended adrenaline auto-injector for self-administration at discharge. Because the majority of patients received medical help later than 30 min after symptom onset, adrenaline auto-injector prescription is a necessity. The low rate of doctors prescribing adrenaline auto-injectors in the ED setting underlines the need to train doctors of various backgrounds in prevention and treatment of anaphylaxis and the close collaboration with allergologists. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Discontinuation symptoms and taper/poststudy-emergent adverse events with desvenlafaxine treatment for major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Stuart A; Fava, Maurizio; Padmanabhan, Sudharshan K; Guico-Pabia, Christine J; Tourian, Karen A

    2009-11-01

    The objective of this study was to assess discontinuation symptoms with desvenlafaxine (administered as desvenlafaxine succinate) treatment for major depressive disorder. Data were analyzed from nine 8-week, double-blind (DB), placebo-controlled studies of desvenlafaxine (50, 100, 200, or 400 mg/day; placebo, n = 319; desvenlafaxine, n = 578) and a relapse-prevention study [12-week, open-label (OL) 200 or 400 mg/day desvenlafaxine (n = 373); 6-month DB placebo (n = 73) or desvenlafaxine (n = 118)]. Rates of taper/poststudy-emergent adverse events were summarized. Discontinuation-Emergent Signs and Symptoms (DESS) checklist scores were analyzed in treatment completers at the end of OL and DB treatment. The most common (> or = 5%) taper/poststudy-emergent adverse events among desvenlafaxine patients were dizziness, nausea, headache, irritability, diarrhea, anxiety, abnormal dreams, fatigue, and hyperhidrosis. In the short-term studies, the highest DESS scores observed for desvenlafaxine groups occurred at first assessment after discontinuation of all active treatment (1.9-5.7). Desvenlafaxine 50- and 100-mg/day groups had significantly increased scores versus placebo (P values < or = 0.028). DESS scores increased significantly for patients discontinuing 12-week, OL desvenlafaxine 200 and 400 mg/day doses compared with those continuing desvenlafaxine (P values < or = 0.022). After the 6-month DB phase, DESS scores increased significantly compared with placebo for patients discontinuing 400 mg/day only (P = 0.029). In conclusion, cessation of desvenlafaxine use is associated with discontinuation symptoms after both short-term and long-term treatment.

  6. Adhesions small bowel obstruction in emergency setting: conservative or operative treatment?

    PubMed Central

    ASSENZA, M.; DE GRUTTOLA, I.; ROSSI, D.; CASTALDI, S.; FALASCHI, F.; GIULIANO, G.

    2016-01-01

    Adhesions small bowel obstructions (aSBO) are among the leading causes of emergency operative intervention. About the 80% of aSBO cases resolve without a surgical treatment. It’s important to identify which patients could undergo a conservative treatment to prevent an useless surgery The aim of this study is to determine findings that can indicate whether patients with aSBO should undergo a conservative or a surgical treatment. 313 patients with diagnosis of submission of aSBO were restudied. Patients were divided into two groups based on the different type of treatment received, 225 patients who underwent surgical treatment within 24 hours after admission, 88 patients which underwent conservative treatment successfully. For each patient, clinical, hematochemical and radiological findings have been analysed. The treatment of aSBO should be, at the beginning, conservative except that cases that presents clinical and/or CT-scan findings predictive for a surgical treatment (free peritoneal fluid, mesenterial edema, transitional point) or a peritonitis (pneumatosis intestinalis, pneumoperitoneum). PMID:27938529

  7. Association of antidepressant treatment with emergency admission to medical units for patients 65 years or older.

    PubMed

    Ortuño, Noèlia; Cobo, Jesús; González, Espe; García, Imma; Ferrer, María-Dolores; Campos, Carmen; Planet, Núria; Oliva, Joan-Carles; Suárez, Mónica; Iglesias-Lepine, María-Luisa; García-Parés, Gemma

    There is increasing evidence relating the presence of depression in seniors and the risk of hospital admission in medical departments from the Emergency Services. To determine the impact of antidepressant treatment (ATD) as a protective factor for emergency hospitalization in older people. All patients aged 65 and over who required urgent attention for medical reasons at the Emergency Department of the Corporació Sanitària i Universitària Parc Taulí (Sabadell, Barcelona, Spain) for the period between January and October 2012 were included in the study. Sociodemographic variables, alcohol and tobacco use, medical history and psychopharmacological treatment were obtained. The necessary sample size was calculated and a simple randomization was performed. Subsequently, a descriptive statistical analysis and parametric tests were conducted. A total of 674 patients (53% women) were evaluated, with a mean age of 78.45 years, and 27.6% of the cases (71% women) were receiving ATD. Among the 333 admitted patients (50%), 83 individuals (24.6%) had previously received ATD; this contrasts with the 103 cases (30.6%) of prior ATD treatment among the patients who were not admitted. After comparative analysis, the relationship between previous use of ATD and being admitted to hospital was not statistically significant in our global sample. This relationship was only statistically significant among the group aged 75 and over (neg. sig. 0.012). In our study, ATD was associated with a decreased risk of hospital admission for urgent medical conditions in people aged 75 and over. Treating depression may protect the elderly against admission to the Emergency department and may potentially be a quality criterion in preventing complications in this population. Copyright © 2014 SEP y SEPB. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Reduced Treatment-Emergent Sexual Dysfunction as a Potential Target in the Development of New Antidepressants

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, David S.; Palazzo, M. Carlotta; Masdrakis, Vasilios G.

    2013-01-01

    Pleasurable sexual activity is an essential component of many human relationships, providing a sense of physical, psychological, and social well-being. Epidemiological and clinical studies show that depressive symptoms and depressive illness are associated with impairments in sexual function and satisfaction, both in untreated and treated patients. The findings of randomized placebo-controlled trials demonstrate that most of the currently available antidepressant drugs are associated with the development or worsening of sexual dysfunction, in a substantial proportion of patients. Sexual difficulties during antidepressant treatment often resolve as depression lifts but can endure over long periods and may reduce self-esteem and affect mood and relationships adversely. Sexual dysfunction during antidepressant treatment is typically associated with many possible causes, but the risk and type of dysfunction vary with differing compounds and should be considered when making decisions about the relative merits and drawbacks of differing antidepressants. A range of interventions can be considered when managing patients with sexual dysfunction associated with antidepressants, including the prescription of phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors, but none of these approaches can be considered “ideal.” As treatment-emergent sexual dysfunction is less frequent with certain drugs, presumably related to differences in their pharmacological properties, and because current management approaches are less than ideal, a reduced burden of treatment-emergent sexual dysfunction represents a tolerability target in the development of novel antidepressants. PMID:23431429

  9. Neonatal infections due to multi-resistant strains: Epidemiology, current treatment, emerging therapeutic approaches and prevention.

    PubMed

    Tzialla, Chryssoula; Borghesi, Alessandro; Pozzi, Margherita; Stronati, Mauro

    2015-12-07

    Severe infections represent the main cause of neonatal mortality accounting for more than one million neonatal deaths worldwide every year. Antibiotics are the most commonly prescribed medications in neonatal intensive care units. The benefits of antibiotic therapy when indicated are clearly enormous, but the continued and widespread use of antibiotics has generated over the years a strong selective pressure on microorganisms, favoring the emergence of resistant strains. Health agencies worldwide are galvanizing attention toward antibiotic resistance in gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Infections in neonatal units due to multidrug and extensively multidrug resistant bacteria are rising and are already seriously challenging antibiotic treatment options. While there is a growing choice of agents against multi-resistant gram-positive bacteria, new options for multi-resistant gram-negative bacteria in the clinical practice have decreased significantly in the last 20 years making the treatment of infections caused by multidrug-resistant pathogens challenging mostly in neonates. Treatment options are currently limited and will be some years before any new treatment for neonates become available for clinical use, if ever. The aim of the review is to highlight the current knowledge on antibiotic resistance in the neonatal population, the possible therapeutic choices, and the prevention strategies to adopt in order to reduce the emergency and spread of resistant strains.

  10. Salbutamol with metered dose inhalers with spacers - an established emergency treatment for preschool wheeze.

    PubMed

    Mecklin, Minna; Paassilta, Marita; Korppi, Matti

    2012-11-01

    Metered dose inhalers (MDI) with spacers were implemented to treat preschool wheeze in the emergency room (ER) and hospital in 2006 in our children's hospital. The implementation at day time happened successfully within 4 months, but not at night time. The objective of the present study was to check the treatment mode, hospitalization rate and length of hospital stay (LOS) 4 years later. The present retrospective hospital chart review was identical to the review 4 years earlier, including data collection on treatment mode in 1- to-5-year-old preschool wheezers in the ER, on need of hospitalization, on treatment mode in hospital and on LOS. Both studies were performed during the same late-autumn and early-winter months. In the ER, 96% of the children with preschool wheeze were treated with salbutamol using MDIs with spacers. Hospitalization rate was 51%, and all but one were treated with MDIs with spacers in hospital at both day and night time. Mean LOS was 2.48 days, being shorter than 4 years earlier. Administration of salbutamol using MDI with spacer became an established emergency treatment of preschool wheeze within 4 years after the initial change from nebulizers to MDIs with spacers. © 2012 The Author(s)/Acta Paediatrica © 2012 Foundation Acta Paediatrica.

  11. [Emergency treatment of epilepsy with Yamamoto New Scalp Acupuncture (YNSA) and body acupuncture – acupuncture in emergency medicine: a case report].

    PubMed

    Schockert, Thomas; Dittmar, Frank; Gleditsch, Jochen M

    2012-01-01

    Worldwide, acupuncture is used in conflict areas and increasingly also as a supportive measure in emergency medicine. In this case, the treatment of epilepsy, masseter cramp, unconsciousness and respiratory arrest by means of YNSA and body acupuncture with only 3 acupuncture needles is described. The 3 points used were YNSA basal ganglia point, Renzhong and Qiangu. After application of the needles, the epileptic fit stopped, the unconscious patient opened his mouth and started breathing spontaneously. In this case, acupuncture simplified the emergency procedure as a supportive treatment method and provided the patient with fast and safe relief.

  12. Transdiagnostic Motivational Enhancement Therapy to Reduce Treatment Attrition: Use in Emerging Adults

    PubMed Central

    Mistler, Lisa A.; Sheidow, Ashli J.; Davis, Maryann

    2017-01-01

    Improving outcomes of youth with mental health (MH) needs as they transition into adulthood is of critical public health significance. Effective psychotherapy MH treatment is available, but can be effective only if the emerging adult (EA) attends long enough to benefit. Unfortunately, completion of psychotherapy among EAs is lower than for more mature adults (Edlund et al., 2002; Olfson, Marcus, Druss, & Pincus, 2002). To target the high attrition of EAs in MH treatment, investigators adapted a developmentally appropriate brief intervention aimed at reducing treatment attrition (TA) in psychotherapy and conducted a feasibility study of implementation. The intervention employs motivational interviewing strategies aimed at engaging and retaining EAs in outpatient MH treatment. Motivational enhancement therapy for treatment attrition, or MET-TA, takes only a few sessions at the outset of treatment as an adjunct to usual treatment. Importantly, it can be used for TA with psychotherapy for any MH condition; in other words, it is transdiagnostic. This article presents the first description of MET-TA, along with a case example that demonstrates important characteristics of the approach, and then briefly describes implementation feasibility based on a small pilot randomized controlled trial. PMID:28979088

  13. Patients' preference of established and emerging treatment options for obstructive sleep apnoea.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Tessa; Pengo, Martino F; Steier, Joerg

    2015-05-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is the most common form of sleep-disordered breathing. The standard treatment, continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), has limited long-term compliance. Alternative treatment options are required and new methods, including hypoglossal nerve stimulation (HNS) and continuous transcutaneous electrical stimulation (CTES), are currently emerging. We report on patients' preference for different treatments of OSA. We recorded patients' age, gender, body mass index (BMI), Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire with 10 questions (FOSQ10), severity of OSA, and current treatment. We showed pictures of existing [CPAP, mandibular advancement device (MAD)] and emerging treatments (HNS and CTES). We then asked (I) whether participants were interested in further information about HNS/CTES; (II) if they would be willing to try HNS/CTES; and (III) if they were to choose only one of the four listed treatments, which one would they prefer to use every night. One hundred sixty-two patients completed the survey {81 males, mean age 52 [12] years, BMI 34 [7] kg/m(2), ESS 10.2 (6.0) points, FOSQ10 28.5 (8.1) points}. The majority of the respondents (89.5%) had been diagnosed with OSA. A total of 91.3% of the respondents were interested in more information and were willing to try HNS/CTES. Most respondents preferred the potential use of CTES (56.7%), while 21.7% chose HNS, 17.8% CPAP, and 3.8% the MAD. There were no differences in the characteristics of the patients who preferred CTES compared to those who preferred other treatments, but a regression analysis revealed that a low ESS score was an independent predictor of patients choosing CTES (P<0.05). More than 9 out of 10 of the respondents were interested in trying emerging technologies to treat OSA, most preferring CTES. Less sleepy patients were more likely to choose less invasive treatments. These findings will likely impact on future research and development of

  14. Patients’ preference of established and emerging treatment options for obstructive sleep apnoea

    PubMed Central

    Pengo, Martino F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is the most common form of sleep-disordered breathing. The standard treatment, continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), has limited long-term compliance. Alternative treatment options are required and new methods, including hypoglossal nerve stimulation (HNS) and continuous transcutaneous electrical stimulation (CTES), are currently emerging. We report on patients’ preference for different treatments of OSA. Methods We recorded patients’ age, gender, body mass index (BMI), Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire with 10 questions (FOSQ10), severity of OSA, and current treatment. We showed pictures of existing [CPAP, mandibular advancement device (MAD)] and emerging treatments (HNS and CTES). We then asked (I) whether participants were interested in further information about HNS/CTES; (II) if they would be willing to try HNS/CTES; and (III) if they were to choose only one of the four listed treatments, which one would they prefer to use every night. Results One hundred sixty-two patients completed the survey {81 males, mean age 52 [12] years, BMI 34 [7] kg/m2, ESS 10.2 (6.0) points, FOSQ10 28.5 (8.1) points}. The majority of the respondents (89.5%) had been diagnosed with OSA. A total of 91.3% of the respondents were interested in more information and were willing to try HNS/CTES. Most respondents preferred the potential use of CTES (56.7%), while 21.7% chose HNS, 17.8% CPAP, and 3.8% the MAD. There were no differences in the characteristics of the patients who preferred CTES compared to those who preferred other treatments, but a regression analysis revealed that a low ESS score was an independent predictor of patients choosing CTES (P<0.05). Conclusions More than 9 out of 10 of the respondents were interested in trying emerging technologies to treat OSA, most preferring CTES. Less sleepy patients were more likely to choose less invasive treatments. These findings will likely impact

  15. [Diagnosis and treatment in the emergency room of acute asthma in childhood].

    PubMed

    Aldana Vergara, Ruth Saraí; Olivar Lòpez, Victor; Sienra Monge, Juan José Luis; Lezana Fernández, José Luis; Zepeda Ortega, Benjamin

    2009-01-01

    Acute asthma is characterized by acute air way obstruction episodes presented as short breath, increased coughing, wheezing and difficult breathing, reversible with bronchodilator. It constitutes one of the most frequent causes of pediatric ER visits whose diagnosis and treatment is not always adequate. It is necessary to carry out a complete medical history searching for the number of previous attacks, risk factors, associated illnesses, triggers, prior hospitalizations, preventive and maintenance treatment used, along with a complete physical examination. During the management of moderate-severe attacks frequent systematic assessments are required to ensure treatment response. In children above 5 years old, monitoring of expiratory peak flow (EPF) during mild-moderate attacks is recommended. In general, a national consensus to classify and treat acute asthma in emergency services does not exist for which the need to develop a clinical practice guide of diagnosis and management arises.

  16. Recent Patents and Emerging Therapeutics in the Treatment of Allergic Conjunctivitis

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Gyan P.; Tamboli, Viral; Jwala, Jwala; Mitra, Ashim K.

    2011-01-01

    Ocular allergy is an inflammatory response of the conjunctival mucosa that also affects the cornea and eyelids. Allergic conjunctivitis includes seasonal allergic conjunctivitis (SAC), perennial allergic conjunctivitis (PAC), vernal keratoconjunctivitis (VKC), atopic keratoconjunctivitis (AKC) and giant papillary conjunctivitis (GPC). In general, allergic conditions involve mast cell degranulation that leads to release of inflammatory mediators and activation of enzymatic cascades generating pro-inflammatory mediators. In chronic ocular inflammatory disorders associated with mast cell activation such as VKC and AKC constant inflammatory response is observed due to predominance of inflammatory mediators such as eosinophils and Th2-generated cytokines. Antihistamines, mast-cell stabilizers, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents, corticosteroids and immunomodulatory agents are commonly indicated for the treatment of acute and chronic allergic conjunctivitis. In recent years newer drug molecules have been introduced in the treatment of allergic conjunctivitis. This article reviews recent patents and emerging therapeutics in the treatment of allergic conjunctivitis. PMID:21171952

  17. Emergency Medical Treatment and Labor Act: what every physician should know about the federal antidumping law.

    PubMed

    Hyman, David A; Studdert, David M

    2015-06-01

    Since 1986, the Emergency Medical Treatment and Labor Act (EMTALA) has imposed an obligation on hospitals and physicians to evaluate and stabilize patients who present to a hospital ED seeking care. Available sanctions for noncompliance include fines, damages awarded in civil litigation, and exclusion from Medicare. EMTALA uses several terms that are familiar to physicians (eg, "emergency medical condition," "stabilize," and "transfer"), but the statutory definitions do not map neatly onto the way in which these terms are used and understood in clinical settings. Thus, there is potential for a mismatch between a physician's on-the-spot professional judgment and what the statute demands. We review what every physician should know about EMTALA and answer six common questions about the law.

  18. The emergency medicine approach to the evaluation and treatment of pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Church, Amy; Tichauer, Matthew

    2012-12-01

    Each year in the United States, up to 900,000 individuals will suffer from acute pulmonary embolism, resulting in an estimated 200,000 to 300,000 hospital admissions. Despite decades of research on the topic, the diagnosis remains elusive in many situations and the fatality rate remains significant. This issue presents a review of the current evidence guiding the emergency medicine approach to the diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary embolism. Key to this approach is the concept of risk stratification: using factors from the history and physical examination, plus ancillary tests, to guide clinical decision making. The pathophysiology of pulmonary embolism and decision-support tools are reviewed, and emergency department management strategies are described.

  19. Pelvic inflammatory disease: diagnosis and treatment in the emergency department [digest].

    PubMed

    Bugg, Charles Walter; Taira, Taku; Zaurova, Milana

    2016-12-22

    Pelvic inflammatory disease is a common disease that is associated with significant complications including infertility, chronic pelvic pain, ruptured tubo-ovarian abscess, and ectopic pregnancy. The diagnosis may be delayed when the presentation has nonspecific signs and symptoms. Even when it is properly identified, pelvic inflammatory disease is often treated suboptimally. This review provides evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis, treatment, disposition, and follow-up of patients with pelvic inflammatory disease. Arranging follow-up of patients within 48 to 72 hours and providing clear patient education are fundamental to ensuring good patient outcomes. Emerging issues, including new pathogens and evolving resistance patterns among pelvic inflammatory disease pathogens are reviewed. [Points & Pearls is a digest of Emergency Medicine Practice].

  20. Emerging roles for miRNAs in the development, diagnosis, and treatment of diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    DiStefano, Johanna K; Taila, Matthew; Alvarez, M Lucrecia

    2013-08-01

    Although the causes of diabetic nephropathy are not yet fully known, emerging evidence suggests a role for epigenetic factors in the development of the disease. In particular, microRNAs (miRNAs) are becoming recognized as important mediators of biological processes relevant to diabetic nephropathy. Until recently, investigations of miRNAs in the development of diabetic nephropathy have remained relatively limited; however, the number of reports identifying potential new candidates and mechanisms of impact is presently expanding at a rapid pace. This review seeks to summarize these recent findings, focusing on new candidates and/or novel mechanisms, including the intersection between genetic variation and miRNA function in modulating disease expression, emerging in the field. We also review the latest advances in the diagnostic and therapeutic potential of miRNAs in the treatment of diabetic nephropathy.

  1. Self-Medication: Initial Treatments Used by Patients Seen in an Ophthalmologic Emergency Room

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Regina Souza; Kara-José, Newton; Temporini, Edméa Rita; Kara-Junior, Newton; Noma-Campos, Regina

    2009-01-01

    OJECTIVE This study seeks to identify practices of self-medication in the treatment of ocular emergencies. We examine patients’ use of both homemade preparations and manufactured products before seeking specialized care. MATERIALS AND METHODS We conducted a cross-sectional analytic survey of consecutive patients seen in the ophthalmology emergency room of a teaching hospital. RESULTS The sample included 561 subjects, 51.3% males and 48.7% females, with a mean age of 39.8 years. Prior to seeking emergency care, 40.5% reported self-medicating; 29.4% used a homemade preparation (13.9% referred to an industrialized product like boric acid as a homemade preparation), and 11.1% used a manufactured product. The most frequently used products included a boric acid solution (53.3%), a normal saline solution (35.7%), herbal infusions (6.1%) and breast milk (4.8%). Viral conjunctivitis was the most frequent diagnosis (24.4%), followed by the presence of a corneal foreign body (7.4%). No significant differences were found in the self-treatment of ocular injuries according to gender (p = 0.95), level of education (p = 0.21) or age (p = 0.14). In addition, self-medication practices were not related to the medically judged severity of the condition. CONCLUSION Patients often attempt to treat conditions that require ophthalmologic emergency care by self-medicating with homemade or manufactured products. The most widely used products include boric acid, normal saline, leaf infusions and breast milk. This behavior occurs independently of educational level, gender, age or the nature of the ocular condition. Self-medication is a culturally driven practice that is used even in cases of acute ocular injuries. PMID:19690656

  2. [A survey of emergency treatment of pesticides poisoning in comprehensive hospitals].

    PubMed

    Chen, Shu-Yang; Zhou, Jing; Li, Zhong-Jie; Wu, Yi-Qun

    2004-10-01

    To seek the characteristics of pesticide poisoning in emergency departments. Twenty-five hospitals were selected. Among them, they were 14 province or city level and 11 county level. The object of study was the patients with pesticide poisoning who were first visit to a doctor (including transfer to the above emergency departments of hospitals) from July 1, 2001 to June 30, 2002. There were 2 261 cases of pesticide poisoning that ranked third place of total acute poisoning cases at the same period. Gender ratio was 1 male to 1.47 female. Among 1 618 patients who first visited to emergency departments (excluding transfer), 43.9% were by emergency ambulance. 68.3% of total cases were caused by intentional exposure to pesticides, of which female accounted for 75.8%. Young people aged 15 to approximately 34 years accounted for 47.5% of all cases. Children (0 to approximately 14 years) also had relatively high pesticide poisoning rates, particularly an accident pesticide poisoning for 1- to approximately 4-year-old children accounted for 65.9% of total acute poisoning in the age group. 98.2% of all cases needed urgent medical treatment, and 52.4% were hospitalized. The leading occupation of patients was farmers followed by housekeepers, students and preschoolers. Insecticides poisoning accounted for 60.1% of all pesticides. The fatality rate in emergency department was 3.9%. 60.8% case was collected from county hospital. Pesticide poisoning rank first place of total acute poisoning cases in county hospital. A safety education of Knowledge Attitude Practice (KAP) is an effective measure for preventing pesticide poisoning.

  3. Treatment of emerging contaminants in wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) effluents by solar photocatalysis using low TiO2 concentrations.

    PubMed

    Prieto-Rodriguez, L; Miralles-Cuevas, S; Oller, I; Agüera, A; Li Puma, G; Malato, S

    2012-04-15

    The optimal photocatalyst concentration for industrial wastewater treatment in current photoreactor designs is several hundreds of milligrams per liter. However, the elimination of emerging contaminants (ECs), which are present at extremely low concentrations in waste water treatment plants (WWTP) effluents might be accomplished at much lower catalyst (TiO(2)) concentrations. One of the main drawbacks of reducing catalyst loading below the optimum is the loss of useful photons which instead are transmitted through the TiO(2) suspension without being absorbed by the catalyst. Accordingly, in this work, laboratory and solar pilot-scale experiments were performed with real WWTP effluents to evaluate the kinetics of photocatalytic degradation of 52 emerging contaminants under realistic (ppb) concentrations. The analysis of the samples was accomplished by solid phase extraction (SPE) followed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). In view of the results, low concentrations of TiO(2) of the order of tens of milligrams per liter were found to be insufficient for the degradation of the ECs in photoreactors with a short light-path length (29 cm). However, it was established that solar reactors of diameters of several hundreds of millimetres could be used for the efficient removal of ECs from WWTP effluents. The results presented show a general methodology for selecting the most efficient reactor diameter on the basis of the desired catalyst concentration.

  4. Treatment effects in the prostate including those associated with traditional and emerging therapies.

    PubMed

    Evans, Andrew J; Ryan, Paul; Van derKwast, Theodorus

    2011-07-01

    Classic treatment options for prostate cancer consist of radical prostatectomy, antiandrogen (or hormonal) therapy, and radiation therapy. Hormonal and radiation therapy, in particular, have well known, often profound effects on the histologic appearance of benign prostate tissue and prostatic carcinoma. The tissue changes induced by these treatments have been comprehensively described in several sources. Novel therapies ranging from focal ablative treatments to highly targeted molecular therapies are beginning to emerge and pathologists will play a central role in documenting the effects of these treatments on normal and malignant prostate tissue. It is therefore important that pathologists have access to basic treatment information and a solid working knowledge of the morphologic changes induced by these therapies. This will ensure accurate interpretation and reporting of posttreatment prostate specimens. This review is based on a presentation given by Dr A. Evans at the International Society of Urological Pathology Companion Society Meeting (Hot Topics in Urological Pathology) at The United States Canadian Academy of Pathology Meeting in Washington DC on March 20, 2010. This review will cover the histopathologic features seen in benign prostate tissue and prostatic carcinoma seen following: hormonal therapy, radiation therapy, ablative therapies such as vascular-targeted photodynamic therapy, interstitial laser thermotherapy, and high-intensity focussed ultrasound. An emphasis is placed on these specific modalities as they are currently in use as primary, salvage, or investigational therapy in the treatment of prostate cancer.

  5. The future of therapy for relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma: emerging agents and novel treatment strategies.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Philippe

    2012-07-01

    Treatment of relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma (MM) continues to present a therapeutic challenge. The immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs) thalidomide and lenalidomide, and the proteasome inhibitor (PI) bortezomib, have dramatically improved clinical outcomes for patients with newly diagnosed and relapsed/refractory MM. However, nearly all patients will eventually relapse or become refractory to these drugs. Numerous agents are currently in development for the treatment of relapsed/refractory MM. Those farthest along in clinical development include new IMiDs (pomalidomide), new PIs (eg, carfilzomib, MLN9708, and marizomib), histone deacetylase inhibitors (eg, panobinostat and vorinostat), monoclonal antibodies (eg, elotuzumab, siltuximab, and BT062), and signal transduction modulators (eg, perifosine). These emerging agents with diverse mechanisms of action have demonstrated promising anti-tumor activity in patients with relapsed/refractory MM, and rationally designed combinations with established agents are being investigated in the clinic. These new agents are creating opportunities to target multiple pathways, overcome resistance, and improve clinical outcomes, particularly for those patients who are refractory to approved novel agents. This article describes emerging antimyeloma agents in mid-stage to late-stage clinical development, and highlights the novel treatment approaches and combination strategies being evaluated in the relapsed/refractory setting. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Print media representations of UK Accident and Emergency treatment targets: Winter 2014-2015.

    PubMed

    Grant, Aimee; Hoyle, Louise

    2017-02-23

    To undertake an analysis of UK national daily newspaper coverage of accident and emergency treatment targets, in order to understand whether the media could be seen to be creating a scandal. Emergency department treatment targets have become common in developed countries. In the UK, hospitals are required to treat and discharge patients within four hours, and statistics are published daily. Breaches of targets are regularly reported by the UK print media. Exploratory research of tabloid newspaper articles that reported on four-hour treatment targets in the UK during a seven-month period over the winter of 2014-2015 (n = 1,317). An interpretivist thematic approach was used during analysis. The main "problem" identified by newspapers was the failure to meet the target, rather than negative effects on patient care (where they existed). Proposed solutions were diverse. Many articles did not describe who was to blame for the failure. We conclude that the media created a feeling of scandal, and hypothesise that this is related to political reasons and the availability of data on a daily basis. It is important for nursing staff to understand the influence of the media on patients and how stories are reported. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Is Renal Thrombotic Angiopathy an Emerging Problem in the Treatment of Ovarian Cancer Recurrences?

    PubMed Central

    Kwa, Maryann; Baumgartner, Robert; Shavit, Linda; Barash, Irina; Michael, Jeffrey; Puzanov, Igor; Kopolovic, Juri; Rosengarten, Ora; Blank, Stephanie; Curtin, John P.; Gabizon, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objective. Ovarian cancer is usually diagnosed at an advanced stage, with most patients undergoing surgery followed by platinum- and taxane-based chemotherapy. After initial clinical remission, the majority recur, leading to additional treatments, including not only platinums and taxanes but also pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD), gemcitabine, topotecan, and, more recently, bevacizumab, which may extend survival times. PLD, in particular, has been extensively studied by our group, with encouraging therapeutic results. We, however, observed instances of chronic kidney disease (CKD) developing among patients who received long-term treatment for recurrent ovarian cancer. To document the frequency and contributing factors to the emergence of CKD, we initiated a retrospective review at two institutions. Patients and Methods. Fifty-six consecutive patients with recurrent ovarian cancer receiving treatment at New York University Cancer Institute were reviewed for the presence of renal disease in 1997–2010. At Shaare Zedek Medical Center, 73 consecutive patients with ovarian cancer were reviewed in 2002–2010. Patients were diagnosed with CKD if they had an estimated GFR <60 mL/minute per 1.73 m2 for >3 months and were staged according to the National Kidney Foundation guidelines. Results. Thirteen patients (23%) developed stage ≥3 CKD. Three patients had renal biopsies performed that showed thrombotic microangiopathy. Conclusions. CKD is emerging as a potential long-term consequence of current chemotherapy for recurrent ovarian cancer. PMID:22622146

  8. Chronic Paroxetine Treatment Prevents the Emergence of Abnormal Electroencephalogram Oscillations in Huntington's Disease Mice.

    PubMed

    Kantor, Sandor; Varga, Janos; Kulkarni, Shreya; Morton, A Jennifer

    2017-06-26

    Disturbance of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep appears early in both patients with Huntington's disease (HD) and mouse models of HD. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are widely prescribed for patients with HD, and are also known to suppress REM sleep in healthy subjects. To test whether selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors can correct abnormal REM sleep and sleep-dependent brain oscillations in HD mice, we treated wild-type and symptomatic R6/2 mice acutely with vehicle and paroxetine (5, 10, and 20 mg/kg). In addition, we treated a group of R6/2 mice chronically with vehicle or paroxetine (20 mg/kg/day) for 8 weeks, with treatment starting before the onset of overt motor symptoms. During and after treatment, we recorded electroencephalogram/electromyogram from the mice. We found that both acute and chronic paroxetine treatment normalized REM sleep in R6/2 mice. However, only chronic paroxetine treatment prevented the emergence of abnormal low-gamma (25-45 Hz) electroencephalogram oscillations in R6/2 mice, an effect that persisted for at least 2 weeks after treatment stopped. Chronic paroxetine treatment also normalized REM sleep theta rhythm in R6/2 mice, but, interestingly, this effect was restricted to the treatment period. By contrast, acute paroxetine treatment slowed REM sleep theta rhythm in WT mice but had no effect on abnormal theta or low-gamma oscillations in R6/2 mice. Our data show that paroxetine treatment, when initiated before the onset of symptoms, corrects both REM sleep disturbances and abnormal brain oscillations, suggesting a possible mechanistic link between early disruption of REM sleep and the subsequent abnormal brain activity in HD mice.

  9. Asthma Trigger Reports Are Associated with Low Quality of Life, Exacerbations, and Emergency Treatments.

    PubMed

    Ritz, Thomas; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich; Klotsche, Jens; Mühlig, Stephan; Riedel, Oliver

    2016-02-01

    Despite the importance of trigger perceptions for asthma diagnosis and management, associations among asthma triggers, affective disorders, and asthma outcome have received little attention. Because anxiety and depression are known to influence patients' health reports, we measured and controlled for these affective disorders in analyzing associations among patient perceptions of asthma triggers and asthma treatment outcomes. Patients from a nationally representative sample of respiratory specialist practices (N = 459) were assessed for clinically significant anxiety and depression and completed questionnaires on asthma triggers, quality of life, and asthma control. Physicians recorded exacerbation and emergency treatment frequencies in the prior year, spirometric lung function, and allergy test results. Hierarchical multiple regressions examined associations among reported trigger factors, anxiety, depression, and asthma outcomes, including quality of life, asthma control, exacerbations, emergencies, and spirometry. Patients across asthma severity levels were well represented. Anxiety and depression were associated with more frequent nonallergic, in particular psychological, triggers. Controlling for demographics, asthma severity, anxiety, and depression, nonallergic asthma triggers (including psychological triggers) explained substantial portions of variance in asthma control (total of 19.5%, odds ratios [ORs] = 2.07-1.37 for individual triggers), asthma-related quality of life (total of 27.5%, ORs = 3.21-1.49), and general quality of life (total of 11.3%, ORs = 1.93-1.55). Psychological triggers were consistently associated with exacerbations and emergency treatments (ORs = 1.96-2.04) over and above other triggers and affective disorders. Spirometric lung function was largely unrelated to perceived asthma triggers. Patients' perceptions of asthma triggers are important determinants of asthma outcomes, which can help identify individuals at

  10. Emergency Coagulation Assessment During Treatment With Direct Oral Anticoagulants: Limitations and Solutions.

    PubMed

    Ebner, Matthias; Birschmann, Ingvild; Peter, Andreas; Härtig, Florian; Spencer, Charlotte; Kuhn, Joachim; Blumenstock, Gunnar; Zuern, Christine S; Ziemann, Ulf; Poli, Sven

    2017-09-01

    In patients receiving direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs), emergency treatment like thrombolysis for acute ischemic stroke is complicated by insufficient availability of DOAC-specific coagulation tests. Conflicting recommendations have been published concerning the use of global coagulation assays for ruling out relevant DOAC-induced anticoagulation. Four hundred eighty-one samples from 96 DOAC-treated patients were tested using prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) and thrombin time (TT), DOAC-specific assays (anti-Xa activity, diluted TT), and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Sensitivity and specificity of test results to identify DOAC concentrations <30 ng/mL were calculated. Receiver operating characteristic analyses were used to define reagent-specific cutoff values. Normal PT and aPTT provide insufficient specificity to safely identify DOAC concentrations <30 ng/mL (rivaroxaban/PT: specificity, 77%/sensitivity, 94%; apixaban/PT: specificity, 13%/sensitivity, 94%, dabigatran/aPTT: specificity, 49%/sensitivity, 91%). Normal TT was 100% specific for dabigatran, but sensitivity was 26%. In contrast, reagent-specific PT and aPTT cutoffs provided >95% specificity and a specific TT cutoff enhanced sensitivity for dabigatran to 84%. For apixaban, no cutoffs could be established. Even if highly DOAC-reactive reagents are used, normal results of global coagulation tests are not suited to guide emergency treatment: whereas normal PT and aPTT lack specificity to rule out DOAC-induced anticoagulation, the low sensitivity of normal TT excludes the majority of eligible patients from treatment. However, reagent-specific cutoffs for global coagulation tests ensure high specificity and optimize sensitivity for safe emergency decision making in rivaroxaban- and dabigatran-treated patients. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifiers: NCT02371044 and NCT02371070. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Travel medicine physician adherence to guidelines for the emergency self treatment of malaria.

