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Sample records for emission sounder tes

  1. Evidence of Convective Redistribution of Carbon Monoxide in Aura Tropospheric Emission Sounder (TES) and Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manyin, Michael; Douglass, Anne; Schoeberl, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Vertical convective transport is a key element of the tropospheric circulation. Convection lofts air from the boundary layer into the free troposphere, allowing surface emissions to travel much further, and altering the rate of chemical processes such as ozone production. This study uses satellite observations to focus on the convective transport of CO from the boundary layer to the mid and upper troposphere. Our hypothesis is that strong convection associated with high rain rate regions leads to a correlation between mid level and upper level CO amounts. We first test this hypothesis using the Global Modeling Initiative (GMI) chemistry and transport model. We find the correlation is robust and increases as the precipitation rate (the strength of convection) increases. We next examine three years of CO profiles from the Tropospheric Emission Sounder (TES) and Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) instruments aboard EOS Aura. Rain rates are taken from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) 3B-42 multi-satellite product. Again we find a correlation between mid-level and upper tropospheric CO, which increases with rain rate. Our result shows the critical importance of tropical convection in coupling vertical levels of the troposphere in the transport of trace gases. The effect is seen most clearly in strong convective regions such as the Inter-tropical Convergence Zone.

  2. Ammonia Measurements by the NASA Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) and the NPP Suomi Cross-Track Infrared Sounder (CrIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cady-Pereira, K. E.; Shephard, M. W.; Henze, D. K.; Zhu, J.; Pinder, R. W.; Bash, J. O.; Walker, J. T.; Luo, M.

    2013-12-01

    Ammonia is highly reactive, with concurrent high spatial and temporal variability; it can play a key role in determining air quality through its part in the formation of PM2.5 particles. Deposition of NH3 also impacts water quality. With increased fertilizer use and rising temperatures ammonia concentrations are expected to increase significantly over India and China. Nevertheless in situ measurements are sparse, especially in areas beyond North America and Europe. The air quality community has a pressing need for global information on the diurnal and seasonal cycles as well as the distribution and strength of the ammonia sources. Measurements from satellites can provide this information. An advanced optimal estimation algorithm has been developed to retrieve NH3 from the TES instrument flying on the AURA satellite and ammonia is currently a standard TES operational product, available at http://avdc.gsfc.nasa.gov/index.php?site=635564035&id=10&go=list&path=/NH3. A similar retrieval is at the prototyping stage for the CrIS instrument. We will first provide a short summary of the characteristics of TES retrieved ammonia, discuss the distinct characteristics of point and satellite measurements and illustrate how information from the latter is related to the former. We will then present results from comparisons with in situ measurements. Specifically, we will compare TES NH3 with surface measurements in North Carolina and China, and examine the trend in NH3 over China; we will also compare TES NH3 with surface and aircraft measurements in the San Joaquin Valley in California, during both the CalNex and DISCOVER-AQ campaigns. We will present results from the application of inverse methods using TES ammonia to constrain model emissions, an area of research that has showcased the value provided by satellite data. Finally, we will demonstrate the potential of a sensor with TES characteristics on a geostationary platform to provide data with quality sufficient to evaluate

  3. Comparison of Methane Data Products from the TES and AIRS Infrared Sounders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagano, T. J.; Pagano, T. S.; Worden, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    Methane is the second most powerful greenhouse gas with a highly positive radiative forcing of 0.48 W/m2 (IPCC 2013). Global concentrations of methane have been steadily increasing since 2007 (Bruhwiler 2014), raising concerns about methane's impact on the future global climate. For about the last decade, the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) on the Earth Observing System (EOS) Aura spacecraft has been detecting several trace gas species in the troposphere including methane. The goal of this study is to compare TES methane retrievals to that of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on the EOS Aqua spacecraft so that scientific investigations may be transferred from TES to AIRS. The two instruments fly in the afternoon constellation (A-Train), providing numerous coincident measurements for comparison. In addition, they also have a similar spectral range, (3.3 to 15.4 µm) for TES (Beer, 2006) and (3.7 to 15.4 µm) for AIRS (Chahine, 2006), making both instruments sensitive to the mid and upper troposphere. This makes them ideal candidates to compare methane data products. However, because AIRS spectral resolution is lower than that of the TES, there may be a difference in vertical sensitivity. In addition, the retrieval techniques and error characteristics are different for the two data sets. The current state of validation for these data products will be presented. To identify conditions in which the data sets agree and dis agree, we present global maps of methane concentrations from monthly level 3 (L3) data products. We also investigate the temporal stability between the two datasets by comparing global zonal averages derived from L3 over the last decade. Finally, we compare L2 retrieval profiles from representative granules in the tropical, mid-latitude and northern latitudes.

  4. (abstract) Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beer, Reinhard

    1994-01-01

    A descope of the EOS program now requires that all EOS platforms after AM1 be launched on DELTA-class vehicles, which results in much smaller platforms (and payloads) than previously envisaged. A major part of the TES hardware design effort has therefore been redirected towards meeting this challenge. The development of the TES concept continues on a schedule to permit flight on the EOS CHEM platform in 2002, where it is planned to be accompanied by HIRDLS and MLS.

  5. Emissivity spectra estimated with the MaxEnTES algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barducci, A.; Guzzi, D.; Lastri, C.; Nardino, V.; Pippi, I.; Raimondi, V.

    2014-10-01

    Temperature and Emissivity Separation (TES) applied to multispectral or hyperspectral Thermal Infrared (TIR) images of the Earth is a relevant issue for many remote sensing applications. The TIR spectral radiance can be modeled by means of the well-known Planck's law, as a function of the target temperature and emissivity. The estimation of these target's parameters (i.e. the Temperature Emissivity Separation, aka TES) is hindered by the circumstance that the number of measurements is less than the unknown number. Existing TES algorithms implement a temperature estimator in which the uncertainty is removed by adopting some a priori assumption that conditions the retrieved temperature and emissivity. Due to its mathematical structure, the Maximum Entropy formalism (MaxEnt) seems to be well suited for carrying out this complex TES operation. The main advantage of the MaxEnt statistical inference is the absence of any external hypothesis, which is instead characterizes most of the existing the TES algorithms. In this paper we describe the performance of the MaxEnTES (Maximum Entropy Temperature Emissivity Separation) algorithm as applied to ten TIR spectral channels of a MIVIS dataset collected over Italy. We compare the temperature and emissivity spectra estimated by this algorithm with independent estimations achieved with two previous TES methods (the Grey Body Emissivity (GBE), and the Model Emittance Calculation (MEC)). We show that MaxEnTES is a reliable algorithm in terms of its higher output Signal-to-Noise Ratio and the negligibility of systematic errors that bias the estimated temperature in other TES procedures.

  6. Pollution over Megacity Regions from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cady-Pereira, K. E.; Payne, V.; Hegarty, J. D.; Luo, M.; Bowman, K. W.; Millet, D. B.

    2015-12-01

    The world's megacities, defined as urban areas with over 10 million people, are growing rapidly in population and increasing in number, as the migration from rural to urban areas continues. This rapid growth brings economic opportunities but also exacts costs, such as traffic congestion, inadequate sanitation and poor air quality. Monitoring air quality has become a priority for many regional governments, as they seek to understand the sources and distribution of the species contributing to the local pollution. Hyperspectral infrared instruments orbiting the Earth can measure many of these species simultaneously, and since they measure averages over their footprints, they are less sensitive to proximity to strong point sources than in situ measurements, and thus provide a more regional perspective. The JPL TES team has selected a number of megacities as Special Observation targets. These observations, or transects, are sets of 20 closely spaced (12 km apart) TES observations carried out every sixteen days. We will present the TES ozone (O3), peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN), ammonia (NH3), formic acid (HCOOH) and methanol (CH3OH) data collected over Mexico City, Lagos (Nigeria) and Los Angeles from 2013 through 2015, and illustrate how the seasonality in the TES measurements is related to local emissions, biomass burning and regional circulation patterns, and we will reinforce our arguments with MODIS AOD and TES CO data. One of the transects over Mexico City in October demonstrates very nicely the synergy obtained from simultaneous measurements of multiple trace species. We will also discuss the spatial variability along the transects and how it is related to topography and land use.

  7. The Hyperspectral Thermal Emission Spectrometer (HyTES): Preliminary Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hook, Simon; Johnson, William R.; Eng, Bjorn T.; Gunapala, Sarah D.; Lamborn, Andrew U.; Mouroulis, Pantazis, Z.; Mouroulis, Pantazis, Z.; Paine, Christopher G.; Soibel, Alexander; Wilson, Daniel W.

    2011-01-01

    The Hyperspectral Thermal Emission Spectrometer (HyTES) is being developed as part of the risk reduction activities associated with the Hyperspectral Infrared Imager (HyspIRI). HyspIRI is one of the Tier 2 Decadal Survey Missions. HyTES will provide information on how to place the filters on the HyspIRI Thermal Infrared Instrument (TIR) as well as provide antecedent science data. The pushbroom design has 512 spatial pixels over a 50-degree field of view and 256 spectral channels between 7.5 micrometers to 12 micrometers. HyTES includes many key enabling state-of-the-art technologies including a high performance convex diffraction grating, a quantum well infrared photodetector (QWIP) focal plane array, and a compact Dyson-inspired optical design. The Dyson optical design allows for a very compact and optically fast system (F/1.6). It also minimizes cooling requirements due to the fact it has a single monolithic prism-like grating design which allows baffling for stray light suppression. The monolithic configuration eases mechanical tolerancing requirements which are a concern since the complete optical assembly is operated at cryogenic temperatures ((is) approximately 100K). The QWIP allows for optimum spatial and spectral uniformity and provides adequate responsivity or D-star to allow 200mK noise equivalent temperature difference (NEDT) operation across the LWIR passband. Assembly of the system is nearly complete. After completion, alignment results will be presented which show low keystone and smile distortion. This is required to minimize spatial-spectral mixing between adjacent spectral channels and spatial positions. Predictions show the system will have adequate signal to noise for laboratory calibration targets.

  8. Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) for the Earth Observing System (EOS) CHEM Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beer, R.; Glavich, T.; Rider, D.

    2000-01-01

    The Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) is an imaging infrared Fourier transform spectrometer scheduled to be launched into polar sun-synchronous orbit on the Earth Observing System (EOS) CHEM satellite in December 2002.

  9. Developing NASA's VIIRS LST and Emissivity EDRs using a physics based Temperature Emissivity Separation (TES) algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, T.; Hulley, G. C.; Malakar, N.; Hook, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    Land Surface Temperature and Emissivity (LST&E) data are acknowledged as critical Environmental Data Records (EDRs) by the NASA Earth Science Division. The current operational LST EDR for the recently launched Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership's (NPP) Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) payload utilizes a split-window algorithm that relies on previously-generated fixed emissivity dependent coefficients and does not produce a dynamically varying and multi-spectral land surface emissivity product. Furthermore, this algorithm deviates from its MODIS counterpart (MOD11) resulting in a discontinuity in the MODIS/VIIRS LST time series. This study presents an alternative physics based algorithm for generation of the NASA VIIRS LST&E EDR in order to provide continuity with its MODIS counterpart algorithm (MOD21). The algorithm, known as temperature emissivity separation (TES) algorithm, uses a fast radiative transfer model - Radiative Transfer for (A)TOVS (RTTOV) in combination with an emissivity calibration model to isolate the surface radiance contribution retrieving temperature and emissivity. Further, a new water-vapor scaling (WVS) method is developed and implemented to improve the atmospheric correction process within the TES system. An independent assessment of the VIIRS LST&E outputs is performed against in situ LST measurements and laboratory measured emissivity spectra samples over dedicated validation sites in the Southwest USA. Emissivity retrievals are also validated with the latest ASTER Global Emissivity Database Version 4 (GEDv4). An overview and current status of the algorithm as well as the validation results will be discussed.

  10. TES Data and Information

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-09-07

    ... and Information The Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer ( TES ) launched into sun-synchronous orbit aboard Aura, the ... TES is a high-resolution imaging infrared Fourier-transform spectrometer that operates in both nadir and limb-sounding modes. TES global ...

  11. Separation of Atmospheric and Surface Spectral Features in Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Michael D.; Bandfield, Joshua L.; Christensen, Philip R.

    2000-01-01

    We present two algorithms for the separation of spectral features caused by atmospheric and surface components in Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) data. One algorithm uses radiative transfer and successive least squares fitting to find spectral shapes first for atmospheric dust, then for water-ice aerosols, and then, finally, for surface emissivity. A second independent algorithm uses a combination of factor analysis, target transformation, and deconvolution to simultaneously find dust, water ice, and surface emissivity spectral shapes. Both algorithms have been applied to TES spectra, and both find very similar atmospheric and surface spectral shapes. For TES spectra taken during aerobraking and science phasing periods in nadir-geometry these two algorithms give meaningful and usable surface emissivity spectra that can be used for mineralogical identification.

  12. Implementation of Cloud Retrievals for Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) Atmospheric Retrievals: Part 1. Description and Characterization of Errors on Trace Gas Retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulawik, Susan S.; Worden, John; Eldering, Annmarie; Bowman, Kevin; Gunson, Michael; Osterman, Gregory B.; Zhang, Lin; Clough, Shepard A.; Shephard, Mark W.; Beer, Reinhard

    2006-01-01

    We develop an approach to estimate and characterize trace gas retrievals in the presence of clouds in high spectral measurements of upwelling radiance in the infrared spectral region (650-2260/cm). The radiance contribution of clouds is parameterized in terms of a set of frequency-dependent nonscattering optical depths and a cloud height. These cloud parameters are retrieved jointly with surface temperature, emissivity, atmospheric temperature, and trace gases such as ozone from spectral data. We demonstrate the application of this approach using data from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) and test data simulated with a scattering radiative transfer model. We show the value of this approach in that it results in accurate estimates of errors for trace gas retrievals, and the retrieved values improve over the initial guess for a wide range of cloud conditions. Comparisons are made between TES retrievals of ozone, temperature, and water to model fields from the Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO), temperature retrievals from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), tropospheric ozone columns from the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) GEOS-Chem, and ozone retrievals from the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS). In each of these cases, this cloud retrieval approach does not introduce observable biases into TES retrievals.

  13. Quantifying global terrestrial methanol emissions using observations from the TES satellite sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, K. C.; Millet, D. B.; Cady-Pereira, K. E.; Shephard, M. W.; Henze, D. K.; Bousserez, N.; Apel, E. C.; de Gouw, J.; Warneke, C.; Singh, H. B.

    2014-03-01

    We employ new global space-based measurements of atmospheric methanol from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) with the adjoint of the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model to quantify terrestrial emissions of methanol to the atmosphere. Biogenic methanol emissions in the model are based on version 2.1 of the Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGANv2.1), using leaf area data from NASA's Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and GEOS-5 assimilated meteorological fields. We first carry out a pseudo observation test to validate the overall approach, and find that the TES sampling density is sufficient to accurately quantify regional- to continental-scale methanol emissions using this method. A global inversion of two years of TES data yields an optimized annual global surface flux of 122 Tg yr-1 (including biogenic, pyrogenic, and anthropogenic sources), an increase of 60% from the a priori global flux of 76 Tg yr-1. Global terrestrial methanol emissions are thus nearly 25% those of isoprene (~540 Tg yr-1), and are comparable to the combined emissions of all anthropogenic volatile organic compounds (~100-200 Tg yr-1). Our a posteriori terrestrial methanol source leads to a strong improvement of the simulation relative to an ensemble of airborne observations, and corroborates two other recent top-down estimates (114-120 Tg yr-1) derived using in situ and space-based measurements. Inversions testing the sensitivity of optimized fluxes to model errors in OH, dry deposition, and oceanic uptake of methanol, as well as to the assumed a priori constraint, lead to global fluxes ranging from 118 to 126 Tg yr-1. The TES data imply a relatively modest revision of model emissions over most of the tropics, but a significant upward revision in midlatitudes, particularly over Europe and North America. We interpret the inversion results in terms of specific source types using the methanol : CO correlations measured by TES, and find that

  14. Submillimeter limb-emission sounder JEM/SMILES aboard the Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inatani, Junji; Ozeki, Hiroyuki; Satoh, Ryouta; Nishibori, Toshiyuki; Ikeda, Naomi; Fujii, Yasunori; Nakajima, Takashi; Iida, Yukiei; Iida, Teruhito; Kikuchi, Ken'ichi; Miura, Takeshi; Masuko, Harunobu; Manabe, Takeshi; Ochiai, Satoshi; Seta, Masumichi; Irimajiri, Yoshihisa; Kasai, Yasuko; Suzuki, Makoto; Shirai, Tomoko; Tsujimaru, Sho; Shibasaki, Kazuo; Shiotani, Masato

    2000-12-01

    A submillimeter limb-emission sounder, that is to be aboard the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM, dubbed as KIBO) at the International Space Station, has been designed. This payload, Superconducting Submillimeter-wave Limb-emission Sounder (SMILES), is aimed at global mappings of stratospheric trace gases by means of the most sensitive submillimeter receiver ever operated in space. Such sensitivity is ascribed to a Superconductor-Insulator- Superconductor (SIS) mixer, which is operated at 4.5 K in a dedicated cryostat combined with a mechanical cooler. SMILES will observe ozone-depletion-related molecules such as ClO, Hcl, HO2, HNO3, BrO and O3 in the frequency bands at 624.32-626.32 GHz and 649.12-650.32 GHz. A scanning antenna will cover tangent altitudes from 10 to 60 km in every 53 seconds, while tracing the latitudes form 38 S to 65 N along its orbit. This global coverage makes SMILES a useful tool of observing the low- and mid- latitudinal areas as well as the Arctic peripheral region. The molecular emissions will be detected by two units of acousto-optic spectrometers (AOS), each of which has coverage of 1.2 GHz with a resolution of 1.8 MHz. This high-resolution spectroscopy will allow us to detect weak emission lines attributing to less-abundant species.

  15. The tropospheric emission spectrometer (TES) for the Earth Observing System (EOS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beer, R.

    In recent years, increasing concern has been expressed about Global Change - the natural and anthropogenic alteration of the Earth's environment involving global greenhouse warming and the associated climate change, urban and regional atmospheric pollution, acid deposition, regional increases in tropospheric zone, and the decrease in stratospheric ozone. A common theme among these problems is that they all involve those tropospheric trace gases which are fundamental to the biosphere-troposphere interaction, the chemistry of the free troposphere itself, and troposphere-stratosphere exchange. The chemical species involved all have spectral signatures within the near and mid infrared that can now be measured by advanced techniques of remote-sensing infrared spectroradiometry. Such a system is the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES), now in Phase B definition for the Earth Observing System (EOS) polar platforms. TES addresses these objectives by obtaining radiometrically calibrated, linewidth-limited spectral resolution, infrared spectra of the lower atmosphere using both natural thermal emission and reflected sunlight (where appropriate) in three different, but fully programmable, modes: a gobal mode, a pointed mode, and a limb-viewing mode. The goals of TES, its instrumentation, operational modes, sensitivity and data handling are discussed.

  16. The tropospheric emission spectrometer (TES) for the Earth Observing System (EOS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beer, R.

    1992-01-01

    In recent years, increasing concern has been expressed about Global Change - the natural and anthropogenic alteration of the Earth's environment involving global greenhouse warming and the associated climate change, urban and regional atmospheric pollution, acid deposition, regional increases in tropospheric zone, and the decrease in stratospheric ozone. A common theme among these problems is that they all involve those tropospheric trace gases which are fundamental to the biosphere-troposphere interaction, the chemistry of the free troposphere itself, and troposphere-stratosphere exchange. The chemical species involved all have spectral signatures within the near and mid infrared that can now be measured by advanced techniques of remote-sensing infrared spectroradiometry. Such a system is the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES), now in Phase B definition for the Earth Observing System (EOS) polar platforms. TES addresses these objectives by obtaining radiometrically calibrated, linewidth-limited spectral resolution, infrared spectra of the lower atmosphere using both natural thermal emission and reflected sunlight (where appropriate) in three different, but fully programmable, modes: a gobal mode, a pointed mode, and a limb-viewing mode. The goals of TES, its instrumentation, operational modes, sensitivity and data handling are discussed.

  17. Comparison of improved Aura Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) CO{sub 2} with HIPPO and SGP aircraft profile measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Kulawik, S. S.; Worden, J. R.; Wofsy, S. C.; Biraud, S. C.; Nassar, R.; Jones, D. B.A.; Olsen, E. T.; Osterman, G. B.

    2012-02-01

    Comparisons are made between mid-tropospheric Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) satellite measurements and ocean profiles from three Hiaper Pole-to-Pole Observations (HIPPO) campaigns and land aircraft profiles from the United States Southern Great Plains (SGP) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) site over a 4-yr period. These comparisons are used to characterize the bias in the TES CO{sub 2} estimates and to assess whether calculated and actual uncertainties and sensitivities are consistent. The HIPPO dataset is one of the few datasets spanning the altitude range where TES CO{sub 2} estimates are sensitive, which is especially important for characterization of biases. We find that TES CO{sub 2} estimates capture the seasonal and latitudinal gradients observed by HIPPO CO{sub 2} measurements; actual errors range from 0.8–1.2 ppm, depending on the campaign, and are approximately 1.4 times larger than the predicted errors. The bias of TES versus HIPPO is within 0.85 ppm for each of the 3 campaigns; however several of the sub-tropical TES CO{sub 2} estimates are lower than expected based on the calculated errors. Comparisons of aircraft flask profiles, which are measured from the surface to 5 km, to TES CO{sub 2} at the SGP ARM site show good agreement with an overall bias of 0.1 ppm and rms of 1.0 ppm. We also find that the predicted sensitivity of the TES CO{sub 2} estimates is too high, which results from using a multi-step retrieval for CO{sub 2} and temperature. We find that the averaging kernel in the TES product corrected by a pressure-dependent factor accurately reflects the sensitivity of the TES CO{sub 2} product.

  18. Overview and early results of the Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Ken-Ichi; Nishibori, Toshiyuki; Ochiai, Satoshi; Ozeki, Hiroyuki; Irimajiri, Yoshihisa; Kasai, Yasuko; Koike, Makoto; Manabe, Takeshi; Mizukoshi, Kazuo; Murayama, Yasuhiro; Nagahama, Tomoo; Sano, Takuki; Sato, Ryota; Seta, Masumichi; Takahashi, Chikako; Takayanagi, Masahiro; Masuko, Harunobu; Inatani, Junji; Suzuki, Makoto; Shiotani, Masato

    2010-12-01

    The Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) was successfully launched and attached to the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) on the International Space Station (ISS) on 25 September 2009. It has been making atmospheric observations since 12 October 2009 with the aid of a 4 K mechanical cooler and superconducting mixers for submillimeter limb-emission sounding in the frequency bands of 624.32-626.32 GHz and 649.12-650.32 GHz . On the basis of the observed spectra, the data processing has been retrieving vertical profiles for the atmospheric minor constituents in the middle atmosphere, such as O3 with isotopes, HCl, ClO, HO2, BrO, and HNO3. Results from SMILES have demonstrated its high potential to observe atmospheric minor constituents in the middle atmosphere. Unfortunately, SMILES observations have been suspended since 21 April 2010 owing to the failure of a critical component.

  19. Observation capability of Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) from International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasai, Yasuko; Tanaka, Takahiro; Dupuy, Eric; Kita, Kazuyuki; Baron, Philippe; Ochiai, Satoshi; Nishibori, Toshiyuki; Kikuchi, Kenichi; Mendrok, Jana; Murtagh, Donal P.; Urban, Joachim; Smiles Mission Team

    A new generation of sub-millimeter-wave receivers employing sensitive SIS (Superconductor-Insulator-Superconductor) detector technology will provide new opportunities for precise pas-sive remote sensing observation of minor constituents in atmosphere. Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) had been launched in September 11, 2009 and installed to the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) on the International Space Station (ISS). SMILES is a collaboration project of National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA). Mission objectives of SMILES are: 1. Space demonstration of super-sensitive SIS mixer and 4-K mechanical cooler technology 2. Super-sensitive global observation of atmospheric minor constituents with sub-millimeter-wave limb emission sounder JEM/SMILES will allow to observe the atmospheric species such as O3, H35Cl, H37Cl, ClO, HO2, BrO, HOCl, HOBr, HNO3, CH3CN, Ozone isotope species, H2O, and Ice Cloud with the precisions in a few to several tens percents. The altitude region of observation is from the upper troposphere to the mesopouse. We performed the early comparison/validation of ozone with 4 satellites measurements, AURA/MLS, Odin/SMR, ACE, and Odin/OSIRIS, and ozonesonde. SMILES ozone was in good agreement with these data. For example, difference between SMILES and MLS was less than 2 percent be-tween 20-50km. These results are consistent with the observation capabilities of JEM/SMILES with error analysis. This super technology may allow us to open new issues in atmospheric science.

  20. Near-infrared emission spectra of TeS, TeSe and Te2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setzer, K. D.; Fink, E. H.

    2014-10-01

    Emission spectra of the radicals TeS, TeSe and Te2 in the near-infrared spectral region have been measured with a high-resolution Fourier-transform spectrometer. The molecules were generated in a fast-flow system by reacting microwave-discharged mixtures of Tex, Sx, and/or Sex vapour and Ar carrier gas and excited by energy transfer and energy pooling processes in collisions with metastable oxygen O2(a1Δg). The b1Σ+(b0+) → X3Σ-(X10+,X21) electric dipole transitions of TeS and TeSe and the b1Σ+g(b0+g) → X3Σ-g(X21g) magnetic dipole transition of Te2 were measured at medium and high spectral resolution. A very weak emission at 3356 cm-1 observed in the spectrum of TeSe was identified to be the 0-0 band of the hitherto unknown a1Δ(a2) → X3Σ-(X21) transition of the molecule. Analyses of the spectra have yielded a number of new or improved spectroscopic parameters of the molecules.

  1. Correcting Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer (MGS-TES) High Altitude (40 - 65 km) Temperature Retrievals for Instrumental Correlated Noise and Biases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnochie, T. H.; Smith, M. D.

    2011-12-01

    Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer (MGS-TES) nadir-soundings have been used to derive atmospheric temperatures up to roughly 40 km [Conrath et al., JGR 105 2000, Smith et al., JGR 106, 2001], and MGS-TES limb soundings have been used to extend the atmospheric temperature data set to > 60 km in altitude [Smith et al., JGR 106, 2001]. The ~40 - ~65 km altitude range probed by the MGS-TES limb sounding is particularly important for capturing key dynamical features such as the warm winter polar mesosphere [e.g., Smith et al., JGR 106, 2001; McCleese et al., Nature Geoscience 1, 2008], and the response of thermal tides to dust opacity [e.g. Wilson and Hamilton, J. Atmos. Sci. 53, 1996]. Thus accurate and precise temperature profiles at these altitudes are particularly important for constraining global circulation models. They are also critical for interpreting observations of mesospheric condensate aerosols [e.g., Määttänen et al., Icarus 209, 2010; McConnochie et al., Icarus 210, 2010)]. We have indentified correlated noise components in the MGS-TES limb sounding radiances that propagate into very large uncertainties in the retrieved temperatures. We have also identified a slowly varying radiance bias in the limb sounding radiances. Note that the nadir-sounding-based MGS-TES atmospheric temperatures currently available from the Planetary Data System are not affected by either of these issues. These two issues affect the existing MGS-TES limb sounding temperature data set are as follows: Considering, for example, the 1.5 Pascal pressure level (which typically falls between 50 and 60 km altitude), correlated-noise induced standard errors for individual limb-sounding temperature retrievals were 3 - 5 K in Mars Year 24, rising to 5 - 15 K in Mars Year 25 and 10 - 15 K in Mars Year 26 and 27. The radiance bias, although consistent on ~10-sol time scales, is highly variable over the course of the MGS-TES mission. It results in temperatures (at the 1

  2. Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) Observations of Dust Opacity During Aerobraking and Science Phasing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Michael D.; Pearl, John C.; Conrath, Barney J.; Christensen, Philip R.

    1999-01-01

    The Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) arrived at Mars in September 1997 near Mars southern spring equinox and has now provided monitoring of conditions in the Mars atmosphere for more than half a Mars year. The large majority of the spectra taken by the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) are in a nadir geometry (downward looking mode) where Mars is observed through the atmosphere. Most of these contain the distinct spectral signature of atmospheric dust. For these nadir-geometry spectra we retrieve column-integrated infrared aerosol (dust) opacities. TES observations during the aerobraking and science-phasing portions of the MGS mission cover the seasonal range L(sub s)=184 deg - 28 deg. Excellent spatial coverage was obtained in the southern hemisphere. Northern hemisphere coverage is generally limited to narrow strips taken during the periapsis pass but is still very valuable. At the beginning of the mission the 9-(micron)meter dust opacity at midsouthern latitudes was low (0.15-0.25). As the season advanced through southern spring and into summer, TES observed several regional dust storms (including the Noachis dust storm of November 1997) where peak 9-(micron)meter dust opacities approached or exceeded unity, as well as numerous smaller local storms. Both large and small dust storms exhibited significant changes in both spatial coverage and intensity over a timescale of a day. Throughout southern spring and summer the region at the edge of the retreating southern seasonal polar ice cap was observed to be consistently more dusty than other latitudes.

  3. Current Status of Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiotani, M.; Takayanagi, M.

    2009-12-01

    Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) was designed to be aboard the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) on the International Space Station (ISS) as a collaboration project of Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT). Mission Objectives are: i) Space demonstration of superconductive mixer and 4-K mechanical cooler for the submillimeter limb-emission sounding, and ii) global observations of atmospheric minor constituents in the stratosphere (O3, HCI, CIO, HO2, HOCI, BrO, O3 isotopes, HNO3, CH3CN, etc), contributing to the atmospheric sciences. The SMILES observation is characterized as aiming at variation and its impact of radical species in the stratosphere. Based on its high sensitivity in detecting atmospheric limb emission of the submillimeter wave range, JEM/SMILES will make measurements on several radical species crucial to the ozone chemistry. It will be launched with H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV) by the latest version of H-II rocket (H-IIB) on September 10th from Tanegashima Space Center in Japan. In this presentaiton, the up-to-date information of SMILES operation as well as the preliminary result of observation data processing.

  4. Analysis of SO II point source emissions using NASA atmospheric infrared sounder data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Sylvia S.; Miller, David P.; Lewis, Paul E.

    2007-04-01

    Determining the extent to which large power plant emission sources interacting with atmospheric constituents affect the environment could play a significant role in future U.S. energy production policy. The effects on the environment caused by the interaction between power plant emissions and atmospheric constituents has not been investigated in depth due to the lack of calibrated spectral data on a suitable temporal and spatial scale. The availability of NASA's space-based Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) data makes it possible to explore, and begin the first steps toward establishing, a correlation between known emission sources and environmental indicators. An exploratory study was conducted in which a time series of 26 cloud-free AIRS data containing two coal-fired power plants in northern New Mexico were selected, acquired, and analyzed for SO II emissions. A generic forward modeling process was also developed to derive an estimate of the expected AIRS pixel radiance containing the SO II emissions from the two power plants based on published combustion analysis data for coal and available power plant documentation. Analysis of the AIRS NEΔR calculated in this study and subsequent comparison with the radiance values for SO II calculated from the forward model provided essential information regarding the suitability and risk in the use of a modified AIRS configuration for monitoring anthropogenic point source emissions. The results of this study along with its conclusions and recommendations in conjunction with additional research collaboration in several specific topics will provide guidance for the development of the next generation infrared spectrometer system that NASA is considering building for environmental monitoring.

  5. Detection and Spatial Mapping of Anthropogenic Methane Plumes with the Hyperspectral Thermal Emission Spectrometer (HyTES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hulley, Glynn; Duren, Riley; Hook, Simon; Hopkins, Francesca

    2016-04-01

    Detection and Spatial Mapping of Anthropogenic Methane Plumes with the Hyperspectral Thermal Emission Spectrometer (HyTES) Glynn Hulley, Simon Hook, Riley Duren, Francesca Hopkins Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA, USA Currently large uncertainties exist associated with attribution and quantification of fugitive emissions of greenhouse gases such as methane across many regions and key economic sectors. A number of observational efforts are currently underway to better quantify and reduce uncertainties associated with these emissions, including agriculture and oil and gas production operations. One such effort led by JPL is the development of the Hyperspectral Thermal Emission Spectrometer (HyTES) - a wide swath Thermal Infrared (TIR) airborne imager with high spectral (256 bands from 7.5 - 12 micron) and spatial resolution (~1.5 m at 1-km AGL altitude) that presents a major advance in airborne TIR remote sensing measurements. Using HyTES we have developed robust and reliable techniques for the detection and high resolution mapping of small scale plumes of anthropogenic (oil and gas fields, landfills, dairies) and non-anthropogenic (natural seeps) sources of methane in the state of California and Colorado. A background on the HyTES sensor, science objectives, gas detection methods, and examples of mapping fugitive methane plumes in California and Colorado will be discussed. These kind of observational efforts and studies will help address critical science questions related to methane budgets and management of future emissions in California and other regions.

  6. Current status of Superconductive Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiotani, Masato

    Superconductive Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) was designed to be aboard the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) on the International Space Station (ISS) as a collaboration project of Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT). Mission Objectives are: i) Space demonstration of superconductive mixer and 4-K mechanical cooler for the submillimeter limbemission sounding, and ii) global observations of atmospheric minor constituents in the stratosphere (O3, HCI, CIO, HO2, HOCI, BrO, O3 isotopes, HNO3, CH3CN, etc), contributing to the atmospheric sciences. The SMILES observation is characterized as aiming at variation and its impact of radical species in the stratosphere. Based on its high sensitivity in detecting atmospheric limb emission of the submillimeter wave range, JEM/SMILES will make measurements on several radical species crucial to the ozone chemistry (normal O3, isotope O3, ClO, HCl, HOCl, BrO, HO2, and H2O2). The SMILES will also try to observe isotopic composition of ozone. Fabrication of the proto-flight model (PFM) and functional test have been done, and it is aiming at the launch scheduled in 2009 by the H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV).

  7. Overview and Early Results of the Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiotani, Masato

    2010-05-01

    The Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) was developed to be aboard the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) on the International Space Station (ISS) under the cooperation of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and the National Institute of Information and Communication Technology (NICT). SMILES was successfully launched by the H-IIB rocket with the H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV) on September 11, 2009 and was attached to JEM on September 25. Mission objectives are: i) Space demonstration of 4-K mechanical cooler and super-conductive mixer for the submillimeter limb-emission sounding in the frequency bands of 624.32- 627.32 GHz and 649.12- 650.32 GHz, and ii) global observations of atmospheric minor constituents in the middle atmosphere (O3, HCl, ClO, HO2, HOCl, BrO, O3 isotopes, HNO3, CH3CN, etc), contributing to the atmospheric sciences. SMILES started atmospheric observations on October 12, 2009, and has been making very precise measurements on several radical species crucial to the ozone chemistry with its high-sensitivity. In this presentation, the overview of SMILES and the early results will be shown to demonstrate its high potential to observe the atmospheric minor constituents in the middle atmosphere.

  8. Overview and early results of the Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiotani, Masato; Takayanagi, Masahiro; Murayama, Yasuhiro

    The Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) was developed to be aboard the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) on the International Space Station (ISS) under the cooperation of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and the National Institute of Information and Communication Technology (NICT). SMILES was successfully launched by the H-IIB rocket with the H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV) on September 11, 2009 and was attached to JEM on September 25. Mission objectives are: i) Space demonstration of 4-K mechanical cooler and super-conductive mixer for the submillimeter limb-emission sounding in the frequency bands of 624.32-627.32 GHz and 649.12-650.32 GHz, and ii) global observations of atmospheric minor constituents in the middle atmosphere (O3, HCl, ClO, HO2, HOCl, BrO, O3 isotopes, HNO3, CH3CN, etc), contributing to the atmospheric sciences. SMILES started atmospheric observations on October 12, 2009, and has been making very precise measurements on several radical species crucial to the ozone chemistry with its high-sensitivity. In this pre-sentation, the overview of SMILES and the preliminary results will be shown to demonstrate its high potential to observe the atmospheric minor constituents in the middle atmosphere.

  9. High spatial resolution imaging of methane and other trace gases with the airborne Hyperspectral Thermal Emission Spectrometer (HyTES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hulley, Glynn C.; Duren, Riley M.; Hopkins, Francesca M.; Hook, Simon J.; Vance, Nick; Guillevic, Pierre; Johnson, William R.; Eng, Bjorn T.; Mihaly, Jonathan M.; Jovanovic, Veljko M.; Chazanoff, Seth L.; Staniszewski, Zak K.; Kuai, Le; Worden, John; Frankenberg, Christian; Rivera, Gerardo; Aubrey, Andrew D.; Miller, Charles E.; Malakar, Nabin K.; Sánchez Tomás, Juan M.; Holmes, Kendall T.

    2016-06-01

    Currently large uncertainties exist associated with the attribution and quantification of fugitive emissions of criteria pollutants and greenhouse gases such as methane across large regions and key economic sectors. In this study, data from the airborne Hyperspectral Thermal Emission Spectrometer (HyTES) have been used to develop robust and reliable techniques for the detection and wide-area mapping of emission plumes of methane and other atmospheric trace gas species over challenging and diverse environmental conditions with high spatial resolution that permits direct attribution to sources. HyTES is a pushbroom imaging spectrometer with high spectral resolution (256 bands from 7.5 to 12 µm), wide swath (1-2 km), and high spatial resolution (˜ 2 m at 1 km altitude) that incorporates new thermal infrared (TIR) remote sensing technologies. In this study we introduce a hybrid clutter matched filter (CMF) and plume dilation algorithm applied to HyTES observations to efficiently detect and characterize the spatial structures of individual plumes of CH4, H2S, NH3, NO2, and SO2 emitters. The sensitivity and field of regard of HyTES allows rapid and frequent airborne surveys of large areas including facilities not readily accessible from the surface. The HyTES CMF algorithm produces plume intensity images of methane and other gases from strong emission sources. The combination of high spatial resolution and multi-species imaging capability provides source attribution in complex environments. The CMF-based detection of strong emission sources over large areas is a fast and powerful tool needed to focus on more computationally intensive retrieval algorithms to quantify emissions with error estimates, and is useful for expediting mitigation efforts and addressing critical science questions.

  10. Direct Top-down Estimates of Biomass Burning CO Emissions Using TES and MOPITT Versus Bottom-up GFED Inventory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pechony, Olga; Shindell, Drew T.; Faluvegi, Greg

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we utilize near-simultaneous observations from two sets of multiple satellite sensors to segregate Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) and Measurements of Pollution in the Troposphere (MOPITT) CO observations over active fire sources from those made over clear background. Hence, we obtain direct estimates of biomass burning CO emissions without invoking inverse modeling as in traditional top-down methods. We find considerable differences between Global Fire Emissions Database (GFED) versions 2.1 and 3.1 and satellite-based emission estimates in many regions. Both inventories appear to greatly underestimate South and Southeast Asia emissions, for example. On global scales, however, CO emissions in both inventories and in the MOPITT-based analysis agree reasonably well, with the largest bias (30%) found in the Northern Hemisphere spring. In the Southern Hemisphere, there is a one-month shift between the GFED and MOPITT-based fire emissions peak. Afternoon tropical fire emissions retrieved from TES are about two times higher than the morning MOPITT retrievals. This appears to be both a real difference due to the diurnal fire activity variations, and a bias due to the scarcity of TES data.

  11. Validation of ozone data from the Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imai, Koji; Manago, Naohiro; Mitsuda, Chihiro; Naito, Yoko; Nishimoto, Eriko; Sakazaki, Takatoshi; Fujiwara, Masatomo; Froidevaux, Lucien; Clarmann, Thomas; Stiller, Gabriele P.; Murtagh, Donal P.; Rong, Ping-Ping; Mlynczak, Martin G.; Walker, Kaley A.; Kinnison, Douglas E.; Akiyoshi, Hideharu; Nakamura, Tetsu; Miyasaka, Takayuki; Nishibori, Toshiyuki; Mizobuchi, Satoko; Kikuchi, Ken-Ichi; Ozeki, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Chikako; Hayashi, Hiroo; Sano, Takuki; Suzuki, Makoto; Takayanagi, Masahiro; Shiotani, Masato

    2013-06-01

    The Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) onboard the International Space Station provided global measurements of ozone profiles in the middle atmosphere from 12 October 2009 to 21 April 2010. We present validation studies of the SMILES version 2.1 ozone product based on coincidence statistics with satellite observations and outputs of chemistry and transport models (CTMs). Comparisons of the stratospheric ozone with correlative data show agreements that are generally within 10%. In the mesosphere, the agreement is also good and better than 30% even at a high altitude of 73 km, and the SMILES measurements with their local time coverage also capture the diurnal variability very well. The recommended altitude range for scientific use is from 16 to 73 km. We note that the SMILES ozone values for altitude above 26 km are smaller than some of the correlative satellite datasets; conversely the SMILES values in the lower stratosphere tend to be larger than correlative data, particularly in the tropics, with less than 8% difference below ~24 km. The larger values in the lower stratosphere are probably due to departure of retrieval results between two detection bands at altitudes below 28 km; it is ~3% at 24 km and is increasing rapidly down below.

  12. Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) Observations: Atmospheric Temperatures During Aerobraking and Science Phasing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conrath, Barney J.; Pearl, John C.; Smith, Michael D.; Maguire, William C.; Christensen, Philip R.; Dason, Shymala; Kaelberer, Monte S.

    1999-01-01

    Between September 1997, when the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft arrived at Mars, and September 1998 when the final aerobraking phase of the mission began, the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) has acquired an extensive data set spanning approximately half of a Martian year. Nadir-viewing spectral measurements from this data set within the 15-micrometers CO2 absorption band are inverted to obtain atmospheric temperature profiles from the surface up to about the 0.1 mbar level. The computational procedure used to retrieve the temperatures is presented. Mean meridional cross sections of thermal structure are calculated for periods of time near northern hemisphere fall equinox, winter solstice, and spring equinox, as well as for a time interval immediately following the onset of the Noachis Terra dust storm. Gradient thermal wind cross sections are calculated from the thermal structure. Regions of possible wave activity are identified using cross sections of rms temperature deviations from the mean. Results from both near-equinox periods show some hemispheric asymmetry with peak eastward thermal winds in the north about twice the magnitude of those in the south. The results near solstice show an intense circumpolar vortex at high northern latitudes and waves associated with the vortex jet core. Warming of the atmosphere aloft at mid-northern latitudes suggests the presence of a strong cross-equatorial Hadley circulation. Although the Noachis dust storm did not become global in scale, strong perturbations to the atmospheric structure are found, including an enhanced temperature maximum aloft at high northern latitudes resulting from intensification of the Hadley circulation. TES results for the various seasonal conditions are compared with published results from Mars general circulation models, and generally good qualitative agreement is found.

  13. Detection and Spatial Mapping of Anthropogenic Methane Plumes with the Hyperspectral Thermal Emission Spectrometer (HyTES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hook, S. J.; Hulley, G. C.; Duren, R. M.; Guillevic, P.; Aubrey, A. D.; Johnson, W. R.

    2014-12-01

    Currently large uncertainties exist associated with attribution and quantification of fugitive emissions of greenhouse gases such as methane across many regions and key economic sectors. A number of observational efforts are currently underway to better quantify and reduce uncertainties associated with these emissions, including agriculture and oil and gas production operations. One such effort led by JPL is the development of the Hyperspectral Thermal Emission Spectrometer (HyTES) - a wide swath Thermal Infrared (TIR) airborne imager with high spectral (256 bands from 7.5 - 12 micron) and spatial resolution (~1.5 m at 1-km AGL altitude) that presents a major advance in airborne TIR remote sensing measurements. Using HyTES we have developed robust and reliable techniques for the detection and high resolution mapping of small scale plumes of anthropogenic (oil and gas fields, landfills, dairies) and non-anthropogenic (natural seeps) sources of methane in the state of California and Colorado. A background on the HyTES sensor, science objectives, gas detection methods, and examples of mapping fugitive methane plumes in California and Colorado will be discussed. These kind of observational efforts and studies will help address critical science questions related to methane budgets and management of future emissions in California and other regions.

  14. A Balloon-borne Limb-Emission Sounder at 650-GHz band for Stratospheric observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irimajiri, Yoshihisa; Ochiai, Satoshi

    We have developed a Balloon-borne Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (BSMILES) to observe stratospheric minor constituents like ozone, HCl etc. BSMILES carries a 300mm-diameter offset parabolic antenna, a 650-GHz heterodyne superconducting (SIS) low-noise receiver, and an acousto-optical spectrometer (AOS) with the bandwidth of 1GHz and the resolution of 1MHz. Gondola size is 1.35 m x 1.35 m x 1.26 m. Total weight is about 500 kg. Limb observations are made by scanning the antenna beam of about 0.12 degrees (FWHM) in vertical direction. A calibrated hot load (CHL) and elevation angle of 50 degrees are ob-served after each scan for calibration. The DSB system noise temperature of the SIS receiver is less than 460 K at 624-639 GHz with a best value of 330 K that is 11 times as large as the quantum limit. Data acquisition and antenna control are made by on-board PCs. Observed data are recorded to PC card with 2 GB capacity to collect after the observations from the sea, and HK data are transmitted to the ground. Gondola attitude is measured by three-axis fiber-optical gyroscope with accuracy less than 0.01 degrees, three-axis accelerometer, and a two-axis geoaspect sensor. Electric power is supplied by lithium batteries. Total power con-sumption is about 150W. Almost all systems are put in pressurized vessels for waterproofing, heat dissipation, and noise shield, etc. BSMILES was launched from Sanriku Balloon Center of Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS), Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), at the east coast of Japan, in the summer of 2003, 2004, and 2006. The gondola was carried to an altitude of 35 km by a balloon of 100,000 m3 in volume and the observations were made for 1.5 hours in 2004. All systems operated normally by keeping their temperature within the limit of operation by keeping gondola warm with styrene foam. After the observations, the gondola was dropped and splashed on the Pacific Ocean by a parachute and

  15. The EOS AURA Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES): Status of the Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beer, Reinhard

    2005-01-01

    This slide presentation is a programmatic overview covering some of the highlights of the mission and serve as an introduction to the accompanying presentations at the workshop. It reviews the goals and the products of the TES experiment, a simplified chemistry of ozone in both the stratosphere and troposphere, a description of the instrument, and the TES operational modes. Included are graphs showing some of the results of TES analysis of the key constituents of the tropospheric chemistry and the inter-regional transport.

  16. Remote gas plume sensing and imaging with NASA's Hyperspectral Thermal Emission Spectrometer (HyTES).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, William R.; Hulley, Glynn; Hook, Simon J.

    2014-05-01

    The hyperspectral thermal emission spectrometer was developed under NASA's instrument incubator program and has now completed three deployments. The scan head uses a state-of-the-art Dyson spectrometer cooled to 100K coupled to a quantum well infrared photodetector array held at 40K. The combination allows for 256 spectral channels between 7.5μm and 12μm with 512 cross track spatial pixels. Spectral features for many interesting gases fall within the instrument passband. We first review the pre-flight calibration and validation process for HyTES using a suite of instrumentation. This includes a smile measurement at two wavelengths (8.18μm and 10.6μm) as well as a concentration determination using large aperture gas cells. We then show positive gas plume detection at ranges >1000m for various cases: Ammonia gas detection from Salton Sea fumaroles, Methane detection from staged releases points in Wyoming as well as naturally occurring methane hot spots off the coast of Santa Barbara.

  17. Development of superconducting submillimeter-wave limb emission sounder (JEM/SMILES) aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozeki, Hiroyuki; Inatani, Junji; Satoh, Ryouta; Nishibori, Toshiyuki; Ikeda, Naomi; Fujii, Yasunori; Nakajima, Takashi; Iida, Yukiei; Iida, Teruhito; Kikuchi, Ken'ichi; Miura, Takeshi; Masuko, Harunobu; Manabe, Takeshi; Ochiai, Satoshi; Seta, Masumichi; Irimajiri, Yoshihisa; Kasai, Yasuko; Suzuki, Makoto; Shirai, Tomoko; Tsujimaru, Sho; Shibasaki, Kazuo; Shiotani, Masato

    2001-12-01

    A submillimeter wave limb emission sounder, that is to be aboard the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM, dubbed as 'KIBO') at the International Space Station, has been designed. This payload, Superconducting Submillimeter-wave Limb Emission Sounder (SMILES), is aimed at global mappings of stratospheric trace gasses by means of the most sensitive submillimeter receiver ever operated in space. Such sensitivity is ascribed to a Superconductor-Insulator- Superconductor (SIS) mixer, which is operated at 4.5 K in a dedicated cryostat combined with a mechanical cooler. SMILES will observe ozone-depletion-related molecules such as ClO, HCl, HO2, HNO3, BrO and O3 in the frequency bands at 624.32 - 626.32 GHz, and 649.12 - 650.32 GHz. A scanning antenna will cover tangent altitudes from 10 to 60 km in every 53 seconds, while tracing latitudes from 38S to 65N along its orbit. This global coverage makes SMILES a useful tool of observing the low- and mid-latitudinal areas as well as the Arctic peripheral region. The molecular emissions will be detected by two units of acousto-optic spectrometers (AOS), each of which has coverage of 1.2 GHz with a resolution of 1.8 MHz. This high-resolution spectroscopy will allow us to detect weal emission lines attributing to less-abundant species.

  18. Characterization of anthropogenic methane plumes with the Hyperspectral Thermal Emission Spectrometer (HyTES): a retrieval method and error analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuai, Le; Worden, John R.; Li, King-Fai; Hulley, Glynn C.; Hopkins, Francesca M.; Miller, Charles E.; Hook, Simon J.; Duren, Riley M.; Aubrey, Andrew D.

    2016-07-01

    We introduce a retrieval algorithm to estimate lower tropospheric methane (CH4) concentrations from the surface to 1 km with uncertainty estimates using Hyperspectral Thermal Emission Spectrometer (HyTES) airborne radiance measurements. After resampling, retrievals have a spatial resolution of 6 × 6 m2. The total error from a single retrieval is approximately 20 %, with the uncertainties determined primarily by noise and spectral interferences from air temperature, surface emissivity, and atmospheric water vapor. We demonstrate retrievals for a HyTES flight line over storage tanks near Kern River Oil Field (KROF), Kern County, California, and find an extended plume structure in the set of observations with elevated methane concentrations (3.0 ± 0.6 to 6.0 ± 1.2 ppm), well above mean concentrations (1.8 ± 0.4 ppm) observed for this scene. With typically a 20 % estimated uncertainty, plume enhancements with more than 1 ppm are distinguishable from the background values with its uncertainty. HyTES retrievals are consistent with simultaneous airborne and ground-based in situ CH4 mole fraction measurements within the reported accuracy of approximately 0.2 ppm (or ˜ 8 %), due to retrieval interferences related to air temperature, emissivity, and H2O.

  19. Simultaneous physical retrieval of surface emissivity spectrum and atmospheric parameters from infrared atmospheric sounder interferometer spectral radiances.

    PubMed

    Masiello, Guido; Serio, Carmine

    2013-04-10

    The problem of simultaneous physical retrieval of surface emissivity, skin temperature, and temperature, water-vapor, and ozone atmospheric profiles from high-spectral-resolution observations in the infrared is formulated according to an inverse problem with multiple regularization parameters. A methodology has been set up, which seeks an effective solution to the inverse problem in a generalized L-curve criterion framework. The a priori information for the surface emissivity is obtained on the basis of laboratory data alone, and that for the atmospheric parameters by climatology or weather forecasts. To ensure that we deal with a problem of fewer unknowns than observations, the dimensionality of the emissivity is reduced through expansion in Fourier series. The main objective of this study is to demonstrate the simultaneous retrieval of emissivity, skin temperature, and atmospheric parameters with a two-dimensional L-curve criterion. The procedure has been demonstrated with spectra observed from the infrared atmospheric sounder interferometer, flying onboard the European Meteorological Operational satellite. To check the quality and reliability of the methodology, we have used spectra recorded over regions characterized by known or stable emissivity. These include sea surface, for which effective emissivity models are known, and arid lands (Sahara and Namib Deserts) that are known to exhibit the characteristic spectral signature of quartz-rich sand.

  20. Development of Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (JEM/SMILES) Aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manabe, Takeshi

    2002-06-01

    In recent years, stratospheric ozone depletion is one of the most significant global environmental issues. it is well known that stratospheric trace gases, which include chlorine oxides and bromine oxides, play a crucial role in the process of stratospheric ozone destruction. Although the abundances of these trace gases are as low as in the order of parts par billion or less, they are quite efficient to destroy stratospheric ozone by catalytic reactions. In order to establish the techniques to monitor stratospheric Ozone and Ozone depleting molecules, CRL (Communications Research Laboratory and NASDA are collaborating to develop Superconducting Submillimeter-Limb Emission Sounder (JEM/SMILES) to be aboard the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) of the International Space Station. In this paper, the outline of the JEM/SMILES project and the payload instrument is introduced.

  1. Terrestrial Analogue Field Thermal Emission Spectroscopy: Applications to the MER Mini-TES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenhagen, B. T.; Kirkland, L. E.; Herr, K. C.

    2002-12-01

    The 2003 Mars Exploration Rover science strategy is to identify promising targets using the visible/near-infrared imaging Pancam and the thermal infrared spectrometer Mini-TES. The rover would then traverse to those targets for more detailed examination. Team members will select sites using target morphology and color from Pancam, and interpretations of the mineralogy using Mini-TES. This strategy requires low ambiguity, near real-time interpretations of Mini-TES data. Field spectrometer measurements from a rover perspective differ significantly from both laboratory and airborne measurements. Thus field testing using instrumentation similar to the Mini-TES is required to develop and test methods. We will discuss our field testing research toward that end, with a focus on smooth rock coatings. Researchers desire to detect and characterize smooth rock coatings on Mars, if present. In July 2002, we measured field data of a varnished desert pavement, using equipment that measures very similarly to the Mini-TES. Desert varnish may provide information on the environmental conditions, and interests exobiologists because it may be biologically mediated. Downwelling radiance can affect the spectral character by imparting the spectral character of the downwelling radiance onto the measured target spectrum. The contribution differs from the airborne, laboratory, and field perspectives, and with the surface texture. Downwelling radiance is the thermal energy radiated onto a target by all objects in the hemisphere, including surrounding materials and atmospheric gases and aerosols. Smooth (specular) targets reflect light at the angle of incidence (line-sight), while diffuse targets reflect downwelling radiance integrated from the entire hemisphere. Because even smooth rock coatings are not entirely smooth, they have both diffuse and specular components. Typically the diffuse downwelling component is measured using a high reflectance, rough-surfaced target with a known spectral

  2. Observation of atmospheric composition by Superconducting SubMillimeter-wave Limb Emission Sounder (SMILES) onbord International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasai, Y.; Philippe, B.; Mendrok, J.; Ochiai, S.; Urban, J.; Manabe, T.; Kikuchi, K.; Nishibori, T.; Sano, T.; Moller, J.; Murtagh, D. P.

    2009-12-01

    The Superconducting SubMillimeter-wave Limb Emission The Superconducting SubMillimeter-wave Limb Emission Sounder (SMILES) is the first application of superconductor--insulator--superconductor (SIS) heterodyne detector technology to the investigation of the Earth atmosphere from space. SMILES was designed to be onboard the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) on the International Space Station (ISS), and is scheduled to be launched on 11 September 2009 by the H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV). SMILES is a collaboration project of the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA). The performance of this state-of-the-art SIS receiver, with an estimated single side band (SSB) receiver noise temperature of 500 K at 625--650 GHz, provides a large improvement in sensitivity compared to the conventional submillimeter-wave Schottky-diode receivers used by the Sub-Millimetre Radiometer (SMR) onboard the Odin satellite (3000K, single side band, 485--580 GHz, cooled) and the Millimeter-wave Limb Sounder (MLS) onboard Aura (12000K, double side band at 625--650 GHz, uncooled). Since the integration time reduces with the square of the system noise temperature, this performance is roughly equivalent to reducing by a factor of up to 5-10 the integration time needed to reaching the same noise equivalent brightness temperatures. SMILES measurements thus have the potential to provide meaningful information on the global distribution of short-lived radical species, such as ozone, HCl, ClO, HO2, HOCl, CH3CN, BrO, H2O and ice cloud. NICT is operating the L2 research/L3 operational processing chain. In this paper, we introduce the status of SMILES data and its observation performance.

  3. TES Level 1 Algorithms: Interferogram Processing, Geolocation, Radiometric, and Spectral Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Worden, Helen; Beer, Reinhard; Bowman, Kevin W.; Fisher, Brendan; Luo, Mingzhao; Rider, David; Sarkissian, Edwin; Tremblay, Denis; Zong, Jia

    2006-01-01

    The Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) on the Earth Observing System (EOS) Aura satellite measures the infrared radiance emitted by the Earth's surface and atmosphere using Fourier transform spectrometry. The measured interferograms are converted into geolocated, calibrated radiance spectra by the L1 (Level 1) processing, and are the inputs to L2 (Level 2) retrievals of atmospheric parameters, such as vertical profiles of trace gas abundance. We describe the algorithmic components of TES Level 1 processing, giving examples of the intermediate results and diagnostics that are necessary for creating TES L1 products. An assessment of noise-equivalent spectral radiance levels and current systematic errors is provided. As an initial validation of our spectral radiances, TES data are compared to the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) (on EOS Aqua), after accounting for spectral resolution differences by applying the AIRS spectral response function to the TES spectra. For the TES L1 nadir data products currently available, the agreement with AIRS is 1 K or better.

  4. Global Carbon Monoxide Products from Combined AIRS, TES and MLS Measurements on A-Train Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, Juying X.; Yang, R.; Wei, Z.; Carminati, F.; Tangborn, A.; Sun, Z.; Lahoz, W.; Attie, J. L.; El Amraoui, L.; Duncan, B.

    2014-01-01

    This study tests a novel methodology to add value to satellite data sets. This methodology, data fusion, is similar to data assimilation, except that the background modelbased field is replaced by a satellite data set, in this case AIRS (Atmospheric Infrared Sounder) carbon monoxide (CO) measurements. The observational information comes from CO measurements with lower spatial coverage than AIRS, namely, from TES (Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer) and MLS (Microwave Limb Sounder). We show that combining these data sets with data fusion uses the higher spectral resolution of TES to extend AIRS CO observational sensitivity to the lower troposphere, a region especially important for air quality studies. We also show that combined CO measurements from AIRS and MLS provide enhanced information in the UTLS (upper troposphere/lower stratosphere) region compared to each product individually. The combined AIRS-TES and AIRS-MLS CO products are validated against DACOM (differential absorption mid-IR diode laser spectrometer) in situ CO measurements from the INTEX-B (Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment: MILAGRO and Pacific phases) field campaign and in situ data from HIPPO (HIAPER Pole-to-Pole Observations) flights. The data fusion results show improved sensitivities in the lower and upper troposphere (20-30% and above 20%, respectively) as compared with AIRS-only version 5 CO retrievals, and improved daily coverage compared with TES and MLS CO data.

  5. TES FAQ

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-03-14

    ... to observe volcanic eruptions, biomass burning, and pollution events. Data File Information TES Level 1B ... calibrated spectral radiances and their corresponding noise equivalent spectral radiances (NESR). The geolocation, quality and some ...

  6. The Level 2 research product algorithms for the Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baron, P.; Urban, J.; Sagawa, H.; Möller, J.; Murtagh, D. P.; Mendrok, J.; Dupuy, E.; Sato, T. O.; Ochiai, S.; Suzuki, K.; Manabe, T.; Nishibori, T.; Kikuchi, K.; Sato, R.; Takayanagi, M.; Murayama, Y.; Shiotani, M.; Kasai, Y.

    2011-10-01

    This paper describes the algorithms of the level-2 research (L2r) processing chain developed for the Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES). The chain has been developed in parallel to the operational chain for conducting researches on calibration and retrieval algorithms. L2r chain products are available to the scientific community. The objective of version 2 is the retrieval of the vertical distribution of trace gases in the altitude range of 18-90 km. A theoretical error analysis is conducted to estimate the retrieval feasibility of key parameters of the processing: line-of-sight elevation tangent altitudes (or angles), temperature and ozone profiles. While pointing information is often retrieved from molecular oxygen lines, there is no oxygen line in the SMILES spectra, so the strong ozone line at 625.371 GHz has been chosen. The pointing parameters and the ozone profiles are retrieved from the line wings which are measured with high signal to noise ratio, whereas the temperature profile is retrieved from the optically thick line center. The main systematic component of the retrieval error was found to be the neglect of the non-linearity of the radiometric gain in the calibration procedure. This causes a temperature retrieval error of 5-10 K. Because of these large temperature errors, it is not possible to construct a reliable hydrostatic pressure profile. However, as a consequence of the retrieval of pointing parameters, pressure induced errors are significantly reduced if the retrieved trace gas profiles are represented on pressure levels instead of geometric altitude levels. Further, various setups of trace gas retrievals have been tested. The error analysis for the retrieved HOCl profile demonstrates that best results for inverting weak lines can be obtained by using narrow spectral windows.

  7. The Level 2 research product algorithms for the Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baron, P.; Urban, J.; Sagawa, H.; Möller, J.; Murtagh, D. P.; Mendrok, J.; Dupuy, E.; Sato, T. O.; Ochiai, S.; Suzuki, K.; Manabe, T.; Nishibori, T.; Kikuchi, K.; Sato, R.; Takayanagi, M.; Murayama, Y.; Shiotani, M.; Kasai, Y.

    2011-06-01

    This paper describes the algorithms of the level-2 research (L2r) processing chain developed for the Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES). The chain has been developed in parallel to the operational chain for conducting researches on calibration and retrieval algorithms. L2r chain products are available to the scientific community. The objective of version 2 is the retrieval of the vertical distribution of trace gases in the altitude range of 18-90 km. An theoretical error analysis is conducted to estimate the retrieval feasibility of key parameters of the processing: line-of-sight elevation tangent altitudes (or angles), temperature and O3 profiles. The line-of-sight tangent altitudes are retrieved between 20 and 50 km from the strong ozone (O3) line at 625.371 GHz, with low correlation with the O3 volume-mixing ratio and temperature retrieved profiles. Neglecting the non-linearity of the radiometric gain in the calibration procedure is the main systematic error. It is large for the retrieved temperature (between 5-10 K). Therefore, atmospheric pressure can not be derived from the retrieved temperature, and, then, in the altitude range where the line-of-sight tangent altitudes are retrieved, the retrieved trace gases profiles are found to be better represented on pressure levels than on altitude levels. The error analysis for the retrieved HOCl profile demonstrates that best results for inverting weak lines can be obtained by using narrow spectral windows. Future versions of the L2r algorithms will improve the temperature/pressure retrievals and also provide information in the upper tropospheric/lower stratospheric region (e.g., water vapor, ice content, O3) and on stratospheric and mesospheric line-of-sight winds.

  8. Comparison of ozone profiles between Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder and worldwide ozonesonde measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imai, Koji; Fujiwara, Masatomo; Inai, Yoichi; Manago, Naohiro; Suzuki, Makoto; Sano, Takuki; Mitsuda, Chihiro; Naito, Yoko; Hasebe, Fumio; Koide, Takashi; Shiotani, Masato

    2013-11-01

    compared ozone profiles measured by the Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) with those taken at worldwide ozonesonde stations. To assess the quality of the SMILES version 2.3 ozone data for 16-30 km, 601 ozonesonde profiles were compared with the coincident SMILES ozone profiles. The agreement between SMILES and ozonesonde measurements was generally good within 5%-7% for 18-30 km at middle and high latitudes but degraded below 18 km. At low latitudes, however, the SMILES ozone data showed larger values (~6%-15% for 20-26 km) than those at middle and high latitudes. To explain this bias, we explored some possible issues in the ozonesonde measurement system. One possibility is due to a pressure bias in radiosonde measurements with a pressure sensor, but it would be within a few percent. We also examined an issue of the ozonesonde's response time. The response time was estimated from ozonesonde measurements with ascending and descending profiles showing clear difference, by using the time lag correction method to minimize the difference between them. Our estimation shows 28 s on average which is a similar value derived by prelaunch preparation. By applying this correction to the original profiles, we found a negative bias of the ascending ozonesonde measurement more than 7% at 20 km in the equatorial latitude where the vertical gradient of ozone is steep. The corrected ozonesonde profiles showed better agreement with the SMILES data. We suggest that the response time of ozonesondes could create a negative bias, particularly in the lower stratosphere at equatorial latitudes.

  9. Connecting Surface Emissions, Convective Uplifting, and Long-Range Transport of Carbon Monoxide in the Upper Troposphere: New Observations from the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Jonathan H.; Livesey, Nathaniel J.; Su, Hui; Neary, Lori; McConnell, John C.; Richards, Nigel A. D.

    2007-01-01

    Two years of observations of upper tropospheric (UT) carbon monoxide (CO) from the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder are analyzed; in combination with the CO surface emission climatology and data from the NCEP analyses. It is shown that spatial distribution, temporal variation and long-range transport of UT CO are closely related to the surface emissions, deep-convection and horizontal winds. Over the Asian monsoon region, surface emission of CO peaks in boreal spring due to high biomass burning in addition to anthropogenic emission. However, the UT CO peaks in summer when convection is strongest and surface emission of CO is dominated by anthropogenic source. The long-range transport of CO from Southeast Asia across the Pacific to North America, which occurs most frequently during boreal summer, is thus a clear imprint of Asian anthropogenic pollution influencing global air quality.

  10. Deriving Vertical Profiles of Aerosol Sizes from TES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, M. J.; Clancy, R. T.; Smith, M. D.; McConnochie, T. H.; Flittner, D. E.; Fouchet, T.

    2011-12-01

    Vertical variations in aerosol particle sizes can have a dramatic effect in their net impact on the state and evolution of the Martian atmosphere. Recent analyses of data from the Spectroscopy for the Investigation of the Characteristics of the Atmosphere of Mars (SPICAM) and the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) instruments offer some long overdue progress in constraining this aspect of aerosols. However, significantly more work remains to be done along these lines in order to better constrain and inform modern dynamical simulations of the Martian atmosphere. Thus, the primary goal of our work is to perform retrievals of particle size as a function of altitude for both dust and water ice aerosols. The choice of the TES dataset, with pole-to-pole coverage over a period of nearly three martian years, provides the crucial systematic temporal and spatial sampling. Additional leverage on the particle size will be obtained by using both solarband bolometry and infrared (IR) spectroscopy. Our presentation will include: 1) A summary of our limb radiative transfer comparison/validation exercises which include Monte Carlo, Gauss-Seidel, and discrete-ordinate algorithms (including the plane-parallel source function approximation). 2) The initial results of the application of our particle size retrieval scheme to the TES observations of the 2001 planet encircling dust event. 3) A few test applications to the Mars Climate Sounder (MCS) radiance profiles (enabled by the recent solarband radiometric calibration by Bandfield and collaborators). 4) Our plans for additional retrievals (aphelion cloud season, lower optical depth locations and seasons, etc.) and the distribution of the derived profiles.

  11. Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) satellite observations of ammonia, methanol, formic acid, and carbon monoxide over the Canadian oil sands: validation and model evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shephard, M. W.; McLinden, C. A.; Cady-Pereira, K. E.; Luo, M.; Moussa, S. G.; Leithead, A.; Liggio, J.; Staebler, R. M.; Akingunola, A.; Makar, P.; Lehr, P.; Zhang, J.; Henze, D. K.; Millet, D. B.; Bash, J. O.; Zhu, L.; Wells, K. C.; Capps, S. L.; Chaliyakunnel, S.; Gordon, M.; Hayden, K.; Brook, J. R.; Wolde, M.; Li, S.-M.

    2015-12-01

    The wealth of air quality information provided by satellite infrared observations of ammonia (NH3), carbon monoxide (CO), formic acid (HCOOH), and methanol (CH3OH) is currently being explored and used for a number of applications, especially at regional or global scales. These applications include air quality monitoring, trend analysis, emissions, and model evaluation. This study provides one of the first direct validations of Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) satellite-retrieved profiles of NH3, CH3OH, and HCOOH through comparisons with coincident aircraft profiles. The comparisons are performed over the Canadian oil sands region during the intensive field campaign (August-September, 2013) in support of the Joint Canada-Alberta Implementation Plan for Oil Sands Monitoring (JOSM). The satellite/aircraft comparisons over this region during this period produced errors of (i) +0.08 ± 0.25 ppbv for NH3, (ii) +7.5 ± 23 ppbv for CO, (iii) +0.19 ± 0.46 ppbv for HCOOH, and (iv) -1.1 ± 0.39 ppbv for CH3OH. These values mostly agree with previously estimated retrieval errors; however, the relatively large negative bias in CH3OH and the significantly greater positive bias for larger HCOOH and CO values observed during this study warrant further investigation. Satellite and aircraft ammonia observations during the field campaign are also used in an initial effort to perform preliminary evaluations of Environment Canada's Global Environmental Multi-scale - Modelling Air quality and CHemistry (GEM-MACH) air quality modelling system at high resolution (2.5 × 2.5 km2). These initial results indicate a model underprediction of ~ 0.6 ppbv (~ 60 %) for NH3, during the field campaign period. The TES/model CO comparison differences are ~ +20 ppbv (~ +20 %), but given that under these conditions the TES/aircraft comparisons also show a small positive TES CO bias indicates that the overall model underprediction of CO is closer to ~ 10 % at 681 hPa (~ 3 km) during this period.

  12. Vertical Profiles of Aerosol Particle Sizes using MGS/TES and MRO/MCS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, M. J.; Clancy, R. T.; Smith, M. D.; Benson, J. L.; McConnochie, T. H.; Pankine, A.

    2012-12-01

    Vertical variations in aerosol particle sizes often have a dramatic impact on the state and evolution of the Martian atmosphere. Recent analyses of data from the Spectroscopy for the Investigation of the Characteristics of the Atmosphere of Mars (SPICAM), the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES), and the Mars Climate Sounder (MCS) instruments offer some long overdue progress in constraining this aspect of aerosols. However, significantly more work remains to be done along these lines in order to better constrain and inform modern dynamical simulations of the Martian atmosphere. Thus, the primary goal of our work is to perform retrievals of particle size as a function of altitude for both dust and water ice aerosols. The choice of the TES and MCS dataset, with pole-to-pole coverage over a period of nearly eight martian years, provides the crucial systematic temporal and spatial sampling. Our presentation will include: 1) A summary of our limb radiative transfer algorithms and retrieval schemes; 2) The initial results of the application of our particle size retrieval scheme to the 2001 TES and 2007 MCS observations of those planet encircling dust events; 3) Near-term plans for for additional retrievals (aphelion cloud season, lower optical depth locations and seasons, etc.); 4) Location of the archive to be used for the distribution of the derived profiles and associated retrieval metadata.

  13. SAIL-Thermique: a model for land surface spectral emissivity in the thermal infrared. Evaluation and reassesment of the temperature - emissivity separation (TES) algorithm in presence of vegetation canopies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olioso, A.; Jacob, F.; Lesaignoux, A.

    2014-12-01

    The SAIL-Thermique model was developed to simulate thermal infrared (TIR) radiative transfers inside vegetation canopies and land surface emissivity. It is based on the SAIL model developed by Verhoef (1984) for simulating spectral reflectances in the solar domain. Due to the difficulty to measure land surface emissivity, no emissivity model was validated against ground measurements. In this study, several datasets extracted from the literature and from recent databases were used for evaluating emissivity simulations. Model simulations were performed from the knowledge of leaf area index, leaf inclination distribution, direction of viewing, and leaf and soil optical properties. As data on leaf inclination and leaf optical properties were usually not available, stochastic simulations were performed from a priori knowledges on their distribution (extracted from the literature and recent databases). Simulated 8-14 μm emissivities were favorably compared to measurements with a root mean square difference (RMSD) around 0.006 (0.004 when considering only herbaceous species). The model was then used for simulating emissivity spectra for providing information for the interpretation of TIR multispectral data from the ASTER sensor. We used the land surface emissivity simulations for re-assessing the TES algorithm used to separate emissivity and land surface temperature. We showed that the inclusion of vegetated land surfaces significantly modified the relationship between minimum emissivity and minimum maximum difference (ɛmin- MMD) which is at the heart of the TES algorithm. This relationship was originally established on the ASTER spectral library which did not include vegetated land surface (Schmugge et al. 1998). On a synthetic database, estimations of spectral emissivities and surface temperature were significantly improved when using the new ɛmin- MMD relationship in comparison to the classical one: RMSD dropped from ~0.012 to ~0.006 for spectral emissivity and from

  14. Diurnal ozone variations in the stratosphere revealed in observations from the Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) on board the International Space Station (ISS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakazaki, Takatoshi; Fujiwara, Masatomo; Mitsuda, Chihiro; Imai, Koji; Manago, Naohiro; Naito, Yoko; Nakamura, Tetsu; Akiyoshi, Hideharu; Kinnison, Douglas; Sano, Takuki; Suzuki, Makoto; Shiotani, Masato

    2013-04-01

    Considerable uncertainties remain in the global pattern of diurnal variation in stratospheric ozone, particularly lower to middle stratospheric ozone, which is the principal contributor to total column ozone. The Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) attached to the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) on board the International Space Station (ISS) was developed to gather high-quality global measurements of stratospheric ozone at various local times, with the aid of superconducting mixers cooled to 4K by a compact mechanical cooler. Using the SMILES dataset, as well as data from nudged chemistry-climate models (MIROC3.2-CTM and SD-WACCM), we show that the SMILES observational data have revealed the global pattern of diurnal ozone variations throughout the stratosphere. We also found that these variations can be explained by both photochemistry and dynamics. The peak-to-peak difference in the stratospheric ozone mixing ratio (total column ozone) reached 8% (1%) over the course of a day. This variation needs to be considered when merging ozone data from different satellite measurements and even from measurements made using one specific instrument at different local times.

  15. Diurnal ozone variations in the stratosphere revealed in observations from the Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) onboard the International Space Station (ISS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakazaki, Takatoshi; Fujiwara, Masatomo; Mitsuda, Chihiro; Imai, Koji; Manago, Naohiro; Naito, Yoko; Nakamura, Tetsu; Akiyoshi, Hideharu; Kinnison, Douglas; Sano, Takuki; Suzuki, Makoto; Shiotani, Masato

    2013-04-01

    Considerable uncertainties remain in the global pattern of diurnal variation in stratospheric ozone, particularly lower to middle stratospheric ozone, which is the principal contributor to total column ozone. The Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) attached to the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) on board the International Space Station (ISS), was developed to gather high-quality global measurements of stratospheric ozone at various local times, with the aid of superconducting mixers cooled to 4 K by a compact mechanical cooler. Using the SMILES dataset, as well as data from nudged chemistry-climate models (MIROC3.2-CTM and SD-WACCM), we show that the SMILES observational data have revealed the global pattern of diurnal ozone variations throughout the stratosphere. We also found that these variations can be explained by both photochemistry and dynamics. The peak-to-peak difference in the stratospheric ozone mixing ratio (total column ozone) reached 8% (1%) over the course of a day. This variation needs to be considered when merging ozone data from different satellite measurements and even from measurements made using one specific instrument at different local times.

  16. CH4 and CO distributions over tropical fires during October 2006 as observed by the Aura TES satellite instrument and modeled by GEOS-Chem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worden, J.; Wecht, K.; Frankenberg, C.; Alvarado, M.; Bowman, K.; Kort, E.; Kulawik, S.; Lee, M.; Payne, V.; Worden, H.

