Science.gov

Sample records for emission monitoring systems

  1. Acoustic emission monitoring system

    DOEpatents

    Romrell, Delwin M.

    1977-07-05

    Methods and apparatus for identifying the source location of acoustic emissions generated within an acoustically conductive medium. A plurality of acoustic receivers are communicably coupled to the surface of the medium at a corresponding number of spaced locations. The differences in the reception time of the respective sensors in response to a given acoustic event are measured among various sensor combinations prescribed by the monitoring mode employed. Acoustic reception response encountered subsequent to the reception by a predetermined number of the prescribed sensor combinations are inhibited from being communicated to the processing circuitry, while the time measurements obtained from the prescribed sensor combinations are translated into a position measurement representative of the location on the surface most proximate the source of the emission. The apparatus is programmable to function in six separate and five distinct operating modes employing either two, three or four sensory locations. In its preferred arrangement the apparatus of this invention will re-initiate a monitoring interval if the predetermined number of sensors do not respond to a particular emission within a given time period.

  2. Continuous emission monitoring and accounting automated systems at an HPP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roslyakov, P. V.; Ionkin, I. L.; Kondrateva, O. E.; Borovkova, A. M.; Seregin, V. A.; Morozov, I. V.

    2015-03-01

    Environmental and industrial emission monitoring at HPP's is a very urgent task today. Industrial monitoring assumes monitoring of emissions of harmful pollutants and optimization of fuel combustion technological processes at HPP's. Environmental monitoring is a system to assess ambient air quality with respect to a number of separate sources of harmful substances in pollution of atmospheric air of the area. Works on creating an industrial monitoring system are carried out at the National Research University Moscow Power Engineering Institute (MPEI) on the basis of the MPEI combined heat and power plant, and environmental monitoring stations are installed in Lefortovo raion, where the CHPP is located.

  3. 40 CFR 60.1725 - How are the data from the continuous emission monitoring systems used?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... continuous emission monitoring systems used? You must use data from the continuous emission monitoring systems for sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and carbon monoxide to demonstrate continuous compliance with...

  4. ETV TEST OF PCDD/F EMISSIONS MONITORING SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Four polychlorinated dibenzodioxin and furan (PCDD/F) emission monitors were tested under the EPA Environmental Technology and Verification (ETV) program. Two long-term sampling devices, the DioxinMonitoringSystem and Adsorption Method for Sampling Dioxins and Furans, and two sem...

  5. ETV TEST OF PCDD/F EMISSIONS MONITORING SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Four polychlorinated dibenzodioxin and furan (PCDD/F) emission monitors were tested under the EPA Environmental Technology and Verification (ETV) program. Two long-term sampling devices, the DioxinMonitoringSystem and Adsorption Method for Sampling Dioxins and Furans, and two sem...

  6. Modeling carbon emissions from urban traffic system using mobile monitoring.

    PubMed

    Sun, Daniel Jian; Zhang, Ying; Xue, Rui; Zhang, Yi

    2017-12-01

    Comprehensive analyses of urban traffic carbon emissions are critical in achieving low-carbon transportation. This paper started from the architecture design of a carbon emission mobile monitoring system using multiple sets of equipment and collected the corresponding data about traffic flow, meteorological conditions, vehicular carbon emissions and driving characteristics on typical roads in Shanghai and Wuxi, Jiangsu province. Based on these data, the emission model MOVES was calibrated and used with various sensitivity and correlation evaluation indices to analyze the traffic carbon emissions at microscopic, mesoscopic and macroscopic levels, respectively. The major factors that influence urban traffic carbon emissions were investigated, so that emission factors of CO, CO2 and HC were calculated by taking representative passenger cars as a case study. As a result, the urban traffic carbon emissions were assessed quantitatively, and the total amounts of CO, CO2 and HC emission from passenger cars in Shanghai were estimated as 76.95kt, 8271.91kt, and 2.13kt, respectively. Arterial roads were found as the primary line source, accounting for 50.49% carbon emissions. In additional to the overall major factors identified, the mobile monitoring system and carbon emission quantification method proposed in this study are of rather guiding significance for the further urban low-carbon transportation development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. EVALUATION OF DIOXIN EMISSIONS MONITORING SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Continuous samplers and real or semi-real-time continuous monitors for polychlorinated dibenzodioxins and furans provide significant advantages relative to conventional methods of extractive sampling. Continuous samplers collect long term samples over a time period of days to wee...

  8. 40 CFR 60.2941 - What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... continuous emission monitoring systems? 60.2941 Section 60.2941 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... emission monitoring systems? (a) Conduct annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring systems... emission monitoring systems daily and quarterly as specified in appendix F of this part....

  9. 40 CFR 60.2941 - What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... continuous emission monitoring systems? 60.2941 Section 60.2941 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... emission monitoring systems? (a) Conduct annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring systems... emission monitoring systems daily and quarterly as specified in appendix F of this part....

  10. 40 CFR 60.2941 - What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... continuous emission monitoring systems? 60.2941 Section 60.2941 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... emission monitoring systems? (a) Conduct annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring systems... emission monitoring systems daily and quarterly as specified in appendix F of this part....

  11. 40 CFR 60.1250 - What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... continuous emission monitoring systems? 60.1250 Section 60.1250 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Continuous Emission Monitoring § 60.1250 What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems? (a) Conduct annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring systems no more than...

  12. 40 CFR 60.1250 - What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... continuous emission monitoring systems? 60.1250 Section 60.1250 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Continuous Emission Monitoring § 60.1250 What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems? (a) Conduct annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring systems no more than...

  13. 40 CFR 60.3040 - What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... continuous emission monitoring systems? 60.3040 Section 60.3040 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... continuous emission monitoring systems? (a) Conduct annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring... emission monitoring systems daily and quarterly as specified in appendix F of this part....

  14. 40 CFR 60.1235 - How are the data from the continuous emission monitoring systems used?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... emission monitoring systems used? 60.1235 Section 60.1235 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Continuous Emission Monitoring § 60.1235 How are the data from the continuous emission monitoring systems used? You must use data from the continuous emission monitoring systems for sulfur dioxide,...

  15. 40 CFR 60.1250 - What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... continuous emission monitoring systems? 60.1250 Section 60.1250 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Continuous Emission Monitoring § 60.1250 What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems? (a) Conduct annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring systems no more than...

  16. 40 CFR 60.3040 - What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... continuous emission monitoring systems? 60.3040 Section 60.3040 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... continuous emission monitoring systems? (a) Conduct annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring... emission monitoring systems daily and quarterly as specified in appendix F of this part....

  17. 40 CFR 60.3040 - What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... continuous emission monitoring systems? 60.3040 Section 60.3040 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... continuous emission monitoring systems? (a) Conduct annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring... emission monitoring systems daily and quarterly as specified in appendix F of this part....

  18. 40 CFR 60.1235 - How are the data from the continuous emission monitoring systems used?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... emission monitoring systems used? 60.1235 Section 60.1235 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Continuous Emission Monitoring § 60.1235 How are the data from the continuous emission monitoring systems used? You must use data from the continuous emission monitoring systems for sulfur dioxide,...

  19. 40 CFR 60.1250 - What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... continuous emission monitoring systems? 60.1250 Section 60.1250 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Continuous Emission Monitoring § 60.1250 What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems? (a) Conduct annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring systems no more than...

  20. 40 CFR 60.3040 - What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... continuous emission monitoring systems? 60.3040 Section 60.3040 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... continuous emission monitoring systems? (a) Conduct annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring... emission monitoring systems daily and quarterly as specified in appendix F of this part....

  1. 40 CFR 60.3040 - What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... continuous emission monitoring systems? 60.3040 Section 60.3040 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... continuous emission monitoring systems? (a) Conduct annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring... emission monitoring systems daily and quarterly as specified in appendix F of this part....

  2. 40 CFR 60.1250 - What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... continuous emission monitoring systems? 60.1250 Section 60.1250 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Continuous Emission Monitoring § 60.1250 What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems? (a) Conduct annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring systems no more than...

  3. 40 CFR 60.1235 - How are the data from the continuous emission monitoring systems used?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... emission monitoring systems used? 60.1235 Section 60.1235 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Continuous Emission Monitoring § 60.1235 How are the data from the continuous emission monitoring systems used? You must use data from the continuous emission monitoring systems for sulfur dioxide,...

  4. 40 CFR 63.7747 - How do I apply for alternative monitoring requirements for a continuous emissions monitoring system?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... monitoring requirements for a continuous emissions monitoring system? 63.7747 Section 63.7747 Protection of... apply for alternative monitoring requirements for a continuous emissions monitoring system? (a) You may... prevention technique, a description of the continuous monitoring system or method including...

  5. 40 CFR 63.7747 - How do I apply for alternative monitoring requirements for a continuous emissions monitoring system?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... monitoring requirements for a continuous emissions monitoring system? 63.7747 Section 63.7747 Protection of... apply for alternative monitoring requirements for a continuous emissions monitoring system? (a) You may... prevention technique, a description of the continuous monitoring system or method including...

  6. 40 CFR 63.7747 - How do I apply for alternative monitoring requirements for a continuous emissions monitoring system?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... monitoring requirements for a continuous emissions monitoring system? 63.7747 Section 63.7747 Protection of... apply for alternative monitoring requirements for a continuous emissions monitoring system? (a) You may... prevention technique, a description of the continuous monitoring system or method including...

  7. 40 CFR 63.7747 - How do I apply for alternative monitoring requirements for a continuous emissions monitoring system?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... monitoring requirements for a continuous emissions monitoring system? 63.7747 Section 63.7747 Protection of... apply for alternative monitoring requirements for a continuous emissions monitoring system? (a) You may... prevention technique, a description of the continuous monitoring system or method including...

  8. 40 CFR 63.7747 - How do I apply for alternative monitoring requirements for a continuous emissions monitoring system?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... monitoring requirements for a continuous emissions monitoring system? 63.7747 Section 63.7747 Protection of... apply for alternative monitoring requirements for a continuous emissions monitoring system? (a) You may... prevention technique, a description of the continuous monitoring system or method including...

  9. 40 CFR 60.2941 - What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... continuous emission monitoring systems? 60.2941 Section 60.2941 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Monitoring § 60.2941 What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems? (a) Conduct annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring systems no more than 12 months after...

  10. 40 CFR 60.2939 - What continuous emission monitoring systems must I install?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... § 60.2939 What continuous emission monitoring systems must I install? (a) You must install, calibrate, maintain, and operate continuous emission monitoring systems for carbon monoxide and for oxygen. You must..., evaluate, and operate each continuous emission monitoring system according to the “Monitoring...

  11. 40 CFR 60.2939 - What continuous emission monitoring systems must I install?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... § 60.2939 What continuous emission monitoring systems must I install? (a) You must install, calibrate, maintain, and operate continuous emission monitoring systems for carbon monoxide and for oxygen. You must..., evaluate, and operate each continuous emission monitoring system according to the “Monitoring...

  12. 40 CFR 60.2941 - What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... continuous emission monitoring systems? 60.2941 Section 60.2941 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Monitoring § 60.2941 What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems? (a) Conduct annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring systems no more than 12 months after...

  13. 40 CFR 62.15180 - How are the data from the continuous emission monitoring systems used?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... emission monitoring systems used? 62.15180 Section 62.15180 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Constructed on or Before August 30, 1999 Continuous Emission Monitoring § 62.15180 How are the data from the continuous emission monitoring systems used? You must use data from the continuous emission...

  14. 40 CFR 60.1725 - How are the data from the continuous emission monitoring systems used?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... emission monitoring systems used? 60.1725 Section 60.1725 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Before August 30, 1999 Model Rule-Continuous Emission Monitoring § 60.1725 How are the data from the continuous emission monitoring systems used? You must use data from the continuous emission...

  15. 40 CFR 62.15180 - How are the data from the continuous emission monitoring systems used?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... emission monitoring systems used? 62.15180 Section 62.15180 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Constructed on or Before August 30, 1999 Continuous Emission Monitoring § 62.15180 How are the data from the continuous emission monitoring systems used? You must use data from the continuous emission...

  16. 40 CFR 60.1725 - How are the data from the continuous emission monitoring systems used?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... emission monitoring systems used? 60.1725 Section 60.1725 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Before August 30, 1999 Model Rule-Continuous Emission Monitoring § 60.1725 How are the data from the continuous emission monitoring systems used? You must use data from the continuous emission...

  17. 40 CFR 62.15180 - How are the data from the continuous emission monitoring systems used?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... emission monitoring systems used? 62.15180 Section 62.15180 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Constructed on or Before August 30, 1999 Continuous Emission Monitoring § 62.15180 How are the data from the continuous emission monitoring systems used? You must use data from the continuous emission...

  18. 40 CFR 60.1725 - How are the data from the continuous emission monitoring systems used?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... emission monitoring systems used? 60.1725 Section 60.1725 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Before August 30, 1999 Model Rule-Continuous Emission Monitoring § 60.1725 How are the data from the continuous emission monitoring systems used? You must use data from the continuous emission...

  19. 40 CFR 60.2939 - What continuous emission monitoring systems must I install?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... and Qualification Monitoring § 60.2939 What continuous emission monitoring systems must I install? (a) You must install, calibrate, maintain, and operate continuous emission monitoring systems for carbon... carbon monoxide. (b) You must install, evaluate, and operate each continuous emission monitoring...

  20. 40 CFR 60.2939 - What continuous emission monitoring systems must I install?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... and Qualification Monitoring § 60.2939 What continuous emission monitoring systems must I install? (a) You must install, calibrate, maintain, and operate continuous emission monitoring systems for carbon... carbon monoxide. (b) You must install, evaluate, and operate each continuous emission monitoring...

  1. 40 CFR 60.2939 - What continuous emission monitoring systems must I install?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... and Qualification Monitoring § 60.2939 What continuous emission monitoring systems must I install? (a) You must install, calibrate, maintain, and operate continuous emission monitoring systems for carbon... carbon monoxide. (b) You must install, evaluate, and operate each continuous emission monitoring...

  2. How to select a continuous emission monitoring system

    SciTech Connect

    Radigan, M.J. )

    1994-02-01

    Selecting a continuous emission monitoring system (CEMS) involves more than picking an analyzer. Successful CEMS interface sampling and data-management systems to produce accurate, reliable reports required by regulatory agencies. Following objective guidelines removes some of the misery from CEMS shopping. However, prospective CEMS buyers should do their homework and develop well-thought-out, detailed specification for the processes' sampling criteria. Fine tuning the analyzer/data management system can eliminate maintenance costs and keep the facility operating within its permit restrictions.

  3. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT ANR PIPELINE COMPANY PARAMETRIC EMISSIONS MONITORING SYSTEM (PEMS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Environmental Technology Verification report discusses the technology and performance of a gaseous-emissions monitoring system for large, natural-gas-fired internal combustion engines. The device tested is the Parametric Emissions Monitoring System (PEMS) manufactured by ANR ...

  4. Monitoring emissions: Instrumentation aims for total system commitment

    SciTech Connect

    Elliot, T.C.

    1994-06-01

    This article examines different approaches to meeting the reporting requirements of the Clean Air Act Amendments, particularly instrumentation needed to monitor emissions. Besides monitoring to meet CAA regulation, instrumentation today must also embrace analysis to measure air quality, including mass flow to quantify SO[sub 2] emissions, and data acquisition for regular reporting to EPA.

  5. 40 CFR 60.1740 - What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... continuous emission monitoring systems? 60.1740 Section 60.1740 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems? (a) Conduct annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring systems no more than 13 months after the previous evaluation was conducted. (b) Evaluate...

  6. 40 CFR 60.1740 - What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... continuous emission monitoring systems? 60.1740 Section 60.1740 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems? (a) Conduct annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring systems no more than 13 months after the previous evaluation was conducted. (b) Evaluate...

  7. 40 CFR 62.15195 - What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... continuous emission monitoring systems? 62.15195 Section 62.15195 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems? (a) Conduct annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring systems no more than 13 months after the previous evaluation was conducted. (b) Evaluate...

  8. 40 CFR 62.15195 - What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... continuous emission monitoring systems? 62.15195 Section 62.15195 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems? (a) Conduct annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring systems no more than 13 months after the previous evaluation was conducted. (b) Evaluate...

  9. 40 CFR Table 3 of Subpart Aaaa of... - Requirements for Validating Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) 3 Table 3 of Subpart AAAA of Part 60 Protection of Environment...—Requirements for Validating Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) For the following continuous emission monitoring systems Use the following methods in appendix A of this part to validate pollutant...

  10. 40 CFR 62.15195 - What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... continuous emission monitoring systems? 62.15195 Section 62.15195 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems? (a) Conduct annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring systems no more than 13 months after the previous evaluation was conducted. (b) Evaluate...

  11. 40 CFR Table 3 of Subpart Aaaa of... - Requirements for Validating Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) 3 Table 3 of Subpart AAAA of Part 60 Protection of Environment...—Requirements for Validating Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) For the following continuous emission monitoring systems Use the following methods in appendix A of this part to validate pollutant...

  12. 40 CFR 60.1740 - What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... continuous emission monitoring systems? 60.1740 Section 60.1740 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems? (a) Conduct annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring systems no more than 13 months after the previous evaluation was conducted. (b) Evaluate...

  13. 40 CFR 60.1740 - What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... continuous emission monitoring systems? 60.1740 Section 60.1740 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems? (a) Conduct annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring systems no more than 13 months after the previous evaluation was conducted. (b) Evaluate...

  14. 40 CFR 62.15195 - What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... continuous emission monitoring systems? 62.15195 Section 62.15195 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems? (a) Conduct annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring systems no more than 13 months after the previous evaluation was conducted. (b) Evaluate...

  15. 40 CFR 62.15195 - What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... continuous emission monitoring systems? 62.15195 Section 62.15195 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems? (a) Conduct annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring systems no more than 13 months after the previous evaluation was conducted. (b) Evaluate...

  16. 40 CFR 60.1740 - What is my schedule for evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... continuous emission monitoring systems? 60.1740 Section 60.1740 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... evaluating continuous emission monitoring systems? (a) Conduct annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring systems no more than 13 months after the previous evaluation was conducted. (b) Evaluate...

  17. 40 CFR 60.1720 - What continuous emission monitoring systems must I install for gaseous pollutants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., maintain, and operate continuous emission monitoring systems for oxygen (or carbon dioxide), sulfur dioxide... emission monitoring systems for sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and oxygen (or carbon dioxide) at the... also install continuous emission monitoring systems for sulfur dioxide and oxygen (or carbon......

  18. 40 CFR 60.1720 - What continuous emission monitoring systems must I install for gaseous pollutants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., maintain, and operate continuous emission monitoring systems for oxygen (or carbon dioxide), sulfur dioxide... emission monitoring systems for sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and oxygen (or carbon dioxide) at the... also install continuous emission monitoring systems for sulfur dioxide and oxygen (or carbon......

  19. 40 CFR Table 3 of Subpart Aaaa to... - Requirements for Validating Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... following methods in appendix A of this part to measure oxygen (or carbon dioxide) 1. Nitrogen Oxides (Class... Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) 3 Table 3 of Subpart AAAA to Part 60 Protection of Environment... Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) For the following continuous emission monitoring systems...

  20. 40 CFR 60.1720 - What continuous emission monitoring systems must I install for gaseous pollutants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., maintain, and operate continuous emission monitoring systems for oxygen (or carbon dioxide), sulfur dioxide... emission monitoring systems for sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and oxygen (or carbon dioxide) at the... also install continuous emission monitoring systems for sulfur dioxide and oxygen (or carbon......

  1. 40 CFR 60.1720 - What continuous emission monitoring systems must I install for gaseous pollutants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., maintain, and operate continuous emission monitoring systems for oxygen (or carbon dioxide), sulfur dioxide... emission monitoring systems for sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and oxygen (or carbon dioxide) at the... also install continuous emission monitoring systems for sulfur dioxide and oxygen (or carbon......

  2. 40 CFR 60.1240 - How do I make sure my continuous emission monitoring systems are operating correctly?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... emission monitoring systems that measure oxygen (or carbon dioxide), sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides (Class... minutes) using your oxygen (or carbon dioxide) continuous emission monitoring system, your sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, or carbon monoxide continuous emission monitoring systems, as appropriate, and...

  3. 40 CFR 60.1240 - How do I make sure my continuous emission monitoring systems are operating correctly?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... emission monitoring systems that measure oxygen (or carbon dioxide), sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides (Class... minutes) using your oxygen (or carbon dioxide) continuous emission monitoring system, your sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, or carbon monoxide continuous emission monitoring systems, as appropriate, and...

  4. 40 CFR 60.1730 - How do I make sure my continuous emission monitoring systems are operating correctly?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring systems that measure oxygen (or carbon dioxide... to 60 minutes) using your oxygen (or carbon dioxide) continuous emission monitoring system, your sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, or carbon monoxide continuous emission monitoring systems,...

  5. 40 CFR 60.1730 - How do I make sure my continuous emission monitoring systems are operating correctly?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring systems that measure oxygen (or carbon dioxide... to 60 minutes) using your oxygen (or carbon dioxide) continuous emission monitoring system, your sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, or carbon monoxide continuous emission monitoring systems,...

  6. 40 CFR 60.1240 - How do I make sure my continuous emission monitoring systems are operating correctly?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... emission monitoring systems that measure oxygen (or carbon dioxide), sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides (Class... minutes) using your oxygen (or carbon dioxide) continuous emission monitoring system, your sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, or carbon monoxide continuous emission monitoring systems, as appropriate, and...

  7. 40 CFR 60.1730 - How do I make sure my continuous emission monitoring systems are operating correctly?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring systems that measure oxygen (or carbon dioxide... to 60 minutes) using your oxygen (or carbon dioxide) continuous emission monitoring system, your sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, or carbon monoxide continuous emission monitoring systems,...

  8. 40 CFR 60.3038 - What continuous emission monitoring systems must I install?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... December 9, 2004 Model Rule-Monitoring § 60.3038 What continuous emission monitoring systems must I install? (a) You must install, calibrate, maintain, and operate continuous emission monitoring systems for... system according to the “Monitoring Requirements” in § 60.13....

  9. 40 CFR 60.3038 - What continuous emission monitoring systems must I install?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... December 9, 2004 Model Rule-Monitoring § 60.3038 What continuous emission monitoring systems must I install? (a) You must install, calibrate, maintain, and operate continuous emission monitoring systems for... system according to the “Monitoring Requirements” in § 60.13....

  10. 40 CFR 60.3038 - What continuous emission monitoring systems must I install?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... December 9, 2004 Model Rule-Monitoring § 60.3038 What continuous emission monitoring systems must I install? (a) You must install, calibrate, maintain, and operate continuous emission monitoring systems for... system according to the “Monitoring Requirements” in § 60.13....

  11. 40 CFR 60.3038 - What continuous emission monitoring systems must I install?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... December 9, 2004 Model Rule-Monitoring § 60.3038 What continuous emission monitoring systems must I install? (a) You must install, calibrate, maintain, and operate continuous emission monitoring systems for... system according to the “Monitoring Requirements” in § 60.13....

  12. 40 CFR 60.3038 - What continuous emission monitoring systems must I install?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... December 9, 2004 Model Rule-Monitoring § 60.3038 What continuous emission monitoring systems must I install? (a) You must install, calibrate, maintain, and operate continuous emission monitoring systems for... system according to the “Monitoring Requirements” in § 60.13....

  13. Basic Information about Air Emissions Monitoring

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This site is about types of air emissions monitoring and the Clean Air Act regulations, including Ambient Air Quality Monitoring, Stationary Source Emissions Monitoring, and Continuous Monitoring Systems.

  14. Procedure 5 - Quality Assurance Requirements For Vapor Phase Mercury Continuous Emissions Monitoring Systems And Sorbent Trap Monitoring Systems Used For Compliance Determination At Stationary Sources

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Promulgated quality assurance procedure 5 Quality Assurance Requirements For Vapor Phase Mercury Continuous Emissions Monitoring Systems And Sorbent Trap Monitoring Systems Used For Compliance Determination At Stationary Sources

  15. Procedure 5 Quality Assurance Requirements For Vapor Phase Mercury Continuous Emissions Monitoring Systems And Sorbent Trap Monitoring Systems Used For Compliance Determination At Stationary Sources

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Promulgated quality assurance Procedure 5 Quality Assurance Requirements For Vapor Phase Mercury Continuous Emissions Monitoring Systems And Sorbent Trap Monitoring Systems Used For Compliance Determination At Stationary Sources

  16. 40 CFR 60.1235 - How are the data from the continuous emission monitoring systems used?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... used? You must use data from the continuous emission monitoring systems for sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and carbon monoxide to demonstrate continuous compliance with the emission limits specified in... emission monitoring systems used? 60.1235 Section 60.1235 Protection of Environment...

  17. 40 CFR 62.15175 - What continuous emission monitoring systems must I install for gaseous pollutants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., maintain, and operate continuous emission monitoring systems for oxygen (or carbon dioxide), sulfur dioxide... emission monitoring system for sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and oxygen (or carbon dioxide) at the... part 60. (c) You must monitor the oxygen (or carbon dioxide) concentration at each location where you...

  18. 40 CFR 60.1720 - What continuous emission monitoring systems must I install for gaseous pollutants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., maintain, and operate continuous emission monitoring systems for oxygen (or carbon dioxide), sulfur dioxide... emission monitoring systems for sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and oxygen (or carbon dioxide) at the... oxygen (or carbon dioxide) concentration at each location where you monitor sulfur dioxide and...

  19. 40 CFR 62.15175 - What continuous emission monitoring systems must I install for gaseous pollutants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., maintain, and operate continuous emission monitoring systems for oxygen (or carbon dioxide), sulfur dioxide... emission monitoring system for sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and oxygen (or carbon dioxide) at the... part 60. (c) You must monitor the oxygen (or carbon dioxide) concentration at each location where...

  20. 40 CFR 62.15175 - What continuous emission monitoring systems must I install for gaseous pollutants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., maintain, and operate continuous emission monitoring systems for oxygen (or carbon dioxide), sulfur dioxide... emission monitoring system for sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and oxygen (or carbon dioxide) at the... part 60. (c) You must monitor the oxygen (or carbon dioxide) concentration at each location where...

  1. 40 CFR 62.15175 - What continuous emission monitoring systems must I install for gaseous pollutants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., maintain, and operate continuous emission monitoring systems for oxygen (or carbon dioxide), sulfur dioxide... emission monitoring system for sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and oxygen (or carbon dioxide) at the... part 60. (c) You must monitor the oxygen (or carbon dioxide) concentration at each location where...

  2. 40 CFR 62.15175 - What continuous emission monitoring systems must I install for gaseous pollutants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., maintain, and operate continuous emission monitoring systems for oxygen (or carbon dioxide), sulfur dioxide... emission monitoring system for sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and oxygen (or carbon dioxide) at the... part 60. (c) You must monitor the oxygen (or carbon dioxide) concentration at each location where...

  3. 40 CFR 60.1235 - How are the data from the continuous emission monitoring systems used?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... used? You must use data from the continuous emission monitoring systems for sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and carbon monoxide to demonstrate continuous compliance with the emission limits specified in...

  4. 40 CFR Table 7 to Subpart Jjj of... - Requirements for Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) a

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Requirements for Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) a 7 Table 7 to Subpart JJJ of Part 62 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...—Requirements for Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) a ER31JA03.013...

  5. 40 CFR Table 7 to Subpart Jjj of... - Requirements for Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) a

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Requirements for Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) a 7 Table 7 to Subpart JJJ of Part 62 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...—Requirements for Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) a ER31JA03.013...

  6. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart Jjj of... - Requirements for Validating Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Requirements for Validating Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) 6 Table 6 to Subpart JJJ of Part 62 Protection of Environment... of Part 62—Requirements for Validating Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) ER31JA03.012...

  7. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart Jjj of... - Requirements for Validating Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Requirements for Validating Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) 6 Table 6 to Subpart JJJ of Part 62 Protection of Environment... of Part 62—Requirements for Validating Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) ER31JA03.012...

  8. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart Jjj of... - Requirements for Validating Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Requirements for Validating Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) 6 Table 6 to Subpart JJJ of Part 62 Protection of Environment... of Part 62—Requirements for Validating Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) ER31JA03.012...

  9. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart Jjj of... - Requirements for Validating Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Requirements for Validating Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) 6 Table 6 to Subpart JJJ of Part 62 Protection of Environment... of Part 62—Requirements for Validating Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) ER31JA03.012...

  10. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart Jjj of... - Requirements for Validating Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Requirements for Validating Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) 6 Table 6 to Subpart JJJ of Part 62 Protection of Environment... of Part 62—Requirements for Validating Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) ER31JA03.012...

  11. 40 CFR Table 7 to Subpart Jjj of... - Requirements for Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) a

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Requirements for Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) a 7 Table 7 to Subpart JJJ of Part 62 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...—Requirements for Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) a ER31JA03.013...

  12. 40 CFR Table 7 to Subpart Jjj of... - Requirements for Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) a

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Requirements for Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) a 7 Table 7 to Subpart JJJ of Part 62 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...—Requirements for Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) a ER31JA03.013...

  13. 40 CFR Table 7 to Subpart Jjj of... - Requirements for Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) a

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Requirements for Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) a 7 Table 7 to Subpart JJJ of Part 62 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...—Requirements for Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) a ER31JA03.013...

  14. 40 CFR 62.15180 - How are the data from the continuous emission monitoring systems used?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... systems for sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and carbon monoxide to demonstrate continuous compliance with... emission monitoring systems used? 62.15180 Section 62.15180 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Constructed on or Before August 30, 1999 Continuous Emission Monitoring § 62.15180 How are the data from...

  15. 40 CFR 62.15180 - How are the data from the continuous emission monitoring systems used?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... systems for sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and carbon monoxide to demonstrate continuous compliance with... emission monitoring systems used? 62.15180 Section 62.15180 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Constructed on or Before August 30, 1999 Continuous Emission Monitoring § 62.15180 How are the data from...

  16. Continuous Emissions Monitoring System Monitoring Plan for the Y-12 Steam Plant

    SciTech Connect

    2003-02-28

    The Oak Ridge Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12), managed by BWXT, is submitting this Continuous Emissions Monitoring System (CEMS) Monitoring Plan in conformance with the requirements of Title 40 of the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 75. The state of Tennessee identified the Y-12 Steam Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, as a non-electrical generation unit (EGU) nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) budget source as a result of the NO{sub x} State Implementation Plan (SIP) under the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) Rule 1200-3-27. Following this introduction, the monitoring plan contains the following sections: CEMS details, NO{sub x} emissions, and quality assurance (QA)/quality control (QC). The following information is included in the attachments: fuel and flue gas diagram, system layout, data flow diagrams, Electronic Monitoring Plan printouts, vendor information on coal and natural gas feed systems, and the Certification Test Protocol. The Y-12 Steam Plant consists of four Wickes boilers. Each is rated at a maximum heat input capacity of 296.8 MMBtu/hour or 250,000 lb/hour of 250-psig steam. Although pulverized coal is the principal fuel, each of the units can fire natural gas or a combination of coal and gas. Each unit is equipped with a Joy Manufacturing Company reverse air baghouse to control particulate emissions. Flue gases travel out of the baghouse, through an induced draft fan, then to one of two stacks. Boilers 1 and 2 exhaust through Stack 1. Boilers 3 and 4 exhaust through Stack 2. A dedicated CEMS will be installed in the ductwork of each boiler, downstream of the baghouse. The CEMS will be designed, built, installed, and started up by URS Group, Inc. (URS). Data acquisition and handling will be accomplished using a data acquisition and handling system (DAHS) designed, built, and programmed by Environmental Systems Corporation (ESC). The installed CEMS will continuously monitor NO{sub x}, flue gas flowrate, and carbon

  17. 40 CFR 60.2940 - How do I make sure my continuous emission monitoring systems are operating correctly?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... emission monitoring systems are operating correctly? 60.2940 Section 60.2940 Protection of Environment... 16, 2006 Monitoring § 60.2940 How do I make sure my continuous emission monitoring systems are... emission monitoring systems that measure carbon monoxide and oxygen. (b) Complete your initial...

  18. 40 CFR 60.2940 - How do I make sure my continuous emission monitoring systems are operating correctly?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... emission monitoring systems are operating correctly? 60.2940 Section 60.2940 Protection of Environment... 16, 2006 Monitoring § 60.2940 How do I make sure my continuous emission monitoring systems are... emission monitoring systems that measure carbon monoxide and oxygen. (b) Complete your initial...

  19. HANDBOOK: CONTINUOUS EMISSION MONITORING SYSTEMS FOR NON-CRITERIA POLLUTANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This Handbook provides a description of the methods used to continuously monitor non-criteria pollutants emitted from stationary sources. The Handbook contains a review of current regulatory programs, the state-of-the-art sampling system design, analytical techniques, and the use...

  20. 40 CFR 60.1730 - How do I make sure my continuous emission monitoring systems are operating correctly?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... emission monitoring systems are operating correctly? 60.1730 Section 60.1730 Protection of Environment... continuous emission monitoring systems are operating correctly? (a) Conduct initial, daily, quarterly, and annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring systems that measure oxygen (or carbon dioxide...

  1. 40 CFR 62.15185 - How do I make sure my continuous emission monitoring systems are operating correctly?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... emission monitoring systems are operating correctly? 62.15185 Section 62.15185 Protection of Environment... make sure my continuous emission monitoring systems are operating correctly? (a) Conduct initial, daily, quarterly, and annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring systems that measure oxygen (or...

  2. 40 CFR 60.1730 - How do I make sure my continuous emission monitoring systems are operating correctly?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... emission monitoring systems are operating correctly? 60.1730 Section 60.1730 Protection of Environment... continuous emission monitoring systems are operating correctly? (a) Conduct initial, daily, quarterly, and annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring systems that measure oxygen (or carbon dioxide...

  3. 40 CFR 60.3039 - How do I make sure my continuous emission monitoring systems are operating correctly?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... emission monitoring systems are operating correctly? 60.3039 Section 60.3039 Protection of Environment... emission monitoring systems are operating correctly? (a) Conduct initial, daily, quarterly, and annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring systems that measure carbon monoxide and oxygen. (b...

  4. 40 CFR 60.3039 - How do I make sure my continuous emission monitoring systems are operating correctly?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... emission monitoring systems are operating correctly? 60.3039 Section 60.3039 Protection of Environment... emission monitoring systems are operating correctly? (a) Conduct initial, daily, quarterly, and annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring systems that measure carbon monoxide and oxygen. (b...

  5. 40 CFR 62.15185 - How do I make sure my continuous emission monitoring systems are operating correctly?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... emission monitoring systems are operating correctly? 62.15185 Section 62.15185 Protection of Environment... make sure my continuous emission monitoring systems are operating correctly? (a) Conduct initial, daily, quarterly, and annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring systems that measure oxygen (or...

  6. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart Bbbb of... - Model Rule-Requirements for Validating Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) 6 Table 6 to Subpart BBBB of Part 60 Protection of Environment...—Requirements for Validating Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) For the following continuous emission monitoring systems Use the following methods in appendix A of this part to validate poollutant...

  7. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart Bbbb of... - Model Rule-Requirements for Validating Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) 6 Table 6 to Subpart BBBB of Part 60 Protection of Environment...—Requirements for Validating Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) For the following continuous emission monitoring systems Use the following methods in appendix A of this part to validate poollutant...

  8. 40 CFR 60.3039 - How do I make sure my continuous emission monitoring systems are operating correctly?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... emission monitoring systems are operating correctly? 60.3039 Section 60.3039 Protection of Environment... emission monitoring systems are operating correctly? (a) Conduct initial, daily, quarterly, and annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring systems that measure carbon monoxide and oxygen....

  9. 40 CFR 60.3039 - How do I make sure my continuous emission monitoring systems are operating correctly?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... emission monitoring systems are operating correctly? 60.3039 Section 60.3039 Protection of Environment... emission monitoring systems are operating correctly? (a) Conduct initial, daily, quarterly, and annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring systems that measure carbon monoxide and oxygen....

  10. 40 CFR 60.3039 - How do I make sure my continuous emission monitoring systems are operating correctly?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... emission monitoring systems are operating correctly? 60.3039 Section 60.3039 Protection of Environment... emission monitoring systems are operating correctly? (a) Conduct initial, daily, quarterly, and annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring systems that measure carbon monoxide and oxygen....

  11. Acoustic Emission Weld Monitor System. Data Acquisition and Investigation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-10-01

    AE signals, as compared with previous experience monitoring submerged arc welding of mild carbon steels, was correlated with a large number of...observed that the background AE level was at times significantly greater than that for submerged arc welding of mild steels. The relatively high number...processing techniques and in- corporated them in systems applicable to railroad tank car fabrication 12 which primarily consists of submerged arc welding

  12. 40 CFR 60.1725 - How are the data from the continuous emission monitoring systems used?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... systems for sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and carbon monoxide to demonstrate continuous compliance with... emission monitoring systems used? 60.1725 Section 60.1725 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Emission Guidelines and Compliance Times for Small Municipal Waste Combustion Units Constructed on...

