Science.gov

Sample records for emerging technologies improved

  1. Emerging technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Hodson, C.O.; Williams, D.

    1996-07-01

    Among the emerging technologies for air, hazardous waste and water come new ways of looking at pollution, in both the figurative and quite literal sense. The use of microbes for remediation and pollution control is a component in many of the technologies in this report and is the focus of environmental research at many university and industry labs. Bacteria are the engines driving one featured emissions control technology: the air biofilter. Biofilters are probably more acceptable to most engineers as a soil remediation technology--such as the innovative method described in the hazardous waste section--rather than as means of cleaning off-gases, but in many cases bugs can perform the function inexpensively. The authors give the basics on this available technology. A more experimental application of microbes is being investigated as a potential quantum leap in heavy metals removal technology: bio-engineered, metal consuming plants. The effort to genetically engineer a green remediation tool is detailed in the hazardous waste section.

  2. Theme: Emerging Technologies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malpiedi, Barbara J.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Consists of six articles discussing the effect of emerging technologies on agriculture. Specific topics include (1) agriscience programs, (2) the National Conference on Agriscience and Emerging Occupations and Technologies, (3) biotechnology, (4) program improvement through technology, (5) the Agriscience Teacher of the Year program, and (6)…

  3. The Role of Emerging Technologies in Improving Energy Efficiency:Examples from the Food Processing Industry

    SciTech Connect

    Lung, Robert Bruce; Masanet, Eric; McKane, Aimee

    2006-05-01

    For over 25 years, the U.S. DOE's Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) has championed the application of emerging technologies in industrial plants and monitored these technologies impacts on industrial energy consumption. The cumulative energy savings of more than 160 completed and tracked projects is estimated at approximately 3.99 quadrillion Btu (quad), representing a production cost savings of $20.4 billion. Properly documenting the impacts of such technologies is essential for assessing their effectiveness and for delivering insights about the optimal direction of future technology research. This paper analyzes the impacts that several emerging technologies have had in the food processing industry. The analysis documents energy savings, carbon emissions reductions and production improvements and assesses the market penetration and sector-wide savings potential. Case study data is presented demonstrating the successful implementation of these technologies. The paper's conclusion discusses the effects of these technologies and offers some projections of sector-wide impacts.

  4. Emerging technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Shin-yee

    1993-03-01

    The mission of the Emerging Technologies thrust area at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is to help individuals establish technology areas that have national and commercial impact, and are outside the scope of the existing thrust areas. We continue to encourage innovative ideas that bring quality results to existing programs. We also take as our mission the encouragement of investment in new technology areas that are important to the economic competitiveness of this nation. In fiscal year 1992, we have focused on nine projects, summarized in this report: (1) Tire, Accident, Handling, and Roadway Safety; (2) EXTRANSYT: An Expert System for Advanced Traffic Management; (3) Odin: A High-Power, Underwater, Acoustic Transmitter for Surveillance Applications; (4) Passive Seismic Reservoir Monitoring: Signal Processing Innovations; (5) Paste Extrudable Explosive Aft Charge for Multi-Stage Munitions; (6) A Continuum Model for Reinforced Concrete at High Pressures and Strain Rates: Interim Report; (7) Benchmarking of the Criticality Evaluation Code COG; (8) Fast Algorithm for Large-Scale Consensus DNA Sequence Assembly; and (9) Using Electrical Heating to Enhance the Extraction of Volatile Organic Compounds from Soil.

  5. Social Media in School Emergency Management: Using New Media Technology to Improve Emergency Management Communications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Kim

    2011-01-01

    Social Media is the use of social networking sites, messaging sites, texting, and other web-based or mobile technologies to support social interaction. Facebook is by far the most widely used social networking site. Twitter is by far the most widely used messaging site. The goals of this presentation are: (1) To provide an understanding of the…

  6. Emerging liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry technologies improving dried blood spot analysis.

    PubMed

    Rao, Ramisetti Nageswara

    2014-08-01

    Dried blood spots (DBS), a micro blood sampling technique, has recently gained interest in drug discovery and development due to its inherent advantages over the conventional whole blood, plasma or serum sample collection. Since the regulatory authorities have agreed to the use of blood as an acceptable biological matrix for drug exposure measurements, its applications have been extended not only to therapeutic drug monitoring but also to toxicokinetic and pharmacokinetic studies. The pharmaceutical industry is keen to promote DBS as a prominent tool in bioanalytical applications due to the financial, ethical and organizational issues involved in clinical trials. This could be accomplished due to the latest advances in modern analytical technology, particularly liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. The present review discusses some of the emerging liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry technologies in improving DBS analysis for its innovative applications in the development of new drugs.

  7. New technologies emerge.

    PubMed

    Gray, S P

    1997-01-01

    Technology vendors continue to invent new devices, systems and processes to sell to the health care industry. Drugs, instruments and procedures continue to improve and address disease and injury treatment needs. In addition to these direct medical treatment innovations and enhancements, a number of new supporting systems and products have emerged. These support technologies hold significant promise for managers to make day-to-day execution of health care delivery more cost effective and customer friendly.

  8. [Improving emergency department organisation].

    PubMed

    Yordanov, Youri; Beltramini, Alexandra; Debuc, Erwan; Pateron, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Emergency departments use has been constantly increasing over the world. Overcrowding is defined as a situation which compromises patient safety because of delayed cares. This situation is often reached. Emergency departments have to continuously improve their organization to be able to ensure the same quality of care to a higher number of patients. Thus a good organization is essential: it doesn't always avoid overcrowding. The rest of the hospital has to be involved in this process to ensure efficiency. We examine the various interventions and procedures that can be found in medical literature for improving patients flow and management in emergency departments. PMID:25842427

  9. [Improving emergency department organisation].

    PubMed

    Yordanov, Youri; Beltramini, Alexandra; Debuc, Erwan; Pateron, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Emergency departments use has been constantly increasing over the world. Overcrowding is defined as a situation which compromises patient safety because of delayed cares. This situation is often reached. Emergency departments have to continuously improve their organization to be able to ensure the same quality of care to a higher number of patients. Thus a good organization is essential: it doesn't always avoid overcrowding. The rest of the hospital has to be involved in this process to ensure efficiency. We examine the various interventions and procedures that can be found in medical literature for improving patients flow and management in emergency departments.

  10. Emergent technologies: 25 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rising, Hawley K.

    2013-03-01

    This paper will talk about the technologies that have been emerging over the 25 years since the Human Vision and Electronic Imaging conference began that the conference has been a part of, and that have been a part of the conference, and will look at those technologies that are emerging today, such as social networks, haptic technologies, and still emerging imaging technologies, and what we might look at for the future.Twenty-five years is a long time, and it is not without difficulty that we remember what was emerging in the late 1980s. Yet to be developed: The first commercial digital still camera was not yet on the market, although there were hand held electronic cameras. Personal computers were not displaying standardized images, and image quality was not something that could be talked about in a standardized fashion, if only because image compression algorithms were not standardized yet for several years hence. Even further away were any standards for movie compression standards, there was no personal computer even on the horizon which could display them. What became an emergent technology and filled many sessions later, image comparison and search, was not possible, nor the current emerging technology of social networks- the world wide web was still several years away. Printer technology was still devising dithers and image size manipulations which would consume many years, as would scanning technology, and image quality for both was a major issue for dithers and Fourier noise.From these humble beginnings to the current moves that are changing computing and the meaning of both electronic devices and human interaction with them, we will see a course through the changing technology that holds some features constant for many years, while others come and go.

  11. Emerging and Disruptive Technologies

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Several emerging or disruptive technologies can be identified that might, at some point in the future, displace established laboratory medicine technologies and practices. These include increased automation in the form of robots, 3-D printing, technology convergence (e.g., plug-in glucose meters for smart phones), new point-of-care technologies (e.g., contact lenses with sensors, digital and wireless enabled pregnancy tests) and testing locations (e.g., Retail Health Clinics, new at-home testing formats), new types of specimens (e.g., cell free DNA), big biology/data (e.g., million genome projects), and new regulations (e.g., for laboratory developed tests). In addition, there are many emerging technologies (e.g., planar arrays, mass spectrometry) that might find even broader application in the future and therefore also disrupt current practice. One interesting source of disruptive technology may prove to be the Qualcomm Tricorder XPrize, currently in its final stages.

  12. Emerging and Disruptive Technologies.

    PubMed

    Kricka, Larry J

    2016-08-01

    Several emerging or disruptive technologies can be identified that might, at some point in the future, displace established laboratory medicine technologies and practices. These include increased automation in the form of robots, 3-D printing, technology convergence (e.g., plug-in glucose meters for smart phones), new point-of-care technologies (e.g., contact lenses with sensors, digital and wireless enabled pregnancy tests) and testing locations (e.g., Retail Health Clinics, new at-home testing formats), new types of specimens (e.g., cell free DNA), big biology/data (e.g., million genome projects), and new regulations (e.g., for laboratory developed tests). In addition, there are many emerging technologies (e.g., planar arrays, mass spectrometry) that might find even broader application in the future and therefore also disrupt current practice. One interesting source of disruptive technology may prove to be the Qualcomm Tricorder XPrize, currently in its final stages. PMID:27683538

  13. Emerging and Disruptive Technologies.

    PubMed

    Kricka, Larry J

    2016-08-01

    Several emerging or disruptive technologies can be identified that might, at some point in the future, displace established laboratory medicine technologies and practices. These include increased automation in the form of robots, 3-D printing, technology convergence (e.g., plug-in glucose meters for smart phones), new point-of-care technologies (e.g., contact lenses with sensors, digital and wireless enabled pregnancy tests) and testing locations (e.g., Retail Health Clinics, new at-home testing formats), new types of specimens (e.g., cell free DNA), big biology/data (e.g., million genome projects), and new regulations (e.g., for laboratory developed tests). In addition, there are many emerging technologies (e.g., planar arrays, mass spectrometry) that might find even broader application in the future and therefore also disrupt current practice. One interesting source of disruptive technology may prove to be the Qualcomm Tricorder XPrize, currently in its final stages.

  14. Emerging and Disruptive Technologies

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Several emerging or disruptive technologies can be identified that might, at some point in the future, displace established laboratory medicine technologies and practices. These include increased automation in the form of robots, 3-D printing, technology convergence (e.g., plug-in glucose meters for smart phones), new point-of-care technologies (e.g., contact lenses with sensors, digital and wireless enabled pregnancy tests) and testing locations (e.g., Retail Health Clinics, new at-home testing formats), new types of specimens (e.g., cell free DNA), big biology/data (e.g., million genome projects), and new regulations (e.g., for laboratory developed tests). In addition, there are many emerging technologies (e.g., planar arrays, mass spectrometry) that might find even broader application in the future and therefore also disrupt current practice. One interesting source of disruptive technology may prove to be the Qualcomm Tricorder XPrize, currently in its final stages. PMID:27683538

  15. Emerging Propulsion Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keys, Andrew S.

    2006-01-01

    The Emerging Propulsion Technologies (EPT) investment area is the newest area within the In-Space Propulsion Technology (ISPT) Project and strives to bridge technologies in the lower Technology Readiness Level (TRL) range (2 to 3) to the mid TRL range (4 to 6). A prioritization process, the Integrated In-Space Transportation Planning (IISTP), was developed and applied in FY01 to establish initial program priorities. The EPT investment area emerged for technologies that scored well in the IISTP but had a low technical maturity level. One particular technology, the Momentum-eXchange Electrodynamic-Reboost (MXER) tether, scored extraordinarily high and had broad applicability in the IISTP. However, its technical maturity was too low for ranking alongside technologies like the ion engine or aerocapture. Thus MXER tethers assumed top priority at EPT startup in FY03 with an aggressive schedule and adequate budget. It was originally envisioned that future technologies would enter the ISP portfolio through EPT, and EPT developed an EPT/ISP Entrance Process for future candidate ISP technologies. EPT has funded the following secondary, candidate ISP technologies at a low level: ultra-lightweight solar sails, general space/near-earth tether development, electrodynamic tether development, advanced electric propulsion, and in-space mechanism development. However, the scope of the ISPT program has focused over time to more closely match SMD needs and technology advancement successes. As a result, the funding for MXER and other EPT technologies is not currently available. Consequently, the MXER tether tasks and other EPT tasks were expected to phased out by November 2006. Presentation slides are presented which provide activity overviews for the aerocapture technology and emerging propulsion technology projects.

  16. Emerging Vaccine Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Loomis, Rebecca J.; Johnson, Philip R.

    2015-01-01

    Vaccination has proven to be an invaluable means of preventing infectious diseases by reducing both incidence of disease and mortality. However, vaccines have not been effectively developed for many diseases including HIV-1, hepatitis C virus (HCV), tuberculosis and malaria, among others. The emergence of new technologies with a growing understanding of host-pathogen interactions and immunity may lead to efficacious vaccines against pathogens, previously thought impossible. PMID:26343196

  17. Emerging technologies in aesthetic medicine.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Bobby Y; Hantash, Basil M

    2009-10-01

    Recent advances in technology have drastically improved aesthetic treatment for skin. Of particular interest is the emergence of laser- and lightbased technologies, which have offered great promise among skin-rejuvenation therapies. New laser resurfacing techniques for skin rejuvenation offer significant advantages over conventional ablative lasers, such as the CO(2) and erbiumYAG laser systems. Nonablative and fractional lasers, although not as efficacious as ablative therapies, are associated with significantly diminished complication rates and shortened recovery times. Novel devices combining ablative and fractional technologies have also surfaced, demonstrating noteworthy results. In this review, the authors will discuss the implications of current developments in research and technology for skin rejuvenation. Furthermore, the authors will address emerging therapies for acne vulgaris, lipolysis, and cellulite. PMID:19850201

  18. Emerging Propulsion Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonometti, J. A.

    2004-11-01

    The Emerging Propulsion Technologies (EPT) technology area is a branch of the In-Space Program that serves as a bridge to bring high-risk/high-payoff technologies to a higher level of maturity. Emerging technologies are innovative and, if successfully developed, could result in revolutionary science capabilities for NASA science missions. EPT is also charged with the responsibility of assessing the technology readiness level (TRL) of technologies under consideration for inclusion in the ISP portfolio. One such technology is the Momentum-eXchange/Electrodynamic Reboost (MXER) tether concept, which is the current, primary investment of EPT. The MXER tether is a long, rotating cable placed in an elliptical Earth orbit, whose rapid rotation allows its tip to catch a payload in a low Earth orbit and throw that payload to a high-energy orbit. Electrodynamic tether propulsion is used to restore the orbital energy transferred by the MXER tether to the payload and reboost the tether's orbit. This technique uses solar power to drive electrical current collected from the Earth's ionosphere through the tether, resulting in a magnetic interaction with the terrestrial field. Since the Earth itself serves as the reaction mass, the thrust force is generated without propellant and allows the MXER facility to be repeatedly reused without re-supply. Essentially, the MXER facility is a 'propellantless' upper stage that could assist nearly every mission going beyond low Earth orbit. Payloads to interplanetary destinations could especially benefit from the boost provided by the MXER facility, resulting in launch vehicle cost reductions, increased payload fractions and more frequent mission opportunities. Synergistic tether technologies resulting from MXER development could include science sampling in the upper atmosphere, remote probes or attached formation flying, artificial gravity experiments with low Coriolis forces, and other science needs that use long, ultra-light strength or

  19. Emerging aerospace technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballhaus, W. F., Jr.; Milov, L. A.

    1985-01-01

    The United States Government has a long history of promoting the advancement of technology to strengthen the economy and national defense. An example is NASA, which was formed in 1958 to establish and maintain U.S. space technology leadership. This leadership has resulted in technological benefits to many fields and the establishment of new commercial industries, such as satellite communications. Currently, NASA's leading technology development at Ames Research Center includes the Tilt Rotor XV-15, which provides the versatility of a helicopter with the speed of a turboprop aircraft; the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulator, which is pushing the state of the art in advanced computational mathematics and computer simulation; and the Advanced Automation and Robotics programs, which will improve all areas of space development as well as life on Earth. Private industry is involved in maintaining technological leadership through NASA's Commercial Use of Space Program, which provides for synergistic relationships among government, industry, and academia. The plan for a space station by 1992 has framed much of NASA's future goals and has provided new areas of opportunity for both domestic space technology and leadership improvement of life on Earth.

  20. Emerging Technologies and MOUT

    SciTech Connect

    YONAS,GEROLD; MOY,TIMOTHY DAVID

    2000-11-15

    Operating in a potentially hostile city is every soldier's nightmare. The staggering complexity of the urban environment means that deadly threats--or non-combatants-may lurk behind every corner, doorway, or window. Urban operations present an almost unparalleled challenge to the modern professional military. The complexity of urban operations is further amplified by the diversity of missions that the military will be called upon to conduct in urban terrain. Peace-making and peace-keeping missions, urban raids to seize airports or WMD sites or to rescue hostages, and extended urban combat operations all present different sorts of challenges for planners and troops on the ground. Technology almost never serves as a magic bullet, and past predictions of technological miracles pile high on the ash heap of history. At the same time, it is a vital element of planning in the modern age to consider and, if possible, take advantage of emerging technologies. We believe that technologies can assist military operations in urbanized terrain (MOUT) in three primary areas, which are discussed.

  1. Emerging Technologies to Conserve Biodiversity.

    PubMed

    Pimm, Stuart L; Alibhai, Sky; Bergl, Richard; Dehgan, Alex; Giri, Chandra; Jewell, Zoë; Joppa, Lucas; Kays, Roland; Loarie, Scott

    2015-11-01

    Technologies to identify individual animals, follow their movements, identify and locate animal and plant species, and assess the status of their habitats remotely have become better, faster, and cheaper as threats to the survival of species are increasing. New technologies alone do not save species, and new data create new problems. For example, improving technologies alone cannot prevent poaching: solutions require providing appropriate tools to the right people. Habitat loss is another driver: the challenge here is to connect existing sophisticated remote sensing with species occurrence data to predict where species remain. Other challenges include assembling a wider public to crowdsource data, managing the massive quantities of data generated, and developing solutions to rapidly emerging threats. PMID:26437636

  2. Emergency Response Improvement Act

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Andrews, Robert E. [D-NJ-1

    2013-11-20

    11/21/2013 Referred to the Subcommittee on Economic Development, Public Buildings and Emergency Management. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  3. Nanotechnology - An emerging technology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buckingham, D.

    2007-01-01

    The science of nanotechnology is still in its infancy. However, progress is being made in research and development of potential beneficial properties of nanomaterials that could play an integral part in the development of new and changing uses for mineral commodities. Nanotechnology is a kind of toolbox that allows industry to make nanomaterials and nanostructures with special properties. New nanotechnology applications of mineral commodities in their nanoscale form are being discovered, researched and developed. At the same time, there is continued research into environmental, human health and safety concerns that inherently arise from the development of a new technology. Except for a few nanomaterials (CNTs, copper, silver and zinc oxide), widespread applications are hampered by processing and suitable commercial-scale production techniques, high manufacturing costs, product price, and environmental, and human health and safety concerns. Whether nanotechnology causes a tidal wave of change or is a long-term evolutionary process of technology, new applications of familiar mineral commodities will be created. As research and development continues, the ability to manipulate matter at the nanoscale into increasingly sophisticated nanomaterials will improve and open up new possibilities for industry that will change the flow and use of mineral commodities and the materials and products that are used.

  4. Emerging technologies for telemedicine.

    PubMed

    Cao, Minh Duc; Minh, Cao Duc; Shimizu, Shuji; Antoku, Yasuaki; Torata, Nobuhiro; Kudo, Kuriko; Okamura, Koji; Nakashima, Naoki; Tanaka, Masao

    2012-01-01

    This paper focuses on new technologies that are practically useful for telemedicine. Three representative systems are introduced: a Digital Video Transport System (DVTS), an H.323 compatible videoconferencing system, and Vidyo. Based on some of our experiences, we highlight the advantages and disadvantages of each technology, and point out technologies that are especially targeted at doctors and technicians, so that those interested in using similar technologies can make appropriate choices and achieve their own goals depending on their specific conditions. PMID:22563284

  5. Emerging Technologies for Telemedicine

    PubMed Central

    Minh, Cao Duc; Antoku, Yasuaki; Torata, Nobuhiro; Kudo, Kuriko; Okamura, Koji; Nakashima, Naoki; Tanaka, Masao

    2012-01-01

    This paper focuses on new technologies that are practically useful for telemedicine. Three representative systems are introduced: a Digital Video Transport System (DVTS), an H.323 compatible videoconferencing system, and Vidyo. Based on some of our experiences, we highlight the advantages and disadvantages of each technology, and point out technologies that are especially targeted at doctors and technicians, so that those interested in using similar technologies can make appropriate choices and achieve their own goals depending on their specific conditions. PMID:22563284

  6. SITE EMERGING TECHNOLOGY Program

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document is intended as a reference guide for EPA Regional decision makers and others interested in tchnologies in the SITE Demonstration and Technologies programs. The Technologies are described in technology profiles presented in alphabetical order by developer name and se...

  7. Emerging technology for vehicular safety and emergency response to roadway crashes.

    PubMed

    Champion, H R; Cushing, B

    1999-12-01

    Emerging technology for vehicular safety and emergency response to roadway crashes is the topic of this article. Reduction in emergency medical services system notification time, improvements in vehicular safety, crash avoidance and protection, post-crash injury control, triage, national automatic crash notification systems, and technologic improvements in emergency diagnostics and treatment during the past year are discussed. PMID:10625974

  8. Improving emergency department patient flow

    PubMed Central

    Jarvis, Paul Richard Edwin

    2016-01-01

    Emergency departments (ED) face significant challenges in delivering high quality and timely patient care on an ever-present background of increasing patient numbers and limited hospital resources. A mismatch between patient demand and the ED’s capacity to deliver care often leads to poor patient flow and departmental crowding. These are associated with reduction in the quality of the care delivered and poor patient outcomes. A literature review was performed to identify evidence-based strategies to reduce the amount of time patients spend in the ED in order to improve patient flow and reduce crowding in the ED. The use of doctor triage, rapid assessment, streaming and the co-location of a primary care clinician in the ED have all been shown to improve patient flow. In addition, when used effectively point of care testing has been shown to reduce patient time in the ED. Patient flow and departmental crowding can be improved by implementing new patterns of working and introducing new technologies such as point of care testing in the ED.

  9. Forum outlines top emerging technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Extance, Andy

    2015-04-01

    Additive manufacturing, next-generation robotics, "sense and avoid" drones that fly themselves, artificial intelligence and "neuromorphic" computing have all made it into the World Economic Forum's top 10 emerging technologies for 2015.

  10. Citizen Science and Emerging Technologies

    EPA Science Inventory

    This session will discuss challenges and opportunities associated with citizen science and how emerging technologies can support citizen science activities. In addition, the session will provide an overview of low-cost environmental monitors and sensors and introduce the Citizen...

  11. Emerging Technologies in Physics Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krusberg, Zosia A. C.

    2007-01-01

    Three emerging technologies in physics education are evaluated from the interdisciplinary perspective of cognitive science and physics education research. The technologies--Physlet Physics, the Andes Intelligent Tutoring System (ITS), and Microcomputer-Based Laboratory (MBL) Tools--are assessed particularly in terms of their potential at promoting…

  12. Emerging energy-efficient industrial technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, N.; Worrell, E.; Ruth, M.; Price, L.; Elliott, R.N.; Shipley, A.M.; Thorne, J.

    2000-10-01

    the decision on whether to adopt an emerging technology. The technologies were characterized with respect to energy efficiency, economics, and environmental performance. The results demonstrate that the United States is not running out of technologies to improve energy efficiency and economic and environmental performance, and will not run out in the future. We show that many of the technologies have important non-energy benefits, ranging from reduced environmental impact to improved productivity and worker safety, and reduced capital costs.

  13. Emerging Literacy through Assistive Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, Jennifer

    2002-01-01

    This article discuses how assistive technology affected the emergent literacy of 10 preschoolers (age 3) with multiple disabilities. The children used picture communication symbols, adapted books, a BIGmack, and a computer with Intellikeys, Intellipics, and Overlay Maker, alternative keyboard, and software. The benefits to the children are…

  14. Emergency Medical Service (EMS): Rotorcraft Technology Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauchspies, J. S.; Adams, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    A lead organization on the national level should be designated to establish concepts, locations, and the number of shock trauma air medical services. Medical specialists desire a vehicle which incorporates advances in medical technology trends in health care. Key technology needs for the emergency medical services helicopter of the future include the riding quality of fixed wing aircraft (reduced noise and vibration), no tail rotor, small rotor, small rotor diameter, improved visibility, crashworthy vehicle, IFR capability, more affordability high reliability, fuel efficient, and specialized cabins to hold medical/diagnostic and communications equipment. Approaches to a national emergency medical service are discussed.

  15. Final Technical Report: Characterizing Emerging Technologies.

    SciTech Connect

    King, Bruce Hardison; Hansen, Clifford; Stein, Joshua; Riley, Daniel; Gonzalez, Sigifredo

    2015-12-01

    The Characterizing Emerging Technologies project focuses on developing, improving and validating characterization methods for PV modules, inverters and embedded power electronics. Characterization methods and associated analysis techniques are at the heart of technology assessments and accurate component and system modeling. Outputs of the project include measurement and analysis procedures that industry can use to accurately model performance of PV system components, in order to better distinguish and understand the performance differences between competing products (module and inverters) and new component designs and technologies (e.g., new PV cell designs, inverter topologies, etc.).

  16. The emerging story of emerging technologies in neuropsychiatry.

    PubMed

    Coffey, M Justin; Coffey, C Edward

    2016-06-01

    The growth of new technologies in health care is exponential, and the impact of such rapid technological innovation on health care delivery is substantial. This review describes two emerging technologies-mobile applications and wearable technologies-and uses a virtual case report to illustrate the impact of currently available technologies on the health care experience of a patient with neuropsychiatric illness. PMID:27489452

  17. The emerging story of emerging technologies in neuropsychiatry.

    PubMed

    Coffey, M Justin; Coffey, C Edward

    2016-06-01

    The growth of new technologies in health care is exponential, and the impact of such rapid technological innovation on health care delivery is substantial. This review describes two emerging technologies-mobile applications and wearable technologies-and uses a virtual case report to illustrate the impact of currently available technologies on the health care experience of a patient with neuropsychiatric illness.

  18. Emerging Technologies for Cancer Prevention and Other Population Health Challenges

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Emerging technologies, such as information and communication technologies (including future versions of the Internet), microelectromechanical systems, nanotechnologies, genomics, robotics, artificial intelligence, and sensors, provide enormous opportunities for enhancing health and quality of life. Population health technologies (PHTs) encompass the various applications of emerging technologies to improve the health of populations and communities. These technologies may change many population health paradigms, including those related to cancer prevention and control. In the future, emerging technologies will allow true customization of health communication to individuals, and existing tailoring approaches will be considered very crude. Environmental monitoring systems based on emerging technologies could also provide real-time information that health officials and community residents could use immediately to ameliorate potential carcinogenic or unhealthy exposures. Accelerating the application and diffusion of emerging technologies to population health challenges will require a multipronged approach, including new transdisciplinary programs, increased funding, supportive infrastructure, and policy changes. PMID:15998621

  19. The emerging story of emerging technologies in neuropsychiatry

    PubMed Central

    Coffey, M. Justin; Coffey, C. Edward

    2016-01-01

    The growth of new technologies in health care is exponential, and the impact of such rapid technological innovation on health care delivery is substantial. This review describes two emerging technologies—mobile applications and wearable technologies—and uses a virtual case report to illustrate the impact of currently available technologies on the health care experience of a patient with neuropsychiatric illness. PMID:27489452

  20. Emerging Communication Technologies (ECT) Phase 4 Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bastin, Gary L.; Harris, William G.; Marin, Jose A.; Nelson, Richard A.

    2005-01-01

    The Emerging Communication Technology (ECT) project investigated three First Mile communication technologies in support of NASA s Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV), Advanced Range Technology Working Group (ARTWG), and the Advanced Spaceport Technology Working Group (ASTWG). These First Mile technologies have the purpose of interconnecting mobile users with existing Range Communication infrastructures on a 24/7 basis. ECT is a continuation of the Range Information System Management (RISM) task started in 2002. This is the fourth year of the project.

  1. Emerging Technologies Integrating Technology into Study Abroad

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godwin-Jones, Robert

    2016-01-01

    "Ready access to travel and to technology-enhanced social networking (e.g., Facebook or Skype) has changed the nature of study abroad to the point where today's experiences are fundamentally different from those of earlier eras" (Kinginger, 2013a, p. 345). In addition to more travel options and greater technology availability, study…

  2. Electronic Roundup: Emerging Technologies in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Byron

    2008-01-01

    The high rate of technological change that libraries are experiencing makes it seem that the future is closer than it used to be. Rather than having some notion of the future, particularly in emerging technologies, librarians need to be kept well informed and up-to-date in the potential uses of these technologies, especially those that apply to…

  3. Improving Injury Prevention Through Health Information Technology

    PubMed Central

    Haegerich, Tamara M.; Sugerman, David E.; Annest, Joseph L.; Klevens, Joanne; Baldwin, Grant T.

    2015-01-01

    Health information technology is an emerging area of focus in clinical medicine with the potential to improve injury and violence prevention practice. With injuries being the leading cause of death for Americans aged 1–44 years, greater implementation of evidence-based preventive services, referral to community resources, and real-time surveillance of emerging threats is needed. Through a review of the literature and capturing of current practice in the field, this paper showcases how health information technology applied to injury and violence prevention can lead to strengthened clinical preventive services, more rigorous measurement of clinical outcomes, and improved injury surveillance, potentially resulting in health improvement. PMID:25441230

  4. Emerging Technologies - Capturing Innovation with Technology

    SciTech Connect

    2012-12-01

    ET team research results are critical to achieving 50% energy savings across U.S. buildings within the next two decades. The ET team focuses on supporting research, development, and tech-to-market opportunities of high impact technologies, or those that demonstrate potential for achieving significant energy savings cost effectively.

  5. Learning from Fiction: Applications in Emerging Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Ruthanna

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the development of public opinion about emerging technologies, when the scope of that emergence is still speculative, poses particular challenges. Opinions and beliefs may be drawn from conflicting experts in multiple fields, media portrayals with varying biases, and fictional narratives that portray diverse possible futures. This…

  6. Emerging technologies in paediatric leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Genetic changes, in particular chromosomal aberrations, are a hallmark of acute lymphoblastic lymphoma (ALL) and accurate detection of them is important in ensuring assignment to the appropriate drug protocol. Our ability to detect these genetic changes has been somewhat limited in the past due to the necessity to analyse mitotically active cells by conventional G-banded metaphase analysis and by mutational analysis of individual genes. Advances in technology include high resolution, microarray-based techniques that permit examination of the whole genome. Here we will review the current available methodology and discuss how the technology is being integrated into the diagnostic setting. PMID:26835367

  7. Emerging Technologies in the Workplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ammon, Adelaide; Robertson, Lyle

    1985-01-01

    Presents survey responses of 100 Michigan firms regarding the use of advanced technologies, employment growth projections in skilled occupations, and views about community college education. Examines the impact of the introduction of office automation, telecommunications, computer-aided design, laser, quality control, materials management, and…

  8. Technology improves upper extremity rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Kowalczewski, Jan; Prochazka, Arthur

    2011-01-01

    Stroke survivors with hemiparesis and spinal cord injury (SCI) survivors with tetraplegia find it difficult or impossible to perform many activities of daily life. There is growing evidence that intensive exercise therapy, especially when supplemented with functional electrical stimulation (FES), can improve upper extremity function, but delivering the treatment can be costly, particularly after recipients leave rehabilitation facilities. Recently, there has been a growing level of interest among researchers and healthcare policymakers to deliver upper extremity treatments to people in their homes using in-home teletherapy (IHT). The few studies that have been carried out so far have encountered a variety of logistical and technical problems, not least the difficulty of conducting properly controlled and blinded protocols that satisfy the requirements of high-level evidence-based research. In most cases, the equipment and communications technology were not designed for individuals with upper extremity disability. It is clear that exercise therapy combined with interventions such as FES, supervised over the Internet, will soon be adopted worldwide in one form or another. Therefore it is timely that researchers, clinicians, and healthcare planners interested in assessing IHT be aware of the pros and cons of the new technology and the factors involved in designing appropriate studies of it. It is crucial to understand the technical barriers, the role of telesupervisors, the motor improvements that participants can reasonably expect and the process of optimizing IHT-exercise therapy protocols to maximize the benefits of the emerging technology.

  9. Technology improves upper extremity rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Kowalczewski, Jan; Prochazka, Arthur

    2011-01-01

    Stroke survivors with hemiparesis and spinal cord injury (SCI) survivors with tetraplegia find it difficult or impossible to perform many activities of daily life. There is growing evidence that intensive exercise therapy, especially when supplemented with functional electrical stimulation (FES), can improve upper extremity function, but delivering the treatment can be costly, particularly after recipients leave rehabilitation facilities. Recently, there has been a growing level of interest among researchers and healthcare policymakers to deliver upper extremity treatments to people in their homes using in-home teletherapy (IHT). The few studies that have been carried out so far have encountered a variety of logistical and technical problems, not least the difficulty of conducting properly controlled and blinded protocols that satisfy the requirements of high-level evidence-based research. In most cases, the equipment and communications technology were not designed for individuals with upper extremity disability. It is clear that exercise therapy combined with interventions such as FES, supervised over the Internet, will soon be adopted worldwide in one form or another. Therefore it is timely that researchers, clinicians, and healthcare planners interested in assessing IHT be aware of the pros and cons of the new technology and the factors involved in designing appropriate studies of it. It is crucial to understand the technical barriers, the role of telesupervisors, the motor improvements that participants can reasonably expect and the process of optimizing IHT-exercise therapy protocols to maximize the benefits of the emerging technology. PMID:21763524

  10. DEVELOPMENT OF EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES WITHIN THE SITE PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Site Program is formed by five research programs: the Demonstration Program, the Emerging Technology Program, the Measurement and Monitoring Technology Development Program, the Innovative Technology Program, and the Technology Transfer Program. The Emerging Technology (ET) P...

  11. Emerging Education Technologies and Research Directions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spector, J. Michael

    2013-01-01

    Two recent publications report the emerging technologies that are likely to have a significant impact on learning and instruction: (a) New Media Consortium's "2011 Horizon Report" (Johnson, Smith, Willis, Levine & Haywood, 2011), and (b) "A Roadmap for Education Technology" funded by the National Science Foundation in…

  12. Assessment of an Emerging Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ardema, Mark D.

    1979-01-01

    The AIAA's 1979 Lighter-Than-Air (LTA) Systems Technology Conference--the third of the series--was held July 11-13 in Palo Alto, Calif. Highlights of the conference proved to be strong interest in patrol and surveillance airships, particularly for coastal patrol missions, the session devoted to overviews of foreign activity, the luncheon address by Morris B. Jobe, president of Goodyear Aerospace, coincident remarks by RAdm. Manning of the Coast Guard R&D Office and RAdm Seiberlich of the Navy, and presence of the Goodyear advertising airship Columbia.

  13. Emerging technologies for bioweapons defense.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Sinh; Rosen, Joseph M; Koop, C Everett

    2005-01-01

    The Global War on Terrorism (GWOT) has changed the way we think about national security. The tragic events of Sept.11 have shown us that world of the 21(st) century is clearly a dangerous place. Terrorism, more than ever, affects the very lives of each and every citizens of our country. Al Qaida has proven that it is able to use simple rudimentary methods to invoke strategic economic losses to our society with our own domestic resources as its weapons. The dawn of the new century has brought forth a new kind of asymmetric war where guerilla fighters are armed not with rifles but with technology at the touch of a keyboard. Warfare as we know it has changed and just as the military has its "transformation", medicine so too must have its own transformation in order to protect our citizen against the ever changing threat of bioterrorism. Virtual Reality and its applications can play a vital role in developing new countermeasures to minimize the catastrophic effects of a potential bioterror attack. PMID:15718759

  14. Emerging technologies for bioweapons defense.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Sinh; Rosen, Joseph M; Koop, C Everett

    2005-01-01

    The Global War on Terrorism (GWOT) has changed the way we think about national security. The tragic events of Sept.11 have shown us that world of the 21(st) century is clearly a dangerous place. Terrorism, more than ever, affects the very lives of each and every citizens of our country. Al Qaida has proven that it is able to use simple rudimentary methods to invoke strategic economic losses to our society with our own domestic resources as its weapons. The dawn of the new century has brought forth a new kind of asymmetric war where guerilla fighters are armed not with rifles but with technology at the touch of a keyboard. Warfare as we know it has changed and just as the military has its "transformation", medicine so too must have its own transformation in order to protect our citizen against the ever changing threat of bioterrorism. Virtual Reality and its applications can play a vital role in developing new countermeasures to minimize the catastrophic effects of a potential bioterror attack.

  15. Improving competence in emergency mental health triage.

    PubMed

    Broadbent, M; Jarman, H; Berk, M

    2002-07-01

    The Emergency Department is an important contact point for people with mental health problems (Tobin et al. 1999, p. 2). The Barwon Health Emergency Department is no exception. Approximately 1000 clients per year, or 2.6% of the 38,000 people seen annually in the Barwon Health, Geelong Hospital Emergency Department present with a primary mental health complaint or associated issue. The triage scale used in the Emergency Department contained little guidance for the triage of clients with mental health problems. A triage scale specifically designed to highlight mental health emergencies was implemented and its impact on practice was assessed. Improvements in communication, nurses' confidence in triaging clients with mental health problems and time to intervention by mental health staff were made. This article describes the implementation and evaluation of a mental health triage scale and changes to practice that resulted.

  16. Emerging electrochemical energy conversion and storage technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badwal, Sukhvinder; Giddey, Sarbjit; Munnings, Christopher; Bhatt, Anand; Hollenkamp, Tony

    2014-09-01

    Electrochemical cells and systems play a key role in a wide range of industry sectors. These devices are critical enabling technologies for renewable energy; energy management, conservation and storage; pollution control / monitoring; and greenhouse gas reduction. A large number of electrochemical energy technologies have been developed in the past. These systems continue to be optimized in terms of cost, life time and performance, leading to their continued expansion into existing and emerging market sectors. The more established technologies such as deep-cycle batteries and sensors are being joined by emerging technologies such as fuel cells, large format lithium-ion batteries, electrochemical reactors; ion transport membranes and supercapacitors. This growing demand (multi billion dollars) for electrochemical energy systems along with the increasing maturity of a number of technologies is having a significant effect on the global research and development effort which is increasing in both in size and depth. A number of new technologies, which will have substantial impact on the environment and the way we produce and utilize energy, are under development. This paper presents an overview of several emerging electrochemical energy technologies along with a discussion some of the key technical challenges.

  17. Emerging electrochemical energy conversion and storage technologies.

    PubMed

    Badwal, Sukhvinder P S; Giddey, Sarbjit S; Munnings, Christopher; Bhatt, Anand I; Hollenkamp, Anthony F

    2014-01-01

    Electrochemical cells and systems play a key role in a wide range of industry sectors. These devices are critical enabling technologies for renewable energy; energy management, conservation, and storage; pollution control/monitoring; and greenhouse gas reduction. A large number of electrochemical energy technologies have been developed in the past. These systems continue to be optimized in terms of cost, life time, and performance, leading to their continued expansion into existing and emerging market sectors. The more established technologies such as deep-cycle batteries and sensors are being joined by emerging technologies such as fuel cells, large format lithium-ion batteries, electrochemical reactors; ion transport membranes and supercapacitors. This growing demand (multi billion dollars) for electrochemical energy systems along with the increasing maturity of a number of technologies is having a significant effect on the global research and development effort which is increasing in both in size and depth. A number of new technologies, which will have substantial impact on the environment and the way we produce and utilize energy, are under development. This paper presents an overview of several emerging electrochemical energy technologies along with a discussion some of the key technical challenges.

  18. Emerging electrochemical energy conversion and storage technologies

    PubMed Central

    Badwal, Sukhvinder P. S.; Giddey, Sarbjit S.; Munnings, Christopher; Bhatt, Anand I.; Hollenkamp, Anthony F.

    2014-01-01

    Electrochemical cells and systems play a key role in a wide range of industry sectors. These devices are critical enabling technologies for renewable energy; energy management, conservation, and storage; pollution control/monitoring; and greenhouse gas reduction. A large number of electrochemical energy technologies have been developed in the past. These systems continue to be optimized in terms of cost, life time, and performance, leading to their continued expansion into existing and emerging market sectors. The more established technologies such as deep-cycle batteries and sensors are being joined by emerging technologies such as fuel cells, large format lithium-ion batteries, electrochemical reactors; ion transport membranes and supercapacitors. This growing demand (multi billion dollars) for electrochemical energy systems along with the increasing maturity of a number of technologies is having a significant effect on the global research and development effort which is increasing in both in size and depth. A number of new technologies, which will have substantial impact on the environment and the way we produce and utilize energy, are under development. This paper presents an overview of several emerging electrochemical energy technologies along with a discussion some of the key technical challenges. PMID:25309898

  19. Innovation for maintenance technology improvements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shives, T. R. (Editor); Willard, W. A. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    A group of 34 submitted entries (32 papers and 2 abstracts) from the 33rd meeting of the Mechanical Failures Prevention Group whose subject was maintenance technology improvement through innovation. Areas of special emphasis included maintenance concepts, maintenance analysis systems, improved maintenance processes, innovative maintenance diagnostics and maintenance indicators, and technology improvements for power plant applications.

  20. Nanotechnology risk perceptions and communication: emerging technologies, emerging challenges.

    PubMed

    Pidgeon, Nick; Harthorn, Barbara; Satterfield, Terre

    2011-11-01

    Nanotechnology involves the fabrication, manipulation, and control of materials at the atomic level and may also bring novel uncertainties and risks. Potential parallels with other controversial technologies mean there is a need to develop a comprehensive understanding of processes of public perception of nanotechnology uncertainties, risks, and benefits, alongside related communication issues. Study of perceptions, at so early a stage in the development trajectory of a technology, is probably unique in the risk perception and communication field. As such it also brings new methodological and conceptual challenges. These include: dealing with the inherent diversity of the nanotechnology field itself; the unfamiliar and intangible nature of the concept, with few analogies to anchor mental models or risk perceptions; and the ethical and value questions underlying many nanotechnology debates. Utilizing the lens of social amplification of risk, and drawing upon the various contributions to this special issue of Risk Analysis on Nanotechnology Risk Perceptions and Communication, nanotechnology may at present be an attenuated hazard. The generic idea of "upstream public engagement" for emerging technologies such as nanotechnology is also discussed, alongside its importance for future work with emerging technologies in the risk communication field.

  1. Key Emerging Technologies for Postsecondary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Laurence F.; Levine, Alan; Smith, Rachel S.; Haywood, Keene

    2010-01-01

    The annual "Horizon Report" describes the continuing work of the New Media Consortium's Horizon Project, a qualitative research project established in 2002 that identifies and describes emerging technologies likely to have a large impact on teaching, learning, or creative inquiry on college and university campuses within the next five years. The…

  2. Emerging Materials Technologies That Matter to Manufacturers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, Ajay K.

    2015-01-01

    A brief overview of emerging materials technologies. Exploring the weight reduction benefit of replacing Carbon Fiber with Carbon Nanotube (CNT) in Polymer Composites. Review of the benign purification method developed for CNT sheets. The future of manufacturing will include the integration of computational material design and big data analytics, along with Nanomaterials as building blocks.

  3. Key Emerging Technologies for Postsecondary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Laurence F.; Levine, Alan; Smith, Rachel S.; Haywood, Keene

    2010-01-01

    The annual "Horizon Report" describes the continuing work of the New Media Consortium's Horizon Project, a qualitative research project established in 2002 that identifies and describes emerging technologies likely to have a large impact on teaching, learning, or creative inquiry on college and university campuses within the next five years. This…

  4. Energy Efficiency: Information Sources for New and Emerging Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, Steven A.

    2007-12-31

    The purpose of this article is to share a list of useful organizations that provide reliable information on new and emerging energy-efficient technologies based on research and experience. Experienced energy managers may use the information provided by these organizations to enhance their knowledge and understanding, thereby improving their energy management programs. The scope is limited to publicly-available and open-membership organizations that deal with new and emerging, energy-efficient technologies, strategies, and products. The sources identified should not be considered exhaustive but rather a first step “go to” list suggested by the author when searching for useful information on new and emerging energy-efficient technologies.

  5. Emerging technologies and their impact on disability.

    PubMed

    Wise, Paul H

    2012-01-01

    Technological innovation is transforming the prevalence and functional impact of child disability, the scale of social disparities in child disability, and perhaps the essential meaning of disability in an increasingly technology-dominated world. In this article, Paul Wise investigates several specific facets of this transformation. He begins by showing how technological change influences the definition of disability, noting that all technology attempts to address some deficiency in human capacity or in the human condition. Wise then looks at the impact of technology on childhood disabilities. Technical improvements in the physical environment, such as better housing, safer roads, and poison-prevention packaging, have significantly reduced childhood injury and disability. Other technological breakthroughs, such as those that identify genetic disorders that may lead to pregnancy termination, raise difficult moral and ethical issues. Technologies that identify potential health risks are also problematic in the absence of any efficient treatment. Wise stresses the imbalance in the existing health care delivery system, which is geared toward treating childhood physical illnesses that are declining in prevalence at a time when mental and emotional conditions, many of which are not yet well understood, are on the rise. This mismatch, Wise says, poses complex challenges to caring for disabled children, particularly in providing them with highly coordinated and integrated systems of care. Technology can also widen social disparities in health care for people, including children with disabilities. As Wise observes, efficacy--the ability of a technology to change health outcomes--is key to understanding the relationship of technology to social disparities. As technological innovation enhances efficacy, access to that technology becomes more important. Health outcomes may improve for those who can afford the technology, for example, but not for others. Hence, as efficacy

  6. Emerging technologies and their impact on disability.

    PubMed

    Wise, Paul H

    2012-01-01

    Technological innovation is transforming the prevalence and functional impact of child disability, the scale of social disparities in child disability, and perhaps the essential meaning of disability in an increasingly technology-dominated world. In this article, Paul Wise investigates several specific facets of this transformation. He begins by showing how technological change influences the definition of disability, noting that all technology attempts to address some deficiency in human capacity or in the human condition. Wise then looks at the impact of technology on childhood disabilities. Technical improvements in the physical environment, such as better housing, safer roads, and poison-prevention packaging, have significantly reduced childhood injury and disability. Other technological breakthroughs, such as those that identify genetic disorders that may lead to pregnancy termination, raise difficult moral and ethical issues. Technologies that identify potential health risks are also problematic in the absence of any efficient treatment. Wise stresses the imbalance in the existing health care delivery system, which is geared toward treating childhood physical illnesses that are declining in prevalence at a time when mental and emotional conditions, many of which are not yet well understood, are on the rise. This mismatch, Wise says, poses complex challenges to caring for disabled children, particularly in providing them with highly coordinated and integrated systems of care. Technology can also widen social disparities in health care for people, including children with disabilities. As Wise observes, efficacy--the ability of a technology to change health outcomes--is key to understanding the relationship of technology to social disparities. As technological innovation enhances efficacy, access to that technology becomes more important. Health outcomes may improve for those who can afford the technology, for example, but not for others. Hence, as efficacy

  7. Emerging technologies planning guide, 1993 edition

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-11-01

    Information system technology enhancements during the next five years are expected to provide some of the most significant individual and organization work improvements ever made in the office environment. This guide is an aid to planning these technologies and assessing their roles in improving the effectiveness of Headquarters programs. Their implementation will cost-effectively support Departmental operations and the National Energy Strategy. At the hear of this process is an understanding of the relationship which exists between technology introduction and the planning, budgeting and acquisition process. The 1993 edition of this guide covers the 1993--1997 time frame.

  8. Emerging neural stimulation technologies for bladder dysfunctions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jee Woong; Kim, Daejeong; Yoo, Sangjin; Lee, Hyungsup; Lee, Gu-Haeng; Nam, Yoonkey

    2015-03-01

    In the neural engineering field, physiological dysfunctions are approached by identifying the target nerves and providing artificial stimulation to restore the function. Neural stimulation and recording technologies play a central role in this approach, and various engineering devices and stimulation techniques have become available to the medical community. For bladder control problems, electrical stimulation has been used as one of the treatments, while only a few emerging neurotechnologies have been used to tackle these problems. In this review, we introduce some recent developments in neural stimulation technologies including microelectrode array, closed-loop neural stimulation, optical stimulation, and ultrasound stimulation.

  9. IMPROVED ROOF STABILIZATION TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect

    M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.

    1999-01-01

    Many U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) remediation sites have performed roof repair and roof replacement to stabilize facilities prior to performing deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) activities. This project will review the decision criteria used by these DOE sites, along with the type of repair system used for each different roof type. Based on this information, along with that compiled from roofing experts, a decision-making tool will be generated to aid in selecting the proper roof repair systems. Where appropriate, innovative technologies will be reviewed and applied to the decision-making tool to determine their applicability. Based on the results, applied research and development will be conducted to develop a method to repair these existing roofing systems, while providing protection for the D and D worker in a cost-efficient manner.

  10. The great downside dilemma for risky emerging technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baum, Seth D.

    2014-12-01

    Some emerging technologies promise to significantly improve the human condition, but come with a risk of failure so catastrophic that human civilization may not survive. This article discusses the great downside dilemma posed by the decision of whether or not to use these technologies. The dilemma is: use the technology, and risk the downside of catastrophic failure, or do not use the technology, and suffer through life without it. Historical precedents include the first nuclear weapon test and messaging to extraterrestrial intelligence. Contemporary examples include stratospheric geoengineering, a technology under development in response to global warming, and artificial general intelligence, a technology that could even take over the world. How the dilemma should be resolved depends on the details of each technology’s downside risk and on what the human condition would otherwise be. Meanwhile, other technologies do not pose this dilemma, including sustainable design technologies, nuclear fusion power, and space colonization. Decisions on all of these technologies should be made with the long-term interests of human civilization in mind. This paper is part of a series of papers based on presentations at the Emerging Technologies and the Future of Humanity event held at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences on 17 March 2014.

  11. Emerging Technologies for Assembly of Microscale Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Kavaz, Doga; Demirel, Melik C.; Demirci, Utkan

    2013-01-01

    Assembly of cell encapsulating building blocks (i.e., microscale hydrogels) has significant applications in areas including regenerative medicine, tissue engineering, and cell-based in vitro assays for pharmaceutical research and drug discovery. Inspired by the repeating functional units observed in native tissues and biological systems (e.g., the lobule in liver, the nephron in kidney), assembly technologies aim to generate complex tissue structures by organizing microscale building blocks. Novel assembly technologies enable fabrication of engineered tissue constructs with controlled properties including tunable microarchitectural and predefined compositional features. Recent advances in micro- and nano-scale technologies have enabled engineering of microgel based three dimensional (3D) constructs. There is a need for high-throughput and scalable methods to assemble microscale units with a complex 3D micro-architecture. Emerging assembly methods include novel technologies based on microfluidics, acoustic and magnetic fields, nanotextured surfaces, and surface tension. In this review, we survey emerging microscale hydrogel assembly methods offering rapid, scalable microgel assembly in 3D, and provide future perspectives and discuss potential applications. PMID:23184717

  12. Scientometric methods for identifying emerging technologies

    DOEpatents

    Abercrombie, Robert K; Schlicher, Bob G; Sheldon, Frederick T

    2015-11-03

    Provided is a method of generating a scientometric model that tracks the emergence of an identified technology from initial discovery (via original scientific and conference literature), through critical discoveries (via original scientific, conference literature and patents), transitioning through Technology Readiness Levels (TRLs) and ultimately on to commercial application. During the period of innovation and technology transfer, the impact of scholarly works, patents and on-line web news sources are identified. As trends develop, currency of citations, collaboration indicators, and on-line news patterns are identified. The combinations of four distinct and separate searchable on-line networked sources (i.e., scholarly publications and citation, worldwide patents, news archives, and on-line mapping networks) are assembled to become one collective network (a dataset for analysis of relations). This established network becomes the basis from which to quickly analyze the temporal flow of activity (searchable events) for the example subject domain.

  13. The Virtual Learning Commons: An Emerging Technology for Learning About Emerging Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennington, D. D.; Del Rio, N.; Fierro, C.; Gandara, A.; Garcia, A.; Garza, J.; Giandoni, M.; Ochoa, O.; Padilla, E.; Salamah, S.