    PubMed

    Flaherty, Gerard T; Walden, Lucas M; Townend, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Few studies have examined emergency self treatment (EST) antimalarial prescribing patterns. 110 physician-members of the Travel Medicine Society of Ireland and British Global and Travel Health Association participated in this study. There was a trend towards the prescription of EST for travel to remote low-risk malaria areas; for long-term residents living in low-risk areas; and for frequent travellers to low-risk areas. This study provides insights into the use of EST in travellers' malaria. © International Society of Travel Medicine, 2016. All rights reserved. Published by Oxford University Press. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Targeted treatment of recurrent platinum-resistant ovarian cancer: current and emerging therapies

    PubMed Central

    Mantia-Smaldone, Gina M; Edwards, Robert P; Vlad, Anda M

    2010-01-01

    With advances in surgical techniques and chemotherapeutic agents, mortality rates from epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) have slightly decreased over the last 30 years. However, EOC still ranks as the most deadly gynecologic cancer with an overall 5-year survival rate of 45%. Prognosis is especially disappointing for women with platinum-resistant disease, where 80% of patients will fail to respond to available therapies. Emerging treatment strategies have sub-sequently focused on targets which are integral to tumor growth and metastasis. In this review, we will focus on those innovative agents currently under investigation in clinical trials. PMID:21734812

  13. Emergency portacaval shunt versus rescue portacaval shunt in a randomized controlled trial of emergency treatment of acutely bleeding esophageal varices in cirrhosis--part 3.

    PubMed

    Orloff, Marshall J; Isenberg, Jon I; Wheeler, Henry O; Haynes, Kevin S; Jinich-Brook, Horacio; Rapier, Roderick; Vaida, Florin; Hye, Robert J

    2010-11-01

    Emergency treatment of bleeding esophageal varices in cirrhosis is of singular importance because of the high mortality rate. Emergency portacaval shunt is rarely used today because of the belief, unsubstantiated by long-term randomized trials, that it causes frequent portal-systemic encephalopathy and liver failure. Consequently, portacaval shunt has been relegated solely to salvage therapy when endoscopic and pharmacologic therapies have failed. Is the regimen of endoscopic sclerotherapy with rescue portacaval shunt for failure to control bleeding varices superior to emergency portacaval shunt? A unique opportunity to answer this question was provided by a randomized controlled trial of endoscopic sclerotherapy versus emergency portacaval shunt conducted from 1988 to 2005. Unselected consecutive cirrhotic patients with acute bleeding esophageal varices were randomized to endoscopic sclerotherapy (n = 106) or emergency portacaval shunt (n = 105). Diagnostic workup was completed and treatment was initiated within 8 h. Failure of endoscopic sclerotherapy was defined by strict criteria and treated by rescue portacaval shunt (n = 50) whenever possible. Ninety-six percent of patients had more than 10 years of follow-up or until death. Comparison of emergency portacaval shunt and endoscopic sclerotherapy followed by rescue portacaval shunt showed the following differences in measurements of outcomes: (1) survival after 5 years (72% versus 22%), 10 years (46% versus 16%), and 15 years (46% versus 0%); (2) median post-shunt survival (6.18 versus 1.99 years); (3) mean requirements of packed red blood cell units (17.85 versus 27.80); (4) incidence of recurrent portal-systemic encephalopathy (15% versus 43%); (5) 5-year change in Child's class showing improvement (59% versus 19%) or worsening (8% versus 44%); (6) mean quality of life points in which lower is better (13.89 versus 27.89); and (7) mean cost of care per year ($39,200 versus $216,700). These differences were

  14. Evaluation and selection of emergency treatment technology based on dynamic fuzzy GRA method for chemical contingency spills.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Guo, Liang; Jiang, Jiping; Hao, Linlin; Liu, Rentao; Wang, Peng

    2015-12-15

    A robust scheme to address emergency pollution accident is becoming more and more important with the rise of the frequency and intensity of the emergency pollution accidents. Therefore, it is crucial to select an appropriate technology in an emergency response to chemical spills. In this study, an evaluation framework based on dynamic fuzzy GRA method has been developed to make forward optimum scheme for the selection of emergency treatment technology. Dynamic analysis and linguistic terms are used to evaluate alternatives to improve efficiency of emergency treatment procedures by addressing the vagueness and ambiguity in decision making. The method was then applied in a case study to evaluate emergency arsenic treatment technology and demonstrate its applicability and feasibility in emergency arsenic pollution under two scenarios associated with different arsenic levels. Therefore, not only the results can be used for selecting emergency treatment technology, but also help decision-makers identify desired decisions for contaminant mitigation with a quick response and cost-effective manner. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Emerging minimally invasive procedures for focal treatment of organ-confined prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Habibian, David J; Katz, Aaron E

    2016-11-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy amongst American men. However, the majority of prostate cancer diagnoses are of low risk, organ-confined disease. Many men elect to undergo definitive treatment, but may benefit from focal therapy to maintain continence and potency. This review reports the mechanism of action and outcomes of emerging focal therapies for prostate cancer. We report the mechanism of action of focal cryotherapy, high intensity focused ultrasound, focal laser ablation, and irreversible electroporation. In addition, we reviewed the largest studies available reporting rates of urinary incontinence, erectile dysfunction, biochemical recurrence-free survival (ASTRO), and post-operative adverse events for each procedure. Each treatment modality stated has a unique mechanism in the ablation of cancerous cells. Genito-urinary symptoms following these studies report incontinence and erectile dysfunction rates ranging from 0-15% and 0-53%, respectively. Biochemical disease-free survival was reported using the ASTRO definition. Some treatment modalities lack the necessary follow-up to determine effectiveness in cancer control. No focal therapy studies reported serious adverse events. These minimally invasive procedures are feasible in a clinical setting and show promising functional and disease control results with short to medium-term follow-up. However, each treatment requires additional robust prospective studies as well as its own unique domain to determine biochemical recurrence free survival to properly determine their role in treatment of organ-confined prostate cancer.

  16. Low-dose propofol for the abortive treatment of pediatric migraine in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Sheridan, David C; Spiro, David M; Nguyen, Thuan; Koch, Thomas K; Meckler, Garth D

    2012-12-01

    Limited progress has been made in the past decade for abortive treatment of migraine headache in the pediatric emergency department (PED). Propofol, a general anesthetic, has been reported to be effective in the treatment of refractory headaches in adults at subanesthetic doses but never in the pediatric population. The goal of this study was to review our institution's experience with subanesthetic doses of propofol for the abortive treatment of pediatric migraine and compare propofol with standard abortive therapy in the PED. Retrospective review of all patients discharged from the Oregon Health and Science University PED with a diagnosis of migraine headache from January 2010 to July 2011. Patients treated with subanesthetic doses of propofol were compared with matched controls who received standard abortive migraine therapy, defined as the combined use of a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medication, diphenhydramine, and prochlorperazine. Outcome variables of interest included reduction of pain as measured on a self-reported visual analog scale and length of stay after administration of initial abortive medication. Patients who received subanesthetic doses of propofol achieved significantly greater reduction in pain scores (80.1% vs 61.1%; P < 0.05) compared with matched controls as well as shorter stay (122 minutes vs 203 minutes; P = 0.2) after treatment. No adverse effects (hypotension, respiratory depression, or hypoxia) were recorded in either group. Propofol seems to be effective for the abortive treatment of pediatric migraine headache in the PED. Further prospective trials are warranted to either support or refute these initial findings.

  17. Diagnostic testing and treatment of pediatric headache in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Sheridan, David C; Meckler, Garth D; Spiro, David M; Koch, Thomas K; Hansen, Matthew L

    2013-12-01

    To describe the variability in diagnostic testing and treatment of headaches in children presenting to the emergency department (ED) with use of a nationally representative sample. This was a retrospective cohort study using the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey during 2005-2009. To assess the use of evidence-based treatment, we analyzed all patients <18 years old in 2 groups: (1) primary discharge diagnosis of headache and (2) discharge diagnosis of migraine. Four hundred forty-eight sampled ED visits from 2005-2009 represented a national estimate of 1.7 million visits with a discharge diagnosis of headache. A total of 95 visits represented a national estimate of 340 000 visits with a discharge diagnosis of migraine. Median age was 13.1 years and 60% were female with a primary diagnosis of headache. In this group, neuroimaging was performed in 37% of patients and 39% underwent blood tests. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and opioids were most commonly used for treatment. For children with a discharge diagnosis of migraine, approximately 40% of patients received non-evidence-based treatment, most commonly with opioid medications, and >20% of patients underwent computed tomography scanning. There is significant variability in the evaluation and treatment of pediatric headache in the ED. Despite evidence-based clinical guidelines for migraine headache, a large number of children continue to receive opioids and ionizing radiation in the ED. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. 38 CFR 17.120 - Payment or reimbursement for emergency treatment furnished by non-VA providers to certain...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... emergency treatment, not previously authorized, in a private or public (or Federal) hospital not operated by... and who is medically determined to be in need of hospital care or medical services for any of the...

  19. 38 CFR 17.120 - Payment or reimbursement for emergency treatment furnished by non-VA providers to certain...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... emergency treatment, not previously authorized, in a private or public (or Federal) hospital not operated by... and who is medically determined to be in need of hospital care or medical services for any of the...

  20. Ovarian response to gonadotropin treatment initiated relative to wave emergence in ultrasonographically monitored ewes.

    PubMed

    Rubianes, E; Ungerfeld, R; Viñoles, C; Rivero, A; Adams, G P

    1997-06-01

    Follicular recruitment and luteal response to superovulatory treatment initiated relative to the status of the first wave of the ovine estrous cycle (Wave 1) were studied. All ewes (n = 25) received an intravaginal progestagen sponge to synchronize estrous cycles, and ewes were monitored daily by transrectal ultrasonography. Multiple-dose FSH treatment (total dose = 100 mg NIH-FSH-P1) was initiated on the day of ovulation (Day 0 group) in 16 ewes. In the remaining 9 ewes, FSH treatment was started 3 d after emergence of the largest follicle of Wave 1 (Day 3 group). Ewes received PGF(2alpha) with the last 2 FSH treatments to induce luteolysis. Daily blood samples were taken to determine progesterone profiles and to evaluate the luteal response subsequent to superovulation. The ovulation rate was determined by ultrasonography and correlated with direct observation of the ovaries during laparotomy 5 to 6 d after superovulatory estrus when the uterus was flushed to collect embryos. Results confirmed that follicular recruitment was suppressed by the presence of a large, growing follicle. In the Day 0 and Day 3 groups, respectively, mean numbers (+/- SEM) of large follicles (>/= 4 mm) recruited were 6.4 +/- 0.6 and 2.7 +/- 0.7 (P < 0.01) at 48 h after the onset of treatment, and 6.7 +/- 0.5 and 5.1 +/- 0.6 (P = 0.08) at 72 h after the onset of treatment. Ovulation rates were 5.6 +/- 0.8 and 3.3 +/- 0.8 in the respective groups (P < 0.05). The number of transferable embryos was 1.8 +/- 0.5 and 0.3 +/- 0.2 in the respective groups (P < 0.05). Short luteal phases (treatment initiated at the time of emergence of Wave 1 induced a superovulatory response in ewes. Response was influenced by the status of the follicular wave. The presence of a large growing follicle

  1. [Management of the pediatric dental patient with seizure disorder: prevention and treatment of emergencies].

    PubMed

    Shapira, Y; Sapir, S; Amir, E

    2003-09-01

    Seizures are not infrequent in childhood and may occur during dental treatment. Generalized seizures and particularly the Tonic-clonic (grand-mal) are the most hazardous and may induce self-injury, aspiration, and medical emergency as status epilepticus. The differential diagnosis of isolated seizure attack should consider hyperventilation, hyperglycemia, local anesthetic toxicity, and anoxia. The pediatric dentist should be aware of predisposing factors that may induce seizure attack in their patients. Proper precautionary measures could prevent the attack from occurring or at least reduce its consequences. The diagnosis as to the cause of the seizure, as well as providing proper management, could prevent further complications. This article presents the medical and dental history relevant for prevention of seizure attack in the dental chair, antiepileptic drugs with possible interactions with the dental treatment and management of such attack, should they occurs.

  2. Hypocretin and its emerging role as a target for treatment of sleep disorders.

    PubMed

    Cao, Michelle; Guilleminault, Christian

    2011-04-01

    The neuropeptides hypocretin-1 and -2 (orexin A and B) are critical in the regulation of arousal and maintenance of wakefulness. Understanding the role of the hypocretin system in sleep/wake regulation has come from narcolepsy-cataplexy research. Deficiency of hypocretin results in loss of sleep/wake control with consequent unstable transitions from wakefulness into non-rapid eye movement (REM) and REM sleep, and clinical manifestations including daytime hypersomnolence, sleep attacks, and cataplexy. The hypocretin system regulates sleep/wake control through complex interactions between monoaminergic/cholinergic wake-promoting and GABAergic sleep-promoting neuronal systems. Research for the hypocretin agonist and the hypocretin antagonist for the treatment of sleep disorders has vigorously increased over the past 10 years. This review will focus on the origin, functions, and mechanisms in which the hypocretin system regulates sleep and wakefulness, and discuss its emerging role as a target for the treatment of sleep disorders.

  3. High Feasibility of Empiric HIV Treatment for Patients With Suspected Acute HIV in an Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Kathleen R; Arora, Sanjay; Walsh, Kristin B; Lora, Meredith; Merjavy, Stephen; Livermore, Shanna; Menchine, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Earlier intervention in acute HIV infection limits HIV reservoirs and may decrease HIV transmission. We developed criteria for empiric antiretroviral therapy (ART) in an emergency department (ED) routine HIV screening program. We assessed the feasibility and willingness of patients with suspected acute HIV infection in the ED to begin ART. A suspected acute HIV infection was defined as a positive HIV antigen antibody combination immunoassay with pending HIV-antibody differentiation test results and HIV RNA viral load. During the study period, there were 16 confirmed cases of acute HIV infection: 11 met our criteria for empiric ART and agreed to treatment, 10 were prescribed ART, and 1 left the ED against medical advice without a prescription for ART. Eight patients completed at least one follow-up visit. Empiric HIV treatment in an ED is feasible, well received by patients, and offers a unique entry point into the HIV care continuum.

  4. Disseminated cytomegalovirus infection complicating active treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus: an emerging problem.

    PubMed

    Berman, N; Belmont, H M

    2017-04-01

    Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) often require immunosuppression to induce remission of active disease exacerbations. Over the past two decades, treatment modalities for this condition have emerged leading to improved morbidity from disease related outcomes. However, as a result, infection risks and patterns have changed, leading to higher rates of opportunistic infections among this population. We report four cases of cytomegalovirus (CMV) in patients with SLE who received immunosuppressive therapy, including pulse steroids, antimetabolites such as mycophenolate mofetil, and alkylating agents such as cyclophosphamide. We propose that given the rise in prevalence of CMV, there is a need for appropriate screening for this opportunistic pathogen and studies to determine the risks and benefits of prophylactic or preemptive treatment for this virus.

  5. Improvements in current treatments and emerging therapies for adult obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Freedman, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is common and is associated with a number of adverse outcomes, including an increased risk for cardiovascular disease. Typical treatment approaches, including positive airway pressure, oral appliances, various upper airway surgeries, and/or weight loss, can improve symptoms and reduce the severity of disease in select patient groups. However, these approaches have several potential limitations, including suboptimal adherence, lack of suitability for all patient groups, and/or absence of adequate outcomes data. Emerging potential therapeutic options, including nasal expiratory positive airway pressure (PAP), oral negative pressure, upper airway muscle stimulation, and bariatric surgery, as well as improvements in existing treatments and the utilization of improving technologies are moving the field forward and should offer effective therapies to a wider group of patients with OSA.

  6. Plant Alkaloids as an Emerging Therapeutic Alternative for the Treatment of Depression

    PubMed Central

    Perviz, Sadia; Khan, Haroon; Pervaiz, Aini

    2016-01-01

    Depression is a heterogeneous mood disorder that has been classified and treated in a variety of ways. Although, a number of synthetic drugs are being used as standard treatment for clinically depressed patients, but they have adverse effects that can compromise the therapeutic treatments and patient's compliance. Unlike, synthetic medications, herbal medicines are widely used across the globe due to their wide applicability and therapeutic efficacy associated with least side effects, which in turn has initiated the scientific research regarding the antidepressant activity. This review is mostly based on the literature of the last decade, aimed at exploring the preclinical profile of plant-based alkaloids (the abundant secondary metabolite) as an emerging therapy for depression. PMID:26913004

  7. POST Traumatic Stress Disorder in Emergency Workers: Risk Factors and Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argentero, Piergiorgio; Dell'Olivo, Bianca; Setti, Ilaria

    Post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are emergent phenomena resulting from exposure to a traumatic event that causes actual or threatened death or injury and produces intense fear, helplessness, or horror. In order to assess the role of different factors contributing to this kind of emergent phenomenon prevalence rates across gender, cultures, and samples exposed to different traumas are examined. Risk factors for PTSD, including pre-existing individual-based factors, features of the traumatic event, and post-trauma interventions are examined as well. Several characteristics of the trauma, related to cognitions, post-trauma social support and therapeutic interventions for PTSD are also considered. Further work is needed in order to analyze the inter-relationships among these factors and underlying mechanisms. The chaotic nature of traumatic processes, the multiple and interactive impacts on traumatic events require a comprehensive perspective aimed at planning effective interventions. Treatment outcome studies recommended the combined use of training and therapies as first-line treatment for PTSD.

  8. [Treatment with human tetanus immunoglobulins in the Emergency Department. Effects of informed consent].

    PubMed

    Massari, M; D'Adamo, F; Santucci, G

    1997-11-01

    The impact of informed consent to tetanus prophylaxis with human immunoglobulins on patients treated in the Emergency Department has been evaluated. Tetanus vaccination history was investigated in 1435 patients in 1995 and in 1300 patients in 1996 with post-traumatic skin lesions. The study has shown that in 1995, 55% and in 1996 49.5% of the total patients studied had not received vaccine for tetanus or boosters for over 10 years. These patients had been proposed the treatment with human tetanus immunoglobulins (TIG). The research was performed comparing the consent obtained before (from 17/5 to 15/7/1995) and after (from 17/5 to 15/7/1996) the introduction of the informed consent. The survey was divided into 15-day periods. In 1995 prophylaxis with human immunoglobulins was refused by 42 patients out of 831 (5%) while, in the following year, by 284 out of 641 (44.3%). Every period examined has shown highly significant differences (p < 0.000). Informing the patients that tetanus prophylaxis with human immunoglobulins can expose them to the risk, at present remote, of transmission of viral infections, has caused a heavy rise of denials to the suggestion of treatment with human immunoglobulins. The amount of the treated patients and the time that was devoted to informed consent would make Emergency Department one of the main places for effective and widespread tetanus prophylaxis. However a greater activity of outer structures would also be hoped for.

  9. New and emerging treatments for osteoarthritis management: will the dream come true with personalized medicine?

    PubMed

    Roubille, Camille; Pelletier, Jean-Pierre; Martel-Pelletier, Johanne

    2013-10-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a dynamic process involving the main tissues of the joint for which a global approach should be considered. No disease-modifying OA drug (DMOAD) has yet been approved. New therapeutic strategies are needed that would be cost effective by reducing the need for pharmacological interventions and surgical management while targeting specific pathways leading to OA. The treatment landscape of OA is about to change based on new agents having shown some structural effects and emerging therapies with DMOAD effects. In this review based on a Medline (via PubMed) search, promising new and emerging therapies with a potential structural effect (DMOAD) will be discussed including growth factors, platelet-rich plasma, autologous stem cells, bone remodeling modulators, cytokine inhibition, gene therapy, and RNA interference. DMOAD development should focus on targeting some phenotypes of OA patients evidenced with sensitive techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging, as a single treatment will unlikely be appropriate for all OA patients. This will allow the development of DMOADs based on personalized medicine. An exciting new era in DMOAD development is within reach, provided future clinical trials are sufficiently powered, systematically designed, use the appropriate evaluation tools, and target the appropriate categories of OA patients.

  10. Intravenous lidocaine for the treatment of acute pain in the emergency department

    PubMed Central

    Fitzpatrick, Brendan Michael; Mullins, Michael Eugene

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate intravenous lidocaine’s safety and efficacy as an analgesic agent in the treatment of a variety of painful conditions presenting to the emergency department. Methods This case series identified seventeen patients who received lidocaine over a six month period and recorded demographic data, amount of lidocaine administered, the amount of opioid medication administered before and after lidocaine, pre- and post-lidocaine pain scores, and any qualitative descriptors of the patient’s pain recorded in the record. Side effects and adverse events were also recorded. Results Of the seven patients who had a pre- and post-lidocaine pain score recorded, the mean reduction was 3 points on a 10 point scale. Patients who received lidocaine used less opioid medication. One patient received an improperly high dose of lidocaine and suffered a brief seizure and cardiac arrest, but was quickly resuscitated. Conclusion This series suggests that lidocaine may be a useful adjunct in the treatment of acutely painful conditions in the emergency department. PMID:27752626

  11. Effect of testing and treatment on emergency department length of stay using a national database.

    PubMed

    Kocher, Keith E; Meurer, William J; Desmond, Jeffrey S; Nallamothu, Brahmajee K

    2012-05-01

    Testing and treatment are essential aspects of the delivery of emergency care. Recognition of the effects of these activities on emergency department (ED) length of stay (LOS) has implications for administrators planning efficient operations, providers, and patients regarding expectations for length of visit; researchers in creating better models to predict LOS; and policy-makers concerned about ED crowding. A secondary analysis was performed using years 2006 through 2008 of the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS), a nationwide study of ED services. In univariate and bivariate analyses, the authors assessed ED LOS and frequency of testing (blood test, urinalysis, electrocardiogram [ECG], radiograph, ultrasound, computed tomography [CT], or magnetic resonance imaging [MRI]) and treatment (providing a medication or performance of a procedure) according to disposition (discharged or admitted status). Two sets of multivariable models were developed to assess the contribution of testing and treatment to LOS, also stratified by disposition. The first was a series of logistic regression models to provide an overview of how testing and treatment activity affects three dichotomized LOS cutoffs at 2, 4, and 6 hours. The second was a generalized linear model (GLM) with a log-link function and gamma distribution to fit skewed LOS data, which provided time costs associated with tests and treatment. Among 360 million weighted ED visits included in this analysis, 227 million (63%) involved testing, 304 million (85%) involved treatment, and 201 million (56%) involved both. Overall, visits with any testing were associated with longer LOS (median = 196 minutes; interquartile range [IQR] = 125 to 305 minutes) than those with any treatment (median = 159 minutes; IQR = 91 to 262 minutes). This difference was more pronounced among discharged patients than admitted patients. Obtaining a test was associated with an adjusted odds ratio (OR) of 2.29 (95% confidence

  12. Chemotherapy-Induced Constipation and Diarrhea: Pathophysiology, Current and Emerging Treatments

    PubMed Central

    McQuade, Rachel M.; Stojanovska, Vanesa; Abalo, Raquel; Bornstein, Joel C.; Nurgali, Kulmira

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) side-effects of chemotherapy are a debilitating and often overlooked clinical hurdle in cancer management. Chemotherapy-induced constipation (CIC) and Diarrhea (CID) present a constant challenge in the efficient and tolerable treatment of cancer and are amongst the primary contributors to dose reductions, delays and cessation of treatment. Although prevalence of CIC is hard to estimate, it is believed to affect approximately 16% of cancer patients, whilst incidence of CID has been estimated to be as high as 80%. Despite this, the underlying mechanisms of both CID and CIC remain unclear, but are believed to result from a combination of intersecting mechanisms including inflammation, secretory dysfunctions, GI dysmotility and alterations in GI innervation. Current treatments for CIC and CID aim to reduce the severity of symptoms rather than combating the pathophysiological mechanisms of dysfunction, and often result in worsening of already chronic GI symptoms or trigger the onset of a plethora of other side-effects including respiratory depression, uneven heartbeat, seizures, and neurotoxicity. Emerging treatments including those targeting the enteric nervous system present promising avenues to alleviate CID and CIC. Identification of potential targets for novel therapies to alleviate chemotherapy-induced toxicity is essential to improve clinical outcomes and quality of life amongst cancer sufferers. PMID:27857691

  13. Endovascular Treatment in Emergency Setting of Acute Arterial Injuries After Orthopedic Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Carrafiello, Gianpaolo Fontana, Federico Mangini, Monica Ierardi, Anna Maria Lagana, Domenico; Piacentino, Filippo Vizzari, Francesco Alberto Spano, Emanuela Fugazzola, Carlo

    2012-06-15

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility and effectiveness of emergency endovascular treatment of acute arterial injuries after orthopedic surgery. Materials and Methods: Fifteen patients (mean age 68.3 years) with acute arterial injuries after orthopedic surgery were observed, in particular, 5 patients with pseudoaneurysm, 9 patients with active bleeding, and 1 patient with arterial dissection. Transarterial embolization (TAE) and positioning of covered and noncovered stents were the treatments performed. Follow-up after stent implantation (mean 36 months) was performed with color Doppler US (CDU) at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months and yearly thereafter. Plain X-ray was performed to evidence dislodgment or fracture of the graft. A minimum of 12 months' follow-up is available after TAE. Results: Immediate technical success was obtained in all cases. No major complications occurred. Overall clinical success rate was 100%. During mean follow-up, stent-graft occlusions did not occurred. No recurrence and/or consequence of TAE was registered during a minimum follow-up of 12 months. Conclusions: Percutaneous treatment is a feasible and safe tool for treating arterial injuries because it can provide fast and definitive resolution of the damage. This low-invasiveness approach can be proposed as first-line treatment in patients with acute injuries after orthopedic surgery.

  14. Chemotherapy-Induced Constipation and Diarrhea: Pathophysiology, Current and Emerging Treatments.

    PubMed

    McQuade, Rachel M; Stojanovska, Vanesa; Abalo, Raquel; Bornstein, Joel C; Nurgali, Kulmira

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) side-effects of chemotherapy are a debilitating and often overlooked clinical hurdle in cancer management. Chemotherapy-induced constipation (CIC) and Diarrhea (CID) present a constant challenge in the efficient and tolerable treatment of cancer and are amongst the primary contributors to dose reductions, delays and cessation of treatment. Although prevalence of CIC is hard to estimate, it is believed to affect approximately 16% of cancer patients, whilst incidence of CID has been estimated to be as high as 80%. Despite this, the underlying mechanisms of both CID and CIC remain unclear, but are believed to result from a combination of intersecting mechanisms including inflammation, secretory dysfunctions, GI dysmotility and alterations in GI innervation. Current treatments for CIC and CID aim to reduce the severity of symptoms rather than combating the pathophysiological mechanisms of dysfunction, and often result in worsening of already chronic GI symptoms or trigger the onset of a plethora of other side-effects including respiratory depression, uneven heartbeat, seizures, and neurotoxicity. Emerging treatments including those targeting the enteric nervous system present promising avenues to alleviate CID and CIC. Identification of potential targets for novel therapies to alleviate chemotherapy-induced toxicity is essential to improve clinical outcomes and quality of life amongst cancer sufferers.

  15. Clostridium difficile infection: update on emerging antibiotic treatment options and antibiotic resistance

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Dhara; Dang, Minh-Duc; Hasbun, Rodrigo; Koo, Hoonmo L; Jiang, Zhi-Dong; DuPont, Herbert L; Garey, Kevin W

    2010-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is the most common cause of identifiable diarrhea in hospitalized patients. The incidence and severity of CDIs are increasing. The increased incidence and severity of the disease has sparked interest in the optimal treatment of CDI as well as the use of new therapies and drug discovery. Current treatment strategies are inadequate with decreased response rates to metronidazole, and high recurrence rates with the use of metronidazole and oral vancomycin. Although incidence rates continue to be low, in vitro resistance to antibiotics used for the treatment of CDI has been noted. Recently, important data has emerged on new anti-C. difficile antibiotics such as rifaximin, rifalazil, fidaxomicin, nitazoxanide, tigecycline and ramoplanin. The purpose of this review is to provide an update on the in vitro susceptibility and new antibiotic treatment options for CDI. This review will focus primarily on scientific studies published in the last 36 months in order to provide an up-to-date review on the topic. PMID:20455684

  16. Implementation of Human Trafficking Education and Treatment Algorithm in the Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Egyud, Amber; Stephens, Kimberly; Swanson-Bierman, Brenda; DiCuccio, Marge; Whiteman, Kimberly

    2017-04-18

    Health care professionals have not been successful in recognizing or rescuing victims of human trafficking. The purpose of this project was to implement a screening system and treatment algorithm in the emergency department to improve the identification and rescue of victims of human trafficking. The lack of recognition by health care professionals is related to inadequate education and training tools and confusion with other forms of violence such as trauma and sexual assault. A multidisciplinary team was formed to assess the evidence related to human trafficking and make recommendations for practice. After receiving education, staff completed a survey about knowledge gained from the training. An algorithm for identification and treatment of sex trafficking victims was implemented and included a 2-pronged identification approach: (1) medical red flags created by a risk-assessment tool embedded in the electronic health record and (2) a silent notification process. Outcome measures were the number of victims who were identified either by the medical red flags or by silent notification and were offered and accepted intervention. Survey results indicated that 75% of participants reported that the education improved their competence level. The results demonstrated that an education and treatment algorithm may be an effective strategy to improve recognition. One patient was identified as an actual victim of human trafficking; the remaining patients reported other forms of abuse. Education and a treatment algorithm were effective strategies to improve recognition and rescue of human trafficking victims and increase identification of other forms of abuse. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Treatment of Systemic Sclerosis-related Interstitial Lung Disease: A Review of Existing and Emerging Therapies.

    PubMed

    Volkmann, Elizabeth R; Tashkin, Donald P

    2016-11-01

    Although interstitial lung disease accounts for the majority of deaths of patients with systemic sclerosis, treatment options for this manifestation of the disease are limited. Few high-quality, randomized, controlled trials exist for systemic sclerosis-related interstitial lung disease, and historically, studies have favored the use of cyclophosphamide. However, the benefit of cyclophosphamide for this disease is tempered by its complex adverse event profile. More recent studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of mycophenolate for systemic sclerosis-related interstitial lung disease, including Scleroderma Lung Study II. This review highlights the findings of this study, which was the first randomized controlled trial to compare cyclophosphamide with mycophenolate for the treatment of systemic sclerosis-related interstitial lung disease. The results reported in this trial suggest that there is no difference in treatment efficacy between mycophenolate and cyclophosphamide; however, mycophenolate appears to be safer and more tolerable than cyclophosphamide. In light of the ongoing advances in our understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms underlying interstitial lung disease in systemic sclerosis, this review also summarizes novel treatment approaches, presenting clinical and preclinical evidence for rituximab, tocilizumab, pirfenidone, and nintedanib, as well as hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and lung transplantation. This review further explores how reaching a consensus on appropriate study end points, as well as trial enrichment criteria, is central to improving our ability to judiciously evaluate the safety and efficacy of emerging experimental therapies for systemic sclerosis-related interstitial lung disease.

  18. Modifying the Interagency Emergency Health Kit to include treatment for non-communicable diseases in natural disasters and complex emergencies

    PubMed Central

    Tonelli, Marcello; Nadler, Brian; Darzi, Ara; Rasheed, Shahnawaz

    2016-01-01

    The Interagency Emergency Health Kit (IEHK) provides a standard package of medicines and simple medical devices for aid agencies to use in emergencies such as disasters and armed conflicts. Despite the increasing burden of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) in such settings, the IEHK includes few drugs and devices for management of NCDs. Using published data to model the population burden of acute and chronic presentations of NCDs in emergency-prone regions, we estimated the quantity of medications and devices that should be included in the IEHK. NCDs considered were cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, hypertension and chronic respiratory disease. In scenario 1 (the primary scenario), we assumed that resources in the IEHK would only include those needed to manage acute life-threatening conditions. In scenario 2, we included resources required to manage both acute and chronic presentations of NCDs. Drugs and devices that might be required included amlodipine, aspirin, atenolol, beclomethasone, dextrose 50%, enalapril, furosemide, glibenclamide, glyceryl trinitrate, heparin, hydralazine, hydrochlorothiazide, insulin, metformin, prednisone, salbutamol and simvastatin. For scenario 1, the number of units required ranged from 12 (phials of hydralazine) to ∼15 000 (tablets of enalapril). Space and weight requirements were modest and total cost for all drugs and devices was approximately US$2078. As expected, resources required for scenario 2 were much greater. Space and cost requirements increased proportionately: estimated total cost of scenario 2 was $22 208. The resources required to treat acute NCD presentations appear modest, and their inclusion in the IEHK seems feasible. PMID:28588970

  19. The Risk of Treatment-Emergent Mania With Methylphenidate in Bipolar Disorder.

    PubMed

    Viktorin, Alexander; Rydén, Eleonore; Thase, Michael E; Chang, Zheng; Lundholm, Cecilia; D'Onofrio, Brian M; Almqvist, Catarina; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Lichtenstein, Paul; Larsson, Henrik; Landén, Mikael

    2017-04-01

    The authors sought to determine the risk of treatment-emergent mania associated with methylphenidate, used in monotherapy or with a concomitant mood-stabilizing medication, in patients with bipolar disorder. Using linked Swedish national registries, the authors identified 2,307 adults with bipolar disorder who initiated therapy with methylphenidate between 2006 and 2014. The cohort was divided into two groups: those with and those without concomitant mood-stabilizing treatment. To adjust for individual-specific confounders, including disorder severity, genetic makeup, and early environmental factors, Cox regression analyses were used, conditioning on individual to compare the rate of mania (defined as hospitalization for mania or a new dispensation of stabilizing medication) 0-3 months and 3-6 months after medication start following nontreated periods. Patients on methylphenidate monotherapy displayed an increased rate of manic episodes within 3 months of medication initiation (hazard ratio=6.7, 95% CI=2.0-22.4), with similar results for the subsequent 3 months. By contrast, for patients taking mood stabilizers, the risk of mania was lower after starting methylphenidate (hazard ratio=0.6, 95% CI=0.4-0.9). Comparable results were observed when only hospitalizations for mania were counted. No evidence was found for a positive association between methylphenidate and treatment-emergent mania among patients with bipolar disorder who were concomitantly receiving a mood-stabilizing medication. This is clinically important given that up to 20% of people with bipolar disorder suffer from comorbid ADHD. Given the markedly increased hazard ratio of mania following methylphenidate initiation in bipolar patients not taking mood stabilizers, careful assessment to rule out bipolar disorder is indicated before initiating monotherapy with psychostimulants.