  13. Improve emissions monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Vining, S.K.

    1998-01-01

    Marathon`s Texas City refinery was subject to five separate EPA regulations in addition to a state program for monitoring and repairing fugitive leaks. In this case history, the refinery sought an organizational solution that reduced monitoring costs and kept the facility fully compliant with current state and federal regulations. Equally important, the new monitoring program incorporated flexibility for future emission-reduction requirements. The paper describes the solution, regulatory background, the previous system, leak-threshold consolidation, operator ownership, and projects benefits.

  14. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Eeee of... - Requirements for Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Monitoring Systems (CEMS) 3 Table 3 to Subpart EEEE of Part 60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL..., Subpt. EEEE, Table 3 Table 3 to Subpart EEEE of Part 60—Requirements for Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) As stated in § 60.2940, you must comply with the following: For the followingpollutants...

  15. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Eeee of... - Requirements for Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Monitoring Systems (CEMS) 3 Table 3 to Subpart EEEE of Part 60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL..., Subpt. EEEE, Table 3 Table 3 to Subpart EEEE of Part 60—Requirements for Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) As stated in § 60.2940, you must comply with the following: For the followingpollutants...

  16. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Eeee of... - Requirements for Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Monitoring Systems (CEMS) 3 Table 3 to Subpart EEEE of Part 60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL..., Subpt. EEEE, Table 3 Table 3 to Subpart EEEE of Part 60—Requirements for Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) As stated in § 60.2940, you must comply with the following: For the followingpollutants...

  17. 40 CFR 60.1240 - How do I make sure my continuous emission monitoring systems are operating correctly?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... emission monitoring systems are operating correctly? 60.1240 Section 60.1240 Protection of Environment... Continuous Emission Monitoring § 60.1240 How do I make sure my continuous emission monitoring systems are operating correctly? (a) Conduct initial, daily, quarterly, and annual evaluations of your continuous...

  18. 40 CFR 60.1240 - How do I make sure my continuous emission monitoring systems are operating correctly?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... emission monitoring systems are operating correctly? 60.1240 Section 60.1240 Protection of Environment... Continuous Emission Monitoring § 60.1240 How do I make sure my continuous emission monitoring systems are operating correctly? (a) Conduct initial, daily, quarterly, and annual evaluations of your continuous...

  19. 40 CFR 60.2940 - How do I make sure my continuous emission monitoring systems are operating correctly?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... emission monitoring systems are operating correctly? 60.2940 Section 60.2940 Protection of Environment... monitoring systems are operating correctly? (a) Conduct initial, daily, quarterly, and annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring systems that measure carbon monoxide and oxygen. (b) Complete your...

  20. 40 CFR 60.2940 - How do I make sure my continuous emission monitoring systems are operating correctly?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... emission monitoring systems are operating correctly? 60.2940 Section 60.2940 Protection of Environment... monitoring systems are operating correctly? (a) Conduct initial, daily, quarterly, and annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring systems that measure carbon monoxide and oxygen. (b) Complete your...

  1. 40 CFR 60.2940 - How do I make sure my continuous emission monitoring systems are operating correctly?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... emission monitoring systems are operating correctly? 60.2940 Section 60.2940 Protection of Environment... monitoring systems are operating correctly? (a) Conduct initial, daily, quarterly, and annual evaluations of your continuous emission monitoring systems that measure carbon monoxide and oxygen. (b) Complete...

  2. Fugitive emissions monitoring trends

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, K.H.

    1997-02-01

    New Clean Air Act requirements are pushing facilities to reevaluate their monitoring programs. A description of the fugitive emission guidelines is included in this article, along with ideas about monitoring.

  3. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continous Monitoring Systems for Metal HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... monitoring system to measure and record the opacity of emissions from each catalyst regenerator vent. 2... opacity of emissions from each catalyst regenerator vent. 3. Option 2: PM limit not subject to the NSPS... Continuous opacity monitoring system to measure and record the opacity of emissions from each catalyst...

  4. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continous Monitoring Systems for Metal HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... monitoring system to measure and record the opacity of emissions from each catalyst regenerator vent. 2... opacity of emissions from each catalyst regenerator vent. 3. Option 2: PM limit not subject to the NSPS... Continuous opacity monitoring system to measure and record the opacity of emissions from each catalyst...

  5. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continous Monitoring Systems for Metal HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... monitoring system to measure and record the opacity of emissions from each catalyst regenerator vent. 2... opacity of emissions from each catalyst regenerator vent. 3. Option 2: PM limit not subject to the NSPS... Continuous opacity monitoring system to measure and record the opacity of emissions from each catalyst...

  6. 40 CFR 60.4345 - What are the requirements for the continuous emission monitoring system equipment, if I choose to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... continuous emission monitoring system equipment, if I choose to use this option? 60.4345 Section 60.4345... PERFORMANCE FOR NEW STATIONARY SOURCES Standards of Performance for Stationary Combustion Turbines Monitoring § 60.4345 What are the requirements for the continuous emission monitoring system equipment, if...

  7. 40 CFR 60.4345 - What are the requirements for the continuous emission monitoring system equipment, if I choose to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... continuous emission monitoring system equipment, if I choose to use this option? 60.4345 Section 60.4345... PERFORMANCE FOR NEW STATIONARY SOURCES Standards of Performance for Stationary Combustion Turbines Monitoring § 60.4345 What are the requirements for the continuous emission monitoring system equipment, if...

  8. 40 CFR 60.4345 - What are the requirements for the continuous emission monitoring system equipment, if I choose to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... continuous emission monitoring system equipment, if I choose to use this option? 60.4345 Section 60.4345... § 60.4345 What are the requirements for the continuous emission monitoring system equipment, if I...) for each 15-minute quadrant of the hour, to validate the hour. For partial unit operating hours, at...

  9. 40 CFR 62.15185 - How do I make sure my continuous emission monitoring systems are operating correctly?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... concurrently (or within 30 to 60 minutes) using your oxygen (or carbon dioxide) continuous emission monitoring system, your sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, or carbon monoxide continuous emission monitoring systems... carbon dioxide), sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides (Class I municipal waste combustion units only),...

  10. 40 CFR 62.15185 - How do I make sure my continuous emission monitoring systems are operating correctly?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... concurrently (or within 30 to 60 minutes) using your oxygen (or carbon dioxide) continuous emission monitoring system, your sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, or carbon monoxide continuous emission monitoring systems... carbon dioxide), sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides (Class I municipal waste combustion units only),...

  11. 40 CFR 62.15185 - How do I make sure my continuous emission monitoring systems are operating correctly?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... concurrently (or within 30 to 60 minutes) using your oxygen (or carbon dioxide) continuous emission monitoring system, your sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, or carbon monoxide continuous emission monitoring systems... carbon dioxide), sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides (Class I municipal waste combustion units only),...

  12. 40 CFR Table 17 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Monitoring Systems for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Reforming Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Continuous Monitoring Systems for... Monitoring Systems for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Reforming Units As stated in § 63.1566(b)(1), you... shall install and operate this type of continuous monitoring system . . . 1. Option 1: vent to a...

  13. 40 CFR Table 17 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Monitoring Systems for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Reforming Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Continuous Monitoring Systems for... Monitoring Systems for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Reforming Units As stated in § 63.1566(b)(1), you... shall install and operate this type of continuous monitoring system . . . 1. Option 1: vent to a...

  14. 40 CFR Table 17 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Monitoring Systems for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Reforming Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Continuous Monitoring Systems for... Monitoring Systems for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Reforming Units As stated in § 63.1566(b)(1), you... shall install and operate this type of continuous monitoring system . . . 1. Option 1: vent to a...

  15. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continous Monitoring Systems for Metal HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... system to measure and record the opacity of emissions from each catalyst regenerator vent. 2. Option 1... emissions from each catalyst regenerator vent. 3. Option 2: PM limit not subject to the NSPS for PM in 40... opacity monitoring system to measure and record the opacity of emissions from each catalyst...

  16. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continous Monitoring Systems for Metal HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... system to measure and record the opacity of emissions from each catalyst regenerator vent. 2. Option 1... emissions from each catalyst regenerator vent. 3. Option 2: PM limit not subject to the NSPS for PM in 40... opacity monitoring system to measure and record the opacity of emissions from each catalyst...

  17. Field evaluation of Fourier transform infrared continuous emissions monitoring (FTIR CEM) systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunder, Thomas A.; Geyer, Thomas J.; Kinner, Laura L.; Plummer, Grant M.

    1995-02-01

    Recent environmental regulations, including the Clean Air Act and the Enhanced Monitoring Regulations, may require continuous emissions monitoring (CEM) of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs). A promising technique for this application is Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). FTIR spectroscopy can, in principle, be used to monitor virtually any gas phase species. Two evaluations of FTIR CEM systems are discussed. The first study, performed in 1993 - 94, compared two FTIR CEM systems on a side-by-side basis in an extended field test at two coal-fired electric power plants. The FTIR CEM systems monitored the legally mandated criteria pollutants and diluents (CO, CO2, NO, NO2, and SO2) as well as H2O. In addition, one system monitored two HAPs (HCl and HF) and NH3. The FTIR CEM measurements were compared with those from the compliance CEM systems at the facilities. Several relative accuracy test audits were also performed to verify the FTIR CEM accuracy. The second evaluation was recently commenced on behalf of the Environmental Protection Agency. In this study, FTIR CEM systems are evaluated specifically for the monitoring of HAP species by conducting laboratory and field tests. The evaluation culminates in the development of proposed performance specifications and protocols for FTIR CEM systems.

  18. Comparative study of gas-analyzing systems designed for continuous monitoring of TPP emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondrat'eva, O. E.; Roslyakov, P. V.

    2017-06-01

    Determining the composition of combustion products is important in terms of both control of emissions into the atmosphere from thermal power plants and optimization of fuel combustion processes in electric power plants. For this purpose, the concentration of oxygen, carbon monoxide, nitrogen, and sulfur oxides in flue gases is monitored; in case of solid fuel combustion, fly ash concentration is monitored as well. According to the new nature conservation law in Russia, all large TPPs shall be equipped with continuous emission monitoring and measurement systems (CEMMS) into the atmosphere. In order to ensure the continuous monitoring of pollutant emissions, direct round-the-clock measurements are conducted with the use of either domestically produced or imported gas analyzers and analysis systems, the operation of which is based on various physicochemical methods and which can be generally used when introducing CEMMS. Depending on the type and purposes of measurement, various kinds of instruments having different features may be used. This article represents a comparative study of gas-analysis systems for measuring the content of polluting substances in exhaust gases based on various physical and physicochemical analysis methods. It lists basic characteristics of the methods commonly applied in the area of gas analysis. It is proven that, considering the necessity of the long-term, continuous operation of gas analyzers for monitoring and measurement of pollutant emissions into the atmosphere, as well as the requirements for reliability and independence from aggressive components and temperature of the gas flow, it is preferable to use optical gas analyzers for the aforementioned purposes. In order to reduce the costs of equipment comprising a CEMMS at a TPP and optimize the combustion processes, electrochemical and thermomagnetic gas analyzers may also be used.

  19. Oak Ridge Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) Incinerator test bed for continuous emissions monitoring systems (CEMS)

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, L.V. Jr.

    1997-12-31

    The Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) Incinerator, located on the K-25 Site at Oak Ridge, Tennessee, continues to be the only operational incinerator in the country that can process hazardous and radioactively contaminated polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) waste. During 1996, the US Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management Office of Science and Technology (EM-50) and Lockheed Martin Energy Systems established a continuous emissions monitoring systems (CEMS) test bed and began conducting evaluations of CEMS under development to measure contaminants from waste combustion and thermal treatment stacks. The program was envisioned to promote CEMS technologies meeting requirements of the recently issued Proposed Standards for Hazardous Waste Combustors as well as monitoring technologies that will allay public concerns about mixed waste thermal treatment and accelerate the development of innovative treatment technologies. Fully developed CEMS, as well as innovative continuous or semi-continuous sampling systems not yet interfaced with a pollutant analyzer, were considered as candidates for testing and evaluation. Complementary to other Environmental Protection Agency and DOE sponsored CEMS testing and within compliant operating conditions of the TSCA Incinerator, prioritization was given to multiple metals monitors also having potential to measure radionuclides associated with particulate emissions. In August 1996, developers of two multiple metals monitors participated in field activities at the incinerator and a commercially available radionuclide particulate monitor was acquired for modification and testing planned in 1997. This paper describes the CEMS test bed infrastructure and summarizes completed and planned activities.

  20. Experiences in long-term evaluation of mercury emission monitoring systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chin-Min Cheng; Hung-Ta Lin; Qiang Wang; Chien-Wei Chen; Chia-Wei Wang; Ming-Chung Liu; Chi-Kuan Chen; Wei-Ping Pan

    2008-09-15

    Six mercury continuous emission monitoring (CEM) systems provided by two leading mercury (Hg) CEM system manufacturers were tested at five coal combustion utilities. The linearity, response time, day-to-day stability, efficiency of the Hg speciation modules, and ease of use were evaluated by following procedures specified in the Code of Federal Regulation Title 40 Part 75 (40 CFR Part 75). Mercury monitoring results from Hg CEM systems were compared to an EPA-recognized reference method. A sorbent trap sampling system was also evaluated in this study to compare the relative accuracy to the reference method as well as to Hg CEM systems. A conceptual protocol proposed by U.S. EPA (Method 30A) for using an Hg CEM system as the reference method for the Hg relative accuracy (RA) test was also followed to evaluate the workability of the protocol. This paper discusses the operational experience obtained from these field studies and the remaining challenges to overcome while using Hg CEM systems and the sorbent trap method for continuous Hg emission monitoring. 3 refs., 5 figs., 11 tabs.

  1. Formaldehyde surface emission monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, T.G.; Hawthorne, A.R.; Daffron, C.R.; Corey, M.D.; Reed, T.J.; Schrimsher, J.M.

    1984-03-01

    A passive surface emission monitor has been developed for nondestructive measurement of formaldehyde (CH/sub 2/O) emission rates from CH/sub 2/O resin-containing materials such as urea-formaldehyde foam insulation (UFFI) and pressed-wood products. Emitted CH/sub 2/O is sorbed by a planar distribution of 13X molecular sleve supported inside the monitor and analyzed by using a water-rinse desorption, colorimetric analysis procedure. A detection limit of similarly ordered 0.025 mg of CH/sub 2/O/(M/sup 2/ h) is achieved with a 20.3 cm diameter monitor and a 2-h collection period. Measurements of CH/sub 2/O emission rates from pressed-wood products and UFFI encased in simulated wall panels show a strong correlation with reference chamber techniques. The surface monitor has been used to measure the CH/sub 2/O emission rate from interior walls and floors in one UFFI and two non-UFFI homes. By application of a simple single compartment model to predict indoor CH/sub 2/O concentrations from in situ CH/sub 2/O emission rate and tracer gas infiltration rate measurements, a good correlation between the predicted and measured CH/sub 2/O concentrations was achieved. 22 references, 5 figures, 4 tables.

  2. Crack Propagation Analysis Using Acoustic Emission Sensors for Structural Health Monitoring Systems

    DOE PAGES

    Kral, Zachary; Horn, Walter; Steck, James

    2013-01-01

    Aerospace systems are expected to remain in service well beyond their designed life. Consequently, maintenance is an important issue. A novel method of implementing artificial neural networks and acoustic emission sensors to form a structural health monitoring (SHM) system for aerospace inspection routines was the focus of this research. Simple structural elements, consisting of flat aluminum plates of AL 2024-T3, were subjected to increasing static tensile loading. As the loading increased, designed cracks extended in length, releasing strain waves in the process. Strain wave signals, measured by acoustic emission sensors, were further analyzed in post-processing by artificial neural networks (ANN).more » Several experiments were performed to determine the severity and location of the crack extensions in the structure. ANNs were trained on a portion of the data acquired by the sensors and the ANNs were then validated with the remaining data. The combination of a system of acoustic emission sensors, and an ANN could determine crack extension accurately. The difference between predicted and actual crack extensions was determined to be between 0.004 in. and 0.015 in. with 95% confidence. These ANNs, coupled with acoustic emission sensors, showed promise for the creation of an SHM system for aerospace systems.« less

  3. Crack Propagation Analysis Using Acoustic Emission Sensors for Structural Health Monitoring Systems

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Walter; Steck, James

    2013-01-01

    Aerospace systems are expected to remain in service well beyond their designed life. Consequently, maintenance is an important issue. A novel method of implementing artificial neural networks and acoustic emission sensors to form a structural health monitoring (SHM) system for aerospace inspection routines was the focus of this research. Simple structural elements, consisting of flat aluminum plates of AL 2024-T3, were subjected to increasing static tensile loading. As the loading increased, designed cracks extended in length, releasing strain waves in the process. Strain wave signals, measured by acoustic emission sensors, were further analyzed in post-processing by artificial neural networks (ANN). Several experiments were performed to determine the severity and location of the crack extensions in the structure. ANNs were trained on a portion of the data acquired by the sensors and the ANNs were then validated with the remaining data. The combination of a system of acoustic emission sensors, and an ANN could determine crack extension accurately. The difference between predicted and actual crack extensions was determined to be between 0.004 in. and 0.015 in. with 95% confidence. These ANNs, coupled with acoustic emission sensors, showed promise for the creation of an SHM system for aerospace systems. PMID:24023536

  4. 40 CFR 63.9307 - What are my continuous emissions monitoring system installation, operation, and maintenance...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... install, operate, and maintain each CEMS to monitor carbon monoxide (CO) or total hydrocarbons (THC) and... emission control device. (b) To comply with the CO or THC percent reduction emission limitation, you may install, operate, and maintain a CEMS to monitor CO or THC and O2 at both the inlet and the outlet of the...

  5. 40 CFR 62.15225 - What must I do if my continuous emission monitoring system is temporarily unavailable to meet the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... emission monitoring system is temporarily unavailable to meet the data collection requirements? 62.15225... Emission Monitoring § 62.15225 What must I do if my continuous emission monitoring system is temporarily... methods for collecting data when these systems malfunction or when repairs, calibration checks, or...

  6. 40 CFR 62.15225 - What must I do if my continuous emission monitoring system is temporarily unavailable to meet the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... emission monitoring system is temporarily unavailable to meet the data collection requirements? 62.15225... Emission Monitoring § 62.15225 What must I do if my continuous emission monitoring system is temporarily... methods for collecting data when these systems malfunction or when repairs, calibration checks, or...

  7. 40 CFR 60.1770 - What must I do if any of my continuous emission monitoring systems are temporarily unavailable to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... emission monitoring systems are temporarily unavailable to meet the data collection requirements? 60.1770... Emission Monitoring § 60.1770 What must I do if any of my continuous emission monitoring systems are... alternate methods for collecting data when systems malfunction or when repairs, calibration checks, or...

  8. 40 CFR 60.1770 - What must I do if any of my continuous emission monitoring systems are temporarily unavailable to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... emission monitoring systems are temporarily unavailable to meet the data collection requirements? 60.1770... Emission Monitoring § 60.1770 What must I do if any of my continuous emission monitoring systems are... alternate methods for collecting data when systems malfunction or when repairs, calibration checks, or...

  9. 40 CFR 62.15225 - What must I do if my continuous emission monitoring system is temporarily unavailable to meet the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... emission monitoring system is temporarily unavailable to meet the data collection requirements? 62.15225... Emission Monitoring § 62.15225 What must I do if my continuous emission monitoring system is temporarily... methods for collecting data when these systems malfunction or when repairs, calibration checks, or...

  10. 40 CFR 62.15225 - What must I do if my continuous emission monitoring system is temporarily unavailable to meet the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... emission monitoring system is temporarily unavailable to meet the data collection requirements? 62.15225... Emission Monitoring § 62.15225 What must I do if my continuous emission monitoring system is temporarily... methods for collecting data when these systems malfunction or when repairs, calibration checks, or...

  11. 40 CFR 62.15225 - What must I do if my continuous emission monitoring system is temporarily unavailable to meet the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... emission monitoring system is temporarily unavailable to meet the data collection requirements? 62.15225... Emission Monitoring § 62.15225 What must I do if my continuous emission monitoring system is temporarily... methods for collecting data when these systems malfunction or when repairs, calibration checks, or...

  12. GREENHOUSE GAS (GHG) VERIFICATION GUIDELINE SERIES: ANR Pipeline Company PARAMETRIC EMISSIONS MONITORING SYSTEM (PEMS) VERSION 1.0

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Environmental Technology Verification report discusses the technology and performance of the Parametric Emissions Monitoring System (PEMS) manufactured by ANR Pipeline Company, a subsidiary of Coastal Corporation, now El Paso Corporation. The PEMS predicts carbon doixide (CO2...

  13. GREENHOUSE GAS (GHG) VERIFICATION GUIDELINE SERIES: ANR Pipeline Company PARAMETRIC EMISSIONS MONITORING SYSTEM (PEMS) VERSION 1.0

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Environmental Technology Verification report discusses the technology and performance of the Parametric Emissions Monitoring System (PEMS) manufactured by ANR Pipeline Company, a subsidiary of Coastal Corporation, now El Paso Corporation. The PEMS predicts carbon doixide (CO2...

  14. 40 CFR 60.1280 - What must I do if any of my continuous emission monitoring systems are temporarily unavailable to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... emission monitoring systems are temporarily unavailable to meet the data collection requirements? 60.1280... Modification or Reconstruction is Commenced After June 6, 2001 Continuous Emission Monitoring § 60.1280 What must I do if any of my continuous emission monitoring systems are temporarily unavailable to meet...

  15. 40 CFR 60.1280 - What must I do if any of my continuous emission monitoring systems are temporarily unavailable to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... emission monitoring systems are temporarily unavailable to meet the data collection requirements? 60.1280... Modification or Reconstruction is Commenced After June 6, 2001 Continuous Emission Monitoring § 60.1280 What must I do if any of my continuous emission monitoring systems are temporarily unavailable to meet...

  16. 40 CFR 60.1280 - What must I do if any of my continuous emission monitoring systems are temporarily unavailable to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... emission monitoring systems are temporarily unavailable to meet the data collection requirements? 60.1280... Modification or Reconstruction is Commenced After June 6, 2001 Continuous Emission Monitoring § 60.1280 What must I do if any of my continuous emission monitoring systems are temporarily unavailable to meet...

  17. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart Bbbb of... - Model Rule-Requirements for Validating Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... levels Use the following methods in appendix A of this part to measure oxygen (or carbon dioxide) 1... Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) 6 Table 6 to Subpart BBBB of Part 60 Protection of Environment... SOURCES Emission Guidelines and Compliance Times for Small Municipal Waste Combustion Units Constructed...

  18. A greenhouse-gas information system monitoring and validating emissions reporting and mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Jonietz, Karl K; Dimotakis, Paul E; Walker, Bruce C

    2011-09-26

    Current GHG-mitigating regimes, whether internationally agreed or self-imposed, rely on the aggregation of self-reported data, with limited checks for consistency and accuracy, for monitoring. As nations commit to more stringent GHG emissions-mitigation actions and as economic rewards or penalties are attached to emission levels, self-reported data will require independent confirmation that they are accurate and reliable, if they are to provide the basis for critical choices and actions that may be required. Supporting emissions-mitigation efforts and agreements, as well as monitoring energy- and fossil-fuel intensive national and global activities would be best achieved by a process of: (1) monitoring of emissions and emission-mitigation actions, based, in part, on, (2) (self-) reporting of pertinent bottom-up inventory data, (3) verification that reported data derive from and are consistent with agreed-upon processes and procedures, and (4) validation that reported emissions and emissions-mitigation action data are correct, based on independent measurements (top-down) derived from a suite of sensors in space, air, land, and, possibly, sea, used to deduce and attribute anthropogenic emissions. These data would be assessed and used to deduce and attribute measured GHG concentrations to anthropogenic emissions, attributed geographically and, to the extent possible, by economic sector. The validation element is needed to provide independent assurance that emissions are in accord with reported values, and should be considered as an important addition to the accepted MRV process, leading to a MRV&V process. This study and report focus on attributes of a greenhouse-gas information system (GHGIS) needed to support MRV&V needs. These needs set the function of such a system apart from scientific/research monitoring of GHGs and carbon-cycle systems, and include (not exclusively): the need for a GHGIS that is operational, as required for decision-support; the need for a

  19. A VCSEL based system for on-site monitoring of low level methane emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannath, A.; Hodgkinson, J.; Gillard, R. G.; Riley, R. J.; Tatam, R. P.

    2011-03-01

    Continuous monitoring of methane emissions has assumed greater significance in the recent past due to increasing focus on global warming issues. Many industries have also identified the need for ppm level methane measurement as a means of gaining carbon credits. Conventional instruments based on NDIR spectroscopy are unable to offer the high selectivity and sensitivity required for such measurements. Here we discuss the development of a robust VCSEL based system for accurate low level measurements of methane. A possible area of application is the measurement of residual methane whilst monitoring the output of flare stacks and exhaust gases from methane combustion engines. The system employs a Wavelength Modulation Spectroscopy (WMS) scheme with second harmonic detection at 1651 nm. Optimum modulation frequency and ramp rates were chosen to maintain high resolution and fast response times which are vital for the intended application. Advanced data processing techniques were used to achieve long term sensitivity of the order of 10-5 in absorbance. The system is immune to cross interference from other gases and its inherent design features makes it ideal for large scale commercial production. The instrument maintains its calibration and offers a completely automated continuous monitoring solution for remote on site deployment.

  20. 40 CFR 60.73 - Emission monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... continuous monitoring system for measuring nitrogen oxides (NOX). The pollutant gas mixtures under... the applicable standard (kg/metric ton, lb/ton). The conversion factor shall be established by measuring emissions with the continuous monitoring system concurrent with measuring emissions with the...

  1. 40 CFR 60.73 - Emission monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... continuous monitoring system for measuring nitrogen oxides (NOX). The pollutant gas mixtures under... the applicable standard (kg/metric ton, lb/ton). The conversion factor shall be established by measuring emissions with the continuous monitoring system concurrent with measuring emissions with the...

  2. 40 CFR 60.73 - Emission monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... continuous monitoring system for measuring nitrogen oxides (NOX). The pollutant gas mixtures under... the applicable standard (kg/metric ton, lb/ton). The conversion factor shall be established by measuring emissions with the continuous monitoring system concurrent with measuring emissions with the...

  3. 40 CFR 60.73 - Emission monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... continuous monitoring system for measuring nitrogen oxides (NOX). The pollutant gas mixtures under... the applicable standard (kg/metric ton, lb/ton). The conversion factor shall be established by measuring emissions with the continuous monitoring system concurrent with measuring emissions with the...

  4. Air Emissions Monitoring for Permits

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Operating permits document how air pollution sources will demonstrate compliance with emission limits and also how air pollution sources will monitor, either periodically or continuously, their compliance with emission limits and all other requirements.

  5. 40 CFR 60.84 - Emission monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ....84 Emission monitoring. (a) A continuous monitoring system for the measurement of sulfur dioxide... under § 60.13(d), shall be sulfur dioxide (SO2). Method 8 shall be used for conducting monitoring system... applicable standard (kg/metric ton, lb/ton). The conversion factor shall be determined, as a minimum, three...

  6. Integration of acoustic emission systems within Integri-TechTM analysis system for structural health monitoring of pressurised engineering plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghouri, A. A.; Rafferty, Steven; Pickwell, Andy; Galbraith, Walter; Pierce, S. Gareth; Gachagan, Anthony

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this Acoustic Emission (AE) based Structural Health Monitoring project is to enable accurate location of AE sources in pressurised engineering plant and to use AE source location data to establish defect locations for use within Integri-TechTM; a finite element based analysis, monitoring and fitness for service assessment system. Integri-TechTM is a windows based system which carries out combined analysis and assessment providing fatigue life and remnant life calculations and inspection priorities presenting the results in an accessible web portal format. The software uses finite element stress models created in the companion software Model Wizard. The AE monitoring system that has been developed can be used with an array of up to four AE broad band sensor channels with associated signal processing. Using a flexible approach in MATLAB, the authors have developed algorithms which were used for analysing the received AE signals to extract information about the nature and location of the source. The ability to carry out source location and possibly perform real time monitoring (detecting cracking as it occurs) is attractive feature of the AE system developed for this project. The time of arrival (TOA) data was used by Integri-TechTM software to calculate source location using its own built-in algorithm, and this was verified independently using a MATLAB approach.

  7. A feasibility study on the predictive emission monitoring system applied to the Hsinta power plant of Taiwan Power Company.

    PubMed

    Chien, T W; Chu, H; Hsu, W C; Tseng, T K; Hsu, C H; Chen, K Y

    2003-08-01

    The continuous emission monitoring system (CEMS) can monitor flue gas emissions continuously and instantaneously. However, it has the disadvantages of enormous cost, easily producing errors in sampling periods of bad weather, lagging response in variable ambient environments, and missing data in daily zero and span tests and maintenance. The concept of a predictive emission monitoring system (PEMS) is to use the operating parameters of combustion equipment through thermodynamic or statistical methods to construct a mathematic model that can predict emissions by a computer program. The goal of this study is to set up a PEMS in a gas-fired combined cycle power generation unit at the Hsinta station of Taiwan Power Co. The emissions to be monitored include nitrogen oxides (NOx) and oxygen (O2) in flue gas. The major variables of the predictive model were determined based on the combustion theory. The data of these variables then were analyzed to establish a regression model. From the regression results, the influences of these variables are discussed and the predicted values are compared with the CEMS data for accuracy. In addition, according to the cost information, the capital and operation and maintenance costs for a PEMS can be much lower than those for a CEMS.

  8. Measuring the respiratory gas exchange of grazing cattle using the GreenFeed emissions monitoring system

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ruminants are a significant source of enteric methane, which has been identified as a powerful greenhouse gas that contributes to climate change. With interest in developing technologies to decrease enteric methane emission, systems are currently being developed to measure the methane emission by c...

  9. Gold nanospikes based microsensor as a highly accurate mercury emission monitoring system

    PubMed Central

    Sabri, Ylias M.; Ippolito, Samuel J.; Tardio, James; Bansal, Vipul; O'Mullane, Anthony P.; Bhargava, Suresh K.

    2014-01-01

    Anthropogenic elemental mercury (Hg0) emission is a serious worldwide environmental problem due to the extreme toxicity of the heavy metal to humans, plants and wildlife. Development of an accurate and cheap microsensor based online monitoring system which can be integrated as part of Hg0 removal and control processes in industry is still a major challenge. Here, we demonstrate that forming Au nanospike structures directly onto the electrodes of a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) using a novel electrochemical route results in a self-regenerating, highly robust, stable, sensitive and selective Hg0 vapor sensor. The data from a 127 day continuous test performed in the presence of volatile organic compounds and high humidity levels, showed that the sensor with an electrodeposted sensitive layer had 260% higher response magnitude, 3.4 times lower detection limit (~22 μg/m3 or ~2.46 ppbv) and higher accuracy (98% Vs 35%) over a Au control based QCM (unmodified) when exposed to a Hg0 vapor concentration of 10.55 mg/m3 at 101°C. Statistical analysis of the long term data showed that the nano-engineered Hg0 sorption sites on the developed Au nanospikes sensitive layer play a critical role in the enhanced sensitivity and selectivity of the developed sensor towards Hg0 vapor. PMID:25338965

  10. INSIDE in-beam positron emission tomography system for particle range monitoring in hadrontherapy.

    PubMed

    Bisogni, Maria Giuseppina; Attili, Andrea; Battistoni, Giuseppe; Belcari, Nicola; Camarlinghi, Niccolo'; Cerello, Piergiorgio; Coli, Silvia; Del Guerra, Alberto; Ferrari, Alfredo; Ferrero, Veronica; Fiorina, Elisa; Giraudo, Giuseppe; Kostara, Eleftheria; Morrocchi, Matteo; Pennazio, Francesco; Peroni, Cristiana; Piliero, Maria Antonietta; Pirrone, Giovanni; Rivetti, Angelo; Rolo, Manuel D; Rosso, Valeria; Sala, Paola; Sportelli, Giancarlo; Wheadon, Richard

    2017-01-01

    The quality assurance of particle therapy treatment is a fundamental issue that can be addressed by developing reliable monitoring techniques and indicators of the treatment plan correctness. Among the available imaging techniques, positron emission tomography (PET) has long been investigated and then clinically applied to proton and carbon beams. In 2013, the Innovative Solutions for Dosimetry in Hadrontherapy (INSIDE) collaboration proposed an innovative bimodal imaging concept that combines an in-beam PET scanner with a tracking system for charged particle imaging. This paper presents the general architecture of the INSIDE project but focuses on the in-beam PET scanner that has been designed to reconstruct the particles range with millimetric resolution within a fraction of the dose delivered in a treatment of head and neck tumors. The in-beam PET scanner has been recently installed at the Italian National Center of Oncologic Hadrontherapy (CNAO) in Pavia, Italy, and the commissioning phase has just started. The results of the first beam test with clinical proton beams on phantoms clearly show the capability of the in-beam PET to operate during the irradiation delivery and to reconstruct on-line the beam-induced activity map. The accuracy in the activity distal fall-off determination is millimetric for therapeutic doses.

  11. Broadband UV spectroscopy system used for monitoring of SO 2 and NO emissions from thermal power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y. G.; Wang, H. S.; Somesfalean, G.; Wang, Z. Y.; Lou, X. T.; Wu, S. H.; Zhang, Z. G.; Qin, Y. K.

    2010-11-01

    A gas monitoring system based on broadband absorption spectroscopic techniques in the ultraviolet region is described and tested. The system was employed in real-time continuous concentration measurements of sulfur dioxide (SO 2) and nitric oxide (NO) from a 220-ton h -1 circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler in Shandong province, China. The emission coefficients (per kg of coal and per kWh of electricity) and the total emission of the two pollutant gases were evaluated. The measurement results showed that the emission concentrations of SO 2 and NO from the CFB boiler fluctuated in the range of 750-1300 mg m -3 and 100-220 mg m -3, respectively. Compared with the specified emission standards of air pollutants from thermal power plants in China, the values were generally higher for SO 2 and lower for NO. The relatively high emission concentrations of SO 2 were found to mainly depend on the sulfur content of the fuel and the poor desulfurization efficiency. This study indicates that the broadband UV spectroscopy system is suitable for industrial emission monitoring and pollution control.

  12. Comparison of passive-remote and conventional Fourier transform infrared systems for continuously monitoring incinerator emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Demirgian, J.C.; Hammer, C.L.; Kroutil, R.T.

    1992-07-01

    Significant improvements in detection technology are needed to comply with the requirements in the Clean Air Act of 1990, Title 3, which requires the monitoring of air toxics. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy can satisfy these requirements in two different modes. Conventional FTIR spectrometers can be installed on-stream so that a vapor stream enters an infrared cell for analysis. Other types of FTIR spectrometers can detect chemical plumes remotely, measure the natural emissions of the molecules in the plume. The samples do not come to the instrument, and the instrument has neither source nor reflector mirrors. We will discuss the applications of FTIR spectrometry for both conventional and passive-remote FTIR spectroscopy. Some applications of conventional FTIR include a continuous emission monitor for measuring incinerator emissions and determining indoor air quality. Passive-remote FTIR spectroscopy can be used to identify and track a chemical plume. It can also be used to detect fugitive emissions. Hence, it can be used as an independent means to assure compliance with environmental regulations in real-time. Because of the relatively simple instrumentation, passive-remote instruments can be helicopter- or vehicle-mounted for mobile detection of plumes.

  13. Comparison of passive-remote and conventional Fourier transform infrared systems for continuously monitoring incinerator emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Demirgian, J.C.; Hammer, C.L. ); Kroutil, R.T. )

    1992-01-01

    Significant improvements in detection technology are needed to comply with the requirements in the Clean Air Act of 1990, Title 3, which requires the monitoring of air toxics. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy can satisfy these requirements in two different modes. Conventional FTIR spectrometers can be installed on-stream so that a vapor stream enters an infrared cell for analysis. Other types of FTIR spectrometers can detect chemical plumes remotely, measure the natural emissions of the molecules in the plume. The samples do not come to the instrument, and the instrument has neither source nor reflector mirrors. We will discuss the applications of FTIR spectrometry for both conventional and passive-remote FTIR spectroscopy. Some applications of conventional FTIR include a continuous emission monitor for measuring incinerator emissions and determining indoor air quality. Passive-remote FTIR spectroscopy can be used to identify and track a chemical plume. It can also be used to detect fugitive emissions. Hence, it can be used as an independent means to assure compliance with environmental regulations in real-time. Because of the relatively simple instrumentation, passive-remote instruments can be helicopter- or vehicle-mounted for mobile detection of plumes.

  14. The Tree Drought Emission MONitor (Tree DEMON), an innovative system for assessing biogenic volatile organic compounds emission from plants.

    PubMed

    Lüpke, Marvin; Steinbrecher, Rainer; Leuchner, Michael; Menzel, Annette

    2017-01-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) emitted by plants play an important role for ecological and physiological processes, for example as response to stressors. These emitted compounds are involved in chemical processes within the atmosphere and contribute to the formation of aerosols and ozone. Direct measurement of BVOC emissions requires a specialized sample system in order to obtain repeatable and comparable results. These systems need to be constructed carefully since BVOC measurements may be disturbed by several side effects, e.g., due to wrong material selection and lacking system stability. In order to assess BVOC emission rates, a four plant chamber system was constructed, implemented and throughout evaluated by synthetic tests and in two case studies on 3-year-old sweet chestnut seedlings. Synthetic system test showed a stable sampling with good repeatability and low memory effects. The first case study demonstrated the capability of the system to screen multiple trees within a few days and revealed three different emission patterns of sweet chestnut trees. The second case study comprised an application of drought stress on two seedlings compared to two in parallel assessed seedlings of a control. Here, a clear reduction of BVOC emissions during drought stress was observed. The developed system allows assessing BVOC as well as CO2 and water vapor gas exchange of four tree specimens automatically and in parallel with repeatable results. A canopy volume of 30 l can be investigated, which constitutes in case of tree seedlings the whole canopy. Longer lasting experiments of e.g., 1-3 weeks can be performed easily without any significant plant interference.