    2013-12-01

    The Virtual Learning Commons (VLC), funded by the National Science Foundation Office of Cyberinfrastructure CI-Team Program, is a combination of semantic, visualization, and social media tools that support knowledge sharing and innovation across research disciplines. The explosion of new scientific tools and techniques challenges the ability of researchers to be aware of emerging technologies that might benefit them. Even when aware, it can be difficult to understand enough about emerging technologies to become potential adopters or re-users. Often, emerging technologies have little documentation, especially about the context of their use. The VLC tackles this challenge by providing mechanisms for individuals and groups of researchers to collectively organize Web resources through social bookmarking, and engage each other around those collections in order to a) learn about potentially relevant technologies that are emerging; and b) get feedback from other researchers on innovative ideas and designs. Concurrently, developers of emerging technologies can learn about potential users and the issues they encounter, and they can analyze the impact of their tools on other projects. The VLC aims to support the 'fuzzy front end' of innovation, where novel ideas emerge and there is the greatest potential for impact on research design. It is during the fuzzy front end that conceptual collisions across disciplines and exposure to diverse perspectives provide opportunity for creative thinking that can lead to inventive outcomes. This presentation will discuss the innovation theories that have informed design of the VLC, and hypotheses about the flow of information in virtual settings that can enable the process of innovation. The presentation will include a brief demonstration of key capabilities within the VLC that enable learning about emerging technologies, including the technologies that are presented in this session.

  14. Improving Technology and Engineering Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tech Directions, 2013

    2013-01-01

    Improving Technology and Engineering Education for All Students: A Plan of Action is the theme of this year's International Technology and Engineering Educators Association (ITEEA) annual conference, which meets March 7-9 in Columbus, OH. The theme is aligned with ITEEA's 2012-15 Strategic Plan: Investing in People as Educational Change Agents.…

  15. Characterizing emerging industrial technologies in energy models

    SciTech Connect

    Laitner, John A.; Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina; Hanson, Donald A.

    2003-07-29

    Conservation supply curves are a common tool in economic analysis. As such, they provide an important opportunity to include a non-linear representation of technology and technological change in economy-wide models. Because supply curves are closely related to production isoquants, we explore the possibility of using bottom-up technology assessments to inform top-down representations of energy models of the U.S. economy. Based on a recent report by LBNL and ACEEE on emerging industrial technologies within the United States, we have constructed a supply curve for 54 such technologies for the year 2015. Each of the selected technologies has been assessed with respect to energy efficiency characteristics, likely energy savings by 2015, economics, and environmental performance, as well as needs for further development or implementation of the technology. The technical potential for primary energy savings of the 54 identified technologies is equal to 3.54 Quads, or 8.4 percent of the assume d2015 industrial energy consumption. Based on the supply curve, assuming a discount rate of 15 percent and 2015 prices as forecasted in the Annual Energy Outlook2002, we estimate the economic potential to be 2.66 Quads - or 6.3 percent of the assumed forecast consumption for 2015. In addition, we further estimate how much these industrial technologies might contribute to standard reference case projections, and how much additional energy savings might be available assuming a different mix of policies and incentives. Finally, we review the prospects for integrating the findings of this and similar studies into standard economic models. Although further work needs to be completed to provide the necessary link between supply curves and production isoquants, it is hoped that this link will be a useful starting point for discussion with developers of energy-economic models.

  16. Emerging Technology in Refractive Cataract Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Saraiva, João; Neatrour, Kristin; Waring IV, George O.

    2016-01-01

    Technology in cataract surgery is constantly evolving to meet the goals of both surgeons and patients. Recent major advances in refractive cataract surgery include innovations in preoperative and intraoperative diagnostics, femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery (FLACS), and a new generation of intraocular lenses (IOLs). This paper presents the latest technologies in each of these major categories and discusses how these contributions serve to improve cataract surgery outcomes in a safe, effective, and predictable manner. PMID:27433353

  17. Emerging Technology in Refractive Cataract Surgery.

    PubMed

    Saraiva, João; Neatrour, Kristin; Waring Iv, George O

    2016-01-01

    Technology in cataract surgery is constantly evolving to meet the goals of both surgeons and patients. Recent major advances in refractive cataract surgery include innovations in preoperative and intraoperative diagnostics, femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery (FLACS), and a new generation of intraocular lenses (IOLs). This paper presents the latest technologies in each of these major categories and discusses how these contributions serve to improve cataract surgery outcomes in a safe, effective, and predictable manner. PMID:27433353

  18. Improving transient analysis technology for aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melosh, R. J.; Chargin, Mladen

    1989-01-01

    Aircraft dynamic analyses are demanding of computer simulation capabilities. The modeling complexities of semi-monocoque construction, irregular geometry, high-performance materials, and high-accuracy analysis are present. At issue are the safety of the passengers and the integrity of the structure for a wide variety of flight-operating and emergency conditions. The technology which supports engineering of aircraft structures using computer simulation is examined. Available computer support is briefly described and improvement of accuracy and efficiency are recommended. Improved accuracy of simulation will lead to a more economical structure. Improved efficiency will result in lowering development time and expense.

  19. Can Technology Improve the Quality of Colonoscopy?

    PubMed

    Thirumurthi, Selvi; Ross, William A; Raju, Gottumukkala S

    2016-07-01

    In order for screening colonoscopy to be an effective tool in reducing colon cancer incidence, exams must be performed in a high-quality manner. Quality metrics have been presented by gastroenterology societies and now include higher adenoma detection rate targets than in the past. In many cases, the quality of colonoscopy can often be improved with simple low-cost interventions such as improved procedure technique, implementing split-dose bowel prep, and monitoring individuals' performances. Emerging technology has expanded our field of view and image quality during colonoscopy. We will critically review several technological advances in the context of quality metrics and discuss if technology can really improve the quality of colonoscopy.

  20. Directional navigation improves opportunistic communication for emergencies.

    PubMed

    Kokuti, Andras; Gelenbe, Erol

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel direction based shortest path search algorithm to guide evacuees during an emergency. It uses opportunistic communications (oppcomms) with low-cost wearable mobile nodes that can exchange packets at close range of a few to some tens of meters without help of an infrastructure. The algorithm seeks the shortest path to exits which are safest with regard to a hazard, and is integrated into an autonomous Emergency Support System (ESS) to guide evacuees in a built environment. The algorithm proposed that ESSs are evaluated with the DBES (Distributed Building Evacuation Simulator) by simulating a shopping centre where fire is spreading. The results show that the directional path finding algorithm can offer significant improvements for the evacuees. PMID:25140633

  1. Directional Navigation Improves Opportunistic Communication for Emergencies

    PubMed Central

    Kokuti, Andras.; Gelenbe, Erol.

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel direction based shortest path search algorithm to guide evacuees during an emergency. It uses opportunistic communications (oppcomms) with low-cost wearable mobile nodes that can exchange packets at close range of a few to some tens of meters without help of an infrastructure. The algorithm seeks the shortest path to exits which are safest with regard to a hazard, and is integrated into an autonomous Emergency Support System (ESS) to guide evacuees in a built environment. The algorithm proposed that ESSs are evaluated with the DBES (Distributed Building Evacuation Simulator) by simulating a shopping centre where fire is spreading. The results show that the directional path finding algorithm can offer significant improvements for the evacuees. PMID:25140633

  2. Emerging CFD technologies and aerospace vehicle design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aftosmis, Michael J.

    1995-01-01

    With the recent focus on the needs of design and applications CFD, research groups have begun to address the traditional bottlenecks of grid generation and surface modeling. Now, a host of emerging technologies promise to shortcut or dramatically simplify the simulation process. This paper discusses the current status of these emerging technologies. It will argue that some tools are already available which can have positive impact on portions of the design cycle. However, in most cases, these tools need to be integrated into specific engineering systems and process cycles to be used effectively. The rapidly maturing status of unstructured and Cartesian approaches for inviscid simulations makes suggests the possibility of highly automated Euler-boundary layer simulations with application to loads estimation and even preliminary design. Similarly, technology is available to link block structured mesh generation algorithms with topology libraries to avoid tedious re-meshing of topologically similar configurations. Work in algorithmic based auto-blocking suggests that domain decomposition and point placement operations in multi-block mesh generation may be properly posed as problems in Computational Geometry, and following this approach may lead to robust algorithmic processes for automatic mesh generation.

  3. Sandia technology & entrepreneurs improve Lasik

    ScienceCinema

    Neal, Dan; Turner, Tim

    2016-07-12

    Former Sandian Dan Neal started his company, WaveFront Sciences, based on wavefront sensing metrology technologies licensed from Sandia National Laboratories and by taking advantage of its Entrepreneurial Separation to Transfer Technology (ESTT) program. Abbott Medical Optics since acquired WaveFront and estimates that one million patients have improved the quality of their vision thanks to its products. ESTT is a valuable tool which allows Sandia to transfer technology to the private sector and Sandia employees to leave the Labs in order to start up new technology companies or help expand existing companies.

  4. Sandia technology & entrepreneurs improve Lasik

    SciTech Connect

    Neal, Dan; Turner, Tim

    2013-11-21

    Former Sandian Dan Neal started his company, WaveFront Sciences, based on wavefront sensing metrology technologies licensed from Sandia National Laboratories and by taking advantage of its Entrepreneurial Separation to Transfer Technology (ESTT) program. Abbott Medical Optics since acquired WaveFront and estimates that one million patients have improved the quality of their vision thanks to its products. ESTT is a valuable tool which allows Sandia to transfer technology to the private sector and Sandia employees to leave the Labs in order to start up new technology companies or help expand existing companies.

  5. Overview of emerging nonvolatile memory technologies.

    PubMed

    Meena, Jagan Singh; Sze, Simon Min; Chand, Umesh; Tseng, Tseung-Yuen

    2014-01-01

    Nonvolatile memory technologies in Si-based electronics date back to the 1990s. Ferroelectric field-effect transistor (FeFET) was one of the most promising devices replacing the conventional Flash memory facing physical scaling limitations at those times. A variant of charge storage memory referred to as Flash memory is widely used in consumer electronic products such as cell phones and music players while NAND Flash-based solid-state disks (SSDs) are increasingly displacing hard disk drives as the primary storage device in laptops, desktops, and even data centers. The integration limit of Flash memories is approaching, and many new types of memory to replace conventional Flash memories have been proposed. Emerging memory technologies promise new memories to store more data at less cost than the expensive-to-build silicon chips used by popular consumer gadgets including digital cameras, cell phones and portable music players. They are being investigated and lead to the future as potential alternatives to existing memories in future computing systems. Emerging nonvolatile memory technologies such as magnetic random-access memory (MRAM), spin-transfer torque random-access memory (STT-RAM), ferroelectric random-access memory (FeRAM), phase-change memory (PCM), and resistive random-access memory (RRAM) combine the speed of static random-access memory (SRAM), the density of dynamic random-access memory (DRAM), and the nonvolatility of Flash memory and so become very attractive as another possibility for future memory hierarchies. Many other new classes of emerging memory technologies such as transparent and plastic, three-dimensional (3-D), and quantum dot memory technologies have also gained tremendous popularity in recent years. Subsequently, not an exaggeration to say that computer memory could soon earn the ultimate commercial validation for commercial scale-up and production the cheap plastic knockoff. Therefore, this review is devoted to the rapidly developing new

  6. Overview of emerging nonvolatile memory technologies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Nonvolatile memory technologies in Si-based electronics date back to the 1990s. Ferroelectric field-effect transistor (FeFET) was one of the most promising devices replacing the conventional Flash memory facing physical scaling limitations at those times. A variant of charge storage memory referred to as Flash memory is widely used in consumer electronic products such as cell phones and music players while NAND Flash-based solid-state disks (SSDs) are increasingly displacing hard disk drives as the primary storage device in laptops, desktops, and even data centers. The integration limit of Flash memories is approaching, and many new types of memory to replace conventional Flash memories have been proposed. Emerging memory technologies promise new memories to store more data at less cost than the expensive-to-build silicon chips used by popular consumer gadgets including digital cameras, cell phones and portable music players. They are being investigated and lead to the future as potential alternatives to existing memories in future computing systems. Emerging nonvolatile memory technologies such as magnetic random-access memory (MRAM), spin-transfer torque random-access memory (STT-RAM), ferroelectric random-access memory (FeRAM), phase-change memory (PCM), and resistive random-access memory (RRAM) combine the speed of static random-access memory (SRAM), the density of dynamic random-access memory (DRAM), and the nonvolatility of Flash memory and so become very attractive as another possibility for future memory hierarchies. Many other new classes of emerging memory technologies such as transparent and plastic, three-dimensional (3-D), and quantum dot memory technologies have also gained tremendous popularity in recent years. Subsequently, not an exaggeration to say that computer memory could soon earn the ultimate commercial validation for commercial scale-up and production the cheap plastic knockoff. Therefore, this review is devoted to the rapidly developing new

  7. Emerging technologies in medical applications of minimum volume vitrification

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaohui; Catalano, Paolo N; Gurkan, Umut Atakan; Khimji, Imran; Demirci, Utkan

    2011-01-01

    Cell/tissue biopreservation has broad public health and socio-economic impact affecting millions of lives. Cryopreservation technologies provide an efficient way to preserve cells and tissues targeting the clinic for applications including reproductive medicine and organ transplantation. Among these technologies, vitrification has displayed significant improvement in post-thaw cell viability and function by eliminating harmful effects of ice crystal formation compared to the traditional slow freezing methods. However, high cryoprotectant agent concentrations are required, which induces toxicity and osmotic stress to cells and tissues. It has been shown that vitrification using small sample volumes (i.e., <1 μl) significantly increases cooling rates and hence reduces the required cryoprotectant agent levels. Recently, emerging nano- and micro-scale technologies have shown potential to manipulate picoliter to nanoliter sample sizes. Therefore, the synergistic integration of nanoscale technologies with cryogenics has the potential to improve biopreservation methods. PMID:21955080

  8. Emerging critical issues and technology needs

    SciTech Connect

    Arvizu, D.E.; Baker, A.B.

    1997-08-01

    In April 1997, a panel of experts representing private sector electricity companies met to identify emerging critical issues in the electricity sector and to ascertain how technology can help with these issues. Sandia National laboratories sponsored and conducted the meeting. The panel determined the top eight issues that will be critically important over the next five to ten years, when the electricity sector is expected to undergo a major transition in its market and the regulations that govern it. This report presents a discussion of the selection and ranking of critical issues identified by the panel and the research priorities that were identified.

  9. Emerging technologies in bioremediation: constraints and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Rayu, Smriti; Karpouzas, Dimitrios G; Singh, Brajesh K

    2012-11-01

    Intensive industrialisation, inadequate disposal, large-scale manufacturing activities and leaks of organic compounds have resulted in long-term persistent sources of contamination of soil and groundwater. This is a major environmental, policy and health issue because of adverse effects of contaminants on humans and ecosystems. Current technologies for remediation of contaminated sites include chemical and physical remediation, incineration and bioremediation. With recent advancements, bioremediation offers an environmentally friendly, economically viable and socially acceptable option to remove contaminants from the environment. Three main approaches of bioremediation include use of microbes, plants and enzymatic remediation. All three approaches have been used with some success but are limited by various confounding factors. In this paper, we provide a brief overview on the approaches, their limitations and highlights emerging technologies that have potential to revolutionise the enzymatic and plant-based bioremediation approaches.

  10. Emerging technologies in arthroplasty: additive manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Samik; Kulesha, Gene; Kester, Mark; Mont, Michael A

    2014-06-01

    Additive manufacturing is an industrial technology whereby three-dimensional visual computer models are fabricated into physical components by selectively curing, depositing, or consolidating various materials in consecutive layers. Although initially developed for production of simulated models, the technology has undergone vast improvements and is currently increasingly being used for the production of end-use components in various aerospace, automotive, and biomedical specialties. The ability of this technology to be used for the manufacture of solid-mesh-foam monolithic and coated components of complex geometries previously considered unmanufacturable has attracted the attention of implant manufacturers, bioengineers, and orthopedic surgeons. Currently, there is a paucity of reports describing this fabrication method in the orthopedic literature. Therefore, we aimed to briefly describe this technology, some of the applications in other orthopedic subspecialties, its present use in hip and knee arthroplasty, and concerns with the present form of the technology. As there are few reports of clinical trials presently available, the true benefits of this technology can only be realized when studies evaluating the clinical and radiographic outcomes of cementless implants manufactured with additive manufacturing report durable fixation, less stress shielding, and better implant survivorship. Nevertheless, the authors believe that this technology holds great promise and may potentially change the conventional methods of casting, machining, and tooling for implant manufacturing in the future. PMID:24764230

  11. Emerging technologies in arthroplasty: additive manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Samik; Kulesha, Gene; Kester, Mark; Mont, Michael A

    2014-06-01

    Additive manufacturing is an industrial technology whereby three-dimensional visual computer models are fabricated into physical components by selectively curing, depositing, or consolidating various materials in consecutive layers. Although initially developed for production of simulated models, the technology has undergone vast improvements and is currently increasingly being used for the production of end-use components in various aerospace, automotive, and biomedical specialties. The ability of this technology to be used for the manufacture of solid-mesh-foam monolithic and coated components of complex geometries previously considered unmanufacturable has attracted the attention of implant manufacturers, bioengineers, and orthopedic surgeons. Currently, there is a paucity of reports describing this fabrication method in the orthopedic literature. Therefore, we aimed to briefly describe this technology, some of the applications in other orthopedic subspecialties, its present use in hip and knee arthroplasty, and concerns with the present form of the technology. As there are few reports of clinical trials presently available, the true benefits of this technology can only be realized when studies evaluating the clinical and radiographic outcomes of cementless implants manufactured with additive manufacturing report durable fixation, less stress shielding, and better implant survivorship. Nevertheless, the authors believe that this technology holds great promise and may potentially change the conventional methods of casting, machining, and tooling for implant manufacturing in the future.

  12. The Emergence of Personalized Health Technology

    PubMed Central

    Christie, Gillian Pepall

    2016-01-01

    Personalized health technology is a noisy new entrant to the health space, yet to make a significant impact on population health but seemingly teeming with potential. Devices including wearable fitness trackers and healthy-living apps are designed to help users quantify and improve their health behaviors. Although the ethical issues surrounding data privacy have received much attention, little is being said about the impact on socioeconomic health inequalities. Populations who stand to benefit the most from these technologies are unable to afford, access, or use them. This paper outlines the negative impact that these technologies will have on inequalities unless their user base can be radically extended to include vulnerable populations. Frugal innovation and public–private partnership are discussed as the major means for reaching this end. PMID:27165944

  13. Selecting a process paradigm for an emergent disruptive technology: Evidence from the emerging microsystems technology base

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.H.; Walsh, S.T.

    1998-08-01

    Emergent technologies often suffer from a lack of an installed manufacturing base and an obvious dominant manufacturing technique. Firms which base their search for competitive advantage on emergent disruptive technologies must make hard production choices and endure major manufacturing discontinuities. The authors as well as many other firms, are now facing these challenges with the embrace of microsystems technologies. They add to the literature by providing a set of criteria for firms investing in emergent disruptive technologies. Sandia has long been associated as a pioneer in the development of new manufacturing techniques. Microsystems is just the current in a long line of manufacturing technologies that have been considered for mission critical system applications. The authors as well as others, have had to make the hard choice of investing in specific microsystems manufacturing techniques. Important considerations in the technique choice include: the existing internal manufacturing bases, commonality with existing commercial manufacturing infrastructure, current and projected critical performance characteristics, learning curves, the promise to add new but un-thought-of functionally to existing systems, and the anticipated ability to qualify devices built from the technique for mission critical applications.

  14. Electroactive polymers: an emerging technology for MEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornbluh, Roy D.; Pelrine, Ron; Prahlad, Harsha; Heydt, Richard

    2004-01-01

    Electroactive polymer (EAP) transducers are an emerging technology with many features that are desirable for MEMS devices. These advantages include simple fabrication in a variety of size scales, and ruggedness due to their inherent flexibility. Dielectric elastomer, a type of EAP transducer that couples the deformation of a rubbery polymer film to an applied electric field, shows particular promise because it can produce high strain and energy density, high efficiency and fast speed of response, and inherent environmental tolerance. A variety of proof-of-principle dielectric elastomer actuator configurations have been demonstrated at the small size scales needed for MEMS devices, including rolled "artificial muscle" actuators for insect-inspired microrobots, framed and bending beam actuators for efficient opto-mechanical switches, diaphragm and enhanced-thickness-mode actuators for microfluidic pumps, and valves and arrays of diaphragms for haptic displays. Several challenges remain for EAPs, including integration with driving electronics, and operational lifetime.

  15. Emerging Technologies for the Clinical Microbiology Laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Buchan, Blake W.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY In this review we examine the literature related to emerging technologies that will help to reshape the clinical microbiology laboratory. These topics include nucleic acid amplification tests such as isothermal and point-of-care molecular diagnostics, multiplexed panels for syndromic diagnosis, digital PCR, next-generation sequencing, and automation of molecular tests. We also review matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight (MALDI-TOF) and electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry methods and their role in identification of microorganisms. Lastly, we review the shift to liquid-based microbiology and the integration of partial and full laboratory automation that are beginning to impact the clinical microbiology laboratory. PMID:25278575

  16. Emerging Technologies: Biosecurity and Consequence Management Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, Dana; Nordmann, Brian

    The natural outbreaks of disease and pandemics are transnational threats that create international challenges when detection and containment are not timely due to scarce human and material resources. Whether the cause of those outbreaks is natural or intentional in origin, the main goal of consequence management operations is to save lives. The consequence management process is a continuum of inter-connected phases such as planning, preparation, response, and recovery. The rapid advances of life sciences and the emergence of dual-use technologies such as synthetic biology and nanotechnology pose additional challenges in terms of planning for the unknown potential threats whether they may be synthetic microorganisms with unpredictable dissemination patterns or nanoscale-manipulated biological agents evading current detection capabilities. The US National Strategy for Countering Biological Threats is emphasizing prevention while continuing to support the national preparedness goals and response/recovery capabilities. The recent policies, guidelines, and recommendations on overhauling the biological risk management in the United States are a proactive stance to a rapidly changing global environment. They include optimization of the current oversight frameworks and active engagement of the industry and academia in order to reduce the risk that individuals with ill intent may exploit the commercial application of nucleic acid synthesis technology to access genetic material derived from or by encoding Biological Select Agents or Toxins. We are also actively seeking to increase our knowledge of health effects of various types of nanomaterials, and how to assess, control, and prevent harmful exposure, taking into consideration the numerous gaps that currently exist with regard to the distinct behavior of nanoparticles compared to the same chemical or material at "macro-scale". Fundamentally, a biological incident, whether it is of natural, accidental, or deliberate origin

  17. Emerging technology in the Soviet Union: Selected papers with analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    Various papers on emerging Soviet technology are presented. The topics addressed are: economic considerations of emerging technology; aviation, motor, and space designs; new materials and components for IR lasers; electroslag technology for smelting high quality metals from scrap and for preparing ingots with differential properties; computer design and application in the USSR; advances in tribology: slideway design and unloading systems; analysis of emerging Soviet technology.

  18. Emerging technologies for iron and steelmaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, C. P.; Fruehan, R. J.

    2001-10-01

    The iron and steel industry has undergone a technological revolution in the last 40 years. In a relatively short time, the North American industry has observed the complete disappearance of basic open hearth processing, as well as the wide spread adoption of continuous casting and the near complete shift of long product production to the electric arc furnace sector. These and other developments have dramatically affected the way steel is made, the price, quality and range of products generated, and changed the basic structure of the industry. The same trends can be observed in other industrialized nations and are reflected in the global industry as well. Competitive forces and market globalization will continue to drive the development and adoption of new iron and steelmaking technologies well into the 21st century. Industry response to specific local and global technology drivers will likely result in both incremental improvements in existing technologies, and in major developments in several key areas including direct iron making and near net shape casting.

  19. Integration of multi-technology on oil spill emergency preparedness.

    PubMed

    Liao, Zhenliang; Hannam, Phillip M; Xia, Xiaowei; Zhao, Tingting

    2012-10-01

    This paper focuses on the integration of technologies including Case-Based Reasoning (CBR), Genetic Algorithm (GA) and Artificial Neural Network (ANN) for establishing emergency preparedness for oil spill accidents. In CBR, the Frame method is used to define case representation, and the HEOM (Heterogeneous Euclidean-Overlap Metric) is improved to define the similarity of case properties. In GA, we introduce an Improved Genetic Algorithm (IGA) that achieves case adaptation, in which technologies include the Multi-Parameter Cascade Code method, the Small Section method for generation of an initial population, the Multi-Factor Integrated Fitness Function, and Niche technology for genetic operations including selection, crossover, and mutation. In ANN, a modified back-propagation algorithm is employed to train the algorithm to quickly improve system preparedness. Through the analysis of 32 fabricated oil spill cases, an oil spill emergency preparedness system based on the integration of CBR, GA and ANN is introduced. In particular, the development of ANN is presented and analyzed. The paper also discusses the efficacy of our integration approach.

  20. Emerging technologies in hemostasis diagnostics: a report from the Australasian Society of Thrombosis and Haemostasis Emerging Technologies Group.

    PubMed

    Adams, Murray; Ward, Chris; Thom, Jim; Bianchi, Alessandra; Perrin, Emma; Coghlan, Douglas; Smith, Mark

    2007-04-01

    Technology in hemostasis laboratories has evolved enormously during the last 30 years. Although many scientists and clinicians will remember the traditional tilt-tube techniques to screen for coagulation abnormalities and to monitor anticoagulant therapy, the hemostasis laboratory today uses a variety of modern technologies. These include flow cytometry, chromogenic assays, molecular typing (e.g., polymerase chain reaction), immunologic assays (e.g., enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays), functional assays of specific coagulation proteins, and platelet function analyzers. Although these advances in technology have resulted in greater capability, productivity, sensitivity, specificity, and ultimately, improvement in the clinical care of patients, controversies and limitations remain. This article highlights new and emerging technologies in hemostasis and discusses whether they have improved or are likely to improve laboratory diagnostics by specifically addressing the following: (1) Can new technologies help predict likelihood of thrombosis recurrence? (2) Has an understanding of the role of A Disintegrin-like And Metalloprotease with Thrombo Spondin type 1 motifs (ADAMTS13) in microangiopathy resulted in improved diagnostic methods for this disorder? (3) Does thrombelastography allow better definition of bleeding risk than conventional hemostasis assays, especially in settings of acute hemostatic pathology?

  1. Emerging desalination technologies for water treatment: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Subramani, Arun; Jacangelo, Joseph G

    2015-05-15

    In this paper, a review of emerging desalination technologies is presented. Several technologies for desalination of municipal and industrial wastewater have been proposed and evaluated, but only certain technologies have been commercialized or are close to commercialization. This review consists of membrane-based, thermal-based and alternative technologies. Membranes based on incorporation of nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes or graphene-based ones show promise as innovative desalination technologies with superior performance in terms of water permeability and salt rejection. However, only nanocomposite membranes have been commercialized while others are still under fundamental developmental stages. Among the thermal-based technologies, membrane distillation and adsorption desalination show the most promise for enhanced performance with the availability of a waste heat source. Several alternative technologies have also been developed recently; those based on capacitive deionization have shown considerable improvements in their salt removal capacity and feed water recovery. In the same category, microbial desalination cells have been shown to desalinate high salinity water without any external energy source, but to date, scale up of the process has not been methodically evaluated. In this paper, advantages and drawbacks of each technology is discussed along with a comparison of performance, water quality and energy consumption.

  2. Emerging desalination technologies for water treatment: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Subramani, Arun; Jacangelo, Joseph G

    2015-05-15

    In this paper, a review of emerging desalination technologies is presented. Several technologies for desalination of municipal and industrial wastewater have been proposed and evaluated, but only certain technologies have been commercialized or are close to commercialization. This review consists of membrane-based, thermal-based and alternative technologies. Membranes based on incorporation of nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes or graphene-based ones show promise as innovative desalination technologies with superior performance in terms of water permeability and salt rejection. However, only nanocomposite membranes have been commercialized while others are still under fundamental developmental stages. Among the thermal-based technologies, membrane distillation and adsorption desalination show the most promise for enhanced performance with the availability of a waste heat source. Several alternative technologies have also been developed recently; those based on capacitive deionization have shown considerable improvements in their salt removal capacity and feed water recovery. In the same category, microbial desalination cells have been shown to desalinate high salinity water without any external energy source, but to date, scale up of the process has not been methodically evaluated. In this paper, advantages and drawbacks of each technology is discussed along with a comparison of performance, water quality and energy consumption. PMID:25770440

  3. Emerging electro-optical technologies for defense applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkateswarlu, Ronda; Ser, W.; Er, Meng H.; Chan, Philip

    1999-11-01

    Technological breakthroughs in the field of imaging and non- imaging sensor sand the related signal processors helped the military users to achieve 'force multiplication'. Present day 'smart-weapon systems' are being converted to 'brilliant-weapon systems' to bridge the gap until the most potent new 'fourth generation systems' come on line based on nanotechnology. The recent military tactics have evolved to take advantage of ever improving technologies to improve the quality and performance over time. The drive behind these technologies is to get a first-pass-mission-success against the target with negligible collateral damage, protecting property and the lives of non-combatants. These technologies revolve around getting target information, detection, designation, guidance, aim-point selection, and mission accomplishment. The effectiveness of these technologies is amply demonstrated during recent wars. This paper brings out the emerging trends in visible/IR/radar smart-sensors and the related signal processing technologies that lead to brilliant guided weapon systems. The purpose of this paper is to give an overview to the readers about futuristic systems. This paper also addresses various system configurations including sensor-fusion.

  4. Printing Technology and the Emergence of College Physics Textbooks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zebrowski, Ernest, Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Traces the effects the relationship between printing technology, and publishing have had on the historical emergence of college physics textbooks. Printing technology before 1880, growth of the book publishing industry, emergence of college physics textbooks, linotype machines, printing technology, and textbook pedagogy are among the areas…

  5. Emerging Technologies: Applications and Implications for School Library Media Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craver, Kathleen W.

    This paper examines emerging information technologies and their implications for school library media centers. Because of the fluctuating situation regarding new innovations, only emerging technologies that specialists believe will occur within the next 5 to 10 years are discussed. For each technology mentioned, a brief description is given…

  6. Emerging Technologies as Cognitive Tools for Authentic Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrington, Jan; Parker, Jenni

    2013-01-01

    Employing emerging technologies in learning is becoming increasingly important as a means to support the development of digital media literacy. Using a theoretical framework of authentic learning and technology as cognitive tools, this paper examined student responses to the infusion of emerging technologies in a large first year teacher education…

  7. Emergency Lighting Technology Evolves To Save Lives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregory, Dennis

    2001-01-01

    Explores the benefits of including high-brightness Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) for emergency systems and its use in residence halls. LED emergency lighting options and their qualifications are also highlighted.(GR)

  8. Mobile Emergency Response Water Treatment Technology Results

    EPA Science Inventory

    When natural disasters like hurricanes, floods and earthquakes occur, safe drinking water can be compromised, limited or unavailable. Under such situations, communities have emergency response plans. One of many options for providing safe drinking water during emergency situati...

  9. Current and Emerging Technology Approaches in Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Conley, Yvette P.; Biesecker, Leslie G.; Gonsalves, Stephen; Merkle, Carrie J.; Kirk, Maggie; Aouizerat, Bradley E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To introduce current and emerging approaches that are being utilized in the field of genomics so the reader can conceptually evaluate the literature and appreciate how these approaches are advancing our understanding of health-related issues. Organizing Construct Each approach is described and includes information related to how it is advancing research, its potential clinical utility, exemplars of current uses, challenges related to technologies used for these approaches, and when appropriate information related to understanding the evidence base for clinical utilization of each approach is provided. Web-based resources are included for the reader who would like more in-depth information and to provide opportunity to stay up to date with these approaches and their utility. Conclusions The chosen approaches– genome sequencing, genome-wide association studies, epigenomics, and gene expression– are extremely valuable approaches for collecting research data to help us better understand the pathophysiology of a variety of health-related conditions, but they are also gaining in utility for clinical assessment and testing purposes. Clinical Relevance Our increased understanding of the molecular underpinnings of disease will assist with better development of screening tests, diagnostic tests, tests that allow us to prognosticate, tests that allow for individualized treatments, and tests to facilitate post-treatment surveillance. PMID:23294727

  10. Emerging technologies in microguidance and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, Marc S.

    1993-01-01

    Employing recent advances in microfabrication, the Charles Stark Draper Laboratory has developed inertial guidance instruments of very small size and low cost. Microfabrication employs the batch processing techniques of solid state electronics, such as photolithography, diffusion, and etching, to carve mechanical parts. Within a few years, microfabricated gyroscopes should perform in the 10 to 100 deg/h range. Microfabricated accelerometers have demonstrated performance in the 50 to 500 microgravity range. These instruments will result in not only the redesign of conventional military products, but also new applications that could not exist without small, inexpensive sensors and computing. Draper's microfabricated accelerometers and gyroscopes will be described and test results summarized. Associated electronics and control issues will also be addressed. Gimballed, vibrating gyroscopes and force rebalance accelerometers constructed from bulk silicon, polysilicon surface-machined tuning fork gyroscopes, and quartz resonant accelerometers and gyroscopes are examined. Draper is pursuing several types of devices for the following reasons: to address wide ranges of performance, to realize construction in a flat pack, and to lessen the risks associated with emerging technologies.

  11. Emerging Technology for Writing Instruction: New Directions for Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pan, Alex C.; Zbikowski, John M.

    1997-01-01

    Explores teachers' perceptions about computer use in writing instruction. Topics include emerging computer technology, including telecommunications and hypermedia; evolution of software, including word processing, desktop publishing, and multimedia; issues related to implementing technology, including the teacher's role; and suggested learning…

  12. Emerging Technologies: Small Satellite and Associated TPED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zitz, R.

    2014-09-01

    The 2010 National Space Policy directs the U.S. space community, comprised of the Department of Defense, Intelligence Community, Military Services and NASA to examine our nation's ability to conduct space-based ISR and communications even during a period of peer state and near peer state attacks intended to deny us our advantages we accrue from our use of space systems. DOD and the ICs past experience is largely one of building small numbers of extraordinarily capable and expensive (exquisite) satellites for communications and ISR. As potential adversaries continue to develop cyber-attack capabilities and have demonstrated an ability to kinetically attack spacecraft, the vulnerability of our architecture is now a serious concern. In addition, the sluggish U.S. economy, the draw down and pull back from a decade of combat operations, and other factors have combined to force a significant reduction in DOD and IC spending over the coming decade(s). Simultaneously, DOD and the IC have a growing awareness that the long lead times and long mission duration of the exquisite space assets can lead to fielding technologies that become obsolete and mission limiting. Some DOD and IC leaders are now examining alternative architectures to provide lower cost, flexible, more diverse and rapidly launchable space systems. Government leaders are considering commercially hosted payloads in geosynchronous orbits and smaller, lower cost, free flying government and commercial satellites in low earth orbits. Additional changes to the ground tasking, processing, exploitation and dissemination (TPED) systems would ensure small satellites have end-to-end mission capability and meet emerging needs such as ease of tasking, multi-INT processing, and more advanced distribution mechanisms (e.g., to users on the move). Today, a majority of agency leaders and their subordinate program managers remain convinced that only large, expensive systems can truly answer requirements and provide reliable

  13. Emergency Information Improvement Act of 2013

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Higgins, Brian [D-NY-26

    2013-07-10

    07/11/2013 Referred to the Subcommittee on Economic Development, Public Buildings and Emergency Management. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  14. Teachers Enacting a Technology-Rich Curriculum for Emergent Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cviko, Amina; McKenney, Susan; Voogt, Joke

    2012-01-01

    PictoPal is the name of a technology-rich curriculum with a focus on emergent literacy of Dutch kindergarteners. A case study design was used to examine teacher technology integration within PictoPal along with their perceptions about teaching/learning, technology and technology-based innovations. Observations were undertaken on pupils' engagement…

  15. "Handy Manny" and the Emergent Literacy Technology Toolkit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hourcade, Jack J.; Parette, Howard P., Jr.; Boeckmann, Nichole; Blum, Craig

    2010-01-01

    This paper outlines the use of a technology toolkit to support emergent literacy curriculum and instruction in early childhood education settings. Components of the toolkit include hardware and software that can facilitate key emergent literacy skills. Implementation of the comprehensive technology toolkit enhances the development of these…

  16. Key Emerging Technologies for Elementary and Secondary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Laurence F.; Levine, Alan; Smith, Rachel S.; Haywood, Keene

    2010-01-01

    The "Horizon Report" series is the most visible outcome of the New Media Consortium's Horizon Project, an ongoing research effort that identifies and describes emerging technologies likely to have a large impact on teaching, learning, research, or creative expression within education around the globe. The report examines emerging technologies for…

  17. Key Emerging Technologies for Elementary and Secondary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Laurence F.; Levine, Alan; Smith, Rachel S.; Haywood, Keene

    2010-01-01

    The Horizon Report series is the most visible outcome of the New Media Consortium's Horizon Project, an ongoing research effort that identifies and describes emerging technologies likely to have a large impact on teaching, learning, research, or creative expression within education around the globe. The report examines emerging technologies for…

  18. The Photon Haystack and Emerging Radiation Detection Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Runkle, Robert C.; Smith, Leon E.; Peurrung, Anthony J.

    2009-09-15

    The resources devoted to interdicting special nuclear materials have increased considerably over the last several years in step with growing efforts to counter nuclear proliferation and nuclear terrorism. This changing landscape has led to a great deal of current research and development that aims to improve the effectiveness of technology now deployed worldwide. The interdiction of special nuclear materials is most commonly addressed by detecting and characterizing emitted gamma rays, but modest signature emissions can be obscured by attenuating material and must be differentiated from large and highly variable environmental background. While this makes gamma-ray detection of special nuclear materials a daunting technical challenge, a host of new detection technologies are now emerging. We thus review special nuclear material signatures, the physics of detection approaches, and detection performance metrics. The use of benchmark materials aids our discussion and comparison of detection methods.

  19. Microfluidic chip-based technologies: emerging platforms for cancer diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The development of early and personalized diagnostic protocols is considered the most promising avenue to decrease mortality from cancer and improve outcome. The emerging microfluidic-based analyzing platforms hold high promises to fulfill high-throughput and high-precision screening with reduced equipment cost and low analysis time, as compared to traditional bulky counterparts in bench-top laboratories. This article overviewed the potential applications of microfluidic technologies for detection and monitoring of cancer through nucleic acid and protein biomarker analysis. The implications of the technologies in cancer cytology that can provide functional personalized diagnosis were highlighted. Finally, the future niches for using microfluidic-based systems in tumor screening were briefly discussed. PMID:24070124

  20. Emerging technologies in extracellular vesicle-based molecular diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Jia, Shidong; Zocco, Davide; Samuels, Michael L; Chou, Michael F; Chammas, Roger; Skog, Johan; Zarovni, Natasa; Momen-Heravi, Fatemeh; Kuo, Winston Patrick

    2014-04-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs), including exosomes and microvesicles, have been shown to carry a variety of biomacromolecules including mRNA, microRNA and other non-coding RNAs. Within the past 5 years, EVs have emerged as a promising minimally invasive novel source of material for molecular diagnostics. Although EVs can be easily identified and collected from biological fluids, further research and proper validation is needed in order for them to be useful in the clinical setting. In addition, innovative and more efficient means of nucleic acid profiling are needed to facilitate investigations into the cellular and molecular mechanisms of EV function and to establish their potential as useful clinical biomarkers and therapeutic tools. In this article, we provide an overview of recent technological improvements in both upstream EV isolation and downstream analytical technologies, including digital PCR and next generation sequencing, highlighting future prospects for EV-based molecular diagnostics.

  1. Emerging Technologies for Environmental Remediation: Integrating Data and Judgment.

    PubMed

    Bates, Matthew E; Grieger, Khara D; Trump, Benjamin D; Keisler, Jeffrey M; Plourde, Kenton J; Linkov, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Emerging technologies present significant challenges to researchers, decision-makers, industry professionals, and other stakeholder groups due to the lack of quantitative risk, benefit, and cost data associated with their use. Multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) can support early decisions for emerging technologies when data is too sparse or uncertain for traditional risk assessment. It does this by integrating expert judgment with available quantitative and qualitative inputs across multiple criteria to provide relative technology scores. Here, an MCDA framework provides preliminary insights on the suitability of emerging technologies for environmental remediation by comparing nanotechnology and synthetic biology to conventional remediation methods. Subject matter experts provided judgments regarding the importance of criteria used in the evaluations and scored the technologies with respect to those criteria. The results indicate that synthetic biology may be preferred over nanotechnology and conventional methods for high expected benefits and low deployment costs but that conventional technology may be preferred over emerging technologies for reduced risks and development costs. In the absence of field data regarding the risks, benefits, and costs of emerging technologies, structuring evidence-based expert judgment through a weighted hierarchy of topical questions may be helpful to inform preliminary risk governance and guide emerging technology development and policy.

  2. Emerging Technologies for Environmental Remediation: Integrating Data and Judgment.

    PubMed

    Bates, Matthew E; Grieger, Khara D; Trump, Benjamin D; Keisler, Jeffrey M; Plourde, Kenton J; Linkov, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Emerging technologies present significant challenges to researchers, decision-makers, industry professionals, and other stakeholder groups due to the lack of quantitative risk, benefit, and cost data associated with their use. Multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) can support early decisions for emerging technologies when data is too sparse or uncertain for traditional risk assessment. It does this by integrating expert judgment with available quantitative and qualitative inputs across multiple criteria to provide relative technology scores. Here, an MCDA framework provides preliminary insights on the suitability of emerging technologies for environmental remediation by comparing nanotechnology and synthetic biology to conventional remediation methods. Subject matter experts provided judgments regarding the importance of criteria used in the evaluations and scored the technologies with respect to those criteria. The results indicate that synthetic biology may be preferred over nanotechnology and conventional methods for high expected benefits and low deployment costs but that conventional technology may be preferred over emerging technologies for reduced risks and development costs. In the absence of field data regarding the risks, benefits, and costs of emerging technologies, structuring evidence-based expert judgment through a weighted hierarchy of topical questions may be helpful to inform preliminary risk governance and guide emerging technology development and policy. PMID:26580228

  3. Improving communication between emergency department staff.

    PubMed

    Moore, Kate

    2014-05-01

    During redevelopment of the emergency department at the Royal Sussex County Hospital, Brighton, it was deemed vital that its internal communication system should be as effective as possible. An audit of staff perceptions of the existing communication system and a relevant literature review were undertaken, therefore, to inform a proposal for the development of a new online system. This article describes the development and implementation of the system. PMID:24806866

  4. OVERVIEW OF EMERGING CLEAN DIESEL ENGINE TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Fairbanks, John

    2001-08-05

    Diesel engines are the most realistic technology to achieve a major improvement in fuel economy in the next decade. In the US light truck market, i.e. Sport Utility Vehicles , pick-up trucks and mini-vans, diesel engines can more than double the fuel economy of similarly rated spark ignition (SI) gasoline engines currently in these vehicles. These new diesel engines are comparable to the SI engines in noise levels and 0 to 60 mph acceleration. They no longer have the traditional ''diesel smell.'' And the new diesel engines will provide roughly twice the service life. This is very significant for resale value which could more than offset the initial premium cost of the diesel engine over that of the SI gasoline engine. So why are we not seeing more diesel engine powered personal vehicles in the U.S.? The European auto fleet is comprised of a little over 30 percent diesel engine powered vehicles while current sales are about 50 percent diesel. In France, over 70 percent of the luxury class cars i.e. Mercedes ''S'' Class, BMW 700 series etc., are sold with the diesel engine option selected. Diesel powered BMW's are winning auto races in Germany. These are a typical of the general North American perspective of diesel powered autos. The big challenge to commercial introduction of diesel engine powered light trucks and autos is compliance with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Tier 2, 2007 emissions standards. Specifically, 0.07gm/mile Oxides of Nitrogen (NOx) and 0.01 gm/mile particulates (PM). Although the EPA has set a series of bins of increasing stringency until the 2007 levels are met, vehicle manufacturers appear to want some assurance that Tier 2, 2007 can be met before they commit an engine to a vehicle.

  5. 1992 UPDATE OF U.S. EPA'S SUPERFUND INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION (SITE) EMERGING TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Emerging Technology Program (ETP) has encouraged and financially supported further development of bench- and pilot-scale testing and evaluation of innovative technologies suitable for use at hazardous waste sites for five year...

  6. Developing an active emergency medical service system based on WiMAX technology.

    PubMed

    Li, Shing-Han; Cheng, Kai-An; Lu, Wen-Hui; Lin, Te-Chang

    2012-10-01

    The population structure has changed with the aging of population. In the present, elders account for 10.63% of the domestic population and the percentage is still gradually climbing. In other words, the demand for emergency services among elders in home environment is expected to grow in the future. In order to improve the efficiency and quality of emergency care, information technology should be effectively utilized to integrate medical systems and facilities, strengthen human-centered operation designs, and maximize the overall performance. The improvement in the quality and survival rate of emergency care is an important basis for better life and health of all people. Through integrated application of medical information systems and information communication technology, this study proposes a WiMAX-based emergency care system addressing the public demands for convenience, speed, safety, and human-centered operation of emergency care. This system consists of a healthcare service center, emergency medical service hospitals, and emergency ambulances. Using the wireless transmission capability of WiMAX, patients' physiological data can be transmitted from medical measurement facilities to the emergency room and emergency room doctors can provide immediate online instructions on emergency treatment via video and audio transmission. WiMAX technology enables the establishment of active emergency medical services. PMID:22109672

  7. Developing an active emergency medical service system based on WiMAX technology.

    PubMed

    Li, Shing-Han; Cheng, Kai-An; Lu, Wen-Hui; Lin, Te-Chang

    2012-10-01

    The population structure has changed with the aging of population. In the present, elders account for 10.63% of the domestic population and the percentage is still gradually climbing. In other words, the demand for emergency services among elders in home environment is expected to grow in the future. In order to improve the efficiency and quality of emergency care, information technology should be effectively utilized to integrate medical systems and facilities, strengthen human-centered operation designs, and maximize the overall performance. The improvement in the quality and survival rate of emergency care is an important basis for better life and health of all people. Through integrated application of medical information systems and information communication technology, this study proposes a WiMAX-based emergency care system addressing the public demands for convenience, speed, safety, and human-centered operation of emergency care. This system consists of a healthcare service center, emergency medical service hospitals, and emergency ambulances. Using the wireless transmission capability of WiMAX, patients' physiological data can be transmitted from medical measurement facilities to the emergency room and emergency room doctors can provide immediate online instructions on emergency treatment via video and audio transmission. WiMAX technology enables the establishment of active emergency medical services.

  8. Emerging technologies and corporate culture at Microsoft: a methodological note.

    PubMed

    Klein, David; Schmeling, James; Blanck, Peter

    2005-01-01

    This article explores factors important in the study and examination of corporate culture and change. The particular focus is on the technological methods used to conduct a study of accessible technology and corporate culture at Microsoft Corporation. Reasons for particular approaches are explained. Advantages and challenges of emerging technologies that store and retrieve information in the study of corporate culture are reviewed.

  9. Emerging technologies for the detection of melanoma: achieving better outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Herman, Cila

    2012-01-01

    Every year around 2.5–3 million skin lesions are biopsied in the US, and a fraction of these – between 50,000 and 100,000 – are diagnosed as melanoma. Diagnostic instruments that allow early detection of melanoma are the key to improving survival rates and reducing the number of unnecessary biopsies, the associated morbidity, and the costs of care. Advances in technology over the past 2 decades have enabled the development of new, sophisticated test methods, which are currently undergoing laboratory and small-scale clinical testing. This review highlights and compares some of the emerging technologies that hold the promise of melanoma diagnosis at an early stage of the disease. The needs for detection at different levels (patient, primary care, specialized care) are discussed, and three broad classes of instruments are identified that are capable of satisfying these needs. Technical and clinical requirements on the diagnostic instruments are introduced to aid the comparison and evaluation of new technologies. White- and polarized-light imaging, spatial and spectroscopic multispectral methods, quantitative thermographic imaging, confocal microscopy, Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT), and Terahertz (THZ) imaging methods are highlighted in light of the criteria identified in the review. Based on the properties, possibilities, and limitations of individual methods, those best suited for a particular setting are identified. Challenges faced in development and wide-scale application of novel technologies are addressed. PMID:23204850

  10. Emerging Technologies and Their Impact on Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wise, Paul H.

    2012-01-01

    Technological innovation is transforming the prevalence and functional impact of child disability, the scale of social disparities in child disability, and perhaps the essential meaning of disability in an increasingly technology-dominated world. In this article, Paul Wise investigates several specific facets of this transformation. He begins by…

  11. Fulldome Video: An Emerging Technology for Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Law, Linda E.

    2006-01-01

    This article talks about fulldome video, a new technology which has been adopted fairly extensively by the larger, well-funded planetariums. Fulldome video, also called immersive projection, can help teach subjects ranging from geology to history to chemistry. The rapidly advancing progress of projection technology has provided high-resolution…

  12. Emerging technologies for the changing global market

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruit, Wendy; Schutzenhofer, Scott; Goldberg, Ben; Everhart, Kurt

    1993-01-01

    This project served to define an appropriate methodology for effective prioritization of technology efforts required to develop replacement technologies mandated by imposed and forecast legislation. The methodology used is a semi-quantative approach derived from quality function deployment techniques (QFD Matrix). This methodology aims to weight the full environmental, cost, safety, reliability, and programmatic implications of replacement technology development to allow appropriate identification of viable candidates and programmatic alternatives. The results will be implemented as a guideline for consideration for current NASA propulsion systems.

  13. Emerging 21(st) Century Medical Technologies.

    PubMed

    Bajwa, Mohammad

    2014-05-01

    Although several medical technologies have been around since decades and are in the continuous process of development, some latest technologies are changing the way medicine would be practiced in the future. These technologies would allow medical practice from anywhere, any time and from any device. These include smart phones, Tablet PCs, Touch screens, digital ink, voice recognition, Electronic Health Records (EHRs), Health Information Exchange (HIE), Nationwide Health Information Network (NwHIN), Personal Health Records (PHRs), patient portals, Nanomedicine, genome-based personalized medicine, Geographical Positioning System (GPS), Radiofrequency Identification (RFID), Telemedicine, clinical decision support (CDS), mobile home healthcare, cloud computing, and social media, to name a few significant. PMID:24948997

  14. Emerging 21st Century Medical Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Bajwa, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Although several medical technologies have been around since decades and are in the continuous process of development, some latest technologies are changing the way medicine would be practiced in the future. These technologies would allow medical practice from anywhere, any time and from any device. These include smart phones, Tablet PCs, Touch screens, digital ink, voice recognition, Electronic Health Records (EHRs), Health Information Exchange (HIE), Nationwide Health Information Network (NwHIN), Personal Health Records (PHRs), patient portals, Nanomedicine, genome-based personalized medicine, Geographical Positioning System (GPS), Radiofrequency Identification (RFID), Telemedicine, clinical decision support (CDS), mobile home healthcare, cloud computing, and social media, to name a few significant. PMID:24948997

  15. EMERGING TECHNOLOGY BULLETIN: SPOUTED BED REACTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Spouted Bed Reactor (SBR) technology utilizes the unique attributes of the "spouting " fluidization regime, which can provide heat transfer rates comparable to traditional fluid beds, while providing robust circulation of highly heterogeneous solids, concurrent with very agg...

  16. Emerging electromembrane technologies in hazardous management

    SciTech Connect

    Grebenyuk, V.D.; Grebenyuk, O.V.

    1995-12-31

    A new generalized index of ecological estimation of different technological process is suggested. It is the number of salt equivalents which contaminate environment when a production unit is making. The quantity of salt equivalent have been calculated not only as necessary amount for the technological process by itself, but as amount of energy and different materials for an entire technology. The estimation of different methods of water treatment is shown. The electrodialysis is the most ecological method of water desalination in comparison with others. This conclusion was spreaded on other electromembrane technologies in hazardous management. Such as: (1) Brackish water desalination, (2) Acid rain prevention, (3) Recuperation of pure heavy metals from rinse galvanic water.