    2013-04-01

    Tropical fires represent a highly uncertain source of atmospheric methane (CH4) because of the variability of fire emissions and the dependency of the fire CH4 emission factors (g kg-1 dry matter burned) on fuel type and combustion phase. In this paper we use new observations of CH4 and CO in the free troposphere from the Aura Tropospheric Emission Sounder (TES) satellite instrument to place constraints on the role of tropical fire emissions versus microbial production (e.g. in wetlands and livestock) during the (October) 2006 El Niño, a time of significant fire emissions from Indonesia. We first compare the global CH4 distributions from TES using the GEOS-Chem model. We find a mean bias between the observations and model of 26.3 ppb CH4 that is independent of latitude between 50° S and 80° N, consistent with previous validation studies of TES CH4 retrievals using aircraft measurements. The slope of the distribution of CH4 versus CO as observed by TES and modeled by GEOS-Chem is consistent (within the TES observation error) for air parcels over the Indonesian peat fires, South America, and Africa. The CH4 and CO distributions are correlated between R = 0.42 and R = 0.46, with these correlations primarily limited by the TES random error. Over Indonesia, the observed slope of 0.13 (ppb ppb-1) ±0.01, as compared to a modeled slope of 0.153 (ppb ppb-1) ±0.005 and an emission ratio used within the GEOS-Chem model of approximately 0.11 (ppb ppb-1), indicates that most of the observed methane enhancement originated from the fire. Slopes of 0.47 (ppb ppb-1) ±0.04 and 0.44 (ppb ppb-1) ±0.03 over South America and Africa show that the methane in the observed air parcels primarily came from microbial-generated emissions. Sensitivity studies using GEOS-Chem show that part of the observed correlation for the Indonesian observations and most of the observed correlations over South America and Africa are a result of transport and mixing of the fire and nearby microbial

  17. CH4 and CO distributions over tropical fires as observed by the Aura TES satellite instrument and modeled by GEOS-Chem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worden, J.; Wecht, K.; Frankenberg, C.; Alvarado, M.; Bowman, K.; Kort, E.; Kulawik, S.; Lee, M.; Payne, V.; Worden, H.

    2012-10-01

    Tropical fires represent a highly uncertain source of atmospheric methane (CH4) because of the variability of fire emissions and the dependency of the fire CH4 emission factors (g kg-1 dry matter burned) on fuel type and combustion phase. In this paper we use new observations of CH4 and CO in the free troposphere from the Aura Tropospheric Emission Sounder (TES) satellite instrument to place constraints on the role of tropical fire emissions versus microbial production (e.g. in wetlands and livestock) during the (October) 2006 El Nino, a time of significant peat fire emissions from Indonesia We first evaluate the global CH4 distributions from TES using the GEOS-Chem model. We find a mean bias between the observations and model of 26.3 ppb CH4 that is independent of latitude between 50° S and 80° N consistent with previous validation studies of TES CH4 retrievals using aircraft measurements. The slope of the distribution of CH4 versus CO as observed by TES and modeled by GEOS-Chem is consistent (within the TES observation error) for air parcels over the Indonesian peat fires, South America, and Africa. The CH4 and CO distributions are correlated between R = 0.42 and R = 0.46, with these correlations primarily limited by the TES random error. Over Indonesia, the observed slope of 0.13 (ppb ppb-1) ± 0.01, as compared to a modeled slop of 0.153 (ppb ppb-1) ± 0.005 and an emission ratio used within the GEOS-Chem model of approximately 0.11 (ppb ppb-1) indicates that most of the observed methane enhancement originated from the fire. Slopes of 0.47 (ppb ppb-1) ± 0.04 and 0.44 (ppb ppb-1) ± 0.03 over South America and Africa show that the methane in the observed air parcels primarily came from microbial generated emissions. Sensitivity studies using GEOS-Chem show that part of the observed correlation for the Indonesian observations and most of the observed correlations over South America and Africa are a result of transport and mixing of the fire and nearby

  18. Topside sounders as mobile ionospheric heaters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, R. F.

    2006-01-01

    There is evidence that satellite-borne RF sounders can act as mobile ionospheric heaters in addition to performing topside sounding. The main objective of topside sounding is to use sounder-generated electromagnetic (em) waves to obtain ionospheric topside vertical electron-density (N(sub e) profiles. These profiles are obtained from mathematical inversions of the frequency vs. delay-time ionospheric reflection traces. In addition to these em reflection traces, a number of narrowband intense signals are observed starting at zero delay times after the transmitted pulses. Some of these signals, termed plasma resonances, appear at characteristic frequencies of the ambient medium such as at the electron cyclotron frequency f(sub ce), the harmonics nf(sub ce), the electron plasma frequency f(sub pe) and the upper-hybrid frequency f(sub uh), where (f(sub uh))(exp 2) = (f(sub ce))(exp 2) + (f(sub pe))(exp 2) . These signals have been attributed to the oblique echoes of sounder-generated electrostatic (es) waves. These resonances provide accurate in situ f(sub pe) and f(sub ce) values which, in turn, lead to accurate N(sub e) and [B] values where B is the ambient magnetic field. Resonances are also observed between the nf(sub ce) harmonics both above and below f(sub uh). The former, known as the Qn plasma resonances, are mainly attributed to the matching of the wave group velocity of sounder-generated (Bernstein-mode) es waves to the satellite velocity. The frequency spectrum of these waves in the magnetosphere can be used to detect non-Maxwellian electron velocity-distributions. In addition, these resonances also exhibit components that appear to be the result of plasma emissions stimulated by the sounder pulses. The plasma resonances observed between the nf(sub ce) harmonics and below f(sub uh), known as the Dn plasma resonances, are entirely attributed to such sounder-stimulated plasma emissions. There are other sounder-stimulated plasma phenomena that also fall into

  19. Preflight and Inflight Calibration of TES and AES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rider, David M.

    1997-01-01

    The Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES), an EOS CHEM platform instrument, and its companion instrument, the Airborne Emission Spectrometer (AES), are both Fourier transform spectrometers designed for remote sensing of the troposphere.

  20. Summer season variability of the north residual cap of Mars as observed by the Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer (MGS-TES)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Calvin, W.M.; Titus, T.N.

    2008-01-01

    Previous observations have noted the change in albedo in a number of North Pole bright outliers and in the distribution of bright ice deposits between Mariner 9, Viking, and Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) data sets. Changes over the summer season as well as between regions at the same season (Ls) in different years have been observed. We used the bolometric albedo and brightness temperature channels of the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) on the MGS spacecraft to monitor north polar residual ice cap variations between Mars years and within the summer season for three northern Martian summers between July 1999 and April 2003. Large-scale brightness variations are observed in four general areas: (1) the patchy outlying frost deposits from 90 to 270??E, 75 to 80??N; (2) the large "tail" below the Chasma Boreale and its associated plateau from 315 to 45??E, 80 to 85??N, that we call the "Boreale Tongue" and in Hyperboreae Undae; (3) the troughed terrain in the region from 0 to 120??E longitude (the lower right on a polar stereographic projection) we have called "Shackleton's Grooves" and (4) the unit mapped as residual ice in Olympia Planitia. We also note two areas which seem to persist as cool and bright throughout the summer and between Mars years. One is at the "source" of Chasma Boreale (???15??E, 85??N) dubbed "McMurdo", and the "Cool and Bright Anomaly (CABA)" noted by Kieffer and Titus 2001. TES Mapping of Mars' north seasonal cap. Icarus 154, 162-180] at ???330??E, 87??N called here "Vostok". Overall defrosting occurs early in the summer as the temperatures rise and then after the peak temperatures are reached (Ls???110) higher elevations and outlier bright deposits cold trap and re-accumulate new frost. Persistent bright areas are associated with either higher elevations or higher background albedos suggesting complex feedback mechanisms including cold-trapping of frost due to albedo and elevation effects, as well as influence of mesoscale atmospheric dynamics

  1. Constraining U.S. ammonia emissions using TES remote sensing observations and the GEOS-Chem adjoint model

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ammonia (NH(3)has significant impacts on biodiversity, eutrophication, and acidification. Widespread uncertainty in the magnitude and seasonality of NH3 emissions hinders efforts to address these issues. In this work, we constrain U.S. NH3 sources using obse...

  2. TES radiometric assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Worden, H.; Sarkissian, E.; Bowman, K.; Fisher, B.; Rider, D.; Aumann, H. H.; Apolinski, M.; Debaca, R. C.; Gluck, S.; Madatyan, M.; McDuffie, J.; Tremblay, D.; Shephard, M.; Cady-Pereira, K.; Tobin, D.; Revercomb, H.

    2005-01-01

    TES is an infrared Fourier transform spectrometer on board the EOS-Aura spacecraft launched July 15, 2004. Improvements to the radiometric calibration and consequent assessment of radiometric accuracy have been on-going since launch.

  3. Sensitivity of Temperature Profiles Retrieved from Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer (MGS/TES) Observations to the GSFC Synthetic Mars Model Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maguire, William C.; Pearl, J. C.; Smith, M. D.; Thompson, R. F.; Conrath, B. J.; Dason, S.; Kaelberer, M. S.; Christensen, P. R.

    1999-01-01

    Part of the task of interpreting IR spectral features observed by MGS/TES due to surface minerals requires distinguishing those IR signatures from atmospheric signatures of gas and dust. Surface-atmosphere separation for MGS/TES depends on knowledge of the retrieved temperature profile. In turn, the temperature retrieval Erom the observed data depends on molecular parameters including 15 micron CO2 line shape or line intensities which contribute to defining the Mars synthetic radiative transfer model. Using a simple isothermal, homogeneous single layer model of Pinnock and Shine, we find the ratio of (the error in degrees Kelvin of the retrieved temperature profile) to (the percentage error in the absorption coefficient) (deg K/percent) to be 0.4 at 200K. This ratio at 150K and 250K is 0.2 and 0.6, respectively. A more refined model, incorporating observed MGS/TES retrieved temperature profiles, the TES instrumental resolution and the most recent molecular modelling, will yield an improved knowledge of this error sensitivity. We present results of such a sensitivity study to determine the dependence of temperature profiles inverted from MGS/TES on these and other molecular parameters. This work was supported in part by NASA's Mars Data Analysis Program.

  4. Apollo lunar sounder experiment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Phillips, R.J.; Adams, G.F.; Brown, W.E., Jr.; Eggleton, R.E.; Jackson, P.; Jordan, R.; Linlor, W.I.; Peeples, W.J.; Porcello, L.J.; Ryu, J.; Schaber, G.; Sill, W.R.; Thompson, T.W.; Ward, S.H.; Zelenka, J.S.

    1973-01-01

    The scientific objectives of the Apollo lunar sounder experiment (ALSE) are (1) mapping of subsurface electrical conductivity structure to infer geological structure, (2) surface profiling to determine lunar topographic variations, (3) surface imaging, and (4) measuring galactic electromagnetic radiation in the lunar environment. The ALSE was a three-frequency, wide-band, coherent radar system operated from lunar orbit during the Apollo 17 mission.

  5. Temperatures and aerosol opacities of the Mars atmosphere at aphelion: Validation and inter-comparison of limb sounding profiles from MRO/MCS and MGS/TES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirley, James H.; McConnochie, Timothy H.; Kass, David M.; Kleinböhl, Armin; Schofield, John T.; Heavens, Nicholas G.; McCleese, Daniel J.; Benson, Jennifer; Hinson, David P.; Bandfield, Joshua L.

    2015-05-01

    We exploit the relative stability and repeatability of the Mars atmosphere at aphelion for an inter-comparison of Mars Global Surveyor/Thermal Emission Spectrometer (MGS/TES) and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter/Mars Climate Sounder (MRO/MCS) nighttime temperature profiles and aerosol opacity profiles in Mars years 25, 26, 29, 30, and 31. Cross-calibration of these datasets is important, as they together provide an extended climatology for this planetary atmosphere. As a standard of comparison we employ temperature profiles obtained by radio occultation methods during the MGS mission in Mars years 24, 25, and 26. We first compare both zonal mean TES limb sounding profiles and zonal mean MCS limb sounding profiles with zonal means of radio occultation temperature profiles for the same season (Ls = 70-80°) and latitudes (55-70°N). We employ a statistical z test for quantifying the degree of agreement of temperature profiles by pressure level. For pressures less than 610 Pa (altitudes > 3 km), the ensemble mean temperature difference between the radio occultation and TES limb sounding profiles found in these comparisons was 1.7 ± 0.7 K. The ensemble mean temperature difference between radio occultation and MCS profiles was 1.4 ± 1.0 K. These differences fall within the formal error estimates for both TES and MCS, validating the accuracy of the instruments and their respective retrieval algorithms. In the second phase of our investigation, we compare aphelion season zonal mean TES limb sounding temperature, water ice opacity, and dust opacity profiles with those obtained at the same latitudes in different years by MCS. The ensemble mean temperature difference found for three comparisons between TES and MCS zonal mean temperature profiles was 2.8 ± 2.1 K. MCS and TES temperatures between 610 Pa and 5 Pa from 55 to 70°N are largely in agreement (with differences < 2 K) when water ice aerosol opacities are comparable. Temperature differences increase when the opacities

  6. SVD analysis of Aura TES spectral residuals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beer, Reinhard; Kulawik, Susan S.; Rodgers, Clive D.; Bowman, Kevin W.

    2005-01-01

    Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) analysis is both a powerful diagnostic tool and an effective method of noise filtering. We present the results of an SVD analysis of an ensemble of spectral residuals acquired in September 2004 from a 16-orbit Aura Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) Global Survey and compare them to alternative methods such as zonal averages. In particular, the technique highlights issues such as the orbital variation of instrument response and incompletely modeled effects of surface emissivity and atmospheric composition.

  7. No Widespread Dust in the Middle Atmosphere of Mars from Mars Climate Sounder Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinboehl, A.; Schofield, J. T.; Kass, D. M.; Abdou, W. A.; McCleese, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    The vertical distribution of dust in the Martian atmosphere has been a topic of discussion in the recent years. Measurements by limb sounding instruments like the Mars Climate Sounder (MCS) and the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) indicate that atmospheric dust is not homogeneously distributed in the vertical but exhibits layering in the lower atmosphere. Recent retrievals from TES measurements also suggest a dust maximum higher in the atmosphere that predominantly occurs at 50-60 km altitude on the daytime hemisphere. We use new retrievals from MCS measurements to investigate this deduction. MCS is a mid- and far-infrared thermal emission radiometer on board the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. It measures radiances in limb and on-planet viewing geometries. From these radiance measurements, profiles of atmospheric temperature, dust and water ice are retrieved from the surface to ~80 km altitude with a vertical resolution of ~5 km. Updates to the retrieval algorithm yield improved representations of aerosols above ~40 km altitude. The sensitivity of an MCS limb measurement to aerosols at these altitudes is typically not limited by signal-to-noise but rather by the uncertainties in the representation of the instrument's vertical field-of-view, the far wings of which can provide radiance contributions from the lower atmosphere and the surface. Sensitivity studies suggest that radiances attributed to dust in the middle atmosphere are a consequence of these far wing effects. Our results do not support the existence of widespread dust in the middle atmosphere of Mars inferred from earlier observations. The average dust extinction does not exceed 10-6 km-1 at 463 cm-1 above 50 km altitude in atmospheric conditions without large dust storms.

  8. No widespread dust in the upper atmosphere of Mars from Mars Climate Sounder observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinboehl, Armin; Schofield, John T.; Kass, David M.; Abdou, Wedad A.; McCleese, Daniel J.

    2015-04-01

    The vertical distribution of dust in the Martian atmosphere has been a topic of discussion in the recent years. Measurements by limb sounding instruments like the Mars Climate Sounder (MCS) and the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) indicate that atmospheric dust is not homogeneously distributed in the vertical but exhibits layering in the lower atmosphere. Recent retrievals from TES measurements also suggest a dust maximum higher in the atmosphere that predominantly occurs at 50-60 km altitude on the daytime hemisphere. We use new retrievals from MCS measurements to investigate this deduction. MCS is a mid- and far-infrared thermal emission radiometer on board the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. It measures radiances in limb and on-planet viewing geometries. From these radiance measurements, profiles of atmospheric temperature, dust and water ice are retrieved from the surface to ~80 km with a vertical resolution of ~5 km. Updates to the retrieval algorithm yield improved representations of aerosols above ~40 km altitude. With a few notable exceptions, retrieved dust extinctions in the upper atmosphere do not exceed 1e-5 km-1 at mid-infrared wavelengths, which is close to the limit of the MCS sensitivity. The sensitivity of an MCS limb measurement to aerosols at these altitudes is typically not limited by signal-to-noise but rather by the uncertainties in the representation of the instrument's vertical field-of-view, the far wings of which can provide radiance contributions from the lower atmosphere and the surface. Sensitivity studies suggest that low radiances measured at high altitudes are not caused by widespread dust but can be explained by these radiance contributions. Thus MCS measurements do not support the existence of widespread dust in the upper atmosphere of Mars.

  9. TES Limb-Geometry Observations of Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Michael D.

    2003-01-01

    The Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) on-board Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) has a pointing mirror that allows observations in the plane of the orbit anywhere from directly nadir to far above either the forward or aft limbs for details about the TES instrument). Nadir-geometry observations are defined as those where the field-of-view contains the surface of Mars (even if the actual observation is at a high emission angle far from true nadir). Limb-geometry observations are defined as those where the line-of-sight of the observations does not intersect the surface. At a number of points along the MGS orbit (typically every 10 deg. or 20 deg. of latitude) a limb sequence is taken, which includes a stack of overlapping TES spectra from just below the limb to more than 120 km above the limb. A typical limb sequence has approx. 20 individual spectra, and the projected size of a TES pixel at the limb is 13 km.

  10. A Microwave Pressure Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flower, D. A.; Peckham, G. E.

    1978-01-01

    An instrument to measure atmospheric pressure at the earth's surface from an orbiting satellite would be a valuable addition to the expanding inventory of remote sensors. The subject of this report is such an instrument - the Microwave Pressure Sounder (MPS). It is shown that global-ocean coverage is attainable with sufficient accuracy, resolution and observational frequency for meteorological, oceanographic and climate research applications. Surface pressure can be deduced from a measurement of the absorption by an atmospheric column at a frequency in the wing of the oxygen band centered on 60 GHz. An active multifrequency instrument is needed to make this measurement with sufficient accuracy. The selection of optimum operating frequencies is based upon accepted models of surface reflection, oxygen, water vapor and cloud absorption. Numerical simulation using a range of real atmospheres defined by radiosonde observations were used to validate the frequency selection procedure. Analyses are presented of alternative system configurations that define the balance between accuracy and achievable resolution.

  11. Space View Issues for Hyperspectral Sounders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manning, Evan M.; Aumann, Hartmut H.; Broberg, Steven E.

    2013-01-01

    The expectation for climate quality measurements from hyperspectral sounders is absolute calibration accuracy at the 100 mK level and stability at the < 40 mK/decade level. The Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS)1, Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS), and Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) hyperspectral sounders currently in orbit have been shown to agree well over most of their brightness temperature range. Some larger discrepancies are seen, however, at the coldest scene temperatures, such as those seen in Antarctic winter and deep convective clouds. A key limiting factor for the calibrated scene radiance accuracy for cold scenes is how well the effective radiance of the cold space view pertains to the scene views. The space view signal is composed of external sources and instrument thermal emission at about 270 K from the scan mirror, external baffles, etc. Any difference in any of these contributions between space views and scene views will impact the absolute calibration accuracy, and the impact can be critical for cold scenes. Any change over time in these will show up as an apparent trend in calibrated radiances. We use AIRS data to investigate the validity of the space view assumption in view of the 100 mK accuracy and 40 mK/decade trend expectations. We show that the space views used for the cold calibration point for AIRS v5 Level-1B products meet these standards except under special circumstances and that AIRS v6 Level-1B products will meet them under all circumstances. This analysis also shows the value of having multiple distinct space views to give operational redundancy and analytic data, and that reaching climate quality requires continuing monitoring of aging instruments and adjustment of calibration.

  12. Use of AIRS, OMI, MLS, and TES Data in Assessing Forest Ecosystem Exposure to Ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spruce, Joseph P.

    2007-01-01

    Ground-level ozone at high levels poses health threats to exposed flora and fauna, including negative impacts to human health. While concern is common regarding depletion of ozone in the stratosphere, portions of the urban and rural United States periodically have high ambient levels of tropospheric ozone on the ground. Ozone pollution can cause a variety of impacts to susceptible vegetation (e.g., Ponderosa and Jeffrey pine species in the southwestern United States), such as stunted growth, alteration of growth form, needle or leaf chlorosis, and impaired ability to withstand drought-induced water stress. In addition, Southern Californian forests with high ozone exposures have been recently subject to multiyear droughts that have led to extensive forest overstory mortality from insect outbreaks and increased incidence of wildfires. Residual forests in these impacted areas may be more vulnerable to high ozone exposures and to other forest threats than ever before. NASA sensors collect a wealth of atmospheric data that have been used recently for mapping and monitoring regional tropospheric ozone levels. AIRS (Atmospheric Infrared Sounder), OMI (Ozone Monitoring Instrument), MLS (Microwave Limb Sounder), and TES (Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer) data could be used to assess forest ecosystem exposure to ozone. Such NASA data hold promise for providing better or at least complementary synoptic information on ground-level ozone levels that Federal agency partners can use to assess forest health trends and to mitigate the threats as needed in compliance with Federal laws and mandates. NASA data products on ozone concentrations may be able to aid applications of DSTs (decision support tools) adopted by the USDA FS (U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service) and by the NPS (National Park Service), such as the Ozone Calculator, in which ground ozone estimates are employed to assess ozone impacts to forested vegetation.

  13. Atmospheric infrared sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenkranz, Philip, W.; Staelin, David, H.

    1995-01-01

    This report summarizes the activities of two Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) team members during the first half of 1995. Changes to the microwave first-guess algorithm have separated processing of Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit A (AMSU-A) from AMSU-B data so that the different spatial resolutions of the two instruments may eventually be considered. Two-layer cloud simulation data was processed with this algorithm. The retrieved water vapor column densities and liquid water are compared. The information content of AIRS data was applied to AMSU temperature profile retrievals in clear and cloudy atmospheres. The significance of this study for AIRS/AMSU processing lies in the improvement attributable to spatial averaging and in the good results obtained with a very simple algorithm when all of the channels are used. Uncertainty about the availability of either a Microwave Humidity Sensor (MHS) or AMSU-B for EOS has motivated consideration of possible low-cost alternative designs for a microwave humidity sensor. One possible configuration would have two local oscillators (compared to three for MHS) at 118.75 and 183.31 GHz. Retrieval performances of the two instruments were compared in a memorandum titled 'Comparative Analysis of Alternative MHS Configurations', which is attached.

  14. Demonstration of superconducting sub-millimeter-wave limb emission sounder (SMILES) for observing trace gases in the middle atmosphere using the exposed facility of the Japanese experimental module (JEM) of the international space station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuko, Harunobu; Manabe, Takeshi; Seta, Masumichi; Kasai, Yasuko; Ochiai, Satoshi; Irimajiri, Yoshihisa; Inatani, Junji; Ikeda, Naomi; Nishibori, Toshiyuki; Iida, Yukiei; Fujii, Yasunori

    1999-01-01

    The sub-millimeter wavelength region is advantageous for high-precision observations of trace species in the stratosphere. A Superconducting Sub-Millimeter-wave Limb Emission Sounder (SMILES) is scheduled to demonstrate the measurements of extremely faint sub-millimeter-wave emissions of the atmospheric trace gases on the Exposed Facility (EF) of the Japanese Experimental Module (JEM) of the International Space Station in 2003. The applications of superconductivity and mechanical 4K-refrigerator in space will be demonstrated in the experiment. JEM/SMILES obtains the diurnal and seasonal variability in the global three-dimensional distributions of the stratospheric trace gases for quantitative understanding of the stratospheric ozone depletion and its effect on the climate change with respect to the relationships among chemical reaction processes and their relationships with atmospheric dynamics. JEM/SMILES utilizes the 640GHz band to measure the vertical profiles of trace gases involved in the stratospheric ozone depletion such as chlorine monoxide (CLO), bromine monoxide (BrO), etc., along with atmospheric temperature. JEM/SMILES employs Superconductor-Insulator-Superconductor (SIS) mixers to improve measurement precision and spatial resolution, thereby enabling us to quantitatively understand the interactive processes between chemistry and dynamics.

  15. Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer and Airborne Emission Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavich, T.; Beer, R.

    1996-01-01

    The Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) is an instrument being developed for the NASA Earth Observing System Chemistry Platform. TES will measure the distribution of ozone and its precursors in the lower atmosphere. The Airborne Emission Spectrometer (AES) is an aircraft precursor to TES. Applicable descriptions are given of instrument design, technology challenges, implementation and operations for both.

  16. First Atmospheric Science Results from the Mars Exploration Rovers Mini-TES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Michael D.; Wolff, Michael J.; Lemmon, Mark T.; Spanovich, Nicole; Banfield, Don; Budney, Charles J.; Clancy, R. Todd; Ghosh, Amitabha; Landis, Geoffrey A.; Smith, Peter; Whitney, Barbara; Christensen, Philip R.; Squyres, Steven W.

    2004-01-01

    Thermal infrared spectra of the martian atmosphere taken by the Miniature Thermal Emission Spectrometer (Mini-TES) were used to determine the atmospheric temperatures in the planetary boundary layer and the column-integrated optical depth of aerosols. Mini-TES observations show the diurnal variation of the martian boundary layer thermal structure, including a near-surface superadiabatic layer during the afternoon and an inversion layer at night. Upward-looking Mini-TES observations show warm and cool parcels of air moving through the Mini-TES field of view on a time scale of 30 seconds. The retrieved dust optical depth shows a downward trend at both sites.

  17. In-Flight Performance of the TES Loop Heat Pipe Rejection System: Seven Years in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriquez, Jose I.; Na-Nakornpanom, Arthur

    2012-01-01

    The Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) is an infrared, high spectral resolution Fourier transform spectrometer with a 3.3 to 15.4 micron wavelength coverage. TES is a scanning instrument intended for determining the chemical state of the Earth's lower atmosphere (troposphere) from the surface to 30+ km. TES produces vertical profiles of important pollutant and greenhouse gases such as carbon monoxide, ozone, methane, and water vapor on a global scale every other day. TES was launched into orbit onboard NASA's earth Observing System Aura spacecraft on July 15, 2004 from Vandenberg Air Force Base, California.

  18. Spatially resolving methane emissions in California: constraints from the CalNex aircraft campaign and from present (GOSAT, TES) and future (TROPOMI, geostationary) satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wecht, K. J.; Jacob, D. J.; Sulprizio, M. P.; Santoni, G. W.; Wofsy, S. C.; Parker, R.; Bösch, H.; Worden, J.

    2014-02-01

    We apply a continental-scale inverse modeling system for North America based on the GEOS-Chem model to optimize California methane emissions at 1/2° × 2/3° horizontal resolution using atmospheric observations from the CalNex aircraft campaign (May-June 2010) and from satellites. Inversion of the CalNex data yields a best estimate for total California methane emissions of 2.86 ± 0.21 Tg yr-1, compared with 1.92 Tg yr-1 in the EDGAR v4.2 emission inventory used as a priori and 1.51 Tg yr-1 in the California Air Resources Board (CARB) inventory used for state regulations of greenhouse gas emissions. These results are consistent with a previous Lagrangian inversion of the CalNex data. Our inversion provides 12 independent pieces of information to constrain the geographical distribution of emissions within California. Attribution to individual source types indicates dominant contributions to emissions from landfills/wastewater (1.1 Tg yr-1), livestock (0.87 Tg yr-1), and gas/oil (0.64 Tg yr-1). EDGAR v4.2 underestimates emissions from livestock while CARB underestimates emissions from landfills/wastewater and gas/oil. Current satellite observations from GOSAT can constrain methane emissions in the Los Angeles Basin but are too sparse to constrain emissions quantitatively elsewhere in California (they can still be qualitatively useful to diagnose inventory biases). Los Angeles Basin emissions derived from CalNex and GOSAT inversions are 0.42 ± 0.08 and 0.31 ± 0.08, respectively. An observation system simulation experiment (OSSE) shows that the future TROPOMI satellite instrument (2015 launch) will be able to constrain California methane emissions at a detail comparable to the CalNex aircraft campaign. Geostationary satellite observations offer even greater potential for constraining methane emissions in the future.

  19. Spatially resolving methane emissions in California: constraints from the CalNex aircraft campaign and from present (GOSAT, TES) and future (TROPOMI, geostationary) satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wecht, K. J.; Jacob, D. J.; Sulprizio, M. P.; Santoni, G. W.; Wofsy, S. C.; Parker, R.; Bösch, H.; Worden, J.

    2014-08-01

    We apply a continental-scale inverse modeling system for North America based on the GEOS-Chem model to optimize California methane emissions at 1/2° × 2/3° horizontal resolution using atmospheric observations from the CalNex aircraft campaign (May-June 2010) and from satellites. Inversion of the CalNex data yields a best estimate for total California methane emissions of 2.86 ± 0.21 Tg a-1, compared with 1.92 Tg a-1 in the EDGAR v4.2 emission inventory used as a priori and 1.51 Tg a-1 in the California Air Resources Board (CARB) inventory used for state regulations of greenhouse gas emissions. These results are consistent with a previous Lagrangian inversion of the CalNex data. Our inversion provides 12 independent pieces of information to constrain the geographical distribution of emissions within California. Attribution to individual source types indicates dominant contributions to emissions from landfills/wastewater (1.1 Tg a-1), livestock (0.87 Tg a-1), and gas/oil (0.64 Tg a-1). EDGAR v4.2 underestimates emissions from livestock, while CARB underestimates emissions from landfills/wastewater and gas/oil. Current satellite observations from GOSAT can constrain methane emissions in the Los Angeles Basin but are too sparse to constrain emissions quantitatively elsewhere in California (they can still be qualitatively useful to diagnose inventory biases). Los Angeles Basin emissions derived from CalNex and GOSAT inversions are 0.42 ± 0.08 and 0.31 ± 0.08 Tg a-1 that the future TROPOMI satellite instrument (2015 launch) will be able to constrain California methane emissions at a detail comparable to the CalNex aircraft campaign. Geostationary satellite observations offer even greater potential for constraining methane emissions in the future.

  20. TES validation results from the Lake Tahoe special observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trembaly, D.; Sund Kulawik, S.; Rider, D.; Hook, S. J.

    2006-12-01

    The Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) is a high-resolution infrared Fourier transform spectrometer on board the AURA spacecraft launched in 2004. As part of the science validation activities, four "Stare" special observations were acquired in August and September 2005 over Lake Tahoe located a the California-Nevada border in western US. Each "Stare" observation took 32 target observation scans each sharing almost the same footprint. The Tahoe site has several advantages for validation, namely it is at high altitude with negligible cloud cover, it has water as the surface with known spectral emissivity, and it has ground-based in-situ radiometric measurements. Statistics of the retrieved values of the target data set over water are compared with the observation error available in the TES product file. In most cases, the results show that the standard deviation of the volume mixing ratio (VMR 1 sigma) at a given pressure level is less that the observation error for H20, atmospheric temperature, and O3. VMR-sigma is higher than the observation error in the cases of H2O and atmospheric temperature for pressure levels very near the surface. The surface temperature retrieved by the TES algorithm agrees to less than 1K of the observed in-situ radiometeric measurements. This exercise has provided important validation of the TES reported errors and the TES on-board radiometric calibration source.

  1. Results from the Mars Climate Sounder and Intercomparison of Data with Radio Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCleese, D. J.; Schofield, J. T.; Hinson, D. P.; Abdou, W. A.; Kleinboehl, A.; Kass, D. M.

    2012-12-01

    The Mars Climate Sounder (MCS) on MRO has obtained a record of the vertical structure of Martian atmospheric temperature, dust, and water ice clouds extending more than 3 Mars years (MY 28-MY 31). When added to the data set acquired by the highly successful Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) on MGS, a nearly continuous climate record now exists of sufficient duration (>7 Mars years) to study dominant modes of the atmospheric circulation and interannual variability. New insight into the vertical structure of dust and condensates has changed our perception of the role of aerosols and their variability in driving the global circulation. Recent work by Kleinböhl, et al (this conference) utilizes MCS coverage of local time of day to observe and model semi-diurnal tides. In this paper we discuss the robustness of inferences drawn from MCS data, our efforts to validate the observations, and explore the continuity of the data with previous and concurrent measurements. Comparison of profiles of temperature from MCS and MRO Radio Science (RS) are particularly useful because the two measurement techniques are based on different physical principles. Radio occultations sound the limb of Mars with an X-band radio signal (~4 cm wavelength), using measurements of refractive bending to derive profiles of density, temperature, and pressure versus radius. This is a physically independent mechanism from the thermal emission measurements of MCS and, unlike MCS, RS is insensitive to dust and aerosol. Also, RS investigations were conducted on both MGS and MRO providing a means of comparing the non-overlapping TES and MCS observations. On MRO, RS profiles are obtained roughly once per day on ingress occultations only. RS temperature measurements extend from 0-40 km with a vertical resolution of about 1 km, and are particularly accurate in the lower half of this range. MCS obtains temperatures from 0-80 km, and is able to use its two-axis articulation to make simultaneous and coincident

  2. Effects of Palagonitic Dust Coatings on Thermal Emission Spectra of Rocks and Minerals: Implications for Mineralogical Characterization of the Martian Surface by MGS-TES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graff, T. G.; Morris, R.; Christensen, P.

    2001-01-01

    Thermal emission measurements on dust-coated rocks and minerals show that a 300 5m thick layer is required to mask emission from the substrate and that non-linear effects are present. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  3. HyTES: Thermal Imaging Spectrometer Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, William R.; Hook, Simon J.; Mouroulis, Pantazis; Wilson, Daniel W.; Gunapala, Sarath D.; Realmuto, Vincent; Lamborn, Andy; Paine, Chris; Mumolo, Jason M.; Eng, Bjorn T.

    2011-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory has developed the Hyperspectral Thermal Emission Spectrometer (HyTES). It is an airborne pushbroom imaging spectrometer based on the Dyson optical configuration. First low altitude test flights are scheduled for later this year. HyTES uses a compact 7.5-12 micrometer m hyperspectral grating spectrometer in combination with a Quantum Well Infrared Photodetector (QWIP) and grating based spectrometer. The Dyson design allows for a very compact and optically fast system (F/1.6). Cooling requirements are minimized due to the single monolithic prism-like grating design. The configuration has the potential to be the optimal science-grade imaging spectroscopy solution for high altitude, lighter-than-air (HAA, LTA) vehicles and unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) due to its small form factor and relatively low power requirements. The QWIP sensor allows for optimum spatial and spectral uniformity and provides adequate responsivity which allows for near 100mK noise equivalent temperature difference (NEDT) operation across the LWIR passband. The QWIP's repeatability and uniformity will be helpful for data integrity since currently an onboard calibrator is not planned. A calibration will be done before and after eight hour flights to gage any inconsistencies. This has been demonstrated with lab testing. Further test results show adequate NEDT, linearity as well as applicable earth science emissivity target results (Silicates, water) measured in direct sunlight.

  4. Processing TES Level-2 Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poosti, Sassaneh; Akopyan, Sirvard; Sakurai, Regina; Yun, Hyejung; Saha, Pranjit; Strickland, Irina; Croft, Kevin; Smith, Weldon; Hoffman, Rodney; Koffend, John; Benenyan, Gerard; Nair, Hari; Sarkissian, Edwin; McDuffie, James; Monarrez, Ruth; Ho,David; Chan, Benny; Lampel, Michael

    2006-01-01

    TES Level 2 Subsystem is a set of computer programs that performs functions complementary to those of the program summarized in the immediately preceding article. TES Level-2 data pertain to retrieved species (or temperature) profiles, and errors thereof. Geolocation, quality, and other data (e.g., surface characteristics for nadir observations) are also included. The subsystem processes gridded meteorological information and extracts parameters that can be interpolated to the appropriate latitude, longitude, and pressure level based on the date and time. Radiances are simulated using the aforementioned meteorological information for initial guesses, and spectroscopic-parameter tables are generated. At each step of the retrieval, a nonlinear-least-squares- solving routine is run over multiple iterations, retrieving a subset of atmospheric constituents, and error analysis is performed. Scientific TES Level-2 data products are written in a format known as Hierarchical Data Format Earth Observing System 5 (HDF-EOS 5) for public distribution.

  5. Global Summary MGS TES Data and Mars-Gram Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justus, C.; Johnson, D.; Parker, Nelson C. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM 2001) is an engineering-level Mars atmosphere model widely used for many Mars mission applications. From 0-80 km, it is based on NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model (MGCM), while above 80 km it is based on University of Arizona Mars Thermospheric General Circulation Model. Mars-GRAM 2001 and MGCM use surface topograph$ from Mars Global Surveyor Mars Orbiting Laser Altimeter (MOLA). Validation studies are described comparing Mars-GRAM with a global summary data set of Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) data. TES averages and standard deviations were assembled from binned TES data which covered surface to approx. 40 km, over more than a full Mars year (February, 1999 - June, 2001, just before start of a Mars global dust storm). TES data were binned in 10-by-10 degree latitude-longitude bins (i.e. 36 longitude bins by 19 latitude bins), 12 seasonal bins (based on 30 degree increments of Ls angle). Bin averages and standard deviations were assembled at 23 data levels (temperature at 21 pressure levels, plus surface temperature and surface pressure). Two time-of day bins were used: local time near 2 or 14 hours local time). Two dust optical depth bins wereused: infrared optical depth either less than or greater than 0.25 (which corresponds to visible optical depth either less than or greater than about 0.5). For interests in aerocapture and precision entry and landing, comparisons focused on atmospheric density. TES densities versus height were computed from TES temperature versus pressure, using assumptions of perfect gas law and hydrostatics. Mars-GRAM validation studies used density ratio (TES/Mars-GRAM) evaluated at data bin center points in space and time. Observed average TES/Mars-GRAM density ratios were generally 1+/-0.05, except at high altitudes (15-30 km, depending on season) and high latitudes (> 45 deg N), or at most altitudes in the southern hemisphere at Ls approx. 90 and 180deg

  6. Development of a superconducting submillimeter-wave limb emission sounder (SMILES) on the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) of the International Space Station (ISS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Naomi; Inatani, Junji; Iida, Yukiei; Masuko, Harunobu; Manabe, Takeshi; Ochiai, Satoshi; Irimajiri, Yoshihisa; Seta, Masumichi; Shi, Sheng-Cai; Noguchi, Takashi

    1998-11-01

    NASDA and CRL are planning to develop a spaceborne SMILES, which is to be installed in the Exposed Facility (EF) on the JEM of the ISS. By observing gases such as ClO, HCl, NO, N2O, HO2 and BrO in the stratosphere, JEM/SMILES can trace the chemical reactions concerning the ozone depletion and climate change. Global distribution of those gases will be mapped with a height resolution of about 2 km. JEM/SMILES receives low-intensity signals from those gases with highly sensitive SIS (Superconductor-Insulator-Superconductor) mixers at 640 GHz, which are cooled to 4.2 K by a space-qualified mechanical cooler. The mission target is to demonstrate the effectiveness of the submillimeter-wave limb emission sounding and to establish space applicability of the low-noise SIS mixers and a mechanical 4-K cooler. JEM/SMILES is expected to be launched in 2003, and the experiments will last a year or more.

  7. TES carbon monoxide validation with DACOM aircraft measurements during INTEX-B 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, M.; Rinsland, C.; Fisher, B.; Sachse, G.; Diskin, G.; Logan, J.; Worden, H.; Kulawik, S.; Osterman, G.; Eldering, A.; Herman, R.; Shephard, M.

    2007-12-01

    Validation of Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) tropospheric CO profiles with in situ CO measurements from the Differential Absorption CO Measurement (DACOM) instrument during the Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment (INTEX)-B campaigns in March to May 2006 are presented. For each identified DACOM CO profile, one to three TES CO profiles are selected closest in location to the small area that the DACOM profile covers. The time differences between the comparison profiles are within 2 hours. The DACOM CO vertical profiles are adjusted by applying nearest coincident TES averaging kernels and the a priori profiles. This step accounts for the effect of the vertical resolution of the TES CO retrievals and removes the influence of the a priori assumptions in the comparisons. Comparison statistics for data taken near Houston in March 2006 show good agreement between TES and the adjusted DACOM CO profiles in the lower and middle troposphere with a correlation coefficient of 0.87. On average, the TES CO volume mixing ratio profile is 0-10% lower than the adjusted DACOM CO profile from the lower to middle troposphere. This is within the 10-20% standard deviations of the TES or DACOM CO profiles taken in the Houston area. The comparisons of TES and DACOM CO profiles near Hawaii and Anchorage in April to May 2006 are not as good. In these regions the aircraft DACOM CO profiles are characterized by plumes or enhanced CO layers, consistent with known features in the tracer fields due to transpacific transport of polluted air parcels originating from East Asia. Although TES observations over the Pacific region also show localized regions of enhanced CO, the coincidence criteria for obtaining good comparisons with aircraft measurements are challenging. The meaning of validation comparisons in profile portions where TES retrievals have little sensitivity is addressed. Examinations of characteristic parameters in TES retrievals are important in data applications.

  8. TES Observations of the South Pole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titus, T. N.; Kieffer, H. H.; Mullins, K. F.

    1998-09-01

    The recession of the south polar cap has been observed telescopically and from spacecraft in both the visible and thermal regions. Although a simple cap-edge versus time plot has commonly been used, without regard as to the longitude of measurement, Mariner 9, Viking, and HST observations clearly show that the retreating edge is irregular and asymmetric. The data used in this analysis is from the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES). Repeated TES coverage over the period L_s 185 through L_s 270 acquired much of the cap recession. During this period of time, TES was taking data in the array normal spin (ANS) mode, scanning acrossed the planet as the satellite made one complete roll every 100 minutes. Therefore, the data was irregularly sampled in both space and time. Also, because of the changes in the spacecraft orbit, the spatial resolution of the data is variable, ranging from 25 to 125 kilometers. We have constructed a map of the south polar region that contains the date when the last CO_2 sublimates, hereafter called the crocus date. The crocus date is based on sliding a representative temperature - versus - time curve along the observations for each location in the polar region and selecting the season of maximum temperature change. Recessions in the classic area ``Mountains of Mitchell'' are delayed significantly, disappearing approximately at L_s 260. High resolution (26 Km) brightness temperature data at L_s 244 confirms that solid CO_2 is the dominant cold component. One region (approx. 72-80 S, 180-250 W) within the annual polar cap became dark long before the temperatures begin to rise; in comparison with most areas that showed a gradual increase in brightness until a rapid darkening as the temperature rose well above CO_2 frost value. This dark region, here after called the Kidney Bean region, appears to be a major contributor to the asymmetric polar recession. The cause of the Kidney Bean region's unexpected behavior is

  9. How Well Can Infrared Sounders Observe the Atmosphere and Surface Through Clouds?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Daniel K.; Larar, Allen M.; Liu, Xu; Smith, William L.; Strow, L. Larrabee; Yang, Ping

    2010-01-01

    Infrared sounders, such as the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI), and the Cross-track Infrared sounder (CrIS), have a cloud-impenetrable disadvantage in observing the atmosphere and surface under opaque cloudy conditions. However, recent studies indicate that hyperspectral, infrared sounders have the ability to detect cloud effective-optical and microphysical properties and to penetrate optically thin clouds in observing the atmosphere and surface to a certain degree. We have developed a retrieval scheme dealing with atmospheric conditions with cloud presence. This scheme can be used to analyze the retrieval accuracy of atmospheric and surface parameters under clear and cloudy conditions. In this paper, we present the surface emissivity results derived from IASI global measurements under both clear and cloudy conditions. The accuracy of surface emissivity derived under cloudy conditions is statistically estimated in comparison with those derived under clear sky conditions. The retrieval error caused by the clouds is shown as a function of cloud optical depth, which helps us to understand how well infrared sounders can observe the atmosphere and surface through clouds.

  10. TES Observations of the Martian Surface and Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christensen, P. R.; Kieffer, H. H.; Pearl, J. C.; Conrath, B.; Malin, M. C.; Clark, R. C.; Morris, R. V.; Bandfield, J. L.; Smith, M. D.; Lane, M. D.

    2000-01-01

    The Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) instrument is a Fourier transform Michelson interferometer operating with 10 or 5 cm(exp -1) sampling in the thermal infrared spectral region from 1700 to 200 cm(exp -1) (-6 to 50 micrometers) where virtually all minerals have characteristic fundamental vibrational absorption bands. The TES data used in this paper are among the 6 x 10(exp 7) spectra collected during the early mapping phase of the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) mission from southern hemisphere winter to early summer (aerocentric longitude, L(sub s), 107 deg to 297 deg. The methodology for separating the surface and atmospheric components of the radiance from Mars, which allows detailed analysis and interpretation of surface mineralogy, is described in previous paper. Additional information is contained in original extended abstract.

  11. Multiorder etalon sounder (MOES) development and test for balloon experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hays, Paul B.; Wnag, Jinxue; Wu, Jian

    1993-01-01

    The Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI), with its high throughput and high spectral resolution has been used in the remote-sensing measurements of the earth's atmospheric composition, winds, and temperatures. The most recent satellite instruments include the Fabry-Perot interferometer flown on the Dynamics Explorer-2 (DE-2), the High Resolution Doppler Imager (HRDI), and the Cryogenic Limb Array Etalon Spectrometer (CLAES) flown on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS). These instruments measure the Doppler line profiles of the emission and absorption of certain atmospheric species (such as atomic oxygen) in the visible and infrared spectral region. The successful space flight of DE-FPI, HRDI, and CLAES on UARS demonstrated the extremely high spectral resolution and ruggedness of the etalon system for the remote sensing of earth and planetary atmospheres. Recently, an innovative FPI focal plane detection technique called the Circle-to-Line Interferometer Optical (CLIO) system was invented at the Space Physics Research Laboratory. The CLIO simplifies the FPI focal plane detection process by converting the circular rings or fringes into a linear pattern similar to that produced by a conventional spectrometer, while retaining the throughput advantage of the etalon interferometer. The combination of FPI and CLIO allows the development of more sensitive Fabry-Perot interferometers in the infrared for the remote sensing of the lower atmospheres of Earth and possibly other planets. The Multiorder Etalon Sounder (MOES), a combination of the rugged etalon and the CLIO, compares very favorably to other space-borne optical instruments in terms of performance versus complexity. The new instrument is expected to be rugged, compact, and very suitable for an operational temperature and moisture sounder. With this technique, the contamination of radiance measurements by emissions of other gases is also minimized. At the Space Physics Research Laboratory (SPRL), the MOES

  12. Mars Global Surveyor TES Results: Observations of Water Ice Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearl, John C.; Smith, M. D.; Conrath, B. J.; Bandfield, J. L.; Christensen, P. R.

    1999-01-01

    On July 31, 1999, Mars Global Surveyor completed its first martian year in orbit. During this time, the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) experiment gathered extensive data on water ice clouds. We report here on three types of martian clouds. 1) Martian southern summer has long been characterized as the season when the most severe dust storms occur. It is now apparent that northern spring/summer is characterized as a time of substantial low latitude ice clouds [1]. TES observations beginning in the northern summer (Lsubs=107) show a well developed cloud belt between 10S and 30N latitude; 12 micron opacities were typically 0.15. This system decreased dramatically after Lsubs= 130. Thereafter, remnants were most persistent over the Tharsis ridge. 2) Clouds associated with major orographic features follow a different pattern [2]. Clouds of this type were present prior to the regional Noachis dust storm of 1997. They disappeared with the onset of the storm, but reappeared rather quickly following its decay. Typical infrared opacities were near 0.5. 3) Extensive, very thin clouds are also widespread [3]. Found at high altitudes (above 35 km), their opacities are typically a few hundredths. At times, such as in northern spring, these clouds are limited in their northern extent only by the southern edge of the polar vortex. We describe the distribution, infrared optical properties, and seasonal trends of these systems during the first martian year of TES operations.

  13. Mars Aerocapture and Validation of Mars-GRAM with TES Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justus, C. G.; Duvall, Aleta; Keller, Vernon W.

    2005-01-01

    Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM) is a widely-used engineering- level Mars atmospheric model. Applications include systems design, performance analysis, and operations planning for aerobraking, entry descent and landing, and aerocapture. Typical Mars aerocapture periapsis altitudes (for systems with rigid-aeroshell heat shields) are about 50 km. This altitude is above the 0-40 km height range covered by Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) nadir observations. Recently, TES limb sounding data have been made available, spanning more than two Mars years (more than 200,000 data profiles) with altitude coverage up to about 60 km, well within the height range of interest for aerocapture. Results are presented comparing Mars-GRAM atmospheric density with densities from TES nadir and limb sounding observations. A new Mars-GRAM feature is described which allows individual TES nadir or limb profiles to be extracted from the large TES databases, and to be used as an optional replacement for standard Mars-GRAM background (climatology) conditions. For Monte-Carlo applications such as aerocapture guidance and control studies, Mars-GRAM perturbations are available using these TES profile background conditions.

  14. Channel alignment and radiometry in hyperspectral atmospheric infrared sounders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, Denis A.; Aumanna, H. H.; Pagano, Thomas S.; Overoye, Kenneth R.; Schindler, Rudolf A.

    2005-01-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) is a hyper-spectral infrared sounder which covers the 3.7 to 15,4 micron region with 2378 spectral channels. The AIRS instrument specification called for spatial co-registration of all channels to better than 2% of the field of view. Pre-launch testing confirmed that this requirement was met, since the standard deviations in the centroids was about 1% of the 13.5 km IFOV in scan and 3% in track. Detailed analysis of global AIRS data show that the typical scene gradient in 10 micron window channels is about I .3K/km rms. The way these gradients, which are predominantly caused by clouds, manifest themselves in the data depends on the details of the instrument design and the way the spectral channels are used in the data analysis, AIRS temperature and moisture retrievals use 328 of the 2378 channels from 17 independent arrays. As a result, the effect of the boresight misalignment averages to zero mean. Any increase in the effective noise is less than 0.2K. Also, there is no discernable performance degradation of products at the 45 km spatial resolution in the presence of partially cloudy scenes with up to 80% cloudiness. Single pixel radiometric differences between channels with boresight alignment differences can be appreciable and can affect scientific investigations on a single 15km footprint scale, particularly near coastlines, thunderstorms and surface emissivity inhomogeneities.

  15. Lessons Learned from Previous Space-Borne Sounders as a Guide to Future Sounder Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, Robert F.; Deshpande, Manohar D.; Farrell,William M.; Fung, Shing F.; Osherovich, Vladimir A.; Pfaff, Rovert E.; Rowland, Douglas E.; Adrian, Mark L.

    2008-01-01

    Space-borne radio sounding is considered to be the gold standard for electron-density (N(sub e)) measurements compared to other techniques even under low-density conditions, such as N(sub e) < 1/cu cm, when other techniques are known to experience difficulties. These reliable measurements are not restricted to in-situ N(sub e) determinations since a spaceborne sounder can provide vertical N(sub e) profiles (N(sub e)(h)) from the spacecraft altitude to the altitude of maximum N(sub e). Near-conjunction studies involving the International Satellites for Ionospheric Studies (ISIS) satellites in the topside ionosphere and Dynamics Explorer 2 (DE 2) near the altitude of the F-region peak density have verified that, even at the greatest distance from the sounder, the ISIS-derived N(sub e)(h) profiles agree with the DE-2 Langmuir-probe measurements to within about 30% over a density range of more than two decades. Space-borne sounders can also provide N(sub e) profiles along the magnetic-field B, by inverting echoes that are ducted along field-aligned irregularities (FAI), and can provide information about the terrain beneath the satellite by examining surface reflections in the frequency range above the ionospheric penetration frequency. Many nations have launched rocket and satellite radio sounders in geospace over more than 4 decades and there have been sounders on space-probes and in orbit around other planets. Here we will summarize some of the lessons learned from these accomplishments by analyzing data from radio sounders on the Alouette and ISIS satellites and the OEDIPUS and other rockets in the terrestrial ionosphere, the IMAGE satellite in the terrestrial magnetosphere, the Ulysses space probe in Jupiter's 10 plasma torus and the MARSIS satellite in orbit around Mars. The emphasis will be on information deduced concerning (1) fundamental plasma processes and gradients in N, and B in the vicinity of the sounders from sounder-stimulated plasma resonances and

  16. Cross-validation of IASI/MetOp derived tropospheric δD with TES and ground-based FTIR observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacour, J.-L.; Clarisse, L.; Worden, J.; Schneider, M.; Barthlott, S.; Hase, F.; Risi, C.; Clerbaux, C.; Hurtmans, D.; Coheur, P.-F.

    2014-11-01

    The Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) flying on-board MetOpA and MetOpB is able to capture fine isotopic variations of the HDO to H2O ratio (δD) in the troposphere. Such observations at the high spatio temporal resolution of the sounder are of great interest to improve our understanding of the mechanisms controlling humidity in the troposphere. In this study we aim to empirically assess the validity of our error estimation previously evaluated theoretically. To achieve this, we compare IASI δD retrieved profiles with other available profiles of δD, from the TES infrared sounder onboard AURA and from three ground-based FTIR stations produced within the MUSICA project: the NDACC (Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change) sites Kiruna and Izana, and the TCCON site Karlsruhe, which in addition to near-infrared TCCON spectra also records mid-infrared spectra. We describe the achievable level of agreement between the different retrievals and show that these theoretical errors are in good agreement with empirical differences. The comparisons are made at different locations from tropical to Arctic latitudes, above sea and above land. Generally IASI and TES are similarly sensitive to δD in the free troposphere which allows to compare their measurements directly. At tropical latitudes where IASI's sensitivity is lower than that of TES, we show that the agreement improves when taking into account the sensitivity of IASI in the TES retrieval. For the comparison IASI-FTIR only direct comparisons are performed because of similar sensitivities. We identify a quasi negligible bias in the free troposphere (-3‰) between IASI retrieved δD with the TES one, which are bias corrected, but an important with the ground-based FTIR reaching -47‰. We also suggest that model-satellite observations comparisons could be optimized with IASI thanks to its high spatial and temporal sampling.

  17. MOC Image of Phobos with TES Temperature Overlay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This image of Phobos, the inner and larger of the two moons of Mars, was taken by the Mars Global Surveyor on August 19, 1998. The Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) measured the brightness of thermal radiation at the same time the camera acquired this image. By analyzing the brightness, TES scientists could deduce the various fractions of the surface exposed to the Sun and their temperatures. This preliminary analysis shows that the surface temperature, dependent on slope and particle size, varies from a high of +25o F (-4o C) on the most illuminated slopes to -170o F (-112o C) in shadows. This large difference, and the fact that such differences can be found in close proximity, adds support to the notion that the surface of Phobos is covered by very small particles.

    Malin Space Science Systems, Inc. and the California Institute of Technology built the MOC using spare hardware from the Mars Observer mission. MSSS operates the camera from its facilities in San Diego, CA. The Thermal Emission Spectrometer is operated by Arizona State University and was built by Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Mars Surveyor Operations Project operates the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft with its industrial partner, Lockheed Martin Astronautics, from facilities in Pasadena, CA and Denver, CO.

  18. Determination of cloud parameters from infrared sounder data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, H.-Y. M.

    1984-01-01

    The World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) plan is concerned with the need to develop a uniform global cloud climatology as part of a broad research program on climate processes. The International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) has been approved as the first project of the WCRP. The ISCCP has the basic objective to collect and analyze satellite radiance data to infer the global distribution of cloud radiative properties in order to improve the modeling of cloud effects on climate. Research is conducted to explore an algorithm for retrieving cloud properties by utilizing the available infrared sounder data from polar-orbiting satellites. A numerical method is developed for computing cloud top heights, amount, and emissivity on the basis of a parameterized infrared radiative transfer equation for cloudy atmospheres. Theoretical studies were carried out by considering a synthetic atmosphere.

  19. Mars Global Surveyor TES Results: Observations of Atmospheric Dust During Mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Michael D.; Pearl, J. C.; Conrath, B. J.; Christensen, P. R.

    1999-01-01

    The Mars Global Surveyor entered mapping orbit around Mars in March 1999. Infrared spectra returned by the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) are very well suited for monitoring column-integrated infrared dust opacity. A global view of dust opacity is possible on a daily basis allowing the detailed study of the evolution of dust storms and the seasonal trend of the background dust opacity. Information about the vertical distribution of dust in the atmosphere can be obtained by examination of TES spectra taken in a limb-viewing geometry. We report here on 1) the observed horizontal distribution of dust aerosols and their evolution with time during the mapping phase of the Mars Global Surveyor mission so far (roughly covering northern hemisphere summer and early fall), and 2) the vertical distribution of dust aerosols as determined from TES spectra taken in the limb-viewing geometry.

  20. Industrial waste materials and by-products as thermal energy storage (TES) materials: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutierrez, Andrea; Miró, Laia; Gil, Antoni; Rodríguez-Aseguinolaza, Javier; Barreneche, Camila; Calvet, Nicolas; Py, Xavier; Fernández, A. Inés; Grágeda, Mario; Ushak, Svetlana; Cabeza, Luisa F.

    2016-05-01

    A wide variety of potential materials for thermal energy storage (TES) have been identify depending on the implemented TES method, Sensible, latent or thermochemical. In order to improve the efficiency of TES systems more alternatives are continuously being sought. In this regard, this paper presents the review of low cost heat storage materials focused mainly in two objectives: on the one hand, the implementation of improved heat storage devices based on new appropriate materials and, on the other hand, the valorisation of waste industrial materials will have strong environmental, economic and societal benefits such as reducing the landfilled waste amounts, reducing the greenhouse emissions and others. Different industrial and municipal waste materials and by products have been considered as potential TES materials and have been characterized as such. Asbestos containing wastes, fly ashes, by-products from the salt industry and from the metal industry, wastes from recycling steel process and from copper refining process and dross from the aluminium industry, and municipal wastes (glass and nylon) have been considered. This work shows a great revalorization of wastes and by-product opportunity as TES materials, although more studies are needed to achieve industrial deployment of the idea.

  1. Rocket/Nimbus Sounder Comparison (RNSC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The experimental results for radiance and temperature differences in the Wallops Island comparisons indicate that the differences between satellite and rocket systems are of the same order of magnitude as the differences among the various satellite and rocket sounders. The Arcasondes produced usable data to about 50 km, while the Datasondes require design modification. The SIRS and IRIS soundings provided usable data to 30 mb; extension of these soundings was also investigated.

  2. VAS demonstration: (VISSR Atmospheric Sounder) description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, H. E.; Uccellini, L. W.

    1985-01-01

    The VAS Demonstration (VISSR Atmospheric Sounder) is a project designed to evaluate the VAS instrument as a remote sensor of the Earth's atmosphere and surface. This report describes the instrument and ground processing system, the instrument performance, the valiation as a temperature and moisture profiler compared with ground truth and other satellites, and assesses its performance as a valuable meteorological tool. The report also addresses the availability of data for scientific research.

  3. Tropospheric Vertical Distribution of Tropical Atlantic Ozone Observed by TES during the Northern African Biomass Burning Season

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jourdain, L.; Worden, H. M.; Worden, J. R.; Bowman, K.; Li, Q.; Eldering, A.; Kulawik, S. S.; Osterman, G.; Boersma, K. F.; Fisher, B.; Rinsland, C. P.; Beer, R.; Gunson, M.

    2007-01-01

    We present vertical distributions of ozone from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) over the tropical Atlantic Ocean during January 2005. Between 10N and 20S, TES ozone retrievals have Degrees of Freedom for signal (DOF) around 0.7 - 0.8 each for tropospheric altitudes above and below 500 hPa. As a result, TES is able to capture for the first time from space a distribution characterized by two maxima: one in the lower troposphere north of the ITCZ and one in the middle and upper troposphere south of the ITCZ. We focus our analysis on the north tropical Atlantic Ocean, where most of previous satellite observations showed discrepancies with in-situ ozone observations and models. Trajectory analyses and a sensitivity study using the GEOS-Chem model confirm the influence of northern Africa biomass burning on the elevated ozone mixing ratios observed by TES over this region.

  4. Successful Mars remote sensors, MO THEMIS and MER Mini-TES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silverman, Steven; Christensen, Phil

    2003-11-01

    This paper describes results of the calibration of the Miniature Thermal Emission Spectrometer (Mini-TES) and the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) built by Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing (SBRS) under contract to Arizona State University (ASU). This paper also serves as an update to an earlier paper (Silverman, et al., 2003) for mission description and instrument designs (Schueler, et al., 2003). A major goal of the Mars Exploration Program is to help determine whether life ever existed on Mars via detailed in situ studies and surface sample return. It is essential to identify landing sites with the highest probability of containing samples indicative of early pre-biotic or biotic environments. Of particular interest are aqueous and/or hydrothermal environments in which life could have existed, or regions of current near-surface water or heat sources. The search requires detailed geologic mapping and accurate interpretations of site composition and history in a global context. THEMIS and Mini-TES were designed to do this and builds upon a wealth of data from previous experiments. Previous experiments include the Mariner 6/7 Mars Infrared Radiometer (MIR) and Infrared Spectrometer, the Mariner 9 Infrared Interferometer Spectrometer (IRIS), the Viking Infrared Thermal Mapper (IRTM), the Phobos Termoscan, and the continuing Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) mission using the Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) and MGS Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES). TES has collected hyperspectral images (up to 286 spectral bands from 6-50 μm) of the entire martian surface, providing an initial global reconnaissance of mineralogy and thermophysical properties. By covering the key 6.3 to 15.0 μm region in both TES and THEMIS, it is possible to combine TES fine spectral resolution with THEMIS fine spatial resolution to achieve a global mineralogic inventory at the spatial scales necessary for detailed geologic studies within the Odyssey data resources. Mini-TES is a single detector

  5. TES L2 Lite Standard Products

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-07-21

    ... and data/data comparisons. This product can be used for science analysis as each data product is fully characterized.   “NOTE: An update to the TES L2 Lite Products PGE corrected a date range issue in the ...

  6. View to the south with the Two Sounder Antennas on ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View to the south with the Two Sounder Antennas on the left - Over-the-Horizon Backscatter Radar Network, Christmas Valley Radar Site Transmit Sector Four Sounder Antennas, On unnamed road west of Lost Forest Road, Christmas Valley, Lake County, OR

  7. Topside sounder observations of equatorial bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyson, P. L.; Benson, R. F.

    1978-01-01

    Large scale regions of depleted equatorial ionospheric plasma, called equatorial bubbles, are investigated using topside sounder data. The sounder's unique remote measuring capability enables the magnetic field-aligned nature of the bubbles to be investigated. A search of all available Alouette 2 and ISIS 1 ionograms during nighttime perigee passes near the magnetic equator has revealed a variety of echo signatures associated with bubbles. In addition to a sudden drop in electron density, these signatures usually include in situ spread F and ducted traces. The ducted traces have been used to determine the electron density distribution and to infer changes in ion composition along the magnetic field line within the duct associated with the bubble. In some cases it can be determined that the bubble is asymmetric with respect to the magnetic equator. Even though such features require 3 dimensional models for their explanation, the great field-aligned extent of the bubbles (relative to their cross section) suggests that current theories, which ignore variations along the magnetic field, are still applicable.

  8. The Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite microwave limb sounder instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barath, F. T.; Chavez, M. C.; Cofield, R. E.; Flower, D. A.; Frerking, M. A.; Gram, M. B.; Harris, W. M.; Holden, J. R.; Jarnot, R. F.; Kloezeman, W. G.

    1993-01-01

    The microwave limb sounder (MLS) on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) is the first satellite experiment using limb sounding techniques at microwave frequencies. Primary measurement objectives are stratospheric ClO, O3, H2O, temperature, and pressure. Measurements are of thermal emission: all are performed simultaneously and continuously and are not degraded by ice clouds or volcanic aerosols. The instrument has a 1.6-m mechanically scanning antenna system and contains heterodyne radiometers in spectral bands centred near 63, 183, and 205 GHz. The radiometers operate at ambient temperature and use Schottky-diode mixers with local oscillators derived from phase-locked Gunn oscillators. Frequency tripling by varactor multipliers generates the 183- and 205-GHz local oscillators, and quasi-optical techniques inject these into the mixers. Six 15-channel filter banks spectrally resolve stratospheric thermal emission lines and produce an output spectrum every 2 s. Thermal stability is sufficient for 'total power' measurements which do not require fast chopping. Radiometric calibration, consisting of measurements of cold space and an internal target, is performed every 65-s limb scan. Instrument in-orbit performance has been excellent, and all objectives are being met.

  9. Mini-TES Observations of Comanche Carbonate and Its Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruff, Steven W.; Morris, Richard V.

    2010-01-01

    The discovery by the Spirit rover of outcrops rich in Mg-Fe carbonate [Morris et al., 2010] represents another manifestation of a diverse aqueous history in Gusev crater. In 2005, observations by the Moessbauer spectrometer (MB) on outcrops dubbed Comanche provided initial indication of Fe-Mg carbonate that was subsequently supported by analysis of elemental data from the Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS). The recognition of a carbonate component in thermal infrared spectra measured by the Miniature Thermal Emission Spectrometer (Mini-TES) was significantly delayed due to dust contamination of the instrument's optics. With the implementation of a viable dust correction, the Comanche spectra were revisited and presented clear and compelling evidence for a Mg-Fe carbonate component that could be as much as a third of the total mineral abundance. The data from all three instruments in combination are best matched by Mg-Fe carbonate with an abundance of 16-34 wt%. Mini-TES spectra were acquired for 12 targets at various locations on the Comanche (4-5 m long) and Comanche Spur (1-2 m long) outcrops, the latter being the location of the MB and APXS measurements. The two outcrops are spectrally comparable and share similar morphology and texture based on color images from the Panoramic Camera (Pancam). The highest quality Mini-TES spectrum comes from the larger Comanche outcrop on a target named Saupitty. Linear least squares modeling of the Saupitty spectrum employed a library of laboratory spectra tailored for consistency with the APXS and MB data and included spectra representing Martian dust, a slope spectrum to account for any temperature determination errors, and a blackbody spectrum to account for differences in spectral contrast between the laboratory and Mini-TES spectrum. Successful modeling of the Comanche Saupitty spectrum required one or more carbonate phases to obtain a good fit. Excluding all carbonates from the full starting library more than

  10. A joint data record of tropospheric ozone from Aura-TES and MetOp-IASI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oetjen, Hilke; Payne, Vivienne H.; Neu, Jessica L.; Kulawik, Susan S.; Edwards, David P.; Eldering, Annmarie; Worden, Helen M.; Worden, John R.

    2016-08-01

    The Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) on Aura and Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) on MetOp-A together provide a time series of 10 years of free-tropospheric ozone with an overlap of 3 years. We characterise the differences between TES and IASI ozone measurements and find that IASI's coarser vertical sensitivity leads to a small (< 5 ppb) low bias relative to TES for the free troposphere. The TES-IASI differences are not dependent on season or any other factor and hence the measurements from the two instruments can be merged, after correcting for the offset, in order to study decadal-scale changes in tropospheric ozone. We calculate time series of regional monthly mean ozone in the free troposphere over eastern Asia, the western United States (US), and Europe, carefully accounting for differences in spatial sampling between the instruments. We show that free-tropospheric ozone over Europe and the western US has remained relatively constant over the past decade but that, contrary to expectations, ozone over Asia in recent years does not continue the rapid rate of increase observed from 2004 to 2010.

  11. Mineralogy at Meridiani Planum from the Mini-TES experiment on the opportunity rover

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christensen, P.R.; Wyatt, M.B.; Glotch, T.D.; Rogers, A.D.; Anwar, S.; Arvidson, R. E.; Bandfield, J.L.; Blaney, D.L.; Budney, C.; Calvin, W.M.; Fallacaro, A.; Fergason, R.L.; Gorelick, N.; Graff, T.G.; Hamilton, V.E.; Hayes, A.G.; Johnson, J. R.; Knudson, A.T.; McSween, H.Y.; Mehall, G.L.; Mehall, L.K.; Moersch, J.E.; Morris, R.V.; Smith, M.D.; Squyres, S. W.; Ruff, S.W.; Wolff, M.J.

    2004-01-01

    The Miniature Thermal Emission Spectrometer (Mini-TES) on Opportunity investigated the mineral abundances and compositions of outcrops, rocks, and soils at Meridiani Planum. Coarse crystalline hematite and olivine-rich basaltic sands were observed as predicted from orbital TES spectroscopy. Outcrops of aqueous origin are composed of 15 to 35% by volume magnesium and calcium sulfates [a high-silica component modeled as a combination of glass, feldspar, and sheet silicates (???20 to 30%)], and hematite; only minor jarosite is identified in Mini-TES spectra. Mini-TES spectra show only a hematite signature in the millimeter-sized spherules. Basaltic materials have more plagioclase than pyroxene, contain olivine, and are similar in inferred mineral composition to basalt mapped from orbit. Bounce rock is dominated by clinopyroxene and is close in inferred mineral composition to the basaltic martian meteorites. Bright wind streak material matches global dust. Waterlain rocks covered by unaltered basaltic sands suggest a change from an aqueous environment to one dominated by physical weathering.

  12. Cloud properties and bulk microphysical properties of semi-transparent cirrus from IR Sounders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stubenrauch, Claudia; Feofilov, Artem; Armante, Raymond; Guignard, Anthony

    2013-04-01

    Satellite observations provide a continuous survey of the atmosphere over the whole globe. IR sounders have been observing our planet since 1979. The spectral resolution has improved from TIROS-N Operational Vertical Sounders (TOVS) to the Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS), and to the InfraRed Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI); resolution within the CO2 absorption band makes these passive sounders most sensitive to semi-transparent cirrus (about 30% of all clouds), day and night. The LMD cloud property retrieval method developed for TOVS, has been adapted to the second generation of IR sounders like AIRS and, recently, IASI. It is based on a weighted χ2 method using different channels within the 15 micron CO2 absorption band. Once the cloud physical properties (cloud pressure and IR emissivity) are retrieved, cirrus bulk microphysical properties (De and IWP) are determined from spectral emissivity differences between 8 and 12 μm. The emissivities are determined using the retrieved cloud pressure and are then compared to those simulated by the radiative transfer model. For IASI, we use the latest version of the radiative transfer model 4A (http://4aop.noveltis.com), which has been coupled with the DISORT algorithm to take into account multiple scattering of ice crystals. The code incorporates single scattering properties of column-like or aggregate-like ice crystals provided by MetOffice (Baran et al. (2001); Baran and Francis (2004)). The synergy of AIRS and two active instruments of the A-Train (lidar and radar of the CALIPSO and CloudSat missions), which provide accurate information on vertical cloud structure, allowed the evaluation of cloud properties retrieved by the weighted χ2 method. We present first results for cloud properties obtained with IASI/ Metop-A and compare them with those of AIRS and other cloud climatologies having participated in the GEWEX cloud assessment. The combination of IASI observations at 9:30 AM and 9:30 PM complement

  13. RAWS: The spaceborne radar wind sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Richard K.

    1991-01-01

    The concept of the Radar Wind Sounder (RAWS) is discussed. The goals of the RAWS is to estimate the following three qualities: the echo power, to determine rain rate and surface wind velocity; the mean Doppler frequency, to determine the wind velocity in hydrometers; and the spread of the Doppler frequency, to determine the turbulent spread of the wind velocity. Researchers made significant progress during the first year. The feasibility of the concept seems certain. Studies indicate that a reasonably sized system can measure in the presence of ice clouds and dense water clouds. No sensitivity problems exist in rainy environments. More research is needed on the application of the radar to the measurement of rain rates and winds at the sea surface.

  14. Millimeter-Wave Atmospheric Sounder (MAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, G. K.

    1988-01-01

    MAS is a remote sensing instrument for passive sounding (limb sounding) of the earth's atmosphere from the Space Shuttle. The main objective of the MAS is to study the composition and dynamic structure of the stratosphere, mesosphere, and lower thermosphere in the height range 20 to 100 km, the region known as the middle atmosphere. The MAS will be flown on the Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science (ATLAS 1) NASA mission scheduled for late 1990. The Millimeter-Wave Atmospheric Sounder will provide, for the first time, information obtained simultaneously on the temperature and on ozone concentrations in the 20 to 90 km altitude region. The information will cover a large area of the globe, will have high accuracy and high vertical resolution, and will cover both day and night times. Additionally, data on the two important molecules, H2O and ClO, will also be provided.

  15. RAWS: The spaceborne radar wind sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Richard K.

    1991-09-01

    The concept of the Radar Wind Sounder (RAWS) is discussed. The goals of the RAWS is to estimate the following three qualities: the echo power, to determine rain rate and surface wind velocity; the mean Doppler frequency, to determine the wind velocity in hydrometers; and the spread of the Doppler frequency, to determine the turbulent spread of the wind velocity. Researchers made significant progress during the first year. The feasibility of the concept seems certain. Studies indicate that a reasonably sized system can measure in the presence of ice clouds and dense water clouds. No sensitivity problems exist in rainy environments. More research is needed on the application of the radar to the measurement of rain rates and winds at the sea surface.

  16. Climate Change and Sounder Radiometric Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagano, Thomas S.; Aumann, Hartmut H.; Manning, Evan

    2009-01-01

    Satellite instrument radiometric stability is critical for climate studies. The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) radiances are of sufficient stability and accuracy to serve as a climate data record as evidenced by comparisons with the global network of buoys. In this paper we examine the sensitivity of derived geophysical products to potential instrument radiometric stability issues due to diurnal, orbital and seasonal variations. Our method is to perturb the AIRS radiances and examine the impact to retrieved parameters. Results show that instability in retrieved temperature products will be on the same order of the brightness temperature error in the radiances and follow the same time dependences. AIRS excellent stability makes it ideal for examining impacts of instabilities of future systems on geophysical parameter performance.

  17. Mini-TES Observations of the Gusev and Meridiani Landing Sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christensen, Philip; Arvidson, Raymond; Bandfield, Joshua L.; Blaney, Diana; Budney, Charles; Calvin, Wendy; Ciccolella, Sandra; Fallacro, Alicia; Fergason, Robin; Glotch, Timothy

    2004-01-01

    The Miniature Thermal Emission Spectrometer (Mini-TES) has provided remote measurements of the mineralogy and thermophysical properties of the scene surrounding the Mars Exploration Rovers. The specific scientific objectives of this investigation are to: (1) determine the mineralogy of rocks and soils; (2) determine the thermophysical properties of surface materials; and (3) determine the temperature profile, dust and water-ice opacity, and water vapor abundance in the lower atmospheric boundary layer.

  18. Assimilation of the Microwave Limb Sounder Radiances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wargan, K.; Read, W.; Livesey, N.; Wagner, P.; Nguyen. H.; Pawson, S.

    2012-01-01

    It has been shown that the assimilation of limb-sounder data can significantly improve the representation of ozone in NASA's GEOS Data Assimilation Systems (GEOS-DAS), particularly in the stratosphere. The studies conducted so far utilized retrieved data from the MIPAS, POAM, ILAS and EOS Microwave Limb Sounder (EOS MLS) instruments. Direct assimilation of the radiance data can be seen as the natural next step to those studies. The motivation behind working with radiances is twofold. First, retrieval algorithms use a priori data which are either climatological or are obtained from previous analyses. This introduces additional uncertainty and, in some cases, may lead to "self-contamination"- when the a priori is taken from the same assimilation system in which subsequently ingests the retrieved observations. Second, radiances can be available in near real time thus providing an opportunity for operational assimilation, which could help improve the use of infrared radiance instruments from operational satellite instruments. In this presentation we summarize our ongoing work on an implementation of the assimilation of EOS MLS radiances into the GEOS-5 DAS. This work focuses on assimilation of band 7 brightness temperatures which are sensitive to ozone. Our implementation uses the MLS Callable Forward Model developed by the MLS team at NASA JPL as the observation operator. We will describe our approach and recent results which are not yet final. In particular, we will demonstrate that this approach has a potential to improve the vertical structure of ozone in the lower tropical stratosphere as compared with the retrieved MLS product. We will discuss the computational efficiency of this implementation.