  15. A custom acoustic emission monitoring system for harsh environments: application to freezing-induced damage in alpine rock-walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girard, L.; Beutel, J.; Gruber, S.; Hunziker, J.; Lim, R.; Weber, S.

    2012-06-01

    We present a custom acoustic emission (AE) monitoring system designed to perform long-term measurements on high-alpine rock-walls. AE monitoring is a common technique for characterizing damage evolution in solid materials. The system is based on a two-channel AE sensor node (AE-node) integrated into a Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) customized for operation in harsh environments. This wireless architecture offers flexibility in the deployment of AE-nodes at any position of the rock-wall that needs to be monitored, within a range of a few hundred meters from a core station connected to the internet. The system achieves near real-time data delivery and allows the user to remotely control the AE detection threshold. In order to protect AE sensors and capture acoustic signals from specific depths of the rock-wall, a special casing was developed. The monitoring system is completed by two probes that measure rock temperature and liquid water content, both probes being also integrated into the WSN. We report a first deployment of the monitoring system on a rock-wall at Jungfraujoch, 3500 m a.s.l., Switzerland. While this first deployment of the monitoring system aims to support fundamental research on processes that damage rock under cold climate, the system could serve a number of other applications, including rock-fall hazard surveillance or structural monitoring of concrete structures.

  16. A custom acoustic emission monitoring system for harsh environments: application to freezing-induced damage in alpine rock walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girard, L.; Beutel, J.; Gruber, S.; Hunziker, J.; Lim, R.; Weber, S.

    2012-11-01

    We present a custom acoustic emission (AE) monitoring system designed to perform long-term measurements on high-alpine rock walls. AE monitoring is a common technique for characterizing damage evolution in solid materials. The system is based on a two-channel AE sensor node (AE-node) integrated into a wireless sensor network (WSN) customized for operation in harsh environments. This wireless architecture offers flexibility in the deployment of AE-nodes at any position of the rock wall that needs to be monitored, within a range of a few hundred meters from a core station connected to the internet. The system achieves near real-time data delivery and allows the user to remotely control the AE detection threshold. In order to protect AE sensors and capture acoustic signals from specific depths of the rock wall, a special casing was developed. The monitoring system is completed by two probes that measure rock temperature and liquid water content, both probes being also integrated into the WSN. We report a first deployment of the monitoring system on a rock wall at Jungfraujoch, 3500 m a.s.l., Switzerland. While this first deployment of the monitoring system aims to support fundamental research on processes that damage rock under cold climate, the system could serve a number of other applications, including rock fall hazard surveillance or structural monitoring of concrete structures.

  17. 40 CFR 60.1230 - What continuous emission monitoring systems must I install for gaseous pollutants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... systems for oxygen (or carbon dioxide), sulfur dioxide, and carbon monoxide. If you operate a Class I... sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and oxygen (or carbon dioxide) at the outlet of the air pollution... according to the “Monitoring Requirements” in § 60.13. (c) You must monitor the oxygen (or carbon...

  18. 40 CFR 60.1230 - What continuous emission monitoring systems must I install for gaseous pollutants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... systems for oxygen (or carbon dioxide), sulfur dioxide, and carbon monoxide. If you operate a Class I... sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and oxygen (or carbon dioxide) at the outlet of the air pollution... according to the “Monitoring Requirements” in § 60.13. (c) You must monitor the oxygen (or carbon...

  19. 40 CFR 60.1230 - What continuous emission monitoring systems must I install for gaseous pollutants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... systems for oxygen (or carbon dioxide), sulfur dioxide, and carbon monoxide. If you operate a Class I... sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and oxygen (or carbon dioxide) at the outlet of the air pollution... according to the “Monitoring Requirements” in § 60.13. (c) You must monitor the oxygen (or carbon...

  20. 40 CFR 60.1230 - What continuous emission monitoring systems must I install for gaseous pollutants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... systems for oxygen (or carbon dioxide), sulfur dioxide, and carbon monoxide. If you operate a Class I... sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and oxygen (or carbon dioxide) at the outlet of the air pollution... according to the “Monitoring Requirements” in § 60.13. (c) You must monitor the oxygen (or carbon...

  1. 40 CFR 60.1230 - What continuous emission monitoring systems must I install for gaseous pollutants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... systems for oxygen (or carbon dioxide), sulfur dioxide, and carbon monoxide. If you operate a Class I... sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and oxygen (or carbon dioxide) at the outlet of the air pollution... according to the “Monitoring Requirements” in § 60.13. (c) You must monitor the oxygen (or carbon...

  2. Self-emission glucose monitoring system with single chip guided-mode resonance filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Yen-Chun; Yang, Sheng; Schmidt, Dominik

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we designed and simulated an array of bandpass filters as a spectral separator for mid-infrared self-emission noninvasive glucose monitoring, using the human body as the background radiation emitter. The filters were based on the guided-mode resonance (GMR) effect. The human body is a good black body radiator that provides a stable temperature and continuous radiation energy in the mid-infrared range. We can thus use self-emission from the human body to measure certain fingerprint peaks of glucose spectrum between 8 μm to 10 μm, which allows estimation of glucose concentration. The GMR filter set includes at least four filters on one chip fabricated at the same time. By using fixed thicknesses and the same thin-film material for all the filters on the chip, a structure period adjustment alone can theoretically achieve multiple bandpass filters between the glucose fingerprint ranges - and achieve these coplanar filters on a single chip. By using all CMOS-compatible materials, COMSOL simulations show that a series of peaks with transmittances up to 70% and bandwidths of around 200nm can be achieved. This filter set can be fabricated with just a few thin layers that can simplify the typical thin-film deposition process. The proposed GMR filter array can then be combined with a thermometer array to achieve the non-invasive glucose monitoring. We compare the results obtained with the first version of the fabricated filter set with the measurements of Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy.

  3. Continuous emission monitor for incinerators

    SciTech Connect

    Demirgian, J.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the development of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to continuous monitoring of incinerator emissions. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy is well suited to this application because it can identify and quantify selected target analytes in a complex mixture without first separating the components in the mixture. Currently, there is no on-stream method to determine the destruction of hazardous substances, such as benzene, or to continuously monitor for hazardous products of incomplete combustion (PICs) in incinerator exhaust emissions. This capability is especially important because of Federal regulations in the Clean Air Act of 1990, which requires the monitoring of air toxics (Title III), the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), and the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA). An on-stream continuous emission monitor (CEM) that can differentiate species in the ppm and ppb range and can calculate the destruction and removal efficiency (DRE) could be used to determine the safety and reliability of incinerators. This information can be used to address reasonable public concern about incinerator safety and aid in the permitting process.

  4. Continuous emission monitor for incinerators

    SciTech Connect

    Demirgian, J.

    1992-07-01

    This paper describes the development of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to continuous monitoring of incinerator emissions. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy is well suited to this application because it can identify and quantify selected target analytes in a complex mixture without first separating the components in the mixture. Currently, there is no on-stream method to determine the destruction of hazardous substances, such as benzene, or to continuously monitor for hazardous products of incomplete combustion (PICs) in incinerator exhaust emissions. This capability is especially important because of Federal regulations in the Clean Air Act of 1990, which requires the monitoring of air toxics (Title III), the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), and the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA). An on-stream continuous emission monitor (CEM) that can differentiate species in the ppm and ppb range and can calculate the destruction and removal efficiency (DRE) could be used to determine the safety and reliability of incinerators. This information can be used to address reasonable public concern about incinerator safety and aid in the permitting process.

  5. 40 CFR Table 4 of Subpart Aaaa of... - Requirements for Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... dioxide emissions of the municipal waste combustion unit P.S. 2 Method 6C. 4. Carbon Monoxide 125 percent... nitrogen oxides emissions of the municipal waste combustion unit P.S. 2 Method 7E. 3. Sulfur Dioxide Inlet to control device: 125 percent of the maximum expected sulfur dioxide emissions of the...

  6. 40 CFR Table 4 of Subpart Aaaa of... - Requirements for Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... dioxide emissions of the municipal waste combustion unit P.S. 2 Method 6C. 4. Carbon Monoxide 125 percent... nitrogen oxides emissions of the municipal waste combustion unit P.S. 2 Method 7E. 3. Sulfur Dioxide Inlet to control device: 125 percent of the maximum expected sulfur dioxide emissions of the...

  7. 40 CFR 60.73 - Emission monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... continuous monitoring system for measuring nitrogen oxides (NOX). The pollutant gas mixtures under Performance Specification 2 and for calibration checks under § 60.13(d) of this part shall be nitrogen dioxide... represents emission measurements concurrent with the reference method test periods, the conversion factor...

  8. Tropospheric Emission Monitoring Internet Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der A, R.; Temis Team

    The Tropospheric Emission Monitoring Internet Service (TEMIS) will produce and deliver global concentrations of tropospheric trace gases. The resulting data base of trace gas concentrations will be important input for subsequent emission estimates of NOx, CH4, CO, aerosols, BrO and hydrocarbons. Potential users and user require- ments have been identified for the trace gas products O3, NO2, HCHO, BrO, SO2, H2O, CO and CH4, and for the UV index, clouds and aerosols. Based on the re- quirements of these users, the trace gas products to be delivered are selected and de- fined. The Service will be based on data from the UV-visible instruments GOME and SCIAMACHY, which have the unique ability to monitor these trace gases in the tro- posphere. The retrieval of tropospheric products will be based on several techniques, such as DOAS and Optimal Estimation, in combination with data assimilation tech- niques.

  9. A Greenhouse-Gas Information System: Monitoring and Validating Emissions Reporting and Mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Jonietz, Karl K.; Dimotakis, Paul E.; Walker, Bruce C.

    2011-09-26

    This study and report focus on attributes of a greenhouse-gas information system (GHGIS) needed to support MRV&V needs. These needs set the function of such a system apart from scientific/research monitoring of GHGs and carbon-cycle systems, and include (not exclusively): the need for a GHGIS that is operational, as required for decision-support; the need for a system that meets specifications derived from imposed requirements; the need for rigorous calibration, verification, and validation (CV&V) standards, processes, and records for all measurement and modeling/data-inversion data; the need to develop and adopt an uncertainty-quantification (UQ) regimen for all measurement and modeling data; and the requirement that GHGIS products can be subjected to third-party questioning and scientific scrutiny. This report examines and assesses presently available capabilities that could contribute to a future GHGIS. These capabilities include sensors and measurement technologies; data analysis and data uncertainty quantification (UQ) practices and methods; and model-based data-inversion practices, methods, and their associated UQ. The report further examines the need for traceable calibration, verification, and validation processes and attached metadata; differences between present science-/research-oriented needs and those that would be required for an operational GHGIS; the development, operation, and maintenance of a GHGIS missions-operations center (GMOC); and the complex systems engineering and integration that would be required to develop, operate, and evolve a future GHGIS.

  10. Monitoring ethylene emissions from plants cultured for a controlled ecological life support system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corey, Kenneth A.

    1995-01-01

    Emission of hydrocarbons and other volatile compounds by materials and organisms in closed environments will be a major concern in the design and management of advanced life support systems with a bioregenerative component. Ethylene, a simple hydrocarbon synthesized by plants, is involved in the elicitation of a wide range of physiological responses. In closed environments, ethylene may build up to levels which become physiologically active. In several growouts of 'Yecora Rojo' wheat in Kennedy Space Center's Biomass Production Chamber (BPC), it was observed that leaf flecking and rolling occurred in the sealed environment and was virtually eliminated when potassium permanganate was used to scrub the atmospheric environment. It was suggested that ethylene, which accumulated to about 60 ppb in the chamber and which was effectively absorbed by potassium permanganate, was responsible for the symptoms. The objectives of this work were to: (1) determine rates of ethylene evolution from lettuce (Lactuca sativa cultivar Waldemann's Green) and wheat (Triticum aestivum cultivar Yecora Rojo) plants during growth and development; (2) determine the effects of exposure of whole, vegetative stage plants to exogenous ethylene concentrations in the range of what would develop in closed environment growth chambers; and (3) develop predictive functions for changes in ethylene concentration that would develop under different cropping and closed environment configurations. Results will lead to the development of management strategies for ethylene in bioregenerative life support systems.

  11. 40 CFR Table 4 of Subpart Aaaa to... - Requirements for Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... expected sulfur dioxide emissions of the municipal waste combustion unit. Control device outlet: 50 percent of the maximum expected hourly potential sulfur dioxide emissions of the municipal waste combustion... interference trap. 5. Oxygen or Carbon Dioxide 25 percent oxygen or 25 percent carbon dioxide P.S. 3 Method...

  12. 40 CFR Table 4 of Subpart Aaaa to... - Requirements for Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... expected sulfur dioxide emissions of the municipal waste combustion unit. Control device outlet: 50 percent of the maximum expected hourly potential sulfur dioxide emissions of the municipal waste combustion... interference trap. 5. Oxygen or Carbon Dioxide 25 percent oxygen or 25 percent carbon dioxide P.S. 3 Method...

  13. 40 CFR 61.183 - Emission monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Inorganic Arsenic Emissions From Arsenic Trioxide and Metallic Arsenic Production Facilities § 61.183 Emission monitoring. (a... arsenic trioxide and metallic arsenic process emission stream that exits from a control device. (b) The...

  14. 40 CFR 61.183 - Emission monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Inorganic Arsenic Emissions From Arsenic Trioxide and Metallic Arsenic Production Facilities § 61.183 Emission monitoring. (a... arsenic trioxide and metallic arsenic process emission stream that exits from a control device. (b) The...

  15. 40 CFR 61.183 - Emission monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Inorganic Arsenic Emissions From Arsenic Trioxide and Metallic Arsenic Production Facilities § 61.183 Emission monitoring. (a... arsenic trioxide and metallic arsenic process emission stream that exits from a control device. (b) The...

  16. 40 CFR 61.183 - Emission monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Inorganic Arsenic Emissions From Arsenic Trioxide and Metallic Arsenic Production Facilities § 61.183 Emission monitoring. (a... arsenic trioxide and metallic arsenic process emission stream that exits from a control device. (b) The...

  17. 40 CFR 61.183 - Emission monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Inorganic Arsenic Emissions From Arsenic Trioxide and Metallic Arsenic Production Facilities § 61.183 Emission monitoring. (a... arsenic trioxide and metallic arsenic process emission stream that exits from a control device. (b) The...

  18. The Use of an Automated System (GreenFeed) to Monitor Enteric Methane and Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Ruminant Animals.

    PubMed

    Hristov, Alexander N; Oh, Joonpyo; Giallongo, Fabio; Frederick, Tyler; Weeks, Holley; Zimmerman, Patrick R; Harper, Michael T; Hristova, Rada A; Zimmerman, R Scott; Branco, Antonio F

    2015-09-07

    Ruminant animals (domesticated or wild) emit methane (CH4) through enteric fermentation in their digestive tract and from decomposition of manure during storage. These processes are the major sources of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from animal production systems. Techniques for measuring enteric CH4 vary from direct measurements (respiration chambers, which are highly accurate, but with limited applicability) to various indirect methods (sniffers, laser technology, which are practical, but with variable accuracy). The sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) tracer gas method is commonly used to measure enteric CH4 production by animal scientists and more recently, application of an Automated Head-Chamber System (AHCS) (GreenFeed, C-Lock, Inc., Rapid City, SD), which is the focus of this experiment, has been growing. AHCS is an automated system to monitor CH4 and carbon dioxide (CO2) mass fluxes from the breath of ruminant animals. In a typical AHCS operation, small quantities of baiting feed are dispensed to individual animals to lure them to AHCS multiple times daily. As the animal visits AHCS, a fan system pulls air past the animal's muzzle into an intake manifold, and through an air collection pipe where continuous airflow rates are measured. A sub-sample of air is pumped out of the pipe into non-dispersive infra-red sensors for continuous measurement of CH4 and CO2 concentrations. Field comparisons of AHCS to respiration chambers or SF6 have demonstrated that AHCS produces repeatable and accurate CH4 emission results, provided that animal visits to AHCS are sufficient so emission estimates are representative of the diurnal rhythm of rumen gas production. Here, we demonstrate the use of AHCS to measure CO2 and CH4 fluxes from dairy cows given a control diet or a diet supplemented with technical-grade cashew nut shell liquid.

  19. The Use of an Automated System (GreenFeed) to Monitor Enteric Methane and Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Ruminant Animals

    PubMed Central

    Hristov, Alexander N.; Oh, Joonpyo; Giallongo, Fabio; Frederick, Tyler; Weeks, Holley; Zimmerman, Patrick R.; Harper, Michael T.; Hristova, Rada A.; Zimmerman, R. Scott; Branco, Antonio F.

    2015-01-01

    Ruminant animals (domesticated or wild) emit methane (CH4) through enteric fermentation in their digestive tract and from decomposition of manure during storage. These processes are the major sources of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from animal production systems. Techniques for measuring enteric CH4 vary from direct measurements (respiration chambers, which are highly accurate, but with limited applicability) to various indirect methods (sniffers, laser technology, which are practical, but with variable accuracy). The sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) tracer gas method is commonly used to measure enteric CH4 production by animal scientists and more recently, application of an Automated Head-Chamber System (AHCS) (GreenFeed, C-Lock, Inc., Rapid City, SD), which is the focus of this experiment, has been growing. AHCS is an automated system to monitor CH4 and carbon dioxide (CO2) mass fluxes from the breath of ruminant animals. In a typical AHCS operation, small quantities of baiting feed are dispensed to individual animals to lure them to AHCS multiple times daily. As the animal visits AHCS, a fan system pulls air past the animal’s muzzle into an intake manifold, and through an air collection pipe where continuous airflow rates are measured. A sub-sample of air is pumped out of the pipe into non-dispersive infra-red sensors for continuous measurement of CH4 and CO2 concentrations. Field comparisons of AHCS to respiration chambers or SF6 have demonstrated that AHCS produces repeatable and accurate CH4 emission results, provided that animal visits to AHCS are sufficient so emission estimates are representative of the diurnal rhythm of rumen gas production. Here, we demonstrate the use of AHCS to measure CO2 and CH4 fluxes from dairy cows given a control diet or a diet supplemented with technical-grade cashew nut shell liquid. PMID:26383886

  20. 40 CFR 75.13 - Specific provisions for monitoring CO2 emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Specific provisions for monitoring CO2... monitoring CO2 emissions. (a) CO 2 continuous emission monitoring system. If the owner or operator chooses to... operating requirements in § 75.10 for a CO2 continuous emission monitoring system and flow monitoring system...

  1. Characteristics of TiNi Thin Films Deposited by Magnetron Sputtering System with Optical Emission Spectroscopy Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Erqiang; Bao, Mingdong; Yuan, Guozheng; Xiao, Gesheng; Jin, Tao; Li, Zhigang; Shu, Xuefeng

    2015-07-01

    TiNi composite thin films were fabricated using a closed-field unbalanced magnetron sputtering system equipped with optical emission spectroscopy monitor (OEM). The thin films were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and nanoindentation. Results show that the TiNi films are amorphous, and their composition varies approximately linearly with the OEM value. Thus, the film composition could be controlled by in situ real-time OEM. The structure of the single B2 parent phase was observed in the annealed TiNi film. The hardness and elastic modulus of the films increased because of the precipitation of the Ti3Ni4 phase in the single B2 parent phase.

  2. 40 CFR Table 4 of Subpart Aaaa to... - Requirements for Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... interference trap. 5. Oxygen or Carbon Dioxide 25 percent oxygen or 25 percent carbon dioxide P.S. 3 Method 3A... combustion unit P.S. 2 Method 7E. 3. Sulfur Dioxide Inlet to control device: 125 percent of the maximum expected sulfur dioxide emissions of the municipal waste combustion unit. Control device outlet: 50 percent...

  3. 40 CFR 60.264 - Emission monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Emission monitoring. 60.264 Section 60... Facilities § 60.264 Emission monitoring. (a) The owner or operator subject to the provisions of this subpart... opacity of emissions discharged into the atmosphere from the control device(s). (b) For the purpose...

  4. 40 CFR 60.264 - Emission monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Emission monitoring. 60.264 Section 60... Facilities § 60.264 Emission monitoring. (a) The owner or operator subject to the provisions of this subpart... opacity of emissions discharged into the atmosphere from the control device(s). (b) For the purpose...

  5. 40 CFR 60.264 - Emission monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Emission monitoring. 60.264 Section 60... Facilities § 60.264 Emission monitoring. (a) The owner or operator subject to the provisions of this subpart... opacity of emissions discharged into the atmosphere from the control device(s). (b) For the purpose...

  6. 40 CFR 60.264 - Emission monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Emission monitoring. 60.264 Section 60... Facilities § 60.264 Emission monitoring. (a) The owner or operator subject to the provisions of this subpart... opacity of emissions discharged into the atmosphere from the control device(s). (b) For the purpose...

  7. 40 CFR 60.264 - Emission monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Emission monitoring. 60.264 Section 60... Facilities § 60.264 Emission monitoring. (a) The owner or operator subject to the provisions of this subpart... opacity of emissions discharged into the atmosphere from the control device(s). (b) For the purpose...

  8. Diffuse H_{2} emission: a useful geochemical tool to monitor the volcanic activity at El Hierro volcano system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, Nemesio M.; Melián, Gladys; González-Santana, Judit; Barrancos, José; Padilla, Germán; Rodríguez, Fátima; Padrón, Eleazar; Hernández, Pedro A.

    2016-04-01

    The occurrence of interfering processes affecting reactive gases as CO2 during its ascent from magmatic bodies or hydrothermal systems toward the surface environment hinders the interpretation of their enrichments in the soil atmosphere and fluxes for volcano monitoring purposes (Marini and Gambardella, 2005). These processes include gas scrubbing by ground-waters and interaction with rocks, decarbonatation processes, biogenic production, etc. Within the rest of the soil gases, particularly interest has been addressed to light and highly mobile gases. They offer important advantages for the detection of vertical permeability structures, because their interaction with the surrounding rocks or fluids during the ascent toward the surface is minimum. H2 is one of the most abundant trace species in volcano-hydrothermal systems and is a key participant in many redox reactions occurring in the hydrothermal reservoir gas (Giggenbach, 1987). Although H2 can be produced in soils by N2-fixing and fertilizing bacteria, soils are considered nowadays as sinks of molecular hydrogen (Smith-Downey et al., 2006). Because of its chemical and physical characteristics, H2 generated within the crust moves rapidly and escapes to the atmosphere. These characteristics make H2 one of the best geochemical indicators of magmatic and geothermal activity at depth. El Hierro is the youngest and the SW-most of the Canary Islands and the scenario of the last volcanic eruption of the archipelago, a submarine eruption that took place 2 km off the southern coast of the island from October 2011 to March 2012. Since at El Hierro Island there are not any surface geothermal manifestations (fumaroles, etc), we have focused our studies on soil degassing surveys. Here we show the results of soil H2 emission surveys that have been carried out regularly since mid-2012. Soil gas samples were collected in ˜600 sites selected based on their accessibility and geological criteria. Soil gases were sampled at ˜40

  9. Turbomachine monitoring system and method

    DOEpatents

    Delvaux, John McConnell

    2016-02-23

    In an embodiment, a system includes a turbomachine having a first turbomachine component including a first mechanoluminescent material. The first turbomachine component is configured to produce a first light emission upon exposure to a mechanical stimulus sufficient to cause mechanoluminescence by the first mechanoluminescent material. The system also includes a turbomachine monitoring system configured to monitor the structural health of the first component based on detection of the first light emission.

  10. Question No. 5: What Role Can Satellites Take, as a Complement to Ground Based Measurement Systems, to Provide Sustained Observations to Monitor GHG Emissions?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chahine, Moustafa; Olsen, Edward

    2011-01-01

    What role can satellites take, as a complement to ground based measurement systems, to provide sustained observations to monitor GHG emissions (e.g., CO2, CH4, O3, N2O, CFC s, NH3, and NF3) that contribute to global warming?

  11. Temporal and Spatial Variations of Particulate Emissions on Major Highways in Southern California: Lagrangian Approach Using Mobile Monitoring System.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, H.; Grady, M.; Pham, L.

    2014-12-01

    In 2010 CARB reported 9,000 people in California die prematurely each year as a result of exposure to particulate emissions. Public's exposure to particulate emissions is known to be highest on highway during daily commute. Total particle concentrations vary temporarily and spatially due to many reasons including particle nucleation, traffic, and meteorological conditions. The stationary ambient monitoring sites are too sparsely located to measure these variations on highway. Also, emissions from highways can be included in the emission inventory which can improve modeler capability to predict at much finer scale. Emissions from highways are vary temporally and spatially. This study used a mobile platform to measure total particle number, total particle surface area and average particle diameter in Lagrangian approach. The study will report occurrence and frequency of hot spots for particle nucleation on highway and temporal/ spatial variations of particle concentrations on highway. This will enable better assessment of public's exposure to particulate emissions on highway by transportation and propose a methodology how to obtain emission inventory for major highways.

  12. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Eeee of... - Requirements for Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Systems (CEMS) As stated in § 60.2940, you must comply with the following: For the followingpollutants Use the following span values for your CEMS Use the following performance specifications (P.S.) in appendix B of this part for your CEMS If needed to meet minimum data requirements, use the following...

  13. 40 CFR 63.9307 - What are my continuous emissions monitoring system installation, operation, and maintenance...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Hazardous Air Pollutants for Engine Test Cells/Stands General Compliane Requirements § 63.9307 What are my... oxygen (O2) at the outlet of the exhaust system of the engine test cell/stand or at the outlet of the... at all times that the engine test cell/stand is operating, including but not limited to,...

  14. Alternatives generation and analysis for double-shell tank primary ventilation systems emissions control and monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    SEDERBURG, J.P.

    1999-09-30

    This AGA addresses the question: ''What equipment upgrades, operational changes, and/or other actions are required relative to the DST tanks farms' ventilation systems to support retrieval, staging (including feed sampling), and delivery of tank waste to the Phase I private contractor?'' Issues and options for the various components within the ventilation subsystem affect each other. Recommended design requirements are presented and the preferred alternatives are detailed.

  15. 40 CFR 61.163 - Emission monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Emission monitoring. 61.163 Section 61.163 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Inorganic Arsenic...

  16. 40 CFR 61.163 - Emission monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Emission monitoring. 61.163 Section 61.163 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Inorganic Arsenic...

  17. 40 CFR 61.163 - Emission monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Emission monitoring. 61.163 Section 61.163 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Inorganic Arsenic...

  18. 40 CFR 61.163 - Emission monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Emission monitoring. 61.163 Section 61.163 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Inorganic Arsenic...

  19. 40 CFR 61.163 - Emission monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Emission monitoring. 61.163 Section 61.163 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Inorganic Arsenic...

  20. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION (ETV) TEST OF DIOXIN EMISSION MONITORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The performance of four dioxin emission monitors including two long-term sampling devices, the DMS (DioxinMonitoringSystem) and AMESA (Adsorption Method for Sampling Dioxins and Furans), and two semi-real-time continuous monitors, RIMMPA-TOFMS (Resonance Ionization with Multi-Mir...

  1. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION (ETV) TEST OF DIOXIN EMISSION MONITORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The performance of four dioxin emission monitors including two long-term sampling devices, the DMS (DioxinMonitoringSystem) and AMESA (Adsorption Method for Sampling Dioxins and Furans), and two semi-real-time continuous monitors, RIMMPA-TOFMS (Resonance Ionization with Multi-Mir...

  2. Acoustic emission monitoring of wind turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Dam, Jeremy; Bond, Leonard J.

    2015-03-01

    Damage to wind turbine blades can, if left uncorrected, evolve into catastrophic failures resulting in high costs and significant losses for the operator. Detection of damage, especially in real time, has the potential to mitigate the losses associated with such catastrophic failure. To address this need various forms of online monitoring are being investigated, including acoustic emission detection. In this paper, pencil lead breaks are used as a standard reference source and tests are performed on unidirectional glass-fiber-reinforced-polymer plates. The mechanical pencil break is used to simulate an acoustic emission (AE) that generates elastic waves in the plate. Piezoelectric sensors and a data acquisition system are used to detect and record the signals. The expected dispersion curves generated for Lamb waves in plates are calculated, and the Gabor wavelet transform is used to provide dispersion curves based on experimental data. AE sources using an aluminum plate are used as a reference case for the experimental system and data processing validation. The analysis of the composite material provides information concerning the wave speed, modes, and attenuation of the waveform, which can be used to estimate maximum AE event - receiver separation, in a particular geometry and materials combination. The foundational data provided in this paper help to guide improvements in online structural health monitoring of wind turbine blades using acoustic emission.

  3. A CAVITY RINGDOWN SPECTROSCOPY MERCURY CONTINUOUS EMISSION MONITOR

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher C. Carter, Ph.D.

    2002-01-01

    The first quarter of this project to develop a Cavity Ringdown Spectroscopy mercury continuous emission monitor involved acquisition and verification of the laser system to be used, initial cavity design, and initial software development for signal processing and data acquisition.

  4. 40 CFR Table 24 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Monitoring Systems for Inorganic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Reforming Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... entering the scrubber during coke burn-off and catalyst rejuvenation; and continuous parameter monitoring... catalyst rejuvenation 1; and continuous parameter monitoring system to measure and record the pH or alkalinity of the water (or scrubbing liquid) exiting the scrubber during coke burn-off and...

  5. 40 CFR Table 24 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Monitoring Systems for Inorganic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Reforming Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... entering the scrubber during coke burn-off and catalyst rejuvenation; and continuous parameter monitoring... catalyst rejuvenation 1; and continuous parameter monitoring system to measure and record the pH or alkalinity of the water (or scrubbing liquid) exiting the scrubber during coke burn-off and...

  6. 40 CFR 75.13 - Specific provisions for monitoring CO 2 emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Specific provisions for monitoring CO... provisions for monitoring CO 2 emissions. (a) CO 2 continuous emission monitoring system. If the owner or...” shall apply rather than “SO2 mass emissions.” (b) Determination of CO 2 emissions using appendix G...

  7. 40 CFR 75.13 - Specific provisions for monitoring CO 2 emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Specific provisions for monitoring CO... provisions for monitoring CO 2 emissions. (a) CO 2 continuous emission monitoring system. If the owner or...” shall apply rather than “SO2 mass emissions.” (b) Determination of CO 2 emissions using appendix G...

  8. Testing of Continuous Sampling Air-ICP and Mercury Systems as Continuous Emission Monitors at the Diagnostic Instrumentation and Analysis Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    D.P. Baldwin; S.J. Bajic; D.E. Eckels; D.S. Zamzow; G.P. Miller; S. Tao; C.A. Waggoner

    2001-03-15

    This report has been prepared to document the performance of the continuous sampling reduced-pressure air-ICP-AES (inductively coupled plasma--atomic emission spectroscopy) and mercury-monitor systems developed by Ames Laboratory for use as continuous emission monitors (CEM). This work was funded by the U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management, Office of Science and Technology, through the Mixed Waste Focus Area. The purpose of the project is to develop instrumentation and methods for spectroscopic field monitoring applications. During FY00 this included continued work on the development of the continuous sample introduction system and the multi-frequency AOTF-echelle spectrometer, used in conjunction with the reduced-pressure air-ICP-AES system as a multi-metal CEM. The assembly, development, and testing of an echelle spectrometer system for the detection of mercury (Hg) by atomic absorption was also completed during FY00. The continuous sampling system and the multi-metal air-ICP and mercury-monitor CEM systems were tested at Mississippi State University at the Diagnostic Instrumentation and Analysis Laboratory (DIAL) at the end of FY00. This report describes the characteristics and performance of these systems, and the results of the field tests performed at DIAL.

  9. A feasibility study of a predictive emissions monitoring system applied to taipower's nanpu and hsinta power plants.

    PubMed

    Chien, Tsung-Wen; Hsueh, Hsin-Ta; Chu, Hsin; Hsu, Wei-Chieh; Tu, Yueh-Yuan; Tsai, Hsien-Shiou; Chen, Kuo-Yi

    2010-08-01

    The Hsinta and Nanpu Power Stations are located in southern Taiwan. The Hsinta Power Station consists of five combined-cycle gas turbines (CCGT), whereas the Nanpu Power Station consists of four. A project was undertaken to develop and deploy a predictive emissions monitoring system (PEMS) on CCGT unit 3 of Hsinta Power Station (HT-3) and CCGT unit 1 of Nanpu Power Station (NP-1) with the long-term goal of developing a universal model for this kind of power plant. After the first-year PEMS project at the Hsinta power plant, one goal of the second-year PEMS project was to set up a second PEMS at the Nanpu power plant and compare the PEM models applied the to two gas-fired combined cycle power generation units. Consequently, the second and third PEMS of Taiwan at CCGT HT-3 and NP-1 were finished. After comparing the differences among HT-1, HT-3, and NP-1 PEMS models, the pattern of model functionality indicated that this model could be applied to the other units of the same type and size. However, the PEMS function constant or parameter coefficients must be modified on a case-by-case basis. With regard to the PEMS model developed for HT-3, the relative accuracy (RA) of the 15-variable model with start-up mode is only 7.43% and met the criteria of draft PS-16. With regard to the PEMS model developed for NP-1, the RA of the 10-variable model with start-up mode was only 7.76% and also met the criteria of draft PS-16.

  10. Acoustic emission monitoring of polymer composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bardenheier, R.

    1981-01-01

    The techniques of acoustic emission monitoring of polymer composite materials is described. It is highly sensitive, quasi-nondestructive testing method that indicates the origin and behavior of flaws in such materials when submitted to different load exposures. With the use of sophisticated signal analysis methods it is possible the distinguish between different types of failure mechanisms, such as fiber fracture delamination or fiber pull-out. Imperfections can be detected while monitoring complex composite structures by acoustic emission measurements.

  11. 40 CFR 60.273 - Emission monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) STANDARDS OF PERFORMANCE FOR NEW STATIONARY SOURCES Standards of Performance for Steel Plants: Electric Arc Furnaces Constructed After October 21, 1974, and On or Before August 17, 1983 § 60.273 Emission monitoring... when the furnace is operating in the melting and refining period. All visible emissions observations...

  12. 40 CFR 60.273 - Emission monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) STANDARDS OF PERFORMANCE FOR NEW STATIONARY SOURCES Standards of Performance for Steel Plants: Electric Arc Furnaces Constructed After October 21, 1974, and On or Before August 17, 1983 § 60.273 Emission monitoring... when the furnace is operating in the melting and refining period. All visible emissions observations...

  13. 40 CFR Table 24 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Monitoring Systems for Inorganic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Reforming Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... scrubbing liquid) flow rate entering the scrubber during coke burn-off and catalyst rejuvenation; and... during coke burn-off and catalyst rejuvenation 1; and continuous parameter monitoring system to measure... burn-off and catalyst rejuvenation. 2 2. Internal scrubbing system or no control device (e.g., hot...

  14. 40 CFR Table 24 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Monitoring Systems for Inorganic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Reforming Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... scrubbing liquid) flow rate entering the scrubber during coke burn-off and catalyst rejuvenation; and... during coke burn-off and catalyst rejuvenation 1; and continuous parameter monitoring system to measure... burn-off and catalyst rejuvenation. 2 2. Internal scrubbing system or no control device (e.g.,...

  15. 40 CFR Table 24 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Monitoring Systems for Inorganic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Reforming Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... scrubbing liquid) flow rate entering the scrubber during coke burn-off and catalyst rejuvenation; and... during coke burn-off and catalyst rejuvenation 1; and continuous parameter monitoring system to measure... burn-off and catalyst rejuvenation. 2 2. Internal scrubbing system or no control device (e.g.,...

  16. Monitoring hydraulic fracturing with seismic emission volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, F.; Tang, Y.; Chen, H.; TAO, K.; Levander, A.

    2014-12-01

    Recent developments in horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing have made it possible to access the reservoirs that are not available for massive production in the past. Hydraulic fracturing is designed to enhance rock permeability and reservoir drainage through the creation of fracture networks. Microseismic monitoring has been proven to be an effective and valuable technology to image hydraulic fracture geometry. Based on data acquisition, seismic monitoring techniques have been divided into two categories: downhole and surface monitoring. Surface monitoring is challenging because of the extremely low signal-to-noise ratio of the raw data. We applied the techniques used in earthquake seismology and developed an integrated monitoring system for mapping hydraulic fractures. The system consists of 20 to 30 state-of-the-art broadband seismographs, which are generally about hundreds times more sensible than regular geophones. We have conducted two experiments in two basins with very different geology and formation mechanism in China. In each case, we observed clear microseismic events, which may correspond to the induced seismicity directly associated with fracturing and the triggered ones at pre-existing faults. However, the magnitude of these events is generally larger than magnitude -1, approximately one to two magnitudes larger than those detected by downhole instruments. Spectrum-frequency analysis of the continuous surface recordings indicated high seismic energy associated with injection stages. The seismic energy can be back-projected to a volume that surrounds each injection stage. Imaging seismic emission volume (SEV) appears to be an effective way to map the stimulated reservior volume, as well as natural fractures.