  17. Addressing social resistance in emerging security technologies.

    PubMed

    Mitchener-Nissen, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    In their efforts to enhance the safety and security of citizens, governments and law enforcement agencies look to scientists and engineers to produce modern methods for preventing, detecting, and prosecuting criminal activities. Whole body scanners, lie detection technologies, biometrics, etc., are all being developed for incorporation into the criminal justice apparatus. Yet despite their purported security benefits these technologies often evoke social resistance. Concerns over privacy, ethics, and function-creep appear repeatedly in analyses of these technologies. It is argued here that scientists and engineers continue to pay insufficient attention to this resistance; acknowledging the presence of these social concerns yet failing to meaningfully address them. In so doing they place at risk the very technologies and techniques they are seeking to develop, for socially controversial security technologies face restrictions and in some cases outright banning. By identifying sources of potential social resistance early in the research and design process, scientists can both engage with the public in meaningful debate and modify their security technologies before deployment so as to minimize social resistance and enhance uptake. PMID:23970863

  18. Addressing social resistance in emerging security technologies

    PubMed Central

    Mitchener-Nissen, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    In their efforts to enhance the safety and security of citizens, governments and law enforcement agencies look to scientists and engineers to produce modern methods for preventing, detecting, and prosecuting criminal activities. Whole body scanners, lie detection technologies, biometrics, etc., are all being developed for incorporation into the criminal justice apparatus.1 Yet despite their purported security benefits these technologies often evoke social resistance. Concerns over privacy, ethics, and function-creep appear repeatedly in analyses of these technologies. It is argued here that scientists and engineers continue to pay insufficient attention to this resistance; acknowledging the presence of these social concerns yet failing to meaningfully address them. In so doing they place at risk the very technologies and techniques they are seeking to develop, for socially controversial security technologies face restrictions and in some cases outright banning. By identifying sources of potential social resistance early in the research and design process, scientists can both engage with the public in meaningful debate and modify their security technologies before deployment so as to minimize social resistance and enhance uptake. PMID:23970863

  19. Assessing Expectations: Towards a Toolbox for an Ethics of Emerging Technologies.

    PubMed

    Lucivero, Federica; Swierstra, Tsjalling; Boenink, Marianne

    2011-08-01

    In recent years, several authors have argued that the desirability of novel technologies should be assessed early, when they are still emerging. Such an ethical assessment of emerging technologies is by definition focused on an elusive object. Usually promises, expectations, and visions of the technology are taken as a starting point. As Nordmann and Rip have pointed out in a recent article, however, ethicists should not take for granted the plausibility of such expectations and visions. In this paper, we explore how the quality of expectations on emerging technologies might be assessed when engaging in a reflection on the desirability of emerging technologies. We propose that an assessment of expectations' plausibility should focus on statements on technological feasibility, societal usability, and desirability of the expected technology. Whereas the feasibility statement and, to a lesser extent, the usability statements are frequently quite futuristic, the claims on desirability, by contrast, often display a conservative stance towards the future. Assessing the quality of expectations and visions on behalf of emerging technologies requires, then, a careful and well-directed use of both skepticism and imagination. We conclude with a brief overview of the tools and methods ethicists could use to assess claims made on behalf of emerging technologies and improve the ethical reflection on them.

  20. Business Value of Information Sharing and the Role of Emerging Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumar, Sanjeev

    2009-01-01

    Information Technology has brought significant benefits to organizations by allowing greater information sharing within and across firm boundaries leading to performance improvements. Emerging technologies such as Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) and Web2.0 have transformed the volume and process of information sharing. However, a comprehensive…

  1. Existing and Emerging Technologies for Point-of-Care Testing

    PubMed Central

    St John, Andrew; Price, Christopher P

    2014-01-01

    The volume of point-of-care testing (PoCT) has steadily increased over the 40 or so years since its widespread introduction. That growth is likely to continue, driven by changes in healthcare delivery which are aimed at delivering less costly care closer to the patient’s home. In the developing world there is the challenge of more effective care for infectious diseases and PoCT may play a much greater role here in the future. PoCT technologies can be split into two categories, but in both, testing is generally performed by technologies first devised more than two decades ago. These technologies have undoubtedly been refined and improved to deliver easier-to-use devices with incremental improvements in analytical performance. Of the two major categories the first is small handheld devices, providing qualitative or quantitative determination of an increasing range of analytes. The dominant technologies here are glucose biosensor strips and lateral flow strips using immobilised antibodies to determine a range of parameters including cardiac markers and infectious pathogens. The second category of devices are larger, often bench-top devices which are essentially laboratory instruments which have been reduced in both size and complexity. These include critical care analysers and, more recently, small haematology and immunology analysers. New emerging devices include those that are utilising molecular techniques such as PCR to provide infectious disease testing in a sufficiently small device to be used at the point of care. This area is likely to grow with many devices being developed and likely to reach the commercial market in the next few years. PMID:25336761

  2. New Trends of Emerging Technologies in Digital Pathology.

    PubMed

    Bueno, Gloria; Fernández-Carrobles, M Milagro; Deniz, Oscar; García-Rojo, Marcial

    2016-01-01

    The future paradigm of pathology will be digital. Instead of conventional microscopy, a pathologist will perform a diagnosis through interacting with images on computer screens and performing quantitative analysis. The fourth generation of virtual slide telepathology systems, so-called virtual microscopy and whole-slide imaging (WSI), has allowed for the storage and fast dissemination of image data in pathology and other biomedical areas. These novel digital imaging modalities encompass high-resolution scanning of tissue slides and derived technologies, including automatic digitization and computational processing of whole microscopic slides. Moreover, automated image analysis with WSI can extract specific diagnostic features of diseases and quantify individual components of these features to support diagnoses and provide informative clinical measures of disease. Therefore, the challenge is to apply information technology and image analysis methods to exploit the new and emerging digital pathology technologies effectively in order to process and model all the data and information contained in WSI. The final objective is to support the complex workflow from specimen receipt to anatomic pathology report transmission, that is, to improve diagnosis both in terms of pathologists' efficiency and with new information. This article reviews the main concerns about and novel methods of digital pathology discussed at the latest workshop in the field carried out within the European project AIDPATH (Academia and Industry Collaboration for Digital Pathology). PMID:27100343

  3. Information Technology Services Support for Emergencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spicer, Donald Z.

    2008-01-01

    For at least the last quarter century, enterprises--including higher education institutions--have increasingly relied on Information Technology Services (ITS) for business functions. As a result, IT organizations have had to develop the discipline of production operations as well as recovery procedures to respond when those operations are…

  4. Evaluating glaucoma damage: emerging imaging technologies

    PubMed Central

    Kostanyan, Tigran; Wollstein, Gadi; Schuman, Joel S

    2015-01-01

    The use of ocular imaging tools to estimate structural and functional damage in glaucoma has become a common clinical practice and a substantial focus of vision research. The evolution of the imaging technologies through increased scanning speed, penetration depth, image registration and development of multimodal devices has the potential to detect the pathology more reliably and in earlier stages. This review is focused on new ocular imaging modalities used for glaucoma diagnosis. PMID:27087829

  5. Emerging technologies in mass spectrometry imaging.

    PubMed

    Jungmann, Julia H; Heeren, Ron M A

    2012-08-30

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) as an analytical tool for bio-molecular and bio-medical research targets accurate compound localization and identification. In terms of dedicated instrumentation, this translates into the demand for more detail in the image dimension (spatial resolution) and in the spectral dimension (mass resolution and accuracy), preferably combined in one instrument. At the same time, large area biological tissue samples require fast acquisition schemes, instrument automation and a robust data infrastructure. This review discusses the analytical capabilities of an "ideal" MSI instrument for bio-molecular and bio-medical molecular imaging. The analytical attributes of such an ideal system are contrasted with technological and methodological challenges in MSI. In particular, innovative instrumentation for high spatial resolution imaging in combination with high sample throughput is discussed. Detector technology that targets various shortcomings of conventional imaging detector systems is highlighted. The benefits of accurate mass analysis, high mass resolving power, additional separation strategies and multimodal three-dimensional data reconstruction algorithms are discussed to provide the reader with an insight in the current technological advances and the potential of MSI for bio-medical research. PMID:22469858

  6. Regulatory Promotion of Emergent CCS Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, Lincoln; Uchitel, Kirsten; Johnson, David

    2014-01-01

    Despite the growing inevitability of climate change and the attendant need for mitigation strategies, carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) has yet to gain much traction in the United States. Recent regulatory proposals by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), limited in scope to new-build power plants, represent the only significant policy initiative intended to mandate diffusion of CCS technology. Phase I of this Project assessed barriers to CCS deployment as prioritized by the CCS community. That research concluded that there were four primary barriers: (1) cost, (2) lack of a carbon price, (3) liability, and (4) lack of a comprehensive regulatory regime. Phase II of this Project, as presented in this Report, assesses potential regulatory models for CCS and examines where those models address the hurdles to diffusing CCS technology identified in Phase I. It concludes (1) that a CCS-specific but flexible standard, such as a technology performance standard or a very particular type of market-based regulation, likely will promote CCS diffusion, and (2) that these policies cannot work alone, but rather, should be combined with other measures, such as liability limits and a comprehensive CCS regulatory regime.

  7. Engagement and Uncertainty: Emerging Technologies Challenge the Work of Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eaton, Weston; Wright, Wynne; Whyte, Kyle; Gasteyer, Stephen P.; Gehrke, Pat J.

    2014-01-01

    Universities' increasing applications of science and technology to address a wide array of societal problems may serve to thwart democratic engagement strategies. For emerging technologies, such challenges are particularly salient, as knowledge is incomplete and application and impact are uncertain or contested. Insights from science and…

  8. Assistive Technology and Emergent Literacy for Preschoolers: A Literature Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Floyd, Kimberly Kris; Smith Canter, Lora Lee; Jeffs, Tara; Judge, Sharon A.

    2008-01-01

    Despite the legislative mandate for assistive technology (AT) consideration and the tenacity of researchers, educators, and practitioners to develop more proficient readers at younger ages, cohesive and comprehensive emergent literacy technology planning has not been sufficiently developed for preschool children with disabilities. The purpose of…

  9. Information technology model for evaluating emergency medicine teaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorbach, James; Ryan, James

    1996-02-01

    This paper describes work in progress to develop an Information Technology (IT) model and supporting information system for the evaluation of clinical teaching in the Emergency Medicine (EM) Department of North Shore University Hospital. In the academic hospital setting student physicians, i.e. residents, and faculty function daily in their dual roles as teachers and students respectively, and as health care providers. Databases exist that are used to evaluate both groups in either academic or clinical performance, but rarely has this information been integrated to analyze the relationship between academic performance and the ability to care for patients. The goal of the IT model is to improve the quality of teaching of EM physicians by enabling the development of integrable metrics for faculty and resident evaluation. The IT model will include (1) methods for tracking residents in order to develop experimental databases; (2) methods to integrate lecture evaluation, clinical performance, resident evaluation, and quality assurance databases; and (3) a patient flow system to monitor patient rooms and the waiting area in the Emergency Medicine Department, to record and display status of medical orders, and to collect data for analyses.

  10. Illustrating anticipatory life cycle assessment for emerging photovoltaic technologies.

    PubMed

    Wender, Ben A; Foley, Rider W; Prado-Lopez, Valentina; Ravikumar, Dwarakanath; Eisenberg, Daniel A; Hottle, Troy A; Sadowski, Jathan; Flanagan, William P; Fisher, Angela; Laurin, Lise; Bates, Matthew E; Linkov, Igor; Seager, Thomas P; Fraser, Matthew P; Guston, David H

    2014-09-16

    Current research policy and strategy documents recommend applying life cycle assessment (LCA) early in research and development (R&D) to guide emerging technologies toward decreased environmental burden. However, existing LCA practices are ill-suited to support these recommendations. Barriers related to data availability, rapid technology change, and isolation of environmental from technical research inhibit application of LCA to developing technologies. Overcoming these challenges requires methodological advances that help identify environmental opportunities prior to large R&D investments. Such an anticipatory approach to LCA requires synthesis of social, environmental, and technical knowledge beyond the capabilities of current practices. This paper introduces a novel framework for anticipatory LCA that incorporates technology forecasting, risk research, social engagement, and comparative impact assessment, then applies this framework to photovoltaic (PV) technologies. These examples illustrate the potential for anticipatory LCA to prioritize research questions and help guide environmentally responsible innovation of emerging technologies.

  11. Illustrating anticipatory life cycle assessment for emerging photovoltaic technologies.

    PubMed

    Wender, Ben A; Foley, Rider W; Prado-Lopez, Valentina; Ravikumar, Dwarakanath; Eisenberg, Daniel A; Hottle, Troy A; Sadowski, Jathan; Flanagan, William P; Fisher, Angela; Laurin, Lise; Bates, Matthew E; Linkov, Igor; Seager, Thomas P; Fraser, Matthew P; Guston, David H

    2014-09-16

    Current research policy and strategy documents recommend applying life cycle assessment (LCA) early in research and development (R&D) to guide emerging technologies toward decreased environmental burden. However, existing LCA practices are ill-suited to support these recommendations. Barriers related to data availability, rapid technology change, and isolation of environmental from technical research inhibit application of LCA to developing technologies. Overcoming these challenges requires methodological advances that help identify environmental opportunities prior to large R&D investments. Such an anticipatory approach to LCA requires synthesis of social, environmental, and technical knowledge beyond the capabilities of current practices. This paper introduces a novel framework for anticipatory LCA that incorporates technology forecasting, risk research, social engagement, and comparative impact assessment, then applies this framework to photovoltaic (PV) technologies. These examples illustrate the potential for anticipatory LCA to prioritize research questions and help guide environmentally responsible innovation of emerging technologies. PMID:25121583

  12. Emerging Technologies: Something Borrowed, Something New

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinhorst, Sabine; Cannon, Gordon

    1999-04-01

    The cover of the July 16, 1998 issue of Nature features a remarkable new "smart material" that can be used to print electronically on a variety of surfaces, including paper, plastic, and metal. The electrophoretic ink developed in J. Jacobson's lab at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology consists of liquid with dispersed, oppositely charged black and white microparticles that are contained in microcapsules. Application of a potential results in migration of the microparticles to opposite sides of the microcapsule, thereby generating either a white or black image that depends on the direction of the potential. Unlike liquid crystal displays, the image generated with electrophoretic ink is stable even after the power has been turned off. Cost and resolution of this new technology compare favorably with most other electronic image display systems currently in use or under development. Promising applications for electrophoretic ink in the future may range from street signs to electronic books (Comiskey et al., Vol. 394, pp 253-255; "News and Views" commentary by R. Wisnieff on pp 225-227).

  13. Emerging trends: grid technology in pathology.

    PubMed

    Bueno, Gloria; García-Rojo, Marcial; Déniz, Oscar; Fernández-Carrobles, María del Milagro; Vállez, Noelia; Salido, Jesús; García-González, Jesús

    2012-01-01

    Grid technology has enabled clustering and access to, and interaction among, a wide variety of geographically distributed resources such as supercomputers, storage systems, data sources, instruments as well as special devices and services, realizing network-centric operations. Their main applications include large scale computational and data intensive problems in science and engineering. Grids are likely to have a deep impact on health related applications. Moreover, they seem to be suitable for tissue-based diagnosis. They offer a powerful tool to deal with current challenges in many biomedical domains involving complex anatomical and physiological modeling of structures from images or large image databases assembling and analysis. This chapter analyzes the general structures and functions of a Grid environment implemented for tissue-based diagnosis on digital images. Moreover, it presents a Grid middleware implemented by the authors for diagnostic pathology applications. The chapter is a review of the work done as part of the European COST project EUROTELEPATH. PMID:22925801

  14. Improving Quality of Emergency Care Through Integration of Mental Health.

    PubMed

    Okafor, Martha; Wrenn, Glenda; Ede, Victor; Wilson, Nana; Custer, William; Risby, Emile; Claeys, Michael; Shelp, Frank E; Atallah, Hany; Mattox, Gail; Satcher, David

    2016-04-01

    The goal of this study was to better integrate emergency medical and psychiatric care at a large urban public hospital, identify impact on quality improvement metrics, and reduce healthcare cost. A psychiatric fast track service was implemented as a quality improvement initiative. Data on disposition from the emergency department from January 2011 to May 2012 for patients impacted by the pilot were analyzed. 4329 patients from January 2011 to August 2011 (pre-intervention) were compared with 4867 patients from September 2011 to May 2012 (intervention). There was a trend of decline on overall quality metrics of time to triage and time from disposition to discharge. The trend analysis of the psychiatric length of stay and use of restraints showed significant reductions. Integrated emergency care models are evidence-based approach to ensuring that patients with mental health needs receive proper and efficient treatment. Results suggest that this may also improve overall emergency department's throughput.

  15. EMERGING TECHNOLOGY SUMMARY: DEMONSTRATION OF AMBERSORB 563 ADSORBENT TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A field pilot study was conducted to demonstrate the technical feasibility and cost-effectiveness of Ambersorb® 5631 carbonaceous adsorbent for remediating groundwater contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The Ambersorb adsorbent technology demonstration consist...

  16. Evaluation and selection of emergency treatment technology based on dynamic fuzzy GRA method for chemical contingency spills.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Guo, Liang; Jiang, Jiping; Hao, Linlin; Liu, Rentao; Wang, Peng

    2015-12-15

    A robust scheme to address emergency pollution accident is becoming more and more important with the rise of the frequency and intensity of the emergency pollution accidents. Therefore, it is crucial to select an appropriate technology in an emergency response to chemical spills. In this study, an evaluation framework based on dynamic fuzzy GRA method has been developed to make forward optimum scheme for the selection of emergency treatment technology. Dynamic analysis and linguistic terms are used to evaluate alternatives to improve efficiency of emergency treatment procedures by addressing the vagueness and ambiguity in decision making. The method was then applied in a case study to evaluate emergency arsenic treatment technology and demonstrate its applicability and feasibility in emergency arsenic pollution under two scenarios associated with different arsenic levels. Therefore, not only the results can be used for selecting emergency treatment technology, but also help decision-makers identify desired decisions for contaminant mitigation with a quick response and cost-effective manner.

  17. VLSI Technology: Impact and Promise. Identifying Emerging Issues and Trends in Technology for Special Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bayoumi, Magdy

    As part of a 3-year study to identify emerging issues and trends in technology for special education, this paper addresses the implications of very large scale integrated (VLSI) technology. The first section reviews the development of educational technology, particularly microelectronics technology, from the 1950s to the present. The implications…

  18. Improving School Curriculum through Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frazier, Peggy; Reed, Patty

    Educators and administrators have many things to consider before setting up a distance education facility at their schools. They will first need to decide what type of distance education technology will best benefit their students and schools. Administrators will need to decide if they want to use programming that is locally controlled or…

  19. IMPROVEMENT OF WATER MAIN INSPECTION TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document is a handout of a slide presentation that addresses improvement of water main inspection technology. The slide presentation addresses the need for improved inspection technology (e.g., 237,000 main breaks/yr); the limits on main break prevention; and, the adverse ...

  20. Improving dietetics education with interactive communication technology.

    PubMed

    Litchfield, R E; Oakland, M J; Anderson, J A

    2000-10-01

    Changes occurring in health care, education, and technology are altering dietetics education. A model of learnercentered, cooperative, distance education based on interactive online technology is described for use in a dietetic internship. Evaluation of this model includes review of key-feature exams, results of computer attitudes surveys, use of the technology by interns, exit interviews, and performance on the examination for registered dietitians. In a pilot study of the model with 8 subjects, comfort using the Internet improved significantly. Use of interactive communication technology in dietetics education has the potential to improve competency, technological aptitude, professional partnering skills, and lifelong learning skills.

  1. Innovative pacing: Recent advances, emerging technologies, and future directions in cardiac pacing.

    PubMed

    Austin, Christopher; Kusumoto, Fred

    2016-07-01

    The field of cardiovascular medicine is rapidly evolving as advancements in technology and engineering provide clinicians new and exciting ways to care for an aging population. Cardiac pacing, in particular, has seen a series of game-changing technologies emerge in the past several years spurred by low-power electronics, high density batteries, improved catheter delivery systems and innovative software design. We look at several of these emerging pacemaker technologies, discussing the rationale, current state and future directions of these pioneering developments in electrophysiology. PMID:27017442

  2. The Status of Emerging Technologies: An Economic/Technological Assessment to the Year 2000. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Commerce, Washington, DC.

    The U.S. Department of Commerce reviewed emerging technologies and their future impact on the economy. This report lists the emerging technologies and suggests their potential contribution to the gross national product by the year 2000. It is based on an assessment by technical experts and agency heads within the Department of Commerce, who…

  3. Recent improvements in antigene technology.

    PubMed

    Buchini, Sabrina; Leumann, Christian J

    2003-12-01

    DNA triple-helix-based approaches to control and modulate cellular functions on the level of genomic DNA (antigene technology) suffered in the past from a stepmother-like treatment in comparison to the flourishing field of oligonucleotide-based control of translation (antisense technology). This was mostly due to lack of affinity of triplex-forming oligonucleotides to their DNA target, to sequence restriction constraints imposed by the triple helical recognition motifs and by open questions to the accessibility of the target DNA. Recent developments in the area have brought about new bases that specifically recognize pyrimidine-purine inversion sites as well as sugar modifications, for example, the 2'-aminoethoxy-oligonucleotides or oligonucleotides based on the locked nucleic acid sugar unit, which greatly enhance triplex stability and alleviate in part the sequence restriction constraints. With this, sequence-specific genomic DNA manipulation is starting to become a useful tool in biotechnology.

  4. Constructing productive engagement: pre-engagement tools for emerging technologies.

    PubMed

    te Kulve, Haico; Rip, Arie

    2011-12-01

    Engagement with stakeholders and civil society is increasingly important for new scientific and technological developments. Preparation of such engagements sets the stage for engagement activities and thus contributes to their outcomes. Preparation is a demanding task, particularly if the facilitating agent aims for timely engagement related to emerging technologies. Requirements for such preparation include understanding of the emerging science & technology and its dynamics. Multi-level analysis and socio-technical scenarios are two complementary tools for constructing productive engagement. Examination of the emergence of nanotechnologies in the food packaging sector demonstrates how these tools work. In light of recent policy demands for responsible innovation, but also more generally, the role of organizers of engagement activities is one that deserves reflection insofar as it can extend beyond that of preparation and facilitation.

  5. SITE TECHNOLOGY PROFILES, TENTH EDITION, VOLUME 2 - EMERGING TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program, now in its thirteenth year, is an integral part of EPA's research into alternative cleanup methods for hazardous waste sites around the nation. The SITE Program was created to encourage the development and routine us...

  6. EMERGING TECHNOLOGY REPORT: DEMONSTRATION OF AMBERSORB™ 563 ADSORBENT TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Ambersorb™ (Rohm and Haas) Adsorbent technology demonstration was conducted over a 12-week period during the spring/summer of 1994 at Site 32/36 of the former Pease Air Force Base, Newington, N.H. The groundwater in this area is contaminated with a number of chlorinated organ...

  7. [Technological improvements in interventional cardiology].

    PubMed

    Calabuig, J; Artaiz, M; Azcárate, P; Palazuelos, J; Martín-Raymondi, D

    2005-01-01

    In the last few years, the evolution of coronary interventionism has been very important. The primary success rates in the early 1990s were 86-88% with a re-stenosis rate of 30%-40%. Current primary success rates have risen to over 95% with a re-stenosis rate of under 10% even for many types of lesions classically considered complex. Currently the main limitations in interventional cardiology remain coronary segments that cannot be accessed due to chronic total occlusion, or severe proximal tortuosity or calcification. Rapid improvements have led to broader clinical indications for percutaneous revascularization procedures. We describe the latest improvements in techniques.

  8. Development of Rural Emergency Medical System (REMS) with Geospatial Technology in Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ooi, W. H.; Shahrizal, I. M.; Noordin, A.; Nurulain, M. I.; Norhan, M. Y.

    2014-02-01

    Emergency medical services are dedicated services in providing out-of-hospital transport to definitive care or patients with illnesses and injuries. In this service the response time and the preparedness of medical services is of prime importance. The application of space and geospatial technology such as satellite navigation system and Geographical Information System (GIS) was proven to improve the emergency operation in many developed countries. In collaboration with a medical service NGO, the National Space Agency (ANGKASA) has developed a prototype Rural Emergency Medical System (REMS), focusing on providing medical services to rural areas and incorporating satellite based tracking module integrated with GIS and patience database to improve the response time of the paramedic team during emergency. With the aim to benefit the grassroots community by exploiting space technology, the project was able to prove the system concept which will be addressed in this paper.

  9. When systems fail: improving care through technology can create risk.

    PubMed

    Bagalio, Sharon A

    2007-01-01

    Emerging medical technology is transforming the care of the modern-day patient. Hospital performance and patient safety is improving, lowering professional liability and medical malpractice costs. This advanced technology affects not only diagnosis and treatment but also hospital productivity and revenue. However, it also exposes hospitals and medical personnel to a number of unforeseeable risks. This article examines ongoing efforts to improve patient safety through the use of technology, automation and complex systems operations. It discusses the importance of skilled negotiation when vying for technology contracts and the value of maintaining a reliable data center to support it. Technology risk exposure is now a reality. A hospital needs to know how to protect itself from cyber liability, business interruption, and data loss and theft by ensuring that there is adequate coverage. PMID:20200890

  10. Emergent FDA biodefense issues for microarray technology: process analytical technology.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Sandy

    2004-11-01

    A successful biodefense strategy relies upon any combination of four approaches. A nation can protect its troops and citizenry first by advanced mass vaccination, second, by responsive ring vaccination, and third, by post-exposure therapeutic treatment (including vaccine therapies). Finally, protection can be achieved by rapid detection followed by exposure limitation (suites and air filters) or immediate treatment (e.g., antibiotics, rapid vaccines and iodine pills). All of these strategies rely upon or are enhanced by microarray technologies. Microarrays can be used to screen, engineer and test vaccines. They are also used to construct early detection tools. While effective biodefense utilizes a variety of tactical tools, microarray technology is a valuable arrow in that quiver.

  11. Population health technologies: emerging innovations for the health of the public.

    PubMed

    Eng, Thomas R

    2004-04-01

    At the beginning of the 21st century, we are at the dawn of a possibly unprecedented era of scientific discovery and promise. Emerging technologies, including information and communication technologies, genomics, microelectromechanical systems, robotics, sensors, and nanotechnologies, provide enormous opportunities for population health improvement. Population health technology refers to the application of an emerging technology to improve the health of populations. Emerging technologies present an opportunity for addressing global health challenges-in both developed and developing countries. Health issues ripe for the application of new technologies include disease surveillance and control, environmental monitoring and pollution prevention, food safety, health behavior change, self-care, population screening, and chronic disease and injury prevention and control. If appropriately applied, population health technologies may greatly enhance existing health intervention models. However, potential adverse consequences could arise related to privacy, confidentiality, and security; quality and effectiveness; sustainability; and the technology divide. To ensure the optimal development and diffusion of population health technologies will require balancing these risks and benefits while simultaneously adopting new mechanisms of public and private support for research and development in this potentially important new domain of public health.

  12. Emerging Communication Technologies (ECT) Phase 3 Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bastin, Gary L.; Harris, William G.; Bates, Lakesha D.; Nelson, Richard A.

    2004-01-01

    The Emerging Communication Technology (ECT) project investigated three First Mile communication technologies in support of NASA s Second Generation Reusable Launch Vehicle (2nd Gen RLV), Orbital Space Plane, Advanced Range Technology Working Group (ARTWG) and the Advanced Spaceport Technology Working Group (ASTWG). These First Mile technologies have the purpose of interconnecting mobile users with existing Range Communication infrastructures. ECT was a continuation of the Range Information System Management (RISM) task started in 2002. RISM identified the three advance communication technologies investigated under ECT. These were Wireless Ethernet (Wi-Fi), Free Space Optics (FSO), and Ultra Wideband (UWB). Due to the report s size, it has been broken into three volumes: 1) Main Report 2) Appendices 3) UWB.

  13. Emerging Communication Technologies (ECT) Phase 2 Report. Volume 2; Appendices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bastin, Gary L.; Harris, William G.; Chiodini, Robert; Nelson, Richard A.; Huang, PoTien; Kruhm, David A.

    2003-01-01

    The Emerging Communication Technology (ECT) project investigated three First Mile communication technologies in support of NASA s Second Generation Reusable Launch Vehicle (2nd Gen RLV), Orbital Space Plane, Advanced Range Technology Working Group (ARTWG) and the Advanced Spaceport Technology Working Group (ASTWG). These First Mile technologies have the purpose of interconnecting mobile users with existing Range Communication infrastructures. ECT was a continuation of the Range Information System Management (RISM) task started in 2002. RISM identified the three advance communication technologies investigated under ECT. These were Wireless Ethernet (Wi-Fi), Free Space Optics (FSO), and Ultra Wideband (UWB). Due to the report s size, it has been broken into three volumes: 1) Main Report 2) Appendices 3) UWB

  14. Improving Accountability Models by Using Technology-Enabled Knowledge Systems (TEKS). CSE Report 656

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Eva L.

    2005-01-01

    This paper addresses accountability and the role emerging technologies can play in improving education. The connection between accountability and technology can be best summarized in one term: feedback. Technological supports provide ways of designing, collecting and sharing information in order to provide the basis for the improvement of systems…

  15. WMD first response: requirements, emerging technologies, and policy implications

    SciTech Connect

    Vergino, E S; Hoehn, W E

    2000-06-19

    In the US today, efforts are underway to defend against the possible terrorist use of weapons of mass destruction (WMD) against US cities. These efforts include the development and adaptation of technologies to support prevention and detection, to defend against a possible attack, and, if these fail, to provide both mitigation responses and attribution for a WMD incident. Technologies under development span a range of systems, from early detection and identification of an agent or explosive, to diagnostic and systems analysis tools; and to forensic analysis for law enforcement. Also, many techniques and tools that have been developed for other applications are being examined to determine whether, with some modification, they could be of use by the emergency preparedness, public health, and law enforcement communities. However, anecdotal evidence suggests the existence of a serious disconnect between the technology development communities and these user communities. This disconnect arises because funding for technology development is derived primarily from sources (principally federal agencies) distant from the emergency response communities, which are predominantly state, county, or local entities. Moreover, the first responders with whom we have worked candidly admit that their jurisdictions have been given, or have purchased for them, a variety of technological devices, typically without consulting the emergency responders about their utility. In private discussions, emergency responders derisively refer to these as a closet full of useless toys. Technology developers have many new and relevant technologies currently in the development pipeline, but most have not been adequately vetted against the field needs or validated for field use. The Center for Global Security Research at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the Sam Nunn School of International Affairs at the Georgia Institute of Technology recently sponsored a two-day workshop to bring together

  16. Establishing and Maintaining an Early Childhood Emergent Literacy Technology Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutinger, Patricia L.; Bell, Carol; Daytner, Gary; Johanson, Joyce

    2006-01-01

    The three-year Early Childhood Emergent Literacy Technology Curriculum (ELiTeC) study (E2) was designed to replicate, on a broad scale, the results of earlier research in which a curriculum model was developed, implemented, and studied in preschool classrooms for children with disabilities or those at risk. ELiTeC was based on the assumptions that…

  17. EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES FOR THE MANAGEMENT AND UTILIZATION OF LANDFILL GAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives information on emerging technologies that are considered to be commercially available (Tier 1), currently undergoing research and development (Tier 2), or considered as potentially applicable (Tier 3) for the management of landfill gas (LFG) emissions or for the ...

  18. Case Study – Idling Reduction Technologies for Emergency Service Vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Laughlin, Michael; Owens, Russell J.

    2016-01-01

    This case study explores the use of idle reduction technologies (IRTs) on emergency service vehicles in police, fire, and ambulance applications. Various commercially available IRT systems and approaches can decrease, or ultimately eliminate, engine idling. Fleets will thus save money on fuel, and will also decrease their criteria pollutant emissions, greenhouse gas emissions, and noise.

  19. Learning from History: Chronicling the Emergence of Human Performance Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Driscoll, Tony

    2003-01-01

    Defines human performance technology (HPT) as systems thinking applied to human resource activities, chronicles the emergence of HPT and the development of the HPT process model, and considers its use to define and implement high-performance work systems in information age organizations. (Author/LRW)

  20. The Emerging Technology of Avatars: Some Educational Considerations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blake, Anne M.; Moseley, James L.

    2010-01-01

    Avatars are gaining popularity as an emerging technology to facilitate learning and instruction. Avatars can be used as agents of e-learning applications or as part of immersive learning environments such as Second Life. Research indicates that avatar use has numerous potential benefits, including increased student engagement and opportunities for…

  1. Web 2.0 and Emerging Technologies in Online Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diaz, Veronica

    2010-01-01

    As online learning continues to grow, so do the free or nearly free Web 2.0 and emerging online learning technologies available to faculty and students. This chapter explores the implementation process and corresponding considerations of adapting such tools for teaching and learning. Issues addressed include copyright, intellectual property,…

  2. Negative Reinforcement in Applied Behavior Analysis: An Emerging Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iwata, Brian A.

    1987-01-01

    The article describes three aspects of negative reinforcement as it relates to applied behavior analysis: behavior acquired or maintained through negative reinforcement, the treatment of negatively reinforced behavior, and negative reinforcement as therapy. Current research suggests the emergence of an applied technology on negative reinforcement.…

  3. Voice Assessment of Student Work: Recent Studies and Emerging Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckhouse, Barry; Carroll, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    Although relatively little attention has been given to the voice assessment of student work, at least when compared with more traditional forms of text-based review, the attention it has received strongly points to a promising form of review that has been hampered by the limits of an emerging technology. A fresh review of voice assessment in light…

  4. Seed Mucilage Improves Seedling Emergence of a Sand Desert Shrub

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xuejun; Baskin, Carol C.; Baskin, Jerry M.; Liu, Guangzheng; Huang, Zhenying

    2012-01-01

    The success of seedling establishment of desert plants is determined by seedling emergence response to an unpredictable precipitation regime. Sand burial is a crucial and frequent environmental stress that impacts seedling establishment on sand dunes. However, little is known about the ecological role of seed mucilage in seedling emergence in arid sandy environments. We hypothesized that seed mucilage enhances seedling emergence in a low precipitation regime and under conditions of sand burial. In a greenhouse experiment, two types of Artemisia sphaerocephala achenes (intact and demucilaged) were exposed to different combinations of burial depth (0, 5, 10, 20, 40 and 60 mm) and irrigation regimes (low, medium and high, which simulated the precipitation amount and frequency in May, June and July in the natural habitat, respectively). Seedling emergence increased with increasing irrigation. It was highest at 5 mm sand burial depth and ceased at burial depths greater than 20 mm in all irrigation regimes. Mucilage significantly enhanced seedling emergence at 0, 5 and 10 mm burial depths in low irrigation, at 0 and 5 mm burial depths in medium irrigation and at 0 and 10 mm burial depths in high irrigation. Seed mucilage also reduced seedling mortality at the shallow sand burial depths. Moreover, mucilage significantly affected seedling emergence time and quiescence and dormancy percentages. Our findings suggest that seed mucilage plays an ecologically important role in successful seedling establishment of A. sphaerocephala by improving seedling emergence and reducing seedling mortality in stressful habitats of the sandy desert environment. PMID:22511952

  5. Handbook of Research on Emerging Priorities and Trends in Distance Education: Communication, Pedagogy, and Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuzer, T. Volkan, Ed.; Eby, Gulsun, Ed.

    2014-01-01

    With the rise of distance education in the post-modern world, progressive research on the best methods, tools, and technologies in the field is necessary to continue to take advantage of the pedagogical opportunities and improvements offered through remote learning platforms. The "Handbook of Research on Emerging Priorities and Trends in…

  6. Understanding Fire Through Improved Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Aztec(TradeMark) is the commercial name for Southwest Sciences laser. The laser has coarse tuning ranges of 10 nanometers (nm) to 30 nm at wavelengths ranging from 630 nm to 2,300 nm, making it the only commercially available external cavity diode laser with wavelengths beyond 1,650 nm. The laser's high-speed tuning in both coarse and fine wavelength regimes allows for increased trace gas detection. With the automated coarse tuning option, the Aztec sweeps through its wavelength range in less than 1 millisecond. While some diode lasers can only detect one type, or species, of a trace gas, the Aztec's broad wavelength tuning provides access to multiple trace gas species. The Aztec has a wide range of applications for both NASA and commercial users, from protecting astronauts in space to improving combustion processes on Earth. It may serve as a new tool for planetary exploration, as it can detect a wide range of multiple gas species in planetary atmospheres. The laser could optically detect gaseous indicators of incipient fires on the International Space Station and Space Shuttle, as well as detect low concentrations of potentially toxic gases in spacecraft crew habitats. The laser could also provide more accurate fire detection in aircraft cargo compartments. Since the Aztec can detect several gases that only evolve during an actual fire, its implementation could reduce the large number of commercial aircraft landings that currently occur due to false alarms. Other applications include environmental and industrial process monitoring.

  7. Mobile technology: streamlining practice and improving care.

    PubMed

    Blake, Holly

    2013-09-01

    The use of mobile phones in care delivery has the potential to improve the way in which care is delivered. When implemented effectively, mobile technologies can empower patients and enhance communication between patients and their health-care providers. When barriers are recognised and addressed, mobile technologies can change working lives, facilitating rapid access to information and supporting efficiency in practice. PMID:24005486

  8. Improving NASA's technology for space science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The continued advance of the nation's space program is directly dependent upon the development and use of new technology. Technology is the foundation for every aspect of space missions and ground operations. The improvements in technology that will enable future advances are not only in device and system performance, but also in permitting missions to be carried out more rapidly and at lower cost. Although more can be done with current technology, NASA's recent call for new and innovative approaches should not be answered by employing only today's technologies; new technologies with revolutionary potential should be sought. The study reported here was performed to identify means to enhance the development of technologies for the space sciences and applications.

  9. New technologies for reporting real-time emergent infections

    PubMed Central

    CHUNARA, RUMI; FREIFELD, CLARK C.; BROWNSTEIN, JOHN S.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Novel technologies have prompted a new paradigm in disease surveillance. Advances in computation, communications and materials enable new technologies such as mobile phones and microfluidic chips. In this paper we illustrate examples of new technologies that can augment disease detection. We describe technologies harnessing the internet, mobile phones, point of care diagnostic tools and methods that facilitate detection from passively collected unstructured data. We demonstrate how these can all assist in quicker detection, investigation and response to emerging infectious events. Novel technologies enable collection and dissemination of epidemic intelligence data to both public health practitioners and the general public, enabling finer temporal and spatial resolution of disease monitoring than through traditional public health processes. PMID:22894823

  10. Dedicated operating room for emergency surgery improves access and efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Heng, Marilyn; Wright, James G.

    2013-01-01

    Background Scheduling emergency cases among elective surgeries often results in prolonged waits for emergency surgery and delays or cancellation of elective cases. We evaluated the benefits of a dedicated operating room (OR) for emergency procedures available to all surgical services at a large children’s hospital. Methods We compared a 6-month period (January 2009 to June 2009) preimplementation with a 6-month period (January 2010 to June 2010) postimplementation of a dedicated OR. We evaluated OR use, wait times, percentage of cases done within and outside of access targets, off-hours surgery, cancellations, overruns and length of stay. Results Preimplementation, 1069 of the 5500 surgeries performed were emergency cases. Postimplementation, 1084 of the 5358 surgeries performed were emergency cases. Overall use of the dedicated OR was 53% (standard deviation 25%) postimplementation. Excluding outliers, the average wait time for priority 3 emergency patients decreased from 11 hours 8 minutes to 10 hours 5 minutes (p = 0.004). An increased proportion of priority 3 patients, from 52% to 58%, received surgery within 12 hours (p = 0.020). There was a 9% decrease in the proportion of priority 3 cases completed during the evening and night (p < 0.001). The elective surgical schedule benefited from the dedicated OR, with a significant decrease in cancellations (1.5% v. 0.7%, p < 0.001) and an accumulated decrease of 5211 minutes in overrun minutes in elective rooms. The average hospital stay after emergency surgery decreased from 16.0 days to 14.7 days (p = 0.12) following implementation of the dedicated OR. Conclusion A dedicated OR for emergency cases improved quality of care by decreasing cancellations and overruns in elective rooms and increasing the proportion of priority 3 patients who accessed care within the targeted time. PMID:23706847

  11. Image-Guided Tumor Ablation: Emerging Technologies and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    McWilliams, Justin P.; Lee, Edward W.; Yamamoto, Shota; Loh, Christopher T.; Kee, Stephen T.

    2010-01-01

    As the trend continues toward the decreased invasiveness of medical procedures, image-guided percutaneous ablation has begun to supplant surgery for the local control of small tumors in the liver, kidney, and lung. New ablation technologies, and refinements of existing technologies, will enable treatment of larger and more complex tumors in these and other organs. At the same time, improvements in intraprocedural imaging promise to improve treatment accuracy and reduce complications. In this review, the latest advancements in clinical and experimental ablation technologies will be summarized, and new applications of image-guided tumor ablation will be discussed. PMID:22550370

  12. Microfluidics: an emerging technology for food and health science.

    PubMed

    Lin, Gisela; Lee, Abraham P

    2010-03-01

    Microfluidics is an emerging technology with the potential to streamline workflows and processes in the food and health sciences. Because of extreme miniaturization, less reagent consumption and more efficient sample-to-answer protocols are not only attainable but in many cases demonstrated. In this article, we present some key examples of relevant research at the Micro/Nano Fluidics Fundamentals Focus (MF3) Center that has direct applications in food, environmental, and physiological health monitoring.

  13. An Integrated Safety Analysis Methodology for Emerging Air Transport Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kostiuk, Peter F.; Adams, Milton B.; Allinger, Deborah F.; Rosch, Gene; Kuchar, James

    1998-01-01

    The continuing growth of air traffic will place demands on NASA's Air Traffic Management (ATM) system that cannot be accommodated without the creation of significant delays and economic impacts. To deal with this situation, work has begun to develop new approaches to providing a safe and economical air transportation infrastructure. Many of these emerging air transport technologies will represent radically new approaches to ATM, both for ground and air operations.

  14. Negative reinforcement in applied behavior analysis: an emerging technology.

    PubMed

    Iwata, B A

    1987-01-01

    Although the effects of negative reinforcement on human behavior have been studied for a number of years, a comprehensive body of applied research does not exist at this time. This article describes three aspects of negative reinforcement as it relates to applied behavior analysis: behavior acquired or maintained through negative reinforcement, the treatment of negatively reinforced behavior, and negative reinforcement as therapy. A consideration of research currently being done in these areas suggests the emergence of an applied technology on negative reinforcement.

  15. Utilizing Health Analytics in Improving Emergency Room Performance.

    PubMed

    Khalifa, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Emergency room performance improvement has been a major concern for healthcare professionals and researchers. ER patients' length of stay and percentage of patients leaving without treatment are two of the most important indicators for performance monitoring and improvement. The main objective of this study is to utilize health analytics methods in identifying areas of deficiency, potential improvements and recommending effective solutions to enhance ER performance. ER data of 2014 were retrospectively retrieved in January 2015 and analyzed for significant variables affecting inpatient admission rates. Patient Acuity Level was the significant variable on which the recommendations were based. A Fast-Track area was redesigned and dedicated for managing lower acuity level patients; CTAS levels 4 and 5. The performance of the ER has been monitored for the first six months of 2015 and compared to 2014. 29% improvement was achieved on shortening the total ER LOS and 30% improvement was achieved on the percentage of patients leaving ER without treatment.

  16. EDITORIAL: Special cluster on Dielectrics for Emerging Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, R.; Youngs, I.; Stevens, G.

    2004-02-01

    The 2003 Conference on Dielectrics for Emerging Technologies was organised by the Institute of Physics Dielectrics Group as one of the participating conferences at the IOP Physics Congress held at Heriot-Watt University between 23 and 27 March 2003. This was the second annual conference of the new Dielectrics Group, which was formed from the former Dielectrics Society in October 2001. The conference policy remains unchanged, with the Group adopting an interdisciplinary and broadband approach to studies of the interaction of electromagnetic fields with materials. This policy is well exemplified by the papers that were delivered at this conference. The aims of the conference were three-fold: to provide a forum for the presentation of leading-edge research on emerging electromagnetic materials, to present developments on the use of dielectrics in emerging technologies and to broaden the debate on metamaterials in the UK, especially in relation to their potential applications. The metamaterials of interest here are macro- or meso-scopically structured materials that offer novel modes of electromagnetic field interaction, thereby widening the range of effective dielectric properties available to us for novel technological applications. They include `negative refractive index materials', `left handed materials', `photonic' or `electromagnetic band-gap materials' and actively-controlled or `smart' electromagnetic materials. Significant metamaterial applications are anticipated in the development of `perfect' lenses, filters, wavefront-conditioning layers and in improved metrology. The conference focussed additionally on dielectrics in support of electronics, photonics and optics, nano-materials, composites and structures, and the development of tuneable dielectrics and resonators for future applications in telecommunications. We are pleased to report that the conference was successful in achieving its objectives, thirty-four oral papers were delivered and twenty

  17. Improving Emergency Preparedness System Readiness through Simulation and Interprofessional Education

    PubMed Central

    Rambeck, Joan H.; Snyder, Annamay

    2014-01-01

    We applied emerging evidence in simulation science to create a curriculum in emergency response for health science students and professionals. Our research project was designed to (1) test the effectiveness of specific immersive simulations, (2) create reliable assessment tools for emergency response and team communication skills, and (3) assess participants' retention and transfer of skills over time. We collected both quantitative and qualitative data about individual and team knowledge, skills, and attitudes. Content experts designed and pilot-tested scaled quantitative tools. Qualitative evaluations administered immediately after simulations and longitudinal surveys administered 6–12 months later measured student participants' individual perceptions of their confidence, readiness for emergency response, and transfer of skills to their day-to-day experience. Results from 312 participants enrolled in nine workshops during a 24-month period indicated that the 10-hour curriculum is efficient (compared with larger-scale or longer training programs) and effective in improving skills. The curriculum may be useful for public health practitioners interested in addressing public health emergency preparedness competencies and Institute of Medicine research priority areas. PMID:25355984

  18. Improving emergency preparedness system readiness through simulation and interprofessional education.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jane Lindsay; Rambeck, Joan H; Snyder, Annamay

    2014-01-01

    We applied emerging evidence in simulation science to create a curriculum in emergency response for health science students and professionals. Our research project was designed to (1) test the effectiveness of specific immersive simulations, (2) create reliable assessment tools for emergency response and team communication skills, and (3) assess participants' retention and transfer of skills over time. We collected both quantitative and qualitative data about individual and team knowledge, skills, and attitudes. Content experts designed and pilot-tested scaled quantitative tools. Qualitative evaluations administered immediately after simulations and longitudinal surveys administered 6-12 months later measured student participants' individual perceptions of their confidence, readiness for emergency response, and transfer of skills to their day-to-day experience. Results from 312 participants enrolled in nine workshops during a 24-month period indicated that the 10-hour curriculum is efficient (compared with larger-scale or longer training programs) and effective in improving skills. The curriculum may be useful for public health practitioners interested in addressing public health emergency preparedness competencies and Institute of Medicine research priority areas. PMID:25355984

  19. Improving emergency preparedness system readiness through simulation and interprofessional education.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jane Lindsay; Rambeck, Joan H; Snyder, Annamay

    2014-01-01

    We applied emerging evidence in simulation science to create a curriculum in emergency response for health science students and professionals. Our research project was designed to (1) test the effectiveness of specific immersive simulations, (2) create reliable assessment tools for emergency response and team communication skills, and (3) assess participants' retention and transfer of skills over time. We collected both quantitative and qualitative data about individual and team knowledge, skills, and attitudes. Content experts designed and pilot-tested scaled quantitative tools. Qualitative evaluations administered immediately after simulations and longitudinal surveys administered 6-12 months later measured student participants' individual perceptions of their confidence, readiness for emergency response, and transfer of skills to their day-to-day experience. Results from 312 participants enrolled in nine workshops during a 24-month period indicated that the 10-hour curriculum is efficient (compared with larger-scale or longer training programs) and effective in improving skills. The curriculum may be useful for public health practitioners interested in addressing public health emergency preparedness competencies and Institute of Medicine research priority areas.

  20. Development of improved technology for decommissioning operations

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, R.P.

    1982-07-01

    This paper describes the technology development activities conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory under US Department of Energy sponsorship to help ensure the availability of safe, cost-effective and environmentally sound decommissioning technology for radioactively contaminated facilities. These improved decommissioning technologies include techniques for the removal of contaminated concrete surfaces and coatings, adaptation of electropolishing and vibratory finishing decontamination techniques for field decommissioning applications, development of sensitive field instrumentation and methods for the monitoring of large surface areas, techniques for the field sectioning of contaminated components, improved contamination-stabilizing coatings and application methods, and development of a small solidification system for the field solidification of liquid waste. The results of cost/benefit studies for some of these technologies are also reported.

  1. General process improvements through pinch technology

    SciTech Connect

    Linnhoff, B.; Polley, G.T.; Sahdev, V.

    1988-06-01

    Over the last ten years pinch technology has emerged as somewhat of a ''maverick'' development in the process design and energy conservation scene. Running contrary to general trends by taking the computer out of the loop and putting the engineer back in control, it has been questioned by some and welcomed by others. Regardless of persuasion, however, critics and advocates alike have largely failed to notice that pinch technology is more than an energy conservation tool. This is probably because soon after the advent of pinch technology in the 1970s, the process design scene became dominated by the oil crisis. Energy savings became the primary task of process designers and, therefore, the primary focus of the technology. Application during this period typically demonstrated energy cost savings in the range of 20 to 50 percent and payback periods of one year or less. Only recently have the other benefits of the technology reemerged. While it is true that pinch technology is essentially a heat-flow-based technique it is also true that it can be used to address a very diverse range of objectives.

  2. Emerging technology: A key enabler for modernizing pharmaceutical manufacturing and advancing product quality.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Thomas F; Yu, Lawrence X; Lee, Sau L

    2016-07-25

    Issues in product quality have produced recalls and caused drug shortages in United States (U.S.) in the past few years. These quality issues were often due to outdated manufacturing technologies and equipment as well as lack of an effective quality management system. To ensure consistent supply of safe, effective and high-quality drug products available to the patients, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) supports modernizing pharmaceutical manufacturing for improvements in product quality. Specifically, five new initiatives are proposed here to achieve this goal. They include: (i) advancing regulatory science for pharmaceutical manufacturing; (ii) establishing a public-private institute for pharmaceutical manufacturing innovation; (iii) creating incentives for investment in the technological upgrade of manufacturing processes and facilities; (iv) leveraging external expertise for regulatory quality assessment of emerging technologies; and (v) promoting the international harmonization of approaches for expediting the global adoption of emerging technologies.

  3. Using Computer Technology in the Automation of Clinical and Operating Systems in Emergency Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Guarisco, Joseph S.

    2001-01-01

    The practical application of Emergency Medicine throughout the country has historically been viewed by healthcare workers and patients as one of inefficiency and chaos. Believing that the practice of Emergency Medicine was, to the contrary, predictable, we at Ochsner felt that tremendous improvements in efficiency could be won if the vast amount of data generated in our experience of nearly 40,000 Emergency Department visits per year could be harvested. Such improvements would require the employment of computer technology and powerful database management systems. By applying these tools to profile the practice of Emergency Medicine in our institution, we were able to harvest important clinical and operational information that was ultimately used to improve department efficiency and productivity. The ability to analyze data and manage processes within the Emergency Department allowed us to target resources much more efficiently, significantly reducing nonproductive work. The collected data were sorted and filtered by a host of variables creating the ability to profile subsets of our practice—most importantly, physician practice habits and performance. Furthermore, the development of “patient tracking” software allowed us to update, view, and trend data in real-time and tweak clinical and operational processes simultaneously. The data-driven, analytical approach to the management of the Emergency Department has yielded significant improvements in service to our patients and lower operational costs. PMID:21765721

  4. Using LEAN to improve a segment of emergency department flow.

    PubMed

    Vose, Courtney; Reichard, Christine; Pool, Susan; Snyder, Megan; Burmeister, David

    2014-11-01

    Emergency department (ED) overcrowding is an organizational concern. This article describes how Toyota LEAN methods were used as a performance improvement framework to address ED overcrowding. This initiative also impacted "bolus of patients" or "batching" concerns, which occur when inpatient units receive an influx of patients from EDs and other areas at the same time. In addition to decreased incidence of overcrowding, the organization realized increased interprofessional collaboration. PMID:25340919

  5. [Transgenic technology and soybean quality improvement].

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hao; Jin, Hang-Xia; Gai, Jun-Yi; Yu, De-Yue

    2011-05-01

    Soybean is an important source of edible oil, protein and protein diet. The breeding process of high quality soybean can be accelerated via employment of transgenic technology, by which the key genes for soybean quality traits could be directly manipulated. Thus, various soybean varieties could be bred to fulfill different needs for specific consumers. Here, we reviewed the contribution of transgenic technology to improvement of soybean qualities in recent years. We also introduce some newly developed safe transgenic technologies and hope this information could relieve some concerns on the GM food.

  6. Improving mine safety technology and training: establishing US global leadership

    SciTech Connect

    2006-12-15

    In 2006, the USA's record of mine safety was interrupted by fatalities that rocked the industry and caused the National Mining Association and its members to recommit to returning the US underground coal mining industry to a global mine safety leadership role. This report details a comprehensive approach to increase the odds of survival for miners in emergency situations and to create a culture of prevention of accidents. Among its 75 recommendations are a need to improve communications, mine rescue training, and escape and protection of miners. Section headings of the report are: Introduction; Review of mine emergency situations in the past 25 years: identifying and addressing the issues and complexities; Risk-based design and management; Communications technology; Escape and protection strategies; Emergency response and mine rescue procedures; Training for preparedness; Summary of recommendations; and Conclusions. 37 refs., 3 figs., 5 apps.

  7. Emergency shutdown systems: Improved understanding of design requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Bratland, O.