  19. Characteristics of the GOES I-M Imager and Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ernst, Thomas J.; Koenig, Edward W.

    1990-01-01

    The design and the parameters of the improved thermal-imaging and sounding instruments (the Imager and the Sounder) that will be part of the instrument complements of the next-generation Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES I-M) are discussed. The new design incorporates many features that enhance instrumental reliability over the previous GOES radiometric instruments, such as independently functioning Sounder and Imager, redundancy, and more reliable position sensors and lubrication methods. Tables are presented which list the instrument parameters of the GOES I-M Imager and Sounder and the performance characteristics of the two instruments.

  20. Characteristics of the GOES I-M imager and sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, Edward W.

    1989-01-01

    The key features and operational characteristics of the thermal imaging and sounding instruments included into the next-generation GOES spacecraft (GOES I-M) are described. The GOES Imager's censor module has five spectral channels, including an eigth-element visible channel, three IR channels, and a water-vapor channel. The GOES Sounder's detector and filter arrangement makes use of four spectral bands: long-wave, mid-wave, short-wave, and visible. Tables of the Imager and the Sounder sensing performance characteristics are presented together with diagrams of the Imager optic parts and the Imager and the Sounder field and scan patterns.

  1. Discussing the confidence in the identification of Martian CH4 using TES data .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonti, S.; Mancarella, F.; Liuzzi, G.; Roush, T.; Blanco, A.

    In their work of 2010, Fonti and Marzo analyzed, using a statistical clustering technique, about three million of Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) spectra, spanning three Martian Years. They found that the methane content in the Martian atmosphere exhibits a seasonal variability cycle and a recurrent spatial distribution. The temporal variability seemed to have interesting correlations with the annual cycle of other atmospherical components, such as water vapor and dust load, but the temporal sampling of TES data required a substantial increase to characterize the temporal behavior of CH4 in sufficient detail. This, in turn, required a deep revision of the TES clustering done by \\citet{fon10}, which evidenced that their analyses may be ambiguous in associating the clusters with CH4. To reduce this ambiguity, we developed several pre-processing steps that have been applied to the TES data, but unfortunately they did not succeed in removing from the dataset all the possible source of error \\citep{fonti2015}. The results of applying the pre-processing procedures to the dataset Ls = 180° ± 5° of MY24 have been compared to synthetic spectral calculations for a Martian atmosphere containing 0 and 33 ppbv of CH4 \\citep{liuzzi2015}. This comparison suggests that the variability in the TES spectra, in the region where the CH_4 feature occurs, remains greater than the spectral feature associated with 33 ppbv CH4, preventing the possibility to successfully address the issue of Martian CH4 abundances, reaching an higher confidence in the variability of Martian methane.

  2. Validation of UARS Microwave Limb Sounder ClO measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waters, J. W.; Read, W. G.; Froidevaux, L.; Lungu, T. A.; Perun, V. S.; Stachnik, R. A.; Jarnot, R. F.; Cofield, R. E.; Fishbein, E. F.; Flower, D. A.; Burke, J. R.; Hardy, J. C.; Nakamura, L. L.; Ridenoure, B. P.; Shippony, Z.; Thurstans, R. P.; Avallone, L. M.; Toohey, D. W.; Dezafra, R. L.; Shindell, D. T.

    1996-04-01

    Validation of stratospheric ClO measurements by the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) is described. Credibility of the measurements is established by (1) the consistency of the measured ClO spectral emission line with the retrieved ClO profiles and (2) comparisons of ClO from MLS with that from correlative measurements by balloon-based, ground-based, and aircraft-based instruments. Values of "noise" (random), "scaling" (multiplicative), and "bias" (additive) uncertainties are determined for the Version 3 data, the first version publicly released, and known artifacts in these data are identified. Comparisons with correlative measurements indicate agreement to within the combined uncertainties expected for MLS and the other measurements being compared. It is concluded that MLS Version 3 ClO data, with proper consideration of the uncertainties and "quality" parameters produced with these data, can be used for scientific analyses at retrieval surfaces between 46 and 1 hPa (approximately 20-50 km in height). Future work is planned to correct known problems in the data and improve their quality.

  3. Validation of UARS Microwave Limb Sounder ClO Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waters, J. W.; Read, W. G.; Froidevaux, L.; Lungu, T. A.; Perun, V. S.; Stachnik, R. A.; Jarnot, R. F.; Cofield, R. E.; Fishbein, E. F.; Flower, D. A.; Burke, J. R.; Hardy, J. C.; Nakamura, L. L.; Ridenoure, B. P.; Shippony, Z.; Thurstans, R. P.; Thurstans, R. P.; Avallone, L. M.; Toohey, D. W.; deZafra, R. L.; Shindell, D. T.

    1996-01-01

    Validation of stratospheric ClO measurements by the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) is described. Credibility of the measurements is established by (1) the consistency of the measured ClO spectral emission line with the retrieved ClO profiles and (2) comparisons of ClO from MLS with that from correlative measurements by balloon-based, ground-based, and aircraft-based instruments. Values of "noise" (random), "scaling" (multiplicative), and "bias" (additive) uncertainties are determined for the Version 3 data, in the first version public release of the known artifacts in these data are identified. Comparisons with correlative measurements indicate agreement to within the combined uncertainties expected for MLS and the other measurements being compared. It is concluded that MLS Version 3 ClO data, with proper consideration of the uncertainties and "quality" parameters produced with these data, can be used for scientific analyses at retrieval surfaces between 46 and 1 hPa (approximately 20-50 km in height). Future work is planned to correct known problems in the data and improve their quality.

  4. Validation of the Radiometric Stability of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aumann, H. H.; Elliott, D.; Strow, L. L.

    2012-01-01

    It has been widely accepted that an infrared sounder in low polar orbit is capable of producing climate quality data, if the spectral brightness temperatures have instrumental trends of less than 10 mK/yr. Achieving measurement stability at this level is not only very demanding of the design of the instrument, it is also pushes the state of art of measuring on orbit what stability is actually achieved. We discuss this using Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) L1B data collected between 2002 and 2011. We compare the L1B brightness temperature observed in cloud filtered night tropical ocean spectra (obs) to the brightness temperature calculated based on the known surface emissivity, temperature and water vapor profiles from the ECMWF ReAnalysis (ERA) and the growth rates of CO2, N2O and Ozone. The trend in (obs-calc) is a powerful tool for the evaluation of the stability of the 2378 AIRS channels. We divided the channels into seven classes: All channels which sound in the stratosphere (at pressure levels below 150 hPa), 14 micron CO2 sounding, 4 micron CO2 P-branch sounding, 4 micron CO2 R-branch sounding, water vapor sounding, shortwave surface sounding and longwave surface sounding. The peak in the weighting function at 1050 hPa separates sounding and surface channels. The boundary between shortwave and longwave is 5 microns. Except for the stratosphere sounding channels, the remaining six groups have (obs-calc) trends of less than 20 mK/yr. The longwave surface channels have trends of 2 mK/yr, significantly less than the 8 mK/yr trend seem in the shortwave window channels. Based on the design of the instrument, trends within a group of channels should be the same. While the longwave and shortwave trends are less than the canonical 10 mK/yr, the larger trend in the shortwave channels could be an artifact of using the pre-launch determined calibration coefficients. This is currently under evaluation. The trend in (obs-calc) for the non-surface sounding channels, in

  5. Limits of Precipitation Detection from Microwave Radiometers and Sounders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munchak, S. J.; Skofronick-Jackson, G.; Johnson, B. T.

    2012-04-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission will unify and draw from numerous microwave conical scanning imaging radiometers and cross-track sounders, many of which already in operation, to provide near real-time precipitation estimates worldwide at 3-hour intervals. Some of these instruments were designed for primary purposes unrelated to precipitation remote sensing. Therefore it is worthwhile to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of each set of channels with respect to precipitation detection to fully understand their role in the GPM constellation. The GPM radiometer algorithm will use an observationally-based Bayesian retrieval with common databases of precipitation profiles for all sensors. Since these databases are still under development and will not be truly complete until the GPM core satellite has completed at least one year of dual-frequency radar observations, a screening method based upon retrieval of non-precipitation parameters related to the surface and atmospheric state is used in this study. A cost function representing the departure of modeled radiances from their observed values plus the departure of surface and atmospheric parameters from the TELSEM emissivity atlas and MERRA reanalysis is used as an indicator of precipitation. Using this method, two datasets are used to evaluate precipitation detection: One year of matched AMSR-E and AMSU-B/MHS overpasses with CloudSat used as validation globally; and SSMIS overpasses over the United States using the National Mosaic and QPE (NMQ) as validation. The Heidke Skill Score (HSS) is used as a metric to evaluate detection skill over different surfaces, seasons, and across different sensors. Non-frozen oceans give the highest HSS for all sensors, followed by bare land and coasts, then snow-covered land and sea ice. Negligible skill is present over ice sheets. Sounders tend to have higher skill than imagers over complex surfaces (coast, snow, and sea ice), whereas imagers have higher skill

  6. Validation of the radiometric stability of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aumann, H. H.; Elliott, D.; Strow, L. L.

    2012-09-01

    It has been widely accepted that an infrared sounder in low polar orbit is capable of producing climate quality data, if the spectral brightness temperatures have instrumental trends of less than 10 mK/yr. Achieving measurement stability at this level is not only very demanding of the design of the instrument, it is also pushes the state of art of measuring on orbit what stability is actually achieved. We discuss this using Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) L1B data collected between 2002 and 2011. We compare the L1B brightness temperature observed in cloud filtered night tropical ocean spectra (obs) to the brightness temperature calculated based on the known surface emissivity, temperature and water vapor profiles from the ECMWF ReAnalysis (ERA) and the growth rates of CO2 , N2O and Ozone. The trend in (obscalc) is a powerful tool for the evaluation of the stability of the 2378 AIRS channels. We divided the channels into seven classes: All channels which sound in the stratosphere (at pressure levels below 150 hPa), 14 um CO2 sounding, 4 um CO2 P-branch sounding, 4um CO2 R-branch sounding, water vapor sounding, shortwave surface sounding and longwave surface sounding. The peak in the weighting function at 1050 hPa separates sounding and surface channels. The boundary between shortwave and longwave is 5 μm. Except for the stratosphere sounding channels, the remaining six groups have (obs-calc) trends of less than 20 mK/yr. The longwave surface channels have trends of 2 mK/yr, significantly less than the 8 mK/yr trend seem in the shortwave window channels. Based on the design of the instrument, trends within a group of channels should be the same. While the longwave and shortwave trends are less than the canonical 10 mK/yr, the larger trend in the shortwave channels could be an artifact of using the pre-launch determined calibration coefficients. This is currently under evaluation. The trend in (obs-calc) for the non-surface sounding channels, in particular for

  7. TES/MLS Aura L2 Carbon Monoxide (CO) Nadir (TML2COS)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-04-06

    ... associated errors derived using TES & MLS spectral radiance measurements taken at nearest time and locations. Also provided are calculated ... kernels and a priori constraint vectors. News:  TES News Join TES News List Project ...

  8. TES/MLS Aura L2 Carbon Monoxide (CO) Nadir (TML2CO)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-04-05

    ... associated errors derived using TES & MLS spectral radiance measurements taken at nearest time and locations. Also provided are calculated ... kernels and a priori constraint vectors. News:  TES News Join TES News List Project ...

  9. TES observations of the interannual variability of PAN over Northern Eurasia and the relationship to springtime fires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Liye; Fischer, Emily V.; Payne, Vivienne H.; Worden, John R.; Jiang, Zhe

    2015-09-01

    Peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) plays an important role in atmospheric chemistry through its impact on remote oxidant and nitrogen budgets. PAN is formed rapidly in boreal fire plumes through the oxidation of short-lived volatile organic compounds in the presence of nitrogen oxide radicals. Here we present new satellite observations of PAN from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) over northern Eurasia for April 2006-2010. We observe large interannual variability in TES PAN observations, and we show that fires are one source of this variability using (1) Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer Mean Fire Radiative Power observations and (2) Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory backward trajectories. We also show that cold springtime temperatures and enhanced vertical mixing in the lower free troposphere over northeastern Eurasia likely played a role in the detection of PAN from TES in April 2006 in this region.

  10. Reconciling the MOLA, TES, and Neutron Observations of the North Polar CO2 Mass Budget on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haberle, Robert M.; Mattingly, B.; Titus, T. N.

    2003-01-01

    There are now three independent observations of the CO2 polar cap mass budget of Mars' north polar cap. The first is based elevation changes detected by the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) on the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS). The second is based on MGS Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) broadband observations of the solar and infrared radiation fields at the top of the atmosphere. The third is based on neutron counts measured by the neutron spectrometer (NS) on Odyssey. If one assumes a cap density of 910 kg/cu m, then the peak mass loading poleward of 85 N inferred from the MOLA data is approx. 1090 kg/sq m, which compares to approx. 1150 kg/sq m inferred from TES for the same region, and 700 kg/sq m from the NS data. TES and MOLA are in good agreement, but are about 60% higher than the NS data. Is there a way to reconcile these discrepancies?

  11. Development and evaluation of a sensitive and specific assay for diagnosis of human toxocariasis by use of three recombinant antigens (TES-26, TES-30USM, and TES-120).

    PubMed

    Mohamad, Suharni; Azmi, Norhaida Che; Noordin, Rahmah

    2009-06-01

    Diagnosis of human toxocariasis currently relies on serologic tests that use Toxocara excretory-secretory (TES) antigen to detect immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies to the larvae. In general, however, these assays do not have adequate specificity for use in countries in which other soil-transmitted helminths are endemic. The use of recombinant antigens in these assays, however, is promising for improving the specificity of the diagnosis of toxocariasis. Toward this goal, we developed an IgG4 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) involving three recombinant antigens: rTES-30USM (previously produced), rTES-26, and rTES-120. The latter two antigens were produced by reverse transcription-PCR cloning; subcloned into glutathione S-transferase (GST)-tagged and His-tagged prokaryotic expression vectors, respectively; and expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant proteins were subsequently purified by affinity chromatography using GST and His-Trap resins. The diagnostic potential of each purified recombinant antigen was tested with various immunoglobulin classes (IgG, IgM, and IgE) and IgG subclasses. The IgG4 ELISA was determined to have the highest specificity and was further evaluated using a panel of serum samples. The rTES-26 IgG4 ELISA showed 80.0% (24/30 samples positive) sensitivity, and both the rTES-30USM IgG4 ELISA and rTES-120 IgG4 ELISA had 93.0% (28/30) sensitivity. Combined use of rTES-120 and rTES-30 IgG4 ELISA for the diagnosis of toxocariasis provided 100% sensitivity. The specificities of rTES-26, rTES-30USM, and rTES-120 antigens were 96.2%, 93.9%, and 92.0%, respectively. These results indicate that the development of a diagnostic test using the three recombinant antigens will allow for more-accurate detection of toxocariasis.

  12. Work of PZT ceramics sounder for sound source artificial larynx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugio, Yuuichi; Kanetake, Ryota; Tanaka, Akimitsu; Ooe, Katsutoshi

    2007-04-01

    We aim to develop the easy-to-use artificial larynx with high tone quality. We focus on using a PZT ceramics sounder as its sound source, because it is small size, low power consumption, and harmless to humans. But conventional PZT ceramics sounder have the problem that it cannot generate an enough sound in the low frequency range, thus they cannot be used for artificial larynx. Then, we aim to develop the PZT ceramics sounder which can generate enough volume in the low frequency range. If we can lower the resonance frequency of the sounder, it can generate low pitch sound easily. Therefore I created the new diaphragm with low resonance frequency. In addition, we could obtain the high amplitude by changing method of driving. This time, we report on the characteristic comparison of this new PZT ceramics sounder and conventional one. Furthermore, for this new one, we analyzed the best alignment of PZT ceramics and the shape of the diaphragm to obtain low resonance frequency and big amplitude. In fact we analyzed the optimization of the structure. The analysis is done by computer simulation of ANSYS and Laser Doppler Vibrometer. In the future, we will add intonation to the generated sound by input wave form which is developed concurrently, and implant the sounder inside of the body by the method of fixing metal to biomolecule which is done too. And so high tone quality and convenient artificial larynx will be completed.

  13. Phase-change composites TES for nickel-hydrogen batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knowles, Timothy R.; Meyer, Richard A.

    1993-01-01

    Viewgraphs of a discussion on phase-change composites thermal energy storage (TES) for nickel-hydrogen batteries are presented. Topics covered include Ni-H2 thermal control problems; passive thermal control with TES; phase-change composites (PCC); candidate materials; design options; fabrication and freeze-melt cycling; thermal modeling; system benefits; and applications.

  14. Determination of Net Martian Polar Dust Flux from MGS-TES Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackmon, M. A.; Murphy, J. R.

    2003-01-01

    Using atmospheric dust abundance and atmospheric temperature observation data from the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) on board the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS), the net flux of dust into and out of the Martian polar regions will be examined. Mars polar regions possess layered terrain , believed to be comprised of a mixture of ice and dust, with the different layers possibly representing different past climate regimes. These changes in climate may reflect changes in the deposition of dust and volatiles through impacts, volcanism, changes in resources of ice and dust, and response to Milankovitch type cycles (changes in eccentricity of orbit, obliquity and precession of axis). Understanding how rapidly such layers can be generated is an important element to understanding Mars climate history. This study uses the observed vertical temperature data and dust content measurements from TES to analyze the sign (gain or loss) of dust at high latitudes.

  15. The geostationary remote infrared pollution sounder (GRIPS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloom, H.; Dickerson, Russell; Schoeberl, M.; Gordley, L. L.; Marshall, B. T.; McHugh, M.; Spackman, R.; Fish, C.; Kim, J.

    2012-11-01

    Climate change and air quality are the most pressing environmental issues of the 21st century. Despite decades of research, the sources and sinks of key greenhouse gases remain highly uncertain [IPCC, 2007] making atmospheric composition predictions difficult. The Geostationary Remote Infrared Pollution Sounder (GRIPS) will measure carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon monoxide (CO), methane (CH4), and nitrous oxide (N2O) with unprecedented precision to reduce substantially this uncertainty. The GRIPS instrument uses gas filter correlation radiometry (GFCR) to detect reflected and thermal IR radiation from geostationary orbit. GRIPS is designed to haves sensitivity down to the Earth's surface at ~8 km nadir resolution. GRIPS can also resolve CO2, CO, and CH4 anomalies in the planetary boundary layer and the free troposphere to quantify lofting, diurnal variations and long-range transport. With repeated measurements throughout the day GRIPS can maximize the number of cloud free measurements determining biogenic and anthropogenic sources, sinks, and fluxes. Finally, the GFCR technique is, to first order, insensitive to aerosols interference. GRIPS is highly complementary to the Orbiting Carbon Observatory, OCO-2, and other existing and planned missions.

  16. GRIPS - The Geostationary Remote Infrared Pollution Sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickerson, R. R.; Schoeberl, M. R.; Gordley, L. L.; McHugh, M. J.; Thompson, A. M.; Burrows, J. P.; Zeng, N.; Marshall, B. T.; Fish, C. S.; Spackman, J. R.; Kim, J.; Park, R.; Warner, J. X.; Bhartia, P. K.; Kollonige, D. E.

    2012-12-01

    Climate change and air quality are the most pressing environmental issues of the 21st century - for America and for the world as a whole. Despite decades of research, the sources and sinks of key greenhouse gases and other pollutants remain highly uncertain making atmospheric composition predictions difficult. The Geostationary Remote Infrared Pollution Sounder (GRIPS) will measure carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon monoxide (CO), and methane (CH4). By using measurements of nitrous oxide (N2O) and the O2 A-band to help correct for clouds and aerosols, GRIPS will achieve unprecedented precision. Together these gases account for about 85% of all climate forcing and they impact atmospheric ozone (O3). GRIPS, employing gas-filter correlation radiometry, uses the target gases themselves in place of dispersive elements to achieve outstanding throughput, sensitivity, and specificity. Because it uses a combination of reflected and thermal IR, GRIPS will detect trace gas concentrations right down to the Earth's surface. When flown in parallel to a UV/VIS sensor such as GEMS on GEO-KOMPSAT-2B over East Asia or the Sentinel 4 on MTG over Europe/Africa, the combination offers powerful finger-printing capabilities to distinguish and quantify diverse pollution sources such as electricity generation, biomass burning, and motor vehicles. From geostationary orbit, GRIPS will be able to focus on important targets to quantify sources, net flux, diurnal cycles, and long-range transport of these key components in the Earth's radiative balance and air quality.

  17. GRIPS - The Geostationary Remote Infrared Pollution Sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spackman, Ryan; Dickerson, Russell; Schoeberl, Mark; Bloom, Hal; Gordley, Larry; McHugh, Martin; Thompson, Anne; Burrows, John; Zeng, Ning; Marshall, Tom; Fish, Chad; Kim, Jhoon; Park, Rokjin; Warner, Juying; Bhartia, Pawan; Kollonige, Debra

    2013-04-01

    Climate change and air quality are the most pressing environmental issues of the 21st century for America and for the world as a whole. Despite decades of research, the sources and sinks of key greenhouse gases and other pollutants remain highly uncertain making atmospheric composition predictions difficult. The Geostationary Remote Infrared Pollution Sounder (GRIPS) will measure carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon monoxide (CO), and methane (CH4). By using measurements of nitrous oxide (N2O) and the O2 A-band to help correct for clouds and aerosols, GRIPS will achieve unprecedented precision. Together these gases account for about 85% of all climate forcing and they impact atmospheric ozone (O3). GRIPS, employing gas-filter correlation radiometry, uses the target gases themselves in place of dispersive elements to achieve outstanding throughput, sensitivity, and specificity. Because it uses a combination of reflected and thermal IR, GRIPS will detect trace gas concentrations right down to the Earth's surface. When flown in parallel to a UV/VIS sensor such as GEMS on GEO-KOMPSAT-2B over East Asia or the Sentinel 4 on MTG over Europe/Africa, the combination offers powerful finger-printing capabilities to distinguish and quantify diverse pollution sources such as electricity generation, biomass burning, and motor vehicles. From geostationary orbit, GRIPS will be able to focus on important targets to quantify sources, net flux, diurnal cycles, and long-range transport of these key components in the Earth's radiative balance and air quality.

  18. Status of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Christopher R.

    1996-12-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) is being developed for the NASA Earth Observing System (EOS) program with a scheduled launch on the first post meridian platform in the year 2000. AIRS is designed to provide both new and more accurate data about the atmosphere, land, and oceans for application to climate studies and weather prediction. Among the important parameters to be derived from AIRS observations are atmospheric temperature profiles with an average accuracy of 1 K in 1 kilometer layers in the troposphere and surface temperatures with an average accuracy of 0.5 K. The AIRS measurement technique is based on very sensitive passive infrared remote sensing using a precisely calibrated, high resolution grating spectrometer operating in the 3.7 micrometers to 15.4 micrometers region. The instrument concept uses passively cooled multi-aperture eschelle array spectrometer approach in combination with advanced state-of-the-art focal plane and cryogenic refrigerator technology to achieve unparalleled performance capability in a practical long life configuration. AIRS is a key component of NASA's global change research program, and is expected to play an important role in the converged National Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellite System, now under study. This paper provides a brief description of the AIRS instrument design and focuses on the current development status of hardware currently being fabricated for the engineering model. In particular, the paper will address the status and expected performance of the AIRS focal plane assembly, the cryocooler, and components of the optical spectrometer.

  19. Planetary protection for Europa radar sounder antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaron, Kim M.; Moussessian, Alina; Newlin, Laura E.; Willis, Paul B.; Chen, Fei; Harcke, Leif J.; Chapin, Elaine; Jun, Insoo; Gim, Yonggyu; McEachen, Michael; Allen, Scotty; Kirchner, Donald; Blankenship, Donald

    2016-05-01

    The potential for habitability puts stringent requirements on planetary protection for a mission to Europa. A long-wavelength radar sounder with a large antenna is one of the proposed instruments for a future Europa mission. The size and construction of radar sounding antennas make the usual methods of meeting planetary protection requirements challenging. This paper discusses a viable planetary protection scheme for an antenna optimized for Europa radar sounding. The preferred methodology for this antenna is exposure to 100 kGy (10 Mrad) in water of gamma radiation using a Cobalt-60 source for both bulk and surface sterilization and exposure to vapor hydrogen peroxide for surface treatment for possible recontamination due to subsequent handling. For the boom-supported antenna design, selected tests were performed to confirm the suitability of these treatment methods. A portion of a coilable boom residual from an earlier mission was irradiated and its deployment repeatability confirmed with no degradation. Elasticity was measured of several fiberglass samples using a four-point bending test to confirm that there was no degradation due to radiation exposure. Vapor hydrogen peroxide treatment was applied to the silver-coated braid used as the antenna radiating element as it was the material most likely to be susceptible to oxidative attack under the treatment conditions. There was no discernable effect. These tests confirm that the radar sounding antenna for a Europa mission should be able tolerate the proposed sterilization methods.

  20. Submillimeter Planetary Atmospheric Chemistry Exploration Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlecht, Erich T.; Allen, Mark A.; Gill, John J.; Choonsup, Lee; Lin, Robert H.; Sin, Seth; Mehdi, Imran; Siegel, Peter H.; Maestrini, Alain

    2013-01-01

    Planetary Atmospheric Chemistry Exploration Sounder (SPACES), a high-sensitivity laboratory breadboard for a spectrometer targeted at orbital planetary atmospheric analysis. The frequency range is 520 to 590 GHz, with a target noise temperature sensitivity of 2,500 K for detecting water, sulfur compounds, carbon compounds, and other atmospheric constituents. SPACES is a prototype for a powerful tool for the exploration of the chemistry and dynamics of any planetary atmosphere. It is fundamentally a single-pixel receiver for spectral signals emitted by the relevant constituents, intended to be fed by a fixed or movable telescope/antenna. Its front-end sensor translates the received signal down to the 100-MHz range where it can be digitized and the data transferred to a spectrum analyzer for processing, spectrum generation, and accumulation. The individual microwave and submillimeter wave components (mixers, LO high-powered amplifiers, and multipliers) of SPACES were developed in cooperation with other programs, although with this type of instrument in mind. Compared to previous planetary and Earth science instruments, its broad bandwidth (approx. =.13%) and rapid tunability (approx. =.10 ms) are new developments only made possible recently by the advancement in submillimeter circuit design and processing at JPL.

  1. Cross-validation of IASI/MetOp derived tropospheric δD with TES and ground-based FTIR observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacour, J.-L.; Clarisse, L.; Worden, J.; Schneider, M.; Barthlott, S.; Hase, F.; Risi, C.; Clerbaux, C.; Hurtmans, D.; Coheur, P.-F.

    2015-03-01

    The Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) flying onboard MetOpA and MetOpB is able to capture fine isotopic variations of the HDO to H2O ratio (δD) in the troposphere. Such observations at the high spatio-temporal resolution of the sounder are of great interest to improve our understanding of the mechanisms controlling humidity in the troposphere. In this study we aim to empirically assess the validity of our error estimation previously evaluated theoretically. To achieve this, we compare IASI δD retrieved profiles with other available profiles of δD, from the TES infrared sounder onboard AURA and from three ground-based FTIR stations produced within the MUSICA project: the NDACC (Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change) sites Kiruna and Izaña, and the TCCON site Karlsruhe, which in addition to near-infrared TCCON spectra also records mid-infrared spectra. We describe the achievable level of agreement between the different retrievals and show that these theoretical errors are in good agreement with empirical differences. The comparisons are made at different locations from tropical to Arctic latitudes, above sea and above land. Generally IASI and TES are similarly sensitive to δD in the free troposphere which allows one to compare their measurements directly. At tropical latitudes where IASI's sensitivity is lower than that of TES, we show that the agreement improves when taking into account the sensitivity of IASI in the TES retrieval. For the comparison IASI-FTIR only direct comparisons are performed because the sensitivity profiles of the two observing systems do not allow to take into account their differences of sensitivity. We identify a quasi negligible bias in the free troposphere (-3‰) between IASI retrieved δD with the TES, which are bias corrected, but important with the ground-based FTIR reaching -47‰. We also suggest that model-satellite observation comparisons could be optimized with IASI thanks to its high

  2. Successful Mars remote sensors, MO THEMIS and MER Mini-TES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silverman, Steven; Christensen, Phil

    2006-10-01

    This paper describes results of the calibration of the miniature thermal emission spectrometer (Mini-TES) and the thermal emission imaging system (THEMIS) built by Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing (SBRS) under contract to Arizona State University (ASU). This paper also serves as an update to an earlier paper (Silverman et al., 2003) for mission description and instrument designs (Schueler et al., 2003). A major goal of the Mars exploration program is to help determine whether life ever existed on Mars via detailed in situ studies and surface sample return. It is essential to identify landing sites with the highest probability of containing samples indicative of early pre-biotic or biotic environments. Of particular interest are aqueous and/or hydrothermal environments in which life could have existed, or regions of current near-surface water or heat sources [Exobiology_Working_Group, 1995, An Exobiological Strategy for Mars Exploration, NASA Headquarters]. The search requires detailed geologic mapping and accurate interpretations of site composition and history in a global context. THEMIS and Mini-TES were designed to do this and builds upon a wealth of data from previous experiments. Previous experiments include the Mariner 6/7 Mars infrared radiometer (MIR) and infrared spectrometer [G.C. Pimentel, P.B. Forney, K.C. Herr, Evidence about hydrate and solid water in the martian surface from the 1969 Mariner infrared spectrometer, Journal of Geophysical Research 79(11) (1974) 1623 1634], the Mariner 9 infrared interferometer spectrometer (IRIS) [B. Conrath, R. Curran, R. Hanel, V. Kunde, W. Maguire, J. Pearl, J. Pirraglia, J. Walker, Atmospheric and surface properties of Mars obtained by infrared spectroscopy on Mariner 9, Journal of Geophysical Research 78 (1973) 4267 4278], the Viking infrared thermal mapper (IRTM) [H.H. Kieffer, T.Z. Martin, A.R. Peterfreund, B.M. Jakosky, E.D. Miner, F.D. Palluconi, Thermal and albedo mapping of Mars during the Viking

  3. Cross-track infrared sounder FPA performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Souza, Arvind I.; Dawson, Larry C.; Marsh, Stacy; Willis, Richard W.; Wijewarnasuriya, Priyalal S.; DeWames, Roger E.; Arias, Jose M.; Bajaj, Jagmohan; Hildebrandt, Gernot; Moore, Fergus E.

    2001-10-01

    The National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS) Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) is an interferometric sensor that measures earth radiances at high spectral resolution, using the data to provide pressure, temperature and moisture profiles of the atmosphere. The pressure, temperature and moisture sounding data are used in weather prediction models that track storms, predict levels of precipitation etc. The CrIS instrument contains SWIR ((λc approximately 5 μm at 98K), MWIR (λc approximately 9 μm at 98K) LWIR (λc approximately 16 μm at 81K) Focal Plane Array (FPA) modules. A critical CrIS design selection was the use of photovoltaic (PV) detectors in all three spectral bands. PV detectors have the important benefits of high sensitivity and linearity. Each FPA modules consists of nine large (1000 μm diameter) photovoltaic detectors with accompanying cold preamplifiers. This paper describes the performance for all the modules forming the CrIS Detector Preamplifier Module (DPM). Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) is used to grow the appropriate bandgap n-type Hg1-xCdxTe on lattice matched CdZnTe. SWIR, MWIR and LWIR 1000 μm diameter detectors have been manufactured using the Lateral Collection Diode (LCD) architecture. Custom pre-amplifiers have been designed to interface with the large SWIR, MWIR and LWIR detectors. The operating temperature is above 78K, permitting the use of passive radiators in spacecraft to cool the detectors. Recently fabricated 1000 micrometers diameter photovoltaic detectors have the measured performance parameters listed in the Table below. Expected D* performance from the detector/pre-amplifier models are also listed in the table. The D* values are calculated at the CrIS program peak wavelength specified for each spectral band.

  4. Using New Observations from TES to Evaluate the Contribution of Fires to Peroxyacetyl Nitrate (PAN) over North America and Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, E. V.; Payne, V.; Zhu, L.; Worden, J. R.; Jiang, Z.; Kulawik, S. S.; Brey, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    Neither the mechanisms or the magnitude of the contribution of fires to ozone are completely understood, but peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) chemistry is certainly part of the puzzle. In situ observations show that PAN is formed rapidly in fire plumes, and its eventual decomposition can provide an important NOx redistribution pathway capable of sustaining efficient ozone production under the right conditions. Satellite measurements of PAN from the Aura Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) offer a new opportunity to look at when and where elevated PAN abundances in the troposphere are due to fires, placing new constraints on our understanding of the air quality impacts of smoke plumes. We will present an overview of what we have learned about fires and PAN from TES, and what types of analyses have been required to pull information out of this emerging dataset. We will focus on TES retrievals of PAN over Asia and North America collected between 2005 and 2011 during spring and summer months. We have found that fires are a major source of the PAN observed by TES in both regions, but there is significant observed interannual variability driven by a combination of emissions and dynamics.

  5. Hyperspectral Thermal Emission Spectrometer: Engineering Flight Campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, William R.; Hook, Simon J.; Shoen, Steven S.; Eng, Bjorn T.

    2013-01-01

    The Hyperspectral Thermal Emission Spectrometer (HyTES) successfully completed its first set of engineering test flights. HyTES was developed in support of the Hyperspectral Infrared Imager (HyspIRI). HyspIRI is one of the Tier II Decadal Survey missions. HyTES currently provides both high spectral resolution (17 nm) and high spatial resolution (2-5m) data in the thermal infrared (7.5-12 micron) part of the electromagnetic spectrum. HyTES data will be used to help determine the optimum band positions for the HyspIRI Thermal Infrared (TIR) sensor and provide antecedent data for HyspIRI related studies.

  6. On-Orbit performance of the TES pulse tube cryocooler system and the instrument - Six years in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Jose Israel; Na-Nakornpanom, Arthur

    2012-06-01

    The Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) instrument pulse tube cryocoolers began operation 36 days after launch of the NASA Earth Observing System (EOS) Aura spacecraft on July 15, 2004. TES is designed with four infrared Mercury Cadmium Telluride focal plane arrays in two separate housings cooled by a pair of Northrup Grumman Aerospace Systems (NGAS) single-stage pulse tube cryocoolers. The instrument also makes use of a two-stage passive cooler to cool the optical bench. The instrument is a high-resolution infrared imaging Fourier transform spectrometer with 3.3-15.4 micron spectral coverage. After four weeks of outgassing, the instrument optical bench and focal planes were cooled to their operating temperatures to begin science operations. During the early months of the mission, ice contamination of the cryogenic surfaces including the focal planes led to increased cryocooler loads and the need for periodic decontamination cycles. After a highly successful 5 years of continuous in-space operations, TES was granted a 2 year extension. This paper reports on the TES cryogenic system performance including the two-stage passive cooler. After a brief overview of the cryogenic design, the paper presents detailed data on the highly successful space operation of the pulse tube cryocoolers and instrument thermal design over the past six years since the original turn-on in 2004. The data shows the cryogenic contamination decreased substantially to where decontamination cycles are now performed every six months. The cooler stroke required for constant-temperature operation has not increased indicating nearconstant cooler efficiency and the instrument's thermal design has also provided a nearly constant heat rejection sink. At this time TES continues to operate in space providing important Earth science data. KEYWORDS: TES, EOS, Aura, cryocooler

  7. Latest developments of geostationary microwave sounder technologies for NOAA's mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajpai, Shyam; Madden, Michael; Chu, Donald; Yapur, Martin

    2006-12-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) have been flying microwave sounders since 1975 on Polar Operational Environmental Satellites (POES). Microwave observations have made significant contributions to the understanding of the atmosphere and earth surface. This has helped in improving weather and storm tracking forecasts. However, NOAA's Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) have microwave requirements that can not be met due to the unavailability of proven technologies. Several studies of a Geostationary Microwave Sounder (GMS) have been conducted. Among those, are the Geostationary Microwave Sounder (GEM) that uses a mechanically steered solid dish antenna and the Geostationary Synthetic Thinned Aperture Radiometer (GeoSTAR) that utilizes a sparse aperture array. Both designs take advantage of the latest developments in sensor technology. NASA/Jet Propulsion Lab (JPL) has recently successfully built and tested a prototype ground-based GeoSTAR at 50 GHz frequency with promising test results. Current GOES IR Sounders are limited to cloud top observations. Therefore, a sounding suite of IR and Microwave should be able to provide observations under clear as well as cloudy conditions all the time. This paper presents the results of the Geostationary Microwave Sounder studies, user requirements, frequencies, technologies, limitations, and implementation strategies.

  8. The UARS and EOS Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) Experiments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waters, J. W.; Read, W. G.; Froidevaux, L.; Jarnot, R. F.; Cofield, R. E.; Flower, D. A.; Lau, G. K.; Pickett, H. M.; Santee, M. L.; Wu, D. L.; Boyles, M. A.; Burke, J. R.; Lay, R. R.; Loo, M. S.; Livesey, N. J.; Lungu, T. A.; Manney, G. L.; Nakamura, L. L.;  Perun, V. S.;  Ridenoure, B. P.;  Shippony, Z.;  Siegel, P. H.;  Thurstans, R. P.;  Harwood, R. S.;  Pumphrey, H. C.;  Filipiak, M. J.

    1999-01-01

    The Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) experiments obtain measurements of atmospheric composition, temperature, and pressure by observations of millimeter- and submillimeter-wavelength thermal emission as the instrument field of view is scanned through the atmospheric limb. Features of the measurement technique include the ability to measure many atmospheric gases as well as temperature and pressure, to obtain measurements even in the presence of dense aerosol and cirrus, and to provide near-global coverage on a daily basis at all times of day and night from an orbiting platform. The composition measurements are relatively insensitive to uncertainties in atmospheric temperature. An accurate spectroscopic database is available, and the instrument calibration is also very accurate and stable. The first MLS experiment in space, launched on the (NASA) Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) in September 1991, was designed primarily to measure stratospheric profiles of ClO, O3, H2O, and atmospheric pressure as a vertical reference. Global measurement of ClO, the predominant radical in chlorine destruction of ozone, was an especially important objective of UARS MLS. All objectives of UARS MLS have been accomplished and additional geophysical products beyond those for which the experiment was designed have been obtained, including measurement of upper-tropospheric water vapor, which is important for climate change studies. A follow-on MLS experiment is being developed for NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) and is scheduled to be launched on the EOS CHEMISTRY platform in late 2002. EOS MLS is designed for many stratospheric measurements, including HOx radicals, which could not be measured by UARS because adequate technology was not available, and better and more extensive upper-tropospheric and lower-stratospheric measurements.

  9. Validation of UARS Microwave Limb Sounder temperature and pressure measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fishbein, E. F.; Cofield, R. E.; Froidevaux, L.; Jarnot, R. F.; Lungu, T.; Read, W. G.; Shippony, Z.; Waters, J. W.; McDermid, I. S.; McGee, T. J.; Singh, U.; Gross, M.; Hauchecorne, A.; Keckhut, P.; Gelman, M. E.; Nagatani, R. M.

    1996-04-01

    The accuracy and precision of the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) atmospheric temperature and tangent-point pressure measurements are described. Temperatures and tangent-point pressure (atmospheric pressure at the tangent height of the field of view boresight) are retrieved from a 15-channel 63-GHz radiometer measuring O2 microwave emissions from the stratosphere and mesosphere. The Version 3 data (first public release) contains scientifically useful temperatures from 22 to 0.46 hPa. Accuracy estimates are based on instrument performance, spectroscopic uncertainty and retrieval numerics, and range from 2.1 K at 22 hPa to 4.8 K at 0.46 hPa for temperature and from 200 m (equivalent log pressure) at 10 hPa to 300 m at 0.1 hPa. Temperature accuracy is limited mainly by uncertainty in instrument characterization, and tangent-point pressure accuracy is limited mainly by the accuracy of spectroscopic parameters. Precisions are around 1 K and 100 m. Comparisons are presented among temperatures from MLS, the National Meteorological Center (NMC) stratospheric analysis and lidar stations at Table Mountain, California, Observatory of Haute Provence (OHP), France, and Goddard Spaceflight Center, Maryland. MLS temperatures tend to be 1-2 K lower than NMC and lidar, but MLS is often 5 - 10 K lower than NMC in the winter at high latitudes, especially within the northern hemisphere vortex. Winter MLS and OHP (44°N) lidar temperatures generally agree and tend to be lower than NMC. Problems with Version 3 MLS temperatures and tangent-point pressures are identified, but the high precision of MLS radiances will allow improvements with better algorithms planned for the future.

  10. Validation of UARS Microwave Limb Sounder ozone measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froidevaux, L.; Read, W. G.; Lungu, T. A.; Cofield, R. E.; Fishbein, E. F.; Flower, D. A.; Jarnot, R. F.; Ridenoure, B. P.; Shippony, Z.; Waters, J. W.; Margitan, J. J.; McDermid, I. S.; Stachnik, R. A.; Peckham, G. E.; Braathen, G.; Deshler, T.; Fishman, J.; Hofmann, D. J.; Oltmans, S. J.

    1996-04-01

    This paper describes the validation of ozone data from the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS). The MLS ozone retrievals are obtained from the calibrated microwave radiances (emission spectra) in two separate bands, at frequencies near 205 and 183 GHz. Analyses described here focus on the MLS Version 3 data (the first set of files made publicly available). We describe results of simulations performed to assess the quality of the retrieval algorithms, in terms of both mixing ratio and radiance closure. From actual MLS observations, the 205-GHz ozone retrievals give better closure (smaller radiance residuals) than that from the 183-GHz measurements and should be considered more accurate from the calibration aspects. However, the 183-GHz data are less noise limited in the mesosphere and can provide the most useful scientific results in that region. We compare the retrieved 205-GHz ozone profiles in the middle-to lower stratosphere to ozonesonde measurements at a wide range of latitudes and seasons. Ground-based lidar data from Table Mountain, California, provide a good reference for comparisons at higher altitudes. Based on these analyses, comparisons with balloon-borne measurements and others, as well as a detailed budget of estimated uncertainties, MLS results appear to be generally of high quality, with some biases worth mentioning. Results for the lowermost stratosphere (˜50 to 100 hPa) are still in need of improvement. A set of estimated precision and accuracy values is derived for the MLS ozone data sets. We also comment on recent updates in the retrieval algorithms and their impact on ozone values.

  11. Global dust infrared aerosol properties retrieved using hyperspectral sounders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capelle, Virginie; Chédin, alain; Pondrom, Marc; Pierangelo, Clémence; Armante, Raymond; Crevoisier, Cyril; Crépeau, Laurent; Scott, Noëlle

    2015-04-01

    Observations from infrared hyperspectral sounders, here IASI and AIRS, are interpreted in terms of dust aerosol properties (AOD and mean altitude). The method is based on a "Look-Up-Table" (LUT) approach, where all radiative transfer computation is performed once for all and "off-line", for a large selection of atmospheric situations, of observing conditions, of surface characteristics (in particular the surface emissivity and temperature), and different aerosol refractive index models. The inversion scheme follows two main steps: first, determination of the observed atmospheric thermodynamic situation, second, simultaneous retrieval of the 10µm coarse-mode AOD and of the mean altitude. The method is here applied over sea and over land, at daily scale daytime and nighttime, and at the satellite pixel resolution (12 km at nadir). The geographical study area studied includes the northern tropics from west Atlantic to the Arabian peninsula and Indian ocean, and the Mediterranean basin, all of them characterized by strong, regular dust events. A special focus is given to the hourly variation of aerosol properties within a day. In this context, both IASI overpasses are processed, providing two measurements at 9:30AM and 9:30PM (equator local time) each day. First results obtained from AIRS observations, made at 1:30 AM and PM, open the way to the analysis of the aerosol diurnal cycle. For the AOD, comparisons are made with AERONET ground-based data , when available, in order to 1) evaluate our results, and 2) show the importance of a better knowledge of the aerosol diurnal cycle, especially close to the sources. Mean aerosol layer altitude obtained from IASI is compared at local scale with the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP/CALIPSO) aerosol altitude.

  12. Validation of UARS Microwave Limb Sounder Ozone Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Froidevaux, L.; Read, W. G.; Lungu, T. A.; Cofield, R. E.; Fishbein, E. F.; Flower, D. A.; Jarnot, R. F.; Ridenoure, B. P.; Shippony, Z.; Waters, J. W.; Margitan, J. J.; McDermid, I. S.; Stachnik, R. A.; Peckham, G. E.; Braathen, G.; Deshler, T.; Fishman, J.; Hofmann, D. J.; Oltmans, S. J.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes the validation of ozone data from the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS). The MLS ozone retrievals are obtained from the calibrated microwave radiances (emission spectra) in two separate bands, at frequencies near 205 and 183 GHz. Analyses described here focus on the MLS Version 3 data (the first set of files made publicly available). We describe results of simulations performed to assess the quality of the retrieval algorithms, in terms of both mixing ratio and radiance closure. From actual MLS observations, the 205-GHz ozone retrievals give better closure (smaller radiance residuals) than that from the 183-GHz measurements and should be considered more accurate from the calibration aspects. However, the 183-GHz data are less noise limited in the mesosphere and can provide the most useful scientific results in that region. We compare the retrieved 205-GHz ozone profiles in the middle-to lower stratosphere to ozonesonde measurements at a wide range of latitudes and seasons. Ground-based lidar data from Table Mountain, California, provide a good reference for comparisons at higher altitudes. Based on these analyses, comparisons with balloon-borne measurements and others, as well as a detailed budget of estimated uncertainties, MLS results appear to be generally of high quality, with some biases worth mentioning. Results for the lowermost stratosphere (approx. 50 to 100 bPa) are still in need of improvement. A set of estimated precision and accuracy values is derived for the MLS ozone data sets. We also comment on recent updates in the retrieval algorithms and their impact on ozone values.

  13. Validation of UARS Microwave Limb Sounder Temperature and Pressure Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishbein, E. F.; Cofield, R. E.; Froidevaux, L.; Jarnot, R. F.; Lungu, T.; Read, W. G.; Shippony, Z.; Waters, J. W.; McDermid, I. S.; McGee, T. J.; Singh, U.; Gross, M.; Hauchecorne, A.; Keckhut, P.; Gelman, M. E.; Nagatani, R. M.

    1996-01-01

    The accuracy and precision of the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) atmospheric temperature and tangent-point pressure measurements are described. Temperatures and tangent- point pressure (atmospheric pressure at the tangent height of the field of view boresight) are retrieved from a 15-channel 63-GHz radiometer measuring O2 microwave emissions from the stratosphere and mesosphere. The Version 3 data (first public release) contains scientifically useful temperatures from 22 to 0.46 hPa. Accuracy estimates are based on instrument performance, spectroscopic uncertainty and retrieval numerics, and range from 2.1 K at 22 hPa to 4.8 K at 0.46 hPa for temperature and from 200 m (equivalent log pressure) at 10 hPa to 300 m at 0.1 hPa. Temperature accuracy is limited mainly by uncertainty in instrument characterization, and tangent-point pressure accuracy is limited mainly by the accuracy of spectroscopic parameters. Precisions are around 1 K and 100 m. Comparisons are presented among temperatures from MLS, the National Meteorological Center (NMC) stratospheric analysis and lidar stations at Table Mountain, California, Observatory of Haute Provence (OHP), France, and Goddard Spaceflight Center, Maryland. MLS temperatures tend to be 1-2 K lower than NMC and lidar, but MLS is often 5 - 10 K lower than NMC in the winter at high latitudes, especially within the northern hemisphere vortex. Winter MLS and OHP (44 deg N) lidar temperatures generally agree and tend to be lower than NMC. Problems with Version 3 MLS temperatures and tangent-point pressures are identified, but the high precision of MLS radiances will allow improvements with better algorithms planned for the future.

  14. TES premapping data: Slab ice and snow flurries in the Martian north polar night

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Titus, T.N.; Kieffer, H.H.; Mullins, K.F.; Christensen, P.R.

    2001-01-01

    In the 1970s, Mariner and Viking spacecraft observations of the north polar region of Mars revealed polar brightness temperatures that were significantly below the expected kinetic temperatures for CO2 sublimation. For the past few decades, the scientific community has speculated as to the nature of these Martian polar cold spots. Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) thermal spectral data have shown these cold spots to result largely from fine-grained, CO2 and have constrained most of these cold spots to the surface (or near-surface). Cold spot formation is strongly dependent on topography, forming preferentially near craters and on polar slopes. TES data, combined with Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) cloud data, suggest atmospheric condensates form a small fraction of the observed cold spots. TES observations of spectra close to a blackbody indicate that another major component of the polar cap is slab CO2 ice; these spectrally bland regions commonly have a low albedo. The cause is uncertain but may result from most of the light being reflected toward the specular direction, from the slab ice being intrinsically dark, or from it being transparent. Regions of the cap where the difference between the brightness temperatures at 18 ??m (T18) and 25 ??m (T25) is less than 5?? are taken to indicate deposits of slab ice. Slab ice is the dominant component of the polar cap at latitudes outside of the polar night. Copyright 2001 by the American Geophysical Union.

  15. Water Ice Clouds in the Martian Atmosphere: A View from MGS TES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hale, A. S.; Tamppari, L. K.; Christensen, P. R.; Smith, M. D.; Bass, Deborah; Qu, Zheng; Pearl, J. C.

    2005-01-01

    We use the method of Tamppari et al. to map water ice clouds in the Martian atmosphere. This technique was originally developed to analyze the broadband Viking IRTM channels and we have now applied it to the TES data. To do this, the TES spectra are convolved to the IRTM bandshapes and spatial resolutions, enabling use of the same processing techniques as were used in Tamppari et al.. This retrieval technique relies on using the temperature difference recorded in the 20 micron and 11 micron IRTM bands (or IRTM convolved TES bands) to map cold water ice clouds above the warmer Martian surface. Careful removal of surface contributions to the observed radiance is therefore necessary, and we have used both older Viking-derived basemaps of the surface emissivity and albedo, and new MGS derived basemaps in order the explore any possible differences on cloud retrieval due to differences in surface contribution removal. These results will be presented in our poster. Our previous work has concentrated primarily on comparing MGS TES to Viking data; that work saw that large-scale cloud features, such as the aphelion cloud belt, are quite repeatable from year to year, though small scale behavior shows some variation. Comparison of Viking and MGS era cloud maps will be presented in our poster. In the current stage of our study, we have concentrated our efforts on close analysis of water ice cloud behavior in the northern summer of the three MGS mapping years on relatively small spatial scales, and present our results below. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  16. Evaluation of ACCMIP Outgoing Longwave Radiation from Tropospheric Ozone Using TES Satellite Observations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, Kevin W.; Shindell, Drew Todd; Worden, H. M.; Lamarque, J. F.; Young, P. J.; Stevenson, D. S.; Qu, Z.; delaTorre, M.; Bergmann, D.; Cameron-Smith, P. J.; Collins, W. J.; Doherty, R.; Dalsoren, S. B.; Faluvegi, G.; Folberth, G.; Horowitz, L. W.; Josse, B. M.; Lee, Y. H.; MacKenzie, I. A.; Myhre, G.; Nagashima, T.; Naik, V.; Strode, S. A.; Kulawik, S. S..; Worden, J. R.

    2013-01-01

    We use simultaneous observations of tropospheric ozone and outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) sensitivity to tropospheric ozone from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) to evaluate model tropospheric ozone and its effect on OLR simulated by a suite of chemistry-climate models that participated in the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP). The ensemble mean of ACCMIP models show a persistent but modest tropospheric ozone low bias (5-20 ppb) in the Southern Hemisphere (SH) and modest high bias (5-10 ppb) in the Northern Hemisphere (NH) relative to TES ozone for 2005-2010. These ozone biases have a significant impact on the OLR. Using TES instantaneous radiative kernels (IRK), we show that the ACCMIP ensemble mean tropospheric ozone low bias leads up to 120mW/ sq. m OLR high bias locally but zonally compensating errors reduce the global OLR high bias to 39+/- 41mW/ sq. m relative to TES data. We show that there is a correlation (Sq. R = 0.59) between the magnitude of the ACCMIP OLR bias and the deviation of the ACCMIP preindustrial to present day (1750-2010) ozone radiative forcing (RF) from the ensemble ozone RF mean. However, this correlation is driven primarily by models whose absolute OLR bias from tropospheric ozone exceeds 100mW/ sq. m. Removing these models leads to a mean ozone radiative forcing of 394+/- 42mW/ sq. m. The mean is about the same and the standard deviation is about 30% lower than an ensemble ozone RF of 384 +/- 60mW/ sq. m derived from 14 of the 16 ACCMIP models reported in a companion ACCMIP study. These results point towards a profitable direction of combining satellite observations and chemistry-climate model simulations to reduce uncertainty in ozone radiative forcing.

  17. TES/Aura L2 Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Nadir (TL2CO2N)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-01-30

    TES/Aura L2 Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Nadir (TL2CO2N) News:  TES News ... L2 Platform:  TES/Aura L2 Carbon Dioxide Spatial Coverage:  5.2 x 8.5 km nadir ... Subset Data: TES Order Tool Parameters:  Carbon Dioxide Order Data:  Reverb:   Order Data ...

  18. TES/Aura L2 Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Nadir (TL2CO2NS)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-01-30

    TES/Aura L2 Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Nadir (TL2CO2NS) News:  TES News ... L2 Platform:  TES/Aura L2 Carbon Dioxide Spatial Coverage:  5.3 x 8.5 km nadir ... Subset Data: TES Order Tool Parameters:  Carbon Dioxide Order Data:  Reverb:   Order Data ...

  19. TES/Aura L2 Ammonia (NH3) Nadir (TL2NH3N)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-01-30

    TES/Aura L2 Ammonia (NH3) Nadir (TL2NH3N) News:  TES News ... Level:  L2 Instrument:  TES/Aura L2 Ammonia Spatial Coverage:  5.3 x 8.5 km nadir ... Data: TES Order Tool Parameters:  Ammonia Order Data:  Reverb:   Order Data ...

  20. TES/Aura L3 Ammonia (NH3) Daily (TL3NH3D)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-08-28

    TES/Aura L3 Ammonia (NH3) Daily (TL3NH3D) News:  TES News ... Level:  L3 Instrument:  TES/Aura L3 Ammonia Spatial Coverage:  5.3 x 8.5 km Spatial ... Data: TES Order Tool Parameters:  Ammonia Order Data:  Reverb:   Order Data ...

  1. TES/Aura L2 Ammonia (NH3) Nadir (TL2NH3NS)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-01-30

    TES/Aura L2 Ammonia (NH3) Nadir (TL2NH3NS) News:  TES News ... Level:  L2 Platform:  TES/Aura L2 Ammonia Spatial Coverage:  5.3 x 8.5 km nadir ... Data: TES Order Tool Parameters:  Ammonia Order Data:  Reverb:   Order Data ...

  2. Spectral Resolution and Coverage Impact on Advanced Sounder Information Content

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larar, Allen M.; Liu, Xu; Zhou, Daniel K.; Smith, William L.

    2010-01-01

    Advanced satellite sensors are tasked with improving global measurements of the Earth s atmosphere, clouds, and surface to enable enhancements in weather prediction, climate monitoring capability, and environmental change detection. Achieving such measurement improvements requires instrument system advancements. This presentation focuses on the impact of spectral resolution and coverage changes on remote sensing system information content, with a specific emphasis on thermodynamic state and trace species variables obtainable from advanced atmospheric sounders such as the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) and Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) systems on the MetOp and NPP/NPOESS series of satellites. Key words: remote sensing, advanced sounders, information content, IASI, CrIS

  3. Mineralogical characterization of Mars Science Laboratory candidate landing sites from THEMIS and TES data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, A. Deanne; Bandfield, Joshua L.

    2009-10-01

    Data from the Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) and the Mars Odyssey Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) instruments are used to assess the mineralogic and dust cover characteristics of landing regions proposed for the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission. Candidate regions examined in this study are Eberswalde crater, Gale crater, Holden crater, Mawrth Vallis, Miyamoto crater, Nili Fossae Trough, and south Meridiani Planum. Compositional units identified in each region from TES and THEMIS data are distinguished by variations in hematite, olivine, pyroxene and high-silica phase abundance, whereas no units are distinguished by elevated phyllosilicate or sulfate abundance. Though phyllosilicate minerals have been identified in all sites using near-infrared observations, these minerals are not unambiguously detected using either TES spectral index or deconvolution analysis methods. For some of the sites, small phyllosilicate outcrop sizes relative to the TES field of view likely hinder phyllosilicate mineral detection. Porous texture and/or small particle size (<˜60 μm) associated with the phyllosilicate-bearing surfaces may also contribute to non-detections in the thermal infrared data sets, in some areas. However, in Mawrth Vallis and Nili Fossae, low phyllosilicate abundance (<10-20 areal %, depending on the phyllosilicate composition) is the most likely explanation for non-detection. TES data over Mawrth Vallis indicate that phyllosilicate-bearing surfaces also contain significant concentrations (>15%, possibly up to ˜40%) of a high-silica phase such as amorphous silica or zeolite. High-silica phase abundance over phyllosilicate-bearing surfaces in Mawrth Vallis is higher than that of surrounding surfaces by 10-15%. With the exception of these high-silica surfaces in Mawrth Vallis, regions examined in this study exhibit similar bulk mineralogical compositions to that of most low-albedo regions on Mars; the MSL scientific payload

  4. Identifying and Mapping Seasonal Surface Water Frost with MGS TES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bapst, J.; Bandfield, J. L.; Wood, S. E.

    2013-12-01

    The Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) visible/near-infrared and thermal infrared bolometers measured surface broadband albedo and temperature for more than three Mars years. As seasons progress on Mars, surface temperatures may fall below the frost point of volatiles in the atmosphere (namely, carbon dioxide and water). Systematic mapping of the spatial and temporal occurrence of these volatiles in the martian atmosphere, on the surface, and in the subsurface has shown their importance in understanding the climate of Mars. However, few studies have investigated seasonal surface water frost and its role in the global water cycle. We examine zonally-averaged TES daytime albedo, temperature, and water vapor abundance data [after Smith, 2004] to map the presence of surface water frost on Mars. Surface water frost occurs in the polar and mid latitudes, in regions with surface temperatures less than 220 K and above 150 K, and can significantly increase albedo relative to the bare surface. In the northern hemisphere water frost is most apparent in late fall/early winter, before the onset of carbon dioxide frost. Dust storms occurring near northern winter solstice affect albedo data and prevent us from putting a latitudinal lower limit on the water frost in the northern hemisphere. Regardless, seasonal water frost occurs at least as low as 48°N in Utopia Planitia, beginning at Ls=~230°, as observed by Viking Lander 2 [Svitek and Murray, 1990]. Daytime surface water frost was also observed at the Phoenix Lander site (68°N) beginning at Ls=~160° [Cull et al., 2010]. The timing of albedo variations observed by TES agree relatively well with lander observations of seasonal frost. Seasonal water frost is not detected during fall in the southern hemisphere. A potential explanation for this discrepancy, compared with frost detections in the north, is the disparity in atmospheric water vapor abundance between the two hemispheres. The frost point temperatures for water vapor

  5. View to the northeast of the Sounder Antenna OvertheHorizon ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View to the northeast of the Sounder Antenna - Over-the-Horizon Backscatter Radar Network, Christmas Valley Radar Site Transmit Sector Five Sounder Antennas, On unnamed road west of Lost Forest Road, Christmas Valley, Lake County, OR

  6. View to the eastnortheast of the Sounder Antenna OvertheHorizon ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View to the east-northeast of the Sounder Antenna - Over-the-Horizon Backscatter Radar Network, Christmas Valley Radar Site Transmit Sector Five Sounder Antennas, On unnamed road west of Lost Forest Road, Christmas Valley, Lake County, OR

  7. TES Carbon Monoxide Validation during the Two AVE Campaigns using the Argus and ALIAS Instruments on NASA's WB-57F

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez, Jinena P.; Luo, Ming; Christensen, Lance E.; Loewenstein, Max; Jost, Hansjurg; Webster, Christopher R.; Osterman, Greg

    2008-01-01

    The Aura Validation Experiment (AVE) focuses on validating Aura satellite measurements of important atmospheric trace gases using ground-based, aircraft, and balloon-borne instruments. Global satellite observations of CO from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) on the EOS Aura satellite have been ongoing since September 2004. This paper discusses CO validation experiments during the Oct-AVE (2004 Houston, Texas) and CR-AVE (2006 San Jose, Costa Rica) campaigns. The coincidences in location and time between the satellite observations and the available in situ profiles for some cases are not ideal. However, the CO distribution patterns in the two validation flight areas are shown to have very little variability in the aircraft and satellite . observations, thereby making them suitable for validation comparisons. TES CO profiles, which typically have a retrieval uncertainty of 10-20%, are compared with in situ CO measurements from NASA Ames Research Center's Argus instrument taken on board the WB-57F aircraft during Oct-AVE. TES CO retrievals during CR-AVE are compared with in situ measurements from Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Aircraft Laser Infrared Absorption Spectrometer (ALIAS) instrument as well as with the Argus instrument, both taken on board the WB-57F aircraft. During CR-AVE, the average overall difference between ALIAS and Argus CO was 4%, with the ALIAS measurement higher. During individual flights, 2-min time-averaged differences between the two in situ instruments had standard deviation of 14%. The TES averaging kernels and a priori constraint profiles for CO are applied to the in situ data for proper comparisons to account for the reduced vertical resolution and the influence of the a priori in the satellite-derived profile. In the TES sensitive pressure range, approx.700-200 hPa, the in situ profiles and TES profiles agree within 5-10%, less than the variability in CO distributions obtained by both TES and the aircraft instruments in the two

  8. TES Detector Noise Limited Readout Using SQUID Multiplexers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staguhn, J. G.; Benford, D. J.; Chervenak, J. A.; Khan, S. A.; Moseley, S. H.; Shafer, R. A.; Deiker, S.; Grossman, E. N.; Hilton, G. C.; Irwin, K. D.

    2004-01-01

    The availability of superconducting Transition Edge Sensors (TES) with large numbers of individual detector pixels requires multiplexers for efficient readout. The use of multiplexers reduces the number of wires needed between the cryogenic electronics and the room temperature electronics and cuts the number of required cryogenic amplifiers. We are using an 8 channel SQUID multiplexer to read out one-dimensional TES arrays which are used for submillimeter astronomical observations. We present results from test measurements which show that the low noise level of the SQUID multiplexers allows accurate measurements of the TES Johnson noise, and that in operation, the readout noise is dominated by the detector noise. Multiplexers for large number of channels require a large bandwidth for the multiplexed readout signal. We discuss the resulting implications for the noise performance of these multiplexers which will be used for the readout of two dimensional TES arrays in next generation instruments.

  9. TES/Aura L2 Summary Product (TL2SUMS)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-01-30

    ... Title:  TES Discipline:  Tropospheric Chemistry Level:  L2 Spatial Coverage:  (-90, ... OPeNDAP Parameters:  Air Temperature Surface Air Temperature Carbon Monoxide Tropospheric Ozone Ozone ...

  10. TES/Aura L2 Supplemental Product (TL2SUPS)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-01-30

    ... Title:  TES Discipline:  Tropospheric Chemistry Level:  L2 Spatial Coverage:  (-90, ... OPeNDAP Parameters:  Air Temperature Surface Air Temperature Carbon Monoxide Tropospheric Ozone Ozone ...

  11. IMAGE Observations of Sounder Stimulated and Naturally Occurring Fast Z mode Cavity Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonwalkar, V. S.; Taylor, C.; Reddy, A.

    2015-12-01

    We report first observations of sounder stimulated and naturally occurring fast Z mode (ZM) cavity noise detected by the Radio Plasma Imager (RPI) on the IMAGE satellite. The fast Z mode cavity noise is a banded, structure-less radio emission trapped inside fast Z mode cavities, which are characterized by a minimum (fz,min) in fast Z mode cut-off frequency (fz) along a geomagnetic field line [Gurnett et al., JGR, 1983]. Fast Z mode waves reflect at fz ~ f, where f is the wave frequency. Waves in the frequency range fz,min < f < fz,max, where fz,max is the maximum fz above fz,min altitude, are trapped within the cavity as they bounce back and forth between reflection altitudes (fz ~ f) above and below the fz,min altitude. These trapped waves will be observed by a satellite passing through the cavity. The observed cavity noise lower cutoff is at the local Z mode cut-off frequency (fz,Sat) and the upper cut-off is presumably close to fz,max. The cavity noise is observed typically inside the plasmasphere. Comparison of cavity noise as observed on the plasmagram obtained during active sounding with that observed on the dynamic spectra obtained from the interspersed passive wave measurements indicate that the cavity noise is either stimulated by transmissions from the sounder (RPI) or is of natural origin. The sounder stimulated noise is often accompanied by fast Z mode echoes. The naturally occurring cavity noise is observed on both the plasmagram and the dynamic spectra. We believe the stimulated cavity noise is generated due to scattering from small-scale irregularities of waves transmitted by RPI. One potential candidate for the source of naturally occurring Z mode cavity noise is the ring current electrons that can generate fast ZM waves via higher order cyclotron resonance [Nishimura et al., Earth Planets Space, 2007].

  12. Note on the Effect of Horizontal Gradients for Nadir-Viewing Microwave and Infrared Sounders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joiner, J.; Poli, P.

    2004-01-01

    Passive microwave and infrared nadir sounders such as the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit A (AMSU-A) and the Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS), both flying on NASA s EOS Aqua satellite, provide information about vertical temperature and humidity structure that is used in data assimilation systems for numerical weather prediction and climate applications. These instruments scan cross track so that at the satellite swath edges, the satellite zenith angles can reach approx. 60 deg. The emission path through the atmosphere as observed by the satellite is therefore slanted with respect to the satellite footprint s zenith. Although radiative transfer codes currently in use at operational centers use the appropriate satellite zenith angle to compute brightness temperature, the input atmospheric fields are those from the vertical profile above the center of the satellite footprint. If horizontal gradients are present in the atmospheric fields, the use of a vertical atmospheric profile may produce an error. This note attempts to quantify the effects of horizontal gradients on AIRS and AMSU-A channels by computing brightness temperatures with accurate slanted atmospheric profiles. We use slanted temperature, water vapor, and ozone fields from data assimilation systems. We compare the calculated slanted and vertical brightness temperatures with AIRS and AMSU-A observations. We show that the effects of horizontal gradients on these sounders are generally small and below instrument noise. However, there are cases where the effects are greater than the instrument noise and may produce erroneous increments in an assimilation system. The majority of the affected channels have weighting functions that peak in the upper troposphere (water vapor sensitive channels) and above (temperature sensitive channels) and are unlikely t o significantly impact tropospheric numerical weather prediction. However, the errors could be significant for other applications such as stratospheric

  13. Results of the international ionospheric Doppler sounder network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lastovicka, Jan; Chum, Jaroslav

    2016-07-01

    This paper summarizes main recent results reached by the Czech-lead international network of ionospheric Doppler sounders. The network consists of Doppler sounders in the western half of Czechia (5 measuring paths, 3 frequencies with central receivers in Prague), northern Taiwan (3 transmitters, two separated receivers, 1 frequency), and three similar systems (3 measuring paths with 1 receiver and 1 frequency) in Tucuman (north-western Argentina), Hermanus (the southernmost South Africa) and Luisville (northern South Africa). Three main areas of research have been (1) statistical properties of gravity waves, (2) ionospheric effects of earthquakes, and (3) low latitude/equatorial phenomena. Some results: (1) the theoretically expected dominance of gravity wave propagation against wind has been confirmed; (2) impact of the Tohoku 2001 M9.0 earthquake was registered in the ionosphere over the Czech Republic as long-period infrasound on the distance of about 9000 km from epicenter; analysis of ionospheric infrasound excited by the Nepal 2015 M7.8 earthquake observed by the Czech and Taiwan Doppler sounders showed that the intensity of ionospheric signal is significantly height dependent and that the Doppler shift depends not only on the advection (up and down motion) of the reflecting layer but also on the compression/rarefaction of the electron gas; (3) spread F structures observed by Doppler sounders in Tucuman and Taiwan (both under the crest of equatorial ionization anomaly) provide results consistent with S4 scintillation data and with previous optical, GPS and satellite measurements.

  14. Film handling procedures for Apollo 17 lunar sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, M. S.

    1972-01-01

    Film handling procedures for the Apollo 17 Lunar Sounder are itemized, including purchase of flight film, establishment of processing standards, transportation of flight films, flight film certification, application of pre- and post-sensitometry, film loading and downloading, film processing, titling, and duplication.

  15. Design and testing of hardware improvements of an acoustic sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, W. L.

    1985-06-01

    The application of lasers in military communications and weapons systems accentuate the need for instruments capable of measuring the fine dynamic structure of the atmosphere. One of the most useful tools available for the probing of the atmosphere is the acoustic sounder. Commercial grade acoustic sounders, such as the Aeroviroment model number 300 cannot collect atmospheric data with the quality needed for laser propagation research. The usable range of the Aerovironment model 300 acoustic sounder is less than 500 meters. Many laser systems need atmospheric information at altitudes of 1 to 2 kilometers and higher. The objective of this thesis was to upgrade an existing acoustic sounder to increase the range and improve the quality of the receiver-processor. A serious deficiency of the Aerovironment model number 300 is the poor coupling of the acoustic transducer to the feedhorn. This thesis involved a complete redesign and experimental test of the transducer feedhorn using two different horn styles as well as making the horn removable and easily changeable.

  16. Toward the characterization of upper tropospheric clouds using Atmospheric Infrared Sounder and Microwave Limb Sounder observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahn, Brian H.; Eldering, Annmarie; Braverman, Amy J.; Fetzer, Eric J.; Jiang, Jonathan H.; Fishbein, Evan; Wu, Dong L.

    2007-03-01

    We estimate the accuracy of cloud top altitude (Z) retrievals from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) observing suite (ZA) on board the Earth Observing System Aqua platform. We compare ZA with coincident measurements of Z derived from the micropulse lidar and millimeter wave cloud radar at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program sites of Nauru and Manus islands (ZARM) and the inferred Z from vertically resolved Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) ice water content (IWC) retrievals. The mean difference in ZA minus ZARM plus or minus one standard deviation ranges from -2.2 to 1.6 km ± 1.0 to 4.2 km for all cases of AIRS effective cloud fraction (fA) > 0.15 at Manus Island using the cloud radar only. The range of mean values results from using different approaches to determine ZARM, day/night differences, and the magnitude of fA; the variation about the mean decreases for increasing values of fA. Analysis of ZARM from the micropulse lidar at Nauru Island for cases restricted to 0.05 ≤ fA ≤ 0.15 indicates a statistically significant improvement in ZA - ZARM over the cloud radar-derived values at Manus Island. In these cases the ZA - ZARM difference is -1.1 to 2.1 km ± 3.0 to 4.5 km. These results imply that the operational ZA is quantitatively useful for constraining cirrus altitude despite the nominal 45 km horizontal resolution. Mean differences of cloud top pressure (PCLD) inferred from coincident AIRS and MLS ice water content (IWC) retrievals depend upon the method of defining AIRS PCLD (as with the ARM comparisons) over the MLS spatial scale, the peak altitude and maximum value of MLS IWC, and fA. AIRS and MLS yield similar vertical frequency distributions when comparisons are limited to fA > 0.1 and IWC > 1.0 mg m-3. Therefore the agreement depends upon the opacity of the cloud, with decreased agreement for optically tenuous clouds. Further, the mean difference and standard deviation of AIRS and MLS

  17. Hematite spherules at Meridiani: Results from MI, Mini-TES, and Pancam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvin, W. M.; Shoffner, J. D.; Johnson, J. R.; Knoll, A. H.; Pocock, J. M.; Squyres, S. W.; Weitz, C. M.; Arvidson, R. E.; Bell, J. F.; Christensen, P. R.; de Souza, P. A.; Farrand, W. H.; Glotch, T. D.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Jolliff, B. L.; Knudson, A. T.; McLennan, S. M.; Rogers, A. D.; Thompson, S. D.

    2008-12-01

    We report on observations of hematite-bearing spherules at Meridiani Planum made using the Microscopic Imager (MI), Mini-Thermal Emission Spectrometer (Mini-TES), and Panoramic Camera (Pancam) instruments on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity. Spherules were observed on soil surfaces and in outcrop rocks, both on undisturbed surfaces and in abraded surfaces ground using the Rock Abrasion Tool (RAT). Spherule size and shape change little along the 850 m eastward traverse from Eagle Crater to Endurance Crater, but spherules decrease and then slightly increase in size along the 6 km traverse from Endurance south to Victoria Crater. Local populations range from submillimeters to several millimeters in diameter. An additional small diameter (100 μm) size population is possible. An increase in irregular shapes is found near Victoria Crater. This, combined with the size decrease south of Endurance, suggests either a changing depositional environment, or variation in the duration and timing of diagenetic events. The dominant smaller size population observed early in the mission in aeolian areas and ripple crests is observed as the primary size population in abraded outcrop farther south. This suggests that successively younger beds are exposed at the surface along the southward traverse. Stratigraphically higher units removed by erosion could be recorded by the present surface lag deposit. Coordinated systematic observations are used to determine optical and infrared hematite indices of the surface soils in Pancam and Mini-TES. In spite of the systematic variation seen in MI, both Pancam and Mini-TES indices are highly variable based on the local surface, and neither show systematic trends south of Endurance. The lack of a 390 cm-1 feature in Mini-TES spectra suggests concentric or radial interior structure within the spherules at scales too fine for MI to observe. Mini-TES does not detect any silicate component in the spherules. A bound water component in soils or in

  18. Hematite spherules at Meridiani: results from MI, Mini-TES, and Pancam

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Calvin, W.M.; Shoffner, J.D.; Johnson, J. R.; Knoll, A.H.; Pocock, J.M.; Squyres, S. W.; Weitz, C.M.; Arvidson, R. E.; Bell, J.F.; Christensen, P.R.; de Souza, P. A.; Farrand, W. H.; Glotch, T.D.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Jolliff, B.L.; Knudson, A.T.; McLennan, S.M.; Rogers, A.D.; Thompson, S.D.

    2008-01-01

    We report on observations of hematite-bearing spherules at Meridiani Planum made using the Microscopic Imager (MI), Mini-Thermal Emission Spectrometer (Mini-TES), and Panoramic Camera (Pancam) instruments on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity. Spherules were observed on soil surfaces and in outcrop rocks, both on undisturbed surfaces and in abraded surfaces ground using the Rock Abrasion Tool (RAT). Spherule size and shape change little along the 850 m eastward traverse from Eagle Crater to Endurance Crater, but spherules decrease and then slightly increase in size along the 6 km traverse from Endurance south to Victoria Crater. Local populations range from submillimeters to several millimeters in diameter. An additional small diameter (100 μm) size population is possible. An increase in irregular shapes is found near Victoria Crater. This, combined with the size decrease south of Endurance, suggests either a changing depositional environment, or variation in the duration and timing of diagenetic events. The dominant smaller size population observed early in the mission in aeolian areas and ripple crests is observed as the primary size population in abraded outcrop farther south. This suggests that successively younger beds are exposed at the surface along the southward traverse. Stratigraphically higher units removed by erosion could be recorded by the present surface lag deposit. Coordinated systematic observations are used to determine optical and infrared hematite indices of the surface soils in Pancam and Mini-TES. In spite of the systematic variation seen in MI, both Pancam and Mini-TES indices are highly variable based on the local surface, and neither show systematic trends south of Endurance. The lack of a 390 cm?1 feature in Mini-TES spectra suggests concentric or radial interior structure within the spherules at scales too fine for MI to observe. Mini-TES does not detect any silicate component in the spherules. A bound water component in soils or in

  19. Stratospheric and mesospheric HO2 observations from the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millán, L.; Wang, S.; Livesey, N.; Kinnison, D.; Sagawa, H.; Kasai, Y.