  17. Monitoring by Control Technique - Capture Systems

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Stationary source emissions monitoring is required to demonstrate that a source is meeting the requirements in Federal or state rules. This page is about capture system control techniques used to reduce pollutant emissions.

  18. Milliwave melter monitoring system

    DOEpatents

    Daniel, William E.; Woskov, Paul P.; Sundaram, Shanmugavelayutham K.

    2011-08-16

    A milliwave melter monitoring system is presented that has a waveguide with a portion capable of contacting a molten material in a melter for use in measuring one or more properties of the molten material in a furnace under extreme environments. A receiver is configured for use in obtaining signals from the melt/material transmitted to appropriate electronics through the waveguide. The receiver is configured for receiving signals from the waveguide when contacting the molten material for use in determining the viscosity of the molten material. Other embodiments exist in which the temperature, emissivity, viscosity and other properties of the molten material are measured.

  19. An automated SO2 camera system for continuous, real-time monitoring of gas emissions from Kīlauea Volcano's summit Overlook Crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kern, Christoph; Sutton, Jeff; Elias, Tamar; Lee, Lopaka; Kamibayashi, Kevan; Antolik, Loren; Werner, Cynthia

    2015-07-01

    SO2 camera systems allow rapid two-dimensional imaging of sulfur dioxide (SO2) emitted from volcanic vents. Here, we describe the development of an SO2 camera system specifically designed for semi-permanent field installation and continuous use. The integration of innovative but largely "off-the-shelf" components allowed us to assemble a robust and highly customizable instrument capable of continuous, long-term deployment at Kīlauea Volcano's summit Overlook Crater. Recorded imagery is telemetered to the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) where a novel automatic retrieval algorithm derives SO2 column densities and emission rates in real-time. Imagery and corresponding emission rates displayed in the HVO operations center and on the internal observatory website provide HVO staff with useful information for assessing the volcano's current activity. The ever-growing archive of continuous imagery and high-resolution emission rates in combination with continuous data from other monitoring techniques provides insight into shallow volcanic processes occurring at the Overlook Crater. An exemplary dataset from September 2013 is discussed in which a variation in the efficiency of shallow circulation and convection, the processes that transport volatile-rich magma to the surface of the summit lava lake, appears to have caused two distinctly different phases of lake activity and degassing. This first successful deployment of an SO2 camera for continuous, real-time volcano monitoring shows how this versatile technique might soon be adapted and applied to monitor SO2 degassing at other volcanoes around the world.

  20. Fabrication of a high performance acoustic emission (AE) sensor to monitor and diagnose disturbances in HTS tapes and magnet systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ju-Hyung; Song, Jung-Bin; Jeong, Young Hun; Lee, Young-Jin; Paik, Jong-Hoo; Kim, Woo-Seok; Lee, Haigun

    2010-02-01

    An acoustic emission (AE) technique was introduced as a non-destructive method to monitor sudden deformation caused by local heat concentrations and micro-cracks within superconductors and superconducting magnets. However, the detection of AE signals in a high temperature superconductor (HTS) tape is not easy because of its low signal to noise ratio caused by the noise from boiling liquid cryogen or mechanical vibration from the cryo-cooler. Therefore, high performance piezoelectric ceramics are needed to improve the sensitivity of the AE sensor. The aim of this study was to improve the piezoelectric and dielectric properties to enhance the performance of an AE sensor. This study examined the effects of Nb2O5 addition (0.0 wt.% to 2.0 wt.%) on the properties of high performance piezoelectric ceramics, Pb(Zr0.54 Ti0.46)O3 + 0.2 wt.% Cr2O3, sintered at 1200 °C for 2 h. The performance was examined with respect to the acoustic emission response of AE sensors manufactured using the specimens with various Nb2O5 contents. Superior sensor performance was obtained for the AE sensors fabricated with the specimens containing 1.0 wt.% to 1.5 wt.% Nb2O5. The performance and characteristics of the AE sensors were in accordance with their piezoelectric and dielectric properties.

  1. 40 CFR 62.15205 - What minimum amount of monitoring data must I collect with my continuous emission monitoring...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... averages for sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides (Class I municipal waste combustion units only), and carbon... your continuous emission monitoring systems to complete at least one cycle of operation...

  2. 40 CFR 62.15205 - What minimum amount of monitoring data must I collect with my continuous emission monitoring...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... averages for sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides (Class I municipal waste combustion units only), and carbon... your continuous emission monitoring systems to complete at least one cycle of operation...

  3. 40 CFR 62.15205 - What minimum amount of monitoring data must I collect with my continuous emission monitoring...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... averages for sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides (Class I municipal waste combustion units only), and carbon... your continuous emission monitoring systems to complete at least one cycle of operation...

  4. On-site monitoring of biogenic emissions from Eucalyptus dunnii leaves using membrane extraction with sorbent interface combined with a portable gas chromatograph system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinyu; Pawliszyn, Richard; Wang, Limei; Pawliszyn, Janusz

    2004-01-01

    Membrane extraction with sorbent interface, combined with a portable gas chromatograph system (MESI-Portable GC) for continuous on-line monitoring of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) emissions (from leaves of Eucalytus dunnii in a greenhouse), is presented herein. A sampling chamber was designed to facilitate the extraction and identification of the BVOCs emitted by the Eucalytus dunnii leaves. Preliminary experiments, including; enrichment times, microtrap temperatures, stripping gas flow rates, and desorption temperatures were investigated to optimize experimental parameters. The main components of BVOCs released by the Eucalytus dunnii leaves were identified by comparing the retention times of peaks with those of authentic standard solutions. They were then confirmed with solid phase microextraction coupled with gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (SPME-GC-MS). BVOC emission profiles of [small alpha]-pinene, eucalyptol, and [gamma]-terpinene emitted by intact and damaged Eucalytus dunnii leaves were obtained. The findings suggest that the MESI-Portable GC system is a simple and useful tool for field monitoring changes in plant emissions as a function of time.

  5. 40 CFR 60.3041 - What is the minimum amount of monitoring data I must collect with my continuous emission...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... monitoring data I must collect with my continuous emission monitoring systems, and is the data collection... collect with my continuous emission monitoring systems, and is the data collection requirement enforceable? (a) Where continuous emission monitoring systems are required, obtain 1-hour arithmetic...

  6. 40 CFR 60.2942 - What is the minimum amount of monitoring data I must collect with my continuous emission...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... monitoring data I must collect with my continuous emission monitoring systems, and is the data collection... with my continuous emission monitoring systems, and is the data collection requirement enforceable? (a) Where continuous emission monitoring systems are required, obtain 1-hour arithmetic averages. Make...

  7. 40 CFR 60.284 - Monitoring of emissions and operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... atmosphere from any lime kiln, recovery furnace, digester system, brown stock washer system, multiple-effect... lime kiln or smelt dissolving tank using a scrubber emission control device: (i) A monitoring device... each operating day for the recovery furnace and lime kiln. These 12-hour averages shall correspond...

  8. 40 CFR 60.84 - Emission monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... production rate factor, 368 dscm/metric ton (11,800 dscf/ton) of 100 percent H2SO4 produced. %O2=oxygen... supply oxygen may use the following continuous emission monitoring approach and calculation procedures in... that would alleviate problems encountered in the measurement of gas velocities or production rate...

  9. 40 CFR 60.84 - Emission monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... supply oxygen may use the following continuous emission monitoring approach and calculation procedures in... that would alleviate problems encountered in the measurement of gas velocities or production rate... = acid production rate factor, 368 dscm/metric ton (11,800 dscf/ton) of 100 percent H2SO4 produced. %O2...

  10. 40 CFR 60.84 - Emission monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... production rate factor, 368 dscm/metric ton (11,800 dscf/ton) of 100 percent H2SO4 produced. %O2=oxygen... supply oxygen may use the following continuous emission monitoring approach and calculation procedures in... that would alleviate problems encountered in the measurement of gas velocities or production rate...

  11. 76 FR 18415 - Continuous Emission Monitoring

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 75 Continuous Emission Monitoring CFR Correction In Title 40 of the Code of Federal... units. The owner or operator of an affected unit that combusts wood, refuse, or other material...

  12. Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chance, Kelly; Liu, Xiong; Suleiman, Raid M.; Flittner, David; Al-Saadi, Jay; Janz, Scott

    2015-01-01

    TEMPO is now well into its implementation phase, having passed both its Key Decision Point C and the Critical Design Review (CDR) for the instrument. The CDR for the ground systems will occur in March 2016 and the CDR for the Mission component at a later date, after the host spacecraft has been selected. TEMPO is on schedule to measure atmospheric pollution for greater North America from space using ultraviolet and visible spectroscopy. TEMPO measures from Mexico City to the Canadian oil sands, and from the Atlantic to the Pacific, hourly and at high spatial resolution. TEMPO provides a tropospheric measurement suite that includes the key elements of tropospheric air pollution chemistry. Measurements are from geostationary (GEO) orbit, to capture the inherent high variability in the diurnal cycle of emissions and chemistry. The small product spatial footprint resolves pollution sources at sub-urban scale. Together, this temporal and spatial resolution improves emission inventories, monitors population exposure, and enables effective emission-control strategies. TEMPO takes advantage of a GEO host spacecraft to provide a modest cost mission that measures the spectra required to retrieve O3, NO2, SO2, H2CO, C2H2O2, H2O, aerosols, cloud parameters, and UVB radiation. TEMPO thus measures the major elements, directly or by proxy, in the tropospheric O3 chemistry cycle. Multi-spectral observations provide sensitivity to O3 in the lowermost troposphere, substantially reducing uncertainty in air quality predictions by 50 percent. TEMPO quantifies and tracks the evolution of aerosol loading. It provides near-real-time air quality products that will be made widely, publicly available. TEMPO provides much of the atmospheric measurement capability recommended for GEO-CAPE in the 2007 National Research Council Decadal Survey, Earth Science and Applications from Space: National Imperatives for the Next Decade and Beyond. Instruments from Europe (Sentinel 4) and Asia (GEMS) will

  13. Emission Abatement System

    DOEpatents

    Bromberg, Leslie; Cohn, Daniel R.; Rabinovich, Alexander

    2003-05-13

    Emission abatement system. The system includes a source of emissions and a catalyst for receiving the emissions. Suitable catalysts are absorber catalysts and selective catalytic reduction catalysts. A plasma fuel converter generates a reducing gas from a fuel source and is connected to deliver the reducing gas into contact with the absorber catalyst for regenerating the catalyst. A preferred reducing gas is a hydrogen rich gas and a preferred plasma fuel converter is a plasmatron. It is also preferred that the absorber catalyst be adapted for absorbing NO.sub.x.

  14. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Ffff of... - Model Rule-Requirements for Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... SOURCES Emission Guidelines and Compliance Times for Other Solid Waste Incineration Units That Commenced... emissions of the waste combustion unit P.S.4A Method 10. 2. Oxygen 25 percent oxygen P.S.3 Method 3A or...

  15. An automated SO2 camera system for continuous, real-time monitoring of gas emissions from Kīlauea Volcano's summit Overlook Crater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kern, Christoph; Sutton, Jeff; Elias, Tamar; Lee, Robert Lopaka; Kamibayashi, Kevan P.; Antolik, Loren; Werner, Cynthia A.

    2015-01-01

    SO2 camera systems allow rapid two-dimensional imaging of sulfur dioxide (SO2) emitted from volcanic vents. Here, we describe the development of an SO2 camera system specifically designed for semi-permanent field installation and continuous use. The integration of innovative but largely “off-the-shelf” components allowed us to assemble a robust and highly customizable instrument capable of continuous, long-term deployment at Kīlauea Volcano's summit Overlook Crater. Recorded imagery is telemetered to the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) where a novel automatic retrieval algorithm derives SO2 column densities and emission rates in real-time. Imagery and corresponding emission rates displayed in the HVO operations center and on the internal observatory website provide HVO staff with useful information for assessing the volcano's current activity. The ever-growing archive of continuous imagery and high-resolution emission rates in combination with continuous data from other monitoring techniques provides insight into shallow volcanic processes occurring at the Overlook Crater. An exemplary dataset from September 2013 is discussed in which a variation in the efficiency of shallow circulation and convection, the processes that transport volatile-rich magma to the surface of the summit lava lake, appears to have caused two distinctly different phases of lake activity and degassing. This first successful deployment of an SO2 camera for continuous, real-time volcano monitoring shows how this versatile technique might soon be adapted and applied to monitor SO2 degassing at other volcanoes around the world.

  16. 40 CFR Table 10 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Monitoring Systems for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... the concentration by volume (dry basis) of CO emissions from each catalyst regenerator vent. 2. Not... to measure and record the concentration by volume (dry basis) of CO emissions from each catalyst... record the concentration by volume (dry basis) of CO emissions from each catalyst regenerator vent; or...

  17. 40 CFR Table 10 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Monitoring Systems for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... the concentration by volume (dry basis) of CO emissions from each catalyst regenerator vent. 2. Not... to measure and record the concentration by volume (dry basis) of CO emissions from each catalyst... record the concentration by volume (dry basis) of CO emissions from each catalyst regenerator vent; or...

  18. 40 CFR Table 10 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Monitoring Systems for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... the concentration by volume (dry basis) of CO emissions from each catalyst regenerator vent. 2. Not... to measure and record the concentration by volume (dry basis) of CO emissions from each catalyst... record the concentration by volume (dry basis) of CO emissions from each catalyst regenerator vent; or...

  19. 40 CFR Table 10 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Monitoring Systems for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... concentration by volume (dry basis) of CO emissions from each catalyst regenerator vent. 2. Not subject to the... and record the concentration by volume (dry basis) of CO emissions from each catalyst regenerator vent... by volume (dry basis) of CO emissions from each catalyst regenerator vent; or continuous...

  20. 40 CFR Table 10 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Monitoring Systems for Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... concentration by volume (dry basis) of CO emissions from each catalyst regenerator vent. 2. Not subject to the... and record the concentration by volume (dry basis) of CO emissions from each catalyst regenerator vent... by volume (dry basis) of CO emissions from each catalyst regenerator vent; or continuous...

  1. 40 CFR Table 7 to Subpart Bbbb of... - Model Rule-Requirements for Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... sulfur dioxide emissions of the municipal waste combustion unit 4. Carbon Monoxide 125 percent of the... emissions of the municipal waste combustion unit P.S. 2 Method 7E. 3. Sulfur Dioxide Inlet to control device: 125 percent of the maximum expected hourly potential sulfur dioxide emissions of the municipal...

  2. 40 CFR Table 7 to Subpart Bbbb of... - Model Rule-Requirements for Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... sulfur dioxide emissions of the municipal waste combustion unit 4. Carbon Monoxide 125 percent of the... emissions of the municipal waste combustion unit P.S. 2 Method 7E. 3. Sulfur Dioxide Inlet to control device: 125 percent of the maximum expected hourly potential sulfur dioxide emissions of the municipal...

  3. 40 CFR Table 7 to Subpart Bbbb of... - Model Rule-Requirements for Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... sulfur dioxide emissions of the municipal waste combustion unit 4. Carbon Monoxide 125 percent of the... emissions of the municipal waste combustion unit P.S. 2 Method 7E. 3. Sulfur Dioxide Inlet to control device: 125 percent of the maximum expected hourly potential sulfur dioxide emissions of the municipal...

  4. 40 CFR Table 7 to Subpart Bbbb of... - Model Rule-Requirements for Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... sulfur dioxide emissions of the municipal waste combustion unit 4. Carbon Monoxide 125 percent of the... emissions of the municipal waste combustion unit P.S. 2 Method 7E. 3. Sulfur Dioxide Inlet to control device: 125 percent of the maximum expected hourly potential sulfur dioxide emissions of the municipal...

  5. Acoustic-emission monitoring of steam turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, L. J.; Randall, R. L.; Hong, C.

    1982-04-01

    A method for the on-line detection of crack growth in steam turbine rotors based on acoustic emission (AE) monitoring is discussed. A systematic study involving a number of tasks was performed to evaluate the potential for the detection and correct identification of crack growth AE signals during various turbine operating conditions. These included acoustic wave propagation and attenuation measurements, background noise characterization, laboratory rotor material tests, monitoring equipment optimization, dynamic stress analysis of the rotor under transient operation and on-line source location and signal characterization. No crack growth was detected during the monitoring periods but there was sufficient information from the combined tasks to estimate the flaw growth detectability during different operating conditions if it occurs. The experience also suggests that AE monitoring can be useful for diagnosis of other turbine problems such as blade rubbing, out-of-balance condition, bearing deterioration, lubricating oil contamination and perhaps boiler exfoliation and blade erosion.

  6. Biogenic Emission Inventory System (BEIS)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Biogenic Emission Inventory System (BEIS) estimates volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from vegetation and nitric oxide (NO) emission from soils. Recent BEIS development has been restricted to the SMOKE system

  7. Method and apparatus for calibrating a particle emissions monitor

    DOEpatents

    Flower, W.L.; Renzi, R.F.

    1998-07-07

    The invention discloses a method and apparatus for calibrating particulate emissions monitors, in particular, sampling probes, and in general, without removing the instrument from the system being monitored. A source of one or more specific metals in aerosol (either solid or liquid) or vapor form is housed in the instrument. The calibration operation is initiated by moving a focusing lens, used to focus a light beam onto an analysis location and collect the output light response, from an operating position to a calibration position such that the focal point of the focusing lens is now within a calibration stream issuing from a calibration source. The output light response from the calibration stream can be compared to that derived from an analysis location in the operating position to more accurately monitor emissions within the emissions flow stream. 6 figs.

  8. Method and apparatus for calibrating a particle emissions monitor

    DOEpatents

    Flower, William L.; Renzi, Ronald F.

    1998-07-07

    The instant invention discloses method and apparatus for calibrating particulate emissions monitors, in particular, and sampling probes, in general, without removing the instrument from the system being monitored. A source of one or more specific metals in aerosol (either solid or liquid) or vapor form is housed in the instrument. The calibration operation is initiated by moving a focusing lens, used to focus a light beam onto an analysis location and collect the output light response, from an operating position to a calibration position such that the focal point of the focusing lens is now within a calibration stream issuing from a calibration source. The output light response from the calibration stream can be compared to that derived from an analysis location in the operating position to more accurately monitor emissions within the emissions flow stream.

  9. Challenges in the development of sensors for monitoring automobile emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, R.S.; Pham, A.Q.

    1997-02-20

    A new generation of on-board automotive sensors are needed for diagnosis and control of engines and catalytic converters. With regard to catalytic converters, the intent of these regulations is to ensure that the vehicle operator is informed when emission control system are no longer performing adequately. In order to be commercialized, sensors for emission control must meet certain criteria, including low cost, reliability, and manufacturability. We have been developing solid state electrochemical sensors for emission control. Most recently, our work has focused on the development of hydrocarbon sensors for monitoring catalytic converter performance. Previous work was concerned with the development of an oxygen sensor having appropriate sensitivity for lean-burn engines. Operational limits for oxygen sensors have been defined and new materials have been developed for hydrocarbon sensors. Technical results are presented here as well as challenges to be met in the development of materials and designs for new chemical sensors for monitoring automotive emissions.

  10. Optimization of Sensor Monitoring Strategies for Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klise, K. A.; Laird, C. D.; Downey, N.; Baker Hebert, L.; Blewitt, D.; Smith, G. R.

    2016-12-01

    Continuous or regularly scheduled monitoring has the potential to quickly identify changes in air quality. However, even with low-cost sensors, only a limited number of sensors can be placed to monitor airborne pollutants. The physical placement of these sensors and the sensor technology used can have a large impact on the performance of a monitoring strategy. Furthermore, sensors can be placed for different objectives, including maximum coverage, minimum time to detection or exposure, or to quantify emissions. Different objectives may require different monitoring strategies, which need to be evaluated by stakeholders before sensors are placed in the field. In this presentation, we outline methods to enhance ambient detection programs through optimal design of the monitoring strategy. These methods integrate atmospheric transport models with sensor characteristics, including fixed and mobile sensors, sensor cost and failure rate. The methods use site specific pre-computed scenarios which capture differences in meteorology, terrain, concentration averaging times, gas concentration, and emission characteristics. The pre-computed scenarios become input to a mixed-integer, stochastic programming problem that solves for sensor locations and types that maximize the effectiveness of the detection program. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  11. Quantitative structural health monitoring using acoustic emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcox, Paul D.; Lee, Chee Kin; Scholey, Jonathan J.; Friswell, Michael I.; Wisnom, Michael R.; Drinkwater, Bruce W.

    2006-03-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) testing is potentially a highly suitable technique for structural health monitoring (SHM) applications due to its ability to achieve high sensitivity from a sparse array of sensors. For AE to be deployed as part of an SHM system it is essential that its capability is understood. This is the motivation for developing a forward model, referred to as QAE-Forward, of the complete AE process in real structures which is described in the first part of this paper. QAE-Forward is based around a modular and expandable architecture of frequency domain transfer functions to describe various aspects of the AE process, such as AE signal generation, wave propagation and signal detection. The intention is to build additional functionality into QAE-Forward as further data becomes available, whether this is through new analytic tools, numerical models or experimental measurements. QAE-Forward currently contains functions that implement (1) the excitation of multimodal guided waves by arbitrarily orientated point sources, (2) multi-modal wave propagation through generally anisotropic multi-layered media, and (3) the detection of waves by circular transducers of finite size. Results from the current implementation of QAE-Forward are compared to experimental data obtained from Hsu-Neilson tests on aluminum plate and good agreement is obtained. The paper then describes an experimental technique and a finite element modeling technique to obtain quantitative AE data from fatigue crack growth that will feed into QAE-Forward.

  12. 40 CFR 60.403 - Monitoring of emissions and operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Phosphate Rock Plants § 60.403 Monitoring of emissions and operations. (a) Any owner or operator subject to... of the gases discharged into the atmosphere from any phosphate rock dryer, calciner, or grinder. The span of this system shall be set at 40-percent opacity. (b) For ground phosphate rock storage and...

  13. 40 CFR 60.403 - Monitoring of emissions and operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Phosphate Rock Plants § 60.403 Monitoring of emissions and operations. (a) Any owner or operator subject to... of the gases discharged into the atmosphere from any phosphate rock dryer, calciner, or grinder. The span of this system shall be set at 40-percent opacity. (b) For ground phosphate rock storage and...

  14. 40 CFR 60.403 - Monitoring of emissions and operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Phosphate Rock Plants § 60.403 Monitoring of emissions and operations. (a) Any owner or operator subject to... of the gases discharged into the atmosphere from any phosphate rock dryer, calciner, or grinder. The span of this system shall be set at 40-percent opacity. (b) For ground phosphate rock storage and...

  15. 40 CFR 60.403 - Monitoring of emissions and operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Phosphate Rock Plants § 60.403 Monitoring of emissions and operations. (a) Any owner or operator subject to... of the gases discharged into the atmosphere from any phosphate rock dryer, calciner, or grinder. The span of this system shall be set at 40-percent opacity. (b) For ground phosphate rock storage and...

  16. 40 CFR 60.403 - Monitoring of emissions and operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Phosphate Rock Plants § 60.403 Monitoring of emissions and operations. (a) Any owner or operator subject to... of the gases discharged into the atmosphere from any phosphate rock dryer, calciner, or grinder. The span of this system shall be set at 40-percent opacity. (b) For ground phosphate rock storage and...

  17. 40 CFR 63.848 - Emission monitoring requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... must represent a complete operating cycle. (b) POM emissions from Soderberg potlines. Using the... operating cycle. The primary control system must be sampled over an 8-hour period, unless site-specific... alternative monitoring method. All runs must represent a full process cycle. (4) The owner or operator...

  18. Advanced dive monitoring system.

    PubMed

    Sternberger, W I; Goemmer, S A

    1999-01-01

    The US Navy supports deep diving operations with a variety of mixed-gas life support systems. A systems engineering study was conducted for the Naval Experimental Dive Unit (Panama City, FL) to develop a concept design for an advanced dive monitoring system. The monitoring system is intended primarily to enhance diver safety and secondarily to support diving medicine research. Distinct monitoring categories of diver physiology, life support system, and environment are integrated in the monitoring system. A system concept is proposed that accommodates real-time and quantitative measurements, noninvasive physiological monitoring, and a flexible and expandable implementation architecture. Human factors and ergonomic design considerations have been emphasized to assure that there is no impact on the diver's primary mission. The Navy has accepted the resultant system requirements and the basic design concept. A number of monitoring components have been implemented and successfully support deep diving operations.

  19. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Ffff of... - Model Rule-Requirements for Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... SOURCES Emission Guidelines and Compliance Times for Other Solid Waste Incineration Units That Commenced Construction On or Before December 9, 2004 Pt. 60, Subpt. FFFF, Table 4 Table 4 to Subpart FFFF of Part 60... emissions of the waste combustion unit P.S.4A Method 10. 2. Oxygen 25 percent oxygen P.S.3 Method 3A or...

  20. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Ffff of... - Model Rule-Requirements for Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... SOURCES Emission Guidelines and Compliance Times for Other Solid Waste Incineration Units That Commenced Construction On or Before December 9, 2004 Pt. 60, Subpt. FFFF, Table 4 Table 4 to Subpart FFFF of Part 60... emissions of the waste combustion unit P.S.4A Method 10. 2. Oxygen 25 percent oxygen P.S.3 Method 3A or...

  1. 40 CFR Table 31 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Monitoring Systems for HAP Emissions From Sulfur Recovery Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Emissions From Sulfur Recovery Units 31 Table 31 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Pollutants for Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery... HAP Emissions From Sulfur Recovery Units As stated in § 63.1568(b)(1), you shall meet each...

  2. 40 CFR 60.1765 - What additional requirements must I meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity monitoring system? 60.1765 Section 60.1765 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity monitoring system? Use the required span...

  3. 40 CFR 60.1765 - What additional requirements must I meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity monitoring system? 60.1765 Section 60.1765 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity monitoring system? Use the required span...

  4. 40 CFR 60.1765 - What additional requirements must I meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity monitoring system? 60.1765 Section 60.1765 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity monitoring system? Use the required span...

  5. 40 CFR 60.1765 - What additional requirements must I meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity monitoring system? 60.1765 Section 60.1765 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity monitoring system? Use the required span...

  6. 40 CFR 60.1765 - What additional requirements must I meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity monitoring system? 60.1765 Section 60.1765 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity monitoring system? Use the required span...

  7. [Status and needs research for on-line monitoring of VOCs emissions from stationary sources].

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiang; Zhou, Gang; Zhong, Qi; Zhao, Jin-Bao; Yang, Kai

    2013-12-01

    Based on atmospheric volatile organic compounds (VOCs) pollution control requirements during the twelfth-five year plan and the current status of monitoring and management in the world, instrumental architecture and technical characteristics of continuous emission monitoring systems (CEMS) for VOCs emission from stationary sources are investigated and researched. Technological development needs of VOCs emission on-line monitoring techniques for stationary sources in China are proposed from the system sampling pretreatment technology and analytical measurement techniques.

  8. 40 CFR 60.4345 - What are the requirements for the continuous emission monitoring system equipment, if I choose to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... diluent monitor must complete a minimum of one cycle of operation (sampling, analyzing, and data recording... least one valid data point must be obtained with each monitor for each quadrant of the hour in which the... are performed on the CEMS, a minimum of two valid data points (one in each of two quadrants)...

  9. Emission control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor); Chung, J. Landy (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Methods and apparatus utilizing hydrogen peroxide are useful to reduce SOx and mercury (or other heavy metal) emissions from combustion flue gas streams. The methods and apparatus may further be modified to reduce NOx emissions. Continuous concentration of hydrogen peroxide to levels approaching or exceeding propellant-grade hydrogen peroxide facilitates increased system efficiency. In this manner, combustion flue gas streams can be treated for the removal of SOx and heavy metals, while isolating useful by-products streams of sulfuric acid as well as solids for the recovery of the heavy metals. Where removal of NOx emissions is included, nitric acid may also be isolated for use in fertilizer or other industrial applications.

  10. Using acoustic emission signals for monitoring of production processes.

    PubMed

    Tönshoff, H K; Jung, M; Männel, S; Rietz, W

    2000-07-01

    The systems for in-process quality assurance offer the possibility of estimating the workpiece quality during machining. Especially for finishing processes like grinding or turning of hardened steels, it is important to control the process continuously in order to avoid rejects and refinishing. This paper describes the use of on-line monitoring systems with process-integrated measurement of acoustic emission to evaluate hard turning and grinding processes. The correlation between acoustic emission signals and subsurface integrity is determined to analyse the progression of the processes and the workpiece quality.

  11. 40 CFR 62.15220 - What additional requirements must I meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity monitoring system? 62.15220 Section 62.15220 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... the operation of my continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity monitoring...

  12. 40 CFR 60.1275 - What additional requirements must I meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity monitoring... additional requirements must I meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity monitoring system? Use the required span values and applicable performance...

  13. 40 CFR 62.15220 - What additional requirements must I meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity monitoring system? 62.15220 Section 62.15220 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... the operation of my continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity monitoring...

  14. 40 CFR 62.15220 - What additional requirements must I meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity monitoring system? 62.15220 Section 62.15220 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... the operation of my continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity monitoring...

  15. 40 CFR 60.1275 - What additional requirements must I meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity monitoring... additional requirements must I meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity monitoring system? Use the required span values and applicable performance...

  16. 40 CFR 60.1275 - What additional requirements must I meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity monitoring... additional requirements must I meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity monitoring system? Use the required span values and applicable performance...

  17. 40 CFR 60.1275 - What additional requirements must I meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity monitoring... additional requirements must I meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity monitoring system? Use the required span values and applicable performance...

  18. 40 CFR 62.15220 - What additional requirements must I meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity monitoring system? 62.15220 Section 62.15220 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... the operation of my continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity monitoring...

  19. 40 CFR 60.1275 - What additional requirements must I meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity monitoring... additional requirements must I meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity monitoring system? Use the required span values and applicable performance...

  20. 40 CFR 62.15220 - What additional requirements must I meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity monitoring system? 62.15220 Section 62.15220 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... the operation of my continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity monitoring...

  1. Inductive System Health Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iverson, David L.

    2004-01-01

    The Inductive Monitoring System (IMS) software was developed to provide a technique to automatically produce health monitoring knowledge bases for systems that are either difficult to model (simulate) with a computer or which require computer models that are too complex to use for real time monitoring. IMS uses nominal data sets collected either directly from the system or from simulations to build a knowledge base that can be used to detect anomalous behavior in the system. Machine learning and data mining techniques are used to characterize typical system behavior by extracting general classes of nominal data from archived data sets. IMS is able to monitor the system by comparing real time operational data with these classes. We present a description of learning and monitoring method used by IMS and summarize some recent IMS results.

  2. 40 CFR Table 7 to Subpart Bbbb of... - Model Rule-Requirements for Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Method 10 with alternative interference trap. 5. Oxygen or Carbon Dioxide 25 percent oxygen or 25 percent carbon dioxide P.S. 3 Method 3A or 3B. ... sulfur dioxide emissions of the municipal waste combustion unit 4. Carbon Monoxide 125 percent of the...

  3. 40 CFR Table 31 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Monitoring Systems for HAP Emissions From Sulfur Recovery Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    .... Option 2: TRS limit. Each new or existing sulfur recovery unit (Claus or other type, regardless of size... Emissions From Sulfur Recovery Units 31 Table 31 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery Units Pt....

  4. 40 CFR Table 31 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Monitoring Systems for HAP Emissions From Sulfur Recovery Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... the data for excess oxygen. 3. Option 2: TRS limit. Each new or existing sulfur recovery unit (Claus... Emissions From Sulfur Recovery Units 31 Table 31 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Pollutants for Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur...

  5. 40 CFR Table 31 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Monitoring Systems for HAP Emissions From Sulfur Recovery Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... the data for excess oxygen. 3. Option 2: TRS limit. Each new or existing sulfur recovery unit (Claus... Emissions From Sulfur Recovery Units 31 Table 31 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Pollutants for Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur...

  6. 40 CFR Table 31 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Monitoring Systems for HAP Emissions From Sulfur Recovery Units

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    .... Option 2: TRS limit. Each new or existing sulfur recovery unit (Claus or other type, regardless of size... Emissions From Sulfur Recovery Units 31 Table 31 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery Units Pt....

  7. Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution (TEMPO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoogman, P.; Liu, X.; Suleiman, R. M.; Pennington, W. F.; Flittner, D. E.; Al-Saadi, J. A.; Hilton, B. B.; Nicks, D. K.; Newchurch, M. J.; Carr, J. L.; hide

    2016-01-01

    TEMPO (Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution) was selected in 2012 by NASA as the first Earth Venture Instrument, for launch between 2018 and 2021. It will measure atmospheric pollution for greater North America from space using ultraviolet and visible spectroscopy. TEMPO observes from Mexico City, Cuba, and the Bahamas to the Canadian oil sands, and from the Atlantic to the Pacific, hourly and at high spatial resolution (approximately 2.1 kilometers N/S by 4.4 kilometers E/W at 36.5 degrees N, 100 degrees W). TEMPO provides a tropospheric measurement suite that includes the key elements of tropospheric air pollution chemistry, as well as contributing to carbon cycle knowledge. Measurements are made hourly from geostationary (GEO) orbit, to capture the high variability present in the diurnal cycle of emissions and chemistry that are unobservable from current low-Earth orbit (LEO) satellites that measure once per day. The small product spatial footprint resolves pollution sources at sub-urban scale. Together, this temporal and spatial resolution improves emission inventories, monitors population exposure, and enables effective emission-control strategies. TEMPO takes advantage of a commercial GEO host spacecraft to provide a modest cost mission that measures the spectra required to retrieve ozone (O3), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), sulfur dioxide (SO2), formaldehyde (H2CO), glyoxal (C2H2O2), bromine monoxide (BrO), IO (iodine monoxide),water vapor, aerosols, cloud parameters, ultraviolet radiation, and foliage properties. TEMPO thus measures the major elements, directly or by proxy, in the tropospheric O3 chemistry cycle. Multi-spectral observations provide sensitivity to O3 in the lowermost troposphere, substantially reducing uncertainty in air quality predictions. TEMPO quantifies and tracks the evolution of aerosol loading. It provides these near-real-time air quality products that will be made publicly available. TEMPO will launch at a prime time to be the

  8. Monitoring Cray Cooling Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, Don E; Ezell, Matthew A; Becklehimer, Jeff; Donovan, Matthew J; Layton, Christopher C

    2014-01-01

    While sites generally have systems in place to monitor the health of Cray computers themselves, often the cooling systems are ignored until a computer failure requires investigation into the source of the failure. The Liebert XDP units used to cool the Cray XE/XK models as well as the Cray proprietary cooling system used for the Cray XC30 models provide data useful for health monitoring. Unfortunately, this valuable information is often available only to custom solutions not accessible by a center-wide monitoring system or is simply ignored entirely. In this paper, methods and tools used to harvest the monitoring data available are discussed, and the implementation needed to integrate the data into a center-wide monitoring system at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is provided.

  9. Optical emission line monitor with background observation and cancellation

    DOEpatents

    Goff, David R.; Notestein, John E.

    1986-01-01

    A fiber optics based optical emission line monitoring system is provided in which selected spectral emission lines, such as the sodium D-line emission in coal combustion, may be detected in the presence of interferring background or blackbody radiation with emissions much greater in intensity than that of the emission line being detected. A bifurcated fiber optic light guide is adapted at the end of one branch to view the combustion light which is guided to a first bandpass filter, adapted to the common trunk end of the fiber. A portion of the light is reflected back through the common trunk portion of the fiber to a second bandpass filter adapted to the end of the other branch of the fiber. The first filter bandpass is centered at a wavelength corresponding to the emission line to be detected with a bandwidth of about three nanometers (nm). The second filter is centered at the same wavelength but having a width of about 10 nm. First and second light detectors are located to view the light passing through the first and second filters respectively. Thus, the second detector is blind to the light corresponding to the emission line of interest detected by the first detector and the difference between the two detector outputs is uniquely indicative of the intensity of only the combustion flame emission of interest. This instrument can reduce the effects of interferring blackbody radiation by greater than 20 dB.

  10. Optical emission line monitor with background observation and cancellation

    DOEpatents

    Goff, D.R.; Notestein, J.E.

    1985-01-04

    A fiber optics based optical emission line monitoring system is provided in which selected spectral emission lines, such as the sodium D-line emission in coal combustion, may be detected in the presence of interferring background or blackbody radiation with emissions much greater in intensity than that of the emission line being detected. A bifurcated fiber optic light guide is adapted at the end of one branch to view the combustion light which is guided to a first bandpass filter, adapted to the common trunk end of the fiber. A portion of the light is reflected back through the common trunk portion of the fiber to a second bandpass filter adapted to the end of the other branch of the fiber. The first filter bandpass is centered at a wavelength corresponding to the emission line to be detected with a bandwidth of about three nanometers (nm). The second filter is centered at the same wavelength but having a width of about 10 nm. First and second light detectors are located to view the light passing through the first and second filters respectively. Thus, the second detector is blind to the light corresponding to the emission line of interest detected by the first detector and the difference between the two detector outputs is uniquely indicative of the intensity of only the combustion flame emission of interest. This instrument can reduce the effects of interfering blackbody radiation by greater than 20 dB.