  20. The effect of drug treatment on the pattern of emergence of Onchocerca volvulus microfilariae from skin snips.

    PubMed

    Kale, O O

    1981-06-01

    A controlled study was carried out to determine the effect of some known anti-filarial drugs on the pattern of emergence of Onchocerca volvulus microfilariae from skin snips into saline. The results show that before treatment, 81.7 to 92.1% of microfilariae emerge in all the groups within 24 hours. The differences between the groups were not significant. After treatment with oral diethylcarbamazine, metrifonate and topical diethylcarbamazine (DEC) the percentage of microfilariae emerging from the snips dropped significantly to 48.4, 56.0 and 60.1 respectively, whereas no significant change occurred following treatment with levamisole (88.1%) and yeast tablets (89.1%). A pair-wise comparison of the post-treatment microfilarial emergence in all the groups showed statistically significant differences when (i) oral DEC is compared to levamisole, topical DEC and yeast, (ii) metrifonate is compared to levamisole and yeast and (iii) topical DEC is compared to yeast. It is suggested that microfilariae which fail to emerge from snips after treatment are those that have been killed or paralysed by the action of the drugs. The study has thus established that drug action in vivo is one of the factors which affects the proportion of microfilariae which emerge from skin snips and provides an additional parameter for measuring the antimicrofilarial potential of drugs in clinical chemotherapeutic trials.

  1. Emerging U.S. National Trends in the Treatment of Pediatric Supracondylar Humeral Fractures.

    PubMed

    Holt, Joshua B; Glass, Natalie A; Bedard, Nicholas A; Weinstein, Stuart L; Shah, Apurva S

    2017-04-19

    Understanding national trends in the treatment of pediatric supracondylar humeral fractures will provide important insight into variations in regional treatment and identify areas for improving value and quality in care delivery in the U.S. U.S. national trends in the treatment of supracondylar humeral fractures were evaluated through query of the Humana (2007 to 2014) and ING (2007 to 2011) administrative claims databases. Geographic variation and changes in surgical and transfer rates over time were further explored through the Nationwide Emergency Department Sample (NEDS) database (2006 to 2011). Hospital characteristics impacting treatment decisions were identified. A total of 29,642 pediatric patients with supracondylar humeral fractures were identified in the administrative claims databases and a projected 63,348 encounters for supracondylar humeral fracture were identified in the NEDS database. The majority of the patients (76.1%; 22,563 of 29,642) were treated definitively with cast immobilization. Operative treatment was performed in 23.9% of the patients (7,079 of 29,642), with no change observed in the operative rate over time (p = 0.055). Of patients undergoing operative treatment, closed reduction and percutaneous pinning (CRPP) was performed in 87.3%, with a significant increase noted in the rate of CRPP over time (p = 0.0001); open reduction was performed in 12.7%, with a significant decrease noted in the rate of open reduction over time (p < 0.0001). Regional surgical rates generally showed significant variation from 2006 to 2010, followed by a convergence in the surgical rate among all geographic regions in 2011. These trends occurred simultaneous to a significant increase in transfer rates nationwide, from 5.6% in 2006 to 9.1% in 2011 (p = 0.0011). Transfer rates were significantly higher (p < 0.0001) for nontrauma, nonteaching, and nonmetropolitan centers while surgical rates were significantly higher (p < 0.0001) for trauma, teaching, and

  2. Creativity and dementia: emerging diagnostic and treatment methods for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Cummings, Jeffrey L; Miller, Bruce L; Christensen, Daniel D; Cherry, Debra

    2008-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease research is beginning to yield promising treatments and prevention strategies. Current Alzheimer's disease treatments benefit symptoms, but do not appreciably alter the basic disease process. The new generation of Alzheimer's disease medications, however, will likely include disease-modifying treatments, which will slow disease progression or stop it entirely. These new treatments pursue four points of intervention: increasing the clearance of amyloid-beta42 (Abeta42) proteins in the brain, blocking Abeta42 production, decreasing Abeta42 production, and decreasing Abeta42 aggregation. Neurogenerative therapies are being explored as well, suggesting future treatments may not only stop disease progression but also reverse it. Risk factors for developing Alzheimer's disease and factors associated with a lower risk of Alzheimer's disease have been identified. Future Alzheimer's disease management may come to resemble routine cardiovascular disease prevention and management, which involves the control of modifiable risk factors and the use of medications that decrease or stop underlying pathology. The hope is that such management will arrest the disease process before cognitive symptoms have begun. Like other neurologic illnesses, Alzheimer's disease has a profound impact on creativity. Alzheimer's disease attacks the right posterior part of the brain, which enables people to retrieve internal imagery and copy images. Alzheimer's disease patients may lose the ability to copy images entirely. However, people with Alzheimer's disease can continue to produce art by using their remaining strengths, such as color or composition instead of shapes or realism. Studying art and dementia is a model for identifying the strengths of psychiatric patients. Remarkably, art emerges in some patients even in the face of degenerative disease. In this expert roundtable supplement, Jeffrey L. Cummings, MD, offers an overview of recent advances in Alzheimer's disease

  3. The emerging role of Clostridium histolyticum collagenase in the treatment of Dupuytren disease

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Alexis; Bayat, Ardeshir

    2010-01-01

    this emerging treatment option. PMID:21127696

  4. Novel and emerging therapies in the treatment of recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa

    PubMed Central

    Rashidghamat, Ellie; McGrath, John A.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Epidermolysis bullosa (EB) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of inherited blistering diseases that affects ∼ 500,000 people worldwide. Clinically, individuals with EB have fragile skin and are susceptible to blistering following minimal trauma, with mucous membrane and other organ involvement in some subtypes. Within the spectrum of EB, ∼ 5% of affected individuals have the clinically more severe recessive dystrophic (RDEB) variant with a prevalence of 8 per one million of the population. RDEB is caused by loss-of-function mutations in the type VII collagen gene, COL7A1, which leads to reduced or absent type VII collagen (C7) and a paucity of structurally effective anchoring fibrils at the dermal-epidermal junction (DEJ). Currently, there is no cure for RDEB, although considerable progress has been made in testing novel treatments including gene therapy (lentiviral and gamma retroviral vectors for COL7A1 supplementation in keratinocytes and fibroblasts), as well as cell therapy (use of allogeneic fibroblasts, mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), and bone marrow transplantation (BMT)). Here, we review current treatment modalities available as well as novel and emerging therapies in the treatment of RDEB. Clinical trials of new translational therapies in RDEB offer hope for improved clinical management of patients as well as generating broader lessons for regenerative medicine that could be applicable to other inherited or acquired abnormalities of wound healing or scarring. PMID:28357176

  5. Treatment of severe hypertension and hypertensive emergencies with intravenous clonidine hydrochloride

    PubMed Central

    Niarchos, Andreas P.; Baksi, Arun K.

    1973-01-01

    Eleven severely hypertensive patients, median age 54 years, were treated with intravenous (i.v.) clonidine hydrochloride (Catapres). In nine there were life-threatening complications: severe left ventricular failure (LVF), hypertensive encephalopathy, cerebral haemorrhage, dissecting aortic aneurysm, renal failure, and severe epistaxis. In two patients there was pronounced, but uncomplicated, elevation of blood pressure. 0·15 mg or 0·3 mg clonidine was given every 40 min with electrocardiographic (ECG) monitoring. The mean systolic and diastolic blood pressures in the eleven patients were respectively 266 and 165 mmHg before treatment falling to 165 and 109 mmHg after treatment (P < 0·001). The mean decrease in heart rate was 26 beats/min (P < 0·001). Doses of clonidine required for control ranged from 0·15 mg (one ampoule) to 0·9 mg (mean 0·56 mg), although one patient received a total of 0·9 mg without an adequate response. The presenting condition caused the eventual death of two patients. There were no serious side effects, except for one transient episode of sino-atrial heart block. It is concluded that clonidine is effective and safe in the treatment of hypertensive emergencies. ImagesFig. 5 PMID:4806271

  6. Emerging treatment options in bipolar disorder in adolescents: focus on ziprasidone

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Afshan A; Strawn, Jeffrey R; Croarkin, Paul E

    2010-01-01

    Bipolar disorder is a debilitating, and chronic condition in adolescents. The rate of diagnosis and treatment is increasing in adolescents despite considerable controversy regarding criteria for diagnosis. Atypical antipsychotics have been studied extensively for adult and adolescent bipolar disorder. Ziprasidone is an atypical neuroleptic with novel receptor-binding activity and a favorable side effect profile. It has been marketed in the US since 2000, and now has several indications approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. Emerging case reports, open-label studies, and randomized controlled trials suggest that it may have a role in the management of adolescent bipolar disorder. Somnolence, akathisia, tachycardia, and prolonged corrected QT intervals are major safety concerns. There are no definitive guidelines for dosing ziprasidone in adolescents based on current literature. However, optimal treatment may involve dosages near the adult range. Given minimal data and understanding of its effects on cardiac conduction, it might be prudent to obtain electrocardiograms prior to initiation and during treatment. While not a first-line medication choice for adolescents struggling with bipolar disorder, it may be considered in certain situations in which metabolic side effects and weight gain are of concern. PMID:24600269

  7. Twenty years after ACEIs and ARBs: emerging treatment strategies for diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Stacy A.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is a serious complication of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The disease is now the most common cause of end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) in developed countries, and both the incidence and prevalence of diabetes mellitus is increasing worldwide. Current treatments are directed at controlling hyperglycemia and hypertension, as well as blockade of the renin angiotensin system with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs), and angiotensin receptor blockers. Despite these therapies, DN progresses to ESKD in many patients. As a result, much interest is focused on developing new therapies. It has been over two decades since ACEIs were shown to have beneficial effects in DN independent of their blood pressure-lowering actions. Since that time, our understanding of disease mechanisms in DN has evolved. In this review, we summarize major cell signaling pathways implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic kidney disease, as well as emerging treatment strategies. The goal is to identify promising targets that might be translated into therapies for the treatment of patients with diabetic kidney disease. PMID:26336162

  8. Twenty years after ACEIs and ARBs: emerging treatment strategies for diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Stacy A; Spurney, Robert F

    2015-11-15

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is a serious complication of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The disease is now the most common cause of end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) in developed countries, and both the incidence and prevalence of diabetes mellitus is increasing worldwide. Current treatments are directed at controlling hyperglycemia and hypertension, as well as blockade of the renin angiotensin system with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs), and angiotensin receptor blockers. Despite these therapies, DN progresses to ESKD in many patients. As a result, much interest is focused on developing new therapies. It has been over two decades since ACEIs were shown to have beneficial effects in DN independent of their blood pressure-lowering actions. Since that time, our understanding of disease mechanisms in DN has evolved. In this review, we summarize major cell signaling pathways implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic kidney disease, as well as emerging treatment strategies. The goal is to identify promising targets that might be translated into therapies for the treatment of patients with diabetic kidney disease.

  9. Multiple interventions improve analgesic treatment of supracondylar humerus fractures in a pediatric emergency department.

    PubMed

    Porter, Robert Neil; Chafe, Roger E; Newhook, Leigh A; Murnaghan, Kyle D

    2015-01-01

    Provision of appropriate and timely treatment for pain in the pediatric population has been challenging. Children with painful conditions commonly present to emergency departments (EDs), a setting in which it may be particularly difficult to consistently provide timely analgesic interventions. To measure the effectiveness of a set of interventions in improving the rate and timeliness of analgesic medication administration, as well as appropriate backslab immobilization (application of a moldable plaster or fiberglass splint), in a pediatric ED. Data regarding pain management were collected on a consecutive sample of cases of supracondylar fracture over a 13-month period. This followed the implementation of a formal triage pain assessment and treatment medical directive, supplemented with relevant education of nursing and house staff, and posters in the ED. These data were compared with data previously collected from a similar cohort of cases, which presented before the interventions. Postintervention, the proportion of patients treated with an analgesic within 60 min of triage increased from 15% to 54% (P<0.001), and the median time to administration of an analgesic decreased from 72.5 min to 11 min (P<0.001). Rates for backslab application before radiography were similar before and after the intervention (29% and 33%, respectively; P=0.646). A multifaceted approach to improving early analgesic interventions was associated with considerably improved rates of early analgesic treatments for supracondylar fracture; however, no improvement in early immobilization was observed.

  10. Multiple interventions improve analgesic treatment of supracondylar fractures in a pediatric emergency department

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Robert N; Chafe, Roger E; Newhook, Leigh A; Murnaghan, Kyle D

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Provision of appropriate and timely treatment for pain in the pediatric population has been challenging. Children with painful conditions commonly present to emergency departments (EDs), a setting in which it may be particularly difficult to consistently provide timely analgesic interventions. OBJECTIVES: To measure the effectiveness of a set of interventions in improving the rate and timeliness of analgesic medication administration, as well as appropriate backslab immobilization (application of a moldable plaster or fiberglass splint), in a pediatric ED. METHODS: Data regarding pain management were collected on a consecutive sample of cases of supracondylar fracture over a 13-month period. This followed the implementation of a formal triage pain assessment and treatment medical directive, supplemented with relevant education of nursing and house staff, and posters in the ED. These data were compared with data previously collected from a similar cohort of cases, which presented before the interventions. RESULTS: Postintervention, the proportion of patients treated with an analgesic within 60 min of triage increased from 15% to 54% (P<0.001), and the median time to administration of an analgesic decreased from 72.5 min to 11 min (P<0.001). Rates for backslab application before radiography were similar before and after the intervention (29% and 33%, respectively; P=0.646). CONCLUSIONS: A multifaceted approach to improving early analgesic interventions was associated with considerably improved rates of early analgesic treatments for supracondylar fracture; however, no improvement in early immobilization was observed. PMID:26125193

  11. Childhood trauma and posttraumatic stress disorder in patients with psychosis: clinical challenges and emerging treatments.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Ingo; Fisher, Helen L

    2011-11-01

    To review the current literature on childhood trauma and emerging treatments for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), one of its most prevalent consequences, in patients with psychotic disorders. Of patients with psychosis, 40-50% report either childhood sexual abuse or childhood physical abuse, and 11-46% fulfil a diagnosis of PTSD. About one-third of patients report childhood emotional abuse in the absence of other forms of childhood trauma. More robust evidence is mounting to support the role of childhood trauma in the aetiology of psychosis, but more research is needed to understand the underlying mechanisms. Patients with a history of childhood trauma and/or PTSD have a more severe clinical profile compared with those without these experiences, worse overall functioning, and lower remission rates. Research suggests that instruments assessing childhood trauma and PTSD developed for the general population are also appropriate for use among people with psychosis, and trauma-focussed treatments can be used safely and effectively in this group. Childhood trauma and its consequences are highly prevalent among patients with psychosis and severely affect the course and outcome. Treatment approaches appropriate for this population need to be further evaluated and implemented into routine practice.

  12. Novel Treatments for Metastatic Cutaneous Melanoma and the Management of Emergent Toxicities

    PubMed Central

    Lemech, Charlotte; Arkenau, Hendrik-Tobias

    2012-01-01

    The last 12 months have seen the beginning of a new era in the treatment options available for patients with metastatic cutaneous melanoma, a disease previously characterised by its poor prognosis and limited treatment options. Two mechanistically diverse agents have now demonstrated an overall survival benefit in different patient subgroups and further clinical trials are ongoing with emerging single agents and novel combinations. The first agent to demonstrate an overall survival benefit was the CTLA-4 antibody, ipilimumab, illustrating the importance of the immune system and immunomodulation in melanoma tumorigenesis. The second group of agents to show a survival benefit were the selective BRAF inhibitors, vemurafenib and GSK2118436, in patients who are BRAF V600 mutation positive. In addition, in the same BRAF mutant patient population, MEK inhibitors also show promising results and are currently under investigation in later stage trials. Although ipilimumab, BRAF and MEK inhibitors are just passing through the clinical trials arena, their use will rapidly become more widespread. Along with their significant clinical benefits, there are also unique adverse events related to these agents. Although the majority are mild and can be managed with supportive treatment, some toxicities require special management strategies. We outline up-to-date clinical development and management guidelines for ipilimumab, as well as the BRAF and MEK inhibitors. PMID:22253555

  13. Hospital effluents as a source of emerging pollutants: An overview of micropollutants and sustainable treatment options

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verlicchi, P.; Galletti, A.; Petrovic, M.; Barceló, D.

    2010-08-01

    SummaryHospital wastewaters contain a variety of toxic or persistent substances such as pharmaceuticals, radionuclides, solvents and disinfectants for medical purposes in a wide range of concentrations due to laboratory and research activities or medicine excretion. Most of these compounds belong to the so called emerging contaminants; quite often unregulated pollutants which may be candidates for future regulation depending on research on their potential health effects and monitoring of their occurrence. Their main characteristic is that they do not need to persist in the environment to cause negative effects since their high transformation/removal rates can be compensated for by their continuous introduction into the environment. Some of these compounds, most of them pharmaceuticals and personal care products may also be present in urban wastewaters. Their concentrations in the effluents may vary from ng L -1 to μg L -1. In this paper, hospital effluents and urban wastewaters are compared in terms of quali-quantitative characteristics. On the basis of an in-depth survey: (i) hospital average specific daily water consumptions (L patient -1 day -1) are evaluated and compared to urban ones (L person -1 day -1), (ii) conventional parameters concentrations in hospital effluents are compared to urban ones and (iii) main pharmaceuticals and other emerging compounds contents are compared in the two wastewaters. Finally, an overview of the removal capacity of the different treatments is reported.

  14. Identification and Treatment of Human Trafficking Victims in the Emergency Department: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, Patric; Stoklosa, Hanni

    2016-05-01

    Human trafficking victims experience extreme exploitation and have unique health needs, yet too often go undetected by physicians and providers in the Emergency Department (ED). We report a clinical case of human trafficking of a white, English-speaking United States citizen and discuss the features of presentation and treatment options for human trafficking victims upon presentation to the ED. A 29-year-old woman with a past medical history significant for intravenous drug abuse and recent relapse presented to the ED after a reported sexual assault. The patient was discharged that evening and returned to the ED the following day acutely suicidal. The patient divulged that she had been kidnapped and raped at gunpoint by numerous individuals as a result of a debt owed to her drug dealers. WHY SHOULD AN EMERGENCY PHYSICIAN BE AWARE OF THIS?: Many human trafficking victims present to an ED during the course of their exploitation. To that end, EDs provide one of a limited set of opportunities to intervene in the human trafficking cycle of exploitation, and physicians as well as other ED staff should be equipped to respond. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Surgical treatment of left colon malignant emergencies. A new tool for operative risk evaluation.

    PubMed

    Ceriati, Franco; Tebala, Giovanni D; Ceriati, Emanuela; Coco, Claudio; Tebala, Domenico; Verbo, Alessandro; D'Andrilli, Antonio; Picciocchi, Aurelio

    2002-01-01

    The surgical treatment of left colon and rectal cancer emergencies is still controversial. In our opinion the choice is to be based on the general health status of each patient. We retrospectively analyzed our series of 57 patients who underwent immediate resection and anastomosis. Factors significantly related to short-term results were chronic renal failure, heart disease, low albumin serum levels and colonic perforation. The presence of a diverting colostomy did not result in being a protective factor toward anastomotic dehiscence. We constructed a Colorectal Tumors Emergencies Score made of the identified four factors in which the score of each factor is the approximated odds ratio (chronic renal failure 7 points, low albumin serum levels 6 points, heart disease 5 points, colon perforation 4 points). Each patient was classified as Low Risk (CTES < 4), Moderate Risk (CTES 4-12) and High Risk (CTES > 12), mortality and morbidity being 4.3% and 21.7%, 24.0% and 60.0%, 88.9% and 88.9%, respectively. High-risk patients may undergo a staged procedure. Moderate risk patient may be treated by immediate resection of the tumor, without anastomosis. Immediate resection and anastomosis may be reserved to low-risk patients.

  16. Emerging options for treatment of articular cartilage injury in the athlete.

    PubMed

    Mithoefer, Kai; McAdams, Timothy R; Scopp, Jason M; Mandelbaum, Bert R

    2009-01-01

    Articular cartilage injury is observed with increasing frequency in both elite and amateur athletes and results from the significant joint stress associated particularly with high-impact sports. The lack of spontaneous healing of these joint surface defects leads to progressive joint pain and mechanical symptoms with resulting functional impairment and limitation of athletic participation. Left untreated, articular cartilage defects can lead to chronic joint degeneration and athletic disability. Articular cartilage repair in athletes requires effective and durable joint surface restoration that can withstand the significant joint stresses generated during athletic activity. Several techniques for articular cartilage repair have been developed recently, which can successfully restore articular cartilage surfaces and allow for return to high-impact athletics after articular cartilage injury. Besides these existing techniques, new promising scientific concepts and techniques are emerging that incorporate modern tissue engineering technologies and promise further improvement for the treatment of these challenging injuries in the demanding athletic population.

  17. Current and emerging therapies in irritable bowel syndrome: from pathophysiology to treatment.

    PubMed

    Chang, Joseph Y; Talley, Nicholas J

    2010-07-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome is a common functional gastrointestinal disorder with characteristic symptoms of abdominal pain/discomfort with a concurrent disturbance in defecation. It accounts for a significant healthcare burden, and symptoms may be debilitating for some patients. Traditional symptom-based therapies have been found to be ineffective in the treatment of the entire syndrome complex, and do not modify the natural history of the disorder. Although the exact etiopathogenesis of IBS is incompletely understood, recent advances in the elucidation of the pathophysiology and molecular mechanisms of IBS have resulted in the development of novel therapies, as well as potential future therapeutic targets. This article reviews current and emerging therapies in IBS based upon: IBS as a serotonergic disorder; stimulating intestinal chloride channels; modulation of visceral hypersensitivity; altering low-grade intestinal inflammation; and modulation of the gut microbiota.

  18. Lipid Mediators of Allergic Disease: Pathways, Treatments, and Emerging Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Schauberger, Eric; Peinhaupt, Miriam; Cazares, Tareian

    2017-01-01

    Bioactive lipids are critical regulators of inflammation. Over the last 75 years, these diverse compounds have emerged as clinically-relevant mediators of allergic disease pathophysiology. Animal and human studies have demonstrated the importance of lipid mediators in the development of asthma, allergic rhinitis, urticaria, anaphylaxis, atopic dermatitis, and food allergy. Lipids are critical participants in cell signaling events which influence key physiologic (bronchoconstriction) and immune phenomena (degranulation, chemotaxis, sensitization). Lipid-mediated cellular mechanisms including: (1) formation of structural support platforms (lipid rafts) for receptor signaling complexes, (2) activation of a diverse family of G-protein coupled receptors, and (3) mediating intracellular signaling cascades by acting as second messengers. Here, we review four classes of bioactive lipids (platelet activating factor, the leukotrienes, the prostanoids, and the sphingolipids) with special emphasis on lipid synthesis pathways and signaling, atopic disease pathology, and the ongoing development of atopy treatments targeting lipid mediator pathways. PMID:27333777

  19. Contamination control by a greenhouse for emergency medical treatment of the contaminated patient.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yuji; Fukutsu, Kumiko; Akashi, Makoto

    2011-07-01

    In emergency medical treatment of patients contaminated with radioactivity, air contamination control is very important to prevent the secondary contamination of medical staff. In order to optimize design of a greenhouse, a numerical analysis was made by using the Flow Designer software. As a scenario of air contamination, the breathing air of the patient was assumed to be highly contaminated with radioactive gaseous or particulate matter. It was found that air contamination strongly depended on the characteristics of the contaminants. The contamination map of the coarse aerosols with low diffusivity was quite different from those of the fine aerosols and gas. If the setting conditions of air-flow rate of the ventilation and the exhausting position were optimized, secondary contamination of the medical staff standing by the patient is prevented securely by a greenhouse.

  20. Feasibility of emergency department bilingual computerized alcohol screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment.

    PubMed

    Vaca, Federico; Winn, Diane; Anderson, Craig; Kim, Doug; Arcila, Mauricio

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of utilizing a computerized alcohol screening and intervention (CASI) kiosk in an emergency department (ED). An interactive English and Spanish audiographical computer program, developed for used on a mobile computer cart, was administered to 5103 patients. Patients who screened at risk (19%) also received a fully computer-guided brief negotiated interview (BNI) and a printed personal alcohol reduction plan. A higher percentage of younger patients, and males (31% versus 16% females), screened at risk or dependent. Patient surveys indicated CASI was easy to use and over 75% did not prefer a medical professional over the computer. The ED-based bilingual computerized alcohol screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment required little time to administer, was acceptable to patients, identified at-risk and dependent drinkers, and was able to provide personalized feedback and brief intervention.

  1. Current and Emerging Therapies for the Treatment of Cystic Fibrosis or Mitigation of Its Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Mark P; Caraher, Emma

    2016-03-01

    Clinical presentation of the chronic, heritable condition cystic fibrosis (CF) is complex, with a diverse range of symptoms often affecting multiple organs with varying severity. The primary source of morbidity and mortality is due to progressive destruction of the airways attributable to chronic inflammation arising from microbial colonisation. Antimicrobial therapy combined with practises to remove obstructive mucopurulent deposits form the cornerstone of current therapy. However, new treatment options are emerging which offer, for the first time, the opportunity to effect remission from the underlying cause of CF. Here, we discuss these therapies, their mechanisms of action, and their successes and failures in order to illustrate the shift in the nature of how CF will likely be managed into the future.

  2. Emerging strategies and therapies for treatment of Paget’s disease of bone

    PubMed Central

    Michou, Laëtitia; Brown, Jacques P

    2011-01-01

    Paget’s disease of bone (PDB) is a progressive monostotic or polyostotic metabolic bone disease characterized by focal abnormal bone remodeling, with increased bone resorption and excessive, disorganized, new bone formation. PDB rarely occurs before middle age, and it is the second most frequent metabolic bone disorder after osteoporosis, affecting up to 3% of adults over 55 years of age. One of the most striking and intriguing clinical features is the focal nature of the disorder, in that once the disease is established within a bone, there is only local spread within that bone and no systemic dissemination. Despite many years of intense research, the etiology of PDB has still to be conclusively determined. Based on a detailed review of genetic and viral factors incriminated in PDB, we propose a unifying hypothesis from which we can suggest emerging strategies and therapies. PDB results in weakened bone strength and abnormal bone architecture, leading to pain, deformity or, depending on the bone involved, fracture in the affected bone. The diagnostic assessment includes serum total alkaline phosphatase, total body bone scintigraphy, skull and enlarged view pelvis x-rays, and if needed, additional x-rays. The ideal therapeutic option would eliminate bone pain, normalize serum total alkaline phosphatase with prolonged remission, heal radiographic osteolytic lesions, restore normal lamellar bone, and prevent recurrence and complications. With the development of increasingly potent bisphosphonates, culminating in the introduction of a single intravenous infusion of zoledronic acid 5 mg, these goals of treatment are close to being achieved, together with long-term remission in almost all patients. Based on the recent pathophysiological findings, emerging strategies and therapies are reviewed: ie, pulse treatment with zoledronic acid; denosumab, a fully human monoclonal antibody directed against RANK ligand; tocilizumab, an interleukin-6 receptor inhibitor; odanacatib

  3. A strategy for emergency treatment of Schistosoma japonicum-infested water

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Schistosomiasis japonica, caused by contact with Schistosoma japonicum cercaria-infested water when washing, bathing or production, remains a major public-health concern in China. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of a suspension concentrate of niclosamide (SCN) on killing cercaria of S. japonicum that float on the water surface, and its toxicity to fish, so as to establish an emergency-treatment intervention for rapidly killing cercaria and eliminating water infectivity. Results At 30 min after spraying 100 mg/L SCN, with niclosamide dosages of 0.01, 0.02, 0.03, 0.04 g/m2, the water infectivity reduced significantly and no infectivity was found at 60 min after spraying SCN. The surface of static water was sprayed with 100 mg/L SCN, the peak concentration was found at 0 min, and the solution diffused to site with a water depth of 10 cm after 10 min. 30 min later, SCN diffused to the whole water body, and distributed evenly. After spraying 100 mg/L SCN onto the surface of the water with a volume of(3.14 × 202×50)cm3, with niclosamide dosages of 0.02 g/m2, 96 h later, no death of zebra fish was observed. Conclusions By spraying 100 mg/L SCN, with a niclosamide dosage of 0.02 g/m2 onto the surface of S. japonicum-infested water, infectivity of the water can be eliminated after 30-60 min, and there is no evident toxicity to fish. This cercaria-killing method, as an emergency-treatment intervention for infested water, can be applied in those forecasting and early warning systems for schistosomiasis. PMID:22047607

  4. Osteopathic manipulative treatment use in the emergency department: a retrospective medical record review.

    PubMed

    Ault, Brian; Levy, David

    2015-03-01

    Although the use of osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT) appears to be declining, data on the use of OMT in the emergency department (ED) are not available. To determine the quantity and characteristics of OMT performed in a single, community academic ED that houses an osteopathic emergency medicine residency. Retrospective medical record review. A single large community academic ED with an osteopathic emergency medicine residency from July 14, 2005, to March 4, 2013. Patients in the ED who received OMT (N=2076). Medical record data were analyzed to determine patient demographics; treatment characteristics including number of procedures and patients per physician, OMT techniques used, night vs day procedure variation, and financial implication of future billing for OMT; chief complaints; primary discharge diagnoses; and length of stay in the ED. Patients were aged 0 to 95 years (mean, 39 years) and were predominately female (1260 [60.69%]) and white (1300 [62.62%]). A mean of 0.74 patients received OMT per day, and a mean of 29.65 procedures were performed per physician. When data for residents were looked at separately, the mean was higher at 40.32 procedures per physician. The top 3 discharge diagnoses were low back pain (189 patients [9.10%]), muscle spasm (106 patients [5.11%]), and spasm: muscle, back (93 patients [4.48%]). Eleven different OMT techniques were recorded, with myofascial release being used most frequently (1150 of 2868 procedures [40.09%]), followed by muscle energy (672 [23.43%]). The average length of stay in the ED was 206 minutes. A total of 1663 OMT procedures (80%) were performed during the day, whereas 413 (20%) were performed at night. Potential procedural billing for all OMT performed during the study period was $33.09 per day. In contrast to perceptions that OMT use is declining, the authors found that OMT is being performed on a near daily basis in the ED. Additional research is needed to fully understand the impact of OMT in the

  5. Effectiveness of Emergency Rehabilitation Treatments in Reducing Post-fire Erosion, Colorado Front Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rough, D. T.; MacDonald, L. H.

    2003-12-01

    Daniella T.M. Rough Department of Forest, Rangeland, and Watershed Stewardship, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO Lee H. MacDonald Department of Forest, Rangeland, and Watershed Stewardship, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO Burned area emergency rehabilitation (BAER) treatments are often applied to reduce post-fire flooding and erosion, but few studies have quantified their efficacy. The effectiveness of different BAER treatments in reducing post-fire erosion rates is being studied for three different wildfires in the Colorado Front Range. The treatments being monitored include seeding, contour felling, mulching, scarification with seeding, and a polyacrylamide (PAM). Sediment production rates are being measured at the hillslope scale using sediment fences installed immediately after the June 2000 Bobcat fire and the 2002 Hayman and Schoonover fires. Neither aerial- nor ground-based seeding significantly reduced erosion rates in the first three years after the Bobcat fire. In contrast, 4.5 t ha-1 of straw mulch consistently reduced sediment yields by more than 90%. Contour felling initially reduced erosion rates for small and moderate storms, but was less effective following the largest storms, presumably due to overwhelmed sediment storage capacity. A paired\\-swale design is being used for the 2002 Hayman and Schoonover fires, as this provides a more sensitive evaluation of BAER treatment effectiveness. The ground-based application of straw mulch and the aerial application of hydromulch each reduced sediment yields by more than 95% in both 2002 and 2003. However, the ground-based application of hydromulch in fall 2002 did not significantly reduce sediment yields in 2003. In 2002 the application of 11 kg ha-1 of PAM in an ammonium sulfate solution reduced sediment yields by 66%. In 2003 neither these sites nor three newly treated sites showed a significant reduction in sediment yields. A dry application of 5.6 kg ha-1 PAM had no detectable

  6. Repeat epinephrine treatments for food-related allergic reactions that present to the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Banerji, Aleena; Rudders, Susan A; Corel, Blanka; Garth, Alisha M; Clark, Sunday; Camargo, Carlos A

    2010-01-01

    To date, there are sparse data on epinephrine treatment for food-related anaphylaxis in adults. We sought to establish the frequency of more than one epinephrine treatment for adult patients who present with food-related anaphylaxis to the emergency department (ED). We performed a chart review, at two academic centers, of all adults presenting to the ED for food allergy (ICD9CM codes 693.1, 995.0, 995.1, 995.3, 995.7, 995.60-995.69, 558.3, 692.5, and 708.X) between January 1, 2001 and December 31, 2006. We focused on causative foods; treatments, including the number of epinephrine treatments given before and during the ED visit; and disposition. Through random sampling and appropriate weighting, the 486 reviewed cases represented a study cohort of 1286 patients. The median age was 36 years and the cohort was 62% women. Shellfish (23%), peanuts (12%), tree nuts (14%), and fish (14%) provoked the allergic reaction most commonly. Most patients (62%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 57-68%) met criteria for food-related anaphylaxis. In the ED, anaphylaxis patients received epinephrine (18%), antihistamines (91%), corticosteroids (81%), and inhaled albuterol (19%). Overall, 17% (95% CI, 9-25%) of patients with food-related anaphylaxis given epinephrine received >1 dose over the course of their reaction. Among anaphylaxis patients admitted to the hospital, only 10% included anaphylaxis in the discharge diagnosis. At ED discharge (82% of patients), 18% were referred to an allergist and 39% were prescribed self-injectable epinephrine. Among ED patients with food-related anaphylaxis treated with epinephrine, 17% were given >1 dose. This study supports the recommendation that patients at risk for food-related anaphylaxis should carry 2 doses of epinephrine.

  7. Emergency Department–Initiated Buprenorphine/Naloxone Treatment for Opioid Dependence

    PubMed Central

    D’Onofrio, Gail; O’Connor, Patrick G.; Pantalon, Michael V.; Chawarski, Marek C.; Busch, Susan H.; Owens, Patricia H.; Bernstein, Steven L.; Fiellin, David A.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Opioid-dependent patients often use the emergency department (ED) for medical care. OBJECTIVE To test the efficacy of 3 interventions for opioid dependence: (1) screening and referral to treatment (referral); (2) screening, brief intervention, and facilitated referral to community-based treatment services (brief intervention); and (3) screening, brief intervention, ED-initiated treatment with buprenorphine/naloxone, and referral to primary care for 10-week follow-up (buprenorphine). DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS A randomized clinical trial involving 329 opioid-dependent patients who were treated at an urban teaching hospital ED from April 7, 2009, through June 25, 2013. INTERVENTIONS After screening, 104 patients were randomized to the referral group, 111 to the brief intervention group, and 114 to the buprenorphine treatment group. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Enrollment in and receiving addiction treatment 30 days after randomization was the primary outcome. Self-reported days of illicit opioid use, urine testing for illicit opioids, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) risk, and use of addiction treatment services were the secondary outcomes. RESULTS Seventy-eight percent of patients in the buprenorphine group (89 of 114 [95% CI, 70%-85%]) vs 37% in the referral group (38 of 102 [95% CI, 28%-47%]) and 45% in the brief intervention group (50 of 111 [95% CI, 36%-54%]) were engaged in addiction treatment on the 30th day after randomization (P < .001). The buprenorphine group reduced the number of days of illicit opioid use per week from 5.4 days (95% CI, 5.1-5.7) to 0.9 days (95% CI, 0.5-1.3) vs a reduction from 5.4 days (95% CI, 5.1-5.7) to 2.3 days (95% CI, 1.7-3.0) in the referral group and from 5.6 days (95% CI, 5.3-5.9) to 2.4 days (95% CI, 1.8-3.0) in the brief intervention group (P < .001 for both time and intervention effects; P = .02 for the interaction effect). The rates of urine samples that tested negative for opioids did not differ

  8. A One Month Review of the Types of Medical Emergencies and their Treatment Outcomes at Two Urban Public Health Clinics.