    2015-03-01

    This study introduces stratospheric and mesospheric hydroperoxyl radical (HO2) estimates from the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) using an offline retrieval (i.e. run separately from the standard MLS algorithm). This new data set provides two daily zonal averages, one during daytime from 10 to 0.0032 hPa (using day-minus-night differences between 10 and 1 hPa to ameliorate systematic biases) and one during nighttime from 1 to 0.0032 hPa. The vertical resolution of this new data set varies from about 4 km at 10 hPa to around 14 km at 0.0032 hPa. A description of the methodology and an error analysis are presented. Comparisons against the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM), the Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) and the Far Infrared Spectrometer (FIRS-2) measurements, as well as photochemical simulations, demonstrate the robustness of the retrieval and indicate that the retrieval is sensitive enough to detect mesospheric HO2 layers during both day and night. This new data set is the first long-term HO2 stratospheric and mesospheric satellite record and it provides needed constraints to help resolve the O3 deficit problem and the "HOx dilemma".

  20. Stratospheric and mesospheric HO2 observations from the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millán, L.; Wang, S.; Livesey, N.; Kinnison, D.; Sagawa, H.; Kasai, Y.

    2014-09-01

    This study introduces stratospheric and mesospheric hydroperoxyl radical (HO2) estimates from the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) using an offline retrieval (i.e. run separately from the standard MLS algorithm). This new dataset provides two daily zonal averages, one during daytime and one during nighttime, with a varying vertical resolution from about 4 km at 10 hPa to around 14 km at 0.0032 hPa. A description of the methodology and an error analysis are presented. Comparisons against the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM), the Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) and the Far Infrared Spectrometer (FIRS-2) measurements, as well as, photochemical simulations demonstrate the robustness of the retrieval and indicate that the retrieval is sensitive enough to detect mesospheric HO2 layers during both day and night. This new dataset is the first long-term HO2 stratospheric and mesospheric satellite record and it provides needed constraints to help resolve the O3 deficit problem and the "HOx dilemma".

  1. On-Orbit Performance of the TES Pulse Tube Cryocooler System and the Instrument - Six Years in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, J. I.; Na-Nakornpanom, A.

    2011-01-01

    The Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) instrument pulse tube cryocoolers began operation 36 days after launch of the NASA Earth Observing System (EOS) Aura spacecraft on July 15, 2004. TES is designed with four infrared Mercury Cadmium Telluride focal plane arrays in two separate housings cooled by a pair of Northrup Grumman Aerospace Systems (NGAS) single-stage pulse tube cryocoolers. The instrument also makes use of a two-stage passive cooler to cool the optical bench. The instrument is a high-resolution infrared imaging Fourier transform spectrometer with 3.3-15.4 micron spectral coverage. After four weeks of outgassing, the instrument optical bench and focal planes were cooled to their operating temperatures to begin science operations. During the early months of the mission, ice contamination of the cryogenic surfaces including the focal planes led to increased cryocooler loads and the need for periodic decontamination cycles. After a highly successful 5 years of continuous in-space operations, TES was granted a 2 year extension. This paper reports on the TES cryogenic system performance including the two-stage passive cooler. After a brief overview of the cryogenic design, the paper presents detailed data on the highly successful space operation of the pulse tube cryocoolers and instrument thermal design over the past six years since the original turn-on in 2004. The data shows the cryogenic contamination decreased substantially to where decontamination cycles are now performed every six months. The cooler stroke required for constant-temperature operation has not increased indicating near-constant cooler efficiency and the instrument's thermal design has also provided a nearly constant heat rejection sink. At this time TES continues to operate in space providing important Earth science data.

  2. Impact of local and non-local sources of pollution on background US Ozone: synergy of a low-earth orbiting and geostationary sounder constellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, K. W.; Lee, M.

    2015-12-01

    Dramatic changes in the global distribution of emissions over the last decade have fundamentally altered source-receptor pollution impacts. A new generation of low-earth orbiting (LEO) sounders complimented by geostationary sounders over North America, Europe, and Asia providing a unique opportunity to quantify the current and future trajectory of emissions and their impact on global pollution. We examine the potential of this constellation of air quality sounders to quantify the role of local and non-local sources of pollution on background ozone in the US. Based upon an adjoint sensitivity method, we quantify the role synoptic scale transport of non-US pollution on US background ozone over months representative of different source-receptor relationships. This analysis allows us distinguish emission trajectories from megacities, e.g. Beijing, or regions, e.g., western China, from natural trends on downwind ozone. We subsequently explore how a combination of LEO and GEO observations could help quantify the balance of local emissions against changes in distant sources . These results show how this unprecedented new international ozone observing system can monitor the changing structure of emissions and their impact on global pollution.

  3. The DST group ionospheric sounder replacement for JORN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, T. J.; Quinn, A. D.; Pederick, L. H.

    2016-06-01

    The Jindalee Over-the-horizon Radar Network (JORN) is an integral part of Australia's national defense capability. JORN uses a real-time ionospheric model as part of its operations. The primary source of data for this model is a set of 13 vertical-incidence sounders (VIS) scattered around the Australian coast and inland locations. These sounders are a mix of Lowell digisonde portable sounder (DPS)-1 and DPS-4. Both of these sounders, the DPS-1 in particular, are near the end of their maintainable life. A replacement for these aging sounders was required as part of the ongoing sustainment program for JORN. Over the last few years the High-Frequency Radar Branch (HFRB) of the Defence Science and Technology (DST) Group, Australian Department of Defence, has been developing its own sounders based on its successful radar hardware technology. The DST Group VIS solution known as PRIME (Portable Remote Ionospheric Monitoring Equipment) is a 100% duty cycle, continuous wave system that receives the returned ionospheric signal while it is still transmitting and operates the receiver in the near field of the transmitter. Of considerable importance to a successful VIS is the autoscaling software, which takes the ionogram data and produces an ionogram trace (group delay as a function of frequency), and from that produces a set of ionospheric parameters that represent the (bottomside) overhead electron density profile. HFRB has developed its own robust autoscaling software. The performance of DST Group's PRIME under a multitude of challenging ionospheric conditions has been studied. In December 2014, PRIME was trialed at a JORN VIS site collocated with the existing Lowell Digisonde DPS-1. This side-by-side testing determined that PRIME was fit for purpose. A summary of the results of this comparison and example PRIME output will be discussed. Note that this paper compares PRIME with the 25 year old Lowell Digisonde DPS-1, which is planned to be replaced. Our future plans include

  4. Observations of the north polar water ice annulus on Mars using THEMIS and TES

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wagstaff, K.L.; Titus, T.N.; Ivanov, A.B.; Castano, R.; Bandfield, J.L.

    2008-01-01

    The Martian seasonal CO2 ice caps advance and retreat each year. In the spring, as the CO2 cap gradually retreats, it leaves behind an extensive defrosting zone from the solid CO2 cap to the location where all CO2 frost has sublimated. We have been studying this phenomenon in the north polar region using data from the THermal EMission Imaging System (THEMIS), a visible and infra-red (IR) camera on the Mars Odyssey spacecraft, and the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) on Mars Global Surveyor. Recently, we discovered that some THEMIS images of the CO2 defrosting zone contain evidence for a distinct defrosting phenomenon: some areas just south of the CO2 cap edge are too bright in visible wavelengths to be defrosted terrain, but too warm in the IR to be CO2 ice. We hypothesize that we are seeing evidence for a seasonal annulus of water ice (frost) that recedes with the seasonal CO2 cap, as predicted by previous workers. In this paper, we describe our observations with THEMIS and compare them to simultaneous observations by TES and OMEGA. All three instruments find that this phenomenon is distinct from the CO2 cap and most likely composed of water ice. We also find strong evidence that the annulus widens as it recedes. Finally, we show that this annulus can be detected in the raw THEMIS data as it is collected, enabling future long-term onboard monitoring. ?? 2007.

  5. Calibration of the Microwave Limb Sounder on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarnot, R. F.; Cofield, R. E.; Waters, J. W.; Flower, D. A.; Peckham, G. E.

    1996-01-01

    The Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) is a three-radiometer, passive, limb emission instrument onboard the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS). Radiometric, spectral and field-of-view calibrations of the MLS instrument are described in this paper. In-orbit noise performance, gain stability, spectral baseline and dynamic range are described, as well as use of in-flight data for validation and refinement of prelaunch calibrations. Estimated systematic scaling uncertainties (3 sigma) on calibrated limb radiances from prelaunch calibrations are 2.6% in bands 1 through 3, 3.4% in band 4, and 6% in band 5. The observed systematic errors in band 6 are about 15%, consistent with prelaunch calibration uncertainties. Random uncertainties on individual limb radiance measurements are very close to the levels predicted from measured radiometer noise temperature, with negligible contribution from noise and drifts on the regular in-flight gain calibration measurements.

  6. Next Generation Grating Spectrometer Sounders for LEO and GEO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagano, Thomas S.

    2011-01-01

    AIRS and MODIS are widely used for weather, climate, composition, carbon cycle, cross-calibration, and applications. The community asking for new capability in the 2020 timeframe, capabilities desired: (1) Hyperspectral UV to LWIR, High Spatial ?1km IFOV (2) Maximize Synergies of Solar Reflected and IR. Synergies with OCO-2. We expect more users and applications of next gen LEO IR Sounder than GEO. These include: weather, climate, GHG monitoring, aviation, disaster response. There is a new direction for imagers and sounders: (1) Separate Vis/NIR/SWIR from MWIR/LWIR instruments reduces technology risk and complexity. (2) Expect Costs to be lower than CrIS & VIIRS Some additional ideas to reduce costs include: (1) minimum set of requirements (2) mini-grating spectrometers. supports constellation for higher revisit (3) new technology to reduce instrument size (large format fpa's) (4) hosted payloads

  7. Integrated Microcalorimeters Using Ir TES And Sn Mushroom Absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.; Bogorin, D.; Galeazzi, M.

    2006-09-07

    Cryogenic microcalorimeters have the potential to meet the requirements of future x-ray missions. The University of Miami has recently started a program to fabricate fully integrated microcalorimeter arrays. We deposit high purity iridium thin film as Transition Edge Sensors (TES). We chose iridium because it has a bulk transition temperature of 112 mK and we expect single layer TES to have good reproducibility and long term stability. Also we use integrated tin film in a mushroom geometry as the absorbers to get high filling factor, low heat capacity and easy array manufacturing process. We present here our preliminary results in both areas.

  8. Integrating CRISM and TES hyperspectral data to characterize a halloysite-bearing deposit in Kashira crater, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goudge, Timothy A.; Mustard, John F.; Head, James W.; Salvatore, Mark R.; Wiseman, Sandra M.

    2015-04-01

    We present morphologic observations and spectral modeling results of a large, kaolin-group mineral-bearing deposit within Kashira crater in the southern highlands of Mars. We employ both non-linear unmixing of Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) visible to near-infrared (VNIR) reflectance data and linear unmixing of Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) thermal infrared (TIR) emissivity data to quantitatively analyze the kaolin-group mineral within this deposit. We use a novel approach for quantitative analysis of CRISM data through non-linear unmixing with in-scene, orbitally-derived endmembers combined with laboratory measured endmembers. Results from this approach indicate that the deposit within Kashira crater is best modeled as a combination of surrounding spectral units (i.e., in-scene derived endmembers) with the addition of the kaolin-group mineral halloysite. Linear unmixing of TES data suggest that the deposit contains ∼30% halloysite, a result that is supported by a sensitivity analysis. Potential formation mechanisms for this deposit include hydrothermal alteration, arid-environment pedogenic weathering of a basaltic mound deposit, or pedogenic weathering of a volcanic ash deposit. Our modeling results offer a quantitative reconciliation of the CRISM and TES datasets, and provide a consistent mineralogy from spectral unmixing for an aqueous alteration mineral-bearing deposit on Mars using a combined analysis of both VNIR and TIR hyperspectral data.

  9. On Cirrus Cloud Fields Measured by the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Brian H.; Eldering, Annmarie; Liou, Kuo Nan

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation showing trends in clouds measured by the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) is given. The topics include: 1) Trends in clouds measured by AIRS: Are they reasonable? 2) Single and multilayered cloud trends; 3) Retrievals of thin cirrus D(sub e) and tau: Single-layered cloud only; 4) Relationships between ECF, D(sub e), tau, and T(sub CLD); and 5) MODIS vs. AIRS retrievals.

  10. High resolution microwave spectrometer sounder (HIMSS), volume 1, book 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The following topics are presented with respect to the high resolution microwave spectrometer sounder (HIMSS) that is to be used as an instrument for NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS): (1) preliminary program plans; (2) contract end item (CEI) specification; and (3) the instrument interface description document. Under the preliminary program plans section, plans dealing with the following subject areas are discussed: spares, performance assurance, configuration management, software implementation, contamination, calibration management, and verification.

  11. Submillimeter Wave Sounder for the Japanese Mars Mission (MELOS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroda, T.; Kasai, Y.; Sagawa, H.; Hartogh, P.; Murtagh, D. P.; Manabe, T.; Mendrok, J.; Nishibori, T.; Ochiai, S.; Aoyama, Y.

    2009-12-01

    The Submillimeter wave (SMM) sounder is proposed as an instrument onboard the meteorological orbiter of the next Japanese Mars exploration mission (MELOS). Characteristics of the SMM sounder are the observations of wind, temperature, CO, water vapor and its isotopes, minor radical species such as H2O2 and HO2. Many potential contributions to the Martian science are expected from the measurements: for example, the understanding of the Martian atmospheric circulation regime, the water cycle and variable hygropause, isotopic fractionation including HDO/H2O, photochemistry in the middle atmosphere, and thermophysical properties of the surface layer. By employing both limb and nadir observations from the elliptic orbit, the SMM sounder will achieve high vertical resolution in the wind, temperature and water vapor observations by pointing to several tangential heights in the limb observing geometry, as well as the horizontal mapping with temporal variation of minor molecules. Since the dust and ice cloud are almost transparent at submillimeter wavelengths, the SMM sounder can provide observational data without being affected by the dust distribution. The draft design of the instrument is dual frequency receivers of 500 and 600 or 800 GHz in order to observe at least two water vapor lines, including the ground state 110 - 101 transition at 556.9 GHz, with different line strengths. Combination of the observations of weak and strong opacity lines enables us to measure the H2O abundance in a wide range of the altitudes: from the surface to more than 100 km. This study will optimize the instrumental design by examining its scientific performance with the observation simulations. We also discuss the scientific significances of the planned observations in collaboration with the studies using general circulation models (GCMs) for the Martian atmosphere.

  12. High resolution microwave spectrometer sounder (HIMSS), volume 1, book 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The following topics are presented with respect to the high resolution microwave spectrometer sounder (HIMSS) that is to be used as an instrument for NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS): (1) an instrument overview; (2) an instrument description; (3) the instrument's conceptual design; (4) technical risks and offsets; (5) instrument reliability; (6) commands and telemetry; (7) mass and power budgets; (8) integration and test program; (9) program implementation; and (10) phase CD schedule.

  13. The Apollo 17 Lunar Sounder. [lunar orbit coherent radar experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, R. J.; Brown, W. E., Jr.; Jordan, R.; Adams, G. F.; Jackson, P.; Peeples, W. J.; Porcello, L. J.; Ryu, J.; Eggleton, R. E.; Schaber, G.

    1973-01-01

    The Apollo Lunar Sounder Experiment, a coherent radar operated from lunar orbit during the Apollo 17 mission, has scientific objectives of mapping lunar subsurface structure, surface profiling, surface imaging, and galactic noise measurement. Representative results from each of the four disciplines are presented. Subsurface reflections have been interpreted in both optically and digitally processed data. Images and profiles yield detailed selenomorphological information. The preliminary galactic noise results are consistent with earlier measurements by other workers.

  14. An antenna system for the microwave limb sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gustincic, J. J.

    1976-01-01

    The results of an initial design study to determine a suitable antenna system for the Microwave Limb Sounder experiment are presented. The resulting antenna system consisting of a parabolic cylinder fed by a number of Gregorian subreflectors is described and estimates of achievable antenna beamwidths and beam efficiencies are made. A short analysis is presented which yields expressions for the subreflector coordinates which can be implemented into existing programs for future antenna design and evaluation.

  15. Sonic depth sounder for laboratory and field use

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richardson, E.V.; Simons, Daryl B.; Posakony, G.J.

    1961-01-01

    The laboratory investigation of roughness in alluvial channels has led to the development of a special electronic device capable of mapping the streambed configuration under dynamic conditions. This electronic device employs an ultrasonic pulse-echo principle, similar to that of a fathometer, that utilizes microsecond techniques to give high accuracy in shallow depths. This instrument is known as the sonic depth sounder and was designed to cover a depth range of 0 to 4 feet with an accuracy of ? 0.5 percent. The sonic depth sounder is capable of operation at frequencies of 500, 1,000 and 2,000 kilocycles. The ultrasonic beam generated at the transducer is designed to give a minimum-diameter interrogating signal over the extended depth range. The information obtained from a sonic depth sounder is recorded on a strip-chart recorder. This permanent record allows an analysis to be made of the streambed configuration under different dynamic conditions. The model 1024 sonic depth sounder was designed principally as a research instrument to meet laboratory needs. As such, it is somewhat limited in its application as a field instrument on large streams and rivers. The principles employed in this instrument, however, have many potentials for field applications such as the indirect measurement of bed load when the bed roughness is ripples and (or) dunes, depth measurement, determination of bed configuration, and determination of depth of scour around bridge piers and abutments. For field application a modification of the present system into a battery-operated lightweight instrument designed to operate at a depth range of 0 to 30 feet is possible and desirable.

  16. Satellite Sounder Data Assimilation for Improving Alaska Region Weather Forecast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Jiang; Stevens, E.; Zhang, X.; Zavodsky, B. T.; Heinrichs, T.; Broderson, D.

    2014-01-01

    A case study and monthly statistical analysis using sounder data assimilation to improve the Alaska regional weather forecast model are presented. Weather forecast in Alaska faces challenges as well as opportunities. Alaska has a large land with multiple types of topography and coastal area. Weather forecast models must be finely tuned in order to accurately predict weather in Alaska. Being in the high-latitudes provides Alaska greater coverage of polar orbiting satellites for integration into forecasting models than the lower 48. Forecasting marine low stratus clouds is critical to the Alaska aviation and oil industry and is the current focus of the case study. NASA AIRS/CrIS sounder profiles data are used to do data assimilation for the Alaska regional weather forecast model to improve Arctic marine stratus clouds forecast. Choosing physical options for the WRF model is discussed. Preprocess of AIRS/CrIS sounder data for data assimilation is described. Local observation data, satellite data, and global data assimilation data are used to verify and/or evaluate the forecast results by the MET tools Model Evaluation Tools (MET).

  17. GEO/SAMS - The Geostationary Synthetic Aperture Microwave Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambrigtsen, Bjorn H.

    2008-01-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has for many years operated two weather satellite systems, the Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite system (POES), using low-earth orbiting (LEO) satellites, and the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite system (GOES), using geostationary earth orbiting (GEO) satellites. (Similar systems are also operated by other nations.) The POES satellites have been equipped with both infrared (IR) and microwave (MW) atmospheric sounders, which makes it possible to determine the vertical distribution of temperature and humidity in the troposphere even under cloudy conditions. Such satellite observations have had a significant impact on weather forecasting accuracy, especially in regions where in situ observations are sparse. In contrast, the GOES satellites have only been equipped with IR sounders, since it has not been feasible to build a large enough antenna to achieve sufficient spatial resolution for a MW sounder in GEO. As a result, GOES soundings can only be obtained in cloud free areas and in the less important upper atmosphere, above the cloud tops. This has hindered the effective use of GOES data in numerical weather prediction. Full sounding capabilities with the GOES system is highly desirable because of the advantageous spatial and temporal coverage that is possible from GEO. While POES satellites provide coverage in relatively narrow swaths, and with a revisit time of 12-24 hours or more, GOES satellites can provide continuous hemispheric coverage, making it possible to monitor highly dynamic phenomena such as hurricanes.

  18. Geophysical Information from Advanced Sounder Infrared Spectral Radiance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larar, Allen M.; Zhou, Daniel K.; Liu, Xu; Smith, William L.

    2012-01-01

    Advanced satellite sensors are tasked with improving global observations of the Earth's atmosphere, clouds, and surface to enable enhancements in weather prediction, climate monitoring capability, and environmental change detection. Satisfying this type of improvement for inferred geophysical information from these observations requires optimal usage of data from current systems as well as enhancements to future sensors. This presentation addresses the information content present in infrared spectral radiance from advanced atmospheric sounders with an emphasis on knowledge of thermodynamic state and trace species. Results of trade-off studies conducted to evaluate the impact of spectral resolution, spectral coverage, instrument noise, and a priori knowledge on remote sensing system information content will be discussed. A focus is placed on information achievable from the Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) on the NASA EOS Aqua satellite in orbit since 2002, the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) aboard MetOp-A since 2006, and the Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) instrument aboard the NPP and JPSS series of satellites which began 28 October 2011.

  19. Satellite Monitoring Over the Canadian Oil Sands: Highlights from Aura OMI and TES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shephard, Mark W.; McLinden, Chris; Fioletov, Vitali; Cady-Pereira, Karen E.; Krotkov, Nick A.; Boersma, Folkert; Li, Can; Luo, Ming; Bhartia, P. K.; Joiner, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    Satellite remote sensing provides a unique perspective for air quality monitoring in and around the Canadian Oil Sands as a result of its spatial and temporal coverage. Presented are Aura satellite observations of key pollutants including nitrogen dioxide (NO2), sulfur dioxide (SO2), carbon monoxide (CO), ammonia (NH3), methanol (CH3OH), and formic acid (HCOOH) over the Canadian Oil Sands. Some of the highlights include: (i) the evolution of NO2 and SO2 from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), including comparisons with other nearby sources, (ii) two years of ammonia, carbon monoxide, methanol, and formic acid observations from 240 km North-South Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) transects through the oils sands, and (iii) preliminary insights into emissions derived from these observations.

  20. Physical properties of the Mars Exploration Rover landing sites as inferred from Mini-TES-derived thermal inertia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fergason, R.L.; Christensen, P.R.; Bell, J.F.; Golombek, M.P.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Kieffer, H.H.

    2006-01-01

    The Miniature Thermal Emission Spectrometer (Mini-TES) on board the two Mars Exploration Rovers provides the first opportunity to observe thermal properties from the Martian surface, relate these properties to orbital data, and perform soil conductivity experiments under Martian conditions. The thermal inertias of soils, bedforms, and rock at each landing site were derived to quantify the physical properties of these features and understand geologic processes occurring at these localities. The thermal inertia for the. Gusev plains rock target Bonneville Beacon (???1200 J m-2 K-1 s-1/2) is consistent with a dense, basaltic rock, but the rocks at the Columbia Hills have a lower thermal inertia (???620 J m-2 K-1 s-1/2), suggesting that they have a volcaniclasic origin. Bedforms on the floors of craters at both landing sites have thermal inertias of 200 J m-2 K-1 s-1/2, consistent with a particle diameter of ???160 ??m. This diameter is comparable to the most easily moved grain size in the current atmosphere on Mars, suggesting that these bedforms may have formed under current atmospheric conditions. Along the Meridiani plains, the thermal inertia is lower than that derived from TES and Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) orbital data. This discrepancy is not well understood. Mini-TES-derived thermal inertias at Gusev along a ???2.5 km traverse follow trends in thermal inertia measured from orbit with TES and THEMIS. However, along the traverse, there are variability and mixing of particle sizes that are not resolved in the orbital thermal inertia data due to meter-scale processes that are not identifiable at larger scales. Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union.

  1. Inverse modeling of CO2 sources and sinks using satellite observations of CO2 from TES and surface flask measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Nassar, Ray; Jones, DBA; Kulawik, SS; Worden, JR; Bowman, K; Andres, Robert Joseph; Suntharalingam, P; Chen, j.; Brenninkmeijer, CAM; Schuck, TJ; Conway, T.J.; Worthy, DE

    2011-01-01

    We infer CO2 surface fluxes using satellite observations of mid-tropospheric CO2 from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) and measurements of CO2 from surface flasks in a time-independent inversion analysis based on the GEOS-Chem model. Using TES CO2 observations over oceans, spanning 40 S 40 N, we find that the horizontal and vertical coverage of the TES and flask data are complementary. This complementarity is demonstrated by combining the datasets in a joint inversion, which provides better constraints than from either dataset alone, when a posteriori CO2 distributions are evaluated against independent ship and aircraft CO2 data. In particular, the joint inversion offers improved constraints in the tropics where surface measurements are sparse, such as the tropical forests of South America. Aggregating the annual surface-to-atmosphere fluxes from the joint inversion for the year 2006 yields 1.13 0.21 PgC for the global ocean, 2.77 0.20 PgC for the global land biosphere and 3.90 0.29 PgC for the total global natural flux (defined as the sum of all biospheric, oceanic, and biomass burning contributions but excluding CO2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion). These global ocean and global land fluxes are shown to be near the median of the broad range of values from other inversion results for 2006. To achieve these results, a bias in TES CO2 in the Southern Hemisphere was assessed and corrected using aircraft flask data, and we demonstrate that our results have low sensitivity to variations in the bias correction approach. Overall, this analysis suggests that future carbon data assimilation systems can benefit by integrating in situ and satellite observations of CO2 and that the vertical information provided by satellite observations of mid-tropospheric CO2 combined with measurements of surface CO2, provides an important additional constraint for flux inversions.

  2. TES/Aura L2 Water Vapor (H2O) Limb (TL2H2OL)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-02-06

    TES/Aura L2 Water Vapor (H2O) Limb (TL2H2OL) News:  TES News ... Level:  L2 Platform:  TES/Aura L2 Water Vapor Spatial Coverage:  27 x 23 km Limb ... Access: OPeNDAP Parameters:  H2O Water Volume Mixing Radio Precision Vertical Resolution Order ...

  3. TES/Aura L2 Carbon Monoxide (CO) Lite Nadir (TL2COLN)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-06-16

    TES/Aura L2 Carbon Monoxide (CO) Lite Nadir (TL2COLN) News:  TES News ... Level:  L2 Instrument:  TES/Aura L2 Carbon Monoxide Spatial Coverage:  5.3 km nadir ... OPeNDAP Access:  OPeNDAP Parameters:  Carbon Monoxide Order Data:  Reverb:   Order Data ...

  4. TES/Aura L2 Formic Acid (FOR) Nadir (TL2FORN)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-02-04

    TES/Aura L2 Formic Acid (FOR) Nadir (TL2FORN) News:  TES News Join ... L2 Platform:  TES/Aura L2 Formic Acid Spatial Coverage:  5.3 x 8.5 km nadir Spatial ... Access:  OPeNDAP Parameters:  Formic Acid Volume Mixing Ratio Precision Vertical Resolution Order ...

  5. TES/Aura L2 Formic Acid (FOR) Lite Nadir (TL2FORLN)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-06-16

    TES/Aura L2 Formic Acid (FOR) Lite Nadir (TL2FORLN) News:  TES News ... L2 Instrument:  TES/Aura L2 Formic Acid Spatial Coverage:  5.3 km nadir Spatial ... Access:  OPeNDAP Parameters:  Formic Acid Volume Mixing Ratio Vertical Resolution Precision Order ...

  6. TES/Aura L2 Formic Acid (FOR) Nadir (TL2FORNS)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-02-04

    TES/Aura L2 Formic Acid (FOR) Nadir (TL2FORNS) News:  TES News Join ... L2 Platform:  TES/Aura L2 Formic Acid Spatial Coverage:  5.3 x 8.5 km nadir Spatial ... Access:  OPeNDAP Parameters:  Formic Acid Volume Mixing Ratio Precision Vertical Resolution Order ...

  7. SOM Classification of Martian TES Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogan, R. C.; Roush, T. L.

    2002-01-01

    A classification scheme based on unsupervised self-organizing maps (SOM) is described. Results from its application to the ASU mineral spectral database are presented. Applications to the Martian Thermal Emission Spectrometer data are discussed. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  8. Multiplexing Readout of TES Microcalorimeters Based on Analog Baseband Feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Takei, Y.; Yamasaki, N.Y; Mitsuda, K.; Kimura, S.; Hirakoso, W.; Masui, K.; Korte, P. A. J. de; Kuur, J. van der; Gottardi, L.

    2009-12-16

    A TES microcalorimeter array is a promising spectrometer with excellent energy resolution and a moderate imaging capability. To realize a large format array in space, multiplexing the TES signals at the low tempersture stage is mandatory. We are developing frequency division multiplexing (FDM) based on baseband feedback technique. In FDM, each TES is AC-biased with a different carrier frequency. Signals from several pixels are summed and then read out by one SQUID. The maximum number of multiplexed pixels are limited by the frequency band in which the SQUID can be operated in a flux-locked loop, which is {approx}1 MHz with standard flux-locked loop circuit. In the baseband feedback, the signal ({approx}10 kHz band) from the TES is once demodulated. Then a reconstructed copy of the modulated signal with an appropriate phase is fed back to the SQUID input coil to maintain an approximately constant magnetic flux. This can be implemented even for large cable delays and automatically suppresses the carrier. We developed a prototype electronics for the baseband feedback based on an analog phase sensitive detector (PSD) and a multiplier. Combined with Seiko 80-SSA SQUID amp, open-loop gain of 8 has been obtained for 10 kHz baseband signal at 5 MHz carrier frequency, with a moderate noise contribution of 27pA/{radical}(Hz) at input.

  9. The rocks of Gusev Crater as viewed by the Mini-TES instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruff, S. W.; Christensen, P. R.; Blaney, D. L.; Farrand, W. H.; Johnson, J. R.; Michalski, J. R.; Moersch, J. E.; Wright, S. P.; Squyres, S. W.

    2006-12-01

    The Miniature Thermal Emission Spectrometer (Mini-TES) on board the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit is part of a payload designed to investigate whether a lake once existed in Gusev Crater. Mini-TES has observed hundreds of rocks along the rover's traverse into the Columbia Hills, yielding information on their distribution, bulk mineralogy, and the potential role of water at the site. Although dust in various forms produces contributions to the spectra, we have established techniques for dealing with it. All of the rocks encountered on the plains traverse from the lander to the base of the Columbia Hills share common spectral features consistent with an olivine-rich basaltic rock known as Adirondack Class. Beginning at the base of the West Spur of the Columbia Hills and across its length, the rocks are spectrally distinct from the plains but can be grouped into a common type called Clovis Class. These rocks, some of which appear as in-place outcrop, are dominated by a component whose spectral character is consistent with unaltered basaltic glass despite evidence from other rover instruments for significant alteration. The northwest flank of Husband Hill is covered in float rocks known as Wishstone Class with spectral features that can be attributed uniquely to plagioclase feldspar, a phase that represents more than half of the bulk mineralogy. Rare exceptions are three classes of basaltic ``exotics'' found scattered across Husband Hill that may represent impact ejecta and/or float derived from local intrusions within the hills. The rare outcrops observed on Husband Hill display distinctive spectral characteristics. The outcrop called Peace shows a feature attributable to molecular bound water, and the outcrop that hosts the rock called Watchtower displays a dominant basaltic glass component. Despite evidence from the rover's payload for significant alteration of some of the rocks, no unambiguous detection of crystalline phyllosilicates or other secondary silicates

  10. The rocks of Gusev Crater as viewed by the Mini-TES instrument

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruff, S.W.; Christensen, P.R.; Blaney, D.L.; Farrand, W. H.; Johnson, J. R.; Michalski, J.R.; Moersch, J.E.; Wright, S.P.; Squyres, S. W.

    2006-01-01

    The Miniature Thermal Emission Spectrometer (Mini-TES) on board the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit is part of a payload designed to investigate whether a lake once existed in Gusev Crater. Mini-TES has observed hundreds of rocks along the rover's traverse into the Columbia Hills, yielding information on their distribution, bulk mineralogy, and the potential role of water at the site. Although dust in various forms produces contributions to the spectra, we have established techniques for dealing with it. All of the rocks encountered on the plains traverse from the lander to the base of the Columbia Hills share common spectral features consistent with an olivine-rich basaltic rock known as Adirondack Class. Beginning at the base of the West Spur of the Columbia Hills and across its length, the rocks are spectrally distinct from the plains but can be grouped into a common type called Clovis Class. These rocks, some of which appear as in-place outcrop, are dominated by a component whose spectral character is consistent with unaltered basaltic glass despite evidence from other rover instruments for significant alteration. The northwest flank of Husband Hill is covered in float rocks known as Wishstone Class with spectral features that can be attributed uniquely to plagioclase feldspar, a phase that represents more than half of the bulk mineralogy. Rare exceptions are three classes of basaltic "exotics" found scattered across Husband Hill that may represent impact ejecta and/or float derived from local intrusions within the hills. The rare outcrops observed on Husband Hill display distinctive spectral characteristics. The outcrop called Peace shows a feature attributable to molecular bound water, and the outcrop that hosts the rock called Watchtower displays a dominant basaltic glass component. Despite evidence from the rover's payload for significant alteration of some of the rocks, no unambiguous detection of crystalline phyllosilicates or other secondary silicates has

  11. Thermal-infrared spectral observations of geologic materials in emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christensen, Philip R.; Luth, Sharon J.

    1987-01-01

    The thermal-infrared spectra of geologic materials in emission were studied using the prototype Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES). A variety of of processes and surface modifications that may influence or alter the spectra of primary rock materials were studied. It was confirmed that thermal emission spectra contain the same absorption features as those observed in transmission and reflection spectra. It was confirmed that the TES instrument can be used to obtain relevant spectra for analysis of rock and mineral composition.

  12. Mars Polar Thermal Inertia and Albedo Properties Using TES Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherbenski, J. M.; Paige, D. A.

    2002-12-01

    We present north and south polar thermal inertia and albedo maps derived from MGS TES observations. The maps were derived using the same robust approach developed to make polar thermal and inertia and albedo maps using IRTM observationsby Paige, Bachman, and Keegan (1994) and Paige and Keegan (1994). The data processing approach involved reading TES reduced data records in PDS format using the Vanilla software tool, and sending the data down a processing pipeline that constrains and bins the data, and compares it to the results of a diurnal and seasonal thermal model to obtain the best fit thermal inertia and apparent albedo. To facilitate comparison, the TES maps were created at the same Ls ranges as the published IRTM maps using TES spectral surface temperature results. The north polar maps used TES nadir observations obtained during a 50-day period from Ls 98.39 to Ls 121.25. The south polar maps used TES nadir observations obtained during a 30-day period from Ls 321.58 to 338.07. The creation of these maps employ a basic thermal model that does not include the effects of the atmosphere, as well as a one-dimensional radiative-convective model that does include the effects of the atmosphere. The spatial resolution of the north polar maps is 0.1 degrees of latitude and 1.0 degrees of longitude. The spatial resolution of the south polar maps is 2 degrees of latitude and 2 degrees of longitude. The TES north polar maps show the residual cap area in significantly greater detail than has been available previously. The IRTM maps showed that the north polar sand sea that surrounds the cap has unusually low thermal inertia. The TES maps confirm this conclusion, but also show that the dark renetrant features in chama boreal and elsewhere on the cap also have low thermal inertias. This strongly supports the proposal that these dark rentrants are the sources of the dune material. The TES maps also show that the darker layered deposits which are found at the periphery of the

  13. Analysis of TES FFSM Eddies and MOC Dust Storms, MY 24 - 26

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noble, J.; Wilson, R.; Haberle, R. M.; Bridger, A. F.; Hollingsworth, J. L.; Kahre, M. A.; Barnes, J.; Cantor, B. A.

    2013-12-01

    Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) orbiter observed a planet-encircling dust storm (PDS) in Mars year (MY) 25 from Ls=176.2-263.4°. We present an examination of Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) dust storms and transient baroclinic eddies identified from Fast Fourier Synoptic Mapping (FFSM) of Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) temperatures for the first two phases of the storm: precursor, Ls=176.2- 184.7°, and expansion, Ls=184.7-193°. FFSM analysis of TES 3.7 hPa thermal data shows the presence of eastward traveling waves at 60° S with a period of about three sols. We hypothesize that these waves are transient baroclinic eddies that contributed to the initiation of precursor storms near Hellas. Integration of FFSM and MOC MY 24 and 25 data shows interesting temporal and spatial associations between the evolution of eddies and storms, including: 1) comparable periodicities of travelling waves and pulses of storm activity; 2) concurrent eastward propagation of both eddies and storms; and 3) structured spatial relationship where high-latitude storms tend to occur on the eastern side of the eddy, while lower (and some middle) latitude storms occur on the western. These results suggest a causal relationship between baroclinic eddies and local storm initiation. New MY 26 results will be presented.

  14. Analysis of TES FFSM Eddies and MOC Dust Storms, MY 24 - 26

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noble, J.; Haberle, R. M.; Bridger, A. F.; Wilson, R.; Barnes, J.; Hollingsworth, J.; Kahre, M. A.; Cantor, B. A.

    2012-12-01

    Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) orbiter observed a planet-encircling dust storm (PDS) in Mars year (MY) 25 from Ls=176.2-263.4°. We present an examination of Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) dust storms and transient baroclinic eddies identified from Fast Fourier Synoptic Mapping (FFSM) of Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) temperatures for the first two phases of the storm: precursor, Ls=176.2- 184.7°, and expansion, Ls=184.7-193°. FFSM analysis of TES 3.7 hPa thermal data shows the presence of eastward-traveling waves at 60° S with a period of about three sols. We hypothesize that these waves are transient baroclinic eddies that contributed to the initiation of precursor storms near Hellas. Integration of FFSM and MOC MY 24 and 25 data shows interesting temporal and spatial associations between the evolution of eddies and storms, including: 1) comparable periodicities of travelling waves and pulses of storm activity; 2) concurrent eastward propagation of both eddies and storms; and 3) structured spatial relationship where high-latitude storms tend to occur on the eastern side of the eddy, while lower (and some middle) latitude storms occur on the western. These results suggest a causal relationship between baroclinic eddies and local storm initiation. New MY 26 results will be presented.lt;img border=0 src="images/P22A-03_B.jpg">

  15. Atmospheric infrared sounder on AIRS with emphasis on level 2 products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Sung-Yung; Fetzer, Eric; Granger, Stephanie; Hearty, Thomas; Lambrigtsen, Bjorn; Manning, Evan M.; Olsen, Edward; Pagano, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) was launched aboard EOS Aqua in May of 2002. AIRS is a grating spectrometer with almost 2400 channels covering the 3.74 to 15.40 micron spectral region with a nominal spectral resolution ((nu)/(delta)(nu)) of 1200, with some gaps. In addition, AIRS has 4 channels in the NIR/VIS region. The AIRS operates in conjunction with the microwave sounders Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU-A) and Humidity Sounder of Brazil (HSB). The microwave sounders are mainly used for cloud clearing of IR radiances, or to remove the effect of cloud on the IR radiances.

  16. TES mapping of Mars' north seasonal cap

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kieffer, H.H.; Titus, T.N.

    2001-01-01

    The Mars Global Surveyor thermal emission spectrometer has made observations of Mars' north polar region for nearly a full martian year. Measurements of bolometric emission and reflectance, as well as brightness temperatures in specific bands synthesized from thermal radiance spectra, are used to track the behavior of surface and atmospheric temperatures, the distribution of condensed CO2 and H2O, and the occurrence of dust storms. CO2 grain size in the polar night is variable in space and time, and is influenced by atmospheric conditions. Some specific locations display concentration of H2O frost and indicate the presence of long-term water-ice near the surface. Annual budgets of solid CO2 range up to 1500 kg m-2; preliminary analysis suggests significant transport of energy into latitudes near 70?? N during the polar night. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science.

  17. Low Cost Upper Atmosphere Sounder (LOCUS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerber, Daniel; Swinyard, Bruce M.; Ellison, Brian N.; Aylward, Alan D.; Aruliah, Anasuya; Plane, John M. C.; Feng, Wuhu; Saunders, Christopher; Friend, Jonathan; Bird, Rachel; Linfield, Edmund H.; Davies, A. Giles; Parkes, Steve

    2014-05-01

    The Mesosphere - Lower Thermosphere region (MLT) is often quoted as being the least well known region of the atmosphere, meaning that measurements of this altitude range are sparser than for the neighbouring layers. The reason for this apparent lack of observations can be traced back to a combination of two facts - A) the MLT is ill suited for in-situ sampling on a global scale because the residual air drag is prohibitive for suborbital vehicles (rockets are traditionally used to sample the MLT region, but they only provide snapshot measurements both geographically, as well as temporally), and B) Some of the most important trace gases in the MLT have spectral emission lines in the THz range, a frequency band which has only just become accessible to conventional remote sensing technologies (i.e. passive heterodyne detection) thanks to ongoing technology development, but which still poses massive - often prohibitive - demands on the complexity, weight and power consumption of satellite borne remote sensing detectors. To mitigate the substantial power requirements of a Local Oscillator (LO) able to pump a heterodyne receiver at THZ frequencies, we are suggesting the use of Quantum Cascade Laser diodes (QCL). Combining a QCL LO with a sub-harmonic Schottky mixer in an integrated receiver system would allow us to build a THz passive heterodyne detector for atmospheric remote sensing that is both very compact and power efficient, and could therefore be built and launched much more cheaply than competitive systems. Many of the technologies required for such an instrument already exist at technology readiness levels (TRL) of 3-5. A consortium of RAL Space, University College London (UCL), University of Leeds, Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd (SSTL) and STAR-Dundee have been awarded a grant through the ESA In Orbit Demonstration Programme (IOD) to start developing an integrated, sub-harmonic heterodyne receiver with a QCL LO up to a TRL that would allow IOD hopefully in the

  18. Tropospheric and Airborne Emission Spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavich, Thomas; Beer, Reinhard

    1996-01-01

    X This paper describes the development of two related instruments, the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) and the Airborne Emission Spectrometer (AES). Both instruments are infrared imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometers, used for measuring the state of the lower atmosphere, and in particular the measurement of ozone and ozone sources and sinks.

  19. Impact of Measurement System Characteristics on Advanced Sounder Information Content

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larar, Allen M.; Liu, Xu; Zhou, Daniel K.

    2011-01-01

    Advanced satellite sensors are tasked with improving global observations of the Earth's atmosphere, clouds, and surface to enable enhancements in weather prediction, climate monitoring capability, and environmental change detection. Achieving such an improvement in geophysical information inferred from these observations requires optimal usage of data from current systems as well as instrument system enhancements for future sensors. This presentation addresses results of tradeoff studies evaluating the impact of spectral resolution, spectral coverage, instrument noise, and a priori knowledge on remote sensing system information content, with a specific emphasis on thermodynamic state and trace species information obtainable from advanced atmospheric sounders. Particular attention will be devoted toward information achievable from the Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) on the NASA EOS Aqua satellite in orbit since 2002, the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) aboard MetOp-A since 2006, and the Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) instrument to fly aboard the NPP and JPSS series of satellites expected to begin in late 2011. While all of these systems cover nearly the same infrared spectral extent, they have very different number of channels, instrument line shapes, coverage continuity, and instrument noise. AIRS is a grating spectrometer having 2378 discrete spectral channels ranging from about 0.4 to 2.2/cm resolution; IASI is a Michelson interferometer with 8461 uniformly-spaced spectral channels of 0.5/cm (apodized) resolution; and CrIS is a Michelson interferometer having 1305 spectral channels of 0.625, 1.250, and 2.50/cm (unapodized) spectral resolution, respectively, over its three continuous but non-overlapping bands. Results of tradeoff studies showing information content sensitivity to assumed measurement system characteristics will be presented.

  20. Thermal emission spectrometer experiment - Mars Observer mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christensen, Philip R.; Anderson, Donald L.; Chase, Stillman C.; Clark, Roger N.; Kieffer, Hugh H.; Malin, Michael C.; Pearl, John C.; Carpenter, James; Bandiera, Nuno; Brown, F. G.

    1992-01-01

    The paper describes the thermal emission spectrometer (TES) designed for the Mars Observer mission. The TES measurements of the surface and the atmosphere of Mars will be used to determine and map the composition of the surface rocks, minerals, and the condensates. Examples of information that will be obtained from TES data include mineral abundance maps, condensate properties and their distribution in time and space, aerosol properties and their distribution in time and space, the rock abundance, the polar energy balance, and properties of gaseous species. Where appropriate, these derived parameters will be distributed in the form of gridded map, to allow direct comparison with other derived data sets.

  1. Observation of severe weather activities by Doppler sounder array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. E.; Hung, R. J.

    1975-01-01

    A three-dimensional, nine-element, high-frequency CW Doppler sounder array has been used to detect ionospheric disturbances during periods of severe weather, particularly during periods with severe thunderstorms and tornadoes. One typical disturbance recorded during a period of severe thunderstorm activity and one during a period of tornado activity have been chosen for analysis in this note. The observations indicate that wave-like disturbances possibly generated by the severe weather have wave periods in the range 2-8 min which place them in the infrasonic wave category.

  2. Broadband infrared beam splitter for spaceborne interferometric infrared sounder.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tianyan; Liu, Dingquan; Qin, Yang

    2014-10-01

    A broadband infrared beam splitter (BS) on ZnSe substrate used for the spaceborne interferometric infrared sounder (SIIRS) is studied in the spectral range of 4.44-15 μm. Both broadband antireflection coating and broadband beam-splitter coating in this BS are designed and tested. To optimize the optical properties and the stability of the BS, suitable infrared materials were selected, and improved deposition techniques were applied. The designed structures matched experimental data well, and the properties of the BS met the application specification of SIIRS. PMID:25322240

  3. Observations of Gravity Waves with the UARS Microwave Limb Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, D. L.; Waters, J. W.

    1996-01-01

    From Introduction: Observations (of gravity waves-GW) from radar, lidar, balloon and rocket yield good temporal and vertical resolutions usually at one geographical location while aircraft observations provide good horizontal resolution but for a short period of time. It is difficult in general for space-borne sensors to obtain the same resolutions, but observations of GWs at somewhat larger scales are feasible, for example using saturated radiances from the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS)[Wu and Waters, 1996].

  4. Initial results from the Mini-TES experiment in Gusev crater from the Spirit rover

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christensen, P.R.; Ruff, S.W.; Fergason, R.L.; Knudson, A.T.; Anwar, S.; Arvidson, R. E.; Bandfield, J.L.; Blaney, D.L.; Budney, C.; Calvin, W.M.; Glotch, T.D.; Golombek, M.P.; Gorelick, N.; Graff, T.G.; Hamilton, V.E.; Hayes, A.; Johnson, J. R.; McSween, H.Y.; Mehall, G.L.; Mehall, L.K.; Moersch, J.E.; Morris, R.V.; Rogers, A.D.; Smith, M.D.; Squyres, S. W.; Wolff, M.J.; Wyatt, M.B.

    2004-01-01

    The Miniature Thermal Emission Spectrometer (Mini-TES) on Spirit has studied the mineralogy and thermophysical properties at Gusev crater. Undisturbed soil spectra show evidence for minor carbonates and bound water. Rocks are olivine-rich basalts with varying degrees of dust and other coatings. Dark-toned soils observed on disturbed surfaces may be derived from rocks and have derived mineralogy (??5 to 10%) of 45% pyroxene (20% Ca-rich pyroxene and 25% pigeonite), 40% sodic to intermediate plagioclase, and 15% olivine (forsterite 45% ??5 to 10). Two spectrally distinct coatings are observed on rocks, a possible indicator of the interaction of water, rock, and airfall dust. Diurnal temperature data indicate particle sizes from 40 to 80 ??m in hollows to ???0.5 to 3 mm in soils.

  5. Survey of TES high albedo events in Mars' northern polar craters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Armstrong, J.C.; Nielson, S.K.; Titus, T.N.

    2007-01-01

    Following the work exploring Korolev Crater (Armstrong et al., 2005) for evidence of crater interior ice deposits, we have conducted a survey of Thermal Emission Spectroscopy (TES) temperature and albedo measurements for Mars' northern polar craters larger than 10 km. Specifically, we identify a class of craters that exhibits brightening in their interiors during a solar longitude, Ls, of 60 to 120 degrees, roughly depending on latitude. These craters vary in size, latitude, and morphology, but appear to have a specific regional association on the surface that correlates with the distribution of subsurface hydrogen (interpreted as water ice) previously observed on Mars. We suggest that these craters, like Korolev, exhibit seasonal high albedo frost events that indicate subsurface water ice within the craters. A detailed study of these craters may provide insight in the geographical distribution of the ice and context for future polar missions. Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union.

  6. The Behm Acoustic Sounder for Airplanes with Reference to Its Accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreiber, Ernest

    1930-01-01

    Relative altimetry is of great importance for increasing the safety in aerial transportation, because it makes possible safe flying at night, by poor visibility, and when landing. Among the instruments of this type is the Behm sounder, which operates on an acoustic principle. Acoustic altimetry in general and the Behn sounder, in particular, are covered in this report.

  7. Design Evolution of the Spiderweb TES Bolometer for Cosmology Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westbrook, B.; Lee, A.; Meng, X.; Suzuki, A.; Arnold, K.; Shirokoff, E.; George, E.; Aubin, F.; Dobbs, M.; MacDermid, K.; Hanany, S.; Raach, K.; Aboobaker, A.; Hubmayr, J.; Oshima, T.; Kawamura, M.; Kohno, K.

    2012-06-01

    Our group at UC Berkeley has produced the next generation of millimeter-wave spiderweb-absorber transition edge sensor (TES) bolometer technology, which was originally developed for the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment—Sunyaev Zel'dolvich (APEX-SZ) and South Pole Telescope (SPT) experiments. We will discuss the adaptation of this technology to a balloon-borne environment and to sub-millimeter wavelengths for the E and B Experiment (EBEX) and the Atacama Sub-millimeter Telescope Experiment (ASTE). Specifically, this proceedings will address the methods we used to increase the thermal contact between the TES and a heat capacity used to limit electrothermal bandwidth, increase the optical efficiency at sub-millimeter wavelengths by reducing the grid spacing of the spiderweb absorber, and reduce the saturation power of the bolometers by a factor of 4 compared to the lowest saturation power SPT bolometers by the altering the bolometer geometry.

  8. TES observations of the martian surface and atmosphere

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christensen, P.R.; Kieffer, H.H.; Pearl, J.C.; Conrath, B.; Malin, M.C.; Clark, R.C.; Morris, R.V.; Banfield, J.L.; Lane, M.D.; Smith, M.D.; Hamilton, V.E.; Kuzmin, R.O.

    2000-01-01

    The TES instrument is a Fourier transform Michelson interferometer operating with 10 or 5 cm-1 sampling int he thermal infared spectral region from 1700 to 200 cm-1 (~6 to 50 μm) where virtually all minerals have characteristic fundamental vibrational absorption bands (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8). The TES data used in this paper are among the 6x107 spectra collected during the early mapping phase of the MGS mission from southern hemisphere winter to early summer (aerocentric longitude, Ls, 107° to 297°. The methodology for separating the surface and atmospheric components of the radiance from Mars, which allows detailed analysis and interpretation of surface mineralogy (9, 10), is described in previous papers (10, 11).

  9. Overview of the Waveform Capture in the Lunar Radar Sounder on board KAGUYA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasahara, Y.; Goto, Y.; Hashimoto, K.; Imachi, T.; Kumamoto, A.; Ono, T.; Matsumoto, H.

    2007-12-01

    The Lunar explorer "gKAGUYA"h (SELENE) spacecraft will be launched on September 13, 2007. The Lunar Radar Sounder (LRS) is one of the scientific instruments on board KAGUYA. It consists of three subsystems: the sounder observation (SDR), the natural plasma wave receiver (NPW), and the waveform capture (WFC). The WFC is a high-performance and multifunctional software receiver in which most functions are realized by the onboard software implemented in a digital signal processor (DSP). The WFC consists of a fast-sweep frequency analyzer (WFC-H) covering the frequency range from 1 kHz to 1 MHz and a waveform receiver (WFC-L) in the frequency range from 10 Hz to 100 kHz. The amount of raw data from the plasma wave instrument is huge because the scientific objectives require the covering of a wide frequency range with high time and frequency resolution; furthermore, a variety of operation modes are needed to meet these scientific objectives. In addition, new techniques such as digital filtering, automatic filter selection, and data compression are implemented for data processing of the WFC-L to extract the important data adequately under the severe restriction of total amount of telemetry data. Because of the flexibility of the instruments, various kinds of observation modes can be achieved, and we expect the WFC to generate many interesting data. By taking advantage of a moon orbiter, the WFC is expected to measure plasma waves and radio emissions that are generated around the moon and/or that originated from the sun and from the earth and other planets. One of the phenomena of most interest to be obtained from the WFC data is the dynamics of lunar wake as a result of solar wind-moon interaction. Another scientific topic in the field of lunar plasma physics concerns the minimagnetosphere caused by the magnetic anomaly of the moon. There are various kinds of other plasma waves to be observed from the moon such as Auroral Kilometric Radiation, electrostatic solitary wave

  10. Requirements for a Moderate-Resolution Infrared Imaging Sounder (MIRIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagano, Thomas S.; Aumann, Hartmut H.; Gerber, Andrew J.; Kuai, Le; Gontijo, I.; DeLeon, Berta; Susskind, Joel; Iredell, Lena; Bajpai, Shyam

    2013-01-01

    The high cost of imaging and sounding from space warrants exploration of new methods for obtaining the required information, including changing the spectral band sets, employing new technologies and merging instruments. In some cases we must consider relaxation of the current capability. In others, we expect higher performance. In general our goal is to meet the VIIRS and CrIS requirements while providing the enhanced next generation capabilities: 1) Hyperspectral Imaging in the Vis/NIR bands, 2) High Spatial Resolution Sounding in the Infrared bands. The former will improve the accuracy of ocean color products, aerosols and water vapor, surface vegetation and geology. The latter will enable the high-impact achieved by the current suite of hyperspectral infrared sounders to be achieved by the next generation high resolution forecast models. We examine the spectral, spatial and radiometric requirements for a next generation system and technologies that can be applied from the available inventory within government and industry. A two-band grating spectrometer instrument called the Moderate-resolution Infrared Imaging Sounder (MIRIS) is conceived that, when used with the planned NASA PACE Ocean Color Instrument (OCI) will meet the vast majority of CrIS and VIIRS requirements in the all bands and provide the next generation capabilities desired. MIRIS resource requirements are modest and the Technology Readiness Level is high leading to the expectation that the cost and risk of MIRIS will be reasonable.

  11. LAWS (Laser Atmospheric Wind Sounder) earth observing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Wind profiles can be measured from space using current technology. These wind profiles are essential for answering many of the interdisciplinary scientific questions to be addressed by EOS, the Earth Observing System. This report provides guidance for the development of a spaceborne wind sounder, the Laser Atmospheric Wind Sounder (LAWS), discussing the current state of the technology and reviewing the scientific rationale for the instrument. Whether obtained globally from the EOS polar platform or in the tropics and subtropics from the Space Station, wind profiles from space will provide essential information for advancing the skill of numerical weather prediction, furthering knowledge of large-scale atmospheric circulation and climate dynamics, and improving understanding of the global biogeochemical and hydrologic cycles. The LAWS Instrument Panel recommends that it be given high priority for new instrument development because of the pressing scientific need and the availability of the necessary technology. LAWS is to measure wind profiles with an accuracy of a few meters per second and to sample at intervals of 100 km horizontally for layers km thick.

  12. Using THEMIS and TES to conduct a mineral analysis on Olympus Mons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chase, Nicole Danielle

    2016-10-01

    Olympus Mons is the largest shield volcano in our known solar system. In previous studies, the composition of the basaltic lava flows on Olympus Mons was shown to be similar to the composition of those lava flows of Earth's shield volcanoes. It has been suggested that basalt located near volcanoes contained bacteria living below the surface of the Earth. In this pilot study, the effect of Olympus Mons' aspect (i.e. north- vs. south-facing slope) on its mineral composition was examined. Imagery from Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS), onboard the Mars Odyssey spacecraft, were used because Olympus Mons' size and surface roughness hinder rover exploration. After removing transmission errors and performing an atmospheric correction, the THEMIS images were ready to be analyzed via a mineral spectral library. Using Arizona State University's Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) derived mineral spectral library, the images were classified in ENVI. These classifications were verified using ASU's GIS tool, Java Mission-planning and Analysis for Remote Sensing (JMARS) and TES. Results show differences in the mineral composition and in the geological features on Olympus Mons' surface. The mineral vanadinite was shown to be prevalent on the sampled southern portions of Olympus Mons, but was sparse on the sampled northern portions. Previous studies suggested that the mineral ilmenite, which this study found in high concentrations on the sampled northern portions of Olympus Mons, might serve as a food source for iron-oxidizing and iron-scavenging bacteria. Future research should focus on better understanding the concentrations of vanadinite and ilmenite on Olympus Mons to see if these minerals have a role in the potential presence of bacteria on Olympus Mons.

  13. Remote sensing of the troposphere by infrared emission spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beer, Reinhard; Glavich, Thomas A.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes the concept of a cryogenic IR imaging Fourier transform spectrometer, called the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES), designed for observations of the troposphere and lower stratosphere from a near-earth orbit, using natural thermal emission and reflected sunlight. The principal molecular species to be measured by TES are O3, CO, CO2, N2O, H2O, H2O2, NO, NO2, HNO3, NH3, CH4, C2H6, C2H2, SO2, COS, CFCl3, and CF2Cl2. The TES is scheduled for a launch on the second polar platform of the Earth Observing System in 1998.

  14. THz Limb Sounder (TLS) for Lower Thermospheric Wind, Oxygen Density, and Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Dong L.; Yee, Jeng-Hwa; Schlecht, Erich; Mehdi, Imran; Siles, Jose; Drouin, Brian J.

    2016-01-01

    Neutral winds are one of the most critical measurements in the lower thermosphere and E region ionosphere (LTEI) for understanding complex electrodynamic processes and ion-neutral interactions. We are developing a high-sensitivity, low-power, noncryogenic 2.06 THz Schottky receiver to measure wind profiles at 100-140 km. The new technique, THz limb sounder (TLS), aims to measure LTEI winds by resolving the wind-induced Doppler shift of 2.06 THz atomic oxygen (OI) emissions. As a transition between fine structure levels in the ground electronic state, the OI emission is in local thermodynamic equilibrium(LTE) at altitudes up to 350km. This LTE property, together with day-and-night capability and small line-of-sight gradient, makes the OI limb sounding a very attractive technique for neutral wind observations. In addition to the wind measurement, TLS can also retrieve [OI] density and neutral temperature in the LTEI region. TLS leverages rapid advances in THz receiver technologies including subharmonically pumped (SHP)mixers and Schottky-diode-based power multipliers. Current SHP Schottky receivers have produced good sensitivity for THz frequencies at ambient environment temperatures (120-150 K), which are achievable through passively cooling in spaceflight. As an emerging technique, TLS can fill the critical data gaps in the LTEI neutral wind observations to enable detailed studies on the coupling and dynamo processes between charged and neutral molecules.

  15. THz limb sounder (TLS) for lower thermospheric wind, oxygen density, and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Dong L.; Yee, Jeng-Hwa; Schlecht, Erich; Mehdi, Imran; Siles, Jose; Drouin, Brian J.

    2016-07-01

    Neutral winds are one of the most critical measurements in the lower thermosphere and E region ionosphere (LTEI) for understanding complex electrodynamic processes and ion-neutral interactions. We are developing a high-sensitivity, low-power, noncryogenic 2.06 THz Schottky receiver to measure wind profiles at 100-140 km. The new technique, THz limb sounder (TLS), aims to measure LTEI winds by resolving the wind-induced Doppler shift of 2.06 THz atomic oxygen (OI) emissions. As a transition between fine structure levels in the ground electronic state, the OI emission is in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) at altitudes up to 350 km. This LTE property, together with day-and-night capability and small line-of-sight gradient, makes the OI limb sounding a very attractive technique for neutral wind observations. In addition to the wind measurement, TLS can also retrieve [OI] density and neutral temperature in the LTEI region. TLS leverages rapid advances in THz receiver technologies including subharmonically pumped (SHP) mixers and Schottky-diode-based power multipliers. Current SHP Schottky receivers have produced good sensitivity for THz frequencies at ambient environment temperatures (120-150 K), which are achievable through passively cooling in spaceflight. As an emerging technique, TLS can fill the critical data gaps in the LTEI neutral wind observations to enable detailed studies on the coupling and dynamo processes between charged and neutral molecules.

  16. Selection of the sounding channels for the High Resolution Limb Sounder (HIRDLS)

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, D.P.; Gille, J.C.; Bailey, P.L.; Barnett, J.J.

    1994-12-31

    In this paper the authors describe the scientific design work behind the selection of the IR spectral passbands for the 21 sounding channels of the High Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder (HIRDLS) which is scheduled to fly aboard the Earth Observing System (EOS) chemistry platform at the beginning of the next century. At least one radiometer channel must be used for each gas that is being measured. Preferably the interfering contributions to the radiance by other gases in a channel should be small, but the principle requirements are that the desired emission be measured with high signal-to-noise ratio, and that there be separate channels for the measurement of interfering species. However, more than one channel is required to provide full altitude coverage of those target gases such as CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, and O{sub 3}, which have emission bands whose centers become optically thick in the middle atmosphere. Further channels, in which gaseous absorption is low, are required for the characterization of aerosol effects. The authors describe the HIRDLS channels selected for each gas, with emphasis on signal-to-noise considerations and altitude coverage, the elimination of contaminating signal between channels, and non-LTE processes for high altitude sounding and space view definition.

  17. Selection of sounding channels for the High Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnett, John J.; Edwards, David P.; Gille, John C.; Bailey, Paul L.

    1995-10-01

    We describe the scientific design work behind the selection of the IR spectral passbands for the 21 sounding channels of the High Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder (HIRDLS), which is scheduled to fly aboard the Earth Observing System chemistry platform at the beginning of the next century. At least one radiometer channel must be used for each gas that is being measured. Preferably the interfering contributions to the radiance by other gases in a channel should be small, but the principal requirements are that the desired emission be measured with high signal-to-noise ratio and that there be separate channels for the measurement of interfering species. However, more than one channel is required for providing full altitude coverage of those target gases such as CO2, H2O, and O3, which have emission bands whose centers become optically thick in the middle atmosphere. Further channels, in which gaseous absorption is low, are required for the characterization of aerosol effects. We describe the HIRDLS channels selected for each gas, with emphasis on signal-to-noise considerations and altitude coverage, the elimination of contaminating signal between channels, and nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium processes for high-altitude sounding and space view definition.

  18. Thermal Band Atmospheric Correction Using Atmospheric Profiles Derived from Global Positioning System Radio Occultation and the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagnutti, Mary; Holekamp, Kara; Stewart, Randy; Vaughan, Ronald D.

    2006-01-01

    This Rapid Prototyping Capability study explores the potential to use atmospheric profiles derived from GPS (Global Positioning System) radio occultation measurements and by AIRS (Atmospheric Infrared Sounder) onboard the Aqua satellite to improve surface temperature retrieval from remotely sensed thermal imagery. This study demonstrates an example of a cross-cutting decision support technology whereby NASA data or models are shown to improve a wide number of observation systems or models. The ability to use one data source to improve others will be critical to the GEOSS (Global Earth Observation System of Systems) where a large number of potentially useful systems will require auxiliary datasets as input for decision support. Atmospheric correction of thermal imagery decouples TOA radiance and separates surface emission from atmospheric emission and absorption. Surface temperature can then be estimated from the surface emission with knowledge of its emissivity. Traditionally, radiosonde sounders or atmospheric models based on radiosonde sounders, such as the NOAA (National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration) ARL (Air Resources Laboratory) READY (Real-time Environmental Application and Display sYstem), provide the atmospheric profiles required to perform atmospheric correction. Unfortunately, these types of data are too spatially sparse and too infrequently taken. The advent of high accuracy, global coverage, atmospheric data using GPS radio occultation and AIRS may provide a new avenue for filling data input gaps. In this study, AIRS and GPS radio occultation derived atmospheric profiles from the German Aerospace Center CHAMP (CHAllenging Minisatellite Payload), the Argentinean Commission on Space Activities SAC-C (Satellite de Aplicaciones Cientificas-C), and the pair of NASA GRACE (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment) satellites are used as input data in atmospheric radiative transport modeling based on the MODTRAN (MODerate resolution atmospheric

  19. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement site atmospheric state best estimates for Atmospheric Infrared Sounder temperature and water vapor retrieval validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, David C.; Revercomb, Henry E.; Knuteson, Robert O.; Lesht, Barry M.; Strow, L. Larrabee; Hannon, Scott E.; Feltz, Wayne F.; Moy, Leslie A.; Fetzer, Eric J.; Cress, Ted S.

    2006-05-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) is the first of a new generation of advanced satellite-based atmospheric sounders with the capability of obtaining high-vertical resolution profiles of temperature and water vapor. The high-accuracy retrieval goals of AIRS (e.g., 1 K RMS in 1 km layers below 100 mbar for air temperature, 10% RMS in 2 km layers below 100 mbar for water vapor concentration), combined with the large temporal and spatial variability of the atmosphere and difficulties in making accurate measurements of the atmospheric state, necessitate careful and detailed validation using well-characterized ground-based sites. As part of ongoing AIRS Science Team efforts and a collaborative effort between the NASA Earth Observing System (EOS) project and the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program, data from various ARM and other observations are used to create best estimates of the atmospheric state at the Aqua overpass times. The resulting validation data set is an ensemble of temperature and water vapor profiles created from radiosondes launched at the approximate Aqua overpass times, interpolated to the exact overpass time using time continuous ground-based profiles, adjusted to account for spatial gradients within the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) footprints, and supplemented with limited cloud observations. Estimates of the spectral surface infrared emissivity and local skin temperatures are also constructed. Relying on the developed ARM infrastructure and previous and ongoing characterization studies of the ARM measurements, the data set provides a good combination of statistics and accuracy which is essential for assessment of the advanced sounder products. Combined with the collocated AIRS observations, the products are being used to study observed minus calculated AIRS spectra, aimed at evaluation of the AIRS forward radiative transfer model, AIRS observed radiances, and temperature and water vapor profile

  20. Geo-STAR: A Geostationary Microwave Sounder for the Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambrigtsen, Bjorn H.; Brown, S. T.; Dinardo, S. J.; Gaier, T. C.; Kangaslahti, P. P.; Tanner, A. B.

    2007-01-01

    The Geostationary Synthetic Thinned Aperture Radiometer (GeoSTAR) is a new Earth remote sensing instrument concept that has been under development at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. First conceived in 1998 as a NASA New Millennium Program mission and subsequently developed in 2003-2006 as a proof-of-concept prototype under the NASA Instrument Incubator Program, it is intended to fill a serious gap in our Earth remote sensing capabilities - namely the lack of a microwave atmospheric sounder in geostationary orbit. The importance of such observations have been recognized by the National Academy of Sciences National Research Council, which recently released its report on a 'Decadal Survey' of NASA Earth Science activities1. One of the recommended missions for the next decade is a geostationary microwave sounder. GeoSTAR is well positioned to meet the requirements of such a mission, and because of the substantial investment NASA has already made in GeoSTAR technology development, this concept is fast approaching the necessary maturity for implementation in the next decade. NOAA is also keenly interested in GeoSTAR as a potential payload on its next series of geostationary weather satellites, the GOES-R series. GeoSTAR, with its ability to map out the three-dimensional structure of temperature, water vapor, clouds, precipitation and convective parameters on a continual basis, will significantly enhance our ability to observe hurricanes and other severe storms. In addition, with performance matching that of current and next generation of low-earth-orbiting microwave sounders, GeoSTAR will also provide observations important to the study of the hydrologic cycle, atmospheric processes and climate variability and trends. In particular, with GeoSTAR it will be possible to fully resolve the diurnal cycle. We discuss the GeoSTAR concept and basic design, the performance of the prototype, and a number of science applications that will be possible with GeoSTAR. The work reported

  1. GeoSTAR: a geostationary microwave sounder for the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambrigtsen, B. H.; Brown, S. T.; Dinardo, S. J.; Gaier, T. C.; Kangaslahti, P. P.; Tanner, A. B.

    2007-09-01

    The Geostationary Synthetic Thinned Aperture Radiometer (GeoSTAR) is a new Earth remote sensing instrument concept that has been under development at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. First conceived in 1998 as a NASA New Millennium Program mission and subsequently developed in 2003-2006 as a proof-of-concept prototype under the NASA Instrument Incubator Program, it is intended to fill a serious gap in our Earth remote sensing capabilities - namely the lack of a microwave atmospheric sounder in geostationary orbit. The importance of such observations have been recognized by the National Academy of Sciences National Research Council, which recently released its report on a "Decadal Survey" of NASA Earth Science activities. One of the recommended missions for the next decade is a geostationary microwave sounder. GeoSTAR is well positioned to meet the requirements of such a mission, and because of the substantial investment NASA has already made in GeoSTAR technology development, this concept is fast approaching the necessary maturity for implementation in the next decade. NOAA is also keenly interested in GeoSTAR as a potential payload on its next series of geostationary weather satellites, the GOES-R series. GeoSTAR, with its ability to map out the three-dimensional structure of temperature, water vapor, clouds, precipitation and convective parameters on a continual basis, will significantly enhance our ability to observe hurricanes and other severe storms. In addition, with performance matching that of current and next generation of low-earth-orbiting microwave sounders, GeoSTAR will also provide observations important to the study of the hydrologic cycle, atmospheric processes and climate variability and trends. In particular, with GeoSTAR it will be possible to fully resolve the diurnal cycle. We discuss the GeoSTAR concept and basic design, the performance of the prototype, and a number of science applications that will be possible with GeoSTAR. The work reported

  2. TES/Aura L2 Ozone (O3) Lite Nadir (TL2O3LN)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-08-26

    TES/Aura L2 Ozone (O3) Lite Nadir (TL2O3LN) News:  TES News ... Level:  L2 Instrument:  TES/Aura L2 Ozone Spatial Coverage:  5.3 km nadir Spatial ... OPeNDAP Access:  OPeNDAP Parameters:  Ozone Order Data:  Reverb:   Order Data Guide ...

  3. TES/Aura L2 Water Vapor (H2O) Limb (TL2H2OLS)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-01-30

    TES/Aura L2 Water Vapor (H2O) Limb (TL2H2OLS) News:  TES News ... Level:  L2 Platform:  TES/Aura L2 Water Vapor Spatial Coverage:  27 x 23 km Limb ... Access:  OPeNDAP Parameters:  H2O Water Volume Mixing Radio Precision Vertical Resolution Order ...

  4. TES/Aura L2 Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Lite Nadir (TL2CO2LN)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-06-24

    TES/Aura L2 Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Lite Nadir (TL2CO2LN) News:  TES News ... L2 Instrument:  TES/Aura L2 Carbon Dioxide Spatial Coverage:  5.3 km nadir Spatial ... OPeNDAP Access:  OPeNDAP Parameters:  Carbon Dioxide Order Data:  Reverb:   Order Data ...

  5. TES/Aura L2 Ammonia (NH3) Lite Nadir (TL2NH3LN)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-08-26

    TES/Aura L2 Ammonia (NH3) Lite Nadir (TL2NH3LN) News:  TES News ... Level:  L2 Instrument:  TES/Aura L2 Ammonia Spatial Coverage:  5.3 km nadir Spatial ... OPeNDAP Access:  OPeNDAP Parameters:  Ammonia Order Data:  Reverb:   Order Data ...

  6. TES/Aura L2 Methane (CH4) Lite Nadir (TL2CH4LN)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-08-31

    TES/Aura L2 Methane (CH4) Lite Nadir (TL2CH4LN) News:  TES News ... Level:  L2 Instrument:  TES/Aura L2 Methane Spatial Coverage:  5.3 km nadir Spatial ... OPeNDAP Access:  OPeNDAP Parameters:  Methane Order Data:  Reverb:   Order Data ...

  7. Understanding patterns of variability in tropospheric ozone over Europe and eastern Asia in 2005-2009 using TES observations and the TM5 chemistry transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verstraeten, W. W.; van Geel, M. H. A.; Boersma, K. F.

    2012-04-01

    Tropospheric ozone is an important greenhouse gas and a global air pollutant. Because of its oxidizing power, it is harmful to the tissues of many living organisms. Ozone in the troposphere is produced by photo-chemical oxidation of precursors including volatile organic compounds (VOC's) and CO in the presence of NOx. These precursors may originate from anthropogenic emissions, but may also be naturally produced by vegetation, animals, bacteria and fungi. Intrusions of stratospheric ozone into the higher troposphere also contribute to the ozone abundance in the troposphere. The interpretation of tropospheric ozone observations remains a challenging task due to complex varying spatio-temporal emissions of ozone precursors with different lifetimes (from minutes to hours, days and weeks), stratospheric intrusion, and the effect of long-range transport of precursors and ozone driven by meteorological variables. In some areas the combination of favourable photochemical regimes and specific meteorological conditions may enhance the local tropospheric ozone productions. Thanks to their extensive spatial coverage and frequent overpasses, spaceborne sensors are excellent tools to map spatio-temporal patterns of tropospheric ozone. However, evaluating trends in tropospheric ozone concentrations over Europe (e.g. Mediterranean maxima) and China requires the use of advanced chemical transport models (CTM) for understanding and attributing the different sources to the observations. The objective of this study was to evaluate time series of tropospheric ozone observed from space by TES (Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer onboard NASA's EOS-Aura satellite) with the TM5 CTM using five years (2005-2009) of observations and simulations. From dedicated TM5 model runs, the spatio-temporal TES trends of tropospheric ozone are analysed aiming at understanding the different sources and mechanisms involved. First comparison of tropospheric ozone concentration from TES v4 observations and

  8. Profiling Tropospheric CO2 using the Aura TES and TCCON instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuai, L.; Worden, J.; Kulawik, S. S.; Bowman, K. W.; Biraud, S. C.; Abshire, J. B.; Wofsy, S. C.; Natraj, V.; Frankenberg, C.; Wunch, D.; Connor, B. J.; Miller, C. E.; Roehl, C. M.; Shia, R.; Yung, Y. L.

    2012-12-01

    Characterizing the global carbon budget requires mapping the global distribution and variability of CO2 sources and sinks. Measurements of the total column of CO2 by ground or by satellite have the potential to estimate global sources and sinks (Rayner and O'Brien, GRL, 2001, Olsen and Randerson, JGR, 2004) but are less sensitive to regional scale and local sources and sinks because CO2 is a long-lived gas which makes it challenging to disentangle local sources from CO2 transported into the observed air parcel (Keppel-Aleks et al., BGD, 2011). We explore the use of total column measurements with estimates of the free tropospheric CO2 by TES to distinguish boundary layer CO2 and free tropospheric CO2 because quantify the vertical gradient between the free troposphere and boundary layer is critical for estimating CO2 fluxes (Stephens, Science, 2007) and near surface CO2 should be more sensitive to local fluxes than the total column CO2. In this study, CO2 profiles are estimated from the Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON) measurements and integrated into a column-averaged concentration. These column averages agree with aircraft data within 0.67 ppm, consistent with the uncertainties due to measurement noise and temperature. There is a bias of about -5 ppm, consistent with Wunch et al. (Atmos. Meas. Tech. 2010). Free troposphere estimates of CO2 are obtained from the GEOS-Chem model that has assimilated CO2 measurements from Aura Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer. The boundary layer CO2 estimates are calculated by subtracting TES free tropospheric CO2 from TCCON column CO2. This estimate of boundary layer CO2 agrees well with aircraft data with RMS of 1.44 ppm for about the fifty PBL CO2 estimates. This work shows that total column from NIR measurements (GOSAT, TCCON and OCO-2) and free troposphere measurement from TIR (e.g. TES and AIRS) can be used to profile CO2 and obtain PBL CO2 with precision necessary to capture the atmospheric CO2 variability. It

  9. Estimates of boundary layer CO2 by combining TCCON and TES data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuai, L.; Worden, J.; Kulawik, S.; Bowman, K.; Frankenberg, C.; Olsen, E.; Wunch, D.; Shia, R.; Connor, B.; Miller, C.; Yung, Y.