  11. 40 CFR 60.273 - Emission monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... alarm system that will sound when an increase in relative particulate loading is detected over the alarm... temperature and humidity according to the procedures identified in the site-specific monitoring plan required... (c) of this section and the alarm on the bag leak detection system does not sound, the owner...

  12. 40 CFR 60.273 - Emission monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... alarm system that will sound when an increase in relative particulate loading is detected over the alarm... temperature and humidity according to the procedures identified in the site-specific monitoring plan required... (c) of this section and the alarm on the bag leak detection system does not sound, the owner...

  13. Safety system status monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, J.R.; Morgenstern, M.H.; Rideout, T.H.; Cowley, P.J.

    1984-03-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory has studied the safety aspects of monitoring the preoperational status of safety systems in nuclear power plants. The goals of the study were to assess for the NRC the effectiveness of current monitoring systems and procedures, to develop near-term guidelines for reducing human errors associated with monitoring safety system status, and to recommend a regulatory position on this issue. A review of safety system status monitoring practices indicated that current systems and procedures do not adequately aid control room operators in monitoring safety system status. This is true even of some systems and procedures installed to meet existing regulatory guidelines (Regulatory Guide 1.47). In consequence, this report suggests acceptance criteria for meeting the functional requirements of an adequate system for monitoring safety system status. Also suggested are near-term guidelines that could reduce the likelihood of human errors in specific, high-priority status monitoring tasks. It is recommended that (1) Regulatory Guide 1.47 be revised to address these acceptance criteria, and (2) the revised Regulatory Guide 1.47 be applied to all plants, including those built since the issuance of the original Regulatory Guide.

  14. Tropospheric emissions: monitoring of pollution (TEMPO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chance, Kelly; Liu, Xiong; Suleiman, Raid M.; Flittner, David E.; Al-Saadi, Jassim; Janz, Scott J.

    2013-09-01

    TEMPO was selected in 2012 by NASA as the first Earth Venture Instrument, for launch circa 2018. It will measure atmospheric pollution for greater North America from space using ultraviolet and visible spectroscopy. TEMPO measures from Mexico City to the Canadian tar sands, and from the Atlantic to the Pacific, hourly and at high spatial resolution (~2 km N/S×4.5 km E/W at 36.5°N, 100°W). TEMPO provides a tropospheric measurement suite that includes the key elements of tropospheric air pollution chemistry. Measurements are from geostationary (GEO) orbit, to capture the inherent high variability in the diurnal cycle of emissions and chemistry. The small product spatial footprint resolves pollution sources at sub-urban scale. Together, this temporal and spatial resolution improves emission inventories, monitors population exposure, and enables effective emission-control strategies. TEMPO takes advantage of a commercial GEO host spacecraft to provide a modest cost mission that measures the spectra required to retrieve O3, NO2, SO2, H2CO, C2H2O2, H2O, aerosols, cloud parameters, and UVB radiation. TEMPO thus measures the major elements, directly or by proxy, in the tropospheric O3 chemistry cycle. Multi-spectral observations provide sensitivity to O3 in the lowermost troposphere, substantially reducing uncertainty in air quality predictions. TEMPO quantifies and tracks the evolution of aerosol loading. It provides near-real-time air quality products that will be made widely, publicly available. TEMPO will launch at a prime time to be the North American component of the global geostationary constellation of pollution monitoring together with European Sentinel-4 and Korean GEMS.

  15. 40 CFR 75.11 - Specific provisions for monitoring SO2 emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... the SO2 monitoring system, as required by section 2.1.1 in appendix B of this part, the zero-level... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Specific provisions for monitoring SO2... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTINUOUS EMISSION MONITORING Monitoring Provisions § 75.11 Specific provisions for...

  16. 40 CFR 75.11 - Specific provisions for monitoring SO2 emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... the SO2 monitoring system, as required by section 2.1.1 in appendix B of this part, the zero-level... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Specific provisions for monitoring SO2... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTINUOUS EMISSION MONITORING Monitoring Provisions § 75.11 Specific provisions for...

  17. Electrochemical NOx Sensor for Monitoring Diesel Emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, L Y; Glass, R S

    2008-11-14

    Increasingly stringent emissions regulations will require the development of advanced gas sensors for a variety of applications. For example, compact, inexpensive sensors are needed for detection of regulated pollutants, including hydrocarbons (HCs), CO, and NO{sub x}, in automotive exhaust. Of particular importance will be a sensor for NO{sub x} to ensure the proper operation of the catalyst system in the next generation of diesel (CIDI) automobiles. Because many emerging applications, particularly monitoring of automotive exhaust, involve operation in harsh, high-temperature environments, robust ceramic-oxide-based electrochemical sensors are a promising technology. Sensors using yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) as an oxygen-ion-conducting electrolyte have been widely reported for both amperometric and potentiometric modes of operation. These include the well-known exhaust gas oxygen (EGO) sensor. More recently, ac impedance-based (i.e., impedance-metric) sensing techniques using YSZ have been reported for sensing water vapor, hydrocarbons, CO, and NO{sub x}. Typically small-amplitude alternating signal is applied, and the sensor response is measured at a specified frequency. Most impedance-metric techniques have used the modulus (or magnitude) at low frequencies (< 1 Hz) as the sensing signal and attribute the measured response to interfacial phenomena. Work by our group has also investigated using phase angle as the sensing signal at somewhat higher frequencies (10 Hz). The higher frequency measurements would potentially allow for reduced sampling times during sensor operation. Another potential advantage of impedance-metric NO{sub x} sensing is the similarity in response to NO and NO{sub 2} (i.e., total-NO{sub x} sensing). Potentiometric NO{sub x} sensors typically show higher sensitivity to NO2 than NO, and responses that are opposite in sign. However, NO is more stable than NO{sub 2} at temperatures > 600 C, and thermodynamic calculations predict {approx}90

  18. Remote Monitor Alarm System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stute, Robert A. (Inventor); Galloway, F. Houston (Inventor); Medelius, Pedro J. (Inventor); Swindle, Robert W. (Inventor); Bierman, Tracy A. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A remote monitor alarm system monitors discrete alarm and analog power supply voltage conditions at remotely located communications terminal equipment. A central monitoring unit (CMU) is connected via serial data links to each of a plurality of remote terminal units (RTUS) that monitor the alarm and power supply conditions of the remote terminal equipment. Each RTU can monitor and store condition information of both discrete alarm points and analog power supply voltage points in its associated communications terminal equipment. The stored alarm information is periodically transmitted to the CMU in response to sequential polling of the RTUS. The number of monitored alarm inputs and permissible voltage ranges for the analog inputs can be remotely configured at the CMU and downloaded into programmable memory at each RTU. The CMU includes a video display, a hard disk memory, a line printer and an audio alarm for communicating and storing the alarm information received from each RTU.

  19. Remote maintenance monitoring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpkins, Lorenz G. (Inventor); Owens, Richard C. (Inventor); Rochette, Donn A. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A remote maintenance monitoring system retrofits to a given hardware device with a sensor implant which gathers and captures failure data from the hardware device, without interfering with its operation. Failure data is continuously obtained from predetermined critical points within the hardware device, and is analyzed with a diagnostic expert system, which isolates failure origin to a particular component within the hardware device. For example, monitoring of a computer-based device may include monitoring of parity error data therefrom, as well as monitoring power supply fluctuations therein, so that parity error and power supply anomaly data may be used to trace the failure origin to a particular plane or power supply within the computer-based device. A plurality of sensor implants may be rerofit to corresponding plural devices comprising a distributed large-scale system. Transparent interface of the sensors to the devices precludes operative interference with the distributed network. Retrofit capability of the sensors permits monitoring of even older devices having no built-in testing technology. Continuous real time monitoring of a distributed network of such devices, coupled with diagnostic expert system analysis thereof, permits capture and analysis of even intermittent failures, thereby facilitating maintenance of the monitored large-scale system.

  20. Tropospheric emissions: Monitoring of pollution (TEMPO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoogman, P.; Liu, X.; Suleiman, R. M.; Pennington, W. F.; Flittner, D. E.; Al-Saadi, J. A.; Hilton, B. B.; Nicks, D. K.; Newchurch, M. J.; Carr, J. L.; Janz, S. J.; Andraschko, M. R.; Arola, A.; Baker, B. D.; Canova, B. P.; Chan Miller, C.; Cohen, R. C.; Davis, J. E.; Dussault, M. E.; Edwards, D. P.; Fishman, J.; Ghulam, A.; González Abad, G.; Grutter, M.; Herman, J. R.; Houck, J.; Jacob, D. J.; Joiner, J.; Kerridge, B. J.; Kim, J.; Krotkov, N. A.; Lamsal, L.; Li, C.; Lindfors, A.; Martin, R. V.; McElroy, C. T.; McLinden, C.; Natraj, V.; Neil, D. O.; Nowlan, C. R.; O`Sullivan, E. J.; Palmer, P. I.; Pierce, R. B.; Pippin, M. R.; Saiz-Lopez, A.; Spurr, R. J. D.; Szykman, J. J.; Torres, O.; Veefkind, J. P.; Veihelmann, B.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Chance, K.

    2017-01-01

    TEMPO was selected in 2012 by NASA as the first Earth Venture Instrument, for launch between 2018 and 2021. It will measure atmospheric pollution for greater North America from space using ultraviolet and visible spectroscopy. TEMPO observes from Mexico City, Cuba, and the Bahamas to the Canadian oil sands, and from the Atlantic to the Pacific, hourly and at high spatial resolution ( 2.1 km N/S×4.4 km E/W at 36.5°N, 100°W). TEMPO provides a tropospheric measurement suite that includes the key elements of tropospheric air pollution chemistry, as well as contributing to carbon cycle knowledge. Measurements are made hourly from geostationary (GEO) orbit, to capture the high variability present in the diurnal cycle of emissions and chemistry that are unobservable from current low-Earth orbit (LEO) satellites that measure once per day. The small product spatial footprint resolves pollution sources at sub-urban scale. Together, this temporal and spatial resolution improves emission inventories, monitors population exposure, and enables effective emission-control strategies. TEMPO takes advantage of a commercial GEO host spacecraft to provide a modest cost mission that measures the spectra required to retrieve ozone (O3), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), sulfur dioxide (SO2), formaldehyde (H2CO), glyoxal (C2H2O2), bromine monoxide (BrO), IO (iodine monoxide), water vapor, aerosols, cloud parameters, ultraviolet radiation, and foliage properties. TEMPO thus measures the major elements, directly or by proxy, in the tropospheric O3 chemistry cycle. Multi-spectral observations provide sensitivity to O3 in the lowermost troposphere, substantially reducing uncertainty in air quality predictions. TEMPO quantifies and tracks the evolution of aerosol loading. It provides these near-real-time air quality products that will be made publicly available. TEMPO will launch at a prime time to be the North American component of the global geostationary constellation of pollution monitoring

  1. 40 CFR 61.68 - Emission monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... alternative method. The vinyl chloride monitoring system used to meet the requirements in § 61.65(b)(8)(i) may... calibration gas mixture prepared from the gases specified in Sections 7.2.1 and 7.2.2 of Method 106 and in accordance with Section 10.1 of Method 106, or (2) A calibration gas cylinder standard containing the...

  2. Emission control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Methods and apparatus utilizing hydrogen peroxide are useful to reduce NOx, SOx and mercury (or other heavy metal) emissions from combustion flue gas streams. Continuous concentration of hydrogen peroxide to levels approaching or exceeding propellant-grade hydrogen peroxide facilitates increased system efficiency. In this manner, combustion flue gas streams can be treated for the removal of NOx, SOx and heavy metals, while isolating useful by-products streams of sulfuric acid and nitric acid as well as solids for the recovery of the heavy metals.

  3. Laser beam monitoring system

    DOEpatents

    Weil, Bradley S.; Wetherington, Jr., Grady R.

    1985-01-01

    Laser beam monitoring systems include laser-transparent plates set at an angle to the laser beam passing therethrough and light sensor for detecting light reflected from an object on which the laser beam impinges.

  4. 40 CFR Part 75 Emissions Monitoring Policy Manual

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Provides guidance on the requirements of 40 CFR Part 75 through a series of questions and answers that can be used by units to monitor mass sulfur dioxide emissions, mass carbon dioxide emissions, nitrogen oxide rate and heat input.

  5. Clean Air Markets - Part 75 Emissions Monitoring Policy Manual

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Learn about monitoring mass sulfur dioxide and mass carbon dioxide emissions, nitrogen oxide emission rate, and heat input by units affected by the Acid Rain Program and the Clean Air Interstate Rule.

  6. PISCES field chemical emissions monitoring project: Site 112 emissions report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-01

    This report is one of a series sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute in the area of trace substance emissions from fossil-fuel power plants. This report presents the results of a sampling and analytical study to characterize trace substances emissions at Site 112. Site 112 is a tangentially fired boiler firing residual oil. Site 112 employs electrostatic precipitators and a flue gas desulfurization system for particulate and SO{sub 2} control. Sampling at Site 112 was performed in July and August of 1992 for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and mercury. The objective of this report is to transmit the detailed data to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to assist the Agency in evaluating utility trace chemical emissions as well as the associated health risk impacts - as mandated in Title III of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments. This report does not attempt to compare the results with other sites. An assessment of data from all plants that have been tested is presented in the Electric Utility Trace Substances Synthesis Report (EPRI TR-104614).

  7. PISCES field chemical emissions monitoring project: Site 21 emissions report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-01

    This report is one of a series sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute in the area of trace substance emissions from fossil-fuel power plants. This report presents the results of a sampling and analytical study to characterize trace substances emissions at Site 21. Site 21 is a pilot-scale electrostatic precipitator and wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system. The flue gas for the pilot unit is provided by an adjacent power plant boiler which bums a medium-sulfur bituminous, coal. The primary objective in the Site 21 sampling and analytical program was to quantify the various components of variance in the measurement of trace chemical species. In addition to the replicate sample trains typically conducted at previous PISCES field measurements, duplicate analyses and duplicate (simultaneous) sample trains were also conducted. This enabled the variance due to sampling, analytical, and process conditions to be estimated. The objective of this report is to transmit the detailed data to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to assist the Agency in evaluating utility trace chemical emissions as well as the associated health risk impacts - as mandated in Title III of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments. This report does not attempt to compare the results with other sites. An assessment of data from all plants that have been tested is presented in the Electric Utility Trace Substances Synthesis Report.

  8. Development of an element-selective monitoring system for adsorbable organic halogens (AOX) with plasma emission spectrometric detection for quasi-continuous waste-water analysis.

    PubMed

    Twiehaus, T; Evers, S; Buscher, W; Cammann, K

    2001-11-01

    An automated quasi-continuously-operating monitor has been developed for element-selective analysis of adsorbable organic halogens (AOX) in water. After extensive optimization the automatic method was applied to the analysis of standard solutions and real waste water samples to prove its analytical applicability. The new instrument is based on the element-selective analysis of halogens by means of a spectroscopic detection system consisting of a microwave-induced helium plasma excitation source (TM010-type; developed in this laboratory) and the plasma emission detector (PED) which operates with oscillating narrow-band interference filters. After enriching the organic components on activated charcoal and pyrolysis in an oxygen stream at 950 degrees C, in accordance with DIN/EN 38409,H14/1485, interfering CO2 and H2O gas generated during combustion is removed from the analytes in the so-called ELSA-system (element-selective AOX-analyzer). For focused injection into the plasma excitation source the analytes (hydrogen halides) are trapped in a deactivated fused silica capillary at -180 degrees C; this is followed by identification and quantification on the basis of element-specific emission of radiation in the VIS and NIR-region (chlorine 837.6 nm, fluorine 685.6 nm). Bromine and iodine could not be detected with satisfactory inter-element selectivity, because of spectral interferences caused by matrix elements, and so results from the respective single-element investigations for determination of AOBr and AOI are not presented. The procedure has been validated and the analytical performance has been examined by calibration with p-chlorophenol and p-fluorophenol. The limit of detection was 1.1 microg (absolute) for chlorine and 6.6 microg (absolute) for fluorine.

  9. Vital signs monitoring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffen, Dale A. (Inventor); Sturm, Ronald E. (Inventor); Rinard, George A. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A system is disclosed for monitoring vital physiological signs. Each of the system components utilizes a single hybrid circuit with each component having high accuracy without the necessity of repeated calibration. The system also has low power requirements, provides a digital display, and is of sufficiently small size to be incorporated into a hand-carried case for portable use. Components of the system may also provide independent outputs making the component useful, of itself, for monitoring one or more vital signs. The overall system preferably includes an ECG amplifier and cardiotachometer signal conditioner unit, an impedance pneumograph and respiration rate signal conditioner unit, a heart/breath rate processor unit, a temperature monitoring unit, a selector switch, a clock unit, and an LCD driver unit and associated LCDs, with the system being capable of being expanded as needed or desired, such as, for example, by addition of a systolic/diastolic blood pressure unit.

  10. 40 CFR 75.12 - Specific provisions for monitoring NOX emission rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... provisions for monitoring NOX emission rate. (a) Coal-fired units, gas-fired nonpeaking units or oil-fired nonpeaking units. The owner or operator shall meet the general operating requirements in § 75.10 of this part for a NOX continuous emission monitoring system (CEMS) for each affected coal-fired unit, gas-fired...

  11. Spontaneous otoacoustic emissions in monitor lizards.

    PubMed

    Manley, Geoffrey A

    2004-03-01

    Monitors (all of which belong to the genus Varanus) make up a very uniform family of often large lizards. They have a large auditory papilla that is not highly specialized, but is divided into two unequal sub-papillae. All hair cells are covered by a tectorial membrane. Spontaneous otoacoustic emissions (SOAE) were examined in Cape monitor lizards (Varanus exanthematicus) and found between 1.08 and 2.91 kHz (at 32 degrees C) and with levels between -2.8 and 25.8 dB SPL. The frequency of SOAE was temperature dependent, with a maximal shift of 0.07 octaves/degrees C. All SOAE could be suppressed by external tones, most easily by tones near the center frequency and thus suppression tuning curves were V-shaped. In addition, SOAE could be facilitated by external tones, the amplitude increasing up to 10 dB. The most effective tones were generally those between 0.33 and 0.75 octaves above the respective center frequency of the SOAE. External tones could also change the center frequency of SOAE by up to several hundred Hz, most tones causing frequency 'pushing'. Compared to SOAE of other lizards, Varanus SOAE have larger amplitudes and show larger frequency shifts with temperature. Both of these features may be the result of the coupling of large numbers of hair cells via the continuous tectorial membrane.

  12. Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution (TEMPO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chance, Kelly; Liu, Xiong; Suleiman, Raid M.; Flittner, David E.; Al-Saadi, Jassim; Janz, Scott J.

    2014-06-01

    TEMPO, selected by NASA as the first Earth Venture Instrument, will measure atmospheric pollution for greater North America from space using ultraviolet and visible spectroscopy. TEMPO measures from Mexico City to the Canadian oil sands, and from the Atlantic to the Pacific, hourly and at high spatial resolution. TEMPO provides a tropospheric measurement suite that includes the key elements of tropospheric air pollution chemistry. Measurements are from geostationary (GEO) orbit, to capture the inherent high variability in the diurnal cycle of emissions and chemistry. The small product spatial footprint resolves pollution sources at sub-urban scale. Together, this temporal and spatial resolution improves emission inventories, monitors population exposure, and enables effective emission-control strategies. TEMPO takes advantage of a GEO host spacecraft to provide a modest-cost mission that measures the spectra required to retrieve O3, NO2, SO2, H2CO, C2H2O2, H2O, aerosols, cloud parameters, and UVB radiation. TEMPO thus measures the major elements, directly or by proxy, in the tropospheric O3 chemistry cycle. Multi-spectral observations provide sensitivity to O3 in the lowermost troposphere, reducing uncertainty in air quality predictions by 50 %. TEMPO quantifies and tracks the evolution of aerosol loading. It provides near-real-time air quality products that will be made widely, publicly available. TEMPO makes the first tropospheric trace gas measurements from GEO, by building on the heritage of five spectrometers flown in low-earth-orbit (LEO). These LEO instruments measure the needed spectra, although at coarse spatial and temporal resolutions, to the precisions required for TEMPO and use retrieval algorithms developed for them by TEMPO Science Team members and currently running in operational environments. This makes TEMPO an innovative use of a well-proven technique, able to produce a revolutionary data set. TEMPO provides much of the atmospheric measurement

  13. Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution (TEMPO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chance, K.; Liu, X.; Suleiman, R. M.; Flittner, D. E.; Al-Saadi, J. A.; Janz, S. J.; Tempo Science Team

    2013-05-01

    TEMPO has been selected by NASA as the first Earth Venture Instrument. It will measure atmospheric pollution for greater North America from space using ultraviolet/visible spectroscopy. TEMPO measures from Mexico City to the Canadian tar/oil sands, and from the Atlantic to the Pacific, hourly and at high spatial resolution (Mexico City is measured at 1.6 km N/S by 4.5 km E/W). TEMPO provides a tropospheric measurement suite that includes the key elements of tropospheric air pollution chemistry. Measurements are from geostationary (GEO) orbit, to capture the inherent high variability in the diurnal cycle of emissions and chemistry. The small product spatial footprint resolves pollution sources at sub-urban scale. Together, this temporal and spatial resolution improves emission inventories, monitors population exposure, and enables effective emission-control strategies. TEMPO takes advantage of a GEO host spacecraft to provide a modest cost mission that measures the spectra required to retrieve O3, NO2, SO2, H2CO, C2H2O2, H2O, aerosols, cloud parameters, and UVB radiation. TEMPO thus measures the major elements, directly or by proxy, in the tropospheric O3 chemistry cycle. Multi-spectral observations provide sensitivity to O3 in the lowermost troposphere, reducing uncertainty in air quality predictions by 50%. TEMPO quantifies and tracks the evolution of aerosol loading. It provides near-real-time air quality products that will be made widely, publicly available. TEMPO makes the first tropospheric trace gas measurements from GEO, by building on the heritage of five spectrometers flown in low-earth-orbit (LEO). These LEO instruments measure the needed spectra, although at coarse spatial and temporal resolutions, to the precisions required for TEMPO and use retrieval algorithms developed for them by TEMPO Science Team members and currently running in operational environments. This makes TEMPO an innovative use of a well proven technique, able to produce a revolutionary

  14. Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution (TEMPO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chance, K.; Liu, X.; Suleiman, R. M.; Flittner, D. E.; Janz, S. J.

    2012-12-01

    TEMPO is a proposed concept to measure pollution for greater North America using ultraviolet/visible spectroscopy. TEMPO measures from Mexico City to the Canadian tar/oil sands, and from the Atlantic to the Pacific, hourly and at high spatial resolution (9 km2). TEMPO provides a tropospheric measurement suite that includes the key elements of tropospheric air pollution chemistry. Measurements are from geostationary (GEO) orbit, to capture the inherent high variability in the diurnal cycle of emissions and chemistry. The small product spatial footprint resolves pollution sources at sub-urban scale. Together, this temporal and spatial resolution improves emission inventories, monitors population exposure, and enables effective emission-control strategies. TEMPO takes advantage of a GEO host spacecraft to provide a modest cost mission that measures the spectra required to retrieve O3, NO2, SO2, H2CO, C2H2O2, H2O, aerosols, cloud parameters, and UVB radiation. TEMPO thus measures the major elements, directly or by proxy, in the tropospheric O3 chemistry cycle. Multi-spectral observations provide sensitivity to O3 in the lowermost troposphere, reducing uncertainty in air quality predictions by 50%. TEMPO quantifies and tracks the evolution of aerosol loading. It provides near-real-time air quality products that will be made widely, publicly available. TEMPO makes the first tropospheric trace gas measurements from GEO, by building on the heritage of five spectrometers flown in low-earth-orbit (LEO). These LEO instruments measure the needed spectra, although at coarse spatial and temporal resolutions, to the precisions required for TEMPO and use retrieval algorithms developed for them by TEMPO Science Team members and currently running in operational environments. This makes TEMPO an innovative use of a well proven technique, able to produce a revolutionary data set. TEMPO provides much of the atmospheric measurement capability recommended for GEO-CAPE in the 2007

  15. Copilot: Monitoring Embedded Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pike, Lee; Wegmann, Nis; Niller, Sebastian; Goodloe, Alwyn

    2012-01-01

    Runtime verification (RV) is a natural fit for ultra-critical systems, where correctness is imperative. In ultra-critical systems, even if the software is fault-free, because of the inherent unreliability of commodity hardware and the adversity of operational environments, processing units (and their hosted software) are replicated, and fault-tolerant algorithms are used to compare the outputs. We investigate both software monitoring in distributed fault-tolerant systems, as well as implementing fault-tolerance mechanisms using RV techniques. We describe the Copilot language and compiler, specifically designed for generating monitors for distributed, hard real-time systems. We also describe two case-studies in which we generated Copilot monitors in avionics systems.

  16. The NASA Carbon Monitoring System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurtt, G. C.

    2015-12-01

    Greenhouse gas emission inventories, forest carbon sequestration programs (e.g., Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD and REDD+), cap-and-trade systems, self-reporting programs, and their associated monitoring, reporting and verification (MRV) frameworks depend upon data that are accurate, systematic, practical, and transparent. A sustained, observationally-driven carbon monitoring system using remote sensing data has the potential to significantly improve the relevant carbon cycle information base for the U.S. and world. Initiated in 2010, NASA's Carbon Monitoring System (CMS) project is prototyping and conducting pilot studies to evaluate technological approaches and methodologies to meet carbon monitoring and reporting requirements for multiple users and over multiple scales of interest. NASA's approach emphasizes exploitation of the satellite remote sensing resources, computational capabilities, scientific knowledge, airborne science capabilities, and end-to-end system expertise that are major strengths of the NASA Earth Science program. Through user engagement activities, the NASA CMS project is taking specific actions to be responsive to the needs of stakeholders working to improve carbon MRV frameworks. The first phase of NASA CMS projects focused on developing products for U.S. biomass/carbon stocks and global carbon fluxes, and on scoping studies to identify stakeholders and explore other potential carbon products. The second phase built upon these initial efforts, with a large expansion in prototyping activities across a diversity of systems, scales, and regions, including research focused on prototype MRV systems and utilization of COTS technologies. Priorities for the future include: 1) utilizing future satellite sensors, 2) prototyping with commercial off-the-shelf technology, 3) expanding the range of prototyping activities, 4) rigorous evaluation, uncertainty quantification, and error characterization, 5) stakeholder

  17. Urine Monitoring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feedback, Daniel L.; Cibuzar, Branelle R.

    2009-01-01

    The Urine Monitoring System (UMS) is a system designed to collect an individual crewmember's void, gently separate urine from air, accurately measure void volume, allow for void sample acquisition, and discharge remaining urine into the Waste Collector Subsystem (WCS) onboard the International Space Station. The Urine Monitoring System (UMS) is a successor design to the existing Space Shuttle system and will resolve anomalies such as: liquid carry-over, inaccurate void volume measurements, and cross contamination in void samples. The crew will perform an evaluation of airflow at the ISS UMS urinal hose interface, a calibration evaluation, and a full user interface evaluation. o The UMS can be used to facilitate non-invasive methods for monitoring crew health, evaluation of countermeasures, and implementation of a variety of biomedical research protocols on future exploration missions.

  18. 40 CFR 60.343 - Monitoring of emissions and operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Manufacturing Plants § 60.343 Monitoring of emissions and operations. (a) The owner or operator of a facility... monitoring device must be accurate within ±250 pascals (one inch of water). (2) A monitoring device for continuous measurement of the scrubbing liquid supply pressure to the control device. The monitoring device...

  19. 40 CFR 60.343 - Monitoring of emissions and operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Manufacturing Plants § 60.343 Monitoring of emissions and operations. (a) The owner or operator of a facility... monitoring device must be accurate within ±250 pascals (one inch of water). (2) A monitoring device for continuous measurement of the scrubbing liquid supply pressure to the control device. The monitoring device...

  20. Advanced Monitoring systems initiative

    SciTech Connect

    R.J. Venedam; E.O. Hohman; C.F. Lohrstorfer; S.J. Weeks; J.B. Jones; W.J. Haas

    2004-09-30

    The Advanced Monitoring Systems Initiative (AMSI) actively searches for promising technologies and aggressively moves them from the research bench into DOE/NNSA end-user applications. There is a large unfulfilled need for an active element that reaches out to identify and recruit emerging sensor technologies into the test and evaluation function. Sensor research is ubiquitous, with the seeds of many novel concepts originating in the university systems, but at present these novel concepts do not move quickly and efficiently into real test environments. AMSI is a widely recognized, self-sustaining ''business'' accelerating the selection, development, testing, evaluation, and deployment of advanced monitoring systems and components.

  1. System health monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Reneke, J.A.; Fryer, M.O.

    1995-08-01

    Well designed large systems include many instrument taking data. These data are used in a variety of ways. They are used to control the system and its components, to monitor system and component health, and often for historical or financial purposes. This paper discusses a new method of using data from low level instrumentation to monitor system and component health. The method uses the covariance of instrument outputs to calculate a measure of system change. The method involves no complicated modeling since it is not a parameter estimation algorithm. The method is iterative and can be implemented on a computer in real time. Examples are presented for a metal lathe and a high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter. It is shown that the proposed method is quite sensitive to system changes such as wear out and failure. The method is useful for low level system diagnostics and fault detection.

  2. VME system monitor board

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-01

    Much of the machinery throughout the APS will be controlled by VME based computers. In order to increase the reliability of the system, it is necessary to be able to monitor the status of each VME crate. In order to do this, a VME System Monitor was created. In addition to being able to monitor and report the status (watchdog timer, temperature, CPU (Motorola MVME 167) state (status, run, fail), and the power supply), it includes provisions to remotely reset the CPU and VME crate, digital I/O, and parts of the transition module (serial port and ethernet connector) so that the Motorla MVME 712 is not needed. The standard VME interface was modified on the System Monitor so that in conjunction with the Motorola MVME 167 a message based VXI interrupt handler could is implemented. The System Monitor is a single VME card (6U). It utilizes both the front panel and the P2 connector for I/O. The front panel contains a temperature monitor, watchdog status LED, 4 general status LEDs, input for a TTL interrupt, 8 binary inputs (24 volt, 5 volt, and dry contact sense), 4 binary outputs (dry contact, TTL, and 100 mA), serial port (electrical RS-232 or fiber optic), ethernet transceiver (10 BASE-FO or AUI), and a status link to neighbor crates. The P2 connector is used to provide the serial port and ethernet to the processor. In order to abort and read the status of the CPU, a jumper cable must be connected between the CPU and the System Monitor.

  3. Monitoring damage growth in titanium matrix composites using acoustic emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakuckas, J. G., Jr.; Prosser, W. H.; Johnson, W. S.

    1993-01-01

    The application of the acoustic emission (AE) technique to locate and monitor damage growth in titanium matrix composites (TMC) was investigated. Damage growth was studied using several optical techniques including a long focal length, high magnification microscope system with image acquisition capabilities. Fracture surface examinations were conducted using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The AE technique was used to locate damage based on the arrival times of AE events between two sensors. Using model specimens exhibiting a dominant failure mechanism, correlations were established between the observed damage growth mechanisms and the AE results in terms of the events amplitude. These correlations were used to monitor the damage growth process in laminates exhibiting multiple modes of damage. Results revealed that the AE technique is a viable and effective tool to monitor damage growth in TMC.

  4. Environmental Monitoring Data System

    SciTech Connect

    Coombs, Jason R.

    2004-04-21

    A set of database management tools, data processing tools, and auxiliary support functionality for processing and handling semi-structured environmental monitoring data. The system provides a flexible description language for describing the data, allowing the database to store disparate data from many different sources without changes to the configuration. The system employs XML to support unlimited named allribute/value pairs for each object defined in the system.

  5. Voltage monitoring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canicatti, C. L. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of a system for monitoring the voltage at a remote location and determining when the voltage exceeds upper and lower levels. The system includes transmission lines for transmitting the voltage back to a central station and applying such to an amplifier having a pair of outputs. One of the outputs of the amplifier is applied to an oscillograph. The other output is fed through an isolation transformer, a full wave rectifier, to a pair of unijunctional transistor circuits for producing pulses when the voltage exceeds or drops below a predetermined level. These pulses, in turn, energize a relay which turns on the oscillograph for recording the voltages being monitored.

  6. 40 CFR 60.373 - Monitoring of emissions and operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Monitoring of emissions and operations. 60.373 Section 60.373 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR...-Acid Battery Manufacturing Plants § 60.373 Monitoring of emissions and operations. The owner or...

  7. 40 CFR 60.373 - Monitoring of emissions and operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Monitoring of emissions and operations. 60.373 Section 60.373 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR...-Acid Battery Manufacturing Plants § 60.373 Monitoring of emissions and operations. The owner or...

  8. 40 CFR 60.373 - Monitoring of emissions and operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Monitoring of emissions and operations. 60.373 Section 60.373 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR...-Acid Battery Manufacturing Plants § 60.373 Monitoring of emissions and operations. The owner or...

  9. 40 CFR 60.373 - Monitoring of emissions and operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Monitoring of emissions and operations. 60.373 Section 60.373 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR...-Acid Battery Manufacturing Plants § 60.373 Monitoring of emissions and operations. The owner or...

  10. 40 CFR 60.373 - Monitoring of emissions and operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Monitoring of emissions and operations. 60.373 Section 60.373 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR...-Acid Battery Manufacturing Plants § 60.373 Monitoring of emissions and operations. The owner or...

  11. Effluent emissions monitoring at the DOE Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Vance, L.W.

    1993-05-01

    There are numerous regulatory requirements controlling the effluent emissions monitoring at a U.S. Department of Energy site. This paper defines how these regulatory effluent emissions monitoring requirements and the Quality Assurance oversight of these requirements were implemented by Westinghouse Hanford Company, the operations contractor, at the DOE Hanford Site.

  12. Acoustic emission monitoring of HFIR vessel during hydrostatic testing

    SciTech Connect

    Friesel, M.A.; Dawson, J.F.

    1992-08-01

    This report discusses the results and conclusions reached from applying acoustic emission monitoring to surveillance of the High Flux Isotope Reactor vessel during pressure testing. The objective of the monitoring was to detect crack growth and/or fluid leakage should it occur during the pressure test. The report addresses the approach, acoustic emission instrumentation, installation, calibration, and test results.

  13. 40 CFR 62.15205 - What minimum amount of monitoring data must I collect with my continuous emission monitoring...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... monoxide are in parts per million by dry volume at 7 percent oxygen (or the equivalent carbon dioxide level). Use the 1-hour averages of oxygen (or carbon dioxide) data from your continuous emission monitoring system to determine the actual oxygen (or carbon dioxide) level and to calculate emissions at 7 percent...

  14. 40 CFR 62.15205 - What minimum amount of monitoring data must I collect with my continuous emission monitoring...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...). Use the 1-hour averages of oxygen (or carbon dioxide) data from your continuous emission monitoring system to determine the actual oxygen (or carbon dioxide) level and to calculate emissions at 7 percent... averages for sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides (Class I municipal waste combustion units only), and...

  15. Wearable Health Monitoring Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, John

    2015-01-01

    The shrinking size and weight of electronic circuitry has given rise to a new generation of smart clothing that enables biological data to be measured and transmitted. As the variation in the number and type of deployable devices and sensors increases, technology must allow their seamless integration so they can be electrically powered, operated, and recharged over a digital pathway. Nyx Illuminated Clothing Company has developed a lightweight health monitoring system that integrates medical sensors, electrodes, electrical connections, circuits, and a power supply into a single wearable assembly. The system is comfortable, bendable in three dimensions, durable, waterproof, and washable. The innovation will allow astronaut health monitoring in a variety of real-time scenarios, with data stored in digital memory for later use in a medical database. Potential commercial uses are numerous, as the technology enables medical personnel to noninvasively monitor patient vital signs in a multitude of health care settings and applications.

  16. 40 CFR 60.2942 - What is the minimum amount of monitoring data I must collect with my continuous emission...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... monitoring systems are required, obtain 1-hour arithmetic averages. Make sure the averages for carbon...-hour arithmetic average. Section 60.13(e)(2) requires your continuous emission monitoring systems to...

  17. 40 CFR 60.2942 - What is the minimum amount of monitoring data I must collect with my continuous emission...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... monitoring systems are required, obtain 1-hour arithmetic averages. Make sure the averages for carbon...-hour arithmetic average. Section 60.13(e)(2) requires your continuous emission monitoring systems to...

  18. Air Monitoring of Emissions from the Fukushima Daiichi Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    McNaughton, Michael; Allen, Shannon P.; Archuleta, Debra C.; Brock, Burgandy; Coronado, Melissa A.; Dewart, Jean M.; Eisele, William F. Jr.; Fuehne, David P.; Gadd, Milan S.; Green, Andrew A.; Lujan, Joan J.; MacDonell, Carolyn; Whicker, Jeffrey J.