    PubMed

    Chew, B H; Than, T L; Chew, K S; Jamaludin, N K; Hassan, H

    2012-12-01

    Our study was to examine prevalence and treatment outcomes of medical emergencies at two urban public health clinics in the Petaling district, Selangor, Malaysia. A prospective universal sampling was employed to recruit all emergencies over one month period (12 April to 11 May 2011). A structured case record form was used to capture demographic data, whether the index case was selfpresenting or decided by health care workers as a medical emergency, presenting complaints, diagnoses, concurrent chronic diseases and their treatment outcomes at the clinic level. Emergency presentations and diagnoses were classified according to the International Classification of Primary Care, revised second edition (ICPC-2-R). A total of 125 medical emergencies with 276 presenting complaints were recorded. The mean age was 30.7 years old (SD 19.9). The prevalence of medical emergency was 0.56% (125/22,320). Chief complaints were mainly from ICPC-2-R chapter R (respiratory system) and chapter A (general and unspecified), 40.0% and 28.0% respectively. The most common diagnosis was acute exacerbation of bronchial asthma (34.6%). Forty percent were referred to hospitals. After adjusting for age and gender, patients who presented with painful emergency (OR 4.9 95% CI 2.0 to 11.7), cardiovascular emergency (OR 63.4 95% CI 12.9 to 310.4) and non-respiratory emergency were predictors of hospital referral (OR 4.6 95% CI 1.1 to 19.1). There was about one medical emergency for every 200 patients presenting to these urban public polyclinics which were mainly acute asthma. More than half were discharged well and given a follow-up.

  9. Anesthesia treatment in cases of infant epiglottis cyst emergency extirpation operations.

    PubMed

    Xu, Q; Xu, J P; Wang, L Z

    2014-06-17

    Congenital epiglottic cyst is a rare embryonic disease. As a congenital laryngeal mucocele, its clinical manifestations include repeated sudden dyspneic respiration and even suffocation accompanied by laryngeal stridor after birth. During food intake, bucking and vomiting is a key feature. Delay in diagnosis and treatment of the disease affects growth and the development of neonatorum leading to suffocation and death. This study was designed to investigate the safety of anesthesia in infants with congenital epiglottic cyst during operation to reduce the occurrence of its complications. The treatment of operations on 12 infants with congenital epiglottic cysts were retrospectively analyzed. Twelve cases of infants with epiglottic cysts received emergency enucleation. Owing to adequate preanesthetic preparation, cystectomies were successfully performed with microwave cauterization under suspension laryngoscopy. None of the 12 patients showed apparent suffocation during anesthesia, the surgical results were good, and after 6 months to 1 year of follow-up, the disease had not recurred. Because of the acute onset of the disease and its severe symptoms and complications, attention should be paid to improve preoperative preparation. Careful selection of proper anesthesia is the key to achieving a successful operation.

  10. Nanoscale zero-valent iron: future prospects for an emerging water treatment technology.

    PubMed

    Crane, R A; Scott, T B

    2012-04-15

    For the past 15 years, nanoscale metallic iron (nZVI) has been investigated as a new tool for the treatment of contaminated water and soil. The technology has reached commercial status in many countries worldwide, however is yet to gain universal acceptance. This review summarises our contemporary knowledge of nZVI aqueous corrosion, manufacture and deployment, along with methods to enhance particle reactivity, stability and subsurface mobility. Reasons for a lack of universal acceptance are also explored. Key factors include: concerns over the long-term fate, transformation and ecotoxicity of nZVI in environmental systems and, a lack of comparable studies for different nZVI materials and deployment strategies. It is highlighted that few investigations to date have examined systems directly analogous to the chemistry, biology and architecture of the terrestrial environment. Such emerging studies have highlighted new concerns, including the prospect for remobilisation of heavy metals and radionuclides over extended periods. The fundamental importance of being able to accurately predict the long-term physical, chemical and biological fate of contaminated sites following nZVI treatment is emphasised and, as part of this, a universal empirical testing framework for nZVI is suggested. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Recent Patents on Emerging Therapeutics for the Treatment of Glaucoma, Age Related Macular Degeneration and Uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Vadlapudi, Aswani Dutt; Patel, Ashaben; Cholkar, Kishore; Mitra, Ashim K.

    2014-01-01

    Advancements in the field and rising interest among pharmaceutical researchers have led to the development of new molecules with enhanced therapeutic activity. Design of new drugs which can target a particular pathway and/or explore novel targets is of immense interest to ocular pharmacologists worldwide. Delivery of suitable pharmacologically active agents at proper dose (within the therapeutic window) to the target tissues without any toxicity to the healthy ocular tissues still remain an elusive task. Moreover, the presence of static and dynamic barriers to drug absorption including the corneal epithelium (lipophilic), corneal and scleral stroma (hydrophilic), conjunctival lymphatics, choroidal vasculature and the blood-ocular barriers also pose a significant challenge for achieving therapeutic drug concentrations at the target site. Although many agents are currently available, new compounds are being introduced for treating various ocular diseases. Deeper understanding of the etiology and complex mechanisms associated with the disease condition would aid in the development of potential therapeutic candidates. Novel small molecules as well as complex biotechnology derived macromolecules with superior efficacy, safety and tolerability are being developed. Therefore, this review article provides an overview of existing drugs, treatment options, advances in emerging therapeutics and related recent patents for the treatment of ocular disorders such as glaucoma, age related macular degeneration (AMD) and uveitis. PMID:25414810

  12. Current Treatment, Emerging Translational Therapies, and New Therapeutic Targets for Autoimmune Myasthenia Gravis.

    PubMed

    Guptill, Jeffrey T; Soni, Madhu; Meriggioli, Matthew N

    2016-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disease associated with the production of autoantibodies against 1) the skeletal muscle acetylcholine receptor; 2) muscle-specific kinase, a receptor tyrosine kinase critical for the maintenance of neuromuscular synapses; 3) low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4, an important molecular binding partner for muscle-specific kinase; and 4) other muscle endplate proteins. In addition to the profile of autoantibodies, MG may be classified according the location of the affected muscles (ocular vs generalized), the age of symptom onset, and the nature of thymic pathology. Immunopathologic events leading to the production of autoantibodies differ in the various disease subtypes. Advances in our knowledge of the immunopathogenesis of the subtypes of MG will allow for directed utilization of the ever-growing repertoire of therapeutic agents that target distinct nodes in the immune pathway relevant to the initiation and maintenance of autoimmune disease. In this review, we examine the pathogenesis of MG subtypes, current treatment options, and emerging new treatments and therapeutic targets.

  13. Removal and fate of emerging contaminants combining biological, flocculation and membrane treatments.

    PubMed

    Melo-Guimarães, Anemir; Torner-Morales, Francisco J; Durán-Álvarez, Juan C; Jiménez-Cisneros, Blanca E

    2013-01-01

    An experimental study combining biological treatment with flocculation (F) and ultrafiltration (UF) membrane technology was conducted, separately and in combination, seeking to increase insight into the capability of such treatment processes to remove emerging contaminants (ECs). The occurrence and removal efficiencies of 17 ECs are reported for wastewater from Mexico City. Results showed that activated sludge (AS) is the predominant process for removing acidic pharmaceutical compounds, and the use of a cationic flocculant increases the biodegradability of these compounds as well as that of 4-nonylphenol. The UF process alone showed greater removal of phenolic compounds than AS. However, the contribution of flocculation to EC removal by the UF unit was fairly limited. In general, the F + AS + UF processes yielded better results than their separate use, leading to the highest removal rates of 15 of the 17 compounds. In the case of some phenolic compounds and the phthalic acid esters, a competitive sorption process between the membrane and the sludge steps seemed to take place. Bis-2-ethylhexylphthalate (DEHP) was found to be significantly sorbed onto sludge. The F + AS + UF process operated as a membrane bioreactor (MBR) using 16 gL(-1) of suspended solids in the mixed liquor (MLSS) yielded the highest removal efficiencies for the ECs tested.

  14. Persistent Human Chorionic Gonadotropin After Methotrexate Treatment and an Emergency Surgical Procedure for Ectopic Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Kurt-Mangold, Michelle; Van Voorhis, Bradley J; Krasowski, Matthew D

    2015-01-01

    The case study is a 33-year-old white female with persistently elevated serum human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) levels following methotrexate treatment and emergency surgery for ectopic pregnancy. At the time of the first methotrexate dose, the serum hCG concentration was 27,995 IU/L. The laboratory was consulted 3.5 months after the surgery, because serum hCG levels had stopped declining and had leveled off to around 80 to 90 IU/L but with negative urine pregnancy tests. Laboratory studies ruled out heterophile antibody interference and hook effect by multiple methods including analysis by different serum hCG assays, treatment with heterophile antibody blocking agents, and dilution studies. Three additional doses of methotrexate over six months were required for serum hCG concentrations to decline to undetectable levels. This case illustrates challenges that may arise with serum hCG measurements in management of ectopic pregnancies. Close collaboration between the laboratory and clinical service is key for optimal patient care.

  15. Evaluation of emerging contaminants in a drinking water treatment plant using electrodialysis reversal technology.

    PubMed

    Gabarrón, S; Gernjak, W; Valero, F; Barceló, A; Petrovic, M; Rodríguez-Roda, I

    2016-05-15

    Emerging contaminants (EC) have gained much attention with globally increasing consumption and detection in aquatic ecosystems during the last two decades from ng/L to lower ug/L. The aim of this study was to evaluate the occurrence and removal of pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs), endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) and related compounds in a Drinking Water Treatment Plant (DWTP) treating raw water from the Mediterranean Llobregat River. The DWTP combined conventional treatment steps with the world's largest electrodialysis reversal (EDR) facility. 49 different PhACs, EDCs and related compounds were found above their limit of quantification in the influent of the DWTP, summing up to a total concentration of ECs between 1600-4200 ng/L. As expected, oxidation using chlorine dioxide and granular activated carbon filters were the most efficient technologies for EC removal. However, despite the low concentration detected in the influent of the EDR process, it was also possible to demonstrate that this process partially removed ionized compounds, thereby constituting an additional barrier against EC pollution in the product. In the product of the EDR system, only 18 out of 49 compounds were quantifiable in at least one of the four experimental campaigns, showing in all cases removals higher than 65% and often beyond 90% for the overall DWTP process. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Influence of hummocks and emergent vegetation on hydraulic performance in a surface flow wastewater treatment wetland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keefe, Steffanie H.; Daniels, Joan S.; Runkel, Robert L.; Wass, Roland D.; Stiles, Eric A.; Barber, Larry B.

    2010-01-01

    A series of tracer experiments were conducted biannually at the start and end of the vegetation growing season in a surface flow wastewater treatment wetland located near Phoenix, AZ. Tracer experiments were conducted prior to and following reconfiguration and replanting of a 1.2 ha treatment wetland from its original design of alternating shallow and deep zones to incorporate hummocks (shallow planting beds situated perpendicular to flow). Tracer test data were analyzed using analysis of moments and the one-dimensional transport with inflow and storage numerical model to evaluate the effects of the seasonal vegetation growth cycle and hummocks on solute transport. Following reconfiguration, vegetation coverage was relatively small, and minor changes in spatial distribution influenced wetland hydraulics. During start-up conditions, the wetland underwent an acclimation period characterized by small vegetation coverage and large transport cross-sectional areas. At the start of the growing season, new growth of emergent vegetation enhanced hydraulic performance. At the end of the growing season, senescing vegetation created short-circuiting. Wetland hydrodynamics were associated with high volumetric efficiencies and velocity heterogeneities. The hummock design resulted in breakthrough curves characterized by multiple secondary tracer peaks indicative of varied flow paths created by bottom topography.

  17. The future is today: emerging drugs for the treatment of erectile dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Albersen, Maarten; Shindel, Alan; Mwamukonda, Kuwong; Lue, Tom

    2011-01-01

    Erectile Dysfunction (ED) is the most common male sexual dysfunction presented for treatment, and the most thoroughly studied sexual dysfunction in men. In the late 20th century, important discoveries were made regarding both the physiologic processes of penile erection and the pathophysiology of ED. These discoveries led to the commercial introduction of the phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors (PDE5I), a class of medications which now accounts for the largest segment of the ED market. While these drugs are highly efficacious for many men, a relatively large subset of ED patients who do not respond to PDE5I has been identified. Recognition of this subset of the ED population and the ageing of the population has driven researchers to investigate novel treatment targets for ED. Increased research efforts have resulted in the development of several orally available compounds that combine high efficacy with low rates of adverse events. In this review we report on various compounds that regulate penile erection both centrally (Clavulanic acid, Dopamine and Melanocortin receptor agonists) and peripherally (novel PDE5I, soluble and particulate Guanylil Cyclase activators, Rho-kinase inhibitors and Maxi-K channel openers), and discuss the preclinical and clinical evidence supporting the development of these emerging drugs for ED. PMID:20415601

  18. Current and emerging drugs for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Triantafillidis, John K; Merikas, Emmanuel; Georgopoulos, Filippos

    2011-01-01

    During the last decade a large number of biological agents against tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), as well as many biochemical substances and molecules specifically for the medical treatment of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), have been developed. This enormous progress was a consequence of the significant advances in biotechnology along with the increased knowledge of the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of IBD. However, conventional therapies remain the cornerstone of treatment for most patients. During recent years conventional and biologic IBD therapies have been optimized. Newer mesalazine formulations with a reduced pill size and only one dose per day demonstrate similar efficacy to older formulations. New corticosteroids retain the efficacy of older corticosteroids while exhibiting a higher safety profile. The role of antibiotics and probiotics has been further clarified. Significant progress in understanding thiopurine metabolism has improved the effective dose along with adjunctive therapies. Quite a large number of substances and therapies, including biologic agents other than TNF-α inhibitors, unfractionated or low-molecular-weight heparin, omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, microbes and microbial products, leukocytapheresis, and other substances under investigation, could offer important benefits to our patients. In this paper we review the established and emerging therapeutic strategies in patients with Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. PMID:21552489

  19. Development and Psychometric Evaluation of the Treatment-Emergent Activation and Suicidality Assessment Profile

    PubMed Central

    Storch, Eric A.; Murphy, Tanya K.; Bodzin, Danielle; Mutch, P. Jane; Lehmkuhl, Heather; Aman, Michael; Goodman, Wayne K.

    2010-01-01

    Although effective in treating a range of childhood psychiatric conditions, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) have been implicated in the induction of an “activation syndrome” (characterized by symptoms of irritability, restlessness, emotional labiality, etc.) that may represent an intermediary state change that fosters suicidality. SSRI-induced activation syndrome is well-accepted by many clinicians and thought to be relatively common, particularly in children and teens. However, gaps exist in empirical data on phenomenology and tools for early detection. With this in mind, we report on a recently funded National Institutes of Health grant to develop a measure of behavioral activation to be completed in a clinical setting. We discuss the development of this measure—the Treatment-Emergent Activation and Suicidality Assessment Profile (TE-ASAP)—as well as psychometric results from a sample of youth with internalizing disorders who were at varying stages of SSRI treatment. Overall, psychometric data were quite promising, with the TE-ASAP demonstrating excellent reliability (i.e., internal consistency, inter-rater, short-term test–retest stability) and strong validity properties. Through further evaluation of the TE-ASAP in the context of a controlled multimodal trial in youth with obsessive–compulsive disorder, we hope to augment understanding of activation syndrome and, in turn, mitigate risks through early detection of this potentially lifethreatening adverse effect. PMID:20473344

  20. Development and Psychometric Evaluation of the Treatment-Emergent Activation and Suicidality Assessment Profile.

    PubMed

    Reid, Jeannette M; Storch, Eric A; Murphy, Tanya K; Bodzin, Danielle; Mutch, P Jane; Lehmkuhl, Heather; Aman, Michael; Goodman, Wayne K

    2010-02-04

    Although effective in treating a range of childhood psychiatric conditions, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) have been implicated in the induction of an "activation syndrome" (characterized by symptoms of irritability, restlessness, emotional labiality, etc.) that may represent an intermediary state change that fosters suicidality. SSRI-induced activation syndrome is well-accepted by many clinicians and thought to be relatively common, particularly in children and teens. However, gaps exist in empirical data on phenomenology and tools for early detection. With this in mind, we report on a recently funded National Institutes of Health grant to develop a measure of behavioral activation to be completed in a clinical setting. We discuss the development of this measure-the Treatment-Emergent Activation and Suicidality Assessment Profile (TE-ASAP)-as well as psychometric results from a sample of youth with internalizing disorders who were at varying stages of SSRI treatment. Overall, psychometric data were quite promising, with the TE-ASAP demonstrating excellent reliability (i.e., internal consistency, inter-rater, short-term test-retest stability) and strong validity properties. Through further evaluation of the TE-ASAP in the context of a controlled multimodal trial in youth with obsessive-compulsive disorder, we hope to augment understanding of activation syndrome and, in turn, mitigate risks through early detection of this potentially lifethreatening adverse effect.

  1. Tuberous Sclerosis and Bilateral Renal Angiomyolipomas: A Case Report and Literature Review of Emerging Treatment Strategies

    PubMed Central

    James, Leighton R.

    2016-01-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex is a rare multisystemic genetic disorder associated with the development of benign hamartomas. Angiomyolipomas are one such characteristic finding that may be seen in 55–80% of tuberous sclerosis complex patients. While being normally asymptomatic, they can also cause significant morbidity and mortality. We present the case of a patient with tuberous sclerosis complex and recently discovered bilateral renal angiomyolipomas, admitted for hematuria who underwent left renal artery embolization; however, worsening renal function necessitated subsequent nephrectomy. Despite still being mainstays of treatment, invasive interventions are now being recommended for specific patient populations as demonstrated in our case. Emerging strategies targeting the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway have been shown to reduce the size of angiomyolipomas and are now used to treat asymptomatic cases >3 cm. Our review discusses these treatment options with the intention of increasing awareness of current recommendations and hopefully leading to increased application of these novel therapies that will reduce the need for invasive interventions. PMID:27525138

  2. New and emerging technologies for the treatment of inherited retinal diseases: a horizon scanning review

    PubMed Central

    Smith, J; Ward, D; Michaelides, M; Moore, A T; Simpson, S

    2015-01-01

    The horizon scanning review aimed to identify new and emerging technologies in development that have the potential to slow or stop disease progression and/or reverse sight loss in people with inherited retinal diseases (IRDs). Potential treatments were identified using recognized horizon scanning methods. These included a combination of online searches using predetermined search terms, suggestions from clinical experts and patient and carer focus groups, and contact with commercial developers. Twenty-nine relevant technologies were identified. These included 9 gene therapeutic approaches, 10 medical devices, 5 pharmacological agents, and 5 regenerative and cell therapies. A further 11 technologies were identified in very early phases of development (typically phase I or pre-clinical) and were included in the final report to give a complete picture of developments ‘on the horizon'. Clinical experts and patient and carer focus groups provided helpful information and insights, such as the availability of specialised services for patients, the potential impacts of individual technologies on people with IRDs and their families, and helped to identify additional relevant technologies. This engagement ensured that important areas of innovation were not missed. Most of the health technologies identified are still at an early stage of development and it is difficult to estimate when treatments might be available. Further, well designed trials that generate data on efficacy, applicability, acceptability, and costs of the technologies, as well as the long-term impacts for various conditions are required before these can be considered for adoption into routine clinical practice. PMID:26113499

  3. New and emerging technologies for the treatment of inherited retinal diseases: a horizon scanning review.

    PubMed

    Smith, J; Ward, D; Michaelides, M; Moore, A T; Simpson, S

    2015-09-01

    The horizon scanning review aimed to identify new and emerging technologies in development that have the potential to slow or stop disease progression and/or reverse sight loss in people with inherited retinal diseases (IRDs). Potential treatments were identified using recognized horizon scanning methods. These included a combination of online searches using predetermined search terms, suggestions from clinical experts and patient and carer focus groups, and contact with commercial developers. Twenty-nine relevant technologies were identified. These included 9 gene therapeutic approaches, 10 medical devices, 5 pharmacological agents, and 5 regenerative and cell therapies. A further 11 technologies were identified in very early phases of development (typically phase I or pre-clinical) and were included in the final report to give a complete picture of developments 'on the horizon'. Clinical experts and patient and carer focus groups provided helpful information and insights, such as the availability of specialised services for patients, the potential impacts of individual technologies on people with IRDs and their families, and helped to identify additional relevant technologies. This engagement ensured that important areas of innovation were not missed. Most of the health technologies identified are still at an early stage of development and it is difficult to estimate when treatments might be available. Further, well designed trials that generate data on efficacy, applicability, acceptability, and costs of the technologies, as well as the long-term impacts for various conditions are required before these can be considered for adoption into routine clinical practice.

  4. Emergence of mmpT5 Variants during Bedaquiline Treatment of Mycobacterium intracellulare Lung Disease.

    PubMed

    Alexander, David C; Vasireddy, Ravikiran; Vasireddy, Sruthi; Philley, Julie V; Brown-Elliott, Barbara A; Perry, Benjamin J; Griffith, David E; Benwill, Jeana L; Cameron, Andrew D S; Wallace, Richard J

    2017-02-01

    Bedaquiline (BDQ), a diarylquinoline antibiotic that targets ATP synthase, is effective for the treatment of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infections that no longer respond to conventional drugs. While investigating the off-label use of BDQ as salvage therapy, seven of 13 patients with Mycobacterium intracellulare lung disease had an initial microbiological response and then relapsed. Whole-genome comparison of pretreatment and relapse isolates of M. intracellulare uncovered mutations in a previously uncharacterized locus, mmpT5 Preliminary analysis suggested similarities between mmpT5 and the mmpR5 locus, which is associated with low-level BDQ resistance in M. tuberculosis Both genes encode transcriptional regulators and are adjacent to orthologs of the mmpS5-mmpL5 drug efflux operon. However, MmpT5 belongs to the TetR superfamily, whereas MmpR5 is a MarR family protein. Targeted sequencing uncovered nonsynonymous mmpT5 mutations in isolates from all seven relapse cases, including two pretreatment isolates. In contrast, only two relapse patient isolates had nonsynonymous changes in ATP synthase subunit c (atpE), the primary target of BDQ. Susceptibility testing indicated that mmpT5 mutations are associated with modest 2- to 8-fold increases in MICs for BDQ and clofazimine, whereas one atpE mutant exhibited a 50-fold increase in MIC for BDQ. Bedaquiline shows potential for the treatment of M. intracellulare lung disease, but optimization of treatment regimens is required to prevent the emergence of mmpT5 variants and microbiological relapse.

  5. Kind and estimated stocking amount of antidotes for initial treatment for acute poisoning at emergency medical centers in Korea.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Chang Hwan; Ryoo, Seung Mok; Lim, Kyoung Soo; Kim, Won; Lim, Hoon; Oh, Bum Jin

    2014-11-01

    Antidotes for toxicological emergencies can be life-saving. However, there is no nationwide estimation of the antidotes stocking amount in Korea. This study tried to estimate the quantities of stocking antidotes at emergency department (ED). An expert panel of clinical toxicologists made a list of 18 emergency antidotes. The quantity was estimated by comparing the antidote utilization frequency in a multicenter epidemiological study and the nation-wide EDs' data of National Emergency Department Information System (NEDIS). In an epidemiological study of 11 nationwide EDs from January 2009 to December 2010, only 92 (1.9%) patients had been administered emergency antidotes except activated charcoal among 4,870 cases of acute adult poisoning patients. Comparing with NEDIS data, about 1,400,000 patients visited the 124 EDs nationwide due to acute poisoning and about 103,348 adult doses of the 18 emergency antidotes may be required considering poisoning severity score. Of these, 13,224 (1.9%) adult doses of emergency antidotes (575 of atropine, 144 of calcium gluconate or other calcium salts, 2,587 of flumazenil, 3,450 of N-acetylcysteine, 5,893 of pralidoxime, 287 of hydroxocobalamin, 144 of sodium nitrite, and 144 of sodium thiosulfate) would be needed for maintaining the present level of initial treatment with emergency antidotes at EDs in Korea.

  6. Biologically active filters - An advanced water treatment process for contaminants of emerging concern.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuangyi; Gitungo, Stephen W; Axe, Lisa; Raczko, Robert F; Dyksen, John E

    2017-05-01

    With the increasing concern of contaminants of emerging concern (CECs) in source water, this study examines the hypothesis that existing filters in water treatment plants can be converted to biologically active filters (BAFs) to treat these compounds. Removals through bench-scale BAFs were evaluated as a function of media, granular activated carbon (GAC) and dual media, empty bed contact time (EBCT), and pre-ozonation. For GAC BAFs, greater oxygen consumption, increased pH drop, and greater dissolved organic carbon removal normalized to adenosine triphosphate (ATP) were observed indicating increased microbial activity as compared to anthracite/sand dual media BAFs. ATP concentrations in the upper portion of the BAFs were as much as four times greater than the middle and lower portions of the dual media and 1.5 times greater in GAC. Sixteen CECs were spiked in the source water. At an EBCT of 18 min (min), GAC BAFs were highly effective with overall removals greater than 80% without pre-ozonation; exceptions included tri(2-chloroethyl) phosphate and iopromide. With a 10 min EBCT, the degree of CECs removal was reduced with less than half of the compounds removed at greater than 80%. The dual media BAFs showed limited CECs removal with only four compounds removed at greater than 80%, and 10 compounds were reduced by less than 50% with either EBCT. This study demonstrated that GAC BAFs with and without pre-ozonation are an effective and advanced technology for treating emerging contaminants. On the other hand, pre-ozonation is needed for dual media BAFs to remove CECs. The most cost effective operating conditions for dual media BAFs were a 10 min EBCT with the application of pre-ozonation.

  7. GOST: A generic ordinal sequential trial design for a treatment trial in an emerging pandemic

    PubMed Central

    Whitehead, John

    2017-01-01

    Background Conducting clinical trials to assess experimental treatments for potentially pandemic infectious diseases is challenging. Since many outbreaks of infectious diseases last only six to eight weeks, there is a need for trial designs that can be implemented rapidly in the face of uncertainty. Outbreaks are sudden and unpredictable and so it is essential that as much planning as possible takes place in advance. Statistical aspects of such trial designs should be evaluated and discussed in readiness for implementation. Methodology/Principal findings This paper proposes a generic ordinal sequential trial design (GOST) for a randomised clinical trial comparing an experimental treatment for an emerging infectious disease with standard care. The design is intended as an off-the-shelf, ready-to-use robust and flexible option. The primary endpoint is a categorisation of patient outcome according to an ordinal scale. A sequential approach is adopted, stopping as soon as it is clear that the experimental treatment has an advantage or that sufficient advantage is unlikely to be detected. The properties of the design are evaluated using large-sample theory and verified for moderate sized samples using simulation. The trial is powered to detect a generic clinically relevant difference: namely an odds ratio of 2 for better rather than worse outcomes. Total sample sizes (across both treatments) of between 150 and 300 patients prove to be adequate in many cases, but the precise value depends on both the magnitude of the treatment advantage and the nature of the ordinal scale. An advantage of the approach is that any erroneous assumptions made at the design stage about the proportion of patients falling into each outcome category have little effect on the error probabilities of the study, although they can lead to inaccurate forecasts of sample size. Conclusions/Significance It is important and feasible to pre-determine many of the statistical aspects of an efficient trial

  8. Emergency Endovascular Treatment of Sac Rupture for Type IIIa Endoleak in Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Previously Excluded with Endovascular Repair

    SciTech Connect

    Carrafiello, Gianpaolo Mangini, Monica Bracchi, Elena Recaldini, Chiara; Cocozza, Eugenio; Piffaretti, Gabriele; Pellegrino, Carlo Lagana, Domenico Fugazzola, Carlo

    2010-08-15

    Elective endovascular treatment of thoracic aortic pathology has been applied in a variety of conditions. The complications of thoracic aortic stenting are also well recognized. Endoleak after endovascular repair of thoracic aortic aneurysms is the most frequent complication; among them, type III is the least frequent. Endovascular treatment of type III endoleak is generally performed under elective conditions; less frequently, in emergency. We report a successful emergency endovascular management of post-thoracic endovascular repair for thoracic aortic aneurysm rupture due to type IIIa endoleak.

  9. Performance in appropriate Rh testing and treatment with Rh immunoglobulin in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Griffey, Richard T; Chen, Betty C; Krehbiel, Nicholas W

    2012-04-01

    The quality measure "Rh immunoglobulin administration for Rh-negative women at risk for fetal blood exposure" was recently endorsed by the National Quality Forum. No published data have shown a related performance gap in US emergency departments (EDs). We determine performance in a US ED for appropriate Rh testing and treatment among pregnant ED patients at risk of fetal blood exposure. This was a retrospective, observational study in an urban, academic ED with 97,000 annual visits. We performed record review of all pregnant ED patients aged 14 to 50 years and presenting between June 1, 2009, and June 1, 2010, to determine whether a sensitizing event or a potential sensitizing event occurred and whether Rh testing and treatment with Rh immunoglobulin were performed when indicated. Performance rates were calculated under 2 different assumptions for patients without Rh testing ordered in the ED but who had previous data in the electronic medical record: (1) unless explicitly documented by the treating physician, previous Rh data were considered as not having been checked; and (2) when available in the electronic medical record, Rh status was always considered as having been checked. Interrater reliability was assessed for whether a trauma represented a sensitizing event. Among 1,465 patients identified, 808 met inclusion criteria; 560 had a sensitizing event and 248 had a potential sensitizing event. Interrater reliability for determination of sensitizing event or potential sensitizing event in trauma was moderate (κ=0.42). Performance rates for Rh testing among patients with sensitizing events, with potential sensitizing events, and overall were 73% (95% confidence interval [CI] 69% to 76%) (408/560), 36% (95% CI 31% to 43%) (90/248), and 62% (95% CI 58% to 65%) (498/808). Appropriate treatment for patients with a sensitizing event, with a potential sensitizing event, and overall was 56% (95% CI 39% to 71%) (19/34), 0% (95% CI 0% to 49%) (0/5), and 48% (95% CI 33

  10. Application of Ureteroscope in Emergency Treatment with Persistent Renal Colic Patients during Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shilin; Liu, Guoqing; Duo, Yongfu; Wang, Jianfeng; Li, Jierong; Li, Chunjing

    2016-01-01

    Background Although the application of ureteroscopy in the treatment of ureteral calculi during pregnancy has been on the rise, for persistent renal colic patients without ultrasound-detected ureteral calculi, it may represent a clinical dilemma due to the potential risks for both mother and fetus. Objective The aim of the present study is to present our experience with the application of the ureteroscope in the emergency treatment of persistent renal colic patients during pregnancy. Methods From March 2009 to September 2014, a total of 117 pregnant women who received ureteroscopy for persistent renal colic were retrospectively analyzed. Patients were divided into three groups according to duration of the persistent renal colic: Group A (within 12 hours; 24 cases); Group B (12 to 24 hours; 76 cases); and Group C (more than 24 hours; 17 cases). The stone-free rate, complications, and other qualitative data were analyzed. Results Of the 117 patients, 31 patients who were found not to have renal or ureteral calculi received ureteroscopic double-J (DJ) stent insertion, whereas 86 patients who were found with ureteral calculi received ureteroscopic lithotripsy (URSL) and DJ stent insertion. Among them, 24 patients (27.9%) were found with ureteral calculi by ureteroscopy rather than ultrasound. In addition, 73 patients (84.9%) had complete fragmentation of calculi; 12 patients (10.3%) had a threatened abortion (the rates of threatened abortion in Groups A, B and C were 8.3% vs. 6.5% vs. 29.4%; Group C compared with Groups A and B, p<0.05), and one patient (1.2%) had urosepsis (in Group C). However, these complications were cured with conservative treatment, without postpartum infant and maternal complications. Conclusion For pregnant patients with persistent renal colic/ureteral calculi and hydronephrosis, ureteroscopic DJ stent insertion and URSL are effective and safe options when conservative treatment fails, even if no urinary calculi were found by ultrasound. At the

  11. Emerging approaches of traditional Chinese medicine formulas for the treatment of hyperlipidemia.

    PubMed

    Xie, Weidong; Zhao, Yunan; Du, Lijun

    2012-03-27

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) formulas have been widely used in China since ancient times to treat certain diseases (e.g., phlegm, dampness and blood stasis). Recently, the effects of these medicines have been increasingly demonstrated to be helpful for hyperlipidemic patients. This manuscript aims to describe the scientific evidence for the efficacy of TCM and attempts to identify potential TCM formulas for treating hyperlipidemia. TCM formulas approved by the State Food and Drug Administration of China (SFDA) were sourced from the official SFDA website (http://www.sda.gov.cn/). Human and animal evidence for the hypolipidemic effects of herbs from TCM formulas were reviewed via the Internet (Elsevier, ACS, Wiley Online Library, SpringerLink, PubMed, Web of Science, CNKI, Baidu, and Google) and libraries up to October 31, 2011. More than 50 TCM formulas have been used to treat hyperlipidemia. These herbs can primarily be grouped into three categories: (1) herbs promoting excretions, generally by reducing food retention, enhancing purgative effects, and promoting diuresis and choleretic effects, e.g., Fructus Crataegi (), Radix Polygoni Multiflori (), Semen Cassiae (), and Radix et Rhizoma Rhei (), Rhizoma alismatis (), and Herba Artemisiae Scopariae (); (2) herbs acting on the cardiovascular system, generally by improving blood circulation based on TCM theories, e.g., Radix Salviae Miltiorrhizae (), Radix Puerariae (), Rhizoma Chuanxiong (), Flos Carthami (), and Folium Nelumbinis (); and (3) herbs that have tonic effects, e.g., Fructus Lycii (), Radix Ginseng (), and Radix Astragali (). Three basic approaches, including excretory function enhancement, cardiovascular system improvement, and tonic effect reinforcement, are emerging among TCM formulas for the treatment of hyperlipidemia. These approaches may be useful in controlling blood lipid levels, preventing cardiovascular complications, and adjusting bodily functions in hyperlipidemic patients. However

  12. Disparities in Treatment of Older Adults with Suicide Risk in the Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Arias, Sarah A; Boudreaux, Edwin D; Segal, Daniel L; Miller, Ivan; Camargo, Carlos A; Betz, Marian E

    2017-07-28

    We described characteristics and treatment received for older (≥60 years) vs younger (<60 years) adult emergency department (ED) patients with suicide risk. Retrospective chart review. An ED with universal screening for suicide risk. Eligible charts included a random sample of adults (≥18 years) who screened positive for suicidal ideation (SI) in past 2 weeks and/or a suicide attempt (SA) within the past 6 months. Visit dates were from May 2014 to September 2016. A total of 800 charts were reviewed, with oversampling of older adults. Of the 200 older adults sampled, fewer older adults compared to younger adults (n = 600) had a chief complaint involving psychiatric behavior (53% vs 70%) or self-harm behavior (26% vs 36%). Although a higher number of older adults (93%) had documentation of current SI compared to younger adults (79%), fewer older adults (17%) reported SA in the past 2 weeks compared to younger adults (23%). Of those with a positive suicide screen who were discharged home, less than half of older adults received a mental health evaluation during their visit (42%, 95% CI 34-52) compared to 66% (95% CI 61-70) of younger adults who met the same criteria. Similarly, fewer older, than younger, adult patients with current SI/SA received referral resources (34%; 95% CI 26-43; vs 60%; 95% CI 55-65). Significantly fewer suicidal older adult patients who were discharged home received a mental health evaluation when compared to similar younger adults. These findings highlight an important area for improvement in the treatment of older adults at risk for suicide. © 2017, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2017, The American Geriatrics Society.