    2012-04-01

    Monitoring the global distribution and long-term variations of CO2 sources and sinks is required for characterizing the global carbon budget. Measurements of the total column CO2 by ground or by satellite have the potential to estimate global sources and sinks (Rayner and O'Brien, GRL, 2001, Olsen and Randerson, JGR, 2004) but are less sensitive to regional scale sources and sinks because CO2 is a long-lived gas which makes it challenging to identify local sources from CO2 transported into the observed air parcel (Keppel-Aleks et al., BGD, 2011). In this study we explore the use of total column measurements with estimates of the free tropospheric CO2 to distinguish planetary boundary layer (PBL) CO2 and free tropospheric CO2 because quantifying the vertical gradient between the free troposphere and boundary layer is critical for estimating CO2 fluxes (Stephens, Science, 2007) and near surface CO2 should be more sensitive to local fluxes than the total column CO2. Column-averaged concentrations are derived by integrating CO2 profiles, which are retrieved from the Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON) measurements. These column data agree with aircraft integrated column CO2 within root mean square (RMS) of 0.7 ppm, consistent with the uncertainties due to measurement noise and temperature. There is a bias of about -5 ppm, agreeing with Wunch et al. (Atmos. Meas. Tech. 2010). Free troposphere estimates of CO2 are obtained from the GEOS-Chem model that has assimilated CO2 measurements from Aura Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES). The PBL CO2 estimates are calculated by subtracting TES free tropospheric CO2 from TCCON column CO2. This estimate of PBL CO2 agrees well with aircraft data with RMS of 1.30 ppm for more than forty PBL CO2 estimates we compared. This work shows that total column from NIR measurements (GOSAT, TCCON and OCO-2) and free troposphere measurement from TIR (e.g. TES and AIRS) can be used to profile CO2 and obtain PBL estimates with

  10. Simultaneous physical retrieval of atmospheric and surface state from Martian spectra: the phi MARS algorithm and application to TES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liuzzi, G.; Masiello, G.; Serio, C.; Mancarella, F.; Fonti, S.; Roush, T.

    The problem of fully simultaneous retrieval of surface and atmosphere has been satisfactorily addressed as far as Earth is concerned in many works \\citep{masACP09,carENSO05}, especially for high-resolution instruments. However, such retrieval know-how has been not completely implemented in other planetary contexts. In this perspective, we present a new methodology for the simultaneous retrieval of surface and atmospheric parameters of Mars. The methodology, fully explained in \\cite{liuzzi2015} is based on a non-linear, iterative optimal estimation scheme, supported by a statistical retrieval procedure used to initialize the physical retrieval algorithm with a reliable first guess of the atmospheric parameters. The forward module \\cite{liuzzi2014} is fully integrated with the inverse one, and it is a monochromatic radiative transfer model with the capability to calculate genuine analytical Jacobians of any desired geophysical parameter. We describe both the mathematical framework of the methodology and, as a proof of concept, its application to a large sample of data acquired by the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES). Results are drawn for the case of surface temperature and emissivity, atmospheric temperature profile, water vapour, dust and ice mixing ratios. Some work has also been done for revisiting the claims of methane detection with TES data \\citep{fon10,fonti2015}. Comparison with climate models and other TES data analyses show a very good agreement and consistency. Moreover, we will show how the methodology can be applied to other instruments looking at Mars, simply customizing part of the forward and reverse modules.

  11. Satellite Sounder Data Assimilation for Improving Alaska Region Weather Forecast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Jiang; Stevens, E.; Zavodsky, B. T.; Zhang, X.; Heinrichs, T.; Broderson, D.

    2014-01-01

    Data assimilation has been demonstrated very useful in improving both global and regional numerical weather prediction. Alaska has very coarser surface observation sites. On the other hand, it gets much more satellite overpass than lower 48 states. How to utilize satellite data to improve numerical prediction is one of hot topics among weather forecast community in Alaska. The Geographic Information Network of Alaska (GINA) at University of Alaska is conducting study on satellite data assimilation for WRF model. AIRS/CRIS sounder profile data are used to assimilate the initial condition for the customized regional WRF model (GINA-WRF model). Normalized standard deviation, RMSE, and correlation statistic analysis methods are applied to analyze one case of 48 hours forecasts and one month of 24-hour forecasts in order to evaluate the improvement of regional numerical model from Data assimilation. The final goal of the research is to provide improved real-time short-time forecast for Alaska regions.

  12. Stratospheric CH3CN from the UARS Microwave Limb Sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livesey, Nathaniel J.; Waters, Joe W.; Khosravi, Rashid; Brasseur, Guy P.; Tyndall, Geoffrey S.; Read, William G.

    CH3CN in the stratosphere has been measured by the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS), providing the first global CH3CN dataset. The MLS observations are in broad agreement with past high and midlatitude observations of CH3CN, although concentrations are a little larger than previously observed. In the tropics, where CH3CN has not up to now been measured, a persistent ‘peak’ in the profiles is seen around 22 hPa, which may be evidence of a tropical stratospheric CH3CN source. Comparisons are made with the NCAR SOCRATES model, including runs having an artificial tropical stratospheric CH3CN source.

  13. Mechanical Description of the Mars Climate Sounder Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jau, Bruno M.

    2008-01-01

    This paper introduces the Mars Climate Sounder (MCS) Instrument of the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) spacecraft. The instrument scans the Martian atmosphere almost continuously to systematically acquire weather and climate observations over time. Its primary components are an optical bench that houses dual telescopes with a total of nine channels for visible and infrared sensing, and a two axis gimbal that provides pointing capabilities. Both rotating joints consist of an integrated actuator with a hybrid planetary/harmonic transmission and a twist cap section that enables the electrical wiring to pass through the rotating joint. Micro stepping is used to reduce spacecraft disturbance torques to acceptable levels while driving the stepper motors. To ensure survivability over its four year life span, suitable mechanical components, lubrication, and an active temperature control system were incorporated. Some life test results and lessons learned are provided to serve as design guidelines for actuator parts and flex cables.

  14. Global Daily Atmospheric State Profiles from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagano, Thomas S.; Aumann, Hartmut H.; Fetzer, Eric J.; Lambrigtsen, Bjorn H.; Chahine, Moustafa T.

    2008-01-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) is a hyperspectral infrared instrument on the EOS Aqua Spacecraft, launched on May 4, 2002. AIRS has 2378 infrared channels ranging from 3.7 (micro)m to 15.4 (micro)m and a 13.5 km footprint. AIRS, in conjunction with the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU), produces temperature profiles with 1K/km accuracy on a global scale, as well as water vapor profiles, clouds, dust and trace gas amounts for CO2, CO, SO2, O3 and CH4.[1] AIRS data are used for weather forecasting and studies of global climate change. The AIRS is a 'facility' instrument developed by NASA as an experimental demonstration of advanced technology for remote sensing and the benefits of high resolution infrared spectra to science investigations.

  15. Assimilation of thermodynamic information from advanced infrared sounders under partially cloudy skies for regional NWP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Pei; Li, Jun; Goldberg, Mitchell D.; Schmit, Timothy J.; Lim, Agnes H. N.; Li, Zhenglong; Han, Hyojin; Li, Jinlong; Ackerman, Steve A.

    2015-06-01

    Generally, only clear-infrared spectral radiances (not affected by clouds) are assimilated in weather analysis systems. This is due to difficulties in modeling cloudy radiances as well as in observing their vertical structure from space. To take full advantage of the thermodynamic information in advanced infrared (IR) sounder observations requires assimilating radiances from cloud-contaminated regions. An optimal imager/sounder cloud-clearing technique has been developed by the Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. This technique can be used to retrieve clear column radiances through combining collocated multiband imager IR clear radiances and the sounder cloudy radiances; no background information is needed in this method. The imager/sounder cloud-clearing technique is similar to that of the microwave/IR cloud clearing in the derivation of the clear-sky equivalent radiances. However, it retains the original IR sounder resolution, which is critical for regional numerical weather prediction applications. In this study, we have investigated the assimilation of cloud-cleared IR sounder radiances using Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS)/Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer for three hurricanes, Sandy (2012), Irene (2011), and Ike (2008). Results show that assimilating additional cloud-cleared AIRS radiances reduces the 48 and 72 h temperature forecast root-mean-square error by 0.1-0.3 K between 300 and 850 hPa. Substantial improvement in reducing track forecasts errors in the range of 10 km to 50 km was achieved.

  16. How Strong is the Case for Geostationary Hyperspectral Sounders?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk-Davidoff, D. B.; Liu, Z.; Jensen, S.; Housley, E.

    2014-12-01

    The NASA GIFTS program designed and constructed a flight-ready hyperspectral infrared sounder for geostationary orbit. Efforts are now underway to launch a constellation of similar instruments. Salient characteristics included 4 km spatial resolution at nadir and 0.6 cm-1 spectral resolution in two infrared bands. Observing system experiments have demonstrated the success of assimilated hyperspectral infrared radiances from IASI and AIRS in improving weather forecast skill. These results provide circumstantial evidence that additional observations at higher spatial and temporal resolution would likely improve forecast skill further. However, there is only limited work investigating the magnitude of this skill improvement in the literature. Here we present a systematic program to quantify the additional skill of a constellation of geostationary hyperspectral sounders through observing system simulation experiments (OSSEs) using the WRF model and the WRFDA data assimilation system. The OSSEs will focus first on high-impact events, such as the forecast for Typhoon Haiyun, but will also address quotidian synoptic forecast skill. The focus will be on short-term forecast skill (<24 hours lead time), in accord with WRF's mesoscale design, and with the view that high time frequency observations are likely to make the biggest impact on the skill of short-range forecasts. The experiments will use as their starting point the full existing observational suite, so that additionality can be addressed, but will also consider contingencies, such as the loss of particular elements of the existing system, as well as the degree to which a stand-alone system of hyperspectral sounds would be able to successfully initialize a regional forecast model. A variety of settings, tropical and extratropical, marine and continental will be considered.

  17. Alternative cloud clearing methodologies for the atmospheric infrared sounder (AIRS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnet, C. D.; Goldberg, M.; King, Thomas; Nalli, Nicholas; Wolf, Walter; Zhou, Lihang; Wei, Jennifer

    2005-08-01

    Traditional cloud clearing methods utilize a clear estimate of the atmosphere inferred from a microwave sounder to extrapolate cloud cleared radiances (CCR's) from a spatial interpolation of multiple cloudy infrared footprints. Unfortunately, sounders have low information content in the lower atmosphere due to broad weighting functions, interference from surface radiance and the microwave radiances can also suffer from uncorrected side-lobe contamination. Therefore, scenes with low altitude clouds can produce errant CCR's that, in-turn, produce errant sounding products. Radiances computed from the corrupted products can agree with the measurements within the error budget making detection and removal of the errant scenes impractical; typically, a large volume of high quality retrievals are rejected in order to remove a few errant scenes. In this paper we compare and contrast the yield and accuracy of the traditional approach with alternative methods of obtaining CCR's. The goal of this research is three-fold: (1) to have a viable approach if the microwave instruments fail on the EOS-AQUA platform; (2) to improve the accuracy and reliability of infrared products derived from CCR's; and (3) to investigate infrared approaches for geosynchronous platforms where microwave sounding is difficult. The methods discussed are (a) use of assimilation products, (b) use of a statistical regression trained on cloudy radiances, (c) an infrared multi-spectral approach exploiting the non-linearity of the Planck function, and (d) use of clear MODIS measurements in the AIRS sub-pixel space. These approaches can be used independently of the microwave measurements; however, they also enhance the traditional approach in the context of quality control, increased spatial resolution, and increased information content.

  18. Characterizing and Modeling the Noise and Complex Impedance of Feedhorn-Coupled TES Polarimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Appel, J. W.; Beall, J. A.; Essinger-Hileman, T.; Parker, L. P.; Staggs, S. T.; Visnjic, C.; Zhao, Y.; Austermann, J. E.; Halverson, N. W.; Henning, J. W.; Simon, S. M.; Becker, D.; Britton, J.; Cho, H. M.; Hilton, G. C.; Irwin, K. D.; Niemack, M. D.; Yoon, K. W.; Benson, B. A.; Bleem, L. E.

    2009-12-16

    We present results from modeling the electrothermal performance of feedhorn-coupled transition edge sensor (TES) polarimeters under development for use in cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization experiments. Each polarimeter couples radiation from a corrugated feedhorn through a planar orthomode transducer, which transmits power from orthogonal polarization modes to two TES bolometers. We model our TES with two- and three-block thermal architectures. We fit the complex impedance data at multiple points in the TES transition. From the fits, we predict the noise spectra. We present comparisons of these predictions to the data for two TESes on a prototype polarimeter.

  19. Characterization of Polycapillary Optics in a TES Microcalorimeter EDS System Installed on an SEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takano, A.; Maehata, K.; Iyomoto, N.; Yasuda, K.; Maeno, H.; Shiiyama, K.; Tanaka, K.

    2016-08-01

    Energy-dispersive spectroscopic measurements are performed using a superconducting transition-edge sensor (TES) microcalorimeter mounted on a scanning electron microscope (SEM) for advanced research at Kyushu University. Because the sensitive area of the TES microcalorimeter is about 0.02~mm2, polycapillary optics is used to collect the X-rays emitted by the SEM specimen on the TES microcalorimeter. The X-ray transmission efficiency of the polycapillary optics is obtained by analyzing the X-ray energy spectra measured by the TES microcalorimeter. The obtained transmission efficiency of the polycapillary optics is reproduced by the calculated results of the simulation.

  20. In vitro production of Toxocara canis excretory-secretory (TES) antigen.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Divyamol; Jeyathilakan, N; Abdul Basith, S; Senthilkumar, T M A

    2016-09-01

    Toxocara canis is a widespread gastrointestinal nematode parasite of dogs and cause Toxocara larva migrans, an important zoonotic disease in humans on ingestion of infective eggs. Toxocarosis is one of the few human parasitic diseases whose serodiagnosis uses a standardized antigen, T. canis excretory secretory antigen (TES). The present study describes collection of T. canis adult worm, collection and embryonation of T. canis eggs, hatching and separation of T. canis larvae, in vitro maintenance of T. canis second stage larvae for production of TES, concentration of culture fluid TES and yield of TES in correlation with various methods cited in literature. PMID:27605834

  1. Comparison Of TES FFSM Eddies And MOC Storms MY 24-26

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noble, John; Haberle, R. M.; Bridger, A. F. C.; Wilson, R. J.; Barnes, J. R.; Hollingsworth, J. L.; Cantor, B. A.

    2012-10-01

    Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) orbiter observed a planet-encircling dust storm (PDS) in Mars year (MY) 25 from Ls=176.2-263.4°. Although PDSs occur on an irregular basis, all well-documented storms have begun within ± 75° of Ls from perihelion (Ls=251°) when insolation is greatest near the SH summer solstice (Ls=270°) and the south polar cap is receding. PDS seasonal occurrence suggests the presence of climatic/environmental precursors and components, yet interannual variability suggests that initiation and expansion mechanisms are not solely seasonal in character. We have integrated and examined all available MGS data in order to better understand and characterize the dynamical processes responsible for MY 25 PDS initiation and expansion. Here we present an examination of Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) dust storms and transient baroclinic eddies identified from Fast Fourier Synoptic Mapping (FFSM) of Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) temperatures for the first two phases of the storm: precursor, Ls=176.2- 184.7°, and expansion, Ls=184.7-193°. FFSM analysis of TES 3.7 hPa thermal data shows the presence of eastward-traveling waves at 60° S with a period of about three sols. We hypothesize that these waves are transient baroclinic eddies that contributed to the initiation of precursor storms near Hellas. An examination of the spatial and temporal relationship of FFSM eddies and MOC storms suggests an interesting association between eastward eddy propagation and eastward storm evolution. Determining the factors responsible for PDS genesis in MY 25 and not 24 and 26 is difficult. The most notable difference is the amplitude of E1-E7 eddies in Hellas, with all seven MY 25 eddies colder than -3.5 K, compared with three in MY 24 and two in MY 26. It is possible that the sustained series of high-amplitude eddies in MY 25 was a factor in PDS interannual variability.

  2. In-Flight Performance of the TES Loop Heat Pipe Rejection System: Seven Years in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, Jose I.; Na-Nakornpanom, Arthur

    2012-01-01

    The Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) instrument heat rejection system has been operating in space for nearly 8 years since launched on NASA's EOS Aura Spacecraft. The instrument is an infrared imaging fourier transform spectrometer with spectral coverage of 3.2 to 15.4 microns. The loop heat pipe (LHP) based heat rejection system manages all of the instrument components waste heat including the two mechanical cryocoolers and their drive electronics. Five propylene LHPs collect and transport the instrument waste heat to the near room temperature nadir viewing radiators. During the early months of the mission, ice contamination of the cryogenic surfaces including the focal planes led to increased cryocooler loads and the need for periodic decontamination cycles. Focal plane decontamination cycles require power cycling both cryocoolers which also requires the two cryocooler LHPs to turn off and on during each cycle. To date, the cryocooler LHPs have undergone 24 start-ups in orbit successfully. This paper reports on the TES cryocooler loop heat pipe based heat rejection system performance. After a brief overview of the instrument thermal design, the paper presents detailed data on the highly successful space operation of the loop heat pipes since instrument turn-on in 2004. The data shows that the steady-state and transient operation of the LHPs has not changed since 2004 and shows consistent and predictable performance. The LHP based heat rejection system has provided a nearly constant heat rejection heat sink for all of its equipment which has led to exceptional overall instrument performance with world class science.

  3. Hemispheric asymmetry in martian seasonal surface water ice from MGS TES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bapst, Jonathan; Bandfield, Joshua L.; Wood, Stephen E.

    2015-11-01

    The Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) visible/near-infrared and thermal infrared bolometers measured planetary broadband albedo and temperature for more than three Mars years. As seasons progress on Mars, surface temperatures may fall below the frost point of volatiles in the atmosphere (namely, carbon dioxide and water). Systematic mapping of the spatial and temporal occurrence of these volatiles in the martian atmosphere, on the surface, and in the subsurface has shown their importance in understanding the climate of Mars. We examine TES daytime albedo, temperature, and atmospheric opacity data to map the latitudinal and temporal occurrence of seasonal surface water frost on Mars. We expand on previous work by looking at the behavior of water frost over the entire martian year, made possible with comprehensive, multi-year data. Interpretations of frost are based on albedo changes and the corresponding daytime temperature range. Data is considered consistent with water frost when there are significant albedo increases (>0.05 relative to frost-free seasons) and the observed temperatures are ∼170-200 K. We argue the presence of extensive water frost in the northern hemisphere, extending from the pole to ∼40°N, following seasonal temperature trends. In the north, water frost first appears near the pole at Ls = ∼160° and is last observed at Ls = ∼90°. Extensive water frost is less evident in southern hemisphere data, though both hemispheres show data that are consistent with the presence of a water ice annulus during seasonal cap retreat. Hemispherical asymmetry in the occurrence of seasonal water frost is due in part to the lower (∼40%) atmospheric water vapor abundances observed in the southern hemisphere. Our results are consistent with net transport of water vapor to the northern hemisphere. The deposition and sublimation of seasonal water frost may significantly increase the near-surface water vapor density that could

  4. Past Habitability of Mars: Interpretations of Mars Global Surveyor TES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkland, L.; Herr, K.; Adams, P.

    2003-12-01

    A primary question in habitability studies of Mars is whether significant surface water was present in the past. If large water deposits were present, then carbonate deposits likely would have formed. Thus, much debate about the past climate and habitability centers on whether carbonate deposits have been detected. Here we discuss relevant infrared spectral evidence; implications for astrobiology; and the unifying research needed to address astrobiology concerns. Under specific conditions, carbonates exhibit spectral features near 6.5, 11, and 33 microns. Several past studies proposed detection of carbonates on Mars (reviewed Roush et al. [1993]). The detections have not widely been perceived as conclusive. Two recent orbited instruments (1996 Global Surveyor TES; 2001 Odyssey THEMIS) were intended to resolve the question. However, no 11 or 33 micron band detections have been reported. Complexities in atmospheric unmixing significantly delayed and complicated analysis of the 6.5 micron region. Bandfield et al. [2003] recently proposed detection of a 6.5 micron carbonate feature in the surface dust. However, TES did not detect the 11 and 33 micron bands, placing the interpretation again in the debated category. Christensen et al. [2001] concluded that TES detected no carbonate to the 10 percent per pixel level, and Bandfield et al. [2003] in selected dark regions to 5 percent. The 2003 rover Mini-TES is comparable to TES, and is similarly intended to resolve the minerals present. One interpretation of those results is that the types of carbonate deposits expected from large bodies of water are not present. One inference is that no large, standing bodies of water on Mars existed. However, discussion of a key issue to the debate has been missing: What impacts whether a mineral deposit is detectable by these instruments? We will demonstrate that rough surface texture can cause large mineral deposits, including rocks, to have subdued spectral signatures [Kirkland et al

  5. Atmospheric Waves in MGS TES Limb-Scan Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banfield, D. J.; Conrath, B. J.; Kaelberer, M. S.; Smith, M. D.

    2014-12-01

    We have quantified the expression of the lowest zonal wavenumber forced and traveling waves evident in the MGS TES Limb-scan temperature retrievals. The results were found to be broadly consistent with the vertically limited and vertically smoothed (although better spatially and temporally resolved) results from the more numerous MGS TES nadir temperature retrievals (e.g., Wilson et al., 2002, Banfield et al., 2003, Banfield et al. 2004). The MGS TES Limb-scan retrievals were used to compute a measure of the Diurnal Kelvin Waves (DK1 And DK2). The structures revealed are consistent with theory, and indicative of the importance of these wave modes at aerobraking altitudes (e.g., Wilson 2000, Forbes & Hagan, 2000, Wilson, 2002). The stationary wave structures revealed in the limb retrievals show the winter polar waves in both hemispheres continue to have their maximum amplitude aligned along the polar vortices, even for altitudes above 4 scale heights. The phase structures in and above the stationary waves revealed by the limb retrievals are consistent with the nadir results and the heat fluxes computed in those analyses (Banfield et al., 2003). The winter polar vortex zonal wavenumber 1 traveling waves continue along the edge of the polar vortex, reaching to 6 or more scale heights altitude in the northern winter and extending between 60N and the north pole. The peak amplitudes for these zonal wavenumber 1 traveling waves were found to lie at about 4 scale heights altitude. The limb retrievals revealed more clear evidence of a northern fall equinoctial global traveling wave mode having expression not only in the mid-latitudes in both hemispheres, but also out of phase above the tropics at altitudes above 4 scale heights. Zonal wavenumber 2 & 3 traveling waves could not be reliably retrieved from the limb retrievals.

  6. Complex-compound low-temperature TES system

    SciTech Connect

    Rockenfeller, U.

    1989-03-01

    Development of a complex-compound low-temperature TES system is described herein from basic chemical principles through current bench scale system development. Important application engineering issues and an economic outlook are addressed as well. The system described uses adsorption reactions between solid metal inorganic salts and ammonia refrigerant. It is the coordinative nature of these reactions that allows for storage of ammonia refrigerant within the solid salt crystals that function as a chemical compressor during on peak periods (substituting the mechanical compressor) and release ammonia during off peak periods while a mechanical vapor compression system provides the necessary reactor pressure and heat.

  7. The Multiplexed SQUID TES array at Ninety Gigahertz (MUSTANG)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korngut, Phillip M.

    The Multiplexed SQUID/TES Array at Ninety Gigahertz (MUSTANG) is a bolometric continuum imaging camera designed to operate at the Gregorian focus of the 100 m Green Bank Telescope (GBT) in Pocahontas county, West Virginia. The combination of the GBT's large collecting area and the 8 x 8 array of transition edge sensors at the heart of MUSTANG allows for deep imaging at 10'' resolution at 90 GHz. The MUSTANG receiver is now a facility instrument of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory available to the general astronomical community. The 3.3 mm continuum passband is useful to access a large range of Galactic and extra-Galactic astrophysics. Sources with synchrotron, free-free and thermal blackbody emission can be detected at 3.3 mm. Of particular interest is the Sunyaev Zel'dovich effect in clusters of galaxies, which arises from the inverse Compton scattering of CMB photons off hot electrons in the intra-cluster medium. In the MUSTANG band, the effect is observationally manifested as an artificial decrement in power on the sky in the direction of the cluster. There have been many experiments in the past two decades dedicated to measurements of the SZE, however, nearly all of them were accomplished with angular resolution larger than ˜ 1'. The massive primary of the GBT enables measurements of the SZE on 10'' scales. This provides a new technique to map pressure substructure in the plasma atmospheres of merging clusters of galaxies. By analyzing MUSTANG data along side X-ray data, spatially resolved measurements of the temperature, density and pressure of the ICM can be performed which can be used to infer the physics governing major mergers. This thesis details the design, commissioning and operation of the various components which comprise the MUSTANG receiver. This includes the sub-kelvin cryogenic cooling, the time domain multiplexed readout electronics and the array of transition edge sensor bolometers. Laboratory characterization of the detector array is

  8. Space-time integrity of improved stratospheric and mesospheric sounder and microwave limb sounder temperature fields at Kelvin wave scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, E. M.; Stanford, J. L.; Ziemke, J. R.; Allen, D. R.; Taylor, F. W.; Rodgers, C. D.; Lawrence, B. N.; Fishbein, E. F.; Elson, L. S.; Waters, J. W.

    1995-07-01

    Space-time analyses, which are sensitive to details of retrieval and gridding processes not seen in zonal and time means, are used to investigate the integrity of version 8 gridded retrieved temperatures from the improved stratospheric and mesospheric sounder (ISAMS) on the upper atmosphere research satellite (UARS). This note presents results of such analyses applied to ISAMS tropical data. Comparisons are made with microwave limb sounder (MLS), also on UARS, temperatures. Prominent zonal wave number 1 features are observed with characteristics similar to those expected for Kelvin waves. Time versus longitude plots reveal quasi-regular eastward phase progression from November 1991 to mid-January 1992. The perturbations extend throughout the upper stratosphere and lower mesosphere (altitudes of 32-64 km), exhibiting peak-to-peak amplitudes of up to 2°-3° K and periods from ˜ 2 weeks in midstratosphere to ˜ 1 week at higher altitudes. Faster Kelvin waves with periods of 3-5 days are also found in the lower mesosphere. Height versus time plots reveal downward phase and upward group velocities, consistent with forcing from below. Vertical wavelengths are ˜ 20 km for the slower mode and about twice this scale for the faster 3 to 5-day mode. The features are trapped within ±10°-15° of the equator. Kelvin wave signatures in ISAMS and MLS temperatures are compared at 10 and 1 hPa. Good agreement is found, illustrating the internal consistency and ability of both ISAMS and MLS temperature grids to capture relatively small amplitude features with space-time scales of fast, zonally asymmetric equatorial modes.

  9. Delineating the Tes Interaction Site in Zyxin and Studying Cellular Effects of Its Disruption.

    PubMed

    Hadzic, Ermin; Catillon, Marie; Halavatyi, Aliaksandr; Medves, Sandrine; Van Troys, Marleen; Moes, Michèle; Baird, Michelle A; Davidson, Michael W; Schaffner-Reckinger, Elisabeth; Ampe, Christophe; Friederich, Evelyne

    2015-01-01

    Focal adhesions are integrin-based structures that link the actin cytoskeleton and the extracellular matrix. They play an important role in various cellular functions such as cell signaling, cell motility and cell shape. To ensure and fine tune these different cellular functions, adhesions are regulated by a large number of proteins. The LIM domain protein zyxin localizes to focal adhesions where it participates in the regulation of the actin cytoskeleton. Because of its interactions with a variety of binding partners, zyxin has been proposed to act as a molecular scaffold. Here, we studied the interaction of zyxin with such a partner: Tes. Similar to zyxin, Tes harbors three highly conserved LIM domains of which the LIM1 domain directly interacts with zyxin. Using different zyxin variants in pull-down assays and ectopic recruitment experiments, we identified the Tes binding site in zyxin and showed that four highly conserved amino acids are crucial for its interaction with Tes. Based upon these findings, we used a zyxin mutant defective in Tes-binding to assess the functional consequences of abrogating the zyxin-Tes interaction in focal adhesions. Performing fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, we showed that zyxin recruits Tes to focal adhesions and modulates its turnover in these structures. However, we also provide evidence for zyxin-independent localization of Tes to focal adhesions. Zyxin increases focal adhesion numbers and reduces focal adhesion lifetimes, but does so independent of Tes. Quantitative analysis showed that the loss of interaction between zyxin and Tes affects the process of cell spreading. We conclude that zyxin influences focal adhesion dynamics, that it recruits Tes and that this interaction is functional in regulating cell spreading. PMID:26509500

  10. Toric offset three-reflector antenna for an advanced microwave limb sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cofield, Richard E.; Cwik, Thomas A.; Raouf, Nasrat A.

    2002-12-01

    An advanced Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS), now in concept development for a potential future mission, is a space-borne heterodyne instrument to measure pressure, temperature, and atmospheric constituents from thermal emission between 120 and 2400 GHz. Previous MLS instruments used pencil-beam antennas sized to resolve ~1 vertical scale height. Current atmospheric models need better horizontal resolution than orbit spacing provides. To meet these needs, a new antenna concept combines the wide scan range of the parabolic torus with unblocked offset Cassegrain optics. The resulting system is diffraction-limited in the vertical plane but extremely astigmatic, with beamwidths 0.13×2.5°. Nadir axis symmetry ensures that this Beam Aspect Ratio (BAR) is invariant over +/-33 degrees of azimuth. The antenna can feed either an array of receivers or multiplexed low-noise receivers whose FOVs are swept by a small scanning mirror. We describe 3 stages of antenna design: First, using a paraxial-optics method, we choose conic profiles given vertical resolution orbit geometry, then develop the surfaces by nadir axis rotation, matching axisymmetric feeds to the BAR. A ray-trace program validates the design and generates alignment and deformation tolerances. Finally, a physical optics analysis verifies reflector surface currents and radiation patterns.

  11. The Earth Observing System Microwave Limb Sounder (EOS MLS) on the Aura Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waters, Joe W.; Froidevaux, Lucien; Harwood, Robert S.; Jarnot, Robert F.; Pickett, Herbert M.; Read, William G.; Siegel, Peter H.; Cofield, Richard E.; Filipiak, Mark J.; Flower, Dennis A.; Holden, James R.; Lau, Gary K.; Livesey, Nathaniel J.; Manney, Gloria L; Pumphrey, Hugh C.; Santee, Michelle L.; Wu, Dong L.; Cuddy, David T.; Lay, Richard R.; Loo, Mario S.; Perun, Vincent S.; Schwartz, Michael J.; Stek, Paul C.; Thurstans, Robert P.; Boyles, Mark A.

    2006-01-01

    The Earth Observing System Microwave Limb Sounder measures several atmospheric chemical species (OH, HO2, H2O, O3, HCl, ClO, HOCl, BrO, HNO3, N2O, CO, HCN, CH3CN, volcanic SO2), cloud ice, temperature, and geopotential height to improve our understanding of stratospheric ozone chemistry, the interaction of composition and climate, and pollution in the upper troposphere. All measurements are made simultaneously and continuously, during both day and night. The instrument uses heterodyne radiometers that observe thermal emission from the atmospheric limb in broad spectral regions centered near 118, 190, 240, and 640 GHz, and 2.5 THz. It was launched July 15, 2004 on the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Aura satellite and started full-up science operations on August 13, 2004. An atmospheric limb scan and radiometric calibration for all bands are performed routinely every 25 s. Vertical profiles are retrieved every 165 km along the suborbital track, covering 82 S to 82 N latitudes on each orbit. Instrument performance to date has been excellent; data have been made publicly available; and initial science results have been obtained.

  12. The Geostationary Remote Infrared Pollution Sounder (GRIPS): measurement of the carbon gases from space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoeberl, M.; Dickerson, R.; Marshall, B. T.; McHugh, M.; Fish, C.; Bloom, H.

    2013-09-01

    Climate change and air quality are the most pressing environmental issues of the 21st century. Despite decades of research, the sources and sinks of key greenhouse gases remain highly uncertain [IPCC1] making quantitative predictions of atmospheric composition and their impacts. The Geostationary Remote Infrared Pollution Sounder (GRIPS) is a multi-purpose instrument designed to reduce uncertainty associated with atmospheric radiative forcing. GRIPS will measure will measure greenhouse gases and aerosols - two of the most important elements in the earth's radiation budget. GRIPS will observe carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon monoxide (CO), methane (CH4), - the carbon gases, nitrous oxide (N2O), water vapor and aerosols with unprecedented precision through the atmosphere. The GRIPS instrument uses gas filter correlation radiometry (GFCR) to detect reflected and thermal IR radiation to detect the gases and the reflected solar radiation in the visible and short-wave infrared bands for aerosols. GRIPS is designed to have sensitivity down to the Earth's surface at ~2-8km nadir resolution. GRIPS can resolve CO2, CO, and CH4 anomalies in the planetary boundary layer and the free troposphere to quantify lofting, diurnal variations and longrange transport. With repeated measurements throughout the day GRIPS can maximize the number of cloud free measurements determining biogenic and anthropogenic sources, sinks, and fluxes. GRIPS is highly complementary to the Orbiting Carbon Observatory, OCO-2, the geostationary Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution (TEMPO) and Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) and other existing and planned missions.

  13. Thermal Stability of a 4 Meter Primary Reflector for the Scanning Microwave Limb Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cofield, Richard E.; Kasl, Eldon P.

    2011-01-01

    The Scanning Microwave Limb Sounder (SMLS) is a space-borne heterodyne radiometer which will measure pressure, temperature and atmospheric constituents from thermal emission in [180,680] GHz. SMLS, planned for the NRC Decadal Survey's Global Atmospheric Composition Mission, uses a novel toric Cassegrain antenna to perform both elevation and azimuth scanning. This provides better horizontal and temporal resolution and coverage than were possible with elevation-only scanning in the two previous MLS satellite instruments. SMLS is diffraction-limited in the vertical plane but highly astigmatic in the horizontal (beam aspect ratio approx. 1:20). Nadir symmetry ensures that beam shape is nearly invariant over plus or minus 65 deg azimuth. A low-noise receiver FOV is swept over the reflector system by a small azimuth-scanning mirror. We describe the fabrication and thermal-stability test of a composite demonstration primary reflector, having full 4m height and 1/3 the width planned for flight. Using finite-element models of reflectors and structure, we evaluate thermal deformations and optical performance for 4 orbital environments and isothermal soak. We compare deformations with photogrammetric measurements made during soak tests in a chamber. The test temperature range exceeds predicted orbital ranges by large factors, implying in-orbit thermal stability of 0.21 micron rms (root mean square)/C, which meets SMLS requirements.

  14. Evaluation of Precipitation Detection over Various Surfaces from Passive Microwave Imagers and Sounders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munchak, S. Joseph; Skofronick-Jackson, Gail

    2012-01-01

    During the middle part of this decade a wide variety of passive microwave imagers and sounders will be unified in the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission to provide a common basis for frequent (3 hr), global precipitation monitoring. The ability of these sensors to detect precipitation by discerning it from non-precipitating background depends upon the channels available and characteristics of the surface and atmosphere. This study quantifies the minimum detectable precipitation rate and fraction of precipitation detected for four representative instruments (TMI, GMI, AMSU-A, and AMSU-B) that will be part of the GPM constellation. Observations for these instruments were constructed from equivalent channels on the SSMIS instrument on DMSP satellites F16 and F17 and matched to precipitation data from NOAA's National Mosaic and QPE (NMQ) during 2009 over the continuous United States. A variational optimal estimation retrieval of non-precipitation surface and atmosphere parameters was used to determine the consistency between the observed brightness temperatures and these parameters, with high cost function values shown to be related to precipitation. The minimum detectable precipitation rate, defined as the lowest rate for which probability of detection exceeds 50%, and the detected fraction of precipitation, are reported for each sensor, surface type (ocean, coast, bare land, snow cover) and precipitation type (rain, mix, snow). The best sensors over ocean and bare land were GMI (0.22 mm/hr minimum threshold and 90% of precipitation detected) and AMSU (0.26 mm/hr minimum threshold and 81% of precipitation detected), respectively. Over coasts (0.74 mm/hr threshold and 12% detected) and snow-covered surfaces (0.44 mm/hr threshold and 23% detected), AMSU again performed best but with much lower detection skill, whereas TMI had no skill over these surfaces. The sounders (particularly over water) benefited from the use of re-analysis data (vs. climatology) to

  15. A Deployable 4 Meter 180 to 680 GHz Antenna for the Scanning Microwave Limb Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cofield, Richard E.; Cohen, Eri J.; Agnes, Gregory S.; Stek, Paul C.; Livesey, Nathaniel J.; Read, William G.; Thomson, Mark W.; Kasl, Eldon

    2011-01-01

    The Scanning Microwave Limb Sounder (SMLS) is a space-borne heterodyne radiometer which will measure pressure, temperature and atmospheric constituents from thermal emission between 180 and 680 GHz. SMLS, planned for the Global Atmospheric Composition Mission of the NRC Decadal Survey, uses a novel toric Cassegrain antenna to perform both elevation and azimuth scanning. These provide better horizontal and temporal resolution and coverage than were possible with elevation-only scanning at typical Low-Earth orbit spacing in the two previous MLS satellite instruments. Development of the SMLS antenna was the focus of a 2006 Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) program whose phase II culminated in the fabrication and thermal stability testing of a composite demonstration model of the SMLS primary reflector. This reflector has the full 4m height and 1/3 the width planned for flight. An Instrument Incubator Program (IIP) titled "A deployable 4 Meter 180 to 680 GHz antenna for the Scanning Microwave Limb Sounder" continues development of the SMLS antenna with the study of 5 topics: 1) detailed mathematical modeling of the antenna patterns from which we simulate geophysical parameter retrievals in order to establish FOV performance requirements; 2) thorough correlation of finite element model predictions with measurements made on the SBIR reflector. We will again measure deformations of this reflector, under more flight-like thermal gradients, using higher precision metrology techniques available in a new large-aperture facility at JPL; 3) fabrication of a full-width primary reflector whose asbuilt surface figure will better meet the figure requirements of SMLS than did the SBIR reflector; 4) integration of the primary with other reflectors, and with residual front ends built in a 2007 IIP, in a breadboard antenna; and finally 5) RF testing of the breadboard on a Near Field Range at JPL. We report on significant progress in 3 areas of the current IIP: development of

  16. HIRS-AMTS satellite sounding system test - Theoretical and empirical vertical resolving power. [High resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder - Advanced Moisture and Temperature Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, O. E.

    1982-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with the vertical resolving power of satellite-borne temperature sounding instruments. Information is presented on the capabilities of the High Resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder (HIRS) and a proposed sounding instrument called the Advanced Moisture and Temperature Sounder (AMTS). Two quite different methods for assessing the vertical resolving power of satellite sounders are discussed. The first is the theoretical method of Conrath (1972) which was patterned after the work of Backus and Gilbert (1968) The Backus-Gilbert-Conrath (BGC) approach includes a formalism for deriving a retrieval algorithm for optimizing the vertical resolving power. However, a retrieval algorithm constructed in the BGC optimal fashion is not necessarily optimal as far as actual temperature retrievals are concerned. Thus, an independent criterion for vertical resolving power is discussed. The criterion is based on actual retrievals of signal structure in the temperature field.

  17. Remote Sensing of Atmospheric Climate Parameters from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagano, Thomas S.; Chahine, Moustafa T.; Aumann, Hartmut H.; Tian, Baijun; Lee, Sung-Yung; Olsen, Ed; Lambrigtsen, Bjorn; Fetzer, Eric; Irion, F. W.; McMillan, Wallace; Strow, Larrabee; Fu, Xiouhua; Barnet, Chris; Goldberg, Mitch; Susskind, Joel; Blaisdell, John

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the standard and research products from Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and their current accuracies as demonstrated through validation efforts. It also summarizes ongoing research using AIRS data for weather prediction and improving climate models.

  18. Distributed Antenna-Coupled TES for FIR Detectors Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, Peter K.; Leduc, Henry G.; Dowell, C. Darren; Lee, Richard A.; Zmuidzinas, Jonas

    2007-01-01

    We describe a new architecture for a superconducting detector for the submillimeter and far-infrared. This detector uses a distributed hot-electron transition edge sensor (TES) to collect the power from a focal-plane-filling slot antenna array. The sensors lay directly across the slots of the antenna and match the antenna impedance of about 30 ohms. Each pixel contains many sensors that are wired in parallel as a single distributed TES, which results in a low impedance that readily matches to a multiplexed SQUID readout These detectors are inherently polarization sensitive, with very low cross-polarization response, but can also be configured to sum both polarizations. The dual-polarization design can have a bandwidth of 50The use of electron-phonon decoupling eliminates the need for micro-machining, making the focal plane much easier to fabricate than with absorber-coupled, mechanically isolated pixels. We discuss applications of these detectors and a hybridization scheme compatible with arrays of tens of thousands of pixels.

  19. Thermal Tides and Stationary Waves Revealed by MGS TES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banfield, D.; Conrath, B. J.; Pearl, J. C.; Smith, M. D.; Gierasch, P. J.; P. R. Christensen

    1999-01-01

    Atmospheric temperature retrievals from TES observed radiances make possible the most complete separation of the constituent wave modes evident in Mars atmosphere to date. We use all of the data from the pre-mapping mission phase, which affords good sampling of the diurnal tides and stationary waves. TES retrievals of atmospheric temperature on a grid of pressure levels are the fundamental data set in this study. We then fit this data to selected fourier modes in longitude and time for latitude and L(sub s) bins. From this we have identified the amplitudes and phases of the diurnal and semi-diurnal tides, the first few (gravest) stationary waves and standing waves, as well as an estimate of the zonal and time mean temperature meridional cross sections. These results will be compared with existing models and theory. A possible critical layer for the sun-synchronous diurnal tide may indicate 40 m/s surface zonal wind near 50S for L(sub s) =255-285. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  20. Thermal Conductance Engineering for High-Speed TES Microcalorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hays-Wehle, J. P.; Schmidt, D. R.; Ullom, J. N.; Swetz, D. S.

    2016-07-01

    Many current and future applications for superconducting transition-edge sensor (TES) microcalorimeters require significantly faster pulse response than is currently available. X-ray spectroscopy experiments at next-generation synchrotron light sources need to successfully capture very large fluxes of photons, while detectors at free-electron laser facilities need pulse response fast enough to match repetition rates of the source. Additionally, neutrino endpoint experiments such as HOLMES need enormous statistics, yet are extremely sensitive to pile-up effects that can distort spectra. These issues can be mitigated only by fast rising and falling edges. To address these needs, we have designed high-speed TES detectors with novel geometric enhancements to increase the thermal conductance of pixels suspended on silicon nitride membranes. This paper shows that the thermal conductivity can be precisely engineered to values spanning over an order of magnitude to achieve fast thermal relaxation times tailored to the relevant applications. Using these pixel prototypes, we demonstrate decay time constants faster than 100 μ s, while still maintaining spectral resolution of 3 eV FWHM at 1.5 keV. This paper also discusses the trade-offs inherent in reducing the pixel time constant, such as increased bias current leading to degradation in energy resolution, and potential modifications to improve performance.

  1. Ultrasensitive TES bolometers for space based FIR astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, D.; Mauskopf, P. D.; Ade, P.; Bruijn, M.; de Korte, P. A. J.; Hoevers, H.; Ridder, M.; Khosropanah, P.; Dirks, B.; Gao, J.-R.

    2009-12-01

    We present results from the development of a background limited transition edge sensor (TES) bolometer for the wavelength band 30-60 μm. The bolometer consists of a Ti/Au superconducting thermometer and a Ta radiation absorber deposited on a 200μm×300μm membrane of SixNy suspended on long, narrow legs. This device is voltage biased and the current through the device is measured by a SQUID amplifier. The thermometer has transition temperature Tc = 108 mK and the device is operated from a 70 mK base plate. FIR radiation is coupled into a multimodc horn with entrance aperture of 450 μm, length 4.5 mm and exit aperture of 45 μm, which feeds a metal integrating cavity containing the detector. The radiation band is defined by a pair of lowpass and highpass mesh filters in front of the horn. Here we present measurements of optical noise equivalent power (NEP), optical efficiency, dynamic range and time constant. The results show that measured TES detectors are close to meeting the requirement of the ``Band 3'' of SAFARI FTS imaging instrument [1] on the SPICA mission [2].

  2. Miniature thermal emission spectrometer for the Mars Exploration Rover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silverman, Steven; Peralta, Richard; Christensen, Phil; Mehall, Greg

    2006-10-01

    This paper describes results of the calibration of the miniature thermal emission spectrometer (Mini-TES) being built by Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing (SBRS) under contract to Arizona State University (ASU). This paper also serves as an update to an earlier paper [R.J. Peralta, S. Silverman, D. Bates, Raytheon/Santa Barbara Remote Sensing, P. Christensen, G. Mehall, T. Tourville, R. Keehn, G. Cannon, Arizona State University, Miniature thermal emission spectrometer for the Mars Exploration Rover, Proceedings of the SPIE, vol. 4485-09, August 2001] for mission description and instrument design. Mini-TES is a single detector Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS), covering the spectral range 5 29μm at 10cm spectral resolution. Launched in June 2003, one Mini-TES instrument will fly to Mars aboard each of the two missions of NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Project (MER), named Spirit and Opportunity. Mini-TES is designed to provide a key minerological remote sensing component of the MER mission, which includes several other science instruments. The first Mini-TES unit was required to meet a two-year development schedule with proven, flight-tested instrumentation. Therefore, SBRS designed Mini-TES based on proven heritage from the successful Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) thermal emission spectrometer (TES), which was launched in 1996 and is still operational with over 500 million spectra collected to date. Mini-TES design, performance, integration onto the rovers, as well as details of the calibration are discussed. Full instrument and calibration details are the subject of an upcoming Journal of Geophysical Research Mini-TES paper by Christensen, et al.

  3. FINE PARTICULATE MATTER EMISSIONS FROM CANDLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives reulst of testing five types of candles, purchased from local stores, for fine particulate matter (PM) emissions under close-to-realistic conditions in a research house. The test method allows for determination of both the emission and deposition rates. Most tes...

  4. Investigating the Role of Compositionally-Diverse Glasses in Interpreting Martian Chemistry and Mineralogy as Viewed by TES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minitti, M. E.; Wyatt, M. B.; Hamilton, V. E.

    2006-12-01

    Mineralogy and chemistry of the Martian surface are derived from Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) data by linear deconvolution using a spectral library containing the infrared spectra of a variety of phases [e.g. 1]. Obtaining successful results relies on utilization of a spectral library containing an accurate representation of the phases measured on the Martian surface. In order to explore the influence of a variety of glass compositions on the deconvolution of TES spectra, we synthesized five pristine glasses, obtained their thermal infrared spectra and conducted preliminary TES spectral deconvolutions using a spectral library containing the new glass spectra. The five new glasses have compositions relevant to Martian igneous processes. One basalt has a high-FeO, low-Al2O 3 composition linked to several Martian meteorites [refs in 3]. A second basalt is based on the Deccan Trap basalt that serves as a spectral analog to the TES Surface Type 1 (ST1) spectrum [2]. Similarly, one andesite is based on the Medicine Lake andesite that serves as a spectral analog to the TES Surface Type 2 (ST2) spectrum [2]. A second andesite represents the interstitial melt composition resulting from 90% crystallization of an anhydrous Martian meteorite basalt (described above) [3]. A dacitic glass represents the interstitial melt composition resulting from 80% crystallization of a hydrous Martian meteorite basalt [3]. Each glass was fused in either Pt or AgPd tubing vacuum sealed in SiO2 glass tubing for 72-96 hours. We collected thermal infrared spectra of the ≥500 μm fraction of the glasses at the Hawai'i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology with a ThermoElectron Nexus 470 FTIR interferometric spectrometer in thermal emission mode [4]. We obtained data from 200-4000 cm-1 at 2 cm-1 spectral sampling. Preliminary deconvolutions of ST1 and ST2 spectra indicate that the newly synthesized glasses may represent significant components in the Martian surface. ST1 and ST2 are

  5. Recent microwave sounder observations from aircraft during the HS3 field campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambrigtsen, B.; Brown, S. E.

    2014-12-01

    The High Altitude MMIC Sounding Radiometer (HAMSR) is a microwave sounder similar to but more capable and accurate than current satellite microwave sounders. Since 2010 it has operated on NASA's Global Hawk UAVs and has been participating in the multiyear Hurricane and Severe Storm Sentinel (HS3) hurricane campaign. We present recent results from HS3, including analysis of the thermodynamic and precipitation structure in and around tropical storm systems sampled during HS3. Copyright 2014 California Institute of Technology. Government sponsorship acknowledged.

  6. 75 FR 5314 - T.E.S. Filer City Station Limited Partnership; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission T.E.S. Filer City Station Limited Partnership; Notice of Filing January 26, 2010. Take notice that on January 20, 2010, T.E.S. City Station Limited Partnership,...

  7. GeoSTAR: a microwave sounder for geostationary applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambrigtsen, B. H.; Brown, S. T.; Dinardo, S. J.; Gaier, T. C.; Kangaslahti, P. P.; Tanner, A. B.; Piepmeier, J. R.; Ruf, C. S.; Gross, S. M.; Musko, S.; Rogacki, S.

    2006-09-01

    The Geostationary Synthetic Thinned Aperture Radiometer, GeoSTAR, is a new concept for a microwave atmospheric sounder intended for geostationary satellites such as the GOES weather satellites operated by NOAA. A small but fully functional prototype has recently been developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory to demonstrate the feasibility of using aperture synthesis in lieu of the large solid parabolic dish antenna that is required with the conventional approach. Spatial resolution requirements dictate such a large aperture in GEO that the conventional approach has not been feasible, and it is only now, with the GeoSTAR approach, that a GEO microwave sounder can be contemplated. Others have proposed GEO microwave radiometers that would operate at sub-millimeter wavelengths to circumvent the large-aperture problem, but GeoSTAR is the only viable approach that can provide full sounding capabilities equal to or exceeding those of the AMSU systems now operating on LEO weather satellites and which have had tremendous impact on numerical weather forecasting. GeoSTAR will satisfy a number of important measurement objectives, many of them identified by NOAA as unmet needs in their GOES-R pre-planned product improvements (P3I) lists and others by NASA in their research roadmaps and as discussed in a white paper submitted to the NRC Decadal Survey. The performance of the prototype has been outstanding, and this proof of concept represents a major breakthrough in remote sensing capabilities. The GeoSTAR concept is now at a stage of development where an infusion into space systems can be initiated, either on a NASA sponsored research mission or on a NOAA sponsored operational mission. GeoSTAR is an ideal candidate for a joint "research to operations" mission, and that may be the most likely scenario. Additional GeoSTAR related technology development and other risk reduction activities are under way, and a GeoSTAR mission is feasible in the GOES-R/S time frame, 2012-2014.

  8. Mars south polar spring and summer behavior observed by TES: seasonal cap evolution controlled by frost grain size

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kieffer, Hugh H.; Titus, Timothy N.; Mullins, Kevin F.; Christensen, Philip R.

    2000-01-01

    Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) observations of the recession phase of Mars' south polar cap are used to quantitatively map this recession in both thermal and visual appearance. Geographically nonuniform behavior interior to the cap is characterized by defining several small regions which exemplify the range of behavior. For most of the cap, while temperatures remain near the CO2 frost point, albedos slowly increase with the seasonal rise of the Sun, then drop rapidly as frost patches disappear over a period of ∼20 days. A “Cryptic” region remains dark and mottled throughout its cold period. TES observations are compared with first-order theoretical spectra of solid CO2 frost with admixtures of dust and H2O. The TES spectra indicate that the Cryptic region has much larger grained solid CO2 than the rest of the cap and that the solid CO2 here may be in the form of a slab. The Mountains of Mitchel remain cold and bright well after other areas at comparable latitude, apparently as a result of unusually small size of the CO2 frost grains; we found little evidence for a significant presence of H2O. Although CO2 grain size may be the major difference between these regions, incorporated dust is also required to match the observations; a self-cleaning process carries away the smaller dust grains. Comparisons with Viking observations indicate little difference in the seasonal cycle 12 Martian years later. The observed radiation balance indicates CO2 sublimation budgets of up to 1250 kg m−2. Regional atmospheric dust is common; localized dust clouds are seen near the edge of the cap prior to the onset of a regional dust storm and interior to the cap during the storm.

  9. Independent Verification of Mars-GRAM 2010 with Mars Climate Sounder Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justh, Hilary L.; Burns, Kerry L.

    2014-01-01

    The Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM) is an engineering-level atmospheric model widely used for diverse mission and engineering applications. Applications of Mars-GRAM include systems design, performance analysis, and operations planning for aerobraking, entry, descent and landing, and aerocapture. Atmospheric influences on landing site selection and long-term mission conceptualization and development can also be addressed utilizing Mars-GRAM. Mars-GRAM's perturbation modeling capability is commonly used, in a Monte Carlo mode, to perform high-fidelity engineering end-to-end simulations for entry, descent, and landing. Mars-GRAM is an evolving software package resulting in improved accuracy and additional features. Mars-GRAM 2005 has been validated against Radio Science data, and both nadir and limb data from the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES). From the surface to 80 km altitude, Mars-GRAM is based on the NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model (MGCM). Above 80 km, Mars-GRAM is based on the University of Michigan Mars Thermospheric General Circulation Model (MTGCM). The most recent release of Mars-GRAM 2010 includes an update to Fortran 90/95 and the addition of adjustment factors. These adjustment factors are applied to the input data from the MGCM and the MTGCM for the mapping year 0 user-controlled dust case. The adjustment factors are expressed as a function of height (z), latitude and areocentric solar longitude (Ls).

  10. Case studies of thermal energy storage (TES) systems: Evaluation and verification of system performance

    SciTech Connect

    Akbari, H.; Sezgen, O.

    1992-01-01

    We have developed two case studies to review and analyze energy performance of thermal energy storage CMS systems in commercial buildings. Our case studies considered two partial ice storage systems in Northern California. For each case, we compiled historical data on TES design, installation, and operation. This information was further enhanced by data obtained through interviews with the building owners and operators. The performance and historical data of the TES systems and their components were grouped into issues related to design, installation, operation, and maintenance of the systems. Our analysis indicated that (1) almost all problems related to the operation of TES and non-TES systems could be traced back to the design of the system, and (2) the identified problems were not unique to the TES systems. There were as many original problems with conventional'' HVAC systems and components as with TES systems. Judging from the problems related to non-TES components identified in these two case studies, it is reasonable to conclude that conventional systems have as many problems as TES systems, but a failure, in a TES system may have a more dramatic impact on thermal comfort and electricity charges. The objective of the designers of the TES systems in the case-study buildings was to design just-the-right-size systems so that both the initial investment and operating costs would be minimized. Given such criteria, a system is typically designed only for normal and steady-state operating conditions-which often precludes due consideration to factors such as maintenance, growth in the needed capacity, ease of the operation, and modularity of the systems. Therefore, it is not surprising to find that these systems, at least initially, did not perform to the design intent and expectation and that they had to go through extended periods of trouble-shooting.

  11. Case studies of thermal energy storage (TES) systems: Evaluation and verification of system performance. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Akbari, H.; Sezgen, O.

    1992-01-01

    We have developed two case studies to review and analyze energy performance of thermal energy storage CMS systems in commercial buildings. Our case studies considered two partial ice storage systems in Northern California. For each case, we compiled historical data on TES design, installation, and operation. This information was further enhanced by data obtained through interviews with the building owners and operators. The performance and historical data of the TES systems and their components were grouped into issues related to design, installation, operation, and maintenance of the systems. Our analysis indicated that (1) almost all problems related to the operation of TES and non-TES systems could be traced back to the design of the system, and (2) the identified problems were not unique to the TES systems. There were as many original problems with ``conventional`` HVAC systems and components as with TES systems. Judging from the problems related to non-TES components identified in these two case studies, it is reasonable to conclude that conventional systems have as many problems as TES systems, but a failure, in a TES system may have a more dramatic impact on thermal comfort and electricity charges. The objective of the designers of the TES systems in the case-study buildings was to design just-the-right-size systems so that both the initial investment and operating costs would be minimized. Given such criteria, a system is typically designed only for normal and steady-state operating conditions-which often precludes due consideration to factors such as maintenance, growth in the needed capacity, ease of the operation, and modularity of the systems. Therefore, it is not surprising to find that these systems, at least initially, did not perform to the design intent and expectation and that they had to go through extended periods of trouble-shooting.

  12. Pioneer Venus Sounder Probe Neutral Gas Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, J. H.; Hodges, R. R., Jr.; Wright, W. W.; Blevins, V. A.; Duerksen, K. D.; Brooks, L. D.

    1980-01-01

    A neutral gas mass spectrometer was flown to Venus as part of the Pioneer Venus Multiprobe to measure the composition of its lower atmosphere. The instrument, mounted in the Sounder Probe, was activated after the probe entered the top of the atmosphere, and it obtained data during the descent from 62 km to the surface. Atmospheric gases were sampled through a pair of microleaks, the effluent from which was pumped by a combination of ion and getter pumping. A pneumatically operated valve, controlled by the ambient atmospheric pressure, maintained the ion source pressure at a nearly constant value during descent while the atmospheric pressure varied by three orders of magnitude. A single focusing magnetic sector field mass spectrometer with mass resolution sufficient to reasonably separate argon from C3H4 at 40 amu provided the mass analysis and relative abundance measurements. A microprocessor controlled the operation of the mass spectrometer through a highly efficient peak-tip stepping routine and data compression algorithm that effected a scan of the mass spectrum from 1 to 208 amu in 64 sec while requiring an information rate of only 40 bits/sec to return the data to earth. A subscale height altitude resolution was thus obtained. Weight, size, and power requirements were minimized to be consistent with interplanetary flight contraints.

  13. The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder version 6 cloud products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahn, B. H.; Irion, F. W.; Dang, V. T.; Manning, E. M.; Nasiri, S. L.; Naud, C. M.; Blaisdell, J. M.; Schreier, M. M.; Yue, Q.; Bowman, K. W.; Fetzer, E. J.; Hulley, G. C.; Liou, K. N.; Lubin, D.; Ou, S. C.; Susskind, J.; Takano, Y.; Tian, B.; Worden, J. R.

    2014-01-01

    The version 6 cloud products of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) instrument suite are described. The cloud top temperature, pressure, and height and effective cloud fraction are now reported at the AIRS field-of-view (FOV) resolution. Significant improvements in cloud height assignment over version 5 are shown with FOV-scale comparisons to cloud vertical structure observed by the CloudSat 94 GHz radar and the Cloud-Aerosol LIdar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP). Cloud thermodynamic phase (ice, liquid, and unknown phase), ice cloud effective diameter (De), and ice cloud optical thickness (τ) are derived using an optimal estimation methodology for AIRS FOVs, and global distributions for 2007 are presented. The largest values of τ are found in the storm tracks and near convection in the tropics, while De is largest on the equatorial side of the midlatitude storm tracks in both hemispheres, and lowest in tropical thin cirrus and the winter polar atmosphere. Over the Maritime Continent the diurnal variability of τ is significantly larger than for the total cloud fraction, ice cloud frequency, and De, and is anchored to the island archipelago morphology. Important differences are described between northern and southern hemispheric midlatitude cyclones using storm center composites. The infrared-based cloud retrievals of AIRS provide unique, decadal-scale and global observations of clouds over portions of the diurnal and annual cycles, and capture variability within the mesoscale and synoptic scales at all latitudes.

  14. The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder Version 6 cloud products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahn, B. H.; Irion, F. W.; Dang, V. T.; Manning, E. M.; Nasiri, S. L.; Naud, C. M.; Blaisdell, J. M.; Schreier, M. M.; Yue, Q.; Bowman, K. W.; Fetzer, E. J.; Hulley, G. C.; Liou, K. N.; Lubin, D.; Ou, S. C.; Susskind, J.; Takano, Y.; Tian, B.; Worden, J. R.

    2013-06-01

    The Version 6 cloud products of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) instrument suite are described. The cloud top temperature, pressure, and height and effective cloud fraction are now reported at the AIRS field of view (FOV) resolution. Significant improvements in cloud height assignment over Version 5 are shown with pixel-scale comparisons to cloud vertical structure observed by the CloudSat 94 GHz radar and the Cloud-Aerosol LIdar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP). Cloud thermodynamic phase (ice, liquid, and unknown phase), ice cloud effective diameter (De), and ice cloud optical thickness (τ) are derived using an optimal estimation methodology for AIRS FOVs, and global distributions for January 2007 are presented. The largest values of τ are found in the storm tracks and near convection in the Tropics, while De is largest on the equatorial side of the midlatitude storm tracks in both hemispheres, and lowest in tropical thin cirrus and the winter polar atmosphere. Over the Maritime Continent the diurnal cycle of τ is significantly larger than for the total cloud fraction, ice cloud frequency, and De, and is anchored to the island archipelago morphology. Important differences are described between northern and southern hemispheric midlatitude cyclones using storm center composites. The infrared-based cloud retrievals of AIRS provide unique, decadal-scale and global observations of clouds over the diurnal and annual cycles, and captures variability within the mesoscale and synoptic scales at all latitudes.

  15. Scanning Mechanism of the FY-3 Microwave Humidity Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, Manfred; Jing, Li; Hehr, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Astrium GmbH Germany, developed the scanning equipment for the instrument package of the MicroWave Humidity Sounder (MWHS) flying on the FY-3 meteorological satellite (FY means Feng Yun, Wind and Cloud) in a sun-synchronized orbit of 850-km altitude and at an inclination of 98.8 . The scanning mechanism rotates at variable velocity comprising several acceleration / deceleration phases during each revolution. The Scanning Mechanism contains two output shafts, each rotating a parabolic offset Antenna Reflector. The mechanism is operated in closed loop by means of redundant control electronics. MWHS is a sounding radiometer for measurement of global atmospheric water vapour profiles. An Engineering Qualification Model was developed and qualified and a first Flight Model was launched early 2008. The system is now working for more than two years successful in orbit. A second Flight Model of the Antenna Scanning Mechanism and of its associated control electronics was built and delivered to the customer for application on the follow-on spacecraft that will be launched by the end of 2010.

  16. Fluvial Morphodynamics: advancing understanding using Multibeam Echo Sounders (MBES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, D. R.; Best, J. L.

    2012-12-01

    Accurately and reliably determining riverbed morphology is key to understanding linkages between flow fields, sediment transport and bed roughness in a range of aquatic environments, including large fluvial channels. Modern shallow-water multibeam echo sounder (MBES) systems are now allowing us to acquire bathymetric data at unprecedented resolutions that are millimetric in precision and centimetric in accuracy. Such systems, and the morphological resolution they can supply, are capable of revealing the complex three-dimensional patterns in riverbed morphology that are facilitating a holistic examination of system morphodynamics, at the field scale, that was unimaginable just a few years ago. This paper presents a range of MBES acquired examples to demonstrate how the methodological developments in this technology are leading to advances in our substantive understanding of large river systems. This includes examples that show linkages across scales, and in particular the morphodynamics of superimposed bedforms and bars revealed by such high-resolution data, which have broad implications for a range of applications, including flood prediction, engineering design and reconstructing ancient sedimentary environments.

  17. The TIROS-N high resolution infrared radiation sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, E. W.

    1979-01-01

    The high-resolution infrared radiation sounder (HIRS/2) was developed and flown on the Television and Infrared Observation Satellite, N Series (TIROS-N) as one means of obtaining atmospheric vertical profile information. The HIRS/2 receives visible and infrared spectrum radiation through a single telescope and selects 20 narrow spectral channels by means of a rotating filter wheel. A passive radiant cooler provides an operating temperature of 106.7K for the HgCdTe and InSb detectors while the visible detector operates at instrument frame temperature. Low noise amplifiers and digital processing provide 13 bit data for spacecraft data multiplexing and transmission. The qualities of system performance that determine sounding capability are the dynamic range of data collection, the noise equivalent radiance of the system, the registration of the air columns sampled in each channel, and the ability to upgrade the calibration of the instrument to maintain the performance standard throughout life. The basic performance of the instrument in test is described. Early orbital information from the TIROS-N launched on October 13, 1978 are given and some observations on system quality are made.

  18. Coherent launch-site atmospheric wind sounder: theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    Hawley, J G; Targ, R; Henderson, S W; Hale, C P; Kavaya, M J; Moerder, D

    1993-08-20

    The coherent launch-site atmospheric wind sounder (CLAWS) is a lidar atmospheric wind sensor designed to measure the winds above space launch facilities to an altitude of 20 km. In our development studies, lidar sensor requirements are defined, a system to meet those requirements is defined and built, and the concept is evaluated, with recommendations for the most feasible and cost-effective lidar system for use as an input to a guidance and control system for missile or spacecraft launches. The ability of CLAWS to meet NASA goals for increased safety and launch/mission flexibility is evaluated in a field test program at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in which we investigate maximum detection range, refractive turbulence, and aerosol backscattering efficiency. The Nd:YAG coherent lidar operating at 1.06 µm with 1-J energy per pulse is able to make real-time measurements of the three-dimensional wind field at KSC to an altitude of 26 km, in good agreement with our performance simulations. It also shows the height and thickness of the volcanic layer caused by the volcanic eruption of Mount Pinatubo in the Philippines.

  19. Development and test of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morse, Paul G.; Bates, Jerry C.; Miller, Christopher R.; Chahine, Moustafa T.; O'Callaghan, Fred; Aumann, Hartmut H.; Karnik, Avinash R.

    1999-12-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) has been developed for the NASA Earth Observing System (EOS) program for a scheduled launch on the EOS PM-1 spacecraft in December 2000. AIRS, working in concert with complementary microwave instrumentation on EOS PM-1 is designed to provide both new and more accurate data about the atmosphere, land and oceans for application to NASA climate studies and NOAA and DOD weather prediction. Among the important parameters to be derived from AIRS observations are atmospheric temperature profiles with an average accuracy of 1 K in 1 kilometer (km) layers in the troposphere, humidity profiles to 10% accuracy and surface temperatures with an average accuracy of 0.5 K. The AIRS measurement technique is based on passive IR remote sensing using a precisely calibrated, high spectral resolution grating spectrometer operating in the 3.7 - 15.4 micrometer region. The instrument concept uses a passively cooled multi- aperture echelle array spectrometer approach in combination with advanced state of the art focal plane and cryogenic refrigerator technology to achieve unparalleled performance capability in a practical long life configuration. The AIRS instrument, which has been under development since 1991, has been fully integrated and has completed successfully a comprehensive performance verification program. Performance verification included thermal vacuum testing, environmental qualification and a full range of spatial, spectral and radiometric calibrations, which have demonstrated outstanding spectrometric performance. This paper provides a brief overview of the AIRS mission and instrument design along with key results from the test program.

  20. The Mars Climate Sounder In-Flight Positioning Anomaly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jau, Bruno M.; Kass, David

    2008-01-01

    The paper discusses the Mars Climate Sounder (MCS) instrument s in-flight positioning errors and presents background material about it. A short overview of the instrument s science objectives and data acquisition techniques is provided. The brief mechanical description familiarizes the reader with the MCS instrument. Several key items of the flight qualification program, which had a rigorous joint drive test program but some limitations in overall system testing, are discussed. Implications this might have had for the flight anomaly, which began after several months of flawless space operation, are mentioned. The detection, interpretation, and instrument response to the errors is discussed. The anomaly prompted engineering reviews, renewed ground, and some in-flight testing. A summary of these events, including a timeline, is included. Several items of concern were uncovered during the anomaly investigation, the root cause, however, was never found. The instrument is now used with two operational constraints that work around the anomaly. It continues science gathering at an only slightly diminished pace that will yield approximately 90% of the originally intended science.

  1. Microwave Limb Sounder/El Nino Watch - December, 1997

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This image shows differences in atmospheric water vapor relative to a normal (average) year in the Earth's upper troposphere about 10 kilometers (6 miles) above the surface. The measurements were taken by the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) instrument aboard NASA's Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS). These data, collected in late December 1997, show higher than normal levels of water vapor (red) over the central and eastern Pacific which indicates the presence of an El Nino condition. At the same time, the western Pacific (blue) is much drier than normal. The unusually moist air above the central and eastern Pacific is a consequence of the much warmer-than-normal ocean waters which occur during El Nino. Warmer water evaporates at a higher rate and the resulting warm moist air rises and forms tall cloud towers. In the tropics, the warm water and the resulting tall cloud towers typically produce large amounts of rain. These data show significant increases in the amount of atmospheric moisture off the coast of Peru and Ecuador since measurements were made in November 1997. The maximum water temperature in the eastern tropical Pacific, as measured by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), is still higher than normal and these high ocean temperatures are likely responsible for an increase in evaporation and the subsequent rise in humidity.

  2. Infrared atmospheric sounder interferometer radiometric noise assessment from spectral residuals.

    PubMed

    Serio, Carmine; Standfuss, Carsten; Masiello, Guido; Liuzzi, Giuliano; Dufour, Emmanuel; Tournier, Bernard; Stuhlmann, Rolf; Tjemkes, Stephen; Antonelli, Paolo

    2015-07-01

    The problem of characterizing and estimating the radiometric noise of satellite high spectral resolution infrared spectrometers from Earth views is addressed in this paper. A methodology has been devised which is based on the common concept of spectral residuals (Observations-Calculations) obtained after spectral radiance inversion for atmospheric and surface parameters. An in-depth analytical assessment of the statistical covariance matrix of the spectral residuals has been performed which is based on the optimal estimation theory. It has been mathematically demonstrated that the use of spectral residuals to assess instrument noise leads to an effective estimator, which is largely independent of possible departures of the observational covariance matrix from the true covariances. Application to the Infrared Atmospheric Sounder Interferometer has been considered. It is shown that Earth-view-derived observation errors agree with blackbody in-flight calibration. The spectral residuals approach also proved to be effective in characterizing noise features due to mechanical microvibrations of the beam splitter of the IASI instrument.

  3. The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder Version 6 Cloud Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, B. H.; Irion, F. W.; Dang, V. T.; Manning, E. M.; Nasiri, S. L.; Naud, C. M.; Blaisdell, J. M.; Schreier, M. M..; Yue, Q.; Bowman, K. W.; Fetzer, E. J.; Hulley, G. C.; Liou, K. N.; Lubin, D.; Ou, S. C.; Susskind, J.; Takano, Y.; Tian, B.; Worden, J. R.

    2014-01-01

    The version 6 cloud products of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) instrument suite are described. The cloud top temperature, pressure, and height and effective cloud fraction are now reported at the AIRS field-of-view (FOV) resolution. Significant improvements in cloud height assignment over version 5 are shown with FOV-scale comparisons to cloud vertical structure observed by the CloudSat 94 GHz radar and the Cloud-Aerosol LIdar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP). Cloud thermodynamic phase (ice, liquid, and unknown phase), ice cloud effective diameter D(sub e), and ice cloud optical thickness (t) are derived using an optimal estimation methodology for AIRS FOVs, and global distributions for 2007 are presented. The largest values of tau are found in the storm tracks and near convection in the tropics, while D(sub e) is largest on the equatorial side of the midlatitude storm tracks in both hemispheres, and lowest in tropical thin cirrus and the winter polar atmosphere. Over the Maritime Continent the diurnal variability of tau is significantly larger than for the total cloud fraction, ice cloud frequency, and D(sub e), and is anchored to the island archipelago morphology. Important differences are described between northern and southern hemispheric midlatitude cyclones using storm center composites. The infrared-based cloud retrievals of AIRS provide unique, decadal-scale and global observations of clouds over portions of the diurnal and annual cycles, and capture variability within the mesoscale and synoptic scales at all latitudes.

  4. Regional Assimilation of NASA Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Shih-Hung; Lapenta, William; Jediovec, Gary J.; McCarty, William; Mecikalski, John R.

    2004-01-01

    The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPORT) Center seeks to accelerate the infusion of NASA Earth Science Enterprise (ESE) observations, data assimilation and modeling research into NW S forecast operations and decision-making. The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), is expected to advance climate research and weather prediction into the 21 st century. It is one of six instruments onboard Aqua, a satellite that is part of NASA s Earth Observing System. AIRS, along with two partner microwave sounding instruments, represents the most advanced atmospheric sounding system ever deployed in space. The system is capable of measuring the atmospheric temperature in the troposphere with radiosonde accuracies of 1 K over 1 km-thick layers under both clear and cloudy conditions, while the accuracy of the derived moisture profiles will exceed that obtained by radiosondes. It is imperative that the scientific community is prepared to take full advantage of next-generation satellite data that will become available within the next decade. The purpose of this paper is to describe a procedure designed to optimally assimilate AIRS data at high spatial resolution over both land and ocean. The assimilation system used in this study is the Local Analysis and Prediction System (LAPS) developed at the Forecast System Laboratory used extensively around the globe. Results will focus on quality control issues associated with AIRS, optimal assimilation strategies, and the impact of the AIRS data on subsequent numerical forecasts at 12 km produced by the next generation Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model.

  5. Exploiting hyperspectral sounders for volcanic ash remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Western, Luke; Watson, Matthew; Francis, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Assumptions are made when retrieving properties of volcanic ash clouds using passive infrared satellite remote sensing. Assumptions in the retrieval method lead to larger uncertainties in the retrieved volcanic ash cloud properties. It is a general desire to reduce these uncertainties by removing some of the assumptions that must be made. Hyperspectral sounders provide the spectral capabilities to explore many of the physical parameters that describe volcanic ash clouds - the question is, which parameters is it possible to retrieve? We show that using the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) it is possible to retrieve the mass column loading and cloud top pressure of a volcanic ash cloud, together with the effective radius and spread of the ash particle size distribution, as well as the cloud top pressure of any underlying water cloud using an optimal estimation technique. We discuss the capabilities and shortcomings of the method. The consideration of an underlying water cloud is of importance for improving retrievals, and we place a particular focus on how well the particle size distribution can be described. More specifically, we investigate the viability of using either a lognormal or a gamma distribution to describe the distribution of ash particles, and we show that it is possible to retrieve information about the spread of a lognormal distribution of particles, whereas it is not for a gamma distribution. Some preliminary conclusions on the size distribution of volcanic ash are presented.

  6. Sensitivity Analysis for Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) CO2 Retrieval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gat, Ilana

    2012-01-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) is a thermal infrared sensor able to retrieve the daily atmospheric state globally for clear as well as partially cloudy field-of-views. The AIRS spectrometer has 2378 channels sensing from 15.4 micrometers to 3.7 micrometers, of which a small subset in the 15 micrometers region has been selected, to date, for CO2 retrieval. To improve upon the current retrieval method, we extended the retrieval calculations to include a prior estimate component and developed a channel ranking system to optimize the channels and number of channels used. The channel ranking system uses a mathematical formalism to rapidly process and assess the retrieval potential of large numbers of channels. Implementing this system, we identifed a larger optimized subset of AIRS channels that can decrease retrieval errors and minimize the overall sensitivity to other iridescent contributors, such as water vapor, ozone, and atmospheric temperature. This methodology selects channels globally by accounting for the latitudinal, longitudinal, and seasonal dependencies of the subset. The new methodology increases accuracy in AIRS CO2 as well as other retrievals and enables the extension of retrieved CO2 vertical profiles to altitudes ranging from the lower troposphere to upper stratosphere. The extended retrieval method for CO2 vertical profile estimation using a maximum-likelihood estimation method. We use model data to demonstrate the beneficial impact of the extended retrieval method using the new channel ranking system on CO2 retrieval.