    2012-06-12

    In response to the disasters in Japan on March 11, 2011, and the subsequent emissions from Fukushima-Daiichi, we monitored the air near Los Alamos using four air-monitoring systems: the standard AIRNET samplers, the standard rad-NESHAP samplers, the NEWNET system, and high-volume air samplers. Each of these systems has advantages and disadvantages. In combination, they provide a comprehensive set of measurements of airborne radionuclides near Los Alamos during the weeks following March 11. We report air-monitoring measurements of the fission products released from the Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear-power-plant accident in 2011. Clear gamma-spectrometry peaks were observed from Cs-134, Cs-136, Cs-137, I-131, I132, Te-132, and Te-129m. These data, together with measurements of other radionuclides, are adequate for an assessment and assure us that radionuclides from Fukushima Daiichi did not present a threat to human health at or near Los Alamos. The data demonstrate the capabilities of the Los Alamos air-monitoring systems.

  19. Benzene Monitor System report

    SciTech Connect

    Livingston, R.R.

    1992-10-12

    Two systems for monitoring benzene in aqueous streams have been designed and assembled by the Savannah River Technology Center, Analytical Development Section (ADS). These systems were used at TNX to support sampling studies of the full-scale {open_quotes}SRAT/SME/PR{close_quotes} and to provide real-time measurements of benzene in Precipitate Hydrolysis Aqueous (PHA) simulant. This report describes the two ADS Benzene Monitor System (BMS) configurations, provides data on system operation, and reviews the results of scoping tests conducted at TNX. These scoping tests will allow comparison with other benzene measurement options being considered for use in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) laboratory. A report detailing the preferred BMS configuration statistical performance during recent tests has been issued under separate title: Statistical Analyses of the At-line Benzene Monitor Study, SCS-ASG-92-066. The current BMS design, called the At-line Benzene Monitor (ALBM), allows remote measurement of benzene in PHA solutions. The authors have demonstrated the ability to calibrate and operate this system using peanut vials from a standard Hydragard{trademark} sampler. The equipment and materials used to construct the ALBM are similar to those already used in other applications by the DWPF lab. The precision of this system ({+-}0.5% Relative Standard Deviation (RSD) at 1 sigma) is better than the purge & trap-gas chromatograpy reference method currently in use. Both BMSs provide a direct measurement of the benzene that can be purged from a solution with no sample pretreatment. Each analysis requires about five minutes per sample, and the system operation requires no special skills or training. The analyzer`s computer software can be tailored to provide desired outputs. Use of this system produces no waste stream other than the samples themselves (i.e. no organic extractants).

  20. Corrosion Monitoring System

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Russ Braunling

    2004-10-31

    The Corrosion Monitoring System (CMS) program developed and demonstrated a continuously on-line system that provides real-time corrosion information. The program focused on detecting pitting corrosion in its early stages. A new invention called the Intelligent Ultrasonic Probe (IUP) was patented on the program. The IUP uses ultrasonic guided waves to detect small defects and a Synthetic Aperture Focusing Technique (SAFT) algorithm to provide an image of the pits. Testing of the CMS demonstrated the capability to detect pits with dimensionality in the sub-millimeter range. The CMS was tested in both the laboratory and in a pulp and paper industrial plant. The system is capable of monitoring the plant from a remote location using the internet.

  1. WORKSHOP ON SOURCE EMISSION AND AMBIENT AIR MONITORING OF MERCURY

    EPA Science Inventory

    AN EPA/ORD Workshop on Source Emission and Ambient Air Monitoring of Mercury was held on 9/13-14/99, Bloomington, Minnesota. The purpose of the workshop was to discuss the state-of-the-science in source and ambient air mercury monitoring as well as mercury monitoring research and...

  2. WORKSHOP ON SOURCE EMISSION AND AMBIENT AIR MONITORING OF MERCURY

    EPA Science Inventory

    AN EPA/ORD Workshop on Source Emission and Ambient Air Monitoring of Mercury was held on 9/13-14/99, Bloomington, Minnesota. The purpose of the workshop was to discuss the state-of-the-science in source and ambient air mercury monitoring as well as mercury monitoring research and...

  3. Multimedia traffic monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Sayegh, Osamah A.; Dashti, Ali E.

    2000-10-01

    Increasing congestion on roads and highways, and the problems associated with conventional traffic monitoring systems have generated an interest in new traffic surveillance systems, such as video image processing. These systems are expected to be more effective and more economical than conventional surveillance systems. In this paper, we describe the design of a traffic surveillance system, called Multimedia traffic Monitoring System. The system is based on a client/server model, with the following main modules: 1) video image capture module (VICM), 2) video image processing module (VIPM), and 3) database module (DBM). The VICM is used to capture the live feed from a digital camera. Depending on the mode of operation, VICM either: 1) sends the video images directly to the VIPM (on the same processing node), or 2) compresses the video images and sends them to the VIPM and/or the DBM on separate processing node(s). The main contribution of this paper is the design of a traffic monitoring system that uses image processing (VIPM) to estimate traffic flow. In the current implementation, VIPM estimates the number of vehicles per kilometer, while using 9 image sequences (at a rate of 4 frames per second). The VIPM algorithm generates a virtual grid and superimposes it on a part of the traffic scene. Motion and vehicle detection operators are carried out within each cell in the grid. Vehicle count is concluded based on the nine images of a sequence. The system is tested against a manual count of more than 40 image sequences (total of more than 365 traffic images) of various traffic situations. The results show that the system is able to determine the traffic flow with a precision of 1.5 vehicles per kilometer.

  4. Inductive System Monitors Tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The Inductive Monitoring System (IMS) software developed at Ames Research Center uses artificial intelligence and data mining techniques to build system-monitoring knowledge bases from archived or simulated sensor data. This information is then used to detect unusual or anomalous behavior that may indicate an impending system failure. Currently helping analyze data from systems that help fly and maintain the space shuttle and the International Space Station (ISS), the IMS has also been employed by data classes are then used to build a monitoring knowledge base. In real time, IMS performs monitoring functions: determining and displaying the degree of deviation from nominal performance. IMS trend analyses can detect conditions that may indicate a failure or required system maintenance. The development of IMS was motivated by the difficulty of producing detailed diagnostic models of some system components due to complexity or unavailability of design information. Successful applications have ranged from real-time monitoring of aircraft engine and control systems to anomaly detection in space shuttle and ISS data. IMS was used on shuttle missions STS-121, STS-115, and STS-116 to search the Wing Leading Edge Impact Detection System (WLEIDS) data for signs of possible damaging impacts during launch. It independently verified findings of the WLEIDS Mission Evaluation Room (MER) analysts and indicated additional points of interest that were subsequently investigated by the MER team. In support of the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate, IMS is being deployed as an anomaly detection tool on ISS mission control consoles in the Johnson Space Center Mission Operations Directorate. IMS has been trained to detect faults in the ISS Control Moment Gyroscope (CMG) systems. In laboratory tests, it has already detected several minor anomalies in real-time CMG data. When tested on archived data, IMS was able to detect precursors of the CMG1 failure nearly 15 hours in advance of

  5. HyperCard Monitor System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Julian; Maurer, Hermann

    An investigation into high level event monitoring within the scope of a well-known multimedia application, HyperCard--a program on the Macintosh computer, is carried out. A monitoring system is defined as a system which automatically monitors usage of some activity and gathers statistics based on what is has observed. Monitor systems can give the…

  6. Monitoring the progress of emission inventories

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, J.A. Jr.; Solomon, D.; Husk, M.; Irving, B.; Kruger, D.; Levin. L.

    2006-12-15

    This issue of EM contains three articles which focus on the latest improvements on the emissions inventory process. The first, 'Building the national emissions inventory: challenges and plans for improvements' by Doug Solomon and Martin Husk (pages 8-11), looks at the US national emissions inventory. The next, 'Greenhouse gas inventories - a historical perspective and assessment of improvements since 1990' by Bill Irving and Dina Kruger (pages 12-19) assesses improvements in national and international greenhouse gas emissions inventories over the last 15 years. The third article, 'The global mercury emissions inventory' by Leonard Levin (pages 20-25) gives an overview of the challenges associated with conducting a worldwide inventory of mercury emissions.

  7. Remote lightning monitor system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lennon, C. L.; Britt, T. O. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An apparatus for monitoring, analyzing and accurately determining the value of peak current, the peak rate of change in current with respect to time and the rise time of the electrical currents generated in an electrical conductive mast that is located in the vicinity where lightning is to be monitored is described. The apparatus includes an electrical coil for sensing the change in current flowing through the mast and generating a voltage responsive. An on-site recorder and a recorder control system records the voltages produced responsive to lightning strikes and converts the voltage to digital signals for being transmitted back to the remote command station responsive to command signals. The recorder and the recorder control system are carried within an RFI proof environmental housing into which the command signals are fed by means of a fiber optic cable so as to minimize electrical interference.

  8. National Emissions Report (1978): National Emissions Data Systems (NEDS) of the Aerometric and Emissions Reporting System (AEROS). Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-12-01

    The National Emissions Report summarizes annual cumulative estimates of source emissions of five criteria pollutants: particulates, sulfur oxides, nitrogen oxides, hydrocarbons, and carbon monoxide. Source emissions data are reported to the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency under provisions of Section 110 of the Clean Air Act, as amended 1977, and EPA Regulations, Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 51.321. Summary data are presented for the nation as a whole, for individual states, and for Air Quality Control Regions and individual interstate portions thereof. The data compilations result from the operations of the National Emissions Data System (NEDS), which functions as a component of the comprehensive EPA air information system--the Aerometric and Emissions Reporting System (AEROS). AEROS is managed by the National Air Data Branch, Monitoring and Data Analysis Division, Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards, U. S. Environmental Protection Agency at Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27711.

  9. National emissions report (1979): National Emissions Data Systems (NEDS) of the Aerometric and Emissions Reporting System (AEROS). Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-08-01

    The National Emissions Report summarizes annual cumulative estimates of source emissions of five criteria pollutants: particulates, sulfur oxides, nitrogen oxides, hydrocarbons, and carbon monoxide. Source emissions data are reported to the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency under provisions of Section 110 of the Clean Air Act, as amended 1977, and EPA Regulations, Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 51.321. Summary data are presented for the nation as a whole, for individual states, and for Air Quality Control Regions and individual interstate portions thereof. The data compilations result from the operations of the National Emissions Data System (NEDS), which functions as a component of the comprehensive EPA air information system--the Aerometric and Emissions Reporting System (AEROS). AEROS is managed by the National Air Data Branch, Monitoring and Data Analysis Division, Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards, U. S. Environmental Protection Agency at Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27711.

  10. National Emissions Report, 1983: national emissions data systems (neds) of the Aerometric and Emissions Reporting System (AEROS). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-12-01

    The National Emissions Report summarizes annual cumulative estimates of source emissions of five criteria pollutants: particulates, sulfur oxides, nitrogen oxides, volatile organic compounds, and carbon monoxide. Source emissions data are reported to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under provisions of Section 110 of the Clean Air Act, as amended 1977, and EPA Regulations, Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 51.321. Summary data are presented for the Nation as a whole, for individual States, and for Air Quality Control Regions and for individual interstate portions thereof. The data compilations result from the operations of the National Emissions Data System (NEDS), which functions as a component of the comprehensive EPA air information system--the Aerometric and Emissions Reporting System (AEROS). AEROS is managed by the National Air Data Branch, Monitoring and Data Analysis Division, Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency at Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27711.

  11. 40 CFR 60.273 - Emission monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-pressure fabric filter if observations of the opacity of the visible emissions from the control device are performed by a certified visible emission observer; or on any single-stack fabric filter if visible... continuously operated on all single-stack fabric filters if the owner or operator elects not to install and...

  12. Locomotive emissions monitoring program annual report, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    The report is to include data on the traffic moved and the fuel consumed, estimates of the consequent emissions of certain exhaust gases, and information on any improvements in equipment or operating practices that will lead to reduced emissions. This is the first such annual report.

  13. Multiplexing Technology for Acoustic Emission Monitoring of Aerospace Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, William; Percy, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    The initiation and propagation of damage mechanisms such as cracks and delaminations generate acoustic waves, which propagate through a structure. These waves can be detected and analyzed to provide the location and severity of damage as part of a structural health monitoring (SHM) system. This methodology of damage detection is commonly known as acoustic emission (AE) monitoring, and is widely used on a variety of applications on civil structures. AE has been widely considered for SHM of aerospace vehicles. Numerous successful ground and flight test demonstrations have been performed, which show the viability of the technology for damage monitoring in aerospace structures. However, one significant current limitation for application of AE techniques on aerospace vehicles is the large size, mass, and power requirements for the necessary monitoring instrumentation. To address this issue, a prototype multiplexing approach has been developed and demonstrated in this study, which reduces the amount of AE monitoring instrumentation required. Typical time division multiplexing techniques that are commonly used to monitor strain, pressure and temperature sensors are not applicable to AE monitoring because of the asynchronous and widely varying rates of AE signal occurrence. Thus, an event based multiplexing technique was developed. In the initial prototype circuit, inputs from eight sensors in a linear array were multiplexed into two data acquisition channels. The multiplexer rapidly switches, in less than one microsecond, allowing the signals from two sensors to be acquired by a digitizer. The two acquired signals are from the sensors on either side of the trigger sensor. This enables the capture of the first arrival of the waves, which cannot be accomplished with the signal from the trigger sensor. The propagation delay to the slightly more distant neighboring sensors makes this possible. The arrival time from this first arrival provides a more accurate source location

  14. Modular biowaste monitoring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogal, G. L.

    1975-01-01

    The objective of the Modular Biowaste Monitoring System Program was to generate and evaluate hardware for supporting shuttle life science experimental and diagnostic programs. An initial conceptual design effort established requirements and defined an overall modular system for the collection, measurement, sampling and storage of urine and feces biowastes. This conceptual design effort was followed by the design, fabrication and performance evaluation of a flight prototype model urine collection, volume measurement and sampling capability. No operational or performance deficiencies were uncovered as a result of the performance evaluation tests.

  15. Specifications Physiological Monitoring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The operation of a physiological monitoring system (PMS) is described. Specifications were established for performance, design, interface, and test requirements. The PMS is a compact, microprocessor-based system, which can be worn in a pack on the body or may be mounted on a Spacelab rack or other appropriate structure. It consists of two modules, the Data Control Unit (DCU) and the Remote Control/Display Unit (RCDU). Its purpose is to collect and distribute data from physiological experiments in the Spacelab and in the Orbiter.

  16. Fatigue crack monitoring with coupled piezoelectric film acoustic emission sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Changjiang

    Fatigue-induced cracking is a commonly seen problem in civil infrastructures reaching their original design life. A number of high-profile accidents have been reported in the past that involved fatigue damage in structures. Such incidences often happen without prior warnings due to lack of proper crack monitoring technique. In order to detect and monitor the fatigue crack, acoustic emission (AE) technique, has been receiving growing interests recently. AE can provide continuous and real-time monitoring data on damage progression in structures. Piezoelectric film AE sensor measures stress-wave induced strain in ultrasonic frequency range and its feasibility for AE signal monitoring has been demonstrated recently. However, extensive work in AE monitoring system development based on piezoelectric film AE sensor and sensor characterization on full-scale structures with fatigue cracks, have not been done. A lack of theoretical formulations for understanding the AE signals also hinders the use of piezoelectric film AE sensors. Additionally, crack detection and source localization with AE signals is a very important area yet to be explored for this new type of AE sensor. This dissertation presents the results of both analytical and experimental study on the signal characteristics of surface stress-wave induced AE strain signals measured by piezoelectric film AE sensors in near-field and an AE source localization method based on sensor couple theory. Based on moment tensor theory, generalized expression for AE strain signal is formulated. A special case involving the response of piezoelectric film AE sensor to surface load is also studied, which could potentially be used for sensor calibration of this type of sensor. A new concept of sensor couple theory based AE source localization technique is proposed and validated with both simulated and experimental data from fatigue test and field monitoring. Two series of fatigue tests were conducted to perform fatigue crack

  17. Satellite monitoring of trace gas and aerosol emissions during wildfires in Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondur, V. G.

    2016-12-01

    Peculiarities of the formation of carbon gas and fine aerosol emissions into the atmosphere during wildfires are analyzed. A prompt satellite monitoring system and technique for the assessment of burnt areas and volumes of CO2, CO, and PM2.5 emissions from wildfires are described. The results of satellite monitoring of the Russian Federation and some Russian regions for different months over 2010-2014 are given; burnt areas and volumes of carbon gas and aerosol emissions throughout the entire territory are assessed. The peculiarities of seasonal frequencies of wildfires and volumes of hazardous gas and fine aerosol emissions in the regions under study are identified.

  18. Pisces field chemical emissions monitoring project: Site 117 emissions report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-01

    This report is one of a series sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute in the area of trace substance emissions from fossil-fuel power plants. This report presents the results of a sampling and analytical study to characterize trace substances emissions at Site 117. Site 117 is a 1 MW selective catalytic reduction (SCR) pilot plant. The host boiler is an 850 MW boiler which burned a residual fuel oil. The objective of this report is to transmit the detailed data to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to assist the Agency in evaluating utility trace chemical emissions as well as the associated health risk impacts - as mandated in Title III of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments. This report does not attempt to compare the results with other sites. An assessment of data from all plants that have been tested is presented in the Electric Utility Trace Substances Synthesis Report.

  19. 40 CFR 60.613 - Monitoring of emissions and operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) Air Oxidation Unit Processes § 60.613 Monitoring of emissions and operations. (a) The owner or... from each air oxidation reactor within an affected facility at a point closest to the inlet of...

  20. 40 CFR 60.663 - Monitoring of emissions and operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) Distillation Operations § 60.663 Monitoring of emissions and operations. (a) The owner or operator of an... distillation unit within an affected facility at a point closest to the inlet of each boiler or process...

  1. 40 CFR 60.663 - Monitoring of emissions and operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) Distillation Operations § 60.663 Monitoring of emissions and operations. (a) The owner or operator of an... distillation unit within an affected facility at a point closest to the inlet of each boiler or process...

  2. 40 CFR 60.663 - Monitoring of emissions and operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) Distillation Operations § 60.663 Monitoring of emissions and operations. (a) The owner or operator of an... distillation unit within an affected facility at a point closest to the inlet of each boiler or process...

  3. 40 CFR 60.663 - Monitoring of emissions and operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) Distillation Operations § 60.663 Monitoring of emissions and operations. (a) The owner or operator of an... distillation unit within an affected facility at a point closest to the inlet of each boiler or process...

  4. 40 CFR 60.663 - Monitoring of emissions and operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) Distillation Operations § 60.663 Monitoring of emissions and operations. (a) The owner or operator of an... distillation unit within an affected facility at a point closest to the inlet of each boiler or process...

  5. 40 CFR 60.314 - Monitoring of emissions and operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Surface Coating of Metal Furniture § 60.314 Monitoring of emissions and operations. (a) The owner or... measurement device shall be installed in the gas stream immediately before and after the catalyst bed....

  6. Air Monitoring, Measuring, and Emissions Research

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Measurement research is advancing the ability to determine the composition of sources of air pollution, conduct exposure assessments, improve monitoring capabilities and support public health research.

  7. Earth System Monitoring, Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orcutt, John

    This section provides sensing and data collection methodologies, as well as an understanding of Earth's climate parameters and natural and man-made phenomena, to support a scientific assessment of the Earth system as a whole, and its response to natural and human-induced changes. The coverage ranges from climate change factors and extreme weather and fires to oil spill tracking and volcanic eruptions. This serves as a basis to enable improved prediction and response to climate change, weather, and natural hazards as well as dissemination of the data and conclusions. The data collection systems include satellite remote sensing, aerial surveys, and land- and ocean-based monitoring stations. Our objective in this treatise is to provide a significant portion of the scientific and engineering basis of Earth system monitoring and to provide this in 17 detailed articles or chapters written at a level for use by university students through practicing professionals. The reader is also directed to the closely related sections on Ecological Systems, Introduction and also Climate Change Modeling Methodology, Introduction as well as Climate Change Remediation, Introduction to. For ease of use by students, each article begins with a glossary of terms, while at an average length of 25 print pages each, sufficient detail is presented for use by professionals in government, universities, and industries. The chapters are individually summarized below.

  8. Induced Seismicity Monitoring System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, S. R.; Jarpe, S.; Harben, P.

    2014-12-01

    There are many seismological aspects associated with monitoring of permanent storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) in geologic formations. Many of these include monitoring underground gas migration through detailed tomographic studies of rock properties, integrity of the cap rock and micro seismicity with time. These types of studies require expensive deployments of surface and borehole sensors in the vicinity of the CO2 injection wells. Another problem that may exist in CO2 sequestration fields is the potential for damaging induced seismicity associated with fluid injection into the geologic reservoir. Seismic hazard monitoring in CO2 sequestration fields requires a seismic network over a spatially larger region possibly having stations in remote settings. Expensive observatory-grade seismic systems are not necessary for seismic hazard deployments or small-scale tomographic studies. Hazard monitoring requires accurate location of induced seismicity to magnitude levels only slightly less than that which can be felt at the surface (e.g. magnitude 1), and the frequencies of interest for tomographic analysis are ~1 Hz and greater. We have developed a seismo/acoustic smart sensor system that can achieve the goals necessary for induced seismicity monitoring in CO2 sequestration fields. The unit is inexpensive, lightweight, easy to deploy, can operate remotely under harsh conditions and features 9 channels of recording (currently 3C 4.5 Hz geophone, MEMS accelerometer and microphone). An on-board processor allows for satellite transmission of parameter data to a processing center. Continuous or event-detected data is kept on two removable flash SD cards of up to 64+ Gbytes each. If available, data can be transmitted via cell phone modem or picked up via site visits. Low-power consumption allows for autonomous operation using only a 10 watt solar panel and a gel-cell battery. The system has been successfully tested for long-term (> 6 months) remote operations over a wide range

  9. 40 CFR 60.464 - Monitoring of emissions and operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Coil Surface Coating § 60.464 Monitoring of emissions and operations. (a) Where compliance with the numerical limit specified in § 60.462(a) (1) or (2) is achieved through the use of low VOC-content coatings without the use of emission control devices or through the use of higher VOC-content coatings...

  10. Method and apparatus for monitoring mercury emissions

    DOEpatents

    Durham, M.D.; Schlager, R.J.; Sappey, A.D.; Sagan, F.J.; Marmaro, R.W.; Wilson, K.G.

    1997-10-21

    A mercury monitoring device that continuously monitors the total mercury concentration in a gas. The device uses the same chamber for converting speciated mercury into elemental mercury and for measurement of the mercury in the chamber by radiation absorption techniques. The interior of the chamber is resistant to the absorption of speciated and elemental mercury at the operating temperature of the chamber. 15 figs.

  11. Method and apparatus for monitoring mercury emissions

    DOEpatents

    Durham, Michael D.; Schlager, Richard J.; Sappey, Andrew D.; Sagan, Francis J.; Marmaro, Roger W.; Wilson, Kevin G.

    1997-01-01

    A mercury monitoring device that continuously monitors the total mercury concentration in a gas. The device uses the same chamber for converting speciated mercury into elemental mercury and for measurement of the mercury in the chamber by radiation absorption techniques. The interior of the chamber is resistant to the absorption of speciated and elemental mercury at the operating temperature of the chamber.

  12. Rocket engine condition monitoring system

    SciTech Connect

    Hagar, S.K.; Alcock, J.F.

    1989-01-01

    It is expected that the Rocket Engine Condition Monitoring System (RECMS) program will define engine monitoring technologies and an integration approach which can be applied to engine development in support of advanced launch system objectives. The RECMS program approaches engine monitoring as a system which is fully integrated with the engine controller, vehicle monitoring system, and ground processing systems to ensure mission success in addition to engine reliability. The system components are monitored through health and performance sensors; they are analyzed with the diagnostic and prognostic algorithms and demonstrated by system testing with hardware from other advanced development programs.

  13. 40 CFR 60.47c - Emission monitoring for particulate matter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... to perform subsequent monitoring using a digital opacity compliance system according to a site... also available on the Technology Transfer Network (TTN) under Emission Measurement Center Preliminary... technology to reduce SO2 or PM emissions and that are subject to an opacity standard in § 60.43c(c) are not...

  14. 40 CFR 60.47c - Emission monitoring for particulate matter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... to perform subsequent monitoring using a digital opacity compliance system according to a site... also available on the Technology Transfer Network (TTN) under Emission Measurement Center Preliminary... technology to reduce SO2 or PM emissions and that are subject to an opacity standard in § 60.43c(c) are not...

  15. 40 CFR 60.47c - Emission monitoring for particulate matter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... to perform subsequent monitoring using a digital opacity compliance system according to a site... also available on the Technology Transfer Network (TTN) under Emission Measurement Center Preliminary... technology to reduce SO2 or PM emissions and that are subject to an opacity standard in § 60.43c(c) are not...

  16. 40 CFR 60.47c - Emission monitoring for particulate matter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... to perform subsequent monitoring using a digital opacity compliance system according to a site... also available on the Technology Transfer Network (TTN) under Emission Measurement Center Preliminary... technology to reduce SO2 or PM emissions and that are subject to an opacity standard in § 60.43c(c) are not...

  17. Welding monitoring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babcock, Stephen G. (Inventor); Dyer, Gerald E. (Inventor); Gordon, Stephen S. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    This invention relates to systems for remotely monitoring automatic welding operations, and more particularly to a system wherein the welder is readily positionable, while components of the optical system remain fixed. A welder having an electrode is mounted in an enclosure containing a pair of mirrors. The electrode passes through an opening in the first mirror and a gas cup. The mirror reflects an image of a welding operation taken through the opening of the gas cup to the second mirror. The second mirror then reflects the image through a rotary coupling to a third mirror which, in turn, reflects the image to a receiving lense mounted to a second rotatable coupling. The image is then projected via a fiber optic bundle to a filter unit where selected wavelengths of light are filtered from the welding image. The filter unit is coupled to an enlarger which enlarges the image and passes it to a camera. The camera is connected to an electronic eclipser which selectively darkens the brightest portions of the image. Finally, the image is recorded by a video tape recorder and displayed by a monitor.

  18. Storage monitoring system -- 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Mickelsen, B.; Nilsen, C.; Kinzel, R.; Davidson, B.; Pollock, R.

    1997-11-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has several ongoing projects in the area of nuclear materials management. These projects establish a core capability in monitoring stored nuclear materials. The overarching goal of these projects is to get the right sensor information to the right user to enhance the safety, security and to verify the legitimacy of use of stored nuclear materials. An effort has been initiated to merge these projects into a common system. This paper provides an overview of several of these projects and the integration activities between them.

  19. 40 CFR 51.214 - Continuous emission monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... source category the pollutants which must be monitored. (c) The procedures must, as a minimum, require the types of sources set forth in appendix P of this part to meet the applicable requirements set... the monitoring and recording of emission data; and (ii) Have been unable to complete the installation...

  20. 40 CFR 60.703 - Monitoring of emissions and operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Monitoring of emissions and operations. 60.703 Section 60.703 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR..., temperature monitoring devices shall be installed in the gas stream immediately before and after the...

  1. Continuous-emission monitoring: Proposed acid-rain rule

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has proposed four rules containing the core acid rain requirements: the Permits Rule (40 CFR Part 72), the Allowances Rule (40 CFR Part 73), the Continuous Emission Monitoring Rule (40 CFR Part 75), and the Excess Emissions Rule (40 CRF Part 77). EPA will also propose additional rules at a future date. These rules will include requirements for facilities that elect to opt into the Acid Rain Program (40 CFR Part 74) and for the nitrogen oxide (NOx) control program (40 CFR Part 76). This fact sheet summarizes the key components of the proposed Continuous Emission Monitoring Rule (40 CFR Part 75).

  2. Performance testing of multi-metal continuous emissions monitors

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, W.J.; French, N.B.; Brown, C.H.; Burns, D.B.; Lemieux, P.M.; Ryan, J.V.; Priebe, S.J.; Waterland, L.R.

    1997-11-17

    Three prototype multi-metals continuous emissions monitors (CEMs) were tested in April 1996 at the Rotary Kiln Incinerator Simulator facility at the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) National Risk Management Research Laboratory, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina. The CEM instruments were: Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES); Laser Induced Breakdown Spectrometry-Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (LIBS); and Laser Spark Spectrometry, another LIBS instrument. The three CEMs were tested simultaneously during test periods in which low, medium, and high concentration levels of seven toxic metals -- antimony, arsenic, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, lead, and mercury -- were maintained under carefully controlled conditions. Two methods were used to introduce the test metals into the flue gas: (1) solution atomization, introducing metal-containing aerosol directly into the secondary combustion burner, and (2) injection of fly ash particulates. The testing addressed four measures of CEM performance: relative accuracy (RA), calibration drift, zero drift, and response time. These were accomplished by comparing the toxic metal analyte concentrations reported by the CEMs to the concentrations measured using the EPA reference method (RM) for the same analytes. Overall, the test results showed the prototype nature of the test CEMs and the clear need for further development. None of the CEMs tested consistently achieved RA values of 20% or less as required by the EPA draft performance specification. Instrument size reduction and automation will also likely need additional attention before multi-metal CEMs systems become commercially available for service as envisioned by regulators and citizens.

  3. Groundwater monitoring system

    DOEpatents

    Ames, Kenneth R.; Doesburg, James M.; Eschbach, Eugene A.; Kelley, Roy C.; Myers, David A.

    1987-01-01

    A groundwater monitoring system includes a bore, a well casing within and spaced from the bore, and a pump within the casing. A water impermeable seal between the bore and the well casing prevents surface contamination from entering the pump. Above the ground surface is a removable operating means which is connected to the pump piston by a flexible cord. A protective casing extends above ground and has a removable cover. After a groundwater sample has been taken, the cord is disconnected from the operating means. The operating means is removed for taking away, the cord is placed within the protective casing, and the cover closed and locked. The system is thus protected from contamination, as well as from damage by accident or vandalism.

  4. 40 CFR 75.17 - Specific provisions for monitoring emissions from common, bypass, and multiple stacks for NOX...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) Install, certify, operate, and maintain a NOX continuous emission monitoring system in the duct to the... the ducts from the affected units; or (B) Develop, demonstrate, and provide information satisfactory..., and maintain a NOX-diluent continuous emission monitoring system in the duct from each affected...

  5. Tributary Analysis Monitoring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodard, Stanley, E. (Inventor); Coffey, Neil C. (Inventor); Taylor, Bryant D. (Inventor); Woodman, Keith L. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A monitoring system for a fleet of vehicles includes at least one data acquisition and analysis module (DAAM) mounted on each vehicle in the fleet, a control module on each vehicle in communication with each DAAM, and terminal module located remotely with respect to the vehicles in the fleet. Each DAAM collects/analyzes sensor data to generate analysis results that identify the state of a plurality of systems of the vehicle. Each vehicle's control module collects/analyzes the analysis results from each onboard DAAM to generate vehicle status results that identify potential sources of vehicle anomalies. The terminal module collects/analyzes the analysis results and vehicle status results transmitted from each control module from the fleet of vehicles to identify multiple occurrences of vehicle anomalies and multiple occurrences of those vehicle systems operating at a performance level that is unacceptable. Results of the terminal module's analysis are provided to organizations responsible for the operation, maintenance and manufacturing of the vehicles in the fleet as well as the plurality of systems used in the fleet.

  6. Ammonia emissions of a rotational grazing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voglmeier, Karl; Häni, Christoph; Jocher, Markus; Ammann, Christof

    2017-04-01

    Intensive agricultural livestock production is the main source of air pollution by ammonia (NH3). Grazing is considered to reduce emissions significantly. However, ammonia emissions measurements on pastures are very rare and most emission models base their emissions factors for grazing on studies from the 1990s, which report a large emission range from 2.7% to 13.6% of the applied total ammonia nitrogen (TAN). We present first results of the Posieux pasture experiment in 2016 where NH3 concentration and fluxes were measured during the grazing season. The applied methods include an eddy covariance system with a two channel reactive nitrogen (Nr) converter measuring in parallel the sum of oxidized Nr species and the sum of the total Nr species. The difference of the two channels corresponds to the sum of reduced Nr species. Furthermore four MiniDOAS instruments for line integrated concentration measurements without an inlet system were used. The fluxes were estimated by applying a backward Lagrangian stochastic model (bLS) to the concentration difference of paired MiniDOAS up- and downwind of a sub-plot of the field. Monitoring of dung (visual survey) and urine patch locations (with soil electrical conductivity sensor) was carried out after each grazing rotation on selected sub-plots. It helped to compute statistics of the dung/urine patch distribution on the pasture. The experimental setup and the environmental conditions resulted in high temporal and spatial dynamics of NH3 concentrations and fluxes. The calculated fluxes were used to estimate the total net emission during the grazing period. Based on the average dung/urine patch distribution on the field an emission factor for the pasture was computed and compared to results from the literature. We discuss the applicability and limitations of the two measurement systems, reconsider the main emission drivers and explain differences in the results.

  7. Ignition system monitoring assembly

    DOEpatents

    Brushwood, John Samuel

    2003-11-04

    An ignition system monitoring assembly for use in a combustion engine is disclosed. The assembly includes an igniter having at least one positioning guide with at least one transmittal member being maintained in a preferred orientation by one of the positioning guides. The transmittal member is in optical communication with a corresponding target region, and optical information about the target region is conveyed to the reception member via the transmittal member. The device allows real-time observation of optical characteristics of the target region. The target region may be the spark gap between the igniter electrodes, or other predetermined locations in optical communication with the transmittal member. The reception member may send an output signal to a processing member which, in turn, may produce a response to the output signal.

  8. [Emission of electromagnetic radiation from selected computer monitors].

    PubMed

    Zyss, T

    1995-01-01

    The emission of electromagnetic fields from computer monitors was analysed. The data were compared with the permissible exposure level. EM radiation of chromatic monitors is higher than that of monochromatic ones. The radiation of magnetic fraction is insignificant. Both electric and magnetic fractions of EM radiation, 50 cm away from the monitor, are very low and do not exceed permissible values. It was observed that screen filters were effective in suppressing EM emission only at a short (up to 30 cm) distance from the monitor. At a distance of 50 cm they proved to be ineffective. Metallic-net filters were more effective than glass filters in suppressing EM radiation. It seems that EM fields generated by computer monitors are not harmful to computer operators if the distance is kept in safe limits.

  9. Emissions tracking system (ETS-PC) software

    SciTech Connect

    Weatherbee, J. Jr.; Kress, T.

    1997-12-31

    The U.S. EPA Acid Rain Division developed and is maintaining the Emissions Tracking System (ETS) to receive, store and analyze data from continuous emissions monitors (CEMs) submitted by utilities affected by the 1990 Clean Air Act. This paper will describe ETS-PC, a PC application developed by EPA to assist utilities in analyzing and submitting emission data files each quarter. ETS-PC includes quality assurance software which helps utilities identify possible errors in their quarterly data files (QDFs) prior to submission. It also includes communications software which allows utilities to transfer QDFs via modem directly to the EPA mainframe computer located in Research Triangle Park, NC. After a file is transferred, users are provided with immediate feedback from the mainframe in the form of a file transfer receipt and summary.

  10. A low frequency RFI monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amiri, Shahram; Shankar, N. Udaya; Girish, B. S.; Somashekar, R.

    Radio frequency interference (RFI) is a growing problem for research in radio astronomy particularly at wavelengths longer than 2m. For satisfactory operation of a radio telescope, several bands have been protected for radio astronomy observations by the International Telecommunication Union. Since the radiation from cosmic sources are typically 40 to 100 dB below the emission from services operating in unprotected bands, often the out-of-band emission limits the sensitivity of astronomical observations. Moreover, several radio spectral emissions from cosmic sources are present in the frequency range outside the allocated band for radio astronomy. Thus monitoring of RFI is essential before building a receiver system for low frequency radio astronomy. We describe the design and development of an RFI monitoring system operating in the frequency band 30 to 100 MHz. This was designed keeping in view our proposal to extend the frequency of operation of GMRT down to 40 MHz. The monitor is a PC based spectrometer recording the voltage output of a receiver connected to an antenna, capable of digitizing the low frequency RF directly with an 8 bit ADC and sampling bandwidths up to 16 MHz. The system can operate continuously in almost real-time with a loss of only 2% of data. Here we will present the systems design aspects and the results of RFI monitoring carried out at the Raman Research Institute, Bangalore and at the GMRT site in Khodad.

  11. Continuous monitoring of total hydrocarbon emissions from sludge incinerators

    SciTech Connect

    Bostian, H.E.; Crumpler, E.P.; Koch, P.D.; Chehaske, J.T.; Hagele, J.C.

    1993-01-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Office of Water (OW) drafted risk-based sludge regulations (for incineration and a variety of other options) under Section 405d of the Clean Water Act. Under consideration for the final regulation is a provision for continuously monitoring total hydrocarbon (THC) emissions as a method of controlling organic emissions from sludge incineration. The monitoring would have to demonstrate that the THC stack emissions were not exceeding a concentration limit. Continuous analyzers for THC, CO, and oxygen (O2) were installed and operated at two facilities, both of which employed multiple-hearth furnaces (MHFs) to incinerate wastewater sludge. In addition, EPA requested an evaluation of the use of these monitors to assist with incinerator operation.