    1995-12-01

    Wellhead- and process emergency shutdown systems are complex in the sense that their design has to rely on knowledge from many different disciplines. This paper discusses the most common weaknesses in traditional ESD system design and proposes some modifications with emphasis on the hydraulic part of topside ESD systems. The information is based on inspections carried out on most installations in the Norwegian sector of the North Sea, countless interviews of offshore personnel and design experience from some of the largest platforms in the world. It also outlines possible simplifications and cost savings during upgrading of old systems. A newly developed valve that has the potential to reduce complexity and save costs in ESD systems is presented. In subsea control systems, the new technology can reduce installation costs considerably by reducing the need for electrical cables. The paper is relevant to designers of wellhead and process emergency shutdown systems, hydraulic power units, and accumulator banks.

  8. PREFACE: Emerging non-volatile memories: magnetic and resistive technologies Emerging non-volatile memories: magnetic and resistive technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dieny, B.; Jagadish, Chennupati

    2013-02-01

    In 2010, the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS) published an assessment of the potential and maturity of selected emerging research on memory technologies. Eight different technologies of non-volatile memories were compared (ferroelectric gate field-effect transistor, nano-electro-mechanical switch, spin-transfer torque random access memories (STTRAM), various types of resistive RAM, in particular redox RAM, nanothermal phase change RAM, electronic effects RAM, macromolecular memories and molecular RAM). In this report, spin-transfer torque MRAM and redox RRAM were identified as two emerging memory technologies recommended for accelerated research and development leading to scaling and commercialization of non-volatile RAM to and beyond the 16nm generation. Nowadays, there is an intense research and development effort in microelectronics on these two technologies, one based on spintronic phenomena (tunnel magnetoresistance and spin-transfer torque), the other based on migration of vacancies or ions in an insulating matrix driven by oxydo-reduction potentials. Both technologies could be used for standalone or embedded applications. In this context, it appeared timely to publish a cluster of review articles related to these two technologies. In this cluster, the first two articles introduce the general principles of spin-transfer torque RAM and of thermally assisted RAM. The third presents a broader range of applications for this integrated CMOS/magnetic tunnel junction technology for low-power electronics. The fourth paper presents more advanced research on voltage control of magnetization switching with the aim of dramatically reducing the write energy in MRAM. The last two papers deal with two categories of resistive RAM, one based on the migration of cations, the other one based on nanowires. We thank all the authors and reviewers for their contribution to this cluster issue. Our special thanks are due to Dr Olivia Roche, Publisher, and Dr

  9. A Study of Scientometric Methods to Identify Emerging Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Abercrombie, Robert K; Udoeyop, Akaninyene W

    2011-01-01

    This work examines a scientometric model that tracks the emergence of an identified technology from initial discovery (via original scientific and conference literature), through critical discoveries (via original scientific, conference literature and patents), transitioning through Technology Readiness Levels (TRLs) and ultimately on to commercial application. During the period of innovation and technology transfer, the impact of scholarly works, patents and on-line web news sources are identified. As trends develop, currency of citations, collaboration indicators, and on-line news patterns are identified. The combinations of four distinct and separate searchable on-line networked sources (i.e., scholarly publications and citation, worldwide patents, news archives, and on-line mapping networks) are assembled to become one collective network (a dataset for analysis of relations). This established network becomes the basis from which to quickly analyze the temporal flow of activity (searchable events) for the example subject domain we investigated.

  10. Emerging technologies for the in-situ production of MMCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koczak, M. J.; Premkumar, M. K.

    1993-01-01

    Among the numerous methods of producing discontinuously reinforced metal-matrix composites, technologies allowing insitu production of the reinforcing phase offer significant advantages from a technical and economic standpoint. The in-situ formation of a ceramic second phase provides greater control of the size and level of reinforcement, yielding better tailorability of the composite properties. As an example, significantly finer ceramic particulates are possible, which minimizes toughness degradation that is traditionally associated with composites containing relatively large particles. Several emerging, innovative technologies in this area are under development. As with any new technology there are technical challenges, but it is believed that these processes have unique capabilities and, thus, they present cost-effective production processes for metal-matrix composites.

  11. Enhancing the Use of Vehicle Alcohol Interlocks With Emerging Technology

    PubMed Central

    Voas, Robert B.

    2014-01-01

    Among the earliest applications of health technologies to a safety program was the development of blood alcohol content (BAC) tests for use in impaired-driving enforcement. This led to the development of miniature, highly accurate devices that officers could carry in their pockets. A natural extension of this technology was the vehicle alcohol interlock, which is used to reduce recidivism among drivers convicted of driving under the influence (DUI) by requiring them to install the devices (which will not allow someone with a positive BAC to drive) on their vehicles. While on the vehicle, interlocks have been shown to reduce recidivism by two-thirds. Use of these devices has been growing at the rate of 10 to 15 percent a year, and there currently are more than 300,000 units in use. This expansion in the application of interlocks has benefited from the integration of other emerging technologies into interlock systems. Such technologies include data systems that record both driver actions and vehicle responses, miniature cameras and face recognition to identify the user, Wi-Fi systems to provide rapid reporting on offender performance and any attempt to circumvent the device, GPS tracking of the vehicle, and more rapid means for monitoring the integrity of the interlock system. This article describes how these health technologies are being applied in interlock programs and the outlook for new technologies and new court sanctioning programs that may influence the growth in the use of interlocks in the future. PMID:26259002

  12. Emerging techniques and technologies in brain tumor imaging.

    PubMed

    Ellingson, Benjamin M; Bendszus, Martin; Sorensen, A Gregory; Pope, Whitney B

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the state of imaging techniques and technologies for detecting response of brain tumors to treatment in the setting of multicenter clinical trials. Within currently used technologies, implementation of standardized image acquisition and the use of volumetric estimates and subtraction maps are likely to help to improve tumor visualization, delineation, and quantification. Upon further development, refinement, and standardization, imaging technologies such as diffusion and perfusion MRI and amino acid PET may contribute to the detection of tumor response to treatment, particularly in specific treatment settings. Over the next few years, new technologies such as 2(3)Na MRI and CEST imaging technologies will be explored for their use in expanding the ability to quantitatively image tumor response to therapies in a clinical trial setting.

  13. Aviation system capacity improvements through technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, W. Don

    1995-01-01

    A study was conducted with the primary objective of determining the impact of technology on capacity improvements in the U.S. air transportation system and, consequently, to assess the areas where NASA's expertise and technical contributions would be the most beneficial. The outlook of the study is considered both near- and long-term (5 to 25 years). The approach was that of actively working with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Flight Transportation Laboratory and included interactions with 'users' outside of both agencies as well as with organizations within. This report includes an overall survey of what are believed to be the causes of the capacity problems, ongoing work with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to alleviate the problems, and identifies improvements in technology that would increase capacity and reduce delays.

  14. Emergency department mental health triage scales improve outcomes.

    PubMed

    Broadbent, Marc; Jarman, Heather; Berk, Michael

    2004-02-01

    The assessment and management of clients with mental illness is an important facet of providing emergency care. In Australian emergency departments, it is usually the generalist registered nurses* without adequate preparation in the assessment and care for clients with mental illness who conduct the initial assessment at triage. A search of the literature revealed a limited number of publications addressing the provision of triage and management guidelines to assist nurses to make objective clinical decisions to ensure appropriate care for clients with mental illness. This paper examines the need for such guidelines and reviews a number of mental health triage scales that have been evaluated for use in emergency departments. Findings show that these triage scales have led to improvements in staff confidence and attitudes when dealing with clients with mental health problems, resulting in improved outcomes for clients. Strengths and limitations of the evaluations have also been explored. Highlighted is the need for consideration of the inclusion of clients' reactions to the impact of this change to service delivery in future evaluations.

  15. Improving the Quality of Imaging in the Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Blackmore, C Craig; Castro, Alexandra

    2015-12-01

    Imaging is critical for the care of emergency department (ED) patients. However, much of the imaging performed for acute care today is overutilization, creating substantial cost without significant benefit. Further, the value of imaging is not easily defined, as imaging only affects outcomes indirectly, through interaction with treatment. Improving the quality, including appropriateness, of emergency imaging requires understanding of how imaging contributes to patient care. The six-tier efficacy hierarchy of Fryback and Thornbury enables understanding of the value of imaging on multiple levels, ranging from technical efficacy to medical decision-making and higher-level patient and societal outcomes. The imaging efficacy hierarchy also allows definition of imaging quality through the Institute of Medicine (IOM)'s quality domains of safety, effectiveness, patient-centeredness, timeliness, efficiency, and equitability and provides a foundation for quality improvement. In this article, the authors elucidate the Fryback and Thornbury framework to define the value of imaging in the ED and to relate emergency imaging to the IOM quality domains.

  16. Narrow band gap conjugated polymers for emergent optoelectronic technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azoulay, Jason D.; Zhang, Benjamin A.; London, Alexander E.

    2015-09-01

    Conjugated organic molecules effectively produce and harvest visible light and find utility in a variety of emergent optoelectronic technologies. There is currently interest in expanding the scope of these materials to extend functionality into the infrared (IR) spectral regions and endow functionality relevant in emergent technologies. Developing an understanding of the interplay between chemical and electronic structure in these systems will require control of the frontier orbital energetics (separation, position, and alignment), ground state electronic configurations, interchain arrangements, solid-state properties, and many other molecular features with synthetic precision that has yet to be demonstrated. Bridgehead imine substituted 4H-cyclopenta[2,1-b:3,4-b']dithiophene (CPDT) structural units, in combination with strong acceptors with progressively delocalized π-systems, afford modular donor-acceptor copolymers with broad and long wavelength absorption that spans technologically relevant wavelength (λ) ranges from 0.7 < λ < 3.2 μm.1 Here we demonstrate that electronic and structural manipulation play a major role in influencing the energetics of these systems and ultimately controlling the band gap of the materials. These results bear implication in the development of very narrow band gap systems where precise control will be necessary for achieving desired properties such as interactions with longer wavelength light.

  17. Physician's emerging roles relating to trends in health information technology.

    PubMed

    David Johnson, J

    2014-08-12

    Objective: To determine the new roles that physicians will adopt in the near future to adjust to accelerating trends from managed care to outcome-based practice to health care reform to health information technology to the evolving role of health consumers. Methods: Trends and related developments concerning the changing roles of physicians based on prior literature reviews. Results: Six possible roles, traditional, gatekeeper, coach, navigator, informatician and one voice among many, are discussed in terms of physician's centrality, patient autonomy, decision-making and uncertainty, information seeking, satisfaction and outcomes, particularly those related to compliance. Conclusion: A greater understanding of these emerging roles could lead to more efficacious outcomes in our ever changing, increasingly complex medical system. Patients often have little understanding of emerging trends that lead to the development of specialized roles such as hospitalist and navigators and, relatedly, the evolving roles of physicians.

  18. New technologies in predicting, preventing and controlling emerging infectious diseases

    PubMed Central

    Christaki, Eirini

    2015-01-01

    Surveillance of emerging infectious diseases is vital for the early identification of public health threats. Emergence of novel infections is linked to human factors such as population density, travel and trade and ecological factors like climate change and agricultural practices. A wealth of new technologies is becoming increasingly available for the rapid molecular identification of pathogens but also for the more accurate monitoring of infectious disease activity. Web-based surveillance tools and epidemic intelligence methods, used by all major public health institutions, are intended to facilitate risk assessment and timely outbreak detection. In this review, we present new methods for regional and global infectious disease surveillance and advances in epidemic modeling aimed to predict and prevent future infectious diseases threats. PMID:26068569

  19. Contaminated concrete: Occurrence and emerging technologies for DOE decontamination

    SciTech Connect

    Dickerson, K.S.; Wilson-Nichols, M.J.; Morris, M.I.

    1995-08-01

    The goals of the Facility Deactivation, Decommissioning, and Material Disposition Focus Area, sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Development, are to select, demonstrate, test, and evaluate an integrated set of technologies tailored to provide a complete solution to specific problems posed by deactivation, decontamination, and decommissioning, (D&D). In response to these goals, technical task plan (TTP) OR152002, entitled Accelerated Testing of Concrete Decontamination Methods, was submitted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This report describes the results from the initial project tasks, which focused on the nature and extent of contaminated concrete, emerging candidate technologies, and matching of emerging technologies to concrete problems. Existing information was used to describe the nature and extent of contamination (technology logic diagrams, data bases, and the open literature). To supplement this information, personnel at various DOE sites were interviewed, providing a broad perspective of concrete contamination. Because characterization is in the initial stage at many sites, complete information is not available. Assimilation of available information into one location is helpful in identifying potential areas of concern in the future. The most frequently occurring radiological contaminants within the DOE complex are {sup 137}Cs, {sup 238}U (and it daughters), and {sup 60}Co, followed closely by {sup 90}Sr and tritium, which account for {minus}30% of the total occurrence. Twenty-four percent of the contaminants were listed as unknown, indicating a lack of characterization information, and 24% were listed as other contaminants (over 100 isotopes) with less than 1% occurrence per isotope.

  20. Improving Emergency Department Door to Doctor Time and Process Reliability

    PubMed Central

    El Sayed, Mazen J.; El-Eid, Ghada R.; Saliba, Miriam; Jabbour, Rima; Hitti, Eveline A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study is to determine the effectiveness of using lean management methods on improving emergency department door to doctor times at a tertiary care hospital. We performed a before and after study at an academic urban emergency department with 49,000 annual visits after implementing a series of lean driven interventions over a 20 month period. The primary outcome was mean door to doctor time and the secondary outcome was length of stay of both admitted and discharged patients. A convenience sample from the preintervention phase (February 2012) was compared to another from the postintervention phase (mid-October to mid-November 2013). Individual control charts were used to assess process stability. Postintervention there was a statistically significant decrease in the mean door to doctor time measure (40.0 minutes ± 53.44 vs 25.3 minutes ± 15.93 P < 0.001). The postintervention process was more statistically in control with a drop in the upper control limits from 148.8 to 72.9 minutes. Length of stay of both admitted and discharged patients dropped from 2.6 to 2.0 hours and 9.0 to 5.5 hours, respectively. All other variables including emergency department visit daily volumes, hospital occupancy, and left without being seen rates were comparable. Using lean change management techniques can be effective in reducing door to doctor time in the Emergency Department and improving process reliability. PMID:26496278

  1. Negative reinforcement in applied behavior analysis: an emerging technology.

    PubMed Central

    Iwata, B A

    1987-01-01

    Although the effects of negative reinforcement on human behavior have been studied for a number of years, a comprehensive body of applied research does not exist at this time. This article describes three aspects of negative reinforcement as it relates to applied behavior analysis: behavior acquired or maintained through negative reinforcement, the treatment of negatively reinforced behavior, and negative reinforcement as therapy. A consideration of research currently being done in these areas suggests the emergence of an applied technology on negative reinforcement. PMID:3323157

  2. Health information exchange improves identification of frequent emergency department users.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Jason S; Johnson, Sarah A; Angiollilo, John; Fleischman, William; Onyile, Arit; Kuperman, Gilad

    2013-12-01

    We hypothesized that using communitywide data from a health information exchange (HIE) could improve the ability to identify frequent emergency department (ED) users-those with four or more ED visits in thirty days-by allowing ED use to be measured across unaffiliated hospitals. When we analyzed HIE-wide data instead of site-specific data, we identified 20.3 percent more frequent ED users (5,756 versus 4,785) and 16.0 percent more visits by them to the ED (53,031 versus 45,771). Additionally, we found that 28.8 percent of frequent ED users visited multiple EDs during the twelve-month study period, versus 3.0 percent of all ED users. All three differences were significant ($$p ). An improved ability to identify frequent ED users allows better targeting of case management and other services that can improve frequent ED users' health and reduce their use of costly emergency medical services.

  3. Improving Emergency Response and Human-Robotic Performance

    SciTech Connect

    David I. Gertman; David J. Bruemmer; R. Scott Hartley

    2007-08-01

    Preparedness for chemical, biological, and radiological/nuclear incidents at nuclear power plants (NPPs) includes the deployment of well trained emergency response teams. While teams are expected to do well, data from other domains suggests that the timeliness and accuracy associated with incident response can be improved through collaborative human-robotic interaction. Many incident response scenarios call for multiple, complex procedure-based activities performed by personnel wearing cumbersome personal protective equipment (PPE) and operating under high levels of stress and workload. While robotic assistance is postulated to reduce workload and exposure, limitations associated with communications and the robot’s ability to act independently have served to limit reliability and reduce our potential to exploit human –robotic interaction and efficacy of response. Recent work at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) on expanding robot capability has the potential to improve human-system response during disaster management and recovery. Specifically, increasing the range of higher level robot behaviors such as autonomous navigation and mapping, evolving new abstractions for sensor and control data, and developing metaphors for operator control have the potential to improve state-of-the-art in incident response. This paper discusses these issues and reports on experiments underway intelligence residing on the robot to enhance emergency response.

  4. Can technology improve alignment during knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Thienpont, Emmanuel; Fennema, Peter; Price, Andrew

    2013-09-01

    Component malalignment remains a concern in total knee arthroplasty (TKA); therefore, a series of technologies have been developed to improve alignment. The authors conducted a systematic review to compare computer-assisted navigation with conventional instrumentation, and assess the current evidence for patient-matched instrumentation and robot-assisted implantation. An extensive search of the PubMed database for relevant meta-analyses, systematic reviews and original articles was performed, with each study scrutinised by two reviewers. Data on study characteristics and outcomes were extracted from each study and compared. In total 30 studies were included: 10 meta-analyses comparing computer-assisted navigation and conventional instrumentation, 13 studies examining patient-matched instrumentation, and seven investigating robot-assisted implantation. Computer-assisted navigation showed significant and reproducible improvements in mechanical alignment over conventional instrumentation. Patient-matched instrumentation appeared to achieve a high degree of mechanical alignment, although the majority of studies were of poor quality. The data for robot-assisted surgery was less indicative. Computer-assisted navigation improves alignment during TKA over conventional instrumentation. For patient-matched instrumentation and robot-assisted implantation, alignment benefits have not been reliably demonstrated. For all three technologies, clinical benefits cannot currently be assumed, and further studies are required. Although current technologies to improve alignment during TKA appear to result in intra-operative benefits, their clinical impact remains unclear, and surgeons should take this into account when considering their adoption.

  5. Process Improvements to Reform Patient Flow in the Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Whatley, Shawn D; Leung, Alexander K; Duic, Marko

    2016-01-01

    Emergency departments (ED) function to diagnose, stabilize, manage and dispose patients as efficiently as possible. Although problems may be suspected at triage, ED physician input is required at each step of the patient journey through the ED, from diagnosis to disposition. If we want timely diagnosis, appropriate treatment and great outcomes, then ED processes should connect patients and physicians as quickly as possible. This article discusses the key concepts of ED patient flow, value and efficiency. Based on these fundamentals, it describes the significant impact of ED process improvements implemented on measures of ED efficiency at a large community ED in Ontario, Canada. PMID:27133605

  6. Process Improvements to Reform Patient Flow in the Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Whatley, Shawn D; Leung, Alexander K; Duic, Marko

    2016-01-01

    Emergency departments (ED) function to diagnose, stabilize, manage and dispose patients as efficiently as possible. Although problems may be suspected at triage, ED physician input is required at each step of the patient journey through the ED, from diagnosis to disposition. If we want timely diagnosis, appropriate treatment and great outcomes, then ED processes should connect patients and physicians as quickly as possible. This article discusses the key concepts of ED patient flow, value and efficiency. Based on these fundamentals, it describes the significant impact of ED process improvements implemented on measures of ED efficiency at a large community ED in Ontario, Canada.

  7. Improved Emergency Egress Lighting System for the ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eaton, Leslie L.; Barr, Don A.

    2005-01-01

    Emergency lights provide illumination in corridors, stairwells, ramps, escalators, aisles, and exit passageways during power failures. Safety and visibility are critical during a power outage. If emergency lights fail to operate properly, the building occupants can become disoriented. Four documents in a collection discuss different topics relating to a proposed improved emergency egress lighting system (EELS) for the International Space Station (ISS). While the present EELS is designed around rows of green-light-emitting diodes, the proposed system contains strips of electroluminescent tape using different colors for each egress path. The proposed EELS can be powered by the same battery currently used by the present EELS, but would require an inverter because electroluminescent devices require AC. Electroluminescent devices also require significantly less current and, depending on the color, would emit 3 to 8 times the light of the present EELS. In addition, they could operate for up to 75 hours (versus .20 minutes for the present system). The first document contains a one-page summary of the proposal and an evaluation of technical merit. The second document summarizes the motivation for, and the design of, the proposed EELS. The third document addresses relevant aspects of the measurement of spectral sensitivity and the psychophysics of perception of light. The fourth document presents additional background information and technical specifications for the electroluminescent tapes.

  8. Experience Scaling Up Manufacturing of Emerging Photovoltaic Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, G. W.; Skinner, D. E.

    2007-01-01

    This report examines two important generic photovoltaic technologies at particularly revealing stages of development, i.e., the stages between R&D and stable commercial production and profitable sales. Based on two historical cases, it attempts to shed light on the difference between: (1) costs and schedules validated by actual manufacturing and market experience, and (2) estimated costs and schedules that rely on technology forecasts and engineering estimates. The amorphous Silicon case also identifies some of the costs that are incurred in meeting specific market requirements, while the Cadmium Telluride case identifies many of the operational challenges involved in transferring R&D results to production. The transition between R&D and commercial success takes a great deal of time and money for emerging energy conversion technologies in general. The experience reported here can be instructive to those managing comparable efforts, and to their investors. It can also be instructive to R&D managers responsible for positioning such new technologies for commercial success.

  9. Mining for Emerging Technologies within Text Streams and Documents

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, David W.; Whitney, Paul D.; Calapristi, Augustin J.; Brockman, Fred J.

    2009-02-10

    Text streams, collections of documents or messages that are generated and observed over time, are ubiquitous. Our research and development is targeted at developing algorithms to find and characterize changes in topic within text streams. To date, this research has demonstrated the ability to detect and describe 1) short duration, atypical events and 2) the emergence of longer term shifts in topical content. This technology has been applied to pre-defined temporally ordered document collections but is also suitable for application to near real-time textual data streams. The underlying event and emergence detection algorithms have been interfaced to an event detection software user interface named SURPRISE. This software provides an interactive graphical user interface and tools for manipulating and correlating the terms and scores identified by the algorithms. Additionally, SURPRISE has been interfaced with the IN-SPIRE text analytics tool to enable an analyst to evaluate the surprising or emerging terms via a visualization of the entire document collection. IN-SPIRE assists in the exploration of related topics, events and views currently based on single term events. The focus of this research is to contribute to detecting, and preventing, strategic surprise.

  10. The role of surgeons in identifying emerging technologies for health technology assessment

    PubMed Central

    Stafinski, Tania; Topfer, Leigh-Ann; Zakariasen, Ken; Menon, Devidas

    2010-01-01

    Background Health technology assessment (HTA) is a tool intended to help policy-makers decide which technologies to fund. However, given the proliferation of new technologies, it is not possible to undertake an HTA of each one before it becomes funded. Consequently, “horizon-scanning” processes have been developed to identify emerging technologies that are likely to have a substantial impact on clinical practice. Although the importance of physicians in the adoption of new technologies is well recognized, their role in horizon scanning in Canada has been limited. The purpose of this project was to pilot an approach to engage physicians, specifically surgeons, in provincial horizon-scanning activities. Methods We invited 18 surgeons from Alberta’s 2 medical schools to a horizon-scanning workshop to solicit their views on emerging technologies expected to impact surgical practice within the next 5 years and/or the importance of different attributes or characteristics of new technologies. Results Surgeons, regardless of specialty, identified developments designed to enhance existing minimally invasive surgical techniques, such as endoscopic, robotic and image-guided surgery. Several nonsurgical areas, including molecular genetics and nanotechnology, were also identified. Of the 13 technology attributes discussed, safety or risk, effectiveness and feasibility were rated as most important. Lastly, participating surgeons expressed an interest in becoming further involved in local HTA initiatives. Conclusion Surgeons, as adopters and users of health technologies, represent an important and accessible information source for identifying emerging technologies for HTA. A more formal, ongoing relationship between the government, HTA and surgeons may help to optimize the use of HTA resources. PMID:20334740

  11. Project Responder: technology needs for local emergency response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beakley, Guy; Garwin, Thomas; Pollard, Neal A.; Singley, George T., III; Tuohy, Robert V.; Lupo, Jasper

    2003-09-01

    Since April 2001, the Oklahoma City National Memorial Institute for the Prevention of Terrorism has funded an effort by Hicks &Associates, Inc. and the Terrorism Research Center, Inc., aimed ultimately at improving local, state, and federal emergency responders" capabilities for mitigating the effects of chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or explosive/ incendiary (CBRNE) terrorism. This effort, titled "Project Responder," began by developing an understanding of how state and local responders view their current capabilities, shortfalls, and needs. This paper discusses some of the results of this first phase of the effort that has resulted in a comprehensive report titled "Emergency Responders" Needs, Goals, and Priorities." This paper addresses two of the capabilities from that report which we believe are of most interest to this conference. There are ten other capabilities discussed in the report, which may also be of interest.

  12. Improving Patients Experience in Peadiatric Emergency Waiting Room.

    PubMed

    Ehrler, Frederic; Siebert, Johan; Wipfli, Rolf; Duret, Cyrille; Gervaix, Alain; Lovis, Christian

    2016-01-01

    When visiting the emergency department, the perception of the time spent in the waiting room before the beginning of the care, may influence patients' experience. Based on models of service evaluation, highlighting the importance of informing people about their waiting process and their place in the queue, we have developed an innovative information screen aiming at improving perception of time by patients. Following an iterative process, a group of experts including computer scientists, ergonomists and caregivers designed a solution adapted to the pediatric context. The solution includes a screen displaying five lanes representing triage levels. Patients are represented by individual avatars, drawn sequentially in the appropriate line. The interface has been designed using gamification principle, aiming at increasing acceptance, lowering learning curve and improving satisfaction. Questionnaire based evaluation results revealed high satisfaction from the 278 respondents even if the informative content was not always completely clear. PMID:27332258

  13. Process-Improvement Cost Model for the Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Dyas, Sheila R; Greenfield, Eric; Messimer, Sherri; Thotakura, Swati; Gholston, Sampson; Doughty, Tracy; Hays, Mary; Ivey, Richard; Spalding, Joseph; Phillips, Robin

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this report is to present a simplified, activity-based costing approach for hospital emergency departments (EDs) to use with Lean Six Sigma cost-benefit analyses. The cost model complexity is reduced by removing diagnostic and condition-specific costs, thereby revealing the underlying process activities' cost inefficiencies. Examples are provided for evaluating the cost savings from reducing discharge delays and the cost impact of keeping patients in the ED (boarding) after the decision to admit has been made. The process-improvement cost model provides a needed tool in selecting, prioritizing, and validating Lean process-improvement projects in the ED and other areas of patient care that involve multiple dissimilar diagnoses. PMID:26720989

  14. Process-Improvement Cost Model for the Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Dyas, Sheila R; Greenfield, Eric; Messimer, Sherri; Thotakura, Swati; Gholston, Sampson; Doughty, Tracy; Hays, Mary; Ivey, Richard; Spalding, Joseph; Phillips, Robin

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this report is to present a simplified, activity-based costing approach for hospital emergency departments (EDs) to use with Lean Six Sigma cost-benefit analyses. The cost model complexity is reduced by removing diagnostic and condition-specific costs, thereby revealing the underlying process activities' cost inefficiencies. Examples are provided for evaluating the cost savings from reducing discharge delays and the cost impact of keeping patients in the ED (boarding) after the decision to admit has been made. The process-improvement cost model provides a needed tool in selecting, prioritizing, and validating Lean process-improvement projects in the ED and other areas of patient care that involve multiple dissimilar diagnoses.

  15. Role of design complexity in technology improvement.

    PubMed

    McNerney, James; Farmer, J Doyne; Redner, Sidney; Trancik, Jessika E

    2011-05-31

    We study a simple model for the evolution of the cost (or more generally the performance) of a technology or production process. The technology can be decomposed into n components, each of which interacts with a cluster of d - 1 other components. Innovation occurs through a series of trial-and-error events, each of which consists of randomly changing the cost of each component in a cluster, and accepting the changes only if the total cost of the cluster is lowered. We show that the relationship between the cost of the whole technology and the number of innovation attempts is asymptotically a power law, matching the functional form often observed for empirical data. The exponent α of the power law depends on the intrinsic difficulty of finding better components, and on what we term the design complexity: the more complex the design, the slower the rate of improvement. Letting d as defined above be the connectivity, in the special case in which the connectivity is constant, the design complexity is simply the connectivity. When the connectivity varies, bottlenecks can arise in which a few components limit progress. In this case the design complexity depends on the details of the design. The number of bottlenecks also determines whether progress is steady, or whether there are periods of stasis punctuated by occasional large changes. Our model connects the engineering properties of a design to historical studies of technology improvement.

  16. Emerging Communication Technologies (ECT) Phase 2 Report. Volume 3; Ultra Wideband (UWB) Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bastin, Gary L.; Harris, William G.; Chiodini, Robert; Nelson, Richard A.; Huang, PoTien; Kruhm, David A.

    2003-01-01

    The Emerging Communication Technology (ECT) project investigated three First Mile communication technologies in support of NASA s Second Generation Reusable Launch Vehicle (2nd Gen RLV), Orbital Space Plane, Advanced Range Technology Working Group (ARTWG) and the Advanced Spaceport Technology Working Group (ASTWG). These First Mile technologies have the purpose of interconnecting mobile users with existing Range Communication infrastructures. ECT was a continuation of the Range Information System Management (RISM) task started in 2002. RISM identified the three advance communication technologies investigated under ECT. These were Wireless Ethernet (Wi-Fi), Free Space Optics (FSO), and Ultra Wideband (UWB). Due to the report s size, it has been broken into three volumes: 1) Main Report 2) Appendices 3) UWB

  17. Improving acute medical management: Junior Doctor Emergency Prescription Cards

    PubMed Central

    Hutton, Joe; Gingell, Megan; Hutchinson, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Doctors commencing Foundation Year (FY) training face many stresses and challenges. FY doctors are often the first point of contact for acutely unwell and deteriorating patients. Trust guidelines are used to aid acute medical management. Accessing guidelines is often fraught with barriers. Evidence suggests aide-memoire cards can provide easier access to guidelines and management pathways. We aimed to improve prescribing accuracy and efficiency of FY doctors for acute medical conditions within Gloucestershire trust by improving access to and usability of trust guidelines. Questionnaires were distributed to FY doctors to identify acute medical conditions to include on the emergency prescription cards (EPCs). Two small double-sided cards were created containing bullet pointed trust guidelines for: hyper/hypokalaemia, status epilepticus, diabetic emergencies, arrhythmias, myocardial infarction, acute asthma, pulmonary oedema, anaphylaxis and a ward-round checklist. Feedback was used to improve EPCs prior to distribution. Pre (N=53) and post-intervention (N=46) written questionnaires were completed by FY doctors. These assessed acute clinical management including use of guidance, confidence in management, speed of prescribing and EPC “usability”. To assess prescribing accuracy, prescriptions for acute medical conditions were reviewed pre (N=8) and post-intervention (N=12). The EPCs were well received (80% quite/very useful) and found “easy to use” (83%). The introduction of EPCs increased guidance use (pre-intervention 58.8%, post-intervention 71.7%), increased confidence (pre-intervention 79%, post-intervention 89%) and significantly improved prescribing speed (p=0.05). There was a significant correlation with confidence and prescribing speed (p = 0.023). The accuracy of prescribed doses improved (pre-intervention 62.5%, post-intervention 87.5% accurate) as did details regarding route / additional required information (pre-intervention 75%, post

  18. Improving acute medical management: Junior Doctor Emergency Prescription Cards.

    PubMed

    Hutton, Joe; Gingell, Megan; Hutchinson, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Doctors commencing Foundation Year (FY) training face many stresses and challenges. FY doctors are often the first point of contact for acutely unwell and deteriorating patients. Trust guidelines are used to aid acute medical management. Accessing guidelines is often fraught with barriers. Evidence suggests aide-memoire cards can provide easier access to guidelines and management pathways. We aimed to improve prescribing accuracy and efficiency of FY doctors for acute medical conditions within Gloucestershire trust by improving access to and usability of trust guidelines. Questionnaires were distributed to FY doctors to identify acute medical conditions to include on the emergency prescription cards (EPCs). Two small double-sided cards were created containing bullet pointed trust guidelines for: hyper/hypokalaemia, status epilepticus, diabetic emergencies, arrhythmias, myocardial infarction, acute asthma, pulmonary oedema, anaphylaxis and a ward-round checklist. Feedback was used to improve EPCs prior to distribution. Pre (N=53) and post-intervention (N=46) written questionnaires were completed by FY doctors. These assessed acute clinical management including use of guidance, confidence in management, speed of prescribing and EPC "usability". To assess prescribing accuracy, prescriptions for acute medical conditions were reviewed pre (N=8) and post-intervention (N=12). The EPCs were well received (80% quite/very useful) and found "easy to use" (83%). The introduction of EPCs increased guidance use (pre-intervention 58.8%, post-intervention 71.7%), increased confidence (pre-intervention 79%, post-intervention 89%) and significantly improved prescribing speed (p=0.05). There was a significant correlation with confidence and prescribing speed (p = 0.023). The accuracy of prescribed doses improved (pre-intervention 62.5%, post-intervention 87.5% accurate) as did details regarding route / additional required information (pre-intervention 75%, post-intervention 97

  19. The Technology Review 10: Emerging Technologies that Will Change the World.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technology Review, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Identifies 10 emerging areas of technology that will soon have a profound impact on the economy and on how people live and work: brain-machine interfaces; flexible transistors; data mining; digital rights management; biometrics; natural language processing; microphotonics; untangling code; robot design; and microfluidics. In each area, one…

  20. Strategies for Integrating Emerging Technologies: Case Study of an Online Educational Technology Master's Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Czerkawski, Betul C.

    2013-01-01

    Emerging technologies do not necessarily facilitate or advance learning processes; teaching strategies that are used in the learning process, integration and incorporation methods do. In online instruction, research shows that "effective distance education depends on the provision of pedagogical excellence" (Bernard et al., 2004, p.413).…

  1. A review of a recently emerged technology: Constructed wetland--Microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Doherty, Liam; Zhao, Yaqian; Zhao, Xiaohong; Hu, Yuansheng; Hao, Xiaodi; Xu, Lei; Liu, Ranbin

    2015-11-15

    Constructed wetlands (CWs) and microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are compatible technologies since both are reliant on the actions of bacteria to remove contaminants from wastewater. MFCs require the anode to remain anaerobic with the cathode exposed to oxygen while these redox conditions can develop naturally in CWs. For this reason, research into combining the two technologies (termed as CW-MFC) has emerged in recent years with the aim of improving the wastewater treatment capacity of wetlands while simultaneously producing electrical power. Based on the published work (although limited), this review aims to provide a timely, current state-of-the-art in CW-MFC while exploring future challenges and research directions.

  2. Emerging technologies advancing forage and turf grass genomics.

    PubMed

    Kopecký, David; Studer, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Grassland is of major importance for agricultural production and provides valuable ecosystem services. Its impact is likely to rise in changing socio-economic and climatic environments. High yielding forage grass species are major components of sustainable grassland production. Understanding the genome structure and function of grassland species provides opportunities to accelerate crop improvement and thus to mitigate the future challenges of increased feed and food demand, scarcity of natural resources such as water and nutrients, and high product qualities. In this review, we will discuss a selection of technological developments that served as main drivers to generate new insights into the structure and function of nuclear genomes. Many of these technologies were originally developed in human or animal science and are now increasingly applied in plant genomics. Our main goal is to highlight the benefits of using these technologies for forage and turf grass genome research, to discuss their potentials and limitations as well as their relevance for future applications. PMID:24309540

  3. Emerging technologies advancing forage and turf grass genomics.

    PubMed

    Kopecký, David; Studer, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Grassland is of major importance for agricultural production and provides valuable ecosystem services. Its impact is likely to rise in changing socio-economic and climatic environments. High yielding forage grass species are major components of sustainable grassland production. Understanding the genome structure and function of grassland species provides opportunities to accelerate crop improvement and thus to mitigate the future challenges of increased feed and food demand, scarcity of natural resources such as water and nutrients, and high product qualities. In this review, we will discuss a selection of technological developments that served as main drivers to generate new insights into the structure and function of nuclear genomes. Many of these technologies were originally developed in human or animal science and are now increasingly applied in plant genomics. Our main goal is to highlight the benefits of using these technologies for forage and turf grass genome research, to discuss their potentials and limitations as well as their relevance for future applications.

  4. Emerging, Photonic Based Technologies for NASA Space Communications Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pouch, John; Nguyen, Hung; Lee, Richard; Levi, Anthony; Bos, Philip; Titus, Charles; Lavrentovich, Oleg

    2002-01-01

    An objective of NASA's Computing, Information, and Communications Technology program is to support the development of technologies that could potentially lower the cost of the Earth science and space exploration missions, and result in greater scientific returns. NASA-supported photonic activities which will impact space communications will be described. The objective of the RF microphotonic research is to develop a Ka-band receiver that will enable the microwaves detected by an antenna to modulate a 1.55- micron optical carrier. A key element is the high-Q, microphotonic modulator that employs a lithium niobate microdisk. The technical approach could lead to new receivers that utilize ultra-fast, photonic signal processing techniques, and are low cost, compact, low weight and power efficient. The progress in the liquid crystal (LC) beam steering research will also be reported. The predicted benefits of an LC-based device on board a spacecraft include non-mechanical, submicroradian laser-beam pointing, milliradian scanning ranges, and wave-front correction. The potential applications of these emerging technologies to the various NASA missions will be presented.

  5. Novel technologies and emerging biomarkers for personalized cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jianda; Hegde, Priti S; Clynes, Raphael; Foukas, Periklis G; Harari, Alexandre; Kleen, Thomas O; Kvistborg, Pia; Maccalli, Cristina; Maecker, Holden T; Page, David B; Robins, Harlan; Song, Wenru; Stack, Edward C; Wang, Ena; Whiteside, Theresa L; Zhao, Yingdong; Zwierzina, Heinz; Butterfield, Lisa H; Fox, Bernard A

    2016-01-01

    The culmination of over a century's work to understand the role of the immune system in tumor control has led to the recent advances in cancer immunotherapies that have resulted in durable clinical responses in patients with a variety of malignancies. Cancer immunotherapies are rapidly changing traditional treatment paradigms and expanding the therapeutic landscape for cancer patients. However, despite the current success of these therapies, not all patients respond to immunotherapy and even those that do often experience toxicities. Thus, there is a growing need to identify predictive and prognostic biomarkers that enhance our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the complex interactions between the immune system and cancer. Therefore, the Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer (SITC) reconvened an Immune Biomarkers Task Force to review state of the art technologies, identify current hurdlers, and make recommendations for the field. As a product of this task force, Working Group 2 (WG2), consisting of international experts from academia and industry, assembled to identify and discuss promising technologies for biomarker discovery and validation. Thus, this WG2 consensus paper will focus on the current status of emerging biomarkers for immune checkpoint blockade therapy and discuss novel technologies as well as high dimensional data analysis platforms that will be pivotal for future biomarker research. In addition, this paper will include a brief overview of the current challenges with recommendations for future biomarker discovery.

  6. Improving the safety of remote site emergency airway management.

    PubMed

    Wijesuriya, Julian; Brand, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Airway management, particularly in non-theatre settings, is an area of anaesthesia and critical care associated with significant risk of morbidity & mortality, as highlighted during the 4th National Audit Project of the Royal College of Anaesthetists (NAP4). A survey of junior anaesthetists at our hospital highlighted a lack of confidence and perceived lack of safety in emergency airway management, especially in non-theatre settings. We developed and implemented a multifaceted airway package designed to improve the safety of remote site airway management. A Rapid Sequence Induction (RSI) checklist was developed; this was combined with new advanced airway equipment and drugs bags. Additionally, new carbon dioxide detector filters were procured in order to comply with NAP4 monitoring recommendations. The RSI checklists were placed in key locations throughout the hospital and the drugs and advanced airway equipment bags were centralised in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU). It was agreed with the senior nursing staff that an appropriately trained ICU nurse would attend all emergency situations with new airway resources upon request. Departmental guidelines were updated to include details of the new resources and the on-call anaesthetist's responsibilities regarding checks and maintenance. Following our intervention trainees reported higher confidence levels regarding remote site emergency airway management. Nine trusts within the Northern Region were surveyed and we found large variations in the provision of remote site airway management resources. Complications in remote site airway management due lack of available appropriate drugs, equipment or trained staff are potentially life threatening and completely avoidable. Utilising the intervention package an anaesthetist would be able to safely plan and prepare for airway management in any setting. They would subsequently have the drugs, equipment, and trained assistance required to manage any difficulties or complications

  7. A Call for a Community of Practice to Assess the Impact of Emerging Technologies on Undergraduate Biology Education †

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Jamie L.; Dario-Becker, Juville; Hughes, Lee E.; Amburn, D. Sue Katz; Shaw, Joyce A.

    2012-01-01

    Recent recommendations for educational research encourage empirically tested, theory-based, completely transparent, and broadly applicable studies. In light of these recommendations, we call for a research standard and community of practice in the evaluation of technology use in the undergraduate life science classroom. We outline appropriate research methodology, review and critique the past research on technology usage and, lastly, suggest a new and improved focus for research on emerging technologies. PMID:23653777

  8. SITE - EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES: LASER INDUCED PHOTO- CHEMICAL OXIDATIVE DESTRUCTION OF TOXIC ORGANICS IN LEACHATES AND GROUNDWATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The technology described in this report has been developed under the Emerging Technology Program of the Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program to photochemically oxidize organic compounds in wastewater by applying ultraviolet radiation using an excimer laser. T...

  9. Improving student retention in computer engineering technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierozinski, Russell Ivan

    The purpose of this research project was to improve student retention in the Computer Engineering Technology program at the Northern Alberta Institute of Technology by reducing the number of dropouts and increasing the graduation rate. This action research project utilized a mixed methods approach of a survey and face-to-face interviews. The participants were male and female, with a large majority ranging from 18 to 21 years of age. The research found that participants recognized their skills and capability, but their capacity to remain in the program was dependent on understanding and meeting the demanding pace and rigour of the program. The participants recognized that curriculum delivery along with instructor-student interaction had an impact on student retention. To be successful in the program, students required support in four domains: academic, learning management, career, and social.

  10. Software productivity improvement through software engineering technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgarry, F. E.

    1985-01-01

    It has been estimated that NASA expends anywhere from 6 to 10 percent of its annual budget on the acquisition, implementation and maintenance of computer software. Although researchers have produced numerous software engineering approaches over the past 5-10 years; each claiming to be more effective than the other, there is very limited quantitative information verifying the measurable impact htat any of these technologies may have in a production environment. At NASA/GSFC, an extended research effort aimed at identifying and measuring software techniques that favorably impact productivity of software development, has been active over the past 8 years. Specific, measurable, software development technologies have been applied and measured in a production environment. Resulting software development approaches have been shown to be effective in both improving quality as well as productivity in this one environment.

  11. Wind power project siting workshop: emerging issues and technologies

    SciTech Connect

    anon.

    2004-12-01

    With wind power development extending more broadly across the various regions of the United States, and with new participants entering the wind development business, AWEA developed a workshop on the various ways in which wind power projects affect--and don't affect--elements of the human and natural environment. Over 180 people gathered in Portland, OR on October 13-14, 2004 to participate in a day and a half of presentations by 20 leading industry specialists. Their presentations covered emerging issues of project siting, such as bat interactions and wildlife survey techniques, and methods of generating local support for wind projects. Workshop topics included: Avian and Bat Research Updates; Wildlife Survey Technologies & Techniques; Technical Issues such as Noise, Aesthetics, and Lighting; National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Scenarios and Federal Land Policies; Tribal & Community Relations; Federal & State Permitting Process; and Bureau of Land Management Wind Power Developments.

  12. Analysis of a US Department of Energy Emergent Technologies Cohort

    SciTech Connect

    Strader, Cliff; Ellis, Elizabeth; Barrie, Martin D; Tankersley, William; Wallace, Phil; Nichols, Gregory

    2012-12-12

    As a major user of engineered nanoparticles, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) uses various methods to monitor the health of emergent technologies workers (ETW) who handle or could potentially be exposed to unbound engineered nanoparticles (UNP). Using data from DOE’s Illness and Injury Surveillance Program (IISP), Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) created a registry of ETWs. IISP currently tracks 125,000 workers at 14 DOE facilities. Workers in IISP, who were classified as ETWs, were placed in a separate database using Microsoft Access. Using SAS (Version 9.2; Cary, NC), the health status of this cohort was analyzed by a variety of different variables such as age, gender, occupation, years of employment, number of years classified as an ETW, and site.

  13. The emergence and diffusion of DNA microarray technology

    PubMed Central

    Lenoir, Tim; Giannella, Eric

    2006-01-01

    The network model of innovation widely adopted among researchers in the economics of science and technology posits relatively porous boundaries between firms and academic research programs and a bi-directional flow of inventions, personnel, and tacit knowledge between sites of university and industry innovation. Moreover, the model suggests that these bi-directional flows should be considered as mutual stimulation of research and invention in both industry and academe, operating as a positive feedback loop. One side of this bi-directional flow – namely; the flow of inventions into industry through the licensing of university-based technologies – has been well studied; but the reverse phenomenon of the stimulation of university research through the absorption of new directions emanating from industry has yet to be investigated in much detail. We discuss the role of federal funding of academic research in the microarray field, and the multiple pathways through which federally supported development of commercial microarray technologies have transformed core academic research fields. Our study confirms the picture put forward by several scholars that the open character of networked economies is what makes them truly innovative. In an open system innovations emerge from the network. The emergence and diffusion of microarray technologies we have traced here provides an excellent example of an open system of innovation in action. Whether they originated in a startup company environment that operated like a think-tank, such as Affymax, the research labs of a large firm, such as Agilent, or within a research university, the inventors we have followed drew heavily on knowledge resources from all parts of the network in bringing microarray platforms to light. Federal funding for high-tech startups and new industrial development was important at several phases in the early history of microarrays, and federal funding of academic researchers using microarrays was fundamental

  14. Developing Information on Energy Savings and Associated Costs and Benefits of Energy Efficient Emerging Technologies Applicable in California

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Tengfang; Slaa, Jan Willem; Sathaye, Jayant

    2010-12-15

    Implementation and adoption of efficient end-use technologies have proven to be one of the key measures for reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions throughout the industries. In many cases, implementing energy efficiency measures is among one of the most cost effective investments that the industry could make in improving efficiency and productivity while reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. Over the years, there have been incentives to use resources and energy in a cleaner and more efficient way to create industries that are sustainable and more productive. With the working of energy programs and policies on GHG inventory and regulation, understanding and managing the costs associated with mitigation measures for GHG reductions is very important for the industry and policy makers around the world and in California. Successful implementation of applicable emerging technologies not only may help advance productivities, improve environmental impacts, or enhance industrial competitiveness, but also can play a significant role in climate-mitigation efforts by saving energy and reducing the associated GHG emissions. Developing new information on costs and savings benefits of energy efficient emerging technologies applicable in California market is important for policy makers as well as the industries. Therefore, provision of timely evaluation and estimation of the costs and energy savings potential of emerging technologies applicable to California is the focus of this report. The overall goal of the project is to identify and select a set of emerging and under-utilized energy-efficient technologies and practices as they are important to reduce energy consumption in industry while maintaining economic growth. Specifically, this report contains the results from performing Task 3 Technology Characterization for California Industries for the project titled Research Opportunities in Emerging and Under-Utilized Energy-Efficient Industrial Technologies, sponsored by

  15. The Virtual Learning Commons: Supporting Science Education with Emerging Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennington, D. D.; Gandara, A.; Gris, I.

    2012-12-01

    The Virtual Learning Commons (VLC), funded by the National Science Foundation Office of Cyberinfrastructure CI-Team Program, is a combination of Semantic Web, mash up, and social networking tools that supports knowledge sharing and innovation across scientific disciplines in research and education communities and networks. The explosion of scientific resources (data, models, algorithms, tools, and cyberinfrastructure) challenges the ability of educators to be aware of resources that might be relevant to their classes. Even when aware, it can be difficult to understand enough about those resources to develop classroom materials. Often emerging data and technologies have little documentation, especially about their application. The VLC tackles this challenge by providing mechanisms for individuals and groups of educators to organize Web resources into virtual collections, and engage each other around those collections in order to a) learn about potentially relevant resources that are available; b) design classes that leverage those resources; and c) develop course syllabi. The VLC integrates Semantic Web functionality for structuring distributed information, mash up functionality for retrieving and displaying information, and social media for discussing/rating information. We are working to provide three views of information that support educators in different ways: 1. Innovation Marketplace: supports users as they find others teaching similar courses, where they are located, and who they collaborate with; 2. Conceptual Mapper: supports educators as they organize their thinking about the content of their class and related classes taught by others; 3. Curriculum Designer: supports educators as they generate a syllabus and find Web resources that are relevant. This presentation will discuss the innovation and learning theories that have informed design of the VLC, hypotheses about the use of emerging technologies to support innovation in classrooms, and will include a

  16. Emerging Energy-Efficient Technologies in Buildings Technology Characterizations for Energy Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Hadley, SW

    2004-10-11

    The energy use in America's commercial and residential building sectors is large and growing. Over 38 quadrillion Btus (Quads) of primary energy were consumed in 2002, representing 39% of total U.S. energy consumption. While the energy use in buildings is expected to grow to 52 Quads by 2025, a large number of energy-related technologies exist that could curtail this increase. In recent years, improvements in such items as high efficiency refrigerators, compact fluorescent lights, high-SEER air conditioners, and improved building shells have all contributed to reducing energy use. Hundreds of other technology improvements have and will continue to improve the energy use in buildings. While many technologies are well understood and are gradually penetrating the market, more advanced technologies will be introduced in the future. The pace and extent of these advances can be improved through state and federal R&D. This report focuses on the long-term potential for energy-efficiency improvement in buildings. Five promising technologies have been selected for description to give an idea of the wide range of possibilities. They address the major areas of energy use in buildings: space conditioning (33% of building use), water heating (9%), and lighting (16%). Besides describing energy-using technologies (solid-state lighting and geothermal heat pumps), the report also discusses energy-saving building shell improvements (smart roofs) and the integration of multiple energy service technologies (CHP packaged systems and triple function heat pumps) to create synergistic savings. Finally, information technologies that can improve the efficiency of building operations are discussed. The report demonstrates that the United States is not running out of technologies to improve energy efficiency and economic and environmental performance, and will not run out in the future. The five technology areas alone can potentially result in total primary energy savings of between 2 and 4

  17. Hot Technologies for K-12 Schools: The 2005 Guide for Technology Decision Makers. COSN's Emerging Technologies Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vockley, Martha, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    As technology companies introduce innovative products and services for the education market, school districts have the opportunity to invest in technologies designed to improve instruction and operations--from teaching, learning and assessments to organizational efficiency. Perhaps the greatest promise of anticipated technologies is their…

  18. Emerging technologies for HIV prevention for MSM: what we have learned, and ways forward.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Patrick S; Grey, Jeremy A; Simon Rosser, Brian R

    2013-06-01

    Technology-enabled HIV research and prevention has emerged in the past 10 years as an exciting dynamic field that offers great potential to help bring HIV prevention efforts to scale in key risk communities. Evolutions in technologies and in HIV epidemics suggest mutual opportunities to reach most at risk populations in novel ways. New technologies cannot completely replace interventions and services currently delivered by the people. However, we suggest that emerging technologies hold promise to bring services to scale and produce efficiencies in reaching rural populations of men who have sex with men (MSM), connecting with populations who are not reached in current urban outreach efforts, and providing services or research surveys that can be described algorithmically. Furthermore, the types of technologies (eg, internet-based, smartphone-based, text messaging) should be matched with both the content to be delivered and the technology usage patterns of target populations. We suggest several key principles and lessons learned that comprise a framework in which to consider the opportunities of technologies and HIV prevention and research. Future directions include improvement of data quality in online surveying, better characterization of biases, developing improved sampling approaches, working with funders to ensure compatibility of funding mechanisms and online research proposals, and promoting consensus approaches to the duplication and presentation of research and program evaluation results from online research. Given the current calls for comprehensive packages of prevention services for MSM, effective prevention might require an intentional combination of technology-enabled prevention services to achieve scale and strategic use of personally delivered package components in cases where non-algorithmic services, such as individualized counseling, are needed. PMID:23673879

  19. Emerging technologies for HIV prevention for MSM: What we’ve learned, and ways forward

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Patrick S; Grey, Jeremy A; Rosser, B R Simon

    2013-01-01

    The field of technology-enabled HIV research and prevention has emerged in the past 10 years as an exciting, dynamic field that offers great potential to help bring HIV prevention efforts to scale in key risk communities. Evolutions in technologies and in HIV epidemics suggest mutual opportunities to reach most at risk populations in novel ways. New technologies cannot completely replace interventions and services currently delivered by people. However, we suggest that emerging technologies hold promise to bring services to scale and produce efficiencies in reaching rural populations of MSM, connecting with populations who aren’t reached in current urban outreach efforts, and providing services or research surveys that can be described algorithmically. Further, the types of technologies (e.g., internet-based, smartphone-based, text messaging) should be matched with both the content to be delivered, and the technology usage patterns of target populations. We suggest several key principles and lessons learned that comprise a framework in which to consider the opportunities of technologies and HIV prevention and research. Future directions include improvement of data quality in online surveying, better characterization of biases, developing improved sampling approaches, working with funders to ensure compatibility of funding mechanisms and online research proposals, and promoting consensus approaches to the duplication and presentation of research and program evaluation results from online research. Given current calls for comprehensive packages of prevention services for MSM, effective prevention might require an intentional combination of technology-enabled prevention services to achieve scale, and strategic use of personally-delivered package components in cases where non-algorithmic services, such as individualized counseling, are needed. PMID:23673879

  20. Emerging technologies and challenges for better and safer drugs.

    PubMed

    Theodosiou, Maria; Amir-Aslani, Arsia; Mégarbane, Bruno

    2014-04-01

    Regardless of stringent safety regulations and increased compound selectivity by pharmaceutical companies, prediction of toxicity in humans is still far from perfect and adverse drug reactions are still detected after drug marketing. High costs of failures due to toxicity has led pharmaceutical companies to search for screening methods that would allow detection of toxicity issues at an early stage and improve their preclinical and clinical toxicology. Thanks to the last decade's biotechnology revolution, new technologies like toxicogenomics have demonstrated the capacity to improve toxicity assessment. However, our understanding of toxicological mechanisms is still incomplete and a wide range of approaches must be used to gain insight into toxicity issues. Consequently, an array of in silico, in vitro and in vivo methods is utilized to predict toxicity and its causative mechanisms, improving drug development processes and minimizing costs of failure. PMID:24243233

  1. Academic versus Non-Academic Emerging Adult College Student Technology Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanson, Joan Ann; Walker, Erica

    2014-01-01

    Emerging adult college students have developmental and educational needs which are unique to their phase of life. The purpose of this study was to examine academic and non-academic technology use by emerging adult college students. Survey results (N = 235) provided insights into emerging adult college student technology preferences and frequency…

  2. Emerging Technologies for Pediatric and Adult Trauma Care

    PubMed Central

    Moulton, Steven L.; Haley-Andrews, Stephanie; Mulligan, Jane

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of the Review Current EMS protocols rely on provider directed care for evaluation, management and triage of injured patients from the field to a trauma center. New methods to quickly diagnose, support and coordinate the movement of trauma patients from the field to the most appropriate trauma center are in development. These methods will enhance trauma care and promote trauma system development. Recent Findings Recent advances in machine learning, statistical methods, device integration and wireless communication are giving rise to new methods for vital sign data analysis and a new generation of transport monitors. These monitors will collect and synchronize exponentially growing amounts of vital sign data with electronic patient care information. The application of advanced statistical methods to these complex clinical data sets has the potential to reveal many important physiological relationships and treatment effects. Summary Several emerging technologies are converging to yield a new generation of smart sensors and tightly integrated transport monitors. These technologies will assist pre-hospital providers in quickly identifying and triaging the most severely injured children and adults to the most appropriate trauma centers. They will enable the development of real-time clinical support systems of increasing complexity, able to provide timelier, more cost-effective, autonomous care. PMID:20407375

  3. Cell Surface and Membrane Engineering: Emerging Technologies and Applications.

    PubMed

    Saeui, Christopher T; Mathew, Mohit P; Liu, Lingshui; Urias, Esteban; Yarema, Kevin J

    2015-01-01

    Membranes constitute the interface between the basic unit of life-a single cell-and the outside environment and thus in many ways comprise the ultimate "functional biomaterial". To perform the many and often conflicting functions required in this role, for example to partition intracellular contents from the outside environment while maintaining rapid intake of nutrients and efflux of waste products, biological membranes have evolved tremendous complexity and versatility. This article describes how membranes, mainly in the context of living cells, are increasingly being manipulated for practical purposes with drug discovery, biofuels, and biosensors providing specific, illustrative examples. Attention is also given to biology-inspired, but completely synthetic, membrane-based technologies that are being enabled by emerging methods such as bio-3D printers. The diverse set of applications covered in this article are intended to illustrate how these versatile technologies-as they rapidly mature-hold tremendous promise to benefit human health in numerous ways ranging from the development of new medicines to sensitive and cost-effective environmental monitoring for pathogens and pollutants to replacing hydrocarbon-based fossil fuels.