  13. Anaphylaxis in a New York City pediatric emergency department: Triggers, treatments, and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Faith; Chawla, Kanwaljit; Järvinen, Kirsi M.; Nowak-Weęgrzyn, Anna

    2011-01-01

    Background Anaphylaxis incidence is increasing. Objective To characterize anaphylaxis in children in an urban pediatric emergency department (PED). Methods Review of PED records for anaphylactic reactions over 5 years. Results We identified 213 anaphylactic reactions in 192 children (97 males); 6 were infants; 20 had multiple reactions; median age 8 years; range 4 mo-18 yr. Sixty-two reactions were coded as anaphylaxis; 151 additional reactions met the Second symposium anaphylaxis criteria. There was no increase in incidence over 5 years. The triggers included: foods, 71%; unknown, 15%; drugs, 9%, and other, 5%. Food was more likely to be a trigger in multiple PED visits, P=.03. Epinephrine was administered in 169 (79%) reactions; in 58 (27%) epinephrine was given before arrival in PED. Patients with Medicaid were less likely to receive epinephrine before arrival in PED, P<.001. Twenty-eight (14.6%) patients were hospitalized; 9 in the intensive care unit. For thirteen (6%) of the reactions, two doses of epinephrine were administered; 69% of patients treated with two doses of epinephrine were hospitalized, compared to 12% of patients treated with a single dose, P<.001. Administration of both epinephrine doses before arrival to PED was associated with a lower rate of hospitalization compared to epinephrine administration in the PED, P=.05. Conclusions Food is the main anaphylaxis trigger in the urban PED, although the ICD-9 code for anaphylaxis is underutilized. Treatment with two doses of epinephrine is associated with a higher risk of hospitalization; epinephrine treatment before arrival to PED is associated with a decreased risk. Children with Medicaid are less likely to receive epinephrine before arrival in PED. PMID:22018905

  14. Effectiveness of standardized combination therapy for migraine treatment in the pediatric emergency department.

    PubMed

    Leung, Stephanie; Bulloch, Blake; Young, Christine; Yonker, Marcy; Hostetler, Mark

    2013-03-01

    To compare outcomes of pediatric migraine patients treated in an emergency department (ED) before and after implementation of a standardized combination intravenous therapy regimen aimed toward improving and standardizing abortive migraine therapy. In a pediatric ED, migraines represent 8-18% of all headache visits. Despite this large number, no standard treatment for acute migraine therapy currently exists. The study utilized a retrospective chart review of patients seeking acute migraine treatment at a tertiary care, pediatric ED from August 2006 to March 2010. Inclusion criteria were pediatric migraine patients as defined by International Headache Society guidelines. The comparison population received various migraine therapies based on attending practice preference. After October 2008, patients received standardized intravenous combination therapy involving a normal saline fluid bolus, ketorolac, prochlorperazine, and diphenhydramine. Occasionally, metoclopramide was substituted during prochlorperazine shortages. Reduction in headache pain score was the primary outcome. Secondary outcome measures included length of ED stay, hospital admission rate, and ED readmission rate within 48 hours. The study yielded 87 patients who received standardized combination therapy and 165 comparison patients. No significant difference in patient characteristics existed when evaluating patient demographics, outpatient medication use, and initial headache pain score. When compared with the non-standardized therapy population, the combination therapy patients revealed significant reductions in pain score (decrease of 5.3 vs. 6.9, difference -1.6, 95% confidence interval -2.2 to -0.8, P < .001), length of ED stay (5.3 vs. 4.4 hours, difference 0.9, 95% confidence interval 0.2-1.6, P = .008), and hospital admission rate (32% vs. 3%, P < .001) without changes in ED return rate (7% vs. 2%, P = .148). Standardized combination therapy is effective for acute pediatric

  15. The Future of Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia: Emerging Pathophysiological Concepts and Potential New Avenues of Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Jennifer J. P.; Tibboel, Dick; de Kleer, Ismé M.; Reiss, Irwin K. M.; Rottier, Robbert J.

    2017-01-01

    Yearly more than 15 million babies are born premature (<37 weeks gestational age), accounting for more than 1 in 10 births worldwide. Lung injury caused by maternal chorioamnionitis or preeclampsia, postnatal ventilation, hyperoxia, or inflammation can lead to the development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), one of the most common adverse outcomes in these preterm neonates. BPD patients have an arrest in alveolar and microvascular development and more frequently develop asthma and early-onset emphysema as they age. Understanding how the alveoli develop, and repair, and regenerate after injury is critical for the development of therapies, as unfortunately there is still no cure for BPD. In this review, we aim to provide an overview of emerging new concepts in the understanding of perinatal lung development and injury from a molecular and cellular point of view and how this is paving the way for new therapeutic options to prevent or treat BPD, as well as a reflection on current treatment procedures. PMID:28589122

  16. Emerging contaminant degradation and removal in algal wastewater treatment ponds: Identifying the research gaps.

    PubMed

    Norvill, Zane N; Shilton, Andy; Guieysse, Benoit

    2016-08-05

    Whereas the fate of emerging contaminants (ECs) during 'conventional' and 'advanced' wastewater treatment (WWT) has been intensively studied, little research has been conducted on the algal WWT ponds commonly used in provincial areas. The long retention times and large surface areas exposed to light potentially allow more opportunities for EC removal to occur, but experimental evidence is lacking to enable definite predictions about EC fate across different algal WWT systems. This study reviews the mechanisms of EC hydrolysis, sorption, biodegradation, and photodegradation, applying available knowledge to the case of algal WWT. From this basis the review identifies three main areas that need more research due to the unique environmental and ecological conditions occurring in algal WWT ponds: i) the effect of diurnally fluctuating pH and dissolved oxygen upon removal mechanisms; ii) the influence of algae and algal biomass on biodegradation and sorption under relevant conditions; and iii) the significance of EC photodegradation in the presence of dissolved and suspended materials. Because of the high concentration of dissolved organics typically found in algal WWT ponds, most EC photodegradation likely occurs via indirect mechanisms rather than direct photolysis in these systems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Emergence of Bruton's tyrosine kinase-negative Hodgkin lymphoma during ibrutinib treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Glavey, Siobhan; Quinn, John; McCloy, Mary; Sargent, Jeremy; McCartney, Yvonne; Catherwood, Mark; Marafioti, Teresa; Leader, Mary; Murphy, Philip; Thornton, Patrick

    2017-10-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) is a chronic B-cell lympho-proliferative disorder in which lymphomatous transformations occur in 5%-15% of patients. Histologically these cases resemble diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, or Richter's transformation, in over 80% of cases. Rare cases of transformation to Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) have been reported in the literature with an estimated prevalence of 0.4%. We report a case of a 67-year-old female with CLL treated with the novel Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) inhibitor, ibrutinib, who subsequently presented with intractable fevers. Bone marrow trephine, and lymph node biopsy revealed classical HL with negative immuno-histochemistry for Btk in HL cells, on a backdrop of CLL. The patient commenced treatment with Adriamycin, Vinblastine and Dacarbazine (AVD), which resulted in an excellent response. Hodgkin transformation of CLL is rare with a single retrospective study of 4121 CLL patients reporting only 18 cases. Btk expression in HL cells is recently recognised in classical HL; however, the majority of HLs are Btk negative. Given that Btk inhibitors have recently been shown to induce genomic instability in B cells, in the context of their widespread use, such emerging cases are increasingly relevant. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Trajectories of Adolescent Alcohol Use after Brief Treatment in an Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Sara J.; Spirito, Anthony; Hernandez, Lynn; Barnett, Nancy P.; Eaton, Cheryl A.; Lewander, William; Rohsenow, Damaris J.; Monti, Peter M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective The primary aim of this study was to identify distinct classes of trajectories of adolescent substance use following a brief motivational interviewing (MI) intervention in an Emergency Department (ED). The secondary aim was to identify predictors of class membership. Methods Latent growth mixture modeling was used with 177 adolescents who participated in two randomized clinical trials evaluating MI for an alcohol-related event. Results Three classes were identified: (1) moderate use, decreasers consisting of 56.8% of participants; (2) heavy use, decreasers, consisting of 10.5% of participants, and (3) heavy use sustainers, consisting of 32.7% of participants. Hispanic ethnicity, parental monitoring, and days of high-volume drinking were significant predictors of class membership. Hispanic ethnic status and high levels of parental monitoring were associated with decreased likelihood of belonging to either of the two heavy use classes. More frequent high-volume drinking at baseline was associated with increased likelihood of belonging to the heavy use, sustainer class, and decreased likelihood of belonging to the heavy use, decreaser class. Across all three classes, being female and having frequent high-volume drinking at baseline were associated with worse response to the intervention. Conclusions These findings have important implications for identifying adolescents who may benefit from different or additional intervention, and for anticipating and informing families of adolescents’ potential drinking course following treatment. PMID:22560729

  19. Engineering application of activated alumina adsorption dams for emergency treatment of arsenic-contaminated rivers.

    PubMed

    Dou, Junfeng; Qin, Wei; Ding, Aizhong; Xie, En; Zheng, Lei; Ding, Wencheng

    2015-01-01

    A batch of lab-based adsorption experiments were performed to investigate the arsenic (As) removal efficacy by activated alumina. Four factors including contact time, pH, initial As concentration and different coexisting ions were examined. The adsorbent made of activated alumina (AA) with particles of 2-4 mm diameter showed a high As removal efficiency and the As concentrations of the samples were below 0.05 mg/L when the hydraulic retention time (HRT) was operated above 5 min. The As concentrations of the samples could remain below 0.05 mg/L for 30 days. A series of AA adsorption dams coupled with several other supporting adsorption techniques were employed for As-contaminated river restoration. The engineering project functioned well, and the effluent As concentration was below 0.05 mg/L when the influent was between 0.2 and 0.7 mg/L, which met the discharge requirement of the Surface Water Quality Standards criteria III in China. The results demonstrated that AA adsorption dams could be applied for emergency treatments of small- or medium-sized rivers contaminated with As.

  20. Microwave as an emerging technology for the treatment of biohazardous waste: A mini-review.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Klaus

    2017-05-01

    Microwave is an emerging technology to treat biohazardous waste, including material from healthcare facilities. A screen of the peer-reviewed literature shows that only limited information may be found in this area of work and, furthermore, analysis of the references reveals that sometimes not all necessary aspects for the appropriate use of the technology are considered. Very often conventional microwave technology is applied for the inactivation of pathogens, which might make sense for certain applications but, on the other hand, may lead to the misbelief that microwave systems cannot be used for the inactivation of a solid "dry" waste. However, conventional microwave units have no means to control the inactivation process, and especially moisture content. But there are a few sophisticated microwave technologies with appropriate measurements allowing a validated inactivation of biohazardous materials. These technologies are an effective tool for inactivation and some of them are commercially available. It must also be considered that the waste should be preferably inactivated either directly at the place where it is generated or biohazardous waste should be transported only in closed systems. Moreover, microwave technology presents a possibility to save energy costs in comparison to the more widely used autoclaves. This mini-review will discuss important aspects for the use of microwave technology for the treatment of biohazardous waste.

  1. Emerging concepts in the treatment of myofascial pain: a review of medications, modalities, and needle-based interventions.

    PubMed

    Annaswamy, Thiru Mandyam; De Luigi, Arthur J; O'Neill, Bryan J; Keole, Nandita; Berbrayer, David

    2011-10-01

    Significant developments and changes in the use of interventions and treatments for the management of myofascial pain syndrome have occurred in the past 10 years. These emerging concepts have changed the approach for clinicians who manage these pain disorders. However, wide variations in practice patterns prevail, and no clear consensus exists regarding when and how to use these interventions; in addition, awareness of the evidence basis behind their use is limited. This review examines the most recent advances in the treatment of myofascial pain syndromes. Specifically, the evidence basis of various emerging interventions is reviewed and recommendations for routine clinical practice and their rationale are provided. The purpose of this review is to provide the clinician with a better understanding of emerging concepts in the interventions used for myofascial pain syndromes.

  2. Long-Term Follow-Up After Endovascular Treatment of Acute Aortic Emergencies

    SciTech Connect

    Pitton, M. B. Herber, S.; Schmiedt, W.; Neufang, A.; Dorweiler, B.; Dueber, C.

    2008-01-15

    Purpose. To investigate the long-term outcome and efficacy of emergency treatment of acute aortic diseases with endovascular stent-grafts. Methods. From September 1995 to April 2007, 37 patients (21 men, 16 women; age 53.9 {+-} 19.2 years, range 18-85 years) with acute complications of diseases of the descending thoracic aorta were treated by endovascular stent-grafts: traumatic aortic ruptures (n = 9), aortobronchial fistulas due to penetrating ulcer or hematothorax (n = 6), acute type B dissections with aortic wall hematoma, penetration, or ischemia (n = 13), and symptomatic aneurysm of the thoracic aorta (n = 9) with pain, penetration, or rupture. Diagnosis was confirmed by contrast-enhanced CT. Multiplanar reformations were used for measurement of the landing zones of the stent-grafts. Stent-grafts were inserted via femoral or iliac cut-down. Two procedures required aortofemoral bypass grafting prior to stent-grafting due to extensive arteriosclerotic stenosis of the iliac arteries. In this case the bypass graft was used for introduction of the stent-graft. Results. A total of 46 stent-grafts were implanted: Vanguard/Stentor (n = 4), Talent (n = 31), and Valiant (n = 11). Stent-graft extension was necessary in 7 cases. In 3 cases primary graft extension was done during the initial procedure (in 1 case due to distal migration of the graft during stent release, in 2 cases due to the total length of the aortic aneurysm). In 4 cases secondary graft extensions were performed-for new aortic ulcers at the proximal stent struts (after 5 days) and distal to the graft (after 8 months) and recurrent aortobronchial fistulas 5 months and 9 years after the initial procedure-resulting in a total of 41 endovascular procedures. The 30-day mortality rate was 8% (3 of 37) and the overall follow-up was 29.9 {+-} 36.6 months (range 0-139 months). All patients with traumatic ruptures demonstrated an immediate sealing of bleeding. Patients with aortobronchial fistulas also

  3. 18 CFR 2.60 - Facilities and activities during an emergency-accounting treatment of defense-related expenditures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Facilities and activities during an emergency-accounting treatment of defense-related expenditures. 2.60 Section 2.60 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL...

  4. 18 CFR 2.60 - Facilities and activities during an emergency-accounting treatment of defense-related expenditures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Facilities and activities during an emergency-accounting treatment of defense-related expenditures. 2.60 Section 2.60 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL...

  5. 18 CFR 2.60 - Facilities and activities during an emergency-accounting treatment of defense-related expenditures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Facilities and activities during an emergency-accounting treatment of defense-related expenditures. 2.60 Section 2.60 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL...

  6. 18 CFR 2.60 - Facilities and activities during an emergency-accounting treatment of defense-related expenditures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Facilities and activities during an emergency-accounting treatment of defense-related expenditures. 2.60 Section 2.60 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL...

  7. Beyond land application: Emerging technologies for the treatment and reuse of anaerobically digested agricultural and food waste.

    PubMed

    Sheets, Johnathon P; Yang, Liangcheng; Ge, Xumeng; Wang, Zhiwu; Li, Yebo

    2015-10-01

    Effective treatment and reuse of the massive quantities of agricultural and food wastes generated daily has the potential to improve the sustainability of food production systems. Anaerobic digestion (AD) is used throughout the world as a waste treatment process to convert organic waste into two main products: biogas and nutrient-rich digestate, called AD effluent. Biogas can be used as a source of renewable energy or transportation fuels, while AD effluent is traditionally applied to land as a soil amendment. However, there are economic and environmental concerns that limit widespread land application, which may lead to underutilization of AD for the treatment of agricultural and food wastes. To combat these constraints, existing and novel methods have emerged to treat or reuse AD effluent. The objective of this review is to analyze several emerging methods used for efficient treatment and reuse of AD effluent. Overall, the application of emerging technologies is limited by AD effluent composition, especially the total solid content. Some technologies, such as composting, use the solid fraction of AD effluent, while most other technologies, such as algae culture and struvite crystallization, use the liquid fraction. Therefore, dewatering of AD effluent, reuse of the liquid and solid fractions, and land application could all be combined to sustainably manage the large quantities of AD effluent produced. Issues such as pathogen regrowth and prevalence of emerging organic micro-pollutants are also discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. 21 CFR 500.65 - Epinephrine injection 1:1,000 in 10-milliliter containers for emergency treatment of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... containers for emergency treatment of anaphylactoid shock in cattle, horses, sheep, and swine. 500.65 Section... cattle, horses, sheep, and swine. (a) Anaphylactoid reactions in cattle, horses, sheep, and swine occur... treating anaphylactoid shock. Usual Dosage: Cattle, horses, sheep, and swine—1 cubic centimeter per 100...

  9. 21 CFR 500.65 - Epinephrine injection 1:1,000 in 10-milliliter containers for emergency treatment of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... containers for emergency treatment of anaphylactoid shock in cattle, horses, sheep, and swine. 500.65 Section... cattle, horses, sheep, and swine. (a) Anaphylactoid reactions in cattle, horses, sheep, and swine occur... treating anaphylactoid shock. Usual Dosage: Cattle, horses, sheep, and swine—1 cubic centimeter per 100...

  10. 21 CFR 500.65 - Epinephrine injection 1:1,000 in 10-milliliter containers for emergency treatment of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... containers for emergency treatment of anaphylactoid shock in cattle, horses, sheep, and swine. 500.65 Section... cattle, horses, sheep, and swine. (a) Anaphylactoid reactions in cattle, horses, sheep, and swine occur... treating anaphylactoid shock. Usual Dosage: Cattle, horses, sheep, and swine—1 cubic centimeter per 100...

  11. 21 CFR 500.65 - Epinephrine injection 1:1,000 in 10-milliliter containers for emergency treatment of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... containers for emergency treatment of anaphylactoid shock in cattle, horses, sheep, and swine. 500.65 Section... cattle, horses, sheep, and swine. (a) Anaphylactoid reactions in cattle, horses, sheep, and swine occur... treating anaphylactoid shock. Usual Dosage: Cattle, horses, sheep, and swine—1 cubic centimeter per 100...

  12. 21 CFR 500.65 - Epinephrine injection 1:1,000 in 10-milliliter containers for emergency treatment of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... containers for emergency treatment of anaphylactoid shock in cattle, horses, sheep, and swine. 500.65 Section... cattle, horses, sheep, and swine. (a) Anaphylactoid reactions in cattle, horses, sheep, and swine occur... treating anaphylactoid shock. Usual Dosage: Cattle, horses, sheep, and swine—1 cubic centimeter per 100...

  13. EVALUATION OF DEMONSTRATED AND EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES FOR THE TREATMENT AND CLEAN-UP OF CONTAMINATED LAND AND GROUNDWATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This article provides an overview of the Phase III Pilot Study on the Evaluation of Demonstrated and Emerging Technologies for Treatment and Clean Up of Contaminated Land and Groundwater. It also contains the key conclusions of the Pilot Study and recommendations for further act...

  14. The use of therapeutic plasmapheresis in the treatment of poisoned and snake bite victims: an academic emergency department's experiences.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Cuma; Bayraktaroğlu, Ziya; Gunay, Nurullah; Bozkurt, Selim; Köse, Ataman; Yilmaz, Mehmet

    2006-12-01

    The objective of this study is to describe the clinical status, procedural interventions, and outcomes of critically ill patients with poisoning and snake bite injuries presenting to a tertiary-care emergency department for treatment with therapeutic plasmapheresis. Records of 20 patients who presented to our academic emergency department over a 2-year period and who underwent plasmapheresis for poisoning or snake bite were retrospectively reviewed. Plasmapheresis was performed using centrifugation technology via an intravenous antecubital venous or subclavian vein catheter access. Human albumin or fresh frozen plasma were used as replacement fluids. Data extracted from the patient record included demographic data, clinical status, and outcome measures. Sixteen patients underwent plasmapheresis because of toxicity from snake bite. Three patients were treated for drug poisoning (phenytoin, theophylline, bipyridene HCl) and one patient for mushroom poisoning. Haematologic parameters such as platelet count, PT, and INR resolved rapidly in victims of snake bite injuries after treatment with plasmapheresis. Loss of limbs did not occur in these cases. Seven patients required admission to the intensive care unit. One patient with mushroom poisoning died. Mean length of hospital stay was 14.3 days (range 3-28 days) for all cases. Plasmapheresis was a clinically effective and safe approach in the treatment of snake bite envenomation and other drug poisoning victims especially in the management of hematologic problems and in limb preservation/salvage strategies. In addition to established conventional therapies, emergency physicians should consider plasmapheresis among the therapeutic options in treatment strategies for selected toxicologic emergencies.

  15. EVALUATION OF DEMONSTRATED AND EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES FOR THE TREATMENT AND CLEAN-UP OF CONTAMINATED LAND AND GROUNDWATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This article provides an overview of the Phase III Pilot Study on the Evaluation of Demonstrated and Emerging Technologies for Treatment and Clean Up of Contaminated Land and Groundwater. It also contains the key conclusions of the Pilot Study and recommendations for further act...

  16. Substance Use Prevention and Treatment Outcomes for Emerging Adults in Non-College Settings: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Davis, Jordan P; Smith, Douglas C; Briley, Daniel A

    2017-03-20

    Emerging adults have the highest prevalence rate of alcohol and drug use and represent a large proportion of treatment admissions in the United States. Those who do not attend college experience higher rates of use and may not have similar advantages as those attending college. A systematic review included studies investigating prevention and treatment outcomes among emerging adults in non-college settings. We included studies reporting an average age between 18 and 25 conducted outside of college settings. We extracted data for experimental effects (experimental group compared to control), and contrasted treatments with active and no intervention controls. We also examined several moderators. Fifty studies were meta-analyzed, including 32 prevention and 18 treatment studies. Overall, our experimental weighted mean effect size was d = .17 for both prevention and treatment studies. Comparisons across treatment types typically yielded nonsignificant results. Across prevention and treatment studies, smaller effects existed for studies delivering personalized feedback interventions. For treatment studies only, the percent of students included in the sample was a significant moderator. Overall effects were similar to current meta-analyses on college drinking. However, personalized feedback may be a less effective prevention strategy in non-college settings, and the field should prioritize increasing the effectiveness of treatments targeting non-college students. (PsycINFO Database Record

  17. 75 FR 80762 - Medicare Program; Emergency Medical Treatment and Labor Act: Applicability to Hospital and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-23

    ... hospital inpatients in the May 9, 2002 Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment System (IPPS) proposed rule... proposed rule could further burden the emergency system and could force hospitals providing emergency care... policy does not obligate hospitals with specialized capabilities to do so. IV. Collection of Information...

  18. Emergency endovascular treatment of a ruptured thoracic aneurysm discovered as a back pulsatile mass.

    PubMed

    Collart, Frédéric; Kerbaul, Francois; Jop, Bertrand; Magnan, Pierre-Edouard; Bartoli, Jean-Michel

    2005-07-20

    We report a case of a 65-year-old patient admitted in emergency for a sudden chest pain associated with a pulsatile mass of the back. The CT scan showed a ruptured dissecting aneurysm involving the chest wall. The patient was treated in emergency with an endovascular-covered prosthesis with a favorable outcome.

  19. Emergency care of esophageal foreign body impactions: timing, treatment modalities, and resource utilization.

    PubMed

    Crockett, S D; Sperry, S L W; Miller, C Brock; Shaheen, N J; Dellon, E S

    2013-01-01

    Esophageal foreign body impaction (EFBI) often requires urgent evaluation and treatment, but characteristics of emergency department (ED) care such as timing of presentation and therapeutic procedures and costs of care are unknown. We aimed to study health-care utilization for patients with EFBI presenting to the ED. Cases of EFBI from 2002 to 2009 were identified by querying three different databases from the University of North Carolina Hospitals for all records with ICD-9 CM code 935.1: 'foreign body in the esophagus.' Charts were reviewed to confirm EFBI and extract pertinent data related to the ED visit, including time of presentation, length of ED stay, medications administered, type of procedure performed, characteristics of procedures, and time to therapeutic procedure. Hospital charges for EFBI encounters and consult fees were determined from the Physicians' Fee Reference 2010, and were compiled to estimate costs. Of the 548 cases of EFBI identified, 351 subjects (64%) presented to the ED. A total of 118 (34%) patients received a medication to treat EFBI, which was only effective in 8% of those patients. Two hundred ninety (83%) subjects underwent a procedure including esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) (n=206) or ear, nose, and throat surgery (ENT)-performed laryngoscopy/esophagoscopy (n=138). Admission to the hospital occurred in 162 (46%) of cases. There was no relationship between ED arrival time and time-to-procedure or total time in ED. There was also no significant relationship between delivery of ED medications and likelihood of undergoing a procedure, or between ED arrival time and delivery of medications. The charges associated with a typical EFBI episode ranged from $2284-$6218. In conclusion, the majority of patients with EFBI at our institution presented to the ED. Medical management was largely ineffective. A therapeutic procedure was required to clear the EFBI in most patients. Time of ED arrival made no difference in time

  20. Approaches to treatment of community-acquired pneumonia in the emergency department and the appropriate role of fluoroquinolones.

    PubMed

    Moran, Gregory

    2006-05-01

    The Emergency Department is a critical point of care for patients presenting with signs and symptoms of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). The initial diagnosis, the decision to admit or discharge, the timing of initiating treatment, and appropriateness of the empirical therapy are key factors in successful management. Rising resistance rates to commonly used CAP antibiotics has complicated empirical treatment. Respiratory fluoroquinolones represent an important therapeutic option for patients with co-morbidities and risk factors for penicillin-, macrolide-, and multi-drug-resistant S. pneumoniae infections. Ensuring appropriate use is required to maintain their high level of effectiveness in key respiratory pathogens. Treatment guidelines from the Infectious Diseases Society of America, American Thoracic Society, and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are available to assist emergency physicians in developing clinical pathways to ensure appropriate use of available therapies.

  1. Treatment-emergent mutations in NAEβ confer resistance to the NEDD8-activating enzyme inhibitor MLN4924.

    PubMed

    Milhollen, Michael A; Thomas, Michael P; Narayanan, Usha; Traore, Tary; Riceberg, Jessica; Amidon, Benjamin S; Bence, Neil F; Bolen, Joseph B; Brownell, James; Dick, Lawrence R; Loke, Huay-Keng; McDonald, Alice A; Ma, Jingya; Manfredi, Mark G; Sells, Todd B; Sintchak, Mike D; Yang, Xiaofeng; Xu, Qing; Koenig, Erik M; Gavin, James M; Smith, Peter G

    2012-03-20

    MLN4924 is an investigational small-molecule inhibitor of NEDD8-activating enzyme (NAE) in clinical trials for the treatment of cancer. MLN4924 is a mechanism-based inhibitor, with enzyme inhibition occurring through the formation of a tight-binding NEDD8-MLN4924 adduct. In cell and xenograft models of cancer, we identified treatment-emergent heterozygous mutations in the adenosine triphosphate binding pocket and NEDD8-binding cleft of NAEβ as the primary mechanism of resistance to MLN4924. Biochemical analyses of NAEβ mutants revealed slower rates of adduct formation and reduced adduct affinity for the mutant enzymes. A compound with tighter binding properties was able to potently inhibit mutant enzymes in cells. These data provide rationales for patient selection and the development of next-generation NAE inhibitors designed to overcome treatment-emergent NAEβ mutations.

  2. Effects on outpatient and emergency mental health care of strict Medicaid early periodic screening, diagnosis, and treatment enforcement.

    PubMed

    Snowden, Lonnie R; Masland, Mary C; Wallace, Neal T; Evans-Cuellar, Allison

    2007-11-01

    We investigated enforcement of mental health benefits provided by California Medicaid's Early Periodic Screening, Diagnosis, and Treatment (EPSDT) program. Enforcement, compelled by a consumer-driven lawsuit, resulted in an almost 4-fold funding increase over a 5-year period. We evaluated the impact of enforcement on outpatient treatment intensity (number of visits per child) and rates of emergency care treatment. Using fixed-effects regression, we examined the number of outpatient mental health visits per client and the percentage of all clients using crisis care across 53 autonomous California county mental health plans over 32 three-month periods (quarters; emergency crisis care rates) and 36 quarters (out-patient mental health visits). Enforcement of EPSDT benefits in accordance with federal law produced favorable changes in patterns of mental health service use, consistent with policy aims.

  3. Effects on Outpatient and Emergency Mental Health Care of Strict Medicaid Early Periodic Screening, Diagnosis, and Treatment Enforcement

    PubMed Central

    Snowden, Lonnie R.; Masland, Mary C.; Wallace, Neal T.; Evans-Cuellar, Allison

    2007-01-01

    We investigated enforcement of mental health benefits provided by California Medicaid’s Early Periodic Screening, Diagnosis, and Treatment (EPSDT) program. Enforcement, compelled by a consumer-driven lawsuit, resulted in an almost 4-fold funding increase over a 5-year period. We evaluated the impact of enforcement on outpatient treatment intensity (number of visits per child) and rates of emergency care treatment. Using fixed-effects regression, we examined the number of outpatient mental health visits per client and the percentage of all clients using crisis care across 53 autonomous California county mental health plans over 32 three-month periods (quarters; emergency crisis care rates) and 36 quarters (out-patient mental health visits). Enforcement of EPSDT benefits in accordance with federal law produced favorable changes in patterns of mental health service use, consistent with policy aims. PMID:17329640

  4. Time to Treatment and Mortality during Mandated Emergency Care for Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Seymour, Christopher W; Gesten, Foster; Prescott, Hallie C; Friedrich, Marcus E; Iwashyna, Theodore J; Phillips, Gary S; Lemeshow, Stanley; Osborn, Tiffany; Terry, Kathleen M; Levy, Mitchell M

    2017-06-08

    In 2013, New York began requiring hospitals to follow protocols for the early identification and treatment of sepsis. However, there is controversy about whether more rapid treatment of sepsis improves outcomes in patients. We studied data from patients with sepsis and septic shock that were reported to the New York State Department of Health from April 1, 2014, to June 30, 2016. Patients had a sepsis protocol initiated within 6 hours after arrival in the emergency department and had all items in a 3-hour bundle of care for patients with sepsis (i.e., blood cultures, broad-spectrum antibiotic agents, and lactate measurement) completed within 12 hours. Multilevel models were used to assess the associations between the time until completion of the 3-hour bundle and risk-adjusted mortality. We also examined the times to the administration of antibiotics and to the completion of an initial bolus of intravenous fluid. Among 49,331 patients at 149 hospitals, 40,696 (82.5%) had the 3-hour bundle completed within 3 hours. The median time to completion of the 3-hour bundle was 1.30 hours (interquartile range, 0.65 to 2.35), the median time to the administration of antibiotics was 0.95 hours (interquartile range, 0.35 to 1.95), and the median time to completion of the fluid bolus was 2.56 hours (interquartile range, 1.33 to 4.20). Among patients who had the 3-hour bundle completed within 12 hours, a longer time to the completion of the bundle was associated with higher risk-adjusted in-hospital mortality (odds ratio, 1.04 per hour; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.02 to 1.05; P<0.001), as was a longer time to the administration of antibiotics (odds ratio, 1.04 per hour; 95% CI, 1.03 to 1.06; P<0.001) but not a longer time to the completion of a bolus of intravenous fluids (odds ratio, 1.01 per hour; 95% CI, 0.99 to 1.02; P=0.21). More rapid completion of a 3-hour bundle of sepsis care and rapid administration of antibiotics, but not rapid completion of an initial bolus of

  5. Assessing the burden of treatment-emergent adverse events associated with atypical antipsychotic medications.

    PubMed

    Llorca, Pierre-Michel; Lançon, Christophe; Hartry, Ann; Brown, T Michelle; DiBenedetti, Dana B; Kamat, Siddhesh A; François, Clément

    2017-02-13

    Treatment of schizophrenia and major depressive disorder (MDD) with atypical antipsychotics (AAPs) show improved efficacy and reduced side effect burden compared with older antipsychotic medications. However, a risk of treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs) remains. TEAEs are hard to quantify and perspectives on the importance of TEAEs differ across patients and between patients and physicians. The current study is a qualitative assessment that investigates TEAEs of AAPs from both patient and physician perspectives to provide better understanding of the occurrence and burden of TEAEs associated with these medications. Focus groups comprised of patients with MDD and interviews with patients with schizophrenia were conducted at two qualitative research facilities, along with a physician focus group at one of the facilities. Information collected from patients included an exhaustive list of TEAEs experienced, and the frequency and level of bother of each TEAE; from psychiatrists, information included an exhaustive list of TEAEs based on personal observations and patient report, frequency of TEAEs, clinically important TEAEs, and levels of patient-perceived bother. Standard qualitative analysis methods were used to identify, quantify, characterize, and summarize patterns found in the data collected. A total of 42 patients (25 with MDD and 17 with schizophrenia) and 4 psychiatrists participated in the study. TEAEs reported as bothersome across both patients groups included cognitive issues, weight gain and/or increased appetite, low energy, extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS), and need to sleep/excessive sleep/excessive sleepiness. TEAEs considered more bothersome by patients with schizophrenia were weight gain, low energy, EPS, mental anxiety, and increased positive symptoms; those considered more bothersome by patients with MDD were cognitive issues, somnolence/sedation, and flat/restricted affect. TEAEs considered most clinically important by psychiatrists included

  6. Brief Intervention and Follow-Up for Suicidal Patients With Repeat Emergency Department Visits Enhances Treatment Engagement

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Gregory K.; Currier, Glenn W.; Lyons, Chelsea; Chesin, Megan; Knox, Kerry L.