  12. Surface emission monitoring of formaldehyde resin-containing products

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, T.G.; Reed, T.J.; Tromberg, B.J.; Hawthorne, A.R.

    1984-01-01

    A passive surface emission monitor has been developed for nondestructive measurement of formaldehyde (CH/sub 2/O) emission rates from CH/sub 2/O resin-containing materials such as urea-formaldehyde foam insulation (UFFI), pressed-wood products, fibrous glass insulation and ceiling tiles. Emitted CH/sub 2/O is sorbed by a planar distribution of 13X molecular sieve supported inside the monitor and analyzed using a water-rinse desorption, colorimetric analysis procedure. A detection limit of approx. = 0.025 mg CH/sub 2/O/m/sup 2/h is achieved using a 20.3 cm diameter monitor and a 2-h collection period. Measurement of CH/sub 2/O emission rates from pressed-wood products and UFFI encased in simulated wall panels show a strong correlation with reference chamber techniques. 3 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  13. A CAVITY RING-DOWN SPECTROSCOPY MERCURY CONTINUOUS EMISSION MONITOR

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher C. Carter, Ph.D.

    2003-04-01

    Accurate reporting of mercury concentration requires a detailed model that includes experimental parameters that vary, such as: pressure, temperature, concentration, absorption cross-section, and isotopic structure etc. During this quarter a theoretical model has been developed to model the 253.7 nm mercury transition. In addition, while testing the interferent species SO{sub 2}, SRD was able to determine the absorption cross-section experimentally and add this to the theoretical model. Assuming that the baseline losses are due to the mirror reflectivity and SO{sub 2}, SRD can now determine the concentrations of both mercury and SO{sub 2} from the data taken. For the CRD instrument to perform as a continuous emission monitor it will be required to monitor mercury concentrations over extended periods of time. The stability of monitoring mercury concentrations over time with the CRD apparatus was tested during the past quarter. During a test which monitored the mercury concentration every 2 seconds it was found that the standard deviation, of a signal from about 1.25 ppb Hg, was only 30 ppt. SRD continued interferent gas testing during this past quarter. This included creating a simulated flue gas composed of the gases tested individually by SRD. The detection limits for mercury, although dependent on the concentration of SO{sub 2} in the simulated gas matrix, remained well below the ppb range. It was determined that for the gases tested the only measurable changes in the baseline level occurred for SO{sub 2} and mercury. Speciation studies continued with mercury chloride (HgCl{sub 2}). This included checking for spectral speciation with both Hg and HgCl{sub 2} present in the CRD cavity. There was no observable spectral shift. Also a pyrolysis oven was incorporated into the gas delivery system both for tests with HgCl{sub 2} as well as atomization of the entire gas stream. The pyrolysis tests conducted have been inconclusive thus far.

  14. Airborne monitoring of landfills CH_{4} emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasbarra, Daniele; Gioli, Beniamino; Carlucci, Pantaleone; Magliulo, Vincenzo; Toscano, Piero; Zaldei, Alessandro

    2017-04-01

    The disposal and treatment of waste produces emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs), which contribute to global climate change. In particular, large quantities of Methane are released in the breakdown of organic matter in landfills. In this work we present a new payload of the Sky Arrow ERA aircraft and an original methodology to compute methane emissions, based on the atmospheric mass budget approach. The payload is presently being used for intensive measurements in the area known as "Terra dei fuochi". In this area, located between the provinces of Naples and Caserta (Southern Italy), urban waste combined with industrial toxic waste has been illegally dumped in old quarries or buried in the nearby countryside for decades. This led to patchy sources of methane, with several hot spots spread over a heterogeneous land. In this context, the use of aircraft allows for the investigation at the landscape as well as at the regional scale, taking into account all sources, including those of small dimensions. The Sky Arrow ERA is equipped with the Mobile Flux Platform, capable of deriving the 3D wind vector at 50 Hz, while CO2 and water vapor densities are measured by an infrared gas analyzer (Licor 7500). A new configuration of the Licor 7700 open path fast methane gas analyzer was developed, based on enclosing the sensor within a cylinder exposed to the external air in-flow. This set-up allows for fast response measurements, while avoiding external modifications, subjected to restrictions. Ambient methane mixing ratios in excess of 7 ppm were measured during landfills overpasses; performing grid flight plans at different heights, to describe a virtual box enclosing the study area, and applying interpolation procedures, it was possible to reconstruct wind components and scalar concentrations in a 5x5 kilometers domain containing 6 different landfills, with a resolution of 50 m horizontal and 20 m vertical. For each flight the methane mass flows along and across the wind

  15. Owl: Next Generation System Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, M; White, B S; McKee, S A; Lee, H S; Jeitner, J

    2005-02-16

    As microarchitectural and system complexity grows, comprehending system behavior becomes increasingly difficult, and often requires obtaining and sifting through voluminous event traces or coordinating results from multiple, non-localized sources. Owl is a proposed framework that overcomes limitations faced by traditional performance counters and monitoring facilities in dealing with such complexity by pervasively deploying programmable monitoring elements throughout a system. The design exploits reconfigurable or programmable logic to realize hardware monitors located at event sources, such as memory buses. These monitors run and writeback results autonomously with respect to the CPU, mitigating the system impact of interrupt-driven monitoring or the need to communicate irrelevant events to higher levels of the system. The monitors are designed to snoop any kind of system transaction, e.g., within the core, on a bus, across the wire, or within I/O devices.

  16. 40 CFR 60.343 - Monitoring of emissions and operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... continuous measurement of the scrubbing liquid supply pressure to the control device. The monitoring device... continuous monitoring system, except as provided in paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section, to monitor and... rotary lime kiln. The span of this system shall be set at 40 percent opacity. (b) The owner or operator...

  17. Initial Development of a Continuous Emission Monitor for Dioxins

    SciTech Connect

    Michael J. Coggiola; Harald Oser; Gregory W. Faris; David R. Crosley

    2002-03-30

    Under contract DE-AC26-98FT-40370, SRI International has completed the third phase of a planned three-phase effort to develop a laboratory prototype continuous emission monitor (CEM) for dioxins and furans generated during the incineration of waste materials at DOE remediation sites. The project was initiated on July 29, 1998 with the technical effort completed in October 2001. During this research effort, SRI has made numerous improvements in our jet-REMPI instrument. These improvements have involved characterization and optimization of the molecular cooling in the gas jet, implementation of a custom-fabricated, four pulsed valve assembly, new data acquisition and display software, and preliminary development of a wavelength and mass calibration approach. We have also measured the REMPI excitation spectra of numerous organic compounds that are likely to be present in the exhaust stream of a waste incinerator. These spectra must be well characterized in the laboratory to understand any potential interferences that might arise when monitoring for dioxin and furan congeners. Our results to date continue to validate the original concept of using jet-REMPI as the detection method in a dioxin CEM. Using only commercial components with minor modifications, we have already demonstrated a detection sensitivity in the low ppt range with sufficient chemical specificity to separately detect two closely related congeners of dichlorodibenzodioxin present in a mixture. To demonstrate the utility of this methodology outside of the controlled conditions of the laboratory, we performed a series of pseudo-field experiments at the US Environmental Protection Agency's National Risk Management Research Laboratory, Research Triangle Park, NC. The instrument used for those studies was built by SRI under contract with US EPA, and was an exact duplicate of the SRI system. This duplication allowed the experiments to be conducted without transporting the SRI system to the EPA site. Using the

  18. Fiber optic acoustic emission sensors for harsh environment health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borinski, Jason W.; Duke, John C., Jr.; Horne, Michael R.

    2001-07-01

    Optical fiber sensors are rapidly emerging as viable alternatives to piezoelectric devices as effective means of detecting and quantifying acoustic emission (AE). Compared to traditional piezoelectric-based sensors, optical fiber sensors offer much smaller size, reduced weight, ability to operate at temperatures up to 2000 degree(s)C, immunity to electromagnetic interference, resistance to corrosive environments, inherent safety within flammable environments, and the ability to multiplex multiple sensors on a single fiber. The authors have investigated low-profile fiber optic-based AE sensors for non-destructive evaluation (NDE) systems. In particular, broadband and resonant type optical fiber sensors were developed for monitoring acoustic emission for NDE of pressurized composite vessels and commercial airframe structures. The authors developed an in-plane, broadband sensor design based on optical strain gage technology. In addition, an out-of-plane, resonant sensor was developed using micromachining techniques. The sensors have been evaluated for performance using swept frequency and impulse excitation techniques and compared to conventional piezoelectric transducers. Further, application experiments were conducted using these sensors on both aluminum lap-joints and composite fracture coupons, with collocated piezoelectric transducers. The results indicate that optical fiber AE sensors can be used as transducers sensitive to acoustic events and the indication of imminent failure of a structure, making these sensors useful in many applications where conventional piezoelectric transducers are not well suited.

  19. Quality monitored distributed voting system

    DOEpatents

    Skogmo, David

    1997-01-01

    A quality monitoring system can detect certain system faults and fraud attempts in a distributed voting system. The system uses decoy voters to cast predetermined check ballots. Absent check ballots can indicate system faults. Altered check ballots can indicate attempts at counterfeiting votes. The system can also cast check ballots at predetermined times to provide another check on the distributed voting system.

  20. Quality monitored distributed voting system

    DOEpatents

    Skogmo, D.

    1997-03-18

    A quality monitoring system can detect certain system faults and fraud attempts in a distributed voting system. The system uses decoy voters to cast predetermined check ballots. Absent check ballots can indicate system faults. Altered check ballots can indicate attempts at counterfeiting votes. The system can also cast check ballots at predetermined times to provide another check on the distributed voting system. 6 figs.

  1. Early corrosion monitoring of prestressed concrete piles using acoustic emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vélez, William; Matta, Fabio; Ziehl, Paul H.

    2013-04-01

    The depassivation and corrosion of bonded prestressing steel strands in concrete bridge members may lead to major damage or collapse before visual inspections uncover evident signs of damage, and well before the end of the design life. Recognizing corrosion in its early stage is desirable to plan and prioritize remediation strategies. The Acoustic Emission (AE) technique is a rational means to develop structural health monitoring and prognosis systems for the early detection and location of corrosion in concrete. Compelling features are the sensitivity to events related to micro- and macrodamage, non-intrusiveness, and suitability for remote and wireless applications. There is little understanding of the correlation between AE and the morphology and extent of early damage on the steel surface. In this paper, the evidence collected from prestressed concrete (PC) specimens that are exposed to salt water is discussed vis-à-vis AE data from continuous monitoring. The specimens consist of PC strips that are subjected to wet/dry salt water cycles, representing portions of bridge piles that are exposed to tidal action. Evidence collected from the specimens includes: (a) values of half-cell potential and linear polarization resistance to recognize active corrosion in its early stage; and (b) scanning electron microscopy micrographs of steel areas from two specimens that were decommissioned once the electrochemical measurements indicated a high probability of active corrosion. These results are used to evaluate the AE activity resulting from early corrosion.

  2. Monitoring of volcanic emissions of SO2 and ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theys, Nicolas; Clarisse, Lieven; Brenot, Hugues; van Gent, Jeroen; Campion, Robin; van der A, Ronald; Valks, Pieter; Corradini, Stefano; Merucci, Luca; Van Roozendael, Michel; Coheur, Pierre-François; Hurtmans, Daniel; Clerbaux, Cathy; Tait, Steve; Ferrucci, Fabrizio

    2013-04-01

    Volcanic eruptions can emit large quantities of fine particles (ash) into the atmosphere as well as several trace gases, such as water vapour, carbon dioxide, sulphur species (SO2, H2S) and halogens (HCl, HBr, HF). These volcanic ejecta can have a considerable impact on the atmosphere, human health and society. Volcanic ash in particular is known to be a major threat for aviation, especially after dispersion over long distances (>1000 km) from the erupting volcano. In this respect, the continuous monitoring of volcanic ash from space is playing an essential role for the mitigation of aviation hazards. Compared to ash, SO2 is less critical for aviation safety, but is much easier to measure. Therefore, SO2 observations are often use as a marker of volcanic ash in the atmosphere. Moreover, SO2 yields information on the processes occurring in the magmatic system and is used as a proxy for the eruptive rate. In this presentation we give an overview of recent developments of the Support to Aviation Control Service (SACS). The focus is on the near-real time detection and monitoring of volcanic plumes of ash and SO2 using polar-orbiting instruments GOME-2, OMI, IASI and AIRS. The second part of the talk is dedicated to the determination of volcanic SO2 fluxes from satellite measurements. We review different techniques and investigate the temporal evolution of the total emissions of SO2 for recent volcanic events.

  3. The utility of space-based CO2 emission mapping for monitoring emissions from cities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, T.; Lauvaux, T.; Roman, M. O.; Wang, Z.; Tang, J.; Rao, P.

    2016-12-01

    Cities are responsible for more than 70% of greenhouse gas emissions in the world and their magnitude is rapidly changing in response to economic activities and emission reduction efforts. The science community is expected to provide a tool to monitor these emissions and guide practical emission management. When applying a top-down inversion to a city, the availability of detailed emission inventory is one of limiting factor other than atmospheric data. With a hope of getting more CO2 data collected by ongoing and future CO2 satellites (e.g. NASA's OCO2/OCO3), we started prototyping the use of satellite data to help constraining city emissions. The development of fine-grained emission dataset, which will be a prior for inversion, requires time-intensive labor and often difficult to update on annual basis. We made an attempt to improve the 1 km resolution fossil fuel emission fields taken from global nightlight-based emission model ODIAC using a 30m resolution impervious surface data. Impervious data is a good indicator of emitting areas in cities (e.g. building/road vs. urban vegetation) and should inform fine-scale emission source spatial structures. We implemented inversions using two different prior emissions (1km ODIAC emission field and the improved 30m emission field) and compared to the control inversion case where a fine-grained emission data was used. We confirmed that the use of two satellite-based emission fields both yield comparable emission estimates to the control. Also, the improved results from the run with the 30m emission field relative to the 1km ODIAC case, suggested that while temporal variations are captured by atmospheric inversions (emissions are only provided on monthly basis), emission spatial structures remain as a key information to constrain emission spatial distributions at a very fine spatial scale. The improved emission field can be also used to implement the full characterization of error structures, which is not currently

  4. 40 CFR 60.734 - Monitoring of emissions and operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Calciners and Dryers in Mineral Industries § 60.734 Monitoring of emissions and operations. (a) With the... calciner, a feldspar rotary dryer, a fire clay rotary dryer, an industrial sand fluid bed dryer, a kaolin rotary calciner, a perlite rotary dryer, a roofing granules fluid bed dryer, a roofing granules...

  5. 40 CFR 52.796 - Industrial continuous emission monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Industrial continuous emission monitoring. 52.796 Section 52.796 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Indiana § 52.796 Industrial...

  6. 40 CFR 60.613 - Monitoring of emissions and operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... operator of an affected facility that uses an incinerator to seek to comply with the TOC emission limit... and having an accuracy of ±1 percent of the temperature being monitored expressed in degrees Celsius... device in the firebox equipped with a continuous recorder and having an accuracy of ±1 percent of...

  7. 40 CFR 60.703 - Monitoring of emissions and operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... that uses an incinerator to seek to comply with the TOC emission limit specified under § 60.702(a... ±1 percent of the temperature being monitored expressed in degrees Celsius or ±0.5 °C, whichever is... equipped with a continuous recorder and having an accuracy of ±1 percent of the temperature being...

  8. 40 CFR 60.613 - Monitoring of emissions and operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... operator of an affected facility that uses an incinerator to seek to comply with the TOC emission limit... and having an accuracy of ±1 percent of the temperature being monitored expressed in degrees Celsius... device in the firebox equipped with a continuous recorder and having an accuracy of ±1 percent of...

  9. 40 CFR 60.703 - Monitoring of emissions and operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... that uses an incinerator to seek to comply with the TOC emission limit specified under § 60.702(a... ±1 percent of the temperature being monitored expressed in degrees Celsius or ±0.5 °C, whichever is... equipped with a continuous recorder and having an accuracy of ±1 percent of the temperature being...

  10. 40 CFR 60.613 - Monitoring of emissions and operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... operator of an affected facility that uses an incinerator to seek to comply with the TOC emission limit... and having an accuracy of ±1 percent of the temperature being monitored expressed in degrees Celsius... device in the firebox equipped with a continuous recorder and having an accuracy of ±1 percent of...

  11. Quality Assurance Program Plan for radionuclide airborne emissions monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Vance, L.M.

    1993-07-01

    This Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) describes the quality assurance requirements and responsibilities for radioactive airborne emissions measurements activities from regulated stacks are controlled at the Hanford Site. Detailed monitoring requirements apply to stacks exceeding 1% of the standard of 10 mrem annual effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual from operations of the Hanford Site.

  12. Status of Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution (TEMPO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suleiman, R. M.; Chance, K.; Liu, X.; Flittner, D. E.; Al-Saadi, J. A.; Janz, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    TEMPO is now well into its implementation phase, having passed both its Key Decision Point C and the Critical Design Review (CDR) for the instrument. The CDR for the ground systems will occur in March 2016 and the CDR for the Mission component at a later date, after the host spacecraft has been selected. TEMPO is on schedule to measure atmospheric pollution for greater North America from space using ultraviolet and visible spectroscopy. TEMPO measures from Mexico City to the Canadian oil sands, and from the Atlantic to the Pacific, hourly and at high spatial resolution. TEMPO provides a tropospheric measurement suite that includes the key elements of tropospheric air pollution chemistry. Measurements are from geostationary (GEO) orbit, to capture the inherent high variability in the diurnal cycle of emissions and chemistry. The small product spatial footprint resolves pollution sources at sub-urban scale. Together, this temporal and spatial resolution improves emission inventories, monitors population exposure, and enables effective emission-control strategies.TEMPO takes advantage of a GEO host spacecraft to provide a modest cost mission that measures the spectra required to retrieve O3, NO2, SO2, H2CO, C2H2O2, H2O, aerosols, cloud parameters, and UVB radiation. TEMPO thus measures the major elements, directly or by proxy, in the tropospheric O3 chemistry cycle. Multi-spectral observations provide sensitivity to O3 in the lowermost troposphere, substantially reducing uncertainty in air quality predictions by 50%. TEMPO quantifies and tracks the evolution of aerosol loading. It provides near-real-time air quality products that will be made widely, publicly available.TEMPO provides much of the atmospheric measurement capability recommended for GEO-CAPE in the 2007 National Research Council Decadal Survey, Earth Science and Applications from Space: National Imperatives for the Next Decade and Beyond. Instruments from Europe (Sentinel 4) and Asia (GEMS) will form

  13. Status of Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution (TEMPO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chance, K.; Liu, X.; Suleiman, R. M.; Flittner, D. E.; Al-Saadi, J. A.; Janz, S. J.

    2016-12-01

    TEMPO is now in the Assembly, Integration and Test (AI&T) phase, having passed its Key Decision Point C, Critical Design Reviews (CDRs) for the instrument and the ground systems, and the Test Readiness Review (TRR). The TEMPO instrument is scheduled for delivery in August 2017. The request for proposals to host TEMPO on a commercial geostationary satellite is scheduled for release by May 2017, with host selection hopefully completed by the end of calendar 2017. TEMPO is thus on schedule to measure atmospheric pollution for greater North America from space using ultraviolet and visible spectroscopy. TEMPO measures from Mexico City and Cuba to the Canadian oil sands, and from the Atlantic to the Pacific, hourly and at high spatial resolution. It provides a measurement suite that includes the key elements of tropospheric air pollution chemistry. Measurements are from geostationary (GEO) orbit, to capture the high variability in the diurnal cycle of emissions and chemistry. The small spatial footprint resolves pollution sources at sub-urban scale. Together, this temporal and spatial resolution improves emission inventories, monitors population exposure, and enables effective emission-control strategies.TEMPO takes advantage of a GEO host spacecraft to provide a mission that measures the spectra required to retrieve O3, NO2, SO2, H2CO, C2H2O2, H2O, aerosols, cloud parameters, and UVB radiation. TEMPO thus measures the major elements, directly or by proxy, in the tropospheric O3 chemistry cycle. Multi-spectral observations provide sensitivity to O3 in the lowermost troposphere, substantially reducing uncertainty in air quality predictions. TEMPO quantifies and tracks the evolution of aerosol loading. It provides near-real-time air quality products that will be made widely, publicly available.TEMPO provides much of the atmospheric measurement capability recommended for GEO-CAPE in the 2007 National Research Council Decadal Survey, Earth Science and Applications from Space

  14. OpenSM Monitoring System

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, T. A.

    2015-04-17

    The OpenSM Monitoring System includes a collection of diagnostic and monitoring tools for use on Infiniband networks. The information this system gathers is obtained from a service, which in turn is obtained directly from the OpenSM subnet manager.

  15. Ecological Monitoring Information System (EMIS).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fiene, Richard John; And Others

    A system for evaluating and monitoring child development projects, with possible computerization capabilities, was developed for the State of Pennsylvania in connection with 26 child development projects funded by the Appalachian Regional Commission. The Ecological Monitoring Information System (EMIS), provides a series of ecological measurement…

  16. Acoustic emission structural health management systems (AE-SHMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finlayson, Richard D.; Friesel, Mark A.; Carlos, Mark F.; Miller, Ronnie K.; Godinez, Valery

    2000-05-01

    Many of today's methods of inspecting structures are very time consuming, labor intensive and in many cases (due to limited access), impractical. In addition, long shutdown times are required to perform the inspections, thus creating tremendous expenses associated with manpower, materials and lost production. With continuing advances in signal processing and communications a significant interest has been shown in developing new diagnostic technologies for monitoring the integrity of structures with known defects, or for detecting new defects, in real time with minimum human involvement. The continued use of aging structures, especially in regard to the airworthiness of aging aircraft, is a major area of concern. Recent developments in both active and passive Acoustic Emission monitoring as an advanced tool for 'Structural Health Management Systems (SHMS),' are illustrated by using two recently developed acoustic emission systems; the Acoustic Emission-Health and Usage Monitoring System (AE-HUMS) helicopter drivetrain health monitoring system, and the Acoustic Emission Flight Instrument System (AEFIS) composite health monitoring system. The data collected with these types of systems is processed with advanced data screening and classification techniques, which are employed to take full advantage of parametric and waveform-based acoustic emission.

  17. Television Monitoring System for Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vallow, K.; Gordon, S.

    1986-01-01

    Welding process in visually inaccessible spots viewed and recorded. Television system enables monitoring of welding in visually inaccessible locations. System assists welding operations and provide video record, used for weld analysis and welder training.

  18. Television Monitoring System for Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vallow, K.; Gordon, S.

    1986-01-01

    Welding process in visually inaccessible spots viewed and recorded. Television system enables monitoring of welding in visually inaccessible locations. System assists welding operations and provide video record, used for weld analysis and welder training.

  19. Arduino Based Infant Monitoring System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhanah Mohamad Ishak, Daing Noor; Jamil, Muhammad Mahadi Abdul; Ambar, Radzi

    2017-08-01

    This paper proposes a system for monitoring infant in an incubator and records the relevant data into a computer. The data recorded by the system can be further referred by the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) personnel for diagnostic or research purposes. The study focuses on designing the monitoring system that consists of an incubator equipped with humidity sensor to measure the humidity level, and a pulse sensor that can be attached on an infant placed inside the incubator to monitor infant’s heart pulse. The measurement results which are the pulse rate and humidity level are sent to the PC via Arduino microcontroller. The advantage of this system will be that in the future, it may also enable doctors to closely monitor the infant condition through local area network and internet. This work is aimed as an example of an application that contributes towards remote tele-health monitoring system.

  20. Monitoring Surface Climate With its Emissivity Derived From Satellite Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Daniel K.; Larar, Allen M.; Liu, Xu

    2012-01-01

    Satellite thermal infrared (IR) spectral emissivity data have been shown to be significant for atmospheric research and monitoring the Earth fs environment. Long-term and large-scale observations needed for global monitoring and research can be supplied by satellite-based remote sensing. Presented here is the global surface IR emissivity data retrieved from the last 5 years of Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) measurements observed from the MetOp-A satellite. Monthly mean surface properties (i.e., skin temperature T(sub s) and emissivity spectra epsilon(sub v) with a spatial resolution of 0.5x0.5-degrees latitude-longitude are produced to monitor seasonal and inter-annual variations. We demonstrate that surface epsilon(sub v) and T(sub s) retrieved with IASI measurements can be used to assist in monitoring surface weather and surface climate change. Surface epsilon(sub v) together with T(sub s) from current and future operational satellites can be utilized as a means of long-term and large-scale monitoring of Earth 's surface weather environment and associated changes.

  1. Gas House Autonomous System Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Luke; Edsall, Ashley

    2015-01-01

    Gas House Autonomous System Monitoring (GHASM) will employ Integrated System Health Monitoring (ISHM) of cryogenic fluids in the High Pressure Gas Facility at Stennis Space Center. The preliminary focus of development incorporates the passive monitoring and eventual commanding of the Nitrogen System. ISHM offers generic system awareness, adept at using concepts rather than specific error cases. As an enabler for autonomy, ISHM provides capabilities inclusive of anomaly detection, diagnosis, and abnormality prediction. Advancing ISHM and Autonomous Operation functional capabilities enhances quality of data, optimizes safety, improves cost effectiveness, and has direct benefits to a wide spectrum of aerospace applications.

  2. Plutonium process monitoring (PPM) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, A. S.; Ricketts, T. E.; Pansoy-Hejlvik, M. E.; Ramsey, K. B.; Hansel, K. M.; Romero, M. K.

    2000-07-01

    In mid-1980, Marsh and Pope developed an online gamma system to monitor americium, uranium and plutonium gamma rays during anion-exchange process for plutonium aqueous recovery operations. It has been shown that the real-time elution profiles of actinide impurities are important for plutonium loss via break-through, waste minimization, and process monitoring. However, the current monitoring equipment and data acquisition software are obsolete and are frequently problematic. In 1999, we redesigned the on-line gamma monitoring system in collaboration with Perkin-Elmer ORTEC (Oak Ridge, TN) to enhance and upgrade the current system. This paper describes the new integrated plutonium process monitoring (PPM) system for the aqueous plutonium recovery and anion-exchange processes at the Los Alamos Plutonium Facility.

  3. Research Spotlight: Satellites monitor air pollutant emissions in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tretkoff, Ernie

    A new satellite study verifies that Chinese emission control efforts did reduce power plant emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO2), a harmful gas that causes acid rain and can form sulfate aerosols; these aerosols play an important role in the climate system by affecting clouds and precipitation patterns and altering the amount of sunlight that is reflected away from Earth.

  4. Flow cytometer jet monitor system

    DOEpatents

    Van den Engh, Ger

    1997-01-01

    A direct jet monitor illuminates the jet of a flow cytometer in a monitor wavelength band which is substantially separate from the substance wavelength band. When a laser is used to cause fluorescence of the substance, it may be appropriate to use an infrared source to illuminate the jet and thus optically monitor the conditions within the jet through a CCD camera or the like. This optical monitoring may be provided to some type of controller or feedback system which automatically changes either the horizontal location of the jet, the point at which droplet separation occurs, or some other condition within the jet in order to maintain optimum conditions. The direct jet monitor may be operated simultaneously with the substance property sensing and analysis system so that continuous monitoring may be achieved without interfering with the substance data gathering and may be configured so as to allow the front of the analysis or free fall area to be unobstructed during processing.

  5. MICRO AUTO GASIFICATION SYSTEM: EMISSIONS ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A compact, CONEX-housed waste to energy unit, Micro Auto Gasification System (MAGS), was characterized for air emissions from burning of military waste types. The MAGS unit is a dual chamber gasifier with a secondary diesel-fired combustor. Eight tests were conducted with multiple waste types in a 7-day period at the Kilauea Military Camp in Hawai’i. The emissions characterized were chosen based on regulatory emissions limits as well as their ability to cause adverse health effects on humans: particulate matter (PM), mercury, heavy metals, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs). Three military waste feedstock compositions reflecting the variety of wastes to be encountered in theatre were investigated: standard waste (SW), standard waste with increased plastic content (HP), standard waste without SW food components but added first strike ration (FSR) food and packaging material (termed FSR). A fourth waste was collected from the Kilauea dumpster that served the dining facility and room lodging (KMC). Limited scrubber water and solid ash residue samples were collected to obtain a preliminary characterization of these effluents/residues.Gasifying SW, HP, and KMC resulted in similar PCDD/PCDF stack concentrations, 0.26-0.27 ng TEQ/m3 at 7% O2, while FSR waste generated a notably higher stack concentration of 0.68 ng TEQ/m3 at 7% O2. The PM emission

  6. Monitoring soil greenhouse gas emissions from managed grasslands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz-Pinés, Eugenio; Lu, Haiyan; Butterbach-Bahl, Klaus; Kiese, Ralf

    2014-05-01

    Grasslands in Central Europe are of enormous social, ecological and economical importance. They are intensively managed, but the influence of different common practices (i.e. fertilization, harvesting) on the total greenhouse gas budget of grasslands is not fully understood, yet. In addition, it is unknown how these ecosystems will react due to climate change. Increasing temperatures and changing precipitation will likely have an effect on productivity of grasslands and on bio-geo-chemical processes responsible for emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O). In the frame of the TERENO Project (www.tereno.net), a long-term observatory has been implemented in the Ammer catchment, southern Germany. Acting as an in situ global change experiment, 36 big lysimeters (1 m2 section, 150 cm height) have been translocated along an altitudinal gradient, including three sites ranging from 600 to 860 meters above sea level. In addition, two treatments have been considered, corresponding to different management intensities. The overall aim of the pre-alpine TERENO observatory is improving our understanding of the consequences of climate change and management on productivity, greenhouse gas balance, soil nutritional status, nutrient leaching and hydrology of grasslands. Two of the sites are equipped with a fully automated measurement system in order to continuously and accurately monitor the soil-atmosphere greenhouse gas exchange. Thus, a stainless steel chamber (1 m2 section, 80 cm height) is controlled by a robotized system. The chamber is hanging on a metal structure which can move both vertically and horizontally, so that the chamber is able to be set onto each of the lysimeters placed on the field. Furthermore, the headspace of the chamber is connected with a gas tube to a Quantum Cascade Laser, which continuously measures CO2, CH4, N2O and H2O mixing ratios. The chamber acts as a static chamber and sets for 15 minutes onto each lysimeter

  7. Unattended Monitoring System Design Methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Drayer, D.D.; DeLand, S.M.; Harmon, C.D.; Matter, J.C.; Martinez, R.L.; Smith, J.D.

    1999-07-08

    A methodology for designing Unattended Monitoring Systems starting at a systems level has been developed at Sandia National Laboratories. This proven methodology provides a template that describes the process for selecting and applying appropriate technologies to meet unattended system requirements, as well as providing a framework for development of both training courses and workshops associated with unattended monitoring. The design and implementation of unattended monitoring systems is generally intended to respond to some form of policy based requirements resulting from international agreements or domestic regulations. Once the monitoring requirements are established, a review of the associated process and its related facilities enables identification of strategic monitoring locations and development of a conceptual system design. The detailed design effort results in the definition of detection components as well as the supporting communications network and data management scheme. The data analyses then enables a coherent display of the knowledge generated during the monitoring effort. The resultant knowledge is then compared to the original system objectives to ensure that the design adequately addresses the fundamental principles stated in the policy agreements. Implementation of this design methodology will ensure that comprehensive unattended monitoring system designs provide appropriate answers to those critical questions imposed by specific agreements or regulations. This paper describes the main features of the methodology and discusses how it can be applied in real world situations.

  8. Monitoring X-Ray Emission from X-Ray Bursters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaaret, Philip

    1998-01-01

    The goal of this investigation was to use the All-Sky Monitor on the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) in combination with the Burst and Transient Source Experiment on the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory to simultaneously measure the x-ray (2-12 keV) and hard x-ray (20-100 keV) emission from x-ray bursters. The investigation was successful. We made the first simultaneous measurement of hard and soft x-ray emission and found a strong anticorrelation of hard and soft x-ray emission from the X-Ray Burster 4U 0614+091. The monitoring performed under this investigation was also important in triggering target of opportunity observations of x-ray bursters made under the investigation hard x-ray emission of x-ray bursters approved for RXTE cycles 1 and 2. These observations lead to a number of papers on high-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations and on hard x-ray emission from the x-ray bursters 4U 0614+091 and 4U 1705-44.

  9. Engineering monitoring expert system's developer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, Ching F.

    1991-01-01

    This research project is designed to apply artificial intelligence technology including expert systems, dynamic interface of neural networks, and hypertext to construct an expert system developer. The developer environment is specifically suited to building expert systems which monitor the performance of ground support equipment for propulsion systems and testing facilities. The expert system developer, through the use of a graphics interface and a rule network, will be transparent to the user during rule constructing and data scanning of the knowledge base. The project will result in a software system that allows its user to build specific monitoring type expert systems which monitor various equipments used for propulsion systems or ground testing facilities and accrues system performance information in a dynamic knowledge base.

  10. A Community Emissions Data System (CEDS) for Historical Emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Steven J.; Zhou, Yuyu; Kyle, G. Page; Wang, Hailong; Yu, Hongbin

    2015-04-21

    Historical emission estimates for anthropogenic aerosol and precursor compounds are key data needed for Earth system models, climate models, and atmospheric chemistry and transport models; both for general analysis and assessment and also for model validation through comparisons with observations. Current global emission data sets have a number of shortcomings, including timeliness and transparency. Satellite and other earth-system data are increasingly available in near real-time, but global emission estimates lag by 5-10 years. The CEDS project will construct a data-driven, open source framework to produce annually updated emission estimates. The basic methodologies to be used for this system have been used for SO2 (Smith et al. 2011, Klimont, Smith and Cofala 2013), and are designed to complement existing inventory efforts. The goal of this system is to consistently extend current emission estimates both forward in time to recent years and also back over the entire industrial era. The project will produce improved datasets for global and (potentially) regional model, allow analysis of trends across time, countries, and sectors of emissions and emission factors, and facilitate improved scientific analysis in general. Consistent estimation of uncertainty will be an integral part of this system. This effort will facilitate community evaluation of emissions and further emission-related research more generally.

  11. The CUORE slow monitoring systems

    DOE PAGES

    Gladstone, L.; Biare, D.; Cappelli, L.; ...

    2017-09-20

    CUORE is a cryogenic experiment searching primarily for neutrinoless double decay inmore » $$^{130}$$Te. It will begin data-taking operations in 2016. To monitor the cryostat and detector during commissioning and data taking, we have designed and developed Slow Monitoring systems. In addition to real-time systems using LabVIEW, we have an alarm, analysis, and archiving website that uses MongoDB, AngularJS, and Bootstrap software. These modern, state of the art software packages make the monitoring system transparent, easily maintainable, and accessible on many platforms including mobile devices.« less

  12. The CUORE slow monitoring systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladstone, L.; Biare, D.; Cappelli, L.; Cushman, J. S.; Del Corso, F.; Fujikawa, B. K.; Hickerson, K. P.; Moggi, N.; Pagliarone, C. E.; Schmidt, B.; Wagaarachchi, S. L.; Welliver, B.; Winslow, L. A.

    2017-09-01

    CUORE is a cryogenic experiment searching primarily for neutrinoless double decay in 130Te. It will begin data-taking operations in 2016. To monitor the cryostat and detector during commissioning and data taking, we have designed and developed Slow Monitoring systems. In addition to real-time systems using LabVIEW, we have an alarm, analysis, and archiving website that uses MongoDB, AngularJS, and Bootstrap software. These modern, state of the art software packages make the monitoring system transparent, easily maintainable, and accessible on many platforms including mobile devices.

  13. Improving Emission Estimates With The Community Emissions Data System (CEDS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, S.; Hoesly, R. M.

    2016-12-01

    Inventory data is a key component of scientific and regulatory efforts focused on air pollution, climate and global change and also a critical compliment for observational emission efforts. The Community Emissions Data System (CEDS) project aims to provide consistent estimates of historical anthropogenic emissions using an open-source data system. The first product from this system was anthropogenic emissions over 1750-2014 of reactive gases, aerosols, and carbon dioxide, for use in CMIP6. These data are annually resolved, have monthly seasonality, were estimated at a moderately detailed level of 50+ sectors and 8 fuel types, and were mapped to spatial grids. CEDS combines bottom-up default emissions estimates that are calibrated to country-level inventories where these are deemed reliable. Outside of years where inventories are available, driver data and emission factors are extended using user-defined rules. The system is designed to facilitate annual updates (so the most recent inventory data is available). The software and most input data are being released as open source software in order to provide access to assumptions, improve emission estimates, and allow access to fundamental emissions data for research purposes. We report on our efforts to expand the spatial resolution by estimating emission trends by state/province for large countries. This will allow spatial shifts in emissions over time to be better represented and make the data more useful for research such as that discussed in this session. As part of these improvements we will add support for use of regionally-specific emission proxies and point sources. A key focus of ongoing research is better quantification of emissions uncertainty. Our goal is consistent estimation of uncertainty over time, sector, and country. We will also report on results estimating the additional uncertainty associated with extending emissions data over recent years. http://www.globalchange.umd.edu/CEDS/

  14. Power Plant Emission Monitoring in Munich Using Differential Column Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jia; Nguyen, Hai; Toja-Silva, Francisco; Heinle, Ludwig; Hase, Frank; Butz, André

    2017-04-01

    Differential column measurements using compact Fourier transform spectrometers (EM27/SUN) have shown to be an effective method to determine the greenhouse gas emissions. Citywide measurement campaigns were carried out in Boston, Indianapolis, San Francisco, etc., focusing on city (e.g. emissions from natural gas infrastructure) and local sources. We are particularly working on validating this novel method for attributing and quantifying local emission sources. Optimal strategies are developed for measuring in different seasons with various sun elevations. We have deployed two spectrometers to monitor the CO2 and CH4 emission rates (kg s-1) of a natural gas fired combined heat-and-power plant in Munich, Germany (Heizkraftwerk Süd). We placed our spectrometers in the vicinity (<800 m) of the power plant and measured the differences between the column-averaged dry-air mole fractions at a downwind and a non-downwind site of the power plant (ΔXCO2 and ΔXCH4). Measurements in summer and winter have been carried out. We compared the measured data of ΔXCO2 with the results of a Gaussian plume model and a computational fluid dynamics simulation using OpenFOAM. The determined emission rates agree well with our a priori knowledge of the inflow. In this work, we discuss the accuracy of the differential column measurements for determining power plant emissions and explore their sensitivities to meteorological and model parameters. In addition, we present measurement strategies and experimental design criteria for different meteorological conditions and time of the year, including winter when the sun elevation is low and the column inclination becomes very important. Differential column measurements using compact spectrometers are shown to be a reliable method to monitor power plant emissions.