  4. 3D Medical Collaboration Technology to Enhance Emergency Healthcare

    PubMed Central

    Welch, Greg; Sonnenwald, Diane H; Fuchs, Henry; Cairns, Bruce; Mayer-Patel, Ketan; Söderholm, Hanna M.; Yang, Ruigang; State, Andrei; Towles, Herman; Ilie, Adrian; Ampalam, Manoj; Krishnan, Srinivas; Noel, Vincent; Noland, Michael; Manning, James E.

    2009-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) videoconferencing has been explored widely in the past 15–20 years to support collaboration in healthcare. Two issues that arise in most evaluations of 2D videoconferencing in telemedicine are the difficulty obtaining optimal camera views and poor depth perception. To address these problems, we are exploring the use of a small array of cameras to reconstruct dynamic three-dimensional (3D) views of a remote environment and of events taking place within. The 3D views could be sent across wired or wireless networks to remote healthcare professionals equipped with fixed displays or with mobile devices such as personal digital assistants (PDAs). The remote professionals’ viewpoints could be specified manually or automatically (continuously) via user head or PDA tracking, giving the remote viewers head-slaved or hand-slaved virtual cameras for monoscopic or stereoscopic viewing of the dynamic reconstructions. We call this idea remote 3D medical collaboration. In this article we motivate and explain the vision for 3D medical collaboration technology; we describe the relevant computer vision, computer graphics, display, and networking research; we present a proof-of-concept prototype system; and we present evaluation results supporting the general hypothesis that 3D remote medical collaboration technology could offer benefits over conventional 2D videoconferencing in emergency healthcare. PMID:19521951

  5. 3D medical collaboration technology to enhance emergency healthcare.

    PubMed

    Welch, Gregory F; Sonnenwald, Diane H; Fuchs, Henry; Cairns, Bruce; Mayer-Patel, Ketan; Söderholm, Hanna M; Yang, Ruigang; State, Andrei; Towles, Herman; Ilie, Adrian; Ampalam, Manoj K; Krishnan, Srinivas; Noel, Vincent; Noland, Michael; Manning, James E

    2009-04-19

    Two-dimensional (2D) videoconferencing has been explored widely in the past 15-20 years to support collaboration in healthcare. Two issues that arise in most evaluations of 2D videoconferencing in telemedicine are the difficulty obtaining optimal camera views and poor depth perception. To address these problems, we are exploring the use of a small array of cameras to reconstruct dynamic three-dimensional (3D) views of a remote environment and of events taking place within. The 3D views could be sent across wired or wireless networks to remote healthcare professionals equipped with fixed displays or with mobile devices such as personal digital assistants (PDAs). The remote professionals' viewpoints could be specified manually or automatically (continuously) via user head or PDA tracking, giving the remote viewers head-slaved or hand-slaved virtual cameras for monoscopic or stereoscopic viewing of the dynamic reconstructions. We call this idea remote 3D medical collaboration. In this article we motivate and explain the vision for 3D medical collaboration technology; we describe the relevant computer vision, computer graphics, display, and networking research; we present a proof-of-concept prototype system; and we present evaluation results supporting the general hypothesis that 3D remote medical collaboration technology could offer benefits over conventional 2D videoconferencing in emergency healthcare.

  6. New technologies to improve laboratory testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burtis, C. A.

    Several core technologies that are having, or will have, an impact on the clinical laboratory are discussed. These include instrument-related technologies such as computer technology, chemometrics, robotics, sensors, and biological technologies such as cell fusion and recombinant DNA.

  7. Oil field slim hole drilling technology improving

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-11-23

    Recent advances in slim hole drilling technology have improved the application of this drilling technique to oil and gas exploration and development wells. These advancements include Optimization of slim hole drilling hydraulics, Application of a small particle weighing agent to improve well control and coring operations, Use of slim hole techniques to drill horizontal wells, Use of a new polycrystalline diamond compact cutter to allow economical re-entry of small diameter wells in hard rock. Slim hole continuous coring and drilling is becoming more accepted as a viable drilling method, especially as exploration budgets become smaller. Typical applications for slim hole equipment include drilling in frontier areas where logistics can be a problem and reentry operations in which the existing well has a small diameter. Typically, slim hole drilling operations use technology borrowed from the mining industry. The rigs are smaller and drill with much higher rotational speeds. Definitions of slim holes vary from a well with 90% drilled, with a diameter of less than 7 in. To a well with 70% drilled with less than 5 in. A goal of slim hole, however it is defined, is the drilling of a well with a diameter smaller than that used on conventional wells in the area. The reduced diameter helps cut rig time and cost and reduces the cost of the tubulars. Another goal of slim hole drilling is the ability to retrieve cores from the entire well during drilling.

  8. Emerging technologies in ethanol production. Agriculture information bulletin

    SciTech Connect

    Hohmann, N.; Rendleman, C.M.

    1993-01-01

    The fuel ethanol industry is poised to adopt a wide range of technologies that would reduce costs at every stage of the production process. Improved enzymes and fermenter designs can reduce the time needed to convert corn to ethanol and lower capital costs. Membrane filtration can allow the recovery of high-value coproducts such as lactic acid. Adoption of these and other innovations in the next 5 years is expected in new ethanol plants constructed to cope with new demand resulting from Clean Air Act stipulations for cleaner burning fuel. Biomass (agricultural residues, municipal and yard waste, energy crops like switchgrass) can also be converted to ethanol, although commercial-scale ventures are limited by current technology. While biomass requires more handling and sorting before conversion, those costs may be offset by the abundance of biomass relative to corn.

  9. Improving neutron dosimetry using bubble detector technology

    SciTech Connect

    Buckner, M.A.

    1993-02-01

    Providing accurate neutron dosimetry for a variety of neutron energy spectra is a formidable task for any dosimetry system. Unless something is known about the neutron spectrum prior to processing the dosimeter, the calculated dose may vary greatly from that actually encountered; that is until now. The entrance of bubble detector technology into the field of neutron dosimetry has eliminated the necessity of having an a priori knowledge of the neutron energy spectra. Recently, a new approach in measuring personnel neutron dose equivalent was developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. By using bubble detectors in combination with current thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) as a Combination Personnel Neutron Dosimeter (CPND), not only is it possible to provide accurate dose equivalent results, but a simple four-interval neutron energy spectrum is obtained as well. The components of the CPND are a Harshaw albedo TLD and two bubble detectors with theoretical energy thresholds of 100 key and 1500 keV. Presented are (1) a synoptic history surrounding emergence of bubble detector technology, (2) a brief overview of the current theory on mechanisms of interaction, (3) the data and analysis process involved in refining the response functions, (4) performance evaluation of the original CPND and a reevaluation of the same data under the modified method, (5) the procedure used to determine the reference values of component fluence and dose equivalent for field assessment, (6) analysis of the after-modification results, (7) a critique of some currently held assumptions, offering some alternative explanations, and (8) thoughts concerning potential applications and directions for future research.

  10. Emergency care center turnaround time--an improvement story.

    PubMed

    Gelrud, Joan; Burroughs, Helen; Koterwas, Joanne

    2008-01-01

    Emergency department overcrowding is a nationally recognized barrier to patient safety. Other obstacles to efficiency and adequate care in emergency rooms include lengthy patient waits and side-tracked ambulances. This article explores one community hospital's approach to significantly decreasing emergency visit turnaround times while increasing patient satisfaction.

  11. Emerging Endoscopic Imaging Technologies for Bladder Cancer Detection

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Aristeo; Liao, Joseph C.

    2014-01-01

    Modern urologic endoscopy is the result of continuous innovations since early 19th century. White light cystoscopy is the primary strategy for identification, resection, and local staging of bladder cancer. While highly effective, white light cystoscopy has several well-recognized shortcomings. Recent advances in optical imaging technologies and device miniaturization hold the potential to improve bladder cancer diagnosis and resection. Photodynamic diagnosis and narrow band imaging are the first to enter the clinical arena. Confocal laser endomicroscopy, optical coherence tomography, Raman spectroscopy, UV autofluorescence, and others have shown promising clinical and pre-clinical feasibility. We review their mechanisms of action, highlight their respective advantages, and propose future directions. PMID:24658832

  12. Improving Emergency Department flow through optimized bed utilization

    PubMed Central

    Chartier, Lucas Brien; Simoes, Licinia; Kuipers, Meredith; McGovern, Barb

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decade, patient volumes in the emergency department (ED) have grown disproportionately compared to the increase in staffing and resources at the Toronto Western Hospital, an academic tertiary care centre in Toronto, Canada. The resultant congestion has spilled over to the ED waiting room, where medically undifferentiated and potentially unstable patients must wait until a bed becomes available. The aim of this quality improvement project was to decrease the 90th percentile of wait time between triage and bed assignment (time-to-bed) by half, from 120 to 60 minutes, for our highest acuity patients. We engaged key stakeholders to identify barriers and potential strategies to achieve optimal flow of patients into the ED. We first identified multiple flow-interrupting challenges, including operational bottlenecks and cultural issues. We then generated change ideas to address two main underlying causes of ED congestion: unnecessary patient utilization of ED beds and communication breakdown causing bed turnaround delays. We subsequently performed seven tests of change through sequential plan-do-study-act (PDSA) cycles. The most significant gains were made by improving communication strategies: small gains were achieved through the optimization of in-house digital information management systems, while significant improvements were achieved through the implementation of a low-tech direct contact mechanism (a two-way radio or walkie-talkie). In the post-intervention phase, time-to-bed for the 90th percentile of high-acuity patients decreased from 120 minutes to 66 minutes, with special cause variation showing a significant shift in the weekly measurements. PMID:27752312

  13. Emerging Two-Phase Cooling Technologies for Power Electronic Inverters

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, J.S.

    2005-08-17

    In order to meet the Department of Energy's (DOE's) FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (FVCT) goals for volume, weight, efficiency, reliability, and cost, the cooling of the power electronic devices, traction motors, and generators is critical. Currently the power electronic devices, traction motors, and generators in a hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) are primarily cooled by water-ethylene glycol (WEG) mixture. The cooling fluid operates as a single-phase coolant as the liquid phase of the WEG does not change to its vapor phase during the cooling process. In these single-phase systems, two cooling loops of WEG produce a low temperature (around 70 C) cooling loop for the power electronics and motor/generator, and higher temperature loop (around 105 C) for the internal combustion engine. There is another coolant option currently available in automobiles. It is possible to use the transmission oil as a coolant. The oil temperature exists at approximately 85 C which can be utilized to cool the power electronic and electrical devices. Because heat flux is proportional to the temperature difference between the device's hot surface and the coolant, a device that can tolerate higher temperatures enables the device to be smaller while dissipating the same amount of heat. Presently, new silicon carbide (SiC) devices and high temperature direct current (dc)-link capacitors, such as Teflon capacitors, are available but at significantly higher costs. Higher junction temperature (175 C) silicon (Si) dies are gradually emerging in the market, which will eventually help to lower hardware costs for cooling. The development of high-temperature devices is not the only way to reduce device size. Two-phase cooling that utilizes the vaporization of the liquid to dissipate heat is expected to be a very effective cooling method. Among two-phase cooling methods, different technologies such as spray, jet impingement, pool boiling and submersion, etc. are being developed. The Oak Ridge

  14. Telemedicine in emergency neurological service provision in Singapore: using technology to overcome limitations.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rajinder; Ng, Wai Hoe; Lee, Kim En; Wang, Ernest; Ng, Ivan; Lee, Wei Ling

    2009-01-01

    Medical emergencies form a significant proportion of neurological and neurosurgical practice. The highly specialized nature of neurology and neurosurgery limits expertise to a small number of highly specialized centers; hence, many neurological emergencies will be managed in regional hospitals without comprehensive support. The common theme in neurological emergencies lies with prompt diagnosis, rapid access to scans, accurate scan interpretation, and quick institution of appropriate treatment. Failure in any one of these can result in devastating and permanent neurological deficits or death. The judicious use of information and communication technology can overcome some of the limitations imposed by scarce resources. Multimedia messaging service can be used to transmit important scan images to experienced staff to faciliate accurate and prompt diagnosis and commence optimal treatment. Telestroke based on the remote evaluation of acute ishemic stroke model can also be utilized so that selected stroke patients can be given intravenous tissue plasminogen activator in the emergency department of a regional hospital with the supervision of a stroke neurologist. We describe our experience with these technological initiatives to improve clinical care and outcome in our patients.

  15. Using principles from emergency management to improve emergency response plans for research animals.

    PubMed

    Vogelweid, Catherine M

    2013-10-01

    Animal research regulatory agencies have issued updated requirements for emergency response planning by regulated research institutions. A thorough emergency response plan is an essential component of an institution's animal care and use program, but developing an effective plan can be a daunting task. The author provides basic information drawn from the field of emergency management about best practices for developing emergency response plans. Planners should use the basic principles of emergency management to develop a common-sense approach to managing emergencies in their facilities.

  16. Improving emergency department flow through Rapid Medical Evaluation unit.

    PubMed

    Chartier, Lucas; Josephson, Timothy; Bates, Kathy; Kuipers, Meredith

    2015-01-01

    The Toronto Western Hospital is an academic hospital in Toronto, Canada, with an annual Emergency Department (ED) volume of 64,000 patients. Despite increases in patient volumes of almost six percent per annum over the last decade, there have been no commensurate increases in resources, infrastructure, and staffing. This has led to substantial increase in patient wait times, most specifically for those patients with lower acuity presentations. Despite requiring only minimal care, these patients contribute disproportionately to ED congestion, which can adversely impact resource utilization and quality of care for all patients. We undertook a retrospective evaluation of a quality improvement initiative aimed at improving wait times experienced by patients with lower acuity presentations. A rapid improvement event was organized by frontline workers to rapidly overhaul processes of care, leading to the creation of the Rapid Medical Evaluation (RME) unit - a new pathway of care for patients with lower acuity presentations. The RME unit was designed by re-purposing existing resources and re-assigning one physician and one nurse towards the specific care of these patients. We evaluated the performance of the RME unit through measurement of physician initial assessment (PIA) times and total length of stay (LOS) times for multiple groups of patients assigned to various ED care pathways, during three periods lasting three months each. Weekly measurements of mean and 90th percentile of PIA and LOS times showed special cause variation in all targeted patient groups. Of note, the patients seen in the RME unit saw their median PIA and LOS times decrease from 98min to 70min and from 165min to 130min, respectively, from baseline. Despite ever-growing numbers of patient visits, wait times for all patients with lower acuity presentations remained low, and wait times of patients with higher acuity presentations assigned to other ED care pathways were not adversely affected. By

  17. Improving Modern Cancer Care Through Information Technology

    PubMed Central

    Clauser, Steven B.; Wagner, Edward H.; Bowles, Erin J. Aiello; Tuzzio, Leah; Greene, Sarah M.

    2011-01-01

    The cancer care system is increasingly complex, marked by multiple hand-offs between primary care and specialty providers, inadequate communication among providers, and lack of clarity about a “medical home” (the ideal accountable care provider) for cancer patients. Patients and families often cite such difficulties as information deficits, uncoordinated care, and insufficient psychosocial support. This article presents a review of the challenges of delivering well coordinated, patient-centered cancer care in a complex modern healthcare system. An examination is made of the potential role of information technology (IT) advances to help both providers and patients. Using the published literature as background, a review is provided of selected work that is underway to improve communication, coordination, and quality of care. Also discussed are additional challenges and opportunities to advancing understanding of how patient data, provider and patient involvement, and informatics innovations can support high-quality cancer care. PMID:21521595

  18. Breast cancer in tough economic times: disruptive technology emerging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bretz, Phillip; Lynch, Richard

    2012-06-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the efficacy of melding three emerging technologies: Pharmacogenomics, Modified Military Digital Infrared and Halo to establish their capability in diagnosing ultra-small breast cancers as well as other cancers. Mammography, ultrasound and MRI technologies have been available for over forty years, however, there is still no uniform utilization by women, costs continue to escalate and problems persist like high false positive rates for MRI and high false negative rates for mammography. Of the first 500 IR patients, 499 were female and 1 male. Of 550 OncoVue patients, 129 opted to undergo IR. A total of 19 were lost to follow-up. Patients who were negative on IR: 419/500 (84%). Of these, 63/419 went to biopsy because of findings of other diagnostic modalities. Of these 61/63 with negative IR had a negative biopsy. Of two missed, one was the fault of the investigator but was included. In this series 2/500 were false negative (0.4%). The sensitivity was 96% and the specificity was 79%. In total, 46 cancers were identified including five outside the breast (e.g. 2 lung cancers). A total of 92 MRIs were done and in 71/92 patients IR and MRI agreed. Using these three modalities the smallest cancer found was a 4 mm invasive cancer. The study demonstrated that these diagnostic techniques can dramatically lower cost and provide results at least as good as the older paradigms. Further research and a multicenter clinical trial are necessary to shift the paradigm of breast cancer diagnosis and treatment.

  19. Parameter variation and scenario analysis in impact assessments of emerging energy technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breunig, Hanna Marie

    There is a global need for energy technologies that reduce the adverse impacts of societal progress and that address today's challenges without creating tomorrow's problems. Life cycle impact assessment (LCIA) can support technology developers in achieving these prerequisites of sustainability by providing a systems perspective. However, modeling the early-stage scale up and impacts of technology systems may lead to unreliable or incomplete results due to a lack of representative technical, spatial, and temporal data. The goal of this dissertation is to support the acceleration of clean energy technology development by providing information about the regional variation of impacts and benefits resulting from plausible deployment scenarios. Three emerging energy technologies are selected as case studies: (1) brine management for carbon dioxide sequestration; (2) carbon dioxide capture, utilization, and sequestration; (3) stationary fuel cells for combined heat and power in commercial buildings. In all three case studies, priority areas are identified where more reliable data and models are necessary for reducing uncertainty, and vital information is revealed on how impacts vary spatially and temporally. Importantly, moving away from default technology and waste management hierarchies as a source of data fosters goal-driven systems thinking which in turn leads to the discovery of technology improvement potentials.

  20. Cell Surface and Membrane Engineering: Emerging Technologies and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Saeui, Christopher T.; Mathew, Mohit P.; Liu, Lingshui; Urias, Esteban; Yarema, Kevin J.

    2015-01-01

    Membranes constitute the interface between the basic unit of life—a single cell—and the outside environment and thus in many ways comprise the ultimate “functional biomaterial”. To perform the many and often conflicting functions required in this role, for example to partition intracellular contents from the outside environment while maintaining rapid intake of nutrients and efflux of waste products, biological membranes have evolved tremendous complexity and versatility. This article describes how membranes, mainly in the context of living cells, are increasingly being manipulated for practical purposes with drug discovery, biofuels, and biosensors providing specific, illustrative examples. Attention is also given to biology-inspired, but completely synthetic, membrane-based technologies that are being enabled by emerging methods such as bio-3D printers. The diverse set of applications covered in this article are intended to illustrate how these versatile technologies—as they rapidly mature—hold tremendous promise to benefit human health in numerous ways ranging from the development of new medicines to sensitive and cost-effective environmental monitoring for pathogens and pollutants to replacing hydrocarbon-based fossil fuels. PMID:26096148

  1. Anaerobic biodegradation of pesticides and TNT: Site emerging technology demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Davis-Hoover, W.J.; Jackson, T.

    1995-10-01

    J.R. Simplot, Inc. is a multiconglomerate whose initial interest was in the production of potatoes in the Pacific Northwest. This has lead them into the agricultural chemical business including pesticides. Dinoseb (a carcinogenic herbicide used to kill the foliage of potato plants allowing for easier harvesting) was used by them and after Its ban in the U.S., J.R. Simplot realized the only acceptable way to dispose of dinoseb contaminated soils was to incinerate them at considerable cost. Thus J.R. Simplot became interested in developing a disposal solution that would be less cost prohibitive and as effective as incineration. J.R. Simplot submitted a proposal and was accepted into the SITE Emerging Technology Program to optimize the anaerobic biodegradation of nitroaeromatics (dinoseb) contaminated soils with the addition of water, pH buffers, and potato waste as a source of starch. This work ultimately resulted in a good understanding of the biological and chemical process of destruction (optimum conditions of 35 and 37 degrees C, and pH of approximately 7, leads to destruction in 14 days) of both dinoseb and TNT and in several peer reviewed publications.

  2. [Quality improvement of health care services in Croatian emergency medicine].

    PubMed

    Predavec, Sanja; Sogorić, Selma; Jurković, Drazen

    2010-12-01

    Emergency medical services (EMS) in the Republic of Croatia are currently organized as part of the existing health care system and delivered in the form of pre-hospital and hospital EMS. The pre-hospital EMS are delivered by standalone EMS Centers, EMS units set up in community health centers, and by general practitioners working in shifts and on call in remote and scarcely populated areas. In hospitals, each ward usually has its own emergency reception area, and only in a couple of cases there is an integrated emergency admission unit for the entire hospital. The current EMS structure does not meet the basic requirements that would make an EMS system optimal, i.e. equal quality, equal access, effectiveness and appropriate equipment. The EMS Restructuring Project is part of the Croatian health care system reform and is addressed by the National Health Development Strategy 2006-2011. As part of restructuring efforts, the Croatian National Institute of Emergency Medicine, 21 County Institutes of Emergency Medicine and county-level call centers are going to be set up. In addition, the project will introduce the following: integrated emergency admission areas at hospitals; telemedicine as part of emergency medicine; emergency medicine specialty for physicians and additional specialized training for nurses/technicians; separation of emergency and non-emergency transport; standards for vehicles and equipment and guidelines/protocols/algorithms for care. The Croatian National Institute of Emergency Medicine is an umbrella EMS organization. It shapes the EMS in Croatia and proposes, plans, monitors and analyzes EMS actions in Croatia. In addition, it submits a proposal of the Emergency Medicine Network to the minister, sets standards for EMS transport, and coordinates, guides and supervises the work of County Institutes of Emergency Medicine. County Institutes organize and deliver pre-hospital EMS in their counties. Integrated hospital emergency admission units represent a

  3. Emerging Geospatial Sharing Technologies in Earth and Space Science Informatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, R.; Bermudez, L. E.

    2013-12-01

    Emerging Geospatial Sharing Technologies in Earth and Space Science Informatics The Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) mission is to serve as a global forum for the collaboration of developers and users of spatial data products and services, and to advance the development of international standards for geospatial interoperability. The OGC coordinates with over 400 institutions in the development of geospatial standards. In the last years two main trends are making disruptions in geospatial applications: mobile and context sharing. People now have more and more mobile devices to support their work and personal life. Mobile devices are intermittently connected to the internet and have smaller computing capacity than a desktop computer. Based on this trend a new OGC file format standard called GeoPackage will enable greater geospatial data sharing on mobile devices. GeoPackage is perhaps best understood as the natural evolution of Shapefiles, which have been the predominant lightweight geodata sharing format for two decades. However the format is extremely limited. Four major shortcomings are that only vector points, lines, and polygons are supported; property names are constrained by the dBASE format; multiple files are required to encode a single data set; and multiple Shapefiles are required to encode multiple data sets. A more modern lingua franca for geospatial data is long overdue. GeoPackage fills this need with support for vector data, image tile matrices, and raster data. And it builds upon a database container - SQLite - that's self-contained, single-file, cross-platform, serverless, transactional, and open source. A GeoPackage, in essence, is a set of SQLite database tables whose content and layout is described in the candidate GeoPackage Implementation Specification available at https://portal.opengeospatial.org/files/?artifact_id=54838&version=1. The second trend is sharing client 'contexts'. When a user is looking into an article or a product on the web

  4. The emergency physician and knowledge transfer: continuing medical education, continuing professional development, and self-improvement.

    PubMed

    Kilian, Barbara J; Binder, Louis S; Marsden, Julian

    2007-11-01

    A workshop session from the 2007 Academic Emergency Medicine Consensus Conference, Knowledge Translation in Emergency Medicine: Establishing a Research Agenda and Guide Map for Evidence Uptake, focused on developing a research agenda for continuing medical education (CME) in knowledge transfer. Based on quasi-Delphi methodology at the conference session, and subsequent electronic discussion and refinement, the following recommendations are made: 1) Adaptable tools should be developed, validated, and psychometrically tested for needs assessment. 2) "Point of care" learning within a clinical context should be evaluated as a tool for practice changes and improved knowledge transfer. 3) The addition of a CME component to technological platforms, such as search engines and databases, simulation technology, and clinical decision-support systems, may help knowledge transfer for clinicians or increase utilization of these tools and should, therefore, be evaluated. 4) Further research should focus on identifying the appropriate outcomes for physician CME. Emergency medicine researchers should transition from previous media-comparison research agendas to a more rigorous qualitative focus that takes into account needs assessment, instructional design, implementation, provider change, and care change. 5) In the setting of continued physician learning, barriers to the subsequent implementation of knowledge transfer and behavioral changes of physicians should be elicited through research.

  5. Chemical and Biological Terrorism: Improvements to Emergency Medical Response.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeGraffenreid, Jeff Gordon

    The challenge facing many emergency medical services (EMS) is the implementation of a comprehensive educational strategy to address emergency responses to terrorism. One such service, Johnson County (Kansas) Medical Action, needed a strategy that would keep paramedics safe and offer the community an effective approach to mitigation. A…

  6. State of Practice for Emerging Waste Conversion Technologies

    EPA Science Inventory

    New technologies to convert municipal and other waste streams into fuels and chemical commodities, termed conversion technologies, are rapidly developing. Conversion technologies are garnering increasing interest and demand due primarily to alternative energy initiatives. These t...

  7. How to use information technology to improve medication safety.

    PubMed

    Winter, A; Hilgers, R-D; Hofestädt, R; Knaup-Gregori, P; Ose, C; Timmer, A

    2014-01-01

    The publication of a memorandum on improving medication safety by information technology in both the German journal GMS Medical Informatics, Biometry and Epidemiology (MIBE) and the journal Methods of Information in Medicine (MIM) gives reason to strengthen cooperation of MIBE and MIM and to report on more publications of MIBE here. The publications in focus deal with simulation-based optimization of emergency processes, handling of research data in publications, open access to research metadata, reliability of digital patient records in medical research, assessment methods for physical activity, using of insurance databases for epidemiological studies, certificates for epidemiological professionals, regression models, computer based training, and performance management in Swiss hospitals. Finally determining factors for scientific careers are discussed. PMID:25308917

  8. What is New and Innovative in Emergency Neurosurgery? Emerging Diagnostic Technologies Provide Better Care and Influence Outcome: A Specialist Review

    PubMed Central

    Zisakis, Athanasios K.; Exadaktylos, Aristomenis

    2013-01-01

    The development of emergency medical services and especially neurosurgical emergencies during recent decades has necessitated the development of novel tools. Although the gadgets that the neurosurgeon uses today in emergencies give him important help in diagnosis and treatment, we still need new technology, which has rapidly developed. This review presents the latest diagnostic tools, which offer precious help in everyday emergency neurosurgery practice. New ultrasound devices make the diagnosis of haematomas easier. In stroke, the introduction of noninvasive new gadgets aims to provide better treatment to the patient. Finally, the entire development of computed tomography and progress in radiology have resulted in innovative CT scans and angiographic devices that advance the diagnosis, treatment, and outcome of the patent. The pressure on physicians to be quick and effective and to avoid any misjudgement of the patient has been transferred to the technology, with the emphasis on developing new systems that will provide our patients with a better outcome and quality of life. PMID:24349786

  9. Improve emergency light design with lumens/sq ft method.

    PubMed

    Sieron, R L

    1981-05-01

    In summary, the "Lumens/sq ft Method" outlined here is proposed as a guideline for designing emergency lighting systems such as in the accompanying examples. With this method, the total lumens delivered by the emergency lighting units in the area is divided by the floor area (in sq ft) to yield a figure of merit. The author proposes that a range from 0.25 to 1.0 lumens/sq ft be specified for emergency lighting. The lower value may be used for non-critical areas (for example, warehouses), while the higher value would be used for areas such as school corridors and hospitals.

  10. Emerging paradigms in genomics-based crop improvement.

    PubMed

    Bohra, Abhishek

    2013-11-17

    Next generation sequencing platforms and high-throughput genotyping assays have remarkably expedited the pace of development of genomic tools and resources for several crops. Complementing the technological developments, conceptual shifts have also been witnessed in designing experimental populations. Availability of second generation mapping populations encompassing multiple alleles, multiple traits, and extensive recombination events is radically changing the phenomenon of classical QTL mapping. Additionally, the rising molecular breeding approaches like marker assisted recurrent selection (MARS) that are able to harness several QTLs are of particular importance in obtaining a "designed" genotype carrying the most desirable combinations of favourable alleles. Furthermore, rapid generation of genome-wide marker data coupled with easy access to precise and accurate phenotypic screens enable large-scale exploitation of LD not only to discover novel QTLs via whole genome association scans but also to practise genomic estimated breeding value (GEBV)-based selection of genotypes. Given refinements being experienced in analytical methods and software tools, the multiparent populations will be the resource of choice to undertake genome wide association studies (GWAS), multiparent MARS, and genomic selection (GS). With this, it is envisioned that these high-throughput and high-power molecular breeding methods would greatly assist in exploiting the enormous potential underlying breeding by design approach to facilitate accelerated crop improvement.

  11. Emerging paradigms in genomics-based crop improvement.

    PubMed

    Bohra, Abhishek

    2013-01-01

    Next generation sequencing platforms and high-throughput genotyping assays have remarkably expedited the pace of development of genomic tools and resources for several crops. Complementing the technological developments, conceptual shifts have also been witnessed in designing experimental populations. Availability of second generation mapping populations encompassing multiple alleles, multiple traits, and extensive recombination events is radically changing the phenomenon of classical QTL mapping. Additionally, the rising molecular breeding approaches like marker assisted recurrent selection (MARS) that are able to harness several QTLs are of particular importance in obtaining a "designed" genotype carrying the most desirable combinations of favourable alleles. Furthermore, rapid generation of genome-wide marker data coupled with easy access to precise and accurate phenotypic screens enable large-scale exploitation of LD not only to discover novel QTLs via whole genome association scans but also to practise genomic estimated breeding value (GEBV)-based selection of genotypes. Given refinements being experienced in analytical methods and software tools, the multiparent populations will be the resource of choice to undertake genome wide association studies (GWAS), multiparent MARS, and genomic selection (GS). With this, it is envisioned that these high-throughput and high-power molecular breeding methods would greatly assist in exploiting the enormous potential underlying breeding by design approach to facilitate accelerated crop improvement. PMID:24348171

  12. Improving Teachers' Teaching with Communication Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Li-Ling

    2012-01-01

    With the growing needs to address the challenges that new teachers face and the popularity of social networking technology, this study explores how to increase the effectives of teaching through the use of such technology, and how the technology may serve to promote collaboration and open new resources of support in public education. In this…

  13. Academic versus Non-Academic Emerging Adult College Student Technology Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanson, Joan Ann; Walker, Erica

    2015-01-01

    Emerging adult college students have developmental and educational needs which are unique to their phase of life. Emerging adults are also increasingly identified by their technology use and practices. Collegiate instructors will be better equipped for educating these individuals when armed with insights concerning emerging adults' technology…

  14. How technology is improving decision making for environmental restoration

    SciTech Connect

    Ditmars, J.

    1995-02-01

    Environmental restoration, or the cleanup of contaminants from past activities, at its core depends on a series of decisions about the nature and extent of contamination, the risk to human health and the environment, and the potential effectiveness of remediation techniques and technologies to reduce the risk to acceptable levels. The effectiveness with which these decisions are made has significant impacts on the cost and duration of the cleanup efforts. The decisions must often be made on the basis of incomplete and uncertain data. Emerging environmental information and data acquisition technologies together with appropriate strategies to support decision making are beginning to change the way environmental restoration occurs in the United States. Past environmental restoration activities too often relied on prescriptive data collection activities to generate the information upon which decisions were to be made. Retrospective studies of such activities have shown that, while often data were gathered for the purpose of reducing the risk in decision making, little true reduction in risk was realized and large amounts of resources were consumed. Recent examination of the failures in the United States to achieve many complete cleanups despite the investment of large sums and time points to the inability to have decisions made efficiently. The solution to the problem involves both regulatory change to allow more flexibility in decision-making and the introduction of technology to improve decision making. This paper reviews the recent assessments made of the cleanup process and application of strategies and technologies to enhance decision-making for cleanup. It provides examples of the new decision approaches and the technologies that have been employed to speed up characterization and to optimize the implementation of remediation.

  15. Codes and Standards Requirements for Deployment of Emerging Fuel Cell Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Burgess, R.; Buttner, W.; Riykin, C.

    2011-12-01

    The objective of this NREL report is to provide information on codes and standards (of two emerging hydrogen power fuel cell technology markets; forklift trucks and backup power units), that would ease the implementation of emerging fuel cell technologies. This information should help project developers, project engineers, code officials and other interested parties in developing and reviewing permit applications for regulatory compliance.

  16. Emerging CAE technologies and their role in Future Ambient Intelligence Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noor, Ahmed

    2011-03-01

    Dramatic improvements are on the horizon in Computer Aided Engineering (CAE) and various simulation technologies. The improvements are due, in part, to the developments in a number of leading-edge technologies and their synergistic combinations/convergence. The technologies include ubiquitous, cloud, and petascale computing; ultra high-bandwidth networks, pervasive wireless communication; knowledge based engineering; networked immersive virtual environments and virtual worlds; novel human-computer interfaces; and powerful game engines and facilities. This paper describes the frontiers and emerging simulation technologies, and their role in the future virtual product creation and learning/training environments. The environments will be ambient intelligence environments, incorporating a synergistic combination of novel agent-supported visual simulations (with cognitive learning and understanding abilities); immersive 3D virtual world facilities; development chain management systems and facilities (incorporating a synergistic combination of intelligent engineering and management tools); nontraditional methods; intelligent, multimodal and human-like interfaces; and mobile wireless devices. The Virtual product creation environment will significantly enhance the productivity and will stimulate creativity and innovation in future global virtual collaborative enterprises. The facilities in the learning/training environment will provide timely, engaging, personalized/collaborative and tailored visual learning.

  17. Toward a new Federal policy for technology: The outline emerges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logsdon, J. M.

    1972-01-01

    The development is traced of a new federal policy for the support and use of technology. The premises underlying such a policy and forecasts likely future developments are analyzed. The first Presidential message on science and technology is included.

  18. Regionalization of services improves access to emergency vascular surgical care.

    PubMed

    Roche-Nagle, G; Bachynski, K; Nathens, A B; Angoulvant, D; Rubin, B B

    2013-04-01

    Management of vascular surgical emergencies requires rapid access to a vascular surgeon and hospital with the infrastructure necessary to manage vascular emergencies. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of regionalization of vascular surgery services in Toronto to University Health Network (UHN) and St Michael's Hospital (SMH) on the ability of CritiCall Ontario to transfer patients with life- and limb-threatening vascular emergencies for definitive care. A retrospective review of the CritiCall Ontario database was used to assess the outcome of all calls to CritiCall regarding patients with vascular disease from April 2003 to March 2010. The number of patients with vascular emergencies referred via CritiCall and accepted in transfer by the vascular centers at UHN or SMH increased 500% between 1 April 2003-31 December 2005 and 1 January 2006-31 March 2010. Together, the vascular centers at UHN and SMH accepted 94.8% of the 1002 vascular surgery patients referred via CritiCall from other hospitals between 1 January 2006 and 31 March 2010, and 72% of these patients originated in hospitals outside of the Toronto Central Local Health Integration Network. Across Ontario, the number of physicians contacted before a patient was accepted in transfer fell from 2.9 ± 0.4 before to 1.7 ± 0.3 after the vascular centers opened. In conclusion, the vascular surgery centers at UHN and SMH have become provincial resources that enable the efficient transfer of patients with vascular surgical emergencies from across Ontario. Regionalization of services is a viable model to increase access to emergent care. PMID:23508395

  19. Technology Transfer through Training: Emerging Roles for the University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergsma, Harold M.

    The importance of training in the technology transfer process is discussed, with special consideration to conditions in developing countries. Also considered is the role universities can play in training to promote technology transfer. Advisors on training and curriculum development are needed to introduce a new technology. Training farmers to…

  20. Emerging Technology Trends and Ethical Practices for the School Principal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garland, Virginia E.

    2010-01-01

    What is the school principal's role in ensuring ethical technology use while promoting the use of wireless and advanced technologies in instruction? The rapid advances in technology in only the past 5 years, including the increase in laptops and smart phones, have transformed both educational practices and the role of the school principal as…

  1. Emerging Technologies in Adult Literacy and Language Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warschauer, Mark; Liaw, Meei-Ling

    2010-01-01

    Although information and communication technologies have become an integral part of life in the United States, they have not yet been adequately integrated into adult language and literacy programs. This raises concerns because of the potential value of technology for enhancing learning and because of the vital role of technological proficiency as…

  2. Emerging Technologies: An Overview of Practices in Distance Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hussain, Irshad

    2007-01-01

    In contemporary society, information technologies and communication technologies (ICTs) are playing crucial role in dissemination of knowledge and information the world over. Universities/ higher education institutions, particularly distance education universities in developed countries are making best use of these technologies for effective and…

  3. Emerging technologies to measure neighborhood conditions in public health: implications for interventions and next steps.

    PubMed

    Schootman, M; Nelson, E J; Werner, K; Shacham, E; Elliott, M; Ratnapradipa, K; Lian, M; McVay, A

    2016-06-23

    Adverse neighborhood conditions play an important role beyond individual characteristics. There is increasing interest in identifying specific characteristics of the social and built environments adversely affecting health outcomes. Most research has assessed aspects of such exposures via self-reported instruments or census data. Potential threats in the local environment may be subject to short-term changes that can only be measured with more nimble technology. The advent of new technologies may offer new opportunities to obtain geospatial data about neighborhoods that may circumvent the limitations of traditional data sources. This overview describes the utility, validity and reliability of selected emerging technologies to measure neighborhood conditions for public health applications. It also describes next steps for future research and opportunities for interventions. The paper presents an overview of the literature on measurement of the built and social environment in public health (Google Street View, webcams, crowdsourcing, remote sensing, social media, unmanned aerial vehicles, and lifespace) and location-based interventions. Emerging technologies such as Google Street View, social media, drones, webcams, and crowdsourcing may serve as effective and inexpensive tools to measure the ever-changing environment. Georeferenced social media responses may help identify where to target intervention activities, but also to passively evaluate their effectiveness. Future studies should measure exposure across key time points during the life-course as part of the exposome paradigm and integrate various types of data sources to measure environmental contexts. By harnessing these technologies, public health research can not only monitor populations and the environment, but intervene using novel strategies to improve the public health.

  4. Emerging technologies to measure neighborhood conditions in public health: implications for interventions and next steps.

    PubMed

    Schootman, M; Nelson, E J; Werner, K; Shacham, E; Elliott, M; Ratnapradipa, K; Lian, M; McVay, A

    2016-01-01

    Adverse neighborhood conditions play an important role beyond individual characteristics. There is increasing interest in identifying specific characteristics of the social and built environments adversely affecting health outcomes. Most research has assessed aspects of such exposures via self-reported instruments or census data. Potential threats in the local environment may be subject to short-term changes that can only be measured with more nimble technology. The advent of new technologies may offer new opportunities to obtain geospatial data about neighborhoods that may circumvent the limitations of traditional data sources. This overview describes the utility, validity and reliability of selected emerging technologies to measure neighborhood conditions for public health applications. It also describes next steps for future research and opportunities for interventions. The paper presents an overview of the literature on measurement of the built and social environment in public health (Google Street View, webcams, crowdsourcing, remote sensing, social media, unmanned aerial vehicles, and lifespace) and location-based interventions. Emerging technologies such as Google Street View, social media, drones, webcams, and crowdsourcing may serve as effective and inexpensive tools to measure the ever-changing environment. Georeferenced social media responses may help identify where to target intervention activities, but also to passively evaluate their effectiveness. Future studies should measure exposure across key time points during the life-course as part of the exposome paradigm and integrate various types of data sources to measure environmental contexts. By harnessing these technologies, public health research can not only monitor populations and the environment, but intervene using novel strategies to improve the public health. PMID:27339260

  5. Improving Capacity Management in the Emergency Department: A Review of the Literature, 2000-2012.

    PubMed

    McCaughey, Deirdre; Erwin, Cathleen O; DelliFraine, Jami L

    2015-01-01

    Capacity management (CM) is a critical component of maintaining and improving healthcare quality and patient safety. One particular area for concern has been the emergency department and the growing issues of patient overcrowding, boarding, and ambulance diversion, which can result in poor patient care and less efficient operations. This study provides a review of the current and most relevant academic literature on capacity management directly related to hospital emergency departments, identifies strengths and weaknesses of the approaches discussed in the literature, and provides practical recommendations for health services administrators implementing CM in their organizations. An extensive literature search was conducted using several search engines and scholarly databases. Articles were identified based on a combination of keywords and then were reviewed and selected for inclusion in the study in adherence to specified criteria. The CM literature includes a great divergence of themes, topics, and definitions. Twenty-two articles were selected for their relevance to emergency department CM with a focus on operations management concepts. A categorization scheme was used, resulting in four thematic groups of articles: problems, solutions, outcomes, and metrics. Healthcare managers wishing to implement solutions to CM problems have a wide variety of operations literature to draw on that can address scheduling and patient throughput, but there are also a number of studies that consider electronic and technological solutions to CM problems. All of these solutions have the potential to positively influence the quality of patient care, including satisfaction. PMID:26529995

  6. IMPROVING AIR QUALITY THROUGH ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) began the Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) Program in 1995 as a means of working with the private sector to establish a market-based verification process available to all environmental technologies. Under EPA's Office of R...

  7. A Technology Approach to Improving Process Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dray, Lori; Strasburger, Tom

    2013-01-01

    It is impossible to ignore how technology is infiltrating education. Interactive projectors and other technologies give teachers and students the opportunity to bring lessons to life. Some districts are replacing textbooks with digital content, allowing students to interact with content in new ways. Galion City School District in Galion, Ohio, is…

  8. Using Technology to Improve Fee Collection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoenberg, Doug

    2008-01-01

    A child care center's financial health depends on collecting and processing payments. It is one of the most time-consuming and unpleasant administrative tasks. Fortunately, it's an area where the smart use of technology can provide dramatic benefits. This article discusses various tools and technologies that can be used by child care centers to…

  9. Improving Student Performance through Learning Technologies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Media and Technology Yearbook, 1994

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the potential for learning technologies to advance the restructuring of teaching and learning and presents recommendations for a comprehensive approach to incorporating technology, including developing state plans; ensuring sufficient funding; providing teachers and students equitable access; providing adequate training and support;…

  10. Community response grids: using information technology to help communities respond to bioterror emergencies.

    PubMed

    Jaeger, Paul T; Fleischmann, Kenneth R; Preece, Jennifer; Shneiderman, Ben; Wu, Philip Fei; Qu, Yan

    2007-12-01

    Access to accurate and trusted information is vital in preparing for, responding to, and recovering from an emergency. To facilitate response in large-scale emergency situations, Community Response Grids (CRGs) integrate Internet and mobile technologies to enable residents to report information, professional emergency responders to disseminate instructions, and residents to assist one another. CRGs use technology to help residents and professional emergency responders to work together in community response to emergencies, including bioterrorism events. In a time of increased danger from bioterrorist threats, the application of advanced information and communication technologies to community response is vital in confronting such threats. This article describes CRGs, their underlying concepts, development efforts, their relevance to biosecurity and bioterrorism, and future research issues in the use of technology to facilitate community response.

  11. Overcrowding in the emergency departments: Challenges and opportunities for improvement.

    PubMed

    Baig, Muhammad Akbar; Mian, Asad; Najeed, Fatima; Shahzad, Hira

    2015-12-01

    With the advent of Emergency Medicine, one can observe an increase in the number of Emergency Departments (ED) across the country. However, most EDs struggle due to an overwhelming number of patients. Overcrowding can lead to delays in patient care. For a city like Karachi which is an active disaster zone, preemptive preparedness is required in the face of terror threats and such overcrowding needs to be decreased to a bare minimum. The most frequent causes of prolonged length of stay (LOS) in the ED include non-availability of in-hospital beds, delays in response to subspecialty consultations and escalating medical expenses. All of these can negatively impact patient care by putting patient safety at risk and patient care in jeopardy. There is an increased risk of unintentional medical errors and a concomitant increase in unwanted lawsuits. A few simple interventions which may help alleviate this situation to some extent have been discussed. PMID:26627520

  12. Improving diabetes management with mobile health technology.

    PubMed

    Sieverdes, John C; Treiber, Frank; Jenkins, Carolyn

    2013-04-01

    Diabetes affects 25.8 million persons in the United States, and these persons make more than 35 million ambulatory care visits annually. Yet, less than half of persons with diabetes meet the recommended levels of A1C, blood pressure and lipid control. One innovative approach is to use mobile health technologies to help patients better manage their diabetes and related conditions, and 85% to 90% of patients have access to mobile health technology. A brief review of the guidelines for diabetes care and mobile health technology that can support the guidelines are reported related to (1) glycemic control and self-monitoring of blood glucose, (2) pharmacological approaches and medication management, (3) medical nutrition therapy, (4) physical activity and resistance training, (5) weight loss, (6) diabetes self-management education and (7) blood pressure control and hypertension. The patient and provider are encouraged to explore possibilities for mobile health technologies that can support behavior change.

  13. CQI and technology: partnership drives improvement.

    PubMed

    Young, J K

    1993-01-01

    CQI plus technology equals increased financial success, according to Parkview Episcopal Medical Center. For this Pueblo, Colo., community hospital, the results of this equation are impressive--time saved, a motivated workforce and last but not least, more revenue.

  14. U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY'S SITE EMERGING TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM: 1991 UPDATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Emerging Technology Program (ETP) supports the development of technologies successfully tested at the bench- and pilot-scale level. The ETP is part of the Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program which was established in 1986 under the Superfund Amendments an...

  15. A Quantitative Assessment of the Factors that Influence Technology Acceptance in Emergency Response

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seiter, Thomas C.

    2012-01-01

    Traditional models for studying user acceptance and adoption of technology focused on the factors that identify and tested the relationships forged between the user and the technology in question. In emergency response, implementing technology without user acceptance may affect the safety of the responders and citizenry. Integrating the factors…

  16. Lean Manufacturing Improves Emergency Department Throughput and Patient Satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Kane, Marlena; Chui, Kristen; Rimicci, Janet; Callagy, Patrice; Hereford, James; Shen, Sam; Norris, Robert; Pickham, David

    2015-09-01

    A multidisciplinary team led by nursing leadership and physicians developed a plan to meet increasing demand and improve the patient experience in the ED without expanding the department's current resources. The approach included Lean tools and engaged frontline staff and physicians. Applying Lean management principles resulted in quicker service, improved patient satisfaction, increased capacity, and reduced resource utilization. Incorporating continuous daily management is necessary for sustainment of continuous improvement activities. PMID:26252725

  17. Lean Manufacturing Improves Emergency Department Throughput and Patient Satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Kane, Marlena; Chui, Kristen; Rimicci, Janet; Callagy, Patrice; Hereford, James; Shen, Sam; Norris, Robert; Pickham, David

    2015-09-01

    A multidisciplinary team led by nursing leadership and physicians developed a plan to meet increasing demand and improve the patient experience in the ED without expanding the department's current resources. The approach included Lean tools and engaged frontline staff and physicians. Applying Lean management principles resulted in quicker service, improved patient satisfaction, increased capacity, and reduced resource utilization. Incorporating continuous daily management is necessary for sustainment of continuous improvement activities.

  18. Emerging technologies for non-invasive quantification of physiological oxygen transport in plants.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, P; Taguchi, M; Burrs, S L; Hauser, B A; Salim, W W A W; Claussen, J C; McLamore, E S

    2013-09-01

    Oxygen plays a critical role in plant metabolism, stress response/signaling, and adaptation to environmental changes (Lambers and Colmer, Plant Soil 274:7-15, 2005; Pitzschke et al., Antioxid Redox Signal 8:1757-1764, 2006; Van Breusegem et al., Plant Sci 161:405-414, 2001). Reactive oxygen species (ROS), by-products of various metabolic pathways in which oxygen is a key molecule, are produced during adaptation responses to environmental stress. While much is known about plant adaptation to stress (e.g., detoxifying enzymes, antioxidant production), the link between ROS metabolism, O2 transport, and stress response mechanisms is unknown. Thus, non-invasive technologies for measuring O2 are critical for understanding the link between physiological O2 transport and ROS signaling. New non-invasive technologies allow real-time measurement of O2 at the single cell and even organelle levels. This review briefly summarizes currently available (i.e., mainstream) technologies for measuring O2 and then introduces emerging technologies for measuring O2. Advanced techniques that provide the ability to non-invasively (i.e., non-destructively) measure O2 are highlighted. In the near future, these non-invasive sensors will facilitate novel experimentation that will allow plant physiologists to ask new hypothesis-driven research questions aimed at improving our understanding of physiological O2 transport.