  7. Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer for the Earth Observing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavich, Thomas A.; Beer, Reinhard

    1991-01-01

    A Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) for the Earth Observing System (EOS) series of polar-orbiting platforms is described. TES is aimed at studying tropospheric chemistry, in particular, the exchange of gases between the surface and the atmosphere, urban and regional pollution, acid rain precursors, sources and sinks of greenhouse gases, and the interchange of gases between the troposphere and the stratosphere. TES is a high-resolution (0.025/cm) infrared Fourier transform spectrometer operating in the passive thermal-emission mode in a very wide spectral range (600 to 4350/cm; 2.3 to 16.7 microns). TES has 32 spatial pixels in each of four optically conjugated linear detector arrays, each optimized for a different spectral region.

  8. TES/Aura L2 Water Vapor (H2O) Lite Nadir (TL2H2OLN)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-06-16

    TES/Aura L2 Water Vapor (H2O) Lite Nadir (TL2H2OLN) News:  TES News ... Level:  L2 Instrument:  TES/Aura L2 Water Vapor Spatial Coverage:  5.3 km nadir ... HDFView Read Software Level 2 Google Earth Visualizations Related Data:  Level 2 Lite Survey ...

  9. Martian Surface Composition From Multiple Datasets, Part II: Chemical Analysis of Global Mineral Distributions from MGS-TES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, V. E.; Rogers, D.

    2010-12-01

    Koeppen and Hamilton [2008, JGR-Planets] produced global mineral maps of Mars from Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) data using a library of mineral and amorphous phase spectra and a linear least squares fitting algorithm. Here we will use known or estimated bulk chemistries of the phases in the Koeppen and Hamilton [2008] spectral library, along with each phase's modeled abundance in the TES data from that work, to calculate effective bulk chemistry for Martian dark regions at a spatial resolution of ~3x6 km. By doing this, we are able to analyze global bulk chemical variation as well as enable direct comparisons between TES data and chemical/elemental abundance maps (e.g., wt.% SiO2) produced using data collected by the Gamma Ray Spectrometer. A second chemical analysis also makes use of the Koeppen and Hamilton [2008] global mineral maps and focuses on the spatial variations in solid solution chemistry among feldspars, pyroxenes, high silica phases (e.g., silica, phyllosilicates, zeolites), and sulfates. Koeppen and Hamilton [2008] demonstrated that there is a range of Mg-Fe olivine compositions on Mars and that there are distinct geographic distributions of those phases, pointing to spatial variations in geologic processes. We use the same methodology to search for correlations between geography (e.g., geologic unit, latitude), elevation, and chemical (solid solution) composition. Preliminary analyses of pyroxene chemical variation reveal that globally, low-Ca pyroxenes are dominated by the clinopyroxene pigeonite and that among orthopyroxenes, Mg-rich phases (enstatite) are virtually never identified and phases with greater proportions of Fe (bronzite and hypersthene) are identified in distinct geographic and/or geologic terrains. Only the distribution of hypersthene (the composition of pyroxene in the Martian meteorite ALH 84001) correlates with the OMEGA-mapped distribution of low-Ca pyroxene suggesting that OMEGA-based maps of high-Ca pyroxene may include

  10. Winter- and summertime continental influences on tropospheric O3 and CO observed by TES over the western North Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegarty, J.; Mao, H.; Talbot, R.

    2010-04-01

    The distributions of tropospheric ozone (O3) and carbon monoxide (CO), and the synoptic factors regulating these distributions over the western North Atlantic Ocean during winter and summer were investigated using profile retrievals from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) for 2004-2006. Seasonal composites of TES retrievals, reprocessed to remove the influence of the a priori on geographical and seasonal structure, exhibited strong seasonal differences. At the 681 hPa level during winter months of December, January and February (DJF) the composite O3 mixing ratios were uniformly low (~45 ppbv), but continental export was evident in a channel of enhanced CO (100-110 ppbv) flowing eastward from the US coast. In summer months June, July, and August (JJA) O3 mixing ratios were variable (45-65 ppbv) and generally higher due to increased photochemical production. The summer distribution also featured a channel of enhanced CO (95-105 ppbv) flowing northeastward around an anticyclone and exiting the continent over the Canadian Maritimes around 50° N. Offshore O3-CO slopes were generally 0.15-0.20 mol mol-1 in JJA, indicative of photochemical O3 production. Composites for 4 predominant synoptic patterns or map types in DJF suggested that export to the lower free troposphere (681 hPa level) was enhanced by the warm conveyor belt airstream of mid-latitude cyclones while stratospheric intrusions increased TES O3 levels at 316 hPa. A major finding in the DJF data was that offshore 681 hPa CO mixing ratios behind cold fronts could be enhanced up to >150 ppbv likely by lofting from the surface via shallow convection resulting from rapid destabilization of cold air flowing over much warmer ocean waters. In JJA composites for 3 map types showed that the general export pattern of the seasonal composites was associated with a synoptic pattern featuring the Bermuda High. However, weak cyclones and frontal troughs could enhance offshore 681 hPa CO mixing ratios to >110 ppbv

  11. Bismuth X-ray absorber studies for TES microcalorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadleir, J. E.; Bandler, S. R.; Brekosky, R. P.; Chervenak, J.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Finkbeiner, F.; Iyomoto, N.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; King, J. M.; Porter, F. S.; Robinson, I. K.; Saab, T.; Talley, D. J.

    2006-04-01

    Bismuth's large atomic number and low carrier density makes it an attractive X-ray absorber material for microcalorimeters. Bismuth's long fermi wavelength and long mean free paths have motivated much interest in the fabrication of high quality bismuth films to study quantum size effects. Despite such incentives, fabrication of high quality bismuth films has proven difficult, and measured properties of such films are highly variable in the literature. Implementing a bismuth deposition process for TES (superconducting Transition Edge Sensor) device fabrication presents additional challenges particularly at interfaces due to the inherent granularity and surface roughness of its films, its low melting point, and its tendency to diffuse and form undesired intermetallic phases. We report observations of Bi-Cu and Bi-Au diffusion in our devices correlating with large shifts in Tc (superconducting transition temperature). Using SEM and in situ R vs T annealing experiments we have been able to study these diffusion processes and identify their activation temperatures.

  12. Antenna-coupled TES bolometer arrays for CMB polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, C. L.; Bock, J. J.; Bonetti, J. A.; Brevik, J.; Chattopadhyay, G.; Day, P. K.; Golwala, S.; Kenyon, M.; Lange, A. E.; LeDuc, H. G.; Nguyen, H.; Ogburn, R. W.; Orlando, A.; Transgrud, A.; Turner, A.; Wang, G.; Zmuidzinas, J.

    2008-07-01

    We describe the design and performance of polarization selective antenna-coupled TES arrays that will be used in several upcoming Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) experiments: SPIDER, BICEP-2/SPUD. The fully lithographic polarimeter arrays utilize planar phased-antennas for collimation (F/4 beam) and microstrip filters for band definition (25% bandwidth). These devices demonstrate high optical efficiency, excellent beam shapes, and well-defined spectral bands. The dual-polarization antennas provide well-matched beams and low cross polarization response, both important for high-fidelity polarization measurements. These devices have so far been developed for the 100 GHz and 150 GHz bands, two premier millimeter-wave atmospheric windows for CMB observations. In the near future, the flexible microstrip-coupled architecture can provide photon noise-limited detection for the entire frequency range of the CMBPOL mission. This paper is a summary of the progress we have made since the 2006 SPIE meeting in Orlando, FL.

  13. Reconciling the MOLA, TES, and Neutron Observations of the North Polar CO2 Mass Budget on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haberle, R. M.; Mattingly, B.; Titus, T. N.

    2003-01-01

    There are now three independent observations of the CO2 polar cap mass budget of Mars' north polar cap. The first is based elevation changes detected by the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) on the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS). The second is based on MGS Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) broadband observations of the solar and infrared radiation fields at the top of the atmosphere. The third is based on neutron counts measured by the neutron spectrometer (NS) on Odyssey. The TES data are based on an energy balance. The net radiative loss (gain) in a column is balanced by latent heating due condensation (sublimation) of CO2. In calculating the mass budget, the other main energy sources, atmospheric heat transport and subsurface conduction, were neglected. At the pole, atmospheric heat transport is indeed a small term. However, subsurface heat conduction can be significant because at the North Pole water ice, which has a high thermal conductivity compared to bare soil, is a dominant component of the subsurface. Thus, heat conducted down into the ice during summer will slowly bleed back out during fall and winter reducing the amount of CO2 that condenses on the pole. We have taken a first cut at quantifying this effect by fitting a curve to Paige's estimates of the conducted energy flux in his analysis of Viking IRTM data.

  14. Small particle cirrus observed by the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahn, B. H.; Eldering, A.; Fishbein, E. F.

    2003-04-01

    The high-resolution spectra of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) have provided an opportunity to globally observe small particle-dominated cirrus clouds. The shape of the radiance spectra in the atmospheric windows is uniquely influenced by small ice crystals with an effective radius (reff) of a few 10s of microns and smaller. In some rare instances, minima in the AIRS brightness temperature (BT) spectra between 800 to 850 cm-1 are seen, consistent with the existence of ice particles with an reff smaller than 3 microns. Much more frequent occurences of small ice particle clouds with reff larger than 3 microns are observed through the large 998 to 811 cm-1 BT differences without minima. The small particle events are occasionally found in orographic cirrus clouds, in and around cumulonimbus towers, and in cirrus bands far removed from convection and orography. Several cases spanning the variety of small particle-dominated cirrus events will be presented. AIRS, located on the EOS-Aqua platform, is a high-resolution grating spectrometer that scans at angles 49.5 degrees on either side of nadir view, at both visible and infrared wavelengths. The surface footprint is 13.5 km at the nadir view, and coverage in the infrared is in three bandpasses (649-1136, 1265-1629, and 2169-2674 cm-1). Comparisons of observed spectra are made with simulated spectra generated by a plane-parallel scattering radiative transfer model using ice particle shapes and sizes calculated by the T-matrix method. These comparisons yield information on small particle cirrus cloud reff and optical depth. Aumann, H.H., and R.J. Pagano, Atmospheric Infrared Sounder on the Earth Observing System. Opt. Eng. 33, 776-784, 1994. Mishchenko, M.I., and L.D. Travis, Capabilities and limitations of a current Fortran implementation of the T-matrix method for randomly oriented, rotationally symmetric scatterers. J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Transfer, 60, 309-324, 1998. Moncet, J.L., and S.A. Clough

  15. Validation of Aura Microwave Limb Sounder HCl Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Froidevaux, L.; Jiang, Y. B.; Lambert, A.; Livesey, N. J.; Read, W. G.; Waters, J. W.; Fuller, R. A.; Marcy, T. P.; Popp, P. J.; Gao, R. S.; Fahey, D. W.; Jucks, K. W.; Stachnik, R. A.; Toon, G. C.; Christensen, L. E.; Webster, C. R.; Bernath, P. F.; Boone, C. D.; Walker, K. A.; Pumphrey, H. C.; Harwood, R. S.; Manney, G. L.; Schwartz, M. J.; Daffer, W. H.; Drouin, B. J.

    2008-01-01

    The Earth Observing System (EOS) Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) aboard the Aura satellite has provided daily global HCl profiles since August 2004. We provide a characterization of the resolution, random and systematic uncertainties, and known issues for the version 2.2 MLS HCl data. The MLS sampling allows for comparisons with many (1500 to more than 3000) closely matched profiles from the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) and Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS). These data sets provide HCl latitudinal distributions that are, overall, very similar to those from (coincident) MLS profiles, although there are some discrepancies in the upper stratosphere between the MLS and HALOE gradients. As found in previous work, MLS and ACE HCl profiles agree very well (within approximately 5%, on average), but the MLS HCl abundances are generally larger (by 10-20%) than HALOE HCl. The bias versus HALOE is unlikely to arise mostly from MLS, as a similar systematic bias (of order 15%) is not observed between average MLS and balloon-borne measurements of HCl, obtained over Fort Sumner, New Mexico, in 2004 and 2005. At the largest pressure (147 hPa) for MLS HCl, a high bias (approximately 0.2 ppbv) is apparent in analyses of low to midlatitude data versus in situ aircraft chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) HCl measurements from the Aura Validation Experiment (AVE) campaigns in 2004, 2005, and 2006; this bias is also observed in comparisons of MLS and aircraftHCl/O3 correlations. Good agreement between MLS and CIMS HCl is obtained at 100 to 68 hPa. The recommended pressure range for MLS HCl is from 100 to 0.15 hPa.

  16. Improving of Aura Microwave Limb Sounder Data Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuddy, D.; Wagner, P.; Read, W.; Livesey, N. J.; Martinez, E.

    2011-12-01

    The Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on NASA's Aura satellite began collecting atmospheric data in August of 2004, and the MLS Science Investigator-led Processing System (SIPS) processes the raw data to calibrated radiances and the 20 different geophysical parameters. Currently, SIPS provides two versions (V2 and V3) of these data products, and Goddard Earth Science Data and Information Service Centers (GES-DISC) archives and provides them to the user community. This paper will describe the current plans by the MLS Science Team (MST) to improve the V2 and V3 algorithms, and at the top of the list are how to ameliorate the issue with oscillations in the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere (UT/LS) ozone and improve behavior of UT/LS species in thick cloud. Other improvements include: removing adverse cloud interactions in some products (e.g. CO) that now occur in V3, ideally better still with the new cloud forward model; work to further reduce biases in 640 GHz species; extend species to lower altitude (including potentially those at 190 GHz); consider joint retrievals spanning multiple radiometers (e.g., joint 190/640 GHZ ClO to get methanol independently); better HCN lower down using a separate phase (q.v. 190 GHz goal above); and gain better understanding of hydrostatic / pressure inconsistency in Band 1. This paper will also discuss usability improvement such as TAI93 at 0Z of granule, day boundary discontinuities, and extending the data format to be compatible with NetCDF (network Common Data Form) that supports a machine-independent format for representing scientific data and is widely used in the community.

  17. Laser Atmospheric Wind Sounder (LAWS) phase 1. Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This report summarizes and documents the results of the 12-month phase 1 work effort. The objective of phase 1 was to establish the conceptional definition of the laser atmospheric wind sounder (LAWS) sensor system, including accommodations analyses to ensure compatibility with the Space Station Freedom (SSF) and the Earth Observing System (EOS) Polar Orbiting Platform (POP). Various concepts were investigated with trade studies performed to select the configuration to be carried forward to the phase 2 Preliminary Design Definition. A summary of the LAWS system and subsystem trade studies that were performed leading to the baseline design configuration is presented in the appendix. The overall objective of the LAWS Project is to define, design, and implement an operational space based facility, LAWS, for accurate measurement of Earth wind profiles. Phase 1 addressed three major areas: (1) requirements definition; (2) instrument concepts and configurations; and (3) performance analysis. For the LAWS instrument concepts and configurations, the issues which press the technological state of the art are reliable detector lifetime and laser performance and lifetime. Lag angle compensation, pointing accuracy, satellite navigation, and telescope design are significant technical issues, but they are considered to be currently state of the art. The primary issues for performance analysis concern interaction with the atmosphere in terms of backscatter and attenuation, wind variance, and cloud blockage. The phase 1 tasks were formulated to address these significant technical issues and demonstrate the technical feasibility of the LAWS concept. Primary emphasis was placed on analysis/trade and identification of candidate concepts. Promising configurations were evaluated for performance, sensitivities, risks, and budgetary costs. Lockheed's baseline LAWS configuration is presented.

  18. Assessment of error propagation in ultraspectral sounder data via JPEG2000 compression and turbo coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, Donald P.; Wang, Charles C.; Sklar, Dean; Huang, Bormin; Ahuja, Alok

    2005-08-01

    Research has been undertaken to examine the robustness of JPEG2000 when corrupted by transmission bit errors in a satellite data stream. Contemporary and future ultraspectral sounders such as Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS), Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI), Geosynchronous Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (GIFTS), and Hyperspectral Environmental Suite (HES) generate a large volume of three-dimensional data. Hence, compression of ultraspectral sounder data will facilitate data transmission and archiving. There is a need for lossless or near-lossless compression of ultraspectral sounder data to avoid potential retrieval degradation of geophysical parameters due to lossy compression. This paper investigates the simulated error propagation in AIRS ultraspectral sounder data with advanced source and channel coding in a satellite data stream. The source coding is done via JPEG2000, the latest International Organization for Standardization (ISO)/International Telecommunication Union (ITU) standard for image compression. After JPEG2000 compression the AIRS ultraspectral sounder data is then error correction encoded using a rate 0.954 turbo product code (TPC) for channel error control. Experimental results of error patterns on both channel and source decoding are presented. The error propagation effects are curbed via the block-based protection mechanism in the JPEG2000 codec as well as memory characteristics of the forward error correction (FEC) scheme to contain decoding errors within received blocks. A single nonheader bit error in a source code block tends to contaminate the bits until the end of the source code block before the inverse discrete wavelet transform (IDWT), and those erroneous bits propagate even further after the IDWT. Furthermore, a single header bit error may result in the corruption of almost the entire decompressed granule. JPEG2000 appears vulnerable to bit errors in a noisy channel of

  19. Experimental Results from the Thermal Energy Storage-2 (TES-2) Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolbert, Carol

    2000-01-01

    Thermal Energy Storage-2 (TES-2) is a flight experiment that flew on the Space Shuttle Endeavour (STS-72), in January 1996. TES-2 originally flew with TES-1 as part of the OAST-2 Hitchhiker payload on the Space Shuttle Columbia (STS-62) in early 1994. The two experiments, TES-1 and TES-2 were identical except for the fluoride salts to be characterized. TES-1 provided data on lithium fluoride (LiF), TES-2 provided data on a fluoride eutectic (LiF/CaF2). Each experiment was a complex autonomous payload in a Get-Away-Special payload canister. TES-1 operated flawlessly for 22 hr. Results were reported in a paper entitled, Effect of Microgravity on Materials Undergoing Melting and Freezing-The TES Experiment, by David Namkoong et al. A software failure in TES-2 caused its shutdown after 4 sec of operation. TES-1 and 2 were the first experiments in a four experiment suite designed to provide data for understanding the long duration microgravity behavior of thermal energy storage salts that undergo repeated melting and freezing. Such data have never been obtained before and have direct application for the development of space-based solar dynamic (SD) power systems. These power systems will store energy in a thermal energy salt such as lithium fluoride or a eutectic of lithium fluoride/calcium difluoride. The stored energy is extracted during the shade portion of the orbit. This enables the solar dynamic power system to provide constant electrical power over the entire orbit. Analytical computer codes were developed for predicting performance of a space-based solar dynamic power system. Experimental verification of the analytical predictions were needed prior to using the analytical results for future space power design applications. The four TES flight experiments were to be used to obtain the needed experimental data. This paper will address the flight results from the first and second experiments, TES-1 and 2, in comparison to the predicted results from the Thermal

  20. Advanced infrared sounder subpixel cloud detection with imagers and its impact on radiance assimilation in NWP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Pei; Li, Jun; Li, Jinlong; Li, Zhenglong; Schmit, Timothy J.; Bai, Wenguang

    2014-03-01

    Accurate cloud detection is very important for infrared (IR) radiance assimilation; improved cloud detection could reduce cloud contamination and hence improve the assimilation. Although operational numerical weather prediction (NWP) centers are using IR sounder radiance data for cloud detection, collocated high spatial resolution imager data could help sounder subpixel cloud detection and characterization. IR sounder radiances with improved cloud detection using Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS)/Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) were assimilated for Hurricane Sandy (2012). Forecast experiments were run with Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) as the forecast model and the Three-Dimensional Variational Assimilation (3DVAR)-based Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) as the analysis system. Results indicate that forecasts of both hurricane track and intensity are substantially improved when the collocated high spatial resolution MODIS cloud mask is used for AIRS subpixel cloud detection for assimilating radiances. This methodology can be applied to process Crosstrack Infrared Sounder (CRIS)/Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) onboard Suomi-NPOESS Preparatory Project (NPP)/Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) and Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI)/Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) onboard the Metop series for improved radiance assimilation in NWP.

  1. Field-aligned electron density irregularities near 500 km Equator to polar cap topside sounder observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, R. F.

    1985-01-01

    In addition to spread F, evidence for field-aligned electron density irregularities is commonly observed on Alouette 2 topside sounder ionograms recorded near perigee (500 km). This evidence is provided by distinctive signal returns from sounder-generated Z mode waves. At low latitudes these waves become guided in wave ducts caused by field-aligned electron density irregularities and give rise to strong long-duration echoes. At high latitudes, extending well into the polar cap, these Z mode waves (and stimulated electrostatic waves at the plasma frequency) produce a series of vertical bars on the ionogram display as the satellite traverses discrete field-aligned density structures. The radio frequency (RF) noise environment to be expected in the 400 to 500 km altitude region from low to high latitudes was examined by analyzing perigee Alouette 2 topside sounder data. All observed noise bands were scaled on nearly 200 topside sounder ionograms recorded near perigee at low, mid, and high latitude telemetry stations. The minimum and maximum frequencies of each noise band were entered into a data base or computer analysis. The signals of primary interest in the perigee study were found to be sounder-generated.

  2. Future Japanese X-ray TES Calorimeter Satellite: DIOS (Diffuse Intergalactic Oxygen Surveyor)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, S.; Ohashi, T.; Ishisaki, Y.; Ezoe, Y.; Miyazaki, N.; Kuwabara, K.; Kuromaru, G.; Suzuki, S.; Mitsuda, K.; Yamasaki, N. Y.; Takei, Y.; Sakai, K.; Nagayoshi, K.; Yamamoto, R.; Hayashi, T.; Muramatsu, H.; Tawara, Y.; Mitsuishi, I.; Babazaki, Y.; Nakamichi, R.; Bandai, A.; Yuasa, T.; Ota, N.

    2016-08-01

    We present the latest update and progress on the future Japanese X-ray satellite mission Diffuse Intergalactic Oxygen Surveyor (DIOS). DIOS is proposed to JAXA as a small satellite mission, and would be launched with an Epsilon rocket. DIOS would carry on the legacy of ASTRO-H, which carries semiconductor-based microcalorimeters and is scheduled to be launched in 2016, in high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy. A 400-pixel array of transition-edge sensors (TESs) would be employed, so DIOS would also provide valuable lessons for the next ESA X-ray mission ATHENA on TES operation and cryogen-free cooling in space. We have been sophisticating the entire design of the satellite to meet the requirement for the Epsilon payload for the next call. The primary goal of the mission is to search for warm-hot intergalactic medium with high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy by detecting redshifted emission lines from OVII and OVIII ions. The results would have significant impacts on our understanding of the nature of "dark baryons," their total amount and spatial distribution, as well as their evolution over cosmological timescales.

  3. Design and Fabrication of TES Detector Modules for the TIME-Pilot [CII] Intensity Mapping Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunacek, J.; Bock, J.; Bradford, C. M.; Bumble, B.; Chang, T.-C.; Cheng, Y.-T.; Cooray, A.; Crites, A.; Hailey-Dunsheath, S.; Gong, Y.; Kenyon, M.; Koch, P.; Li, C.-T.; O'Brient, R.; Shirokoff, E.; Shiu, C.; Staniszewski, Z.; Uzgil, B.; Zemcov, M.

    2016-08-01

    We are developing a series of close-packed modular detector arrays for TIME-Pilot, a new mm-wavelength grating spectrometer array that will map the intensity fluctuations of the redshifted 157.7 \\upmu m emission line of singly ionized carbon ([CII]) from redshift z ˜ 5 to 9. TIME-Pilot's two banks of 16 parallel-plate waveguide spectrometers (one bank per polarization) will have a spectral range of 183-326 GHz and a resolving power of R ˜ 100. The spectrometers use a curved diffraction grating to disperse and focus the light on a series of output arcs, each sampled by 60 transition edge sensor (TES) bolometers with gold micro-mesh absorbers. These low-noise detectors will be operated from a 250 mK base temperature and are designed to have a background-limited NEP of {˜ }10^{-17} mathrm {W}/mathrm {Hz}^{1/2}. This proceeding presents an overview of the detector design in the context of the TIME-Pilot instrument. Additionally, a prototype detector module produced at the Microdevices Laboratory at JPL is shown.

  4. Thermal Stability of a 4 Meter Primary Reflector for the Scanning Microwave Limb Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cofield, Richard; Kasl, Eldon P.

    2010-01-01

    We describe the fabrication and thermal-stability analysis and test of a composite demonstration model of the Scanning Microwave Limb Sounder (SMLS) primary reflector, having full 4m height and 1/3 the width planned for flight. SMLS is a space-borne heterodyne radiometer which will measure pressure, temperature and atmospheric constituents from thermal emission between 180 and 660 GHz. Current MLS instruments in low Earth orbit scan pencil-beam antennas (sized to resolve about one scale height) vertically over the atmospheric limb. SMLS, planned for the Global Atmospheric Composition Mission of the NRC Decadal Survey, adds azimuthal scanning for better horizontal and temporal resolution and coverage than typical orbit spacing provides. SMLS combines the wide scan range of the parabolic torus with unblocked offset Cassegrain optics. The resulting system is diffraction-limited in the vertical plane but highly astigmatic in the horizontal, having a beam aspect ratio [tilde operator]1:20. Symmetry about the nadir axis ensures that beam shape is nearly invariant over +/-65(white bullet) azimuth. The a feeds a low-noise SIS receiver whose FOV is swept over the reflector system by a small scanning mirror. Using finiteelement models of antenna reflectors and structure, we evaluate thermal deformations and the resulting optical performance for 4 orbital environments and isothermal soak. We compare deformations with photogrammetric measurements made during wide-range (ambient+[-97,+75](white bullet) C) thermal soak tests of the primary in a chamber. This range exceeds predicted orbital soak ranges by large factors, implying in-orbit thermal stability of 0.21(mu)m rms/(white bullet)C, which meets SMLS requirements.

  5. Rescue Simulation - NASA White Sands Test Facility Totally Encapsulating Suit (TES) Boot Camp

    NASA Video Gallery

    The White Sands Test Facility Totally Encapsulating Suit (TES) Boot Camp prepares students to deal with normal propellant operations, emergency events, and pre-operation planning by engaging studen...

  6. NASA White Sands Test Facility Totally Encapsulating Suit (TES) Boot Camp

    NASA Video Gallery

    The NASA White Sands Test Facility Totally Encapsulating Suit (TES) Boot Camp prepares students to deal with normal propellant operations, emergency events, and pre-operation planning by engaging s...

  7. Extended stellar substructure surrounding the Boötes I dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roderick, T. A.; Mackey, A. D.; Jerjen, H.; Da Costa, G. S.

    2016-10-01

    We present deep stellar photometry of the Boötes I dwarf spheroidal galaxy in g- and i-band filters, taken with the Dark Energy Camera at Cerro Tololo in Chile. Our analysis reveals a large, extended region of stellar substructure surrounding the dwarf, as well as a distinct overdensity encroaching on its tidal radius. A radial profile of the Boötes I stellar distribution shows a break radius indicating the presence of extra-tidal stars. These observations strongly suggest that Boötes I is experiencing tidal disruption, although not as extreme as that exhibited by the Hercules dwarf spheroidal. Combined with revised velocity dispersion measurements from the literature, we see evidence suggesting the need to review previous theoretical models of the Boötes I dwarf spheroidal galaxy.

  8. NASA White Sands Test Facility Totally Encapsulating Suit (TES) Boot Camp

    NASA Video Gallery

    The White Sands Test Facility Totally Encapsulating Suit (TES) Boot Camp prepares students to deal with normal propellant operations, emergency events, and pre-operation planning by engaging studen...

  9. A Template-Matching Method For Measuring Energy Depositions In TES Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shank, Benjamin; Yen, Jeffrey; Cabrera, Blas; Kreikebaum, John Mark; Moffatt, Robert; Redl, Peter; Young, Betty; Brink, Paul; Cherry, Matthew; Tomada, Astrid

    2014-03-01

    Transition edge sensors (TES) have a wide variety of applications in particle ∖astrophysics for detecting incoming particles with high energy resolution. In TES design, the need for sufficient heat capacity to avoid saturation limits the ultimate energy resolution. Building on the TES model developed for SuperCDMS by Yen et al. for tungsten TESs deposited next to aluminum collection fins, we outline a time-domain non-linear optimal filter method for reconstructing energy depositions in TES films. This allows us to operate devices into their saturation region while taking into account changing noise performance and loss of energy collection. We show how this method has improved our understanding of quasiparticle diffusion and energy collection in our superconducting sensors.

  10. Collection and dissemination of TES system information for the paper and pulp industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietrich, M. W.; Edde, H.

    1980-01-01

    A survey of U.S. and international paper and pulp mills using thermal energy storage (TES) systems as a part of their production processes was conducted to obtain sufficient operating data to conduct a benefits analysis encompassing: (1) an energy conservation assessment, (2) an economic benefits analysis, and (3) an environmental impact assessment. An information dissemination plan was then proposed to effectively present the benefits of TES to the U.S. paper and pulp industry.

  11. TES: A modular systems approach to expert system development for real time space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    England, Brenda; Cacace, Ralph

    1987-01-01

    A major goal of the space station era is to reduce reliance on support from ground based experts. The TIMES Expert System (TES) is an application that monitors and evaluates real time data to perform fault detection and fault isolation as it would otherwise be carried out by a knowledgeable designer. The development process and primary features of the TES, the modular system and the lessons learned are discussed.

  12. Extending MGS-TES Temperature Retrievals in the Martian Atmosphere up to 90 Km: Retrieval Approach and Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feofilov, A. G.; Kutepov, A. A.; Rezac, L.; Smith, M. D.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a methodology for performing a temperature retrieval in the Martian atmosphere in the 50-90 km altitude range using spectrally integrated 15 micrometers C02 limb emissions measured by the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES), the thermal infrared spectrometer on board the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS). We demonstrate that temperature retrievals from limb observations in the 75-90 km altitude range require accounting for the non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) populations of the C02(v2) vibrational levels. Using the methodology described in the paper, we have retrieved approximately 1200 individual temperature profiles from MGS TES limb observations in the altitude range between 60 and 90 km. 0ur dataset of retrieved temperature profiles is available for download in supplemental materials of this paper. The temperature retrieval uncertainties are mainly caused by radiance noise, and are estimated to be about 2 K at 60 km and below, 4 K at 70 km, 7 K at 80 km, 10 K at 85 km, and 20 K at 90 km. We compare the retrieved profiles to Mars Climate Database temperature profiles and find good qualitative agreement. Quantitatively, our retrieved profiles are in general warmer and demonstrate strong variability with the following values for bias and standard deviations (in brackets) compared to the Martian Year 24 dataset of the Mars Climate Database: 6 (+/-20) K at 60 km, 7.5 (+/-25) K at 65 km, 9 (+/-27) K at 70 km, 9.5 (+/-27) K at 75 km, 10 (+/-28) K at 80 km, 11 (+/-29) K at 85 km, and 11.5 (+/-31) K at 90 km. Possible reasons for the positive temperature bias are discussed. carbon dioxide molecular vibrations

  13. Comparing the net cost of CSP-TES to PV deployed with battery storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorgenson, Jennie; Mehos, Mark; Denholm, Paul

    2016-05-01

    Concentrated solar power with thermal energy storage (CSP-TES) is a unique source of renewable energy in that its energy can be shifted over time and it can provide the electricity system with dependable generation capacity. In this study, we provide a framework to determine if the benefits of CSP-TES (shiftable energy and the ability to provide firm capacity) exceed the benefits of PV and firm capacity sources such as long-duration battery storage or conventional natural gas combustion turbines (CTs). The results of this study using current capital cost estimates indicate that a combination of PV and conventional gas CTs provides a lower net cost compared to CSP-TES and PV with batteries. Some configurations of CSP-TES have a lower net cost than PV with batteries for even the lowest battery cost estimate. Using projected capital cost targets, however, some configurations of CSP-TES have a lower net cost than PV with either option for even the lowest battery cost estimate. The net cost of CSP-TES varies with configuration, and lower solar multiples coupled with less storage are more attractive at current cost levels, due to high component costs. However, higher solar multiples show a lower net cost using projected future costs for heliostats and thermal storage materials.

  14. Nighttime Cirrus Detection using Atmospheric Infrared Sounder Window Channels and Total Column Water Vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Brian H.; Liou, Kuo Nan; Lee, Sung-Yung; Fishbein, Evan F.; DeSouza-Machado, Sergio; Eldering, Annmarie; Fetzer, Eric J.; Hannon, Scott E.; Strow, L. Larrabee

    2005-01-01

    A method of cirrus detection at nighttime is presented that utilizes 3.8 and 10.4 (micro)m infrared (IR) window brightness temperature differences (dBT) and total column precipitable water (PW) measurements. This technique is applied to the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit A (AMSU-A) instrument suite on board EOS-Aqua, where dBT is determined from sets of carefully selected AIRS window channels, while PW is derived from the synergistic AIRS and AMSU-A water vapor retrievals. Simulated and observed dBT for a particular value of PW are not constant; several physical factors impact dBT, including the variability in temperature and relative humidity profiles, surface emissivity, instrument noise, and skin/ near-surface air temperature differences. We simulate clear-sky dBT over a realistic range of PWs using 8350 radiosondes that have varying temperature and relative humidity profiles. Thresholds between cloudy and uncertain sky conditions are derived once the scatter in the clear-sky dBT is determined. Simulations of optically thin cirrus indicate that this technique is most sensitive to cirrus optical depth in the 10 (micro)m window of 0.1-0.15 or greater over the tropical and subtropical oceans, where surface emissivity and skin/near-surface air temperature impacts on the IR radiances are minimal. The method at present is generally valid over oceanic regions only, specifically, the tropics and subtropics. The detection of thin cirrus, and other cloud types, is validated using observations at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program site located at Manus Island in the tropical western Pacific for 89 coincident EOS-Aqua overpasses. Even though the emphasis of this work is on the detection of thin cirrus at nighttime, this technique is sensitive to a broad cloud morphology. The cloud detection technique agrees with ARM-detected clouds 82-84% of the time, which include thin cirrus, as well as other cloud types. Most of

  15. Nighttime cirrus detection using Atmospheric Infrared Sounder window channels and total column water vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahn, Brian H.; Liou, Kuo Nan; Lee, Sung-Yung; Fishbein, Evan F.; Desouza-Machado, Sergio; Eldering, Annmarie; Fetzer, Eric J.; Hannon, Scott E.; Strow, L. Larrabee

    2005-04-01

    A method of cirrus detection at nighttime is presented that utilizes 3.8 and 10.4 μm infrared (IR) window brightness temperature differences (dBT) and total column precipitable water (PW) measurements. This technique is applied to the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit A (AMSU-A) instrument suite on board EOS-Aqua, where dBT is determined from sets of carefully selected AIRS window channels, while PW is derived from the synergistic AIRS and AMSU-A water vapor retrievals. Simulated and observed dBT for a particular value of PW are not constant; several physical factors impact dBT, including the variability in temperature and relative humidity profiles, surface emissivity, instrument noise, and skin/near-surface air temperature differences. We simulate clear-sky dBT over a realistic range of PWs using 8350 radiosondes that have varying temperature and relative humidity profiles. Thresholds between cloudy and uncertain sky conditions are derived once the scatter in the clear-sky dBT is determined. Simulations of optically thin cirrus indicate that this technique is most sensitive to cirrus optical depth in the 10 μm window of 0.1-0.15 or greater over the tropical and subtropical oceans, where surface emissivity and skin/near-surface air temperature impacts on the IR radiances are minimal. The method at present is generally valid over oceanic regions only, specifically, the tropics and subtropics. The detection of thin cirrus, and other cloud types, is validated using observations at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program site located at Manus Island in the tropical western Pacific for 89 coincident EOS-Aqua overpasses. Even though the emphasis of this work is on the detection of thin cirrus at nighttime, this technique is sensitive to a broad cloud morphology. The cloud detection technique agrees with ARM-detected clouds 82-84% of the time, which include thin cirrus, as well as other cloud types. Most of the

  16. Radiometric calibration of IR Fourier transform spectrometers - Solution to a problem with the High-Resolution Interferometer Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Revercomb, Henry E.; Smith, William L.; Buijs, H.; Howell, Hugh B.; Laporte, D. D.

    1988-01-01

    A calibrated Fourier transform spectrometer, known as the High-Resolution Interferometer Sounder (HIS), has been flown on the NASA U-2 research aircraft to measure the infrared emission spectrum of the earth. The primary use - atmospheric temperature and humidity sounding - requires high radiometric precision and accuracy (of the order of 0.1 and 1 C, respectively). To meet these requirements, the HIS instruments, the HIS instrument performs inflight radiometric calibration, using observations of hot and cold blackbody reference sources as the basis for two-point calibrations at each wavenumber. Initially, laboratory tests revealed a calibration problem with brightness temperature errors as large as 15 C between 600 and 900/cm. The symptom of the problem, which occurred in one of the three spectral bands of HIS, was a source-dependent phase response. Minor changes to the calibration equations completely eliminated the anomalous errors. The new analysis properly accounts for the situation in which the phase response for radiance from the instrument itself differs from that for radiance from an external source. The mechanism responsible for the dual phase response of the HIS instrument is identified as emission from the interferometer beam splitter.

  17. Laser Sounder Technique for Remotely Measuring Atmospheric CO2 Concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abshire, J. B.; Collatz, G. J.; Sun, X.; Riris, H.; Andrews, A. E.; Krainak, M.

    2001-12-01

    We describe progress in developing a lidar technique for the remote measurement of the tropospheric CO2 concentrations. Our goal is to demonstrate a technique and technology that will permit measurements of the CO2 column abundance in the lower troposphere from aircraft at the few ppm level, with a capability of scaling to permit global CO2 measurements from orbit. Accurate remote sensing measurements of CO2 mixing ratio from aircraft and space appear difficult. Potential error sources include possible interferences from other trace gas species, the effects of clouds and aerosols in the path, and variability in dry air density caused by pressure or topographic changes. Some potential instrumental errors include frequency drifts in the transmitter and sensitivity drifts in the receiver. High signal-to-noise ratios are needed for estimates at the few ppm level. We are developing a laser sounder approach as a candidate for these measurements. It uses 3 laser transmitters to permit simultaneous measurement of CO2 and O2 extinction, and aerosol backscatter at 1064 nm in the same atmospheric path. It directs the co-aligned laser beams from the lidar toward nadir, and measures the energy of the laser backscatter from land and water surfaces. During each measurement period, the two narrow linewidth lasers are rapidly tuned on and off the selected CO2 and O2 absorption lines. The receiver records and averages the energies of the laser echoes. The column extinction and column densities of both CO2 and O2 are estimated via the differential absorption lidar technique. For the on-line wavelength, the side of the gas absorption line is used, which weights its measurements to 0-4 km in the troposphere. Simultaneous measurements of O2 column abundance are made using an identical approach using an O2 line near 770 nm. Atmospheric baskscatter profiles are measured with the 1064 nm channel, which permits identifying and excluding measurements containing clouds or aerosols backscatter

  18. Shallow scattering layer in the subarctic pacific ocean: detection by high-frequency echo sounder.

    PubMed

    Barraclough, W E; Lebrasseur, R J; Kennedy, O D

    1969-10-31

    Shallow scattering layers consisting mainly of Calanus cristatus were detected on a trans-Pacific crossing to depths of 60 meters with a high-frequency echo sounder. Biomass estimates of these layers indicate concentrations of zoo-plankton that are greater and more extensive than previously reported in the open ocean. PMID:17778203

  19. Determination of film processing specifications for the Apollo 17 S-209 lunar sounder experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, M. S.

    1972-01-01

    The lunar sounder is described as a radar system operating at carrier frequencies of 5, 15, and 150 MHz. The radar echoes are recorded onto Kodak type S0-394 film through the use of an optical recorder utilizing a cathode ray tube as the exposing device. A processing configuration is determined with regard to linearity, dynamic range, and noise.

  20. High-powered Radar Sounders for the Investigation of Jupiter's Icy Moons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Safaeinili, A.; Rodriguez, E.; Edelstein, Wendy

    2003-01-01

    This talk will address the main drivers in the design of a radar sounder for the JIMO mission and provide a potential solution that will optimize the chances of success in the detection of ice/water interface and sub-surface stratigraphy.

  1. High Resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder (HIRS) for the Nimbus F Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, E. W.

    1975-01-01

    Flown on Nimbus F in June 1975, the high resolution infrared radiation sounder (HIRS) scans with a geographical resolution of 23KM and samples radiance in seventeen selected spectral channels from visible (.7 micron) to far IR (15 micron). Vertical temperature profiles and atmospheric moisture content can be inferred from the output. System operation and test results are described.

  2. Evolution of satellite imagers and sounders and for low Earth orbit and technology directions at NASA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagano, Thomas S.; McClain, Charles R.

    2010-09-01

    Imagers and Sounders for Low Earth Orbit (LEO) provide fundamental global daily observations of the Earth System for scientists, researchers, and operational weather agencies. The imager provides the nominal 1-2 km spatial resolution images with global coverage in multiple spectral bands for a wide range of uses including ocean color, vegetation indices, aerosol, snow and cloud properties, and sea surface temperature. The sounder provides vertical profiles of atmospheric temperature, water vapor cloud properties, and trace gases including ozone, carbon monoxide, methane and carbon dioxide. Performance capabilities of these systems has evolved with the optical and sensing technologies of the decade. Individual detectors were incorporated on some of the first imagers and sounders that evolved to linear array technology in the '80's. Signal-to-noise constraints limited these systems to either broad spectral resolution as in the case of the imager, or low spatial resolution as in the case of the sounder. Today's area 2-dimensional large format array technology enables high spatial and high spectral resolution to be incorporated into a single instrument. This places new constraints on the design of these systems and enables new capabilities for scientists to examine the complex processes governing the Earth System.

  3. Facile cleavage of triethylsilyl (TES) ethers using o-iodoxybenzoic acid (IBX) without affecting tert-butyldimethylsilyl (TBS) ethers.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yikang; Huang, Jia-Hui; Shen, Xin; Hu, Qi; Tang, Chao-Jun; Li, Liang

    2002-06-27

    [reaction: see text] In DMSO cleavage of triethylsilyl (TES) ethers by o-iodoxybenzoic acid (IBX) was significantly faster than cleavage of tert-butyldimethylsilyl (TBS) ethers or further oxidation into carbonyl compounds. In most cases, TES protecting groups could be removed in good to excellent yields within 1 h, whereas similar TBS protecting groups remained intact under the same conditions. The procedure also could be adapted for direct one-pot conversion of TES ethers into carbonyl compounds.

  4. Instrument technology for magnetosphere plasma imaging from high Earth orbit. Design of a radio plasma sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, D. Mark; Reinisch, Bodo W.

    1995-01-01

    The use of radio sounding techniques for the study of the ionospheric plasma dates back to G. Briet and M. A. Tuve in 1926. Ground based swept frequency sounders can monitor the electron number density (N(sub e)) as a function of height (the N(sub e) profile). These early instruments evolved into a global network that produced high-resolution displays of echo time delay vs frequency on 35-mm film. These instruments provided the foundation for the success of the International Geophysical Year (1958). The Alouette and International Satellites for Ionospheric Studies (ISIS) programs pioneered the used of spaceborne, swept frequency sounders to obtain N(sub e) profiles of the topside of the ionosphere, from a position above the electron density maximum. Repeated measurements during the orbit produced an orbital plane contour which routinely provided density measurements to within 10%. The Alouette/ISIS experience also showed that even with a high powered transmitter (compared to the low power sounder possible today) a radio sounder can be compatible with other imaging instruments on the same satellite. Digital technology was used on later spacecraft developed by the Japanese (the EXOS C and D) and the Soviets (Intercosmos 19 and Cosmos 1809). However, a full coherent pulse compression and spectral integrating capability, such as exist today for ground-based sounders (Reinisch et al., 1992), has never been put into space. NASA's 1990 Space Physics Strategy Implementation Study "The NASA Space Physics Program from 1995 to 2010" suggested using radio sounders to study the plasmasphere and the magnetopause and its boundary layers (Green and Fung, 1993). Both the magnetopause and plasmasphere, as well as the cusp and boundary layers, can be observed by a radio sounder in a high-inclination polar orbit with an apogee greater than 6 R(sub e) (Reiff et al., 1994; Calvert et al., 1995). Magnetospheric radio sounding from space will provide remote density measurements of

  5. Winter- and summertime continental influences on tropospheric O3 and CO observed by TES over the western North Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegarty, J.; Mao, H.; Talbot, R.

    2009-11-01

    The distribution of tropospheric O3 and CO and the regulating factors over the western North Atlantic Ocean during winter (December, January, and February, DJF) and summer (June, July, August, JJA) were investigated using retrievals from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) for 2004-2006. Seasonal composites of TES retrievals, reprocessed to remove the artificial geographic and seasonal structure added from the a priori, exhibited strong seasonal differences. At the 681 hPa level during winter composite O3 levels were uniformly low (~45 ppbv), but continental export was evident in a channel of enhanced CO (100-110 ppbv) flowing eastward from the US coast. In summer O3 levels were variable (45-65 ppbv) and generally higher due to increased photochemical production. The main export pathway featured a channel of enhanced CO (95-105 ppbv) flowing northeastward around an anticyclone and exiting the continent over the Canadian Maritimes around 50° N. Offshore O3-CO slopes were generally 0.15-0.20 mol mol-1 in JJA, indicative of photochemical O3 production. Composites for 4 predominant circulation patterns or map types in DJF revealed that export to the lower free troposphere (681 hPa level) was enhanced by the warm conveyor belt (WCB) airstream of cyclones while stratospheric intrusions increased TES O3 levels at 316 hPa. A major finding in the DJF data was that offshore 681 hPa CO levels behind cold fronts could be enhanced up to >150 ppbv likely by lofting from the surface via shallow convection resulting from rapid destabilization of cold air flowing over much warmer ocean waters. In JJA composites for 5 map types showed that the main export pattern of seasonal composites contained the Bermuda High as the dominate feature. However, weak cyclones and frontal troughs could enhance offshore 681 hPa CO levels to greater than 110 ppbv with O3-CO slopes >0.50 mol mol-1 south of 45° N. Intense cyclones, which were not as common in the summer, enhanced export by

  6. Allophane on Mars: Evidence from IR Spectroscopy and TES Spectral Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ming, Douglas W.; Rampe, E. B.; Kraft, M. D.; Sharp. T. G.; Golden, D. C.; Christensen, P. C.

    2010-01-01

    Allophane is an alteration product of volcanic glass and a clay mineral precursor that is commonly found in basaltic soils on Earth. It is a poorly-crystalline or amorphous, hydrous aluminosilicate with Si/Al ratios ranging from approx.0.5-1 [Wada, 1989]. Analyses of thermal infrared (TIR) spectra of the Martian surface from TES show high-silica phases at mid-to-high latitudes that have been proposed to be primary volcanic glass [Bandfield et al., 2000; Bandfield, 2002; Rogers and Christensen, 2007] or poorly-crystalline secondary silicates such as allophane or aluminous amorphous silica [Kraft et al., 2003; Michalski et al., 2006; Rogers and Christensen, 2007; Kraft, 2009]. Phase modeling of chemical data from the APXS on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit suggest the presence of allophane in chemically weathered rocks [Ming et al., 2006]. The presence of allophane on Mars has not been previously tested with IR spectroscopy because allophane spectra have not been available. We synthesized allophanes and allophanic gels with a range of Si/Al ratios to measure TIR emission and VNIR reflectance spectra and to test for the presence of allophane in Martian soils. VNIR reflectance spectra of the synthetic allophane samples have broad absorptions near 1.4 m from OH stretching overtones and 1.9 m from a combination of stretching and bending vibrations in H2O. Samples have a broad absorption centered near 2.25 microns, from AlAlOH combination bending and stretching vibrations, that shifts position with Si/Al ratio. Amorphous silica (opaline silica or primary volcanic glass) has been identified in CRISM spectra of southern highland terrains based on the presence of 1.4, 1.9, and broad 2.25 m absorptions [Mustard et al., 2008]; however, these absorptions are also consistent with the presence of allophane. TIR emission spectra of the synthetic allophanes show two spectrally distinct types: Si-rich and Al-rich. Si-rich allophanes have two broad absorptions centered near 1080

  7. Allophane on Mars: Evidence from IR spectroscopy and TES spectral models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rampe, E. B.; Kraft, M. D.; Sharp, T. G.; Golden, D. C.; Ming, D. W.; Christensen, P. R.

    2010-12-01

    Allophane is an alteration product of volcanic glass and a clay mineral precursor that is commonly found in basaltic soils on Earth. It is a poorly-crystalline or amorphous, hydrous aluminosilicate with Si/Al ratios ranging from ~0.5-1 [Wada, 1989]. Analyses of thermal infrared (TIR) spectra of the Martian surface from TES show high-silica phases at mid-to-high latitudes that have been proposed to be primary volcanic glass [Bandfield et al., 2000; Bandfield, 2002; Rogers and Christensen, 2007] or poorly-crystalline secondary silicates such as allophane or aluminous amorphous silica [Kraft et al., 2003; Michalski et al., 2006; Rogers and Christensen, 2007; Kraft, 2009]. Phase modeling of chemical data from the APXS on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit suggest the presence of allophane in chemically weathered rocks [Ming et al., 2006]. The presence of allophane on Mars has not been previously tested with IR spectroscopy because allophane spectra have not been available. We synthesized allophanes and allophanic gels with a range of Si/Al ratios to measure TIR emission and VNIR reflectance spectra and to test for the presence of allophane in Martian soils. VNIR reflectance spectra of the synthetic allophane samples have broad absorptions near 1.4 µm from OH stretching overtones and 1.9 µm from a combination of stretching and bending vibrations in H2O. Samples have a broad absorption centered near 2.25 µm, from AlAlOH combination bending and stretching vibrations, that shifts position with Si/Al ratio. Amorphous silica (opaline silica or primary volcanic glass) has been identified in CRISM spectra of southern highland terrains based on the presence of 1.4, 1.9, and broad 2.25 µm absorptions [Mustard et al., 2008]; however, these absorptions are also consistent with the presence of allophane. TIR emission spectra of the synthetic allophanes show two spectrally distinct types: Si-rich and Al-rich. Si-rich allophanes have two broad absorptions centered near 1080 and

  8. MGS-TES thermal inertia study of the Arsia Mons Caldera

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cushing, G.E.; Titus, T.N.

    2008-01-01

    Temperatures of the Arsia Mons caldera floor and two nearby control areas were obtained by the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES). These observations revealed that the Arsia Mons caldera floor exhibits thermal behavior different from the surrounding Tharsis region when compared with thermal models. Our technique compares modeled and observed data to determine best fit values of thermal inertia, layer depth, and albedo. Best fit modeled values are accurate in the two control regions, but those in the Arsia Mons' caldera are consistently either up to 15 K warmer than afternoon observations, or have albedo values that are more than two standard deviations higher than the observed mean. Models of both homogeneous and layered (such as dust over bedrock) cases were compared, with layered-cases indicating a surface layer at least thick enough to insulate itself from diurnal effects of an underlying substrate material. Because best fit models of the caldera floor poorly match observations, it is likely that the caldera floor experiences some physical process not incorporated into our thermal model. Even on Mars, Arsia Mons is an extreme environment where CO2 condenses upon the caldera floor every night, diurnal temperatures range each day by a factor of nearly 2, and annual average atmospheric pressure is only around one millibar. Here, we explore several possibilities that may explain the poor modeled fits to caldera floor and conclude that temperature dependent thermal conductivity may cause thermal inertia to vary diurnally, and this effect may be exaggerated by presence of water-ice clouds, which occur frequently above Arsia Mons. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  9. Single Pixel Characterization of X-Ray TES Microcalorimeter Under AC Bias at MHz Frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gottardi, L.; Blandler, S. R.; Porter, F. S.; Sadleir, J. E.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Bailey, C. N.; Finkbeiner, F. M.; Chervenak, J. A.; Adams, J. S.; Eckart, M. E.; Kelley, R. L.; Smith, S. J.; Linden, T. V. D.; Hoevers, H.; Kuur, J. V. D.; Lindeman, M.; Bruijn, M.; Hortog, R. D.; Kiviranta, M.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present the progress made at SRON in the read-out of GSFC x-ray transition-edge sensor (TES) micro-calorimeters in the frequency domain. The experiments reported so far, whose aim was to demonstrate an energy resolution of 2eV at 6 keV with a TES acting as a modulator, were carried out at frequencies below 700 kHz using a standard flux locked loop (FLL) SQUID read-out scheme. The TES read-out suffered from the use of sub-optimal circuit components, large parasitic inductances, low quality factor resonators and poor magnetic field shielding. We have developed a novel experimental set-up, which allows us to test several read-out schemes in a single cryogenic run. In this set-up, the TES pixels are coupled via superconducting transformers to 18 high-Q lithographic LC filters with resonant frequencies ranging between 2 and 5 MHz. The signal is amplified by a two-stage SQUID current sensor and baseband feedback is used to overcome the limited SQUID dynamic range. We study the single pixel performance as a function of TES bias frequency, voltage and perpendicular magnetic field.

  10. High temperature thermocline TES - effect of system pre-charging on thermal stratification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavattoni, Simone A.; Barbato, Maurizio C.; Zanganeh, Giw; Pedretti, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate, by means of a computational fluid dynamics approach, the effect of performing an initial charging, or pre-charging, on thermal stratification of an industrial-scale thermocline TES unit, based on a packed bed of river pebbles. The 1 GWhth TES unit under investigation is exploited to fulfill the energy requirement of a reference 80 MWe concentrating solar power plant which uses air as heat transfer fluid. Three different scenarios, characterized by 4 h, 6 h and 8 h of pre-charging, were compared with the reference case of TES system operating without pre-charging. For each of these four scenarios, a total of 30 consecutive charge/discharge cycles, of 12 h each, were simulated and the effect of TES pre-charging on thermal stratification was qualitatively evaluated, by means of a stratification efficiency, based on the second-law of thermodynamics. On the basis of the simulations results obtained, the effect of pre-charging, more pronounced during the first cycles, is not only relevant in reducing the time required by the TES to achieve a stable thermal stratification into the packed bed but also to improve the performance at startup when the system is charged for the first time.

  11. Observation capability of Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) from International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasai, Yasuko; Baron, Philippe; Mendrok, Jana; Tanaka, Takahiro; Urban, Joachim; Kita, Kazuyuki; Sato, Ryota; Murtah, Donal; Suzuki, Makoto; Shiotani, Masato

    2010-05-01

    A new generation of super-sensitive submillimeter-wave receivers, employing SIS (Superconductor-Insulator- Superconductor) technology, will provide new opportunities for precise remote sensing observation of minor constituents in the atmosphere. SMILES had been launched at 11/09/2009, and installed on the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) in the International Space Station (ISS). SMILES is a collaboration project between NICT and JAXA. Mission objectives of SMILES are: i) Space demonstration of super-sensitive SIS mixer and 4-K mechanical cooler technology ii) Super-sensitive global observation of atmospheric minor constituents JEM/SMILES observes the atmospheric species such as O3, H35Cl, H37Cl, ClO, HO2, BrO, HOCl, HOBr, HNO3, CH3CN, Ozone isotope species, H2O, and Ice Cloud with the precisions in a few to several tens percents. Theoretical observation capability was studied with error analysis. The altitude region of observation is from the upper troposphere to the mesopouse. SMILES early results will be shown with global distributions (L3 data). The early comparison/validation of ozone performed with several satellite data, such as MLS, ACE, OSIRIS and Odin.SMR. The statistical analysis showed the differences were less of 5 percent between SMILES and other satellites data validated. This value was consistent with theoretical capability. This super technology may allow us to open new issues in atmospheric science.

  12. Improved western U.S. background ozone estimates via constraining nonlocal and local source contributions using Aura TES and OMI observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Min; Bowman, Kevin W.; Carmichael, Gregory R.; Lee, Meemong; Chai, Tianfeng; Spak, Scott N.; Henze, Daven K.; Darmenov, Anton S.; Silva, Arlindo M.

    2015-04-01

    Western U.S. near-surface ozone (O3) concentrations are sensitive to transported background O3 from the eastern Pacific free troposphere, as well as U.S. anthropogenic and natural emissions. The current 75 ppbv U.S. O3 primary standard may be lowered soon, hence accurately estimating O3 source contributions, especially background O3 in this region has growing policy-relevant significance. In this study, we improve the modeled total and background O3, via repartitioning and redistributing the contributions from nonlocal and local anthropogenic/wildfires sources in a multi-scale satellite data assimilation system containing global Goddard Earth Observing System-Chemistry model (GEOS-Chem) and regional Sulfur Transport and dEposition Model (STEM). Focusing on NASA's ARCTAS (Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites) field campaign period in June-July 2008, we first demonstrate that the negative biases in GEOS-Chem free simulation in the eastern Pacific at 400-900 hPa are reduced via assimilating Aura-Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) O3 profiles. Using the TES-constrained boundary conditions, we then assimilated into STEM the tropospheric nitrogen dioxide (NO2) columns from Aura-Ozone Monitoring Instrument to indicate U.S. nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO2 + NO) emissions at 12 × 12 km2 grid scale. Improved model skills are indicated from cross validation against independent ARCTAS measurements. Leveraging Aura observations, we show anomalously high wildfire NOx emissions in this summer in Northern California and the Central Valley while lower anthropogenic emissions in multiple urban areas than those representing the year of 2005. We found strong spatial variability of the daily maximum 8 h average background O3 and its contribution to the modeled total O3, with the mean value of ~48 ppbv (~77% of the total).

  13. Composition of the Asian summer monsoon anticyclone: Climatology and variability from 10 years of Aura Microwave Limb Sounder measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santee, Michelle; Manney, Gloria; Livesey, Nathaniel; Neu, Jessica; Schwartz, Michael; Read, William

    2016-04-01

    Satellite measurements are invaluable for investigating the composition of the upper troposphere / lower stratosphere (UTLS) in the region of the Asian summer monsoon anticyclone, which has been sparsely sampled by other means. The Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS), launched as part of NASA's Aura mission in July 2004, makes simultaneous co-located measurements of trace gases and cloud ice water content (IWC, a proxy for deep convection) in the UTLS on a daily basis. Here we exploit the dense spatial and temporal coverage, long-term data record, and extensive measurement suite of Aura MLS to characterize the climatological composition of the ASM anticyclone and quantify its considerable spatial, seasonal, and interannual variability. We relate the observed trace gas behavior to various meteorological quantities, such as the size and strength of the ASM anticyclone, the extent and intensity of deep convection, and variations in the tropopause and the upper tropospheric jets in that region. Multiple species of both tropospheric and stratospheric origin are examined to help assess whether the observed variability arises from variations in transport processes or changes in the strength or location of surface emissions.

  14. Experimental Results from the Thermal Energy Storage-1 (TES-1) Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wald, Lawrence W.; Tolbert, Carol; Jacqmin, David

    1995-01-01

    The Thermal Energy Storage-1 (TES-1) is a flight experiment that flew on the Space Shuttle Columbia (STS-62), in March 1994, as part of the OAST-2 mission. TES-1 is the first experiment in a four experiment suite designed to provide data for understanding the long duration microgravity behavior of thermal energy storage fluoride salts that undergo repeated melting and freezing. Such data have never been obtained before and have direct application for the development of space-based solar dynamic (SD) power systems. These power systems will store solar energy in a thermal energy salt such as lithium fluoride or calcium fluoride. The stored energy is extracted during the shade portion of the orbit. This enables the solar dynamic power system to provide constant electrical power over the entire orbit. Analytical computer codes have been developed for predicting performance of a spaced-based solar dynamic power system. Experimental verification of the analytical predictions is needed prior to using the analytical results for future space power design applications. The four TES flight experiments will be used to obtain the needed experimental data. This paper will focus on the flight results from the first experiment, TES-1, in comparison to the predicted results from the Thermal Energy Storage Simulation (TESSIM) analytical computer code. The TES-1 conceptual development, hardware design, final development, and system verification testing were accomplished at the NASA lewis Research Center (LeRC). TES-1 was developed under the In-Space Technology Experiment Program (IN-STEP), which sponsors NASA, industry, and university flight experiments designed to enable and enhance space flight technology. The IN-STEP Program is sponsored by the Office of Space Access and Technology (OSAT).

  15. Effect of Microgravity on Material Undergoing Melting and Freezing: the TES Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namkoong, David; Jacqmin, David; Szaniszlo, Andrew

    1995-01-01

    This experiment is the first to melt and freeze a high temperature thermal energy storage (TES) material under an extended duration of microgravity. It is one of a series to validate an analytical computer program that predicts void behavior of substances undergoing phase change under microgravity. Two flight experiments were launched in STS-62. The first, TES-1, containing lithium fluoride in an annular volume, performed flawlessly in the 22 hours of its operation. Results are reported in this paper. A software failure in TES-2 caused its shutdown after 4 seconds. A computer program, TESSIM, for thermal energy storage simulation is being developed to analyze the phenomena occurring within the TES containment vessel. The first order effects, particularly the surface tension forces, have been incorporated into TESSIM. TESSIM validation is based on two types of results. First is the temperature history of various points of the containment structure, and second, upon return from flight, the distribution of the TES material within the containment vessel following the last freeze cycle. The temperature data over the four cycles showed a repetition of results over the third and fourth cycles. This result is a confirmation that any initial conditions prior to the first cycle had been damped out by the third cycle. The TESSIM simulation showed a close comparison with the flight data. The solidified TES material distribution within the containment vessel was obtained by a tomography imaging process. The frozen material was concentrated toward the colder end of the annular volume. The TESSIM prediction showed the same pattern. With the general agreement of TESSIM and the data, a computerized visual representation can be shown which accurately shows the movement and behavior of the void during the entire freezing and melting cycles.

  16. Distribution functions and statistical parameters that may be used to characterize limb sounders gravity wave climatologies in the stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, P.; Luna, D.; de la Torre, A.; Schmidt, T.

    2015-08-01

    The number of gravity wave (GW) activity climatologies in the stratosphere started to increase more than 10 years ago since the appearance of large amounts of limb and nadir satellite sounders data. There have been very few discussions regarding the adequate statistical description of GW activity in terms of a distribution function and its parameters. We put forward the question whether a general statistical functional representation adaptable to the characteristics of GW activity in diverse geographic regions and seasons exists. Here we approach this issue for two different types of limb sounders and in particular we try to find out which parameters may represent at best the climatological features. We study results for a region close to the Patagonian Andes and their prolongation in the Antarctic Peninsula, which is well-known for the generation by topography of intense stratospheric GW, specially during winter and spring. Global Positioning System (GPS) radio occultation (RO) records presently provide over 2000 profiles per day. We used 5 years of COSMIC (Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere and Climate) mission GPS RO data, which supplied almost 150,000 retrievals for our study. Three different distribution functions have been approached to describe the GW activity climatologies: gaussian, log-normal and gamma. The latter function has not been used in previous work. It has been shown here that it is a competitive option to the log-normal distribution. In addition, its use allows not only to quantify the GW activity level of each climatology in the stratosphere, but also to find out the number of significant modes that essentially determine it. Alternative parameters to the mean like the median may be used to characterize the climatologies. The use of the median may exhibit advantages in cases where the presence of spurious large GW activity measurements are suspected in GPS RO data. The mean is equally suitable to establish GW activity

  17. Optical properties of Argonne/KICP TES bolometers for CMB polarimetry.

    SciTech Connect

    Crites, A. T.; Bleem, L. E.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Datesman, A.; Divan, R.; Everett, W.; McMahon, J.; Mehl, J.; Meyer, S. S.; Novosad, V.; Pearson, J.; Ruhl, J.; Sayre, J.; Wang, G.; Yefremenko, V.; Case Western Reserve Univ.

    2009-01-01

    We present optical data on prototype polarization sensitive Argonne/KICP detectors fabricated at Argonne National Labs which are designed to be installed on the South Pole Telescope and used to measure the polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation. The detectors are Mo/Au transition edge sensors (TES) suspended on silicon nitride, with radiation coupled to the TES using a gold bar absorber. Two stacked detectors with bars in orthogonal directions will be used to measure both polarizations. We discuss measurements of the optical bandpass, time constants and cross-polarization of the detectors.

  18. Optical Properties of Argonne/KICP TES Bolometers for CMB Polarimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Crites, A. T.; Bleem, L. E.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Everett, W.; McMahon, J.; Mehl, J.; Meyer, S. S.; Datesman, A.; Novosad, V.; Pearson, J.; Wang, G.; Yefremenko, V.; Divan, R.; Ruhl, J.; Sayre, J.

    2009-12-16

    We present optical data on prototype polarization sensitive Argonne/KICP detectors fabricated at Argonne National Labs which are designed to be installed on the South Pole Telescope and used to measure the polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation. The detectors are Mo/Au transition edge sensors (TES) suspended on silicon nitride, with radiation coupled to the TES using a gold bar absorber. Two stacked detectors with bars in orthogonal directions will be used to measure both polarizations. We discuss measurements of the optical bandpass, time constants and cross-polarization of the detectors.

  19. Indium Hybridization of Large Format TES Bolometer Arrays to Readout Multiplexers for Far-Infrared Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Timothy M.; Costen, Nick; Allen, Christine

    2007-01-01

    This conference poster reviews the Indium hybridization of the large format TES bolometer arrays. We are developing a key technology to enable the next generation of detectors. That is the Hybridization of Large Format Arrays using Indium bonded detector arrays containing 32x40 elements which conforms to the NIST multiplexer readout architecture of 1135 micron pitch. We have fabricated and hybridized mechanical models with the detector chips bonded after being fully back-etched. The mechanical support consists of 30 micron walls between elements Demonstrated electrical continuity for each element. The goal is to hybridize fully functional array of TES detectors to NIST readout.

  20. Multi-mode TES Bolometer Optimization for the LSPE-SWIPE Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gualtieri, R.; Battistelli, E. S.; Cruciani, A.; de Bernardis, P.; Biasotti, M.; Corsini, D.; Gatti, F.; Lamagna, L.; Masi, S.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we explore the possibility of using transition edge sensor (TES) detectors in multi-mode configuration in the focal plane of the Short Wavelength Instrument for the Polarization Explorer (SWIPE) of the balloon-borne polarimeter Large-Scale Polarization Explorer (LSPE) for the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) polarization. This study is motivated by the fact that maximizing the sensitivity of TES bolometers, under the augmented background due to the multi-mode design, requires a non-trivial choice of detector parameters. We evaluate the best parameter combination taking into account scanning strategy, noise constraints, saturation power, and operating temperature of the cryostat during the flight.

  1. Large area TES spiderweb bolometer for multi-mode cavity microwave detect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biasotti, M.; Bagliani, D.; Ceriale, V.; Corsini, D.; De Bernardis, P.; Gatti, F.; Gualtieri, R.; Lamagna, L.; Masi, S.; Pizzigoni, G.; Schillaci, A.

    2014-07-01

    Large area spiderweb bolometers of 8 mm diameter and a mesh size of 250 μm are fabricated in order to couple with approximately the first 20 modes of a multimode EM cavity at about 140 GHz. The sensor is a Ti/Au/Ti 3 layer TES with Tc tuned in the 330-380 mK and 2 mK transition width. We describe the detector design and the fabrication process, early TES electro-thermal measurements. We also report optical coupling measurement and show the multimode coupling.

  2. The Rocks of Gusev Crater as Viewed by Mini-TES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruff, S. W.; Christensen, P. R.; Blaney, D. L.

    2005-01-01

    We are developing the means to separate atmospheric spectral features from rock spectra. Measurements made in the late afternoon when the temperature difference between the rocks and sky is the greatest provide spectra that are least impacted by downwelling radiance. Additionally, the long wavelength range of Mini-TES spectra contain spectral features that are least effected by contributions from the atmosphere due to its relative transparency in this range. Mini-TES spectra have thus been used to reveal the geological diversity in Gusev crater and will continue to be a rich source of mineralogical information as Spirit continues its traverse.

  3. Modern applications of terahertz emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrel, Shayne Matthew

    Terahertz (THz) emission spectroscopy (TES) is newly developed experimental technique capable of measuring ultrafast dynamics in a variety of systems. Unlike pump-probe spectroscopies where the signals are obtained indirectly, the THz waveform emitted by the dynamical process serves as the signal field. Information about processes involving a time-dependent magnetization, polarization or current is obtained using TES. The detection scheme is polarization sensitive and allows the direction of the dynamical event to be recovered. The role of solvation on intramolecular charge transfer in DMANS (4-(dimethylamino)-4'-nitrostilbene) is studied using TES in three solvents: benzene, toluene, and 1,3-dichlorobenzene. These solvents have similar molecular structures but different polarities and dielectric constants. The charge transfer dynamics are found to depend on the solvent. A secondary feature in the THz emission appearing 4-6 Ps after the main pulse provides evidence that DMANS may undergo a twisted intramolecular charge transfer state (TICT) upon photoexcitation. The ultrafast magnetization dynamics of polycrystalline Ni and single Fe films ranging in thickness from 5 nm to 60 nm are reported using TES. For samples thicker than the visible optical skin depth, (˜10 nm for Ni and ˜27 nm for Fe), the emission is easily interpreted using Lenz's law. For films thinner than visible optical skin depth, the emission patterns are qualitatively different. These results suggest that there are two generation mechanisms at work: one that arises purely from bulk demagnetization in the thick sample limit and another that is the result of difference frequency generation enhanced by the magnetized surface. A comparative study of the magnetization dynamics of a 40 nm Ni and 40 Fe film shows that the magnetization recovers faster in Fe than in Ni. The dependence of optical rectification and shift currents in unbiased GaAs (111) is reported using TES. It is found that the dependence

  4. Software management and implementation plan for the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) carried on a NASA Earth Observing System (EOS) satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, H. Y.; Girard, M. A.; Perun, V. S.; Sherif, J. S.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a Software Management and Implementation Plan (SIMP) for managing and controlling the development of the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) instrument software, and the Instrument Ground Support Equipment (IGSE) software.

  5. An interfaces approach to TES ground data system processing design with the Science Investigator-led Processing System (SIPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurian, R.; Grifin, A.

    2002-01-01

    Developing production-quality software to process the large volumes of scientific data is the responsibility of the TES Ground Data System, which is being developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory together with support contractor Raytheon/ITSS. The large data volume and processing requirements of the TES pose significant challenges to the design.

  6. Design and Field-of-View Calibration of 114-660-GHz Optics of the Earth Observing System Microwave Limb Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cofield, Richard E.; Stek, Paul C.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the optics design and field-of view (FOV) calibration for five radiometers covering 114-660 GHz which share a common antenna in the Microwave Limb Sounder instrument on the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Aura satellite. Details of near-field pattern measurements are presented. Estimated systematic scaling uncertainties (3/spl sigma/) on calibrated limb emissions, due to FOV calibration uncertainties, are below 0.4%. 3/spl sigma/ uncertainties in beamwidth and relative pointing of radiometer boresights are 0.006A(deg) and 0.003A(deg) , respectively. The uncertainty in modeled instrument response, due to the scan dependence of FOV patterns, is less than +/- 0.24 K equivalent blackbody temperature. Refinements to the calibration using in-flight data are presented.

  7. Technology Development for a Hyperspectral Microwave Atmospheric Sounder (HyMAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackwell, W.; Galbraith, C.; Hilliard, L.; Racette, P.; Thompson, E.

    2014-01-01

    The Hyperspectral Microwave Atmospheric Sounder (HyMAS) is being developed at Lincoln Laboratories and accommodated by the Goddard Space Flight Center for a flight opportunity on a NASA research aircraft. The term hyperspectral microwave is used to indicate an all-weather sounding instrument that performs equivalent to hyperspectral infrared sounders in clear air with vertical resolution of approximately 1 km. Deploying the HyMAS equipped scanhead with the existing Conical Scanning Microwave Imaging Radiometer (CoSMIR) shortens the path to a flight demonstration. Hyperspectral microwave is achieved through the use of independent RF antennas that sample the volume of the Earths atmosphere through various levels of frequencies, thereby producing a set of dense, spaced vertical weighting functions.

  8. Space Plasma Slab Studies using a new 3D Embedded Reconfigurable MPSoC Sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekoulis, George

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents recent ionospheric slab thickness measurements using a new mobile digital sounder system. The datasets obtained have been compared to the results of existing sounders in operation. The data validity has been verified. The slab thickness data allow constant monitoring of the lower ionosphere revealing the dynamic trends of the physical processes being involved. The prototype offers a tremendous amount of hardware processing power and a previously unseen response time in servicing the input and output data interfaces. This has been enabled by incorporating the latest three-dimensional Ultrascale+ technologies available commercially from the reconfigurable Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) computing industry. Furthermore, a previously developed Network-on-Chip (NoC) design methodology has been incorporated for connecting and controlling the application driven multiprocessor network. The system determines electron distributions, aggregate electromagnetic field gradients and plasma current density.

  9. Development of the Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) for NPOESS C1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brann, C.; Kunkee, D.

    2008-12-01

    The National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System's Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) is planned for flight on the first NPOESS mission (C1) in 2013. The C1 ATMS will be the second instrument of the ATMS series and will provide along with the companion Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS), atmospheric temperature and moisture profiles for NPOESS. The first flight of the ATMS is scheduled in 2010 on the NPOESS Preparatory Project (NPP) satellite, which is an early instrument risk reduction component of the NPOESS mission. This poster will focus on the development of the ATMS for C1 including aspects of the sensor calibration, antenna beam and RF characteristics and scanning. New design aspects of the C1 ATMS, required primarily by parts obsolescence, will also be addressed in this poster.

  10. Underwater Acoustic Transponders Tracking While Mapping With A Multibeam Echo-Sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Moustier, C. P.; Franzheim, A.; Testa, W.; Burns, J. M.; Foy, R.

    2010-12-01

    A 160 kHz multibeam echo-sounder was used to interrogate and receive the replies from custom-built miniature underwater acoustic transponders attached to the carapace of king crabs in Womens Bay, Alaska. This new application of multibeam echo-sounders combines acoustic tracking and mapping, thus providing environmental context to the tracking information. Each transponder replies with its own coded sequence that stands out from other echoes received by the sonar. Range and bearing of the replies from multiple transponders can be obtained in a single sonar ping. The king crab experiment was done in 25-35 m of water depth, and the system was successfully tested without animals at 190 m depth. Work supported by NOAA's Undersea Research Program Grant G4768, with field work support from NOAA-NMFS/AFSC/RACE and Electronic Navigation Ltd.

  11. Feasibility of stratosphere temperature sounding with the Multi-Order Etalon Sounder (MOES) in the infrared

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.; Hays, P.B.; Moncet, J.L.

    1994-12-31

    Instruments with very high spectral resolution are needed to sound stratospheric temperatures from satellite. Maximizing the contributions of the stratosphere to the upwelling radiance measured by a particular channel can be achieved by using high spectral resolution channels positioned at strong carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) line centers. In this paper, the techniques of stratospheric temperature sounding from satellite are briefly reviewed. The feasibility of high resolution stratospheric temperature sounding with the Multi-Order Etalon Sounder (MOES), a high resolution Fabry-Perot array spectrometer, is discussed. The simulation studies indicate that stratospheric temperatures can be derived with a root-mean-square (RMS) error of about 2--3 K with MOES. A scenario to add MOES to the next generation High Resolution Infrared Sounder (HIRS/3) currently under development with minimal cost is suggested. With its compact size and ruggedness, MOES is an ideal candidate as the stratospheric temperature sounding unit for small environmental satellite platforms.