  15. System monitors discrete computer inputs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, J. J.

    1966-01-01

    Computer system monitors inputs from checkout devices. The comparing, addressing, and controlling functions are performed in the I/O unit. This leaves the computer main frame free to handle memory, access priority, and interrupt instructions.

  16. 40 CFR 60.48b - Emission monitoring for particulate matter and nitrogen oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... to perform subsequent monitoring using a digital opacity compliance system according to a site... also available on the Technology Transfer Network (TTN) under Emission Measurement Center Preliminary.../J (0.060 lb/MMBtu) or less and does not use a post-combustion technology to reduce SO2 or PM...

  17. 40 CFR 60.48b - Emission monitoring for particulate matter and nitrogen oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... to perform subsequent monitoring using a digital opacity compliance system according to a site... also available on the Technology Transfer Network (TTN) under Emission Measurement Center Preliminary.../J (0.060 lb/MMBtu) or less and does not use a post-combustion technology to reduce SO2 or PM...

  18. 40 CFR 60.48b - Emission monitoring for particulate matter and nitrogen oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... to perform subsequent monitoring using a digital opacity compliance system according to a site... also available on the Technology Transfer Network (TTN) under Emission Measurement Center Preliminary.../J (0.060 lb/MMBtu) or less and does not use a post-combustion technology to reduce SO2 or PM...

  19. Monitoring of laser welding process by optical emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruncko, Jaroslav; Uherek, Frantisek; Michalka, Miroslav

    2003-07-01

    Technological processes including laser welding that use a laser beam are typically accompanied with the occurrence of laser-induced plasma. This physical phenomenon is investigated by many different monitoring methods and optical emission spectroscopy is the most common. The recent advert of miniature fibre optic spectrometers and relative cheap and powerful computers has provided a very promising tool for on-line spectral analyzing of laser-induced plasma. The contribution deals with the on-line monitoring of a laser-induced plasma during laser beam welding by optical emission spectroscopy. In this study a continuous-wave CO2 laser with output power up to 3 kW was used. Circumstances of partial and full penetration of welded specimen material and the relation with spectroscopic parameters of laser-induced plasma were investigated.

  20. Monitoring of acoustic emission activity using thin wafer piezoelectric sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trujillo, Blaine; Zagrai, Andrei; Meisner, Daniel; Momeni, Sepand

    2014-03-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) is a well-known technique for monitoring onset and propagation of material damage. The technique has demonstrated utility in assessment of metallic and composite materials in applications ranging from civil structures to aerospace vehicles. While over the course of few decades AE hardware has changed dramatically with the sensors experiencing little changes. A traditional acoustic emission sensor solution utilizes a thickness resonance of the internal piezoelectric element which, coupled with internal amplification circuit, results in relatively large sensor footprint. Thin wafer piezoelectric sensors are small and unobtrusive, but they have seen limited AE applications due to low signal-to-noise ratio and other operation difficulties. In this contribution, issues and possible solutions pertaining to the utility of thin wafer piezoelectrics as AE sensors are discussed. Results of AE monitoring of fatigue damage using thin wafer piezoelectric and conventional AE sensors are presented.

  1. 40 CFR 60.1260 - What is the minimum amount of monitoring data I must collect with my continuous emission...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., nitrogen oxides, and carbon monoxide are in parts per million by dry volume at 7 percent oxygen (or the...) requires your continuous emission monitoring systems to complete at least one cycle of operation...

  2. 40 CFR 60.1260 - What is the minimum amount of monitoring data I must collect with my continuous emission...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., nitrogen oxides, and carbon monoxide are in parts per million by dry volume at 7 percent oxygen (or the...) requires your continuous emission monitoring systems to complete at least one cycle of operation...

  3. 40 CFR 60.1750 - What is the minimum amount of monitoring data I must collect with my continuous emission...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    .... Make sure the averages for sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides (Class I municipal waste combustion units...) requires your continuous emission monitoring systems to complete at least one cycle of operation...

  4. 40 CFR 60.1750 - What is the minimum amount of monitoring data I must collect with my continuous emission...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    .... Make sure the averages for sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides (Class I municipal waste combustion units...) requires your continuous emission monitoring systems to complete at least one cycle of operation...

  5. 40 CFR 60.1750 - What is the minimum amount of monitoring data I must collect with my continuous emission...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    .... Make sure the averages for sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides (Class I municipal waste combustion units...) requires your continuous emission monitoring systems to complete at least one cycle of operation...

  6. 40 CFR 60.1260 - What is the minimum amount of monitoring data I must collect with my continuous emission...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., nitrogen oxides, and carbon monoxide are in parts per million by dry volume at 7 percent oxygen (or the...) requires your continuous emission monitoring systems to complete at least one cycle of operation...

  7. 40 CFR 60.1750 - What is the minimum amount of monitoring data I must collect with my continuous emission...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    .... Make sure the averages for sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides (Class I municipal waste combustion units...) requires your continuous emission monitoring systems to complete at least one cycle of operation...

  8. 40 CFR 60.1260 - What is the minimum amount of monitoring data I must collect with my continuous emission...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., nitrogen oxides, and carbon monoxide are in parts per million by dry volume at 7 percent oxygen (or the...) requires your continuous emission monitoring systems to complete at least one cycle of operation...

  9. 40 CFR 60.3041 - What is the minimum amount of monitoring data I must collect with my continuous emission...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    .... Make sure the averages for carbon monoxide are in parts per million by dry volume at 7 percent oxygen... your continuous emission monitoring systems to complete at least one cycle of operation...

  10. 40 CFR 60.2942 - What is the minimum amount of monitoring data I must collect with my continuous emission...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... the averages for carbon monoxide are in parts per million by dry volume at 7 percent oxygen. Use the 1... emission monitoring systems to complete at least one cycle of operation (sampling, analyzing, and...

  11. 40 CFR 60.2942 - What is the minimum amount of monitoring data I must collect with my continuous emission...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the averages for carbon monoxide are in parts per million by dry volume at 7 percent oxygen. Use the 1... emission monitoring systems to complete at least one cycle of operation (sampling, analyzing, and...

  12. 40 CFR 60.3041 - What is the minimum amount of monitoring data I must collect with my continuous emission...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    .... Make sure the averages for carbon monoxide are in parts per million by dry volume at 7 percent oxygen... your continuous emission monitoring systems to complete at least one cycle of operation...

  13. 40 CFR 60.3041 - What is the minimum amount of monitoring data I must collect with my continuous emission...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...? (a) Where continuous emission monitoring systems are required, obtain 1-hour arithmetic averages... points per hour in order to calculate a valid 1-hour arithmetic average. Section 60.13(e)(2) requires...

  14. 40 CFR 60.3041 - What is the minimum amount of monitoring data I must collect with my continuous emission...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...? (a) Where continuous emission monitoring systems are required, obtain 1-hour arithmetic averages... points per hour in order to calculate a valid 1-hour arithmetic average. Section 60.13(e)(2) requires...

  15. Acoustic emission monitoring for assessment of steel bridge details

    SciTech Connect

    Kosnik, D. E.; Corr, D. J.; Hopwood, T.

    2011-06-23

    Acoustic emission (AE) testing was deployed on details of two large steel Interstate Highway bridges: one cantilever through-truss and one trapezoidal box girder bridge. Quantitative measurements of activity levels at known and suspected crack locations were made by monitoring AE under normal service loads (e.g., live traffic and wind). AE indications were used to direct application of radiography, resulting in identification of a previously unknown flaw, and to inform selection of a retrofit detail.

  16. Supplemental Report: Application of Emission Spectroscopy to Monitoring Technetium

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, W.A.

    2000-07-27

    This report provides supplemental information to an earlier report BNF-98-003-0199, ''Evaluation of Emission Spectroscopy for the On-Line Analysis of Technetium''. In this report data is included from real Hanford samples as well as for solutions spiked with technetium. This supplemental work confirms the ability of ICP-ES to monitor technetium as it breaks through an ion exchange process.

  17. The use of acoustic emission for bearing condition monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lees, A. W.; Quiney, Z.; Ganji, A.; Murray, B.

    2011-07-01

    This paper reports research currently in progress at Swansea University in collaboration with SKF Engineering & Research Centre as part of a continuing investigation into high frequency Acoustic Emission. The primary concerns are experimentally producing subsurface cracks, the type of which would occur in a service failure of a ball bearing, within a steel ball and to closely monitor the properties of this AE from crack initiation to the formation of a ball on the ball surface. It is worth noting that there is evidence that the frequency content of the AE changes during this period, although this has yet to be proved consistent or even fully explained. Conclusive evidence could lead to a system which detects such cracks in a bearing operating in real life conditions, advantageous for many reasons including safety, downtime and maintenance and associated costs. The results from two experimental procedures are presented, one of which loads a single ball held stationary in a test rig to induce subsurface cracks, which are in turn detected by a pair of broadband AE sensors and recorded via a Labview based software system. This approach not only allows detailed analysis of the AE waveforms but also approximate AE source location from the time difference between two sensors. The second experimental procedure details an adaptation of a four-ball lubricant tester in an attempt to produce naturally occurring subsurface cracks from rolling contact whilst minimising the AE arising from surface wear. This thought behind this experiment is reinforced with 3D computational modelling of the rotating system.

  18. Estimating National-scale Emissions using Dense Monitoring Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesan, A.; Manning, A.; Grant, A.; Young, D.; Oram, D.; Sturges, W. T.; Moncrieff, J. B.; O'Doherty, S.

    2014-12-01

    The UK's DECC (Deriving Emissions linked to Climate Change) network consists of four greenhouse gas measurement stations that are situated to constrain emissions from the UK and Northwest Europe. These four stations are located in Mace Head (West Coast of Ireland), and on telecommunication towers at Ridge Hill (Western England), Tacolneston (Eastern England) and Angus (Eastern Scotland). With the exception of Angus, which currently only measures carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4), the remaining sites are additionally equipped to monitor nitrous oxide (N2O). We present an analysis of the network's CH4 and N2O observations from 2011-2013 and compare derived top-down regional emissions with bottom-up inventories, including a recently produced high-resolution inventory (UK National Atmospheric Emissions Inventory). As countries are moving toward national-level emissions estimation, we also address some of the considerations that need to be made when designing these national networks. One of the novel aspects of this work is that we use a hierarchical Bayesian inversion framework. This methodology, which has newly been applied to greenhouse gas emissions estimation, is designed to estimate temporally and spatially varying model-measurement uncertainties and correlation scales, in addition to fluxes. Through this analysis, we demonstrate the importance of characterizing these covariance parameters in order to properly use data from high-density monitoring networks. This UK case study highlights the ways in which this new inverse framework can be used to address some of the limitations of traditional Bayesian inverse methods.

  19. Risk Monitoring for Space Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kafka, Peter

    2005-12-01

    The paper shows the idea, the drivers and some basics within the wide spread field of Risk Monitoring Systems (RMS) for nuclear power plants. Pros and cons are summarised and the status of last developments is touched. Based on these insights the adoption of RMS for space systems and installations is discussed with the aim to contribute to the advancement of space systems safety.

  20. A Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy Mercury Continuous Emission Monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher C. Carter

    2004-12-15

    The Sensor Research & Development Corporation (SRD) has undertaken the development of a Continuous Emissions Monitor (CEM) for mercury based on the technique of Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRD). The project involved building an instrument for the detection of trace levels of mercury in the flue gas emissions from coal-fired power plants. The project has occurred over two phases. The first phase concentrated on the development of the ringdown cavity and the actual detection of mercury. The second phase dealt with the construction and integration of the sampling system, used to carry the sample from the flue stack to the CRD cavity, into the overall CRD instrument. The project incorporated a Pulsed Alexandrite Laser (PAL) system from Light Age Incorporated as the source to produce the desired narrow band 254 nm ultra-violet (UV) radiation. This laser system was seeded with a diode laser to bring the linewidth of the output beam from about 150 GHz to less than 60 MHz for the fundamental beam. Through a variety of non-linear optics the 761 nm fundamental beam is converted into the 254 nm beam needed for mercury detection. Detection of the mercury transition was verified by the identification of the characteristic natural isotopic structure observed at lower cavity pressures. The five characteristic peaks, due to both natural isotopic abundance and hyperfine splitting, provided a unique identifier for mercury. SRD scientists were able to detect mercury in air down below 10 parts-per-trillion by volume (pptr). This value is dependent on the pressure and temperature within the CRD cavity at the time of detection. Sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) absorbs UV radiation in the same spectral region as mercury, which is a significant problem for most mercury detection equipment. However, SRD has not only been able to determine accurate mercury concentrations in the presence of SO{sub 2}, but the CRD instrument can in fact determine the SO{sub 2} concentration as well. Detection of

  1. NASA Carbon Monitoring System Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaye, J. A.; Doorn, B.; Jucks, K. W.; Wickland, D. E.; Bontempi, P. S.; "Nasa CMS Pilot Product; Scoping Study Teams"

    2010-12-01

    NASA has recently begun a focused program to provide products on the amount and distribution of carbon reservoirs and fluxes in the global environment informed by the increasing global observational capability for these quantities developed by NASA and its interagency and international partners. This program, known as a Carbon Monitoring System (CMS), serves as a user-responsive, product-oriented overlay onto the existing observational, modeling, and research programs sponsored by NASA's Earth Science Division (ESD). Initial emphasis is on two pilot products - one on terrestrial biomass and one on integrated emission/uptake ("flux"), as well as a "scoping study" that will enable longer-term planning built around the increasing global observational capability NASA expects to be launching in the next few years (e.g., Landsat Data Continuity Mission in 2012, reflight of Orbiting Carbon Observatory in 2013, decadal survey missions including ICESat-II in 2015 and DESDynI in 2017). Initial efforts on the pilot products are based largely at three NASA centers (Ames, Goddard, Jet Propulsion Laboratory), but will draw on the broader expertise of the research community through workshops (e.g., one held in Boulder in July, 2010) as well as a planned solicitation for a Science Definition Team to provide broader guidance into the development, evaluation, and future evolution of the pilot products. The NASA CMS activity, with its emphasis on utilization of NASA remote-sensing data, will complement related efforts of other Federal agencies; coordination with other agencies will be carried out through the US Global Change Research Program. In this talk, steps taken to initiate this activity in FY2010 and plans for its evolution into the future will be presented.

  2. A grid job monitoring system

    SciTech Connect

    Dumitrescu, Catalin; Nowack, Andreas; Padhi, Sanjay; Sarkar, Subir; /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a web-based Job Monitoring framework for individual Grid sites that allows users to follow in detail their jobs in quasi-real time. The framework consists of several independent components: (a) a set of sensors that run on the site CE and worker nodes and update a database, (b) a simple yet extensible web services framework and (c) an Ajax powered web interface having a look-and-feel and control similar to a desktop application. The monitoring framework supports LSF, Condor and PBS-like batch systems. This is one of the first monitoring systems where an X.509 authenticated web interface can be seamlessly accessed by both end-users and site administrators. While a site administrator has access to all the possible information, a user can only view the jobs for the Virtual Organizations (VO) he/she is a part of. The monitoring framework design supports several possible deployment scenarios. For a site running a supported batch system, the system may be deployed as a whole, or existing site sensors can be adapted and reused with the web services components. A site may even prefer to build the web server independently and choose to use only the Ajax powered web interface. Finally, the system is being used to monitor a glideinWMS instance. This broadens the scope significantly, allowing it to monitor jobs over multiple sites.

  3. A Grid job monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumitrescu, Catalin; Nowack, Andreas; Padhi, Sanjay; Sarkar, Subir

    2010-04-01

    This paper presents a web-based Job Monitoring framework for individual Grid sites that allows users to follow in detail their jobs in quasi-real time. The framework consists of several independent components : (a) a set of sensors that run on the site CE and worker nodes and update a database, (b) a simple yet extensible web services framework and (c) an Ajax powered web interface having a look-and-feel and control similar to a desktop application. The monitoring framework supports LSF, Condor and PBS-like batch systems. This is one of the first monitoring systems where an X.509 authenticated web interface can be seamlessly accessed by both end-users and site administrators. While a site administrator has access to all the possible information, a user can only view the jobs for the Virtual Organizations (VO) he/she is a part of. The monitoring framework design supports several possible deployment scenarios. For a site running a supported batch system, the system may be deployed as a whole, or existing site sensors can be adapted and reused with the web services components. A site may even prefer to build the web server independently and choose to use only the Ajax powered web interface. Finally, the system is being used to monitor a glideinWMS instance. This broadens the scope significantly, allowing it to monitor jobs over multiple sites.

  4. Acoustic Emission and Guided Wave Monitoring of Fatigue Crack Growth on a Full Pipe Specimen

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Ryan M.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Watson, Bruce E.; Doctor, Steven R.; Bond, Leonard J.

    2011-05-06

    Continuous on-line monitoring of active and passive systems, structures and components in nuclear power plants will be critical to extending the lifetimes of nuclear power plants in the US beyond 60 years. Acoustic emission and guided ultrasonic waves are two tools for continuously monitoring passive systems, structures and components within nuclear power plants and are the focus of this study. These tools are used to monitor fatigue damage induced in a SA 312 TP304 stainless steel pipe specimen. The results of acoustic emission monitoring indicate that crack propagation signals were not directly detected. However, acoustic emission monitoring exposed crack formation prior to visual confirmation through the detection of signals caused by crack closure friction. The results of guided ultrasonic wave monitoring indicate that this technology is sensitive to the presence and size of cracks. The sensitivity and complexity of GUW signals is observed to vary with respect to signal frequency and path traveled by the guided ultrasonic wave relative to the crack orientation.

  5. Modular Biometric Monitoring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chmiel, Alan J. (Inventor); Humphreys, Bradley T. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    A modular system for acquiring biometric data includes a plurality of data acquisition modules configured to sample biometric data from at least one respective input channel at a data acquisition rate. A representation of the sampled biometric data is stored in memory of each of the plurality of data acquisition modules. A central control system is in communication with each of the plurality of data acquisition modules through a bus. The central control system is configured to control communication of data, via the bus, with each of the plurality of data acquisition modules.

  6. Emissions of PCDD/Fs, PBDD/Fs, dioxin like-PCBs and PAHs from a cement plant using a long-term monitoring system.

    PubMed

    Conesa, Juan A; Ortuño, Nuria; Abad, Esteban; Rivera-Austrui, Joan

    2016-11-15

    The aim of the present work was to assess the emission of different persistent organic pollutants from a cement plant over a period of one year, under normal operational conditions. Thus, a long-term sampling device was installed in the clinker kiln stack of the cement plant. The factory uses petroleum coke as primary fuel, but also alternative fuels such as solid recovered fuel (SRF), automotive shredder residue (ASR), sewage sludge, waste tires, and meat and bone meal (MBM) wastes, with an energy substitution level of about 40%. Both PCDD/Fs (together with dl-PCBs) and PBDD/Fs were continuously sampled, with a total of ten samples collected in 2-4week periods. Also, PAHs were sampled during one-week periods, in order to evaluate their emissions in three different samples. The emission levels throughout the year were much lower than the set legal limits in all substances, being <10pgI-TEQ/Nm(3) in the case of PCDD/Fs. The data obtained allowed calculation of updated emission factors for the cement sector, which were 8.5ng I-TEQ/ton clinker for PCDD/Fs and 3.2ng WHO-TEQ/ton clinker for PCBs. With respect to the congener distribution, 2,3,7,8-TCDF accounts for 60 to 68% of the total toxicity for PCDD/Fs, and in PBDD/F emissions, a clear predominance of octa-substituted species (both dioxin and furan) was found.

  7. Fracture of Human Femur Tissue Monitored by Acoustic Emission Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Aggelis, Dimitrios. G.; Strantza, Maria; Louis, Olivia; Boulpaep, Frans; Polyzos, Demosthenes; van Hemelrijck, Danny

    2015-01-01

    The study describes the acoustic emission (AE) activity during human femur tissue fracture. The specimens were fractured in a bending-torsion loading pattern with concurrent monitoring by two AE sensors. The number of recorded signals correlates well with the applied load providing the onset of micro-fracture at approximately one sixth of the maximum load. Furthermore, waveform frequency content and rise time are related to the different modes of fracture (bending of femur neck or torsion of diaphysis). The importance of the study lies mainly in two disciplines. One is that, although femurs are typically subjects of surgical repair in humans, detailed monitoring of the fracture with AE will enrich the understanding of the process in ways that cannot be achieved using only the mechanical data. Additionally, from the point of view of monitoring techniques, applying sensors used for engineering materials and interpreting the obtained data pose additional difficulties due to the uniqueness of the bone structure. PMID:25763648

  8. Integrated sUAS Greenhouse Gas Measurements and Imagery for Land Use Emissions Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbieri, L.; Wyngaard, J.; Galford, G. L.; Adair, C.

    2016-12-01

    Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Uses (AFOLU) constitute the second largest anthropogenic source of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions globally. Agriculture is the dominant source of emissions within that sector. There are a variety of agricultural land management strategies that can be implemented to reduce GHG emissions, but determining the best strategies is challenging. Emissions estimates are currently derived from GHG monitoring methods (e.g., static chambers, eddy flux towers) that are time and labor intensive, expensive, and use in-situ equipment. These methods lack the flexible, spatio-temporal monitoring necessary to reduce the high uncertainty in regional GHG emissions estimates. Small Unmanned Aerial Systems (sUAS) provide the rapid response data collection needed to monitor important field management events (e.g., manure spreading). Further, the ease of deployment of sUAS makes monitoring large regional extents over full-seasons more viable. To our knowledge, we present the first integration of sUAS remotely sensed imagery and GHG concentrations in agriculture and land use monitoring. We have developed and tested open-source hardware and software utilizing low-cost equipment (e.g., NDIR gas sensors and Canon cameras). Initial results show agreement with more traditional, proprietary equipment but at a fraction of the costs. Here we present data from test flights over agricultural areas under various management practices. The suite of data includes sUAS overpasses for imagery and CO2 concentration measurements, paired with field-based GHG measurements (static chambers). We have developed a set of best practices for sUAS data collection (e.g., time of day effects variability in localized atmospheric GHG concentrations) and discuss currently known challenges (e.g., accounting for external environmental factors such as wind speed). We present results on all sUAS GHG sampling methods paired with imagery and simultaneous static chamber monitoring for a

  9. Space station atmospheric monitoring systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buoni, C.; Coutant, R.; Barnes, R.; Slivon, L.

    A technology assessment study on atmospheric monitoring systems was performed by Battelle Columbus Division for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's John F. Kennedy Space Center under Contract No. NAS10-11033. In this assessment, the objective was to identify, analyze, and recommend systems to sample and measure Space Station atmospheric contaminants and identify where additional research and technology advancements were required. To achieve this objective, it was necessary to define atmospheric monitoring requirements and to assess the state of the art and advanced technology and systems for technical and operational compatibility with monitoring goals. Three technical tasks were defined to support these needs: Definition of Monitoring Requirements, Assessment of Sampling and Analytical Technology, and Technology Screening and Recommendations. Based on the analysis, the principal candidates recommended for development at the Space Station's initial operational capability were: (1) long-path Fourier transform infrared for rapid detection of high-risk contamination incidences, and (2) gas chromatography/mass spectrometry utilizing mass selective detection (or ion-trap) technologies for detailed monitoring of extended crew exposure to low level (ppbv) contamination. The development of a gas chromatography/mass spectrometry/matrix isolation-Fourier transform infrared system was recommended as part of the long range program of upgrading Space Station trace-contaminant monitoring needs.

  10. Optical monitoring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nev, J. T.; Wrench, E. H.; Fox, M. G.; Lave, H.

    1973-01-01

    Instrument can measure optical transmission, reflectance, and scattering. This information can be used to identify changes in optical properties or deviations from required optical standards. Device consists of monochromatic source, photo detector, transfer mirror, and hemiellipsoid. System might be used to measure optical properties of thin film.

  11. Monitoring of Early-Type Emission Line Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, Steven P.; Boettcher, E.; Wilson, S.; Hosek, M.

    2011-05-01

    We have begun a narrowband imaging program to monitoremission in early-type stars in young open clusters and associations. A minority of early-type stars, particularly Be stars, show Hα in emission due to extended atmospheres and non-equilibrium conditions. Emission features commonly vary irregularly over a range of timescales (Porter, J.M. & Rivinus, T., P.A.S.P. 115:1153-1170, 2003). Some of the brightest such stars, e.g. γ Cas, have been spectroscopically monitored for Hα variability to help constrain models of the unstable disk, but there is relatively little ongoing monitoring in samples including fainter stars (Peters, G., Be Star Newsletter 39:3, 2009). Our program uses matched 5nm-wide on-band (656nm) and off-band (645nm) filters, in conjunction with the Hopkins Observatory 0.6-m telescope and CCD camera. Aperture photometry is done on all early-type stars in each frame, and results expressed as on-band to off-band ratios. Though wavelength-dependent information is lost compared with spectroscopy, imaging allows us to observe much fainter (and therefore many more) objects. Observing young clusters, rather than individual target stars, allows us to record multiple known and candidate emission line stars per frame, and provides multiple "normal" reference stars of similar spectral type. Observations began in the summer of 2010. This project has the potential to produce significant amounts of raw data, so a semi-automated data reduction process has been developed, including astrometric and photometric tasks. Early results, including some preliminary light curves and recovery of known Be stars at least as faint as R=13.9, are presented. We gratefully acknowledge support for student research through an REU grant to the Keck Northeast Astronomy Consortium from the National Science Foundation, and from the Division III Research Funding Committee of Williams College.

  12. Real-time expert system monitors complex air regs

    SciTech Connect

    Hasbach, A.

    1995-07-01

    The South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) in southern California monitors NO{sub x} emissions in real time from a total of 60 boilers at the area`s five electric utilities. SCAQMD accomplishes this with an application developed using G2, an expert system from Gensym Corp., Cambridge, Mass., interfaced to monitoring equipment at each remote facility. In 1991, the SCAQMD board passed Rule 1135 requiring monitoring of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from electric-power generating systems. The rule requires utilities to transmit boiler emissions data in near real-time to SCAQMD. Each utility had to install a continuous emission monitoring system (CEMS) to measure emissions from each boiler and a remote terminal unit (RTU) to telecommunicate emissions data to SCAQMD. The CEMS acquires data from sensing devices for each boiler. The RTU collects the data, performs calculations, and transmits formatted information to the Central Station Compliance Advisory Expert System at SCAQMD. This information includes NO{sub x} emissions, power generation, fuel usage, stack gas flow and equipment status.

  13. System for Multiplexing Acoustic Emission (AE) Instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, William H. (Inventor); Perey, Daniel F. (Inventor); Gorman, Michael R. (Inventor); Scales, Edgar F. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    An acoustic monitoring device has at least two acoustic sensors with a triggering mechanism and a multiplexing circuit. After the occurrence of a triggering event at a sensor, the multiplexing circuit allows a recording component to record acoustic emissions at adjacent sensors. The acoustic monitoring device is attached to a solid medium to detect the occurrence of damage.

  14. Remote monitoring of emissions using on-vehicle sensing and vehicle to roadside communications

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, D.T.

    1995-06-01

    Recent developments in on-vehicle electronics makes practical remote monitoring of vehicle emissions compliance with CARB and EPA regulations. A system consisting of emission controls malfunction sensors, an on-board computer (OBC), and vehicle-to-roadside communications (VRC) would enable enforcement officials to remotely and automatically detect vehicle out-of-compliance status. Remote sensing could be accomplished at highway speeds as vehicles pass a roadside RF antenna and reader unit which would interrogate the on- vehicle monitoring and recording system. This paper will focus on the hardware system components require to achieve this goal with special attention to the VRC; a key element for remote monitoring. this remote sensing concept piggybacks on the development of inexpensive VRC equipment for automatic vehicle identification for electronic toll collection and intelligent transportation applications. Employing an RF transponder with appropriate interface to the OBC and malfunction sensors, a practical monitoring system can be developed with potentially important impact on air quality and enforcement. With such a system in place, the current -- and costly and ineffective -- emission control strategy of periodic smog checking could be replaced or modified.

  15. Glovebox oxygen monitoring system

    SciTech Connect

    Haggard, R.

    1993-08-01

    This system is located in the Replacement Tritium Facility (RTF) at the Savannah River Site of the US Department of Energy. The basic system consists of an oxygen sensor module located inside the glovebox and a wall mounted panel located outside the glovebox that contains an electronics package that displays the oxygen level, displays alarms, and sends signals to a facility Distributed Control System (DCS). RTF is a new facility that will be used primarily to load and unload tritium reservoirs, and recycle the tritium for use in existing or new reservoirs. Tritium, an oderless, colorless, gas is a radioactive isotope of hydrogen that is used in modern thermonuclear weapons. Once on-line, RTF will replace other tritium facilities that have been in existence since the 1950`s. Since the entire process at RTF is contained in nitrogen blanketed gloveboxes and features have been provided to recapture fugitive tritium, environmental releases and worker exposure to tritium will be reduced compared to the old facilities.

  16. National Satellite Forest Monitoring systems for REDD+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonckheere, I. G.

    2012-12-01

    Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD) is an effort to create a financial value for the carbon stored in forests, offering incentives for developing countries to reduce emissions from forested lands and invest in low-carbon paths to sustainable development. "REDD+" goes beyond deforestation and forest degradation, and includes the role of conservation, sustainable management of forests and enhancement of forest carbon stocks. In the framework of getting countries ready for REDD+, the UN-REDD Programme assists developing countries to prepare and implement national REDD+ strategies. For the monitoring, reporting and verification, FAO supports the countries to develop national satellite forest monitoring systems that allow for credible measurement, reporting and verification (MRV) of REDD+ activities. These are among the most critical elements for the successful implementation of any REDD+ mechanism. The UN-REDD Programme through a joint effort of FAO and Brazil's National Space Agency, INPE, is supporting countries to develop cost- effective, robust and compatible national monitoring and MRV systems, providing tools, methodologies, training and knowledge sharing that help countries to strengthen their technical and institutional capacity for effective MRV systems. To develop strong nationally-owned forest monitoring systems, technical and institutional capacity building is key. The UN-REDD Programme, through FAO, has taken on intensive training together with INPE, and has provided technical help and assistance for in-country training and implementation for national satellite forest monitoring. The goal of the support to UN-REDD pilot countries in this capacity building effort is the training of technical forest people and IT persons from interested REDD+ countries, and to set- up the national satellite forest monitoring systems. The Brazilian forest monitoring system, TerraAmazon, which is used as a basis for this initiative, allows

  17. A CAVITY RING-DOWN SPECTROSCOPY MERCURY CONTINUOUS EMISSION MONITOR

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher C. Carter

    2004-03-31

    The construction of the sampling system was completed during the past quarter. The sampling system has been built on a 3 feet x 4 feet x 2 inch breadboard table. The laser system, all the associated optics, and the mounts and hardware needed to couple the UV light into the fiber optic have also been condensed and placed on an identical 3 feet x 4 feet x 2 inch breadboard table. This reduces the footprint of each system for ease of operation at a field test facility. The two systems are only connected with a fiber optic, to bring the UV light to the CRD cavity, and a single coaxial cable used to apply a voltage to the diode seed laser to scan the frequency over the desired mercury transition. SRD software engineers applied a couple of software fixes to correct the problems of the diode seed laser drifting or mode hopping. Upon successful completion of the software fixes another long-term test was conducted. A nearly 3 day long, 24 hours/day, test was run to test out the new subroutines. Everything appeared to work as it should and the mercury concentrations were accurately reported for the entire test, with the exception of a small interval of time when the intensity of the UV light dropped low enough that the program was no longer triggering properly. After adjusting the power of the laser the program returned to proper operation. With the successful completion of a relatively long test SRD software engineer incorporated the new subroutine into an entirely new program. This program operates the CRD instrument automatically as a continuous emissions monitor for mercury. In addition the program also reports the concentration of SO{sub 2} determined in the sample flue gas stream. Various functions, operation of, and a description of the new program have been included with this report. This report concludes the technical work associated with Phase II of the Cavity Ring-Down project for the continuous detection of trace levels of mercury. The project is presently

  18. Acoustic emission monitoring using a multimode optical fiber sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandenplas, Steve; Papy, Jean-Michel; Wevers, Martine; Van Huffel, Sabine

    2004-07-01

    Permanent damage in various materials and constructions often causes high-energy high-frequency acoustic waves. To detect those so called `acoustic emission (AE) events', in most cases ultrasonic transducers are embedded in the structure or attached to its surface. However, for many applications where event localization is less important, an embedded low-cost multimode optical fiber sensor configured for event counting may be a better alternative due to its corrosion resistance, immunity to electromagnetic interference and light-weight. The sensing part of this intensity-modulated sensor consists of a multimode optical fiber. The sensing principle now relies on refractive index variations, microbending and mode-mode interferences by the action of the acoustic pressure wave. A photodiode is used to monitor the intensity of the optical signal and transient signal detection techniques (filtering, frame-to-frame analysis, recursive noise estimation, power detector estimator) on the photodiode output are applied to detect the events. In this work, the acoustic emission monitoring capabilities of the multimode optical fiber sensor are demonstrated with the fiber sensor embedded in the liner of a Power Data Transmission (PDT) coil to detect damage (delamination, matrix cracking and fiber breaking) while bending the coil. With the Hankel Total Least Square (HTLS) technique, it is shown that both the acoustic emission signal and optical signal can be modeled with a sum of exponentially damped complex sinusoids with common poles.

  19. The effect of two ammonia-emission-reducing pig housing systems on odour emission.

    PubMed

    Mol, G; Ogink, N W M

    2004-01-01

    Odour nuisance from agricultural activities is increasing in densely populated countries like the Netherlands. To develop adequate regulations, a large-scale, government-financed monitoring programme was started in the mid-1990s to establish odour emission levels for both conventional and low ammonia emission housing systems for cattle, pigs and poultry. The results indicate that high- and low-odour emission housing are difficult to distinguish because of the large variation within housing systems. Measurements on different farm locations within the same housing system show both a large variation between locations and within one location (in time). The latter, however, is significantly smaller, which suggests that farm management is an important determinant in odour emission that interferes with the effects of housing systems. The current research was aimed at determining the effect of two common ammonia-reducing pig-housing systems on odour emissions compared to conventional housing systems under similar management conditions. The respective reduction principles of these systems are reducing the emitting surface of the manure pit and cooling of manure in the manure pit (both pits beneath slatted floor). Five farms that combined conventional housing with one low-ammonia system (three reduced emitting surface and two manure cooling) were selected for a direct, pair-wise comparison of (olfactometric) odour emission measurements. The results show a highly significant effect (p < 0.01) for two of the three reduced emitting surface systems and for one of the two manure cooling system. The average odour reduction percentages of these systems are 35% (from 24.9 to 16.0 OUE/s per animal) and 23% (from 30.1 to 24.0 OUE/s per animal) respectively. Although odour emission reduction through the type of housing system is possible, management factors interact with the system and thereby determine whether the system reduces odour emission or not.

  20. Directional spectral emissivity measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halyo, Nesim (Inventor); Pandey, Dhirendra K. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    Apparatus and process for determining the emissivity of a test specimen including an integrated sphere having two concentric walls with a coolant circulating therebetween, and disposed within a chamber which may be under ambient, vacuum or inert gas conditions. A reference sample is disposed within the sphere with a monochromatic light source in optical alignment therewith. A pyrometer is in optical alignment with the test sample for obtaining continuous test sample temperature measurements during a test. An arcuate slit port is provided through the spaced concentric walls of the integrating sphere with a movable monochromatic light source extending through and movable along the arcuate slit port. A detector system extends through the integrating sphere for continuously detecting an integrated signal indicative of all radiation within its field of view, as a function of the emissivity of the test specimen at various temperatures and various angle position of the monochromatic light source. A furnace for heating the test sample to approximately 3000 K. and control mechanism for transferring the heated sample from the furnace to the test sample port in the integrating sphere is also contained within the chamber.