  19. E-Learning as an Emerging Technology in India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grover, Pooja; Gupta, Nehta

    2010-01-01

    E-learning is a combination of learning services and technology that allow us to provide high value integrated learning any time, any place. It is about a new blend of resources, interactivity, performance support and structured learning activities. This methodology makes use of various types of technologies in order to enhance or transform the…

  20. Capitalizing on Emerging Technologies: A Case Study of Classroom Blogging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacBride, Robyn; Luehmann, April Lynn

    2008-01-01

    The challenge many teachers face is how to incorporate new technology into their classrooms that strengthens classroom learning by capitalizing on students' media literacies. Blogs, a new and innovative technological tool, can be used in math and science classrooms to support student learning by capitalizing on students' interests and familiarity…

  1. Education and Technology Accelerate Economic Growth for Newly Emerging Economies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Workforce Economics Trends, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Technology provides a new and effective tool for accelerating economic growth, and developing countries are embracing technology and education as the means toward attaining economic parity with the United States and other developed nations. Evidence suggests that this strategy is paying off. Developing countries are building a technology…

  2. Reproductive health professionals' adoption of emerging technologies for health promotion.

    PubMed

    Smith, Peggy B; Buzi, Ruth S

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess reproductive health professionals' familiarity with and use of various electronic technologies to support health promotion. The study also examined the relationship between demographic characteristics and attitudes and beliefs of the effectiveness of new technologies and perceived barriers for usage. A total of 165 reproductive health professionals at two conferences related to reproductive health in the United States completed the study survey. Personal and organizational factors affected the adoption of electronic technologies for health promotion. This included lack of knowledge, skills, and confidence as well as privacy concerns. The results of the study also suggested that being from an older generation was associated with having lower levels of knowledge, skills, and confidence in using new media. These findings highlight the importance of creating learning opportunities on the use of new technology for health promotion as well as addressing specific perceived barriers among reproductive health professionals in order to promote the adoption of these technologies. PMID:25411221

  3. State of Practice for Emerging Waste Conversion Technologies

    EPA Science Inventory

    RTI International (RTI) was contracted by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Office of Research and Development to conduct research to prepare a “State of Practice” report to support State and local decision-makers on the subject of emerging waste conversion technolo...

  4. Enabling Distributed Learning Communities via Emerging Technologies--Part One

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dede, Chris

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses that emerging devices, tools, media and virtual environments offer opportunities for creating new types of learning communities for students and teachers. Examples of learning communities include a national mix of kids working together to create an online encyclopedia about Harry Potter's fictional world, or…

  5. Leveraging Technology and Human Systems in an Emergency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molinski, Stan

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the important relationship between robust technical and human systems when face with emergency. It offers several strategies as essential to reacting effectively to a crisis. When a crisis occurs, it is critical that the administration provide the appropriate information as fast as possible to the people who…

  6. Community Alert: Using Text Messaging and Social Media to Improve Campus Emergency Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connolly, Maureen

    2014-01-01

    This article describes emergency management and the part that social media technologies and mobile messaging have made when they are included as part of the campus emergency plan. Administrators have found that ample notification and preparedness must be built into campus communication systems. Social media platforms such as Twitter and Facebook…

  7. Improving the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism in the emergency department

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Jenni

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis of pulmonary embolism (PE) in the emergency department is challenging due to the wide range of non-specific symptoms, lack of clinical diagnostic criteria, and imperfect investigations. Various scoring systems exist in an attempt to limit unnecessary investigations in those with low risk of PE. Following a baseline audit and subsequent PDSA cycles we implemented a flowchart for use in patients suspected of pulmonary embolism encouraging the correct use of the Wells Score and Pulmonary Embolism Rule out Criteria (PERC). The standard used for comparison was based on the NICE guidelines for diagnosis of PE with the addition that PERC could also be used if appropriate. Data was collected over four week periods before and after the introduction of our flowchart in two emergency departments in Melbourne. We aimed to increase documentation of pre-test probability, reduce inappropriate investigations, and increase the use of interim parenteral anticoagulation where there was a delay to imaging. Results showed an increase in the documentation of pre-test probability and the proportion of investigations requested that were inappropriate was reduced. The percentage of inappropriate d-dimers was reduced from 36% to 24%; the percentage of inappropriate CTPAs was reduced from 34% to 10%; and the percentage of inappropriate V/Q scans was reduced from 42% to 14%. Implementation of a simple diagnostic algorithm led to an increase in documentation of pre-test probability and a reduction in inappropriate and unnecessary investigations. This intervention may be applicable to other emergency departments where similar issues in diagnosing pulmonary embolism exist. PMID:26893882

  8. Partnering Effectively With Inpatient Leaders for Improved Emergency Department Throughput

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Stephanie J.; Esbenshade, Angie

    2015-01-01

    The boarding of patients is a root cause of overcrowding in a majority of emergency departments (EDs) nationwide. It reduces capacity to treat ED patients, decreases bed utilization, and compromises quality, safety, and the patient experience. Because of its systemic nature, it can only be effectively addressed through attention and commitment by all stakeholders. Once emergency departments have addressed throughput challenges they can solve on their own, they are ready to focus on proactive communication and teamwork with inpatient leaders to identify and transfer potential admissions more efficiently. No-delay nurse reports are an important tool to reduce time from admit orders to arrival on patient units. An effective hospital-wide flow committee also removes barriers for admitting patients quickly from the emergency department and addresses a revised January 1, 2014, Joint Commission standard that requires goal setting and measurement to mitigate and better manage the boarding of patients. This article discusses who should attend, the scope of the committee charter, how to use a hospital-wide throughput dashboard to measure results, and includes a sample agenda. It is recommended that the committee also assess and evaluate the effectiveness of the surge plan at least every three years to ensure that it meets goals identified by the committee. This article also shares best practices associated with two key tactics to support an effective hospital-wide throughput committee: inpatient bed huddles to expedite inpatient admissions and inpatient leader rounding, where the inpatient leader rounds on boarded ED patients to ensure safety and quality while also establishing ownership for the transition.

  9. GNSS-based network positioning technology for cooperative emergency management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Caicong; Chu, Tianxing; Tang, Anning; Su, Huaihong

    2009-06-01

    Personal digital assistant (PDA) with built-in GPS chip begins to be used for city management and emergency response management nowadays. The intelligent terminal can be used for event recording, multimedia (photo, audio, and video) capturing, wireless communication, GPS positioning and navigation. In the near future, PDA would take place of the vehicle GPS monitoring terminal to provide more functions and convenient. This article organizes the PDA of the same team for emergency response event into an integrated network through wireless communication so that each terminal can see each other on the map, including the vehicle GPS monitoring terminals. All of the terminals should send its GPS position and collected information to the emergency response center (ERC) through GPRS with a customized protocol. Then the center would create the socket connection to push the neighbors' location and common or special information to the others in the team according to the terminal's requirement and its authorities, and the leader or commander could send commands and messages to all of the underling members also. The GNSS based positioning and communication network organizes the dispersive emergency response personnel handheld with PDA and vehicles equipped with vehicle GPS monitoring terminal into an organic and cooperative network, each member in the network can see where its colleagues are, so as to seek for the help or support and exchange information in real time without calling which avoids exposure to the tracked objects. The Compass-1 satellite positioning and communication terminal is also used for personnel and vehicle positioning and message reporting. Altay is selected as the demonstration area. The prototype emergency management system is established for the local public security bureau and well validates the terminals and network function.

  10. Molecular marker technologies for plant improvement.

    PubMed

    Winter, P; Kahl, G

    1995-07-01

    The exploitation of DNA polymorphisms by an ever-increasing number of molecular marker technologies has begun to have an impact on plant genome research and breeding. Restriction fragment length polymorphisms, micro- and mini-satellites and PCR-based approaches are used to determine inter- and intra-specific genetic diversity and construct molecular maps of crops using specially designed mapping populations. Resistance genes and other agronomically important loci are tagged with tightly linked DNA markers and the genes isolated by magabase DNA technology and cloning into yeast artificial chromosomes (YAC). This review discusses some recent developments and results in this field.

  11. Flattening filter-free accelerators: a report from the AAPM Therapy Emerging Technology Assessment Work Group.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ying; Kry, Stephen F; Popple, Richard; Yorke, Ellen; Papanikolaou, Niko; Stathakis, Sotirios; Xia, Ping; Huq, Saiful; Bayouth, John; Galvin, James; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2015-05-08

    This report describes the current state of flattening filter-free (FFF) radiotherapy beams implemented on conventional linear accelerators, and is aimed primarily at practicing medical physicists. The Therapy Emerging Technology Assessment Work Group of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) formed a writing group to assess FFF technology. The published literature on FFF technology was reviewed, along with technical specifications provided by vendors. Based on this information, supplemented by the clinical experience of the group members, consensus guidelines and recommendations for implementation of FFF technology were developed. Areas in need of further investigation were identified. Removing the flattening filter increases beam intensity, especially near the central axis. Increased intensity reduces treatment time, especially for high-dose stereotactic radiotherapy/radiosurgery (SRT/SRS). Furthermore, removing the flattening filter reduces out-of-field dose and improves beam modeling accuracy. FFF beams are advantageous for small field (e.g., SRS) treatments and are appropriate for intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). For conventional 3D radiotherapy of large targets, FFF beams may be disadvantageous compared to flattened beams because of the heterogeneity of FFF beam across the target (unless modulation is employed). For any application, the nonflat beam characteristics and substantially higher dose rates require consideration during the commissioning and quality assurance processes relative to flattened beams, and the appropriate clinical use of the technology needs to be identified. Consideration also needs to be given to these unique characteristics when undertaking facility planning. Several areas still warrant further research and development. Recommendations pertinent to FFF technology, including acceptance testing, commissioning, quality assurance, radiation safety, and facility planning, are presented. Examples of clinical

  12. Flattening filter-free accelerators: a report from the AAPM Therapy Emerging Technology Assessment Work Group.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ying; Kry, Stephen F; Popple, Richard; Yorke, Ellen; Papanikolaou, Niko; Stathakis, Sotirios; Xia, Ping; Huq, Saiful; Bayouth, John; Galvin, James; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2015-01-01

    This report describes the current state of flattening filter-free (FFF) radiotherapy beams implemented on conventional linear accelerators, and is aimed primarily at practicing medical physicists. The Therapy Emerging Technology Assessment Work Group of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) formed a writing group to assess FFF technology. The published literature on FFF technology was reviewed, along with technical specifications provided by vendors. Based on this information, supplemented by the clinical experience of the group members, consensus guidelines and recommendations for implementation of FFF technology were developed. Areas in need of further investigation were identified. Removing the flattening filter increases beam intensity, especially near the central axis. Increased intensity reduces treatment time, especially for high-dose stereotactic radiotherapy/radiosurgery (SRT/SRS). Furthermore, removing the flattening filter reduces out-of-field dose and improves beam modeling accuracy. FFF beams are advantageous for small field (e.g., SRS) treatments and are appropriate for intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). For conventional 3D radiotherapy of large targets, FFF beams may be disadvantageous compared to flattened beams because of the heterogeneity of FFF beam across the target (unless modulation is employed). For any application, the nonflat beam characteristics and substantially higher dose rates require consideration during the commissioning and quality assurance processes relative to flattened beams, and the appropriate clinical use of the technology needs to be identified. Consideration also needs to be given to these unique characteristics when undertaking facility planning. Several areas still warrant further research and development. Recommendations pertinent to FFF technology, including acceptance testing, commissioning, quality assurance, radiation safety, and facility planning, are presented. Examples of clinical

  13. EMERGING TECHNOLOGY BULLETIN: INNOVATIVE METHODS FOR BIOSLURRY TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Slurry biodegradation systems are created by combining soil or sludge with water. This technology provides rapid biodegradation, due to enhanced mass transfer rates and increased contaminant to microorganism contact. After appropriate pretreatment, the contaminants are suspende...

  14. Radical nursing and the emergence of technique as healthcare technology.

    PubMed

    Barnard, Alan

    2016-01-01

    The integration of technology in care is core business in nursing and this role requires that we must understand and use technology informed by evidence that goes much deeper and broader than actions and behaviours. We need to delve more deeply into its complexity because there is nothing minor or insignificant about technology as a major influence in healthcare outcomes and experiences. Evidence is needed that addresses technology and nursing from perspectives that examine the effects of technology, especially related to increasing demands for efficiency, the relationship of technology to nursing and caring, and a range of philosophical questions associated with empowering people in their healthcare choices. Specifically, there is a need to confront in practice the ways technique influences care. Technique is the creation of a kind of thinking that is necessary for contemporary healthcare technology to develop and be applied in an efficient and rational manner. Technique is not an entity or specific thing, but rather a way of thinking that seeks to shape and organize nursing activity, and manage efficiently individual difference(s) in care. It emphasizes predetermined causal relationships, conformity, and sameness of product, process, and thought. In response is needed a radical vision of nursing that attempts in a real sense to ensure we meet the needs of individuals and their community. Activism and advocacy are needed, and a willingness to create a certain detachment from the imperatives that technique demands. It is argued that our responsibility as nurses is to respond in practice to the errors, advantages, difficulties, and temptations of technology for the benefit of those who most need our assistance and care.

  15. Radical nursing and the emergence of technique as healthcare technology.

    PubMed

    Barnard, Alan

    2016-01-01

    The integration of technology in care is core business in nursing and this role requires that we must understand and use technology informed by evidence that goes much deeper and broader than actions and behaviours. We need to delve more deeply into its complexity because there is nothing minor or insignificant about technology as a major influence in healthcare outcomes and experiences. Evidence is needed that addresses technology and nursing from perspectives that examine the effects of technology, especially related to increasing demands for efficiency, the relationship of technology to nursing and caring, and a range of philosophical questions associated with empowering people in their healthcare choices. Specifically, there is a need to confront in practice the ways technique influences care. Technique is the creation of a kind of thinking that is necessary for contemporary healthcare technology to develop and be applied in an efficient and rational manner. Technique is not an entity or specific thing, but rather a way of thinking that seeks to shape and organize nursing activity, and manage efficiently individual difference(s) in care. It emphasizes predetermined causal relationships, conformity, and sameness of product, process, and thought. In response is needed a radical vision of nursing that attempts in a real sense to ensure we meet the needs of individuals and their community. Activism and advocacy are needed, and a willingness to create a certain detachment from the imperatives that technique demands. It is argued that our responsibility as nurses is to respond in practice to the errors, advantages, difficulties, and temptations of technology for the benefit of those who most need our assistance and care. PMID:26511779

  16. Converging, pervasive technologies: chronic and emerging issues and policy adequacy.

    PubMed

    Seelman, Katherine D

    2008-01-01

    This article is a thought piece with the expansive goal of identifying policy facilitators and barriers to the development of usable and accessible advanced information and communications technology for people with disabilities across the age span at the research and development and marketing stages. The working hypothesis is as follows: The lack of participation in and representation of the interests of people with disabilities in the technology resource system is a barrier to availability of affordable consumer goods that enable independence and community integration. Converging, pervasive computing technology, especially in housing applications, is used as a case example, drawing especially from research and development conducted by the National Science Foundation Quality of Life Technology Engineering Research Center. A critical theory approach is used to identify problems and seek solutions to the apparent lack of balance between the demand and needs of disabled users and the supply and availability of usable, affordable consumer goods produced by the technology resource system in which allocation decisions are made. The approach uses policy analysis tools such as a technology assessment framework; the participation and environment components of the World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health; and participatory action research.

  17. Effect of aircraft technology improvements on intercity energy use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    An examination of the growth or decline in energy consumption in short haul, high density intercity transportation is made in relation to changes in aeronautical technology. Improvements or changes in the technology of competitive modes are also included. Certain improvements in air traffic control procedures were included to determine their effectiveness in saving energy along with a fuel efficient turboprop short haul aircraft concept.

  18. Improving mine safety technology and training in the U.S. recommendations of the Mine Safety Technology and Training Commission

    SciTech Connect

    Grayson, R. Larry

    2008-09-15

    The key issues studied focused on underground coal mining and included (1) prevention of explosions in sealed areas, (2) better emergency preparedness and response, (3) improvement of miners' ability to escape, (4) better protection of miners before and after a fire or explosion, (5) improved provision of oxygen, and (6) development and implementation of more robust post-incident communication. The U.S. Congress passed the Mine Improvement and New Emergency Response Act of 2006, which mandated new laws to address the issues. Concurrent with investigations and congressional deliberations, the National Mining Association formed the independent Mine Safety Technology and Training Commission to study the state-of-the-art relative to technology and training that could address the vulnerabilities exposed by the mine disasters. As discussed, the report outlined persistent vulnerabilities linked with significant hazards in underground coal mines, and made recommendations to provide a path for addressing them. Overall the commission report made 75 recommendations in the areas of risk-based design and management, communications technology, emergency response and mine rescue procedures, training for preparedness, and escape and protection strategies. In its deliberations, the commission importantly noted that mine safety in the U.S. needs to follow a new paradigm for ensuring mine safety and developing a culture of prevention that supports safe production at the business core. In the commission's viewpoint, the bottom line in protecting coal miners is not only adopting a culture of prevention but also systematically pursuing mitigation of significant risks. 4 refs., 2 figs.

  19. A network to improve emergency patient care by facilitating practitioners to effectively support practitioners.

    PubMed

    Christenson, Jim

    2014-01-01

    Networks that integrate academic and clinical activities are developing across Canada. The University of British Columbia, Department of Emergency Medicine, is leading the planning and implementation of a network that integrates clinician researchers and clinical experts with all practitioners in emergency medicine across the province. The intention is to facilitate emergency practitioners supporting emergency practitioners in remote to tertiary care settings to deliver best practices to patients in all BC emergency departments. The structure and objectives of the network demonstrate how focusing directly on patient-centred care across a large dispersed group of caregivers with common needs can effectively improve care delivery.

  20. Technology and simulation to improve patient safety.

    PubMed

    Ghobrial, George M; Hamade, Youssef J; Bendok, Bernard R; Harrop, James S

    2015-04-01

    Improving the quality and efficiency of surgical techniques, reducing technical errors in the operating suite, and ultimately improving patient safety and outcomes through education are common goals in all surgical specialties. Current surgical simulation programs represent an effort to enhance and optimize the training experience, to overcome the training limitations of a mandated 80-hour work week, and have the overall goal of providing a well-balanced resident education in a society with a decreasing level of tolerance for medical errors.

  1. Improved management of chronic disease using health information technology.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Brian E; Samarth, Anita; Starmer, Jack

    2007-10-11

    Technology can be used effectively to improve chronic disease management, impacting health care costs, safety, and quality. The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality has funded several studies to examine best practices in using technology to impact chronic disease management. These projects have employed a variety of technologies to improve care delivery processes, patient education, and continuity of care. Their stories contain valuable lessons for others looking to enhance chronic disease care.

  2. Image/data storage, manipulation and recall using video/computer technology for emergency applications

    SciTech Connect

    Thorpe, J.M.

    1986-01-01

    Employing a blend of broadcast video and state-of-the-art computer technology the Management Emergency Response Information System (MERIS) is designed to control, manipulate, and distribute the graphic and visual information necessary for decision-making in an emergency response situation or exercise. Instant storage and recall of an extensive library of frames of video imagery allow emergency planners the time and freedom to examine necessary information quickly and efficiently.

  3. Mississippi Curriculum Framework for Emergency Medical Technology--Basic (Program CIP: 51.0904). Emergency Medical Technology--Paramedic (Program CIP: 51.0904). Postsecondary Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mississippi Research and Curriculum Unit for Vocational and Technical Education, State College.

    This document, which is intended for use by community and junior colleges throughout Mississippi, contains curriculum frameworks for the course sequences in the emergency medical technology (EMT) programs cluster. Presented in the introductory section are a description of the program and suggested course sequence. Section I lists baseline…

  4. Emerging Technologies: How Do We Know What's Happening "on the Ground"?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Gwen

    2012-01-01

    Libraries have incorporated all kinds of emerging or recently emerged technologies such as social media, mobile apps, e-books, and tablets into their services with differing levels of resource commitment and with vastly different timescales. Some libraries adopt a measured, policy-driven approach, spending a year or more on research, assessment,…

  5. Information Technology Utilization in Emergency Management at Exxon Research and Engineering Company.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soled, E. H.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    This description of the role of the Information Services Division of Exxon Research and Engineering Division in emergency management covers the information technology developed and used for internally generated and published information, and how this information is used to prevent emergencies and deal with them should they actually occur. (EM)

  6. Helicopter Evacuation Following a Rural Trauma: An Emergency Medicine Simulation Scenario Using Innovative Simulation Technology

    PubMed Central

    Whalen, Desmond; Harty, Chris; Ravalia, Mohamed; Renouf, Tia; Alani, Sabrina; Brown, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The relevance of simulation as a teaching tool for medical professionals working in rural and remote contexts is apparent when low-frequency, high-risk situations are considered. Simulation training has been shown to enhance learning and improve patient outcomes in urban settings. However, there are few simulation scenarios designed to teach rural trauma management during complex medical transportation. In this technical report, we present a scenario using a medevac helicopter (Replica of Sikorsky S-92 designed by Virtual Marine Technology, St. John's, NL) at a rural community. This case can be used for training primary care physicians who are working in a rural or remote setting, or as an innovative addition to emergency medicine and pre-hospital care training programs. PMID:27081585

  7. Evidence-Based Point-of-Care Diagnostics: Current Status and Emerging Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Cangel Pui Yee; Mak, Wing Cheung; Cheung, Kwan Yee; Sin, King Keung; Yu, Cheuk Man; Rainer, Timothy H.; Renneberg, Reinhard

    2013-06-01

    Point-of-care (POC) diagnostics brings tests nearer to the site of patient care. The turnaround time is short, and minimal manual interference enables quick clinical management decisions. Growth in POC diagnostics is being continuously fueled by the global burden of cardiovascular and infectious diseases. Early diagnosis and rapid initiation of treatment are crucial in the management of such patients. This review provides the rationale for the use of POC tests in acute coronary syndrome, heart failure, human immunodeficiency virus, and tuberculosis. We also consider emerging technologies that are based on advanced nanomaterials and microfluidics, improved assay sensitivity, miniaturization in device design, reduced costs, and high-throughput multiplex detection, all of which may shape the future development of POC diagnostics.

  8. Helicopter Evacuation Following a Rural Trauma: An Emergency Medicine Simulation Scenario Using Innovative Simulation Technology.

    PubMed

    Whalen, Desmond; Harty, Chris; Ravalia, Mohamed; Renouf, Tia; Alani, Sabrina; Brown, Robert; Dubrowski, Adam

    2016-01-01

    The relevance of simulation as a teaching tool for medical professionals working in rural and remote contexts is apparent when low-frequency, high-risk situations are considered. Simulation training has been shown to enhance learning and improve patient outcomes in urban settings. However, there are few simulation scenarios designed to teach rural trauma management during complex medical transportation. In this technical report, we present a scenario using a medevac helicopter (Replica of Sikorsky S-92 designed by Virtual Marine Technology, St. John's, NL) at a rural community. This case can be used for training primary care physicians who are working in a rural or remote setting, or as an innovative addition to emergency medicine and pre-hospital care training programs. PMID:27081585

  9. CHARACTERIZING COSTS, SAVINGS AND BENEFITS OF A SELECTION OF ENERGY EFFICIENT EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES IN THE UNITED STATES

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, T.; Slaa, J.W.; Sathaye, J.

    2010-12-15

    Implementation and adoption of efficient end-use technologies have proven to be one of the key measures for reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions throughout the industries. In many cases, implementing energy efficiency measures is among one of the most cost effective investments that the industry could make in improving efficiency and productivity while reducing CO2 emissions. Over the years, there have been incentives to use resources and energy in a cleaner and more efficient way to create industries that are sustainable and more productive. With the working of energy programs and policies on GHG inventory and regulation, understanding and managing the costs associated with mitigation measures for GHG reductions is very important for the industry and policy makers around the world. Successful implementation of emerging technologies not only can help advance productivities and competitiveness but also can play a significant role in mitigation efforts by saving energy. Providing evaluation and estimation of the costs and energy savings potential of emerging technologies is the focus of our work in this project. The overall goal of the project is to identify and select emerging and under-utilized energy-efficient technologies and practices as they are important to reduce energy consumption in industry while maintaining economic growth. This report contains the results from performing Task 2"Technology evaluation" for the project titled"Research Opportunities in Emerging and Under-Utilized Energy-Efficient Industrial Technologies," which was sponsored by California Energy Commission and managed by CIEE. The project purpose is to analyze market status, market potential, and economic viability of selected technologies applicable to the U.S. In this report, LBNL first performed re-assessments of all of the 33 emerging energy-efficient industrial technologies, including re-evaluation of the 26 technologies that were previously identified by Martin et al. (2000) and

  10. Emerging photovoltaic module technologies at PVUSA: A five-year assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Townsend, T.

    1995-04-01

    The Photovoltaics for Utility Scale Applications (PVUSA) project tests two types of photovoltaic systems: new modules fielded as 20-kW Emerging Module Technology (EMT) arrays, and more mature technologies fielded as 20- to 500-kW turnkey Utility Scale (US) systems. This report summarizes experiences of the PVUSA project in operating the first six 20-kW EMT photovoltaic systems. Five systems are installed at Davis, California, and one at Kihei, Hawaii. Products selected for testing and demonstration were judged to have potential for significant technical advancement or reduction in manufacturing cost. Features leading to selection of each system and findings over the average 5 years of operation are compared in the report. Factory product qualification test experiences along with field acceptance test results are documented. Evaluation includes a broad range of performance parameters, including long-term efficiency, seasonal generation patterns, and maintenance. While some of the arrays have operated as well as any commercial system, others have fared poorly. Throughout the procurement and operation of these precommercial PV modules, PVUSA has provided feedback to vendors, critical for product improvement. The data and evaluations in this report will be of further benefit to manufacturers and provide general comparative information on a variety of technologies to researchers in utilities, government, and industry alike.

  11. Going Mobile: How Mobile Personal Health Records Can Improve Health Care During Emergencies

    PubMed Central

    Ravi, Sanjana

    2014-01-01

    Personal health records (PHRs), in contrast to electronic health records (EHRs) or electronic medical records (EMRs), are health records in which data are accessible to patients and not just providers. In recent years, many systems have enabled PHRs to be available in a mobile format. Mobile PHRs (mPHRs) allow patients to access health information via the Internet or telecommunication devices, such as mobile phones, personal digital assistants, and tablet computers. mPHRs have the potential to help patients and providers identify medical conditions and prescriptions from numerous locations, which may minimize medical errors and identify improvements to health behaviors during emergencies, when patients present to a new provider, or EHRs are not accessible. Despite their benefits, numerous challenges inhibit the adoption and further development of mPHRs, including integration into overall health technology infrastructure and legal and security concerns. This paper identifies the benefits of mPHRs during emergencies and the remaining challenges impeding full adoption and use, and provides recommendations to federal agencies to enhance support and use of mPHRs. PMID:25098942

  12. Going mobile: how mobile personal health records can improve health care during emergencies.

    PubMed

    Bouri, Nidhi; Ravi, Sanjana

    2014-03-05

    Personal health records (PHRs), in contrast to electronic health records (EHRs) or electronic medical records (EMRs), are health records in which data are accessible to patients and not just providers. In recent years, many systems have enabled PHRs to be available in a mobile format. Mobile PHRs (mPHRs) allow patients to access health information via the Internet or telecommunication devices, such as mobile phones, personal digital assistants, and tablet computers. mPHRs have the potential to help patients and providers identify medical conditions and prescriptions from numerous locations, which may minimize medical errors and identify improvements to health behaviors during emergencies, when patients present to a new provider, or EHRs are not accessible. Despite their benefits, numerous challenges inhibit the adoption and further development of mPHRs, including integration into overall health technology infrastructure and legal and security concerns. This paper identifies the benefits of mPHRs during emergencies and the remaining challenges impeding full adoption and use, and provides recommendations to federal agencies to enhance support and use of mPHRs.

  13. Nanoparticle characterization: State of the art, challenges, and emerging technologies

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Eun Jung; Holback, Hillary; Liu, Karen C.; Abouelmagd, Sara A.; Park, Joonyoung; Yeo, Yoon

    2013-01-01

    Nanoparticles have received enormous attention as a promising tool to enhance target-specific drug delivery and diagnosis. Various in vitro and in vivo techniques are used to characterize a new system and predict its clinical efficacy. These techniques enable efficient comparison across nanoparticles and facilitate a product optimization process. On the other hand, we recognize their limitations as a prediction tool, which owe to inadequate applications and overly simplified test conditions. This article provides a critical review of in vitro and in vivo techniques currently used for evaluation of nanoparticles and introduces emerging techniques and models that may be used complementarily. PMID:23461379

  14. Emerging roles for telemedicine and smart technologies in dementia care

    PubMed Central

    Bossen, Ann L; Kim, Heejung; Williams, Kristine N; Steinhoff, Andreanna E; Strieker, Molly

    2015-01-01

    Demographic aging of the world population contributes to an increase in the number of persons diagnosed with dementia (PWD), with corresponding increases in health care expenditures. In addition, fewer family members are available to care for these individuals. Most care for PWD occurs in the home, and family members caring for PWD frequently suffer negative outcomes related to the stress and burden of observing their loved one’s progressive memory and functional decline. Decreases in cognition and self-care also necessitate that the caregiver takes on new roles and responsibilities in care provision. Smart technologies are being developed to support family caregivers of PWD in a variety of ways, including provision of information and support resources online, wayfinding technology to support independent mobility of the PWD, monitoring systems to alert caregivers to changes in the PWD and their environment, navigation devices to track PWD experiencing wandering, and telemedicine and e-health services linking caregivers and PWD with health care providers. This paper will review current uses of these advancing technologies to support care of PWD. Challenges unique to widespread acceptance of technology will be addressed and future directions explored. PMID:26636049

  15. Building Virtual Teams: Experiential Learning Using Emerging Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hu, Haihong

    2015-01-01

    Currently, virtual teams are being used exponentially in higher education and business because of the development of technologies and globalization. These teams have become an essential approach for collaborative learning as well as task completion. Team learning, especially in an online format, can be challenging due to lack of effective…

  16. EMERGING TECHNOLOGY BULLETIN: BIOSCRUBBER ALUMINUM COMPANY OF AMERICA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biofiltratfon is an established economical air pollution control technology for removing organic contaminants from air. The existing filters using natural media, such as peat and compost, have been demonstrated in the field for degrading up to several thousand ppm of contaminants...

  17. EMERGING TECHNOLOGY SUMMARY: ELECTRO-PURE ALTERNATING CURRENT ELECTROCOAGULATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program was authorized as part of the 1986 amendments to the Superfund legislation. It represents a joint effort between the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Office of Research and Development and Office of Solid W...

  18. An Emerging Technology Curriculum. A Model with Task Listings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bangasser, Vi; And Others

    This project was designed to provide a model for secondary and postsecondary educators in planning and developing a well-articulated competency-based delivery system focusing on high-technology training. The model was to be implemented in several vocational-technical programs so that secondary students would acquire the necessary competencies to…

  19. The re-emergence of Eastern European science and technology

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, C. Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Economic competitiveness, and with it the survival of democracy in Eastern Europe, depends in large part on the ability of the region to manage technology for manufacturing exports. Most East European products are now oriented toward civilian and military needs of the former Soviet Union, and cannot now be sold anywhere. The communist system of central planning and soft budgets provided no incentive to manage technology or any other resource. Innovation was hampered by isolation from changes in world markets and technology, and by the separation of teaching, research, and production. Teaching was carried out on schools and universities, research in government institutes, and production in state-owned enterprises. Eastern European scientific and technological infrastructure is oversized, under-equipped, and politicized, but includes a strong nucleus which could be reformed and reoriented towards world markets. This process is beginning in several countries. But public support is lacking, as are funds for long-range investments. Strategic alliances are urgently needed with western firms and researchers with an understanding of world markets. 15 refs., 3 tabs.

  20. Development and commercialization of emerging infrared radiation food processing technologies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In order to demonstrate a newly developed simultaneous infrared dry-blanching and dehydration (SIRDBD) technology on an industrial scale, a mobile and continuous IR heating system was built and tested to examine its performance for SIRDBD of sliced and diced potatoes. The mobile IR heating equipment...

  1. Technological Education in the United States: Present and Emerging Patterns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bleyer, Dorothy R.; And Others

    The explosive technological advances of recent years have created a need to incorporate technical education into curricula at all levels from elementary through and including higher education. This in turn has led to the necessity of articulation among the various levels of technical education, including articulation between postsecondary…

  2. The Emerging Information and Communications Technology Educational Research Forum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Niki

    1999-01-01

    Describes the development of the ICT (Information and Communications Technology) Educational Research Forum (ERF), which aims to fulfill some of the needs of the education profession to engage with research in the field of ICT, focusing on the ERF design principles; ERF web site content and structure; evaluation and research of the ERF; and future…

  3. Emergent Legal Definitions of Parentage in Assisted Reproductive Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Cherylon; Miller, Michael V.

    2004-01-01

    State statutes and court cases involving Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART) are examined to determine legal definitions of father and mother. While traditional definitions are not disturbed overall by statutes and cases involving use of artificial insemination by donor among married couples, complications and disputes between parties involved…

  4. Improve the design of fire emergency relief systems

    SciTech Connect

    Stickles, R.P.; Melhem, G.A.; Eckhardt, D.R.

    1995-11-01

    In recognition of the potential severe consequences of a process vessel rupture under fire exposure, industry codes such as the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 30 and the American Petroleum Institute (API) Standard 2000 have been established for the specification of emergency relief systems (ERSs). The intent is to reduce the risk of human injury and asset losses associated with process plant fires. These codes are largely prescriptive in nature. That is, they provide specific details on how to achieve safe design. Prescriptive standards are easy to apply, because they are simplified approaches which generally apply to many (but not all) situations. But they also have limitations, including the tendency to result in, at best, suboptimal (overly conservative) designs, and in some instances potentially unsafe designs. As the fire community moves toward performance-based standards for building protection, perhaps it is time to consider a similar approach for vessel protection in a fire. The design issues addressed in this article include: Use of heat input based on actual fuel burning rate, heat of combustion, and flame emissive power, vs. NFPA 30 and API 2000 heat-input equations; Effect of drainage (from vessel to sump) on fire duration, rather than heat input; Use of risk assessment to determine the relative frequency of fire and process-induced incidents; and design for containment, rather than vessel protection when fire probability is low

  5. Identification and assessment of site treatment plan implementation opportunities for emerging technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, E.A.

    1995-12-31

    The Department of Energy (DOE), in response to the 1992 Federal Facility Compliance Act, has prepared Site Treatment Plans (STP) for the approximately 2,000 waste streams identified within its mixed waste inventory Concurrently, emerging mixed waste treatment technologies are in final development. This paper defines a three-phase process to identify and assess implementation opportunities for these emerging technologies within the STP. It highlights the first phase, functional matching of expected treatment capabilities with proposed treatment requirements. Matches are based on treatment type, regulated contaminant and waste matrix type, for both capabilities and requirements. Results identify specific waste streams and volumes that could be treated by each emerging technology. A study for Plasma Hearth Process, Delphi DETOX{sup sm}, Supercritical Water Oxidation and Vitrification shows that about 200,000 ml of DOE`s mixed waste inventory can potentially be treated by one or more of these emerging technologies. Actual implementations are small fractions of the treatable inventory. Differences between potential and actual implementations must be minimized to accrue optimum benefit from implementation of emerging or alternative treatment technologies. Functional matching is the first phase in identifying and quantifying benefits, addressing technology system and treatment issues, and providing, in part, the basis for STP implementation decisions. DOE, through EM`s Office of Technology Development, has funded this work.

  6. [Dentists should improve the ability to deal with medical emergencies in dental clinic].

    PubMed

    Pan, Jian; Liao, Xuejuan; Zhang, Zhuang

    2015-08-01

    In recent years, the number of outpatients in stomatological hospital is in increasing year by year and being accompanied by the corresponding medical risks. One of the risks which may endanger the patient life is medical emergency which need emergency treatment by the dentists in dental clinical practice. The most common emergency type is syncope, followed by hyperventilation, drug overdose, adrenaline reaction and hypertension, etc. Unexpected events mainly occurred at the end of the treatment and before leaving the dental clinic, during or immediately after the local anesthesia, in the treatment process. Tooth extraction related emergency is the most frequently occurring emergency, followed by the local anesthesia related ones. It's strongly suggested that dentists should pay more attention to outpatient clinical emergency treatment, and related knowledge and skills training should be offered to improve the ability to handle medical emergencies.

  7. Emerging computer technologies and the news media of the future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vrabel, Debra A.

    1993-01-01

    The media environment of the future may be dramatically different from what exists today. As new computing and communications technologies evolve and synthesize to form a global, integrated communications system of networks, public domain hardware and software, and consumer products, it will be possible for citizens to fulfill most information needs at any time and from any place, to obtain desired information easily and quickly, to obtain information in a variety of forms, and to experience and interact with information in a variety of ways. This system will transform almost every institution, every profession, and every aspect of human life--including the creation, packaging, and distribution of news and information by media organizations. This paper presents one vision of a 21st century global information system and how it might be used by citizens. It surveys some of the technologies now on the market that are paving the way for new media environment.

  8. Autogenic feedback training improves pilot performance during emergency flying conditions.

    PubMed

    Kellar, M A; Folen, R A; Cowings, P S; Toscano, W B; Hisert, G L

    1993-01-01

    Studies have shown that autonomous mode behavior (AMB) is one cause of aircraft fatalities caused by pilot error. In AMB cases, the pilot is in a high state of psychological and physiological arousal and tends to focus on one problem, while ignoring more critical information. The following study, conducted under the auspices of the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Ames Research Center, examined the effect of training in physiological self-recognition and regulation, as a means of improving crew cockpit performance. Seventeen pilots were assigned to the treatment and control groups matched for accumulated flight hours. PMID:11537902

  9. Signature Optical Cues: Emerging Technologies for Monitoring Plant Health

    PubMed Central

    Liew, Oi Wah; Chong, Pek Ching Jenny; Li, Bingqing; Asundi, Anand K.

    2008-01-01

    Optical technologies can be developed as practical tools for monitoring plant health by providing unique spectral signatures that can be related to specific plant stresses. Signatures from thermal and fluorescence imaging have been used successfully to track pathogen invasion before visual symptoms are observed. Another approach for non-invasive plant health monitoring involves elucidating the manner with which light interacts with the plant leaf and being able to identify changes in spectral characteristics in response to specific stresses. To achieve this, an important step is to understand the biochemical and anatomical features governing leaf reflectance, transmission and absorption. Many studies have opened up possibilities that subtle changes in leaf reflectance spectra can be analyzed in a plethora of ways for discriminating nutrient and water stress, but with limited success. There has also been interest in developing transgenic phytosensors to elucidate plant status in relation to environmental conditions. This approach involves unambiguous signal creation whereby genetic modification to generate reporter plants has resulted in distinct optical signals emitted in response to specific stressors. Most of these studies are limited to laboratory or controlled greenhouse environments at leaf level. The practical translation of spectral cues for application under field conditions at canopy and regional levels by remote aerial sensing remains a challenge. The movement towards technology development is well exemplified by the Controlled Ecological Life Support System under development by NASA which brings together technologies for monitoring plant status concomitantly with instrumentation for environmental monitoring and feedback control.

  10. Pinch technology improves olefin heat recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, J.

    1989-02-01

    Pyrolysis of naphthas or gas oils to provide ethylene and propylene for polymers is gaining in popularity in many countries. Pyrolysis takes place at the comparatively high temperatures of 800 to 850/sup 0/C. The very common solution of pyrolysis gas heat recovery in an ethylene unit is shown. Pinch technology allows finding the temperature point (the pinch) that divides the temperature scale in a process into two parts. If there is a pinch in a process (not every process has a pinch), heat from external sources must be supplied to the process at temperatures above the pinch, and must be taken from the system by cooling media at temperatures below the pinch only. If minimum consumption of energy for heating and cooling from external sources is desired, matching process streams across the pinch and adding heat to the system from external sources below the pinch temperature is not allowed.

  11. Emerging lymphatic imaging technologies for mouse and man

    PubMed Central

    Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.; Kwon, Sunkuk; Rasmussen, John C.

    2014-01-01

    The lymphatic circulatory system has diverse functions in lipid absorption, fluid homeostasis, and immune surveillance and responds dynamically when presented with infection, inflammation, altered hemodynamics, and cancer. Visualization of these dynamic processes in human disease and animal models of disease is key to understanding the contributory role of the lymphatic circulatory system in disease and to devising effective therapeutic strategies. Longitudinal, non-destructive, and repeated imaging is necessary to expand our understanding of disease progression and regression in basic science and clinical investigations. Herein we summarize recent advances in in vivo lymphatic imaging employing magnetic resonance, computed tomography, lymphoscintigraphy, and emerging optical techniques with respect to their contributory roles in both basic science and clinical research investigations. PMID:24590275

  12. Emerging engineering principles for yield improvement in microbial cell design

    PubMed Central

    Comba, Santiago; Arabolaza, Ana; Gramajo, Hugo

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic Engineering has undertaken a rapid transformation in the last ten years making real progress towards the production of a wide range of molecules and fine chemicals using a designed cellular host. However, the maximization of product yields through pathway optimization is a constant and central challenge of this field. Traditional methods used to improve the production of target compounds from engineered biosynthetic pathways in non-native hosts include: codon usage optimization, elimination of the accumulation of toxic intermediates or byproducts, enhanced production of rate-limiting enzymes, selection of appropriate promoter and ribosome binding sites, application of directed evolution of enzymes, and chassis re-circuit. Overall, these approaches tend to be specific for each engineering project rather than a systematic practice based on a more generalizable strategy. In this mini-review, we highlight some novel and extensive approaches and tools intended to address the improvement of a target product formation, founded in sophisticated principles such as dynamic control, pathway genes modularization, and flux modeling. PMID:24688676

  13. Effective and Ineffective Uses of Emerging Technologies: Towards a Transformative Pedagogical Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng'ambi, Dick

    2013-01-01

    Although there is an increasing use of emerging technologies (ETs) in higher education internationally and in South Africa in particular, there is little evidence that their use is transforming teaching and learning practice. Anecdotal evidence shows that there is a dichotomy between the technologies supported and used in higher education…

  14. Emerging Technologies Likely to Impact Teaching, Learning, Research: A Review of the 2009 Horizon Project Findings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forde, James J.

    2010-01-01

    The New Media Consortium's Horizon Report provides a view of the emerging technologies that are likely to impact the educational world globally. Highlighted in this paper are four technologies that rose from the pack as the most likely to impact education in the next three years: (1) Collaborative Environments; (2) Online Communication Tools; (3)…

  15. Disseminating and Replicating an Effective Emerging Literacy Technology Curriculum: A Final Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutinger, Patricia; Bell, Carol; Daytner, Gary; Johanson, Joyce

    2005-01-01

    Emerging Literacy Technology Curriculum (ELiTeC 2, [referred to as E2 in this report]), housed at the Center for Best Practices in Early Childhood at Western Illinois University, was funded in 2000 by the U.S. Department of Education's Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP) as a 3-year Phase 3 Steppingstones of Technology Research on…

  16. Constructing Nanobusiness: The Role of Technology Framing in the Emergence of a Commercial Domain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aten, Kathryn Jeanette

    2009-01-01

    Entrepreneurs seeking to commercialize science-based technologies face considerable challenges including uncertain environments, policy makers and investors' ignorance, and public opposition and ethical concerns. Most research exploring the emergence of technologies assumes the existence of accepted uses or products, despite the fact that efforts…

  17. Information and Communications Technology (ICT) in Nigeria Educational Assessment System--Emerging Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aworanti, Olatunde Awotokun

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines Information and Communications Technology (ICT) in Nigeria educational assessment system with its emerging challenges. This is inevitable following the globalisation trend which has brought drastic changes in the world of technology. The essence of the paper is to describe the present status of ICT in the Nigeria educational…

  18. Preservice Teachers' Emerging TPACK in a Technology-Rich Methods Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozgun-Koca, S. Asli; Meagher, Michael; Edwards, Michael Todd

    2010-01-01

    There is a dearth of research on the mechanisms for preservice teachers' development of the pedagogical knowledge necessary for effective use of such technologies. We explored the emergent Technological Pedagogical and Content Knowledge (TPACK) (Niess 2005, 2006, 2007) of a group of secondary mathematics preservice teachers in a methods course as…

  19. 1993 UPDATE OF THE U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY'S SITE EMERGING TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Emerging Technology Program (ETP), part of the U.S. EPA`s Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program, is continuing to create an environment where technical innovation can accelerate into field and commercial applications for treatment of hazardous waste sites....

  20. Apprehending the Future: Emerging Technologies, from Science Fiction to Campus Reality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Bryan

    2009-01-01

    Deciding which technologies to support for teaching and learning--and how to support them--depends, first, on the ability to learn about each emerging development. Selecting a platform without knowing what is coming right behind it can be risky. Similarly, it is folly to grasp onto a technology without seeing the variety of ways that the…

  1. Mobile Assisted Language Learning: Review of the Recent Applications of Emerging Mobile Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Jaeseok

    2013-01-01

    As mobile computing technologies have been more powerful and inclusive in people's daily life, the issue of mobile assisted language learning (MALL) has also been widely explored in CALL research. Many researches on MALL consider the emerging mobile technologies have considerable potentials for the effective language learning. This review study…

  2. Channeling the Innovation Stream: A Decision Framework for Selecting Emerging Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sauer, Philip S.

    2010-01-01

    The proliferation of emerging technologies offers opportunity but also presents challenges to defense acquisition decision makers seeking to incorporate those technologies as part of the acquisition process. Assessment frameworks and methodologies found in the literature typically address the primary focus of a sponsoring organization's interest…

  3. A Comparative Study on Emerging Electric Vehicle Technology Assessments

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, Jonathan; Khowailed, Gannate; Blackburn, Julia; Sikes, Karen

    2011-03-01

    Numerous organizations have published reports in recent years that investigate the ever changing world of electric vehicle (EV) technologies and their potential effects on society. Specifically, projections have been made on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with these vehicles and how they compare to conventional vehicles or hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). Similar projections have been made on the volumes of oil that these vehicles can displace by consuming large amounts of grid electricity instead of petroleum-based fuels. Finally, the projected rate that these new vehicle fleets will enter the market varies significantly among organizations. New ideas, technologies, and possibilities are introduced often, and projected values are likely to be refined as industry announcements continue to be made. As a result, over time, a multitude of projections for GHG emissions, oil displacement, and market penetration associated with various EV technologies has resulted in a wide range of possible future outcomes. This leaves the reader with two key questions: (1) Why does such a collective range in projected values exist in these reports? (2) What assumptions have the greatest impact on the outcomes presented in these reports? Since it is impractical for an average reader to review and interpret all the various vehicle technology reports published to date, Sentech Inc. and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory have conducted a comparative study to make these interpretations. The primary objective of this comparative study is to present a snapshot of all major projections made on GHG emissions, oil displacement, or market penetration rates of EV technologies. From the extensive data found in relevant publications, the key assumptions that drive each report's analysis are identified and 'apples-to-apples' comparisons between all major report conclusions are attempted. The general approach that was taken in this comparative study is comprised of six primary steps: (1

  4. Potential for Integrating Diffusion of Innovation Principles into Life Cycle Assessment of Emerging Technologies.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Benjamin E; Miller, Shelie A

    2016-03-15

    Life cycle assessment (LCA) measures cradle-to-grave environmental impacts of a product. To assess impacts of an emerging technology, LCA should be coupled with additional methods that estimate how that technology might be deployed. The extent and manner that an emerging technology diffuses throughout a region shapes the magnitude and type of environmental impacts. Diffusion of innovation is an established field of research that analyzes the adoption of new innovations, and its principles can be used to construct scenario models that enhance LCA of emerging technologies. Integrating diffusion modeling techniques with an LCA of emerging technology can provide estimates for the extent of market penetration, the displacement of existing systems, and the rate of adoption. Two general perspectives of application are macro-level diffusion models that use a function of time to represent adoption, and microlevel diffusion models that simulate adoption through interactions of individuals. Incorporating diffusion of innovation concepts complement existing methods within LCA to inform proactive environmental management of emerging technologies. PMID:26820700

  5. Potential for Integrating Diffusion of Innovation Principles into Life Cycle Assessment of Emerging Technologies.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Benjamin E; Miller, Shelie A

    2016-03-15

    Life cycle assessment (LCA) measures cradle-to-grave environmental impacts of a product. To assess impacts of an emerging technology, LCA should be coupled with additional methods that estimate how that technology might be deployed. The extent and manner that an emerging technology diffuses throughout a region shapes the magnitude and type of environmental impacts. Diffusion of innovation is an established field of research that analyzes the adoption of new innovations, and its principles can be used to construct scenario models that enhance LCA of emerging technologies. Integrating diffusion modeling techniques with an LCA of emerging technology can provide estimates for the extent of market penetration, the displacement of existing systems, and the rate of adoption. Two general perspectives of application are macro-level diffusion models that use a function of time to represent adoption, and microlevel diffusion models that simulate adoption through interactions of individuals. Incorporating diffusion of innovation concepts complement existing methods within LCA to inform proactive environmental management of emerging technologies.

  6. Emerging high-throughput drug target validation technologies.

    PubMed

    Ilag, Leodevico L; Ng, Jocelyn H; Beste, Gerald; Henning, Stefan W

    2002-09-15

    Identifying the right target for drug development is a critical bottleneck in the pharmaceutical and biotech industries. The genomics revolution has shifted the problem from a scarcity of targets to a surplus of putative drug targets. As the validity of a target cannot be simply inferred from correlative data, the key is confirmation of the causative role of a gene product in a particular disease. It should therefore be recognized that an effective therapeutic strategy requires an appropriate target validation technology to verify the right target.

  7. Vaccine engineering improved by hybrid technology.

    PubMed

    Linhart, Birgit; Valenta, Rudolf

    2004-08-01

    The term 'vaccination' describes the induction of protective immune responses against infectious diseases, but is also used to define antigen-specific forms of immunotherapy for allergy, cancer and autoimmunity. Successful vaccination requires either immune modulation or the induction of robust specific immunity to several disease-causing antigens. However, natural antigen sources may contain greatly varying amounts of these antigens and some of them may exhibit low immunogenicity. An approach for overcoming the latter problems has been developed for allergy vaccines recently. This approach is based on the genetic engineering of hybrid molecules, consisting of several major disease-eliciting antigens/epitopes. Such hybrid molecules can be built to include the most relevant epitopes of complex antigen sources. Moreover, fusion of different antigens in the form of hybrid molecules strongly increases their immunogenicity. The hybrid approach can also be used for the generation of mosaic antigens with altered immunological properties, which consist of re-shuffled antigen pieces. We exemplify the use of hybrid technology for the generation of new allergy vaccines and discuss its potential applicability for the development of vaccines for infectious diseases, cancer and autoimmunity.

  8. Analogical reasoning in handling emerging technologies: the case of umbilical cord blood biobanking.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Bjørn; Solbakk, Jan Helge; Holm, Søren

    2006-01-01

    How are we individually and as a society to handle new and emerging technologies? This challenging question underlies much of the bioethical debates of modern times. To address this question we need suitable conceptions of the new technology and ways of identifying its proper management and regulation. To establish conceptions and to find ways to handle emerging technologies we tend to use analogies extensively. The aim of this article is to investigate the role that analogies play or may play in the processes of understanding and managing new technology. More precisely we aim to unveil the role of analogies as analytical devices in exploring the "being" of the new technology as well the normative function of analogies in conceptualizing the characteristics and applications of new technology. Umbilical cord blood biobanking will be used as a case to investigate these roles and functions. PMID:17085411

  9. Dynamic digital image analysis: emerging technology for particle characterization.

    PubMed

    Rabinski, G; Thomas, D

    2004-01-01

    The feasibility of applying dynamic imaging analysis technology to particle characterization has been evaluated for application in the water sector. A system has been developed which captures in-situ images of suspended particles in a flowing sample stream and analyzes these images in real time to determine particle size and concentration. The technology can measure samples having a wide range of particle sizes (approximately 1.5 to 1,000 microm equivalent circular diameter) and concentrations (<1 to >1 million/ml). The system also provides magnified images of particles for visual analysis of properties such as size, shape and grayscale level. There are no sample preparation requirements and statistically accurate results are produced in less than three minutes per sample. The overall system architecture is described. The major design challenges in developing a practical system include obtaining adequate contrast for the range of particle materials found in typical water samples and achieving this under operating conditions permitting an adequate sample processing rate for real time feedback of results. Performance of the instrument is reported in reference to industry accepted particle standards and applications as an analytical tool for the water industries are considered.