    2015-01-01

    We implemented an innovative, brief, easy-to-administer 2-part intervention to enhance coping and treatment engagement. The intervention consisted of safety planning and structured telephone follow-up postdischarge with 95 veterans who had 2 or more emergency department (ED) visits within 6 months for suicide-related concerns (i.e., suicide ideation or behavior). The intervention significantly increased behavioral health treatment attendance 3 months after intervention, compared with treatment attendance in the 3 months after a previous ED visit without intervention. The trend was for a decreasing hospitalization rate. PMID:26066951

  7. Current and emerging treatments for irritable bowel syndrome with constipation and chronic idiopathic constipation: focus on prosecretory agents.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Rachel H; Luthin, David R

    2015-06-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome with constipation (IBS-C) and chronic idiopathic constipation (CIC) are two common functional gastrointestinal disorders that impair quality of life and pose a significant economic burden to the health care system. Current therapeutic options include lifestyle modifications, over-the-counter (OTC) agents, antispasmodics, serotonin agonists, and lubiprostone and linaclotide, two prosecretory prescription drugs approved for the treatment of IBS-C and CIC. This review discusses the efficacy and safety of current treatments and emerging therapies for the treatment of IBS-C and CIC, with a focus on the prosecretory agents. A search of the PubMed database (1966-November 2014) was performed to identify relevant articles; clinical trials on emerging agents were also identified by searching the ClinicalTrials.gov registry. OTC laxatives may relieve constipation but do not treat abdominal pain and discomfort. Antispasmodics may provide short-term relief in patients with IBS-C, but their utility is limited by anticholinergic adverse effects. Tricyclic antidepressants, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors have shown benefit in providing global symptom relief and in improving abdominal discomfort, but further research is needed. Phase III clinical trials have demonstrated the efficacy of lubiprostone and linaclotide relative to placebo for the short-term treatment of IBS-C and CIC, with improvements reported in stool frequency, perceived constipation severity, and abdominal pain and discomfort. Relatively small response rates, higher costs, and adverse effects associated with lubiprostone and linaclotide will likely render these agents suitable as second-line therapies in the treatment of IBS-C and CIC. Emerging potential treatment options include prucalopride, plecanatide, elobixibat, and tenapanor. Several of these emerging therapies have novel mechanisms of action and may show promise in patients

  8. Timing of initial antibiotic treatment for febrile neutropenia in the emergency department: the need for evidence-based guidelines.

    PubMed

    Kyriacou, Demetrios N; Jovanovic, Borko; Frankfurt, Olga

    2014-11-01

    Guidelines for the treatment of febrile neutropenia (FN) universally recommend the prompt initiation (<60 minutes) of antibiotic therapy for patients with this complication presenting to medical settings. Unfortunately, administration delays exist in emergency departments where patients with FN frequently seek care. Future guidelines should be based on investigations that clearly indicate the effectiveness of rapid antibiotic therapy. If definitive investigations identify an optimal time period for the initial administration of antibiotics for patients with FN, administrative efforts will be developed to improve the emergency department care of these critically ill patients with cancer. Copyright © 2014 by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network.

  9. Salbutamol via metered-dose inhaler with spacer versus nebulization for acute treatment of pediatric asthma in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Benito-Fernández, Javier; González-Balenciaga, María; Capapé-Zache, Susana; Vázquez-Ronco, Miguel A; Mintegi-Raso, Santiago

    2004-10-01

    To assess the effectiveness of salbutamol delivered via a metered-dose inhaler with spacer versus a nebulizer for acute asthma treatment in the pediatric emergency department. All consecutive children younger than 14 years old who required treatment of acute asthma exacerbation in the emergency department during May 2002 (prospective cohort, n = 321) and May 2001(retrospective cohort, n = 259) were included. Inhaled salbutamol was administered by metered-dose inhaler with a spacer (and a face mask in children younger than 2 years old) in the prospective cohort and by nebulizer in the retrospective cohort. There were no significant differences between the two cohorts in the mean (+/-SD) age (44.50 +/- 38.64 vs. 48.37 +/- 43.55 months) and asthma treatment, arterial oxygen saturation (96.34 +/- 2.12% vs. 96.19 +/- 6.32%), and heart rate (123.71 +/- 23.63 vs. 129.41 +/- 34.55 beats/min) before emergency department consultation. The number of doses of inhaled bronchodilators was also similar (1.42 +/- 1.01 vs. 1.45 +/- 0.98) as well as the number of children that required a stay in the observation unit, admission to the hospital, or returned for medical care. The overall mean length of stay in the emergency department was slightly shorter in the prospective cohort (82 +/- 48 vs. 89 +/- 52 minutes). The administration of bronchodilators using a metered-dose inhaler with spacer is an effective alternative to nebulizers for the treatment of children with acute asthma exacerbations in the emergency department.

  10. An evidence-based approach to the evaluation and treatment of low back pain in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Borczuk, Pierre

    2013-07-01

    Low back pain is the most common musculoskeletal complaint that results in a visit to the emergency department, and it is 1 of the top 5 most common complaints in emergency medicine. Estimates of annual healthcare expenditures for low back pain in the United States exceed $90 billion annually, not even taking lost productivity and business costs into account. This review explores an evidence-based rationale for the evaluation of the patient with low back pain, and it provides guidance on risk stratification pertaining to laboratory assessment and radiologic imaging in the emergency department. Published guidelines from the American College of Physicians and American Pain Society are reviewed, with emphasis on best evidence for pharmacologic treatments, self-care interventions, and more invasive procedures and surgery in management of low back pain. Utilizing effective and proven strategies will avoid medical errors, provide better care for patients, and help manage healthcare resources and costs.

  11. Striking observations during emergency catecholamine treatment of cardiac syncope in a patient with initially unrecognized takotsubo cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Dandel, Michael; Lehmkuhl, Hans B; Schmidt, Gunther; Knosalla, Christoph; Hetzer, Roland

    2009-08-01

    A case is presented of initially unrecognized takotsubo cardiomyopathy with a dramatic clinical course after emergency catecholamine treatment for circulatory support during stress-induced cardiac syncope followed by complete recovery of cardiac function after catecholamine withdrawal and starting beta-blocker therapy. Echocardiography including 2D-strain imaging suggested that the left ventricle (LV) wall motion abnormality was mainly the consequence of geometry-induced regional differences in wall stress (progressively amplified by catecholamines), which might be another possible pathophysiological mechanism involved in the development of LV dysfunction in takotsubo cardiomyopathy. This case also suggests that in emergency, before coronary angiography is possible, echocardiography can be helpful for initial therapeutic decisions, especially to avoid emergency inotropic therapy in such patients.

  12. Assessment and Treatment of Bipolar Spectrum Disorders in Emerging Adulthood: Applying the Behavioral Approach System Hypersensitivity Model

    PubMed Central

    Hamlat, Elissa J.; Garro-Moore, Jared K. O'; Nusslock, Robin; Alloy, Lauren B.

    2016-01-01

    Bipolar disorder is associated with a host of negative physical and interpersonal outcomes including suicide. Emerging adulthood is an age of risk for the onset of bipolar spectrum disorders (BSD) and there has been increased effort to focus on early identification and subsequent intervention for BSDs during this developmental period. Recent research on the behavioral approach system (BAS) hypersensitivity model of bipolar disorder may have implications for the assessment and treatment of BSD in emerging adulthood. We summarize relevant findings on the BAS hypersensitivity model that support the use of reward sensitivity in the early identification of BSDs and suggest evidence-based strategies for clinical work with emerging adults with bipolar spectrum disorders. PMID:28133431

  13. Assessment and Treatment of Bipolar Spectrum Disorders in Emerging Adulthood: Applying the Behavioral Approach System Hypersensitivity Model.

    PubMed

    Hamlat, Elissa J; Garro-Moore, Jared K O'; Nusslock, Robin; Alloy, Lauren B

    2016-08-01

    Bipolar disorder is associated with a host of negative physical and interpersonal outcomes including suicide. Emerging adulthood is an age of risk for the onset of bipolar spectrum disorders (BSD) and there has been increased effort to focus on early identification and subsequent intervention for BSDs during this developmental period. Recent research on the behavioral approach system (BAS) hypersensitivity model of bipolar disorder may have implications for the assessment and treatment of BSD in emerging adulthood. We summarize relevant findings on the BAS hypersensitivity model that support the use of reward sensitivity in the early identification of BSDs and suggest evidence-based strategies for clinical work with emerging adults with bipolar spectrum disorders.

  14. [Consideration of guidelines, recommendations and quality indicators for treatment of stroke in the dataset "Emergency Department" of DIVI].

    PubMed

    Kulla, M; Friess, M; Schellinger, P D; Harth, A; Busse, O; Walcher, F; Helm, M

    2015-12-01

    The dataset "Emergency Department" of the German Interdisciplinary Association of Critical Care and Emergency Medicine (DIVI) has been developed during several expert meetings. Its goal is an all-encompassing documentation of the early clinical treatment of patients in emergency departments. Using the example of the index disease acute ischemic stroke (stroke), the aim was to analyze how far this approach has been fulfilled. In this study German, European and US American guidelines were used to analyze the extent of coverage of the datasets on current emergency department guidelines and recommendations from professional societies. In addition, it was examined whether the dataset includes recommended quality indicators (QI) for quality management (QM) and in a third step it was examined to what extent national provisions for billing are included. In each case a differentiation was made whether the respective rationale was primary, i.e. directly apparent or whether it was merely secondarily depicted by expertise. In the evaluation an additional differentiation was made between the level of recommendations and further quality relevant criteria. The modular design of the emergency department dataset comprising 676 data fields is briefly described. A total of 401 individual fields, divided into basic documentation, monitoring and specific neurological documentation of the treatment of stroke patients were considered. For 247 data fields a rationale was found. Partially overlapping, 78.9 % of 214 medical recommendations in 3 guidelines and 85.8 % of the 106 identified quality indicators were primarily covered. Of the 67 requirements for billing of performance of services, 55.5 % are primarily part of the emergency department dataset. Through appropriate expertise and documentation by a board certified neurologist, the results can be improved to almost 100 %. The index disease stroke illustrates that the emergency department dataset of the DIVI covers medical

  15. Fate and mass balance of contaminants of emerging concern during wastewater treatment determined using the fractionated approach.

    PubMed

    Baalbaki, Zeina; Sultana, Tamanna; Maere, Thomas; Vanrolleghem, Peter A; Metcalfe, Chris D; Yargeau, Viviane

    2016-12-15

    Contaminants of emerging concern (CECs) are often poorly removed from wastewater using conventional treatment technologies and there is limited understanding of their fate during treatment. Inappropriate sampling strategies lead to inaccuracies in estimating removals of CECs. In this study, we used the "fractionated approach" that accounts for the residence time distribution (RTD) in treatment units to investigate the fate of 26 target CECs in a municipal wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) that includes primary, secondary and tertiary treatment steps. Prior hydraulic calibration of each treatment unit was performed. Wastewater and sludge samples were collected at different locations along the treatment train and the concentrations of target CECs were measured by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry. The most substantial aqueous removal occurred during activated sludge treatment (up to 99%). Removals were <50% in the primary clarifier and tertiary rotating biological contactors (RBCs) and up to 70% by sand filtration. Mass balance calculations demonstrated that (bio)degradation accounted for up to 50% of the removal in the primary clarifier and 100% in activated sludge. Removal by sorption to primary and secondary sludge was minimal for most CECs. Analysis of the selected metabolites demonstrated that negative removals obtained could be explained by transformations between the parent compound and their metabolites. This study contributes to the growing literature by applying the fractionated approach to calculate removal of different types of CECs across each wastewater treatment step. An additional level of understanding of the fate of CECs was provided by mass balance calculations in primary and secondary treatments.

  16. Postabortion Care: 20 Years of Strong Evidence on Emergency Treatment, Family Planning, and Other Programming Components.

    PubMed

    Huber, Douglas; Curtis, Carolyn; Irani, Laili; Pappa, Sara; Arrington, Lauren

    2016-09-28

    Worldwide 75 million women need postabortion care (PAC) services each year following safe or unsafe induced abortions and miscarriages. We reviewed more than 550 studies on PAC published between 1994 and 2013 in the peer-reviewed and gray literature, covering emergency treatment, postabortion family planning, organization of services, and related topics that impact practices and health outcomes, particularly in the Global South. In this article, we present findings from studies with strong evidence that have major implications for programs and practice. For example, vacuum aspiration reduced morbidity, costs, and time in comparison to sharp curettage. Misoprostol 400 mcg sublingually or 600 mcg orally achieved 89% to 99% complete evacuation rates within 2 weeks in multiple studies and was comparable in effectiveness, safety, and acceptability to manual vacuum aspiration. Misoprostol was safely introduced in several PAC programs through mid-level providers, extending services to secondary hospitals and primary health centers. In multiple studies, postabortion family planning uptake before discharge increased by 30-70 percentage points within 1-3 years of strengthening postabortion family planning services; in some cases, increases up to 60 percentage points in 4 months were achieved. Immediate postabortion contraceptive acceptance increased on average from 32% before the interventions to 69% post-intervention. Several studies found that women receiving immediate postabortion intrauterine devices and implants had fewer unintended pregnancies and repeat abortions than those who were offered delayed insertions. Postabortion family planning is endorsed by the professional organizations of obstetricians/gynecologists, midwives, and nurses as a standard of practice; major donors agree, and governments should be encouraged to provide universal access to postabortion family planning. Important program recommendations include offering all postabortion women family planning

  17. Postabortion Care: 20 Years of Strong Evidence on Emergency Treatment, Family Planning, and Other Programming Components

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Douglas; Curtis, Carolyn; Irani, Laili; Pappa, Sara; Arrington, Lauren

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Worldwide 75 million women need postabortion care (PAC) services each year following safe or unsafe induced abortions and miscarriages. We reviewed more than 550 studies on PAC published between 1994 and 2013 in the peer-reviewed and gray literature, covering emergency treatment, postabortion family planning, organization of services, and related topics that impact practices and health outcomes, particularly in the Global South. In this article, we present findings from studies with strong evidence that have major implications for programs and practice. For example, vacuum aspiration reduced morbidity, costs, and time in comparison to sharp curettage. Misoprostol 400 mcg sublingually or 600 mcg orally achieved 89% to 99% complete evacuation rates within 2 weeks in multiple studies and was comparable in effectiveness, safety, and acceptability to manual vacuum aspiration. Misoprostol was safely introduced in several PAC programs through mid-level providers, extending services to secondary hospitals and primary health centers. In multiple studies, postabortion family planning uptake before discharge increased by 30–70 percentage points within 1–3 years of strengthening postabortion family planning services; in some cases, increases up to 60 percentage points in 4 months were achieved. Immediate postabortion contraceptive acceptance increased on average from 32% before the interventions to 69% post-intervention. Several studies found that women receiving immediate postabortion intrauterine devices and implants had fewer unintended pregnancies and repeat abortions than those who were offered delayed insertions. Postabortion family planning is endorsed by the professional organizations of obstetricians/gynecologists, midwives, and nurses as a standard of practice; major donors agree, and governments should be encouraged to provide universal access to postabortion family planning. Important program recommendations include offering all postabortion women

  18. A hospital‐wide system to ensure rapid treatment time across the entire spectrum of emergency percutaneous intervention

    PubMed Central

    Johnson‐Wood, Michele L.; VanLeeuwen, Robert; Ramsey, Curtis; Khot, Monica B.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study's aim was to describe a hospital‐wide system to deliver rapid door‐to‐balloon time across the entire spectrum of emergency percutaneous intervention. Background Many patients needing emergency PCI are excluded from door‐to‐balloon public reporting metric; these groups do not achieve door‐to‐balloon times ≤90 min and have increased mortality rates. Methods: We prospectively implemented a protocol for patients with STEMI or other emergency indication for catheterization mandating (1) emergency department physician or cardiologist activation of the catheterization lab and (2) immediate patient transfer to an immediately available catheterization lab by an in‐house nursing transfer team. Results From September 1, 2005 to December 31, 2008, 526 consecutive patients underwent emergency PCI. Median door‐to‐balloon time was 68 min with 85.7% ≤90 min overall. Important subgroups included primary emergency department (62.5 min), cardiorespiratory arrest (71 min), cardiogenic shock (68 min), need for temporary pacemaker or balloon pump (67 min), initial ECG without ST‐elevation (66.5 min), transfer from another ED (84 min), in‐hospital (70 min), and activation indications other than STEMI (68 min). Patients presenting to primary ED and in transfer were compared to historical controls. Treatment ≤90 min increased (28%–85%, P < 0.0001). Mean infarct size decreased, as did hospital length‐of‐stay and admission total hospital costs. Acute myocardial infarction all‐cause 30‐day unadjusted mortality and risk‐standardized mortality ratios were substantially lower than national averages. Conclusion A hospital‐wide systems approach applied across the entire spectrum of emergency PCI leads to rapid door‐to‐balloon time, reduced infarct size and hospitals costs, and low myocardial infarction 30‐day all‐cause mortality. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26700212

  19. Improving the assessment and treatment of pelvic inflammatory disease among adolescents in an urban children's hospital emergency department.

    PubMed

    McCallum, Colleen A; Oman, Kathleen S; Makic, Mary Beth Flynn

    2014-11-01

    Proper pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) assessment and treatment is essential in preventing ectopic pregnancies, repeated PID infections, infertility, chronic pelvic pain, and fetal death. This project measured the effectiveness of interventions directed toward the providers in the emergency department to facilitate a change in the assessment and treatment of PID. Two aims identified for the project included increasing the number of providers who recorded a correct diagnosis of PID in the chart and included a sexual history for female adolescents who presented to the emergency department with abdominal pain. An additional aim was to increase the percentage of adolescents who received the correct treatment for PID. A quality improvement study using pre-post design and Plan-Do-Study-Act cycles over an 18-month period was conducted in the emergency department of an urban children's hospital. Assessment of adolescent female patients' history of recent sexual activity and correct diagnosis and treatment of PID were evaluated. Process improvement interventions consisted of PowerPoint presentations, educational materials, and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) treatment guidelines posted in provider areas (Table 1), along with ongoing positive and corrective feedback to providers. A total of 602 patient records were reviewed (119 in the PID diagnosis and treatment arm and 483 in the obtaining sexual history arm). After process improvement interventions, correct PID diagnosis increased from 72% to 95% (z = 3.064, P = .00109, odds ratio [OR] = 7.08). Correct PID treatment increased from 39.3% to 79.3% (z = 4.190, P = .0000139, OR = 5.90). The percentage of providers who obtained a sexual history increased from 65% to 74.2% (z = 1.892, P = .02929, OR = 1.55). The study demonstrated a significant improvement in all 3 aims related to improved care of adolescents with PID. PowerPoint presentations and the physical presence of the CDC treatment guidelines in the

  20. Impact of an Emergency Triage Assessment and Treatment (ETAT)-based triage process in the paediatric emergency department of a Guatemalan public hospital.

    PubMed

    Crouse, Heather L; Torres, Francisco; Vaides, Henry; Walsh, Michael T; Ishigami, Elise M; Cruz, Andrea T; Torrey, Susan B; Soto, Miguel A

    2016-08-01

    Triage process implementation has been shown to be effective at improving patient outcomes. This study sought to develop, implement and assess the impact of an Emergency Triage Assessment and Treatment (ETAT)-based emergency triage process in the paediatric emergency department (PED) of a public hospital in Guatemala. The study was a quality improvement comparison with a before/after design. Uptake was measured by percentage of patients with an assigned triage category. Outcomes were hospital admission rate, inpatient length of stay (LOS), and mortality as determined by two distinct medical record reviews for 1 year pre- and post-intervention: a random sample (RS) of all PED patients and records for all critically-ill (CI) children [serious diagnoses or admission to the paediatric intensive care unit (PICU)]. Demographics, diagnoses and disposition were recorded. The RS totalled 1027 (51.4% male); median ages pre- and post-intervention were 2.0 and 2.4 years, respectively. There were 196 patients in the CI sample, of whom 56.6% were male and one-third were neonates; median ages of the CI group pre- and post-intervention were 3.1 and 5.6 months, respectively. One year after implementation, 97.5% of medical records had been assigned triage categories. Triage categories (RS/CI) were: emergency (2.9%/54.6%), priority (47.6%/44.4%) and non-urgent (49.4%/1.0%). The CI group was more frequently diagnosed with shock (25%/1%), seizures (9%/0.5%) and malnutrition (6%/0.5%). Admission rates for the RS (8% vs 4%, P=0.01) declined after implementation. For the CI sample, admission rate to the PICU (47% vs 24%, P=0.002) decreased and LOS (7.3 vs 5.7 days, P=0.09) and mortality rates (12% vs 6%, P=0.15) showed trends toward decreasing post-implementation. Paediatric-specific triage algorithms can be implemented and sustained in resource-limited settings. Significant decreases in admission rates (both overall and for the PICU) and trends towards decreased LOS and mortality rates

  1. Can post-wildfire Burned Area Emergency Response treatments mitigate watershed degradation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neary, D.; Ffolliott, P.; Bautista, S.; Wittenberg, L.

    2009-04-01

    Wildfire is a natural phenomenon that began with the development of terrestrial vegetation in a lightning-filled atmosphere 350 million years ago. As human populations developed in the Pleistocene and Holocene epochs, mankind transformed fire into one of its oldest tools. A negative impact of prime concern in the 21st Century is desertification. This term refers to land degradation, not the immediate creation of classical deserts. It is about the loss of the land's proper hydrologic function and biological productivity as a result of human activities and climate change. It affects 33% of the earth's surface and over a billion people. Fire-related desertification has a number of environmental, social, and economic consequences. The two key environmental consequences are soil erosion and exotic plant invasions. Wildfires typically have exotic plant species abundances ten times that of undisturbed forests (Neary et al. 2003). Seeding has been used for many years in the USA as a prime Burned Area Emergency Response (BAER) treatment. Until recently, this seeding contributed to exotic plant invasions since fast-growing, but non native plants seeds were used. The use of native plant seeds and sterile hybrids has reduced this problem somewhat. Erosion after wildfires documented in the USA can be in the range of <1 to 370 Mg/ha, depending on fire severity, degree of water repellency, slope, and post-fire rainfall events. Soil losses in the high end of that range definitely exceed soil loss tolerances and contribute to desertification. Soil disturbance and degradation after wildfires is a function of fire severity, and the impacts can range from the minimal to catastrophic and long-lasting. The most obvious impact is the loss of organic matter from combustion of the forest floor. Changes in soil physical and chemical properties with high-severity wildfire can produce water repellency, aggravating rainfall runoff and erosion. Since soils take long times to form (50 to 75

  2. Cannabis Withdrawal, Posttreatment Abstinence, and Days to First Cannabis Use Among Emerging Adults in Substance Use Treatment: A Prospective Study.

    PubMed

    Davis, Jordan P; Smith, Douglas C; Morphew, Jason W; Lei, Xinrong; Zhang, Saijun

    2016-01-01

    Very little prospective research investigates how cannabis withdrawal is associated with treatment outcomes, and this work has not used the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (5th ed.; DSM-5) thresholds for cannabis withdrawal. The sample included 110 emerging adults entering outpatient substance use treatment who were heavy cannabis users with no other drug use and limited alcohol use. We used survival analyses to predict days to first use of cannabis and logistic regression to predict whether participants were abstinent and living in the community at 3 months. Those meeting criteria for cannabis withdrawal were more likely to return to use sooner than those not meeting criteria for cannabis withdrawal. However, the presence of cannabis withdrawal was not a significant predictor of 3-month abstinence. Emerging adults with DSM-5 cannabis withdrawal may have difficulty initiating abstinence in the days following their intake assessment, implying the need for strategies to mitigate their more rapid return to cannabis use.

  3. Treatment challenges in the management of relapsed or refractory non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma – novel and emerging therapies

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Mark P

    2013-01-01

    Over the last few decades, advances in immunochemotherapy have led to dramatic improvement in the prognosis of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL). Despite these advances, relapsed and refractory disease represents a major treatment challenge. For both aggressive and indolent subtypes of NHL, there is no standard of care for salvage regimens, with prognosis after relapse remaining relatively poor. Nevertheless, there are multiple emerging classes of targeted therapies for relapsed/refractory disease, including monoclonal antibodies, antibody– drug conjugates, radioimmunotherapy, small-molecule inhibitors of cell-growth pathways, and novel chemotherapy agents. This review will discuss treatment challenges of NHL, current available salvage regimens for relapsed/refractory NHL, and the safety and efficacy of novel emerging therapies. PMID:24049458

  4. Cannabis Withdrawal, Posttreatment Abstinence, and Days to First Cannabis Use Among Emerging Adults in Substance Use Treatment: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Jordan P.; Smith, Douglas C.; Morphew, Jason W.; Lei, Xinrong; Zhang, Saijun

    2015-01-01

    Very little prospective research investigates how cannabis withdrawal is associated with treatment outcomes, and this work has not used the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (5th ed.; DSM-5) thresholds for cannabis withdrawal. The sample included 110 emerging adults entering outpatient substance use treatment who were heavy cannabis users with no other drug use and limited alcohol use. We used survival analyses to predict days to first use of cannabis and logistic regression to predict whether participants were abstinent and living in the community at 3 months. Those meeting criteria for cannabis withdrawal were more likely to return to use sooner than those not meeting criteria for cannabis withdrawal. However, the presence of cannabis withdrawal was not a significant predictor of 3-month abstinence. Emerging adults with DSM-5 cannabis withdrawal may have difficulty initiating abstinence in the days following their intake assessment, implying the need for strategies to mitigate their more rapid return to cannabis use. PMID:26877548

  5. Treatment Emergent Agranulocytosis with Skin and Gingival Lesions in a Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Patient: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Zade, Varun; Boddun, Meenakshi; Gupta, Rolly; Kumari, Micky; Suryawanshi, Hema

    2016-01-01

    Chronic Lymphocytic Leukaemia (CLL) is a monoclonal lymphoid malignancy characterized by progressive accumulation of small, mature but functionally incompetent neoplastic lymphocytes in the peripheral blood, bone marrow and lymphoid organs. Patients present a variable course and may not require early intervention unlike other malignancies. Patients with rapidly deteriorating blood counts, and organomegaly need treatment. Alkylating agent live Bendamustine combined with Rituximab, anti-CD 20 monoclonal antibody have shown promising results in such patients. Anaemia, neutropenia and thrombocytopenia have been reported as treatment emergent events with this combination therapy. Neutrophils are the major innate defense and their depletion can result in a wide range of opportunistic infections. This case report discusess the oral and dermal lesions which emerged with the Rituximab and Bendamustine combination therapy in a patient with CLL and their management. PMID:27891482

  6. [Outpatient emergency treatment of nursing home residents : Analysis of insurance claims data].

    PubMed

    Seeger, Insa; Luque Ramos, Andres; Hoffmann, Falk

    2017-07-14

    Utilization of outpatient emergency services by nursing home residents is increasing; however, out of hours medical care (OOHC) in Germany has not yet been studied. In Bremen the used billing codes enabled a comparison between the use of outpatient emergency care in the year before and the year after admission to a nursing home stratified by emergency departments and OOHC. In this retrospective cohort study we used insurance claims data of residents in Bremen, who were insured in a large German statutory health insurance (DAK-Gesundheit). We compared the use of emergency care in hospitals or OOHC practices in the year before and the year after admission to a nursing home. The incidence rates of visits, distribution on weekdays and coded diagnoses were investigated. We included 1175 nursing home residents (77% female) with a mean age of 85 years. After admission to a nursing home the incidence rate of visits in the OOHC practices increased from 30.4 up to 63.7 and in emergency departments (ED) from 27.4 up to 50.7 per 100 person years. A total of 59% of all visits in OOHC practices were on weekends. The most common diagnoses in ED were injuries and poisoning (75%) while a wide range of diagnoses were coded in the OOHC practices. There is a significant difference between diagnoses in the ED and OOHC practices. More research is needed to assess the appropriateness of care.

  7. The Impact of Depression on Abstinence Self-Efficacy and Substance Use Outcomes among Emerging Adults in Residential Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Greenfield, Brenna L.; Venner, Kamilla L.; Kelly, John F.; Slaymaker, Valerie; Bryan, Angela D.

    2012-01-01

    A large proportion of emerging adults treated for substance use disorder (SUD) present with symptoms of negative affect and major depressive disorder (MDD). However, little is known regarding how these comorbidities influence important mechanisms of treatment response, such as increases in abstinence self-efficacy (ASE). This study tested the degree to which MDD and/or depressive symptoms interacted with during-treatment changes in ASE and examined these variables' relation to outcome at 3-months post-treatment. Participants (N = 302; 74% male) completed measures at intake, mid-treatment, end-of-treatment, and at 3-month follow-up. ASE was measured with the Alcohol and Drug Use Self-Efficacy (ADUSE) scale; depressive symptoms were assessed with the Brief Symptom Inventory 18 (BSI 18) Depression scale; and current MDD diagnoses were deduced from the Structured Clinical Interview for the DSM-IV. Random coefficient regression analyses focused on during-treatment changes in ASE, with BSI 18 scores and MDD diagnosis included as moderators. At intake, individuals with MDD or high levels of depressive symptoms had significantly lower ASE, particularly in negative affect situations. No evidence for moderation was found: ASE significantly increased during treatment regardless of MDD status. There was a main effect of BSI 18 Depression scores: those with lower BSI 18 scores had lower ASE scores at each time point. MDD and BSI 18 Depression did not predict three-month outcome, but similar to previous findings ASE did predict abstinence status at three months. Treatment-seeking emerging adults with MDD merit particular clinical attention because of their lower reported self-efficacy throughout treatment. PMID:22288980

  8. Stroke thrombolysis given by emergency physicians cuts in-hospital delays significantly immediately after implementing a new treatment protocol.

    PubMed

    Heikkilä, Iiro; Kuusisto, Hanna; Stolberg, Alexandr; Palomäki, Ari

    2016-04-11

    Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) treatment for acute ischaemic stroke (AIS) should be given as soon as possible, preferably within 60 min after arrival at hospital. There is great variation in door-to-needle times (DNTs) internationally, nationally and even within the same hospital. Various strategies for improving treatment delays have been presented. The role of emergency physicians (EPs) in treating AIS has been under discussion in recent years. Emergency Medicine (EM) officially became a specialty in Finland in 2013. Practical education of EPs in Kanta-Häme Central Hospital began in October 2012, together with reorganization of the in-hospital treatment path for AIS patients. The main change was shifting the on-call duty regarding stroke patients from internists or neurologists to EPs after the third quarter of 2013. This was a retrospective study. The data, concerning the characteristics of tPA-treated patients, DNTs and onset-to-treatment times (OTTs) was collected from electronic and paper records. The period studied was 1 year before and 1 year during reorganization, i.e. 2012 and 2013. During the study period a total of 64 tPA treatments were given, 31 before and 33 during reorganization. The median DNT was 54 min in 2012, while it was 28 min in 2013 (p < 0.001). The median OTTs were 139 and 101 min before and during the start of reorganization, respectively (p < 0.001). Both total and in-hospital delays in the treatment of ischaemic stroke were shortened significantly during reorganization. Emergency physicians are able to treat AIS patients within international time guidelines. Success was based on scrutinized reorganization and good cooperation between neurologists, EPs and radiologists.

  9. Emergencies in Orthodontics. Part 2: Management of Removable Appliances, Functional Appliances and other Adjuncts to Orthodontic Treatment.

    PubMed

    Dowsing, Paul; Murray, Alison; Sandler, Jonathan

    2015-04-01

    In the second of two papers, management of orthodontic emergencies involving appliances other than Fixed appliances will be detailed. Problems relating to removable appliances, as well as other orthodontic adjuncts, will be discussed. Unfortunately, orthodontic appliance breakage does occur, despite the clinicians giving clear and concise instructions to the patients and their parents at fitting. If general dental practitioners have a practical knowledge of how to diagnose problems and to provide appropriate advice or timely 'emergency' treatment, this will significantly reduce the inconvenience for all parties concerned. It should also ensure that treatment progresses in the most efficient and comfortable manner for their patients. In specific situations the early, accurate identification of the problem and instigation of its appropriate management can avoid more serious consequences. Clinical Relevance: Appropriate handling of an orthodontic 'emergency' by the dentist can, on many occasions, provide immediate relief to the patient. This will, in turn, allow treatment to continue in the right direction, thus allowing more efficient and effective use of valuable resources.

  10. Emergency drinking water treatment during source water pollution accidents in China: origin analysis, framework and technologies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Jian; Chen, Chao; Lin, Peng-Fei; Hou, Ai-Xin; Niu, Zhang-Bin; Wang, Jun

    2011-01-01

    China has suffered frequent source water contamination accidents in the past decade, which has resulted in severe consequences to the water supply of millions of residents. The origins of typical cases of contamination are discussed in this paper as well as the emergency response to these accidents. In general, excessive pursuit of rapid industrialization and the unreasonable location of factories are responsible for the increasing frequency of accidental pollution events. Moreover, insufficient attention to environmental protection and rudimentary emergency response capability has exacerbated the consequences of such accidents. These environmental accidents triggered or accelerated the promulgation of stricter environmental protection policy and the shift from economic development mode to a more sustainable direction, which should be regarded as the turning point of environmental protection in China. To guarantee water security, China is trying to establish a rapid and effective emergency response framework, build up the capability of early accident detection, and develop efficient technologies to remove contaminants from water.

  11. Hypnosis in the treatment of acute pain in the emergency department setting.

    PubMed Central

    Deltito, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    Emergency ward physicians are presented daily with patients in pain. Provisions of safe, quick pain control remains one of their major duties. Hypnosis can be used as an effective adjunct or substitute for analgesic medications when these drugs prove to be ineffective or contraindicated. Four such illustrative cases of attempted pain control are presented. The psychological foundations of pain and its assessment are discussed. The emergency ward physician can obtain facility in hypnotic techniques with only modest training. Hypnosis may then become a valuable tool in helping him provide safe and effective pain management. PMID:6728748

  12. Emerging Implications of Balancing Disinfection and Primary Treatment as an Element in CSO Control: Model Requirements

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper describes early results and directions arising from ongoing research into factors that affect the preferred balance between primary treatment and disinfection in a conventional wastewater treatment plant during periods of wet weather overflow. Despite the fact that na...

  13. Emerging Implications of Balancing Disinfection and Primary Treatment as an Element in CSO Control: Model Requirements

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper describes early results and directions arising from ongoing research into factors that affect the preferred balance between primary treatment and disinfection in a conventional wastewater treatment plant during periods of wet weather overflow. Despite the fact that na...

  14. Chloroquine could be used for the treatment of filoviral infections and other viral infections that emerge or emerged from viruses requiring an acidic pH for infectivity.