  12. Science Highlights and Lessons Learned from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagano, Thomas S.; Fetzer, Eric J.; Suda, Jarrod; Licata, Steve

    2011-01-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and companion instrument, the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) on the NASA Earth Observing System Aqua spacecraft are facility instruments designed to support measurements of atmospheric temperature, water vapor and a wide range of atmospheric constituents in support of weather forecasting and scientific research in climate and atmospheric chemistry. This paper is an update to the science highlights from a paper by the authors released last year and also looks back at the lessons learned and future needs of the scientific community. These lessons not only include requirements on the measurements, but scientific shortfalls as well. Results from the NASA Science Community Workshop in IR and MW Sounders relating to AIRS and AMSU requirements and concerns are covered and reflect much of what has been learned and what is needed for future atmospheric sounding from Low Earth Orbit.

  13. The Stratospheric Wind Ingrared Limb Sounder: Investigation of atmospheric dynamics and transport from Eos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccleese, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    The Stratospheric Wind Infrared Limb Sounder (SWIRLS) is one of the instruments in the atmospheric sounder package to be flown by NASA on the Earth Observing System (EOS) B platform in the late 1990's. SWIRLS is designed to measure the horizontal vector wind field, atmospheric temperature, and the abundances and distributions of ozone and nitrous oxide in the middle atmosphere. These measurements will constitute a dynamical climatology of the stratosphere covering time scales ranging from diurnal to interannual. In addition, the SWIRLS investigation will quantify the physical mechanisms responsible for the structure and variations of stratospheric circulation and temperature fields, including the transport of species, particularly ozone, heat and momentum. Existing data sets lack the combination of accuracy, global and temporal coverage, spatial resoultion and simultaneity required to distinguish unambiguosly between the roles of dynamical and chemical processes in determining the current distribution of ozone and its evolution in the future. The measurement objectives, measurement approach, and instrumentation of SWIRLS is described.

  14. Development of Frequency-Division Multiplexing Readout System for Large-Format TES X-ray Microcalorimeter Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, K.; Yamamoto, R.; Takei, Y.; Mitsuda, K.; Yamasaki, N. Y.; Hidaka, M.; Nagasawa, S.; Kohjiro, S.; Miyazaki, T.

    2016-07-01

    We are developing the frequency-division multiplexing (FDM) readout system aimed to realize the 400-pixel transition edge sensor (TES) microcalorimeter array for the DIOS mission as well as large-format arrays with more than a thousand of TES for future space missions such as the ATHENA mission. The developed system consists of the low-power superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID), the digital FDM electronics, and the analog front-end to bridge the SQUID and the digital electronics. Using the developed readout system, we performed a TES readout experiment and succeeded to multiplex four TES signals with the single-staged cryogenic setup. We have experienced two issues during the experiment: an excess noise and crosstalk. The brief overview of the developed system and the details, results, and issues of the TES multiplexing readout experiment is discussed.

  15. Theoretical computation of trace gases retrieval random error from measurements of high spectral resolution infrared sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Hung-Lung; Smith, William L.; Woolf, Harold M.; Theriault, J. M.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the trace gas profiling capabilities of future passive high spectral resolution (1 cm(exp -1) or better) infrared (600 to 2700 cm(exp -1)) satellite tropospheric sounders. These sounders, such as the grating spectrometer, Atmospheric InfRared Sounders (AIRS) (Chahine et al., 1990) and the interferometer, GOES High Resolution Interferometer Sounder (GHIS), (Smith et al., 1991) can provide these unique infrared spectra which enable us to conduct this analysis. In this calculation only the total random retrieval error component is presented. The systematic error components contributed by the forward and inverse model error are not considered (subject of further studies). The total random errors, which are composed of null space error (vertical resolution component error) and measurement error (instrument noise component error), are computed by assuming one wavenumber spectral resolution with wavenumber span from 1100 cm(exp -1) to 2300 cm(exp -1) (the band 600 cm(exp -1) to 1100 cm(exp -1) is not used since there is no major absorption of our three gases here) and measurement noise of 0.25 degree at reference temperature of 260 degree K. Temperature, water vapor, ozone and mixing ratio profiles of nitrous oxide, carbon monoxide and methane are taken from 1976 US Standard Atmosphere conditions (a FASCODE model). Covariance matrices of the gases are 'subjectively' generated by assuming 50 percent standard deviation of gaussian perturbation with respect to their US Standard model profiles. Minimum information and maximum likelihood retrieval solutions are used.

  16. Level 1B products from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on the EOS Aqua Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagano, Thomas S.; Aumann, H. H.; Overoye, Ken

    2003-01-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) was launched May 4, 2002 on the EOS Aqua Spacecraft. A discussion is given of the objectives of the AIRS experiment, including requirements on the data products. We summarize the instrument characteristics, including sensitivity, noise, and spectral response, and preflight calibration results leading to the estimate of the calibration accuracy. The Level 1B calibration algorithm is presented as well as the results of in-flight stability and sensitivity measurements.

  17. The Laser Atmospheric Wind Sounder (LAWS) Phase 2 Preliminary System Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petheram, John C.; Kenyon, David L.; Wissinger, Alan B.; Lawrence, T. Rhidian

    1992-01-01

    The laser Atmospheric Wind Sounder (LAWS) is intended to measure global wind profiles in the lower and upper troposphere as part of the Earth Observing System (EOS). Global scale wind profiles will lead to a better understanding of large scale circulation processes and climate dynamics, an understanding of mesoscale phenomena, improved numerical weather prediction, and further insights into the coupling of the atmosphere/oceans/biosphere system. Here, details are given of the Phase 2 preliminary design.

  18. Suomi NPP/JPSS Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS): Calibration Validation With The Aircraft Based Scanning High-resolution Interferometer Sounder (S-HIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, J. K.; Revercomb, H. E.; Tobin, D.; Knuteson, R. O.; Best, F. A.; Adler, D. A.; Pettersen, C.; Garcia, R. K.; Gero, P.

    2013-12-01

    To better accommodate climate change monitoring and improved weather forecasting, there is an established need for higher accuracy and more refined error characterization of radiance measurements from space and the corresponding geophysical products. This need has led to emphasizing direct tests of on-orbit performance, referred to as validation. Currently, validation typically involves (1) collecting high quality reference data from airborne and/or ground-based instruments during the satellite overpass, and (2) a detailed comparison between the satellite-based radiance measurements and the corresponding high quality reference data. Additionally, for future missions technology advancements at the University of Wisconsin Space Science and Engineering Center (UW-SSEC) have led to the development of an on-orbit absolute radiance reference utilizing miniature phase change cells to provide direct on-orbit traceability to International Standards (SI). The detailed comparison between the satellite-based radiance measurements and the corresponding measurements made from a high-altitude aircraft must account for instrument noise and scene variations, as well as differences in instrument observation altitudes, view angles, spatial footprints, and spectral response. Most importantly, for the calibration validation process to be both accurate and repeatable the reference data instrument must be extremely well characterized and understood, carefully maintained, and accurately calibrated, with traceability to absolute standards. The Scanning High-resolution Interferometer Sounder (S-HIS) meets and exceeds these requirements and has proven to do so on multiple airborne platforms, each with significantly different instrument operating environments. The Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) on Suomi NPP, launched 28 October 2011, is designed to give scientists more refined information about Earth's atmosphere and improve weather forecasts and our understanding of climate. CrIS is an

  19. The Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS): The First 10 Months On-Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Edward; Lyu, C-H Joseph; Blackwell, Willaim; Leslie, R. Vince; Baker, Neal; Mo, Tsan; Sun, Ninghai; Bi, Li; Anderson, Kent; Landrum, Mike; DeAmici, Giovanni; Gu, Degui; Foo, Alex; Ibrahim, Wael; Robinson, Kris; Chidester, Lynn; Shiue, James

    2012-01-01

    The Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) is a new satellite microwave sounding sensor designed to provide operational weather agencies with atmospheric temperature and moisture profile information for global weather forecasting and climate applications. A TMS will continue the microwave sounding capabilities first provided by its predecessors, the Microwave Sounding Unit (MSU) and Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU). The first ATMS was launched October 28, 2011 on board the NPOESS Preparatory Project (NPP) satellite. Microwave soundings by themselves are the highest-impact input data used by Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) models, especially under cloudy sky conditions. ATMS has 22 channels spanning 23-183 GHz, closely following the channel set of the MSU, AMSU-A1/2, AMSU-B, Microwave Humidity Sounder (MHS), and Humidity Sounder for Brazil (HSB). All this is accomplished with approximately 1/4 the volume, 1/2 the mass, and 1/2 the power of the three AMSUs. A description of ATMS cal/val activities will be presented followed by examples of its performance after its first 10 months on orbit.

  20. Wide Field Collimator 2 (WFC2) for GOES Imager and Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etemad, Shahriar; Bremer, James C.; Zukowski, Barbara J.; Pasquale, Bert A.; zukowski, Tmitri J.; Prince, Robert E.; O'Neill, Patrick A.; Ross, Robert W.

    2004-01-01

    Two of the GOES instruments, the Imager and the Sounder, perform scans of the Earth to provide a full disc picture of the Earth. To verify the entire scan process, an image of a target that covers an 18 deg. circular field-of-view is collimated and projected into the field of regard of each instrument. The Wide Field Collimator 2 (WFC2) has many advantages over its predecessor, WFC1, including lower thermal dissipation higher fir field MTF, smaller package, and a more intuitive (faster) focusing process. The illumination source is an LED array that emits in a narrow spectral band centered at 689 nm, within the visible spectral bands of the Imager and Sounder. The illumination level can be continuously adjusted electronically. Lower thermal dissipation eliminates the need for forced convection cooling and minimizes time to reach thermal stability. The lens system has been optimized for the illumination source spectral output and athernalized to remain in focus during bulk temperature changes within the laboratory environment. The MTF of the lens is higher than that of the WFC1 at the edge of FOV. The target is focused in three orthogonal motions, controlled by an ergonomic system that saves substantial time and produces a sharper focus. Key words: Collimator, GOES, Imager, Sounder, Projector

  1. A new multibeam echo sounder/sonar for fishery research applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Lars Nonboe; Berg, Sverre; Stenersen, Erik; Gammelsaeter, Ole Bernt; Lunde, Even Borte

    2003-10-01

    Fisheries scientists have for many years been requesting a calibrated multibeam echo sounder/sonar specially designed for fishery research applications. Simrad AS has, in cooperation with IFREMER, France, agreed on specifications for a multibeam echo sounder and with IMR, Norway for a multibeam sonar, and contracts were signed for development of such systems in January 2003. The systems have 800 transmitting and receiving channels with similar hardware, but different software, and are characterized by narrow beams, low-sidelobe levels, and operate in the frequency range 70-120 kHz. The echo sounder is designed for high operating flexibility, with 1 to 47 beams of approximately 2°, covering a maximum sector of 60°. In addition, normal split beam mode on 70 and 120 kHz with 7° beams for comparison with standard system is available. The sonar will be mounted on a drop keel, looking horizontally, covering a horizontal sector of +/-30°, and a vertical sector of 45°. Total number of beams is 500, 25 beams horizontally with a resolution of ~3°, and 20 beams vertically with a resolution of ~4°. Both systems are designed for accurate fish-stock assessment and fish-behavior studies.

  2. Inter-Comparison of GOES-8 Imager and Sounder Skin Temperature Retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, Stephanie L.; Suggs, Ronnie J.; Jedlovec, Gary J.; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Skin temperature (ST) retrievals derived from geostationary satellite observations have both high temporal and spatial resolutions and are therefore useful for applications such as assimilation into mesoscale forecast models, nowcasting, and diagnostic studies. Our retrieval method uses a Physical Split Window technique requiring at least two channels within the longwave infrared window. On current GOES satellites, including GOES-11, there are two Imager channels within the required spectral interval. However, beginning with the GOES-M satellite the 12-um channel will be removed, leaving only one longwave channel. The Sounder instrument will continue to have three channels within the longwave window, and therefore ST retrievals will be derived from Sounder measurements. This research compares retrievals from the two instruments and evaluates the effects of the spatial resolution and sensor calibration differences on the retrievals. Both Imager and Sounder retrievals are compared to ground-truth data to evaluate the overall accuracy of the technique. An analysis of GOES-8 and GOES-11 intercomparisons is also presented.

  3. Common Bias Readout for TES Array on Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, R.; Sakai, K.; Maehisa, K.; Nagayoshi, K.; Hayashi, T.; Muramatsu, H.; Nakashima, Y.; Mitsuda, K.; Yamasaki, N. Y.; Takei, Y.; Hidaka, M.; Nagasawa, S.; Maehata, K.; Hara, T.

    2016-07-01

    A transition edge sensor (TES) microcalorimeter array as an X-ray sensor for a scanning transmission electron microscope system is being developed. The technical challenge of this system is a high count rate of ˜ 5000 counts/second/array. We adopted a 64 pixel array with a parallel readout. Common SQUID bias, and common TES bias are planned to reduce the number of wires and the resources of a room temperature circuit. The reduction rate of wires is 44 % when a 64 pixel array is read out by a common bias of 8 channels. The possible degradation of the energy resolution has been investigated by simulations and experiments. The bias fluctuation effects of a series connection are less than those of a parallel connection. Simple calculations expect that the fluctuations of the common SQUID bias and common TES bias in a series connection are 10^{-7} and 10^{-3}, respectively. We constructed 8 SQUIDs which are connected to 8 TES outputs and a room temperature circuit for common bias readout and evaluated experimentally. Our simulation of crosstalk indicates that at an X-ray event rate of 500 cps/pixel, crosstalk will broaden a monochromatic line by about 0.01 %, or about 1.5 eV at 15 keV. Thus, our design goal of 10 eV energy resolution across the 0.5-15 keV band should be achievable.

  4. Hydrovolcanic Landforms in Acidalia and Cydonia: Pan-Spectral Analysis with MGS MOC, MOLA, and TES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrand, W. H.; Gaddis, L. R.; Blundell, S.

    2002-01-01

    Landforms resembling tuyas and moberg hills and ridges in Acidalia and Cydonia are examined using MGS MOC, MOLA, and TES data. Using multiple datasets provides additional constraints on the question of whether these landforms are hydrovolcanic in origin. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  5. External review of the thermal energy storage (TES) cogeneration study assumptions. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, B.Y.; Poirier, R.N.

    1996-08-01

    This report is to provide a detailed review of the basic assumptions made in the design, sizing, performance, and economic models used in the thermal energy storage (TES)/cogeneration feasibility studies conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) staff. This report is the deliverable required under the contract.

  6. Solutions Network Formulation Report. Integration of OMI and TES Aerosol Products into the EPA Regional Planning Organizations' FASTNET Aerosol Tracking and Analysis Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knowlton, Kelly; Andrews, Jane C.

    2006-01-01

    (Ozone Monitoring Instrument) and TES (Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer) air quality data for the RPOs by comparing OMI and TES data with ground-based data that are acquired during identified episodes of air pollution. The air quality data from OMI and TES are of different spectral ranges than data from satellites currently included in FASTNET, giving them potential advantages over the existing satellites. If the OMI and TES data are shown to be useful to the RPOs, they would then be integrated into the FASTNET DST for use on an operational basis.

  7. New Results and Insight into Tropospheric Composition - (TES) Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunson, Michael R.; Eldering, Annmarie

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes the scientific challenges along with the chemical and dynamic processes that govern tropospheric ozone. The contents include: 1) The challenge and why; 2) The how to do 'it'; 3) Did 'it' work; 4) What we are trying to do with 'it'; 5) What else is happening; and 6) What next.

  8. The Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS): First Year On-Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, E. J.; Lyu, C.; Blackwell, W. J.; Leslie, V.; Baker, N.; Mo, T.; Sun, N.; Bi, L.; Anderson, K.; Landrum, M.; De Amici, G.; Gu, D.; Foo, A.; Ibrahim, W.; Robinson, K.

    2012-12-01

    The Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) is a new satellite microwave sounding sensor designed to provide operational weather agencies with atmospheric temperature and moisture profile information for global weather forecasting and climate applications. ATMS will continue the microwave sounding capabilities first provided by its predecessors, the Microwave Sounding Unit (MSU) and Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU). The first ATMS was launched October 28, 2011 on board the Suomi-NPOESS Preparatory Project (S-NPP) satellite and has just finished its first year on orbit. Microwave soundings by themselves are the highest-impact input data used by Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) models; and ATMS, when combined with the Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS), forms the Cross-track Infrared and Microwave Sounding Suite (CrIMSS). The microwave soundings help meet NWP sounding requirements under cloudy sky conditions and provide key profile information near the surface. Designed & built by Aerojet Corporation in Azusa, California, (now Northrop Grumman Electronic Systems), ATMS has 22 channels spanning 23—183 GHz, closely following the channel set of the MSU, AMSU-A1 and A2, AMSU-B, Microwave Humidity Sounder (MHS), and Humidity Sounder for Brazil (HSB). It continues their cross-track scanning geometry, but for the first time, provides Nyquist sample spacing. All this is accomplished with approximately one quarter the volume, one half the mass, and one half the power of the three AMSUs. A summary description of the ATMS design will be presented. Post-launch calibration/validation activities include geolocation determination, radiometric calibration using the on-board warm targets and cold space views, simultaneous observations by microwave sounders on other satellites, comparison vs. pre-launch thermovacuum test performance; observations vs. atmospheric model predicted radiances, and comparisons of soundings vs. radiosondes. Brief descriptions of these

  9. Mineral Composition and Abundance of the Rocks and Soils at Gusev and Meridiani from the Mars Exploration Rover Mini-TES Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christensen, P. R.; Wyatt, M. B.; Glotch, T. D.; Rogers, A. D.; Anwar, S.; Arvidson, R. E.; Bandfield, J. L.; Blaney, D. L.; Budney, C.; Calvin, W. M.

    2005-01-01

    The Miniature Thermal Emission Spectrometer (Mini-TES) has provided remote measurements of mineralogy, thermophysical properties, and atmospheric temperature profile and composition of the outcrops, rocks, spherules, and soils surrounding the Spirit and Opportunity Rovers. The mineralogy of volcanic rocks provides insights into the composition of the source regions and the nature of martian igneous processes. Carbonates, sulfates, evaporites, and oxides provide information on the role of water in the surface evolution. Oxides, such as crystalline hematite, provide insight into aqueous weathering processes, as would the occurrence of clay minerals and other weathering products. Diurnal temperature measurements can be used to determine particle size and search for the effects of sub-surface layering, which in turn provide clues to the origin of surficial materials through rock disintegration, aeolian transport, atmospheric fallout, or induration. In addition to studying the surface properties, Mini-TES spectra have also been used to determine the temperature profile in the lower boundary layer, providing evidence for convective activity, and have determined the seasonal trends in atmospheric temperature and dust and cloud opacity.

  10. Instrument technology for magnetosphere plasma imaging from high Earth orbit. Design of a radio plasma sounder. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Haines, D.M.; Reinisch, B.W.

    1995-01-01

    The use of radio sounding techniques for the study of the ionospheric plasma dates back to G. Briet and M. A. Tuve in 1926. Ground based swept frequency sounders can monitor the electron number density (N{sub e}) as a function of height (the N{sub e} profile). These early instruments evolved into a global network that produced high-resolution displays of echo time delay vs frequency on 35-mm film. These instruments provided the foundation for the success of the International Geophysical Year. The Alouette and International Satellites for Ionospheric Studies (ISIS) programs pioneered the used of spaceborne, swept frequency sounders to obtain N{sub e} profiles of the topside of the ionosphere, from a position above the electron density maximum. Repeated measurements during the orbit produced an orbital plane contour which routinely provided density measurements to within 10%. The Alouette/ISIS experience also showed that even with a high powered transmitter (compared to the low power sounder possible today) a radio sounder can be compatible with other imaging instruments on the same satellite. Digital technology was used on later spacecraft developed by the Japanese (the EXOS C and D) and the Soviets (Intercosmos 19 and Cosmos 1809). However, a full coherent pulse compression and spectral integrating capability, such as exist today for ground-based sounders (Reinisch et al.), has never been put into space. NASA`s 1990 Space Physics Strategy Implementation Study `The NASA Space Physics Program from 1995 to 2010` suggested using radio sounders to study the plasmasphere and the magnetopause and its boundary layers (Green and Fung). Both the magnetopause and plasmasphere, as well as the cusp and boundary layers, can be observed by a radio sounder in a high-inclination polar orbit with an apogee greater than 6 R{sub e} (Reiff et al.; Calvert et al.).

  11. Shocked plagioclase signatures in Thermal Emission Spectrometer data of Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, J. R.; Staid, M.I.; Titus, T.N.; Becker, K.

    2006-01-01

    The extensive impact cratering record on Mars combined with evidence from SNC meteorites suggests that a significant fraction of the surface is composed of materials subjected to variable shock pressures. Pressure-induced structural changes in minerals during high-pressure shock events alter their thermal infrared spectral emission features, particularly for feldspars, in a predictable fashion. To understand the degree to which the distribution and magnitude of shock effects influence martian surface mineralogy, we used standard spectral mineral libraries supplemented by laboratory spectra of experimentally shocked bytownite feldspar [Johnson, J.R., Ho??rz, F., Christensen, P., Lucey, P.G., 2002b. J. Geophys. Res. 107 (E10), doi:10.1029/2001JE001517] to deconvolve Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) data from six relatively large (>50 km) impact craters on Mars. We used both TES orbital data and TES mosaics (emission phase function sequences) to study local and regional areas near the craters, and compared the differences between models using single TES detector data and 3 ?? 2 detector-averaged data. Inclusion of shocked feldspar spectra in the deconvolution models consistently improved the rms errors compared to models in which the spectra were not used, and resulted in modeled shocked feldspar abundances of >15% in some regions. However, the magnitudes of model rms error improvements were within the noise equivalent rms errors for the TES instrument [Hamilton V., personal communication]. This suggests that while shocked feldspars may be a component of the regions studied, their presence cannot be conclusively demonstrated in the TES data analyzed here. If the distributions of shocked feldspars suggested by the models are real, the lack of spatial correlation to crater materials may reflect extensive aeolian mixing of martian regolith materials composed of variably shocked impact ejecta from both local and distant sources. ?? 2005 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  12. Shocked Plagioclase Signatures in Thermal Emission Spectrometer Data of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. R.; Staid, M. I.; Titus, T. N.

    2002-01-01

    Deconvolution of TES (Thermal Emission Spectrometer) data using a spectral library that includes spectra of experimentally shocked anorthosite (bytownite) suggests that shocked materials can be identified on Mars at low to intermediate abundances (10 - 20%) over a range of pressures. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  13. Constraints on the Within Season and Between Year Variability of the North Residual Cap from MGS-TES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calvin, W. M.; Titus, T. N.; Mahoney, S. A.

    2003-01-01

    There is a long history of telescopic and spacecraft observations of the polar regions of Mars. The finely laminated ice deposits and surrounding layered terrains are commonly thought to contain a record of past climate conditions and change. Understanding the basic nature of the deposits and their mineral and ice constituents is a continued focus of current and future orbited missions. Unresolved issues in Martian polar science include a) the unusual nature of the CO2 ice deposits ("Swiss Cheese", "slab ice" etc.) b) the relationship of the ice deposits to underlying layered units (which differs from the north to the south), c) understanding the seasonal variations and their connections to the finely laminated units observed in high-resolution images and d) the relationship of dark materials in the wind-swept lanes and reentrant valleys to the surrounding dark dune and surface materials. Our work focuses on understanding these issues in relationship to the north residual ice cap. Recent work using Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) data sets have described evolution of the seasonal CO2 frost deposits. In addition, the north polar residual ice cap exhibits albedo variations between Mars years and within the summer season. The Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) data set can augment these observations providing additional constraints such as temperature evolution and spectral properties associated with ice and rocky materials. Exploration of these properties is the subject of our current study.

  14. Selection of HyspIRI optimal band positions for the earth compositional mapping using HyTES data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullah, Saleem; Khalid, Noora; Iqbal, Arshad

    2016-07-01

    In near future, NASA/JPL will orbit a new space-borne sensor called HyspIRI (Hyperspectral and Infrared Imager) which will cover the spectral range from 0.4 -14μm. Two instruments will be mounted on HyspIRI platform; one is hyperspectral instrument which can sense earth surface between 0.4-2.5μm with 10 nm intervals and a multispectral TIR sensor will acquire images between 3 to 14μm in 8 (1 in MIR and 7 in TIR) spectral bands. The TIR spectral wavebands will be positioned based on their importance in various applications. This study aimed to find HyspIRI optimal TIR wavebands position for earth compositional mapping. Genetic algorithms coupled with Spectral Angle Mapper (GA-SAM) were used as spectral bands selector. High dimensional HyTES (Hyperspectral Thermal Emission Spectrometer) data comprised of 256 spectral bands of Cuprite and Death Valley regions were used to select meaningful subsets of bands for earth compositional mapping. The GA-SAM was trained for eight mineral classes and the algorithms were run iteratively 40 times. High calibration (> 98 %) and validation (> 96 %) accuracies were achieved with limited numbers (seven) of spectral bands selected by GA-SAM. Knowing the important band positions will help scientist of HyspIRI group to place spectral bands at regions were accuracies of earth compositional mapping can be enhanced.

  15. The Expected Impacts of NPOESS Microwave and Infrared Sounder Radiances on Operational Numerical Weather Prediction and Data Assimilation Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swadley, S. D.; Baker, N.; Derber, J.; Collard, A.; Hilton, F.; Ruston, B.; Bell, W.; Candy, B.; Kleespies, T. J.

    2009-12-01

    The NPOESS atmospheric sounding functionality will be accomplished using two separate sensor suites, the combined infrared (IR) and microwave (MW) sensor suite (CrIMSS), and the Microwave Imager/Sounder (MIS) instrument. CrIMSS consists of the Cross Track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) and the cross track Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS), and is scheduled to fly on the NPOESS Preparatory Project (NPP), and NPOESS operational flight units C1 and C3. The MIS is a conical scanning polarimetric imager and sounder patterned after the heritage WindSat, and DMSP Special Sensor Microwave Imagers and Sounders (SSMI and SSMIS), and is scheduled for flight units C2, C3 and C4. ATMS combines the current operational Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) and the Microwave Humidity Sounder (MHS), but with an additional channel in the 51.76 GHz oxygen absorption region and 3 additional channels in the 165.5 and 183 GHz water vapor absorption band. CrIS is a Fourier Transform Spectrometer and will provide 159 shortwave IR channels, 433 mid-range IR channels, and 713 longwave IR channels. The heritage sensors for CrIS are the NASA Advanced Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and the MetOp-A Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI). Both AIRS and IASI are high quality, high spectral resolution sounders which represent a significant improvement in the effective vertical resolution over previous IR sounders. This presentation will give an overview of preparations underway for day-1 monitoring of NPP/NPOESS radiances, and subsequent operational radiance assimilation. These preparations capitalize on experience gained during the pre-launch preparations, sensor calibration/validation and operational assimilation for the heritage sensors. One important step is to use pre-flight sensor channel specifications, noise estimates and knowledge of the antenna patterns, to generate and test proxy NPP/NPOESS sensor observations in existing assimilation systems. Other critical factors for

  16. Pre-Launch Characterization of the Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) on the Joint Polar Satellite System-1 Satellite (JPSS-1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Edward; Leslie, Vince; Lyu, Joseph; Smith, Craig; McCormick, Lisa; Anderson, Kent

    2016-04-01

    The Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) is the newest generation of microwave sounder in the international fleet of polar-orbiting weather satellites, replacing the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) which first entered service in 1998. The first ATMS was launched aboard the Suomi NPP (S-NPP) satellite in late 2011. The second ATMS is manifested on the Joint Polar Satellite System-1 Satellite (JPSS-1). ATMS provides 22 channels of temperature and humidity sounding observations over a frequency range from 23 to 183 GHz. These microwave soundings provide the highest impact data ingested by operational Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) models, and are the most critical of the polar-orbiting satellite observations, particularly because microwave sensing can penetrate clouds. This paper will present performance characterizations from pre-launch calibration measurements of the JPSS-1 ATMS just completed in December, 2015. The measurements were conducted in a thermal vacuum chamber with blackbody targets simulating cold space, ambient, and a variable Earth scene. They represent the best opportunity for calibration characterization of the instrument since the environment can be carefully controlled. We will present characterizations of the sensitivity (NEDT), accuracy, nonlinearity, noise spectral characteristics, gain stability, repeatability, and inter-channel correlation. An estimate of expected "striping" will be presented, and a discussion of reflector emissivity effects will also be provided. Comparisons will be made with the S-NPP flight unit. Finally, we will describe planned on-orbit characterizations - such as pitch and roll maneuvers - that will further improve both the measurement quality and the understanding of various error contributions.

  17. ISIS Processing Tools for Thermal Emission Spectrometer Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, K.; Johnson, J. R.; Gaddis, L.

    2003-01-01

    The Integrated Software for Imagers and Spectrometers (ISIS) package is a widely used planetary data processing and cartography software system produced by the Astrogeology program of the USGS in Flagstaff, AZ. Recent additions to the ISIS system provide useful tools for extracting and projecting Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) data for use with other ISIS programs to process, analyze, and visualize these data, particularly in comparison with other Mars data sets. A general overview of various programs and tools used for extracting and processing TES data are presented.

  18. Field-aligned electron density irregularities near 500 km. Equator to polar cap topside sounder Z mode observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, R. F.

    1984-01-01

    In addition to spread F, evidence for field-aligned electron density irregularities is commonly observed on Alouette 2 topside sounder ionograms recorded near perigee (500 km). This evidence is provided by distinctive signal returns from sounder-generated Z mode waves. At low latitudes these waves become guided in wave ducts caused by field-aligned electron density irregularities and give rise to strong long-duration echoes. At high latitudes, extending well into the polar cap, these Z mode waves (and stimulated electrostatic waves at the plasma frequency) produce a series of vertical bars on the ionogram display as the satellite traverses discrete field-aligned density structures. The radio frequency (RF) noise environment to be expected in the 400 to 500 km altitude region from low to high latitudes was examined by analyzing perigee Alouette 2 topside sounder data. All observed noise bands were scaled on nearly 200 topside sounder ionograms recorded near perigee at low, mid, and high latitude telemetry stations. The minimum and maximum frequencies of each noise band were entered into a data base or compuer analysis. The signals of primary interest in the perigee study were found to be sounder-generated.

  19. A widespread low-latitude diurnal CO2 frost cycle on Mars revealed by Mars Climate Sounder observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piqueux, S.; Kleinboehl, A.; Hayne, P. O.; Kass, D. M.; McCleese, D. J.; Shirley, J. H.; Schofield, J. T.; Heavens, N. G.

    2015-12-01

    Surface observations by the Mars Climate Sounder (MCS) onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter document the widespread occurrence of atmospherically-corrected ground temperatures consistent with the presence of extensive CO2 frost deposits at low latitudes at 3AM. While the detection of CO2 ice has previously been reported outside the polar regions, in discrete locations associated with very high elevation terrains (i.e. associated with Elysium, Olympus Mons and the Tharsis Montes), our observations provide the first observational evidence of a global-scale diurnal CO2 cycle involving the atmosphere and the surface. MCS surface temperatures consistent with the presence of ephemeral diurnal CO2 frost deposits are strongly correlated with geologic terrains characterized by high emissivity, high albedo, and low thermal inertia. All of these properties are conducive to low nighttime temperatures. Thermal modeling of these low inertia terrains (i.e. < 75 J m-2K-1s-1/2), which cover a large fraction of the Martian surface, confirms that the regolith frequently reaches CO2 frost point temperatures at all latitudes near 3AM, with seasonal variations noticed. In addition, models used in conjunction with MCS temperature retrievals also predict that right before sunrise, nearly all of the Martian dusty low thermal inertia units are frosted at some point during the Mars Year. Energy/mass balance modeling suggests deposits with depths of up to several hundreds of microns of CO2 (<<0.1% of the Martian atmosphere). This is not sufficient to generate a measurable diurnal pressure cycle. The discovery of this diurnal CO2 cycle may nonetheless represent an important step forward in our understanding of the way the Mars atmosphere interacts with the surface.

  20. Preliminary validation of the refractivity from the new radio occultation sounder GNOS/FY-3C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Mi; Zhang, Peng; Yang, Guang-Lin; Bi, Yan-Meng; Liu, Yan; Bai, Wei-Hua; Meng, Xiang-Guang; Du, Qi-Fei; Sun, Yue-Qiang

    2016-03-01

    As a new member of the space-based radio occultation sounders, the GNOS (Global Navigation Satellite System Occultation Sounder) mounted on Fengyun-3C (FY-3C) has been carrying out atmospheric sounding since 23 September 2013. GNOS takes approximately 800 daily measurements using GPS (Global Positioning System) and Chinese BDS (BeiDou navigation satellite) signals. In this work, the atmospheric refractivity profiles from GNOS were compared with the ones obtained from the co-located ECMWF (European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts) reanalysis. The mean bias of the refractivity obtained through GNOS GPS (BDS) was found to be approximately -0.09 % (-0.04 %) from the near surface to up to 46 km. While the average standard deviation was approximately 1.81 % (1.26 %), it was as low as 0.75 % (0.53 %) in the range of 5-25 km, where best sounding results are usually achieved. Further, COSMIC (Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere and Climate) and MetOp/ GRAS (GNSS Receiver for Atmospheric Sounding) radio occultation data were compared with the ECMWF reanalysis; the results thus obtained could be used as reference data for GNOS. Our results showed that GNOS/FY-3C meets the design requirements in terms of accuracy and precision of the sounder. It possesses a sounding capability similar to COSMIC and MetOp/GRAS in the vertical range of 0-30 km, though it needs further improvement above 30 km. Overall, it provides a new data source for the global numerical weather prediction (NWP) community.

  1. Development of Level 3 (gridded) products for the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Granger, Stephanie L.; Leroy, Stephen S.; Manning, Evan M.; Fetzer, Eric J.; Oliphant, Robert B.; Braverman, Amy; Lee, Sung-Yung; Lambrigtsen, Bjom H.

    2004-01-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) sounding system is a suite of infrared and microwave instruments flown as part of NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) onboard the Aqua platform. The AIRS dataset provides a daily, global view of Earth processes at a finer vertical resolution than ever before. However, analysis of the AIRS data is a daunting task given the sheer volume and complexity of the data. The volume of data produced by the EOS project is unprecedented; the AIRS project alone will produce many terabytes of data over the lifetime of the mission. This paper describes development of AIRS Level 3 data products that will help to alleviate problems of access and usability.

  2. The Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS): First Year On-Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Edward J.

    2012-01-01

    The Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) is a new satellite microwave sounding sensor designed to provide operational weather agencies with atmospheric temperature and moisture profile information for global weather forecasting and climate applications. A TMS will continue the microwave sounding capabilities first provided by its predecessors, the Microwave Sounding Unit (MSU) and Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU). The first flight unit was launched a year ago in October, 2011 aboard the Suomi-National Polar-Orbiting Partnership (S-NPP) satellite, part of the new Joint Polar-Orbiting Satellite System (JPSS). Microwave soundings by themselves are the highest-impact input data used by Numerical Weather Prediction models; and A TMS, when combined with the Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS), forms the Cross-track Infrared and Microwave Sounding Suite (CrIMSS). The microwave soundings help meet sounding requirements under cloudy sky conditions and provide key profile information near the surface. ATMS was designed & built by Aerojet Corporation in Azusa, California, (now Northrop Grumman Electronic Systems). It has 22 channels spanning 23-183 GHz, closely following the channel set of the MSU, AMSU-AI/2, AMSU-B, Microwave Humidity Sounder (MHS), and Humidity Sounder for Brazil (HSB). It continues their cross-track scanning geometry, but for the first time, provides Nyquist sample spacing. All this is accomplished with approximately V. the volume, Y, the mass, and Y, the power of the three AMSUs. A description will be given of its performance from its first year of operation as determined by post-launch calibration activities. These activities include radiometric calibration using the on-board warm targets and cold space views, and geolocation determination. Example imagery and zooms of specific weather events will be shown. The second ATMS flight model is currently under construction and planned for launch on the "Jl" satellite of the JPSS program in

  3. A method for the removal of ray refraction effects in multibeam echo sounder systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Jisheng; Zhou, Xinghua; Tang, Qiuhua

    2008-05-01

    To a multibeam echo sounder system (MBES), under water sound refraction plays an important role in depth measurement accuracy, and errors in sound velocity profile lead to inaccuracies in the measured depth (especially for outer beams). A method is developed to estimate the sound velocity profile based on the depth measured by vertical beam. Using this depth and other parameters, such as t (sound pulse propagation time), θ (beam inclination angle), etc. We can estimate a simple sound velocity profile with which the depth error has been reduced. This method has been tested with a real dataset acquired in the East China Sea.

  4. Phase Change Material for Temperature Control of Imager or Sounder on GOES Type Satellites in GEO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Michael K.

    2014-01-01

    This paper uses phase change material (PCM) in the scan cavity of an imager or sounder on satellites in geostationary orbit (GEO) to maintain the telescope temperature stable. When sunlight enters the scan aperture, solar heating causes the PCM to melt. When sunlight stops entering the scan aperture, the PCM releases the thermal energy stored to keep the components in the telescope warm. It has no moving parts or bimetallic springs. It reduces heater power required to make up the heat lost by radiation to space through the aperture. It is an attractive thermal control option to a radiator with a louver and a sunshade.

  5. Assimilation of hyperspectral infrared sounder radiances under cloudy skies in a regional NWP model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Pei

    Satellite measurements are an important source of global observations in support of numerical weather prediction (NWP). The assimilation of satellite radiances under clear skies has greatly improved NWP forecast scores. Since most of the data assimilation models are used for the clear radiances assimilation, an important step for satellite radiances assimilation is the clear location detection. Good clear detection could effectively remove the cloud contamination and keep the clear observations for assimilation. In this dissertation, a new detection method uses collocated high spatial resolution imager data onboard the same platform as the satellite sounders to help IR sounders subpixel cloud detection, such as the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), the Crosstrack Infrared Sounder (CrIS) and Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS). The MODIS cloud mask provides a level of confidence for the observed skies to help AIRS Field-of-View (FOVs) cloud detection. By reducing the cloud contamination, a cold bias in the temperature field and a wet bias in the moisture field are corrected for the atmospheric analysis fields. These less cloud affected analysis fields further improve hurricane track and intensity forecast. The availability of satellite observations that can be assimilated in the model is limited if only the clear radiances are assimilation. An effective way to use the thermodynamic information under partially cloudy regions is to assimilate the "cloud-cleared" radiances (CCRs); CCRs are also called clear equivalent radiances. Because the CCRs are the equivalent clear radiances from the partially cloudy FOVs, they can be directly assimilated into the current data assimilation models without modifications. The AIRS CCRs are assimilated and compared with the AIRS using stand-alone cloud detection and collocated cloud detection. The assimilation of AIRS cloud-cleared radiances directly affects

  6. Comparison of airborne lidar measurements with 420 kHz echo-sounder measurements of zooplankton.

    PubMed

    Churnside, James H; Thorne, Richard E

    2005-09-10

    Airborne lidar has the potential to survey large areas quickly and at a low cost per kilometer along a survey line. For this reason, we investigated the performance of an airborne lidar for surveys of zooplankton. In particular, we compared the lidar returns with echo-sounder measurements of zooplankton in Prince William Sound, Alaska. Data from eight regions of the Sound were compared, and the correlation between the two methods was 0.78. To obtain this level of agreement, a threshold was applied to the lidar return to remove the effects of scattering from phytoplankton. PMID:16161666

  7. LASA (Lidar Atmospheric Sounder and Altimeter) Earth Observing System. Volume 2D: Instrument Panel Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The Earth Observing System (Eos) will provide an ideal forum in which the stronly synergistic characteristics of the lidar systems can be used in concert with the characteristics of a number of other sensors to better understand the Earth as a system. Progress in the development of more efficient and long-lasting laser systems will insure their availability in the Eos time frame. The necessary remote-sensing techniques are being developed to convert the Lidar Atmospheric Sounder and Altimeter (LASA) observations into the proper scientific parameters. Each of these activities reinforces the promise that LASA and GLRS will be a reality in the Eos era.

  8. Thermal Tides in the Martian Middle Atmosphere as Seen by the Mars Climate Sounder

    PubMed Central

    Lee, C.; Lawson, W. G.; Richardson, M. I.; Heavens, N. G.; Kleinböhl, A.; Banfield, D.; McCleese, D. J.; Zurek, R.; Kass, D.; Schofield, J. T.; Leovy, C. B.; Taylor, F. W.; Toigo, A. D.

    2016-01-01

    The first systematic observations of the middle atmosphere of Mars (35km–80km) with the Mars Climate Sounder (MCS) show dramatic patterns of diurnal thermal variation, evident in retrievals of temperature and water ice opacity. At the time of writing, the dataset of MCS limb retrievals is sufficient for spectral analysis within a limited range of latitudes and seasons. This analysis shows that these thermal variations are almost exclusively associated with a diurnal thermal tide. Using a Martian General Circulation Model to extend our analysis we show that the diurnal thermal tide dominates these patterns for all latitudes and all seasons. PMID:27630378

  9. Thermal Tides in the Martian Middle Atmosphere as Seen by the Mars Climate Sounder

    PubMed Central

    Lee, C.; Lawson, W. G.; Richardson, M. I.; Heavens, N. G.; Kleinböhl, A.; Banfield, D.; McCleese, D. J.; Zurek, R.; Kass, D.; Schofield, J. T.; Leovy, C. B.; Taylor, F. W.; Toigo, A. D.

    2016-01-01

    The first systematic observations of the middle atmosphere of Mars (35km–80km) with the Mars Climate Sounder (MCS) show dramatic patterns of diurnal thermal variation, evident in retrievals of temperature and water ice opacity. At the time of writing, the dataset of MCS limb retrievals is sufficient for spectral analysis within a limited range of latitudes and seasons. This analysis shows that these thermal variations are almost exclusively associated with a diurnal thermal tide. Using a Martian General Circulation Model to extend our analysis we show that the diurnal thermal tide dominates these patterns for all latitudes and all seasons.

  10. The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder on the Earth Observing System - In-orbit spectral calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aumann, H. H.

    1991-01-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) is a facility instrument on the Earth Observing System (EOS). The ability of AIRS to provide accurate temperature and moisture soundings with high vertical resolution depends critically on a very accurate spectral calibration. The routine in-orbit spectral calibration is accomplished with a Fabry-Perot plate with a fixed spacing of 360 microns. This paper discusses design, Signal-to-Noise, and temperature and alignment stability constraints which have to be met to achieve the required spectral calibration accuracy.

  11. Microwave limb sounder measurement of stratospheric SO[sub 2] from the Mt. Pinatubo Volcano

    SciTech Connect

    Read, W.G.; Froidevaux, L.; Waters, J.W. )

    1993-06-18

    This paper presents measurements of sulfur dioxide densities in the stratosphere made by the microwave limb sounder (MLS) on the upper atmosphere research satellite. The SO[sub 2] came from the eruption of the Mt Pinatubo volcano which injected a massive quantity of gas into the stratosphere. The MLS is able to measure the decay rate of the gas densities based on its extended time and spatial coverage, and from this decay rate infer the OH densities in the stratosphere, since OH is the major reactive species which converts the SO[sub 2] into sulfuric acid.

  12. TES: A modular systems approach to expert system development for real-time space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cacace, Ralph; England, Brenda

    1988-01-01

    A major goal of the Space Station era is to reduce reliance on support from ground based experts. The development of software programs using expert systems technology is one means of reaching this goal without requiring crew members to become intimately familiar with the many complex spacecraft subsystems. Development of an expert systems program requires a validation of the software with actual flight hardware. By combining accurate hardware and software modelling techniques with a modular systems approach to expert systems development, the validation of these software programs can be successfully completed with minimum risk and effort. The TIMES Expert System (TES) is an application that monitors and evaluates real time data to perform fault detection and fault isolation tasks as they would otherwise be carried out by a knowledgeable designer. The development process and primary features of TES, a modular systems approach, and the lessons learned are discussed.

  13. Magnetic Shielding of an Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerator for TES Microcalorimeter Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hishi, U.; Fujimoto, R.; Kunihisa, T.; Takakura, S.; Mitsude, T.; Kamiya, K.; Kotake, M.; Hoshino, A.; Shinozaki, K.

    2014-09-01

    We are developing a compact adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) dedicated for TES X-ray microcalorimeter operation. Ferric ammonium alum (FAA) was grown in a stainless-steel container in our laboratory. This salt pill was mounted together with a superconducting magnet and a conventional mechanical heat-switch in a dedicated helium cryostat. Using this system, we achieved mK and a hold time of h below 100 mK. Initially, we used a 3 mm thick silicon steel shield around the ADR magnet and a Nb/Cryoperm double shield around the detector. However, this silicon steel shield allowed a mT field at the detector position when a full field (3 T) was applied, and caused the Nb shield around the detector to trap a magnetic field. The observed transition curve of a TES was broad ( mK) compared to mK obtained in a dilution refrigerator. By increasing the shield thickness to 12 mm, transition width was improved to mK, which suggests that the shields work as expected. When we operated a TES microcalorimeter, energy resolution was eV (FWHM) at 5.9 keV.

  14. Development of a high-energy-resolution x-ray microcalorimeter using Ti/Au TES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudo, Hiroyuki; Yokoyama, Yuichi; Shoji, Shuichi; Oshima, Tohru; Aruga, Youichi; Maegami, Kana; Fujimoto, Ryuichi; Miyazaki, Toshiyuki; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa

    1999-10-01

    A prototype of an x-ray microcalorimeter using Titanium/Gold transition edge sensor (TES) for detecting cosmic rays is fabricated and tested. This paper reports first experimental result of the prototype. By using silicon bulk micromachining, freestanding microstructure suspended with fine beams are obtained to achieve thermal isolation from the substrate. A superconductor, Ti in this case, can be used as a very sensitive temperature sensor at the narrow temperature range around its transition temperature. At the low temperatures below 1K, the microstructure with very small heat capacity is expected to be thermally detecting single photons. Design consideration to realize radiation detection with extremely good energy resolution has been taken place. Our tentative goal is to obtain the energy resolution of 20eV for 10keV radiation at 0.5K. We have fabricated a test device of the TES. The sensitivity of it is larger than 1000, which is enough for this purpose. The energy resolution of the prototype of the x-ray microcalorimeter was 550eV for 6keV radiation at approximately 0.5K. This value is smaller than that expected. An optimization of the TES features is still necessary for a good energy resolution.

  15. Large Area Superconducting TES Spiderweb Bolometer for Multi-mode Cavity Microwave Detect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biasotti, M.; Bagliani, D.; Corsini, D.; De Bernardis, P.; Gatti, F.; Gualtieri, R.; Lamagna, L.; Masi, S.; Pizzigoni, G.; Schillaci, A.

    2014-05-01

    For the cosmic microwave background, the increase of the sensitivity of present superconducting TES Spiderweb Bolometers can be done coupling them to a large set of modes of the EM radiation inside the cavity. This will require a proper shaping of the horn-cavity assembly for the focal plane of the microwave telescope and the use of large area bolometers. Large area spiderweb bolometers of 8 mm diameter and a mesh size of 250 μm are fabricated in order to couple with approximately the first 20 modes of the cavity at about 140 GHz. These bolometers are fabricated with micro machining techniques from silicon wafer covered with SiO2 - Si3N4 CVD thick films, 0.3 μm and 1 μm respectively. The sensor is a Ti/Au/Ti 3 layer TES sensor with Tc tuned in the 330-380 mK and 2 mK transition width. The TES is electronically coupled to the EM gold absorber that is grown on to the spiderweb mesh in order to sense the temperature of the electron gas heated by the EM radiation. The gold absorber mesh has 5 um beam size over a Si3N4 10 μm beam size supporting mesh. The Si3N4 mesh is then fully suspended by means of DRIE back etching of the Si substrate. Here we present the first results of these large area bolometers.

  16. High-Temperature Phase Change Materials (PCM) Candidates for Thermal Energy Storage (TES) Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, J. C.

    2011-09-01

    It is clearly understood that lower overall costs are a key factor to make renewable energy technologies competitive with traditional energy sources. Energy storage technology is one path to increase the value and reduce the cost of all renewable energy supplies. Concentrating solar power (CSP) technologies have the ability to dispatch electrical output to match peak demand periods by employing thermal energy storage (TES). Energy storage technologies require efficient materials with high energy density. Latent heat TES systems using phase change material (PCM) are useful because of their ability to charge and discharge a large amount of heat from a small mass at constant temperature during a phase transformation like melting-solidification. PCM technology relies on the energy absorption/liberation of the latent heat during a physical transformation. The main objective of this report is to provide an assessment of molten salts and metallic alloys proposed as candidate PCMs for TES applications, particularly in solar parabolic trough electrical power plants at a temperature range from 300..deg..C to 500..deg.. C. The physical properties most relevant for PCMs service were reviewed from the candidate selection list. Some of the PCM candidates were characterized for: chemical stability with some container materials; phase change transformation temperatures; and latent heats.

  17. Production of Toxocara cati TES-120 Recombinant Antigen and Comparison with its T. canis Homolog for Serodiagnosis of Toxocariasis

    PubMed Central

    Zahabiun, Farzaneh; Sadjjadi, Seyed Mahmoud; Yunus, Muhammad Hafiznur; Rahumatullah, Anizah; Moghaddam, Mohammad Hosein Falaki; Saidin, Syazwan; Noordin, Rahmah

    2015-01-01

    Toxocariasis is a cosmopolitan zoonotic disease caused by the infective larvae of Toxocara canis and T. cati. Diagnosis in humans is usually based on clinical symptoms and serology. Immunoglobulin G (IgG)-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits using T. canis excretory–secretory (TES) larval antigens are commonly used for serodiagnosis. Differences in the antigens of the two Toxocara species may influence the diagnostic sensitivity of the test. In this study, T. cati recombinant TES-120 (rTES-120) was cloned, expressed, and compared with its T. canis homolog in an IgG4-western blot. The diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of T. cati rTES-120 were 70% (33/47) and 100% (39/39), respectively. T. canis rTES-120 showed 57.4% sensitivity and 94.4% specificity. When the results of assays using rTES-120 of both species were considered, the diagnostic sensitivity was 76%. This study shows that using antigens from both Toxocara species may improve the serodiagnosis of toxocariasis. PMID:26033026

  18. Improved wide-field collimator for dynamic testing of the GOES imager and sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bremer, James C.; Etemad, Shahriar; Zukowski, Barbara J.; Pasquale, Bert A.; Zukowski, Tmitri J.; Prince, Robert E.; Holmes, Vincent; Ryskewich, John A.; O'Neill, Patrick; Murphy-Morris, Jeanine E.

    2002-09-01

    The GOES Imager and Sounder instruments each observe the full Earth disk, 17.4° in diameter, from geostationary orbit. Pre-launch, each instrument's dynamic scanning performance is tested using the projection of a test pattern from a wide-field collimator. We are fabricating a second wide-field collimator (WFC2) to augment this test program. The WFC2 has several significant advantages over the existing WFC1. The WFC2 target illumination system uses an array of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) radiating at 680nm, which is within the visible bands of both the Imager and Sounder. The light from the LEDs is projected through a non-Lambertian diffuser plate and the target plate to the pupil of the projection lens. The WFC2's power dissipation is much lower than that of WFC1, decreasing stabilization time and eliminating the need for cooling fans. The WFC2's custom-designed 5-element projection lens has the same effective focal length (EFL) as the WFC1 projection lens. The WFC2 lens is optimized for the LED's narrow spectral band simplifying the design and improving image quality. The target plate is mounted in a frame with a mechanized micro-positioner system that controls three degrees of freedom: tip, tilt, and focus. The tip and tilt axes intersect in the WFC's image plane, and all adjustments are controlled remotely by the operator observing the target plate through an auto-collimating telescope.

  19. Modification and Development of a Control Mechanism for the Scanning Microwave Limb Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, Zach

    2011-01-01

    The scanning microwave limb sounder (SMLS) is the latest instrument to probe the Earth's atmosphere to come out of the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) team. Once deployed to the upper stratosphere, it will use microwave detection to measure geo-atmospheric variables such as temperature, pressure, and chemical composition. In addition to previous missions that used vertical limb scans to observe altitudinal variations, the SMLS will rotate laterally allowing it to establish two-dimensional variable dependencies with a single run. A program was originated by a previous intern that will automatically control the movement of the two rotational axes along with a switching mirror and chopper once the instrument is in flight. However, it lacked the code essential to control system's ability to function fully and reliably. By modifying and rewriting parts of the code I sought to have a finished ready-for-flight control system that would be easy to navigate. Three of the major alterations I made including instituting a gyroscope, implementing a restart button, and instigating the automatic creation of a file log with each run to record the position and orientation of the SMLS.

  20. Preliminary validation of refractivity from a new radio occultation sounder GNOS/FY-3C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, M.; Zhang, P.; Yang, G. L.; Bi, Y. M.; Liu, Y.; Bai, W. H.; Meng, X. G.; Du, Q. F.; Sun, Y. Q.

    2015-09-01

    As a new member of space-based radio occultation sounder, the GNOS (Global Navigation Satellite System Occultation Sounder) mounted on FY-3C has been carrying out the atmospheric sounding since 23 September 2013. GNOS takes a daily measurement up to 800 times with GPS (Global Position System) and Chinese BDS (BeiDou navigation satellite) signals. The refractivity profiles from GNOS are compared with the co-located ECMWF (European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts) analyses in this paper. Bias and standard deviation have being calculated as the function of altitude. The mean bias is about 0.2 % from the near surface to 35 km. The average standard deviation is within 2 % while it is down to about 1 % in the range 5-30 km where best soundings are usually made. To evaluate the performance of GNOS, COSMIC (Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere and Climate) and GRAS/METOP-A (GNSS Receiver for Atmospheric Sounding) data are also compared to ECMWF analyses as the reference. The results show that GNOS/FY-3C meets the requirements of the design well. It possesses a sounding capability similar to COSMIC and GRAS in the vertical range of 0-30 km, though it needs improvement in higher altitude. Generally, it provides a new data source for global NWP (numerical weather prediction) community.

  1. NPOESS Preparatory Project Validation Program for the Cross-track Infrared Sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnet, C.; Gu, D.; Nalli, N. R.

    2009-12-01

    The National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS) Program, in partnership with National Aeronautical Space Administration (NASA), will launch the NPOESS Preparatory Project (NPP), a risk reduction and data continuity mission, prior to the first operational NPOESS launch. The NPOESS Program, in partnership with Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems, will execute the NPP Calibration and Validation (Cal/Val) program to ensure the data products comply with the requirements of the sponsoring agencies. The Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) and the Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) are two of the instruments that make up the suite of sensors on NPP. Together, CrIS and ATMS will produce three Environmental Data Records (EDRs) including the Atmospheric Vertical Temperature Profile (AVTP), Atmospheric Vertical Moisture Profile (AVMP), and the Atmospheric Vertical Pressure Profile (AVPP). The AVTP and the AVMP are both NPOESS Key Performance Parameters (KPPs). The validation plans establish science and user community leadership and participation, and demonstrated, cost-effective Cal/Val approaches. This presentation will provide an overview of the collaborative data, techniques, and schedule for the validation of the NPP CrIS and ATMS environmental data products.

  2. Ultraspectral sounder data compression using the non-exhaustive Tunstall coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Shih-Chieh; Huang, Bormin

    2008-08-01

    With its bulky volume, the ultraspectral sounder data might still suffer a few bits of error after channel coding. Therefore it is beneficial to incorporate some mechanism in source coding for error containment. The Tunstall code is a variable-to- fixed length code which can reduce the error propagation encountered in fixed-to-variable length codes like Huffman and arithmetic codes. The original Tunstall code uses an exhaustive parse tree where internal nodes extend every symbol in branching. It might result in assignment of precious codewords to less probable parse strings. Based on an infinitely extended parse tree, a modified Tunstall code is proposed which grows an optimal non-exhaustive parse tree by assigning the complete codewords only to top probability nodes in the infinite tree. Comparison will be made among the original exhaustive Tunstall code, our modified non-exhaustive Tunstall code, the CCSDS Rice code, and JPEG-2000 in terms of compression ratio and percent error rate using the ultraspectral sounder data.

  3. Subsurface sounders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Airborne or spaceborne electromagnetic systems used to detect subsurface features are discussed. Data are given as a function of resistivity of ground material, magnetic permeability of free space, and angular frequency. It was noted that resistivities vary with the water content and temperature.

  4. Land Surface Temperature Retrievals from GOES-8 Using Emissivities Retrieved from MODIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor); Suggs, Ronnie J.; Jedlovec, Gary J.; Lapenta, William M.; Haines, Stephanie L.

    2002-01-01

    Recent studies at the Global Hydrology and Climate Center (GHCC) have shown that the assimilation of land skin temperature (LST) tendencies into a mesoscale model can significantly improve short-term forecasts of near surface air temperature and moisture. Derived land surface products from the GOES satellites were used in these studies to provide high spatial and temporal resolution information about the spatial and temporal variability of the land surface forcing simulated in the model. In the model assimilation studies, LST was derived using a split window technique using the 11 and 12 pm channels found on the GOES-8 Sounder. These studies used a constant surface emissivity of 0.98 for both channels. However, this emissivity assumption over the land does not take into account emissivity variations due to varying terrain characteristics and differences between channels. These emissivity variations are seen to be significant as indicated by emissivity products from the polar orbiting MODIS instrument channels similar to the GOES-8 Sounder channels mentioned above. MODIS is a key instrument aboard the Terra (EOS AM) and Aqua (EOS PM) satellites. In an attempt to improve the emissivity assumptions used in the GOES Sounder LST retrieval procedure, the incorporation of MODIS high spatial resolution (1 km) emissivity measurements into the LST procedure is being explored. This paper intercompares the LST retrievals from the GOES-8 Sounder using a constant emissivity assumption with those using MODIS retrieved emissivities. The effects of MODIS emissivities on the LST retrievals are discussed. Potential improvements in model forecasts using assimilated LST products incorporating MODIS emissivities are also examined.

  5. Validation of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) over the Antarctic Plateau: Low Radiance, Low Humidity, and Thin Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobin, David C.

    2005-01-01

    The main goal of the project has been to use specialized measurements collected at the Antarctic Plateau to provide validation of the Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) spectral radiances and some AIRS Level 2 products. As proposed, efforts conducted at the University of Wisconsin are focused on providing technical information, data, and software in support of the validation studies.

  6. TIDs in the Bottomside Ionospheric F-region Observed Near Jicamarca Using the TIDDBIT HF Doppler Sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowley, G.; Chau, J. L.

    2012-12-01

    The equatorial ionosphere is the site of complex interactions between various geospace drivers, including thermospheric winds, electric fields, and tides propagating from below. Less well known is the effect of gravity waves, and their manifestation as traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs). HF Doppler sounders represent a low-cost and low-maintenance solution for monitoring wave activity in the F region ionosphere. Together with modern data analysis techniques, they can provide comprehensive TID characteristics, including both horizontal and vertical TID velocities and wavelengths across the entire spectrum from periods of 1 min to over an hour. In this invited talk, we review some of the previous observations of TIDs at low latitudes, and present new observations from the TIDDBIT HF Doppler Sounder recently developed by Atmospheric and Space Technology Research Associates LLC, and deployed at Jicamarca, Peru. The completeness of the wave information obtained from the TIDDBIT system makes it possible to reconstruct the vertical displacement of isoionic contours over the 200 km horizontal dimension of the sounder array, and movies revealing the detailed shape and motion of isoionic surfaces over Peru will be shown. We demonstrate how the TID characteristics in Peru vary with season and magnetic activity. We discuss their possible impact on triggering of ionospheric bubbles and irregularities. Such information will be relevant for various operational needs involving navigation, communication, and surveillance systems. Crowley G., and F.S. Rodrigues (2012), Characteristics of Traveling Ionospheric Disturbances Observed by the TIDDBIT Sounder, Radio Sci., doi:10.1029/2011RS004959.

  7. ISIS Topside-Sounder Plasma-Wave Investigations as Guides to Desired Virtual Wave Observatory (VWO) Data Search Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, Robert F.; Fung, Shing F.

    2008-01-01

    Many plasma-wave phenomena, observed by space-borne radio sounders, cannot be properly explained in terms of wave propagation in a cold plasma consisting of mobile electrons and infinitely massive positive ions. These phenomena include signals known as plasma resonances. The principal resonances at the harmonics of the electron cyclotron frequency, the plasma frequency, and the upper-hybrid frequency are well explained by the warm-plasma propagation of sounder-generated electrostatic waves, Other resonances have been attributed to sounder-stimulated plasma instability and non-linear effects, eigenmodes of cylindrical electromagnetic plasma oscillations, and plasma memory processes. Data from the topside sounders of the International Satellites for Ionospheric Studies (ISIS) program played a major role in these interpretations. A data transformation and preservation effort at the Goddard Space Flight Center has produced digital ISIS topside ionograms and a metadata search program that has enabled some recent discoveries pertaining to the physics of these plasma resonances. For example, data records were obtained that enabled the long-standing question (several decades) of the origin of the plasma resonance at the fundamental electron cyclotron frequency to be explained [Muldrew, Radio Sci., 2006]. These data-search capabilities, and the science enabled by them, will be presented as a guide to desired data search capabilities to be included in the Virtual Wave Observatory (VWO).

  8. Hurricane Katrina as Observed by NASA's Spaceborne Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1: click on image for larger AIRS microwave image

    At 1:30 a.m. local time this morning, the remnants of (now Tropical Depression) Katrina were centered on the Mississippi-Tennessee border. This microwave image from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder instrument on NASA's Aqua spacecrat shows that the area of most intense precipitation was concentrated to the north of the center of activity.

    The infrared image shows how the storms look through an AIRS Infrared window channel. Window channels measure the temperature of the cloud tops or the surface of the Earth in cloud-free regions. The lowest temperatures are associated with high, cold cloud tops that make up the top of the hurricane. The infrared signal does not penetrate through clouds, so the purple color indicates the cool cloud tops of the storm. In cloud-free areas, the infrared signal is retrieved at the Earth's surface, revealing warmer temperatures. Cooler areas are pushing to purple and warmer areas are pushing to red.

    The microwave image (figure 1) reveals where the heaviest precipitation in the hurricane is taking place. The blue areas within the storm show the location of this heavy precipitation. Blue areas outside of the storm where there are moderate or no clouds are where the cold (in the microwave sense) sea surface shines through.

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder Experiment, with its visible, infrared, and microwave detectors, provides a three-dimensional look at Earth's weather. Working in tandem, the three instruments can make simultaneous observations all the way down to the Earth's surface, even in the presence of heavy clouds. With more than 2,000 channels sensing different regions of the atmosphere, the system creates a global, 3-D map of atmospheric temperature and humidity and provides information on clouds, greenhouse gases, and many other atmospheric phenomena. The AIRS Infrared Sounder Experiment flies onboard

  9. High-Power Radar Sounders for the Investigation of Jupiter Icy Moons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Safaeinili, A.; Ostro, S.; Rodriquez, E.; Blankenship, D.; Kurth, W.; Kirchner, D.

    2005-01-01

    The high power and high data rate capability made available by a Prometheus class spacecraft could significantly enhance our ability to probe the subsurface of the planets/moons and asteroid/comets. The main technology development driver for our radar is the proposed Jupiter Icy Moon Orbiter (or JIMO) mission due to its harsh radiation environment. We plan to develop a dual-band radar at 5 and 50 MHz in response to the two major science requirements identified by the JIMO Science Definition Team: studying the near subsurface (less than 2 km) at high resolution and detection of the ice/ocean interface for Europa (depth up to 30 km). The 50-MHz band is necessary to provide high spatial resolution (footprint and depth) as required by the JIMO mission science requirements as currently defined. Our preliminary assessment indicates that the 50-MHz system is not required to be as high-power as the 5-MHz system since it will be more limited by the surface clutter than the Jupiter or galactic background noise. The low frequency band (e.g. 5 MHz), which is the focus of this effort, would be necessary to mitigate the performance risks posed by the unknown subsurface structure both in terms of unknown attenuation due to volumetric scattering and also the detection of the interface through the attenuative transition region at the ice/ocean interface. Additionally, the 5-MHz band is less affected by the surface roughness that can cause loss of coherence and clutter noise. However, since the Signal-to-Noise-Ratio (SNR) of the 5-MHz radar band is reduced due to Jupiter noise when operating in the Jupiter side of the moon, it is necessary to increase the radiated power. Our challenge is to design a high-power HF radar that can hnction in Jupiter's high radiation environment, yet be able to fit into spacecraft resource constraints such as mass and thermal limits. Our effort to develop the JIMO radar sounder will rely on our team's experience with planetary radar sounder design

  10. Application of Infrared Hyperspectral Sounder Data to Climate Research: Interannual Variability and climate trend evaluation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aumann, H. H.; Gregorich, D. T.

    2007-12-01

    Satellite measurements of the spectrally resolved upwelling infrared radiances have a unique role in the observation of climate and climate change: They give direct insight into the way the Earth Climate System responds to periodic and long term changes in forcing with changes in surface and atmospheric temperatures and changes in large scale atmospheric circulation patterns. The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), the first in a series of hyper-spectral polar orbiting sounders, was launch on the EOS Aqua into a 1:30 pm polar orbit at 705 km altitude in May 2002, with an anticipated lifetime of 12 years. The Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) was launched in October 2006 into a 9:30 AM orbit, to be followed by the Crosstrack InfraRed Sounder (CRIS) in a 2 PM orbit in 2010. The AIRS radiometric stability since 2002 has been verified at the better than 0.01 K/year level. We report on observations of the oceans between 30S and 30N. The 0.05 K/year trend in co2 sensitive channels due to the 2 ppmv/year increase in the co2 column abundance is readily detectable and statistically reliable. The AIRS data show very consistent seasonal modulations of key surface, cloud, water vapor and atmospheric temperatures. After removing the seasonal variation, the anomaly shows interannual rms variability in the monthly means larger than 0.1 K. The rms variability in the monthly means in the mid- tropospheric temperature with peak excursions as large as 0.6 K are observed by the AIRS 2388 cm-1 channel and AMSU channel 5 at 57 GHz. The interannual variability is not obviously correlated with the Multivariate Enso Index (MEI). This variability places limits on the length of time required to measure global warming trends at the 0.1 K/decade level. These limits exceed the expected 12 year lifetime of AIRS and need to be taken into account in the design of space missions and instruments to measure climate change.

  11. A tropospheric chemistry reanalysis for the years 2005-2012 based on an assimilation of OMI, MLS, TES, and MOPITT satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, K.; Eskes, H. J.; Sudo, K.

    2015-07-01

    We present the results from an 8-year tropospheric chemistry reanalysis for the period 2005-2012 obtained by assimilating multiple data sets from the OMI, MLS, TES, and MOPITT satellite instruments. The reanalysis calculation was conducted using a global chemical transport model and an ensemble Kalman filter technique that simultaneously optimises the chemical concentrations of various species and emissions of several precursors. The optimisation of both the concentration and the emission fields is an efficient method to correct the entire tropospheric profile and its year-to-year variations, and to adjust various tracers chemically linked to the species assimilated. Comparisons against independent aircraft, satellite, and ozonesonde observations demonstrate the quality of the analysed O3, NO2, and CO concentrations on regional and global scales and for both seasonal and year-to-year variations from the lower troposphere to the lower stratosphere. The data assimilation statistics imply persistent reduction of model error and improved representation of emission variability, but they also show that discontinuities in the availability of the measurements lead to a degradation of the reanalysis. The decrease in the number of assimilated measurements increased the ozonesonde-minus-analysis difference after 2010 and caused spurious variations in the estimated emissions. The Northern/Southern Hemisphere OH ratio was modified considerably due to the multiple-species assimilation and became closer to an observational estimate, which played an important role in propagating observational information among various chemical fields and affected the emission estimates. The consistent concentration and emission products provide unique information on year-to-year variations in the atmospheric environment.

  12. A tropospheric chemistry reanalysis for the years 2005-2012 based on an assimilation of OMI, MLS, TES and MOPITT satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, K.; Eskes, H. J.; Sudo, K.

    2015-03-01

    We present the results from an eight-year tropospheric chemistry reanalysis for the period 2005-2012 obtained by assimilating multiple retrieval data sets from the OMI, MLS, TES, and MOPITT satellite instruments. The reanalysis calculation was conducted using a global chemical transport model and an ensemble Kalman filter technique that simultaneously optimises the chemical concentrations of various species and emissions of several precursors. The optimisation of both the concentration and the emission fields is an efficient method to correct the entire tropospheric profile and its year-to-year variations, and to adjust various tracers chemically linked to the species assimilated. Comparisons against independent aircraft, satellite, and ozonesonde observations demonstrate the quality of the analysed O3, NO2, and CO concentrations on regional and global scales and for both seasonal and year-to-year variations from the lower troposphere to the lower stratosphere. The data assimilation statistics imply persistent reduction of model error and improved representation of emission variability, but also show that discontinuities in the availability of the measurements lead to a degradation of the reanalysis. The decrease in the number of assimilated measurements increased the ozonesonde minus analysis difference after 2010 and caused spurious variations in the estimated emissions. The Northern/Southern Hemisphere OH ratio was modified considerably due to the multiple species assimilation and became closer to an observational estimate, which played an important role in propagating observational information among various chemical fields and affected the emission estimates. The consistent concentration and emission products provide unique information on year-to-year variations of the atmospheric environment.

  13. VISSR Atmospheric Sounder (VAS) simulation experiment for a severe storm environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chesters, D.; Uccellini, L. W.; Mostek, A.

    1981-01-01

    Radiance fields were simulated for prethunderstorm environments in Oklahoma to demonstrate three points: (1) significant moisture gradients can be seen directly in images of the VISSIR Atmospheric Sounder (VAS) channels; (2) temperature and moisture profiles can be retrieved from VAS radiances with sufficient accuracy to be useful for mesoscale analysis of a severe storm environment; and (3) the quality of VAS mesoscale soundings improves with conditioning by local weather statistics. The results represent the optimum retrievability of mesoscale information from VAS radiance without the use of ancillary data. The simulations suggest that VAS data will yield the best soundings when a human being classifies the scene, picks relatively clear areas for retrieval, and applies a "local" statistical data base to resolve the ambiguities of satellite observations in favor of the most probable atmospheric structure.

  14. Analysis of data from the Pioneer Venus Sounder Probe mass spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, J. H.

    1981-01-01

    The composition of the lower atmosphere of the planet Venus from 62 km to the surface was measured by a neutral gas mass spectrometer onboard of the Pioneer Venus Sounder Probe. Fifty-one mass spectra were obtained with an average altitude resolution of approximately 1 km. The instrument measured the composition of the gases relative to CO2, the dominant gas, that is sampled from the Venus atmosphere through a special leak. The mass range extended from 1 to 208 amu with a sensitivity of the order of 1 ppm relative to CO2, but for the noble gases it was nearly 100 times better. A description of the instrument and the initial results are reported.

  15. Analysis of data from the Pioneer Venus Sounder Probe mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, J.H.

    1981-05-01

    The composition of the lower atmosphere of the planet Venus from 62 km to the surface was measured by a neutral gas mass spectrometer onboard of the Pioneer Venus Sounder Probe. Fifty-one mass spectra were obtained with an average altitude resolution of approximately 1 km. The instrument measured the composition of the gases relative to CO2, the dominant gas, that is sampled from the Venus atmosphere through a special leak. The mass range extended from 1 to 208 amu with a sensitivity of the order of 1 ppm relative to CO2, but for the noble gases it was nearly 100 times better. A description of the instrument and the initial results are reported.

  16. Observation of the exhaust plume from the space shuttle main engine using the Microwave Limb Sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pumphrey, H. C.; Lambert, A.; Livesey, N. J.

    2010-08-01

    A space shuttle launch deposits 700 t of water in the atmosphere. Some of this water is released into the upper mesosphere and lower thermosphere where it may be directly detected by a limb sounding satellite instrument. We report measurements of water vapour plumes from shuttle launches made by the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on the Aura satellite. Approximately 50% of shuttle launches are detected by MLS. The signal appears at a similar level across the upper 10 km of the MLS limb scan, suggesting that the bulk of the observed water is above the top of the scan. Only a small fraction at best of smaller launches (Ariane, Proton) are detected. We conclude that the sensitivity of MLS is only just great enough to detect a shuttle sized launch, but that a suitably designed instrument of the same general type could detect the exhausts from a large proportion of heavy-lift launches.

  17. Observation of the exhaust plume from the space shuttle main engines using the microwave limb sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pumphrey, H. C.; Lambert, A.; Livesey, N. J.

    2011-01-01

    A space shuttle launch deposits 700 tonnes of water in the atmosphere. Some of this water is released into the upper mesosphere and lower thermosphere where it may be directly detected by a limb sounding satellite instrument. We report measurements of water vapour plumes from shuttle launches made by the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on the Aura satellite. Approximately 50%-65% of shuttle launches are detected by MLS. The signal appears at a similar level across the upper 10 km of the MLS limb scan, suggesting that the bulk of the observed water is above the top of the scan. Only a small fraction at best of smaller launches (Ariane 5, Proton) are detected. We conclude that the sensitivity of MLS is only just great enough to detect a shuttle sized launch, but that a suitably designed instrument of the same general type could detect the exhausts from a large proportion of heavy-lift launches.

  18. On the potential use of satellite sounder data in forecasting tropical cyclone motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kidder, S. Q.; Shyu, K.

    1984-01-01

    Although many prediction schemes are available, tropical cyclone track forecast errors are still unacceptably large. A primary difficulty is that tropical cyclones and their environments are poorly observed by conventional data networks. Satellite sounders, however, routinely provide numerous observations near these storms. Mean layer temperatures from the Scanning Microwave Spectrometer (SCAMS) on board the Nimbus-6 satellite are decomposed using empirical orthogonal functions, and the expansion coefficients are related to deviations from persistence track forecasts. Based on multiple correlation coefficients it appears that upper-level (250-100 mb) temperatures contain significant information about the right-angle error of the persistence forecast location. Temperatures from the 1000-500 mb layer seemed to contain little forecast information. Implications of these results for further work are offered.

  19. Efficient simultaneous image deconvolution and upsampling algorithm for low-resolution microwave sounder data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Jing; Yanovsky, Igor; Yin, Wotao

    2015-01-01

    Microwave imaging has been widely used in the prediction and tracking of hurricanes, typhoons, and tropical storms. Due to the limitations of sensors, the acquired remote sensing data are usually blurry and have relatively low resolution, which calls for the development of fast algorithms for deblurring and enhancing the resolution. We propose an efficient algorithm for simultaneous image deconvolution and upsampling for low-resolution microwave hurricane data. Our model involves convolution, downsampling, and the total variation regularization. After reformulating the model, we are able to apply the alternating direction method of multipliers and obtain three subproblems, each of which has a closed-form solution. We also extend the framework to the multichannel case with the multichannel total variation regularization. A variety of numerical experiments on synthetic and real Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit and Microwave Humidity Sounder data were conducted. The results demonstrate the outstanding performance of the proposed method.

  20. Navigation Signal Disturbances by Multipath Propagation - Scaled Measurements with a Universal Channel Sounder Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geise, Robert; Neubauer, Bjoern; Zimmer, Georg

    2015-11-01

    The performance of navigation systems is always reduced by unwanted multipath propagation. This is especially of practical importance for airborne navigation systems like the instrument landing system (ILS) or the VHF omni directional radio range (VOR). Nevertheless, the quantitative analysis of corresponding, potentially harmful multipath propagation disturbances is very difficult due to the large parameter space. Experimentally difficulties arise due to very expensive, real scale measurement campaigns and numerical simulation techniques still have shortcomings which are briefly discussed. In this contribution a new universal approach is introduced on how to measure very flexibly multipath propagation effects for arbitrary navigation systems using a channel sounder architecture in a scaled measurement environment. Two relevant scenarios of multipath propagation and the impact on navigation signals are presented. The first describes disturbances of the ILS due to large taxiing aircraft. The other example shows the influence of rotating wind turbines on the VOR.