  10. Beyond land application: Emerging technologies for the treatment and reuse of anaerobically digested agricultural and food waste.

    PubMed

    Sheets, Johnathon P; Yang, Liangcheng; Ge, Xumeng; Wang, Zhiwu; Li, Yebo

    2015-10-01

    Effective treatment and reuse of the massive quantities of agricultural and food wastes generated daily has the potential to improve the sustainability of food production systems. Anaerobic digestion (AD) is used throughout the world as a waste treatment process to convert organic waste into two main products: biogas and nutrient-rich digestate, called AD effluent. Biogas can be used as a source of renewable energy or transportation fuels, while AD effluent is traditionally applied to land as a soil amendment. However, there are economic and environmental concerns that limit widespread land application, which may lead to underutilization of AD for the treatment of agricultural and food wastes. To combat these constraints, existing and novel methods have emerged to treat or reuse AD effluent. The objective of this review is to analyze several emerging methods used for efficient treatment and reuse of AD effluent. Overall, the application of emerging technologies is limited by AD effluent composition, especially the total solid content. Some technologies, such as composting, use the solid fraction of AD effluent, while most other technologies, such as algae culture and struvite crystallization, use the liquid fraction. Therefore, dewatering of AD effluent, reuse of the liquid and solid fractions, and land application could all be combined to sustainably manage the large quantities of AD effluent produced. Issues such as pathogen regrowth and prevalence of emerging organic micro-pollutants are also discussed.

  11. Beyond land application: Emerging technologies for the treatment and reuse of anaerobically digested agricultural and food waste.

    PubMed

    Sheets, Johnathon P; Yang, Liangcheng; Ge, Xumeng; Wang, Zhiwu; Li, Yebo

    2015-10-01

    Effective treatment and reuse of the massive quantities of agricultural and food wastes generated daily has the potential to improve the sustainability of food production systems. Anaerobic digestion (AD) is used throughout the world as a waste treatment process to convert organic waste into two main products: biogas and nutrient-rich digestate, called AD effluent. Biogas can be used as a source of renewable energy or transportation fuels, while AD effluent is traditionally applied to land as a soil amendment. However, there are economic and environmental concerns that limit widespread land application, which may lead to underutilization of AD for the treatment of agricultural and food wastes. To combat these constraints, existing and novel methods have emerged to treat or reuse AD effluent. The objective of this review is to analyze several emerging methods used for efficient treatment and reuse of AD effluent. Overall, the application of emerging technologies is limited by AD effluent composition, especially the total solid content. Some technologies, such as composting, use the solid fraction of AD effluent, while most other technologies, such as algae culture and struvite crystallization, use the liquid fraction. Therefore, dewatering of AD effluent, reuse of the liquid and solid fractions, and land application could all be combined to sustainably manage the large quantities of AD effluent produced. Issues such as pathogen regrowth and prevalence of emerging organic micro-pollutants are also discussed. PMID:26235446

  12. Thraustochytrid Marine Protists: production of PUFAs and Other Emerging Technologies.

    PubMed

    Raghukumar, Seshagiri

    2008-01-01

    Thraustochytrids, the heterotrophic, marine, straminipilan protists, are now established candidates for commercial production of the omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (omega-3 PUFA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), that is important in human health and aquaculture. Extensive screening of cultures from a variety of habitats has yielded strains that produce at least 50% of their biomass as lipids, and DHA comprising at least 25% of the total fatty acids, with a yield of at least 5 g L(-1). Most of the lipids occur as triacylglycerols and a lesser amount as phospholipids. Numerous studies have been carried out on salinity, pH, temperature, and media optimization for DHA production. Commercial production is based on a fed batch method, using high C/N ratio that favors lipid accumulation. Schizochytrium DHA is now commercially available as nutritional supplements for adults and as feeds to enhance DHA levels in larvae of aquaculture animals. Thraustochytrids are emerging as a potential source of other PUFAs such as arachidonic acid and oils with a suite of PUFA profiles that can have specific uses. They are potential sources of asataxanthin and carotenoid pigments, as well as other lipids. Genes of the conventional fatty acid synthesis and the polyketide-like PUFA synthesis pathways of thraustochytrids are attracting attention for production of recombinant PUFA-containing plant oils. Future studies on the basic biology of these organisms, including biodiversity, environmental adaptations, and genome research are likely to point out directions for biotechnology explorations. Potential areas include enzymes, polysaccharides, and secondary metabolites.

  13. Technology Assessment and Roadmap for the Emergency Radiation Dose Assessment Program

    SciTech Connect

    Turteltaub, K W; Hartman-Siantar, C; Easterly, C; Blakely, W

    2005-10-03

    A Joint Interagency Working Group (JIWG) under the auspices of the Department of Homeland Security Office of Research and Development conducted a technology assessment of emergency radiological dose assessment capabilities as part of the overall need for rapid emergency medical response in the event of a radiological terrorist event in the United States. The goal of the evaluation is to identify gaps and recommend general research and development needs to better prepare the Country for mitigating the effects of such an event. Given the capabilities and roles for responding to a radiological event extend across many agencies, a consensus of gaps and suggested development plans was a major goal of this evaluation and road-mapping effort. The working group consisted of experts representing the Departments of Homeland Security, Health and Human Services (Centers for Disease Control and the National Institutes of Health), Food and Drug Administration, Department of Defense and the Department of Energy's National Laboratories (see appendix A for participants). The specific goals of this Technology Assessment and Roadmap were to: (1) Describe the general context for deployment of emergency radiation dose assessment tools following terrorist use of a radiological or nuclear device; (2) Assess current and emerging dose assessment technologies; and (3) Put forward a consensus high-level technology roadmap for interagency research and development in this area. This report provides a summary of the consensus of needs, gaps and recommendations for a research program in the area of radiation dosimetry for early response, followed by a summary of the technologies available and on the near-term horizon. We then present a roadmap for a research program to bring present and emerging near-term technologies to bear on the gaps in radiation dose assessment and triage. Finally we present detailed supporting discussion on the nature of the threats we considered, the status of technology

  14. Benchmarking and performance improvement at Rocky Flats Technology Site

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, C.; Doyle, G.; Featherman, W.L.

    1997-03-01

    The Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site has initiated a major work process improvement campaign using the tools of formalized benchmarking and streamlining. This paper provides insights into some of the process improvement activities performed at Rocky Flats from November 1995 through December 1996. It reviews the background, motivation, methodology, results, and lessons learned from this ongoing effort. The paper also presents important gains realized through process analysis and improvement including significant cost savings, productivity improvements, and an enhanced understanding of site work processes.

  15. Infrared facial recognition technology being pushed toward emerging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, David C.

    1997-02-01

    Human identification is a two-step process of initial identity assignment and later verification or recognition. The positive identification requirement is a major part of the classic security, legal, banking, and police task of granting or denying access to a facility, authority to take an action or, in police work, to identify or verify the identity of an individual. To meet this requirement, a three-part research and development (R&D) effort was undertaken Betac International Corporation, through its subsidiaries of Betac Corporation and Technology Recognition Systems, to develop an automated access control system using infrared (IR) facial images to verify the identity of an individual in real time. The system integrates IR facial imaging and a computer-based matching algorithm to perform the human recognition task rapidly, accurately, and nonintrusively, based on three basic principles: every human IR facial image (or thermogram) is unique to that individual; an IR camera can be used to capture human thermograms; and captured thermograms can be digitized, stored, and matched using a computer and mathematical algorithms. The first part of the development effort, an operator-assisted IR image matching proof-of-concept demonstration, was successfully completed in the spring of 1994. The second part of the R&D program, the design and evaluation of a prototype automated access control unit using the IR image matching technology, was completed in April 1995. This paper describes the final development effort to identify, assess, and evaluate the availability and suitability of robust image matching algorithms capable of supporting and enhancing the use of IR facial recognition technology. The most promising mature and available image matching algorithm was integrated into a demonstration access control unit (ACU) using a state-of-the-art IR imager and a performance evaluation was compared against that of a prototype automated ACU using a less robust algorithm and a

  16. A transferable telepsychiatry model for improving access to emergency mental health care.

    PubMed

    Saurman, Emily; Johnston, Jarret; Hindman, James; Kirby, Sue; Lyle, David

    2014-10-01

    The Mental Health Emergency Care-Rural Access Programme (MHEC) aims to improve access to specialist emergency mental health care in rural and remote communities in New South Wales. It provides a range of services including emergency telephone triage and video assessment. The present report provides a detailed description of the structure and function of the MHEC model, and identifies matters concerning adaptation and transferability. Structure: the MHEC can be contacted 24 hours/day, every day of the year; no caller is refused assistance. Function: the MHEC provides information services, clinical services and other programme activities. Adaptation of the model and implementation elsewhere (transferability) should be informed by local needs, existing practices and the components of access. The programme has already attracted the attention of two other regions in Australia interested in implementing emergency telepsychiatry programmes. The MHEC model is a practical solution for improving access to specialist emergency mental health care in underserved areas.

  17. Plasma assisted surface coating/modification processes: An emerging technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, T.

    1986-01-01

    A broad understanding of the numerous ion or plasma assisted surface coating/modification processes is sought. An awareness of the principles of these processes is needed before discussing in detail the ion nitriding technology. On the basis of surface modifications arising from ion or plasma energizing and interactions, it can be broadly classified as deposition of distinct overlay coatings (sputtering-dc, radio frequency, magnetron, reactive; ion plating-diode, triode) and surface property modification without forming a discrete coating (ion implantation, ion beam mixing, laser beam irradiation, ion nitriding, ion carburizing, plasma oxidation). These techniques offer a great flexibility and are capable in tailoring desirable chemical and structural surface properties independent of the bulk properties.

  18. The benefits of improved technologies in agricultural aviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lietzke, K.; Abram, P.; Braen, C.; Givens, S.; Hazelrigg, G. A., Jr.; Fish, R.; Clyne, F.; Sand, F.

    1977-01-01

    The results are present for a study of the economic benefits attributed to a variety of potential technological improvements in agricultural aviation. Part 1 gives a general description of the ag-air industry and discusses the information used in the data base to estimate the potential benefits from technological improvements. Part 2 presents the benefit estimates and provides a quantitative basis for the estimates in each area study. Part 3 is a bibliography of references relating to this study.

  19. Adapting Technology for School Improvement: A Global Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, David W., Ed.; Mahlck, Lars O., Ed.

    2004-01-01

    This book presents a compilation of articles based on the premise that the move to advanced technology use in primary and secondary schools offers great hope for improving the access, quality, and efficiency of basic education. The aim of the book is to identify and examine how information technologies can be, and are being, used to strengthen the…

  20. Studying the deep subsurface biosphere: Emerging technologies and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig Cary, S.; Campbell, Barbara J.; DeLong, Edward F.

    Discoveries from seafloor hydrothermal vent environments continue to challenge accepted notions about microbial metabolism and survivability, geochemical and biochemical interactions, and the limits to and origins of life itself. Recent evidence suggests that a significant and extensive subsurface biosphere exists associated with these vent systems that may support bacteria of unique and unknown lineages using as yet uncharacterized metabolic pathways. With restricted access to the subsurface environment and availability of an extremely limited biomass, microbiologists have resorted to powerful molecular approaches to survey, characterize, and even assist in the later cultivation of these novel subsurface bacteria. Advances in molecular phylogenetic techniques (molecular microbial systematics) based on the small subunit rRNA (16S rRNA) and a knowledge of certain diagnostic metabolic genes have provided an alternative and more comprehensive framework to study microbial populations and communities without the necessity of cultivation. These approaches have been used by a number of investigators in deep-sea hydrothermal vents and terrestrial hot springs with astonishing results. In this paper we introduce some of these current and emerging molecular techniques and demonstrate their efficacy in the context of the subsurface biosphere. Simple gene amplification methods coupled with more sophisticated genomic approaches and fine resolution in situ geochemical tools (see Luther et al., this volume) provides a new-found capability to more fully characterize the diversity of metabolic strategies used by these complex subsurface microbial communities. Understanding these unique microbial communities is not only important from the basic biological perspective but has ramifications for possible industrial applications.

  1. Proteomics and Metabolomics: Two Emerging Areas for Legume Improvement.

    PubMed

    Ramalingam, Abirami; Kudapa, Himabindu; Pazhamala, Lekha T; Weckwerth, Wolfram; Varshney, Rajeev K

    2015-01-01

    The crop legumes such as chickpea, common bean, cowpea, peanut, pigeonpea, soybean, etc. are important sources of nutrition and contribute to a significant amount of biological nitrogen fixation (>20 million tons of fixed nitrogen) in agriculture. However, the production of legumes is constrained due to abiotic and biotic stresses. It is therefore imperative to understand the molecular mechanisms of plant response to different stresses and identify key candidate genes regulating tolerance which can be deployed in breeding programs. The information obtained from transcriptomics has facilitated the identification of candidate genes for the given trait of interest and utilizing them in crop breeding programs to improve stress tolerance. However, the mechanisms of stress tolerance are complex due to the influence of multi-genes and post-transcriptional regulations. Furthermore, stress conditions greatly affect gene expression which in turn causes modifications in the composition of plant proteomes and metabolomes. Therefore, functional genomics involving various proteomics and metabolomics approaches have been obligatory for understanding plant stress tolerance. These approaches have also been found useful to unravel different pathways related to plant and seed development as well as symbiosis. Proteome and metabolome profiling using high-throughput based systems have been extensively applied in the model legume species, Medicago truncatula and Lotus japonicus, as well as in the model crop legume, soybean, to examine stress signaling pathways, cellular and developmental processes and nodule symbiosis. Moreover, the availability of protein reference maps as well as proteomics and metabolomics databases greatly support research and understanding of various biological processes in legumes. Protein-protein interaction techniques, particularly the yeast two-hybrid system have been advantageous for studying symbiosis and stress signaling in legumes. In this review, several

  2. Proteomics and Metabolomics: Two Emerging Areas for Legume Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Ramalingam, Abirami; Kudapa, Himabindu; Pazhamala, Lekha T.; Weckwerth, Wolfram; Varshney, Rajeev K.

    2015-01-01

    The crop legumes such as chickpea, common bean, cowpea, peanut, pigeonpea, soybean, etc. are important sources of nutrition and contribute to a significant amount of biological nitrogen fixation (>20 million tons of fixed nitrogen) in agriculture. However, the production of legumes is constrained due to abiotic and biotic stresses. It is therefore imperative to understand the molecular mechanisms of plant response to different stresses and identify key candidate genes regulating tolerance which can be deployed in breeding programs. The information obtained from transcriptomics has facilitated the identification of candidate genes for the given trait of interest and utilizing them in crop breeding programs to improve stress tolerance. However, the mechanisms of stress tolerance are complex due to the influence of multi-genes and post-transcriptional regulations. Furthermore, stress conditions greatly affect gene expression which in turn causes modifications in the composition of plant proteomes and metabolomes. Therefore, functional genomics involving various proteomics and metabolomics approaches have been obligatory for understanding plant stress tolerance. These approaches have also been found useful to unravel different pathways related to plant and seed development as well as symbiosis. Proteome and metabolome profiling using high-throughput based systems have been extensively applied in the model legume species, Medicago truncatula and Lotus japonicus, as well as in the model crop legume, soybean, to examine stress signaling pathways, cellular and developmental processes and nodule symbiosis. Moreover, the availability of protein reference maps as well as proteomics and metabolomics databases greatly support research and understanding of various biological processes in legumes. Protein-protein interaction techniques, particularly the yeast two-hybrid system have been advantageous for studying symbiosis and stress signaling in legumes. In this review, several

  3. Are Physicians Likely to Adopt Emerging Mobile Technologies? Attitudes and Innovation Factors Affecting Smartphone Use in the Southeastern United States

    PubMed Central

    Putzer, Gavin J; Park, Yangil

    2012-01-01

    The smartphone has emerged as an important technological device to assist physicians with medical decision making, clinical tasks, and other computing functions. A smartphone is a device that combines mobile telecommunication with Internet accessibility as well as word processing. Moreover, smartphones have additional features such as applications pertinent to clinical medicine and practice management. The purpose of this study was to investigate the innovation factors that affect a physician's decision to adopt an emerging mobile technological device such as a smartphone. The study sample consisted of 103 physicians from community hospitals and academic medical centers in the southeastern United States. Innovation factors are elements that affect an individual's attitude toward using and adopting an emerging technology. In our model, the innovation characteristics of compatibility, job relevance, the internal environment, observability, personal experience, and the external environment were all significant predictors of attitude toward using a smartphone. These influential innovation factors presumably are salient predictors of a physician's attitude toward using a smartphone to assist with clinical tasks. Health information technology devices such as smartphones offer promise as a means to improve clinical efficiency, medical quality, and care coordination and possibly reduce healthcare costs. PMID:22737094

  4. Are physicians likely to adopt emerging mobile technologies? Attitudes and innovation factors affecting smartphone use in the Southeastern United States.

    PubMed

    Putzer, Gavin J; Park, Yangil

    2012-01-01

    The smartphone has emerged as an important technological device to assist physicians with medical decision making, clinical tasks, and other computing functions. A smartphone is a device that combines mobile telecommunication with Internet accessibility as well as word processing. Moreover, smartphones have additional features such as applications pertinent to clinical medicine and practice management. The purpose of this study was to investigate the innovation factors that affect a physician's decision to adopt an emerging mobile technological device such as a smartphone. The study sample consisted of 103 physicians from community hospitals and academic medical centers in the southeastern United States. Innovation factors are elements that affect an individual's attitude toward using and adopting an emerging technology. In our model, the innovation characteristics of compatibility, job relevance, the internal environment, observability, personal experience, and the external environment were all significant predictors of attitude toward using a smartphone. These influential innovation factors presumably are salient predictors of a physician's attitude toward using a smartphone to assist with clinical tasks. Health information technology devices such as smartphones offer promise as a means to improve clinical efficiency, medical quality, and care coordination and possibly reduce healthcare costs.

  5. Emerging technologies in extraction and processing of metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, Ramana G.

    2003-04-01

    The growing need to conserve energy and materials and prevent environmental pollution led to an increased demand for better understanding of potential as well as existing processes. In this context, thermodynamic and transport modeling of materials and processes provides a rapid and cost-effective means of conducting and minimizing the complexity of experimental investigations and developing innovative and environmentally friendly metallurgical processes. This presentation concentrates on some fundamentals on new technologies as extractive metallurgy of copper, lead, aluminum, and other nonferrous metals and processing of nanocomposites. The newer routes of copper smelting and modeling of impurities in copper and lead slags and mattes are reviewed. The copper smelting capacity increased by a factor of 10 during the last three decades, the smelting rate increased by a factor of 6, and the process fuel equivalent decreased by a factor of 2. The a priori prediction, with no adjustable parameters, of impurity capacities of S and As in copper slags and S in lead slags, based on the Reddy-Blander model, is reviewed. Excellent agreement between the model-predicted capacities data and laboratory experimental and industrial data was observed. The model is an invaluable tool for optimization of process parameters in the efficient removal of impurities from the nonferrous-metals smelting and refining processes. A new in-situ processing technology for the production of a lightweight alloy matrix with ceramic particle reinforcements such as SiC in aluminum alloy matrix composites by bubbling reactive gas is reviewed. Thermal plasma processing of a nanoscale aluminum alloy matrix with TiC and TiN composites is discussed. The in-situ formed reinforcements are thermodynamically stable, and the composite particles are of uniform size. The optimum process parameters for the production of composite powders by thermal plasma are discussed. A low-temperature aluminum production and

  6. Software Reuse Methods to Improve Technological Infrastructure for e-Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, James J.; Downs, Robert R.; Mattmann, Chris A.

    2011-01-01

    Social computing has the potential to contribute to scientific research. Ongoing developments in information and communications technology improve capabilities for enabling scientific research, including research fostered by social computing capabilities. The recent emergence of e-Science practices has demonstrated the benefits from improvements in the technological infrastructure, or cyber-infrastructure, that has been developed to support science. Cloud computing is one example of this e-Science trend. Our own work in the area of software reuse offers methods that can be used to improve new technological development, including cloud computing capabilities, to support scientific research practices. In this paper, we focus on software reuse and its potential to contribute to the development and evaluation of information systems and related services designed to support new capabilities for conducting scientific research.

  7. Emerging technologies with potential for objectively evaluating speech recognition skills.

    PubMed

    Rawool, Vishakha Waman

    2016-01-01

    Work-related exposure to noise and other ototoxins can cause damage to the cochlea, synapses between the inner hair cells, the auditory nerve fibers, and higher auditory pathways, leading to difficulties in recognizing speech. Procedures designed to determine speech recognition scores (SRS) in an objective manner can be helpful in disability compensation cases where the worker claims to have poor speech perception due to exposure to noise or ototoxins. Such measures can also be helpful in determining SRS in individuals who cannot provide reliable responses to speech stimuli, including patients with Alzheimer's disease, traumatic brain injuries, and infants with and without hearing loss. Cost-effective neural monitoring hardware and software is being rapidly refined due to the high demand for neurogaming (games involving the use of brain-computer interfaces), health, and other applications. More specifically, two related advances in neuro-technology include relative ease in recording neural activity and availability of sophisticated analysing techniques. These techniques are reviewed in the current article and their applications for developing objective SRS procedures are proposed. Issues related to neuroaudioethics (ethics related to collection of neural data evoked by auditory stimuli including speech) and neurosecurity (preservation of a person's neural mechanisms and free will) are also discussed.

  8. Current developments using emerging transdermal technologies in physical enhancement methods.

    PubMed

    Nanda, A; Nanda, S; Ghilzai, N M Khan

    2006-07-01

    Transdermal drug delivery using patches offers many advantages, but is limited primarily by the stratum corneum barrier. Amongst the various methods to overcome this barrier, physical methods are gaining in popularity and commercial devices development. Macroflux, MTS and Silex are based on microporation, involving use of microneedles that pierce thereby bypassing the stratum corneum. Intraject , Powderject and Helios are based on needleless jet injectors wherein very fine, solid particulate drug, is fired directly into the skin, using high-pressure gas. Med- Tats incorporate use of modified drug-containing tattoos, which bind to the skin, wherein the drug is absorbed. CHADD is based on use of heat, which increases skin - permeation of drugs. High-power, pulsed lasers transmit positive mechanical forces to the skin and create intercellular channels into the skin transiently. Sonophoresis involves use of ultrasound, which transiently disrupts the stratum corneum barrier. This technique offers a non-invasive transdermal extraction of interstitial fluids of sampling body fluids. Modified Liposomes include Ethosomes (containing alcohol) and Transferosomes (containing surfactants), which have enhanced skin permeability. Pulsed magnetic fields may create transient pores in cell membranes, including skin, resulting in increased permeation. Iontophoresis is based on application of electric potential for enhancing the movement of substances to and from the body. Dupel, Ionzyme, Liposite, ETrans, Phoresor and Drionic are based on iontophoresis. GlucoWatch offers non-invasive blood glucose monitoring, based on reverse iontophoresis. This review outlines recent commercial developments in physical transdermal drug delivery technology and the specific devices and applications being targeted by the pharmaceutical industry. PMID:16848725

  9. Cenh3: An Emerging Player in Haploid Induction Technology

    PubMed Central

    Britt, Anne B.; Kuppu, Sundaram

    2016-01-01

    True-breeding lines are required for the development and production of crop varieties. In a classical breeding approach these lines are obtained through inbreeding, and often 7–9 generations of inbreeding is performed to achieve the desired level of homozygosity, over a period of several years. In contrast, the chromosomes of haploids can be doubled to produce true-breeding lines in a single generation. Over the last century, scientists have developed a variety of techniques to induce haploids and doubled haploids, though these techniques apply only to particular crop varieties. Ravi and Chan (2010) discovered that haploids could be obtained in Arabidopsis through the manipulation of the centromere-specific histone 3 variant, CENH3. Their approach, which involved extensive modifications to a transgenic CENH3, held promise of being translated to crop species, and has been successfully employed in maize (see Kelliher et al., 2016). Refinements of this technology have since been developed which indicate that non-transgenic modifications to CENH3 will also induce haploids. The complementation of a cenh3 null by CENH3 from closely related plant species can result in plants that are fertile but haploid-inducing on crossing by CENH3 wt plants- suggesting that introgression of alien CENH3 may produce non-transgenic haploid inducers. Similarly, a remarkably wide variety of point mutations in CENH3, inducible by chemical agents, have recently been shown to result in haploid induction on crossing by wild-type CENH3 plants. These CENH3-variant plants grow normally, are fully fertile on self-pollination, and may be present in existing mutagenized collections. PMID:27148276

  10. Integrated assessment of emerging science and technologies as creating learning processes among assessment communities.

    PubMed

    Forsberg, Ellen-Marie; Ribeiro, Barbara; Heyen, Nils B; Nielsen, Rasmus Øjvind; Thorstensen, Erik; de Bakker, Erik; Klüver, Lars; Reiss, Thomas; Beekman, Volkert; Millar, Kate

    2016-12-01

    Emerging science and technologies are often characterised by complexity, uncertainty and controversy. Regulation and governance of such scientific and technological developments needs to build on knowledge and evidence that reflect this complicated situation. This insight is sometimes formulated as a call for integrated assessment of emerging science and technologies, and such a call is analysed in this article. The article addresses two overall questions. The first is: to what extent are emerging science and technologies currently assessed in an integrated way. The second is: if there appears to be a need for further integration, what should such integration consist in? In the article we briefly outline the pedigree of the term 'integrated assessment' and present a number of interpretations of the concept that are useful for informing current analyses and discussions of integration in assessment. Based on four case studies of assessment of emerging science and technologies, studies of assessment traditions, literature analysis and dialogues with assessment professionals, currently under-developed integration dimensions are identified. It is suggested how these dimensions can be addressed in a practical approach to assessment where representatives of different assessment communities and stakeholders are involved. We call this approach the Trans Domain Technology Evaluation Process (TranSTEP). PMID:27465504

  11. Integrated surgical emergency training plan in the internship: A step toward improving the quality of training and emergency center management

    PubMed Central

    Akhlaghi, Mohammad Reza; Vafamehr, Vajiheh; Dadgostarnia, Mohammad; Dehghani, Alireza

    2013-01-01

    training of emergency issues, increasing the teamwork, facing a variety of patients, practicing the role of general practitioners, role-playing on a real patient's bedside, having a multilateral approach to the patient, reducing the wasting time on minor wards, balancing the work and rest schedules of the interns, and better learning and satisfaction of the interns. Over 60% of the participants believed the program has the following benefits: More attention on the training plan, improving the learning of patient management, being more responsive for the training of interns, increasing operational approach to emergency patients, being more aware of the performed actions, and increasing the quality and speed of services provided to patients. The mean score assigned to the whole questionnaire of investigating the viewpoints was 37.5 out of 50. The mean score of the interns’ questionnaire was significantly more than the mean score of the assistants. Discussion: The results obtained indicated that the greatest existing consensus about this plan was the positive impact on the learning of interns in the emergency setting. Thus, it will not only increase the number of patients who the interns are managing during the internship course, but also increases the balance of their workload and they can learn and manage the emergency patients with more leisure. PMID:24520557

  12. What factors were important for dietary improvement in emergency shelters after the Great East Japan Earthquake?

    PubMed

    Tsuboyama-Kasaoka, Nobuyo; Hoshi, Yuko; Onodera, Kazue; Mizuno, Shoichi; Sako, Kazuko

    2014-01-01

    The Great East Japan Earthquake of 2011 left many evacuees with insufficient food and emergency shelter. However, there is no evidence concerning the factors affecting dietary circumstances in emergency shelters after disasters. To clarify the factors that influenced the provision of meals, we reanalyzed a data set from a dietary survey conducted in emergency shelters one month after the Great East Japan Earthquake (2011). Among the 69 shelters in "city A," 53 (79.1%) had food shortages. The possibility of cooking in the emergency shelter improved the provision of meals to evacuees. When comparing emergency shelters with and without cooking equipment, the shelters with cooking equipment provided more meals, as well as more dishes containing grains and vegetables. When there was a gas supply, the twice per day provision of "balanced" meals (containing grains, vegetables, and meat/fish) was more frequent than when there was no gas supply. Interestingly, neither the water supply nor the electricity supply affected the provision of balanced meals. Further, emergency shelters with larger numbers of evacuees had a lower possibility of cooking and lower availability of gas supply. Our results demonstrate that early improvements to post-disaster meal provision may maintain the health of evacuees. Such improvements could be achieved by 1) the speedy restoration of the gas supply to enable cooking, and 2) limiting the number of evacuees per emergency shelter.

  13. What factors were important for dietary improvement in emergency shelters after the Great East Japan Earthquake?

    PubMed

    Tsuboyama-Kasaoka, Nobuyo; Hoshi, Yuko; Onodera, Kazue; Mizuno, Shoichi; Sako, Kazuko

    2014-01-01

    The Great East Japan Earthquake of 2011 left many evacuees with insufficient food and emergency shelter. However, there is no evidence concerning the factors affecting dietary circumstances in emergency shelters after disasters. To clarify the factors that influenced the provision of meals, we reanalyzed a data set from a dietary survey conducted in emergency shelters one month after the Great East Japan Earthquake (2011). Among the 69 shelters in "city A," 53 (79.1%) had food shortages. The possibility of cooking in the emergency shelter improved the provision of meals to evacuees. When comparing emergency shelters with and without cooking equipment, the shelters with cooking equipment provided more meals, as well as more dishes containing grains and vegetables. When there was a gas supply, the twice per day provision of "balanced" meals (containing grains, vegetables, and meat/fish) was more frequent than when there was no gas supply. Interestingly, neither the water supply nor the electricity supply affected the provision of balanced meals. Further, emergency shelters with larger numbers of evacuees had a lower possibility of cooking and lower availability of gas supply. Our results demonstrate that early improvements to post-disaster meal provision may maintain the health of evacuees. Such improvements could be achieved by 1) the speedy restoration of the gas supply to enable cooking, and 2) limiting the number of evacuees per emergency shelter. PMID:24561984

  14. Emerging technologies for oral diagnostics: lessons from chronic graft-versus-host disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mays, Jacqueline W.; Ambatipudi, Kiran S.; Bassim, Carol W.; Melvin, James E.

    2013-05-01

    Saliva is a protein-rich oral fluid that contains information about systemic and oral-specific disease pathogenesis and diagnosis. Technologies are emerging to improve detection of protein components of human saliva for use not only in biomarker discovery, but also for the illumination of pathways involved in oral disease. These include the optimization of liquid chromatography coupled tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis of saliva in health and disease. Downstream of saliva component identification and validation comes the complex task of connecting salivary proteomic data to biological function, disease state, and other clinical patient information in a meaningful way. Augmentation of database information with biological expertise is crucial for effective analysis of potential biomarkers and disease pathways in order to improve diagnosis and identify putative therapeutic targets. This presentation will use LC-MS/MS analysis of saliva from chronic Graft-versus-Host disease (cGVHD) patients to illustrate these principles, and includes a discussion of the complex clinical and diagnostic issues related to proteomics and biomarker research in cGVHD.

  15. New Technologies for Improving Earth Science Data Usability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conover, H.; Graves, S. J.; Ramachandran, R.; Redman, S.; Rushing, J.; Tanner, S.

    2003-12-01

    The Information Technology and Systems Center (ITSC) at the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) is performing research in advanced applications with the goal of improving data usability in the next generation of distributed science data and information systems. These research areas include: data mining and subsetting in real time and for post-run analysis, interchange technologies for improved data exploitation, and the use of semantics to transform data exploitation via intelligent automated processing. Taken together, these technologies will be an important contribution to an evolving standards-based network of interoperable data and services. In addition, ITSC is investigating the role of a variety of infrastructure improvements for improved data usability, such as grid technologies for seamless access to multiple computational and data resources in a virtual computing environment; cluster technologies for high-speed parallel computation, multi-agent computations, and other applications; high-performance networking for high-speed connectivity among advanced applications; and next generation technologies in videoconferencing and electronic collaboration. This presentation will highlight several current ITSC research projects and collaborations which focus on advanced tools and services for such high-performance infrastructures, and which illustrate new approaches to improving data usability.

  16. Vocational Education: Its Role in Productivity Improvement and Technological Innovation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drewes, Donald W.

    This report addresses productivity and technology from the perspective of state vocational education agencies. Chapter 1 explores the meaning and measurement of productivity and the benefits of productivity improvement--profits, a weapon against inflation, success in international trade, increased standard of living, improved quality of life, and…

  17. Information technologies to improve public health: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Manhas, Melissa; Kuo, Mu-Hsing

    2015-01-01

    This systematic review examines a total of eighteen studies on the use of health information technologies to improve public health. Health information technologies are tools that allow for the management of health information in computerized systems. Health information technology, including electronic health records, computers/emails, social media, and cellphones/text messaging are becoming widespread and readily accessible to populations around the globe. In this review, the use of these technologies and interventions are discussed and evaluated for their potential to improve public health. This review found some good-quality evidence on the use of electronic health records and little good-quality evidence on the use of email, social media, cell phones and text messaging to improve healthcare, illustrating the need for further study in these areas. PMID:25676984

  18. Cubesats: Cost-effective science and technology platforms for emerging and developing nations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woellert, Kirk; Ehrenfreund, Pascale; Ricco, Antonio J.; Hertzfeld, Henry

    2011-02-01

    The development, operation, and analysis of data from cubesats can promote science education and spur technology utilization in emerging and developing nations. This platform offers uniquely low construction and launch costs together with a comparative ubiquity of launch providers; factors that have led more than 80 universities and several emerging nations to develop programs in this field. Their small size and weight enables cubesats to “piggyback” on rocket launches and accompany orbiters travelling to Moon and Mars. It is envisaged that constellations of cubesats will be used for larger science missions. We present a brief history, technology overview, and summary of applications in science and industry for these small satellites. Cubesat technical success stories are offered along with a summary of pitfalls and challenges encountered in both developed and emerging nations. A discussion of economic and public policy issues aims to facilitate the decision-making process for those considering utilization of this unique technology.

  19. Tangible computer programming: Exploring the use of emerging technology in classrooms and science museums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horn, Michael S.

    In considering ways to improve the use of digital technology in educational settings, it is helpful to look beyond desktop computers and conventional modes of interaction and consider the flood of emerging technologies that already play a prominent role in the everyday lives of children. In this dissertation, I will present a research project that builds on tangible user interface (TUI) technology to support computer programming and robotics activities in education settings. In particular, I will describe the design and implementation of a novel tangible computer programming language called Tern. I will also describe an evaluation of Tern's use in both formal and informal educational settings--as part of an interactive exhibit on robotics and computer programming called Robot Park on display at the Boston Museum of Science; and as part of a curriculum unit piloted in several kindergarten classrooms in the greater Boston area. In both cases, Tern allows children to create simple computer programs to control a robot. However, rather than using a keyboard or mouse to write programs on a computer screen, children instead use Tern to construct physical algorithmic structures using a collection of interlocking wooden blocks. The goal of this work is not to propose that tangible programming languages are general purpose tools that should replace existing graphical programming languages; rather, I will present evidence to support the argument that tangible programming begins to make sense when one considers the contexts and constraints of specific educational settings. Moreover, in these settings tangible languages can compensate for some of the shortcomings of graphical and text-based systems that have limited their use.

  20. Next generation ligand binding assays-review of emerging real-time measurement technologies.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Stephanie; Cameron, Mark; O'Connor, Edward; Schwickart, Martin; Tanen, Michael; Ware, Mark

    2014-09-01

    Over the last few years, numerous ligand binding assay technologies that utilize real-time measurement have been introduced; however, an assemblage and evaluation of these technologies has not previously been published. Herein, we describe six emerging real-time measurement technologies: Maverick™, MX96 SPR™, NanoDLSay™, AMMP®/ViBE®, SoPrano™, and two Lab-on-a-Chip (LoC) microfluidic devices. The development stage gate of these technologies ranges from pre-commercial to commercially available. Due to the novelty, the application and utility of some of the technologies regarding bioanalysis are likely to evolve but it is our hope that this review will provide insight into the direction the development of real-time measurement technologies is moving and the vision of those that are taking us there. Following the technology discussions, a comprehensive summary table is presented.

  1. NASA Earth Science Mission Control Center Enterprise Emerging Technology Study Study (MCC Technology Study)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Dan; Horan, Stephen; Royer, Don; Sullivan, Don; Moe, Karen

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on the results of the study to identify technologies that could have a significant impact on Earth Science mission operations when looking out at the 5-15 year horizon (through 2025). The potential benefits of the new technologies will be discussed, as well as recommendations for early research and development, prototyping, or analysis for these technologies.

  2. Solid State Ionics Advanced Materials for Emerging Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdari, B. V. R.; Careem, M. A.; Dissanayake, M. A. K. L.; Rajapakse, R. M. G.; Seneviratne, V. A.

    2006-06-01

    . M. Brahmanandhan ... [et al.]. Effect of filler addition on plasticized polymer electrolyte systems / M. Sundar, S. Selladurai. Ionic motion in PEDOT and PPy conducting polymer bilayers / U. L. Zainudeen, S. Skaarup, M. A. Careem. Film formation mechanism and electrochemical characterization of V[symbol]O[symbol] xerogel intercalated by polyaniniline / Q. Zhu ... [et al.]. Effect of NH[symbol]NO[symbol] concentration on the conductivity of PVA based solid polymer electrolyte / M. Hema ... [et al.]. Dielectric and conductivity studies of PVA-KSCN based solid polymer electrolytes / J. Malathi ... [et al.] -- pt. IV. Emerging applications. Invited papers. The use of solid state ionic materials and devices in medical applications / R. Linford. Development of all-solid-state lithium batteries / V. Thangadurai, J. Schwenzei, W. Weppner. Reversible intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells / B.-E. Mellander, I. Albinsson. Nano-size effects in lithium batteries / P. Balaya, Y. Hu, J. Maier. Electrochromics: fundamentals and applications / C. G. Granqvist. Electrochemical CO[symbol] gas sensor / K. Singh. Polypyrrole for artificial muscles: ionic mechanisms / S. Skaarup. Development and characterization of polyfluorene based light emitting diodes and their colour tuning using Forster resonance energy transfer / P. C. Mattur ... [et al.]. Mesoporous and nanoparticulate metal oxides: applications in new photocatalysis / C. Boxall. Proton Conducting (PC) perovskite membranes for hydrogen separation and PC-SOFC electrodes and electrolytes / H. Jena, B. Rambabu. Contributed papers. Electroceramic materials for the development of natural gas fuelled SOFC/GT plant in developing country (Trinidad and Tobogo (T&T)) / R. Saunders, H. Jena, B. Rambabu. Thin film SOFC supported on nano-porous substrate / J. Hoon Joo, G. M. Choi. Characterization and fabrication of silver solid state battery Ag/AGI-AgPO[symbol]/I[symbol], C / E. Kartini ... [et al.]. Performance of lithium polymer

  3. Reductions in Inpatient Mortality following Interventions to Improve Emergency Hospital Care in Freetown, Sierra Leone

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Matthew; Spry, Emily; Daoh, Kisito; Baion, David; Skordis-Worrall, Jolene

    2012-01-01

    Background The demand for high quality hospital care for children in low resource countries is not being met. This paper describes a number of strategies to improve emergency care at a children's hospital and evaluates the impact of these on inpatient mortality. In addition, the cost-effectiveness of improving emergency care is estimated. Methods and Findings A team of local and international staff developed a plan to improve emergency care for children arriving at The Ola During Children's Hospital, Freetown, Sierra Leone. Following focus group discussions, five priority areas were identified to improve emergency care; staff training, hospital layout, staff allocation, medical equipment, and medical record keeping. A team of international volunteers worked with local staff for six months to design and implement improvements in these five priority areas. The improvements were evaluated collectively rather than individually. Before the intervention, the inpatient mortality rate was 12.4%. After the intervention this improved to 5.9%. The relative risk of dying was 47% (95% CI 0.369–0.607) lower after the intervention. The estimated number of lives saved in the first two months after the intervention was 103. The total cost of the intervention was USD 29 714, the estimated cost per death averted was USD 148. There are two main limitation of the study. Firstly, the brevity of the study and secondly, the assumed homogeneity of the clinical cases that presented to the hospital before and after the intervention. Conclusions This study demonstarted a signficant reductuion in inpatient mortality rate after an intervention to improve emergency hospital care If the findings of this paper could be reproduced in a larger more rigorous study, improving the quality of care in hospitals would be a very cost effective strategy to save children's lives in low resource settings. PMID:23028427

  4. Resiliency Improvements in Medical Emergency Staff in Burn Missions: A Qualitative Study in an Iranian Context

    PubMed Central

    Froutan, Razieh; Khankeh, Hamid Reza; Fallahi, Masoud; Ahmadi, Fazlollah; Norouzi, Kian

    2015-01-01

    Background: Medical emergency staff complete understanding of the nature of resiliency in burn events is a prerequisite for improving the quality of clinical service delivery in pre-hospital burn events. Objectives: The present study aimed to describe resiliency in view of medical emergency staff in burn events. Materials and Methods: The present qualitative study was performed using a content analysis method. In total, 18 Iranian emergency care personnel participated in the study. A purposeful sampling method was applied until reaching data saturation. Data was collected using semi-structured interviews and field observations. Afterwards, data was analyzed by face content analysis. Results: By analyzing 456 primary codes, four main concepts including: 1) scene safety/security, 2) effective clinical decision making, 3) self-efficacy and 4) religious support were extracted through content analysis from experiences of pre-hospital emergency personnel during burn care. Conclusions: Different factors affect resiliency improvements in medical emergency staff and consequently the quality of pre-hospital burn care. This study showed that various factors such as scene security/safety, effective decision making, self-efficacy and religious support are effective in the improvement of resiliency and the quality of pre-hospital emergency care. PMID:26421172

  5. Ethical considerations of clinical photography in an area of emerging technology and smartphones.

    PubMed

    Van der Rijt, Rhys; Hoffman, Stuart

    2014-03-01

    Recent advances in digital technology including internet, email and smartphones has revolutionised clinical photography and medical record data storage. The use of smartphones is becoming ubiquitous among medical professionals and the use of clinical photography has become an integral component of the management of patients in a variety of visually orientated specialties. Although clinical photography has its benefits, with this evolving technology also emerge new ethical, legal and social issues, which clinicians must be aware of.

  6. Next generation ligand binding assays-review of emerging technologies' capabilities to enhance throughput and multiplexing.

    PubMed

    Mora, Johanna; Given Chunyk, Allison; Dysinger, Mark; Purushothama, Shobha; Ricks, Claude; Osterlund, Karolina; Theobald, Valerie

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this manuscript is to provide a summary of the evaluation done by the Throughput and Multiplexing subteam on five emerging technologies: Single molecule array (Simoa™), Optimiser™, CyTOF® (Mass cytometry), SQIDLite™, and iLite™. Most of the information is presented with a minimum amount of published data and much is based on discussions with users and the vendor, to help provide the reader with an unbiased assessment of where the subteam sees each technology fitting best in the bioanalysis of large molecules. The evaluation focuses on technologies with advantages in throughput and multiplexing, but is wide enough to capture their strengths in other areas. While all platforms may be suited to support bioanalysis in the discovery space, because of their emergent nature, only Optimiser and SQIDLite are currently ready to be used in the regulated space. With the exception of Optimiser, each instrument/technology requires an up-front investment from the bioanalytical lab that will need justification during capital budget discussions. Ultimately, the platform choice should be driven by the quality of data, project needs, and the intended use of the data generated. In a time- and resource-constrained environment, it is not possible to evaluate all emergent technologies available in the market; we hope that this review gives the reader some of the information needed to decide which technology he/she may want to consider evaluating to support their drug development program in comparison to the options they already have in their hands.

  7. Quantitative Determination of Technological Improvement from Patent Data

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The results in this paper establish that information contained in patents in a technological domain is strongly correlated with the rate of technological progress in that domain. The importance of patents in a domain, the recency of patents in a domain and the immediacy of patents in a domain are all strongly correlated with increases in the rate of performance improvement in the domain of interest. A patent metric that combines both importance and immediacy is not only highly correlated (r = 0.76, p = 2.6*10-6) with the performance improvement rate but the correlation is also very robust to domain selection and appears to have good predictive power for more than ten years into the future. Linear regressions with all three causal concepts indicate realistic value in practical use to estimate the important performance improvement rate of a technological domain. PMID:25874447

  8. An overview of weapons technologies used to improve US healthcare

    SciTech Connect

    Fahrenholtz, J.; Kovarik, T.L.

    1995-05-01

    At Sandia National Laboratories the Biomedical Engineering Program uses existing weapons-related technology in medical applications in order to reduce health care costs, improve diagnoses, and promote efficient health care delivery. This paper describes several projects which use Sandia technologies to solve biomedical problems. Specific technical capabilities that are important to this program include sensor data interpretation, robotics, lasers and optics, microelectronics, image processing and materials.

  9. Health Technologies for the Improvement of Chronic Disease Management

    PubMed Central

    Nikitovic, M; Brener, S

    2013-01-01

    Background As part of ongoing efforts to improve the Ontario health care system, a mega-analysis examining the optimization of chronic disease management in the community was conducted by Evidence Development and Standards, Health Quality Ontario (previously known as the Medical Advisory Secretariat [MAS]). Objective The purpose of this report was to identify health technologies previously evaluated by MAS that may be leveraged in efforts to optimize chronic disease management in the community. Data Sources The Ontario Health Technology Assessment Series and field evaluations conducted by MAS and its partners between January 1, 2006, and December 31, 2011. Review Methods Technologies related to at least 1 of 7 disease areas of interest (type 2 diabetes, coronary artery disease, atrial fibrillation, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, congestive heart failure, stroke, and chronic wounds) or that may greatly impact health services utilization were reviewed. Only technologies with a moderate to high quality of evidence and associated with a clinically or statistically significant improvement in disease management were included. Technologies related to other topics in the mega-analysis on chronic disease management were excluded. Evidence-based analyses were reviewed, and outcomes of interest were extracted. Outcomes of interest included hospital utilization, mortality, health-related quality of life, disease-specific measures, and economic analysis measures. Results Eleven analyses were included and summarized. Technologies fell into 3 categories: those with evidence for the cure of chronic disease, those with evidence for the prevention of chronic disease, and those with evidence for the management of chronic disease. Conclusions The impact on patient outcomes and hospitalization rates of new health technologies in chronic disease management is often overlooked. This analysis demonstrates that health technologies can reduce the burden of illness; improve patient

  10. Emerging Communication Technologies (ECT) Phase 2 Report. Volume 1; Main Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bastin, Gary L.; Harris, William G.; Chiodini, Robert; Nelson, Richard A.; Huang, PoTien; Kruhm, David A.

    2003-01-01

    The Emerging Communication Technology (ECT) project investigated three First Mile communication technologies in support of NASA s Second Generation Reusable Launch Vehicle (2nd Gen RLV), Orbital Space Plane, Advanced Range Technology Working Group (ARTWG) and the Advanced Spaceport Technology Working Group (ASTWG). These First Mile technologies have the purpose of interconnecting mobile users with existing Range Communication infrastructures. ECT was a continuation of the Range Information System Management (RISM) task started in 2002. RISM identified the three advance communication technologies investigated under ECT. These were Wireless Ethernet (Wi-Fi), Free Space Optics (FSO), and Ultra Wideband (UWB). Due to the report s size, it has been broken into three volumes: 1) Main Report 2) Appendices 3) UWB.

  11. Benchmarking and Performance Improvement at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, C. , Doyle, D. , Featherman, W.D.

    1997-12-31

    The Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) has initiated a major work process improvement campaign using the tools of formalized benchmarking and streamlining. This paper provides insights into some of the process improvement activities performed at Rocky Flats from November 1995 through December 1996. It reviews the background, motivation, methodology, results, and lessons learned from this ongoing effort. The paper also presents important gains realized through process analysis and improvement including significant cost savings, productivity improvements, and an enhanced understanding of site work processes.

  12. Enabling heterogenous multi-scale database for emergency service functions through geoinformation technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhanumurthy, V.; Venugopala Rao, K.; Srinivasa Rao, S.; Ram Mohan Rao, K.; Chandra, P. Satya; Vidhyasagar, J.; Diwakar, P. G.; Dadhwal, V. K.

    2014-11-01

    Geographical Information Science (GIS) is now graduated from traditional desktop system to Internet system. Internet GIS is emerging as one of the most promising technologies for addressing Emergency Management. Web services with different privileges are playing an important role in dissemination of the emergency services to the decision makers. Spatial database is one of the most important components in the successful implementation of Emergency Management. It contains spatial data in the form of raster, vector, linked with non-spatial information. Comprehensive data is required to handle emergency situation in different phases. These database elements comprise core data, hazard specific data, corresponding attribute data, and live data coming from the remote locations. Core data sets are minimum required data including base, thematic, infrastructure layers to handle disasters. Disaster specific information is required to handle a particular disaster situation like flood, cyclone, forest fire, earth quake, land slide, drought. In addition to this Emergency Management require many types of data with spatial and temporal attributes that should be made available to the key players in the right format at right time. The vector database needs to be complemented with required resolution satellite imagery for visualisation and analysis in disaster management. Therefore, the database is interconnected and comprehensive to meet the requirement of an Emergency Management. This kind of integrated, comprehensive and structured database with appropriate information is required to obtain right information at right time for the right people. However, building spatial database for Emergency Management is a challenging task because of the key issues such as availability of data, sharing policies, compatible geospatial standards, data interoperability etc. Therefore, to facilitate using, sharing, and integrating the spatial data, there is a need to define standards to build

  13. Ongoing efforts to improve the international nuclear and radiological emergency response.

    PubMed

    Ugletveit, Finn; Molhoek, Wim

    2004-01-01

    It is recognised that states, through the development of a consistent, coherent and sustainable joint programme for improved and more efficient international responses to nuclear and radiological emergencies, could achieve a better and more cost-effective response capability. Enhanced efforts by IAEA member states and the IAEA secretariat to improve the implementation of the Convention on Early Notification of a Nuclear Accident and the Convention on Assistance in Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency have been initiated, establishing a national competent authority coordination group (NCACG) and a long-term action plan for the work.

  14. Assessing Roles of People, Technology and Structure in Emergency Management Systems: A Public Sector Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Minkyun; Sharman, Raj; Cook-Cottone, Catherine P.; Rao, H. Raghav; Upadhyaya, Shambhu J.

    2012-01-01

    Emergency management systems are a critical factor in successful mitigation of natural and man-made disasters, facilitating responder decision making in complex situations. Based on socio-technical systems, have which four components (people, technology, structure and task), this study develops a research framework of factors affecting effective…

  15. Fold-Back: Using Emerging Technologies to Move from Quality Assurance to Quality Enhancement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leonard, Simon N.; Fitzgerald, Robert N.; Bacon, Matt

    2016-01-01

    Emerging technologies offer an opportunity for the development, at the institutional level, of quality processes with greater capacity to enhance learning in higher education than available through current quality processes. These systems offer the potential to extend use of learning analytics in institutional-level quality processes in addition…

  16. Embodying Computational Thinking: Initial Design of an Emerging Technological Learning Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daily, Shaundra B.; Leonard, Alison E.; Jörg, Sophie; Babu, Sabarish; Gundersen, Kara; Parmar, Dhaval

    2015-01-01

    This emerging technology report describes virtual environment interactions an approach for blending movement and computer programming as an embodied way to support girls in building computational thinking skills. The authors seek to understand how body syntonicity might enable young learners to bootstrap their intuitive knowledge in order to…

  17. Teacher Design of Technology for Emergent Literacy: An Explorative Feasibility Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKenney, Susan; Voogt, Joke

    2012-01-01

    The active participation of teachers in designing classroom learning experiences contributes to teacher abilities to facilitate learning. This paper reports on a case study of one Dutch teacher designing a technology-rich learning environment for emergent literacy. Data was collected to explore the design and implementation of the learning…

  18. 1990 UPDATE OF THE US ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY'S SITE EMERGING TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA) directed the U.S. Environmental Protection AGency (EPA) to establish an Alternative/Innovative Treatment Technology Research and Demonstration Program. The EPA's Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response and the ...

  19. THE U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY'S SITE EMERGING TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Under the SITE Emerging Technology Program, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is seeking to foster the further development of technol- ogies that have been successfully tested at bench-scale and are now ready for pilot-scale testing, prior to field- or full-scale demonstra...

  20. "Changing the Way We Talk": Developing Librarians' Competence in Emerging Technologies through a Structured Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pegrum, Mark; Kiel, Ralph

    2011-01-01

    This article reports on the implementation of a professional development program in emerging technologies for librarians at the University of Western Australia. Set up in 2008 to address a lack of pedagogically grounded training in this area, it has now graduated three cohorts. A qualitative analysis of participants' online contributions and…

  1. Women's Social Networking: Steps that Organize Low-Technology Users with Emergency Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gary, Jon O.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the study was for the researcher to develop and have evaluated the content, organization and ease of use of a computer-training program "Emergency Response Quick Start" book based on Information and Communication Technology environmental designs. This book was most notably based on underutilized women social networking traditions…

  2. Personal Reflections on the Origins and Emergence of Recombinant DNA Technology

    PubMed Central

    Berg, Paul; Mertz, Janet E.