    PubMed

    Akpovwa, Hephzibah

    2016-06-01

    Viruses from the Filoviridae family, as many other virus families, require an acidic pH for successful infection and are therefore susceptible to the actions of 4-aminoquinolines, such as chloroquine. Although the mechanisms of action of chloroquine clearly indicate that it might inhibit filoviral infections, several clinical trials that attempted to use chloroquine in the treatment of other acute viral infections - including dengue and influenza A and B - caused by low pH-dependent viruses, have reported that chloroquine had no clinical efficacy, and these results demoted chloroquine from the potential treatments for other virus families requiring low pH for infectivity. The present review is aimed at investigating whether chloroquine could combat the present Ebola virus epidemic, and also at exploring the main reasons for the reported lack of efficacy. Literature was sourced from PubMed, Scopus, Google Scholar, reference list of articles and textbooks - Fields Virology (Volumes 1and 2), the cytokine handbook, Pharmacology in Medicine: Principles and Practice, and hydroxychloroquine and chloroquine retinopathy. The present analysis concludes that (1) chloroquine might find a place in the treatment of Ebola, either as a monotherapy or in combination therapies; (2) the ineffectiveness of chloroquine, or its analogue, hydroxychloroquine, at treating infections from low pH-dependent viruses is a result of the failure to attain and sustain a steady state concentration sufficient to increase and keep the pH of the acidic organelles to approximately neutral levels; (3) to successfully treat filoviral infections - or other viral infections that emerge or emerged from low pH-dependent viruses - a steady state chloroquine plasma concentration of at least 1 µg/mL(~3.125 μM/L) or a whole blood concentration of 16 μM/L must be achieved and be sustained until the patients' viraemia becomes undetectable. These concentrations, however, do not rule out the efficacy of

  15. Does Treatment Work with Internet Sex Offenders? Emerging Findings from the Internet Sex Offender Treatment Programme (i-SOTP)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middleton, David; Mandeville-Norden, Rebecca; Hayes, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    The increase in convictions for internet-related sexual offending has led to new challenges for treatment providers. By 2005 nearly one-third of all sexual convictions in England and Wales were for internet-related sexual offending. In late 2006 a treatment programme for internet-related sexual offending (the i-SOTP) was given accreditation for…

  16. Does Treatment Work with Internet Sex Offenders? Emerging Findings from the Internet Sex Offender Treatment Programme (i-SOTP)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middleton, David; Mandeville-Norden, Rebecca; Hayes, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    The increase in convictions for internet-related sexual offending has led to new challenges for treatment providers. By 2005 nearly one-third of all sexual convictions in England and Wales were for internet-related sexual offending. In late 2006 a treatment programme for internet-related sexual offending (the i-SOTP) was given accreditation for…

  17. National Analysis of Differences among Substance Abuse Treatment Outcomes: College Student and Nonstudent Emerging Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sahker, Ethan; Acion, Laura; Arndt, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To discover differences between student and nonstudent substance abuse treatment demographics, treatment characteristics, and outcomes. Participants: Conducted February 2014, clients without prior treatment admissions, aged 18-24, not in methadone maintenance therapy, and in nonintensive and ambulatory intensive outpatient treatment…

  18. National Analysis of Differences among Substance Abuse Treatment Outcomes: College Student and Nonstudent Emerging Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sahker, Ethan; Acion, Laura; Arndt, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To discover differences between student and nonstudent substance abuse treatment demographics, treatment characteristics, and outcomes. Participants: Conducted February 2014, clients without prior treatment admissions, aged 18-24, not in methadone maintenance therapy, and in nonintensive and ambulatory intensive outpatient treatment…

  19. Emergent geometry, emergent forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selesnick, S. A.

    2017-10-01

    We give a brief account of some aspects of Finkelstein’s quantum relativity, namely an extension of it that derives elements of macroscopic geometry and the Lagrangians of the standard model including gravity from a presumed quantum version of spacetime. These emerge as collective effects in this quantal substrate. Our treatment, which is largely self-contained, differs mathematically from that originally given by Finkelstein. Dedicated to the memory of David Ritz Finkelstein

  20. Outpatient Care of Young People after Emergency Treatment of Deliberate Self-Harm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridge, Jeffrey A.; Marcus, Steven C.; Olfson, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Little is known about the mental health care received by young people after an episode of deliberate self-harm. This study examined predictors of emergency department (ED) discharge, mental health assessments in the ED, and follow-up outpatient mental health care for Medicaid-covered youth with deliberate self-harm. Method: A…

  1. Outpatient Care of Young People after Emergency Treatment of Deliberate Self-Harm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridge, Jeffrey A.; Marcus, Steven C.; Olfson, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Little is known about the mental health care received by young people after an episode of deliberate self-harm. This study examined predictors of emergency department (ED) discharge, mental health assessments in the ED, and follow-up outpatient mental health care for Medicaid-covered youth with deliberate self-harm. Method: A…

  2. One-stage emergency treatment of open grade IIIB tibial shaft fractures with bone loss.

    PubMed

    Tropet, Y; Garbuio, P; Obert, L; Jeunet, L; Elias, B

    2001-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to report the authors' experience with emergency reconstruction of severe tibial shaft fractures. Five male patients were admitted to the emergency room with a grade IIIB open tibial shaft fracture with bone loss (average age, 33 years; age range, 18-65 years). Injuries were the result of motorcycle accidents (N = 2), pedestrian accidents (N = 1), gunshot wound (N = 1), and paragliding fall (N = 1). Primary emergent one-stage management for all patients consisted of administration of antibiotics, debridement, stabilization by locked intramedullary nailing, bone grafting from the iliac crest, and coverage using free muscle flaps (four latissimus dorsi and one gracilis). The average follow-up was 21 months (range, 8 months-3.5 years). Partial weight bearing with no immobilization was started at 3 months, and full weight bearing began 5 months after trauma. No angular complications and no nonunions were observed. There was one case of superficial infection without osteitis. All fractures healed within 6 months in 4 patients and within 10 months in 1 patient. At the last follow-up examination, ankle and knee motion was normal and no pain was noted, except for 1 patient who had associated lesions (ankle motion reduced by 50%). Aggressive emergency management of severe open tibial fractures provides good results. It improves end results markedly, not only by reducing tissue loss from infection, but also reducing healing and rehabilitation times.

  3. Estimating removals of contaminants of emerging concern from wastewater treatment plants: The critical role of wastewater hydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Baalbaki, Zeina; Sultana, Tamanna; Metcalfe, Chris; Yargeau, Viviane

    2017-07-01

    Accurate data is needed to evaluate the capacity of wastewater treatments plants (WWTPs) to remove contaminants of emerging concern (CECs). The variability of CEC removals reported in the literature has raised questions about the methods used to estimate removals. In this study, we used the recently proposed "fractionated approach" to account for the influence of hydrodynamics in WWTPs and applied this method for estimating the removal of 23 target CECs. Data on the conductivity and temperature of wastewater at two WWTPs were used to determine the hydraulic model that best described the flow regime of treatment units. Composite samples (24-h) were collected at different stages of treatment over successive days. The concentrations of the target compounds in wastewater were determined by liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry. Different hydraulic models were necessary to define the hydrodynamics at the two WWTPs, resulting in different load fractions to be used in the calculation of removals. For WWTP A, that has a primary clarifier, all target CECs, except triclosan, were poorly removed during this step at efficiencies <30%. On the other hand, the activated sludge treatment unit at both WWTPs removed most target CECs at >70%. This study expanded the application of the fractionated approach to compare the hydraulics of two treatment trains of different configurations, including primary and secondary treatment. It demonstrated the sensitivity of the method to account for variations between the different treatment units. Reliable removals of an extended list of CECs in primary and secondary treatment were also provided in this study.

  4. The impact of depression on abstinence self-efficacy and substance use outcomes among emerging adults in residential treatment.

    PubMed

    Greenfield, Brenna L; Venner, Kamilla L; Kelly, John F; Slaymaker, Valerie; Bryan, Angela D

    2012-06-01

    A large proportion of emerging adults treated for substance use disorder (SUD) present with symptoms of negative affect and major depressive disorder (MDD). However, little is known regarding how these comorbidities influence important mechanisms of treatment response, such as increases in abstinence self-efficacy (ASE). This study tested the degree to which MDD and/or depressive symptoms interacted with during-treatment changes in ASE and examined these variables' relation to outcome at 3 months' posttreatment. Participants (N = 302; 74% male) completed measures at intake, midtreatment, end-of-treatment, and at 3-month follow-up. ASE was measured with the Alcohol and Drug Use Self-Efficacy (ADUSE) scale; depressive symptoms were assessed with the Brief Symptom Inventory 18 (BSI 18) Depression scale; and current MDD diagnoses were deduced from the Structured Clinical Interview for the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV). Random coefficient regression analyses focused on during-treatment changes in ASE, with BSI 18 scores and MDD diagnosis included as moderators. At intake, individuals with MDD or high levels of depressive symptoms had significantly lower ASE, particularly in negative affect situations. No evidence for moderation was found: ASE significantly increased during treatment regardless of MDD status. There was a main effect of BSI 18 Depression scores: those with lower BSI 18 scores had lower ASE scores at each time point. MDD and BSI 18 Depression did not predict 3-month outcome, but similar to previous findings ASE did predict abstinence status at 3 months. Treatment-seeking emerging adults with MDD merit particular clinical attention because of their lower reported self-efficacy throughout treatment.

  5. Systematic review of mass media interventions designed to improve public recognition of stroke symptoms, emergency response and early treatment.

    PubMed

    Lecouturier, Jan; Rodgers, Helen; Murtagh, Madeleine J; White, Martin; Ford, Gary A; Thomson, Richard G

    2010-12-23

    Mass media interventions have been implemented to improve emergency response to stroke given the emergence of effective acute treatments, but their impact is unclear. Systematic review of mass media interventions aimed at improving emergency response to stroke, with narrative synthesis and review of intervention development. Ten studies were included (six targeted the public, four both public and professionals) published between 1992 and 2010. Only three were controlled before and after studies, and only one had reported how the intervention was developed. Campaigns aimed only at the public reported significant increase in awareness of symptoms/signs, but little impact on awareness of need for emergency response. Of the two controlled before and after studies, one reported no impact on those over 65 years, the age group at increased risk of stroke and most likely to witness a stroke, and the other found a significant increase in awareness of two or more warning signs of stroke in the same group post-intervention. One campaign targeted at public and professionals did not reduce time to presentation at hospital to within two hours, but increased and sustained thrombolysis rates. This suggests the campaign had a primary impact on professionals and improved the way that services for stroke were organised. Campaigns aimed at the public may raise awareness of symptoms/signs of stroke, but have limited impact on behaviour. Campaigns aimed at both public and professionals may have more impact on professionals than the public. New campaigns should follow the principles of good design and be robustly evaluated.

  6. Treatment of Pediatric Diabetic Ketoacidosis in Canada: A Review of Treatment Protocols from Canadian Pediatric Emergency Departments.

    PubMed

    Skitch, Steven A; Valani, Rahim

    2015-11-01

    Diabetes is the most common pediatric endocrine disorder, and diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is the leading cause of diabetes-related morbidity and mortality. This article reviews pediatric DKA treatment protocols from across Canada and identifies similarities and differences. Pediatric tertiary centres in Canada were asked for a copy of their DKA treatment protocol. For each protocol, we collected information on the amount of initial fluid bolus, maintenance fluid rate, insulin infusion rate, potassium replacement, monitoring and adjustment for serum glucose, administration of bicarbonate, and treatment for cerebral edema. Responses were obtained from 13 sites. Treatment guidelines were consistent in their recommendations on timing and dosage of intravenous insulin, potassium replacement, monitoring and adjusting for serum glucose, and management of cerebral edema. Variability in treatment protocols was found chiefly in volume of initial fluid bolus (range: 5-20 mL/kg) and length of time boluses should be administered (20-120 min), maintenance fluid rates (based on weight or a 48-hr deficit), and the role of bicarbonate administration. This is the first review of treatment protocols for pediatric DKA in Canada. It identified many common approaches but noted specific differences in fluid boluses, maintenance fluid rates, and bicarbonate administration. The extent of variation indicates the need for further study, as well as national guidelines that are evidence-based and consistent with best practices.

  7. Ability of newly emerged adult Culex quinquefasciatus (Diptera: Culicidae) mosquitoes to exit belowground stormwater treatment systems via lateral conveyance pipes.

    PubMed

    Metzger, Marco E; Harbison, Justin E; Burns, Joseph E; Hu, Renjie

    2012-03-01

    Culex quinquefasciatus Say mosquitoes flourish in belowground stormwater systems in the southern United States. Recent evidence suggests that oviposition-site-seeking females may have difficulties locating, entering, and ovipositing inside permanent water chambers when surface entry through pickholes in manhole covers are sealed. It remains unknown, however, if newly emerged adults are able to detect cues necessary to exit these partly sealed systems via lateral conveyance pipes or if they perish belowground. Fourth instar Cx. quinquefasciatus were placed within proprietary belowground stormwater treatment systems to determine the percentage of newly emerged adults able to escape treatment chambers via a single lateral conveyance pipe. Overall, 56% of deployed mosquitoes were captured in adult exit traps with an 1:1 male:female ratio. The percentage of adults captured varied significantly among chambers, but was not associated with structural site characteristics such as the chamber depth or the length and course of conveyance pipe to the exit trap. Empirical observations suggested that longbodied cellar spiders, Pholcus phalangioides (Fuesslin), ubiquitous in these structures, may have reduced adult trap capture. Findings demonstrate that newly emerged Cx. quinquefasciatus can exit subterranean chambers under potentially difficult structural conditions but suggest that a portion may perish in the absence of surface exit points in manhole shafts.

  8. Case report: treatment of subdural hematoma in the emergency department utilizing the subdural evacuating port system.

    PubMed

    Asfora, Wilson T; Klapper, Hendrik B

    2013-08-01

    Patients with acute or chronic subdural hematomas may present with rapidly deteriorating neurological function and are at risk for irreversible brainstem injury. In such cases, rapid surgical intervention is required to evacuate the hematoma and reverse critically elevated intracranial pressure. A variety of surgical drainage methods are in existence, none of which are clearly superior to the others. This report presents the case of a 74-year-old woman who suffered an acute-on-chronic subdural hematoma which was evacuated in the emergency department utilizing the subdural evacuating port system (SEPS). The SEPS provides for a minimally invasive technique to drain subdural hematomas and is advantageous in that it can be performed at the bedside. The SEPS is relatively simple to use and may be especially useful to emergency department staff in outlying areas where there is a shortage of neurosurgical coverage.

  9. Emergency Medical Treatment Needs: Chronic and Acute Exposure to Hazardous Materials.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-06-01

    II. CONTROLLING OFFICE NAME AND ADDRESS 12. REPORT DATE Federal Emergency Management Agency June 1982 Washington, D.C. 20472 IS. NUMBER OF PAGES 109...and Centers for Disease Control / NIOSHl . Local or regional (within state) providers/ coordinators of medical care for chemical casualties, i.e...from Poison Control Centers; from Ecology and Environment, Incorporated; and from the Medical University of South Carolina. The major computerized data

  10. Review of Considerations, Management, and Treatment of Medical Emergencies During Commercial Flight

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-04-01

    problems were syncope/presyncope (37.4%), respiratory symptoms (12.1%), and nausea/vomiting (9.5%) [1]. These medical emergencies resulted in physician...as cardiac or respiratory problems , this lowered arterial oxygen partial pressure, resulting in diminished tissue oxygen utilization as previously...aircraft or continue with the flight are the capabilities for managing syncope of unknown origin [16]. 8.2 Respiratory Issues As previously

  11. Response trees for detection, diagnosis, and treatment of emergency conditions at the LOFT facility

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, W.R.

    1980-01-01

    A technique for detecting, diagnosing, and treating emergency conditions has been developed at the LOFT facility. A response tree is a pictorial representation of many different cooling modes which can be used to cool the reactor core. A comprehensive methodology is being developed which will assist the reactor operator in choosing the correct cooling mode, monitoring its performance, and selecting an alternate mode when required. The technique will be implemented using a computer to monitor system status and evaluate the response trees.

  12. Point-of-use water treatment and diarrhoea reduction in the emergency context: an effectiveness trial in Liberia.

    PubMed

    Doocy, Shannon; Burnham, Gilbert

    2006-10-01

    Communicable diseases are of particular concern in conflict and disaster-affected populations that reside in camp settings. In the acute emergency phase, diarrhoeal diseases have accounted for more than 40% of deaths among camp residents. Clear limitations exist in current water treatment technologies, and few products are capable of treating turbid water. We describe the findings of a 12-week effectiveness study of point-of-use water treatment with a flocculant-disinfectant among 400 households in camps for displaced populations in Monrovia, Liberia. In intervention households, point-of-use water treatment with the flocculant-disinfectant plus improved storage reduced diarrhoea incidence by 90% and prevalence by 83%, when compared with control households with improved water storage alone. Among the intervention group, residual chlorine levels met or exceeded Sphere standards in 85% (95% CI: 83.1-86.8) of observations with a 95% compliance rate.

  13. Environmental risk assessment of effluents as a whole emerging contaminant: Efficiency of alternative tertiary treatments for wastewater depuration.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Garduño, B; Pintado-Herrera, M G; Biel-Maeso, M; Rueda-Márquez, J J; Lara-Martín, P A; Perales, J A; Manzano, M A; Garrido-Pérez, C; Martín-Díaz, M L

    2017-08-01

    Emerging contaminants (ECs) and regulated compounds (RCs) from three different WWTP effluents were measured in the current study. The efficiency of two tertiary treatments, Photobiotreatment (PhtBio) and Multi-Barrier Treatment (MBT), for removing contaminants was determined. Results indicated different percentages of removal depending on the treatment and the origin of the effluent. Risk Quotients (RQs) were determined for different species of algae, Daphnia, and fish. RQ results revealed diverse risk values depending on the bioindicator species. Tonalide, galaxolide (fragrances), and ofloxacin (antibiotic) were the most persistent and harmful substances in tested effluents. "Negligible risk" category was reached since a wide diversity of ECs were removed by MBT with high removal percentages. Contrarily, PhtBio was effective only in the depuration of certain chemical compounds, and its efficiency depended on the composition of the raw effluent. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Computer-Based Script Training for Aphasia: Emerging Themes from Post-Treatment Interviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cherney, Leora R.; Halper, Anita S.; Kaye, Rosalind C.

    2011-01-01

    This study presents results of post-treatment interviews following computer-based script training for persons with chronic aphasia. Each of the 23 participants received 9 weeks of AphasiaScripts training. Post-treatment interviews were conducted with the person with aphasia and/or a significant other person. The 23 interviews yielded 584 coded…

  15. Computer-Based Script Training for Aphasia: Emerging Themes from Post-Treatment Interviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cherney, Leora R.; Halper, Anita S.; Kaye, Rosalind C.

    2011-01-01

    This study presents results of post-treatment interviews following computer-based script training for persons with chronic aphasia. Each of the 23 participants received 9 weeks of AphasiaScripts training. Post-treatment interviews were conducted with the person with aphasia and/or a significant other person. The 23 interviews yielded 584 coded…

  16. Consistency between emergency department and orthopedic physicians in the diagnosis and treatment of distal fibular Salter Harris I fractures.

    PubMed

    Zomorrodi, Arezoo; Bennett, Jonathan Eric; Attia, Magdy William; Loiselle, John; Rogers, Kenneth John; Kruse, Richard

    2011-04-01

    The objective was to determine diagnostic and management differences between emergency physicians (EPs) and orthopedic physicians (OPs) for patients with distal fibular physis pain without radiographic fracture. Records from patients with emergency department ankle radiographs between January 2006 and March 2008 were reviewed. Inclusion criteria included trauma, fibular physis pain, normal radiographs, and orthopedic follow-up. Of 1343 patients, 247 met criteria. Emergency physician diagnoses included Salter Harris (SH) I fracture 198 (80%), sprain 5 (2%), other fracture 24 (10%), or other injury 20 (8%). Orthopedic physician diagnoses included SH I fracture 136 (55%), sprain 48 (19%), other fracture 56 (23%), or other injury 7 (3%). Emergency physicians were more likely to diagnose SH I fracture (P = 0.01). Thirty-six patients diagnosed with SH I fracture by EPs were diagnosed by OPs with different fractures, whereas 40 had sprains and 5 had other injuries. A total of 173 (70%) patients were diagnosed with fractures by both EPs and OPs. On the basis of orthopedists diagnosis, EPs did not diagnose 19 (8%) fractures (P = 0.8). EP treatment included splint 157 (64%), boot 82 (33%), air cast 3 (1%), or cast 5 (2%). Orthopedic physician's treatment included splint 2 (1%), boot 46 (19%), air cast 11 (4%), cast 167 (67%), or none 21 (9%). Although EPs diagnosed SH I fracture more frequently than OPs, few fractures were missed. Most patients required ongoing immobilization by OPs regardless of final diagnosis. Suspected SH I fractures should be immobilized and referred for orthopedic evaluation. Copyright © 2011 by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins

  17. DESIGN OF NIDA CTN PROTOCOL 0047: SCREENING, MOTIVATIONAL ASSESSMENT, REFERRAL, AND TREATMENT IN EMERGENCY DEPARTMENTS (SMART-ED)

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, Dennis M.; Adinoff, Bryon; Crandall, Cameron; Forcehimes, Alyssa A.; Lindblad, Robert; Mandler, Raul N.; Oden, Neal; Perl, Harold I.; Walker, Robrina

    2011-01-01

    Background Medical settings such as emergency departments (EDs) present an opportunity to identify and provide services for individuals with substance use problems who might otherwise never receive any form of assessment, referral, or intervention. Although Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) models have been extensively studied and are considered effective for individuals with alcohol problems presenting in emergency departments and other medical settings, the efficacy of such interventions has not been established for drug users presenting in EDs. Objectives This paper describes the design of a NIDA Clinical Trials Network protocol testing the efficacy of an SBIRT model in medical EDs, highlighting considerations that that are pertinent to the design of other studies targeting substance use behaviors in medical treatment settings. Methods The protocol is described, and critical design decisions are discussed. Results Design challenges included defining treatment conditions, study population, and site characteristics; developing the screening process; choosing the primary outcome; balancing brevity and comprehensiveness of assessment; and selecting the strategy for statistical analysis. Conclusion Many of the issues arising in the design of this study will be relevant to future studies of interventions for addictions in medical settings. Scientific Significance Optimal trial design is critical to determining how best to integrate substance abuse interventions into medical care. PMID:21854285

  18. Characteristics of pain and response to analgesic treatment in dogs and cats examined at a veterinary teaching hospital emergency service.

    PubMed

    Wiese, Ashley J; Muir, William W; Wittum, Thomas E

    2005-06-15

    To estimate the prevalence and characteristics of pain in dogs and cats examined by an emergency service at a veterinary teaching hospital and evaluate the response of dogs and cats with signs of pain to analgesic treatment. Cross-sectional study. 317 dogs and 112 cats. A questionnaire was used to categorize the characteristics of pain. The location, cause, and signs of pain were determined by obtaining a thorough history and conducting a physical examination. Pain was categorized by type (superficial somatic, deep somatic, or visceral), mechanism (inflammatory, neuropathic, or both), severity (mild, moderate, or severe), and duration. Evidence for primary or secondary hypersensitivity and hyposensitivity to manipulation was determined. The response to single or multiple analgesic drug administration was assessed. 179 (56%) dogs and 60 (54%) cats had signs of pain. In most of these dogs and cats, pain was classified as acute (< 24 hours' duration) and of moderate severity and was associated with primary hypersensitivity. Most dogs had deep somatic pain; most cats had visceral pain. Inflammation was the most common mechanism. One hundred nineteen (66%) dogs and 41 (68%) cats were treated with analgesic drugs. Analgesic treatment was considered effective in 73 (61%) dogs and 31 (76%) cats. Results suggest that moderate to severe acute somatic pain caused by inflammation is common in dogs and cats examined by an emergency service and that a combination of multiple analgesic drugs is more effective than any single analgesic drug in the treatment of pain in these dogs and cats.

  19. Topical Ketoprofen Versus Placebo in Treatment of Acute Ankle Sprain in the Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Serinken, Mustafa; Eken, Cenker; Elicabuk, Hayri

    2016-09-01

    Topical agents have been shown to be effective in soft tissue injuries and commonly used in outpatient clinics. However, the data regarding topical agents in the emergency department is insufficient, and they are not used often in the emergency department setting. The present study aimed to compare the effect of 2.5% topical ketoprofen (gel form) to placebo in patients presenting with ankle sprain to the emergency department. Patients presenting with ankle sprain composed the study population. Study patients were randomized into 2 study arms: 2.5% ketoprofen gel and placebo administered over a 5-cm area locally. Pain alleviation was measured by visual analog scale at 15 and 30 minutes. A total of 100 patients were included in the final analysis. The median pain reduction in ketoprofen and placebo groups at 15 minutes was 27 (19.8-33.4) and 9 (7.6-17), respectively. The median pain reduction at 30 minutes for both groups was 42 (36-50.8) and 20 (17.6-24.4), respectively. Pain improvement either at 15 minutes (median difference: 16 [9-22]) or 30 minutes (median difference: 21 [15-27]) was better in the ketoprofen group than placebo. There were no adverse effects in either group. Ketoprofen gel was superior to placebo at 30 minutes in alleviating pain secondary to ankle sprain in the ED with a high safety profile. Further studies are needed concerning the effect of ketoprofen gel for long-term effects. Level I, high quality prospective randomized study. © The Author(s) 2016.

  20. Emergency embolization for the treatment of acute hemorrhage from intercostal arteries.

    PubMed

    Stampfl, Ulrike; Sommer, Christof-Matthias; Bellemann, Nadine; Kortes, Nikolas; Gnutzmann, Daniel; Mokry, Theresa; Gockner, Theresa; Schmitz, Anne; Ott, Katja; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Radeleff, Boris

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate embolotherapy for the emergency management of acute bleeding from intercostal arteries. Between October 2003 and August 2012, 19 consecutive patients with hemorrhage from intercostal arteries were scheduled for emergency embolization. The primary study endpoints were technical and clinical success, which were defined as angiographic cessation of bleeding, and cessation of clinical signs of hemorrhage. The secondary study endpoints were periprocedural complications and 30-day mortality rate. In most patients (74 %), hemorrhage was caused by iatrogenic procedures with subsequent intercostal artery laceration. One of the patients was treated twice for recurrent hemothorax caused by a new intercostal artery pseudoaneurysm 7.5 years after the initial procedure. Thus, 20 procedures were performed in these 19 patients. Overall technical success was 85 %. In six patients, no embolization of the "backdoor" was feasible, and in two of these patients additional embolization of other intercostal arteries was necessary to prevent hemorrhage via collateral vessels. Clinical signs of hemorrhage ceased after embolotherapy in 16 of 20 procedures (clinical success 80 %). The mean follow-up was 358.7 ± 637.1 days. One minor procedure-related complication occurred. The 30-day mortality rate was 21 %, however, this was unrelated to intercostal artery hemorrhage. Embolotherapy is an effective emergency therapy for patients with acute hemorrhage from intercostal arteries. Especially if embolization of the backdoor is not feasible, collateral supply via other intercostal arteries should be either ruled out or embolized to prevent ongoing hemorrhage. Despite successful embolotherapy, a majority of patients underwent surgery during follow-up to remove the symptomatic hematoma.

  1. Application of GRA method, dynamic analysis and fuzzy set theory in evaluation and selection of emergency treatment technology for large scale phenol spill incidents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jingjing; Yu, Lean; Li, Lian

    2017-05-01

    Select an appropriate technology in an emergency response is a very important issue with various kinds of chemical contingency spills frequently taking place. Due to the complexity, fuzziness and uncertainties of the chemical contingency spills, the theory of GRA method, dynamic analysis combined with fuzzy set theory will be appropriately applied to selection and evaluation of emergency treatment technology. Finally, a emergency phenol spill accidence occurred in highway is provided to illustrate the applicability and feasibility of the proposed methods.

  2. Novel emerging treatments for hepatitis C infection: a fast-moving pipeline.

    PubMed

    Kardashian, Ara A; Pockros, Paul J

    2017-02-01

    Advances in the treatment of chronic hepatitis C has been one of the pinnacles of medical science in the last 25 years. The age of direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) has led to cure rates >95% with shorter duration and low toxicity regimens, thus changing the landscape of the era of pegylated interferon and ribavirin (RBV). However, there remain some challenges with these therapies as there are multiple regimens available with a fair amount of sophistication required to administer them. Treatment continues to require knowledge of prior treatment status, viral genotype and fibrosis assessment, thus affording an opportunity for improvement in future regimens. This update reviews some upcoming therapies for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C.

  3. Novel emerging treatments for hepatitis C infection: a fast-moving pipeline

    PubMed Central

    Kardashian, Ara A.; Pockros, Paul J.

    2017-01-01

    Advances in the treatment of chronic hepatitis C has been one of the pinnacles of medical science in the last 25 years. The age of direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) has led to cure rates >95% with shorter duration and low toxicity regimens, thus changing the landscape of the era of pegylated interferon and ribavirin (RBV). However, there remain some challenges with these therapies as there are multiple regimens available with a fair amount of sophistication required to administer them. Treatment continues to require knowledge of prior treatment status, viral genotype and fibrosis assessment, thus affording an opportunity for improvement in future regimens. This update reviews some upcoming therapies for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C. PMID:28203284

  4. Emerging Pharmacologic Treatments for Adolescent Substance Use: Challenges and New Directions

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Robert; Treloar, Hayley

    2016-01-01

    Adolescence is a key period in the development of substance use and misuse. Substance use typically begins during adolescence and prevalence rates for many substance use disorders peak before age 21 years. Yet, despite clinical demand, treatments for youth rely almost entirely on psychosocial interventions that yield only modest benefit. One potential way to improve treatment effects is to augment the best available psychosocial interventions with pharmacotherapy. Although pharmacotherapy research has advanced care for adults with substance use disorders, no medication is indicated for adolescents and controlled trials with teenagers are scant. Optimizing treatments for youth will require closing this important gap in medication development research. In this paper we review the paucity of pharmacotherapy research for adolescent substance misuse, and we discuss how we can leverage human laboratory paradigms and technology to advance our understanding regarding if and how medications may improve treatment options for youths. PMID:27570728

  5. Selection of representative emerging micropollutants for drinking water treatment studies: a systematic approach.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xiaohui; Peldszus, Sigrid

    2012-01-01

    Micropollutants remain of concern in drinking water, and there is a broad interest in the ability of different treatment processes to remove these compounds. To gain a better understanding of treatment effectiveness for structurally diverse compounds and to be cost effective, it is necessary to select a small set of representative micropollutants for experimental studies. Unlike other approaches to-date, in this research micropollutants were systematically selected based solely on their physico-chemical and structural properties that are important in individual water treatment processes. This was accomplished by linking underlying principles of treatment processes such as coagulation/flocculation, oxidation, activated carbon adsorption, and membrane filtration to compound characteristics and corresponding molecular descriptors. A systematic statistical approach not commonly used in water treatment was then applied to a compound pool of 182 micropollutants (identified from the literature) and their relevant calculated molecular descriptors. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to summarize the information residing in this large dataset. D-optimal onion design was then applied to the PCA results to select structurally representative compounds that could be used in experimental treatment studies. To demonstrate the applicability and flexibility of this selection approach, two sets of 22 representative micropollutants are presented. Compounds in the first set are representative when studying a range of water treatment processes (coagulation/flocculation, oxidation, activated carbon adsorption, and membrane filtration), whereas the second set shows representative compounds for ozonation and advanced oxidation studies. Overall, selected micropollutants in both lists are structurally diverse, have wide-ranging physico-chemical properties and cover a large spectrum of applications. The systematic compound selection approach presented here can also be adjusted to fit

  6. Current and emerging therapeutic modalities for hyperhidrosis, part 1: conservative and noninvasive treatments.

    PubMed

    Ram, Ramin; Lowe, Nicholas J; Yamauchi, Paul S

    2007-03-01

    Approximately 1% to 3% of the US population has hyperhidrosis (HH). HH can be an incapacitating medical condition because it not only hinders patient quality of life but also causes the secondary effect of excess cutaneous sweat. There is a broad spectrum of treatment modalities including topical and systemic therapies, iontophoresis, localized neuroinhibitory injections, and surgical interventions. This article reviews HH and the conservative treatments for the condition.

  7. Cyanide intoxication as part of smoke inhalation--a review on diagnosis and treatment from the emergency perspective.

    PubMed

    Lawson-Smith, Pia; Jansen, Erik C; Hyldegaard, Ole

    2011-03-03

    This paper reviews the current literature on smoke inhalation injuries with special attention to the effects of hydrogen cyanide. It is assumed that cyanide poisoning is still an overlooked diagnosis in fire victims. Treatment against cyanide poisoning in the emergency setting should be given based on the clinical diagnosis only. Oxygen in combination with a recommended antidote should be given immediately, the first to reduce cellular hypoxia and the second to eliminate cyanide. A specific antidote is hydroxycobalamin, which can be given iv. and has few side effects.

  8. Fifteen-year experience with low-energy laser applications for patient treatment in emergency-care clinics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemtsev, Igor Z.; Lapshin, V. P.

    1994-06-01

    Low energy lasers have been successfully applied for the treatment of more than 10 thousand patients in the Sklifosovsky Scientific Research Institute for Emergency Medicine. We have reviewed and generalized the results of clinical investigations of 34 patients with trauma of motor-locomotive system, 15 patients with muscular atrophy occurred as a result of lower extremity fracture immobilization, 124 patients with burns and of 88 post-infarction patients with ischemic heart disease, who underwent laser therapy with He-Ne laser, N2 Ultra-Violet and GaAs Infra-Red lasers.

  9. [Analysis of the data of patients presenting for emergency treatment with vertigo].

    PubMed

    Varga, Csaba; Nagy, Ferenc; Drubits, Katalin; Lelovics, Zsuzsanna; Varga Györfi, Krisztina; Oláh, Tibor

    2014-05-30

    Analyzing the medical record data of patients with the main symptom of vertigo in "Kaposi M6r" Hospital's Emergency Department. Retrospective evaluation of patients's medical history with vertigo related diagnoses according to BNO classification. In the year of 2010, 18 000 patients were presented to ED. In 471 cases the symptoms were vertigo related which makes up 3% of the total. Almost half, 46% of these patients were brought in by ambulance medical car. The ratio of women was twice as high as of the men. One fifth, 19% of patients with vertigo gained admission to the ward and 81% of them were discharged in 24 hours. According to the interviews, 4 types of vertigo have been identified: "whirling style" vertigo in 37% of the cases, dizziness in 33% of the cases, presyncope in 12% and "light headedness" in 9%. The remaining 9% couldn't be classified. Vertigo is common presenting symptom in emergency department, however it rarely indicates severe condition. The diagnostic value of vertigo classification based on history and brain CT result in identifying the severity of the background condition is questionable. We found that in recognizing the cases which need prompt intervention, thorough neurological examination and the clarification of the vertigo's circumstances proved to be helpful.

  10. Antibiotic resistance of mixed biofilms in cystic fibrosis: impact of emerging microorganisms on treatment of infection.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Susana Patrícia; Ceri, Howard; Azevedo, Nuno Filipe; Pereira, Maria Olívia

    2012-09-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a genetic disorder associated with multispecies infections where interactions between classical and newly identified bacteria might be crucial to understanding the persistent colonisation in CF lungs. This study investigated the interactions between two emerging species, Inquilinus limosus and Dolosigranulum pigrum, and the conventional CF pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa by evaluating the ability to develop biofilms of mixed populations and then studying their susceptibility patterns to eight different antimicrobials. Monospecies biofilms formed by I. limosus and D. pigrum produced significantly less biomass than P. aeruginosa and displayed greater sensitivity to antimicrobials. However, when in dual-species biofilms with P. aeruginosa, the emerging species I. limosus and D. pigrum were crucial in increasing tolerance of the overall consortia to most antibiotics, even without a change in the number of biofilm-encased cells. These results may suggest that revising these and other species interactions in CF might enable the development of more suitable and effective therapies in the future. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  11. Emerging therapies for the treatment of neovascular age-related macular degeneration and diabetic macular edema.