  1. A Field Method for Backscatter Calibration Applied to NOAA's Reson 7125 Multibeam Echo-Sounders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welton, Briana

    Acoustic seafloor backscatter measurements made by multiple Reson multibeam echo-sounders (MBES) used for hydrographic survey are observed to be inconsistent, affecting the quality of data products and impeding large-scale processing efforts. A method to conduct a relative inter and intea sonar calibration in the field using dual frequency Reson 7125 MBES has been developed, tested, and evaluated to improve the consistency of backscatter measurements made from multiple MBES systems. The approach is unique in that it determines a set of corrections for power, gain, pulse length, and an angle dependent calibration term relative to a single Reson 7125 MBES calibrated in an acoustic test tank. These corrections for each MBES can then be applied during processing for any acquisition setting combination. This approach seeks to reduce the need for subjective and inefficient manual data or data product manipulation during post processing, providing a foundation for improved automated seafloor characterization using data from more than one MBES system.

  2. Characteristics of Water Vapor Under Partially Cloudy Conditions: Observations by the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fishbein, E.

    2003-12-01

    The variability and quality of tropical water vapor derived from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) are characterized. Profiles of water vapor, temperature and surface characteristics (states) are derived from coincident Advance Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) and 3x3 sets of AIRS footprints. States are obtained under partially cloudy conditions by estimating the radiances emitted from the clear portions of the AIRS footprints. This procedure, referred to as cloud clearing, amplifies the measurement noise, and the amplification increases with cloud amount and uniformity. Cumulus and stratus cloud amount are related to the water vapor saturation, and noise amplification and water vapor amount may be partially correlated. The correlations between the uncertainty of retrieved water vapor, cloudiness and noise amplification are characterized. Retrieved water vapor is generally good when the amplification is less than three. Water vapor profiles are compared with correlative data, such as radiosondes and numerical weather center analyses and are in relatively good agreement in the lower troposphere

  3. The Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS): A New Operational Sensor Series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Edward; Lyu, Cheng-H Joseph; Leslie, R. Vince; Baker, Neal; Mo, Tsan; Sun, Ninghai; Bi, Li; Anderson, Mike; Landrum, Mike; DeAmici, Giovanni; Gu, Degui; Foo, Alex; Ibrahim, Wael; Robinson, Kris; Chidester, Lynn; Shiue, James

    2012-01-01

    ATMS is a new satellite microwave sounding sensor designed to provide operational weather agencies with atmospheric temperature and moisture profile information for global weather forecasting and climate applications. ATMS will continue the microwave sounding capabilities first provided by its predecessors, the Microwave Sounding Unit (MSU) and Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU). The first ATMS was launched October 28, 2011 on board the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (S-NPP) satellite. Microwave soundings by themselves are the highest-impact input data used by Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) models; and ATMS, when combined with the Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS), forms the Cross-track Infrared and Microwave Sounding Suite (CrIMSS). The microwave soundings help meet NWP sounding requirements under cloudy sky conditions and provide key profile information near the surface

  4. Development of a global backscatter model for NASA's laser atmospheric wind sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowdle, David; Collins, Laurie; Mach, Douglas; Mcnider, Richard; Song, Aaron

    1992-01-01

    During the Contract Period April 1, 1989, to September 30, 1992, the Earth Systems Science Laboratory (ESSL) in the Research Institute at the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) conducted a program of basic research on atmospheric backscatter characteristics, leading to the development of a global backscatter model. The ESSL research effort was carried out in conjunction with the Earth System Observing Branch (ES43) at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Marshall Space Flight Center, as part of NASA Contract NAS8-37585 under the Atmospheric Dynamics Program at NASA Headquarters. This research provided important inputs to NASA's GLObal Backscatter Experiment (GLOBE) program, especially in the understanding of global aerosol life cycles, and to NASA's Doppler Lidar research program, especially the development program for their prospective space-based Laser Atmospheric Wind Sounder (LAWS).

  5. Ionospheric tsunami disturbances probed by HF Doppler sounder, ionosonde and ground-based GPS TEC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei-Suan; Liu, Jann-Yenq Tiger; Wu, Tso-Ren; Tsai, Yu-Lin

    2016-04-01

    Tsunami waves induced by the 26 December 2004 Mw 9.3 Sumatra earthquake, the 11 March 2011 Mw 9.0 Tohoku earthquake, and the 16 September 2015 Mw 8.2 Chile earthquake are recorded by tide gauges around Taiwan. In this paper, the tsunami waves are studied by the tide gauge data and Cornell Multi-grid Coupled of Tsunami Model (COMCOT) simulations, while ionospheric tsunami disturbances (ITDs) are probed by the HF Doppler sounder with a sounding frequency of 5.26 MHz, ionosonde, and GPS TEC derived by ground-based GPS receivers in Taiwan. It is found that ITDs tend to lead their associated tsunami by about 30-60 minutes. A comparison between ITDs and tsunami waves will be presented and discussed.

  6. Laser Atmospheric Wind Sounder (LAWS) phase 1. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The laser atmospheric wind sounder (LAWS) will provide a new space based capability for the direct measurement of atmospheric winds in the troposphere. LAWS will make a major contribution toward advancing the understanding and prediction of the total Earth system and NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) Program. LAWS is designed to measure a fundamental atmospheric parameter required to advance weather forecasting accuracies and investigate global climatic change. LAWS has a potential added benefit of providing (global) concentration profiles of large aerosols including visible and subvisible cirrus clouds, volcanic dust, smoke, and other pollutants. The objective of this Phase One study was to develop a LAWS concept and configuration. The instrument design is outlined in this first volume of three.

  7. A statistical evaluation and comparison of VISSR Atmospheric Sounder (VAS) data and corresponding rawinsonde measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jedlovec, G. J.

    1984-01-01

    The mesoscale accuracy of GOES Visible/IR Spin-Scan-Radiometer (VISSR) Atmospheric Sounder (VAS) temperature profiles and mean-precipitable-water measurements obtained over central Texas on March 6, 1982, is evaluated on the basis of comparing them with three-hourly rawinsonde data (up to 100 mbar) of similar spatial resolution for the same area and time. The VAS data comprise three sets: physical retrievals by the method of Smith (1970), modified physical retrievals by the method of Smith (1983), and regression soundings (incorporating some rawinsonde data) by the method of Lee et al. (1983). The data are presented graphically, and all three VAS data sets are found to have similar temperature biases, which vary from hot to cold with altitude and are apparently related to major inversions. Systematic moisture biases are seen in the physical and modified physical data sets, while the regression soundings are relatively unbiased but do not accurately reproduce moisture gradients seen in the rawinsonde data.

  8. Preliminary Regional Analysis of the Kaguya Lunar Radar Sounder (LRS) Data through Eastern Mare Imbrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, B.L.; Antonenko, I.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Osinski, G.; Ono, T.; Ku-mamoto, A.

    2009-01-01

    The Lunar Radar Sounder (LRS) experiment on board the Kaguya spacecraft is observing the subsurface structure of the Moon, using ground-penetrating radar operating in the frequency range of 5 MHz [1]. Because LRS data provides in-formation about lunar features below the surface, it allows us to improve our understanding of the processes that formed the Moon, and the post-formation changes that have occurred (such as basin formation and volcanism). We look at a swath of preliminary LRS data, that spans from 7 to 72 N, and from 2 to 10 W, passing through the eastern portion of Mare Imbrium (Figure 1). Using software, designed for the mineral exploration industry, we produce a preliminary, coarse 3D model, showing the regional structure beneath the study area. Future research will involve smaller subsets of the data in regions of interest, where finer structures, such as those identified in [2], can be studied.

  9. Mountain Waves in the Middle Atmosphere: Microwave Limb Sounder Observations and Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Jonathan H.; Wu, Dong L.; Eckermann, Stephen D.; Ma, Jun

    2003-01-01

    Observations and analyses of mesoscale gravity waves in the stratosphere from the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) are summarized, with focus on global distribution of topography related wave activities. We found most of the orographical wave activities occur during the winter seasons over high latitude mountain ridges. In the northern hemisphere, the strongest waves are those over Scandinavia, Central Eurasia, and southern Greenland, whereas in the southern hemisphere, wave activities are outstanding over the Andes, New Zealand, and Antarctic rim;, MLS observations suggest that these orographic waves are located mostly on the down stream side of the mountain ridge with downward phase progression and have horizontal phase velocities opposite to the stratospheric jet-stream. Future studies using MLS data and numerical modeling will lead to better understanding of gravity wave effects on dynamics and chemistry in the middle atmosphere.

  10. The Laser Atmospheric Wind Sounder (LAWS) Phase 2 Preliminary Laser Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, T. Rhidian; Pindroh, Albert L.; Bowers, Mark S.; Dehart, Terence E.; Mcdonald, Kenneth F.; Cousins, Ananda; Moody, Stephen E.

    1992-01-01

    The requirements for the Laser Atmospheric Wind Sounder (LAWS) were determined from system considerations and are summarized in tabular form. The laser subsystem provides for the generation and frequency control of two beams, the transmit high power and local oscillator beams, which are delivered to the optical and receiver subsystems, respectively. In our baseline approach, the excitation of the gain section is achieved by a self-sustaining uv-(corona) preionized discharge. Gas is recirculated within the laser loop using a transverse flow fan. An intra-flow-loop heat exchanger, catalyst monolith, and acoustic attenuators condition the gas to ensure uniform energy output and high beam quality during high pulse repetition rate operation. The baseline LAWS laser pulse temporal profile as calculated by in-house laser codes is given in graphical form.

  11. Using lunar sounder imagery to distinguish surface from subsurface reflectors in lunar highlands areas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Bonnie L.; Carter, James L.

    1993-01-01

    We have developed a method using the Apollo 17 Lunar Sounder imagery data which appears capable of filtering out off-nadir surface noise from highland area profiles, so that subsurface features may now be detected in highland areas as well as mare areas. Previously, this had been impossible because the rough topography in the highland areas created noise in the profiles which could not be distinguished from subsurface echoes. The new method is an image processing procedure involving the computerized selection of pixels which represent intermediate echo intensity values, then manually removing those pixels from the profile. Using this technique, a subsurface feature with a horizontal extent of about 150 km, at a calculated depth of approximately 3 km, has been detected beneath the crater Riccioli in the highlands near Oceanus Procellarum. This result shows that the ALSE data contain much useful information that remains to be extracted and used.

  12. Microwave Limb Sounder/El Nino Watch - February thru December, 1997

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This series of six images shows the movement of atmospheric water vapor over the Pacific Ocean during the formation of the 1997 El Nino condition. Higher than normal ocean water temperatures increase the rate of evaporation and the resulting warm moist air rises into the atmosphere altering global weather patterns. Data obtained by the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on NASA's Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS), from late February 1997 to late December 1997, show the movement from the western Pacific to the eastern Pacific of high levels of water vapor (red) at 10 kilometers (6 miles) above the surface. Areas of unusually drier air (blue) appear over Indonesia. December 1997 data also show a rapid increase of water vapor off the coast of South America, the result of very high water temperatures in that region.

  13. Laser Atmospheric Wind Sounder (LAWS) phase 1. Volume 3: Project cost estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The laser atmospheric wind sounder (LAWS) cost modeling activities were initiated in phase 1 to establish the ground rules and cost model that would apply to both phase 1 and phase 2 cost analyses. The primary emphasis in phase 1 was development of a cost model for a LAWS instrument for the Japanese Polar Orbiting Platform (JPOP). However, the Space Station application was also addressed in this model, and elements were included, where necessary, to account for Space Station unique items. The cost model presented in the following sections defines the framework for all LAWS cost modeling. The model is consistent with currently available detail, and can be extended to account for greater detail as the project definition progresses.

  14. The high resoultion dynamics limb sounder (HIRDLS): An instrument for the study of global change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gille, J. C.; Barnett, J. J.

    1992-01-01

    Two groups, in the Unites States and the United Kingdom, proposed to further develop and use infrared limb scanning instruments in atmospheric studies from Earth Observing System (EOS). Subsequent review showed that the scientific objectives and basic measurement approaches were very similar, although there were differences in the proposed instrumentation. Their teams agreed to merge the two investigations into the High Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder (HIRDLS). Under the resulting understanding, the two teams have combined, and will produce a single design to satisfy the scientific requirements of their investigations. The characteristics of limb scanning and earlier experiments are reviewed. The HIRDLS scientific objectives and requirements on the derived geophysical quantities are presented, and the way in which they drive the design of HIRDLS is indicated. A brief description of the HIRDLS instrument and a summary of HIRDLS capabilities follow.

  15. The Impact of Upper Tropospheric Humidity from Microwave Limb Sounder on the Midlatitude Greenhouse Effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Hua; Liu, W. Timothy

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of upper tropospheric humidity, as measured by the Microwave Limb Sounder, and the impact of the humidity on the greenhouse effect in the midlatitudes. Enhanced upper tropospheric humidity and an enhanced greenhouse effect occur over the storm tracks in the North Pacific and North Atlantic. In these areas, strong baroclinic activity and the large number of deep convective clouds transport more water vapor to the upper troposphere, and hence increase greenhouse trapping. The greenhouse effect increases with upper tropospheric humidity in areas with a moist upper troposphere (such as areas over storm tracks), but it is not sensitive to changes in upper tropospheric humidity in regions with a dry upper troposphere, clearly demonstrating that there are different mechanisms controlling the geographical distribution of the greenhouse effect in the midlatitudes.

  16. EOS Microwave Limb Sounder Observations of the Antarctic Polar Vortex Breakup in 2004

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manney, G. L.; Santee, M. L.; Livesey, N. J.; Froidevaux, L.; Read, W. G.; Pumphrey, H. C.; Waters, J. W.; Pawson, S.

    2005-01-01

    Observations from the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on NASA's new Aura satellite give an unprecedentedly detailed picture of the spring Antarctic polar vortex breakup throughout the stratosphere. HCl is a particularly valuable tracer in the lower stratosphere after chlorine deactivation. MLS HCl, N2O, H2O broke up in the upper stratosphere by early October, in the midstratosphere by early November, and in the lower stratosphere by late December. The subvortex broke up just a few days later than the lower stratospheric vortex. Vortex remnants persisted in the midstratosphere through December, but only through early January 2005 in the lower stratosphere. MLS N2O observations show diabatic descent continuing throughout November, with evidence of weak ascent after late October in the lower stratospheric vortex core.

  17. Feasibility Study of Graphite Epoxy Antenna for a Microwave Limb Sounder Radiometer (MLSR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Results are presented of a feasibility study to design graphite epoxy antenna reflectors for a jet propulsion laboratory microwave limb sounder instrument (MLSR). Two general configurations of the offset elliptic parabolic reflectors are presented that will meet the requirements on geometry and reflector accuracy. The designs consist of sandwich construction for the primary reflectors, secondary reflector support structure and cross-tie members between reflector pairs. Graphite epoxy materials of 3 and 6 plies are used in the facesheets of the sandwich. An aluminum honeycomb is used for the core. A built-in adjustment system is proposed to reduce surface distortions during assembly. The manufacturing and environmental effects are expected to result in surface distortions less than .0015 inch and pointing errors less than .002 degree.

  18. Operational calibration of Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite-8 and-9 imagers and sounders.

    PubMed

    Weinreb, M; Jamieson, M; Fulton, N; Chen, Y; Johnson, J X; Bremer, J; Smith, C; Baucom, J

    1997-09-20

    We describe the operational in-orbit calibration of the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES)-8 and-9 imagers and sounders. In the infrared channels the calibration is based on observations of space and an onboard blackbody. The calibration equation expresses radiance as a quadratic in instrument output. To suppress noise in the blackbody sequences, we filter the calibration slopes. The calibration equation also accounts for an unwanted variation of the reflectances of the instruments' scan mirrors with east-west scan position, which was not discovered until the instruments were in orbit. The visible channels are not calibrated, but the observations are provided relative to the level of space and are normalized to minimize east-west striping in the images. Users receive scaled radiances in a GOES variable format (GVAR) data stream. We describe the procedure users can apply to transform GVAR counts into radiances, temperatures, and mode-A counts.

  19. Materials Development for Auxiliary Components for Large Compact Mo/Au TES Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finkbeiner, F. m.; Chervenak, J. A.; Bandler, S. R.; Brekosky, R.; Brown, A. D.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Iyomoto, N.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Porter, F. S.; Saab, T.; Sadleir, J.; Smith, S.

    2007-01-01

    We describe our current fabrication process for arrays of superconducting transition edge sensor microcalorimeters, which incorporates superconducting Mo/Au bilayers and micromachined silicon structures. We focus on materials and integration methods for array heatsinking with our bilayer and micromachining processes. The thin superconducting molybdenum bottom layer strongly influences the superconducting behavior and overall film characteristics of our molybdenum/gold transition-edge sensors (TES). Concurrent with our successful TES microcalorimeter array development, we have started to investigate the thin film properties of molybdenum monolayers within a given phase space of several important process parameters. The monolayers are sputtered or electron-beam deposited exclusively on LPCVD silicon nitride coated silicon wafers. In our current bilayer process, molybdenum is electron-beam deposited at high wafer temperatures in excess of 500 degrees C. Identifying process parameters that yield high quality bilayers at a significantly lower temperature will increase options for incorporating process-sensitive auxiliary array components (AAC) such as array heat sinking and electrical interconnects into our overall device process. We are currently developing two competing technical approaches for heat sinking large compact TES microcalorimeter arrays. Our efforts to improve array heat sinking and mitigate thermal cross-talk between pixels include copper backside deposition on completed device chips and copper-filled micro-trenches surface-machined into wafers. In addition, we fabricated prototypes of copper through-wafer microvias as a potential way to read out the arrays. We present an overview on the results of our molybdenum monolayer study and its implications concerning our device fabrication. We discuss the design, fabrication process, and recent test results of our AAC development.

  20. A chemical confirmation of the faint Boötes II dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, Andreas; Rich, R. Michael

    2014-10-10

    We present a chemical abundance study of the brightest confirmed member star of the ultra-faint dwarf galaxy Boötes II from Keck/HIRES high-resolution spectroscopy at moderate signal-to-noise ratios. At [Fe/H] = –2.93 ± 0.03(stat.) ± 0.17(sys.), this star chemically resembles metal-poor halo field stars and the signatures of other faint dwarf spheroidal galaxies at the same metallicities in that it shows enhanced [α/Fe] ratios, Solar Fe-peak element abundances, and low upper limits on the neutron-capture element Ba. Moreover, this star shows no chemical peculiarities in any of the eight elements we were able to measure. This implies that the chemical outliers found in other systems remain outliers pertaining to the unusual enrichment histories of the respective environments, while Boo II appears to have experienced an enrichment history typical of its very low mass. We also re-calibrated previous measurements of the galaxy's metallicity from the calcium triplet (CaT) and find a much lower value than reported before. The resulting broad metallicity spread, in excess of one dex, the very metal-poor mean, and the chemical abundance patterns of the present star imply that Boötes II is a low-mass, old, metal-poor dwarf galaxy and not an overdensity associated with the Sagittarius Stream as has been previously suggested based on its sky position and kinematics. The low, mean CaT metallicity of –2.7 dex falls right on the luminosity-metallicity relation delineated over four orders of magnitude from the more luminous to the faintest galaxies. Thus Boötes II's chemical enrichment appears representative of the galaxy's original mass, while tidal stripping and other mass loss mechanisms were probably not significant as for other low-mass satellites.

  1. Carbon Monoxide Distribution over Peninsular Malaysia from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajab, Jaso M.; MatJafri, M. Z.; Lim, H. S.; Abdullah, K.

    2009-07-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) onboard NASA's Aqua satellite. It daily coverage of ˜70% of the planet represents a significant evolutionary advance in satellite traces gas remote sensing. AIRS, the part of a large international investment to upgrade the operational meteorological satellite systems, is first of the new generation of meteorological advanced sounders for operational and research use, Providing New Insights into Weather and Climate for the 21st Century. Carbon monoxide (CO) is a ubiquitous, an indoor and outdoor air pollutant, is not a significant greenhouse gas as it absorbs little infrared radiation from the Earth. However, it does have an influence on oxidization in the atmosphere through interaction with hydroxyl radicals (OH), which also react with methane, halocarbons and tropospheric ozone. It produced by the incomplete combustion of fossil fuels and biomass burning, and that it has a role as a smog. The aim of this investigation is to study the (CO) carbon monoxide distribution over Peninsular Malaysia. The land use map of the Peninsular Malaysia was conducted by using CO total column amount, obtained from AIRS data, the map & data was processed and analyzed by using Photoshop & SigmaPlot 11.0 programs and compared for timing of various (day time) (28 August 2005 & 29 August 2007) for both direct comparison and the comparison using the same a priori profile, the CO concentrations in 28/8/2005 higher. The CO maps were generated using Kriging Interpolation technique. This interpolation technique produced high correlation coefficient, R2 and low root mean square error, RMS for CO. This study provided useful information for influence change of CO concentration on varies temperature.

  2. PREMIER - Instrument Development of the Millimetre-Wave Limb Sounder MWLS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerber, D.; Kerridge, B. J.; Siddans, R.; Reburn, W. J.; Matheson, D. N.; Oldfield, M.; Cox, G. M.; Rea, S.; Murtagh, D.; Urban, J.

    2009-04-01

    The PREMIER (Process Exploration through Measurements of Infrared and millimetre-wave Emitted Radiation) mission is one of 6 candidates for ESA's 7th Earth Explorer Core Mission (due for launch ~ 2016), for which Phase 0 Assessment Studies have recently been undertaken. The mission proposes to make detailed measurements in the mid/upper troposphere and lower stratosphere in order to quantify processes controlling atmospheric global composition in this height range of particular importance to climate. PREMIER would consist of an infrared limb-imaging spectrometer which would observe 3D fields of trace gases, alongside a millimetre-wave limb sounder which would enable observations in the presence of most cirrus clouds, and also provide complementary trace gases. In this presentation we report on instrument development of the millimetre-wave limb sounder MWLS during Phase 0 of the PREMIER mission proposal. The PREMIER MWLS is a Swedish lead instrument (aka STEAM-R) co-developed by the Swedish Space Cooperation SSC and Chalmers University of Technology. Retrieval simulations have been performed at RAL to asses the radiometric performance of the MWLS. Based on that information, the observing system has been defined as a progressively spaced feed horn array. Physical optics simulations have been performed at Astrium UK to define the antenna pattern at the main reflector, as well as the quasi-optical layout of the antenna arrays and beam-shaping components. Hardware development has been pushed forward at RAL at several fronts to provide novel components for the instrument, most notably a sub-harmonic image rejection mixer (SHIRM).

  3. Estimating oil concentration and flow rate with calibrated vessel-mounted acoustic echo sounders

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Thomas C.; De Robertis, Alex; Greenaway, Samuel F.; Smith, Shep; Mayer, Larry; Rice, Glen

    2012-01-01

    As part of a larger program aimed at evaluating acoustic techniques for mapping the distribution of subsurface oil and gas associated with the Deepwater Horizon-Macondo oil spill, observations were made on June 24 and 25, 2010 using vessel-mounted calibrated single-beam echo sounders on the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration ship Thomas Jefferson. Coincident with visual observations of oil at the sea surface, the 200-kHz echo sounder showed anomalously high-volume scattering strength in the upper 200 m on the western side of the wellhead, more than 100 times higher than the surrounding waters at 1,800-m distance from the wellhead, and weakening with increasing distance out to 5,000 m. Similar high-volume scattering anomalies were not observed at 12 or 38 kHz, although observations of anomalously low-volume scattering strength were made in the deep scattering layer at these frequencies at approximately the same locations. Together with observations of ocean currents, the acoustic observations are consistent with a rising plume of small (< 1-mm radius) oil droplets. Using simplistic but reasonable assumptions about the properties of the oil droplets, an estimate of the flow rate was made that is remarkably consistent with those made at the wellhead by other means. The uncertainty in this acoustically derived estimate is high due to lack of knowledge of the size distribution and rise speed of the oil droplets. If properly constrained, these types of acoustic measurements can be used to rapidly estimate the flow rate of oil reaching the surface over large temporal and spatial scales. PMID:22167799

  4. Estimating oil concentration and flow rate with calibrated vessel-mounted acoustic echo sounders.

    PubMed

    Weber, Thomas C; De Robertis, Alex; Greenaway, Samuel F; Smith, Shep; Mayer, Larry; Rice, Glen

    2012-12-11

    As part of a larger program aimed at evaluating acoustic techniques for mapping the distribution of subsurface oil and gas associated with the Deepwater Horizon-Macondo oil spill, observations were made on June 24 and 25, 2010 using vessel-mounted calibrated single-beam echo sounders on the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration ship Thomas Jefferson. Coincident with visual observations of oil at the sea surface, the 200-kHz echo sounder showed anomalously high-volume scattering strength in the upper 200 m on the western side of the wellhead, more than 100 times higher than the surrounding waters at 1,800-m distance from the wellhead, and weakening with increasing distance out to 5,000 m. Similar high-volume scattering anomalies were not observed at 12 or 38 kHz, although observations of anomalously low-volume scattering strength were made in the deep scattering layer at these frequencies at approximately the same locations. Together with observations of ocean currents, the acoustic observations are consistent with a rising plume of small (< 1-mm radius) oil droplets. Using simplistic but reasonable assumptions about the properties of the oil droplets, an estimate of the flow rate was made that is remarkably consistent with those made at the wellhead by other means. The uncertainty in this acoustically derived estimate is high due to lack of knowledge of the size distribution and rise speed of the oil droplets. If properly constrained, these types of acoustic measurements can be used to rapidly estimate the flow rate of oil reaching the surface over large temporal and spatial scales. PMID:22167799

  5. Three Years of Atmospheric Infrared Sounder Radiometric Calibration Validation using Sea Surface Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aumann, H. H.; Broberg, Steve; Elliott, Denis; Gaiser, Steve; Gregorich, Dave

    2006-01-01

    This paper evaluates the absolute accuracy and stability of the radiometric calibration of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) by analyzing the difference between the brightness temperatures measured at 2616 cm(exp -1) and those calculated at the top of the atmosphere (TOA), using the Real-Time Global Sea Surface Temperature (RTGSST) for cloud-free night tropical oceans between +/- 30 degrees latitude. The TOA correction is based on radiative transfer. The analysis of the first 3 years of AIRS radiances verifies the absolute calibration at 2616 cm(exp -1) to better than 200 mK, with better than 16 mK/yr stability. The AIRS radiometric calibration uses an internal full aperture wedge blackbody with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) traceable prelaunch calibration coefficients. The calibration coefficients have been unchanged since launch. The analysis uses very tight cloud filtering, which selects about 7000 cloud-free tropical ocean spectra per day, about 0.5% of the data. The absolute accuracy and stability of the radiometry demonstrated at 2616 cm(sup -1) are direct consequences of the implementation of AIRS as a thermally controlled, cooled grating-array spectrometer and meticulous attention to details. Comparable radiometric performance is inferred from the AIRS design for all 2378 channels. AIRS performance sets the benchmark for what can be achieved with a state-of-the-art hyperspectral radiometer from polar orbit and what is expected from future hyperspectral sounders. AIRS was launched into a 705 km altitude polar orbit on NASA's Earth Observation System (EOS) Aqua spacecraft on 4 May 2002. AIRS covers the 3.7-15.4 micron region of the thermal infrared spectrum with a spectral resolution of nu/Delta nu = 1200 and has returned 3.7 million spectra of the upwelling radiance each day since the start of routine data gathering in September 2002.

  6. Microwave Limb Sounder Measurements Depicting the Relationship Between Nitrous Oxide Levels and

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Aura's Microwave Limb Sounder measures nitrous oxide, which is unaffected by stratospheric chemical processes. By studying changes in its levels, scientists can better understand how air is moving around and how ozone is affected by that air motion, allowing them to differentiate those changes from the ones caused by chemical ozone destruction. In these cross-sections of nitrous oxide (top) and ozone (bottom) data from Aura, changes in the levels of these two chemicals at various temperatures and latitudes are depicted over time. The white contour shows the approximate location of the polar vortex boundary.

    The left panel data were collected on January 23, 2005, near the beginning of chemical ozone destruction this winter. Virtually all chemical loss occurred before March 10 (center panel). Ozone destruction extended throughout the polar vortex from about 15-20 kilometers (9-13 miles), but occurred only in the outer part of the vortex from 20-25 kilometers (13-16 miles). The differences between the two days are depicted in the right panel. The largest observed difference is about a 1.2 parts per million by volume decrease in ozone. Plots of nitrous oxide show a decrease in the region in the outer part of the vortex where most ozone loss occurs, indicating that air from above (where nitrous oxide is lower) has moved into this region. This downward motion brings higher ozone into the region where chemical loss is occurring, thus partially masking the effects of chemical loss. Calculations using Microwave Limb Sounder data to separate dynamical and chemical effects indicate maximum chemical ozone loss of approximately 2 parts per million by volume (approximately 60 percent) in the outer part of the vortex near 18-21 kilometers (11-13 miles), and approximately 1.5 parts per million by volume when averaged throughout the whole vortex region.

  7. Progress in developing GeoSTAR: a microwave sounder for GOES-R

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambrigtsen, B. H.; Brown, S. T.; Dinardo, S. J.; Kangaslahti, P. P.; Tanner, A. B.; Wilson, W. J.

    2005-08-01

    The Geostationary Synthetic Thinned Aperture Radiometer (GeoSTAR) is a new concept for a microwave sounder, intended to be deployed on NOAA's next generation of geostationary weather satellites, GOES-R. A ground based prototype has been developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, under NASA Instrument Incubator Program sponsorship, and is currently undergoing tests and performance characterization. The initial space version of GeoSTAR will have performance characteristics equal to those of the AMSU system currently operating on polar orbiting environmental satellites, but subsequent versions will significantly outperform AMSU. In addition to all-weather temperature and humidity soundings, GeoSTAR will also provide continuous rain mapping, tropospheric wind profiling and real time storm tracking. In particular, with the aperture synthesis approach used by GeoSTAR it is possible to achieve very high spatial resolutions without having to deploy the impractically large parabolic reflector antenna that is required with the conventional approach. GeoSTAR therefore offers both a feasible way of getting a microwave sounder in GEO as well as a clear upgrade path to meet future requirements. GeoSTAR offers a number of other advantages relative to real-aperture systems as well, such as 2D spatial coverage without mechanical scanning, system robustness and fault tolerance, operational flexibility, high quality beam formation, and open ended performance expandability. The technology and system design required for GeoSTAR are rapidly maturing, and it is expected that a space demonstration mission can be developed before the first GOES-R launch. GeoSTAR will be ready for operational deployment 2-3 years after that.

  8. Low-Bandwidth Operation of TES-Based Bolometer Operation in a Resistance Locked Loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Kuur, J.; Gottardi, L.; Akamatsu, H.; Bruijn, M.; den Hartog, R.; Hoevers, H.; Gao, J. R.; Hijmering, R.; Khosropanah, P.; Ridder, M.

    2014-08-01

    Operation of TES-based bolometers in a resistance locked loop (RLL), i.e. keeping the operating resistance constant by means of feedback on the bias voltage, provides a number of attractive properties for applications. In combination with frequency domain multiplexing, the technique reduces electrical cross talk, and provides a more detector load independent behaviour with respect to operation under standard voltage bias. This paper shows a quantitative estimation of the large signal properties under the RLL, and shows a comparison with the situation under voltage bias. Furthermore, an unorthodox, low-bandwidth mode of operation will be discussed, from the perspective of the electro-thermal stability in the RLL.

  9. Land surface temperature and emissivity uncertainty analysis over nine pseudo-invariant sand dune sites in the US southwest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, C. G.; Hulley, G. C.; Hook, S. J.

    2012-12-01

    collected from these sites and their emissivities measured in the lab using an FTIR spectrometer. These emissivities are used as input to the radiative transfer model for each instrument in the r-val method, and later degraded to the spectral resolution of the instrument being examined. Results from applying two different MODIS LST products, MOD11 and MOD21, using different temperature / emissivity separation algorithms (Split-Window and Temperature-Emissivity Separation (TES) respectively), over the nine sites will be presented. R-val will be performed using clear MODIS scenes collected over each site, from both the Terra and Aqua satellites. Atmospheric data for the radiative transfer model were obtained from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument on the Aqua satellite for the MODIS-Aqua data, and from the National Centers for Environmental Predictions' Global Data Assimilation System (NCEP GDAS) data for both MODIS-Aqua and MODIS-Terra allowing the contributions to the uncertainty from the atmospheric model to be separated from contributions to uncertainty from LST&E algorithms differences This work represents a first step toward creating a consistent LST&E product across different instruments and algorithms, enabling the creation of a consistent ESDR with well-defined uncertainty statistics for modeling studies.

  10. Study of the Dependency on Magnetic Field and Bias Voltage of an AC-Biased TES Microcalorimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gottardi, L.; Bruijn, M.; denHartog, R.; Hoevers, H.; deKorte, P.; vanderKuur, J.; Linderman, M.; Adams, J.; Bailey, C.; Bandler, S.; Chervenak, J.; Eckart, M.; Finkbeiner, F.; Kelley, R.; Kilbourne, C.; Porter, F.; Sadlier, J.; Smith, S.

    2012-01-01

    At SRON we are studying the performance of a Goddard Space Flight Center single pixel TES microcalorimeter operated in an AC bias configuration. For x-ray photons at 6 keV the pixel shows an x-ray energy resolution Delta E(sub FWHM) = 3.7 eV, which is about a factor 2 worse than the energy resolution observed in an identical DC-biased pixel. In order to better understand the reasons for this discrepancy we characterized the detector as a function of temperature, bias working point and applied perpendicular magnetic field. A strong periodic dependency of the detector noise on the TES AC bias voltage is measured. We discuss the results in the framework of the recently observed weak-link behaviour of a TES microcalorimeter.

  11. Development and Operation of Arrays of TES x-ray Microcalorimeters Suitable for Constellation-X

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilbourne, C. A.; Bandler, S. R.; Brown, A. D.; Chervenak, J. A.; Eckart, M. E.; Finkbeiner, F. M.; Iyomoto, N.; Kelley, R. L.; Porter, F. S.; Smith, S. J.; Irwin, K. D.

    2008-01-01

    Having already developed a transition-edge-sensor (TES) microcalorimeter design that enables uniform and reproducible high spectral resolution (routinely better than 3 eV resolution at 6 keV) and is compatible with high fill-factor arrays, we are now working towards demonstrating this performance at high count rates and with the multiplexed read-out needed for instrumenting the Constellation-X X-ray Microcalorimeter Spectrometer (XMS) focal plane array. Design changes that increase the speed of the individual XMS pixels, such as lowering the heat capacity or increasing the thermal conductance of the link to the 50-mK heatsink, result in larger, faster signals, thus the coupling to the multiplexer and the overall bandwidth of the electronics must accommodate this increase in slew rate. In order to operate the array with high incident x-ray flux without unacceptable degradation of the spectral resolution, the magnitude of thermal and electrical crosstalk must be controlled. We will discuss recent progress in the thermal and electrical designs of our close-packed TES arrays, and we will present spectra acquired through the read-out chain from the multiplexer electronics, through the demultiplexer software, to real-time signal processing.

  12. Array-scale performance of TES X-ray Calorimeters Suitable for Constellation-X

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilbourne, C. A.; Bandler, S. R.; Brown, A. D.; Chervenak, J. A.; Eckart, M. E.; Finkbeiner, F. M.; Iyomoto, N.; Kelley, R. L.; Porter, F. S.; Smith, S. J.; Doriese, W. B.; Irwin, K. D.

    2008-01-01

    Having developed a transition-edge-sensor (TES) calorimeter design that enables high spectral resolution in high fill-factor arrays, we now present array-scale results from 32-pixel arrays of identical closely packed TES pixels. Each pixel in such an array contains a Mo/Au bilayer with a transition temperature of 0.1 K and an electroplated Au or Au/Bi xray absorber. The pixels in an array have highly uniform physical characteristics and performance. The arrays are easy to operate due to the range of bias voltages and heatsink temperatures over which solution better than 3 eV at 6 keV can be obtained. Resolution better than 3 eV has also been obtained with 2x8 time-division SQUID multiplexing. We will present the detector characteristics and show spectra acquired through the read-out chain from the multiplexer electronics through the demultiplexer software to real-time signal processing. We are working towards demonstrating this performance over the range of count rates expected in the observing program of the Constellation-X observatory. We mill discuss the impact of increased counting rate on spectral resolution, including the effects of crosstalk and optimal-filtering dead time.

  13. Development of a TES-Based Anti-Coincidence Detector for Future X-ray Observatories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    Microcalorimeters onboard future x-ray observatories require an anti-coincidence detector to remove environmental backgrounds. In order to most effectively integrate this anticoincidence detector with the main microcalorimeter array, both instruments should use similar read-out technology. The detectors used in the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) use a phonon measurement technique that is well suited for an anti-coincidence detector with a microcalorimeter array using SQUID readout. This technique works by using a transition-edge sensor (TES) connected to superconducting collection fins to measure the athermal phonon signal produced when an event occurs in the substrate crystal. Energy from the event propagates through the crystal to the superconducting collection fins, creating quasiparticles, which are then trapped as they enter the TES where they produce a signal. We are currently developing a prototype anti-coincidence detector for future x-ray missions and have recently fabricated test devices with Mo/Au TESs and Al collection fins. We will present results from the first tests of these devices which indicate a proof of concept that quasiparticle trapping is occurring in these materials.

  14. Small, Fast TES Microcalorimeters with Unprecedented X-ray Spectral Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckart, M. E.; Adams, J. S.; Bailey, C. N.; Bandler, S. R.; Chervenak, J. A.; Finkbeiner, F. M.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Porter, F. S.; Sadleir, J. E.; Smith, S. J.; Hilton, G. C.; Irwin, K. D.; Vale, L. R.

    2011-01-01

    Driven initially by the desire for X-ray microcalorimeter arrays suitable for imaging the dynamic solar corona, we have developed a transition-edge-sensor (TES) microcalorimeter optimization that exhibits a unique combination of high spectral resolving power and a wide X-ray bandpass. These devices have achieved spectral performance of dE approximately 1.3 eV FWHM at 1.5 keV, 1.6 eV at 6 keV, and 2.0 eV at 8 keV, using small TESs (e.g., approximately 35 micron x 35 micron) that operate in a regime in which the superconducting transition is highly current dependent. In order to accommodate high X-ray count rates, the devices sit directly on a solid substrate instead of on membranes, and we use an embedded heatsinking layer to reduce pixel-to-pixel crosstalk. We will present results from devices with a range of TES and absorber sizes, and from device wafers with varied embedded heatsink materials. This contribution will focus on count-rate capabilities, including a discussion of the trade-off between count rate and energy resolution, and the heatsinking design. We will also present preliminary tests of array readout using a code-division multiplexed SQUID readout scheme, which may be necessary to enable large arrays of these fast devices.

  15. AC Read-Out Circuits for Single Pixel Characterization of TES Microcalorimeters and Bolometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gottardi, L.; van de Kuur, J.; Bandler, S.; Bruijn, M.; de Korte, P.; Gao, J. R.; den Hartog, R.; Hijmering, R. A.; Hoevers, H.; Koshropanah, P.; Kilbourne, C.; Lindemann, M. A.; Parra Borderias, M.; Ridder, M.

    2011-01-01

    SRON is developing Frequency Domain Multiplexing (FDM) for the read-out of transition edge sensor (TES) soft x-ray microcalorimeters for the XMS instrument of the International X-ray Observatory and far-infrared bolometers for the SAFARI instrument on the Japanese mission SPICA. In FDM the TESs are AC voltage biased at frequencies from 0.5 to 6 MHz in a superconducting LC resonant circuit and the signal is read-out by low noise and high dynamic range SQUIDs amplifiers. The TES works as an amplitude modulator. We report on several AC bias experiments performed on different detectors. In particular, we discuss the results on the characterization of Goddard Space Flight Center x-ray pixels and SRON bolometers. The paper focuses on the analysis of different read-out configurations developed to optimize the noise and the impedance matching between the detectors and the SQUID amplifier. A novel feedback network electronics has been developed to keep the SQUID in flux locked loop, when coupled to superconducting high Q circuits, and to optimally tune the resonant bias circuit. The achieved detector performances are discussed in view of the instrument requirement for the two space missions.

  16. Development of a TES-Based Anti-Coincidence Detector for Future X-Ray Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Catherine N.; Adams, J. S.; Bandler, S. R.; Eckart, M. E.; Ewin, A. J.; Finkbeiner, F. M.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Porter, F. S.; Sadleir, J. E.; Smith, S. J.; Sultana, M.

    2012-01-01

    Microcalorimeters onboard future x-ray observatories require an anticoincidence detector to remove environmental backgrounds. In order to most effectively integrate this anti-coincidence detector with the main microcalorimeter array, both instruments should use similar read-out technology. The detectors used in the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) use a phonon measurement technique that is well suited for an anti-coincidence detector with a microcalorimeter array using SQUID readout. This technique works by using a transition-edge sensor (TES) connected to superconducting collection fins to measure the athermal phonon signal produced when an event occurs in the substrate crystal. Energy from the event propagates through the crystal to the superconducting collection fins, creating quasiparticles, which are then trapped as they enter the TES where they produce a signal. We are currently developing a prototype anti-coincidence detector for future x-ray missions and have recently fabricated test devices with Mo/Au TESs and Al collection fins. We present results from the first tests of these devices which indicate a proof of concept that quasiparticle trapping is occurring in these materials.

  17. TES-Based X-ray Microcalorimeter Performances Under AC Bias and FDM for Athena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akamatsu, H.; Gottardi, L.; de Vries, C. P.; Adams, J. S.; Bandler, S. R.; Bruijn, M. P.; Chervenak, J. A.; Eckart, M. E.; Finkbeiner, F. M.; Gao, J. R.; den Herder, J.-W.; den Hartog, R.; Hoevers, H.; Kelley, R. E.; Khosropanah, P.; Kilbourne, C. A.; van der Kuur, J.; Lee, S.-J.; van den Linden, A. J.; Porter, F. S.; Ravensberg, K.; Sadleir, J. E.; Smith, S. J.; Suzuki, T.; Wassell, E. J.; Kiviranta, M.

    2016-07-01

    Athena is a European X-ray observatory, scheduled for launch in ˜ 2028. Athena will employ a high-resolution imaging spectrometer called X-ray integral field unit (X-IFU), consisting of an array of ˜ 4000 transition edge sensor (TES) microcalorimeter pixels. For the readout of X-IFU, we are developing frequency domain multiplexing, which is the baseline readout system. In this paper, we report on the performance of a TES X-ray calorimeter array fabricated at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) at MHz frequencies for the baseline of X-IFU detector. During single-pixel AC bias characterization, we measured X-ray energy resolutions (at 6 keV) of about 2.9 eV at both 2.3 and 3.7 MHz. Furthermore, in the multiplexing mode, we measured X-ray energy resolutions of about 2.9 eV at 1.3 and 1.7 MHz.

  18. Data Flow Design for Event Detection and Qualification in TES X-Ray Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceballos, M. T.; Cobo, B.; Fraga-Encinas, R.; van der Kuur, J.; Schuurmans, J.; Gottardi, L.

    2013-10-01

    The current and forthcoming research lines in X-ray astronomy will require unprecedented spectral resolution with imaging capabilities. The most promising detectors able to provide these capabilities are the calorimeters based on Transition Edge Sensor (TES) technologies, like the one that has been under development for the proposed ATHENA x-ray space mission. We present here the Data Flow designed for one of such instruments covering the detection algorithms to extract the x-ray events (photons) from the noisy signal (as well as to cope with a possible pile-up), the event qualification (event grade) according to the event arrival time and proximity to other events, and finally the filtering process applied to these pulses to get their energy content, and thus the astronomical source spectrum. This development is currently part of a collaboration between IFCA (Spain) and SRON (NL) institutes, as part of a larger project initiated in 2005 and named EURECA (de Korte et al. 2009) involving many other institutes in Europe and the USA. This project was created to design the TES prototype proposed for the XEUS/IXO/ATHENA ESA missions.

  19. Antenna-coupled TES bolometer arrays for BICEP2/Keck and SPIDER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlando, A.; Aikin, R. W.; Amiri, M.; Bock, J. J.; Bonetti, J. A.; Brevik, J. A.; Burger, B.; Chattopadthyay, G.; Day, P. K.; Filippini, J. P.; Golwala, S. R.; Halpern, M.; Hasselfield, M.; Hilton, G. C.; Irwin, K. D.; Kenyon, M.; Kovac, J. M.; Kuo, C. L.; Lange, A. E.; LeDuc, H. G.; Llombart, N.; Nguyen, H. T.; Ogburn, R. W.; Reintsema, C. D.; Runyan, M. C.; Staniszewski, Z.; Sudiwala, R.; Teply, G.; Trangsrud, A. R.; Turner, A. D.; Wilson, P.

    2010-07-01

    BICEP2/Keck and SPIDER are cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarimeters targeting the B-mode polarization induced by primordial gravitational waves from inflation. They will be using planar arrays of polarization sensitive antenna-coupled TES bolometers, operating at frequencies between 90 GHz and 220 GHz. At 150 GHz each array consists of 64 polarimeters and four of these arrays are assembled together to make a focal plane, for a total of 256 dual-polarization elements (512 TES sensors). The detector arrays are integrated with a time-domain SQUID multiplexer developed at NIST and read out using the multi-channel electronics (MCE) developed at the University of British Columbia. Following our progress in improving detector parameters uniformity across the arrays and fabrication yield, our main effort has focused on improving detector arrays optical and noise performances, in order to produce science grade focal planes achieving target sensitivities. We report on changes in detector design implemented to optimize such performances and following focal plane arrays characterization. BICEP2 has deployed a first 150 GHz science grade focal plane to the South Pole in December 2009.

  20. Improved methodology for surface and atmospheric soundings, error estimates, and quality control procedures: the atmospheric infrared sounder science team version-6 retrieval algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susskind, Joel; Blaisdell, John M.; Iredell, Lena

    2014-01-01

    The atmospheric infrared sounder (AIRS) science team version-6 AIRS/advanced microwave sounding unit (AMSU) retrieval algorithm is now operational at the Goddard Data and Information Services Center (DISC). AIRS version-6 level-2 products are generated near real time at the Goddard DISC and all level-2 and level-3 products are available starting from September 2002. Some of the significant improvements in retrieval methodology contained in the version-6 retrieval algorithm compared to that previously used in version-5 are described. In particular, the AIRS science team made major improvements with regard to the algorithms used to (1) derive surface skin temperature and surface spectral emissivity; (2) generate the initial state used to start the cloud clearing and retrieval procedures; and (3) derive error estimates and use them for quality control. Significant improvements have also been made in the generation of cloud parameters. In addition to the basic AIRS/AMSU mode, version-6 also operates in an AIRS only (AO) mode, which produces results almost as good as those of the full AIRS/AMSU mode. The improvements of some AIRS version-6 and version-6 AO products compared to those obtained using version-5 are also demonstrated.

  1. Measurement of middle and upper atmospheric horizontal winds with a submillimeter/THz limb sounder: results from JEM/SMILES and simulation study for SMILES-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baron, Philippe; Manago, Naohiro; Ozeki, Hiroyuki; Yoshihisa, Irimajiri; Donal, Murtagh; Yoshinori, Uzawa; Satoshi, Ochiai; Masato, Shiotani; Makoto, Suzuki

    2016-04-01

    In a near future, ESA will launch the Atmospheric Dynamics Mission (ADM) equipped with a lidar for measuring tropospheric and lower stratospheric winds. NASA will continue a long-term series of upper atmospheric wind measurements (altitudes >80 km) with the new Michelson Interferometer for Global High-resolution Thermospheric Imaging (MIGHTI) on the Ionospheric Connection Explorer (ICON) satellite. No mission is planned to observe winds in the middle atmosphere (30-80 km), though they are recognized as essential parameters for understanding atmospheric dynamics and the vertical coupling between atmospheric regions. They are also promising data for improving long-term weather forecast and climate modelling. It has been demonstrated with the Superconducting Submillimeter Wave Limb Emission Sounder (SMILES, Oct 2009 - Apr 2010) that a 4-K cooled microwave radiometer can provide data to fill the altitude gap in the wind measurements. Its possible successor named SMILES-2, is being designed in Japan for the study of the middle and upper atmospheric chemistry and dynamics (O3, H2O, T, atomic O, OH, HO2, ClO, BrO, ...). If realized, the instrument will measure sub-millimeter and THz molecular spectral lines (616-150 μm) with high sensitivity and frequency resolution. The SMILES-2 characteristics are very well suited for horizontal wind observations between 20 km to more than 160 km. The best performances are found between 35-90 km where the retrieval precision is better than 3 m/s for a vertical resolution of 2-3 km [1]. In this presentation, we summarize the results obtained from SMILES and assess the measurement performances of SMILES-2 to measure horizontal winds. [1] P. Baron, N. Manago, H. Ozeki, Y. Irimajiri, D. Murtagh, Y. Uzawa, S. Ochiai, M. Shiotani, M. Suzuki: "Measurement of stratospheric and mesospheric winds with a SubMillimeter wave limb sounder: Results from JEM/SMILES and simulation study for SMILES-2"; Proc. of SPIE Remote sensing, 96390N-96390N-20

  2. Measurement of stratospheric and mesospheric winds with a submillimeter wave limb sounder: results from JEM/SMILES and simulation study for SMILES-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baron, Philippe; Manago, Naohiro; Ozeki, Hiroyuki; Irimajiri, Yoshihisa; Murtagh, Donal; Uzawa, Yoshinori; Ochiai, Satoshi; Shiotani, Masato; Suzuki, Makoto

    2015-10-01

    Satellite missions for measuring winds in the troposphere and thermosphere will be launched in a near future. There is no plan to observe winds in the altitude range between 30-90 km, though middle atmospheric winds are recognized as an essential parameter in various atmospheric research areas. Sub-millimetre limb sounders have the capability to fill this altitude gap. In this paper, we summarize the wind retrievals obtained from the Japanese Superconducting Submillimeter Wave Limb Emission Sounder (SMILES) which operated from the International Space Station between September 2009 and April 2010. The results illustrate the potential of such instruments to measure winds. They also show the need of improving the wind representation in the models in the Tropics, and globally in the mesosphere. A wind measurement sensitivity study has been conducted for its successor, SMILES-2, which is being studied in Japan. If it is realized, sub-millimeter and terahertz molecular lines suitable to determine line-of-sight winds will be measured. It is shown that with the current instrument definition, line-of-sight winds can be observed from 20 km up to more than 160 km. Winds can be retrieved with a precision better than 5 ms-1 and a vertical resolution of 2-3 km between 35-90 km. Above 90 km, the precision is better than 10 ms-1 with a vertical resolution of 3-5 km. Measurements can be performed day and night with a similar sensitivity. Requirements on observation parameters such as the antenna size, the satellite altitude are discussed. An alternative setting for the spectral bands is examined. The new setting is compatible with the general scientific objectives of the mission and the instrument design. It allows to improve the wind measurement sensitivity between 35 to 90 km by a factor 2. It is also shown that retrievals can be performed with a vertical resolution of 1 km and a precision of 5-10 ms-1 between 50 and 90 km.

  3. Transcranial electric stimulation (tES) and NeuroImaging: the state-of-the-art, new insights and prospects in basic and clinical neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Soekadar, Surjo R; Herring, Jim Don; McGonigle, David

    2016-10-15

    Transcranial electric stimulation (tES) of the brain has attracted an increased interest in recent years. Yet, despite remarkable research efforts to date, the underlying neurobiological mechanisms of tES' effects are still incompletely understood. This Special Issue aims to provide a comprehensive and up-to-date overview of the state-of-the-art in studies combining tES and neuroimaging, while introducing most recent insights and outlining future prospects related to this new and rapidly growing field. The findings reported here combine methodological advancements with insights into the underlying mechanisms of tES itself. At the same time, they also point to the many caveats and specific challenges associated with such studies, which can arise from both technical and biological sources. Besides promising to advance basic neuroscience, combined tES and neuroimaging studies may also substantially change previous conceptions about the methods of action of electric or magnetic stimulation on the brain.

  4. Transcranial electric stimulation (tES) and NeuroImaging: the state-of-the-art, new insights and prospects in basic and clinical neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Soekadar, Surjo R; Herring, Jim Don; McGonigle, David

    2016-10-15

    Transcranial electric stimulation (tES) of the brain has attracted an increased interest in recent years. Yet, despite remarkable research efforts to date, the underlying neurobiological mechanisms of tES' effects are still incompletely understood. This Special Issue aims to provide a comprehensive and up-to-date overview of the state-of-the-art in studies combining tES and neuroimaging, while introducing most recent insights and outlining future prospects related to this new and rapidly growing field. The findings reported here combine methodological advancements with insights into the underlying mechanisms of tES itself. At the same time, they also point to the many caveats and specific challenges associated with such studies, which can arise from both technical and biological sources. Besides promising to advance basic neuroscience, combined tES and neuroimaging studies may also substantially change previous conceptions about the methods of action of electric or magnetic stimulation on the brain. PMID:27633745

  5. Hyperspectral Microwave Atmospheric Sounder (HyMAS) architecture and design accommodations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilliard, L.; Racette, P.; Blackwell, W.; Galbraith, C.; Thompson, E.

    The Hyperspectral Microwave Atmospheric Sounder (HyMAS) is being developed at Lincoln Laboratories and accommodated by the Goddard Space Flight Center for a flight opportunity on a NASA research aircraft. The term “ hyperspectral microwave” is used to indicate an all-weather sounding that performs equivalent to hyperspectral infrared sounders in clear air with vertical resolution of approximately 1 km. Deploying the HyMAS equipped scanhead with the existing Conical Scanning Microwave Imaging Radiometer (CoSMIR) shortens the path to a flight demonstration. Hyperspectral microwave is achieved through the use of independent RF antennas that sample the volume of the Earth's atmosphere through various levels of frequencies, thereby producing a set of dense, spaced vertical weighting functions. The simulations proposed for HyMAS 118/183-GHz system should yield surface precipitation rate and water path retrievals for small hail, soft hail, or snow pellets, snow, rainwater, etc. with accuracies comparable to those of the Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder. Further improvements in retrieval methodology (for example, polarization exploitation) are expected. The CoSMIR instrument is a packaging concept re-used on HyMAS to ease the integration features of the scanhead. The HyMAS scanhead will include an ultra-compact Intermediate Frequency Processor (IFP) module that is mounted inside the door to improve thermal management. The IFP is fabricated with materials made of Low-Temperature Co-fired Ceramic (LTCC) technology integrated with detectors, amplifiers, A/D conversion and data aggregation. The IFP will put out 52 channels of 16 bit data comprised of 4 - 9 channel data streams for temperature profiles and 2-8 channel streams for water vapor. With the limited volume of the existing CoSMIR scanhead and new HyMAS front end components, the HyMAS team at Goddard began preliminary layout work inside the new drum. Importing and re-using models of the shell, the s- an head

  6. Hyperspectral Microwave Atmospheric Sounder (HyMAS) Architecture and Design Accommodations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilliard, Lawrence; Racette, Paul; Blackwell, William; Galbraith, Christopher; Thompson, Erik

    2013-01-01

    The Hyperspectral Microwave Atmospheric Sounder (HyMAS) is being developed at Lincoln Laboratories and accommodated by the Goddard Space Flight Center for a flight opportunity on a NASA research aircraft. The term "hyperspectral microwave" is used to indicate an all-weather sounding that performs equivalent to hyperspectral infrared sounders in clear air with vertical resolution of approximately 1 km. Deploying the HyMAS equipped scanhead with the existing Conical Scanning Microwave Imaging Radiometer (CoSMIR) shortens the path to a flight demonstration. Hyperspectral microwave is achieved through the use of independent RF antennas that sample the volume of the Earth s atmosphere through various levels of frequencies, thereby producing a set of dense, spaced vertical weighting functions. The simulations proposed for HyMAS 118/183-GHz system should yield surface precipitation rate and water path retrievals for small hail, soft hail, or snow pellets, snow, rainwater, etc. with accuracies comparable to those of the Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder. Further improvements in retrieval methodology (for example, polarization exploitation) are expected. The CoSMIR instrument is a packaging concept re-used on HyMAS to ease the integration features of the scanhead. The HyMAS scanhead will include an ultra-compact Intermediate Frequency Processor (IFP) module that is mounted inside the door to improve thermal management. The IFP is fabricated with materials made of Low-Temperature Co-fired Ceramic (LTCC) technology integrated with detectors, amplifiers, A/D conversion and data aggregation. The IFP will put out 52 channels of 16 bit data comprised of 4-9 channel data streams for temperature profiles and 2-8 channel streams for water vapor. With the limited volume of the existing CoSMIR scanhead and new HyMAS front end components, the HyMAS team at Goddard began preliminary layout work inside the new drum. Importing and re-using models of the shell, the scan head computer

  7. The GEISA system in 1996: towards an operational tool for the second generation vertical sounders radiance simulation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquinet-Husson, N.; Scott, N. A.; Chedin, A.; Bonnet, B.; Barbe, A.; Tyuterev, V. G.; Champion, J. P.; Winnewisser, M.; Brown, L. R.; Gamache, R.; Golovko, V. F.; Chursin, A. A.

    1998-05-01

    Since their creation, in 1974, the GEISA (Gestion et Etude des Informations Spectroscopiques Atmospheriques: Management and Study of Atmospheric Spectroscopic Information) database system (more than 730,000 entries between 0 and 22,656 cm-1, corresponding to 40 molecules and 86 isotopic species, in its 1992 edition) and the associated software have been widely used for forward atmospheric radiative transfer modelling, with the maximum reliability, tractability and efficiency. For the upcoming high spectral resolution sounders like IASI (Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer) and AIRS (Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder), more complete and accurate laboratory measurements of spectroscopic parameters, presently included in the databases, are required, and more sophisticated theoretical radiative transfer modelling should be developed. Consequently, it is intended to elaborate the GEISA database as an interactive tool, named GEISA/IASI, designed for providing spectroscopic information tailored to the IASI sounding radiative transfer modelling.

  8. Aura's Microwave Limb Sounder Estimates of Ozone Loss, 2004/2005 Arctic Winter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    These data maps from Aura's Microwave Limb Sounder depict levels of hydrogen chloride (top), chlorine monoxide (center), and ozone (bottom) at an altitude of approximately 19 kilometers (490,000 feet) on selected days during the 2004-05 Arctic winter. White contours demark the boundary of the winter polar vortex.

    The maps from December 23, 2004, illustrate vortex conditions shortly before significant chemical ozone destruction began. By January 23, 2005, chlorine is substantially converted from the 'safe' form of hydrogen chloride, which is depleted throughout the vortex, to the 'unsafe' form of chlorine monoxide, which is enhanced in the portions of the region that receive sunlight at that time of year. Ozone increased over the month as a result of dynamical effects, and chemical ozone destruction is just beginning at this time. A brief period of intense cold a few days later promotes further chlorine activation and consequent changes in hydrogen chloride and chlorine monoxide levels on January 27, 2005. Peak chlorine monoxide enhancement occurs in early February.

    By February 24, 2005, chlorine deactivation is well underway, with chlorine monoxide abundances dropping and hydrogen chloride abundances rising. Almost all chlorine monoxide has been quenched by March 10, 2005. The fact that hydrogen chloride has not fully rebounded to December abundances suggests that some of that chemical was recovered into another chlorine reservoir species.

    Ozone maps for January 27, 2005, through March 10, 2005, show indications of mixing of air from outside the polar vortex into it. Such occurrences throughout this winter, especially in late February and early March, complicate analyses, and detailed calculations are required to rigorously disentangle chemical and dynamical effects and accurately diagnose chemical ozone destruction.

    Based on various analyses of Microwave Limb Sounder data, we estimate that maximum local ozone loss of approximately 2 parts

  9. Residual Circulation in the Stratosphere and Lower Mesosphere as Diagnosed from Microwave Limb Sounder Data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eluszkiewicz, Janusz; Crisp, David; Zurek, Richard; Elson, Lee; Fishbein, Evan; Froidevaux, Lucien; Waters, Joe; Grainger, R. G.; Lambert, Alyn; Harwood, Robert; Peckham, Gordon

    1996-01-01

    Results for the residual circulation in the stratosphere and lower mesosphere between September 1991 and August 1994 are reported. This circulation is diagnosed by applying an accurate radiative transfer code to temperature, ozone, and water vapor measurements acquired by the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) onboard the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS), augmented by climatological distributions of methane, nitrous oxide, nitrogen dioxide, surface albedo, and cloud cover. The sensitivity of the computed heating rates to the presence of Mt. Pinatubo aerosols is explored by utilizing aerosol properties derived from the measurements obtained by the Improved Stratospheric and Mesospheric Sounder instrument, also onboard UARS. The computed vertical velocities exhibit a Semiannual oscillation (SAO) around the tropical stratopause, with the region of downward velocities reaching maximum spatial extent in February and August. This behavior reflects the semiannual oscillation in temperature and ozone and mimics that seen in past studies of the October 1978-May 1979 period based on data from the Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere onboard the Nimbus 7 satellite. The SAO vertical velocities are stronger during the northern winter phase, as expected if planetary waves from the winter hemisphere are involved in driving the SAO. A possible quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) signal extending from the middle into the upper stratosphere is also hinted at, with the equatorial vertical velocities in the region 10-1 hPa significantly smaller (or even negative) in 1993/94 than in 1992/93. Despite the short data record, the authors believe that this pattern reflects a QBO signal rather than a coincidental interannual variability, since the time-height section of vertical velocity at the equator resembles that of the zonal wind. Wintertime high-latitude descent rates are usually greater in the Northern Hemisphere, but they also exhibit significant variability there. In the three

  10. Airborne Deployment and Calibration of Microwave Atmospheric Sounder on 6U CubeSat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padmanabhan, S.; Brown, S. T.; Lim, B.; Kangaslahti, P.; Russell, D.; Stachnik, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    To accurately predict how the distribution of extreme events may change in the future we need to understand the mechanisms that influence such events in our current climate. Our current observing system is not well-suited for observing extreme events globally due to the sparse sampling and in-homogeneity of ground-based in-situ observations and the infrequent revisit time of satellite observations. Observations of weather extremes, such as extreme precipitation events, temperature extremes, tropical and extra-tropical cyclones among others, with temporal resolution on the order of minutes and spatial resolution on the order of few kms (<10 kms), are required for improved forecasting of extreme weather events. We envision a suite of low-cost passive microwave sounding and imaging sensors on CubeSats that would work in concert with traditional flagship observational systems, such as those manifested on large environmental satellites (i.e. JPSS,WSF,GCOM-W), to monitor weather extremes. A 118/183 GHz sensor would enable observations of temperature and precipitation extremes over land and ocean as well as tropical and extra-tropical cyclones. This proposed project would enable low cost, compact radiometer instrumentation at 118 and 183 GHz that would fit in a 6U Cubesat with the objective of mass-producing this design to enable a suite of small satellites to image the key geophysical parameters needed to improve prediction of extreme weather events. We take advantage of past and current technology developments at JPL viz. HAMSR (High Altitude Microwave Scanning Radiometer), Advanced Component Technology (ACT'08) to enable low-mass, low-power high frequency airborne radiometers. In this paper, we will describe the design and implementation of the 118 GHz temperature sounder and 183 GHz humidity sounder on the 6U CubeSat. In addition, we will discuss the maiden airborne deployment of the instrument during the Plain Elevated Convection at Night (PECAN) experiment. The

  11. Variations and climatology of CI0 in the polar lower stratosphere from UARS Microwave Limb Sounder measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santee, M. L.; Manney, G. L.; Water, J. W.; Livesey, N. J.

    2002-01-01

    The Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on board the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) measured the global distribution of stratospheric ClO over annual cycles for much of the 1990s, albeit with reduced sampling frequency in the latter half of the decade. Here we present an overview of the interannual and interhemispheric variations in the distribution of ClO derived from UARS MLS measurements, with a particular emphasis on enhancements in the winter polar lower stratosphere.

  12. Indium Hybridization of Large Format TES Bolometer Arrays to Readout Multiplexers for Far-Infrared Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Timothy M.; Costen, Nick; Allen, Christine

    2007-01-01

    The advance of new detector technologies combined with enhanced fabrication methods has resulted in an increase in development of large format arrays. The next generation of scientific instruments will utilize detectors containing hundreds to thousands of elements providing a more efficient means to conduct large area sky surveys. Some notable detectors include a 32x32 x-ray microcalorimeter for Constellation-X, an infrared bolometer called SAFIRE to fly on the airborne observatory SOFIA, and the sub-millimeter bolometer SCUBA-2 to be deployed at the JCMT which will use more than 10,000 elements for two colors, each color using four 32x40 arrays. Of these detectors, SCUBA-2 is farthest along in development and uses indium hybridization to multiplexers for readout of the large number of elements, a technology that will be required to enable the next generation of large format arrays. Our current efforts in working toward large format arrays have produced GISMO, the Goddard IRAM Superconducting 2-Millimeter observer. GISMO is a far infrared instrument to be field tested later this year at the IRAM 30 meter telescope in Spain. GISMO utilizes transition edge sensor (TES) technology in an 8x16 filled array format that allows for typical fan-out wiring and wire-bonding to four 1x32 NIST multiplexers. GISMO'S electrical wiring is routed along the tops of 30 micron walls which also serve as the mechanical framework for the array. This architecture works well for the 128 element array, but is approaching the limit for routing the necessary wires along the surface while maintaining a high fill factor. Larger format arrays will benefit greatly from making electrical connections through the wafer to the backside, where they can be hybridized to a read-out substrate tailored to handling the wiring scheme. The next generation array we are developing is a 32x40 element array on a pitch of 1135 microns that conforms to the NIST multiplexer, already developed for the SCUBA-2

  13. Sensor System Performance Evaluation and Benefits from the NPOESS Airborne Sounder Testbed-Interferometer (NAST-I)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larar, A.; Zhou, D.; Smith, W.

    2009-01-01

    Advanced satellite sensors are tasked with improving global-scale measurements of the Earth's atmosphere, clouds, and surface to enable enhancements in weather prediction, climate monitoring, and environmental change detection. Validation of the entire measurement system is crucial to achieving this goal and thus maximizing research and operational utility of resultant data. Field campaigns employing satellite under-flights with well-calibrated FTS sensors aboard high-altitude aircraft are an essential part of this validation task. The National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS) Airborne Sounder Testbed-Interferometer (NAST-I) has been a fundamental contributor in this area by providing coincident high spectral/spatial resolution observations of infrared spectral radiances along with independently-retrieved geophysical products for comparison with like products from satellite sensors being validated. This paper focuses on some of the challenges associated with validating advanced atmospheric sounders and the benefits obtained from employing airborne interferometers such as the NAST-I. Select results from underflights of the Aqua Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) and the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) obtained during recent field campaigns will be presented.

  14. Physical Retrieval of Surface Emissivity Spectrum from Hyperspectral Infrared Radiances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jun; Weisz, Elisabeth; Zhou, Daniel K.

    2007-01-01

    Retrieval of temperature, moisture profiles and surface skin temperature from hyperspectral infrared (IR) radiances requires spectral information about the surface emissivity. Using constant or inaccurate surface emissivities typically results in large retrieval errors, particularly over semi-arid or arid areas where the variation in emissivity spectrum is large both spectrally and spatially. In this study, a physically based algorithm has been developed to retrieve a hyperspectral IR emissivity spectrum simultaneously with the temperature and moisture profiles, as well as the surface skin temperature. To make the solution stable and efficient, the hyperspectral emissivity spectrum is represented by eigenvectors, derived from the laboratory measured hyperspectral emissivity database, in the retrieval process. Experience with AIRS (Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder) radiances shows that a simultaneous retrieval of the emissivity spectrum and the sounding improves the surface skin temperature as well as temperature and moisture profiles, particularly in the near surface layer.

  15. Design and Performance of a TES X-ray Microcalorimeter Array for Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy on Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muramatsu, Haruka; Nagayoshi, K.; Hayashi, T.; Sakai, K.; Yamamoto, R.; Mitsuda, K.; Yamasaki, N. Y.; Maehata, K.; Hara, T.

    2016-07-01

    We discuss the design and performance of a transition edge sensor (TES) X-ray microcalorimeter array for scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM)-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The TES X-ray microcalorimeter has better energy resolution compared to conventional silicon drift detector and STEM-EDS utilizing a TES detector makes it possible to map the distribution of elements on a specimen in addition to analyze the composition. The requirement for a TES detector is a high counting rate (>20 kcps), wide energy band (0.5-15 keV) and good energy resolution (<10 eV) full width at half maximum. The major improvement of this development is to increase the maximum counting rate. In order to accommodate the high counting rate, we adopted an 8 × 8 format, 64-pixel array and common biasing scheme for the readout method. We did all design and fabrication of the device in house. With the device we have fabricated most recently, the pulse decay time is 40 \\upmu s which is expected to achieve 50 kcps. For a single pixel, the measured energy resolution was 7.8 eV at 5.9 keV. This device satisfies the requirements of counting rate and energy resolution, although several issues remain where the performance must be confirmed.

  16. Fabrication of large dual-polarized multichroic TES bolometer arrays for CMB measurements with the SPT-3G camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posada, C. M.; Ade, P. A. R.; Ahmed, Z.; Arnold, K.; Austermann, J. E.; Bender, A. N.; Bleem, L. E.; Benson, B. A.; Byrum, K.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Cho, H. M.; Ciocys, S. T.; Cliche, J. F.; Crawford, T. M.; Cukierman, A.; Czaplewski, D.; Ding, J.; Divan, R.; de Haan, T.; Dobbs, M. A.; Dutcher, D.; Everett, W.; Gilbert, A.; Halverson, N. W.; Harrington, N. L.; Hattori, K.; Henning, J. W.; Hilton, G. C.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Hubmayr, J.; Irwin, K. D.; Jeong, O.; Keisler, R.; Kubik, D.; Kuo, C. L.; Lee, A. T.; Leitch, E. M.; Lendinez, S.; Meyer, S. S.; Miller, C. S.; Montgomery, J.; Myers, M.; Nadolski, A.; Natoli, T.; Nguyen, H.; Novosad, V.; Padin, S.; Pan, Z.; Pearson, J.; Ruhl, J. E.; Saliwanchik, B. R.; Smecher, G.; Sayre, J. T.; Shirokoff, E.; Stan, L.; Stark, A. A.; Sobrin, J.; Story, K.; Suzuki, A.; Thompson, K. L.; Tucker, C.; Vanderlinde, K.; Vieira, J. D.; Wang, G.; Whitehorn, N.; Yefremenko, V.; Yoon, K. W.; Ziegler, K. E.

    2015-09-01

    This work presents the procedures used at Argonne National Laboratory to fabricate large arrays of multichroic transition-edge sensor (TES) bolometers for cosmic microwave background (CMB) measurements. These detectors will be assembled into the focal plane for the SPT-3G camera, the third generation CMB camera to be installed in the South Pole Telescope. The complete SPT-3G camera will have approximately 2690 pixels, for a total of 16 140 TES bolometric detectors. Each pixel is comprised of a broad-band sinuous antenna coupled to a Nb microstrip line. In-line filters are used to define the different bands before the millimeter-wavelength signal is fed to the respective Ti/Au TES bolometers. There are six TES bolometer detectors per pixel, which allow for measurements of three band-passes (95, 150 and 220 GHz) and two polarizations. The steps involved in the monolithic fabrication of these detector arrays are presented here in detail. Patterns are defined using a combination of stepper and contact lithography. The misalignment between layers is kept below 200 nm. The overall fabrication involves a total of 16 processes, including reactive and magnetron sputtering, reactive ion etching, inductively coupled plasma etching and chemical etching.

  17. Characterization of a Prototype TES-Based Anti-coincidence Detector for Use with Future X-ray Calorimeter Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busch, S. E.; Yoon, W. S.; Adams, J. S.; Bailey, C. N.; Bandler, S. R.; Chervenak, J. A.; Eckart, M. E.; Ewin, A. J.; Finkbeiner, F. M.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Lee, S.-J.; Porst, J.-P.; Porter, F. S.; Sadleir, J. E.; Smith, S. J.; Sultana, M.

    2016-07-01

    For future X-ray observatories utilizing transition-edge sensor (TES) microcalorimeters, an anti-coincidence detector (anti-co) is required to discriminate X-ray (˜ 0.1-10 keV) signals from non-X-ray background events, such as ionizing particles. We have developed a prototype anti-co that utilizes TESs, which will be compatible with the TES focal-plane arrays planned for future X-ray observatories. This anti-co is based upon the cryogenic dark matter search II detector design. It is a silicon wafer covered with superconducting collection fins and TES microcalorimeters. Minimum ionizing particles deposit energy while passing through the silicon. The athermal phonons produced by these events are absorbed in the superconducting fins, breaking Cooper pairs. The resulting quasiparticles diffuse along the superconducting fin, producing a signal when they reach the TES. By determining a correlation between detections in the anti-co and the X-ray detector one can identify and flag these background events. We have fabricated and tested a single-channel prototype anti-co device on a 1.5 × 1.9 cm^2 chip. We have measured the signals in this device from photons of several energies between 1.5 and 60 keV, as well as laboratory background events, demonstrating a threshold ˜ 100 times lower than is needed to detect minimum ionizing particles.

  18. An uncertainty model for deep ocean single beam and multibeam echo sounder data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marks, K. M.; Smith, W. H. F.

    2008-12-01

    Comparing single beam and multibeam echo sounder data where surveys overlap we find that: 95% of multibeam measurements are repeatable to within 0.47% of depth; older single beam data can be at least as accurate as multibeam; single beam and multibeam profiles show excellent agreement at full-wavelengths longer than 4 km; archival sounding errors are not Gaussian; 95% of archival soundings in the northwest Atlantic are accurate to within 1.6% of depth; the 95th percentile error is about five times greater in pre-1969 data than in post-1968 data; many of the largest errors are located over large seafloor slopes, where small navigation errors can lead to large depth errors. Our uncertainty model has the form σ 2 = a 2 + ( bz)2 + ( cs)2, where 2 σ is approximately the 95th percentile error, z is the depth, s is the slope, and a, b, c are constants we determine separately for pre-1969 and post-1968 data.

  19. Design and Implementation of a Mechanical Control System for the Scanning Microwave Limb Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowden, William

    2011-01-01

    The Scanning Microwave Limb Sounder (SMLS) will use technological improvements in low noise mixers to provide precise data on the Earth's atmospheric composition with high spatial resolution. This project focuses on the design and implementation of a real time control system needed for airborne engineering tests of the SMLS. The system must coordinate the actuation of optical components using four motors with encoder readback, while collecting synchronized telemetric data from a GPS receiver and 3-axis gyrometric system. A graphical user interface for testing the control system was also designed using Python. Although the system could have been implemented with a FPGA-based setup, we chose to use a low cost processor development kit manufactured by XMOS. The XMOS architecture allows parallel execution of multiple tasks on separate threads-making it ideal for this application and is easily programmed using XC (a subset of C). The necessary communication interfaces were implemented in software, including Ethernet, with significant cost and time reduction compared to an FPGA-based approach. For these reasons, the XMOS technology is an attractive, cost effective, alternative to FPGA-based technologies for this design and similar rapid prototyping projects.