    2010-01-01

    The emergence of recombinant DNA technology occurred via the appropriation of known tools and procedures in novel ways that had broad applications for analyzing and modifying gene structure and organization of complex genomes. Although revolutionary in their impact, the tools and procedures per se were not revolutionary. Rather, the novel ways in which they were applied was what transformed biology. PMID:20061565

  3. Emerging Technologies Acceptance in Online Tutorials: Tutors' and Students' Behavior Intentions in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Susilo, Adhi

    2014-01-01

    Tutors' and students' intentions to use emerging technologies (ETs) in e-learning systems in higher education institutions are a central concern of researchers, academicians, and practitioners. However, tutors' and students' intentions to use ETs in e-learning systems in distance learning are relatively low. The goal of the study, developed in…

  4. THE FLUID POWER INSTITUTES TESTED PROCEDURES FOR INTRODUCING EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES, 1966.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BAYSINGER, GERALD

    TO EXPLORE NEW WAYS OF INTRODUCING EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES INTO SCHOOLS, FLUID POWER INSTITUTES WERE HELD IN 1964 AND 1965, AND THE SUCCESSFUL PROCEDURES FROM THE TWO WERE THE BASIS FOR PLANNING THE 1966 INSTITUTES HELD IN FIVE INSTITUTIONS HAVING TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAMS. SEVENTY-FIVE HIGH SCHOOL OR COLLEGE LEVEL TEACHERS FROM 25 STATES…

  5. The Future's Future: Implications of Emerging Technology for Special Education Program Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofstetter, Fred T.

    2001-01-01

    This article reviews emerging technologies, imagines how they can be used to help learners with special needs, and recommends new special education program initiatives to help these students make a meaningful transition from school to work. Wearable computers, personal computing devices, DVD, HDTV, MP3, and personal digital assistants are…

  6. Emerging Technologies for Monitoring Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis at the Point-of-Care

    PubMed Central

    Mani, Vigneshwaran; Wang, ShuQi; Inci, Fatih; De Libero, Gennaro; Singhal, Amit; Demirci, Utkan

    2014-01-01

    Infectious diseases are the leading cause of death worldwide. Among them, tuberculosis (TB) remains a major threat to public health, exacerbated by the emergence of multiple drug-resistant (MDR) and extensively drug-resistant (XDR) Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). MDR-Mtb strains are resistant to first-line anti-TB drugs such as isoniazid and rifampicin; whereas XDR-Mtb strains are resistant to additional drugs including at least to any fluoroquinolone and at least one of the second-line anti-TB injectable drugs such as kanamycin, capreomycin, or amikacin. Clinically, these strains have significantly impacted the management of TB in high-incidence developing countries, where systemic surveillance of TB drug resistance is lacking. For effective management of TB on-site, early detection of drug resistance is critical to initiate treatment, to reduce mortality, and to thwart drug-resistant TB transmission. In this review, we discuss the diagnostic challenges to detect drug-resistant TB at the point-of-care (POC). Moreover, we present the latest advances in nano/microscale technologies that can potentially detect TB drug resistance to improve on-site patient care. PMID:24882226

  7. Technological developments and approaches to improving service quality.

    PubMed

    Blumberg, M R

    1999-01-01

    In summary, major paradigm shifts in the health care industry are altering the way technology is maintained and supported. Service organizations are now responsible for maintaining a broader base of technology within the health care delivery network and must to this on an extremely rapid, efficient, and productive basis. A number of new technologies are coming on-line, which can allow a health care technology service organization to experience significant improvements in profitability, efficiency, and productivity. To realize maximum benefit from these technologies, service organizations may find themselves re-engineering their service processes. The author believes that this is a requirement for many service organizations, regardless of whether new technology is implemented. The traditional approaches to service delivery are ineffective in managing the new structural realities and service requirements of today's health care environment. New strategies and tactics are required for ensuring that these requirements are met. These approaches will no doubt improve the overall quality, productivity, and efficiency of service and are based on best practices utilized by leading OEMs and ISOs in the medical electronics and other high technology service industry such as information technology and telecommunications, where the service organization is responsible for supporting a broad array of the technology over a large geography with a densely populated installed base, not unlike the typical health care delivery service environment. Once operational improvements are made, a service organization can take advantage of the productivity and efficiency gains brought on by new technology. Organizations interested in doing so are urged to thoroughly research the current state-of-the-art and best practices, because there are numerous systems currently available off-the-shelf. The author believes that new technology will be a basic requirement for competing in the health care

  8. New technologies and techniques to improve adenoma detection in colonoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bond, Ashley; Sarkar, Sanchoy

    2015-01-01

    Adenoma detection rate (ADR) is a key component of colonoscopy quality assessment, with a direct link between itself and future mortality from colorectal cancer. There are a number of potential factors, both modifiable and non-modifiable that can impact upon ADR. As methods, understanding and technologies advance, so should our ability to improve ADRs, and thus, reduce colorectal cancer mortality. This article will review new technologies and techniques that improve ADR, both in terms of the endoscopes themselves and adjuncts to current systems. In particular it focuses on effective techniques and behaviours, developments in image enhancement, advancement in endoscope design and developments in accessories that may improve ADR. It also highlights the key role that continued medical education plays in improving the quality of colonoscopy and thus ADR. The review aims to present a balanced summary of the evidence currently available and does not propose to serve as a guideline. PMID:26265990

  9. Study on application of aerospace technology to improve surgical implants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. E.; Youngblood, J. L.

    1982-01-01

    The areas where aerospace technology could be used to improve the reliability and performance of metallic, orthopedic implants was assessed. Specifically, comparisons were made of material controls, design approaches, analytical methods and inspection approaches being used in the implant industry with hardware for the aerospace industries. Several areas for possible improvement were noted such as increased use of finite element stress analysis and fracture control programs on devices where the needs exist for maximum reliability and high structural performance.

  10. Akt inhibition improves irinotecan treatment and prevents cell emergence by switching the senescence response to apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Vétillard, Alexandra; Jonchère, Barbara; Moreau, Marie; Toutain, Bertrand; Henry, Cécile; Fontanel, Simon; Bernard, Anne-Charlotte; Campone, Mario; Guette, Catherine; Coqueret, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Activated in response to chemotherapy, senescence is a tumor suppressive mechanism that induces a permanent loss of proliferation. However, in response to treatment, it is not really known how cells can escape senescence and how irreversible or incomplete this pathway is. We have recently described that cells that escape senescence are more transformed than non-treated parental cells, they resist anoikis and rely on Mcl-1. In this study, we further characterize this emergence in response to irinotecan, a first line treatment used in colorectal cancer. Our results indicate that Akt was activated as a feedback pathway during the early step of senescence. The inhibition of the kinase prevented cell emergence and improved treatment efficacy, both in vitro and in vivo. This improvement was correlated with senescence inhibition, p21waf1 downregulation and a concomitant activation of apoptosis due to Noxa upregulation and Mcl-1 inactivation. The inactivation of Noxa prevented apoptosis and increased the number of emergent cells. Using either RNA interference or p21waf1-deficient cells, we further confirmed that an intact p53-p21-senescence pathway favored cell emergence and that its downregulation improved treatment efficacy through apoptosis induction. Therefore, although senescence is an efficient suppressive mechanism, it also generates more aggressive cells as a consequence of apoptosis inhibition. We therefore propose that senescence-inducing therapies should be used sequentially with drugs favoring cell death such as Akt inhibitors. This should reduce cell emergence and tumor relapse through a combined induction of senescence and apoptosis. PMID:26485768

  11. New and Emerging Technologies for Real-Time Air and Surface Beryllium Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Phifer, B.E. Jr.; Churnetski, E.L.; Cooke, L.E.; Reed, J.J.; Howell, M.L.; Smith, V.D.

    2001-09-01

    In this study, five emerging technologies were identified for real-time monitoring of airborne beryllium: Microwave-Induced Plasma Spectroscopy (MIPS), Aerosol Beam-Focused Laser-Induced Plasma Spectroscopy (ABFLIPS), Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS), Surfaced-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) Spectroscopy, and Micro-Calorimetric Spectroscopy (CalSpec). Desired features of real-time air beryllium monitoring instrumentation were developed from the Y-12 CBDPP. These features were used as guidelines for the identification of potential technologies as well as their unique demonstrated capability to provide real-time monitoring of similar materials. However, best available technologies were considered, regardless of their ability to comply with the desired features. None of the five technologies have the capability to measure the particle size of airborne beryllium. Although reducing the total concentration of airborne beryllium is important, current literature suggests that reducing or eliminating the concentration of respirable beryllium is critical for worker health protection. Eight emerging technologies were identified for surface monitoring of beryllium. CalSpec, MIPS, SERS, LIBS, Laser Ablation, Absorptive Stripping Voltametry (ASV), Modified Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) Spectroscopy, and Gamma BeAST. Desired features of real-time surface beryllium monitoring were developed from the Y-12 CBDPP. These features were used as guidelines for the identification of potential technologies. However, the best available technologies were considered regardless of their ability to comply with the desired features.

  12. Emerging technologies and web accessibility: research challenges and opportunities focussing on vision issues.

    PubMed

    Harper, Simon; Yesilada, Yeliz

    2012-01-01

    This is a technological review paper focussed on identifying both the research challenges and opportunities for further investigation arising from emerging technologies, and it does not aim to propose any recommendation or standard. It is focussed on blind and partially sighted World Wide Web (Web) users along with others who use assistive technologies. The Web is a fast moving interdisciplinary domain in which new technologies, techniques and research is in perpetual development. It is often difficult to maintain a holistic view of new developments within the multiple domains which together make up the Web. This suggests that knowledge of the current developments and predictions of future developments are additionally important for the accessibility community. Web accessibility has previously been characterised by the correction of our past mistakes to make the current Web fulfil the original vision of access for all. New technologies were not designed with accessibility in mind and technologies that could be useful for addressing accessibility issues were not identified or adopted by the accessibility community. We wish to enable the research community to undertake preventative measures and proactively address challenges, while recognising opportunities, before they become unpreventable or require retrospective technological enhancement. This article then reviews emerging trends within the Web and Web Accessibility domains.

  13. AR-CITE: Analysis of Search Results for the Clarification and Identification of Technology Emergence

    SciTech Connect

    2012-06-15

    The Analysis of Search Results for the Clarification and Identification of Technology Emergence (AR-CITE) computer code examines a scientometric model that tracks the emergence of an identified technology from initial discovery (via original scientific and conference literature), through critical discoveries (via original scientific, conference literature and patents), transitioning through Technology Readiness Levels (TRLs) and ultimately on to commercial currency of citations, collaboration indicators, and on-line news patterns are identified. The combinations of four distinct and separate searchable on-line networked sources (i.e. scholarly publications and citation, world patents, news archives, and on-line mapping networks) are assembled to become one collective network (a dataset for analysis of relations). This established network becomes the basis from which to quickly analyze the temporal flow of activity (searchable events) for the subject domain to be clarified and identified.

  14. AR-CITE: Analysis of Search Results for the Clarification and Identification of Technology Emergence

    2012-06-15

    The Analysis of Search Results for the Clarification and Identification of Technology Emergence (AR-CITE) computer code examines a scientometric model that tracks the emergence of an identified technology from initial discovery (via original scientific and conference literature), through critical discoveries (via original scientific, conference literature and patents), transitioning through Technology Readiness Levels (TRLs) and ultimately on to commercial currency of citations, collaboration indicators, and on-line news patterns are identified. The combinations of four distinct andmore » separate searchable on-line networked sources (i.e. scholarly publications and citation, world patents, news archives, and on-line mapping networks) are assembled to become one collective network (a dataset for analysis of relations). This established network becomes the basis from which to quickly analyze the temporal flow of activity (searchable events) for the subject domain to be clarified and identified.« less

  15. Executive summary: interventions to improve quality in the crowded emergency department.

    PubMed

    Pines, Jesse M; McCarthy, Melissa L

    2011-12-01

    Emergency department (ED) crowding is a major public health problem in the United States, with increasing numbers of ED visits, longer lengths of stay in the ED, and the common practice of ED boarding. In the next several years, several measures of ED crowding will be assessed and reported on government websites. In addition, with the implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), millions more Americans will have health care insurance, many of whom will choose the ED for their care. In June 2011, a consensus conference was conducted in Boston, Massachusetts, by the journal Academic Emergency Medicine entitled "Interventions to Assure Quality in the Crowded Emergency Department." The overall goal of the conference was to develop a series of research agendas to identify promising interventions to safeguard the quality of emergency care during crowded periods and to reduce ED crowding altogether through systemwide solutions. This was achieved through three objectives: 1) a review of interventions that have been implemented to reduce crowding and summarize the evidence of their effectiveness on the delivery of emergency care; 2) to identify strategies within or outside of the health care setting (i.e., policy, engineering, operations management, system design) that may help reduce crowding or improve the quality of emergency care provided during episodes of ED crowding; and 3) to identify the most appropriate design and analytic techniques for rigorously evaluating ED interventions designed to reduce crowding or improve the quality of emergency care provided during episodes of ED crowding. This article describes the background and rationale for the conference and highlights some of the discussions that occurred on the day of the conference. A series of manuscripts on the details of the conference is presented in this issue of Academic Emergency Medicine.

  16. Improving Learning with Technology. Symposium 25. [AHRD Conference, 2001].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2001

    This document contains three papers on improving learning with technology. "The Benefits, Challenges, and Implications of Teleworking: A Literature Review" (Susan R. Madsen) reviews the literature on the benefits and challenges of teleworking for individuals, work groups, and organizations and investigates the implications of telework for human…

  17. Technological Specialisation Courses in Portugal: Description and Suggested Improvements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    da Costa, Nilza Maria Vilhena Nunes; Simoes, Ana Raquel; Pereira, Giselia Antunes; Pombo, Lucia

    2009-01-01

    This study is a part of the "Post-secondary Vocational Training in Portugal Project: from a description through to suggestions to improve training quality", which ran from 2003 to 2006. This article, which makes use of data obtained from interviews with Directors of Schools which offer technological specialisation courses (CETs) and from…

  18. The Use of Technology to Improve Staff Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nepo, Kaori G.

    2010-01-01

    The on-going staff training is one of critical components for the effective programming for adolescents and adults with autism, although it is often overlooked. The available technology can be useful to improve not only productivity and organization of our daily life, but also the work performance. The purpose of this study was to examine the…

  19. The economic valuation of improved process plant decision support technology.

    PubMed

    White, Douglas C

    2007-06-01

    How can investments that would potentially improve a manufacturing plant's decision process be economically justified? What is the value of "better information," "more flexibility," or "improved integration" and the technologies that provide these effects? Technology investments such as improved process modelling, new real time historians and other databases, "smart" instrumentation, better data analysis and visualization software, and/or improved user interfaces often include these benefits as part of their valuation. How are these "soft" benefits to be converted to a quantitative economic return? Quantification is important if rational management decisions are to be made about the correct amount of money to invest in the technologies, and which technologies to choose among the many available ones. Modelling the plant operational decision cycle-detect, analyse, forecast, choose and implement--provides a basis for this economic quantification. In this paper a new economic model is proposed for estimation of the value of decision support investments based on their effect upon the uncertainty in forecasting plant financial performance. This model leads to quantitative benefit estimates that have a realistic financial basis. An example is presented demonstrating the application of the method.

  20. Sustainable and consumer-friendly emerging technologies for application within the meat industry: An overview.

    PubMed

    Troy, Declan J; Ojha, Kumari Shikha; Kerry, Joseph P; Tiwari, Brijesh K

    2016-10-01

    New and emerging robust technologies can play an important role in ensuring a more resilient meat value chain and satisfying consumer demands and needs. This paper outlines various novel thermal and non-thermal technologies which have shown potential for meat processing applications. A number of process analytical techniques which have shown potential for rapid, real-time assessment of meat quality are also discussed. The commercial uptake and consumer acceptance of novel technologies in meat processing have been subjects of great interest over the past decade. Consumer focus group studies have shown that consumer expectations and liking for novel technologies, applicable to meat processing applications, vary significantly. This overview also highlights the necessity for meat processors to address consumer risk-benefit perceptions, knowledge and trust in order to be commercially successful in the application of novel technologies within the meat sector.

  1. Sustainable and consumer-friendly emerging technologies for application within the meat industry: An overview.

    PubMed

    Troy, Declan J; Ojha, Kumari Shikha; Kerry, Joseph P; Tiwari, Brijesh K

    2016-10-01

    New and emerging robust technologies can play an important role in ensuring a more resilient meat value chain and satisfying consumer demands and needs. This paper outlines various novel thermal and non-thermal technologies which have shown potential for meat processing applications. A number of process analytical techniques which have shown potential for rapid, real-time assessment of meat quality are also discussed. The commercial uptake and consumer acceptance of novel technologies in meat processing have been subjects of great interest over the past decade. Consumer focus group studies have shown that consumer expectations and liking for novel technologies, applicable to meat processing applications, vary significantly. This overview also highlights the necessity for meat processors to address consumer risk-benefit perceptions, knowledge and trust in order to be commercially successful in the application of novel technologies within the meat sector. PMID:27162095

  2. Emergency Contraception and RU-486 (Mifepristone): Do Bioethical Discussions Improve Learning and Retention?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodensteiner, Karin J.

    2012-01-01

    To systematically investigate whether the inclusion of a bioethical discussion improves the learning and retention of biological content, students in two sections of an introductory zoology class were taught the biology behind emergency contraception and RU-486. Students in one section of the course participated in a bioethical discussion, whereas…

  3. Emergency water supply: a review of potential technologies and selection criteria.

    PubMed

    Loo, Siew-Leng; Fane, Anthony G; Krantz, William B; Lim, Teik-Thye

    2012-06-15

    Access to safe drinking water is one of the first priorities following a disaster. However, providing drinking water to the affected population (AP) is challenging due to severe contamination and lack of access to infrastructure. An onsite treatment system for the AP is a more sustainable solution than transporting bottled water. Emergency water technologies (WTs) that are modular, mobile or portable are suitable for emergency relief. This paper reviews WTs including membrane technologies that are suitable for use in emergencies. Physical, chemical, thermal- and light-based treatment methods, and membrane technologies driven by different driving forces such as pressure, temperature and osmotic gradients are reviewed. Each WT is evaluated by ten mutually independent criteria: costs, ease of deployment, ease of use, maintenance, performance, potential acceptance, energy requirements, supply chain requirements, throughput and environmental impact. A scoring system based on these criteria is presented. A methodology for emergency WT selection based on compensatory multi-criteria analysis is developed and discussed. Finally, critical research needs are identified.

  4. European consumer response to packaging technologies for improved beef safety.

    PubMed

    Van Wezemael, Lynn; Ueland, Øydis; Verbeke, Wim

    2011-09-01

    Beef packaging can influence consumer perceptions of beef. Although consumer perceptions and acceptance are considered to be among the most limiting factors in the application of new technologies, there is a lack of knowledge about the acceptability to consumers of beef packaging systems aimed at improved safety. This paper explores European consumers' acceptance levels of different beef packaging technologies. An online consumer survey was conducted in five European countries (n=2520). Acceptance levels among the sample ranged between 23% for packaging releasing preservative additives up to 73% for vacuum packaging. Factor analysis revealed that familiar packaging technologies were clearly preferred over non-familiar technologies. Four consumer segments were identified: the negative (31% of the sample), cautious (30%), conservative (17%) and enthusiast (22%) consumers, which were profiled based on their attitudes and beef consumption behaviour. Differences between consumer acceptance levels should be taken into account while optimising beef packaging and communicating its benefits.

  5. Technologies for improved soil carbon management and environmental quality

    SciTech Connect

    Reicosky, D.C.

    1997-12-31

    The objective of this paper is to create an environmental awareness of and to provide insight into the future balance of environment and economic issues in developing new technologies that benefit the farmer, the public, and agricultural product sales. Agricultural impacts of tillage-induced CO{sub 2} losses are addressed along with new and existing technologies to minimize tillage-induced flow of CO{sub 2} to the atmosphere, Emphasis is placed on the carbon cycle and the cost of environmental damage to illustrate the need for improved technologies leading to reduced environmental impacts by business ventures. New technologies and concepts related to methods of tillage and stover management for carbon sequestration with the agricultural production systems are presented. 16 refs., 3 figs.

  6. Anticipating the Future, Influencing the Present: Assessing the Societal Implications of Emerging Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michelson, Evan S.

    A growing challenge for the American policymaking system is to respond effectively to a wide range of interconnected, complex, long-term science and technology issues. Simultaneously, current approaches and institutions of governance are ill suited to address these multidimensional challenges. As the next generation of innovations in science and technology is arriving at an accelerating rate, the governance system is lagging behind. This realization leads to a vital overarching consideration that steers this study: What approaches are well suited to anticipate the longer-term societal implications of emerging technologies in the 21st Century? This study identifies and examines strategies for anticipating the longer-term societal implications of emerging technologies by way of a qualitative case study. It explores one area of technology (nanotechnology), in one particular governance system (the United States), and with a focus on one high profile non-governmental organization (NGO) involved in addressing a range of nanotechnology's societal and policy implications: the Project on Emerging Nanotechnologies (PEN). Based at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, PEN's goal was to ensure "that as nanotechnologies advance, possible risks are minimized, public and consumer engagement remains strong, and the potential benefits of these new technologies are realized." The conceptual framework of anticipatory governance guides the research, which offers a real-world example about how anticipatory governance applies in the nongovernmental sector and shows how this idea links to broader theoretical debates about the policymaking process. The study's main conclusion is that PEN utilized a set of interconnected strategies related to advancing foresight, operating in a boundary-spanning role, and promoting communications and public engagement in its attempt to influence, anticipate, and shape the societal implications of emerging technologies. The findings are

  7. Improved animal welfare, the right technology and increased business.

    PubMed

    Støier, S; Larsen, H D; Aaslyng, M D; Lykke, L

    2016-10-01

    Animal welfare is receiving increasing attention from the authorities, the public and NGOs. For this reason, the improvement of animal welfare and animal handling systems is of the utmost importance for the meat industry. Technological developments have led to more animal friendly systems that handle animals on the day of slaughter, and these developments will be even more important as consideration for animal welfare and sustainability is no longer just a trend but a licence to operate. Improvement of animal welfare also leads to a higher value of the carcasses due to higher product quality, less cut-off caused by fewer injuries, and reduced working load, which leads to increased business opportunities. Therefore, good animal welfare is good business, and the development and implementation of new technology is the way to obtain improved animal welfare. These subjects will be addressed using examples and cases from the pork and broiler production industry. PMID:27118597

  8. Improved animal welfare, the right technology and increased business.

    PubMed

    Støier, S; Larsen, H D; Aaslyng, M D; Lykke, L

    2016-10-01

    Animal welfare is receiving increasing attention from the authorities, the public and NGOs. For this reason, the improvement of animal welfare and animal handling systems is of the utmost importance for the meat industry. Technological developments have led to more animal friendly systems that handle animals on the day of slaughter, and these developments will be even more important as consideration for animal welfare and sustainability is no longer just a trend but a licence to operate. Improvement of animal welfare also leads to a higher value of the carcasses due to higher product quality, less cut-off caused by fewer injuries, and reduced working load, which leads to increased business opportunities. Therefore, good animal welfare is good business, and the development and implementation of new technology is the way to obtain improved animal welfare. These subjects will be addressed using examples and cases from the pork and broiler production industry.

  9. An emerging new direction in remote sensing for Earth science: the technology of GPS occultations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mannucci, A. J.; Hajj, G. A.; Ao, C.; Dong, D.; Iijima, B. A.; Juarez, M. T.; Kuang, D.; Meehan, T. K.; Young, L. E.; Yunck, T. P.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss recent technology developments that improve science return in the lowest 5 km of the atmosphere, an interesting region that is difficult to sound at high vertical resolution with other techniques from space.

  10. Innovative applications of technology for nuclear power plant productivity improvements

    SciTech Connect

    Naser, J. A.

    2012-07-01

    The nuclear power industry in several countries is concerned about the ability to maintain high plant performance levels due to aging and obsolescence, knowledge drain, fewer plant staff, and new requirements and commitments. Current plant operations are labor-intensive due to the vast number of operational and support activities required by commonly used technology in most plants. These concerns increase as plants extend their operating life. In addition, there is the goal to further improve performance while reducing human errors and increasingly focus on reducing operations and maintenance costs. New plants are expected to perform more productively than current plants. In order to achieve and increase high productivity, it is necessary to look at innovative applications of modern technologies and new concepts of operation. The Electric Power Research Inst. is exploring and demonstrating modern technologies that enable cost-effectively maintaining current performance levels and shifts to even higher performance levels, as well as provide tools for high performance in new plants. Several modern technologies being explored can provide multiple benefits for a wide range of applications. Examples of these technologies include simulation, visualization, automation, human cognitive engineering, and information and communications technologies. Some applications using modern technologies are described. (authors)

  11. Exploring emerging technologies using metaphors--a study of orphan drugs and pharmacogenomics.

    PubMed

    Boon, Wouter; Moors, Ellen

    2008-05-01

    Due to uncertainties of several aspects of emerging health technologies, there is a need to anticipate these developments early. A first step would be to gather information and develop future visions about the technology. This paper introduces metaphor analysis as a novel way to do this. Specifically, we study the future of pharmacogenomics by comparing this technology with orphan drugs, which are more established and often act as a model with comparable (economic, research organisation, etc.) characteristics. The analysis consists of describing the dominant metaphors used and structurally exploring (dis)similarities between pharmacogenomics and orphan drugs developments. This comparison leads to lessons that can be learnt for the emerging pharmacogenomics future. We carried out a comprehensive literature review, extracting metaphors in a structured way from different areas of the drug research and development pipeline. The paper argues that (1) there are many similarities between orphan drugs and pharmacogenomics, especially in terms of registration, and social and economic impacts; (2) pharmacogenomics developments are regarded both as a future 'poison' and a 'chance', whereas orphan drugs are seen as a 'gift', and at the same time as a large 'problem'; and (3) metaphor analysis proves to be a tool for creating prospective images of pharmacogenomics and other emerging technologies.

  12. Lessons from Adult Education: Identifying and Exploring Emerging Ethical Issues in Technologically Enhanced Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mabry, Christie Knittel; O'Driscoll, Tony

    2003-01-01

    Technologically Enhanced Performance (TEP) is the application of technology to improve the performance of knowledge workers. TEP is both an intellectual and ideological complement to the field of Adult Education. As such, much can be learned about ethical issues associated with implementing TEP from the established research and literature base in…

  13. U.S. DOE Roundtable and Workshop on Advanced Steel Technologies: Emerging Global Technologies and R&D Opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Pellegrino, Joan; Jamison, Keith

    2015-12-01

    This report is based on the proceedings of the U.S. DOE Roundtable and Workshop on Advanced Steel Technologies Workshop hosted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy s (DOE s) Advanced Manufacturing Office (AMO) on held on June 23, 2015. Representatives from industry, government, and academia met at the offices of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Washington, DC, to share information on emerging steel technologies, issues impacting technology investment and deployment, gaps in research and development (R&D), and opportunities for greater energy efficiency. The results of the workshop are summarized in this report. They reflect a snapshot of the perspectives and ideas generated by the individuals who attended and not all-inclusive of the steel industry and stakeholder community.

  14. A Legal Analysis of Federal Disability Law as Related to Emerging Technology: Guidelines for Postsecondary Leadership, Policy, and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Roderick Dwayne

    2014-01-01

    This dissertation identified and described the legal requirements imposed by federal disability mandates and case law related to emerging technology. Additionally, the researcher created a legal framework (guidelines) for higher education institutions to consider during policy development and implementation of emerging technology by providing an…

  15. Development and Evaluation of Senior High School Courses on Emerging Technology: A Case Study of a Course on Virtual Reality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Chi-Tung

    2012-01-01

    In Taiwan, the National Science Council has implemented the High Scope Program (HSP) since 2006. The purpose of this study was to analyze the development and effectiveness of senior high school HSP courses on emerging technology. This study used a course on virtual reality as an example, to investigate the influence of emerging technology courses…

  16. Why technology matters as much as science in improving healthcare

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background More than half a million new items of biomedical research are generated every year and added to Medline. How successful are we at applying this steady accumulation of scientific knowledge and so improving the practice of medicine in the USA? Discussion The conventional wisdom is that the US healthcare system is plagued by serious cost, access, safety and quality weaknesses. A comprehensive solution must involve the better translation of an abundance of clinical research into improved clinical practice. Yet the application of knowledge (i.e. technology) remains far less well funded and less visible than the generation, synthesis and accumulation of knowledge (i.e. science), and the two are only weakly integrated. Worse, technology is often seen merely as an adjunct to practice, e.g. electronic health records. Several key changes are in order. A helpful first step lies in better understanding the distinction between science and technology, and their complementary strengths and limitations. The absolute level of funding for technology development must be increased as well as being more integrated with traditional science-based clinical research. In such a mission-oriented federal funding strategy, the ties between basic science research and applied research would be better emphasized and strengthened. Summary It bears repeating that only by applying the wealth of existing and future scientific knowledge can healthcare delivery and patient care ever show significant improvement. PMID:22963227

  17. Advanced Technologies to Improve Closure of Life Support Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barta, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    As NASA looks beyond the International Space Station toward long-duration, deep space missions away from Earth, the current practice of supplying consumables and spares will not be practical nor affordable. New approaches are sought for life support and habitation systems that will reduce dependency on Earth and increase mission sustainability. To reduce launch mass, further closure of Environmental Control and Life Support Systems (ECLSS) beyond the current capability of the ISS will be required. Areas of particular interest include achieving higher degrees of recycling within Atmosphere Revitalization, Water Recovery and Waste Management Systems. NASA is currently investigating advanced carbon dioxide reduction processes that surpass the level of oxygen recovery available from the Sabatier Carbon Dioxide Reduction Assembly (CRA) on the ISS. Candidate technologies will potentially improve the recovery of oxygen from about 50% (for the CRA) to as much as 100% for technologies who's end product is solid carbon. Improving the efficiency of water recycling and recovery can be achieved by the addition of advanced technologies to recover water from brines and solid wastes. Bioregenerative technologies may be utilized for water reclaimation and also for the production of food. Use of higher plants will simultaneously benefit atmosphere revitalization and water recovery through photosynthesis and transpiration. The level at which bioregenerative technologies are utilized will depend on their comparative requirements for spacecraft resources including mass, power, volume, heat rejection, crew time and reliability. Planetary protection requirements will need to be considered for missions to other solar system bodies.

  18. Using a balanced scorecard to improve the performance of an emergency department.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shu-Hsin; Chen, Ping-Ling; Yang, Ming-Chin; Chang, Wen-Yin; Lee, Haw-Jenn

    2004-01-01

    The performance of the emergency department significantly improved after implementing the balanced scorecard including hours of continuing education attended by the staff, staff job satisfaction, the rate of incomplete laboratory tests within 30 minutes, the average monthly inappropriate return rate, and hospital profit. The results can assist administrators plan for the future. Although this was a pilot program for implementing a balanced scorecard in an emergency department, the indicators used in this study may also be reasonable for a hospital that has limited resources.

  19. Using a balanced scorecard to improve the performance of an emergency department.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shu-Hsin; Chen, Ping-Ling; Yang, Ming-Chin; Chang, Wen-Yin; Lee, Haw-Jenn

    2004-01-01

    The performance of the emergency department significantly improved after implementing the balanced scorecard including hours of continuing education attended by the staff, staff job satisfaction, the rate of incomplete laboratory tests within 30 minutes, the average monthly inappropriate return rate, and hospital profit. The results can assist administrators plan for the future. Although this was a pilot program for implementing a balanced scorecard in an emergency department, the indicators used in this study may also be reasonable for a hospital that has limited resources. PMID:15211917

  20. SITE TECHNOLOGY PROFILES - 11TH EDITION, EMERGING TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM, VOLUME 2

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program, now in its eleventh year is an integral part of EPA's research into alternative cleanup methods for hazardous waste sites around the nation. The SITE Program was created to encourage the development and routine use o...

  1. Building the Technology Toolkit of Marketing Students: The Emerging Technologies in Marketing Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Fred L.; Mangold, W. Glynn; Roach, Joy; Holmes, Terry

    2013-01-01

    New information technologies are transforming marketing practice, leading to calls for marketing academics to focus their research and teaching more tightly on areas relevant to practitioners. Developments in e-commerce, business geographic information systems (GIS), and social media offer powerful marketing tools to nontechnical users. This paper…

  2. Quantification of risks from technology for improved plant reliability

    SciTech Connect

    Rode, D.M.

    1996-12-31

    One of the least understood and therefore appreciated threats to profitability are risks from power plant technologies such as steam generators, turbines, and electrical systems. To effectively manage technological risks, business decisions need to be based on knowledge. The scope of the paper describes a quantification or risk process that combines technical knowledge and judgments with commercial consequences. The three principle alternatives to manage risks as well as risk mitigation techniques for significant equipment within a power plant are reported. The result is to equip the decision maker with a comprehensive picture of the risk exposures enabling cost effective activities to be undertaken to improve a plant`s reliability.

  3. Improving global access to new vaccines: intellectual property, technology transfer, and regulatory pathways.

    PubMed

    Crager, Sara Eve

    2014-11-01

    The 2012 World Health Assembly Global Vaccine Action Plan called for global access to new vaccines within 5 years of licensure. Current approaches have proven insufficient to achieve sustainable vaccine pricing within such a timeline. Paralleling the successful strategy of generic competition to bring down drug prices, a clear consensus is emerging that market entry of multiple suppliers is a critical factor in expeditiously bringing down prices of new vaccines. In this context, key target objectives for improving access to new vaccines include overcoming intellectual property obstacles, streamlining regulatory pathways for biosimilar vaccines, and reducing market entry timelines for developing-country vaccine manufacturers by transfer of technology and know-how. I propose an intellectual property, technology, and know-how bank as a new approach to facilitate widespread access to new vaccines in low- and middle-income countries by efficient transfer of patented vaccine technologies to multiple developing-country vaccine manufacturers.

  4. [Improving global access to new vaccines: intellectual property, technology transfer, and regulatory pathways].

    PubMed

    Crager, Sara Eve

    2015-01-01

    The 2012 World Health Assembly Global Vaccine Action Plan called for global access to new vaccines within 5 years of licensure. Current approaches have proven insufficient to achieve sustainable vaccine pricing within such a timeline. Paralleling the successful strategy of generic competition to bring down drug prices, a clear consensus is emerging that market entry of multiple suppliers is a critical factor in expeditiously bringing down prices of new vaccines. In this context, key target objectives for improving access to new vaccines include overcoming intellectual property obstacles, streamlining regulatory pathways for biosimilar vaccines, and reducing market entry timelines for developing-country vaccine manufacturers by transfer of technology and know-how. I propose an intellectual property, technology, and know-how bank as a new approach to facilitate widespread access to new vaccines in low- and middle-income countries by efficient transfer of patented vaccine technologies to multiple developing-country vaccine manufacturers.

  5. Improving Global Access to New Vaccines: Intellectual Property, Technology Transfer, and Regulatory Pathways

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The 2012 World Health Assembly Global Vaccine Action Plan called for global access to new vaccines within 5 years of licensure. Current approaches have proven insufficient to achieve sustainable vaccine pricing within such a timeline. Paralleling the successful strategy of generic competition to bring down drug prices, a clear consensus is emerging that market entry of multiple suppliers is a critical factor in expeditiously bringing down prices of new vaccines. In this context, key target objectives for improving access to new vaccines include overcoming intellectual property obstacles, streamlining regulatory pathways for biosimilar vaccines, and reducing market entry timelines for developing-country vaccine manufacturers by transfer of technology and know-how. I propose an intellectual property, technology, and know-how bank as a new approach to facilitate widespread access to new vaccines in low- and middle-income countries by efficient transfer of patented vaccine technologies to multiple developing-country vaccine manufacturers. PMID:25211753

  6. Improving global access to new vaccines: intellectual property, technology transfer, and regulatory pathways.

    PubMed

    Crager, Sara Eve

    2014-11-01

    The 2012 World Health Assembly Global Vaccine Action Plan called for global access to new vaccines within 5 years of licensure. Current approaches have proven insufficient to achieve sustainable vaccine pricing within such a timeline. Paralleling the successful strategy of generic competition to bring down drug prices, a clear consensus is emerging that market entry of multiple suppliers is a critical factor in expeditiously bringing down prices of new vaccines. In this context, key target objectives for improving access to new vaccines include overcoming intellectual property obstacles, streamlining regulatory pathways for biosimilar vaccines, and reducing market entry timelines for developing-country vaccine manufacturers by transfer of technology and know-how. I propose an intellectual property, technology, and know-how bank as a new approach to facilitate widespread access to new vaccines in low- and middle-income countries by efficient transfer of patented vaccine technologies to multiple developing-country vaccine manufacturers. PMID:25211753

  7. Difficult Airway Response Team: A Novel Quality Improvement Program for Managing Hospital-Wide Airway Emergencies

    PubMed Central

    Mark, Lynette J.; Herzer, Kurt R.; Cover, Renee; Pandian, Vinciya; Bhatti, Nasir I.; Berkow, Lauren C.; Haut, Elliott R.; Hillel, Alexander T.; Miller, Christina R.; Feller-Kopman, David J.; Schiavi, Adam J.; Xie, Yanjun J.; Lim, Christine; Holzmueller, Christine; Ahmad, Mueen; Thomas, Pradeep; Flint, Paul W.; Mirski, Marek A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Difficult airway cases can quickly become emergencies, increasing the risk of life-threatening complications or death. Emergency airway management outside the operating room is particularly challenging. Methods We developed a quality improvement program—the Difficult Airway Response Team (DART)—to improve emergency airway management outside the operating room. DART was implemented by a team of anesthesiologists, otolaryngologists, trauma surgeons, emergency medicine physicians, and risk managers in 2005 at The Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland. The DART program had three core components: operations, safety, and education. The operations component focused on developing a multidisciplinary difficult airway response team, standardizing the emergency response process, and deploying difficult airway equipment carts throughout the hospital. The safety component focused on real-time monitoring of DART activations and learning from past DART events to continuously improve system-level performance. This objective entailed monitoring the paging system, reporting difficult airway events and DART activations to a web-based registry, and using in situ simulations to identify and mitigate defects in the emergency airway management process. The educational component included development of a multispecialty difficult airway curriculum encompassing case-based lectures, simulation, and team building/communication to ensure consistency of care. Educational materials were also developed for non-DART staff and patients to inform them about the needs of patients with difficult airways and ensure continuity of care with other providers after discharge. Results Between July 2008 and June 2013, DART managed 360 adult difficult airway events comprising 8% of all code activations. Predisposing patient factors included body mass index > 40, history of head and neck tumor, prior difficult intubation, cervical spine injury, airway edema, airway bleeding, and previous

  8. WE-A-18C-01: Emerging and Innovative Ultrasound Technology in Diagnosis and Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Emelianov, S; Oraevsky, A; Stafford, R

    2014-06-15

    The application of new ultrasound-based technologies in medicine has expanded in recent years. One area of rapid growth has been the combination of ultrasound with other methods of image generation and imaging modalities to produce hybrid approaches for diagnostic imaging and noninvasive therapeutic intervention. The presentations associated with this session will provide an overview of two emerging technologies that are currently being developed and implemented to enhance ultrasound-related diagnostic imaging and therapy: the utilization of optically-induced ultrasound imaging (optoacoustic / photoacoustic imaging) and the use of magnetic resonance imaging to guide the use of high-intensity focused ultrasound for therapeutic applications. Learning Objectives: Develop a general understanding of the underlying technologies associated with optoacoustic / photoacoustic tomography and MRguided high-intensity focused ultrasound. Develop an understanding of the current methods of these new ultrasound-based technologies in preclinical research and clinical applications.

  9. Does Spanish instruction for emergency medicine resident physicians improve patient satisfaction in the emergency department and adherence to medical recommendations?

    PubMed Central

    Stoneking, LR; Waterbrook, AL; Garst Orozco, J; Johnston, D; Bellafiore, A; Davies, C; Nuño, T; Fatás-Cabeza, J; Beita, O; Ng, V; Grall, KH; Adamas-Rappaport, W

    2016-01-01

    Background After emergency department (ED) discharge, Spanish-speaking patients with limited English proficiency are less likely than English-proficient patients to be adherent to medical recommendations and are more likely to be dissatisfied with their visit. Objectives To determine if integrating a longitudinal medical Spanish and cultural competency curriculum into emergency medicine residency didactics improves patient satisfaction and adherence to medical recommendations in Spanish-speaking patients with limited English proficiency. Methods Our ED has two Emergency Medicine Residency Programs, University Campus (UC) and South Campus (SC). SC program incorporates a medical Spanish and cultural competency curriculum into their didactics. Real-time Spanish surveys were collected at SC ED on patients who self-identified as primarily Spanish-speaking during registration and who were treated by resident physicians from both residency programs. Surveys assessed whether the treating resident physician communicated in the patient’s native Spanish language. Follow-up phone calls assessed patient satisfaction and adherence to discharge instructions. Results Sixty-three patients self-identified as primarily Spanish-speaking from August 2014 to July 2015 and were initially included in this pilot study. Complete outcome data were available for 55 patients. Overall, resident physicians spoke Spanish 58% of the time. SC resident physicians spoke Spanish with 66% of the patients versus 45% for UC resident physicians. Patients rated resident physician Spanish ability as very good in 13% of encounters – 17% for SC versus 5% for UC. Patient satisfaction with their ED visit was rated as very good in 35% of encounters – 40% for SC resident physicians versus 25% for UC resident physicians. Of the 13 patients for whom Spanish was the language used during the medical encounter who followed medical recommendations, ten (77%) of these encounters were with SC resident physicians

  10. Emergency drinking water treatment during source water pollution accidents in China: origin analysis, framework and technologies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Jian; Chen, Chao; Lin, Peng-Fei; Hou, Ai-Xin; Niu, Zhang-Bin; Wang, Jun

    2011-01-01

    China has suffered frequent source water contamination accidents in the past decade, which has resulted in severe consequences to the water supply of millions of residents. The origins of typical cases of contamination are discussed in this paper as well as the emergency response to these accidents. In general, excessive pursuit of rapid industrialization and the unreasonable location of factories are responsible for the increasing frequency of accidental pollution events. Moreover, insufficient attention to environmental protection and rudimentary emergency response capability has exacerbated the consequences of such accidents. These environmental accidents triggered or accelerated the promulgation of stricter environmental protection policy and the shift from economic development mode to a more sustainable direction, which should be regarded as the turning point of environmental protection in China. To guarantee water security, China is trying to establish a rapid and effective emergency response framework, build up the capability of early accident detection, and develop efficient technologies to remove contaminants from water.

  11. Application and development of technologies for engine-condition-based maintenance of emergency diesel generators

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, K. H.; Sang, G.; Choi, L. Y. S.; Lee, B. O.

    2012-07-01

    The emergency diesel generator (EDG) of a nuclear power plant has the role of supplying emergency electric power to protect the reactor core system in the event of the loss of offsite power supply. Therefore, EDGs should be subject to periodic surveillance testing to verify their ability to supply specified frequencies and voltages at design power levels within a limited time. To maintain optimal reliability of EDGs, condition monitoring/diagnosis technologies must be developed. Changing from periodic disassemble maintenance to condition-based maintenance (CBM) according to predictions of equipment condition is recommended. In this paper, the development of diagnosis technology for CBM and the application of a diesel engine condition-analysis system are described. (authors)

  12. American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) Emerging Technology Committee report on electronic brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Park, Catherine C; Yom, Sue S; Podgorsak, Matthew B; Harris, Eleanor; Price, Robert A; Bevan, Alison; Pouliot, Jean; Konski, Andre A; Wallner, Paul E

    2010-03-15

    The development of novel technologies for the safe and effective delivery of radiation is critical to advancing the field of radiation oncology. The Emerging Technology Committee of the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology appointed a Task Group within its Evaluation Subcommittee to evaluate new electronic brachytherapy methods that are being developed for, or are already in, clinical use. The Task Group evaluated two devices, the Axxent Electronic Brachytherapy System by Xoft, Inc. (Fremont, CA), and the Intrabeam Photon Radiosurgery Device by Carl Zeiss Surgical (Oberkochen, Germany). These devices are designed to deliver electronically generated radiation, and because of their relatively low energy output, they do not fall under existing regulatory scrutiny of radioactive sources that are used for conventional radioisotope brachytherapy. This report provides a descriptive overview of the technologies, current and future projected applications, comparison of competing technologies, potential impact, and potential safety issues. The full Emerging Technology Committee report is available on the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology Web site.

  13. Regulatory or regulating publics? The European Union's regulation of emerging health technologies and citizen participation.

    PubMed

    Flear, Mark L; Pickersgill, Martyn D

    2013-01-01

    'Citizen participation' includes various participatory techniques and is frequently viewed as an unproblematic and important social good when used as part of the regulation of the innovation and implementation of science and technology. This is perhaps especially evident in debates around 'anticipatory governance' or 'upstream engagement'. Here, we interrogate this thesis using the example of the European Union's regulation of emerging health technologies (such as nanotechnology). In this case, citizen participation in regulatory debate is concerned with innovative objects for medical application that are considered to be emergent or not yet concrete. Through synthesising insights from law, regulatory studies, critical theory, and science and technology studies, we seek to cast new light on the promises, paradoxes, and pitfalls of citizen participation as a tool or technology of regulation in itself. As such we aim to generate a new vantage point from which to view the values and sociotechnical imaginaries that are both 'designed-in' and 'designed-out' of citizen participation. In so doing, we show not only how publics (do not) regulate technologies, but also how citizens themselves are regulated through the techniques of participation. PMID:23222171

  14. REGULATORY OR REGULATING PUBLICS? THE EUROPEAN UNION'S REGULATION OF EMERGING HEALTH TECHNOLOGIES AND CITIZEN PARTICIPATION

    PubMed Central

    Flear, Mark L.; Pickersgill, Martyn D.

    2013-01-01

    ‘Citizen participation’ includes various participatory techniques and is frequently viewed as an unproblematic and important social good when used as part of the regulation of the innovation and implementation of science and technology. This is perhaps especially evident in debates around ‘anticipatory governance’ or ‘upstream engagement’. Here, we interrogate this thesis using the example of the European Union's regulation of emerging health technologies (such as nanotechnology). In this case, citizen participation in regulatory debate is concerned with innovative objects for medical application that are considered to be emergent or not yet concrete. Through synthesising insights from law, regulatory studies, critical theory, and science and technology studies, we seek to cast new light on the promises, paradoxes, and pitfalls of citizen participation as a tool or technology of regulation in itself. As such we aim to generate a new vantage point from which to view the values and sociotechnical imaginaries that are both ‘designed-in’ and ‘designed-out’ of citizen participation. In so doing, we show not only how publics (do not) regulate technologies, but also how citizens themselves are regulated through the techniques of participation. PMID:23222171

  15. Supporting Sustainable Markets Through Life Cycle Assessment: Evaluating emerging technologies, incorporating uncertainty and the consumer perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merugula, Laura

    As civilization's collective knowledge grows, we are met with the realization that human-induced physical and biological transformations influenced by exogenous psychosocial and economic factors affect virtually every ecosystem on the planet. Despite improvements in energy generation and efficiencies, demand of material goods and energy services increases with no sign of a slowing pace. Sustainable development requires a multi-prong approach that involves reshaping demand, consumer education, sustainability-oriented policy, and supply chain management that does not serve the expansionist mentality. Thus, decision support tools are needed that inform developers, consumers, and policy-makers for short-term and long-term planning. These tools should incorporate uncertainty through quantitative methods as well as qualitatively informing the nature of the model as imperfect but necessary and adequate. A case study is presented of the manufacture and deployment of utility-scale wind turbines evaluated for a proposed change in blade manufacturing. It provides the first life cycle assessment (LCA) evaluating impact of carbon nanofibers, an emerging material, proposed for integration to wind power generation systems as blade reinforcement. Few LCAs of nanoproducts are available in scientific literature due to research and development (R&D) for applications that continues to outpace R&D for environmental, health, and safety (EHS) and life cycle impacts. LCAs of emerging technologies are crucial for informing developers of potential impacts, especially where market growth is swift and dissipative. A second case study is presented that evaluates consumer choice between disposable and reusable beverage cups. While there are a few studies that attempt to make the comparison using LCA, none adequately address uncertainty, nor are they representative for the typical American consumer. By disaggregating U.S. power generation into 26 subregional grid production mixes and evaluating

  16. Ethics of emerging technologies and their transition to accepted practice: intestinal transplant for short bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cummings, C L; Mercurio, M R

    2012-10-01

    Parental counseling becomes complex when considering the use of emerging technologies, especially if it is unclear whether the level of evidence is sufficient to transform the proposed therapy into accepted practice. This paper addresses ethical issues underlying medical decision-making and counseling in the setting of emerging treatments, when long-term outcomes are still in the process of being fully validated. We argue that the ethical transition of emerging technologies, ideally from ethically impermissible to permissible, to obligatory, depends primarily on two factors: outcome data (or prognosis) and treatment feasibility. To illustrate these points, we will use intestinal transplant for short bowel syndrome (SBS) as a specific example. After reviewing the data, this paper will identify the ethical justifications for both comfort care only and intestinal transplant in patients with ultra SBS, and argue that both are ethically permissible, but neither is obligatory. The approach outlined will not only be valuable as ultra SBS outcomes data continue to change, but will also be applicable to other novel therapies as they emerge in perinatal medicine. PMID:23014383

  17. The 1995 Goddard Conference on Space Applications of Artificial Intelligence and Emerging Information Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hostetter, Carl F. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    This publication comprises the papers presented at the 1995 Goddard Conference on Space Applications of Artificial Intelligence and Emerging Information Technologies held at the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland, on May 9-11, 1995. The purpose of this annual conference is to provide a forum in which current research and development directed at space applications of artificial intelligence can be presented and discussed.

  18. To what extent do improved irrigation technologies extend aquifer life?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, C. J.; Hellegers, P. J. G. J.

    2012-08-01

    World financial support for Yemen has concentrated on improved irrigation technology as the primary means to reduce the rate of overexploitation of Yemen's aquifers. An analysis of the impact of such investments on cumulative water abstraction, water savings and the life of an aquifer is presented. It shows that these investments have limited potential to extend aquifer life. The returns are highest in areas with significant remaining resources, and are not attractive in the most severely stressed areas. The analysis also shows that improved irrigation technologies increase the profitability of pumping for the farmer, exacerbating problems of over-abstraction. Finally, it shows that water savings depend on the hydrogeological situation. The policy implications of these findings are discussed in relation to Yemen, an exceptionally water-short country where most of the aquifers in groundwater-irrigated areas are severely over-drafted.

  19. Advances in MWD technology improve real time data

    SciTech Connect

    Brugess, T.; Voisin, B. )

    1992-02-17

    This paper reports that improvements in measurement while drilling (MWD) technology have increased drilling efficiency by allowing the driller to steer the bit with real-time formation evaluation measurements and to optimize bottom hole assembly (BHA) performance during drilling. Significant advances in MWD will come in a viable market that values real-time downhole measurements not only as a replacement for conventional measurements, but also as a means to optimize drilling and increase recoverable reserves. MWD technology will center on improving the real-time capabilities of geosteering, moving sensors closer to the bit, and reducing the length of the entire BHA. The key to success is careful planning, cross training for MWD engineers and directional drillers, and a well-prepared team that includes the operator's representative, well site geologist, driller, and reservoir engineer.

  20. State-of-the-art and emerging technologies for atrial fibrillation ablation.

    PubMed

    Dewire, Jane; Calkins, Hugh

    2010-03-01

    Catheter ablation is an important treatment modality for patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). Although the superiority of catheter ablation over antiarrhythmic drug therapy has been demonstrated in middle-aged patients with paroxysmal AF, the role the procedure in other patient subgroups-particularly those with long-standing persistent AF-has not been well defined. Furthermore, although AF ablation can be performed with reasonable efficacy and safety by experienced operators, long-term success rates for single procedures are suboptimal. Fortunately, extensive ongoing research will improve our understanding of the mechanisms of AF, and considerable funds are being invested in developing new ablation technologies to improve patient outcomes. These technologies include ablation catheters designed to electrically isolate the pulmonary veins with improved safety, efficacy, and speed, catheters designed to deliver radiofrequency energy with improved precision, robotic systems to address the technological demands of the procedure, improved imaging and electrical mapping systems, and MRI-guided ablation strategies. The tools, technologies, and techniques that will ultimately stand the test of time and become the standard approach to AF ablation in the future remain unclear. However, technological advances are sure to result in the necessary improvements in the safety and efficacy of AF ablation procedures.