    PubMed

    Emerson, M Vaughn; Lauer, Andreas K

    2007-01-01

    Diabetic macular edema (DME) and choroidal neovascularization (CNV) associated with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) are the leading causes of vision loss in the industrialized world. The mainstay of treatment for both conditions has been thermal laser photocoagulation, while there have been recent advances in the treatment of CNV using photodynamic therapy with verteporfin. While both of these treatments have prevented further vision loss in a subset of patients, vision improvement is rare. Anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A therapy has revolutionized the treatment of both conditions. Pegaptanib, an anti-VEGF aptamer, prevents vision loss in CNV, although the performance is similar to that of photodynamic therapy. Ranibizumab, an antibody fragment, and bevacizumab, a full-length humanized monoclonal antibody against VEGF, have both shown promising results, with improvements in visual acuity in the treatment of both diseases. VEGF trap, a modified soluble VEGF receptor analog, binds VEGF more tightly than all other anti-VEGF therapies, and has also shown promising results in early trials. Other treatment strategies to decrease the effect of VEGF have used small interfering RNA to inhibit VEGF production and VEGF receptor production. Corticosteroids have shown efficacy in controlled trials, including anacortave acetate in the treatment and prevention of CNV, and intravitreal triamcinolone acetonide and the fluocinolone acetonide implant in the treatment of DME. Receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors, such as vatalanib, inhibit downstream effects of VEGF, and have been effective in the treatment of CNV in early studies. Squalamine lactate inhibits plasma membrane ion channels with downstream effects on VEGF, and has shown promising results with systemic administration. Initial results are also encouraging for other growth factors, including pigment epithelium-derived factor administered via an adenoviral vector. Ruboxistaurin, which decreases protein

  12. Treatment of Anabolic-Androgenic Steroid Dependence: Emerging Evidence and Its Implications

    PubMed Central

    Kanayama, Gen; Brower, Kirk J.; Wood, Ruth I.; Hudson, James I.; Pope, Harrison G.

    2010-01-01

    Currently, few users of anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) seek substance-abuse treatment. But this picture may soon change substantially, because illicit AAS use did not become widespread until the 1980s, and consequently the older members of this AAS-using population—those who initiated AAS as youths in the 1980s—are only now reaching middle age. Members of this group, especially those who have developed AAS dependence, may therefore be entering the age of risk for cardiac and psychoneuroendocrine complications sufficient to motivate them for substance-abuse treatment. We suggest that this treatment should address at least three etiologic mechanisms by which AAS dependence might develop. First, individuals with body-image disorders such as “muscle dysmorphia” may become dependent on AAS for their anabolic effects; these body-image disorders may respond to psychological therapies or pharmacologic treatments. Second, AAS suppress the male hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis via their androgenic effects, potentially causing hypogonadism during AAS withdrawal. Men experiencing prolonged dysphoric effects or frank major depression from hypogonadism may desire to resume AAS, thus contributing to AAS dependence. AAS-induced hypogonadism may require treatment with human chorionic gonadotropin or clomiphene to reactivate neuroendocrine function, and may necessitate antidepressant treatments in cases of depression inadequately responsive to endocrine therapies alone. Third, human and animal evidence indicates that AAS also possess hedonic effects, which likely promote dependence via mechanisms shared with classical addictive drugs, especially opioids. Indeed, the opioid antagonist naltrexone blocks AAS dependence in animals. By inference, pharmacological and psychosocial treatments for human opioid dependence might also benefit AAS-dependent individuals. PMID:20188494

  13. Emerging role of aripiprazole for treatment of irritability associated with autistic disorder in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Stachnik, Joan; Gabay, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Autistic disorder is a largely misunderstood and difficult to treat neurodevelopmental disorder. Three core domains of functioning are affected by autistic disorder, ie, socialization, communication, and behavior. Signs of autistic disorder may be present early, but are frequently overlooked, resulting in a delay in its diagnosis and a subsequent delay in treatment. No one definitive therapy is available, and treatment consists of early educational and behavioral interventions, as well as drug therapy. Atypical antipsychotics have often been used in the treatment of autistic disorder to target irritability, aggression, and self-injurious behavior, all of which can interfere with other aspects of treatment. One atypical antipsychotic, aripiprazole, has recently been approved for treatment of irritability associated with autistic disorder. Based on the results from two randomized, controlled trials, with efficacy data from nearly 300 patients, treatment with aripiprazole was associated with reductions in irritability, global improvements in behavior, and improvements in quality of life from both the patient and caregiver perspectives. Dosage of aripiprazole ranged from 5 mg to 15 mg per day. Aripiprazole was well tolerated during clinical trials, with most adverse events considered mild or moderate. Clinically relevant weight gain occurred in about 30% of patients given aripiprazole, although when compared with other atypical antipsychotics, aripiprazole appears to have fewer metabolic effects and a lower risk of weight gain. However, pediatric patients taking any atypical antipsychotic should be carefully monitored for potential adverse events, because the long-term effects of antipsychotic therapy in this population are not well known. When used appropriately, aripiprazole has the potential to be an effective treatment for children with autistic disorder to improve irritability and aggressive behavior and improve quality of life.

  14. Emerging role of aripiprazole for treatment of irritability associated with autistic disorder in children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Stachnik, Joan; Gabay, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Autistic disorder is a largely misunderstood and difficult to treat neurodevelopmental disorder. Three core domains of functioning are affected by autistic disorder, ie, socialization, communication, and behavior. Signs of autistic disorder may be present early, but are frequently overlooked, resulting in a delay in its diagnosis and a subsequent delay in treatment. No one definitive therapy is available, and treatment consists of early educational and behavioral interventions, as well as drug therapy. Atypical antipsychotics have often been used in the treatment of autistic disorder to target irritability, aggression, and self-injurious behavior, all of which can interfere with other aspects of treatment. One atypical antipsychotic, aripiprazole, has recently been approved for treatment of irritability associated with autistic disorder. Based on the results from two randomized, controlled trials, with efficacy data from nearly 300 patients, treatment with aripiprazole was associated with reductions in irritability, global improvements in behavior, and improvements in quality of life from both the patient and caregiver perspectives. Dosage of aripiprazole ranged from 5 mg to 15 mg per day. Aripiprazole was well tolerated during clinical trials, with most adverse events considered mild or moderate. Clinically relevant weight gain occurred in about 30% of patients given aripiprazole, although when compared with other atypical antipsychotics, aripiprazole appears to have fewer metabolic effects and a lower risk of weight gain. However, pediatric patients taking any atypical antipsychotic should be carefully monitored for potential adverse events, because the long-term effects of antipsychotic therapy in this population are not well known. When used appropriately, aripiprazole has the potential to be an effective treatment for children with autistic disorder to improve irritability and aggressive behavior and improve quality of life. PMID:24600266

  15. Laccase immobilization and insolubilization: from fundamentals to applications for the elimination of emerging contaminants in wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Ba, Sidy; Arsenault, Alexandre; Hassani, Thanina; Jones, J Peter; Cabana, Hubert

    2013-12-01

    Over the last few decades many attempts have been made to use biocatalysts for the biotransformation of emerging contaminants in environmental matrices. Laccase, a multicopper oxidoreductase enzyme, has shown great potential in oxidizing a large number of phenolic and non-phenolic emerging contaminants. However, laccases and more broadly enzymes in their free form are biocatalysts whose applications in solution have many drawbacks rendering them currently unsuitable for large scale use. To circumvent these limitations, the enzyme can be immobilized onto carriers or entrapped within capsules; these two immobilization techniques have the disadvantage of generating a large mass of non-catalytic product. Insolubilization of the free enzymes as cross-linked enzymes (CLEAs) is found to yield a greater volume ratio of biocatalyst while improving the characteristics of the biocatalyst. Ultimately, novel techniques of enzymes insolubilization and stabilization are feasible with the combination of cross-linked enzyme aggregates (combi-CLEAs) and enzyme polymer engineered structures (EPESs) for the elimination of emerging micropollutants in wastewater. In this review, fundamental features of laccases are provided in order to elucidate their catalytic mechanism, followed by different chemical aspects of the immobilization and insolubilization techniques applicable to laccases. Finally, kinetic and reactor design effects for enzymes in relation with the potential applications of laccases as combi-CLEAs and EPESs for the biotransformation of micropollutants in wastewater treatment are discussed.

  16. Opioid Substitution Treatment Planning in a Disaster Context: Perspectives from Emergency Management and Health Professionals in Aotearoa/New Zealand

    PubMed Central

    Blake, Denise; Lyons, Antonia

    2016-01-01

    Opioid Substitution Treatment (OST) is a harm reduction strategy enabling opiate consumers to avoid withdrawal symptoms and maintain health and wellbeing. Some research shows that within a disaster context service disruptions and infrastructure damage affect OST services, including problems with accessibility, dosing, and scripts. Currently little is known about planning for OST in the reduction and response phases of a disaster. This study aimed to identify the views of three professional groups working in Aotearoa/New Zealand about OST provision following a disaster. In-depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 17 service workers, health professionals, and emergency managers in OST and disaster planning fields. Thematic analysis of transcripts identified three key themes, namely “health and wellbeing”, “developing an emergency management plan”, and “stock, dose verification, and scripts” which led to an overarching concept of “service continuity in OST preparedness planning”. Participants viewed service continuity as essential for reducing physical and psychological distress for OST clients, their families, and wider communities. Alcohol and drug and OST health professionals understood the specific needs of clients, while emergency managers discussed the need for sufficient preparedness planning to minimise harm. It is concluded that OST preparedness planning must be multidisciplinary, flexible, and inclusive. PMID:27834915

  17. Opioid Substitution Treatment Planning in a Disaster Context: Perspectives from Emergency Management and Health Professionals in Aotearoa/New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Blake, Denise; Lyons, Antonia

    2016-11-10

    Opioid Substitution Treatment (OST) is a harm reduction strategy enabling opiate consumers to avoid withdrawal symptoms and maintain health and wellbeing. Some research shows that within a disaster context service disruptions and infrastructure damage affect OST services, including problems with accessibility, dosing, and scripts. Currently little is known about planning for OST in the reduction and response phases of a disaster. This study aimed to identify the views of three professional groups working in Aotearoa/New Zealand about OST provision following a disaster. In-depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 17 service workers, health professionals, and emergency managers in OST and disaster planning fields. Thematic analysis of transcripts identified three key themes, namely "health and wellbeing", "developing an emergency management plan", and "stock, dose verification, and scripts" which led to an overarching concept of "service continuity in OST preparedness planning". Participants viewed service continuity as essential for reducing physical and psychological distress for OST clients, their families, and wider communities. Alcohol and drug and OST health professionals understood the specific needs of clients, while emergency managers discussed the need for sufficient preparedness planning to minimise harm. It is concluded that OST preparedness planning must be multidisciplinary, flexible, and inclusive.

  18. Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy: An Emerging Treatment Modality for Retracting Scars of the Hands.

    PubMed

    Saggini, Raoul; Saggini, Andrea; Spagnoli, Anna Maria; Dodaj, Ira; Cigna, Emanuele; Maruccia, Michele; Soda, Giuseppe; Bellomo, Rosa Grazia; Scuderi, Nicolò

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged and abnormal scarring after trauma, burns and surgical procedures often results in a pathologic scar. We evaluated the efficacy of unfocused shock wave treatment, alone or in combination with manual therapy, on retracting scars on the hands. Scar appearance was assessed by means of the modified Vancouver Scar Scale; functional hand mobility was evaluated using a range-of-motion scale, whereas a visual analogue score was implemented for detecting any improvements in referred pain. Additionally, biopsy specimens were collected for clinico-pathologic correlation. For each active treatment group, statistically significant improvements in modified Vancouver Scar Scale were recorded as early as five treatment sessions and confirmed 2 wk after the last treatment session. Analogous results were observed when assessing pain and range of movement. Histopathological examination revealed significant increases in dermal fibroblasts in each active treatment group, as well as in neoangiogenetic response and type-I collagen concentration. Copyright © 2016 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Emerging drugs for the treatment of symptoms associated with autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Wink, Logan K; Plawecki, Martin H; Erickson, Craig A; Stigler, Kimberly A; McDougle, Christopher J

    2010-09-01

    Autism spectrum disorders, or pervasive developmental disorders (PDDs), are neurodevelopmental disorders defined by qualitative impairment in social interaction, impaired communication and stereotyped patterns of behavior. The most common forms of PDD are autistic disorder (autism), Asperger's disorder and PDD not otherwise specified. Recent surveillance studies reveal an increase in the prevalence of autism and related PDDs. The use of pharmacologic agents in the treatment of these disorders can reduce the impact of interfering symptoms, providing relief for affected individuals and their families. This review examines results from neurobiologic research in an attempt to both elucidate the pathophysiology of autism and guide the development of pharmacologic agents for the treatment of associated symptoms. The safety and efficacy data of drugs currently in clinical use for the treatment of these symptoms, as well as pharmaceuticals currently under development, are discussed. This comprehensive review will deepen the reader's current understanding of the research guiding the pharmacologic treatment of symptoms associated with autism and related PDDs. Areas of focus for future research are also discussed. The need for large-scale investigation of some commonly used pharmacologic agents, in addition to the development of drugs with improved efficacy and safety profiles, is made evident. Despite progress in the development of pharmacologic treatments for a number of interfering symptom domains associated with autism and other PDDs, a great deal of work remains.

  20. Emerging Drugs for the Treatment of Symptoms Associated with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Wink, Logan K.; Plawecki, Martin H.; Erickson, Craig A.; Stigler, Kimberly A.; McDougle, Christopher J.

    2010-01-01

    Importance of the Field Autism spectrum disorders, or pervasive developmental disorders (PDDs), are neurodevelopmental disorders defined by qualitative impairment in social interaction, impaired communication, and stereotyped patterns of behavior. The most common forms of PDD are autstic disorder (autism), Asperger's disorder, and pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified (PDD NOS). Recent surveillance studies reveal an increase in the prevalence of autism and related PDDs. The use of pharmacologic agents in the treatment of these disorders can reduce the impact of interfering symptoms, providing relief for affected individuals and their families. Areas Covered in this Review This review examines results from neurobiologic research in an attempt to both elucidate the pathophysiology of autism and guide the development of pharmacologic agents for the treatment of associated symptoms. The safety and efficacy data of drugs currently in clinical use for the treatment of these symptoms, as well as pharmaceuticals currently under development, are discussed. What the Reader will Gain This comprehensive review will deepen the reader's current understanding of the research guiding the pharmacologic treatment of symptoms associated with autism and related PDDs. Areas of focus for future research are also discussed. The need for large-scale investigation of some commonly used pharmacologic agents, in addition to the development of drugs with improved efficacy and safety profiles, is made evident. Take Home Message Despite progress in the development of pharmacologic treatments for a number of interfering symptom domains associated with autism and other PDDs, a great deal of work remains. PMID:20470188

  1. Clinical roundtable monograph: new and emerging treatments for advanced prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    George, Daniel J; Kantoff, Philip W; Lin, Daniel W

    2011-06-01

    Historically, the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) has been limited to chemotherapeutic regimens that did not improve patient survival. In 2004, clinical studies began to demonstrate significant improvements in patient outcomes, including overall survival, with docetaxel versus mitoxantrone chemotherapy. Since these pivotal trials, the combination of docetaxel plus prednisone has become a standard of care for patients with metastatic CRPC. However, the limited survival benefit achieved with this regimen prompted several investigations into the development of alternative therapeutic options. Recent advances have now led to an unprecedented number of new drug approvals within the past year, providing many new treatment options for patients with metastatic CRPC. Sipuleucel-T, considered a new paradigm in cancer treatment, is the first such immunotherapeutic agent approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. Other successes include abiraterone acetate, the first androgen biosynthesis inhibitor, and cabazitaxel, a novel microtubule inhibitor, both of which have demonstrated improved survival following docetaxel failure. The bone-targeting agent denosumab, also recently approved in this setting, offers these patients significant improvement in the prevention of skeletal-related events. The data supporting the approval of each of these agents are described in this monograph, as are current approaches in the treatment of metastatic CRPC and ongoing clinical trials of novel treatments and strategies. The experts also discuss several of the issues regarding the introduction of these novel agents into clinical practice for metastatic CRPC patients.

  2. Low-cost generic drugs under the President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief drove down treatment cost; more are needed.

    PubMed

    Venkatesh, Kartik K; Mayer, Kenneth H; Carpenter, Charles C J

    2012-07-01

    The President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) was originally authorized in 2003 with the goal of supporting HIV prevention, treatment, and care within fifteen focus countries in the developing world. By September 2011 nearly 13 million people around the world were receiving HIV/AIDS-related care through PEPFAR, and 3.9 million were receiving antiretroviral treatment. However, in the early years of the program, access to antiretroviral drugs was hampered by the lack of a licensing process that the US government recognized for generic versions of these medications. Ultimately, the obstacle to approval of generic antiretroviral drugs was removed, which led to PEPFAR's considerable success at making these treatments widely available. This article outlines PEPFAR's evolving use of generic antiretroviral drugs to treat HIV in the developing world, highlights ongoing initiatives to increase access to generic antiretrovirals, and points to the need for mechanisms that will speed up the approval of new generic drugs. The striking decline in antiretroviral treatment costs, from $1,100 per person annually in 2004 to $335 per person annually in 2012, is due to the availability of effective generic antiretrovirals. Given growing resistance to existing drugs and the planned expansion of treatment to millions more people, access to newer generations of generic antiretrovirals will have to be expedited.

  3. Emerging Role of MRI for Radiation Treatment Planning in Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Cobben, David C P; de Boer, Hans C J; Tijssen, Rob H; Rutten, Emma G G M; van Vulpen, Marco; Peerlings, Jurgen; Troost, Esther G C; Hoffmann, Aswin L; van Lier, Astrid L H M W

    2016-12-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides excellent soft-tissue contrast and allows for specific scanning sequences to optimize differentiation between various tissue types and properties. Moreover, it offers the potential for real-time motion imaging. This makes magnetic resonance imaging an ideal candidate imaging modality for radiation treatment planning in lung cancer. Although the number of clinical research protocols for the application of magnetic resonance imaging for lung cancer treatment is increasing (www.clinicaltrials.gov) and the magnetic resonance imaging sequences are becoming faster, there are still some technical challenges. This review describes the opportunities and challenges of magnetic resonance imaging for radiation treatment planning in lung cancer. © The Author(s) 2015.

  4. Determining optimal treatment strategy for diffuse glioma: the emerging role of IDH mutations.

    PubMed

    Juratli, Tareq A; Cahill, Daniel P; McCutcheon, Ian E

    2015-06-01

    The isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (IDH1 and IDH2) genes mutate frequently in gliomas, and it has become increasingly apparent that IDH mutation status accounts for much of the prognostic information previously rendered by histological grading. Most glioblastomas (90-95%) are IDH wild-type and most lower-grade diffuse gliomas (80%) are IDH-mutant. We examine here how IDH mutation status interacts with treatments known to influence survival (surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy) in patients with gliomas, and the impact of the IDH mutations on patients' survival after such treatments. IDH mutations is associated with more complete surgical resection of enhancing disease, and with a better response to RT. In addition, there is increasing clinical evidence that, in certain contexts, IDH mutations predict chemotherapeutic sensitivity. Mutations in IDH and other genes are beginning to drive decisions on therapy for diffuse gliomas and will likely allow tailoring of treatment by molecular profile in the future.

  5. Trabectedin therapy as an emerging treatment strategy for recurrent platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    López-Guerrero, José Antonio; Romero, Ignacio; Poveda, Andrés

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (OC) is a common gynecologic malignancy in women. The standard treatment for OC is maximal cytoreductive surgical debulking followed by platinum-based chemotherapy. Despite the high response rate to primary therapy, approximately 85% of patients will develop recurrent ovarian cancer (ROC). This review identifies the clinical use of trabectedin in the treatment algorithm for ROC, with specific emphasis on platinum-sensitive ROC, for which trabectedin in combination with pegylated liposomal doxorubicin has been approved as a treatment protocol. The main mechanisms of action of trabectedin at the cellular level and in the tumor microenvironment is also discussed as bases for identifying biomarkers for selecting patients who may largely benefit from trabectedin-based therapies. PMID:25556617

  6. History, Evolution, and Importance of Emergency Endovascular Treatment of Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Holodinsky, Jessalyn K; Yu, Amy Y X; Assis, Zarina A; Al Sultan, Abdulaziz S; Menon, Bijoy K; Demchuk, Andrew M; Goyal, Mayank; Hill, Michael D

    2016-05-01

    More than 800,000 people in North America suffer a stroke each year, with ischemic stroke making up the majority of these cases. The outcomes of ischemic stroke range from complete functional and cognitive recovery to severe disability and death; outcome is strongly associated with timely reperfusion treatment. Historically, ischemic stroke has been treated with intravenous thrombolytic agents with moderate success. However, five recently published positive trials have established the efficacy of endovascular treatment in acute ischemic stroke. In this review, we will discuss the history of stroke treatments moving from various intravenous thrombolytic drugs to intra-arterial thrombolysis, early mechanical thrombectomy devices, and finally modern endovascular devices. Early endovascular therapy failures, recent successes, and implications for current ischemic stroke management and future research directions are discussed.

  7. Clinical decision-making in multiple sclerosis: Challenges reported internationally with emerging treatment complexity.

    PubMed

    Ng, Pamela; Murray, Suzanne; Hayes, Sean M

    2015-07-01

    The introduction of several new disease-modifying therapies (DMTs) to the field of Multiple Sclerosis (MS) treatment requires that MS healthcare providers have a comprehensive understanding of the implications of each new treatment option in order to select the treatment that best suits their patient. An international study was conducted in 6 countries to obtain a better understanding of the issues and challenges experienced by Neurologists and Nurses in the treatment and management of their patients with MS. The goal of this research was to obtain evidence to inform future Continuing Medical Education (CME) initiatives and health policies that promote knowledge translation to clinical practice. This article focuses on challenges reported in relation to the use of newly approved therapies, in light of the risks of these new treatments, as well as screening and monitoring precautions that must be taken. An exploratory study and literature review informed the design of an IRB-approved online survey deployed to MS Neurologists and Nurses practicing in 6 countries (Germany, France, Italy, Spain, UK, USA). The sample consisted of actively practicing Neurologists (n=156) and Nurses (n=153). Substantive challenges were reported in participant's knowledge of and confidence in three categories: i) safety profile of newly approved therapies, ii) screening patients for treatment with newly approved therapies, and iii) monitoring for serious adverse events. Findings indicate that, internationally, healthcare providers report substantive challenges integrating newly approved therapies into their clinical decision-making. This study highlights potential factors underlying the challenges, and identifies important targets for CME interventions and policymakers to enhance clinical decision-making amongst MS providers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Transthyretin Cardiac Amyloidosis: Pathogenesis, Treatments, and Emerging Role in Heart Failure with Preserved Ejection Fraction

    PubMed Central

    Ton, Van-Khue; Mukherjee, Monica; Judge, Daniel P

    2014-01-01

    Transthyretin (TTR) amyloidosis causes heart failure from cardiac deposition of TTR amyloid fibrils, the by-product of TTR homotetramer disassembly. Wild-type (WT) TTR deposition leads to senile amyloidosis, predominantly manifesting with cardiomyopathy. Missense mutations in the TTR gene result in familial TTR amyloidosis. Certain mutations are more likely to affect the heart, while others cause more neurologic involvement. Extracellular fibril deposition triggers intracellular stress response, upregulation of the inflammatory cascades, apoptosis, and organ dysfunction. Recent studies suggest that TTR cardiac amyloid may be a significant contributor to the pathogenesis of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). Summarized in this review are the molecular pathways underlying the cellular toxicity of TTR amyloid fibrils and the emerging therapies aimed at TTR tetramer stabilization, abrogation of TTR synthesis in the liver, or inhibition of amyloidogenesis. PMID:25628512

  9. [Perioperative management of direct oral anticoagulant in emergency surgery and bleeding. Haemostasis monitoring and treatment].

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, F; Gómez-Luque, A; Ferrandis, R; Llau, J V; de Andrés, J; Gomar, C; Sierra, P; Castillo, J; Torres, L M

    2015-10-01

    There is an almost unanimous consensus on the management of the direct new oral anticoagulants, dabigatran, rivaroxaban, and apixaban in elective surgery. However, this general consensus does not exist in relation with the direct new oral anticoagulants use in emergency surgery, especially in the bleeding patient. For this reason, a literature review was performed using the MEDLINE-PubMed. An analysis was made of the journal articles, reviews, systematic reviews, and practices guidelines published between 2000 and 2014 using the terms "monitoring" and "reversal". From this review, it was shown that the routine tests of blood coagulation, such as the prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time, have a limited efficacy in the perioperative control of blood coagulation in these patients. There is currently no antidote to reverse the effects of these drugs, although the possibility of using concentrated prothrombin complex and recombinant activated factor vii has been suggested for the urgent reversal of the anticoagulant effect.

  10. Allergy evaluation after emergency treatment: anaphylaxis to the over‐the‐counter medication clobutinol

    PubMed Central

    Seitz, Cornelia S; Bröcker, Eva‐B; Trautmann, Axel

    2007-01-01

    Anaphylaxis is traditionally diagnosed and treated as an acute emergency but should be always followed by a search for specific triggers, resulting in avoidance strategies. This case report highlights the relevance of a detailed evaluation after anaphylaxis for diagnosis of a rare but potentially life‐threatening allergy. Considering the high frequency of clobutinol application, IgE‐mediated allergic hypersensitivity seems extremely rare and has to be distinguished from infection‐associated urticaria and angioedema as well as non‐specific summation effects. Accidental re‐exposure has to be strictly avoided and therefore after identification of clobutinol as the anaphylaxis trigger, the patient received detailed allergy documents including international non‐proprietary and trade names of the culprit drug. PMID:17351213

  11. New and emerging immune-targeted drugs for the treatment of multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Alan M

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a neurodegenerative disease with a major inflammatory component that constitutes the most common progressive and disabling neurological condition in young adults. Injectable immunomodulatory medicines such as interferon drugs and glatiramer acetate have dominated the MS market for over the past two decades but this situation is set to change. This is because of: (i) patent expirations, (ii) the introduction of natalizumab, which targets the interaction between leukocytes and the blood–CNS barrier, (iii) the launch of three oral immunomodulatory drugs (fingolimod, dimethyl fumarate and teriflunomide), with another (laquinimod) under regulatory review and (iv) a number of immunomodulatory monoclonal antibodies (alemtuzumab, daclizumab and ocrelizumab) about to enter the market. Current and emerging medicines are reviewed and their impact on people with MS considered. PMID:24251808

  12. Merkel Cell Carcinoma: Current Issues Regarding Diagnosis, Management, and Emerging Treatment Strategies.

    PubMed

    Brummer, Grace C; Bowen, Anneli R; Bowen, Glen M

    2016-02-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare but aggressive cutaneous tumor with a predilection for the head and neck of elderly Caucasian patients. Although much less common than melanoma, MCC has higher rates of sentinel lymph node involvement, local and regional recurrences, and mortality. The majority of MCC cases have been linked to the relatively newly discovered Merkel cell polyomavirus, which is a ubiquitous constituent of the skin flora. Recent discoveries regarding viral integration and carcinogenesis and the immunologic features of MCC have expanded the understanding of MCC. These discoveries have led to the development and application of emerging therapies such as somatostatin analogs, immune checkpoint inhibition, adoptive cell therapy, and other exciting possibilities for targeted therapy.

  13. Emergency department external fixation for provisional treatment of pilon and unstable ankle fractures

    PubMed Central

    Lareau, Craig R.; Daniels, Alan H.; Vopat, Bryan G.; Kane, Patrick M.

    2015-01-01

    Unstable ankle fractures and impacted tibial pilon fractures often benefit from provisional external fixation as a temporizing measure prior to definitive fixation. Benefits of external fixation include improved articular alignment, decreased articular impaction, and soft tissue rest. Uniplanar external fixator placement in the Emergency Department (ED ex-fix) is a reliable and safe technique for achieving ankle reduction and stability while awaiting definitive fixation. This procedure involves placing transverse proximal tibial and calcaneal traction pins and connecting the pins with two external fixator rods. This technique is particularly useful in austere environments or when the operating room is not immediately available. Additionally, this bedside intervention prevents the patient from requiring general anesthesia and may be a cost-effective strategy for decreasing valuable operating time. The ED ex-fix is an especially valuable procedure in busy trauma centers and during mass casualty events, in which resources may be limited. PMID:25709258

  14. An integrative model of the impairments in insight in schizophrenia: emerging research on causal factors and treatments.

    PubMed

    Vohs, Jenifer L; George, Sunita; Leonhardt, Bethany L; Lysaker, Paul H

    2016-10-01

    Poor insight, or unawareness of some major aspect of mental illness, is a major barrier to wellness when it interferes with persons seeking out treatment or forming their own understanding of the challenges they face. One barrier to addressing impaired insight is the absence of a comprehensive model of how poor insight develops. To explore this issue we review how poor insight is the result of multiple phenomena which interfere with the construction of narrative accounts of psychiatric challenges, rather than a single social or biological cause. Expert commentary: We propose an integrative model of poor insight in schizophrenia which involves the interaction of symptoms, deficits in neurocognition, social cognition, metacognition, and stigma. Emerging treatments for poor insight including therapies which focus on the development of metacognition are discussed.

  15. Unmet needs of patients with narcolepsy: perspectives on emerging treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Wozniak, Dariusz R; Quinnell, Timothy G

    2015-01-01

    The treatment options currently available for narcolepsy are often unsatisfactory due to suboptimal efficacy, troublesome side effects, development of drug tolerance, and inconvenience. Our understanding of the neurobiology of narcolepsy has greatly improved over the last decade. This knowledge has not yet translated into additional therapeutic options for patients, but progress is being made. Some compounds, such as histaminergic H3 receptor antagonists, may prove useful in symptom control of narcolepsy. The prospect of finding a cure still seems distant, but hypocretin replacement therapy offers some promise. In this narrative review, we describe these developments and others which may yield more effective narcolepsy treatments in the future. PMID:26045680

  16. Diagnosis and treatment planning of acute aortic emergencies using a handheld DICOM viewer.

    PubMed

    Choudhri, Asim F; Norton, Patrick T; Carr, Thomas M; Stone, James R; Hagspiel, Klaus D; Dake, Michael D

    2013-08-01

    Acute aortic syndromes and traumatic aortic injury are often diagnosed on CT angiography, possibly requiring emergent intervention. Advances in handheld computing have created the possibility of viewing full DICOM datasets from a remote location. We evaluated the ability to diagnose and characterize acute aortic pathologies on CT angiograms of the thorax using an iPhone-based DICOM viewer. This study was performed after Institutional Review Board approval. Fifteen CT angiograms of the thorax in suspected acute aortic syndromes were evaluated by three blinded radiologists on a handheld device using a DICOM viewer. Studies were evaluated for the ability to identify and classify aortic dissection, transection, or intramural hematoma, measure aortic dimensions, and identify mediastinal hematoma, arch variants, and pulmonary pathology. Studies were compared to blinded interpretations on a dedicated PACS workstation. The aortic pathology was correctly identified as aortic transection/pseudoaneurysm (n = 5), type A dissection (n = 2), and type A intramural hematoma (n = 1) by all reviewers, with no false-positive interpretations. This represents a sensitivity and specificity of 100 %. Mediastinal hematoma (n = 6), pneumothorax (five right, three left), and arch vessel involvement (n = 2) were identified in all cases. There was 88.5 % accuracy in identifying arch variants. Measurement of the size of the involved aortic segment was similar on handheld device and PACS workstation; however the adjacent normal aorta was 1.2 ± 1.0 mm larger on the handheld device (p = 0.03). Handheld DICOM viewers may be useful for emergent consultations and triage, and may expedite preprocedure planning to reduce the time interval between diagnostic scan and therapeutic intervention.

  17. Comparison of two analgesia protocols for the treatment of pediatric orthopedic emergencies.

    PubMed

    Barcelos, Andrea; Garcia, Pedro Celiny Ramos; Portela, Janete L; Piva, Jefferson P; Garcia, João Pedro Tedesco; Santana, João Carlos B

    2015-08-01

    to compare the efficacy of two analgesia protocols (ketamine versus morphine) associated with midazolam for the reduction of dislocations or closed fractures in children. randomized clinical trial comparing morphine (0.1mg/kg; max 5mg) and ketamine (2.0mg/kg, max 70mg) associated with midazolam (0.2mg/kg; max 10mg) in the reduction of dislocations or closed fractures in children treated at the pediatrics emergency room (October 2010 and September 2011). The groups were compared in terms of the times to perform the procedures, analgesia, parent satisfaction and orthopedic team. 13 patients were allocated to ketamine and 12 to morphine, without differences in relation to age, weight, gender, type of injury, and pain scale before the intervention. There was no failure in any of the groups, no differences in time to start the intervention and overall procedure time. The average hospital stay time was similar (ketamine = 10.8+5.1h versus morphine = 12.3+4.4hs; p=0.447). The median pain (faces pain scale) scores after the procedure was 2 in both groups. Amnesia was noted in 92.3% (ketamine) and 83.3% (morphine) (p=0.904). Parents said they were very satisfied in relation to the analgesic intervention (84.6% in the ketamine group and 66.6% in the morphine group; p=0.296). The satisfaction of the orthopedist regarding the intervention was 92.3% in the ketamine group and 75% in the morphine group (p=0.222). by producing results similar to morphine, ketamine can be considered as an excellent option in pain management and helps in the reduction of dislocations and closed fractures in pediatric emergency rooms.

  18. Systematic review of mass media interventions designed to improve public recognition of stroke symptoms, emergency response and early treatment

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Mass media interventions have been implemented to improve emergency response to stroke given the emergence of effective acute treatments, but their impact is unclear. Methods Systematic review of mass media interventions aimed at improving emergency response to stroke, with narrative synthesis and review of intervention development. Results Ten studies were included (six targeted the public, four both public and professionals) published between 1992 and 2010. Only three were controlled before and after studies, and only one had reported how the intervention was developed. Campaigns aimed only at the public reported significant increase in awareness of symptoms/signs, but little impact on awareness of need for emergency response. Of the two controlled before and after studies, one reported no impact on those over 65 years, the age group at increased risk of stroke and most likely to witness a stroke, and the other found a significant increase in awareness of two or more warning signs of stroke in the same group post-intervention. One campaign targeted at public and professionals did not reduce time to presentation at hospital to within two hours, but increased and sustained thrombolysis rates. This suggests the campaign had a primary impact on professionals and improved the way that services for stroke were organised. Conclusions Campaigns aimed at the public may raise awareness of symptoms/signs of stroke, but have limited impact on behaviour. Campaigns aimed at both public and professionals may have more impact on professionals than the public. New campaigns should follow the principles of good design and be robustly evaluated. PMID:21182777

  19. [Non-compliance with the systemic antibiotic treatment prescribed in Primary Health Care emergency departments (Study INCUMAT')].

    PubMed

    Vega-Cubillo, E M; Andrés-Carreira, J M; Cirillo-Ibargüen, S; Manzanares-Arnaiz, C; Moreno-Moreno, G; Redondo-Figuero, C G

    Non-compliance with antibiotics treatment has severe consequences. Although antibiotics are commonly prescribed drugs, there are few studies that evaluate therapeutic compliance in acute diseases. The main objective of this study is to determine the percentage of non-compliance with the systemic antibiotics treatment prescribed in emergency departments. A prospective observational study was performed in the Emergency Department of 2 health centres of the Cantabria Health Service between the months of June and September 2014. The stud